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Sample records for abundance isotopic

  1. Absolute isotopic abundances of Ti in meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederer, F.R.; Papanastassiou, D.A.; Wasserburg, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The absolute isotope abundance of Ti has been determined in Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende and Leoville meteorites and in samples of whole meteorites. The absolute Ti isotope abundances differ by a significant mass dependent isotope fractionation transformation from the previously reported abundances, which were normalized for fractionation using 46 Ti/ 48 Ti. Therefore, the absolute compositions define distinct nucleosynthetic components from those previously identified or reflect the existence of significant mass dependent isotope fractionation in nature. We provide a general formalism for determining the possible isotope compositions of the exotic Ti from the measured composition, for different values of isotope fractionation in nature and for different mixing ratios of the exotic and normal components. The absolute Ti and Ca isotopic compositions still support the correlation of 50 Ti and 48 Ca effects in the FUN inclusions and imply contributions from neutron-rich equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium nucleosynthesis. The present identification of endemic effects at 46 Ti, for the absolute composition, implies a shortfall of an explosive-oxygen component or reflects significant isotope fractionation. Additional nucleosynthetic components are required by 47 Ti and 49 Ti effects. Components are also defined in which 48 Ti is enhanced. Results are given and discussed. (author)

  2. Raman scattering method and apparatus for measuring isotope ratios and isotopic abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harney, R.C.; Bloom, S.D.

    1978-01-01

    Raman scattering is used to measure isotope ratios and/or isotopic abundances. A beam of quasi-monochromatic photons is directed onto the sample to be analyzed, and the resulting Raman-scattered photons are detected and counted for each isotopic species of interest. These photon counts are treated mathematically to yield the desired isotope ratios or isotopic abundances

  3. Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

    2014-03-18

    A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

  4. LITERATURE SURVEY ON ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO MEASUREMENTS - 2001-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-01-01

    Along with my usual weekly review of the published literature for new nuclear data, I also search for new candidates for best measurements of isotopic abundances from a single source. Most of the published articles, that I previously had found in the Research Library at the Brookhaven Lab, have already been sent to the members of the Atomic Weights Commission, by either Michael Berglund or Thomas Walczyk. In the last few days, I checked the published literature for any other articles in the areas of natural variations in isotopic abundance ratios, measurements of isotopic abundance ratios on samples of extra-terrestrial material and isotopic abundance ratio measurements performed using ICPMS instruments. Hopefully this information will be of interest to members of the Commission, the sub-committee on isotopic abundance measurements (SIAM), members of the former sub-committee on natural isotopic fractionation (SNIF), the sub-committee on extra-terrestrial isotope ratios (SETIR), the RTCE Task Group and the Guidelines Task Group, who are dealing with ICPMS and TIMS comparisons. In the following report, I categorize the publications in one of four areas. Measurements performed using either positive or negative ions with Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer, TIMS, instruments; measurements performed on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer, ICPMS, instruments; measurements of natural variations of the isotopic abundance ratios; and finally measurements on extra-terrestrial samples with instrumentation of either type. There is overlap in these areas. I selected out variations and ET results first and then categorized the rest of the papers by TIMS and ICPMS

  5. Literature survey of isotopic abundance data for 1987-1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, N.E.

    1989-01-01

    I have compiled all of the data on isotopic abundance measurements and their variation in nature for the time period since the last General Assembly. Most of the data deals with the variations in the abundances as given by per mil deviations from some standard. As such, they are not of major interest to the Atomic Weights Commission. However, there were some measurements which are of general interest in this list

  6. Isotopic Abundance and Chemical Purity Analysis of Stable Isotope Deuterium Labeled Sudan I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAI Yin-ping;LEI Wen;ZHENG Bo;DU Xiao-ning

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It is important that to analysis of the isotopic abundance and chemical purity of Sudan I-D5, which is the internal standard of isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The isotopic abundance of Sudan I-D5 is detected by “mass cluster” classification method and LC-MS. The repeatability and reproducibility experiments were carried out by using different mass spectrometers and different operators. The RSD was less than 0.1%, so the repeatability and reproducibility were satisfactory. The accuracy and precision of the isotopic abundance analysis method was good with the results of F test and t test. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC had been used for detecting the chemical purity of Sudan I-D5 as external standard method.

  7. A Convenient Method for Estimation of the Isotopic Abundance in Uranium Bearing Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AI -Saleh, F.S.; AI-Mukren, Alj.H.; Farouk, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    A convenient and simple method for estimation of the isotopic abundance in some uranium bearing samples using gamma-ray spectrometry is developed using a hyper pure germanium spectrometer and a standard uranium sample with known isotopic abundance

  8. Measurement of isotope abundance variations in nature by gravimetric spiking isotope dilution analysis (GS-IDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Gina; Walczyk, Thomas

    2013-04-02

    Subtle variations in the isotopic composition of elements carry unique information about physical and chemical processes in nature and are now exploited widely in diverse areas of research. Reliable measurement of natural isotope abundance variations is among the biggest challenges in inorganic mass spectrometry as they are highly sensitive to methodological bias. For decades, double spiking of the sample with a mix of two stable isotopes has been considered the reference technique for measuring such variations both by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) and multicollector-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS). However, this technique can only be applied to elements having at least four stable isotopes. Here we present a novel approach that requires measurement of three isotope signals only and which is more robust than the conventional double spiking technique. This became possible by gravimetric mixing of the sample with an isotopic spike in different proportions and by applying principles of isotope dilution for data analysis (GS-IDA). The potential and principle use of the technique is demonstrated for Mg in human urine using MC-TIMS for isotopic analysis. Mg is an element inaccessible to double spiking methods as it consists of three stable isotopes only and shows great potential for metabolically induced isotope effects waiting to be explored.

  9. Potassium isotope abundances in Australasian tektites and microtektites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, G. F.; O'D. Alexander, C. M.; Berger, E. L.; Delaney, J. S.; Glass, B. P.

    2008-10-01

    We report electron microprobe determinations of the elemental compositions of 11 Australasian layered tektites and 28 Australasian microtektites; and ion microprobe determinations of the 41K/39K ratios of all 11 tektites and 13 of the microtektites. The elemental compositions agree well with literature values, although the average potassium concentrations measured here for microtektites, 1.1 1.6 wt%, are lower than published average values, 1.9 2.9 wt%. The potassium isotope abundances of the Australasian layered tektites vary little. The average value of δ41K, 0.02 ± 0.12‰ (1σ mean), is indistinguishable from the terrestrial value (= 0 by definition) as represented by our standard, thereby confirming four earlier tektite analyses of Humayun and Koeberl (2004). In agreement with those authors, we conclude that evaporation has significantly altered neither the isotopic nor the elemental composition of Australasian layered tektites for elements less volatile than potassium. Although the average 41K/39K ratio of the microtektites, 1.1 ± 1.7‰ (1σ mean), is also statistically indistinguishable from the value for the standard, the individual ratios vary over a very large range, from -10.6 ± 1.4‰ to +13.8 ± 1.5‰ and at least three of them are significantly different from zero. We interpret these larger variations in terms of the evaporation of isotopically light potassium; condensation of potassium in the vapor plume; partial or complete stirring and quenching of the melts; and the possible uptake of potassium from seawater. That the average 41K/39K ratio of the microtektites equals the terrestrial value suggests that the microtektite-forming system was compositionally closed with respect to potassium and less volatile elements. The possibility remains open that 41K/39K ratios of microtektites vary systematically with location in the strewn field.

  10. Variations in lead isotopic abundances in Sprague-Dawley rat tissues: possible reason of formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duojian Liu

    Full Text Available It has been reported in previous research that the lead isotopic composition of blood, urine and feces samples statistically differed from the given lead sources in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. However, the reason for this phenomenon is still unclear. An animal experiment was performed to investigate the lead isotope fractionation in diverse biological samples (i.e., lungs, liver, kidneys, bone and to explore the possible reasons. SD rats were intratracheally instilled with lead acetate at the concentrations of 0, 0.02, 0.2, and 2 mg/kg body weight. Biological samples were collected for lead isotope analysis using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. Significant differences are observed in lead isotope abundances among the diverse biological samples. The lead isotope abundances ((206Pb, (207Pb and (208Pb in diverse biological samples show different degrees and directions of departure from the given lead source. The results suggest that differences in enrichment or depletion capacity for each lead isotope in the various tissues might lead to the variation in lead isotopic abundances in tissues. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead level and the lead isotope abundances in liver and bone is observed. When the whole-blood level is higher than 50 ng/mL, the lead isotopic compositions of biological samples tend to be the same. Thus, the data support the speculation of a fractionation functional threshold.

  11. Isotopic abundances relevant to the identification of magma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Nions, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The behaviour of natural radiogenic isotope tracers in the Earth that have lithophile and atmophile geochemical affinity is reviewed. The isotope tracer signature of oceanic and continental crust may in favourable circumstances by sufficiently distinct from that of the mantle to render a contribution from these sources resolvable within the isotopic composition of the magma. Components derived from the sedimentary and altered basaltic portion of oceanic crust are recognized in some island arc magmas from their Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic signatures. The rare-gas isotope tracers (He, Ar, Xe in particular) are not readily recycled into the mantle and thus provide the basis of an approach that is complementary to that based on the lithophile tracers. In particular, a small mantle-derived helium component may be readily recognized in the presence of a predominant radiogenic component generated in the continents. The importance of assessing the mass balance of these interactions rather than merely a qualitative recognition is emphasized. The question of the relative, contribution of continental-oceanic crust and mantle to magma sources is an essential part of the problem of generation and evolution of continental crust. An approach to this problem through consideration of the isotopic composition of sediments is briefly discussed. (author)

  12. Anatomy of a cluster IDP. Part 2: Noble gas abundances, trace element geochemistry, isotopic abundances, and trace organic chemistry of several fragments from L2008#5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Mckay, David S.; Messenger, S.; Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Walker, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: noble gas content and release temperatures; trace element abundances; heating summary of cluster fragments; isotopic measurements; and trace organic chemistry.

  13. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Direct Isotope Abundance Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manard, Manuel J.; Weeks, Stephan; Kyle, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear forensics community is currently engaged in the analysis of illicit nuclear or radioactive material for the purposes of non-proliferations and attribution. One technique commonly employed for gathering nuclear forensics information is isotope analysis. At present, the state-of-the-art methodology for obtaining isotopic distributions is thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Although TIMS is highly accurate at determining isotope distributions, the technique requires an elementally pure sample to perform the measurement. The required radiochemical separations give rise to sample preparation times that can be in excess of one to two weeks. Clearly, the nuclear forensics community is in need of instrumentation and methods that can expedite their decision making process in the event of a radiological release or nuclear detonation. Accordingly, we are developing instrumentation that couples a high resolution IM drift cell to the front end of a MS. The IM cell provides a means of separating ions based upon their collision cross-section and mass-to-charge ratio (m/z). Two analytes with the same m/z, but with different collision cross-sections (shapes) would exit the cell at different times, essentially enabling the cell to function in a similar manner to a gas chromatography (GC) column. Thus, molecular and atomic isobaric interferences can be effectively removed from the ion beam. The mobility selected chemical species could then be introduced to a MS for high-resolution mass analysis to generate isotopic distributions of the target analytes. The outcome would be an IM/MS system capable of accurately measuring isotopic distributions while concurrently eliminating isobaric interferences and laboratory radiochemical sample preparation. The overall objective of this project is developing instrumentation and methods to produce near real-time isotope distributions with a modular mass spectrometric system that performs the required gas-phase chemistry and

  14. Xe isotopic abundances in enstatite meteorites and relations to other planetary reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jee-Yon; Marti, Kurt; Wacker, John F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the interpretation of xenon that was measured in the Abee meteorite. Reported Xe isotopic abundances in enstatite chondrites (EC's) show some variability, and this makes comparisons to other solar system reservoirs rather difficult. In contrast, we find uniform Xe isotopic abundances in the EC chondrite Abee for a variety of clasts, except for 128 Xe and 129 Xe, the isotopes affected by neutron capture in I and by extinct 129 I. We report averages for the studied clasts which are consistent within error limits with OC-Xe and with the Q-Xe signature. On the other hand, the elemental abundance ratios Ar/Xe are variable between clasts. A strongly reducing environment which is indicated for enstatite meteorites was generally assumed to be consistent with conditions existing in the early inner solar system. Xe isotopic abundances in SNC meteorites from Mars and also those in some terrestrial wells show that distinct isotopic reservoirs coexisted on the same planets. In particular, the Xe isotopic signatures in terrestrial well gases show the presence of a minor distinct component in two of the reported four well gases. These authors suggested that the extra component represents solar Xe, but we show that also a meteoritic xenon reservoir of the Abee-Xe structure is an option. The reported Xe data in Ar-rich (subsolar) EC's show isotopic abundances slightly lighter than those in Abee-Xe, but the relative abundances of Ar, Kr, and Xe indicate only a minor component of elementally unfractionated solar Xe. The elemental ratios suggest rather a different origin for these gases: the loading of solar particles into grain surfaces during exposure at elevated temperatures during accretion of matter in the inner solar system. A model of this type was suggested for the accretion of gases now observed in the atmosphere on Venus. We note that disks of crystalline silicates (including enstatite and olivine) have been observed in T Tauri stars during their early

  15. ICP-oa TOFMS utilisation to determine the Gd isotopic abundance in gadolinium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragomir, M.; Ohai, D.; Dumitrescu, I.; Furtuna, I.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is describes the development of a method that should permit the determination of isotope abundance of gadolinium in gadolinium nitrate, used as burnable poison at Cernavoda NPP. To determine the isotopic abundance of gadolinium the inductively coupled plasma orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ICP-oa TOFMS) was used. The ICP-oa TOFMS allows the elimination of noise associated with instrumental drift and instability (flicker noise). The absence of flicker noise in the ICP-oa TOFMS means that the isotope ratios can be measured up to the statistical limit of ion counting. With TOFMS, each spectrum acquired represents signals from ions extracted from the plasma during the same time interval, formed from identical plasma and sample introduction events. Therefore, the ICP-oa TOFMS, Optimass 8000, has been successfully used for isotope ratio measurements of Gd in gadolinium nitrate [Gd (NO 3 ) 3 x 6H 2 O] sample solutions. (authors)

  16. Isotope-abundance variations and atomic weights of selected elements: 2016 (IUPAC Technical Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Shrestha, Yesha

    2016-01-01

    There are 63 chemical elements that have two or more isotopes that are used to determine their standard atomic weights. The isotopic abundances and atomic weights of these elements can vary in normal materials due to physical and chemical fractionation processes (not due to radioactive decay). These variations are well known for 12 elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, bromine, and thallium), and the standard atomic weight of each of these elements is given by IUPAC as an interval with lower and upper bounds. Graphical plots of selected materials and compounds of each of these elements have been published previously. Herein and at the URL http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7GF0RN2, we provide isotopic abundances, isotope-delta values, and atomic weights for each of the upper and lower bounds of these materials and compounds.

  17. On krypton isotopic abundances in the sun and in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, K.

    1980-01-01

    The Kr isotopic systematics in the meteorite Pesyanoe which is known to contain solar-type gases, are reported. Discrepancies in the isotopic data of fractions released at stepwise increasing temperatures cannot be reconciled with spallation Kr components, although spallation effects are significant. Fractionation mechanisms on the parent body and in the solar wind source region are considered and the implications for solar abundances discussed.

  18. Abundances of light isotopes in galactic cosmic rays and the interstellar gas density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westergaard, N.J.

    1979-01-01

    The fluxes of the light isotopes in the galactic cosmic rays are calculated in the energy range from 10 MeV to 5 GeV. The mean amount of matter traversed is taken to increase with decreasing energy, and various forms of the source spectrum are assumed. It is shown that it is possible to reconcile all observed abundance ratios including the low 10 Be abundance found by Garcia-Munoz et al. with an interstellar gas density of 1 atom cm -1 . However, a low value for the adiabatic deceleration in the solor cavity must be assumed. Comparing isotopes of the light elements does not give a unique solution for the deceleration, and it seems to be more profitable to use the isotopes of H and He for this purpose

  19. Use of the natural abundance of stable isotopes in animal physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Takeo

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies on the natural abundance (δ-value) of stable isotopes in animals are reviewed. The δ 13 C value of livestock varies among different portions of the body and depending on living conditions, etc. Typically, however, it is about 1 percent larger than that of the feed used. The value of δ 15 N of the blood, milk and droppings is reported to be larger than that of the feed while that of urine is smaller with the decrease showing changes through the day. Natural δ 13 C and δ 15 N of animals are known to vary among the various organs and tissues. Investigations on cattle and two types musseks have shown that δ 13 C and δ 15 N have no significant relations with their age. The isotopic ratio of stable isotopes in animals is largely dependent on that of the feed used. Study results are cited on the changes in isotopic ratio of carbon and nitrogen along the digestion process of ruminants. Discussion is made on the causes for the changes in isotopic ratio during the metabolic process. Measurement of natural abundance of stable isotopes can be used as a tool for determining the eating habits of ungulate animals raised on grazing lands. (Nogami, K.)

  20. Improve accuracy and sensibility in glycan structure prediction by matching glycan isotope abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Guang; Liu Xin; Liu Qingyan; Zhou Yanhong; Li Jianjun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A glycan isotope pattern recognition strategy for glycomics. ► A new data preprocessing procedure to detect ion peaks in a giving MS spectrum. ► A linear soft margin SVM classification for isotope pattern recognition. - Abstract: Mass Spectrometry (MS) is a powerful technique for the determination of glycan structures and is capable of providing qualitative and quantitative information. Recent development in computational method offers an opportunity to use glycan structure databases and de novo algorithms for extracting valuable information from MS or MS/MS data. However, detecting low-intensity peaks that are buried in noisy data sets is still a challenge and an algorithm for accurate prediction and annotation of glycan structures from MS data is highly desirable. The present study describes a novel algorithm for glycan structure prediction by matching glycan isotope abundance (mGIA), which takes isotope masses, abundances, and spacing into account. We constructed a comprehensive database containing 808 glycan compositions and their corresponding isotope abundance. Unlike most previously reported methods, not only did we take into count the m/z values of the peaks but also their corresponding logarithmic Euclidean distance of the calculated and detected isotope vectors. Evaluation against a linear classifier, obtained by training mGIA algorithm with datasets of three different human tissue samples from Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG) in association with Support Vector Machine (SVM), was proposed to improve the accuracy of automatic glycan structure annotation. In addition, an effective data preprocessing procedure, including baseline subtraction, smoothing, peak centroiding and composition matching for extracting correct isotope profiles from MS data was incorporated. The algorithm was validated by analyzing the mouse kidney MS data from CFG, resulting in the identification of 6 more glycan compositions than the previous annotation

  1. On the enrichment of low-abundant isotopes of light chemical elements by gas centrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisevich, V.D.; Morozov, O.E.; Zaozerskiy, Yu.P.; Shmelev, G.M.; Shipilov, Yu.D.

    2000-01-01

    A brief review of the main areas for the application of the isotopes 15 N and 13 C is made. Separation of the nitrogen isotopes in a single gas centrifuge in the form of pure nitrogen, ammonia, and trifluoride of nitrogen as well as the carbon isotopes in the form of carbon dioxide has been studied by means of numerical simulation. The parameters of the centrifugal machine investigated were close to the parameters of the Iguassu machine. The dependence of the efficiency criterion versus the basic parameters of the separation process has been explored in the computational experiments. Comparisons of the calculated results with the experimental data have shown good agreement. The results obtained have demonstrated the possibility of using gas centrifuge technology to enrich successfully the low-abundant isotopes of light chemical elements

  2. Metallicity-Dependent Isotopic Abundances and the Impact of Helium Rate Uncertainties in Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    All stellar evolution models for nucleosynthesis require an initial isotopic abundance set to use as a starting point, because nuclear reactions occur between isotopes. Generally, our knowledge of isotopic abundances of stars is fairly incomplete except for the Solar System. We develop a first model for a complete average isotopic decomposition as a function of metallicity. Our model is based on the underlying nuclear astrophysics processes, and is fitted to observational data, rather than traditional forward galactic chemical evolution modeling which integrates stellar yields beginning from big bang nucleosynthesis. We first decompose the isotopic solar abundance pattern into contributions from astrophysical sources. Each contribution is then assumed to scale as a function of metallicity. The resulting total isotopic abundances are summed into elemental abundances and fitted to available halo and disk stellar data to constrain the model's free parameter values. This procedure allows us to use available elemental observational data to reconstruct and constrain both the much needed complete isotopic evolution that is not accessible to current observations, and the underlying astrophysical processes. Our model finds a best fit for Type Ia supernovae contributing ˜0.7 to the solar Fe abundance, and Type Ia onset occurring at [Fe/H]~1.2, in agreement with typical values. The completed model can be used in future nucleosynthesis studies. We also perform a preliminary analysis to assess the impact of our isotopic scaling model on the resulting nucleosynthesis of massive stars, compared to a linear interpolation method. Using these two input methods we compute a limited grid of stellar models, and compare the final nucleosynthesis to observations. The compactness parameter was first used to assess which models would likely explode as successful supernovae, and contribute explosive nucleosynthesis yields. We find a better agreement to solar observations using the scaling

  3. Ar-39 Detection at the 10^-16 Isotopic Abundance Level with Atom Trap Trace Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, W.; Williams, W. D.; Bailey, K.; Davis, A. M.; Hu, S. -M.; Lu, Z. -T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Purtschert, R.; Sturchio, N. C.; Sun, Y. R.; Mueller, P.

    2011-01-01

    Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA), a laser-based atom counting method, has been applied to analyze atmospheric Ar-39 (half-life = 269 yr), a cosmogenic isotope with an isotopic abundance of 8x10^-16. In addition to the superior selectivity demonstrated in this work, counting rate and efficiency of ATTA have been improved by two orders of magnitude over prior results. Significant applications of this new analytical capability lie in radioisotope dating of ice and water samples and in the develop...

  4. Ar39 Detection at the 10-16 Isotopic Abundance Level with Atom Trap Trace Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, W.; Williams, W.; Bailey, K.; Davis, A. M.; Hu, S.-M.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Purtschert, R.; Sturchio, N. C.; Sun, Y. R.; Mueller, P.

    2011-03-01

    Atom trap trace analysis, a laser-based atom counting method, has been applied to analyze atmospheric Ar39 (half-life=269yr), a cosmogenic isotope with an isotopic abundance of 8×10-16. In addition to the superior selectivity demonstrated in this work, the counting rate and efficiency of atom trap trace analysis have been improved by 2 orders of magnitude over prior results. The significant applications of this new analytical capability lie in radioisotope dating of ice and water samples and in the development of dark matter detectors.

  5. The Oxygen Isotopic Composition of MIL 090001: A CR2 Chondrite with Abundant Refractory Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; McKeegan, K. D.; Sharp, Z. D.

    2012-01-01

    MIL 090001 is a large (>6 kg) carbonaceous chondrite that was classified as a member of the CV reduced subgroup (CVred) that was recovered during the 2009-2010 ANSMET field season [1]. Based on the abundance of refractory inclusions and the extent of aqueous alteration, Keller [2] suggested a CV2 classification. Here we report additional mineralogical and petrographic data for MIL 090001, its whole-rock oxygen isotopic composition and ion microprobe analyses of individual phases. The whole rock oxygen isotopic analyses show that MIL 090001 should be classified as a CR chondrite.

  6. Application of mass-predictions to isotope-abundances in breeder-reactor cores

    CERN Document Server

    Kirchner, G

    1981-01-01

    The decay-heat and isotope composition of breeder reactor-cores is calculated at normal shut-down, and a core disintegration event. Using the ORIGEN-code, the influence of the most neutron-rich fission-yield nuclei is studied. Their abundances depend on the assumption about the nuclear data (mass and half-lives). The total decay-heat is not changed from any technical viewpoint. (15 refs).

  7. Oxygen isotopic abundances in the atmospheres of seven red giant stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, M.J.; Lambert, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Abundances ratios of the oxygen isotopes have been measured in α Tau, β And, μ Gem, α Her, β Peg, γ Dra, and α Boo. In all the stars the 16 O/ 18 O ratios are similar; the mean value is 475, which is consistent with the solar system value 16 O/ 18 O = 490. The 16 O/ 17 O ratios range from approx.1000 for β Peg and α Boo to 16 O/ 17 O = 160 for β And

  8. Lithium isotopic abundances in metal-poor stars: a problem for standard big bang nucleosynthesis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nissen, P.E.; Asplund, M.; Lambert, D.L.; Primas, F.; Smith, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    Spectral obtained with VLT/UVES suggest the existence of the 6 Li isotope in several metal-poor stars at a level that challenges ideas about its synthesis. The 7 Li abundance is, on the other hand, a factor of three lower than predicted by standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis theory. Both problems may be explained if decaying suppersymmetric particles affect the synthesis of light elements in the Big Bang. (orig.)

  9. The determination of minor isotope abundances in naturally occurring uranium materials. The tracing power of isotopic signatures for uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovaskainen, R

    1999-11-01

    The mass spectrometric determination of minor abundant isotopes, {sup 234}U and {sup 236}U in naturally occurring uranium materials requires instruments of high abundance sensitivity and the use of highly sensitive detection systems. In this study the thermal ionisation mass spectrometer Finnigan MAT 262RPQ was used. It was equipped with 6 Faraday cups and a Secondary Electron Multiplier (SEM), which was operated in pulse counting mode for the detection of extremely low ion currents. The dynamic measurement range was increased considerably combining these two different detectors. The instrument calibration was performed carefully. The linearity of each detector, the deadtime of the ion counting detector, the detector normalisation factor, the baseline of each detector and the mass discrimination in the ion source were checked and optimised. A measurement technique based on the combination of a Gas Source Mass Spectrometry (GSMS) and a Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) was developed for the accurate determination of isotopic composition in naturally occurring uranium materials. Because the expected ratio of n({sup 234}U)/n({sup 238}U) exceeded the dynamic measurement range of the Faraday detectors of the TIMS instrument, an experimental design using a combination of two detectors was developed. The n({sup 234}U)/n({sup 235}U) and n({sup 236}U)/n({sup 235}U) ratios were determined using ion counting in combination with the decelerating device. The n({sup 235}U)/n({sup 238}U) ratio was determined by the Faraday detector. This experimental design allowed the detector cross calibration to be circumvented. Precisions of less than 1 percent for the n({sup 234}U)/n({sup 235}U) ratios and 5-25 percent for the n({sup 236}U)/n({sup 235}U) ratios were achieved. The purpose of the study was to establish a register of isotopic signatures for natural uranium materials. The amount ratio, and isotopic composition of 18 ore concentrates, collected by the International

  10. The determination of minor isotope abundances in naturally occurring uranium materials. The tracing power of isotopic signatures for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovaskainen, R.

    1999-01-01

    The mass spectrometric determination of minor abundant isotopes, 234 U and 236 U in naturally occurring uranium materials requires instruments of high abundance sensitivity and the use of highly sensitive detection systems. In this study the thermal ionisation mass spectrometer Finnigan MAT 262RPQ was used. It was equipped with 6 Faraday cups and a Secondary Electron Multiplier (SEM), which was operated in pulse counting mode for the detection of extremely low ion currents. The dynamic measurement range was increased considerably combining these two different detectors. The instrument calibration was performed carefully. The linearity of each detector, the deadtime of the ion counting detector, the detector normalisation factor, the baseline of each detector and the mass discrimination in the ion source were checked and optimised. A measurement technique based on the combination of a Gas Source Mass Spectrometry (GSMS) and a Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) was developed for the accurate determination of isotopic composition in naturally occurring uranium materials. Because the expected ratio of n( 234 U)/n( 238 U) exceeded the dynamic measurement range of the Faraday detectors of the TIMS instrument, an experimental design using a combination of two detectors was developed. The n( 234 U)/n( 235 U) and n( 236 U)/n( 235 U) ratios were determined using ion counting in combination with the decelerating device. The n( 235 U)/n( 238 U) ratio was determined by the Faraday detector. This experimental design allowed the detector cross calibration to be circumvented. Precisions of less than 1 percent for the n( 234 U)/n( 235 U) ratios and 5-25 percent for the n( 236 U)/n( 235 U) ratios were achieved. The purpose of the study was to establish a register of isotopic signatures for natural uranium materials. The amount ratio, and isotopic composition of 18 ore concentrates, collected by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from uranium milling and mining

  11. Influence of Biofield Energy Treatment on Isotopic Abundance Ratio in Aniline Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Gopal; Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar; Trivedi, Dahryn; Branton, Alice

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance of 13C/12C or 2H/1H or 15N/14N ≡ (PM+1)/PM in aniline; and (PM+1)/PM and 81Br/79Br ≡ (PM+2)/PM in 4-bromoaniline using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Aniline and 4-bromoaniline samples were divided into two parts: control and treated. The control part remained as untreated, while the treated part was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment. The treated samples we...

  12. Influence of Biofield Energy Treatment on Isotopic Abundance Ratio in Aniline Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi , Mahendra Kumar; Branton , Alice; Trivedi , Dahryn; Nayak , Gopal; Saikia , Gunin; Jana , Snehasis

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance of 13C/12C or 2H/1H or 15N/14N ≡ (PM+1)/PM in aniline; and (PM+1)/PM and 81Br/79Br ≡ (PM+2)/PM in 4-bromoaniline using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Aniline and 4-bromoaniline samples were divided into two parts: control and treated. The control part remained as untreated, while the treated part was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment...

  13. The use of lead isotopic abundances in trace uranium samples for nuclear forensics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahey, A.J.; Ritchie, N.W.M.; Newbury, D.E.; Small, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), secondary electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray analysis have been applied to the measurement of U-bearing particles with the intent of gleaning information concerning their history and/or origin. The lead isotopic abundances are definitive indicators that U-bearing particles have come from an ore-body, even if they have undergone chemical processing. SEM images and X-ray analysis can add further information to the study that may allude to the extent of chemical processing. The presence of 'common' lead that does not exhibit a radiogenic signature is clear evidence of anthropogenic origin. (author)

  14. Influence of Biofield Energy Treatment on Isotopic Abundance Ratio in Aniline Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendra, Trivedi; Alice, Branton; Dahryn, Trivedi; Gopal, Nayak

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance of 13C/12C or 2H/1H or 15N/14N ≡ (PM+1)/PM in aniline; and (PM+1)/PM and 81Br/79Br ≡ (PM+2)/PM in 4-bromoaniline using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Aniline and 4-bromoaniline samples were divided into two parts: control and treated. The control part remained as untreated, while the treated part was subjected to Mr. Trivedi's biofield energy treatment. The treated samples we...

  15. Sims Analysis of Water Abundance and Hydrogen Isotope in Lunar Highland Plagioclase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Hejiu; Guan, Yunbin; Chen, Yang; Peslier, Anne H.; Zhang, Youxue; Liu, Yang; Rossman, George R.; Eiler, John M.; Neal, Clive R.

    2015-01-01

    The detection of indigenous water in mare basaltic glass beads has challenged the view established since the Apollo era of a "dry" Moon. Since this discovery, measurements of water in lunar apatite, olivine-hosted melt inclusions, agglutinates, and nominally anhydrous minerals have confirmed that lunar igneous materials contain water, implying that some parts of lunar mantle may have as much water as Earth's upper mantle. The interpretation of hydrogen (H) isotopes in lunar samples, however, is controversial. The large variation of H isotope ratios in lunar apatite (delta Deuterium = -202 to +1010 per mille) has been taken as evidence that water in the lunar interior comes from the lunar mantle, solar wind protons, and/or comets. The very low deuterium/H ratios in lunar agglutinates indicate that solar wind protons have contributed to their hydrogen content. Conversely, H isotopes in lunar volcanic glass beads and olivine-hosted melt inclusions being similar to those of common terrestrial igneous rocks, suggest a common origin for water in both Earth and Moon. Lunar water could be inherited from carbonaceous chondrites, consistent with the model of late accretion of chondrite-type materials to the Moon as proposed by. One complication about the sources of lunar water, is that geologic processes (e.g., late accretion and magmatic degassing) may have modified the H isotope signatures of lunar materials. Recent FTIR analyses have shown that plagioclases in lunar ferroan anorthosite contain approximately 6 ppm H2O. So far, ferroan anorthosite is the only available lithology that is believed to be a primary product of the lunar magma ocean (LMO). A possible consequence is that the LMO could have contained up to approximately 320 ppm H2O. Here we examine the possible sources of water in the LMO through measurements of water abundances and H isotopes in plagioclase of two ferroan anorthosites and one troctolite from lunar highlands.

  16. The evolution of the global selenium cycle: Secular trends in Se isotopes and abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüeken, E. E.; Buick, R.; Bekker, A.; Catling, D.; Foriel, J.; Guy, B. M.; Kah, L. C.; Machel, H. G.; Montañez, I. P.; Poulton, S. W.

    2015-08-01

    The Earth's surface has undergone major transitions in its redox state over the past three billion years, which have affected the mobility and distribution of many elements. Here we use Se isotopic and abundance measurements of marine and non-marine mudrocks to reconstruct the evolution of the biogeochemical Se cycle from ∼3.2 Gyr onwards. The six stable isotopes of Se are predominantly fractionated during redox reactions under suboxic conditions, which makes Se a potentially valuable new tool for identifying intermediate stages from an anoxic to a fully oxygenated world. δ82/78Se shows small fractionations of mostly less than 2‰ throughout Earth's history and all are mass-dependent within error. In the Archean, especially after 2.7 Gyr, we find an isotopic enrichment in marine (+0.37 ± 0.27‰) relative to non-marine samples (-0.28 ± 0.67‰), paired with increasing Se abundances. Student t-tests show that these trends are statistically significant. Although we cannot completely rule out the possibility of volcanic Se addition, these trends may indicate the onset of oxidative weathering on land, followed by non-quantitative reduction of Se oxyanions during fluvial transport. The Paleoproterozoic Great Oxidation Event (GOE) is not reflected in the marine δ82/78Se record. However, we find a major inflection in the secular δ82/78Se trend during the Neoproterozoic, from a Precambrian mean of +0.42 ± 0.45‰ to a Phanerozoic mean of -0.19 ± 0.59‰. This drop probably reflects the oxygenation of the deep ocean at this time, stabilizing Se oxyanions throughout the water column. Since then, reduction of Se oxyanions has likely been restricted to anoxic basins and diagenetic environments in sediments. In light of recent Cr isotope data, it is likely that oxidative weathering before the Neoproterozoic produced Se oxyanions in the intermediate redox state SeIV, whereas the fully oxidized species SeVI became more abundant after the Neoproterozoic rise of

  17. Carbon abundance and isotopic studies of Shergotty and other shergottite meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, I.P.; Carr, R.H.; Pillinger, C.T.

    1986-01-01

    Consortium samples of the Shergotty meteorite have been measured for C abundance and isotopic composition by stepped combustion and the results compared to different samples of the same meteorite and the other known shergottites. Clearly, the shergottite meteorites have a complex C chemistry and contain components of both low and high thermal stability. Two components labile at low temperature can be tentatively identified, one which is enriched in 13 C and may be related to the carbonate thought to be produced by pre-terrestrial weathering in Nakhla. The other, which is isotopically light, is presently of unknown origin but we speculate that it may be related to shock effects. At high temperatures, two of the samples examined show evidence for a component of CO 2 trapped from the martian atmosphere, possibly indicating that shock-produced glass is heterogeneously distributed throughout the shergottite group. This interpretation is corroborated by N isotope measurements made on one of the specimens. All samples appear to contain evidence of a high temperature magmatic component of C. (author)

  18. Characterizing uranium oxide reference particles for isotopic abundances and uranium mass by single particle isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraiem, M.; Richter, S.; Erdmann, N.; Kühn, H.; Hedberg, M.; Aregbe, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A method to quantify the U mass in single micron particles by ID-TIMS was developed. ► Well-characterized monodisperse U-oxide particles produced by an aerosol generator were used. ► A linear correlation between the mass of U and the volume of particle(s) was found. ► The method developed is suitable for determining the amount of U in a particulate reference material. - Abstract: Uranium and plutonium particulate test materials are becoming increasingly important as the reliability of measurement results has to be demonstrated to regulatory bodies responsible for maintaining effective nuclear safeguards. In order to address this issue, the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in collaboration with the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) has initiated a study to investigate the feasibility of preparing and characterizing a uranium particle reference material for nuclear safeguards, which is finally certified for isotopic abundances and for the uranium mass per particle. Such control particles are specifically required to evaluate responses of instruments based on mass spectrometric detection (e.g. SIMS, TIMS, LA-ICPMS) and to help ensuring the reliability and comparability of measurement results worldwide. In this paper, a methodology is described which allows quantifying the uranium mass in single micron particles by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS). This methodology is characterized by substantial improvements recently achieved at IRMM in terms of sensitivity and measurement accuracy in the field of uranium particle analysis by TIMS. The use of monodisperse uranium oxide particles prepared using an aerosol generation technique developed at ITU, which is capable of producing particles of well-characterized size and isotopic composition was exploited. The evidence of a straightforward correlation between the particle volume and the mass of uranium was demonstrated in this study

  19. Hyperfine Induced Transitions as Diagnostics of Low Density Plasmas and Isotopic Abundance ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brage, T.; Judge, P. G.; Aboussaid, A.; Godefroid, M. R.; Jonsson, P.; Leckrone, D. S.

    1996-05-01

    We propose a new diagnostics of isotope abundance ratios and electron densities for low density plasmas, in the form of J = 0 -> J(') = 0 radiative transitions. These are usually viewed as being allowed only through two-photon decay, but they may also be induced by the hyperfine (HPF) interaction in atomic ions. This predicts a companion line to the E1] and M2 lines in the UV0.01 multiplet of ions isoelectronic to beryllium (e.g. C III, N IV, O V and Fe XXII) or magnesium (e.g. Si II, Ca IX, Fe XV and Ni XVII). As an example the companion line to the well known lambda lambda 1906.7,1908.7 lines in C III will be at 1909.597 Angstroms, but only present in the (13) C isotope (which has nuclear spin different from zero). We present new and accurate decay rates for the nsnp (3P^oJ) -> ns(2) (1S_{J('}=0)) transitions in ions of the Be (n=2) and Mg (n=3) isoelectronic sequences. We show that the HPF induced decay rates for the J = 0 -> J(') = 0 transitions are many orders of magnitude larger than those for the competing two-photon processes and, when present, are typically one or two orders of magnitude smaller than the decay rates of the magnetic quadrupole ( J = 2-> J(') = 0) transitions for these ions. We show that several of these HPF-induced transitions are of potential astrophysical interest, in ions of C, N, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Cr, Fe and Ni. We highlight those cases that may be of particular diagnostic value for determining isotopic abundance ratios and/or electron densities from UV or EUV emission line data. We present our atomic data in the form of scaling laws so that, given the isotopic nuclear spin and magnetic moment, a simple expression yields estimates for HPF induced decay rates. We examine some UV solar and nebular data in the light of these new results and suggest possible cases for future study. We could not find evidence for the existence of HPF induced lines in the spectra we examined, but we demonstrate that existing data have come close to providing

  20. Element distribution and noble gas isotopic abundances in lunar meteorite Allan Hills A81005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraehenbuehl, U.; Eugster, O.; Niedermann, S.

    1986-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite ALLAN HILLS A81005, an anorthositic breccia, is recognized to be of lunar origin. The noble gases in this meteorite were analyzed and found to be solar-wind implanted gases, whose absolute and relative concentrations are quite similar to those in lunar regolith samples. A sample of this meteorite was obtained for the analysis of the noble gas isotopes, including Kr(81), and for the determination of the elemental abundances. In order to better determine the volume derived from the surface correlated gases, grain size fractions were prepared. The results of the instrumental measurements of the gamma radiation are listed. From the amounts of cosmic ray produced noble gases and respective production rates, the lunar surface residence times were calculated. It was concluded that the lunar surface time is about half a billion years

  1. Pu abundances, concentrations, and isotopics by x- and gamma-ray spectrometry assay techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, D.C.; Gunnink, R.; Ruhter, W.D.; Prindle, A.L.; Gomes, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Two x- and gamma-ray systems were recently installed at-line in gloveboxes and will measure Pu solution concentrations from 5 to 105 g/L. These NDA technique, developed and refined over the past decade, are now used domestically and internationally for nuclear material process monitoring and accountability needs. In off- and at-line installations, they can measure solution concentrations to 0.2%. The K-XRFA systems use a transmission source to correct for solution density. The gamma-ray systems use peaks from 59- to 208-keV to determine solution concentrations and relative isotopics. A Pu check source monitors system stability. These two NDA techniques can be combined to form a new, NDA measurement methodology. With the instrument located outside of a glovebox, both relative Pu isotopics and absolute Pu abundances of a sample located inside a glovebox can be measured. The new technique works with either single or dual source excitation; the former for a detector 6 to 20 cm away with no geometric corrections needed; the latter requires geometric corrections or source movement if the sample cannot be measured at the calibration distance. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  2. ANALYSIS OF RICIN TOXIN PREPARATIONS FOR CARBOHYDRATE AND FATTY ACID ABUNDANCE AND ISOTOPE RATIO INFORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Colburn, Heather A.; Moran, James J.; Melville, Angela M.

    2009-12-01

    employing a quadrupole MS system for compound identification and an isotope ratio MS for measuring the stable isotope ratios of deuterium and hydrogen (D/H) in fatty acids. Finally, the method for analyzing the compound abundance data is included. This study indicates that removal of ricinoleic acid is a conserved consequence of each processing step we tested. Furthermore, the stable isotope D/H ratio of ricinoleic acid distinguished between two of the three castor seed sources. Concentrations of arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucosamine and myo-inositol differentiated between crude or acetone extracted samples and samples produced by protein precipitation. Taken together these data illustrate the ability to distinguish between processes used to purify a ricin sample as well as potentially the source seeds.

  3. Distribution and isotopic abundance of sulphur in recent marine sediments off southern California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, I R; Emergy, K O; Rittenberg, S C

    1963-01-01

    Analyses of sulphur compounds in basin sediments off southern California indicate that elemental sulphur, free sulphide, hydrotroilite, organic sulphur, sulphate and pyrite are present in quantities that vary with environment and depth in the sediments. Pyrite is generally the most abundant form, occurring in oxidizing as well as in reducing sediments and often constituting 90% of total sulphur. A material balance indicates that the total sulphur content is far in excess of the sulphate-sulphur initially trapped in the interstitial water. This evidence, together with failure to detect significant alternate sources, suggests that sulphate-sulphur is extracted from the overlying sea water at the sediment-water interface. Isotope measurements confirm many of the conclusions suggested by the quantitative chemical analyses. The show that biological sulphate reduction is the single most important process in the sulphur cycle. The sulphide released is converted to hydrotrolite and then to pyrite. Elemental and organic sulphur appear to be continually forming and reacting in the sediment column. The organic sulphur released from decaying organic matter apparently plays only a small role in the sulphur economy. Enrichment in S/sup 32/ ranging from 9 to 62% was measured in pyrite fragments, a spread similar to that previously observed in ancient sediments. Data from field and laboratory experiments were combined to determine rate of sulphate reduction, number of sulphate reducing bacteria and the amount of organic matter decomposed during sulphate reduction in the sediment, as well as rate of renewal of water in the basins. The results suggest that the methods used may have many applications for elucidating in situ rate processes.

  4. Characterization of uranium isotopic abundances in depleted uranium metal assay standard 115

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, K.J.; Singleton, G.L.; Essex, R.M.; Hasozbek, A.; Orlowicz, G.; Soriano, M.

    2013-01-01

    Certified reference material (CRM) 115, Uranium (Depleted) Metal (Uranium Assay Standard), was analyzed using a TRITON Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer to characterize the uranium isotope-amount ratios. The certified 235 U/ 238 U 'major' isotope-amount ratio of 0.0020337 (12) in CRM 115 was determined using the total evaporation (TE) and the modified total evaporation (MTE) analytical techniques. In the MTE method, the total evaporation process is interrupted on a regular basis to allow correction of background from peak tailing, internal calibration of the secondary electron multiplier detector versus the Faraday cups, peak-centering, and ion source re-focusing. For the 'minor' 234 U/ 238 U and 236 U/ 238 U isotope-amount ratio measurements using MTE, precision and accuracy comparable to conventional analyses are achieved, without compromising the quality of the 235 U/ 238 U isotope-amount ratios. Characterized values of the 234 U/ 238 U and 236 U/ 238 U isotope-amount ratios in CRM 115 are 0.000007545 (10) and 0.000032213 (84), respectively. The 233 U/ 238 U isotope-amount ratio in CRM 115 is estimated to be -9 . The homogeneity of the CRM 115 materials is established through the absence of any statistically significant unit-to-unit variation in the uranium isotope-amount ratios. The measurements leading to the certification of uranium isotope-amount ratios are discussed. (author)

  5. Coupled Mo-U abundances and isotopes in a small marine euxinic basin: Constraints on processes in euxinic basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bura-Nakić, Elvira; Andersen, Morten B.; Archer, Corey; de Souza, Gregory F.; Marguš, Marija; Vance, Derek

    2018-02-01

    Sedimentary molybdenum (Mo) and uranium (U) abundances, as well as their isotope systematics, are used to reconstruct the evolution of the oxygenation state of the surface Earth from the geological record. Their utility in this endeavour must be underpinned by a thorough understanding of their behaviour in modern settings. In this study, Mo-U concentrations and their isotope compositions were measured in the water column, sinking particles, sediments and pore waters of the marine euxinic Lake Rogoznica (Adriatic Sea, Croatia) over a two year period, with the aim of shedding light on the specific processes that control Mo-U accumulation and isotope fractionations in anoxic sediment. Lake Rogoznica is a 15 m deep stratified sea-lake that is anoxic and euxinic at depth. The deep euxinic part of the lake generally shows Mo depletions consistent with near-quantitative Mo removal and uptake into sediments, with Mo isotope compositions close to the oceanic composition. The data also, however, show evidence for periodic additions of isotopically light Mo to the lake waters, possibly released from authigenic precipitates formed in the upper oxic layer and subsequently processed through the euxinic layer. The data also show evidence for a small isotopic offset (∼0.3‰ on 98Mo/95Mo) between particulate and dissolved Mo, even at highest sulfide concentrations, suggesting minor Mo isotope fractionation during uptake into euxinic sediments. Uranium concentrations decrease towards the bottom of the lake, where it also becomes isotopically lighter. The U systematics in the lake show clear evidence for a dominant U removal mechanism via diffusion into, and precipitation in, euxinic sediments, though the diffusion profile is mixed away under conditions of increased density stratification between an upper oxic and lower anoxic layer. The U diffusion-driven precipitation is best described with an effective 238U/235U fractionation of +0.6‰, in line with other studied euxinic

  6. Oxygen isotopic abundances in calcium- aluminum-rich inclusions from ordinary chondrites: implications for nebular heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeegan, K D; Leshin, L A; Russell, S S; MacPherson, G J

    1998-04-17

    The oxygen isotopic compositions of two calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from the unequilibrated ordinary chondrite meteorites Quinyambie and Semarkona are enriched in 16O by an amount similar to that in CAIs from carbonaceous chondrites. This may indicate that most CAIs formed in a restricted region of the solar nebula and were then unevenly distributed throughout the various chondrite accretion regions. The Semarkona CAI is isotopically homogeneous and contains highly 16O-enriched melilite, supporting the hypothesis that all CAI minerals were originally 16O-rich, but that in most carbonaceous chondrite inclusions some minerals exchanged oxygen isotopes with an external reservoir following crystallization.

  7. Mercury (Hg) in meteorites: Variations in abundance, thermal release profile, mass-dependent and mass-independent isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Matthias M. M.; Cloquet, Christophe; Marty, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the concentration, isotopic composition and thermal release profiles of Mercury (Hg) in a suite of meteorites, including both chondrites and achondrites. We find large variations in Hg concentration between different meteorites (ca. 10 ppb to 14,000 ppb), with the highest concentration orders of magnitude above the expected bulk solar system silicates value. From the presence of several different Hg carrier phases in thermal release profiles (150-650 °C), we argue that these variations are unlikely to be mainly due to terrestrial contamination. The Hg abundance of meteorites shows no correlation with petrographic type, or mass-dependent fractionation of Hg isotopes. Most carbonaceous chondrites show mass-independent enrichments in the odd-numbered isotopes 199Hg and 201Hg. We show that the enrichments are not nucleosynthetic, as we do not find corresponding nucleosynthetic deficits of 196Hg. Instead, they can partially be explained by Hg evaporation and redeposition during heating of asteroids from primordial radionuclides and late-stage impact heating. Non-carbonaceous chondrites, most achondrites and the Earth do not show these enrichments in vapor-phase Hg. All meteorites studied here have however isotopically light Hg (δ202Hg = ∼-7 to -1) relative to the Earth's average crustal values, which could suggest that the Earth has lost a significant fraction of its primordial Hg. However, the late accretion of carbonaceous chondritic material on the order of ∼2%, which has been suggested to account for the water, carbon, nitrogen and noble gas inventories of the Earth, can also contribute most or all of the Earth's current Hg budget. In this case, the isotopically heavy Hg of the Earth's crust would have to be the result of isotopic fractionation between surface and deep-Earth reservoirs.

  8. Study on strontium isotope abundance-ratio measurements by using a 13-MeV proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ki; Jang, Han; Lee, Goung-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The Rb-Sr dating method is used in dating Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks. This method measures the 87Rb and the 87Sr concentrations by using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) [J. Hefne et al., Inter. J. Phys. Sci. 3(1), 28 (2008)]. In addition, it calculates the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio to increase the reliability of Rb-Sr dating. In this study, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio was measured by using a 13-MeV proton accelerator. Proton kinetic energies are in the range of tens of megaelectronvolts, and protons have large absorption cross-sections for ( p, n) reactions with most substances. After absorbing a proton with such a high kinetic energy, an element is converted into a nuclide with its atomic number increased by one via nuclear transmutation. These nuclides usually have short half-lives and return to the original state through radioactive decay. When a strontium sample is irradiated with protons, nuclear transmutation occurs; thus, the strontium isotope present in the sample changes to a yttrium isotope, which is an activated radioisotope. Based on this, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio was calculated by analyzing the gamma-rays emitted by each yttrium isotope. The KIRAMS-13 cyclotron at the Cyclotron Center of Chosun University, where 13-MeV protons can be extracted, was utilized in our experiment. The 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratio was computed for samples irradiated with these protons, and the result was similar to the isotope ratio for the Standard Reference Material, i.e., 98.2 ± 3.4%. As part of the analysis, proton activation analyses were performed using 13-MeV protons, and the experimental results of this research suggest a possible approach for measuring the strontium-isotope abundance ratio of samples.

  9. Accurate experimental determination of the isotope effects on the triple point temperature of water. I. Dependence on the "2H abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, V.; Aerts-Bijma, A.T.; Jansen, H.G.; Spriensma, J.J.; Meijer, H.A.J.; Peruzzi, A.; Geel, J. van

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the isotopic composition of water is one of the major contributors to uncertainty in the realization of the triple point of water (TPW). Although the dependence of the TPW on the isotopic composition of the water has been known for years, there is still a lack of a detailed and accurate experimental determination of the values for the correction constants. This paper is the first of two articles (Part I and Part II) that address quantification of isotope abundance effects on the triple point temperature of water. In this paper, we describe our experimental assessment of the "2H isotope effect. We manufactured five triple point cells with prepared water mixtures with a range of "2H isotopic abundances encompassing widely the natural abundance range, while the "1"8O and "1"7O isotopic abundance were kept approximately constant and the "1"8O - "1"7O ratio was close to the Meijer-Li relationship for natural waters. The selected range of "2H isotopic abundances led to cells that realised TPW temperatures between approximately -140 μK to + 2500 μK with respect to the TPW temperature as realized by VSMOW (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water). Our experiment led to determination of the value for the δ"2H correction parameter of A_2_H = 673 μK/(per thousand deviation of δ"2H from VSMOW) with a combined uncertainty of 4 μK (k = 1, or 1 s). (authors)

  10. Determination of Isotopic Abundance of 2H, 13C, 18O, and 37Cl in Biofield Energy Treated Dichlorophenol Isomers

    OpenAIRE

    Branton, Alice; Trivedi, Dahryn; Nayak, Gopal; Trivedi, Mahendra; Saikia, Gunin; Jana, Snehasis

    2016-01-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) and 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP) are two isomers of dichlorophenols, have been used as preservative agents for wood, paints, vegetable fibers and as intermediates in the production of pharmaceuticals and dyes. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance ratios of 2H/1H or 13C/12C, and 18O/16O or 37Cl/35Cl, in dichlorophenol isomers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The 2,4-DCP and 2,6-DCP...

  11. Isotopic abundance measurements on solid nuclear-type samples by glow discharge mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betti, M.; Rasmussen, G.; Koch, L.

    1996-01-01

    A double-focusing glow discharge mass spectrometer (GDMS) installed in a glovebox for nuclear sample screening has been employed for isotopic measurements. Isotopic compositions of zirconium, silicon, lithium, boron, uranium and plutonium which are elements of nuclear concern have been determined. Interferences arising from the matrix sample and the discharge gas (Ar) for each of these elements are discussed. The GDMS results are compared with those from thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). For boron and lithium at μg/g-ng/g levels, the two methods gave results in good agreement. In samples containing uranium the isotopic composition obtained by GDMS was in agreement with those from TIMS independently of the enrichment. Attempts for the determination of plutonium isotopic composition were also made. In this case, due to the interferences of uranium at mass 238 and americium at mass 241, the GDMS raw data are complementary with those values obtained from physical non-destructive techniques. (orig.). With 2 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Evaluation of TASTEX task H: measurement of plutonium isotopic abundances by gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnink, R.; Prindle, A.L.; Asakura, Y.; Masui, J.; Ishiguro, N.; Kawasaki, A.; Kataoka, S.

    1981-10-01

    This report describes a computer-based gamma spectrometer system that was developed for measuring isotopic and total plutonium concentrations in nitric acid solutions. The system was installed at the Tokai reprocessing plant where it is undergoing testing and evaluation as part of the Tokai Advanced Safeguards Exercise (TASTEX). Objectives of TASTEX Task H, High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometer for Plutonium Isotopic Analysis, the methods and equipment used, the installation and calibration of the system, and the measurements obtained from several reprocessing campaigns are discussed and described. In general, we find that measurements for gamma spectroscopy agree well with those of mass spectrometry and of other chemical analysis. The system measures both freshly processed plutonium from the product accountability tank and aged plutonium solutions from storage tanks. 14 figures, 15 tables

  13. Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Gases in the Martian Atmosphere from the Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Webster, Christopher R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Franz, Heather; Wong, Michael; Conrad, Pamela G.; Harpold, Dan; Jones, John J.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Manning, Heidi; Owen, Tobias; Pepin, Robert O.; Squyres, Steven; Trainer, Melissa; Kemppinen, Osku; Bridges, Nathan; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Minitti, Michelle; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Blank, Jennifer; Weigle, Gerald; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Ehlmann, Bethany; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Grotzinger, John; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Léveillé, Richard; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Mauchien, Patrick; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; DeMarines, Julia; Grinspoon, David; Reitz, Günther; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Fabre, Cécile; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Bish, David; Schieber, Juergen; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Berger, Gilles; Cros, Alain; d'Uston, Claude; Forni, Olivier; Gasnault, Olivier; Lasue, Jérémie; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Maurice, Sylvestre; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Pinet, Patrick; Schröder, Susanne; Toplis, Mike; Lewin, Éric; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Dromart, Gilles; Robert, François; Sautter, Violaine; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Mangold, Nicolas; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Clegg, Sam; Cousin, Agnès; DeLapp, Dorothea; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Lanza, Nina; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Wiens, Roger C.; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Dyar, M. Darby; Fassett, Caleb; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Dworkin, Jason P.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Jones, Andrea; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Meyer, Michael; Posner, Arik; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Blaney, Diana; Brinza, David; Calef, Fred; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; DeFlores, Lauren; Ehlmann, Bethany; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Mischna, Michael; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Juarez, Manuel de la Torre; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Yen, Albert; Archer, Paul Douglas; Cucinotta, Francis; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Rampe, Elizabeth; Nolan, Thomas; Fisk, Martin; Radziemski, Leon; Barraclough, Bruce; Bender, Steve; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Tokar, Robert; Vaniman, David; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Yingst, Aileen; Lewis, Kevin; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Grant, John; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Bullock, Mark; Ehresmann, Bent; Hamilton, Victoria; Hassler, Donald; Peterson, Joseph; Rafkin, Scot; Zeitlin, Cary; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Clark, Benton; Wolff, Michael; McLennan, Scott; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Kim, Myung-Hee; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Navarro-González, Rafael; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Dietrich, William; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Madsen, Morten Bo; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; Perrett, Glynis; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Rowland, Scott; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Savijärvi, Hannu; Boehm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Sönke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Bridges, John C.; McConnochie, Timothy; Benna, Mehdi; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Newsom, Horton; Ollila, Ann; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey; Moores, John E.

    2013-07-01

    Volume mixing and isotope ratios secured with repeated atmospheric measurements taken with the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument suite on the Curiosity rover are: carbon dioxide (CO2), 0.960(±0.007); argon-40 (40Ar), 0.0193(±0.0001); nitrogen (N2), 0.0189(±0.0003); oxygen, 1.45(±0.09) × 10-3; carbon monoxide, < 1.0 × 10-3; and 40Ar/36Ar, 1.9(±0.3) × 103. The 40Ar/N2 ratio is 1.7 times greater and the 40Ar/36Ar ratio 1.6 times lower than values reported by the Viking Lander mass spectrometer in 1976, whereas other values are generally consistent with Viking and remote sensing observations. The 40Ar/36Ar ratio is consistent with martian meteoritic values, which provides additional strong support for a martian origin of these rocks. The isotopic signature δ13C from CO2 of ~45 per mil is independently measured with two instruments. This heavy isotope enrichment in carbon supports the hypothesis of substantial atmospheric loss.

  14. Helium Isotopes and Noble Gas Abundances of Cave Dripping Water in Three Caves in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A. T.; Shen, C. C.; Tan, M.; Li, T.; Uemura, R.; Asami, R.

    2015-12-01

    Paleo-temperature recorded in nature archives is a critical parameter to understand climate change in the past. With advantages of unique inert chemical characteristics and sensitive solubilities with temperature, dissolved noble gases in speleothem inclusion water were recently proposed to retrieve terrestrial temperature history. In order to accurately apply this newly-developed speleothem noble gas temperature (NGT) as a reliable proxy, a fundamental issue about behaviors of noble gases in the karst should be first clarified. In this study, we measured noble gas contents in air and dripping water to evaluate any ratio deviation between noble gases. Cave dripping water samples was collected from three selected caves, Shihua Cave in northern China, Furong Cave in southwestern, and Gyukusen Cave in an island located in the western Pacific. For these caves are characterized by a thorough mixing and long-term storage of waters in a karst aquifer by the absence of seasonal oxygen isotope shifts. Ratios of dripping water noble gases are statistically insignificant from air data. Helium isotopic ratios in the dripping water samples match air value. The results indicate that elemental and isotopic signatures of noble gases from air can be frankly preserved in the epikarst and support the fidelity of NGT techniques.

  15. Accurate experimental determination of the isotope effects on the triple point temperature of water. I. Dependence on the 2H abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, V.; Peruzzi, A.; Aerts-Bijma, A. T.; Jansen, H. G.; Spriensma, J. J.; van Geel, J.; Meijer, H. A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Variation in the isotopic composition of water is one of the major contributors to uncertainty in the realization of the triple point of water (TPW). Although the dependence of the TPW on the isotopic composition of the water has been known for years, there is still a lack of a detailed and accurate experimental determination of the values for the correction constants. This paper is the first of two articles (Part I and Part II) that address quantification of isotope abundance effects on the triple point temperature of water. In this paper, we describe our experimental assessment of the 2H isotope effect. We manufactured five triple point cells with prepared water mixtures with a range of 2H isotopic abundances encompassing widely the natural abundance range, while the 18O and 17O isotopic abundance were kept approximately constant and the 18O  -  17O ratio was close to the Meijer-Li relationship for natural waters. The selected range of 2H isotopic abundances led to cells that realised TPW temperatures between approximately  -140 μK to  +2500 μK with respect to the TPW temperature as realized by VSMOW (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water). Our experiment led to determination of the value for the δ2H correction parameter of A2H  =  673 μK / (‰ deviation of δ2H from VSMOW) with a combined uncertainty of 4 μK (k  =  1, or 1σ).

  16. Effectiveness of leaded petrol phase-out in Tianjin, China based on the aerosol lead concentration and isotope abundance ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wan; Liu Xiande; Zhao Liwei; Guo, Dongfa; Tian Xiaodan; Adams, Freddy

    2006-01-01

    The phase-out of leaded petrol has been a measure widely used to reduce atmospheric lead pollution. Since the 1980s, China began to promote unleaded petrol. In order to assess the effectiveness of the measure an isotope fingerprint technique was applied for aerosol samples in the city of Tianjin. After dilute acid leaching, the lead concentration and isotope abundance ratios were determined for 123 samples collected in Tianjin during eight years (1994-2001). The 206 Pb / 207 Pb ratio was lower in summer, when coal combustion emission was low and vehicle exhaust became more important, indicating that the 206 Pb / 207 Pb ratio of leaded petrol in Tianjin is lower than that of aerosol samples. The 206 Pb / 207 Pb ratio gradually increased from 1994 to 2001, a trend that suggests that the contribution from vehicle exhaust was diminishing. Overall, the measurements matched well with national statistical data of leaded and unleaded petrol production. After the nationwide switch to unleaded gasoline, comprehensive control measures are urgently needed to reduce air lead pollution in China, as aerosol lead reduced slightly but remains at a relatively high level

  17. Authentication of origins of fermentive ethanol in Philippine-made beverages by C,H,O isotope abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sucgang, Raymond J.; Morco, Ryan; Bautista, Angel; Laguitan, Arlin; Sevilla III, Fortunato

    2010-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the expediency of radiocarbon liquid scintillation counting for detection of synthetic ethanol adulteration in Philippine-manufactured wines/alcoholic beverages. The impure wines are distinguished from the pure beverages by radiocarbon assay, taking advantage of the anticipated minor 1 4Carbon content of synthetic ethyl alcohol in comparison with the natural 1 4C abundance of the plant-derived, biogenic products. Biogenic samples give 12-15 dpm/g C activities, while synthetic samples exhibits 0-2 dpm/g C activities. The research moreover explores the utility of Deuterium, Oxygen 16 and 1 3Carbon/ 1 2Carbon isotope ratio analysis in the authentication of the botanical and geographical origins of beverages. Initial investigations revealed the mean of δ 1 8O in the Metro Manila area for precipitation, surface waters and ground waters to be -6.09 ± 2.9, -1.59 ± 2.2, and -6.64 ± 0.7 per mil.respectively. δ 2 H in Metro Manila for precipitation, surface waters and ground waters were -43.8 ± 1.2,-11.9 ± 16.2, -45.0 ± 4.8 per mil respectively. Vital information such as detection of illegal dilution with water, or enrichment using other sugars before and after fermentation, misrepresentation of geographical origin, and adulteration with petroleum-derived ethanol can be generated from the isotopic data. (author)

  18. Natural abundance N stable isotopes in plants and soils as an indicator of N deposition hotspots in urban environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trammell, T. L.

    2017-12-01

    The natural abundance of stable isotopes in plants and soils has been utilized to understand ecological phenomenon. Foliar δ15N is an integrator of soil δ15N, atmospheric N sources, and fractionation processes that occur during plant N uptake, plant N assimilation, and mycorrhizal associations. The amount of reactive N in the environment has greatly increased due to human activities, and urban ecosystems experience excess N deposition that can have cascading effects on plants and soils. Foliar δ15N has been shown to increase with increasing N deposition and nitrification rates suggesting increased foliar δ15N occurs with greater N inputs as a result of accelerated soil N cycling. Thus, foliar δ15N can be an indication of soil N availability for plant uptake and soil N cycling rates, since high N availability results in increased soil N cycling and subsequent loss of 14N. Limited research has utilized foliar and soil δ15N in urban forests to assess the importance of plant uptake of atmospheric N deposition and to gain insight about ecosystem processes. Previous investigations found foliar δ15N of mature trees in urban forests is not only related to elevated pollutant-derived N deposition, but also to soil N availability and soil N cycling rates. Similarly, enriched foliar δ15N of urban saplings was attributed to soil characteristics that indicated higher nitrification, thus, greater nitrate leaching and low N retention in the urban soils. These studies demonstrate the need for measuring the δ15N of various plant and soil N sources while simultaneously measuring soil N processes (e.g., net nitrification rates) in order to use natural abundance δ15N of plants and soils to assess N sources and cycling in urban forests. A conceptual framework that illustrates biogenic and anthropogenic controls on nitrogen isotope composition in urban plants and soils will be presented along with foliar and soil δ15N from urban forests across several cities as a proof of

  19. Isotopic abundance of 13 C and contribution of eucalyptus biomass to soil organic matter conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Figueiredo Severo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: It has become possible to evaluate the conversion of soil organic matter (SOM in pastures and arboreal crops due to the difference between the photosynthetic cycles of Eucalyptus (C3 and most grasses (C4. The auto analyzer method coupled to the IRMS (Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer in the present study evaluated the 13C content in soil profiles of Eucalyptus plantations of different ages (2, 10 and 21 years, in natural regeneration areas and natural grazing fields, and estimated the SOM conversion of each crop type of. The initial management of all sampled areas was natural pasture. The following profile layers were evaluated: 0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-40, 40-50, 50-70 and 70-90cm, and the contribution of Eucalyptus biomass over the years of farming was estimated in the SOM conversion process. After 2 years of planting Eucalyptus, the beginning of pasture carbon conversion process occurred in the surface layer (0-5cm. Ten years after planting, the process of converting organic matter by arboreal crops reached the layers up to 20cm. After 21 years of planting and in natural regeneration areas, the entire profile has already been changed by planting Eucalyptus and native tree species.

  20. Water Table Depth Reconstruction in Ombrotrophic Peatlands Using Biomarker Abundance Ratios and Compound-Specific Hydrogen Isotope Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J. E.; Jackson, S. T.; Booth, R. K.; Pendall, E. G.; Huang, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Sediment cores from ombrotrophic peat bogs provide sensitive records of changes in precipitation/evaporation (P/E) balance. Various proxies have been developed to reconstruct surface moisture conditions in peat bogs, including testate amoebae, plant macrofossils, and peat humification. Studying species composition of testate amoeba assemblages is time consuming and requires specialized training. Humification index can be influenced by environmental factors other than moisture balance. The plant macrofossil proxy is less quantitative and cannot be performed on highly decomposed samples. We demonstrate that the ratio of C23 alkane to C29 alkane abundance may provide a simple alternative or complementary means of tracking peatland water-table depth. Data for this proxy can be collected quickly using a small sample (100 mg dry). Water-table depth decreases during drought, and abundance of Sphagnum, the dominant peat-forming genus, decreases as vascular plants increase. Sphagnum moss produces mainly medium chain-length alkanes (C21-C25) while vascular plants (grasses and shrubs) produce primarily longer chain-length alkanes (C27-C31). Therefore, C23:C29 n-alkane ratios quantitatively track the water table depth fluctuations in peat bogs. We compared C23:C29 n-alkane ratios in a core from Minden Bog (southeastern Michigan) with water table depth reconstructions based on testate-amoeba assemblages and humification. The 184-cm core spans the past ~3kyr of continuous peat deposition in the bog. Our results indicate that the alkane ratios closely track the water table depth variations, with C29 most abundant during droughts. We also explored the use of D/H ratios in Sphagnum biomarkers as a water-table depth proxy. Compound-specific hydrogen isotope ratio analyses were performed on Sphagnum biomarkers: C23 and C25 alkane and C24 acid. Dry periods are represented in these records by an enrichment of deuterium in these Sphagnum-specific compounds. These events also correlate

  1. Ion-microprobe measurements of Mg, Ca, Ti and Fe isotopic ratios and trace element abundance in hibonite-bearing inclusions in primitive meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahey, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis reports the isotopic abundances of Mg, Ca, and Ti and rare earth element (REE) abundances in 19 hibonite-bearing inclusions from primative meteorites. The isotopic ratios of Fe were measured in one of the samples, Lance HH-1. These measurements were made by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (CAMECA IMS-3f). The novel hardware and software developments that made this work possible are described in detail. The samples were studied in thin section in order to investigate the relationship between the inclusions and their mineralogical environments. Inclusions from a number of different meteorites, specifically, Mighei, Murray, Murchison, Lance, Efremovka, Vigarano, Qingzhen, Dhajala, and Semarkona, were studied. The isotopes of Ca and Ti show large and correlated abundance anomalies in their most neutron-rich isotopes, 48 Ca and 50 Ti. The largest anomalies among the samples studied here are in the Murray inclusion MY-F6, with a 4.6% deficit in 48 Ca and a 5.2% deficit in 50 Ti, and Lance HH-1, with 3.3% and 6.0% deficits in 48 Ca and 50 Ti respectively. Correlated excesses of 48 Ca and 50 Ti, up to 2.4% and 1.4% respectively, are found in some other samples studied here. The fact that there is a correlation of isotopic anomalies in two different elements is clear evidence for a nucleosynthetic origin of these effects. Various possibilities for the origin of these isotopic anomalies are discussed and it is shown that a Cosmic Chemical Memory-like model of the incomplete mixing of dust grains from one or several supernovae is sufficient to explain the data. Magnesium isotopes show excesses of 26 Mg, attributable to the in-situ decay of 26 Al, in 7 of these inclusions

  2. s-Processing from MHD-induced mixing and isotopic abundances in presolar SiC grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmerini, S.; Trippella, O.; Busso, M.; Vescovi, D.; Petrelli, M.; Zucchini, A.; Frondini, F.

    2018-01-01

    In the past years the observational evidence that s-process elements from Sr to Pb are produced by stars ascending the so-called Asymptotic Giant Branch (or "AGB") could not be explained by self-consistent models, forcing researchers to extensive parameterizations. The crucial point is to understand how protons can be injected from the envelope into the He-rich layers, yielding the formation of 13C and then the activation of the 13C (α,n)16O reaction. Only recently, attempts to solve this problem started to consider quantitatively physically-based mixing mechanisms. Among them, MHD processes in the plasma were suggested to yield mass transport through magnetic buoyancy. In this framework, we compare results of nucleosynthesis models for Low Mass AGB Stars (M≲ 3M⊙), developed from the MHD scenario, with the record of isotopic abundance ratios of s-elements in presolar SiC grains, which were shown to offer precise constraints on the 13C reservoir. We find that n-captures driven by magnetically-induced mixing can indeed account for the SiC data quite well and that this is due to the fact that our 13C distribution fulfils the above constraints rather accurately. We suggest that similar tests should be now performed using different physical models for mixing. Such comparisons would indeed improve decisively our understanding of the formation of the neutron source.

  3. Determination of the isotopic abundance of 235U in rocks in search for an Oklo phenomenon in Brazil by activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcellos, M.B.A.; Armelin, M.J.A.; Lima, F.W. de; Fulfaro, R.

    1981-09-01

    Isotopic analyses of uranium are generally carried out by mass spectrometry, with a precision better than 1%. In nuclear laboratories it is often necessary to perform rapid determinations of 235 U isotopic abundances. Thermal neutron activation analysis by delayed neutron counting or by high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry can be applied for this purpose, although with less precision than by mass spectrometry. In this work, delayed neutron counting and gamma-ray spectrometry are used for the determination of the isotopic abundance of 235 U in rocks from the Northeastern region of Brazil. In the case of the application of delayed neutron counting, the rocks are analyzed non-destructively. When high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry is applied, a pre-irradiation chemical separation had to be performed, by extraction of uranium with tributylphosphate. By both methods employed the results for the isotopic abundance of 235 U can be considered as equal to the natural value of 0.702%, for the rocks under study. The precision attained by gamma-ray spectrometry is better than that by delayed neutron couting. (Author) [pt

  4. Accurate experimental determination of the isotope effects on the triple point temperature of water. II. Combined dependence on the 18O and 17O abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, V.; Kozicki, M.; Aerts-Bijma, A. T.; Jansen, H. G.; Spriensma, J. J.; Peruzzi, A.; Meijer, H. A. J.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is the second of two articles on the quantification of isotope effects on the triple point temperature of water. In this second article, we address the combined effects of 18O and 17O isotopes. We manufactured five triple point cells with waters with 18O and 17O abundances exceeding widely the natural abundance range while maintaining their natural 18O/17O relationship. The 2H isotopic abundance was kept close to that of VSMOW (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water). These cells realized triple point temperatures ranging between  -220 μK to 1420 μK with respect to the temperature realized by a triple point cell filled with VSMOW. Our experiment allowed us to determine an accurate and reliable value for the newly defined combined 18, 17O correction parameter of AO  =  630 μK with a combined uncertainty of 10 μK. To apply this correction, only the 18O abundance of the TPW needs to be known (and the water needs to be of natural origin). Using the results of our two articles, we recommend a correction equation along with the coefficient values for isotopic compositions differing from that of VSMOW and compare the effect of this new equation on a number of triple point cells from the literature and from our own institute. Using our correction equation, the uncertainty in the isotope correction for triple point cell waters used around the world will be  <1 μK.

  5. Determination of plutonium isotopic abundances by gamma-ray spectrometry. Interim report on the status of methods and techniques developed by the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnink, R.

    1980-03-01

    This report presents an overview of methods and techniques developed by the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for determining plutonium isotopic abundances from gamma-ray spectra that have been measured with germanium detectors. The methodology of fitting the spectral features includes discussions of algorithms for gamma-ray and x-ray peak shape fitting and generation of response spectra profiles characteristic of specific isotopes. Applications of the techniques developed at government, commercial, and Japanese reprocessing plants are described. Current development of the methodology for the nondestructive analysis of samples containing nondescript solid materials is also presented

  6. A novel method for collection of soil-emitted nitric oxide (NO) for natural abundance stable N isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z.; Elliott, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    The global inventory of NO emissions is poorly constrained with a large portion of the uncertainty attributed to soil NO emissions that result from soil abiotic and microbial processes. While natural abundance stable N isotopes (δ15N) in various soil N-containing compounds have proven to be a robust tracer of soil N cycling, soil δ15N-NO is rarely quantified mainly due to the diffuse nature, low concentrations, and high reactivity of soil-emitted NO. Here, we present the development and application of a dynamic flux chamber system capable of simultaneously measuring soil NO fluxes and collecting NO for δ15N-NO measurements. The system couples a widely used flow-through soil chamber with a NO collection train, in which NO can be converted to NO2 through O3 titration in a Teflon reaction coil, followed by NO2 collection in a 20% triethanolamine (TEA) solution as nitrite and nitrate for δ15N analysis using the denitrifier method. The efficiency of NO-NO2 conversion in the reaction coil and the recovery of NO in the TEA solution were determined experimentally and found to be quantitative (>99%) over a 10 to 749 ppbv NO mixing ratio range. An analytical NO tank (δ15N-NO=71.0±0.4‰) was used to calibrate the method for δ15N-NO analysis. The resulting accuracy and precision (1σ) of the method across various environmental conditions were 1.6‰ and 1.2‰, respectively. Using this new method, controlled laboratory incubations have been conducted to characterize NO emissions induced by rewetting of air-dried surface soil sampled from an urban forest. Pulsed NO emissions, up to 30 times higher than maximum soil NO emissions under steady state, were triggered upon the rewetting and lasted for next 36 hours. While the measured δ15N-NO over the course of the NO pulsing ranged from -52.0‰ and -34.6‰, reinforcing the notion that soil δ15N-NO is lower than those of fossil-fuel combustion sources, a transient δ15N-NO shift was captured immediately after the

  7. The effects of oxides of carbon and nitrogen emissions on the isotope and element abundances in foliage of C3 plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sucgang, Raymond; Pabroa, Preciosa Corazon; Petrache, Cristina; Bulanhagui, Jaika Faye; Legaspi, Charmaine; Niegas, Elaine; Enerva, Lorna; Luces, Arnicole

    2014-01-01

    The carbon and nitrogen stable isotope abundance of C3 plants mango (Magnifera indica L), molave (Vitex parviflora Juss), talisay (Terminalia catappa L.) leaves harvested from sites with ambient air conditions and sites receiving air pollution contributions from coal-fired power plants were determined and compared. Isotope Ratio Mass Spectroscopy, IRMS was used to determine 13 C and 15 N in the samples. The elemental composition of the samples was determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry, ICP-AES. The 13 C of the leaves grown in ambient air were found to fall within the range of -25.0 to -22.0 per mill and a close agreement with the literature values for the natural abundance of 13 C in C3 plants (-27.0 to -21.0 per mill). The 13 C abundance of plants obtained from sites polluted by coal-fired plants were sporadic from -35 to 24.0 per mille. The 15 N abundance in leaves grown under ambient air condition (-1.0 to 2.0 per mille) were way below the 15 N abundance of plants from coal-fired plant-polluted regions (16.0 to 17.5 per mille). Elemental exposition indicated no differences in element concentrations in leaves from ambient and polluted sites. Differences exist in the Ca, Mg, K ratios across species and are affected by seasonal variation. (author)

  8. ABUNDANCE AND ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF PLANKTONIC MICROCRUSTACEANS IN A CENTRAL AMAZON FLOODPLAIN LAKE: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE TROPHIC DYNAMICS OF THE PLANKTON COMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Caraballo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the hydrological year from December 2007 to November 2008, monthly samplings in the pelagic, littoral and macrophytes zones were conducted in the Lago Catalão, a floodplain lake receiving a mixture of water from Negro and Solimões Rivers, in front of Manaus city. Taxonomic composition and their relative abundance of the planktonic microcrustaceans community was studied. Natural abundances of carbon (C and nitrogen (N stable isotopes were measured to indicate energy sources. Cladocerans were the most abundant, with a relative abundance of 60%, followed by the calanoid and cyclopoid copepods with relative abundances of 29% and 11%, respectively. Diaphanosoma spp. was the dominant cladoceran group during all the sampling periods. Cladocerans were also represented by Moina spp., Ceriodaphnia spp. and Daphnia gessneri. Three genera of calanoid copepods were found: Notodiaptomus spp, Rhacodiaptomus spp., and Argyrodiaptomus spp. The genus Mesocyclops spp. was identified among the cyclopoid copepods. Zooplankton δ13C values indicated that the aquatic macrophyte zone was distinct, with a mean of -27.31‰, which was more enriched than zooplankton in the pelagic and littoral zones, where they had mean δ13C values of -33.11 and -34.66‰, respectively. Overall, analysis of stable isotopes showed that regardless of the pathways, the initial source of carbon for the zooplankton was phytoplankton, with a minimal participation of heterotrophic bacteria.

  9. The isotopic abundance ratio 12C/13C in the solar atmosphere determined from CH-lines in the photospheric spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iversen, Oe.

    1976-01-01

    The R-branch of the (0,0) vibrational band of the violet electronic transition A 2 Δ-X 2 PI of CH is analysed. Isotope wavelength shifts were measured on laboratory spectrograms. The method of synthesising the spectrum was used, and the molecular dissociation equilibrium through the photosphere was computed. 13 CH is not definitely identified in the photospheric spectrum and only upper limits of the 13 C abundance are deduced. The upper limits are sensitive to the local continuum level. A photospheric abundance ratio 12 C/ 13 C greater than the terrestrial value of 90 seems highly probable. (Auth.)

  10. A history of violence: Insights into post-accretionary heating in carbonaceous chondrites from volatile element abundances, Zn isotopes and water contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Brandon; Moynier, Frédéric; Beck, Pierre; Pringle, Emily A.; Siebert, Julien

    2018-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites (CCs) may have been the carriers of water, volatile and moderately volatile elements to Earth. Investigating the abundances of these elements, their relative volatility, and isotopes of state-change tracer elements such as Zn, and linking these observations to water contents, provide vital information on the processes that govern the abundances and isotopic signatures of these species in CCs and other planetary bodies. Here we report Zn isotopic data for 28 CCs (20 CM, 6 CR, 1 C2-ung, and 1 CV3), as well as trace element data for Zn, In, Sn, Tl, Pb, and Bi in 16 samples (8 CM, 6 CR, 1 C2-ung, and 1 CV3), that display a range of elemental abundances from case-normative to intensely depleted. We use these data, water content data from literature and Zn isotopes to investigate volatile depletions and to discern between closed and open system heating. Trace element data have been used to construct relative volatility scales among the elements for the CM and CR chondrites. From least volatile to most, the scale in CM chondrites is Pb-Sn-Bi-In-Zn-Tl, and for CR chondrites it is Tl-Zn-Sn-Pb-Bi-In. These observations suggest that heated CM and CR chondrites underwent volatile loss under different conditions to one another and to that of the solar nebula, e.g. differing oxygen fugacities. Furthermore, the most water and volatile depleted samples are highly enriched in the heavy isotopes of Zn. Taken together, these lines of evidence strongly indicate that heated CM and CR chondrites incurred open system heating, stripping them of water and volatiles concomitantly, during post-accretionary shock impact(s).

  11. A thoroughly validated spreadsheet for calculating isotopic abundances (H-2, O-17, O-18) for mixtures of waters with different isotopic compositions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faghihi, V.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Groening, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    RationaleOxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes are widely used tracers for studies on naturally occurring and laboratory mixtures of isotopically different waters. Although the mixing calculations are straightforward to perform, there are ample possibilities to make mistakes, especially when dealing

  12. Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylations of lactic acid containing 13C at the natural abundance level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.; Czarnota, G.; Papiernik-Zielinska, H.

    1992-01-01

    The 13 C kinetic isotope fractionation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid of natural isotopic composition by sulfuric acid has been studied in the temperature range of 20-80 deg C. The 13 C (1) isotope separation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid by concentrated sulfuric acid depends strongly on the temperature above 40 deg C. Below this temperature the 13 C isotope effect in the decarbonylation of lactic acid by concentrated sulfuric acid is normal similarly as has been found in the decarbonylation of lactic [1- 14 C] acid. The experimental values of k (12C) /k (13C) ratios of isotopic rate constants for 12 C and 13 C are close to, but slightly higher than theoretical 13 C-kinetic isotope effects calculated (neglecting tunneling) under the asumption that the C (1) -OH bond is broken in the rate-controlling step of the dehydration reaction. Dilution of concentrated sulfuric acid with water up to 1.4 molar (H 2 O)/(H 2 SO 4 ) ratio caused the increase of the 13 C isotope fractionation from 1.0273 found in concentrated sulfuric acid at 80.5 deg C to 1.0536±0.0008 (at 80.6 deg C). A discussion of the abnormally high temperature dependence of 14 C and 13 C isotope fractionation in this reaction and the discussion of the problem of relative 14 C/ 13 C kinetic isotope effects is given. (author) 18 refs.; 2 tabs

  13. Using SPIRAL (Single Pollen Isotope Ratio AnaLysis) to estimate C 3- and C 4-grass abundance in the paleorecord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David M.; Hu, Feng Sheng; Scholes, Daniel R.; Joshi, Neeraj; Pearson, Ann

    2008-05-01

    C 3 and C 4 grasses differ greatly in their responses to environmental controls and influences on biogeochemical processes (e.g. water, carbon, and nutrient cycling). Difficulties in distinguishing between these two functional groups of grasses have hindered paleoecological studies of grass-dominated ecosystems. Stable carbon isotopic analysis of individual grains of grass pollen using a spooling-wire microcombustion device interfaced with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer holds promise for improving C 3 and C 4 grass reconstructions. This technique, SPIRAL (Single Pollen Isotope Ratio AnaLysis), has only been evaluated using pollen of known C 3 and C 4 grasses. To test the ability of SPIRAL to reproduce the abundance of C 3 and C 4 grasses on the landscape, we measured δ13C values of > 1500 individual grains of grass pollen isolated from the surface sediments of ten lakes in areas that span a large gradient of C 3- and C 4-grass abundance, as determined from vegetation surveys. Results indicate a strong positive correlation between the δ13C-based estimates of % C 4-grass pollen and the abundance of C 4 grasses on the landscape. The % C 4-grass pollen slightly underestimates the actual abundance of C 4 grasses at sites with high proportions of C 4 grasses, which can be corrected using regression analysis. Comparison of the % C 4-grass pollen with C/N and δ13C measurements of bulk organic matter illustrates the distinct advantages of grass-pollen δ13C as a proxy for distinguishing C 3 and C 4 shifts within the grass family. Thus SPIRAL promises to advance our understanding of grassland ecology and evolution.

  14. High Relative Abundance of Biofuel Sourced Ethanol in Precipitation in the US and Brazil Determined Using Compound Specific Stable Carbon Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, M. S.; Felix, J. D. D.; Casas, M.; Avery, G. B., Jr.; Kieber, R. J.; Mead, R. N.; Willey, J. D.; Lane, C.

    2017-12-01

    Ethanol biofuel production and consumption have increased exponentially over the last two decades to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Currently, 85% of global ethanol production and consumption occurs in the US and Brazil. Increasing biofuel ethanol usage in these two countries enhances emissions of uncombusted ethanol to the atmosphere contributing to poor air quality. Although measurements of ethanol in the air and the precipitation reveal elevated ethanol concentrations in densely populated cities, other sources such as natural vegetation can contribute to emission to the atmosphere. Previous modeling studies indicated up to 12% of atmospheric ethanol is from anthropogenic emissions. Only one gas phase study in southern Florida attempted to constrain the two sources through direct isotopic measurements. The current study used a stable carbon isotope method to constrain sources of ethanol in rainwater from the US and Brazil. A method was developed using solid phase microextraction (SPME) with subsequent analysis by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). Stable carbon isotope signatures (δ13C) of vehicle ethanol emission sources for both the US (-9.8‰) and Brazil (-12.7‰) represented C4 plants as feedstock (corn and sugarcane) for biofuel production. An isotope mixing model using biofuel from vehicles (C4 plants) and biogenic (C3 plants) end-members was implemented to estimate ethanol source apportionment in the rain. We found that stable carbon isotope ratio of ethanol in the rain ranged between -22.6‰ and -12.7‰. Our results suggest that the contribution of biofuel to atmospheric ethanol can be higher than previously estimated. As biofuel usage increasing globally, it is essential to determine the relative abundance of anthropogenic ethanol in other areas of the world.

  15. Isotopic abundance analysis of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur with a combined elemental analyzer-mass spectrometer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichlmayer, F.; Blochberger, K.

    1988-01-01

    Stable isotope ratio measurements of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur are of growing interest as analytical tool in many fields of research, but applications were somewhat hindered in the past by the fact that cumbersome sample preparation was necessary. A method has therefore been developed, consisting in essential of coupling an elemental analyzer with an isotope mass spectrometer, enabling fast and reliable conversion of C-, N- and S-compounds in any solid or liquid sample into the measuring gases carbon dioxide, nitrogen and sulfur dioxide for on-line isotopic analysis. The experimental set-up and the main characteristics are described in short and examples of application in environmental research, food analysis and clinical diagnosis are given. (orig.)

  16. Standard test method for isotopic abundance analysis of uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by multi-collector, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2014-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the isotopic abundance analysis of 234U, 235U, 236U and 238U in samples of hydrolysed uranium hexafluoride (UF6) by inductively coupled plasma source, multicollector, mass spectrometry (ICP-MC-MS). The method applies to material with 235U abundance in the range of 0.2 to 6 % mass. This test method is also described in ASTM STP 1344. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  17. High-precision optical measurements of 13C/12C isotope ratios in organic compounds at natural abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Richard N.; Kuramoto, Douglas S.; Haase, Christa; Tan, Sze M.; Crosson, Eric R.; Saad, Nabil M. R.

    2009-01-01

    A continuous-flow cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system integrating a chromatographic separation technique, a catalytic combustor, and an isotopic 13C/12C optical analyzer is described for the isotopic analysis of a mixture of organic compounds. A demonstration of its potential is made for the geochemically important class of short-chain hydrocarbons. The system proved to be linear over a 3-fold injection volume dynamic range with an average precision of 0.95‰ and 0.67‰ for ethane and propane, respectively. The calibrated accuracy for methane, ethane, and propane is within 3‰ of the values determined using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), which is the current method of choice for compound-specific isotope analysis. With anticipated improvements, the low-cost, portable, and easy-to-use CRDS-based instrumental setup is poised to evolve into a credible challenge to the high-cost and complex IRMS-based technique. PMID:19564619

  18. Sensitive lifetime measurement of excited states of low-abundant isotopes via the (p,p{sup '}γ) reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, Andreas; Derya, Vera; Pickstone, Simon G.; Spieker, Mark; Zilges, Andreas [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Mineva, Milena N. [INRNE, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Petkov, Pavel [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); INRNE, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-07-01

    Absolute transition matrix elements are valuable observables in nuclear-structure physics since they are directly related to the nuclear wave functions. A key ingredient to determine transition matrix elements is the measurement of lifetimes of excited states. In a recent experiment, we extracted the lifetimes of 30 excited states of the low-abundant isotope {sup 96}Ru utilizing the Doppler-shift attenuation method (DSAM) in an inelastic proton-scattering experiment and taking advantage of the proton-γ coincidence technique. In contrast to the DSAM technique following inelastic neutron scattering, which was frequently performed to extract comprehensive lifetime information in the sub-picosecond regime, the (p,p{sup '}γ) reaction requires a much less amount of target material and is thus especially suited to investigate low-abundant isotopes. In this contribution, the (p,p{sup '}γ) method for lifetime measurements is presented and the results of recent experiments on {sup 96}Ru, {sup 94}Zr, and {sup 112,114}Sn are shown.

  19. Monsoon Variability In The Western Arabian Sea During Last 10,000 Years BP: A Planktic Foraminiferal Abundances And It's Stable Isotope Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Tiwari, M.; Sinha, D. K.; Ramesh, R.

    2007-12-01

    : The western Arabian Sea responds to the southwest monsoon winds by upwelling colder and nutrient rich waters from the deeper layers, causing a reduction in the sea surface temperature and enhanced biological productivity. A number of paleoclimatic studies have been carried out in this region to elucidate past monsoon variability (Sirocco et al., 1993; Gupta et al, 2003; Tiwari, 2005; Saher et.al.; 2007). Globigerina bulloides, a planktic foraminiferal species normally inhabiting surface ocean waters in temperate latitudes ( Be and Tolderlund , 1977) also becomes abundant at tropical latitudes upwelling occurs, and in these cases its abundance can exceed considerably. The conspicuous fluctuation in the abundance of Gg.bulloides during upwelling and non upwelling intervals is established through several studies ( Thiede and Junger, 1980, Gupta et al, 2003) This robust relation has been used as a proxy for wind velocity at several different times in the past in the Arabian Sea (Anderson et.al., 2002). A significant result from some of these centennially resolved Holocene records is declining abundance of Globigerina bulloides which is paralleled by reduced insolation record and this has been inferred as declining strength of Asian Monsoon. We are presenting here the data from the core SS4018 from near the Gulf of Aden, Western Arabian Sea taken at a water depth of 2830 m, precisely dated by the radiocarbon method using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry on planktonic foraminiferal separates. We have carried out the planktic foraminiferal census counts for each sample to know the relative abundance of key species. In addition to this, we have also employed multi- proxy approach such as oxygen and carbon isotopes of planktic foraminiferal tests, TOC, CaCO3 (%) to strengthen our interpretation and also to understand the relationships amongst the proxies themselves. Abundance of the key planktic foraminiferal species and other proxy records reveal at least 3 major climatic

  20. Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Gases in the Martian Atmosphere: First Results from the Mars Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Webster, Chris R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Franz, Heather; Wong, Michael; Conrad, Pamela G.; Harpold, Dan; Jones, John J.; Leshin, Laurie, A.; Manning, Heidi; hide

    2013-01-01

    Repeated measurements of the composition of the Mars atmosphere from Curiosity Rover yield a (40)Ar/N2 ratio 1.7 times greater and the (40)Ar/(36)Ar ratio 1.6 times smaller than the Viking Lander values in 1976. The unexpected change in (40)Ar/N2 ratio probably results from different instrument characteristics although we cannot yet rule out some unknown atmospheric process. The new (40)Ar/(36)Ar ratio is more aligned with Martian meteoritic values. Besides Ar and N2 the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument suite on the Curiosity Rover has measured the other principal components of the atmosphere and the isotopes. The resulting volume mixing ratios are: CO2 0.960(+/- 0.007); (40)Ar 0.0193(+/- 0.0001); N2 0.0189(+/- 0.0003); O2 1.45(+/- 0.09) x 10(exp -3); and CO 5.45(+/- 3.62) x 10(exp 4); and the isotopes (40)Ar/(36)Ar 1.9(+/- 0.3) x 10(exp 3), and delta (13)C and delta (18)O from CO2 that are both several tens of per mil more positive than the terrestrial averages. Heavy isotope enrichments support the hypothesis of large atmospheric loss. Moreover, the data are consistent with values measured in Martian meteorites, providing additional strong support for a Martian origin for these rocks.

  1. Abundance, stable isotopic composition, and export fluxes of DOC, POC, and DIC from the Lower Mississippi River during 2006–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yihua; Guo, Laodong; Wang, Xuri; Aiken, George R.

    2015-01-01

    Sources, abundance, isotopic compositions, and export fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved and colloidal organic carbon (DOC and COC), and particulate organic carbon (POC), and their response to hydrologic regimes were examined through monthly sampling from the Lower Mississippi River during 2006–2008. DIC was the most abundant carbon species, followed by POC and DOC. Concentration and δ13C of DIC decreased with increasing river discharge, while those of DOC remained fairly stable. COC comprised 61 ± 3% of the bulk DOC with similar δ13C abundances but higher percentages of hydrophobic organic acids than DOC, suggesting its aromatic and diagenetically younger status. POC showed peak concentrations during medium flooding events and at the rising limb of large flooding events. While δ13C-POC increased, δ15N of particulate nitrogen decreased with increasing discharge. Overall, the differences in δ13C between DOC or DIC and POC show an inverse correlation with river discharge. The higher input of soil organic matter and respired CO2 during wet seasons was likely the main driver for the convergence of δ13C between DIC and DOC or POC, whereas enhanced in situ primary production and respiration during dry seasons might be responsible for their isotopic divergence. Carbon export fluxes from the Mississippi River were estimated to be 13.6 Tg C yr−1 for DIC, 1.88 Tg C yr−1 for DOC, and 2.30 Tg C yr−1 for POC during 2006–2008. The discharge-normalized DIC yield decreased during wet seasons, while those of POC and DOC increased and remained constant, respectively, implying variable responses in carbon export to the increasing discharge.

  2. 235Uranium isotope abundance certified reference material for gamma spectrometry EC nuclear reference material 171 certification report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bievre, P.; Eschbach, H.L.; Lesser, R.; Meyer, H.; Audenhove, Van J.

    1986-01-01

    This certification report contains the information necessary for the final certification of EC nuclear reference material 171. It is also intended to inform the user of the reference material concerned on technical/scientific details which are not given in the certificate. The report describes the reference material which consists of sets of U 3 O 8 samples with five different 235 U/U abundances, filled in cylindrical aluminium cans. The can bottom serves as window for emitted gamma radiation. The report describes how the 235 U/U abundances were characterized, how the other properties relevant for gamma measurements were determined and gives all connected results as well as those from the verification measurements. Appendix A represents the draft certificate. 32 refs

  3. Laser spectrometry applied to the simultaneous determination of the δ2H, δ17O, and δ18O isotope abundances in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerstel, E.R.T.; Trigt, R. van; Dam, N.; Reuss, J.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate the first successful application of infrared laser spectrometry to the accurate, simultaneous determination of the relative 2 H/ 1 H, 17 O/ 16 O, and 18 O/ 16 O isotope abundance ratios in natural water. The method uses a narrow line width color center laser to record the direct absorption spectrum of low-pressure gas-phase water samples (presently 10 μl liquid) in the 3μm spectral region. The precision of the spectroscopic technique is shown to be 0.7 per mille for δ 2 H and 0.5 per mille for δ 17 O and δ 18 O, while the calibrated accuracy for natural waters amounts to about 3 per mille and 1 per mille, respectively. (author)

  4. Natural isotopes abundance of 15N and 13C in leaves of some N2-fixing and non N2-fixing trees and shrubs in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurdali, F.; Al-Shamma'a, M.

    2007-12-01

    Variability in the natural abundance isotopes of 15 N and 13 C in leaves of several legume and non-legume plant species grown at different sites of two areas in semi-arid regions of Syria was determined. In the first area (non-saline soil), the 15 N values of a number of fixing and non-fixing reference plants ranged from -2.09 to +9.46, depending on plant species and studied site. 15 N in a number of legume species including Acacia cyanopylla (-1.73), Acacia farnesiana (-0.55), Prosopis juliflora (-1.64) and Medicago arborea (+1.6) were close to the atmospheric value pointing to a major contribution of N 2 fixing in these species; whereas, those of reference plants were highly positive (between +3.6 and +9.46%). In the actinorhizal tree, Elaeagnus angustifolia, the 15 N abundance was far lower (-0.46 to -2.1%) strongly suggesting that the plant obtained large proportional contribution from BNF. In contrast, δ 15 N values in some other legumes and actinorhizal plants were relatively similar to those of reference plants, suggesting that the contribution of fixed N 2 is negligible. On the other hand, δ 13 C% values in leaves of C3 plants were affected by plant species, ranging from a minimum of -28.67% to a maximum of -23%. However, they were the same within each plant species although they were grown at different sites. Moreover, dual stable isotope analysis in leaves of Prosopis juliflora and other non- legumes grown on a salt affected soil (second area) was also conducted. Results showed that salinity did not affect C assimilation in this woody legume since a higher carbon discrimination was obtained indicating that this plant is a salt tolerant species; whereas, N2-fixation was drastically affected (δ 15 N= +7.03). (Author)

  5. Earthworm eco-physiological characteristics and quantification of earthworm feeding in vermifiltration system for sewage sludge stabilization using stable isotopic natural abundance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaowei; Xing, Meiyan, E-mail: lixiaowei419@163.com; Yang, Jian; Dai, Xiaohu

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Earthworm growth biomass and activity decreased with the VF depth. • Earthworm gut microbial communities were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria. • δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 13}C in earthworms decreased with time, and increased with the VF depth. • Effect of earthworm feeding in enhanced VSS reduction was analyzed quantitatively. • Earthworm feeding had low contribution to the enhanced VSS reduction. - Abstract: Previous studies showed that the presence of earthworm improves treatment performance of vermifilter (VF) for sewage sludge stabilization, but earthworm eco-physiological characteristics and effects in VF were not fully investigated. In this study, earthworm population, enzymatic activity, gut microbial community and stable isotopic abundance were investigated in the VF. Results showed that biomass, average weight, number and alkaline phosphatase activity of the earthworms tended to decrease, while protein content and activities of peroxidase and catalase had an increasing tendency as the VF depth. Earthworm gut microbial communities were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria, and the percentages arrived to 76–92% of the microbial species detected. {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C natural abundance of the earthworms decreased with operation time, and increased as the VF depth. Quantitative analysis using δ{sup 15}N showed that earthworm feeding and earthworm–microorganism interaction were responsible for approximately 21% and 79%, respectively, of the enhanced volatile suspended solid reduction due to the presence of earthworm. The finding provides a quantitative insight into how earthworms influence on sewage sludge stabilization in vermifiltration system.

  6. Alpha-capture reaction rates for 22 Ne (α , n) via sub-Coulomb alpha-transfer and its effect on final abundances of s-process isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatissa, Heshani; Rogachev, Grigory; Koshchiy, Yevgeny; Goldberg, Vladilen; Hooker, Joshua; Hunt, Curtis; Magana, Cordero; Roeder, Brian; Saastamoinen, Antti; Spiridon, Alexandria; Upadhyayula, Sriteja; Trippella, Oscar

    2017-09-01

    The 22 Ne (α , n) reaction is a very important neutron source reaction for the slow neutron capture process (s-process) in asymptotic giant branch stars. These direct measurements are very difficult to carry out at the energy regimes of interest for astrophysics (Gamow energies) due to the extremely small reaction cross section. The large uncertainties introduced when extrapolating direct measurements at high energies down to the Gamow energies can be overcome by measuring the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients (ANC) of the relevant states using α-transfer reactions at sub-Coulomb energies to reduce the optical model dependence. The study of the 22Ne(6Li,d) and 22Ne(7Li,t) reaction was carried out at the Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University. The α-ANC measurements for the near α-threshold resonances of 26Mg provide constraints for the 22Ne(α,n) reaction rate. The effect of this reaction rate on the final abundances of the s-process isotopes will be discussed.

  7. In-plant measurements of gamma-ray transmissions for precise K-edge and passive assay of plutonium concentration and isotopic abundance in product solutions at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakura, Y.; Kondo, I.; Masui, J.; Shoji, K.; Russo, P.A.; Hsue, S.T.; Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.; Johnson, S.S.

    1982-01-01

    A field test has been carried out for more than 2 years for determination of plutonium concentration by K-edge absorption densitometry and for determination of plutonium isotopic abundance by transmission-corrected passive gamma-ray spectrometry. This system was designed and built at Los Alamos National Laboratory and installed at the Tokai reprocessing plant of the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation as a part of the Tokai Advanced Safeguards Technology Exercise (TASTEX). For K-edge measurement of plutonium concentration, the transmissions at two discrete gamma-ray energies are measured using the 121.1- and 122.1-keV gamma rays from 75 Se and 57 Co. Intensities of the plutonium passive gamma rays in the energy regions between 38 and 51 keV and between 129 and 153 keV are used for determination of the isotopic abundances. More than 200 product solution samples have been measured in a timely fashion during these 2 years. The relative precisions and accuracies of the plutonium concentration measurement are shown to be within 0.6% (1 sigma) in these applications, and those for plutonium isotopic abundances are within 3% for 238 Pu, 0.4% for 239 Pu, 1.2% for 240 Pu, 1.3% for 241 Pu, and 7% for 242 Pu. The time required is 10 min for the concentration assay, 10 min for the isotopics assay, and about 15 min for handling procedures in the laboratory

  8. Non-constant relative atomic masses due to varying isotopic abundance of polynuclidic elements and their effect on the accuracy of analytical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstenberger, H.

    1981-01-01

    Alterations of actual relative atomic masses occur in natural samples by natural isotope ratio shifts of polynuclidic elements. Therefore, using nuclear properties for gaining a measuring signal, isotopic shifts of certain elements may lead to significant measuring errors

  9. The relative isotopic abundance (δ13C, δ15N) during composting of agricultural wastes in relation to compost quality and feedstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, Caio T; Magalhães, Alberto M T; Souza, Paulo O; Chalk, Phillip M; Urquiaga, Segundo

    2018-05-01

    Variations in the relative isotopic abundance of C and N (δ 13 C and δ 15 N) were measured during the composting of different agricultural wastes using bench-scale bioreactors. Different mixtures of agricultural wastes (horse bedding manure + legume residues; dairy manure + jatropha mill cake; dairy manure + sugarcane residues; dairy manure alone) were used for aerobic-thermophilic composting. No significant differences were found between the δ 13 C values of the feedstock and the final compost, except for dairy manure + sugarcane residues (from initial ratio of -13.6 ± 0.2 ‰ to final ratio of -14.4 ± 0.2 ‰). δ 15 N values increased significantly in composts of horse bedding manure + legumes residues (from initial ratio of +5.9 ± 0.1 ‰ to final ratio of +8.2 ± 0.5 ‰) and dairy manure + jatropha mill cake (from initial ratio of +9.5 ± 0.2 ‰ to final ratio of +12.8 ± 0.7 ‰) and was related to the total N loss (mass balance). δ 13 C can be used to differentiate composts from different feedstock (e.g. C 3 or C 4 sources). The quantitative relationship between N loss and δ 15 N variation should be determined.

  10. External Quality Assurance: Annual Proficiency Test on {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C isotopic abundance in plant materials [Activities of the Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, Seibersdorf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aigner, Martina [Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, Joint FAO/IAEA Division for Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    Eight out of twelve laboratories (67%) participating in the nitrogen analysis reported {sup 15}N-data within the control limits for the enriched plant sample and eight out of nine (89%) participating laboratories for carbon analysis reported {sup 13}C isotopic abundance results within the control limits for this test sample. The reported analytical data and WEPAL evaluation of the {sup 15}N enriched plant material produced by SWMCNL is shown. All participants received a certificate of participation. Worldwide comparison of stable {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C isotope measurements will provide confidence in the laboratory's analytical performance and is hence an invaluable tool for external quality control. It is hoped that in the future more stable isotope laboratories will make use of this unique opportunity to assess their analytical performance and provide evidence of the high quality of their analytical data.

  11. External Quality Assurance: Annual Proficiency Test on 15N and 13C isotopic abundance in plant materials [Activities of the Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, Seibersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Eight out of twelve laboratories (67%) participating in the nitrogen analysis reported 15 N-data within the control limits for the enriched plant sample and eight out of nine (89%) participating laboratories for carbon analysis reported 13 C isotopic abundance results within the control limits for this test sample. The reported analytical data and WEPAL evaluation of the 15 N enriched plant material produced by SWMCNL is shown. All participants received a certificate of participation. Worldwide comparison of stable 15 N and 13 C isotope measurements will provide confidence in the laboratory's analytical performance and is hence an invaluable tool for external quality control. It is hoped that in the future more stable isotope laboratories will make use of this unique opportunity to assess their analytical performance and provide evidence of the high quality of their analytical data

  12. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level2H-,13C- and15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, A.; Albertino, A.; Sauer, P.E.; Qi, H.; Molinie, R.; Mesnard, F.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the S values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown S values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for ??13C and ??13N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: ??2Hnicotine -162 to -45%o, ??13Cnicotine -30.05 to +7.72%, ?? 15Nnicotine -6.03 to +33.62%; ??15N acetanilide +1-18 to +40.57%; ??13Curea -34.13 to +11.71%, ??15Nurea +0.26 to +40.61% (recommended ?? values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as the first organic nitrogen stable isotope reference materials for GC-IRMS that are available with different ??13N

  13. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level 2H-, 13C- and 15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Albertino, Andrea; Sauer, Peter E; Qi, Haiping; Molinie, Roland; Mesnard, François

    2009-11-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the delta values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown delta values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for delta13C and delta15N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: delta2H(nicotine) -162 to -45 per thousand, delta13C(nicotine) -30.05 to +7.72 per thousand, delta15N(nicotine) -6.03 to +33.62 per thousand; delta15N(acetanilide) +1.18 to +40.57 per thousand; delta13C(urea) -34.13 to +11.71 per thousand, delta15N(urea) +0.26 to +40.61 per thousand (recommended delta values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as

  14. Study of the Role of Terrestrial Processes in the Carbon Cycle Based on Measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, Stephen C; Keeling, Ralph F

    2012-01-03

    The main objective of this project was to continue research to develop carbon cycle relationships related to the land biosphere based on remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its isotopic ratios 13C/12C, 18O/16O, and 14C/12C. The project continued time-series observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and isotopic composition begun by Charles D. Keeling at remote sites, including Mauna Loa, the South Pole, and eight other sites. Using models of varying complexity, the concentration and isotopic measurements were used to study long-term change in the interhemispheric gradients in CO2 and 13C/12C to assess the magnitude and evolution of the northern terrestrial carbon sink, to study the increase in amplitude of the seasonal cycle of CO2, to use isotopic data to refine constraints on large scale changes in isotopic fractionation which may be related to changes in stomatal conductance, and to motivate improvements in terrestrial carbon cycle models. The original proposal called for a continuation of the new time series of 14C measurements but subsequent descoping to meet budgetary constraints required termination of measurements in 2007.

  15. The 13C-pocket structure in AGB models: constraints from zirconium isotope abundances in single mainstream SiC grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Nan; Davis, Andrew M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Gallino, Roberto; Bisterzo, Sara; Savina, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    We present postprocess asymptotic giant branch (AGB) nucleosynthesis models with different 13 C-pocket internal structures to better explain zirconium isotope measurements in mainstream presolar SiC grains by Nicolussi et al. and Barzyk et al. We show that higher-than-solar 92 Zr/ 94 Zr ratios can be predicted by adopting a 13 C-pocket with a flat 13 C profile, instead of the previous decreasing-with-depth 13 C profile. The improved agreement between grain data for zirconium isotopes and AGB models provides additional support for a recent proposal of a flat 13 C profile based on barium isotopes in mainstream SiC grains by Liu et al.

  16. Selective conversion of plasma glucose into CO2 by Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the measurement of C-13 abundance by isotope ratio mass spectrometry : proof of principle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rembacz, Krzysztof P.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Stellaard, Frans

    2007-01-01

    To study carbohydrate digestion and glucose absorption, time-dependent C-13 enrichment in plasma glucose is measured after oral administration of naturally occurring C-13-enriched carbohydrates. The isotope enrichment of the administered carbohydrate is low (APE <0.1%) and plasma C-13 glucose

  17. Carbon-13 isotopic abundance and concentration of atmospheric methane for background air in the Southern and Northern Hemispheres from 1978 to 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, C.M.; Sepanski; Morris, L.J.

    1995-03-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH 4 ) may become an increasingly important contributor to global warming in future years. Its atmospheric concentration has risen, doubling over the past several hundred years, and additional methane is thought to have a much greater effect on climate, on a per molecule basis, than additional C0 2 at present day concentrations (Shine et al. 1990). The causes of the increase of atmospheric CH 4 have been difficult to ascertain because of a lack of quantitative knowledge of the fluxes (i.e., net emissions) from the numerous anthropogenic and natural sources. The goal of CH 4 isotopic studies is to provide a constraint (and so reduce the uncertainties) in estimating the relative fluxes from the various isotopically distinct sources, whose combined fluxes must result in the measured atmospheric isotopic composition, after the fractionating effect of the atmospheric removal process is considered. In addition, knowledge of the spatial and temporal changes in the isotopic composition of atmospheric CH 4 , along with estimates of the fluxes from some of the major sources, makes it possible to calculate growth rates for sources whose temporal emissions trends would be difficult to measure directly

  18. Determining the Local Abundance of Martian Methane and its 13-C/l2-C and D/H Isotopic Ratios for Comparison with Related Gas and Soil Analysis on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Christopher R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the origin of Martian methane will require numerous complementary measurements from both in situ and remote sensing investigations and laboratory work to correlate planetary surface geophysics with atmospheric dynamics and chemistry. Three instruments (Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), Gas Chromatograph (GC) and Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS)) with sophisticated sample handling and processing capability make up the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) analytical chemistry suite on NASA s 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission. Leveraging off the SAM sample and gas processing capability that includes methane enrichment, TLS has unprecedented sensitivity for measuring absolute methane (parts-per-trillion), water, and carbon dioxide abundances in both the Martian atmosphere and evolved from heated soil samples. In concert with a wide variety of associated trace gases (e.g. SO2, H2S, NH3, higher hydrocarbons, organics, etc.) and other isotope ratios measured by SAM, TLS will focus on determining the absolute abundances of methane, water and carbon dioxide, and their isotope ratios: 13C/12C and D/H in methane; 13C/12C and 18O/17O/16O in carbon dioxide; and 18O/17O/16O and D/H in water. Measurements near the MSL landing site will be correlated with satellite (Mars Express, Mars 2016) and ground-based observations.

  19. Human baby hair amino acid natural abundance 15N-isotope values are not related to the 15N-isotope values of amino acids in mother's breast milk protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romek, Katarzyna M; Julien, Maxime; Frasquet-Darrieux, Marine; Tea, Illa; Antheaume, Ingrid; Hankard, Régis; Robins, Richard J

    2013-12-01

    Since exclusively breast-suckled infants obtain their nutrient only from their mother's milk, it might be anticipated that a correlation will exist between the (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios of amino acids of protein of young infants and those supplied by their mother. The work presented here aimed to determine whether amino nitrogen transfer from human milk to infant hair protein synthesized within the first month of life conserves the maternal isotopic signature or whether post-ingestion fractionation dominates the nitrogen isotope spectrum. The study was conducted at 1 month post-birth on 100 mother-infant pairs. Isotope ratios (15)N/(14)N and (13)C/(12)C were measured using isotope ratio measurement by Mass Spectrometry (irm-MS) for whole maternal milk, and infant hair and (15)N/(14)N ratios were also measured by GC-irm-MS for the N-pivaloyl-O-isopropyl esters of amino acids obtained from the hydrolysis of milk and hair proteins. The δ(15)N and δ(13)C (‰) were found to be significantly higher in infant hair than in breast milk (δ(15)N, P amino acids in infant hair was also significantly higher than that in maternal milk (P < 0.001). By calculation, the observed shift in isotope ratio was shown not to be accounted for by the amino acid composition of hair and milk proteins, indicating that it is not simply due to differences in the composition in the proteins present. Rather, it would appear that each pool-mother and infant-turns over independently, and that fractionation in infant N-metabolism even in the first month of life dominates over the nutrient N-content.

  20. Zircon (Hf, O isotopes) as melt indicator: Melt infiltration and abundant new zircon growth within melt rich layers of granulite-facies lenses versus solid-state recrystallization in hosting amphibolite-facies gneisses (central Erzgebirge, Bohemian Massif)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichomirowa, Marion; Whitehouse, Martin; Gerdes, Axel; Schulz, Bernhard

    2018-03-01

    In the central Erzgebirge within the Bohemian Massif, lenses of high pressure and ultrahigh pressure felsic granulites occur within meta-sedimentary and meta-igneous amphibolite-facies felsic rocks. In the felsic granulite, melt rich parts and restite form alternating layers, and were identified by petrology and bulk rock geochemistry. Mineral assemblages representing the peak P-T conditions were best preserved in melanocratic restite layers. In contrast, in the melt rich leucocratic layers, garnet and related HP minerals as kyanite are almost completely resorbed. Both layers display differences in accessory minerals: melanosomes have frequent and large monazite and Fe-Ti-minerals but lack xenotime and apatite; leucosomes have abundant apatite and xenotime while monazite is rare. Here we present a detailed petrographic study of zircon grains (abundance, size, morphology, inclusions) in granulite-facies and amphibolite-facies felsic gneisses, along with their oxygen and hafnium isotope compositions. Our data complement earlier Usbnd Pb ages and trace element data (REE, Y, Hf, U) on zircons from the same rocks (Tichomirowa et al., 2005). Our results show that the degree of melting determines the behaviour of zircon in different layers of the granulites and associated amphibolite-facies rocks. In restite layers of the granulite lenses, small, inherited, and resorbed zircon grains are preserved and new zircon formation is very limited. In contrast, new zircons abundantly grew in the melt rich leucocratic layers. In these layers, the new zircons (Usbnd Pb age, trace elements, Hf, O isotopes) best preserve the information on peak metamorphic conditions due to intense corrosion of other metamorphic minerals. The new zircons often contain inherited cores. Compared to cores, the new zircons and rims show similar or slightly lower Hf isotope values, slightly higher Hf model ages, and decreased oxygen isotope ratios. The isotope compositions (Hf, O) of new zircons indicate

  1. The use of radioisotopes and low abundance stable isotopes for the study of bioavailability and the metabolism of iron, zinc and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggett, P.J.; Fairweather Tait, S.

    1994-01-01

    The use of whole body counting and imaging with ''area of interest'' counting to monitor the metabolism of zinc in healthy volunteers and patients with coeliac diseases and cirrhosis is described as are studies of interaction between iron and copper. Stable isotopes of iron, copper and zinc have been used to investigate the metabolism of these elements in young infants and have proved useful in assessing the validity of current estimated requirements particularly of iron. Stable isotopes have also been used to improve the classic metabolic balance approach to the study of the homeostasis of zinc in zinc deprived volunteers, and have progressed to studies using plasma kinetic curves of the systemic compartmentation of zinc

  2. Heterogeneity of elemental composition and natural abundance of stables isotopes of C and N in soils and leaves of mangroves at their southernmost West Atlantic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tognella, M M P; Soares, M L G; Cuevas, E; Medina, E

    2016-01-01

    Mangrove communities were selected in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, near their southernmost limit of distribution, to study mineral nutrient relation in soils and plants. Communities included three true mangrove species, Rhizophora mangle, Laguncularia racemosa and Avicennia germinans, and two associated species, the fern Acrostichum danaeifolium, and the grass Spartina densiflora. The sites included communities in the lower Río Tavares near Florianopolis city, Sonho beach near Palhoça city, and the Santo Antonio lagoon. These sites included a full range of mangroves under humid climate where winter temperatures, instead of salinity, may be the main factor regulating their productive capacity and species composition. Soil salinity was determined by the concentration of soluble Na, and soil C and N were linearly correlated indicating their association in organic matter. Tavares site showed higher specific conductivity, and concentrations of Na and Mg in the soil layer below 40 cm depth, indicating larger influence of marine water. Isotopic signature of C increased with soil depth suggesting that microorganisms decomposing organic matter are releasing 13C depleted CO2. Nitrogen isotopic signature decreased with soil depth, indicating enrichment in 15N possibly as a result of denitrification in the upper soil layers. Mineral elements in leaf tissues showed A. schaueriana with higher concentrations of N, P, Na, K, Cu, Zn, and Na/Ca ratio. Spartina densiflora was characterized by the lowest N and K concentrations, and the highest concentrations of Al and Fe. Rhizophora mangle and L. racemosa had the highest Ca concentrations. Carbon isotopic signatures identified S. densiflora as a C4 plant, and A. schaueriana as the mangrove species occupying comparatively more water stressed microsites than the rest. Leaf nitrogen isotopic signatures were positive, in correspondence with the soil values. The results support the hypothesis that sites sampled were comparatively

  3. Can we screen phosphorus movement in the landscape through the analysis of δ"1"8O isotopic abundance in phosphate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiling, M.; Aigner, M.; Slaets, J.; Dercon, G.

    2016-01-01

    The SWMCNL explored the possibility of using δ18O isotopic signature in phosphate for screening phosphorus (P) movement in the landscape. Phosphorus is essential for crop production, but extensive use of P fertilizer and animal manure can lead to eutrophication of rivers and lakes. To study these effects, numerous studies on P movement in the soil plant system and P transformation processes have been performed in the past decades. Assessing losses of P through erosion processes, however, is challenging – particularly at the landscape level and on a longer timescale. Using the isotopic signature of stable oxygen isotope ("1"8O) in the phosphate ion as a tracer could be a cost-effective way to study P movements. This approach is already applied as a paleotemperature proxy (the fractionation between phosphate and water is temperature dependent) and can be used for quantifying P losses through leaching into surface and groundwater, as oxygen exchange between phosphate and water is slow in the absence of biological activity.

  4. Carbon isotopes: variations of their natural abundance. Application to correction of radiocarbon dates, to the study of plant metabolism and to paleoclimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerman, J.C.

    1974-01-01

    The radiocarbon activity of contemporaneous samples shows: i) variations in the specific activity of the atmospheric C14, which varies with time and locality. ii) variations due to isotope discrimination, or fractionation, of the carbon isotope ratio during the fixation of carbon by organic or inorganic matter. The variation in the atmospheric concentration of carbon 14 as observed in tree rings are synchronous and of the same amplitude for both hemispheres (southern and northern). A curve for correction of radiocarbon dates of the southern hemisphere is given for the last 500 years. The activity of atmospheric radiocarbon as measured in tree rings varies with latitude, showing a difference of (4.5+-1) per mille between the northern and southern hemispheres, the latter having lower concentration of radiocarbon, equivalent to an age difference of about 35 years. This variation can be explained by a larger exchange of carbon 14 between the atmosphere and the sea in the southern hemisphere to a larger free ocean surface (40%) and a higher agitation by winds. The main differences of the isotope fractionation by different types of plants are correlated to their photosynthetic pathways and thus to the enzyme which effects the primary fixation of carbon. The delta C13 values can be used as basis of a paleoclimate indicator [fr

  5. Food resources of stream macroinvertebrates determined by natural-abundance stable C and N isotopes and a 15N tracer addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick J. Mulholland; Jennifer L. Tank; Diane M. Sanzone; Wilfrid M. Wollheim; Bruce J. Peterson; Jackson R. Webster; Judy L. Meyer

    2000-01-01

    Trophic relationships were examined using natural-abundance 13C and 15N analyses and a 15N-tracer addition experiment in Walker Branch, a 1st-order forested stream in eastern Tennessee. In the 15N-tracer addition experiment, we added 15NH4...

  6. Heterogeneity of elemental composition and natural abundance of stables isotopes of C and N in soils and leaves of mangroves at their southernmost West Atlantic range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. P. Tognella

    Full Text Available Abstract Mangrove communities were selected in the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, near their southernmost limit of distribution, to study mineral nutrient relation in soils and plants. Communities included three true mangrove species, Rhizophora mangle, Laguncularia racemosa and Avicennia germinans, and two associated species, the fern Acrostichum danaeifolium, and the grass Spartina densiflora. The sites included communities in the lower Río Tavares near Florianopolis city, Sonho beach near Palhoça city, and the Santo Antonio lagoon. These sites included a full range of mangroves under humid climate where winter temperatures, instead of salinity, may be the main factor regulating their productive capacity and species composition. Soil salinity was determined by the concentration of soluble Na, and soil C and N were linearly correlated indicating their association in organic matter. Tavares site showed higher specific conductivity, and concentrations of Na and Mg in the soil layer below 40 cm depth, indicating larger influence of marine water. Isotopic signature of C increased with soil depth suggesting that microorganisms decomposing organic matter are releasing 13C depleted CO2. Nitrogen isotopic signature decreased with soil depth, indicating enrichment in 15N possibly as a result of denitrification in the upper soil layers. Mineral elements in leaf tissues showed A. schaueriana with higher concentrations of N, P, Na, K, Cu, Zn, and Na/Ca ratio. Spartina densiflora was characterized by the lowest N and K concentrations, and the highest concentrations of Al and Fe. Rhizophora mangle and L. racemosa had the highest Ca concentrations. Carbon isotopic signatures identified S. densiflora as a C4 plant, and A. schaueriana as the mangrove species occupying comparatively more water stressed microsites than the rest. Leaf nitrogen isotopic signatures were positive, in correspondence with the soil values. The results support the hypothesis that

  7. The depth distribution functions of the natural abundances of carbon isotopes in Alfisols thoroughly sampled by thin-layer sampling, and their relation to the dynamics of organic matter in theses soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker-Heidmann, P.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain fundamental statements on the relationship between the depth distributions of the natural abundances of 13 C and 14 C isotopes and the dynamics of the organic matter in Alfisols. For this purpose, six Alfisols were investigated: four forest soils from Northern Germany, two of them developed in Loess and two in glacial loam, one West German Loess soil used for fruit-growing and one agricultural granite-gneiss soil from the semiarid part of India. The soil was sampled as succesive horizontal layers of 2 cm depth from an area of 0.5 to 1 m 2 size, starting from the organic down to the C horizon or the lower part of the Bt. This kind of completely thin-layer-wise sampling was applied here for the first time. The carbon content and the natural abundances of the 13 C and the 14 C isotopes of each sample were determined. The δ 13 C value was measured by mass spectrometry. A vacuum preparation line with an electronically controlled cooling unit was constructed thereto. For the determination of the 14 C content, the sample carbon was transferred into benzene, and its activity was measured by liquid scintillation spectrometry. From the combination of the depth distribution functions of the 14 C activity and the δ 13 C value, and with the aid of additional analyses like C/N ratio and particle size distribution, a conclusive interpretation as to the dynamics of the organic matter in the investigated Alfisols is given. (orig./BBR)

  8. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.K.

    1976-01-01

    The instant invention relates to a process for separating a material into two or more parts in each of which the abundances of the isotopes of a given element differ from the abundances of the isotopes of the same material in said material. In one embodiment, the invention relates to a method for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase molecules by multiple infrared photon absorption followed by selective dissociation of said excited molecules by the absorption of a single photon of visible or ultraviolet light. This invention is useful for, but not limited to, the separation of the principal isotopes of uranium. 11 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures

  9. K, Rb and Sr abundances and Sr isotopic composition of the Tanzawa granitic and associated gabbroic rocks, Japan: low-potash island arc plutonic complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaka, K.; Yanagi, T.

    1977-01-01

    The granitic and associated gabbroic rocks of the Tanzawa plutonic complex of Miocene age occurring in the northern part of the Izu-Bonin arc are characterized by low abundances of K (229-6790 ppm) and Rb (0.414-12.1 ppm), low K 2 O/Na 2 O ratios (0.037-0.21), moderately high K/Rb ratios (541-630), low Rb/Sr ratios (0.00137-0.0579) and low initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios (0.70332-0.70372). This indicates that acid to intermediate plutonic rocks with these geochemical characteristics also occur in island arc environments besides mid-oceanic ridge environments. They represent, together with associated gabbroic rocks, a low-potash island arc plutonic complex and are expected to occur beneath young island arcs, although now unexposed. The Tanzawa plutonic complex may have been formed by differentiation of low-K calc-alkaline magma. (Auth.)

  10. Geochemistry of silicon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Tiping; Li, Yanhe; Gao, Jianfei; Hu, Bin [Chinese Academy of Geological Science, Beijing (China). Inst. of Mineral Resources; Jiang, Shaoyong [China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan (China).

    2018-04-01

    Silicon is one of the most abundant elements in the Earth and silicon isotope geochemistry is important in identifying the silicon source for various geological bodies and in studying the behavior of silicon in different geological processes. This book starts with an introduction on the development of silicon isotope geochemistry. Various analytical methods are described and compared with each other in detail. The mechanisms of silicon isotope fractionation are discussed, and silicon isotope distributions in various extraterrestrial and terrestrial reservoirs are updated. Besides, the applications of silicon isotopes in several important fields are presented.

  11. 238U series isotopes and 232Th in carbonates and black shales from the Lesser Himalaya: implications to dissolved uranium abundances in Ganga-Indus source waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.K.; Dalai, Tarun K.; Krishnaswami, S.

    2003-01-01

    238 U and 232 Th concentrations and the extent of 238 U- 234 U- 230 Th radioactive equilibrium have been measured in a suite of Precambrian carbonates and black shales from the Lesser Himalaya. These measurements were made to determine their abundances in these deposits, their contributions to dissolved uranium budget of the headwaters of the Ganga and the Indus in the Himalaya and to assess the impact of weathering on 238 U- 234 U- 230 Th radioactive equilibrium in them. 238 U concentrations in Precambrian carbonates range from 0.06 to 2.07 μg g -1 . The 'mean' U/Ca in these carbonates is 2.9 ng U mg -1 Ca. This ratio, coupled with the assumption that all Ca in the Ganga-Indus headwaters is of carbonate origin and that U and Ca behave conservatively in rivers after their release from carbonates, provides an upper limit on the U contribution from these carbonates, to be a few percent of dissolved uranium in rivers. There are, however, a few streams with low uranium concentrations, for which the carbonate contribution could be much higher. These results suggest that Precambrian carbonates make only minor contributions to the uranium budget of the Ganga-Indus headwaters in the Himalaya on a basin wide scale, however, they could be important for particular streams. Similar estimates of silicate contribution to uranium budget of these rivers using U/Na in silicates and Na* (Na corrected for cyclic and halite contributions) in river waters show that silicates can contribute significantly (∼40% on average) to their U balance. If, however, much of the uranium in these silicates is associated with weathering resistant minerals, then the estimated silicate uranium component would be upper limits. Uranium concentration in black shales averages about 37 μg g -1 . Based on this concentration, supply of U from at least ∼50 mg of black shales per liter of river water is needed to balance the average river water U concentration, 1.7 μg L -1 in the Ganga-Indus headwaters

  12. Natural isotopes abundance of sup 1 sup 5 N and sup 1 sup 3 C in leaves of some N sub 2 -fixing and non N sub 2 -fixing trees and shrubs in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurdali, F.; Al-Shamma'a, M.

    2009-01-01

    Varability in the natural abundance isotopes of sup 1 sup 5 N and sup 1 sup 3 C in leaves of several legume and non-legume plant species grown at different sites of two areas in semi-arid regions of Syria was determined. In the first area (non-saline soil), the sup 1 sup 5 N values of a number of fixing and non-fixing reference plants ranged from -2.09 to +9.46, depending on plant species and studied site. sup 1 sup 5 N in a number of legume species including Acacia cyanopylla (-1.73), Acacia farnesiana (-0.55), Prosopis juliflora (-1.64) and Medicago arborea (+1.6) were close to the atmospheric value pointing to a major contribution of N sub 2 fixing in these species; whereas, those of reference plants were highly positive (between +3.6 and +9.46%). In the actinorhizal tree, Elaeagnus angustifolia, the sup 1 sup 5 N abundance was far lower (-0.46 to -2.1%) strongly suggesting that the plant obtained large proportional contribution from BNF. In contrast, delta sup 1 sup 5 N values in some other legumes and actinorhizal plants were relatively similar to those of reference plants, suggesting that the contribution of fixed N sub 2 is negligible. On the other hand, delta sup 1 sup 3 C% values in leaves of C3 plants were affected by plant species, ranging from a minimum of -28.67% to a maximum of -23%. However, they were the same within each plant species although they were grown at different sites. Moreover, dual stable isotope analysis in leaves of Prosopis juliflora and other non- legumes grown on a salt affected soil (second area) was also conducted. Results showed that salinity did not affect C assimilation in this woody legume since a higher carbon discrimination was obtained indicating that this plant is a salt tolerant species; whereas, N2-fixation was drastically affected (delta sup 1 sup 5 N= +7.03). (Author)

  13. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The invention relates to a process for separating a given material into two or more parts, in each of which the abundances of the isotopes of a given element differ from the abundances of the isotopes of the same material in the said material. More particularly, the invention relates to a method for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase UF 6 by infrared photon absorption followed by selective reaction of said excited UF 6 with atomic chlorine, bromine, or iodine to form a product which may be separated by means known in the art

  14. Ferropericlase inclusions in ultradeep diamonds from Sao Luiz (Brazil): high Li abundances and diverse Li-isotope and trace element compositions suggest an origin from a subduction mélange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Hans-Michael; Brey, Gerhard P.; Harris, Jeffrey W.; Durali-Müller, Soodabeh; Ludwig, Thomas; Höfer, Heidi E.

    2018-05-01

    The most remarkable feature of the inclusion suite in ultradeep alluvial and kimberlitic diamonds from Sao Luiz (Juina area in Brazil) is the enormous range in Mg# [100xMg/(Mg + Fe)] of the ferropericlases (fper). The Mg-richer ferropericlases are from the boundary to the lower mantle or from the lower mantle itself when they coexist with ringwoodite or Mg- perovskite (bridgmanite). This, however, is not an explanation for the more Fe-rich members and a lowermost mantle or a "D" layer origin has been proposed for them. Such a suggested ultra-deep origin separates the Fe-rich fper-bearing diamonds from the rest of the Sao Luiz ultradeep diamond inclusion suite, which also contains Ca-rich phases. These are now thought to have an origin in the uppermost lower mantle and in the transition zone and to belong either to a peridotitic or mafic (subducted oceanic crust) protolith lithology. We analysed a new set of more Fe-rich ferropericlase inclusions from 10 Sao Luiz ultradeep alluvial diamonds for their Li isotope composition by solution MC-ICP-MS (multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry), their major and minor elements by EPMA (electron probe micro-analyser) and their Li-contents by SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry), with the aim to understand the origin of the ferropericlase protoliths. Our new data confirm the wide range of ferropericlase Mg# that were reported before and augment the known lack of correlation between major and minor elements. Four pooled ferropericlase inclusions from four diamonds provided sufficient material to determine for the first time their Li isotope composition, which ranges from δ7Li + 9.6 ‰ to -3.9 ‰. This wide Li isotopic range encompasses that of serpentinized ocean floor peridotites including rodingites and ophicarbonates, fresh and altered MORB (mid ocean ridge basalt), seafloor sediments and of eclogites. This large range in Li isotopic composition, up to 5 times higher than `primitive upper mantle' Li-abundances

  15. Isotope separation method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.K.; Eisner, P.N.; Thomas, W.R.L.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus are specified for separating a mixture of isotopes present in a compound, preferably a gaseous compound, into two or more parts in each of which the abundances of the isotopes differ from the natural abundances of the isotopes in the compound. The invention particularly relates to carrying out a laser induced, isotopically selective conversion of gaseous molecules in such a manner as to achieve more than one stage of isotope separation along the length of the laser beam. As an example, the invention is applied to the separation of the isotopes of uranium in UF 6 , in which either the U-235 or U-238 isotope is selectively excited by means of irradiation from an infrared laser, and the selectively excited isotope converted into a product that can be recovered from UF 6 by one of a variety of methods that are described. (U.K.)

  16. Abundance of four sulfur mustard-DNA adducts ex vivo and in vivo revealed by simultaneous quantification in stable isotope dilution-ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Lijun; Wei, Yuxia; Chen, Jia; Shi, Huiqin; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yajiao; He, Jun; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Tingfen; Xie, Jianwei; Peng, Shuangqing

    2014-04-21

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating vesicant and causes blisters upon contact with skin, eyes, and respiratory organs. It covalently links with DNAs by forming four mono- or cross-link adducts. In this article, the reference standards of SM-DNA adducts and deuterated analogues were first synthesized with simplified procedures containing only one or two steps and using less toxic chemical 2-(2-chloroethylthio)ethanol or nontoxic chemical thiodiglycol as starting materials. A sensitive and high-throughput simultaneous quantification method of N(7)-[2-[(2-hydroxyethyl)thio]-ethyl]guanine (N(7)-HETEG), O(6)-[2-[(2-hydroxyethyl)thio]-ethyl]guanine (O(6)-HETEG), N(3)-[2-[(2-hydroxyethyl)thio]-ethyl]adenine (N(3)-HETEA), and bis[2-(guanin-7-yl)ethyl]sulfide (Bis-G) in the Sprague-Dawley rat derma samples was developed by stable isotope dilution-ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (ID-UPLC-MS/MS) with the aim of revealing the real metabolic behaviors of four adducts. The method was validated, the limit of detection (S/N ratio greater than 10) was 0.01, 0.002, 0.04, and 0.11 fmol on column for N(7)-HETEG, O(6)-HETEG, Bis-G, and N(3)-HETEA, respectively, and the lower limit of quantification (S/N ratio greater than 20) was 0.04, 0.01, 0.12, and 0.33 fmol on column for N(7)-HETEG, O(6)-HETEG, Bis-G, and N(3)-HETEA, respectively. The accuracy of this method was determined to be 76% to 129% (n = 3), and both the interday (n = 6) and intraday (n = 7) precisions were less than 10%. The method was further applied for the quantifications of four adducts in the derma of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to SM ex vivo and in vivo, and all adducts had time- and dose-effect relationships. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the real presented status of four DNA adducts was simultaneously revealed by the MS-based method, in which Bis-G showed much higher abundance than the result previously reported and N(3

  17. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    The instant invention relates to a process for separating a material into two or more parts in each of which the abundances of the isotopes of a given element differ from the abundances of the isotopes of the same material in said material. More particularly, the invention relates to a method for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase molecules by multiple infrared photon absorption followed by a step wherein more of the excited molecules than nonexcited molecules are converted to a chemically different form which may be separated by means known in the art. This invention is useful for, but not limited to, the separation of the principal isotopes of uranium. 15 claims, 1 figure

  18. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, W.R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The instant invention relates to an improved process for separating a material into two or more parts in each of which the abundances of the isotopes of a given element differ from the abundances of the isotopes of the same element in said material. More particularly, the invention relates to a method for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase molecules by multiple infrared photon absorption followed by a step wherein more of the excited molecules than non-excited molecules are converted to a chemically different form which may be separated by means known in the art. This invention is useful for, but not limited to, the separation of the principal isotopes of uranium

  19. Emission spectrometric isotope analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Meier, G.; Nitschke, W.; Rose, W.; Schmidt, G.; Rahm, N.; Andrae, G.; Krieg, D.; Kuefner, W.; Tamme, G.; Wichlacz, D.

    1982-01-01

    An emission spectrometric isotope analyzer has been designed for determining relative abundances of stable isotopes in gaseous samples in discharge tubes, in liquid samples, and in flowing gaseous samples. It consists of a high-frequency generator, a device for defined positioning of discharge tubes, a grating monochromator with oscillating slit and signal converter, signal generator, window discriminator, AND connection, read-out display, oscillograph, gas dosing device and chemical conversion system with carrier gas source and vacuum pump

  20. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for distribution for nondestructive research use on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Research Materials Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or is in reprocessing. For some of the high abundance naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56

  1. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available for distribution within the United States for nondestructive research use from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Material Research Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or in reprocessing. For some of the high abundance naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56

  2. Calcium Isotope Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, S.; Richter, S.

    2010-12-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. This presentation discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. Additionally, the availability of Ca isotope reference materials will be discussed.

  3. Isotopic composition of cosmic ray nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enge, W.

    1976-01-01

    A review will be given on the role of cosmic ray isotopes as tracers of the astrophysical nucleo-synthesis. The products of every nuclear burning chain are first of all isotopes and not elements. Thus, it is the study of the isotopes rather than that of the elements that responds to the questions on these nucleo-synthetic reactions. The problems concerning the solar system isotopic abundances and the cosmic ray isotopic abundances as well as a comparison between both will be presented. Furthermore the present stage of the experimental techniques and the latest results will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  4. ICT: isotope correction toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Neubauer, Stefan; Mairinger, Teresa; Zanghellini, Jürgen; Hann, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Isotope tracer experiments are an invaluable technique to analyze and study the metabolism of biological systems. However, isotope labeling experiments are often affected by naturally abundant isotopes especially in cases where mass spectrometric methods make use of derivatization. The correction of these additive interferences--in particular for complex isotopic systems--is numerically challenging and still an emerging field of research. When positional information is generated via collision-induced dissociation, even more complex calculations for isotopic interference correction are necessary. So far, no freely available tools can handle tandem mass spectrometry data. We present isotope correction toolbox, a program that corrects tandem mass isotopomer data from tandem mass spectrometry experiments. Isotope correction toolbox is written in the multi-platform programming language Perl and, therefore, can be used on all commonly available computer platforms. Source code and documentation can be freely obtained under the Artistic License or the GNU General Public License from: https://github.com/jungreuc/isotope_correction_toolbox/ {christian.jungreuthmayer@boku.ac.at,juergen.zanghellini@boku.ac.at} Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Incorporating breeding abundance into spatial assignments on continuous surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushing, Clark S; Marra, Peter P; Studds, Colin E

    2017-06-01

    Determining the geographic connections between breeding and nonbreeding populations, termed migratory connectivity, is critical to advancing our understanding of the ecology and conservation of migratory species. Assignment models based on stable isotopes historically have been an important tool for studying migratory connectivity of small-bodied species, but the low resolution of these assignments has generated interest into combining isotopes with other sources in information. Abundance is one of the most appealing data sources to include in isotope-based assignments, but there are currently no statistical methods or guidelines for optimizing the contribution of stable isotopes and abundance for inferring migratory connectivity. Using known-origin stable-hydrogen isotope samples of six Neotropical migratory bird species, we rigorously assessed the performance of assignment models that differentially weight the contribution of the isotope and abundance data. For two species with adequate sample sizes, we used Pareto optimality to determine the set of models that simultaneously minimized both assignment error rate and assignment area. We then assessed the ability of the top models from these two species to improve assignments of the remaining four species compared to assignments based on isotopes alone. We show that the increased precision of models that include abundance is often offset by a large increase in assignment error. However, models that optimally weigh the abundance data relative to the isotope data can result in higher precision and, in some cases, lower error than models based on isotopes alone. The top models, however, depended on the distribution of relative breeding abundance, with patchier distributions requiring stronger downweighting of abundance, and we present general guidelines for future studies. These results confirm that breeding abundance can be an important source of information for studies investigating broad-scale movements of

  6. Investigation of plutonium abundance and age analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huailong, Wu; Jian, Gong; Fanhua, Hao [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China). Inst. of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry

    2007-06-15

    Based on spectra analysis software, all of the plutonium material peak counts are analyzed. Relatively efficiency calibration is done by the non-coupling peaks of {sup 239}Pu. By using the known isotopes half life and yield, the coupling peaks counts are allocated by non-coupling peaks, consequently the atom ratios of each isotope are gotten. The formula between atom ratio and abundance or age is deduced by plutonium material isotopes decay characteristic. And so the abundance and age of plutonium material is gotten. After some re- peat measurements for a plutonium equipment are completed, a comparison between our analysis results and PC-FRAM and the owner's reference results are done. (authors)

  7. Isotopic compositions of boron in sediments and their implications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Yingkai, X.

    The abundance and isotopic compositions of boron in sediments from the salt lakes of Qaidam Basin, China have been determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry of cesium borate. The results show large variations in the isotopic compositions...

  8. CHLORINE ABUNDANCES IN COOL STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, Z. G.; Pilachowski, C. A. [Indiana University Bloomington, Astronomy Department, Swain West 319, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-7105 (United States); Hinkle, K., E-mail: zmaas@indiana.edu, E-mail: cpilacho@indiana.edu, E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and 1 M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H{sup 35}Cl at 3.69851 μ m. The high-resolution L -band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4 m telescope. The average [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with −0.72 < [Fe/H] < 0.20 is [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] = (−0.10 ± 0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16 ± 0.15) dex. The [{sup 35}Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of ∼0.35 dex above model predictions, suggesting that chemical evolution models are underproducing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and H ii regions. In one star where both H{sup 35}Cl and H{sup 37}Cl could be measured, a {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl isotope ratio of 2.2 ± 0.4 was found, consistent with values found in the Galactic ISM and predicted chemical evolution models.

  9. Electrochemically controlled iron isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jay R.; Young, Edward D.; Kavner, Abby

    2010-02-01

    Variations in the stable isotope abundances of transition metals have been observed in the geologic record and trying to understand and reconstruct the physical/environmental conditions that produced these signatures is an area of active research. It is clear that changes in oxidation state lead to large fractionations of the stable isotopes of many transition metals such as iron, suggesting that transition metal stable isotope signatures could be used as a paleo-redox proxy. However, the factors contributing to these observed stable isotope variations are poorly understood. Here we investigate how the kinetics of iron redox electrochemistry generates isotope fractionation. Through a combination of electrodeposition experiments and modeling of electrochemical processes including mass-transport, we show that electron transfer reactions are the cause of a large isotope separation, while mass transport-limited supply of reactant to the electrode attenuates the observed isotopic fractionation. Furthermore, the stable isotope composition of electroplated transition metals can be tuned in the laboratory by controlling parameters such as solution chemistry, reaction overpotential, and solution convection. These methods are potentially useful for generating isotopically-marked metal surfaces for tracking and forensic purposes. In addition, our studies will help interpret stable isotope data in terms of identifying underlying electron transfer processes in laboratory and natural samples.

  10. Multiple marker abundance profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hooper, Cornelia M.; Stevens, Tim J.; Saukkonen, Anna

    2017-01-01

    proteins and the scoring accuracy of lower-abundance proteins in Arabidopsis. NPAS was combined with subcellular protein localization data, facilitating quantitative estimations of organelle abundance during routine experimental procedures. A suite of targeted proteomics markers for subcellular compartment...

  11. Isotopic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraedts, J.M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of isotopically mixed clusters (dimers of SF 6 ) are calculated as well as transition frequencies. The result leads to speculations about the suitability of the laser-cluster fragmentation process for isotope separation. (Auth.)

  12. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  13. Actinide isotopic analysis systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, Z.M.; Ruhter, W.D.; Gunnink, R.

    1990-01-01

    This manual provides instructions and procedures for using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's two-detector actinide isotope analysis system to measure plutonium samples with other possible actinides (including uranium, americium, and neptunium) by gamma-ray spectrometry. The computer program that controls the system and analyzes the gamma-ray spectral data is driven by a menu of one-, two-, or three-letter options chosen by the operator. Provided in this manual are descriptions of these options and their functions, plus detailed instructions (operator dialog) for choosing among the options. Also provided are general instructions for calibrating the actinide isotropic analysis system and for monitoring its performance. The inventory measurement of a sample's total plutonium and other actinides content is determined by two nondestructive measurements. One is a calorimetry measurement of the sample's heat or power output, and the other is a gamma-ray spectrometry measurement of its relative isotopic abundances. The isotopic measurements needed to interpret the observed calorimetric power measurement are the relative abundances of various plutonium and uranium isotopes and americium-241. The actinide analysis system carries out these measurements. 8 figs

  14. 2. Workshop 'Isotopes in Nature'. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    The workshop was aimed at discussing in detail the following problems: (1) distribution of stable and radioactive isotopes in nature, (2) theoretical and experimental studies of isotopic effects in natural processes, (3) problems of sample preparation and sample measurement in determining the relative abundance of stable isotopes or radioactive isotopes in nature, (4) age estimations of samples from different areas of the geosphere, (5) contributions to the specification of global and regional substance cycles in nature with the aid of isotopic and geochemical studies. 75 summaries are included

  15. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A method of isotope separation is described which involves the use of a laser photon beam to selectively induce energy level transitions of an isotope molecule containing the isotope to be separated. The use of the technique for 235 U enrichment is demonstrated. (UK)

  16. Isotopically labelled pyrimidines and purines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaban, A.T.; Bally, I.

    1987-01-01

    Among the three diazines, pyrimidine is by far the most important one because its derivatives uracil, thymine and cytosine are constituents of the ubiquitous deoxynucleic acids (DNA) and ribonucleic acids (RNA). Other derivatives of pyrimidine without condensed rings include barbiturates, alloxan, orotic acid and thiamine or vitamin B 1 . From the polycyclic derivatives of pyrimidine such as pteridine, alloxazine, and purine, the latter, through its derivatives adenine and guanine complete the list of bases which occur in DNA and RNA: in addition, other purine derivatives such as hypoxanthine, xanthine, theobromine, theophylline, caffeine and uric acid are important natural products with biological activity. The paper presents methods for preparing isotopically labeled pyrimidines as well as purine derivatives. For convenience, the authors describe separately carbon-labeled with radioisotopes 11 C (T 1/2 = 20.3 min) and 14 C (T 1/2 = 5736 years) or the stable isotope 13 C (natural abundance 1.1%) and then hydrogen-labeled systems with the radioisotope 3 H ≡ T (T 1/2 = 12.346 years) or with the stable isotope 2 H ≡ D (natural abundance 0.015%). We do not separate stable from radioactive isotopes because the synthetic methods are identical for the same element; however, the introduction of hydrogen isotopes into organic molecules is often performed by reactions such as isotope exchange which cannot take place in the case of carbon isotopes

  17. Isotopic compositions of the elements 2013 (IUPAC Technical Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meija, Juris; Coplen, Tyler B.; Berglund, Michael; Brand, Willi A.; De Bièvre, Paul; Gröning, Manfred; Holden, Norman E.; Irrgeher, Johanna; Loss, Robert D.; Walczyk, Thomas; Prohaska, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights (ciaaw.org) of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (iupac.org) has revised the Table of Isotopic Compositions of the Elements (TICE). The update involved a critical evaluation of the recent published literature. The new TICE 2013 includes evaluated data from the “best measurement” of the isotopic abundances in a single sample, along with a set of representative isotopic abundances and uncertainties that accommodate known variations in normal terrestrial materials.

  18. Abrupt sea surface pH change at the end of the Younger Dryas in the central sub-equatorial Pacific inferred from boron isotope abundance in corals (Porites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Juillet-Leclerc

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The "δ11B-pH" technique was applied to modern and ancient corals Porites from the sub-equatorial Pacific areas (Tahiti and Marquesas spanning a time interval from 0 to 20.720 calendar years to determine the amplitude of pH changes between the Last Glacial Period and the Holocene. Boron isotopes were measured by Multi-Collector – Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICPMS with an external reproducibility of 0.25‰, allowing a precision of about ±0.03 pH-units for pH values between 8 and 8.3. The boron concentration [B] and isotopic composition of modern samples indicate that the temperature strongly controls the partition coefficient KD for different aragonite species. Modern coral δ11B values and the reconstructed sea surface pH values for different Pacific areas match the measured pH expressed on the seawater scale and confirm the calculation parameters that were previously determined by laboratory calibration exercises. Most ancient sea surface pH reconstructions near Marquesas are higher than modern values. These values range between 8.19 and 8.27 for the Holocene and reached 8.30 at the end of the last glacial period (20.7 kyr BP. At the end of the Younger Dryas (11.50±0.1 kyr BP, the central sub-equatorial Pacific experienced a dramatic drop of up to 0.2 pH-units from the average pH of 8.2 before and after this short event. Using the marine carbonate algorithms, we recalculated the aqueous pCO2 to be 440±25 ppmV at around 11.5 kyr BP for corals at Marquesas and ~500 ppmV near Tahiti where it was assumed that pCO2 in the atmosphere was 250 ppmV. Throughout the Holocene, the difference in pCO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere at Marquesas (ΔpCO2 indicates that the surface waters behave as a moderate CO2 sink or source (−53 to 20 ppmV during El Niño-like conditions. By contrast, during the last glacial/interglacial transition, this area was a marked source of CO2 (21 to 92 ppmV for the atmosphere, highlighting

  19. Isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbuny, M.

    1979-01-01

    The invention discloses a method for deriving, from a starting material including an element having a plurality of isotopes, derived material enriched in one isotope of the element. The starting material is deposited on a substrate at less than a critical submonatomic surface density, typically less than 10 16 atoms per square centimeter. The deposit is then selectively irradiated by a laser (maser or electronic oscillator) beam with monochromatic coherent radiation resonant with the one isotope causing the material including the one istope to escape from the substrate. The escaping enriched material is then collected. Where the element has two isotopes, one of which is to be collected, the deposit may be irradiated with radiation resonant with the other isotope and the residual material enriched in the one isotope may be evaporated from the substrate and collected

  20. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazier, J.L.; Guinamant, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    According to the progress which has been realised in the technology of separating and measuring isotopes, the stable isotopes are used as preferable 'labelling elements' for big number of applications. The isotopic composition of natural products shows significant variations as a result of different reasons like the climate, the seasons, or their geographic origins. So, it was proved that the same product has a different isotopic composition of alimentary and agriculture products. It is also important in detecting the pharmacological and medical chemicals. This review article deals with the technology, like chromatography and spectrophotometry, adapted to this aim, and some important applications. 17 refs. 6 figs

  1. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, R.J.; Morrey, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated

  2. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castle, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to molecular and atomic isotope separation and is particularly applicable to the separation of 235 U from other uranium isotopes including 238 U. In the method described a desired isotope is separated mechanically from an atomic or molecular beam formed from an isotope mixture utilising the isotropic recoil momenta resulting from selective excitation of the desired isotope species by radiation, followed by ionization or dissociation by radiation or electron attachment. By forming a matrix of UF 6 molecules in HBr molecules so as to collapse the V 3 vibrational mode of the UF 6 molecule the 235 UF 6 molecules are selectively excited to promote reduction of UF 6 molecules containing 235 U and facilitate separation. (UK)

  3. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    Isotopic species in an isotopic mixture including a first species having a first isotope and a second species having a second isotope are separated by selectively exciting the first species in preference to the second species and then reacting the selectively excited first species with an additional preselected radiation, an electron or another chemical species so as to form a product having a mass different from the original species and separating the product from the balance of the mixture in a centrifugal separating device such as centrifuge or aerodynamic nozzle. In the centrifuge the isotopic mixture is passed into a rotor where it is irradiated through a window. Heavier and lighter components can be withdrawn. The irradiated mixture experiences a large centrifugal force and is separated in a deflection area into lighter and heavier components. (UK)

  4. An isotope-enrichment unit and a process for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    A process and equipment for isotope enrichment using gas-centrifuge cascades are described. The method is described as applied to the separation of uranium isotopes, using natural-abundance uranium hexafluoride as the gaseous-mixture feedstock. (U.K.)

  5. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  6. Isotope angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepinska, J.; Ruzyllo, W.; Konieczny, W.

    1979-01-01

    Method of technetium isotope 99 m pass through the heart recording with the aid of radioisotope scanner connected with seriograph and computer is being presented. Preliminary tests were carried out in 26 patients with coronary disease without or with previous myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathy, ventricular septal defect and in patients with artificial mitral and aortic valves. The obtained scans were evaluated qualitatively and compared with performed later contrast X-rays of the heart. Size of the right ventricle, volume and rate of left atrial evacuation, size and contractability of left ventricle were evaluated. Similarity of direct and isotope angiocardiographs, non-invasional character and repeatability of isotope angiocardiography advocate its usefulness. (author)

  7. The centenary of the discovery of isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulie, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    This article recalls works performed by different scientists (Marckwald and Keetman, Stromholm and Svedberg, Soddy, Thompson, Aston) which resulted in the observation and identification of the existence of isotopes. The author also recalls various works related to mechanisms of production of isotopes, the discovery of uranium fission and the principle of chain reaction. The author notably evokes French scientists involved in the development of mass spectroscopy and in the research and applications on isotopes within the CEA after the Second World War. A bibliography of article and books published by one of them, Etienne Roth, is provided. References deal with nuclear applications of chemical engineering (heavy water and its production, chemical processes in fission reactors, tritium extraction and enrichment), isotopic fractioning and physical-chemical processes, mass spectrometry and isotopic analysis, isotopic geochemistry (on 07;Earth, search for deuterium in moon rocks and their consequences), first dating and the Oklo phenomenon, radioactive dating, water and climate (isotopic hydrology, isotopes and hailstone formation, the atmosphere), and miscellaneous scientific fields (nuclear measurements and radioactivity, isotopic abundances and atomic weight, isotopic separation and use of steady isotopes)

  8. Stable-isotope paleoclimatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuser, W.G.

    1978-01-01

    Seasonal variations of temperature and salinity in the surface waters of large parts of the oceans are well established. Available data on seasonal distributions of planktonic foraminifera show that the abundances of different species groups peak at different times of the year with an apparent succession of abundance peaks through most of the year. This evidence suggests that a measure of seasonal contrast is recorded in the isotope ratios of oxygen, and perhaps carbon, in the tests of different foraminiferal species. The evaluation of this potential paleoclimatologic tool awaits planned experiments with recent foraminifera in well-known settings, but a variety of available data is consistent with the idea that interspecies differences in 18 O content contain a seasonal component.(auth.)

  9. Nuclear abundances and evolution of the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wannier, P.G.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of molecular and elemental abundances in the interstellar medium (ISM) are reviewed, with special attention given to isotope ratios. The derivation of molecular isotope abundances for the ISM is discussed, along with H and C fractionation. Millimeter- and centimeter-wave spectra of giant clouds are examined with respect to isotope abundances of C, O, N, Si, S, and D. Evidence for the current enrichment of the ISM by mass loss from evolved stars is considered, together with chemical abundance gradients in H II regions and planetary nebulae. Cosmic-ray observations pertaining to abundances in the ISM are summarized, with emphasis on available results for Ne, Mg, Si, Fe, and Ni. The observations reviewed are shown to support arguments in favor of: (1) the cosmological production of D and He-3 (2) the production of the CNO elements by hydrostatic hydrogen burning (3) the nucleosynthesis of Ne, Mg, Si, S, Fe, and Ni as a result of He burning (4) solar abundances of interstellar S, Fe, and Ni and (5) a direct association between observed inhomogeneities in the ISM and mass loss from evolved stellar objects

  10. Leatherback Isotopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SWFSC is currently working on a project identifying global marine isotopes using leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) as the indicator species. We currently...

  11. Isotope Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-18

    The objective of this training modules is to examine the process of using gamma spectroscopy for radionuclide identification; apply pattern recognition to gamma spectra; identify methods of verifying energy calibration; and discuss potential causes of isotope misidentification.

  12. Isotope laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This report from the Dutch Ministry of Health is an advisory document concerned with isotope laboratories in hospitals, in connection with the Dutch laws for hospitals. It discusses which hospitals should have isotope laboratories and concludes that as many hospitals as possible should have small laboratories so that emergency cases can be dealt with. It divides the Netherlands into regions and suggests which hospitals should have these facilities. The questions of how big each lab. is to be, what equipment each has, how each lab. is organised, what therapeutic and diagnostic work should be carried out by each, etc. are discussed. The answers are provided by reports from working groups for in vivo diagnostics, in vitro diagnostics, therapy, and safety and their results form the criteria for the licences of isotope labs. The results of a questionnaire for isotope labs. already in the Netherlands are presented, and their activities outlined. (C.F.)

  13. Isotopic chirality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, H.G. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This paper deals with compounds that are chiral-at least in part, due to isotope substitution-and their use in tracing the steric course of enzyme reaction in vitro and in vivo. There are other applications of isotopically chiral compounds (for example, in analyzing the steric course of nonenzymatic reactions and in probing the conformation of biomolecules) that are important but they will not be discussed in this context.

  14. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described for separating isotopes in which photo-excitation of selected isotope species is used together with the reaction of the excited species with postive ions of predetermined ionization energy, other excited species, or free electrons to produce ions or ion fragments of the selected species. Ions and electrons are produced by an electrical discharge, and separation is achieved through radial ambipolar diffusion, electrostatic techniques, or magnetohydrodynamic methods

  15. Isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lydtin, H-J.; Wilden, R.J.; Severin, P.J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The isotope enrichment method described is based on the recognition that, owing to mass diffusion and thermal diffusion in the conversion of substances at a heated substrate while depositing an element or compound onto the substrate, enrichment of the element, or a compound of the element, with a lighter isotope will occur. The cycle is repeated for as many times as is necessary to obtain the degree of enrichment required

  16. Natural fractionation of uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noordmann, Janine

    2015-01-01

    The topic of this thesis was the investigation of U (n( 238 U) / n( 235 U)) isotope variations in nature with a focus on samples (1) that represent the continental crust and its weathering products (i.e. granites, shales and river water) (2) that represent products of hydrothermal alteration on mid-ocean ridges (i.e. altered basalts, carbonate veins and hydrothermal water) and (3) from restricted euxinic basins (i.e. from the water column and respective sediments). The overall goal was to explore the environmental conditions and unravel the mechanisms that fractionate the two most abundant U isotopes, n( 238 U) and n( 235 U), on Earth.

  17. Orion A helium abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsivilev, A.P.; Ershov, A.A.; Smirnov, G.T.; Sorochenko, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The 22.4-GHz (H,He)66-alpha and 36.5-GHz (H,He)56-alpha radio recombination lines have been observed at several Jaffe-Pankonin positions in the central part of the Orion A source. The measured relative abundance of ionized helium increases with distance, averaging 11.6 percent at peripheral points. The observed behavior is interpreted by a blister-type model nebula, which implies that Orion A has a true He abundance of 12 percent, is moving with a radial velocity of 5 km/sec, and is expanding. 18 references

  18. Understanding Survival And Abundance Of Overwintering Warblers: Does Rainfall Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie M. Dugger; John G Faaborg; Wayne J. Arendt; Keith A. Hobson

    2004-01-01

    We investigated relationships between warbler abundance and survival rates measured on a Puerto Rican wintering site and rainfall patterns measured on the wintering site and in regions where these warblers breed, as estimated using stable-isotope analysis (δD) of feathers collected from wintering birds. We banded birds using constant-effort mist netting...

  19. Stellar Oxygen Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeremy

    1994-04-01

    This dissertation addresses several issues concerning stellar oxygen abundances. The 7774 {\\AA} O I triplet equivalent widths of Abia & Rebolo [1989, AJ, 347, 186] for metal-poor dwarfs are found to be systematically too high. I also argue that current effective temperatures used in halo star abundance studies may be ~150 K too low. New color-Teff relations are derived for metal-poor stars. Using the revised Teff values and improved equivalent widths for the 7774A O I triplet, the mean [O/Fe] ratio for a handful of halo stars is found to be +0.52 with no dependence on Teff or [Fe/H]. Possible cosmological implications of the hotter Teff scale are discussed along with additional evidence supporting the need for a higher temperature scale for metal-poor stars. Our Teff scale leads to a Spite Li plateau value of N(Li)=2.28 +/- 0.09. A conservative minimal primordial value of N(Li)=2.35 is inferred. If errors in the observations and models are considered, consistency with standard models of Big Bang nucleosynthesis is still achieved with this larger Li abundance. The revised Teff scale raises the observed B/Be ratio of HD 140283 from 10 to 12, making its value more comfortably consistent with the production of the observed B and Be by ordinary spallation. Our Teff values are found to be in good agreement with values predicted from both the Victoria and Yale isochrone color-Teff relations. Thus, it appears likely that no changes in globular cluster ages would result. Next, we examine the location of the break in the [O/Fe] versus [Fe/H] plane in a quantitative fashion. Analysis of a relatively homogeneous data set does not favor any unique break point in the range -1.7 /= -3), in agreement with the new results for halo dwarfs. We find that the gap in the observed [O/H] distribution, noted by Wheeler et al. [1989, ARAA, 27, 279], persists despite the addition of more O data and may betray the occurrence of a hiatus in star formation between the end of halo formation and

  20. Abundant Solar Nebula Solids in Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Clemett, S.

    2016-01-01

    Comets have been proposed to consist of unprocessed interstellar materials together with a variable amount of thermally annealed interstellar grains. Recent studies of cometary solids in the laboratory have shown that comets instead consist of a wide range of materials from across the protoplanetary disk, in addition to a minor complement of interstellar materials. These advances were made possible by the return of direct samples of comet 81P/Wild 2 coma dust by the NASA Stardust mission and recent advances in microscale analytical techniques. Isotopic studies of 'cometary' chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and comet 81P/Wild 2 Stardust samples show that preserved interstellar materials are more abundant in comets than in any class of meteorite. Identified interstellar materials include sub-micron-sized presolar silicates, oxides, and SiC dust grains and some fraction of the organic material that binds the samples together. Presolar grain abundances reach 1 weight percentage in the most stardust-rich CP-IDPs, 50 times greater than in meteorites. Yet, order of magnitude variations in presolar grain abundances among CP-IDPs suggest cometary solids experienced significant variations in the degree of processing in the solar nebula. Comets contain a surprisingly high abundance of nebular solids formed or altered at high temperatures. Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples include 10-40 micron-sized, refractory Ca- Al-rich inclusion (CAI)-, chondrule-, and ameboid olivine aggregate (AOA)-like materials. The O isotopic compositions of these refractory materials are remarkably similar to their meteoritic counterparts, ranging from 5 percent enrichments in (sup 16) O to near-terrestrial values. Comet 81P/Wild 2 and CP-IDPs also contain abundant Mg-Fe crystalline and amorphous silicates whose O isotopic compositions are also consistent with Solar System origins. Unlike meteorites, that are dominated by locally-produced materials, comets appear to be composed of

  1. Isotope ratio in stellar atmospheres and nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbuy, B.L.S.

    1987-01-01

    The determination of isotopic ratios in stellar atmospheres is studied. The isotopic shift of atomic and molecular lines of different species of a certain element is examined. CH and MgH lines are observed in order to obtain the 12 C: 13 C and 24 Mg: 25 Mg: 26 Mg isotpic ratios. The formation of lines in stellar atmospheres is computed and the resulting synthetic spectra are employed to determine the isotopic abundances. The results obtained for the isotopic ratios are compared to predictions of nucleosynthesis theories. Finally, the concept of primary and secondary element is discussed, and these definitions are applied to the observed variations in the abundance of elements as a function of metallicity. (author) [pt

  2. Analysis of barium by isotope mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Kaiming; Jia Baoting; Liu Xuemei

    2004-01-01

    The isotopic abundance ratios for barium at sub-microgram level are analyzed by thermal surface ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Rhenium trips used for sample preparation are firstly treated to eliminate possible barium background interference. During the preparation of barium samples phosphoric acid is added as an emitting and stabilizing reagent. The addition of phosphoric acid increases the collection efficiency and ion current strength and stability for barium. A relative standard deviation of 0.02% for the isotopic abundance ratio of 137 Ba to 138 Ba is achieved when the 138 Ba ion current is (1-3) x 10 -12 A. The experimental results also demonstrate that the isotope fractionation effect is negligibly small in the isotopic analysis of barium

  3. Electrolytic recovery of mercury enriched in isotopic abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method of electrolytically extracting liquid mercury from HgO or Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2. Additionally there are disclosed two related techniques associated with the present invention, namely (1) a technique for selectively removing product from different regions of a long photochemical reactor (photoreactor) and (2) a method of accurately measuring the total quantity of mercury formed as either HgO or Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2.

  4. Isotopes Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dairiki, J.M.; Browne, E.; Firestone, R.B.; Lederer, C.M.; Shirley, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    The Isotopes Project compiles and evaluates nuclear structure and decay data and disseminates these data to the scientific community. From 1940-1978 the Project had as its main objective the production of the Table of Isotopes. Since publication of the seventh (and last) edition in 1978, the group now coordinates its nuclear data evaluation efforts with those of other data centers via national and international nuclear data networks. The group is currently responsible for the evaluation of mass chains A = 167-194. All evaluated data are entered into the International Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and are published in Nuclear Data Sheets. In addition to the evaluation effort, the Isotopes Project is responsible for production of the Radioactivity Handbook

  5. Isotope production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Dewi M.

    1995-07-15

    Some 2 0% of patients using radiopharmaceuticals receive injections of materials produced by cyclotrons. There are over 200 cyclotrons worldwide; around 35 are operated by commercial companies solely for the production of radio-pharmaceuticals with another 25 accelerators producing medically useful isotopes. These neutron-deficient isotopes are usually produced by proton bombardment. All commonly used medical isotopes can be generated by 'compact' cyclotrons with energies up to 40 MeV and beam intensities in the range 50 to 400 microamps. Specially designed target systems contain gram-quantities of highly enriched stable isotopes as starting materials. The targets can accommodate the high power densities of the proton beams and are designed for automated remote handling. The complete manufacturing cycle includes large-scale target production, isotope generation by cyclotron beam bombardment, radio-chemical extraction, pharmaceutical dispensing, raw material recovery, and labelling/packaging prior to the rapid delivery of these short-lived products. All these manufacturing steps adhere to the pharmaceutical industry standards of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). Unlike research accelerators, commercial cyclotrons are customized 'compact' machines usually supplied by specialist companies such as IBA (Belgium), EBCO (Canada) or Scanditronix (Sweden). The design criteria for these commercial cyclotrons are - small magnet dimensions, power-efficient operation of magnet and radiofrequency systems, high intensity extracted proton beams, well defined beam size and automated computer control. Performance requirements include rapid startup and shutdown, high reliability to support the daily production of short-lived isotopes and low maintenance to minimize the radiation dose to personnel. In 1987 a major step forward in meeting these exacting industrial requirements came when IBA, together with the University of Louvain-La-Neuve in Belgium, developed the Cyclone-30

  6. Stable isotope research pool inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-08-01

    This report contains a listing of electromagnetically separated stable isotopes which are available at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for distribution for nondestructive research use on a loan basis. This inventory includes all samples of stable isotopes in the Research Materials Collection and does not designate whether a sample is out on loan or is in reprocessing. For some of the high-abundance, naturally occurring isotopes, larger amounts can be made available; for example, Ca-40 and Fe-56. All requests for the loan of samples should be submitted with a summary of the purpose of the loan to: Iotope Distribution Office, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box X, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831. Requests from non-DOE contractors and from foreign institutions require DOE approval

  7. Ammonia abundances in comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S.; Engel, L.

    The emission band strengths of the NH2 bands of Comets Halley, Hartley-Good, Thiele, and Borrelly were measured to determine the NH2 column densities for the comets. Production rates obtained using the Haser and vectorial models are in agreement within the observational errors, suggesting that a simple two-step decay model may be used to approximate the NH2 distribution in a comet's coma. Ammonia-to-water abundance ratios from 0.01 to 0.4 percent were found for the four comets. The ratio in Comet Halley is found to be Q(NH3)/Q(H2O) = 0.002 + or - 0.001. No significant difference in the ammonia abundance was found before or after perihelion in Comet Halley.

  8. The isotope correlation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, L.; Schoof, S.

    1983-01-01

    The ESARDA working group on Isotopic Correlation Techniques, ICT and Reprocessing Input Analysis performed an Isotope Correlation Experiment, ICE with the aim to check the feasibility of the new technique. Ten input batches of the reprocessing of the KWO fuel at the WAK plant were analysed by 4 laboratories. All information to compare ICT with the gravimetric and volumetric methods was available. ICT combined with simplified reactor physics calculation was included. The main objectives of the statistical data evaluation were detection of outliers, the estimation of random errors and of systematic errors of the measurements performed by the 4 laboratories. Different methods for outlier detection, analysis of variances, Grubbs' analysis for the constant-bias model and Jaech's non-constant-bias model were applied. Some of the results of the statistical analysis may seem inconsistent which is due to the following reasons. For the statistical evaluations isotope abundance data (weight percent) as well as nuclear concentration data (atoms/initial metal atoms) were subjected to different outlier criteria before being used for further statistical evaluations. None of the four data evaluation groups performed a complete statistical data analysis which would render possible a comparison of the different methods applied since no commonly agreed statistical evaluation procedure existed. The results prove that ICT is as accurate as conventional techniques which have to rely on costly mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis. The potential of outlier detection by ICT on the basis of the results from a single laboratory is as good as outlier detection by costly interlaboratory comparison. The application of fission product or Cm-244 correlations would be more timely than remeasurements at safeguards laboratories

  9. Compilation of solar abundance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauge, Oe.; Engvold, O.

    1977-01-01

    Interest in the previous compilations of solar abundance data by the same authors (ITA--31 and ITA--39) has led to this third, revised edition. Solar abundance data of 67 elements are tabulated and in addition upper limits for the abundances of 5 elements are listed. References are made to 167 papers. A recommended abundance value is given for each element. (JIW)

  10. 3He Abundances in Planetary Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Ramirez, Lizette

    2017-10-01

    Determination of the 3He isotope is important to many fields of astrophysics, including stellar evolution, chemical evolution, and cosmology. The isotope is produced in stars which evolve through the planetary nebula phase. Planetary nebulae are the final evolutionary phase of low- and intermediate-mass stars, where the extensive mass lost by the star on the asymptotic giant branch is ionised by the emerging white dwarf. This ejecta quickly disperses and merges with the surrounding ISM. 3He abundances in planetary nebulae have been derived from the hyperfine transition of the ionised 3He, 3He+, at the radio rest frequency 8.665 GHz. 3He abundances in PNe can help test models of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. Many hours have been put into trying to detect this line, using telescopes like the Effelsberg 100m dish of the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) 140-foot telescope, the NRAO Very Large Array, the Arecibo antenna, the Green Bank Telescope, and only just recently, the Deep Space Station 63 antenna from the Madrid Deep Space Communications Complex.

  11. Abundances in galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagel, B.E.J.

    1991-01-01

    Standard (or mildly inhomogeneous) Big Bang nucleosynthesis theory is well confirmed by abundance measurements of light elements up to 7 Li and the resulting upper limit to the number of neutrino families confirmed in accelerator experiments. Extreme inhomogeneous models with a closure density in form of baryons seem to be ruled out and there is no evidence for a cosmic 'floor' to 9 Be or heavier elements predicted in some versions of those models. Galaxies show a correlation between luminous mass and abundance of carbon and heavier elements, usually attributed to escape of hot gas from shallow potential wells. Uncertainties include the role of dark matter and biparametric behaviour of ellipticals. Spirals have radial gradients which may arise from a variety of causes. In our own Galaxy one can distinguish three stellar populations - disk, halo and bulge - characterised by differing metallicity distribution functions. Differential abundance effects are found among different elements in stars as a function of metallicity and presumably age, notably in the ratio of oxygen and α-particle elements to iron. These may eventually be exploitable to set a time scale for the formation of the halo, bulge and disk. (orig.)

  12. Isotopically modified compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter the nomenclature of isotopically modified compounds in Slovak language is described. This chapter consists of following parts: (1) Isotopically substituted compounds; (2) Specifically isotopically labelled compounds; (3) Selectively isotopically labelled compounds; (4) Non-selectively isotopically labelled compounds; (5) Isotopically deficient compounds.

  13. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2005-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. (author). 52 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Liquid and gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the determination of 13C-valine isotopic ratios in complex biological samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; Breuillé, Denis; Obled, Christiane; Papet, Isabelle; Schierbeek, Henk; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Fay, Laurent-Bernard

    2008-01-01

    On-line gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is commonly used to measure isotopic ratios at natural abundance as well as for tracer studies in nutritional and medical research. However, high-precision (13)C isotopic enrichment can also be measured by liquid

  15. Isotope generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The patent describes an isotope generator incorporating the possibility of stopping elution before the elution vessel is completely full. Sterile ventilation of the whole system can then occur, including of both generator reservoir and elution vessel. A sterile, and therefore pharmaceutically acceptable, elution fluid is thus obtained and the interior of the generator is not polluted with non-sterile air. (T.P.)

  16. Stable isotope analysis in primatology: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Paul A; Loudon, James E; Sponheimer, Matt

    2012-11-01

    Stable isotope analysis has become an important tool in ecology over the last 25 years. A wealth of ecological information is stored in animal tissues in the relative abundances of the stable isotopes of several elements, particularly carbon and nitrogen, because these isotopes navigate through ecological processes in predictable ways. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes have been measured in most primate taxonomic groups and have yielded information about dietary content, dietary variability, and habitat use. Stable isotopes have recently proven useful for addressing more fine-grained questions about niche dynamics and anthropogenic effects on feeding ecology. Here, we discuss stable carbon and nitrogen isotope systematics and critically review the published stable carbon and nitrogen isotope data for modern primates with a focus on the problems and prospects for future stable isotope applications in primatology. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Isotopic enrichment in a plasma centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Bosco, E.; Dallaqua, R.S.; Ludwig, G.O.; Bittencourt, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    A rotating fully ionized plasma column was produced in a vacuum-arc centrifuge. The apparatus is described and new results for the rotational velocity and isotope enrichment of carbon and metal plasmas are shown. The ion rotation velocity is derived from electrostatic probes measurents and from the azimuthal displacement of the material deposited behind of a narrow slit. The isotope enrichment is measured with a modified quadrupole mass spectrometer, which determines, in situ, the relative abundance of the isotopes at the end of the plasm column at various radil positions. (Author) [pt

  18. Ca isotopes in refractory inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederer, F.R.; Papanastassiou, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute isotope abundance of Ca in Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende and Leoville meteorites. Improved high precision measurements are reported also for 46 Ca. We find that nonlinear isotope effects in Ca are extremely rare in these inclusions. The absence of nonlinear effects in Ca, except for the effects in FUN inclusions, is in sharp contrast to the endemic effects in Ti. One fine-grained inclusion shows an excess of 46 Ca of (7 +- 1) per mille, which is consistent with addition of only 46 Ca or of an exotic (*) component with 46 Ca* approx. 48 Ca*. FUN inclusion EK-1-4-1 shows a small 46 Ca excess of (3.3 +- 1.0) per mille; this confirms that the exotic Ca components in EK-1-4-1 were even more deficient in 46 Ca relative to 48 Ca than is the case for normal Ca. The Ca in the Ca-Al-rich inclusions shows mass dependent isotope fractionation effects which have a range from -3.8 to +6.7 per mille per mass unit difference. This range is a factor of 20 wider than the range previously established for bulk meteorites and for terrestrial and lunar samples. Ca and Mg isotope fractionation effects in the Ca-Al-rich inclusions are common and attributed to kinetic isotope effects. (author)

  19. System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

    2013-07-02

    A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

  20. Anomalous behavior of tellurium abundances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B L

    1984-01-01

    The cosmic abundance of Te is larger than for any element with atomic number greater than 40, but it is one of the least abundant elements in the earth's lithosphere and it is one of the five elements never reported in sea water. On the other hand, it is the fourth most abundant element in the human body (after Fe, Zn and Rb), and is unusually abundant in human food. It is shown that the high abundance in human food combined with the low abundance in soil requires that it be picked up by plant roots very much more efficiently than any other trace element.

  1. Isotope hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drost, W.

    1978-01-01

    The International Symposium on Isotope Hydrology was jointly organized by the IAEA and UNESCO, in co-operation with the National Committee of the Federal Republic of Germany for the International Hydrological Programme (IHP) and the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH (GSF). Upon the invitation of the Federal Republic of Germany the Symposium was held from 19-23 June 1978 in Neuherberg on the GSF campus. The Symposium was officially opened by Mr. S. Eklund, Director General of the IAEA. The symposium - the fifth meeting held on isotope hydrology - was attended by over 160 participants from 44 countries and four international organizations and by about 30 observers from the Federal Republic of Germany. Due to the absence of scientists from the USSR five papers were cancelled and therefore only 46 papers of the original programme were presented in ten sessions

  2. Report on the intercomparison for the isotope standards limestone KH 2 and polyethylene foil PEF 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstenberger, H.; Herrmann, M.

    1983-01-01

    The isotope abundance of 13 C and 18 O of a carbonate was measured by an intercomparison in order to create a new working standard for the mass spectrometric determination of isotopic variations in natural materials. For the same purpose a polyethylene was subjected an intercomparison and the abundance of 13 C and D has been determined. (author)

  3. Isotopic composition of the elements and their variation in nature: a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, N.E.

    1977-03-01

    Data in the literature on isotopic abundance values and their variation in nature are reviewed. Recommended values are presented for the isotopic abundances of all stable elements, their natural variation, and the corresponding atomic weights of these elements. 2 tables, 133 references

  4. Abundance, Excess, Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rox De Luca

    2016-02-01

    Her recent work focuses on the concepts of abundance, excess and waste. These concerns translate directly into vibrant and colourful garlands that she constructs from discarded plastics collected on Bondi Beach where she lives. The process of collecting is fastidious, as is the process of sorting and grading the plastics by colour and size. This initial gathering and sorting process is followed by threading the components onto strings of wire. When completed, these assemblages stand in stark contrast to the ease of disposability associated with the materials that arrive on the shoreline as evidence of our collective human neglect and destruction of the environment around us. The contrast is heightened by the fact that the constructed garlands embody the paradoxical beauty of our plastic waste byproducts, while also evoking the ways by which those byproducts similarly accumulate in randomly assorted patterns across the oceans and beaches of the planet.

  5. Principles of isotopic analysis by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, M.

    1980-01-01

    The use of magnetic sector field mass spectrometers in isotopic analysis, especially for nitrogen gas, is outlined. Two measuring methods are pointed out: the scanning mode for significantly enriched samples and the double collector method for samples near the natural abundance of 15 N. The calculation formulas are derived and advice is given for corrections. (author)

  6. Multi-element isotope dilution analyses using ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpe, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Presently, 37 elements ranging from light (Li,B) through transition metals, noble, rare earth and heavy elements, to actinides and transuranics (Pu, Am, Cm) are measured by isotope dilution at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Projects range from geological and hydrological to biological. The research goal is to measure accurately many elements present in diverse matrices at trace (ppb) levels using isotope dilution methods. Major advantages of isotope dilution methods are accuracy, elimination of ion intensity calibration, and quantitation for samples that require chemical separation. Accuracy depends on tracer isotope calibration, tracer-sample isotopic equilibration, and appropriate background, isobaric and mass bias corrections. Propagation of isotope ratio error due to improper tracer isotope addition is a major concern with multi-element analyses when abundances vary widely. 11 refs., 3 figs

  7. Role of stable isotope mass spectroscopy in hydrological sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keesari, Tirumalesh

    2017-01-01

    Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is a specialized technique used to provide information about a given sample about its geographic, chemical, physical and biological origin. The ability to determine the source of water molecule stems from the relative isotopic abundances of its constituent elements, viz., hydrogen and oxygen or sometimes through its dissolved elements such as carbon, nitrogen and sulphur etc. Since the isotope ratios of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen can become locally enriched or depleted through a variety of kinetic and thermodynamic factors, measurement of the isotope ratios can be used to unravel the processes and differentiate water samples which otherwise exhibit similar chemical signatures. For brevity, this article focuses mainly on measurement of water isotopes, common notation for expressing isotope data and standards, theory of isotope hydrology, field applications and advances

  8. Nuclear isotope measurement in the Hanford environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacker, J.F.; Stoffel, J.J.; Kelley, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is located at the federal government's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, which was built during World War II as part of the secret Manhattan Project to develop the atomic bomb. Monitoring of the Site itself and surrounding environs for Hanford-related radionuclides has been a routine part of the operations since 1944. One of the most sensitive analytical methods used is thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) with triple-sector mass spectrometers. Normal geometry instruments have an abundance sensitivity of 10 -9 for uranium while the authors' newest Triple-Sector Isotope Mass Spectrometer (TRISM), utilizing a new ion-optical design developed at PNL, has an abundance sensitivity of 10 -11 . In favorable cases, sensitivity is such that complete isotopic analyses are obtained on total samples in the femtogram range; and minor isotopes in the attogram range are measured

  9. Isotopic analysis of bullet lead samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar Das, M.; Venkatasubramanian, V.S.; Sreenivas, K.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of using the isotopic composition of lead for the identification of bullet lead is investigated. Lead from several spent bullets were converted to lead sulphide and analysed for the isotopic abundances using an MS-7 mass spectrometer. The abundances are measured relative to that for Pb 204 was too small to permit differentiation, while the range of variation of Pb 206 and Pb 207 and the better precision in their analyses permitted differentiating samples from one another. The correlation among the samples examined has been pointed out. The method is complementary to characterisation of bullet leads by the trace element composition. The possibility of using isotopically enriched lead for tagging bullet lead is pointed out. (author)

  10. Twilight of Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, David

    2014-03-01

    Baby boomers enjoyed the most benign period in human history: fifty years of relative peace, cheap energy, plentiful grain supply, and a warming climate due to the highest solar activity for 8,000 years. The party is over - prepare for the twilight of abundance. David Archibald reveals the grim future the world faces on its current trajectory: massive fuel shortages, the bloodiest warfare in human history, a global starvation crisis, and a rapidly cooling planet. Archibald combines pioneering science with keen economic knowledge to predict the global disasters that could destroy civilization as we know it - disasters that are waiting just around the corner. But there's good news, too: We can have a good future if we prepare for it. Advanced, civilized countries can have a permanently high standard of living if they choose to invest in the technologies that will get them there. Archibald, a climate scientist as well as an inventor and a financial specialist, explains which scientific breakthroughs can save civilization in the coming crisis - if we can cut through the special interest opposition to these innovations and allow free markets to flourish.

  11. Hot vacuum extraction-isotopic dilution mass spectrometry for determination of hydrogen isotopes in zircaloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Y.; Leeson, P.K.; Wilkin, D.; Britton, A.; Macleod, R.

    2016-01-01

    A hot vacuum extraction-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (HVE-IDMS) was studied for determination of hydrogen isotopes in zirconium metal and alloys as nuclear reactor materials. A theoretical assessment of the completeness of the extraction of hydrogen isotopes under the chosen condition was carried out based on the hydrogen and deuterium solubility data for zirconium. The optimal isotopic spiking condition for conventional IDMS was further explored for the special case IDMS where the isotope abundance of the samples is varied and non-natural. Applying the optimal conditions, the accurate IDMS determination was realized. The agreement between the measured values and the certified or prepared values of standard reference materials and homemade standard materials validate the method developed. (author)

  12. Separation and preparation of "6"2Ni isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Xiuyan; Mi Yajing; Zeng Ziqiang; Li Gongliang; Tu Rui

    2014-01-01

    Micro nuclear battery is the perfect power of space craft equipment. "6"3Ni is the core operation material of the "6"3Ni battery. It can produce radioisotope "6"3Ni while high abundance "6"2Ni is irradiated in the reactor. In order to meet the requirements of the abundance and the purity, research of the separation for "6"2Ni isotope was developed. The magnetic field and beam transmission status were simulated. The improvement designs of the ion source and the collector pocket were carried out. The process flow of high abundance "6"2Ni using electromagnetic separation method was established. The experiment of "6"2Ni isotope was developed by using electromagnetism isotope separator. The results show that the enrichment of "6"2Ni isotope is more than 90%. (authors)

  13. Reorientation measurements on tungsten isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, J J; Saladin, J X; Baktash, C; Alessi, J G [Pittsburgh Univ., Pa. (USA)

    1977-11-14

    In a particle-..gamma.. coincidence experiment, a thick tungsten target, of natural isotopic abundance, was bombarded with ..cap alpha.. and /sup 16/O beams. From analysis of the deexcitation ..gamma..-rays following Coulomb excitation, the spectroscopic quadrupole moment of the second 2/sup +/ state (the 2/sup +/' state) was determined for /sup 186/W and /sup 184/W. In a separate Coulomb excitation experiment a thin, isotopically enriched /sup 186/W target was bombarded with /sup 16/O ions. From analysis of projectiles scattered elastically and inelastically the quadrupole moment of the 2/sup +/' state of /sup 186/W was extracted. The results of the two experiments are in good agreement. The quadrupole moment of the 2/sup +/' state is found to be opposite in sign to that of the first 2/sup +/ state for both isotopes studied. However, its magnitude decreases rapidly in going from /sup 186/W to /sup 184/W, in contrast to the predictions of the rotation-vibration of asymmetric rotor models. The microscopic theory of Kumar and Baranger does predict the experimental trend, qualitatively. Thus the present results are interpreted as being evidence of strong coupling between ..beta.. and ..gamma.. degrees of freedom in the tungsten isotopes, which, according to the theory of Kumar and Baranger, is the source of the reduced value of the quadrupole moment.

  14. Selective laser ionization for mass-spectral isotopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.M.; Nogar, N.S.; Downey, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    Resonant enhancement of the ionization process can provide a high degree of elemental selectivity, thus eliminating or drastically reducing the interference problem. In addition, extension of this method to isotopically selective ionization has the potential for greatly increasing the range of isotope ratios that can be determined experimentally. This gain can be realized by reducing or eliminating the tailing of the signal from the high-abundance isotope into that of the low-abundance isotope, augmenting the dispersion of the mass spectrometer. We briefly discuss the hardware and techniques used in both our pulsed and cw RIMS experiments. Results are presented for both cw ionization experiments on Lu/Yb mixtures, and spectroscopic studies of multicolor RIMS of Tc. Lastly, we discuss practical limits of cw RIMS analysis in terms of detection limits and measurable isotope ratios

  15. Utilization of stable isotopes for characterizing an underground gas generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirard, J.P.; Antenucci, D.; Renard, X.; Letolle, R.

    1994-01-01

    The principles of isotopic exchange and isotope ratio result interpretation are first reviewed; then, in the framework of an underground coal gasification project in Belgium, experiments and modelling of the underground gas generator have been carried out: isotopic abundances of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen have been measured in the gasifying agent (O 2 , H 2 O) and in the effluent (CO 2 , CO, H 2 , H 2 O, CH 4 , O 2 , heavy oils and various organic and mineral substances). Gasification kinetics and temperatures have been evaluated and isotope application to thermometry is discussed. 1 fig., 9 refs

  16. ATTA - A new method of ultrasensitive isotope trace analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, K.; Chen, C.Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.M.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T.P.; Young, L.

    2000-01-01

    A new method of ultrasensitive isotope trace analysis has been developed. This method, based on the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms, has been used to count individual 85 Kr and 81 Kr atoms present in a natural krypton gas sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10 -11 and 10 -13 , respectively. This method is free of contamination from other isotopes and elements and can be applied to various different isotope tracers for a wide range of applications. The demonstrated detection efficiency is 1x10 -7 . System improvements could increase the efficiency by many orders of magnitude

  17. Natural fractionation of uranium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noordmann, Janine

    2015-01-24

    The topic of this thesis was the investigation of U (n({sup 238}U) / n({sup 235}U)) isotope variations in nature with a focus on samples (1) that represent the continental crust and its weathering products (i.e. granites, shales and river water) (2) that represent products of hydrothermal alteration on mid-ocean ridges (i.e. altered basalts, carbonate veins and hydrothermal water) and (3) from restricted euxinic basins (i.e. from the water column and respective sediments). The overall goal was to explore the environmental conditions and unravel the mechanisms that fractionate the two most abundant U isotopes, n({sup 238}U) and n({sup 235}U), on Earth.

  18. Nuclides and isotopes. Twelfth edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    This explanatory booklet was designed to be used with the Chart of the Nuclides. It contains a brief history of the atomic theory of matter: ancient speculations, periodic properties of elements (Mendeleev table), radioactivity, early models of atomic structure, the Bohr atom, quantum numbers, nature of isotopes, artificial radioactivity, and neutron fission. Information on the pre-Fermi (natural) nuclear reactor at Oklo and the search for superheavy elements is given. The booklet also discusses information presented on the Chart and its coding: stable nuclides, metastable states, data display and color, isotopic abundances, neutron cross sections, spins and parities, fission yields, half-life variability, radioisotope power and production data, radioactive decay chains, and elements without names. The Periodic Table of the Elements is appended. 3 figures, 3 tables

  19. Isotope hydrology in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, B R [International Atomic Energy Agency, Division of Research and Laboratories, Isotope Hydrology Section, Vienna (Austria)

    1972-07-01

    A wide variety of problems in hydrology have proved susceptible to the use of nuclear techniques. Conclusions may be drawn from the relative abundances of certain 'environmental isotopes', such as heavy stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water molecules, tritium, carbon-14 and silicon-32, in atmospheric, surface or ground water; origin and rate of flow, for example, may be deduced. Artificial radioisotopes may be used similarly as a logical extension to well-known tracer techniques using dyes and salts. Inherent in the use of such radiotracers are the advantages of very high detection sensitivity (and thus very low required concentrations and the elimination of density effects), and a choice of a variety of nuclides alien to the geohydrological system (and hence unique identification and low background). (author)

  20. Stable isotope deltas: Tiny, yet robust signatures in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including 14C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. 13C, 2H, and 18O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as−25 per mil can be written as−25 mUr (or−2.5 cUr or−0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg ‘units’ are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg

  1. Origin and abundance of water in carbonaceous asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocchi, Yves; Bekaert, David V.; Piani, Laurette

    2018-01-01

    The origin and abundance of water accreted by carbonaceous asteroids remains underconstrained, but would provide important information on the dynamic of the protoplanetary disk. Here we report the in situ oxygen isotopic compositions of aqueously formed fayalite grains in the Kaba and Mokoia CV chondrites. CV chondrite bulk, matrix and fayalite O-isotopic compositions define the mass-independent continuous trend (δ17O = 0.84 ± 0.03 × δ18O - 4.25 ± 0.1), which shows that the main process controlling the O-isotopic composition of the CV chondrite parent body is related to isotopic exchange between 16O-rich anhydrous silicates and 17O- and 18O-rich fluid. Similar isotopic behaviors observed in CM, CR and CO chondrites demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of O-isotopic exchange as the main physical process in establishing the O-isotopic features of carbonaceous chondrites, regardless of their alteration degree. Based on these results, we developed a new approach to estimate the abundance of water accreted by carbonaceous chondrites (quantified by the water/rock ratio) with CM (0.3-0.4) ≥ CR (0.1-0.4) ≥ CV (0.1-0.2) > CO (0.01-0.10). The low water/rock ratios and the O-isotopic characteristics of secondary minerals in carbonaceous chondrites indicate they (i) formed in the main asteroid belt and (ii) accreted a locally derived (inner Solar System) water formed near the snowline by condensation from the gas phase. Such results imply low influx of D- and 17O- and 18O-rich water ice grains from the outer part of the Solar System. The latter is likely due to the presence of a Jupiter-induced gap in the protoplanetary disk that limited the inward drift of outer Solar System material at the exception of particles with size lower than 150 μm such as presolar grains. Among carbonaceous chondrites, CV chondrites show O-isotopic features suggesting potential contribution of 17-18O-rich water that may be related to their older accretion relative to other hydrated

  2. Utilization of stable isotopes for characterizing an underground gas generator; Utilisation des isotopes stables pour caracteriser un gazogene souterrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirard, J P; Antenucci, D; Renard, X [Liege Univ. (Belgium); Letolle, R [Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France)

    1994-12-31

    The principles of isotopic exchange and isotope ratio result interpretation are first reviewed; then, in the framework of an underground coal gasification project in Belgium, experiments and modelling of the underground gas generator have been carried out: isotopic abundances of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen have been measured in the gasifying agent (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O) and in the effluent (CO{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, O{sub 2}, heavy oils and various organic and mineral substances). Gasification kinetics and temperatures have been evaluated and isotope application to thermometry is discussed. 1 fig., 9 refs.

  3. Natural isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    14 C dates between 600 and 900 AD were obtained for early Iron Age sites in Natal, and from 1300 to 1450 AD for rock engraving sites in Bushmanland. Palaeoenvironmental data derived from the dating of samples related to sedimentary and geomorphic features in the central and northern Namib Desert enabled the production of a tentative graph for the changes in humidity in the region over the past 40000 years. These results suggest that relatively humid conditions came to an end in the Namib at ±25000 BP (before present). The increased precision of the SIRA mass spectrometer enabled the remeasurement of 13 C and 18 O in the Cango stalagmite. This data confirmed that the environmental temperatures in the Southern Cape remained constant to within ±1 o C during the past 5500 years. Techniques and applications for environmental isotopes in hydrology were developed to determine the origin and movement of ground water. Isotopic fractionation effects in light elements in nature were investigated. The 15 N/ 14 N ratio in bones of animals and humans increases in proportion to the aridity of the environment. This suggests that 15 N in bone from dated archaeological sites could be used to detect changes in past climatic conditions as naturally formed nitrate minerals are higly soluble and are only preserved in special, very dry environments. The sources and sinks of CO 2 on the South African subcontinent were also determined. The 13 C/ 12 C ratios of air CO 2 obtained suggest that the vegetation provides the major proportion of respired CO 2 . 9 refs., 1 fig

  4. Ultratrace Uranium Fingerprinting with Isotope Selective Laser Ionization Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, Summer L.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2008-01-01

    Uranium isotope ratios can provide source information for tracking uranium contamination in a variety of fields, ranging from occupational bioassay to monitoring aftereffects of nuclear accidents. We describe the development of Isotope Selective Laser Ionization Spectrometry (ISLIS) for ultratrace measurement of the minor isotopes 234U, 235U, and 236U with respect to 238U. Optical isotopic selectivity in three-step excitation with single-mode continuous wave lasers is capable of measuring the minor isotopes at relative abundances below 1 ppm, and is not limited by isobaric interferences such as 235UH+ during measurement of 236U. This relative abundance limit approaches the threshold for measurement of uranium minor isotopes with conventional mass spectrometry, typically 10-7, but without mass spectrometric analysis of the laser-created ions. Uranyl nitrate standards from an international blind comparison were used to test analytical performance for different isotopic compositions and with quantities ranging from 11 ng to 10 (micro)g total uranium. Isotopic ratio determination was demonstrated over a linear dynamic range of 7 orders of magnitude with a few percent relative precision and detection limits below 500 fg for the minor isotopes

  5. Terrestrial aurora: astrophysical laboratory for anomalous abundances in stellar systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Roth

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The unique magnetic structure of the terrestrial aurora as a conduit of information between the ionosphere and magnetosphere can be utilized as a laboratory for physical processes at similar magnetic configurations and applied to various evolutionary phases of the solar (stellar system. The most spectacular heliospheric abundance enhancement involves the 3He isotope and selective heavy elements in impulsive solar flares. In situ observations of electromagnetic waves on active aurora are extrapolated to flaring corona in an analysis of solar acceleration processes of 3He, the only element that may resonate strongly with the waves, as well as heavy ions with specific charge-to-mass ratios, which may resonate weaker via their higher gyroharmonics. These results are applied to two observed anomalous astrophysical abundances: (1 enhanced abundance of 3He and possibly 13C in the late stellar evolutionary stages of planetary nebulae; and (2 enhanced abundance of the observed fossil element 26Mg in meteorites as a decay product of radioactive 26Al isotope due to interaction with the flare-energized 3He in the early solar system.

  6. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  7. Method for separating isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jepson, B.E.

    1975-01-01

    Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether

  8. Energy abundance and economic progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schurr, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    A discussion is presented on the benefits of energy abundance and on the links between energy supply, economic growth and human welfare in the United States. It is argued that the restoration of energy abundance with dependable sources of supply should be a major national objective. (U.K.)

  9. Abundances in the Galactic bulge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbuy, B; Alves-Brito, A [Universidade de Sao Paulo, IAG, Rua do Matao 1226, Sao Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Ortolani, S; Zoccali, M [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 2, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Hill, V; Gomez, A [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Melendez, J [Centro de AstrofIsica da Universidade de Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Asplund, M [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Postfach 1317, 85741 Garching (Germany); Bica, E [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, CP 15051, Porto Alegre 91501-970 (Brazil); Renzini, A [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Minniti, D [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)], E-mail: barbuy@astro.iag.usp.br

    2008-12-15

    The metallicity distribution and abundance ratios of the Galactic bulge are reviewed. Issues raised by recent work of different groups, in particular the high metallicity end, the overabundance of {alpha}-elements in the bulge relative to the thick disc and the measurement of giants versus dwarfs, are discussed. Abundances in the old moderately metal-poor bulge globular clusters are described.

  10. Ages of the solar system: Isotopic dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, G.

    1982-01-01

    The major concern of this section will be to outline the ways in which measurements of isotope abundances have been used to determine the chronology of the origin and evolution of the solar system. In passing it should be remembered that the use of isotopic information is by no means restricted simply to the measurement of time scales and, particularly in recent years, isotope abundances have been used to investigate problems as diverse as the heat sources in the early solar nebula and the chemical evolution of the Earth's mantle. The fundamental property of isotopes which makes them especially useful for dating and other applications is the fact that, apart from a limited amount of mass fractionation, the composition of an isotopic mixture is unaffected by chemical processes. In those cases where mass fractionation does occur this effect may itself be useful, particularly as a source of information on temperatures. Since our main theme is time the events discussed in this section will be most conveniently presented as a chronological sequence, progressing from some time before the solar system existed down to the present day. (orig./WL)

  11. Clumped-isotope geochemistry of carbonates: A new tool for the reconstruction of temperature and oxygen isotope composition of seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernasconi, Stefano M., E-mail: Stefano.bernasconi@erdw.ethz.ch [Geological Institute, ETH Zuerich, Sonneggstrasse 5, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Schmid, Thomas W.; Grauel, Anna-Lena [Geological Institute, ETH Zuerich, Sonneggstrasse 5, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Mutterlose, Joerg [Institut fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Geophysik, Ruhr Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Clumped-isotope thermometry of carbonates is discussed. > Clumped isotopes of Belemnites show higher sea surface temperatures than commonly assumed for the lower Cretaceous. > The potential of clumped-isotope measurement on foraminifera is discussed. - Abstract: Clumped-isotope geochemistry deals with State of ordering of rare isotopes in molecules, in particular with their tendency to form bonds with other rare isotopes rather than with the most abundant ones. Among its possible applications, carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry is the one that has gained most attention because of the wide potential of applications in many disciplines of the earth sciences. In particular, it allows reconstructing the temperature of formation of carbonate minerals without knowledge of the isotopic composition of the water from which they were formed. In addition, the O isotope composition of the waters from which they were formed can be calculated using the {delta}{sup 18}O of the same carbonate sample. This feature offers new approaches in paleoclimatology for reconstructing past global geochemical cycles. In this contribution two applications of this method are presented. First the potential of a new analytical method of measurement of clumped isotopes on small samples of foraminifera, for high-resolution SST and seawater {delta}{sup 18}O reconstructions from marine sediments is shown. Furthermore the potential of clumped isotope analysis of belemnites, for reconstructing seawater {delta}{sup 18}O and temperatures in the Cretaceous is shown.

  12. Method for separating isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jepson, B.E.

    1976-01-01

    The invention comprises a method for separating different isotopes of elements from each other by contacting a feed solution containing the different isotopes with a macrocyclic polyether to preferentially form a macrocyclic polyether complex with the lighter of the different isotopes. The macrocyclic polyether complex is then separated from the lighter isotope depleted feed solution. A chemical separation of isotopes is carried out in which a constant refluxing system permits a continuous countercurrent liquid-liquid extraction. (LL)

  13. Method for separating isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlenker, R.F.

    1978-01-01

    A vortex tube for separating isotopes is described. A gas mixture containing the isotopic molecules enters the vortex tube under pressure and is separated into a hot discharge flow stream and a cold discharge flow stream. The hot discharge is enriched in lighter isotopic molecules whereas the cold discharge flow stream is enriched in the heavier isotopic molecules. The vortex tube can be used in a single stage or multistage isotope separation apparatus

  14. The chlorine isotope fingerprint of the lunar magma ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Jeremy W; Treiman, Allan H; Guan, Yunbin; Ma, Chi; Eiler, John M; Gross, Juliane; Greenwood, James P; Stolper, Edward M

    2015-09-01

    The Moon contains chlorine that is isotopically unlike that of any other body yet studied in the Solar System, an observation that has been interpreted to support traditional models of the formation of a nominally hydrogen-free ("dry") Moon. We have analyzed abundances and isotopic compositions of Cl and H in lunar mare basalts, and find little evidence that anhydrous lava outgassing was important in generating chlorine isotope anomalies, because (37)Cl/(35)Cl ratios are not related to Cl abundance, H abundance, or D/H ratios in a manner consistent with the lava-outgassing hypothesis. Instead, (37)Cl/(35)Cl correlates positively with Cl abundance in apatite, as well as with whole-rock Th abundances and La/Lu ratios, suggesting that the high (37)Cl/(35)Cl in lunar basalts is inherited from urKREEP, the last dregs of the lunar magma ocean. These new data suggest that the high chlorine isotope ratios of lunar basalts result not from the degassing of their lavas but from degassing of the lunar magma ocean early in the Moon's history. Chlorine isotope variability is therefore an indicator of planetary magma ocean degassing, an important stage in the formation of terrestrial planets.

  15. Isotopic tracing of perchlorate in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturchio, Neil C.; Böhlke, John Karl; Gu, Baohua; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Jackson, W. Andrew; Baskaran, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Isotopic measurements can be used for tracing the sources and behavior of environmental contaminants. Perchlorate (ClO 4 − ) has been detected widely in groundwater, soils, fertilizers, plants, milk, and human urine since 1997, when improved analytical methods for analyzing ClO 4 −concentration became available for routine use. Perchlorate ingestion poses a risk to human health because of its interference with thyroidal hormone production. Consequently, methods for isotopic analysis of ClO 4 − have been developed and applied to assist evaluation of the origin and migration of this common contaminant. Isotopic data are now available for stable isotopes of oxygen and chlorine, as well as 36Cl isotopic abundances, in ClO 4 − samples from a variety of natural and synthetic sources. These isotopic data provide a basis for distinguishing sources of ClO 4 − found in the environment, and for understanding the origin of natural ClO 4 − . In addition, the isotope effects of microbial ClO 4 − reduction have been measured in laboratory and field experiments, providing a tool for assessing ClO 4 − attenuation in the environment. Isotopic data have been used successfully in some areas for identifying major sources of ClO 4 − contamination in drinking water supplies. Questions about the origin and global biogeochemical cycle of natural ClO 4 − remain to be addressed; such work would benefit from the development of methods for preparation and isotopic analysis of ClO 4 − in samples with low concentrations and complex matrices.

  16. Stable isotope ratio measurements in hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen using Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harney, R.C.; Bloom, S.D.; Milanovich, F.P.

    1975-01-01

    A method for measuring stable isotope ratios using laser Raman scattering was developed which may prove of significant utility and benefit in stable isotope tracer studies. Crude isotope ratio measurements obtained with a low-power laser indicate that with current technology it should be possible to construct an isotope ratio measurement system using laser Raman scattering that is capable of performing 0.1 percent accuracy isotope ratio measurements of 16 O/ 18 O in natural abundance oxygen gas or 14 N/ 15 N in natural abundance nitrogen gas in times less than two minutes per sample. Theory pertinent to the technique, designs of specific isotope ratio spectrometer systems, and data relating to isotope ratio measurements in hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen are presented. In addition, the current status of several studies utilizing this technique is discussed. (auth)

  17. Oxygen abundances in halo stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessell, Michael S.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Ruan, Kui

    1991-12-01

    The present study determines the oxygen abundance for a sample of metal-poor G dwarfs by analysis of OH lines between 3080 and 3200 A and the permitted high-excitation far-red O I triple. The oxygen abundances determined from the low-excitation OH lines are up to 0.55 dex lower than those measured from the high-excitation O I lines. The abundances for the far-red O I triplet lines agree with those rederived from Abia and Rebolo (1989), and the abundances from the OH lines in dwarfs and giants are in agreement with the rederived O abundances of Barbuy (1988) and others from the forbidden resonance O I line. Because the chi = 0.1.7 eV OH lines are formed in the same layers as the majority of Fe, Ti, and other neutral metal lines used for abundance analyses, it is argued that the OH lines and the forbidden O I line yield the true oxygen abundances relative to the metals.

  18. (32)S/(33)S abundance as a function of galactocentric radius in the Milky Way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhouse, M.A.; Thronson, H.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Astration of heavy elements by the stars of the Milky Way forms a fossil record which may preserve spacial distribution of the mass function for the stars in the galaxy. Sulfur is among the last common element for which the relative abundance of its various isotopes have yet to be completely measured within our galaxy. Explosive oxygen burning in massive stars is thought to be the process which dominates sulfur production within stars. There models predict that the various isotopes (S-32, S-33, S-34) are formed in relative abundance which depend strongly upon the mass of the parent star. This relative abundance is thought to be unaffected by subsequent stellar procesing since all important sinks of sulfur destroy it without regard for isotopic form. Hence the spacial variation of the mass function (MF) can be studied by measuring the abundance variation of sulfur isotopes in the galaxy provided that the product yields for these isotopes are known accurately as a function of stellar mass

  19. The use of electrolysis for accurate delta O-17 and delta O-18 isotope measurements in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, HAJ; Li, WJ

    1998-01-01

    We present a new system to measure the relative isotopic abundances of both rare isotopes of oxygen in water. Using electrolysis with CuSO4 as electrolyte, water is transformed into oxygen gas. This gas is subsequently analyzed with a standard Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer. We investigated the

  20. Isotopic variations in primitive meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, R.N.; Chicago Univ., IL; Chicago Univ., IL

    1981-01-01

    The presence of large internal 16 O variability in ordinary chondrites greatly extends the range of meteorite types in which this phenomenon has been observed. These results may lead to identification of major gas and dust reservoirs in the cloud from which the Solar System formed. The demonstration that live 107 Pd was present in the differentiated parent bodies of some iron meteorites supports the million year time scale between a major nucleosynthetic event and Solar System formation, as implied by the presence of live 26 Al in carbonaceous chondrites. However, the variability of radiogenic 26 Mg abundances in these meteorites makes it clear that the data cannot be interpreted simply in terms of time variations. Models of nucleosynthesis for elements from calcium to the iron peak should be aided by the new observations of abundances of titanium isotopes. Progress has been made in establishing the carrier phases of isotopically anomalous xenon and krypton. The apparent location of anomalous xenon and 14 N-rich nitrogen in identical carriers supports the notion that nucleosynthetic anomalies in nitrogen are also present in Allende. (author)

  1. Isotopic homogeneity of iron in the early solar nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X K; Guo, Y; O'Nions, R K; Young, E D; Ash, R D

    2001-07-19

    The chemical and isotopic homogeneity of the early solar nebula, and the processes producing fractionation during its evolution, are central issues of cosmochemistry. Studies of the relative abundance variations of three or more isotopes of an element can in principle determine if the initial reservoir of material was a homogeneous mixture or if it contained several distinct sources of precursor material. For example, widespread anomalies observed in the oxygen isotopes of meteorites have been interpreted as resulting from the mixing of a solid phase that was enriched in 16O with a gas phase in which 16O was depleted, or as an isotopic 'memory' of Galactic evolution. In either case, these anomalies are regarded as strong evidence that the early solar nebula was not initially homogeneous. Here we present measurements of the relative abundances of three iron isotopes in meteoritic and terrestrial samples. We show that significant variations of iron isotopes exist in both terrestrial and extraterrestrial materials. But when plotted in a three-isotope diagram, all of the data for these Solar System materials fall on a single mass-fractionation line, showing that homogenization of iron isotopes occurred in the solar nebula before both planetesimal accretion and chondrule formation.

  2. Following Carbon Isotopes from Methane to Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, K. H.

    2017-12-01

    Continuous-flow methods introduced by Hayes (Matthews and Hayes, 1978; Freeman et al., 1990; Hayes et al., 1990) for compound-specific isotope analyses (CSIA) transformed how we study the origins and fates of organic compounds. This analytical revolution launched several decades of research in which researchers connect individual molecular structures to diverse environmental and climate processes affecting their isotopic profiles. Among the first applications, and one of the more dramatic isotopically, was tracing the flow of natural methane into cellular carbon and cellular biochemical constituents. Microbial oxidation of methane can be tracked by strongly 13C-depleted organic carbon in early Earth sedimentary environments, in marine and lake-derived biomarkers in oils, and in modern organisms and their environments. These signatures constrain microbial carbon cycling and inform our understanding of ocean redox. The measurement of molecular isotopes has jumped forward once again, and it is now possible to determine isotope abundances at specific positions within increasingly complex organic structures. In addition, recent analytical developments have lowered sample sensitivity limits of CSIA to picomole levels. These new tools have opened new ways to measure methane carbon in the natural environment and within biochemical pathways. This talk will highlight how molecular isotope methods enable us to follow the fate of methane carbon in complex environments and along diverse metabolic pathways, from trace fluids to specific carbon positions within microbial biomarkers.

  3. Neodymium isotopic variations in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepgras, D.J.; Wasserburg, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    New data for the direct measurement of the isotopic composition of neodymium in Atlantic Ocean seawater are compared with previous measurements of Pacific Ocean seawater and ferromanganese sediments from major ocean basins. Data for Atlantic seawater are in excellent agreement with Nd isotopic measurements made on Atlantic ferromanganese sediments and are distinctly different from the observed compositions of Pacific samples. These results clearly demonstrate the existence of distinctive differences in the isotopic composition of Nd in the waters of the major ocean basins and are characteristic of the ocean basin sampled. The average epsilonsub(N)sub(d)(0) values for the major oceans as determined by data from seawater and ferromanganese sediments are as follows: Atlantic Ocean, epsilonsub(N)sub(d)(0) approx. equal to - 12 +- 2; Indian Ocean, epsilonsub(N)sub(d)(0) approx. equal to - 8 +- 2; Pacific Ocean, epsilonsub(N)sub(d)(0) approx. equal to -3 +- 2. These values are considerably less than epsilonsub(N)sub(d)(0) value sources with oceanic mantle affinities indicating that the REE in the oceans are dominated by continental sources. The difference in the absolute abundance of 143 Nd between the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans corresponds to approx. 10 6 atoms 143 Nd per gram of seawater. The correspondence between the 143 Nd/ 144 Nd in seawater and in the associated sediments suggests the possible application of this approach to paleo-oceanography. (orig./HAE)

  4. Spectral unmixing: estimating partial abundances

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available techniques is complicated when considering very similar spectral signatures. Iron-bearing oxide/hydroxide/sulfate minerals have similar spectral signatures. The study focuses on how could estimates of abundances of spectrally similar iron-bearing oxide...

  5. Ammonia abundances in four comets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickoff, S.; Tegler, S.C.; Engel, L.

    1991-01-01

    NH2 emission band strengths were measured in four comets and the NH2 column densities were determined in order to measure the ammonia content of the comets. The mean ammonia/water abundance ratio derived for the four comets is found to be 0.13 + or - 0.06 percent, with no significant variation among the comets. The uniformity of this abundance attests to a remarkable degree of chemical homogeneity over large scales in the comet-forming region of the primordial solar nebula, and contrasts with the CO abundance variations found previously in comets. The N2 and NH3 abundances indicate a condensation temperature in the range 20-160 K, consistent with virtually all comet formation hypotheses. 64 refs

  6. Magellanic Clouds Cepheids: Thorium Abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeuncheol Jeong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the high-resolution spectra of 31 Magellanic Clouds Cepheid variables enabled the identification of thorium lines. The abundances of thorium were found with spectrum synthesis method. The calculated thorium abundances exhibit correlations with the abundances of other chemical elements and atmospheric parameters of the program stars. These correlations are similar for both Clouds. The correlations of iron abundances of thorium, europium, neodymium, and yttrium relative to the pulsational periods are different in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC, namely the correlations are negative for LMC and positive or close to zero for SMC. One of the possible explanations can be the higher activity of nucleosynthesis in SMC with respect to LMC in the recent several hundred million years.

  7. NEFSC Survey Indices of Abundance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Northeast Fisheries Survey Bottom trawl survey indices of abundance such as stratified mean number per tow or mean weight per tow by species stock. Includes indices...

  8. Isotope puzzle in sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Liping

    1998-01-01

    Mechanisms affecting multicomponent material sputtering are complex. Isotope sputtering is the simplest in the multicomponent materials sputtering. Although only mass effect plays a dominant role in the isotope sputtering, there is still an isotope puzzle in sputtering by ion bombardment. The major arguments are as follows: (1) At the zero fluence, is the isotope enrichment ejection-angle-independent or ejection-angle-dependent? (2) Is the isotope angular effect the primary or the secondary sputter effect? (3) How to understand the action of momentum asymmetry in collision cascade on the isotope sputtering?

  9. Carbon Isotope Chemistry in Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Amy N.; Willacy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Few details of carbon isotope chemistry are known, especially the chemical processes that occur in astronomical environments like molecular clouds. Observational evidence shows that the C-12/C-13 abundance ratios vary due to the location of the C-13 atom within the molecular structure. The different abundances are a result of the diverse formation pathways that can occur. Modeling can be used to explore the production pathways of carbon molecules in an effort to understand and explain the chemical evolution of molecular clouds.

  10. Isotope resolution of the iron peak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henke, R.P.; Benton, E.V.

    1977-01-01

    A stack of Lexan detectors from the Apollo 17 mission has been analyzed to obtain Z measurements of sufficient accuracy to resolve the iron peak into its isotopic components. Within this distribution several peaks are present. With the centrally located, most populated peak assumed to be 56 Fe, the measurements imply that the abundances of 54 Fe and 58 Fe are appreciable fractions of the 56 Fe abundance. This result is in agreement with those of Webber et al. and Siegman et al. but in disagreement with the predictions of Tsao et al. (Auth.)

  11. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  12. Simulating Isotope Enrichment by Gaseous Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Cameron

    2015-04-01

    A desktop-computer simulation of isotope enrichment by gaseous diffusion has been developed. The simulation incorporates two non-interacting point-mass species whose members pass through a cascade of cells containing porous membranes and retain constant speeds as they reflect off the walls of the cells and the spaces between holes in the membranes. A particular feature is periodic forward recycling of enriched material to cells further along the cascade along with simultaneous return of depleted material to preceding cells. The number of particles, the mass ratio, the initial fractional abundance of the lighter species, and the time between recycling operations can be chosen by the user. The simulation is simple enough to be understood on the basis of two-dimensional kinematics, and demonstrates that the fractional abundance of the lighter-isotope species increases along the cascade. The logic of the simulation will be described and results of some typical runs will be presented and discussed.

  13. Determination of zinc stable isotopes in biological materials using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, K.Y.; Veillon, Claude

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for using isotope dilution to determine both the amount of natural zinc and enriched isotopes of zinc in biological samples. Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry offers a way to quantify not only the natural zinc found in a sample but also the enriched isotope tracers of zinc. Accurate values for the enriched isotopes and natural zinc are obtained by adjusting the mass count rate data for measurable instrumental biases. Analytical interferences from the matrix are avoided by extracting the zinc from the sample matrix using diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate. The extraction technique separates the zinc from elements which form interfering molecular ions at the same nominal masses as the zinc isotopes. Accuracy of the method is verified using standard reference materials. The detection limit is 0.06 μg Zn per sample. Precision of the abundance ratios range from 0.3-0.8%. R.S.D. for natural zinc concentrations is about 200-600 μg g -1 . The accuracy and precision of the measurements make it possible to follow enriched isotopic tracers of zinc in biological samples in metabolic tracer studies. (author). 19 refs.; 1 fig., 4 tabs

  14. A versatile method for simultaneous stable carbon isotope analysis of DNA and RNA nucleotides by liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, T.C.W.; Brasser, J.; de Ruiter, G.; Houtekamer, M.; Bolhuis, H.; Stal, L.J.; Boschker, H.T.S.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALELiquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) is currently the most accurate and precise technique for the measurement of compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios (C-13/C-12) in biological metabolites, at their natural abundance. However, until now this technique

  15. Titanium Isotopes Provide Clues to Lunar Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2012-05-01

    The idea that the Moon formed as the result of the giant impact of a Mars-sized impactor with the still-growing Earth explains two central facts about the Earth-Moon system: its total angular momentum (Earth's spin and the Moon's orbital motion), and the sizes of the metallic cores of the Earth (large) and Moon (tiny). This gives cosmochemists some confidence in the hypothesis, but they would greatly appreciate additional compositional tests. One undisputed point is the identical abundance of the three oxygen isotopes in Earth and Moon. Junjun Zhang and colleagues at the University of Chicago (USA) and the University of Bern (Switzerland) have added another isotopic system to the cosmochemical testing tool kit, titanium isotopes. They find that the ratio of titanium-50 to titanium-47 is identical in Earth and Moon to within four parts per million. In contrast, other solar system materials, such as carbonaceous chondrites, vary by considerably more than this-- up to 150 times as much. The identical oxygen and titanium isotopic compositions in Earth and Moon are surprising in light of what we think we know about planet formation and formation of the Moon after a giant impact. The variations in oxygen and titanium isotopes among meteorite types suggest that it is unlikely that the Moon-forming giant impactor would have had the same isotopic composition as the Earth. Simulations show that the Moon ends up constructed mostly (40-75%) from the impactor materials. Thus, the Moon ought to have different isotopic composition than does Earth. The isotopes might have exchanged in the complicated, messy proto-lunar disk (as has been suggested for oxygen isotopes), making them the same. However, Zhang and colleagues suggest that this exchange is unlikely for a refractory element like titanium. Could the impact simulations be greatly overestimating the contributions from the impactor? Was the mixing of building-block materials throughout the inner solar system much less than

  16. Calcium isotope effects in ion exchange electromigration and calcium isotope analysis by thermo-ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Y.; Hoshi, J.; Iwamoto, H.; Okamoto, M.; Kakihana, H.

    1985-01-01

    Calcium ions were made to electromigrate along a cation exchange membrane. The abundance ratios of the calcium isotopes (Ca-40, 42, 43, 44, 48) in the migrated bands were measured by thermo-ionization mass spectrometry. The lighter isotopes were enriched in the front part of the migrated band. The increments in the isotope abundance ratios were found to be proportional to the mass difference of the isotopes. The observed epsilon-values per unit mass difference (epsilon/ΔM) were 1.26 x 10 -4 (at 20 0 C), 1.85 x 10 -4 (at 25 0 C) and 2.4 x 10 -4 (at 40 0 C). The mass spectrometry was improved by using a low temperature for the evaporation of CaI 2 . (orig.)

  17. Isotopically exchangeable phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, N.O.

    1984-01-01

    A critique revision of isotope dilution is presented. The concepts and use of exchangeable phosphorus, the phosphate adsorption, the kinetics of isotopic exchange and the equilibrium time in soils are discussed. (M.A.C.) [pt

  18. Boron-isotope fractionation in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marentes, E [Univ. of Guelph, Dept. of Horticultural Science, Guelph, Ontario (Canada); Vanderpool, R A [USDA/ARS Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, Grand Forks, North Dakota (United States); Shelp, B J [Univ. of Guelph, Dept. of Horticultural Science, Guelph, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-10-15

    Naturally-occurring variations in the abundance of stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and other elements in plants have been reported and are now used to understand various physiological processes in plants. Boron (B) isotopic variation in several plant species have been documented, but no determination as to whether plants fractionate the stable isotopes of boron, {sup 11}B and {sup 10}B, has been made. Here, we report that plants with differing B requirements (wheat, corn and broccoli) fractionated boron. The whole plant was enriched in {sup 11}B relative to the nutrient solution, and the leaves were enriched in {sup 10}B and the stem in {sup 11}B relative to the xylem sap. Although at present, a mechanistic role for boron in plants is uncertain, potential fractionating mechanisms are discussed. (author)

  19. Boron-isotope fractionation in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marentes, E.; Vanderpool, R.A.; Shelp, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    Naturally-occurring variations in the abundance of stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and other elements in plants have been reported and are now used to understand various physiological processes in plants. Boron (B) isotopic variation in several plant species have been documented, but no determination as to whether plants fractionate the stable isotopes of boron, 11 B and 10 B, has been made. Here, we report that plants with differing B requirements (wheat, corn and broccoli) fractionated boron. The whole plant was enriched in 11 B relative to the nutrient solution, and the leaves were enriched in 10 B and the stem in 11 B relative to the xylem sap. Although at present, a mechanistic role for boron in plants is uncertain, potential fractionating mechanisms are discussed. (author)

  20. Optical isotope shifts for unstable samarium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, D.A.; Walker, P.M.; Griffith, J.A.R.; Evans, D.E.; Grant, I.S.; England, J.G.; Fawcett, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Using a tunable dye laser beam intersecting a thermal atomic beam, optical isotope shifts and hyperfine splittings have been measured for the four unstable samarium isotopes between 144 Sm and 154 Sm, covering the well known transition region from spherical to deformed shapes. (orig.)

  1. Sulphur and lead isotopes in strata-bound deposits, ch. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangster, D.F.

    1976-01-01

    The use of sulphur and lead isotopes as isotopic tracers in the study of ore deposits containing these elements is reviewed. A discussion of the general theory, including abundance and fractionation of sulphur isotopes, single-stage leads, and anomalous leads (two-stage) is given. Attention is paid to sulphur isotopes enclosed in deposits which are located in marine host rocks and in rocks of continental or near-continental origin, as well as in deposits of the conglomerate-U(-Au) type. The lead isotope content of volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits and carbonate-hosted lead-zinc deposits is discussed

  2. Applications of C and N stable isotopes to ecological and environmental studies in seagrass ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepoint, Gilles [Centre MARE, Laboratoire d' Oceanologie, Institut de Chimie, B6, Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium)]. E-mail: g.lepoint@ulg.ac.be; Dauby, Patrick [Centre MARE, Laboratoire d' Oceanologie, Institut de Chimie, B6, Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique, rue Vautier, B1000 Brussels (Belgium); Gobert, Sylvie [Centre MARE, Laboratoire d' Oceanologie, Institut de Chimie, B6, Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2004-12-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen are increasingly used in marine ecosystems, for ecological and environmental studies. Here, we examine some applications of stable isotopes as ecological integrators or tracers in seagrass ecosystem studies. We focus on both the use of natural isotope abundance as food web integrators or environmental tracers and on the use of stable isotopes as experimental tools. As ecosystem integrators, stable isotopes have helped to elucidate the general structure of trophic webs in temperate, Mediterranean and tropical seagrass ecosystems. As environmental tracers, stable isotopes have proven their utility in sewage impact measuring and mapping. However, to make such environmental studies more comprehensible, future works on understanding of basic reasons for variations of N and C stable isotopes in seagrasses should be encouraged. At least, as experimental tracers, stable isotopes allow the study of many aspects of N and C cycles at the scale of a plant or at the scale of the seagrass ecosystem.

  3. Nitrogen abundance in Comet Halley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S.C.; Engel, L.

    1991-01-01

    Data on the nitrogen-containing compounds that observed spectroscopically in the coma of Comet Halley are summarized, and the elemental abundance of nitrogen in the Comet Halley nucleus is derived. It is found that 90 percent of elemental nitrogen is in the dust fraction of the coma, while in the gas fraction, most of the nitrogen is contained in NH3 and CN. The elemental nitrogen abundance in the ice component of the nucleus was found to be deficient by a factor of about 75, relative to the solar photosphere, indicating that the chemical partitioning of N2 into NH3 and other nitrogen compounds during the evolution of the solar nebula cannot account completely for the low abundance ratio N2/NH3 = 0.1, observed in the comet. It is suggested that the low N2/NH3 ratio in Comet Halley may be explained simply by physical fractionation and/or thermal diffusion. 88 refs

  4. Abundances in field dwarf stars. II. Carbon and nitrogen abundances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laird, J.B.

    1985-02-15

    Intermediate-dispersion spectra of 116 field dwarf stars, plus 10 faint field giants and 3 Hyades dwarfs, have been used to derive carbon and nitrogen abundances relative to iron. The program sample includes both disk and halo stars, spanning a range in (Fe/H) of +0.50 to -2.45. Synthetic spectra of CH and NH bands have been used to determine carbon and nitrogen abundances. The C/Fe ratio is solar over the range of metallicity studied, with an estimated intrinsic scatter of 0.10 dex. Down to (Fe/H)roughly-equal-1.8, below which the nitrogen abundance could not be measured, the N/Fe ratio is also constant for the majority of stars, indicating that nitrogen production is largely primary. Four halo stars are found to be enhanced in nitrogen relative to iron, by factors between 5 and 50, although their carbon abundances appear to be normal. These results are discussed in connection with the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the sites of C, N, and Fe nucleosynthesis. The results require that C, N, and Fe be produced in stars of similar mass. Our current understanding of N production, then, implies that most Type I supernovae have intermediate-mass progenitors. The nitrogen in the N-enhanced halo stars is very probably primordial, indicating that the interstellar medium at early epochs contained substantial inhomogeneities.

  5. Abundances in field dwarf stars. II. Carbon and nitrogen abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laird, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Intermediate-dispersion spectra of 116 field dwarf stars, plus 10 faint field giants and 3 Hyades dwarfs, have been used to derive carbon and nitrogen abundances relative to iron. The program sample includes both disk and halo stars, spanning a range in [Fe/H] of +0.50 to -2.45. Synthetic spectra of CH and NH bands have been used to determine carbon and nitrogen abundances. The C/Fe ratio is solar over the range of metallicity studied, with an estimated intrinsic scatter of 0.10 dex. Down to [Fe/H]roughly-equal-1.8, below which the nitrogen abundance could not be measured, the N/Fe ratio is also constant for the majority of stars, indicating that nitrogen production is largely primary. Four halo stars are found to be enhanced in nitrogen relative to iron, by factors between 5 and 50, although their carbon abundances appear to be normal. These results are discussed in connection with the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the sites of C, N, and Fe nucleosynthesis. The results require that C, N, and Fe be produced in stars of similar mass. Our current understanding of N production, then, implies that most Type I supernovae have intermediate-mass progenitors. The nitrogen in the N-enhanced halo stars is very probably primordial, indicating that the interstellar medium at early epochs contained substantial inhomogeneities

  6. Effect of the magnetic isotope of magnesium, 25Mg, on post-radiation recovery of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grodzinskij, D.M.; Evstyukhina, T.A.; Kol'tover, V.K.; Korolev, V.G.; Kutlakhmedov, Yu.A.; Grodzinskij, D.M.; Evstyukhina, T.A.; Kol'tover, V.K.; Korolev, V.G.; Kutlakhmedov, Yu.A.; Grodzinskij, D.M.; Evstyukhina, T.A.; Kol'tover, V.K.; Korolev, V.G.; Kutlakhmedov, Yu.A.

    2011-01-01

    Among three stable magnesium isotopes, 24 Mg, 25 Mg, and 26 Mg with natural abundance 79, 10, and 11%, only 25 Mg has the nuclear spin (I=5/2) and, therefore, the nuclear magnetic moment. Two other isotopes are spinless (I=0) and, hence, have no magnetic moment. We have revealed that magnetic isotope 25 Mg, by comparison to nonmagnetic isotope 24 Mg, essentially stimulates the recovery process in the yeast cells, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, after UV irradiation. Thus, we have first documented the magnetic isotope effect in radiation biology. This finding opens up the way to the development of novel radio-protectors based on the stable magnetic isotopes.

  7. Process for separating U isotopes by infrared excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.K.; Kaldor, Andrew.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns a process for separating a substance into at least two parts in which the isotopic abundances of a given element differ from those of the isotopes of the substance prior to separation. Specifically, the invention concerns a process for the selective excitation of the isotopes of a gaseous phase UF 6 by absorption of infra-red photons, then by selective reaction of UF 6 excited with atomics chlorine, bromine or iodine, forming a product that may be separated by a standard method. The preference criteria of the atomic chlorine, bromine and iodine are related to the thermal dilution problem [fr

  8. Evolution of massive stars with mass loss: surface abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greggio, L.

    1984-01-01

    The location of theoretical stellar models in the upper part of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram depends on a variety of poorly understood physical processes which may occur during the evolution of massive stars. The comparison between theoretical predictions and observations of the surface chemical composition of these objects can help in understanding their evolution and to set more stringent limits to the mentioned parameters. To this end, evolutionary sequences corresponding to 20, 40 and 60 solar masses have been computed up to core He exhaustion, following in detail the abundance variations of CNO, Ne and Mg isotopes. (Auth.)

  9. Calculation of relativistic and isotope shifts in Mg I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berengut, J.C.; Flambaum, V.V.; Kozlov, M.G.

    2005-01-01

    We present an ab initio method of calculation of the isotope and relativistic shifts in atoms with a few valence electrons. It is based on an energy calculation involving the combination of the configuration-interaction method and many-body perturbation theory. This work is motivated by analyses of quasar absorption spectra that suggest that the fine-structure constant α was smaller at an early epoch. Relativistic shifts are needed to measure this variation of α, while isotope shifts are needed to resolve systematic effects in this study. The isotope shifts can also be used to measure isotopic abundances in gas clouds in the early universe, which are needed to study nuclear reactions in stars and supernovae and test models of chemical evolution. This paper shows that the isotope shift in magnesium can be calculated to very high precision using our method

  10. Isotopes as Tracers of the Hawaiian Coffee-Producing Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Green coffee bean isotopes have been used to trace the effects of different climatic and geological characteristics associated with the Hawaii islands. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry ((MC)-ICP-SFMS and ICP-QMS) were applied to determine the isotopic composition of carbon (δ13C), nitrogen (δ15N), sulfur (δ34S), and oxygen (δ18O), the isotope abundance of strontium (87Sr/86Sr), and the concentrations of 30 different elements in 47 green coffees. The coffees were produced in five Hawaii regions: Hawaii, Kauai, Maui, Molokai, and Oahu. Results indicate that coffee plant seed isotopes reflect interactions between the coffee plant and the local environment. Accordingly, the obtained analytical fingerprinting could be used to discriminate between the different Hawaii regions studied. PMID:21838232

  11. Application of Stable Isotope Signatures in Food Traceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaratul Ashifa Abdullah Salim; Roslanzairi Mostapha; Zainon Othman; Nor Afiqah Harun; Mohd Suhaimi Hamzah; Shamsiah Abdul Rahman; Md Suhaimi Elias; Salmah Moosa

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis has widely been used to trace the origin of organic materials in various fields, such as geochemistry, biochemistry, archaeology and petroleum. In past a decade, it has also become an important tool for food traceability study. The globalization of food markets and the relative ease with which food commodities are transported through and between countries and continents, means that consumers are increasingly concerned about the origin of the foods they eat. The natural abundance isotope variation such as carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen and oxygen are use as geographic tracers or marker to determine the geographic origin of fruits, crop, vegetables and food products from animal. The isotopic compositions of plant materials reflect various factors such as isotopic compositions of source materials and their assimilation processes as well as growth environments. This paper will discuss on stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions in rice, advantages, limitations and potential of other analysis applications that can be incorporated in food traceability system. (author)

  12. The use of stable isotopes in medicinal chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliday, D.; Thompson, G.N.

    1988-01-01

    Stable isotopes have been employed increasingly as tracers over the last decade both to provide the clinician with the opportunity to broaden, in a quantitative manner, discrete areas of diagnosis and research, and the clinical chemist with definitive methodology for specific analyte analysis. These non-radioactive 'heavy' isotopes contain one or more extra neutrons in the nucleus compared with their more abundant 'lighter' analogues. Impetus in the application of stable isotopes for in vivo studies has come from an increased awareness of the possible harmful effects in the use of radionuclides, and a realisation of several positive advantages conferred by the use of stable isotopes in their own right - certain elements of clinical importance (especially nitrogen) lack a useable radio-nuclide equivalent; use of a 'cocktail' of stable isotopes permits a range of studies to be performed in the same patient simultaneously and, within specific constraints, serial studies can be performed in the same patients. (author)

  13. Isotopic Discrimination During Leaf Litter Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngao, J.; Rubino, M.

    2006-12-01

    Methods involving stable isotopes have been successfully applied since decades in various research fields. Tracing 13C natural abundance in ecosystem compartments greatly enhanced the understanding of the C fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere C exchanges when compartments present different C isotopic signatures (i.e. atmospheric CO2 vs photosynthetic leaves, C3 vs C4; etc.). However, the assumption that no isotopic discrimination occurs during respiration is commonly made in numbers of C isotope-based ecological studies. Furthermore, verifications of such assumption are sparse and not enough reliable. The aim of our study is to assess the potential isotopic discrimination that may occur during litter decomposition. Leaf litter from an Arbutus unedo (L.) stand (Tolfa, Italy) was incubated in 1L jars, under constant laboratory conditions (i.e. 25 ° C and 135% WC). During the entire incubation period, gravimetric mass loss, litter respiration rates and the isotopic composition of respired CO2 are monitored at regular intervals. Data from 7 months of incubation will be presented and discussed. After two months, the litter mass loss averaged 16% of initial dry mass. During the same time-period, the respiration rate decreased significantly by 58% of the initial respiration rate. Isotopic compositions of respired CO2 ranged between -27.95‰ and - 25.69‰. Mean values did not differ significantly among the sampling days, in spite of an apparent enrichment in 13C of respired CO2 with time. The significance of these isotopic enrichment will be determined at a longer time scale. They may reveal both/either a direct microbial discrimination during respiration processes and/or a use of different litter compounds as C source along time. Further chemical and compound-specific isotopic analysis of dry matter will be performed in order to clarify these hypotheses. This work is part of the "ALICE" project, funded by the European Union's Marie Curie Fellowship Actions that aims to

  14. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  15. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  16. Special features of the isotope ratio determination using mass-spectrometer with induction-bound plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, A.I.; Ramendik, G.I.; Fatyushina, E.V.

    2000-01-01

    The origin of the errors arising upon measuring relative abundance of Nd, Yb, and Gd isotopes on a HP-4500 mass-spectrometer (USA) is studied. It is shown that the main origin of the error is the different sensitivity of the mass-spectrometer to ions of different masses. Optimal content of the elements in the solutions is established upon determination of their isotopic abundance [ru

  17. Chinook Abundance - Point Features [ds180

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  18. Steelhead Abundance - Linear Features [ds185

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  19. Steelhead Abundance - Point Features [ds184

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  20. Coho Abundance - Linear Features [ds183

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  1. Coho Abundance - Point Features [ds182

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  2. EQUILIBRIUM AND KINETIC NITROGEN AND OXYGEN-ISOTOPE FRACTIONATIONS BETWEEN DISSOLVED AND GASEOUS N2O

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    INOUE, HY; MOOK, WG

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the equilibrium as well as kinetic stable nitrogen and oxygen isotope fractionations between aqueous dissolved and gaseous N2O. The equilibrium fractionations, defined as the ratio of the isotopic abundance ratios (15R and 18R, respectively) of gaseous and

  3. Determination of lead isotopes in Arctic and Antarctic snow and ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosman, K.J.R.; Chisholm, W.

    1994-01-01

    The development of high sensitivity mass spectrometry to measure Pb isotopes in Arctic and Antarctic snow and ice has provided a powerful tool for identifying sources of global Pb pollution. The combination of isotope abundance information with concentration measurements adds another dimension to analytical chemistry. (authors). 11 refs., 4 figs

  4. Abundance estimation and conservation biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J.D.; MacKenzie, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001). The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959) and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965) open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992), and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993). However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001). The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004) is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004) emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004) also suggest that our attention

  5. Abundance estimation and Conservation Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichols, J. D.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001. The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959 and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965 open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992, and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993. However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001. The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004 is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004 emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004 also suggest that

  6. Ultrahigh thermal conductivity of isotopically enriched silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyushkin, Alexander V.; Taldenkov, Alexander N.; Ager, Joel W.; Haller, Eugene E.; Riemann, Helge; Abrosimov, Nikolay V.; Pohl, Hans-Joachim; Becker, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Most of the stable elements have two and more stable isotopes. The physical properties of materials composed of such elements depend on the isotopic abundance to some extent. A remarkably strong isotope effect is observed in the phonon thermal conductivity, the principal mechanism of heat conduction in nonmetallic crystals. An isotopic disorder due to random distribution of the isotopes in the crystal lattice sites results in a rather strong phonon scattering and, consequently, in a reduction of thermal conductivity. In this paper, we present new results of accurate and precise measurements of thermal conductivity κ(T) for silicon single crystals having three different isotopic compositions at temperatures T from 2.4 to 420 K. The highly enriched crystal containing 99.995% of 28Si, which is one of the most perfect crystals ever synthesized, demonstrates a thermal conductivity of about 450 ± 10 W cm-1 K-1 at 24 K, the highest measured value among bulk dielectrics, which is ten times greater than the one for its counterpart natSi with the natural isotopic constitution. For highly enriched crystal 28Si and crystal natSi, the measurements were performed for two orientations [001] and [011], a magnitude of the phonon focusing effect on thermal conductivity was determined accurately at low temperatures. The anisotropy of thermal conductivity disappears above 31 K. The influence of the boundary scattering on thermal conductivity persists sizable up to much higher temperatures (˜80 K). The κ(T) measured in this work gives the most accurate approximation of the intrinsic thermal conductivity of single crystal silicon which is determined solely by the anharmonic phonon processes and diffusive boundary scattering over a wide temperature range.

  7. Process for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emile, B.F.M.

    1983-11-01

    A process is claimed for isotopic separation applied to isotopes of elements that can be placed in at least a physicochemical form in which the isotopic atoms or the molecules containing these atoms can be easily displaced and for which there are selective radiations preferentially absorbed by the isotopes of a certain type or by the molecules containing them, said absorption substantially increasing the probability of ionization of said atoms or molecules relative to the atoms or molecules that did not absorb the radiation. The process consists of placing the isotopic mixture in such a form, subjecting it in a separation zone to selective radiations and to an electrical field that produces migration of positive ions toward the negative electrodes and negative ions toward the positive electrodes, and withdrawing from certain such zones the fractions thus enriched in certain isotopes

  8. HNCO ABUNDANCES IN GALAXIES: TRACING THE EVOLUTIONARY STATE OF STARBURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Sergio; Martin-Pintado, J.; Mauersberger, R.

    2009-01-01

    The chemistry in the central regions of galaxies is expected to be strongly influenced by their nuclear activity. To find the best tracers of nuclear activity is of key importance to understand the processes taking place in the most obscured regions of galactic nuclei. In this work, we present multiline observations of CS, C 34 S, HNCO, and C 18 O in a sample of 11 bright galaxies prototypical for different types of activity. The 32 S/ 34 S isotopic ratio is ∼10, supporting the idea of an isotopical 34 S enrichment due to massive star formation in the nuclear regions of galaxies. Although C 32 S and C 34 S do not seem to be significantly affected by the activity type, the HNCO abundance appears highly contrasted among starbursts (SBs). We observed HNCO abundance variations of nearly 2 orders of magnitude. The HNCO molecule is shown to be a good tracer of the amount of molecular material fueling the SB and therefore can be used as a diagnostics of the evolutionary state of a nuclear SB.

  9. MULTIPLE ORIGINS OF NITROGEN ISOTOPIC ANOMALIES IN METEORITES AND COMETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleon, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    Isotopic fractionation and mixing calculations compared with coupled hydrogen and nitrogen isotopic composition of organic molecules from primitive chondrites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), and comets C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and 81P/Wild2 reveal that meteoritic and cometary organic matter contains three different isotopic components of different origins. (1) A major component of carbonaceous chondrites, IDPs, and comets Hale-Bopp and Wild2 shows correlated H and N isotopic compositions attributable to isotope exchange between an organic matter of solar composition and a reservoir formed by ion-molecule reactions at T 15 N-rich component having identical 15 N and D enrichments relative to the protosolar gas. Temperatures > 100 K deduced from the low D/H ratio and an anti-correlation between the abundance of this component and meteoritic age indicate a late origin in the solar protoplanetary disk. N 2 self-shielding and the non-thermal nucleosynthesis of 15 N upon irradiation are possible but unlikely sources of this component, and a chemical origin is preferred. (3) An interstellar component with highly fractionated hydrogen isotopes and unfractionated nitrogen isotopes is present in ordinary chondrites. A dominantly solar origin of D and 15 N excesses in primitive solar system bodies shows that isotopic anomalies do not necessarily fingerprint an interstellar origin and implies that only a very small fraction of volatile interstellar matter survived the events of solar system formation.

  10. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2009-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeolimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteroic waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 56 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2014-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author)

  12. Stable isotope geochemistry: definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2015-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author).

  13. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2012-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 89 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2008-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeolimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteroic waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 56 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2009-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeolimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteroic waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 56 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2016-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author).

  17. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2013-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 91 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schumacher, M.; Werner, R. A.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Brand, W. A.; Geilmann, H.; Neubert, R. E. M.; Kaiser, J.; Jansen, Henk G.

    2011-01-01

    For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (C-13 and O-18) abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the delta O-18

  19. Systematics of new isotopic production cross sections from neon projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.X.; Guzik, T.G.; McMahon, M.; Wefel, J.P.; Flores, I.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Tull, C.E.; Mitchell, J.W.; Cronqvist, M.; Crawford, H.J.

    1996-02-01

    New isotopic production cross sections from 22 Ne projectiles at 377,581 and 891 MeV/nucleon in a liquid hydrogen target have been measured. These data allow to investigate the projectile energy and nuclear composition dependence of the cross sections. The comparisons between data and predictions can have important consequences in source abundance investigations. (K.A.)

  20. Systematics of new isotopic production cross sections from neon projectiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C X; Guzik, T G; McMahon, M; Wefel, J P [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Flores, I; Lindstrom, P J; Tull, C E [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Mitchell, J W [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Cronqvist, M; Crawford, H J [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Space Sciences Lab.; and others

    1996-02-01

    New isotopic production cross sections from {sup 22}Ne projectiles at 377,581 and 891 MeV/nucleon in a liquid hydrogen target have been measured. These data allow to investigate the projectile energy and nuclear composition dependence of the cross sections. The comparisons between data and predictions can have important consequences in source abundance investigations. (K.A.). 9 refs.

  1. Isotopic marking and tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, F.

    1997-01-01

    The use of radioactive isotopes as tracers in biology has been developed thanks to the economic generation of the required isotopes in accelerators and nuclear reactors, and to the multiple applications of tracers in the life domain; the most usual isotopes employed in biology are carbon, hydrogen, phosphorus and sulfur isotopes, because these elements are present in most of organic molecules. Most of the life science knowledge appears to be dependent to the extensive use of nuclear tools and radioactive tracers; the example of the utilization of radioactive phosphorus marked ATP to study the multiple reactions with proteins, nucleic acids, etc., is given

  2. Isotopes in oxidation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, R.

    1976-01-01

    The use of isotopes in the study of organic oxidation mechanisms is discussed. The help provided by tracer studies to demonstrate the two-equivalent path - hydride transfer, is illustrated by the examples of carbonium oxidants and the Wacker reaction. The role of kinetic isotope effects in the study of the scission of carbon-hydrogen bonds is illustrated by hydride abstraction, hydrogen atom abstraction, proton abstraction and quantum mechanical tunnelling. Isotopic studies on the oxidation of alcohols, carbonyl compounds, amines and hydrocarbons are discussed. The role of isotopes in the study of biochemical oxidation is illustrated with a discussion on nicotinamide and flavin coenzymes. (B.R.H.)

  3. Precise and accurate isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J S; Dietze, H J

    2000-09-01

    The precise and accurate determination of isotope ratios by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) is important for quite different application fields (e.g. for isotope ratio measurements of stable isotopes in nature, especially for the investigation of isotope variation in nature or age dating, for determining isotope ratios of radiogenic elements in the nuclear industry, quality assurance of fuel material, for reprocessing plants, nuclear material accounting and radioactive waste control, for tracer experiments using stable isotopes or long-lived radionuclides in biological or medical studies). Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), which used to be the dominant analytical technique for precise isotope ratio measurements, is being increasingly replaced for isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS due to its excellent sensitivity, precision and good accuracy. Instrumental progress in ICP-MS was achieved by the introduction of the collision cell interface in order to dissociate many disturbing argon-based molecular ions, thermalize the ions and neutralize the disturbing argon ions of plasma gas (Ar+). The application of the collision cell in ICP-QMS results in a higher ion transmission, improved sensitivity and better precision of isotope ratio measurements compared to quadrupole ICP-MS without the collision cell [e.g., for 235U/238U approximately 1 (10 microg x L(-1) uranium) 0.07% relative standard deviation (RSD) vs. 0.2% RSD in short-term measurements (n = 5)]. A significant instrumental improvement for ICP-MS is the multicollector device (MC-ICP-MS) in order to obtain a better precision of isotope ratio measurements (with a precision of up to 0.002%, RSD). CE- and HPLC-ICP-MS are used for the separation of isobaric interferences of long-lived radionuclides and stable isotopes by determination of spallation nuclide abundances in an irradiated tantalum target.

  4. Soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics determined by stable isotope techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerzabek, M. H.

    1998-09-01

    Being aware of limitations and possible bias the 13 C natural abundance technique using the different 13 C enrichments in plants with differing photosynthetic pathways in a powerful tool to quantify turnover processes, both in long-term field studies and short-term laboratory experiments. Special care is needed in choosing reference plots and the proper number of replicate samples. The combination of 13 C and 14 C measurements has a high potential for a further improvement of isotope techniques in SOM studies. Natural abundance of 15 N is less powerful with respect to quantification of SOM processes than the isotope dilution technique. However its usefulness could be distinctly improved by introducing other stable isotopes into the studies.(author)

  5. Optimal sample to tracer ratio for isotope dilution mass spectrometry: the polyisotopic case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laszlo, G.; Ridder, P. de; Goldman, A.; Cappis, J.; Bievre, P. de

    1991-01-01

    The Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) measurement technique provides a means for determining the unknown amount of various isotopes of an element in a sample solution of known mass. The sample solution is mixed with an auxiliary solution, or tracer, containing a known amount of the same element having the same isotopes but of different relative abundances or isotopic composition and the induced change in the isotopic composition measured by isotope mass spectrometry. The technique involves the measurement of the abundance ratio of each isotope to a (same) reference isotope in the sample solution, in the tracer solution and in the blend of the sample and tracer solution. These isotope ratio measurements, the known element amount in the tracer and the known mass of sample solution are used to calculate the unknown amount of one isotope in the sample solution. Subsequently the unknown amount of element is determined. The purpose of this paper is to examine the optimization of the ratio of the estimated unknown amount of element in the sample solution to the known amount of element in the tracer solution in order to minimize the relative uncertainty in the determination of the unknown amount of element

  6. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  7. Discovery of the iron isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuh, A.; Fritsch, A.; Heim, M.; Shore, A.; Thoennessen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-eight iron isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  8. Discovery of the silver isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuh, A.; Fritsch, A.; Ginepro, J.Q.; Heim, M.; Shore, A.; Thoennessen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-eight silver isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  9. Discovery of the cadmium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, S.; Thoennessen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-seven cadmium isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  10. Krypton isotope analysis using near-resonant stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, C.A.; Cannon, B.D.; Wacker, J.F.

    1994-12-01

    A method for measuring low relative abundances of 85 Kr in one liter or less samples of air has been under development here at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of the Krypton Isotope Laser Analysis (KILA) method is to measure ratios of 10 -10 or less of 85 Kr to more abundant stable krypton. Mass spectrometry and beta counting are the main competing technologies used in rare-gas trace analysis and are limited in application by such factors as sample size, counting times, and selectivity. The use of high-resolution lasers to probe hyperfine levels to determine isotopic abundance has received much attention recently. In this study, we report our progress on identifying and implementing techniques for trace 85 Kr analysis on small gas samples in a static cell as well as limitations on sensitivity and selectivity for the technique. High-resolution pulsed and cw lasers are employed in a laser-induced fluorescence technique that preserves the original sample. This technique, is based on resonant isotopic depletion spectroscopy (RIDS) in which one isotope is optically depleted while preserving the population of a less abundant isotope. The KILA method consists of three steps. In the first step, the 1s 5 metastable level of krypton is populated via radiative cascade following two-photon excitation of the 2p 6 energy level. Next, using RBDS, the stable krypton isotopes are optically depleted to the ground state through the 1s 4 level with the bulk of the 85 Kr population being preserved. Finally, the remaining metastable population is probed to determine 85 Kr concentration. The experimental requirements for each of these steps are outlined below

  11. Resetting of Mg isotopes between calcite and dolomite during burial metamorphism: Outlook of Mg isotopes as geothermometer and seawater proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongya; Hu, Wenxuan; Wang, Xiaomin; Lu, Yizhou; Wang, Lichao; Liao, Zhiwei; Li, Weiqiang

    2017-07-01

    studies of carbonate rocks with thermal history. By contrast, Mg isotopes of dolomite are less prone to post-depositional resetting due to a number of properties including high Mg abundance and high thermodynamic stability, and Mg isotopes in dolomite may be a more robust recorder for original carbonate precipitates.

  12. Isotopic research in Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuetze, H.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1978 scientists of the Central Institute of Isotope- and Radiation Research of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR have participated in antarctic research. Substantial results have been achieved in research on isotope ratios, on the dynamics of water resources, on concentration of deuterium in lichens, and on age determination of a mummified seal and a penguin colony

  13. Uses of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axente, Damian

    1998-01-01

    The most important fields of stable isotope use with examples are presented. These are: 1. Isotope dilution analysis: trace analysis, measurements of volumes and masses; 2. Stable isotopes as tracers: transport phenomena, environmental studies, agricultural research, authentication of products and objects, archaeometry, studies of reaction mechanisms, structure and function determination of complex biological entities, studies of metabolism, breath test for diagnostic; 3. Isotope equilibrium effects: measurement of equilibrium effects, investigation of equilibrium conditions, mechanism of drug action, study of natural processes, water cycle, temperature measurements; 4. Stable isotope for advanced nuclear reactors: uranium nitride with 15 N as nuclear fuel, 157 Gd for reactor control. In spite of some difficulties of stable isotope use, particularly related to the analytical techniques, which are slow and expensive, the number of papers reporting on this subject is steadily growing as well as the number of scientific meetings organized by International Isotope Section and IAEA, Gordon Conferences, and regional meeting in Germany, France, etc. Stable isotope application development on large scale is determined by improving their production technologies as well as those of labeled compound and the analytical techniques. (author)

  14. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayne, C.K.; Smith, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  16. Separation of uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for separation of uranium isotopes by selective isotopic excitation of photochemically reactive uranyl salt source material at cryogenic temperatures, followed by chemical separation of selectively photochemically reduced U+4 thereby produced from remaining uranyl source material

  17. Isotope research materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Preparation of research isotope materials is described. Topics covered include: separation of tritium from aqueous effluents by bipolar electrolysis; stable isotope targets and research materials; radioisotope targets and research materials; preparation of an 241 Am metallurgical specimen; reactor dosimeters; ceramic and cermet development; fission-fragment-generating targets of 235 UO 2 ; and wire dosimeters for Westinghouse--Bettis

  18. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.K.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase molecules by multiple infrared photon absorption after which more of the excited molecules than nonexcited molecules are converted to a chemically different form which may be separated by means known in the art. This invention is useful for, but not limited to, the separation of the principal isotopes of uranium

  19. Superdeformation in Pb isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naz, Tabassum; Ahmad, Shakeb

    2017-01-01

    The Relatvistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) theory is used to explore the structure of superdeformed (SD) 190,212 Pb isotopes using the non-linear NL3* and density dependent (DD-ME2, DD-PC1) interactions. We have studied the the excitation energy, the potential depth and the deformation of these Pb isotopes

  20. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, C. K.; Smith, D. H.

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers.

  1. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayne, C.K.; Smith, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers

  2. Isotope dilution analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fudge, A.

    1978-12-15

    The following aspects of isotope dilution analysis are covered in this report: fundamental aspects of the technique; elements of interest in the nuclear field, choice and standardization of spike nuclide; pre-treatment to achieve isotopic exchange and chemical separation; sensitivity; selectivity; and accuracy.

  3. Wide angle isotope separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantrowitz, A.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for particle separation. The method uses a wide angle radially expanding vapor of a particle mixture. In particular, selective ionization of one isotope type in the particle mixture is produced in a multichamber separator and the ionized isotope type is accelerated out of the path of the vapor expansion for separate collection

  4. Environmental isotope hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    Environmental isotope hydrology is a relatively new field of investigation based on isotopic variations observed in natural waters. These isotopic characteristics have been established over a broad space and time scale. They cannot be controlled by man, but can be observed and interpreted to gain valuable regional information on the origin, turnover and transit time of water in the system which often cannot be obtained by other techniques. The cost of such investigations is usually relatively small in comparison with the cost of classical hydrological studies. The main environmental isotopes of hydrological interest are the stable isotopes deuterium (hydrogen-2), carbon-13, oxygen-18, and the radioactive isotopes tritium (hydrogen-3) and carbon-14. Isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen are ideal geochemical tracers of water because their concentrations are usually not subject to change by interaction with the aquifer material. On the other hand, carbon compounds in groundwater may interact with the aquifer material, complicating the interpretation of carbon-14 data. A few other environmental isotopes such as 32 Si and 238 U/ 234 U have been proposed recently for hydrological purposes but their use has been quite limited until now and they will not be discussed here. (author)

  5. Laser assisted aerodynamic isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, H. van den

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the efficiency of conventional aerodynamic isotope seperation can be improved by two orders of magnitude with the aid of a relatively weak cw infrared laser which is used to induce isotopically selective condensation. Overall isotope enrichment factors in excess of 2 are obtained as compared to about 1.02 in the conventional seperation. Sulphur isotopes in SF 6 as well as Silicon isotopes in SiF 4 and Bromine isotopes in CF 3 Br are seperated on a laboratory scale. Infrared vibrational predissociation by itself and in combination with isotopically selective condensation are also shown to be effective new ways of isotope separation. (orig.) [de

  6. Isotope pattern deconvolution as a tool to study iron metabolism in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castrillón, José Angel; Moldovan, Mariella; García Alonso, J Ignacio; Lucena, Juan José; García-Tomé, Maria Luisa; Hernández-Apaolaza, Lourdes

    2008-01-01

    Isotope pattern deconvolution is a mathematical technique for isolating distinct isotope signatures from mixtures of natural abundance and enriched tracers. In iron metabolism studies measurement of all four isotopes of the element by high-resolution multicollector or collision cell ICP-MS allows the determination of the tracer/tracee ratio with simultaneous internal mass bias correction and lower uncertainties. This technique was applied here for the first time to study iron uptake by cucumber plants using 57Fe-enriched iron chelates of the o,o and o,p isomers of ethylenediaminedi(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid (EDDHA) and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Samples of root, stem, leaves, and xylem sap, after exposure of the cucumber plants to the mentioned 57Fe chelates, were collected, dried, and digested using nitric acid. The isotopic composition of iron in the samples was measured by ICP-MS using a high-resolution multicollector instrument. Mass bias correction was computed using both a natural abundance iron standard and by internal correction using isotope pattern deconvolution. It was observed that, for plants with low 57Fe enrichment, isotope pattern deconvolution provided lower tracer/tracee ratio uncertainties than the traditional method applying external mass bias correction. The total amount of the element in the plants was determined by isotope dilution analysis, using a collision cell quadrupole ICP-MS instrument, after addition of 57Fe or natural abundance Fe in a known amount which depended on the isotopic composition of the sample.

  7. Isotope pattern deconvolution as a tool to study iron metabolism in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Castrillon, Jose A.; Moldovan, Mariella; Garcia Alonso, J.I. [University of Oviedo, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Oviedo (Spain); Lucena, Juan J.; Garcia-Tome, Maria L.; Hernandez-Apaolaza, Lourdes [Autonoma University of Madrid, Department of Agricultural Chemistry, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-01-15

    Isotope pattern deconvolution is a mathematical technique for isolating distinct isotope signatures from mixtures of natural abundance and enriched tracers. In iron metabolism studies measurement of all four isotopes of the element by high-resolution multicollector or collision cell ICP-MS allows the determination of the tracer/tracee ratio with simultaneous internal mass bias correction and lower uncertainties. This technique was applied here for the first time to study iron uptake by cucumber plants using {sup 57}Fe-enriched iron chelates of the o,o and o,p isomers of ethylenediaminedi(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid (EDDHA) and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Samples of root, stem, leaves, and xylem sap, after exposure of the cucumber plants to the mentioned {sup 57}Fe chelates, were collected, dried, and digested using nitric acid. The isotopic composition of iron in the samples was measured by ICP-MS using a high-resolution multicollector instrument. Mass bias correction was computed using both a natural abundance iron standard and by internal correction using isotope pattern deconvolution. It was observed that, for plants with low {sup 57}Fe enrichment, isotope pattern deconvolution provided lower tracer/tracee ratio uncertainties than the traditional method applying external mass bias correction. The total amount of the element in the plants was determined by isotope dilution analysis, using a collision cell quadrupole ICP-MS instrument, after addition of {sup 57}Fe or natural abundance Fe in a known amount which depended on the isotopic composition of the sample. (orig.)

  8. Isotopes in Greenland Precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Anne-Katrine

    Greenland ice cores offer a unique opportunity to investigate the climate system behaviour. The objective of this PhD project is to investigate isotope modelling of present- day conditions and conduct model-data comparison using Greenland ice cores. Thus this thesis investigates how the integration...... of model and data can be used to improve the understanding of climate changes. This is done through analysis of isotope modelling, observations and ice core measurements. This dissertation comprises three projects: (1) Modelling the isotopic response to changes in Arctic sea surface conditions, (2......) Constructing a new Greenland database of observations and present-day ice core measurements, and (3) Performance test of isotope-enabled CAM5 for Greenland. The recent decades of rapid Arctic sea ice decline are used as a basis for an observational-based model experiment using the isotope-enabled CAM model 3...

  9. Applications of isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby-Smith, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    Current and potential applications of stable isotopes as tracers in a number of biomedical and environmental areas are discussed. It is pointed out that a wide variety of problems exist in these fields whose solutions in principle are amenable to the isotopic approach. The number and diversity of these problems as well as the unique role stable isotopes can play in their solution illustrate the importance of achieving and maintaining a broad inventory of isotopic species. Experience has demonstrated unequivocally an additional overriding requirement for widespread exploration of stable isotopes by the scientific and technical community, i.e., the need for low cost availability of the materials in quantity. Some representative applications of 12 C, 13 C, 14 N, 15 N, 16 O, 17 O, and 18 O are discussed

  10. Geochemistry of the stable isotopes of silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douthitt, C B [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena (USA). Div. of Geological and Planetary Sciences

    1982-08-01

    One hundred thirty two new measurements of the relative abundances of the stable isotopes of silicon in terrestrial materials are presented. The total variation of delta/sup 30/Si found is 6.2 parts per thousand, centered on the mean of terrestrial mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks, delta/sup 30/Si = -0.4 parts per thousand. Igneous rocks show limited variation; coexisting minerals exhibit small, systematic silicon isotopic fractionations that are roughly 1/3 the magnitude of concomitant oxygen isotopic fractionations at 1150/sup 0/C. In both igneous minerals and rocks, delta/sup 30/Si shows a positive correlation with silicon content, as does delta/sup 18/O. Opal from both sponge spicules and sinters is light, with delta/sup 30/Si = -2.3 and -1.4 parts per thousand respectively. Large delta/sup 30/Si values of both positive and negative sign are reported for the first time from clay minerals, opaline phytoliths, and authigenic quartz. All highly fractionated samples were precipitated from solution at low temperatures; however, aqueous silicon is not measurably fractionated relative to quartz at equilibrium. A kinetic isotope fractionation of approximately 3.5 parts per thousand is postulated to occur during the low temperature precipitation of opal and, possibly, poorly ordered phyllosilicates, with the silicate phase being enriched in /sup 28/Si. This fractionation, coupled with a Rayleigh precipitation model, is capable of explaining most non-magmatic delta/sup 30/Si variations.

  11. Atom probe microscopy of zinc isotopic enrichment in ZnO nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Ironside

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on atomic probe microscopy (APM of isotopically enriched ZnO nanorods that measures the spatial distribution of zinc isotopes in sections of ZnO nanorods for natural abundance natZnO and 64Zn and 66Zn enriched ZnO nanorods. The results demonstrate that APM can accurately quantify isotopic abundances within these nanoscale structures. Therefore the atom probe microscope is a useful tool for characterizing Zn isotopic heterostructures in ZnO. Isotopic heterostructures have been proposed for controlling thermal conductivity and also, combined with neutron transmutation doping, they could be key to a novel technology for producing p-n junctions in ZnO thin films and nanorods.

  12. BIPAL - a data library for computing the burnup of fissionable isotopes and products of their decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralovcova, E.; Hep, J.; Valenta, V.

    1978-01-01

    The BIPAL databank contains data on 100 heavy metal isotopes starting with 206 Tl and finishing with 253 Es. Four are stable, the others are unstable. The following data are currently stored in the databank: the serial number and name of isotopes, decay modes and, for stable isotopes, the isotopic abundance (%), numbers of P decays and Q captures, numbers of corresponding final products, branching ratios, half-lives and their units, decay constants, thermal neutron captures, and fission cross sections, and other data (mainly alpha, beta and gamma intensities). The description of data and a printout of the BIPAL library are presented. (J.B.)

  13. Static, Mixed-Array Total Evaporation for Improved Quantitation of Plutonium Minor Isotopes in Small Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, F. E.; Byerly, Benjamin L.; Thomas, Mariam R.; Spencer, Khalil J.

    2016-06-01

    Actinide isotope measurements are a critical signature capability in the modern nuclear forensics "toolbox", especially when interrogating anthropogenic constituents in real-world scenarios. Unfortunately, established methodologies, such as traditional total evaporation via thermal ionization mass spectrometry, struggle to confidently measure low abundance isotope ratios (evaporation techniques as a straightforward means of improving plutonium minor isotope measurements, which have been resistant to enhancement in recent years because of elevated radiologic concerns. Results are presented for small sample (~20 ng) applications involving a well-known plutonium isotope reference material, CRM-126a, and compared with traditional total evaporation methods.

  14. Using cosmogenic isotopes to measure basin-scale rates of erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierman, P.R.; Steig, E.

    1992-01-01

    The authors present a new and different approach to interpreting the abundance of in situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides such as 36 Cl, 26 Al, and 10 Be. Unlike most existing models, which are appropriate for evaluating isotope concentrations on bedrock surfaces, this model can be used to interpret isotope concentration in fluvial sediment. Because sediment is a mixture of material derived from the entire drainage basin, measured isotope abundances can be used to estimate spatially-averaged rates of erosion and sediment transport. Their approach has the potential to provide geomorphologists with a relatively simple but powerful means by which to constrain rates of landscape evolution. The model considers the flux of cosmogenic isotopes into and out of various reservoirs. Implicit in model development are the assumptions that a geomorphic steady-state has been reached and that sampled sediment is spatially and temporally representative of all sediment leaving the basin. Each year, the impinging cosmic-ray flux produces a certain quantity of cosmogenic isotopes in the rock and soil of a drainage basin. For a basin in steady state, the outgoing isotope flux is also constant. They solve for the rate of mass loss as a function of isotope abundance in the sediment, the cosmic ray attenuation length, the isotope half life, and the effective isotope production rate. There are only a few published measurements of cosmogenic isotope abundance in sediment. They calculated model denudation rates for sediment samples from Zaire and central Texas. The denudation rates they calculated appear reasonable and are similar to those they have measured directly on granite landforms in Georgia and southeastern California and those calculated for the Appalachian Piedmont

  15. Isotopic approach to the provenance study of artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabuchi, Hisao

    1994-01-01

    Isotopic abundance ratios, which are proved to be generally constant, are known to vary, for certain elements, from one place to another. Light elements, such as hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur, show measurable variations of their isotope ratios due to isotopic fractionation which takes place during geochemical or biochemical processes. Isotope ratios of strontium and lead vary due to the decay of long-lived radioactive nuclides 87 Rb and 238 U- 235 U- 232 Th, respectively. Such isotopic anomalies can be applicable to provenance studies of archaeological objects. Thus, 13 C/ 12 C, 18 O/ 16 O, or 87 Sr/ 86 Sr were used to examine the authenticity of Greek marble statues. Also, lead isotope ratios have been used since mid-1960s extensively for provenance studies of glasses and bronzes of different civilizations. As an example, the author presents a series of his own works on lead isotope ratios applied to ancient Japanese bronzes, which are summarized as follows. 1) It was generally observed that lead isotope ratios reflect difference in culture to which bronzes belong. 2) Mirrors in the Western Han period (206 B.C. - A.D.8) are clearly distinguished by lead isotope ratios from those made after the mid-Eastern Han period (ca.A.D.150 - 300). 3) Korean mirrors and weapons excavated from the Yayoi sites contain lead of easily recognizable Mississippi Valley type. 4) Bronze objects made in Japan (imitative Han style mirrors, Dotaku, imitative weapons, arrowheads etc.) in the Yayoi and Kofun periods are classified by lead isotope ratios in the following order: the Korean mirror type to the Western Han mirror type in the Yayoi period and the mid- to post- Han mirror type in the Kofun period. 5) Indigenous Japanese lead seems to have been used after the mid-7th century. (J.P.N.)

  16. The lack of potassium-isotopic fractionation in Bishunpur chondrules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C.M. O'D.; Grossman, J.N.; Wang, Jingyuan; Zanda, B.; Bourot-Denise, M.; Hewins, R.H.

    2000-01-01

    In a search for evidence of evaporation during chondrule formation, the mesostases of 11 Bishunpur chondrules and melt inclusions in olivine phenocrysts in 7 of them have been analyzed for their alkali element abundances and K-isotopic compositions. Except for six points, all areas of the chondrules that were analyzed had δ41K compositions that were normal within error (typically ±3%, 2s̀). The six “anomalous” points are probably all artifacts. Experiments have shown that free evaporation of K leads to large 41K enrichments in the evaporation residues, consistent with Rayleigh fractionation. Under Rayleigh conditions, a 3% enrichment in δ41K is produced by ∼12% loss of K. The range of L-chondrite-normalized K/Al ratios (a measure of the K-elemental fractionation) in the areas analyzed vary by almost three orders of magnitude. If all chondrules started out with L-chondrite-like K abundances and the K loss occurred via Rayleigh fractionation, the most K-depleted chondrules would have had compositions of up to δ41K ≅ 200%. Clearly, K fractionation did not occur by evaporation under Rayleigh conditions. Yet experiments and modeling indicate that K should have been lost during chondrule formation under currently accepted formation conditions (peak temperature, cooling rate, etc.). Invoking precursors with variable alkali abundances to produce the range of K/Al fractionation in chondrules does not explain the K-isotopic data because any K that was present should still have experienced sufficient loss during melting for there to have been a measurable isotopic fractionation. If K loss and isotopic fractionation was inevitable during chondrule formation, the absence of K-isotopic fractionation in Bishunpur chondrules requires that they exchanged K with an isotopically normal reservoir during or after formation. There is evidence for alkali exchange between chondrules and rim-matrix in all unequilibrated ordinary chondrites. However, melt inclusions can have

  17. The measurement of abundance and content of 148Nd monitor for the determination of burnup with mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shuqin; Li Silin

    1992-09-01

    The abundance and content of nuclide 148 Nd, which is used as monitor to determine reactor element burnup, were measured by mass spectrometry, and the burnup can be calculated from measured results. The distribution of 148 Nd abundance and content in the axial direction are consistent with the theoretical calculation. The burnup values agree with the data obtained from heavy isotope ratio and radiochemistry methods within the errors of 4.0% and 2.8% respectively

  18. Radiogenic Isotopes in Weathering and Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, J. D.; Erel, Y.

    2003-12-01

    There are a small group of elements that display variations in their isotopic composition, resulting from radioactive decay within minerals over geological timescales. These isotopic variations provide natural fingerprints of rock-water interactions and have been widely utilized in studies of weathering and hydrology. The isotopic systems that have been applied in such studies are dictated by the limited number of radioactive parent-daughter nuclide pairs with half-lives and isotopic abundances that result in measurable differences in daughter isotope ratios among common rocks and minerals. Prior to their application to studies of weathering and hydrology, each of these isotopic systems was utilized in geochronology and petrology. As in the case of their original introduction into geochronology and petrology, isotopic systems with the highest concentrations of daughter isotopes in common rocks and minerals and systems with the largest observed isotopic variations were introduced first and have made the largest impact on our understanding of weathering and hydrologic processes. Although radiogenic isotopes have helped elucidate many important aspects of weathering and hydrology, it is important to note that in almost every case that will be discussed in this chapter, our fundamental understanding of these topics came from studies of variations in the concentrations of major cations and anions. This chapter is a "tools chapter" and thus it will highlight applications of radiogenic isotopes that have added additional insight into a wide spectrum of research areas that are summarized in almost all of the other chapters of this volume.The first applications of radiogenic isotopes to weathering processes were based on studies that sought to understand the effects of chemical weathering on the geochronology of whole-rock samples and geochronologically important minerals (Goldich and Gast, 1966; Dasch, 1969; Blaxland, 1974; Clauer, 1979, 1981; Clauer et al., 1982); as well

  19. Abundances, Ionization States, Temperatures, and FIP in Solar Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2018-04-01

    The relative abundances of chemical elements and isotopes have been our most effective tool in identifying and understanding the physical processes that control populations of energetic particles. The early surprise in solar energetic particles (SEPs) was 1000-fold enhancements in {}3He/{}4He from resonant wave-particle interactions in the small "impulsive" SEP events that emit electron beams that produce type III radio bursts. Further studies found enhancements in Fe/O, then extreme enhancements in element abundances that increase with mass-to-charge ratio A/Q, rising by a factor of 1000 from He to Au or Pb arising in magnetic reconnection regions on open field lines in solar jets. In contrast, in the largest SEP events, the "gradual" events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by fast, wide coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Averaging many events provides a measure of solar coronal abundances, but A/Q-dependent scattering during transport causes variations with time; thus if Fe scatters less than O, Fe/O is enhanced early and depleted later. To complicate matters, shock waves often reaccelerate impulsive suprathermal ions left over or trapped above active regions that have spawned many impulsive events. Direct measurements of ionization states Q show coronal temperatures of 1-2 MK for most gradual events, but impulsive events often show stripping by matter traversal after acceleration. Direct measurements of Q are difficult and often unavailable. Since both impulsive and gradual SEP events have abundance enhancements that vary as powers of A/Q, we can use abundances to deduce the probable Q-values and the source plasma temperatures during acceleration, ≈3 MK for impulsive SEPs. This new technique also allows multiple spacecraft to measure temperature variations across the face of a shock wave, measurements otherwise unavailable and provides a new understanding of abundance variations in the element He. Comparing coronal abundances from SEPs

  20. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    the δ53Cr value of continental runoff into the ocean. The major findings were that river water is characterised by heavy δ53Cr values (+0.1‰ to +1.6‰), while soils are characterised by light δ53Cr values (-0.3‰), relative to the catchment bedrock (-0.17‰ to -0.21‰), indicating that Cr isotopes......, and the quantification the Cr isotope composition of major Cr fluxes into and out of ocean. This thesis adds to the current knowledge of the Cr isotope system and is divided into two studies. The focus of the first study was to determine what processes control the Cr isotopic compositionof river water and to quantify......Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes are a useful tracer of changes in redox conditions because changes in its oxidation state are accompanied by an isotopic fractionation. For this reason the Cr isotope system is being developed as a potential tool for paleo-redox reconstruction. Dissolved Cr in seawater...

  1. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, Eugene E.

    2006-06-19

    The following article is an edited transcript based on the Turnbull Lecture given by Eugene E. Haller at the 2005 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting in Boston on November 29, 2005. The David Turnbull Lectureship is awarded to recognize the career of a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to understanding materials phenomena and properties through research, writing, and lecturing, as exemplified by the life work of David Turnbull. Haller was named the 2005 David Turnbull Lecturer for his 'pioneering achievements and leadership in establishing the field of isotopically engineered semiconductors; for outstanding contributions to materials growth, doping and diffusion; and for excellence in lecturing, writing, and fostering international collaborations'. The scientific interest, increased availability, and technological promise of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This article reviews results obtained with isotopically controlled semiconductor bulk and thin-film heterostructures. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, band structure, and lattice constant in subtle, but, for their physical understanding, significant ways. Large isotope-related effects are observed for thermal conductivity in local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping. Spectacularly sharp photoluminescence lines have been observed in ultrapure, isotopically enriched silicon crystals. Isotope multilayer structures are especially well suited for simultaneous self- and dopant-diffusion studies. The absence of any chemical, mechanical, or electrical driving forces makes possible the study of an ideal random-walk problem. Isotopically controlled semiconductors may find applications in quantum computing, nanoscience, and spintronics.

  2. Pb isotopic composition of the atmosphere of the Sao Paulo city, Brazil, and isotopic characterization of some pollutant sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aily, C.; Babinski, M.; Ruiz, I.R.; Sato, K

    2001-01-01

    Lead isotopes are known to be good tools for surveying lead origin in atmospheric samples (Chow et al., 1975). Lead has four naturally occurring stable isotopes: 206 Pb, 207 Pb, 208 Pb and 204 Pb. The first three isotopes are end products of radioactive decay chains from 238 U, 235 U and 232 Th, respectively, and the last one is non-radiogenic. Therefore, their abundance and the ratios among the four isotopes gradually change with time. Lead in the atmosphere comes from various sources, such as leaded gasoline, industrial emissions and coal combustion. Thus, lead isotope ratios different from those of the mother rock in the region are often observed in the atmosphere (Tatsumoto and Patterson, 1963). Lead is emitted to the atmosphere in fine particles, which can be transported within air masses for very long distances, e. g. from mid latitude regions to the Artic and Antarctica (Sturges and Barrie, 1989). Lead isotopes have been used to trace the pollutant sources in many cities of the world. However, a systematic study using this methodology has not been done in any Brazilian city. The main purpose of the present work is to characterize the Pb isotope composition in the atmosphere in Sao Paulo city, and suggest the possible pollutant sources. For our study lead isotopes were measured in different samples: aerosols and rainwater which would yield the Pb isotope composition of the atmosphere. Samples of gasoline and ethanol, gutter sweepings, soot from vehicle exhaust pipes, and filters containing particulate material from industrial emissions were also analyzed, since they were considered potential pollutant sources of the atmosphere. In order to obtain the local geogenic Pb isotopic composition we also analyzed rock and K-feldspar samples. Lead concentrations were only determined on aerosols and rainwater samples (au)

  3. Nitrogen 15 abundance in protein fractions of beans fertilized with (15NH4)2SO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaud, Saula Goulart; Oliveira, Admar Costa de; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze

    2002-01-01

    Studies evaluating the protein nutritive value of beans labelled with 15 N, using nitrogen balance and the quantitation of faecal and urinary endogenous nitrogen, determined by isotopic dilution, have been extensively used. The objective of this research was to verify if the isotopic labelling of raw, freeze dried beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cultivar Pirata 1) with 1.394 atoms % 15 N, resulted in the same abundance of the whole flour and of the protein fractions extracted from the beans with 0.5 mol L -1 NaCl. The isotopic abundance found in the whole bean flour, in the protein extract, in the globulin and albumin fractions were respectively: 1.394 +- 0.011; 1.403 +- 0.012; 1.399 +- 0.007 and 1.399 +- 0.028 atoms % of 15 N, presenting no difference (P > 0.05). However, a difference was found (P < 0.05) between the above mentioned abundances and the isotopic abundance found in the nitrogen of the proteins in the extraction residue, which was 0.969 +- 0.084. Since the abundances did not differ, the protein nutritive indexes, such as digestibility and biological value, determined from the nitrogen balance and corrected for isotopic dilution, would not be affected by extracting the proteins from the beans with 0.5 mol L 1 NaCl. If working with the nitrogen balance of the residual proteins after extraction and even with the whole flours, these indexes could present incorrect values, since the isotopic labelling of the residual proteins was less than that of the protein fractions. (author)

  4. Radiation gradient isotope separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    A system is described for transporting, separating and storing charged particles, charged antiparticles and fully or partially ionized isotopes of any element comprising a laser beam generator, laser beam intensity profiler, a laser beam variable intensity attenuator, and means for injecting charged particles, charged antiparticles and ionized isotopes into the beam and extracting them from the system as required. The invention is particularly useful for channelling electrons and ions used for fuel pellet compression in inertial fusion systems, for separating the isotopes of elements and for the confinement of charged antiparticles and particle/antiparticle plasmas

  5. Atomic and molecular isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melamed, N.T.

    1979-01-01

    A method for differentially exciting a selected isotopic species in a mixture of isotopic species is described characterized in that almost the entire isotopic mixture is placed in an excited gaseous state; and a preselected isotopic species is then selectively de-excited through stimulated emission

  6. Spectroscopic abundance analyses of the 3He stars HD 185330 and 3 Cen A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadakane, Kozo; Nishimura, Masayoshi

    2018-04-01

    Abundances of 21 elements in two 3He stars, HD 185330 and 3 Cen A, have been analysed relative to the well-studied sharp-lined B3 V star ι Her. Six elements (P, Ti, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Br) are over-abundant in these two peculiar stars, while six elements (C, O, Mg, Al, S, and Cl) are under-abundant. Absorption lines of the two rarely observed heavy elements Br II and Kr II are detected in both stars and these elements are both over-abundant. The centroid wavelengths of the Ca II infrared triplet lines in these stars are redshifted relative to those lines in ι Her and the presence of heavy isotopes of Ca (mass number 44-46) in these two stars is confirmed. In spite of these similarities, there are several remarkable differences in abundance pattern between these two stars. N is under-abundant in HD 185330, as in many Hg-Mn stars, while it is significantly over-abundant in 3 Cen A. P and Ga are both over-abundant in 3 Cen A, while only P is over-abundant and no trace of absorption line of Ga II can be found in HD 185330. Large over-abundances of Kr and Xe are found in both stars, while the abundance ratio Kr/Xe is significantly different between them (-1.4 dex in HD 185330 and +1.2 dex in 3 Cen A). Some physical explanations are needed to account for these qualitative differences.

  7. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David T.; Gruen, Danielle S.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C.; Holden, James F.; Hristov, Alexander N.; Pohlman, John W.; Morrill, Penny L.; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B.; Reeves, Eoghan P.; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N.; Ritter, Daniel J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Kubo, Michael D.; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M.; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply-substituted “clumped” isotopologues, e.g., 13CH3D, has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures; however, the impact of biological processes on methane’s clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on 13CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters.

  8. Rare earth element abundances in presolar SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, T. R.; Ávila, J. N.; Lugaro, M.; Cristallo, S.; Holden, P.; Lanc, P.; Nittler, L.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Gyngard, F.; Amari, S.

    2018-01-01

    Individual isotope abundances of Ba, lanthanides of the rare earth element (REE) group, and Hf have been determined in bulk samples of fine-grained silicon carbide (SiC) from the Murchison CM2 chondrite. The analytical protocol involved secondary ion mass spectrometry with combined high mass resolution and energy filtering to exclude REE oxide isobars and Si-C-O clusters from the peaks of interest. Relative sensitivity factors were determined through analysis of NIST SRM reference glasses (610 and 612) as well as a trace-element enriched SiC ceramic. When normalised to chondrite abundances, the presolar SiC REE pattern shows significant deficits at Eu and Yb, which are the most volatile of the REE. The pattern is very similar to that observed for Group III refractory inclusions. The SiC abundances were also normalised to s-process model predictions for the envelope compositions of low-mass (1.5-3 M⊙) AGB stars with close-to-solar metallicities (Z = 0.014 and 0.02). The overall trace element abundances (excluding Eu and Yb) appear consistent with the predicted s-process patterns. The depletions of Eu and Yb suggest that these elements remained in the gas phase during the condensation of SiC. The lack of depletion in some other moderately refractory elements (like Ba), and the presence of volatile elements (e.g. Xe) indicates that these elements were incorporated into SiC by other mechanisms, most likely ion implantation.

  9. Trophodynamics and functional feeding groups of North Sea fauna: a combined stable isotope and fatty acid approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kürten, B.; Frutos, I.; Struck, U.; Painting, S.J.; Polunin, N.V.C.; Middelburg, J.J.

    The trophodynamics of pelagic and benthic animals of the North Sea, North Atlantic shelf, were assessed using stable isotope analysis (SIA) of natural abundance carbon and nitrogen isotopes, lipid fingerprinting and compound-specific SIA (CSIA) of phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFAs).

  10. Trophodynamics and functional feeding groups of North Sea fauna: a combined stable isotope and fatty acid approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kürten, B.; Frutos, I.; Struck, U.; Painting, S.J.; Polunin, N.V.C.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    The trophodynamics of pelagic and benthic animals of the North Sea, North Atlantic shelf, were assessed using stable isotope analysis (SIA) of natural abundance carbon and nitrogen isotopes, lipid fingerprinting and compound-specific SIA (CSIA) of phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFAs).

  11. High precision isotopic ratio analysis of volatile metal chelates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachey, D.L.; Blais, J.C.; Klein, P.D.

    1980-01-01

    High precision isotope ratio measurements have been made for a series of volatile alkaline earth and transition metal chelates using conventional GC/MS instrumentation. Electron ionization was used for alkaline earth chelates, whereas isobutane chemical ionization was used for transition metal studies. Natural isotopic abundances were determined for a series of Mg, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Zn chelates. Absolute accuracy ranged between 0.01 and 1.19 at. %. Absolute precision ranged between +-0.01-0.27 at. % (RSD +- 0.07-10.26%) for elements that contained as many as eight natural isotopes. Calibration curves were prepared using natural abundance metals and their enriched 50 Cr, 60 Ni, and 65 Cu isotopes covering the range 0.1-1010.7 at. % excess. A separate multiple isotope calibration curve was similarly prepared using enriched 60 Ni (0.02-2.15 at. % excess) and 62 Ni (0.23-18.5 at. % excess). The samples were analyzed by GC/CI/MS. Human plasma, containing enriched 26 Mg and 44 Ca, was analyzed by EI/MS. 1 figure, 5 tables

  12. Isotope Production Facility (IPF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced radioactive isotopes for medicine and research since the mid 1970s, when targets were first irradiated using the 800...

  13. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  14. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree; Heuser, Alexander; Wombacher, Frank; Dietzel, Martin; Tipper, Edward; Schiller, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  15. Geochemical importance of isotopic fractionation during respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleser, G.; Foerstel, H.

    1975-01-01

    In 1935 it was found that atmospheric oxygen contained a relatively greater abundance of the 18 O isotope than did the oxygen bound in water (Dole effect). A major contribution to the fractionation of the stable oxygen isotopes should result from the respiration of microorganisms. In this respect our interest centers on the soil because nearly all organic material produced on land is decomposed within the soil. The oceans are less important because the primary productivity on land is twice the value for the oceans. In a first approach we measured the oxygen isotope fractionation during the respiration of E. coli K12 for different respiration rates. These results, accomplished with a chemostat, indicate that the fractionation factor α of the oxygen isotopes increases with the increasing respiratory activity, measured as Q/sub O 2 /. At low dilution rates or growth rates respectively of about 0.05 h -1 , the fractionation factor amounts to 1.006 increasing to 1.017 at dilution rates of about 1.0 h -1 . The results are interpreted as a kinetic mass fractionation due to the slightly different diffusion coefficients of 16 O 2 and 18 O 16 O. The respiration rates in conjunction with the corresponding fractionation data are compared with the respiration rates of typical soil microorganisms such as Azotobacter, in order to deduce fractionation data for these organisms. This is necessary to calculate a mean global fractionation factor. Understanding the Dole effect with these fractionation processes should finally give us the opportunity to calculate gas-exchange rates between the atmosphere and the oceans, on the basis of the behavior of the stable oxygen isotopes

  16. Laser separation of uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for separating uranium isotopes are claimed. The method comprises the steps of irradiating a uranyl source material at a wavelength selective to a desired isotope and at an effective temperature for isotope spectral line splitting below about 77 deg.K., further irradiating the source material within the fluorescent lifetime of the source material to selectively photochemically reduce the excited isotopic species, and chemically separating the reduced isotope species from the remaining uranyl salt compound

  17. High mass isotope separation arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to the isotope separation art and, more particularly, to a selectively photon-induced energy level transition of an isotopic molecule containing the isotope to be separated and a chemical reaction with a chemically reactive agent to provide a chemical compound containing atoms of the isotope desired. In particular a description is given of a method of laser isotope separation applied to the separation of 235 UF 6 from 238 UF 6 . (U.K.)

  18. Isotope toolbox turns 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenander, Fredrik; Riisager, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    REX-ISOLDE, one of CERN’s most compact accelerators, has just celebrated its 10th anniversary. The machine’s versatility provides radioactive ion beams across the range of nuclear isotopes.......REX-ISOLDE, one of CERN’s most compact accelerators, has just celebrated its 10th anniversary. The machine’s versatility provides radioactive ion beams across the range of nuclear isotopes....

  19. Laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The claimed invention is a method of isotope separation based on the unimolecular decomposition of vibrationally excited negative ions which are produced in the reaction of thermal electrons and molecules which have been vibrationally excited in an isotope selective manner. This method is especially applicable to molecules represented by the formula MF 6 wherein M is selected from the group consisting of U, S, W, Se, Te, Mo, Re and Tc

  20. UWIS isotope separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtasiewicz, A. [Warsaw Univ., Inst. of Experimental Physics, Nuclear Physics Div., Warsaw (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Since 1995 the University of Warsaw Isotope Separator group has participated in the ISOL/IGISOL project at the Heavy Ion Cyclotron. This project consists in installation of an isotope separator (on line with cyclotron heavy ion beam) with a hot plasma ion source (ISOL system) and/or with an ion guide source (IGISOL system). In the report the short description of the present status of the project is presented. 2 figs, 10 refs.

  1. Laser isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldor, A.

    1976-01-01

    The claimed invention is a method of isotope separation based on the unimolecular decomposition of vibrationally excited negative ions which are produced in the reaction of thermal electrons and molecules which have been vibrationally excited in an isotope selective manner. This method is especially applicable to molecules represented by the formula MF 6 wherein M is selected from the group consisting of U, S, W, Se, Te, Mo, Re, and Tc. 9 claims, 1 drawing figure

  2. Isotopes in environmental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, G.; Rozanski, K.; Vose, P.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive and stable isotopes have long been considered a very efficient tool for studying physical and biological aspects of how the global ecosystem functions. Their applications in environmental research are numerous, embracing research at all levels. This article looks at only a few of the approaches to environmental problems that involve the use of isotopes. Special attention is given to studies of the Amazon Basin. Environmental isotopes are very efficient tools in water cycle studies. Tritium, a radioactive tracer, is especially useful in studying dynamics of water movement in different compartments of the hydrosphere, both on the local and global scales. Heavy stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen (deuterium and oxygen-18) provide information about steady-state characteristics of the water cycle. Isotope methods, some relatively new, have a major role in site-specific studies. Some indicative examples include: Studying turnover of organic matter. Changes in the carbon-13/carbon-12 isotopic ratio of organic matter were used to determine the respective contributions of organic carbon derived from forest and pasture. Studying biological nitrogen fixation. One of the ways nitrogen levels in soil can be maintained for productivity is by biological nitrogen fixation. Studying nitrogen availability and losses. The experimental use of nitrogen-15 is invaluable for defining losses of soil nitrogen to the atmosphere and to groundwater. Studies can similarly be done with stable and radioactive sulphur isotopes. This article indicates some potential uses of isotopes in environmental research. While the major problem of global climate change has not been specifically addressed here, the clearing of the Amazon forest, one focus of the IAEA's environmental programme, may have serious consequences for the global climate. These include substantial reduction of the amount of latent heat transported to the regions outside the tropics and acceleration of the greenhouse

  3. Isotopes in everyday life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seligman, H.; Gillen, V.A.

    1990-12-01

    Isotopes represent a tool which can do certain jobs better, easier, quicker, more simply and cheaper than competitive methods. Some measurements could not be done at all without the use of isotopes as there are no alternative methods available. A short review of these tools of science in their different fields is given: food and agriculture, human health applications, industry, hydrology, geology, geochemistry, geophysics and dating, environment, basic scientific research

  4. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabicar, J.; Stamberg, K.; Katzer, J.

    1983-01-01

    A process for separating isotopes by the method of controlled distribution is claimed. A first phase is either a solution of isotopic components and a ligand (from 10 - 6 M to a saturated solution), or a gaseous mixture of isotopic components, or a gaseous mixture of isotopic components and an inert gas. The isotopes are in the starting mixture in molar ratio from 1:10 5 to 1:10 - 5 . The second phase is a solid sorbent such as styrene-divinylbenzene ion exchangers, or bio-sorbents on the basis of mycelium of lower fungi and sorbents on the basis of cellulose, or an extraction agent such as tributyl phosphate and trioctyl amine, if need be, kept by a carrier such as teflon, silica gel and cellulose. The two-phase system exhibits non-linear equilibrium isotherm for sorption and/or desorption or for extraction and/or re-extraction. After bringing both phases into contact the rate of transport of isotopic components from one phase into another is not equal. Retardation of isotopic exchange takes place by complexation of isotopes with ligands such as cabonate, sulphate, citrate, chloride and ethylenediamine tetraacetate ions, or by using sorbents and extraction agents with chelating functional groups such as carboxyl and hyroxyl groups, groups on the basis of phosphorus, nitrogen and sulphur and/or by operating in darkness, or in the light having wave length between 2.5x10 2 and 10 9 nm. The contact time is between 10 - 2 and 10 6 s, temperature between 10 2 and 10 3 K, the number of stirrer revolutions between 10 - 2 and 10 4 revolutions per s, flow rate at column arrangement between 10 - 6 and 10 - 1 m/s and the size of particles of sorbent between 10 - 6 and 10 - 2 m

  5. Isotope separation apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.K.; Eisner, P.N.; Thomas, W.R.I.

    1983-01-01

    This application discloses a method for and an apparatus in which isotopes of an element in a compared are separated from each other while that compound, i.e., including a mixture of such isotopes, flows along a predetermined path. The apparatus includes a flow tube having a beginning and an end. The mixture of isotopes is introduced into the flow tube at a first introduction point between the beginning and the end thereof to flow the mixture toward the end thereof. A laser irradiates the flow tube dissociating compounds of a preselected one of said isotopes thereby converting the mixture in an isotopically selective manner. The dissociation products are removed from the tube at a first removal point between the first introduction point and the end. The dissociation product removed at the the first removal point are reconverted back into the comound thereby providing a first stage enriched compound. This first stage enriched compound is reintroduced into the flow tube at a second introduction point between the beginning thereof and the first introduction point. Further product is removed from the flow tube at a second removal point between the second introduction point and the first introduction point. The second introduction point is chosen so that the isotope composition of the first stage enriched compound is approximately the same as that of the compound in the flow tube

  6. International Isotopes Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Z. Zhiznin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies world markets of stable and radioactive isotopes. Isotopes have found various applications in science, industry, agriculture and other sectors of the economy, but especially - in medicine. Nuclear medicine is developing intensively all over the world thanks to the success in the treatment of various diseases with the help of radioactive pharmaceuticals (radiopharmaceuticals. The article uses empirical data from a forecast study of the global radiopharmaceuticals market made in 2015 by a research company «Markets and Markets» for the European, North American and global markets. The paper also analyzes the statistical data on the global export and import of natural uranium, enriched and depleted uranium, plutonium, thorium and some stable isotopes of non-medical purposes, presented by a company «Trend economy» in 2014. Despite a unique industrial base for the production of isotopes created in the Soviet Union Russia occupies a modest position on the world market of nuclear medicine except for certain areas. More than 80% of isotopes, produced in USSR were consumed domestically, the export of the stable and radioactive isotopes was in equal proportions. Now the country's domestic radiopharmaceuticals market is poorly developed. To radically change the situation, it is necessary to carry out reforms that stimulate the development of nuclear medicine.

  7. Beneficial use of isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertel, E.; Stevens, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    The paper gives an outlook on the main isotopes currently used for beneficial applications, provides an overview on geographic distribution of isotope production capabilities and identifies the main suppliers world-wide. It analyses trends in different countries and regions, including the refurbishment and/or replacement of ageing facilities and the implementation of new capabilities. Issues related to adequate supply of isotopes and potential under or over capacity of production for some key products are discussed. The evolution of the isotope production sector is analysed. Issues such as lowering of governmental support to production facilities, emergence of international co-operation and agreements on production capabilities, and developments in non-OECD/NEA countries are addressed. The paper offers some concluding remarks on the importance of maintaining and enhancing beneficial uses of isotopes, the role of government policies, the need for co-operation between countries and between the private and public sectors. The paper addresses the role of international cooperation in making efficient use of existing isotope production capacity and investigates ways for reducing the need for investment in additional capacity. (author)

  8. Significant biases affecting abundance determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Roger

    2015-08-01

    I have developed two highly efficient codes to automate analyses of emission line nebulae. The tools place particular emphasis on the propagation of uncertainties. The first tool, ALFA, uses a genetic algorithm to rapidly optimise the parameters of gaussian fits to line profiles. It can fit emission line spectra of arbitrary resolution, wavelength range and depth, with no user input at all. It is well suited to highly multiplexed spectroscopy such as that now being carried out with instruments such as MUSE at the VLT. The second tool, NEAT, carries out a full analysis of emission line fluxes, robustly propagating uncertainties using a Monte Carlo technique.Using these tools, I have found that considerable biases can be introduced into abundance determinations if the uncertainty distribution of emission lines is not well characterised. For weak lines, normally distributed uncertainties are generally assumed, though it is incorrect to do so, and significant biases can result. I discuss observational evidence of these biases. The two new codes contain routines to correctly characterise the probability distributions, giving more reliable results in analyses of emission line nebulae.

  9. Isotopic evidence for multiple contributions to felsic magma chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waight, Tod Earle; Wiebe, R.A.; Krogstad, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    The Gouldsboro Granite forms part of the Coastal Maine Magmatic Province, a region characterized by granitic plutons that are intimately linked temporally and petrogenetically with abundant co-existing mafic magmas. The pluton is complex and preserves a felsic magma chamber underlain...... with identical isotopic compositions to more mafic dikes suggest that closed system fractionation may be occurring in deeper level chambers prior to injection to shallower levels. The granitic portion of the pluton has the highest Nd isotopic composition (eNd=+3.0) of plutons in the region whereas the mafic...

  10. New Isotope Analysis Method: Atom Trap Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Kwang Hoon; Park, Hyun Min; Han, Jae Min; Kim, Taek Soo; Cha, Yong Ho; Lim, Gwon; Jeong, Do Young

    2011-01-01

    Trace isotope analysis has been an important role in science, archaeological dating, geology, biology and nuclear industry. Some fission products such as Sr-90, Cs-135 and Kr-85 can be released to the environment when nuclear accident occurs and the reprocessing factory operates. Thus, the analysis of artificially produced radioactive isotopes has been of interest in nuclear industry. But it is difficult to detect them due to low natural abundance less then 10 -10 . In general, radio-chemical method has been applied to detect ultra-trace radio isotopes. But this method has disadvantages of long measurement time for long lived radioisotopes and toxic chemical process for the purification. The Accelerator Mass Spectrometer has high isotope selectivity, but the system is huge and its selectivity is affected by isobars. The laser based method, such as RIMS (Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry) has the advantage of isobar-effect free characteristics. But the system size is still huge for high isotope selective system. Recently, ATTA (Atom Trap Trace Analysis) has been successfully applied to detect ultra-trace isotope, Kr-81 and Kr-85. ATTA is the isobar-effect free detection with high isotope selectivity and the system size is small. However, it requires steady atomic beam source during detection, and is not allowed simultaneous detection of several isotopes. In this presentation, we introduce new isotope detection method which is a coupled method of Atom Trap Mass Spectrometry (ATMS). We expect that it can overcome the disadvantage of ATTA while it has both advantages of ATTA and mass spectrometer. The basic concept and the system design will be presented. In addition, the experimental status of ATMS will also be presented

  11. Investigation of four carbon monoxide isotopomers in natural abundance by laser-induced fluorescence in a supersonic jet

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The four carbon monoxide (CO) isotopomers 12C16O, 13C16O, 12C18O and 12C17O have been detected simultaneously in a CO gas sample of natural isotopic abundance by measuring rovibronic excitation spectra of six vibronic bands in the Fourth Positive...

  12. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may impact on the growth

  13. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may impact on the growth

  14. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may

  15. Achievements in testing of the MGA and FRAM isotopic software codes under the DOE/NNSA-IRSN cooperation of gamma-ray isotopic measurement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, Duc; Wang, Tzu-Fang; Funk, Pierre; Weber, Anne-Laure; Pepin, Nicolas; Karcher, Anna

    2009-01-01

    DOE/NNSA and IRSN collaborated on a study of gamma-ray instruments and analysis methods used to perform isotopic measurements of special nuclear materials. The two agencies agreed to collaborate on the project in response to inconsistencies that were found in the various versions of software and hardware used to determine the isotopic abundances of uranium and plutonium. IRSN used software developed internally to test the MGA and FRAM isotopic analysis codes for criteria used to stop data acquisition. The stop-criterion test revealed several unusual behaviors in both the MGA and FRAM software codes.

  16. Stable isotope analysis of Dacryoconarid carbonate microfossils: a new tool for Devonian oxygen and carbon isotope stratigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frappier, Amy Benoit; Lindemann, Richard H; Frappier, Brian R

    2015-04-30

    Dacryoconarids are extinct marine zooplankton known from abundant, globally distributed calcite microfossils in the Devonian, but their shell stable isotope composition has not been previously explored. Devonian stable isotope stratigraphy is currently limited to less common invertebrates or bulk rock analyses of uncertain provenance. As with Cenozoic planktonic foraminifera, isotopic analysis of dacryoconarid shells could facilitate higher-resolution, geographically widespread stable isotope records of paleoenvironmental change, including marine hypoxia events, climate changes, and biocrises. We explored the use of Dacryoconarid isotope stratigraphy as a viable method in interpreting paleoenvironments. We applied an established method for determining stable isotope ratios (δ(13) C, δ(18) O values) of small carbonate microfossils to very well-preserved dacryoconarid shells. We analyzed individual calcite shells representing five common genera using a Kiel carbonate device coupled to a MAT 253 isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Calcite shell δ(13) C and δ(18) O values were compared by taxonomic group, rock unit, and locality. Single dacryoconarid calcite shells are suitable for stable isotope analysis using a Kiel-IRMS setup. The dacryoconarid shell δ(13) C values (-4.7 to 2.3‰) and δ(18) O values (-10.3 to -4.8‰) were consistent across taxa, independent of shell size or part, but varied systematically through time. Lower fossil δ(18) O values were associated with warmer water temperature and more variable δ(13) C values were associated with major bioevents. Dacryoconarid δ(13) C and δ(18) O values differed from bulk rock carbonate values. Dacryoconarid individual microfossil δ(13) C and δ(18) O values are highly sensitive to paleoenvironmental changes, thus providing a promising avenue for stable isotope chemostratigraphy to better resolve regional to global paleoceanographic changes throughout the upper Silurian to the upper Devonian. Our results

  17. Biological isotopy. Introduction to the isotopic effects and to their applications in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tcherkez, G.

    2010-01-01

    Since their discovery in the beginning of the 20. century, the study of stable isotopes has considerably developed. This domain, which remained limited in its applications until the 1990's, has become particularly important thereafter thanks to its practical applications and in particular to its economical impacts. Many techniques used in fraud control, in drugs use control, in selection of high-yield plants etc are based on isotopic abundance measurements. This reference book gives a synthesis of our actual knowledge on the use of stable isotopes and of isotope fractionation in biology. It presents the basic notions of isotopic biochemistry and explains the origin of the isotopic effects. The application principles of these effects to metabolism, to organisms physiology, to environmental biology etc are explained and detailed using examples and exercises. The first chapters present the basic knowledge which defines, from a mathematical point-of-view, the isotopic effects of chemical reactions or of physical processes taking place in biology. The measurements principle of natural isotopes abundance is then synthesised. Finally, all these notions are applied at different scales: enzymes, physiology, metabolism, environment, ecosystems and fraud crackdown. (J.S.)

  18. SIMS analysis of isotopic impurities in ion implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, D.E.; Blunt, R.T.

    1986-01-01

    The n-type dopant species Si and Se used for ion implantation in GaAs are multi-isotopic with the most abundant isotope not chosen because of potential interferences with residual gases. SIMS analysis of a range of 29 Si implants produced by several designs of ion implanter all showed significant 28 Si impurity with a different depth distribution from that of the deliberately implanted 29 Si isotope. This effect was observed to varying degrees with all fifteen implanters examined and in every 29 Si implant analysed to date 29 Si + , 29 Si ++ and 30 Si implants all show the same effect. In the case of Se implantation, poor mass resolution results in the implantation of all isotopes with the same implant distribution (i.e. energy), whilst implants carried out with good mass resolution show the implantation of all isotopes with the characteristic lower depth distribution of the impurity isotopes as found in the Si implants. This effect has also been observed in p-type implants into GaAs (Mg) and for Ga implanted in Si. A tentative explanation of the effect is proposed. (author)

  19. Matrix effects in laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Staci, E-mail: staci.brown@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Ford, Alan, E-mail: alan.ford@alakaidefense.com [Alakai Defense Systems, 197 Replacement Ave, Suite 102, Fort Leonard Wood, MO 65473 (United States); Akpovo, Charlemagne C., E-mail: charlemagne.akpovo@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Martinez, Jorge, E-mail: jmartinez@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Johnson, Lewis, E-mail: lewis@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) can be used for the detection of isotopes of elements via isotopic shifts in diatomic species in a technique known as laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). While LAMIS works quite well for isotopic analysis of pure compounds under optimal conditions, it is desirable for it to be applicable for a variety of compounds and matrices. However, the LIBS plasma emission associated with LAMIS depends on several parameters, including the applied electric field of the laser pulse, the physical properties of the material being investigated, and the presence of additional elements other than the element of interest. In this paper, we address some of the pitfalls arising from these dependencies when using LAMIS for the determination of the relative isotopic abundance of boron-containing materials with varying chemical matrices. - Highlights: • LAMIS usually determines isotopic composition of boron compounds within 3 percent. • LaBO{sub 3} and some boron-containing mixtures yield inaccurate LAMIS results. • Higher laser energy reduces variability but does not remedy poor LAMIS outcomes.

  20. Isotope determination of sulfur by mass spectrometry in soil samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexssandra Luiza Rodrigues Molina Rossete

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulphur plays an essential role in plants and is one of the main nutrients in several metabolic processes. It has four stable isotopes (32S, 33S, 34S, and 36S with a natural abundance of 95.00, 0.76, 4.22, and 0.014 in atom %, respectively. A method for isotopic determination of S by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS in soil samples is proposed. The procedure involves the oxidation of organic S to sulphate (S-SO4(2-, which was determined by dry combustion with alkaline oxidizing agents. The total S-SO4(2- concentration was determined by turbidimetry and the results showed that the conversion process was adequate. To produce gaseous SO2 gas, BaSO4 was thermally decomposed in a vacuum system at 900 ºC in the presence of NaPO3. The isotope determination of S (atom % 34S atoms was carried out by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS. In this work, the labeled material (K2(34SO4 was used to validate the method of isotopic determination of S; the results were precise and accurate, showing the viability of the proposed method.

  1. Application of Stable Isotope Signatures in Food Traceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaratul Ashifa Abdullah Salim; Roslanzairi Mostapha; Zainon Othman

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis has widely been used to trace the origin of organic materials in various fields, such as geochemistry, biochemistry, archaeology and petroleum. In past a decade, it has also become an important tool for food traceability study. The globalisation of food markets and the relative ease which food commodities are transported through and between countries and continents means that consumers are increasingly concerned about the origin of the foods they eat. The natural abundance of stable isotope variation such as carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen and oxygen are used as geographic tracers or marker to determine the geographic origin of fruits, crop, vegetables and food products from animal. The isotopic compositions of plant materials reflect various factors such as isotopic compositions of source materials and their assimilation processes as well as growth environments. This paper will discuss on stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions in rice that been determined by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry, advantages, limitations and potential of other analysis applications that can be incorporated in food traceability system. (author)

  2. Separation of uranium isotopes by gas centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, I.

    1980-05-01

    The uranium isotope enrichment is studied by means of the countercurrent gas centrifuge driven by thermal convection. A description is given of (a) the transfer and purification of the uranium hexafluoride used as process gas in the present investigation; (b) the countercurrent centrifuge ZG3; (c) the system designed for the introduction and extraction of the process gas from the centrifuge; (d) the measurement of the process gas flow rate through the centrifuge; (e) the determination of the uranium isotopic abundance by mass spectrometry; (f) the operation and mechanical behavior of the centrifuge and (g) the isotope separation experiments, performed, respectively, at total reflux and with production of enriched material. The results from the separation experiments at total reflux are discussed in terms of the enrichment factor variation with the magnitude and flow profile of the countercurrent given by the temperature difference between the rotor covers. As far as the separation experiments with production are concerned, the discussion of their results is presented through the variation of the enrichment factor as a function of the flow rate, the observed asymmetry of the process and the calculated separative power of the centrifuge. (Author) [pt

  3. New Isotopic clues to solar system formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.

    1979-01-01

    The presence of two new extinct nuclides 26 Al and 107 Pd with half-lives approx.10 6 years in the early solar system implies that there were nucleosynthetic activities involving a great many elements almost at the instant of solar system formation. Rare gas and oxygen isotopic abundance variations [''anomalies''] relative to the ''cosmic'' composition were observed in a variety of planetary objects indicating that isotopic heterogeneities caused by the incomplete mixing of distinct nucleosynthetic components permeate of the entire solar system. The correlated nuclear [''FUN''] anomalies in O, Mg, Si, Ca, Sr, Ba, Nd, and Sm were found in three rare inclusions in the Allende meteorite, which show large mass-dependent isotopic fractionation effects. The signature of the nuclear component required to explain these anomalies suggests a source which has received a catastrophic neutron burst [e.g., an r-process event]. These extinct nuclides and nucleosynthetic anomalies provide new clues to solar system formation. In particular, these results have led to the speculation that a nearby supernova had injected freshly synthesized material into the early solar nebula and possibly triggered the collapse of the proto-solar interstellar cloud. Furthermore, these new results have major implications on cosmochronology, nucleosynthesis theory, star formation, planetary heating, and the genetic relationship between different planetary bodies

  4. THE NITROGEN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF METEORITIC HCN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzarello, Sandra, E-mail: pizzar@asu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85018-1604 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    HCN is ubiquitous in extraterrestrial environments and is central to current theories on the origin of early solar system organic compounds such as amino acids. These compounds, observed in carbonaceous meteorites, were likely important in the origin and/or evolution of early life. As part of our attempts to understand the origin(s) of meteoritic CN{sup –}, we have analyzed the {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N isotopic composition of HCN gas released from water extracts of the Murchison meteorite and found its value to be near those of the terrestrial atmosphere. The findings, when evaluated viz-a-viz molecular abundances and isotopic data of meteoritic organic compounds, suggest that HCN formation could have occurred during the protracted water alteration processes known to have affected the mineralogy of many asteroidal bodies during their solar residence. This was an active synthetic stage, which likely involved simple gasses, organic molecules, their presolar precursors, as well as mineral catalysts and would have lead to the formation of molecules of differing isotopic composition, including some with solar values.

  5. Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation Integrated with High-Throughput Liquid Chromatography ? Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Weijun; Chin, Mark H.; Wang, Haixing H.; Livesay, Eric A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Anderson, David J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Desmond J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Temporally and spatially resolved mapping of protein abundance patterns within the mammalian brain is of significant interest for understanding brain function and molecular etiologies of neurodegenerative diseases; however, such imaging efforts have been greatly challenged by complexity of the proteome, throughput and sensitivity of applied analytical methodologies, and accurate quantitation of protein abundances across the brain. Here, we describe a methodology for comprehensive spatial proteome mapping that addresses these challenges by employing voxelation integrated with automated microscale sample processing, high-throughput LC system coupled with high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer and a ''universal'' stable isotope labeled reference sample approach for robust quantitation. We applied this methodology as a proof-of-concept trial for the analysis of protein distribution within a single coronal slice of a C57BL/6J mouse brain. For relative quantitation of the protein abundances across the slice, an 18O-isotopically labeled reference sample, derived from a whole control coronal slice from another mouse, was spiked into each voxel sample and stable isotopic intensity ratios were used to obtain measures of relative protein abundances. In total, we generated maps of protein abundance patterns for 1,028 proteins. The significant agreement of the protein distributions with previously reported data supports the validity of this methodology, which opens new opportunities for studying the spatial brain proteome and its dynamics during the course of disease progression and other important biological and associated health aspects in a discovery-driven fashion

  6. Transportation of medical isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, D.L.

    1997-11-19

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document.

  7. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wexler, Sol; Young, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    Description is given of method for separating a specific isotope from a mixture of isotopes of an actinide element present as MF 6 , wherein M is the actinide element. It comprises: preparing a feed gas mixture of MF 6 in a propellant gas; passing the feed gas mixture under pressure through an expansion nozzle while heating the mixture to about 600 0 C; releasing the heated gas mixture from the nozzle into an exhaust chamber having a reduced pressure, whereby a gas jet of MF 6 molecules, MF 6 molecular clusters and propellant gas molecules is formed, the MF 6 molecules having a translational energy of about 3 eV; converting the MF 6 molecules to MF 6 ions by passing the jet through a cross jet of electron donor atoms so that an electron transfer takes place between the MF 6 - molecules and the electron donor atoms whereby the jet is now quasi-neutral, containing negative MF 6 - ions and positive donor ions; passing the quasi-neutral jet through a radiofrequency mass filter tuned to separate the MF 6 ions containing the specific isotope from the MF 6 - ions of the other isotopes and neutralizing and collecting the MF 6 molecules of the specific isotope [fr

  8. Noncovalent Hydrogen Isotope Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Breslavskaya, N. N.

    2018-02-01

    Zero-point energies (ZPE) and isotope effects, induced by intermolecular, noncovalent vibrations, are computed and tested by experimental data. The ZPE differences of H- and D-complexes of water with hydrogen, methane, and water molecules are about 100-300 cal/mol; they result to isotope effects IE of 1.20-1.70. Semi-ionic bonds between metal ions and water ligands in M(H2O) 6 2+ complexes are much stronger; their ZPEs are about 12-14 kcal/mol per molecule and result to IE of 1.9-2.1 at 300 K. Protonated (deuterated) water and biwater exhibit the largest ZPE differences and isotope effects; the latter are 25-28 and 12-13 for water and biwater, respectively. Noncovalent IEs contribute markedly into the experimentally measured effects and explain many anomalous and even magic properties of the effects, such as the dependence of IE on the solvents and on the presence of the third substances, enormously large isotope effects at the mild conditions, the difference between IEs measured in the reactions of individual protiated and deuterated compounds and those measured in their mixture. Noncovalent IEs are not negligible and should be taken into account to make correct and substantiated conclusions on the reaction mechanisms. The kinetic equations are derived for the total isotope effects, which include noncovalent IEs as additive factors.

  9. Transportation of medical isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document

  10. Isotope methods in hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, H.; Rauert, W.

    1980-01-01

    Of the investigation methods used in hydrology, tracer methods hold a special place as they are the only ones which give direct insight into the movement and distribution processes taking place in surface and ground waters. Besides the labelling of water with salts and dyes, as in the past, in recent years the use of isotopes in hydrology, in water research and use, in ground-water protection and in hydraulic engineering has increased. This by no means replaces proven methods of hydrological investigation but tends rather to complement and expand them through inter-disciplinary cooperation. The book offers a general introduction to the application of various isotope methods to specific hydrogeological and hydrological problems. The idea is to place the hydrogeologist and the hydrologist in the position to recognize which isotope method will help him solve his particular problem or indeed, make a solution possible at all. He should also be able to recognize what the prerequisites are and what work and expenditure the use of such methods involves. May the book contribute to promoting cooperation between hydrogeologists, hydrologists, hydraulic engineers and isotope specialists, and thus supplement proven methods of investigation in hydrological research and water utilization and protection wherever the use of isotope methods proves to be of advantage. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firn, Jennifer; Moore, Joslin L.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Harpole, W. Stanley; Cleland, Elsa E.; Brown, Cynthia S.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Pyke, David A.; Farrell, Kelly A.; Bakker, John D.; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Adler, Peter B.; Collins, Scott L.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Hautier, Yann; Morgan, John W.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Kay, Adam; McCulley, Rebecca; Davies, Kendi F.; Stevens, Carly J.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Holl, Karen D.; Klein, Julia A.; Fay, Phillip A.; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Buckley, Yvonne M.

    2011-01-01

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites - grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of introduced species are assembling similarly on different continents. Overall, we found that substantial changes to populations are not necessarily a pre-condition for invasion success and that increases in species abundance are unusual. Instead, abundance at home predicts abundance away, a potentially useful additional criterion for biosecurity programmes.

  12. Separation of uranium isotopes by accelerated isotope exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seko, M.; Miyake, T.; Inada, K.; Ochi, K.; Sakamoto, T.

    1977-01-01

    A novel catalyst for isotope exchange reaction between uranium(IV) and uranium(VI) compounds enables acceleration of the reaction rate as much as 3000 times to make industrial separation of uranium isotopes economically possible

  13. Variability in Abundances of Meteorites in the Ordovician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, P. R.; Schmitz, B.; Kita, N.

    2017-12-01

    The knowledge of the flux of extraterrestrial material throughout Earth's history is of great interest to reconstruct the collisional evolution of the asteroid belt. Here, we present a review of our investigations of the nature of the meteorite flux to Earth in the Ordovician, one of the best-studied time periods for extraterrestrial matter in the geological record [1]. We base our studies on compositions of extraterrestrial chromite and chrome-spinel extracted by acid dissolution from condensed marine limestone from Sweden and Russia [1-3]. By analyzing major and minor elements with EDS and WDS, and three oxygen isotopes with SIMS we classify the recovered meteoritic materials. Today, the L and H chondrites dominate the meteorite and coarse micrometeorite flux. Together with the rarer LL chondrites they have a type abundance of 80%. In the Ordovician it was very different: starting from 466 Ma ago 99% of the flux was comprised of L chondrites [2]. This was a result of the collisional breakup of the parent asteroid. This event occurred close to an orbital resonance in the asteroid belt and showered Earth with >100x more L chondritic material than today during more than 1 Ma. Although the flux is much lower at present, L chondrites are still the dominant type of meteorites that fall today. Before the asteroid breakup event 467 Ma ago the three groups of ordinary chondrites had about similar abundances. Surprisingly, they were possibly surpassed in abundance by achondrites, materials from partially and fully differentiated asteroids [3]. These achondrites include HED meteorites, which are presumably fragments released during the formation of the Rheasilvia impact structure 1 Ga ago on asteroid 4 Vesta. The enhanced abundance of LL chondrites is possibly a result of the Flora asteroid family forming event at 1 Ga ago. The higher abundance of primitive achondrites was likely due to smaller asteroid family forming events that have not been identified yet but that did

  14. Stable Isotope Group 1982 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.K.

    1983-06-01

    The work of the Stable Isotope Group of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences during 1982, in the fields of isotope geology, isotope hydrology, geochronology, isotope biology and mass spectrometer instrumentation, is described

  15. Stable Isotope Group 1983 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.K.

    1984-06-01

    The work of the Stable Isotope Group of the Institute of Nuclear Sciences in the fields of isotope geology, isotope hydrology, geochronology, isotope biology and related fields, and mass spectrometer instrumentation, during 1983, is described

  16. Isotope separation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, J.-C.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of an isotope separation device comprising a system for converting into gaseous form a first and second isotope to be separated, a monochromatic excitation light source to excite the gaseous molecules of these two isotopes in a distinct manner, a first and second receiver to collect selectively the molecules of the first and second distinctly excited isotopes. The frequency FL of the excitation light is selected between a lower limit and a higher limit F2 + 1/2 LD, depending on the frequences F1 and F2 of two absorption lines near this first and second isotope. The difference DF between these two frequencies F1 and F2 is less than the Doppler width LD of each one of these lines and greater than the natural width LN of each of these two lines and also the width of line LR of the excitation light source. The probability that the molecules will be excited by this light depends on the direction of their displacement to a major and different extent for both isotopes. An ionising light source LI is set up to irradiate the seat of interaction between the excitation light and the gaseous molecules with an ionisation light able to ionise the excited molecules without ionising the molecules that are not excited. The receivers are able to collect selectively the ionised molecules. A sufficiently low gas pressure is selected for the distance between the place of interaction and the first receiver to be less than double the free mean travel of the molecules in the gas [fr

  17. Measurement parameter selection for quantitative isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colby, B.N.; Rosecrance, A.E.; Colby, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    By use of the two-isotope model of isotope dilution, selection criteria were developed for identifying optimum m/z's for quantitation of compounds by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In addition, it was possible to predict the optimum ratio of naturally abundant to labeled compound and to identify appropriate data reduction methods. The validity of these predictions was confirmed by using experimental GC/MS data for several organic compounds

  18. Climate and isotopic tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Baptiste, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The applications of natural radioactivity and isotopic measurements in the sciences concerning Earth and its atmosphere, are numerous: carbon 14 dating with the Tandetron apparatus at the Cea, measurement of oxygen 18 in coral or sediment limestone for the determination of ocean temperature and salinity, carbon 14 dating of corals for the determination of sea level variations, deuterium content in polar ice-cap leads to temperature variations determination; isotopic measurements also enable the determination of present climate features such as global warming, oceanic general circulation

  19. Method to separate isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coenen, H.; Neuschuetz, D.

    1980-01-01

    An extraction by means of supercritical pure gases (e.g. CD 2 ) or gas mixtures is proposed to separate isotopes, especially H/D, Li-6/Li-7, and U-235/U-238, and water or benzol is used as entrainer. The extraction shall be carried out at pressure rates of about 350 bar above the critical pressure with the temperature being by up to 100 0 C above the critical temperature. A NaCl-solution and the change of the isotopic ratio Cl-35/Cl-37 are investigated for example purpose. (UWI) [de

  20. Environmental isotope survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacovides, J.S.

    1979-03-01

    Work was initiated on the 1st of September 1971 with the objective of finding out how best to use environmental isotopes in the interpretation of the hydrology, particularly subsurface hydrology, of Cyprus through a sparse reconnaissance sampling of all the major aquifers and springs covering the whole island. The distribution of sampling was such that the survey in itself could assist in clarifying particular hydrogeologic problems, provide a better understanding of the water systems of the island, establish a general environmental isotope - framework of the hydrologic regimen of Cyprus as well as to provide the basis for specific, more detailed, studies to be undertaken subsequently

  1. Lectures in isotope geology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, E.; Hunziker, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Designed for a introductory course in geochronology and the geochemistry of stable isotopes, this text has been written by recognized experts in the field. Emphasis is on the interpretation and on applications, and examples of these are offered along with each technique. Extraterrestrial applications have been avoided and the treatment of pure experimentation has been kept at a minimum. This text will be appreciated by geologists who want to learn more about methods used in isotope geology, how they can be applied, and how to gauge their usefulness. (orig.) [de

  2. The ruthenium isotopic composition of the oceanic mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, K. R.; Walker, R. J.

    2017-09-01

    The approximately chondritic relative, and comparatively high absolute mantle abundances of the highly siderophile elements (HSE), suggest that their concentrations in the bulk silicate Earth were primarily established during a final ∼0.5 to 1% of ;late accretion; to the mantle, following the cessation of core segregation. Consequently, the isotopic composition of the HSE Ru in the mantle reflects an amalgamation of the isotopic compositions of late accretionary contributions to the silicate portion of the Earth. Among cosmochemical materials, Ru is characterized by considerable mass-independent isotopic variability, making it a powerful genetic tracer of Earth's late accretionary building blocks. To define the Ru isotopic composition of the oceanic mantle, the largest portion of the accessible mantle, we report Ru isotopic data for materials from one Archean and seven Phanerozoic oceanic mantle domains. A sample from a continental lithospheric mantle domain is also examined. All samples have identical Ru isotopic compositions, within analytical uncertainties, indicating that Ru isotopes are well mixed in the oceanic mantle, defining a μ100Ru value of 1.2 ± 7.2 (2SD). The only known meteorites with the same Ru isotopic composition are enstatite chondrites and, when corrected for the effects of cosmic ray exposure, members of the Main Group and sLL subgroup of the IAB iron meteorite complex which have a collective CRE corrected μ100Ru value of 0.9 ± 3.0. This suggests that materials from the region(s) of the solar nebula sampled by these meteorites likely contributed the dominant portion of late accreted materials to Earth's mantle.

  3. High mass isotope separation arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    An isotope separation arrangement for separating a preselected isotope from a mixture of chemically-identical but isotopically-different molecules by either photon-induced pure revibrational or vibronic selective excitation of the molecules containing the atoms of the isotope to be separated from a lower to a higher energy state, and a chemical reaction of the higher energy state molecules with a chemically-reactive agent to form a chemical compound containing primarily the atoms of the isotope to be separated in a physicochemical state different from the physicochemical state of the mixture of chemically-identical but isotopically-different molecules. The chemical compound containing the atoms of the isotope to be separated may be subsequently processed to obtain the isotope. The laser configuration used to generate the photon beam is fully described

  4. Isotope heterogeneity of Pre-Holocene groundwater in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Á.E.; Arnorsson, S.; Heinemeier, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, it has been shown that groundwater with a Pre-Holocene component is more common in the Icelandic bedrock than previously thought. Some of the Pre-Holocene water samples are more depleted in delta H-2 and delta O-18 than any mean annual precipitation in Iceland today due to the cold...... climate at that time. However, most often Pre-Holocene water components cannot be detected based on the water isotopes alone due to mixing with younger and isotopically heavier water. The Cl concentration in relation to the water isotopes in specific areas has proved to be a good indicator of a Pre......-Holocene component in the groundwater. The deuterium excess value may also help to identify water from a different climate regime, if no oxygen shift has occurred. The relative abundance of a Pre-Holocene water component of the Icelandic groundwater has led to the understanding that combined interpretation of water...

  5. Isotope chirality in long-armed multifunctional organosilicon ("Cephalopod") molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabás, Béla; Kurdi, Róbert; Zucchi, Claudia; Pályi, Gyula

    2018-07-01

    Long-armed multifunctional organosilicon molecules display self-replicating and self-perfecting behavior in asymmetric autocatalysis (Soai reaction). Two representatives of this class were studied by statistical methods aiming at determination of probabilities of natural abundance chiral isotopomers. The results, reported here, show an astonishing richness of possibilities of the formation of chiral isotopically substituted derivatives. This feature could serve as a model for the evolution of biological chirality in prebiotic and early biotic stereochemistry. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Abundance Tomography of Type Ia Supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehle, M.; Mazzali, P.A.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of early time spectra of Type Ia Supernovae is presented. A new method to derive a detailed abundance distribution of the SN ejecta through comparison with synthetic spectra, called 'Abundance Tomography' is introduced and applied to the normal SN Ia 2002bo. Conclusions regarding the explosion mechanism are drawn

  7. Diversity, composition and abundance of macroinvertebrates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    these genera were found at all sampling stations as shown in Table 2. Out of the orders sampled, Hemiptera, Pulmonata and. Coleoptera had the highest number of genera with 5, 4 and 4, respectively. In terms of relative abundance, dipterans and Pulmonata were the most abundant while. Hydracarina (water mites) were ...

  8. Resource Abundance and Resource Dependence in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, K.; Magnus, J.R.; Wang, W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reconsiders the ‘curse of resources’ hypothesis for the case of China, and distinguishes between resource abundance, resource rents, and resource dependence. Resource abundance and resource rents are shown to be approximately equivalent, and their association with resource dependence

  9. Determinants of distribution, abundance and reproductive success ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... while local vegetation structure determines the abundance of locally established populations. The abundance of trees affects nest site availability and breeding success, based on observations at two oases. Blackbird nests were usually situated on pomegranate trees and olive trees. The Common Blackbird is a successful ...

  10. Diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, J.F.M.F.; van Bleijswijk, J.D.L.; Witte, H.; van Duyl, F.C.

    2013-01-01

    We analysed the diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) and Bacteria (AOB) in the shallow warm-water sponge Halisarca caerulea and the deep cold-water sponges Higginsia thielei and Nodastrella nodastrella. The abundance of AOA and AOB was analysed using catalyzed reporter

  11. Techniques for preparing isotopic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Guoji; Guan Shouren; Luo Xinghua; Sun Shuhua

    1987-12-01

    The techniques of making isotopic targets for nuclear physics experiments are introduced. Vacuum evaporation, electroplating, centrifugal precipitation, rolling and focused heavy-ion beam sputtering used to prepare various isotopic targets at IAE are described. Reduction-distillation with active metals and electrolytic reduction for converting isotope oxides to metals are mentioned. The stripping processes of producing self-supporting isotopic targets are summarized. The store methods of metallic targets are given

  12. Stellar pulsation and the abundance of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, E.G.

    1978-01-01

    It has been suggested that the appearance of nonvariable stars within the Cepheid strip could be explained by a range in the helium abundance of Population I stars. In order to study this possibility, spectra were obtained of the main-sequence B stars in the galactic cluster NGC 129, which contains a nonvariable Cepheid-strip star, and M25, which contains a relatively hot Cepheid. Unfortunately, several of the stars in these clusters turn out to be helium-weak stars. In NGC 129 two stars which appear normal give a normal abundance, while in M25 all of the observed stars have abnormally low abundances. The significance of the low abundance in M25 is not clear. The abundance in NGC 129 is not low enough to support the above suggestion. 4 figures, 2 tables

  13. Isotope separation using tunable lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snavely, B.B.

    1975-01-01

    Various processes for laser isotope separation based upon the use of the spectroscopic isotope effect in atomic and molecular vapors are discussed. Emphasis is placed upon processes which are suitable for uranium enrichment. A demonstration process for the separation of uranium isotopes using selective photoionization is described. (U.S.)

  14. Isotope effects on nuclear shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    This review concentrates upon empirical trends and practical uses of mostly secondary isotope effects, both of the intrinsic and equilibrium types. The text and the tables are arranged in the following fashion. The most 'popular' isotope effect is treated first, deuterium isotope effects on 13 C nuclear shielding, followed by deuterium on 1 H nuclear shieldings, etc. Focus is thus on the isotopes producing the effect rather than on the nuclei suffering the effect. After a brief treatment of each type of isotope effect, general trends are dealt with. Basic trends of intrinsic isotope effects such as additivity, solvent effects, temperature effects, steric effects, substituent effects and hyperconjugation are discussed. Uses of isotope effects for assignment purposes, in stereochemical studies, in hydrogen bonding and in isotopic tracer studies are dealt with. Kinetic studies, especially of phosphates, are frequently performed by utilizing isotope effects. In addition, equilibrium isotope effects are treated in great detail as these are felt to be new and very important and may lead to new uses of isotope effects. Techniques used to obtain isotope effects are briefly surveyed at the end of the chapter. (author)

  15. Isotope shifting capacity of rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blattner, P.; Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lower Hutt

    1980-01-01

    Any oxygen isotope shifted rock volume exactly defines a past throughput of water. An expression is derived that relates the throughput of an open system to the isotope shift of reservoir rock and present-day output. The small isotope shift of Ngawha reservoir rock and the small, high delta oxygen-18 output are best accounted for by a magmatic water source

  16. Influence of Coronal Abundance Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D. (Technical Monitor); Kashyap, Vinay

    2005-01-01

    The PI of this project was Jeff Scargle of NASA/Ames. Co-I's were Alma Connors of Eureka Scientific/Wellesley, and myself. Part of the work was subcontracted to Eureka Scientific via SAO, with Vinay Kashyap as PI. This project was originally assigned grant number NCC2-1206, and was later changed to NCC2-1350 for administrative reasons. The goal of the project was to obtain, derive, and develop statistical and data analysis tools that would be of use in the analyses of high-resolution, high-sensitivity data that are becoming available with new instruments. This is envisioned as a cross-disciplinary effort with a number of "collaborators" including some at SA0 (Aneta Siemiginowska, Peter Freeman) and at the Harvard Statistics department (David van Dyk, Rostislav Protassov, Xiao-li Meng, Epaminondas Sourlas, et al). We have developed a new tool to reliably measure the metallicities of thermal plasma. It is unfeasible to obtain high-resolution grating spectra for most stars, and one must make the best possible determination based on lower-resolution, CCD-type spectra. It has been noticed that most analyses of such spectra have resulted in measured metallicities that were significantly lower than when compared with analyses of high- resolution grating data where available (see, e.g., Brickhouse et al., 2000, ApJ 530,387). Such results have led to the proposal of the existence of so-called Metal Abundance Deficient, or "MAD" stars (e.g., Drake, J.J., 1996, Cool Stars 9, ASP Conf.Ser. 109, 203). We however find that much of these analyses may be systematically underestimating the metallicities, and using a newly developed method to correctly treat the low-counts regime at the high-energy tail of the stellar spectra (van Dyk et al. 2001, ApJ 548,224), have found that the metallicities of these stars are generally comparable to their photospheric values. The results were reported at the AAS (Sourlas, Yu, van Dyk, Kashyap, and Drake, 2000, BAAS 196, v32, #54.02), and at the

  17. Uranium Isotopic Analysis with the FRAM Isotopic Analysis Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo, D.T.; Sampson, T.E.

    1999-01-01

    FRAM is the acronym for Fixed-Energy Response-Function Analysis with Multiple efficiency. This software was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory originally for plutonium isotopic analysis. Later, it was adapted for uranium isotopic analysis in addition to plutonium. It is a code based on a self-calibration using several gamma-ray peaks for determining the isotopic ratios. The versatile-parameter database structure governs all facets of the data analysis. User editing of the parameter sets allows great flexibility in handling data with different isotopic distributions, interfering isotopes, and different acquisition parameters such as energy calibration and detector type

  18. Isotopes in aquaculture research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyappan, S.; Dash, B.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    The applications of isotopes in aquaculture research include areas like aquatic production process, nutrient cycles and food chain dynamics, fish nutrition, fish physiology, genetics and immunology. The radioisotopes commonly used are beta emitters. The use of different radioisotopes in aquaculture research are presented. 2 tabs

  19. Process for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, E.; Kersting, A.; Gebauhr, W.

    1980-01-01

    Isotope separation in UF 6 gas takes place on the principle of selective excitation by laser irradiation and separation by chemical conversion with a partner in a reaction. Atomic H, N or O or the CH 3 or CHO radicals are suitable partners in the reaction. The recombination takes place by catalytic acceleration on leaving the reaction area. (DG) [de

  20. SHELL ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: The land snail Limicolaria kambeul chudeaui Germain was collected ... Key words/phrases: Ethiopia, isotope geochemistry, Lake Tilo, Limicolaria .... 1984), (c) 6'80 values of precipitation at Addis Ababa, with i 1 S.D. bars for the .... (breakfast cereal), deionised water and cuttlefish bone, the carbon and oxygen.

  1. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D.M.; Maas, E.T.

    1982-01-01

    Processes are disclosed for the separation of isotopes of an element comprising vaporizing uranyl compounds having the formula (UO2a2)n, where a is a monovalent anion and n in an integer from 2 to 4, the compounds having an isotopically shifted infrared absorption spectrum associated with uranyl ions containing said element which is to be separated, and then irradiating the uranyl compound with infrared radiation which is preferentially absorbed by a molecular vibration of uranyl ions of the compound containing a predetermined isotope of that element so that excited molecules of the compound are provided which are enriched in the molecules of the compound containing that predetermined isotope, thus enabling separation of these excited molecules. The processes disclosed include separation of the excited molecules by irradiating under conditions such that the excited molecules dissociate, and also separating the excited molecules by a discrete separation step. The latter includes irradiating the excited molecules by a second infrared laser in order to convert the excited molecules into a separable product, or also by chemically converting the excited molecules, preferably by reaction with a gaseous reactant

  2. Isotopic effect giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenerd, M.; Lebrun, D.; Martin, P.; Perrin, G.; Saintignon, P. de; Chauvin, J.; Duhamel, G.

    1981-10-01

    The systematics of the excitation energy of the giant dipole, monopole, and quadrupole resonances are shown to exhibit an isotopic effect. For a given element, the excitation energy of the transition decreases faster with the increasing neutron number than the empirical laws fitting the overall data. This effect is discussed in terms of the available models

  3. Isotopes in action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    For most people the obvious application of nuclear technology is in power generation. But there are many other uses for radioactive materials or for products made with their help. They are found in our factories, hospitals, offices and homes. ''Isotopes in Action'' looks at the many applications of radioisotopes in our society. (author)

  4. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  5. Isotopes and atomic weights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qinglian

    1990-01-01

    A review of the chemical and mass spectrometric methods of determining the atomic weights of elements is presented. A, special discussion is devoted to the calibration of the mass spectrometer with highly enriched isotopes. It is illustrated by the recent work on europium. How to choose the candidate element for new atomic weight determination forms the last section of the article

  6. Liquid and gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the determination of 13C-valine isotopic ratios in complex biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; Breuillé, Denis; Obled, Christiane; Papet, Isabelle; Schierbeek, Henk; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Fay, Laurent-Bernard

    2008-10-01

    On-line gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is commonly used to measure isotopic ratios at natural abundance as well as for tracer studies in nutritional and medical research. However, high-precision (13)C isotopic enrichment can also be measured by liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS). Indeed, LC-IRMS can be used, as shown by the new method reported here, to obtain a baseline separation and to measure (13)C isotopic enrichment of underivatised amino acids (Asp, Thr-Ser, Glu, Pro, Gly, Ala, Cys and Val). In case of Val, at natural abundance, the SD(delta(13)C) reported with this method was found to be below 1 per thousand . Another key feature of the new LC-IRMS method reported in this paper is the comparison of the LC-IRMS approach with the conventional GC-C-IRMS determination. To perform this comparative study, isotopic enrichments were measured from underivatised Val and its N(O, S)-ethoxycarbonyl ethyl ester derivative. Between 0.0 and 1.0 molar percent excess (MPE) (delta(13)C= -12.3 to 150.8 per thousand), the calculated root-mean-square (rms) of SD was 0.38 and 0.46 per thousand and the calculated rms of accuracy was 0.023 and 0.005 MPE, respectively, for GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS. Both systems measured accurately low isotopic enrichments (0.002 atom percent excess (APE)) with an SD (APE) of 0.0004. To correlate the relative (delta(13)C) and absolute (atom%, APE and MPE) isotopic enrichment of Val measured by the GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS devices, mathematical equations showing the slope and intercept of the curves were established and validated with experimental data between 0.0 to 2.3 MPE. Finally, both GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS instruments were also used to assess isotopic enrichment of protein-bound (13)C-Val in tibial epiphysis in a tracer study performed in rats. Isotopic enrichments measured by LC-IRMS and GC-C-IRMS were not statistically different (p>0.05). The results of this work indicate that

  7. Application of the isotopic index in isotope geochemical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuetze, H.

    1982-06-01

    A method is described which allows to calculate approximately isotope exchange equilibria between different crystalline silicates. The algorithm uses a newly introduced isotopic index. It is defined using isotopic increments of the variant types of silicatic bonds. This isotopic index gives a quantitative measure of the ability to enrich 18 O or 30 Si, respectively. The dependence of isotopic fractionations on temperature can be calculated approximately by means of the isotopic index, too. On this theoretical base some problems of magmatism and two varieties of an isotope geochemical model of the evolution of the Earth's crust are treated. Finally, the possibility is demonstrated to give prognostic statements about the likelihood of ore bearing of different granites. (author)

  8. Direct U isotope analysis in μm-sized particles by LA-MC-ICPMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappel, S.; Boulyga, S.F.; Prohaska, T.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The knowledge of the isotopic composition of individual μm-sized hot particles is of great interest especially for strengthened nuclear safeguards in order to identify undeclared nuclear activities. We present the potential of a 'Nu Plasma HR' MC-ICPMS coupled to a New Wave 'UP 193' laser ablation (LA) system for the direct analysis of U isotope abundance ratios in individual μm-sized particles. The ability to determine 234 U/ 238 U and 235 U/ 238 U isotope ratios was successfully demonstrated in the NUSIMEP-6 interlaboratory comparison, which was organized by the IRMM (Geel, Belgium). (author)

  9. The theory and uses of natural uranium isotopic variations in hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmond, J.K.; Cowart, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    The dissolved concentration of uranium and the relative abundance of two uranium isotopes, 234 U and 238 U, vary over a wide range of values in natural waters. The concentration is controlled mainly by the redox potential of the environment and by CO 2 . The mechanism of isotope fractionation is thought to be entrainment of 234 U in the aqueous phase either by selective leaching of the solid phase or by direct recoil of the daughter nuclide. Ion exchange techniques and alpha-spectrometry permit the measurement of uranium at concentrations as low as pp 10 11 and the isotopic ratio to a few per cent. In oxidizing conditions the uranium isotopes behave in a chemically stable conservative manner such that separate groundwater sources may have identifiably different characteristics and mixing volume calculations may be made. Other potential use of these isotopes include radiometric dating, tracing of hydrologic systems, ore prospecting and earthquake prediction. (author)

  10. Quantifying nitrous oxide production pathways in wastewater treatment systems using isotope technology - A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Haoran; Ye, Liu; Erler, Dirk; Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2017-10-01

    Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) is an important greenhouse gas and an ozone-depleting substance which can be emitted from wastewater treatment systems (WWTS) causing significant environmental impacts. Understanding the N 2 O production pathways and their contribution to total emissions is the key to effective mitigation. Isotope technology is a promising method that has been applied to WWTS for quantifying the N 2 O production pathways. Within the scope of WWTS, this article reviews the current status of different isotope approaches, including both natural abundance and labelled isotope approaches, to N 2 O production pathways quantification. It identifies the limitations and potential problems with these approaches, as well as improvement opportunities. We conclude that, while the capabilities of isotope technology have been largely recognized, the quantification of N 2 O production pathways with isotope technology in WWTS require further improvement, particularly in relation to its accuracy and reliability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bicarbonate adsorption band of the chromatography for carbon isotope separation using anion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Kunihiko; Obanawa, Heiichiro; Hata, Masahisa; Sato, Katsuya

    1985-01-01

    The equilibria of bicarbonate ion between two phases were studied for the carbon isotope separation using anion exchangers. The condition of the formation of a bicarbonate adsorption band was quantitatively discussed. The formation of the adsorption band depends on the difference of S-potential which is the sum of the standard redection chemical potentials and L-potential which is the sum of the reduction chemical potential. The isotopic separation factor observed was about 1.012, independent of the concentrations of acid and alkali in the solutions. The isotopic separation factor was considered to be determined by the reaction of bicarbonate ion on anion exchangers and carbon dioxide dissolved in solutions. The enriched carbon isotope whose isotopic abundance ratio ( 13 C/ 12 C) was 1.258 was obtained with the column packed with anion exchangers. (author)

  12. Helium isotopes in rocks, waters and gases of the earth's crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstikhin, L.H.

    1984-01-01

    In this chapter the distribution of helium isotopes in various samples (rocks, minerals, terrestrial fluids, gases etc.) is interpreted from the genetic point of view, namely what sources and processes provide the abundance of helium isotopes observed in a sample. The mixing of mantle, juvenile helium with pure radiogenic helium is the main process responsible for the helium isotope composition in any sample of the earth's crust, the share of each component (reflected in the 3 He/ 4 He ratio) depending on the history of the tectono-magnetic activity in the given region. A specific chemical composition of a rock or mineral, peculiarities of losses or trapping and a peculiar kind of distribution of radioactive elements can lead to unusual isotopic ratios of 3 He/ 4 He in radiogenic helium. Lastly, technogenic radioactive isotopes are widespread in nature; one of them, tritium ( 3 H), yields 3 He excess in terrestrial waters. (orig.)

  13. Natural isotope correction of MS/MS measurements for metabolomics and (13)C fluxomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedenführ, Sebastian; ten Pierick, Angela; van Dam, Patricia T N; Suarez-Mendez, Camilo A; Nöh, Katharina; Wahl, S Aljoscha

    2016-05-01

    Fluxomics and metabolomics are crucial tools for metabolic engineering and biomedical analysis to determine the in vivo cellular state. Especially, the application of (13)C isotopes allows comprehensive insights into the functional operation of cellular metabolism. Compared to single MS, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) provides more detailed and accurate measurements of the metabolite enrichment patterns (tandem mass isotopomers), increasing the accuracy of metabolite concentration measurements and metabolic flux estimation. MS-type data from isotope labeling experiments is biased by naturally occurring stable isotopes (C, H, N, O, etc.). In particular, GC-MS(/MS) requires derivatization for the usually non-volatile intracellular metabolites introducing additional natural isotopes leading to measurements that do not directly represent the carbon labeling distribution. To make full use of LC- and GC-MS/MS mass isotopomer measurements, the influence of natural isotopes has to be eliminated (corrected). Our correction approach is analyzed for the two most common applications; (13)C fluxomics and isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) based metabolomics. Natural isotopes can have an impact on the calculated flux distribution which strongly depends on the substrate labeling and the actual flux distribution. Second, we show that in IDMS based metabolomics natural isotopes lead to underestimated concentrations that can and should be corrected with a nonlinear calibration. Our simulations indicate that the correction for natural abundance in isotope based fluxomics and quantitative metabolomics is essential for correct data interpretation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Assessment of international reference materials for isotope-ratio analysis (IUPAC Technical Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Vogl, Jochen; Rosner, Martin; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Since the early 1950s, the number of international measurement standards for anchoring stable isotope delta scales has mushroomed from 3 to more than 30, expanding to more than 25 chemical elements. With the development of new instrumentation, along with new and improved measurement procedures for studying naturally occurring isotopic abundance variations in natural and technical samples, the number of internationally distributed, secondary isotopic reference materials with a specified delta value has blossomed in the last six decades to more than 150 materials. More than half of these isotopic reference materials were produced for isotope-delta measurements of seven elements: H, Li, B, C, N, O, and S. The number of isotopic reference materials for other, heavier elements has grown considerably over the last decade. Nevertheless, even primary international measurement standards for isotope-delta measurements are still needed for some elements, including Mg, Fe, Te, Sb, Mo, and Ge. It is recommended that authors publish the delta values of internationally distributed, secondary isotopic reference materials that were used for anchoring their measurement results to the respective primary stable isotope scale.

  15. Preliminary results of oxygen isotope ratio measurement with a particle-gamma coincidence method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borysiuk, Maciek, E-mail: maciek.borysiuk@pixe.lth.se; Kristiansson, Per; Ros, Linus; Abdel, Nassem S.; Elfman, Mikael; Nilsson, Charlotta; Pallon, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The possibility to study variations in the oxygen isotopic ratio with photon tagged nuclear reaction analysis (pNRA) is evaluated in the current work. The experiment described in the article was performed at Lund Ion Beam Analysis Facility (LIBAF) with a 2 MeV deuteron beam. Isotopic fractionation of light elements such as carbon, oxygen and nitrogen is the basis of many analytical tools in hydrology, geology, paleobiology and paleogeology. IBA methods provide one possible tool for measurement of isotopic content. During this experimental run we focused on measurement of the oxygen isotopic ratio. The measurement of stable isotopes of oxygen has a number of applications; the particular one driving the current investigation belongs to the field of astrogeology and specifically evaluation of fossil extraterrestrial material. There are three stable isotopes of oxygen: {sup 16}O, {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O. We procured samples highly enriched with all three isotopes. Isotopes {sup 16}O and {sup 18}O were easily detected in the enriched samples, but no significant signal from {sup 17}O was detected in the same samples. The measured yield was too low to detect {sup 18}O in a sample with natural abundances of oxygen isotopes, at least in the current experimental setup, but the spectral line from the reaction with {sup 16}O was clearly visible.

  16. Isotopic separation by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, M.G.; Barre, Y.; Neige, R.

    1994-01-01

    The isotopic exchange reaction and the isotopic separation factor are first recalled; the principles of ion chromatography applied to lithium isotope separation are then reviewed (displacement chromatography) and the process is modelled in the view of dimensioning and optimizing the industrial process; the various dimensioning parameters are the isotopic separation factor, the isotopic exchange kinetics and the material flow rate. Effects of the resin type and structure are presented. Dimensioning is also affected by physico-chemical and hydraulic parameters. Industrial implementation features are also discussed. 1 fig., 1 tab., 5 refs

  17. Physics with isotopically controlled semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, E.E.

    1994-08-01

    Control of the isotopic composition of semiconductors offers a wide range of new scientific opportunities. In this paper a number of recent results obtained with isotopically pure as well as deliberately mixed diamond and Ge bulk single crystals and Ge isotope superlattices will be reviewed. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, bandstructure and lattice constant in subtle but theoretically well understood ways. Large effects are observed for thermal conductivity, local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping (NTD). Several experiments which could profit greatly from isotope control are proposed

  18. Interstellar Abundances Toward X Per, Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2014-01-01

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to measure elemental abundances in the local ISM. We examine absorption features of 0, Mg, and Si along this line of sight using spectra from the Chandra Observatory's LETG/ ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments. In general, we find that the abundances and their ratios are similar to those of young F and G stars and the most recent solar values. We compare our results with abundances required by dust grain models.

  19. Abundance variations in solar active regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, K. T.; Lemen, J. R.; Linford, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    The diversity in the published values of coronal abundances is unsettling, especially as the range of results seems to be beyond the quoted uncertainties. Measurements of the relative abundance of iron and neon derived from soft X-ray spectra of active regions are presented. From a data base of over 200 spectra taken by the Solar Maximum Mission Flat Crystal Spectrometer, it is found that the relative abundance can vary by as much as a factor of about 7 and can change on timescales of less than 1 h.

  20. Abundances of presolar silicon carbide grains in primitive meteorites determined by NanoSIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jemma; Busemann, Henner; Nittler, Larry R.; Alexander, Conel M. O.'D.; Orthous-Daunay, François-Régis; Franchi, Ian A.; Hoppe, Peter

    2014-08-01

    It has been suggested that the matrices of all chondrites are dominated by a common material with Ivuna-like (CI) abundances of volatiles, presolar grains and insoluble organic matter (IOM) (e.g., Alexander, 2005). However, matrix-normalized abundances of presolar silicon carbide (SiC) grains estimated from their noble gas components show significant variations in even the most primitive chondrites (Huss and Lewis, 1995; Huss et al., 2003), in contradiction to there being a common chondrite matrix material. Here we report presolar SiC abundances determined by NanoSIMS raster ion imaging of IOM extracted from primitive members of different meteorite groups. We show that presolar SiC abundance determinations are comparable between NanoSIMS instruments located at three different institutes, between residues prepared by different demineralization techniques, and between microtomed and non-microtomed samples. Our derived SiC abundances in CR chondrites are comparable to those found in the CI chondrites (∼30 ppm) and are much higher than previously determined by noble gas analyses. The revised higher CR SiC abundances are consistent with the CRs being amongst the most primitive chondrites in terms of the isotopic compositions and disordered nature of their organic matter. Similar abundances between CR1, CR2, and CR3 chondrites indicate aqueous alteration on the CR chondrite parent body has not progressively destroyed SiC grains in them. A low SiC abundance for the reduced CV3 RBT 04133 can be explained by parent body thermal metamorphism at an estimated temperature of ∼440 °C. Minor differences between primitive members of other meteorite classes, which did not experience such high temperatures, may be explained by prolonged oxidation at lower temperatures under which SiC grains formed outer layers of SiO2 that were not thermodynamically stable, leading to progressive degassing/destruction of SiC.

  1. Isotope techniques in the study of environmental change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency, among its efforts to promote the wider use of isotope techniques in hydrology and related environmental disciplines, organized an International Symposium on Applications of Isotope Techniques in Studying Past and Current Environmental Changes in the Hydrosphere and the Atmosphere, held in 1993 in Vienna. The broad scientific interest and abundant participation in the symposium, as well as the rapid progress seen in this field since then, encouraged the IAEA to organize a second symposium of this kind. It was held from 14 to 18 April 1997 in Vienna and brought together 177 scientists representing 46 Member States, UNESCO, FAO, WMO, the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) and the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP). The symposium was structured in five sessions of oral presentations, a poster session and a round table discussion that focused on trends and future requirements in isotope hydrology and on applications in climate and environmental research. The major themes covered by the presentations included the use of isotopic tracers in studies of atmospheric and hydrospheric changes and of the human impact on water and the environment. Special emphasis was placed on isotopic archives of climatic and environmental change. Some contributions addressed new technical approaches

  2. Stable Isotope Identification of Nitrogen Sources for United ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used natural abundance stable isotope data to evaluate nitrogen sources to U.S. west coast estuaries. We collected δ15N of macroalgae data and supplemented this with available data from the literature for estuaries from Mexico to Alaska. Stable isotope ratios of green macroalgae were compared to δ15N of dissolved inorganic nitrogen of oceanic and watershed end members. There was a latitudinal gradient in δ15N of macroalgae with southern estuaries being 7 per mil heavier than northern estuaries. Gradients in isotope data were compared to nitrogen sources estimated by the USGS using the SPARROW model. In California estuaries, the elevation of isotope data appeared to be related to anthropogenic nitrogen sources. In Oregon systems, the nitrogen levels of streams flowing into the estuaries are related to forest cover, rather than to developed land classes. In addition, the δ15N of macroalgae suggested that the ocean and nitrogen-fixing trees in the watersheds were the dominant nitrogen sources. There was also a strong gradient in δ15N of macroalgae with heavier sites located near the estuary mouth. In some Oregon estuaries, there was an elevation an elevation of δ15N above marine end members in the vicinity of wastewater treatment facility discharge locations, suggesting isotopes may be useful for distinguishing inputs along an estuarine gradient. Nutrients are the leading cause of water quality impairments in the United States, and as a result too

  3. Hg stable isotope analysis by the double-spike method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Chris; Johnson, Thomas M

    2010-06-01

    Recent publications suggest great potential for analysis of Hg stable isotope abundances to elucidate sources and/or chemical processes that control the environmental impact of mercury. We have developed a new MC-ICP-MS method for analysis of mercury isotope ratios using the double-spike approach, in which a solution containing enriched (196)Hg and (204)Hg is mixed with samples and provides a means to correct for instrumental mass bias and most isotopic fractionation that may occur during sample preparation and introduction into the instrument. Large amounts of isotopic fractionation induced by sample preparation and introduction into the instrument (e.g., by batch reactors) are corrected for. This may greatly enhance various Hg pre-concentration methods by correcting for minor fractionation that may occur during preparation and removing the need to demonstrate 100% recovery. Current precision, when ratios are normalized to the daily average, is 0.06 per thousand, 0.06 per thousand, 0.05 per thousand, and 0.05 per thousand (2sigma) for (202)Hg/(198)Hg, (201)Hg/(198)Hg, (200)Hg/(198)Hg, and (199)Hg/(198)Hg, respectively. This is slightly better than previously published methods. Additionally, this precision was attained despite the presence of large amounts of other Hg isotopes (e.g., 5.0% atom percent (198)Hg) in the spike solution; substantially better precision could be achieved if purer (196)Hg were used.

  4. Abundance analyses of thirty cool carbon stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, Kazuhiko

    1985-01-01

    The results were previously obtained by use of the absolute gf-values and the cosmic abundance as a standard. These gf-values were found to contain large systematic errors, and as a result, the solar photospheric abundances were revised. Our previous results, therefore, must be revised by using new gf-values, and abundance analyses are extended for as many carbon stars as possible. In conclusion, in normal cool carbon stars heavy metals are overabundant by factors of 10 - 100 and rare-earth elements are overabundant by a factor of about 10, and in J-type cool carbon stars, C 12 /C 13 ratio is smaller, C 2 and CN bands and Li 6708 are stronger than in normal cool carbon stars, and the abundances of s-process elements with respect to Fe are nearly normal. (Mori, K.)

  5. Palaeoceanographic implications of abundance and mean ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Temporal variation in abundance and mean proloculus diameter of the benthic foraminiferal species. Epistominella ... sediments, ice cores, tree rings, corals, etc. are used. ..... Deep-sea foraminifera in the South Atlantic Ocean: Eco- logy and ...

  6. Chinook Abundance - Linear Features [ds181

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The dataset 'ds181_Chinook_ln' is a product of the CalFish Adult Salmonid Abundance Database. Data in this shapefile are collected from stream sections or reaches...

  7. SWFSC/MMTD: Vaquita Abundance Survey 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1997, the Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC) conducted a survey designed to estimate the abundance of vaquita, the Gulf of California harbor porpoise...

  8. Abundance estimation of spectrally similar minerals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates a spectral unmixing method for estimating the partial abundance of spectrally similar minerals in complex mixtures. The method requires formulation of a linear function of individual spectra of individual minerals. The first...

  9. Heavy element abundances of Nova Cygni 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferland, G.J.; Shields, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    McDonald observations of the nebular phase of the outburst of Nova Cygni 1975 are analyzed to measure the abundances of several heavy elements. A new analytical procedure is used to derive the electron density and temperature from the emission line intensities of [O III], [Ne III], and He I observed between days 40 and 120. These physical conditions are used to derive the abundances. We find that Fe has approximately a solar abundance, whereas C, N, O, and Ne are enhanced by factors approx.20 to 100. The enhanced abundance of neon was theoretically unexpected.The derived physical conditions and line intensities are compared with predictions of an equilibrium photoionization model. The model successfully predicts the intensities of He I, [O III], and [Ne III]; but it underestimates the strength of [Ne V] and [Fe VII], which may originate in a mechanically heated ''subcoronal'' line region

  10. Influence of 15N enrichment on the net isotopic fractionation factor during the reduction of nitrate to nitrous oxide in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathieu, O.; Levegue, J.; Henault, C.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas, is mainly emitted from soils during the denitrification process. Nitrogen stable-isotope investigations can help to characterise the N(2)O source and N(2)O production mechanisms. The stable-isotope approach is increasingly used with (15)N natural abundance...

  11. Reconstruction of trophic pathways between plankton and the North Iberian sardine (Sardina pilchardus using stable isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Bode

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Feeding on phyto- and zooplankton by juvenile (< 1 year old and adult sardines (Sardina pilchardus was inferred from analyses of natural abundance of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in samples from the northwestern Iberian Peninsula (Spain collected at the beginning of the upwelling season and peak spawning period of sardine. Plankton samples were fractionated through nets of 20, 200, 500, 1000 and 2000 ?m mesh-size and the muscle protein of individual sardines was isolated before isotopic determinations. Up to six planktonic components and two sardine feeding types were identified from the modes in the frequency distributions of isotope abundance values. Also, the most probable pathways for carbon and nitrogen flows between compartments were analysed. The resulting food web revealed a relatively large degree of omnivory, both in plankton and sardine components, which confirms that complex trophic interactions could also occur in pelagic upwelling ecosystems. Young sardines had isotope abundance values clustered around a single mode in the frequency distribution, while adult sardines displayed two main modes. These modes are interpreted as representative of two extreme feeding types: one related to the individual capture of zooplankton prey and the other to unselective filter-feeding. Although both types of feeding could include micro- (20-200 ?m and mesozooplankton (200-2000 ?m prey, phytoplankton appears to be ingested mainly by filter-feeding. However, even adult sardines must be mainly zoophagous to achieve the observed isotopic abundance values, taking into account current assumptions on stable isotope enrichment through trophic levels. From the differences in the resulting pathways using either carbon or nitrogen isotopes, we interpreted that sardines acquire most of the protein nitrogen from zooplankton while a substantial fraction of their carbon would derive from phytoplankton. These interpretations agree with the information

  12. Good abundances from bad spectra - I. Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. Bryn; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1996-01-01

    Stellar spectra derived from multiple-object fibre-fed spectroscopic radial-velocity surveys, of the type feasible with, among other examples, AUTOFIB, 2dF, HYDRA, NESSIE, and the Sloan survey, differ significantly from those traditionally used for determination of stellar abundances. The spectra tend to be of moderate resolution (around 1A) and signal-to-noise ratio (around 10-20 per resolution element), and cannot usually have reliable continuum shapes determined over wavelength ranges in excess of a few tens of Angstroms. None the less, with care and a calibration of stellar effective temperature from photometry, independent of the spectroscopy, reliable iron abundances can be derived. We have developed techniques to extract true iron abundances and surface gravities from low-signal-to-noise ratio, intermediate-resolution spectra of G-type stars in the 4000-5000A wavelength region. Spectroscopic indices sensitive to iron abundance and gravity are defined from a set of narrow (few-several A wide) wavelength intervals. The indices are calibrated theoretically using synthetic spectra. Given adequate data and a photometrically determined effective temperature, one can derive estimates of the stellar iron abundance and surface gravity. We have also defined a single abundance indicator for the analysis of very low-signal-to-noise ratio spectra; with the further assumption of a value for the stellar surface gravity, this is able to provide useful iron abundance information from spectra having signal-to-noise ratios as low as 10 (1-A elements). The theoretical basis and calibration using synthetic spectra are described in this paper. The empirical calibration of these techniques by application to observational data is described in a separate paper (Jones, Wyse & Gilmore). The technique provides precise iron abundances, with zero-point correct to ~0.1 dex, and is reliable, with typical uncertainties being <~0.2 dex. A derivation of the in situ thick disc metallicity

  13. Chemical Abundances in SFG and DLA

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.; König, Brigitte; Cherinka, Brian

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the chemical abundances of local star-forming galaxies which cause Damped Lyman Alpha lines. A metallicity versus redshift diagram is constructed, on which the chemical abundances of low-redshift star-forming galaxy populations are compared with those of high-redshift Damped Lyman Alpha systems. We disucss two types of experiments on individual star-forming galaxies. In the first, the Damped Lyman Alpha line is created against an internal ultraviolet light source generated by a...

  14. Composition and abundance of tree regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd F. Hutchinson; Elaine Kennedy Sutherland; Charles T. Scott

    2003-01-01

    The composition and abundance of tree seedlings and saplings in the four study areas in southern Ohio were related to soil moisture via a GIS-derived integrated moisture index and to soil texture and fertility. For seedlings, the total abundance of small stems (less than 30 cm tall) was significantly greater on xeric plots (81,987/ha) than on intermediate (54,531/ha)...

  15. Abundance of lithium in Pleiades F stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilachowski, C.A.; Booth, J.; Hobbs, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    The abundance of lithium has been determined for 18 stars in the Pleiades cluster with spectral types from A7V to G0V. The pronounced dip in the lithium abundance among the mid-F stars which has been reported for other, older star clusters is not present in the Pleiades. The removal of lithium from the surfaces of middle-F dwarfs therefore occurs principally after about 100 Myr on the main sequence. 25 references

  16. Bringing organic carbon isotopes and phytoliths to the table as additional constraints on paleoelevation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, N. D.; Cotton, J. M.; Hren, M. T.; Hyland, E. G.; Smith, S. Y.; Strömberg, C. A. E.

    2015-12-01

    A commonly used tool in paleotectonic and paleoaltimetry studies is the oxygen isotopic composition of authigenic carbonates formed that formed in lakes or soils, with both spatial (e.g., shoreline to mountain top) or temporally resolved records potentially providing constraints. However, in many cases there is a substantial spread in the oxygen isotope data for a given time period, often to the point of allowing for essentially any interpretation of the data depending upon how they have been used by the investigator. One potential way of distinguishing between different potential paleotectonic or paleoaltimetric interpretations is to use carbon isotope and plant microfossil (phytolith) analyses from the same paleosols to screen the oxygen isotope data by looking for evidence of evaporative enrichment. For example, if both inorganic (carbonate) and organic carbon isotopes are measured from the same paleosol, then in it possible to determine if the two isotope record equilibrium conditions or if they record disequilibrium driven by kinetic effects. In the former case, the oxygen isotope results can be considered reliable whereas in the latter case, the oxygen isotope results can be considered unreliable and could be culled from the interpretation. Similarly, because the distribution of C4 plants varies as a function of temperature and elevation, the presence/absence or abundance of C4 plant phytoliths, or of carbon isotope compositions that require a component of C4 vegetation can also be used to constrain paleoelevation by providing a maximum elevation constraint. Worked examples will include the late Miocene-Pliocene of Catamarca, Argentina, where phytoliths and organic carbon isotopes provide a maximum elevation constraint and can be used to demonstrate that oxygen isotopes do not provide a locally useful constraint on paleoelevation, and Eocene-Miocene of southwestern Montana where organic matter and phytoliths can be used to select between different potential

  17. Production of stable isotopes utilizing the plasma separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, T. S.; Tarallo, F. J.; Stevenson, N. R.

    2005-12-01

    A plasma separation process (PSP) is being operated at Theragenics Corporation's®, Oak Ridge, TN, facility for the enrichment of stable isotopes. The PSP utilizes ion cyclotron mass discrimination to separate isotopes on a relatively large scale. With a few exceptions, nearly any metallic element could be processed with PSP. Output isotope enrichment factor depends on natural abundance and mass separation and can be fairly high in some cases. The Theragenics™ PSP facility is believed to be the only such process currently in operation. This system was developed and formerly operated under the US Department of Energy Advanced Isotope Separation program. Theragenics™ also has a laboratory at the PSP site capable of harvesting the isotopes from the process and a mass spectrometer system for analyzing enrichment and product purity. Since becoming operational in 2002, Theragenics™ has utilized the PSP to separate isotopes of several elements including: dysprosium, erbium, gadolinium, molybdenum and nickel. Currently, Theragenics™ is using the PSP for the separation of 102Pd, which is used as precursor for the production of 103Pd. The 103Pd radioisotope is the active ingredient in TheraSeed®, which is used in the treatment of early stage prostate cancer and being investigated for other medical applications. New industrial, medical and research applications are being investigated for isotopes that can be enriched on the PSP. Pre-enrichment of accelerator or reactor targets offers improved radioisotope production. Theragenics operates 14 cyclotrons for proton activation and has access to HFIR at ORNL for neutron activation of radioisotopes.

  18. TEA: A CODE CALCULATING THERMOCHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM ABUNDANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver, E-mail: jasmina@physics.ucf.edu [Planetary Sciences Group, Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature–pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows and Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows and Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  19. TEA: A CODE CALCULATING THERMOCHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM ABUNDANCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature–pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows and Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows and Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  20. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldor, A.; Rabinowitz, P.

    1979-01-01

    A method of separating the isotopes of an element is described, which comprises the steps of (i) subjecting molecules of a gaseous compound of the element simultaneously to two infrared radiations of different wavelengths, the first radiation having a wavelength which corresponds to an absorption band of the compound, which in turn corresponds to a mode of molecular motion in which there is participation by atoms of the element, and the second radiation having a power density greater than 10 6 watts per cm 2 , thereby exciting molecules of the compound in an isotopically selective manner, this step being conducted in such manner that the excited molecules either receive a level of energy sufficient to cause them to undergo conversion by unimolecular decomposition or receive a level of energy sufficient to cause them to undergo conversion by reaction with molecules of another gas present for that purpose; and (ii) separating and recovering converted molecules from unconverted molecules. (author)

  1. Decontamination of radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despotovic, R.; Music, S.; Subotic, B.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    Removal of radioactive isotopes under controlled conditions is determined by a number of physical and chemical properties considered radiocontaminating and by the characteristics of the contaminated object. Determination of quantitative and qualitative factors for equilibrium in a contamination-decontamination system provides the basis for rational and successful decontamination. The decontamination of various ''solid/liquid'' systems is interesting from the scientific and technological point of view. These systems are of great importance in radiation protection (decontamination of various surfaces, liquids, drinking water, fixation or collection of radiocontaminants). Different types of decontamination systems are discussed. The dependence of rate and efficiency of the preparation conditions and on the ageing of the scavenger is described. The influence of coagulating electrolyte on radioactive isotope fixation efficiency was also determined. The fixation of fission radionuclide on oxide scavengers has been studied. The connection between fundamental investigations and practical decontamination of the ''solid/liquid'' systems is discussed. (author)

  2. Cyclotrons for isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, B.F.; Stevenson, N.R.

    1995-06-01

    Cyclotrons continue to be efficient accelerators for radioisotope production. In recent years, developments in the accelerator technology have greatly increased the practical beam current in these machines while also improving the overall system reliability. These developments combined with the development of new isotopes for medicine and industry, and a retiring of older machines indicates a strong future for commercial cyclotrons. In this paper we will survey recent developments in the areas of cyclotron technology, and isotope production, as they relate to the new generation of commercial cyclotrons. We will also discuss the possibility of systems capable of extracted energies up to 100 MeV and extracted beam currents of up to 2.0 mA. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  3. Rechargeable radioactive isotope generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, A.K.; Cerone, F.E.

    1978-01-01

    The description is given of a rechargeable radioactive isotope generator having the following features: a box containing a transport shield, a shielded generator including elements for the absorption and holding of the parent isotope, an eluant tank, a first pipe causing this tank to communicate with the transport shield, a second pipe causing this transport shield to communicate with the shielded generator and a third pipe placing the shielded generator in communication with the outside of the unit. It also includes a shelf across the external front part of the unit a part of which is shielded by external components, a shielded elution flask in which the eluate is poured and a filter set at a point between the flask and the third pipe [fr

  4. Equipment for isotope diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platz, W.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns an improvement of equipment for isotope diagnostics allowing to mark special intensity ranges of the recorded measurements by means of different colors. For undisturbed operation it is of advantage to avoid electric circuits between movable and unmovable parts of the color recorder. According to the invention, long gear wheels of glass fiber-reinforced polyamide are used for these connections. (ORU) [de

  5. Stable isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibari, Elghali; Taous, Fouad; Marah, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    This report presents results related to stable isotopes analysis carried out at the CNESTEN DASTE in Rabat (Morocco), on behalf of Senegal. These analyzes cover 127 samples. These results demonstrate that Oxygen-18 and Deuterium in water analysis were performed by infrared Laser spectroscopy using a LGR / DLT-100 with Autosampler. Also, the results are expressed in δ values (‰) relative to V-SMOW to ± 0.3 ‰ for oxygen-18 and ± 1 ‰ for deuterium.

  6. Stable-isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Structures of bacteriochlorophyll b and the Krasnovskii photoreduction products of chlorophyll a are given. All 55 13 C and 4 15 N NMR transitions in chlorophyl a and its magnesium-free derivative pheophytin a were assigned. ESR of triplet states of chlorophylls a, b, c/sub z/, and c 2 and bacteriochlorophyll a are reported. Experiments in the cultivation of 13 C-enriched morning glory plants indicated that the isotope enrichment can produce observable morphological changes. (U.S.)

  7. Protected isotope heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, R.K.; Shure, L.I.; Katzen, E.D.

    1975-01-01

    A radioactive isotope capsule is disposed in a container (heat shield) which will have a single stable trim attitude when reentering the earth's atmosphere and while falling to earth. The center of gravity of the heat source is located forward of the midpoint between the front face and the rear face of the container. The capsule is insulated from the front face of the container but not from the rear surface of the container. (auth)

  8. Isotopes and agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malavolta, E.

    1988-01-01

    The agriculture is defined as the art of desturbing the ecosystems in economical terms with the minimum of irreversible damage. Man survival in the biosphere will depend on its ability of using four technologies - mechanization, fertilizers, irrigation and pest disease control. The isotopes are usefull to establish means of producing more food and to preserve it; and clains of unbearable damages to the ecosystems caused by fertilizers and pesticides are not true, are presented. (author) [pt

  9. Isotopic safeguards statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmerman, C.L.; Stewart, K.B.

    1978-06-01

    The methods and results of our statistical analysis of isotopic data using isotopic safeguards techniques are illustrated using example data from the Yankee Rowe reactor. The statistical methods used in this analysis are the paired comparison and the regression analyses. A paired comparison results when a sample from a batch is analyzed by two different laboratories. Paired comparison techniques can be used with regression analysis to detect and identify outlier batches. The second analysis tool, linear regression, involves comparing various regression approaches. These approaches use two basic types of models: the intercept model (y = α + βx) and the initial point model [y - y 0 = β(x - x 0 )]. The intercept model fits strictly the exposure or burnup values of isotopic functions, while the initial point model utilizes the exposure values plus the initial or fabricator's data values in the regression analysis. Two fitting methods are applied to each of these models. These methods are: (1) the usual least squares fitting approach where x is measured without error, and (2) Deming's approach which uses the variance estimates obtained from the paired comparison results and considers x and y are both measured with error. The Yankee Rowe data were first measured by Nuclear Fuel Services (NFS) and remeasured by Nuclear Audit and Testing Company (NATCO). The ratio of Pu/U versus 235 D (in which 235 D is the amount of depleted 235 U expressed in weight percent) using actual numbers is the isotopic function illustrated. Statistical results using the Yankee Rowe data indicates the attractiveness of Deming's regression model over the usual approach by simple comparison of the given regression variances with the random variance from the paired comparison results

  10. Dual isotope assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.F.W.; Stevens, R.A.J.; Jacoby, B.

    1980-01-01

    Dual isotope assays for thyroid function are performed by carrying out a radio-immunoassay for two of thyroxine (T4), tri-iodothyronine (T3), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroxine binding globulin (TBG), by a method wherein a version of one of the thyroid components, preferably T4 or T3 is labelled with Selenium-75 and the version of the other thyroid component is labelled with a different radionuclide, preferably Iodine-125. (author)

  11. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  12. Method of deuterium isotope separation and enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, S.W.

    1980-01-01

    A method of deuterium isotope separation and enrichment using infrared laser technology in combination with chemical processes for treating and recycling the unreacted and deuterium-depleted starting materials is described. Organic molecules of the formula RX (where R is an ethyl, isopropyl, t-butyl, or cyclopentenyl group and X is F, Cl, Br or OH) containing a normal abundance of hydrogen and deuterium are exposed to intense laser infrared radiation. An olefin containing deuterium (olefin D) will be formed, along with HX. The enriched olefin D can be stripped from the depleted stream of RX and HX, and can be burned to form enriched water or pyrolyzed to produce hydrogen gas with elevated deuterium content. The depleted RX is decomposed to olefins and RX, catalytically exchanged with normal water to restore the deuterium content to natural levels, and recombined to form RX which can be recycled. (LL)

  13. Influence of chemical structure on carbon isotope composition of lignite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdenetsogt, Bat-Orshikh; Lee, Insung; Ko, Yoon-Joo; Mungunchimeg, Batsaikhan

    2017-04-01

    During the last two decades, a number of studies on carbon isotopes in terrestrial organic matter (OM) have been carried out and used to determine changes in paleoatmospheric δ13C value as well as assisting in paleoclimate analysis. Coal is abundant terrestrial OM. However, application of its δ13C value is very limited, because the understanding of changes in isotopic composition during coalification is relatively insufficient. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the chemical structure on the carbon isotope composition of lignite. Generally, lignite has more complex chemical structures than other higher rank coal because of the existence of various types of oxygen-containing functional groups that are eliminated at higher rank level. A total of sixteen Lower Cretaceous lignite samples from Baganuur mine (Mongolia) were studied by ultimate, stable carbon isotope and solid-state 13C CP/MAS NMR analyses. The carbon contents of the samples increase with increase in depth, whereas oxygen content decreases continuously. This is undoubtedly due to normal coalification process and also consistent with solid state NMR results. The δ13C values of the samples range from -23.54‰ to -21.34‰ and are enriched in 13C towards the lowermost samples. Based on the deconvolution of the NMR spectra, the ratios between carbons bonded to oxygen (60-90 ppm and 135-220 ppm) over carbons bonded to carbon and hydrogen (0-50 ppm and 90-135 ppm) were calculated for the samples. These correlate well with δ13C values (R2 0.88). The results indicate that the δ13C values of lignite are controlled by two mechanisms: (i) depletion in 13C as a result of loss of isotopically heavy oxygen-bounded carbons and (ii) enrichment in 13C caused by a loss of isotopically light methane from aliphatic and aromatic carbons. At the rank of lignite, coal is enriched in 13C because the amount of isotopically heavy CO2 and CO, released from coal as a result of changes in the chemical

  14. Diffusive Fractionation of Lithium Isotopes in Olivine Grain Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolova, V.; Watson, E. B.

    2012-12-01

    Diffusive fractionation of isotopes has been documented in silicate melts, aqueous fluids, and single crystals. In polycrystalline rocks, the meeting place of two grains, or grain boundaries, may also be a site of diffusive fractionation of isotopes. We have undertaken an experimental and modeling approach to investigate diffusive fractionation of lithium (Li) isotopes by grain boundary diffusion. The experimental procedure consists of packing a Ni metal capsule with predominantly ground San Carlos olivine and subjecting the capsule to 1100C and 1GPa for two days in a piston cylinder apparatus to create a nominally dry, 'dunite rock'. After this synthesis step, the capsule is sectioned and polished. One of the polished faces of the 'dunite rock' is then juxtaposed to a source material of spodumene and this diffusion couple is subject to the same experimental conditions as the synthesis step. Li abundances and isotopic profiles (ratios of count rates) were analyzed using LA-ICP-MS. Li concentrations linearly decrease away from the source from 550ppm to the average concentration of the starting olivine (2.5ppm). As a function of distance from the source, the 7Li/6Li ratio decreases to a minimum before increasing to the background ratio of the 'dunite rock'. The 7Li/6Li ratio minimum coincides with the lowest Li concentrations above average 'dunite rock' abundances. The initial decrease in the 7Li/6Li ratio is similar to that seen in other studies of diffusive fractionation of isotopes and is thought to be caused by the higher diffusivity (D) of the lighter isotope relative to the heavier isotope. The relationship between D and mass (m) is given by (D1/D2) =(m2/m1)^β, where β is an empirical fractionation factor; 1 and 2 denote the lighter and heavier isotope, respectively. A fit to the Li isotopic data reveals an effective DLi of ~1.2x10^-12 m/s^2 and a β of 0.1. Numerical modelling was utilized to elucidate the relationship between diffusive fractionation

  15. Nitrogen 15 abundance in protein fractions of beans fertilized with ({sup 15}NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaud, Saula Goulart; Oliveira, Admar Costa de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Estudos Agricolas. Dept. de Planejamento Alimentar e Nutricao; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Isotopos Estaveis]. E-mail: admarco@fea.unicamp.br

    2002-12-01

    Studies evaluating the protein nutritive value of beans labelled with 15 N, using nitrogen balance and the quantitation of faecal and urinary endogenous nitrogen, determined by isotopic dilution, have been extensively used. The objective of this research was to verify if the isotopic labelling of raw, freeze dried beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cultivar Pirata 1) with 1.394 atoms % 15 N, resulted in the same abundance of the whole flour and of the protein fractions extracted from the beans with 0.5 mol L{sup -1} NaCl. The isotopic abundance found in the whole bean flour, in the protein extract, in the globulin and albumin fractions were respectively: 1.394 +- 0.011; 1.403 +- 0.012; 1.399 +- 0.007 and 1.399 +- 0.028 atoms % of 15 N, presenting no difference (P > 0.05). However, a difference was found (P < 0.05) between the above mentioned abundances and the isotopic abundance found in the nitrogen of the proteins in the extraction residue, which was 0.969 +- 0.084. Since the abundances did not differ, the protein nutritive indexes, such as digestibility and biological value, determined from the nitrogen balance and corrected for isotopic dilution, would not be affected by extracting the proteins from the beans with 0.5 mol L 1 NaCl. If working with the nitrogen balance of the residual proteins after extraction and even with the whole flours, these indexes could present incorrect values, since the isotopic labelling of the residual proteins was less than that of the protein fractions. (author)

  16. Clustering in the stellar abundance space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesso, R.; Rocha-Pinto, H. J.

    2018-03-01

    We have studied the chemical enrichment history of the interstellar medium through an analysis of the n-dimensional stellar abundance space. This work is a non-parametric analysis of the stellar chemical abundance space. The main goal is to study the stars from their organization within this abundance space. Within this space, we seek to find clusters (in a statistical sense), that is, stars likely to share similar chemo-evolutionary history, using two methods: the hierarchical clustering and the principal component analysis. We analysed some selected abundance surveys available in the literature. For each sample, we labelled the group of stars according to its average abundance curve. In all samples, we identify the existence of a main enrichment pattern of the stars, which we call chemical enrichment flow. This flow is set by the structured and well-defined mean rate at which the abundances of the interstellar medium increase, resulting from the mixture of the material ejected from the stars and stellar mass-loss and interstellar medium gas. One of the main results of our analysis is the identification of subgroups of stars with peculiar chemistry. These stars are situated in regions outside of the enrichment flow in the abundance space. These peculiar stars show a mismatch in the enrichment rate of a few elements, such as Mg, Si, Sc and V, when compared to the mean enrichment rate of the other elements of the same stars. We believe that the existence of these groups of stars with peculiar chemistry may be related to the accretion of planetary material on to stellar surfaces or may be due to production of the same chemical element by different nucleosynthetic sites.

  17. 15N and 13C abundances in marine environments with emphasis on biogeochemical structure of food networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, E.

    1987-01-01

    Distributions of δ 15 N and δ 13 C for biogenic substances in the Antarctic Ocean and in the Otsuchi River estuary in Japan were investigated to construct isotope biogeochemical framework for assessing marine ecosystems. The isotopic compositions of phytoplankton were particularly low in the Antarctic Ocean. High nitrate and CO 2 concentrations in the surface sea waters, and the low light intensity seem to enhance the kinetic isotope fractionations that preferred the depletion of 15 N and 13 C in the algal body. A clear-cut linear relationship between animal δ 15 N and its trophic level was obtained in the Antarctic system. In the estuary, the variation of isotope ratios were principally governed by the mixing of land-derived organic matter, marine phytoplankton, and seagrasses. A food-chain effect of 15 N enrichment was also confirmed. An isotopically ordered structure was presented for a marine estuarine ecosystem. The isotopic abundances in a food network vary mainly because of the variation in 15 N and 13 C contents of primary producers grown under different environmental conditions and because of the enrichment of 15 N along food chains. (author)

  18. Isotope effects on chemical equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golding, P.D.

    1974-01-01

    The thermodynamic equilibrium constants of three deuterated substituted acetic acids are reported. The calculation of secondary isotope effects of the second kind for the three isotopic acid pairs has been accomplished by the appropriate comparison of thermodynamic equilibrium constants, and by the comparison of isotopic slopes. The effect of substituent variation on the isotope effects reported here disqualifies the simple inductive model as a legitimate description of secondary isotope effects of the second kind. The correlation of diminishing isotope effect per deuterium atom with increasing acidity is also invalidated by the present results. The syntheses of 9-thia-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene-9-oxide and thioxanthene-10-oxide are described. These compounds have been partially deuterated at their respective methylene positions. Spectral evidence indicates stereoselectivity of the methylene protons in the exchange reactions of both compounds. (author)

  19. Therapeutic use of radioactive isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Caroline Duc

    2013-01-01

    In December, researchers from ISOLDE-CERN, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) published the results of an in vivo study which successfully proved the effectiveness of four terbium isotopes for diagnosing and treating cancerous tumours.   Four terbium isotopes suitable for clinical purposes. “ISOLDE is the only installation capable of supplying terbium isotopes of such purity and intensity in the case of three out of the four types used in this study,” explains Karl Johnson, a physicist at ISOLDE.  “Producing over a thousand different isotopes, our equipment offers the widest choice of isotopes in the world!” Initially intended for fundamental physics research, ISOLDE has diversified its activities over time to invest in various projects in the materials science, biochemistry and nuclear medicine fields. The proof-of-concept study has confirmed that the four terbium isotopes 149Tb, 152Tb, 155Tb produ...

  20. Preparation of isotopically enriched mercury sulphide targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szerypo, J.; Friebel, H.U.; Frischke, D.; Grossman, R.; Maier, H.J. [Dept. fuer Physik, Univ. Muenchen (LMU) (Germany); Maier-Leibnitz-Lab. (MLL), Garching (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The primary difficulty in performing nuclear reactions on mercury is to obtain a suitable target. The primary difficulty in performing nuclear reactions on mercury is to obtain a suitable target. The utilization of amalgam targets has been reported in early publications. These targets, however, were lacking homogeneity and in-beam stability. A thorough investigation of literature shows, that HgS, because of its comparatively high chemical and mechanical stability, is one of the more adequate Hg compounds for accelerator target applications. In this presentation we describe the production of HgS targets consisting of an enriched Hg isotope and S of natural isotopic abundance, starting up from HgO. Following the outline given in [3], in this special case HgS can be prepared by dissolving HgO in diluted HNO{sub 3} and subsequent precipitation of the black HgS modification with gaseous H{sub 2}S. Last step of the target production procedure is evaporation-condensation of HgS in vacuum. In the present case, HgS layers of 500 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} on a backing carbon foil of 26 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} with a protective carbon layer of about 20 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} thickness on top of the HgS layer were produced. (orig.)

  1. Stable isotope enrichment by thermal diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasaru, Gheorghe

    2003-01-01

    Thermal diffusion (TD) in both gaseous and liquid phase has been the subject of extensive experimental and theoretical investigations, especially after the invention by K. Clusius and G. Dickel of the thermal diffusion column, sixty years ago. This paper gives a brief overview of the most important applications and developments of this transport phenomenon for enrichment of 13 C and of some noble gases isotopes in our institute. The results of calculations of the transport coefficients H and K for a concentric tube type TD column, operated with methane as process gas, are presented. Static separation factor at equilibrium vs gas pressure has been calculated for various molecular models. The experimental separation factors for different gas pressure were found to be consistent with those calculated for the inverse power repulsion model and the Lennard-Jones model. The most important characteristics of a seven-stage cascade consisting of 19 TD columns of concentric tube type are given. This system has been constructed and successfully operated at a temperature of 673 K and produces an enrichment of methane of natural isotopic 13 C abundance, up to the concentration of 25% 13 CH 4 . Enrichment of the noble gases isotopes implies: - a . Enrichment of 20 Ne and 22 Ne in a eight-stage cascade consisting of 8 TD columns; - b. enrichment of 46 Ar in a seven-stage cascade consisting of TD columns and finally; - c. enrichment of 78 Kr and 86 Kr in a fifteen-stage cascade, consisting of 35 TD columns. For all these installations we have adopted TD columns of hot wire type (4 m in length), operated at a temperature of 1073 K. (author)

  2. French days on stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    These first French days on stable isotopes took place in parallel with the 1. French days of environmental chemistry. Both conferences had common plenary sessions. The conference covers all aspects of the use of stable isotopes in the following domains: medicine, biology, environment, tracer techniques, agronomy, food industry, geology, petroleum geochemistry, cosmo-geochemistry, archaeology, bio-geochemistry, hydrology, climatology, nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, isotope separations etc.. Abstracts available on CD-Rom only. (J.S.)

  3. Bracken: estimating species abundance in metagenomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomic experiments attempt to characterize microbial communities using high-throughput DNA sequencing. Identification of the microorganisms in a sample provides information about the genetic profile, population structure, and role of microorganisms within an environment. Until recently, most metagenomics studies focused on high-level characterization at the level of phyla, or alternatively sequenced the 16S ribosomal RNA gene that is present in bacterial species. As the cost of sequencing has fallen, though, metagenomics experiments have increasingly used unbiased shotgun sequencing to capture all the organisms in a sample. This approach requires a method for estimating abundance directly from the raw read data. Here we describe a fast, accurate new method that computes the abundance at the species level using the reads collected in a metagenomics experiment. Bracken (Bayesian Reestimation of Abundance after Classification with KrakEN uses the taxonomic assignments made by Kraken, a very fast read-level classifier, along with information about the genomes themselves to estimate abundance at the species level, the genus level, or above. We demonstrate that Bracken can produce accurate species- and genus-level abundance estimates even when a sample contains multiple near-identical species.

  4. Abundance of sea kraits correlates with precipitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey B Lillywhite

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that sea kraits (Laticauda spp.--amphibious sea snakes--dehydrate without a source of fresh water, drink only fresh water or very dilute brackish water, and have a spatial distribution of abundance that correlates with freshwater sites in Taiwan. The spatial distribution correlates with sites where there is a source of fresh water in addition to local precipitation. Here we report six years of longitudinal data on the abundance of sea kraits related to precipitation at sites where these snakes are normally abundant in the coastal waters of Lanyu (Orchid Island, Taiwan. The number of observed sea kraits varies from year-to-year and correlates positively with previous 6-mo cumulative rainfall, which serves as an inverse index of drought. Grouped data for snake counts indicate that mean abundance in wet years is nearly 3-fold greater than in dry years, and this difference is significant. These data corroborate previous findings and suggest that freshwater dependence influences the abundance or activity of sea kraits on both spatial and temporal scales. The increasing evidence for freshwater dependence in these and other marine species have important implications for the possible impact of climate change on sea snake distributions.

  5. Seismological measurement of solar helium abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorontsov, S.V.; Pamyatnykh, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    The internal structure and evolution of the Sun depends on its chemical composition, particularly the helium abundance. In addition, the helium abundance in the solar envelope is thought to represent the protosolar value, making it a datum of cosmological significance. Spectroscopic measurements of the helium abundance are uncertain, and the most reliable estimates until now have come from the calibration of solar evolutionary models. The frequencies of solar acoustic oscillations are sensitive, however, to the behaviour of the speed of sound in the Sun's helium ionization zone, which allows a helioseismological determination of the helium abundance. Sound-speed inversion of helioseismological data can be used for this purpose, but precise frequency measurements of high-degree oscillation modes are needed. Here we describe a new approach based on an analysis of the phase shift of acoustic waves of intermediate-degree modes. From the accurate intermediate-mode data now available, we obtain a helium mass fraction Y=0.25±0.01 in the solar convection zone, significantly smaller than the value Y=0.27-0.29 predicted by recent solar evolutionary models. The discrepancy indicates either that initial helium abundance was reduced in the envelope by downward diffusion or that the protosolar value was lower than currently accepted. (author)

  6. Deuterium abundance, from ultraviolet to visible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebrard, Guillaume

    2000-01-01

    In the frame of the standard Big Bang model, the primordial abundance of deuterium is the most sensitive to the baryonic density of the Universe. It was synthesized only during the primordial nucleosynthesis few minutes after the Big Bang and no other standard mechanism is able to produce any further significant amount. On the contrary, since deuterium is burned up within stars, its abundance D/H decreases along cosmic evolution. Thus, D/H measurements constrain Big Bang and galactic chemical evolution models. There are three samples of deuterium abundances: primordial, proto-solar and interstellar. Each of them is representative of a given epoch, respectively about 15 Gyrs past, 4.5 Gyrs past and present epoch. Although the evolution of the deuterium abundance seems to be qualitatively understood, the measurements show some dispersion. Present thesis works are linked to deuterium interstellar abundance measurements. Such measurements are classically obtained from spectroscopic observations of the hydrogen and deuterium Lyman series in absorption in the ultraviolet spectral range, using space observatories. Results presented here were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope and FUSE, which has recently been launched. Simultaneously, a new way to observe deuterium has been proposed, in the visible spectral range from ground-based telescopes. This has led to the first detections and the identification of the deuterium Balmer series, in emission in HII regions, using CFHT and VLT telescopes. (author) [fr

  7. Isotope correlation techniques for verifying input accountability measurements at a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, H.; Nakahara, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Isotope correlation techniques were studied to verify input accountability measurements at a reprocessing plant. On the basis of a historical data bank, correlation between plutonium-to-uranium ratio and isotopic variables was derived as a function of burnup. The burnup was determined from the isotopic ratios of uranium and plutonium, too. Data treatment was therefore made in an iterative manner. The isotopic variables were defined to cover a wide spectrum of isotopes of uranium and plutonium. The isotope correlation techniques evaluated important parameters such as the fuel burnup, the most probable ratio of plutonium to uranium, and the amounts of uranium and plutonium in reprocessing batches in connection with fresh fuel fabrication data. In addition, the most probable values of isotope abundance of plutonium and uranium could be estimated from the plutonium-to-uranium ratio determined, being compared with the reported data for verification. A pocket-computer-based system was developed to enable inspectors to collect and evaluate data in a timely fashion at the input accountability measurement point by the isotope correlation techniques. The device is supported by battery power and completely independent of the operator's system. The software of the system was written in BASIC. The data input can be stored in a cassette tape and transferred into a higher level computer. The correlations used for the analysis were given as a form of analytical function. Coefficients for the function were provided relevant to the type of reactor and the initial enrichment of fuel. (author)

  8. Water enriched in the rare stable isotopes : Preparation, measurement and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faghihi, Vahideh

    2016-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is water with increased abundances of the rare stable isotopes 2H and 18O (and to some extent also 17O). Such artificially enriched (or "labelled") waters are often used in biomedicine, for establishing the total amount of body water (and thus body composition) of humans

  9. Light induced drift: a possible mechanism of separation of isotopes by laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, D.J.; Nilaya, J.P.; Venkatramani, N.

    2003-02-01

    A comprehensive review of the literature on the effect of light induced drift and its exploitation in the separation of isotopes, both in atomic and molecular forms, is presented. An experimental scheme based on this effect to separate S 33 , with a natural abundance of ∼0.76%, from SF 6 has also been worked out. (author)

  10. Magma crust interaction at Merapi volcano, Java Indonesia: insights from crystal isotope stratigraphy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chadwick, J.P.; Troll, V.R.; Ginibre, C.; Morgan, D.; Gertisser, R.; Waight, T.; Davidson, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    Recent basaltic andesite lavas from Merapi volcano contain abundant, complexly zoned, plagioclase phenocrysts, analysed here for their petrographic textures, major element composition and Sr isotope composition. Anorthite (An) content in individual crystals can vary by as much as 55 mol% (An

  11. Chemical separation of boron isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palko, A.A.

    1978-06-01

    This is the final report of the research performed at ORNL on the chemical fractionation of boron isotopes between BF/sub 3/ gas and the liquid molecular addition compounds of BF/sub 3/. Thirty compounds were studied, ten of them in detail. Graphs and equations are given for variation of isotopic equilibrium constant, vapor pressure, and BF/sub 3/ solubility as a function of temperature. Rate of isotopic exchange and melting points were determined. Several of the compounds are likely candidates for use in a gas-liquid countercurrent exchange system for large-scale separation of boron isotopes. 23 figs, 53 tables, 39 references.

  12. Melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrevskaya, L.I.; Smushkevich, Yu.I.; Kurkovskaya, L.N.; Ponomarenko, N.K.; Suvorov, N.N.

    1989-01-01

    A study has been made of isotope exchange between melatonin and deuterium (D 2 O) or tritium (HTO) oxide under different conditions. The ease of isotope exchange for the indole ring hydrogens of melatonin in an acidic medium decreases over the series H 4 > H 2 H 6 >> H 7 , enabling the authors to process a route for production of melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes at positions 4,6, and 2 of the indole ring. A method has been suggested for producing melatonin labeled with hydrogen isotopes at position 2 by desulfurization of 2-(2,4-dinitro-phenylsulfenyl)melatonin at Ni(Re) (D)

  13. Melatonin labelled by hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitrevskaya, L.I.; Smushkevich, Yu.I.; Kurkovskaya, L.N.; Ponomarenko, N.K.; Suvorov, N.N.

    1988-01-01

    Isotope exchange of melatonin with deuterium (D 2 O) and tritium (HTO) oxides under different conditions is studied. Simplicity of isotope exchange of hydrogens of the indole ring of melatonin in the acidic medium decreases in series H 4 >H 2 >H 6 >>H 7 , that permits to suggest the way of melatonin preparation labelled by hydrogen isotopes in positions 4,6 and 2 of the indole ring. The way of melatonin preparation labelled by hydrogen isotopes in position 2 according to the reaction of desulfation 2-(2,4-dinitrophenylsulphenyl) melatonin at catalyst Ni(Re)(D) is suggested

  14. Development of Stable Isotope Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Do Young; Kim, Cheol Jung; Han, Jae Min

    2009-03-01

    KAERI has obtained an advanced technology with singular originality for laser stable isotope separation. Objectives for this project are to get production technology of Tl-203 stable isotope used for medical application and are to establish the foundation of the pilot system, while we are taking aim at 'Laser Isotope Separation Technology to make resistance to the nuclear proliferation'. And we will contribute to ensuring a nuclear transparency in the world society by taking part in a practical group of NSG and being collaboration with various international groups related to stable isotope separation technology

  15. Isotope separation by ion waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    One of the isotopes of an element having several isotopes can be separated from the others in a dense, neutral plasma. Thus initially a neutral plasma is prepared including the element in question. This may consist of positive ions and negative electrons or alternatively of positive and negative ions, or else of a mixture of positive ions, negative ions and electrons. The plasma may then be injected into a magnetic field or may be generated in the field where more energy is imparted to a selected isotope than to the others. Finally, the isotopes are separated from each other on the basis of their differential energies. For example, the selected isotope may be given more energy than the others by stimulating it within the plasma at its resonant frequency which may be close to the cyclotron frequency, either by an electric field or by a magnetic field. In order to excite the other isotope, a different resonant frequency is required which depends on the plasma density, the relative concentration of electrons if the plasma contains electrons, the strength of the magnetic field, the ratio of charge to mass of the isotope, and possibly on the physical parameters of the plasma apparatus itself, such as the ratio of the length of the plasma column to its radius. The more energetic isotope may be separated by energy dependent chemical reactions, it may be collected by a positively biased probe or else the isotopes may be separated from each other by magnetic fields or in various other ways

  16. Chemical separation of boron isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palko, A.A.

    1978-06-01

    This is the final report of the research performed at ORNL on the chemical fractionation of boron isotopes between BF 3 gas and the liquid molecular addition compounds of BF 3 . Thirty compounds were studied, ten of them in detail. Graphs and equations are given for variation of isotopic equilibrium constant, vapor pressure, and BF 3 solubility as a function of temperature. Rate of isotopic exchange and melting points were determined. Several of the compounds are likely candidates for use in a gas-liquid countercurrent exchange system for large-scale separation of boron isotopes. 23 figs, 53 tables, 39 references

  17. Isotope separation by magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    One of the isotopes of an element having several isotopes can be separated from the others in a dense, neutral plasma. Thus initially a neutral plasma is prepared including the element in question. This may consist of positive ions and negative electrons or alternatively of positive and negative ions, or else of a mixture of positive ions, negative ions and electrons. The plasma may then be injected into a magnetic field or may be generated in the field where more energy is imparted to a selected isotope than to the others. Finally, the isotopes are separated from each other on the basis of their differential energies. For example, the selected isotope may be given more energy than the others by stimulating it within the plasma at its resonant frequency which may be close to the cyclotron frequency, either by an electric field or by a magnetic field. In order to excite the other isotope, a different resonant frequency is required which depends on the plasma density, the relative concentration of electrons if the plasma contains electrons, the strength of the magnetic field, the ratio of charge to mass of the isotope, and possibly on the physical parameters of the plasma apparatus itself, such as the ratio of the length of the plasma column to its radius. The more energetic isotope may be separated by energy dependent chemical reactions, it may be collected by a positively biased probe or else the isotopes may be separated from each other by magnetic fields or in various other ways

  18. Subdwarf ultraviolet excesses and metal abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carney, B.W.

    1979-01-01

    The relation between stellar ultraviolet excesses and abundances is reexamined with the aid of new data, and an investigation is made of the accuracy of previous abundance analyses. A high-resolution echellogram of the subdwarf HD 201891 is analyzed to illustrate some of the problems. Generally, the earliest and latest analytical techniques yield consistent results for dwarfs. New UBV data yield normalized ultraviolet excesses, delta (U-B)/sub 0.6/, which are compared to abundances to produce a graphical relation that may be used to estimate [Fe/H] to +- 0.2 dex, given UBV colors accurate to +- 0.01 mag. The relation suggests a possible discontinuity between the halo and old-disk stars

  19. Simulation and optimization of stable isotope 18O separation by cascade distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yongyue; Chen Yuyan; Qin Chuanjiang; Liu Yan; Gu Hongsen

    2011-01-01

    The research about started from the plan of four cascade towers design was carried. Firstly, the method of experiment design was using uniform design. Then the incidence formula with the method of binomial stepwise regression was gotten. Last, the optimal operation conditions were gotten by using the method of genetic algorithm. Considering comprehensive factors of drawn from feed rate and from flow rates between cascade column, conclusions were reached on the study of the impact on the abundance of the isotope 18 O. Finally, the incidence formula between the abundance of the isotope 18 O and four operating variables were gotten. Also the incidence formula between heat consumption of the isotope 18 O and four operating variables were gotten. Besides, single factor response diagram of four factors were shown at last. The results showed that the method of simulation and optimization could be applied to 18 O industrial design and would be popular in traditional distillation process to realize optimization design. (authors)

  20. INTERSTELLAR ABUNDANCES TOWARD X Per, REVISITED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2013-01-01

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to examine dust grain types and measure elemental abundances in the local interstellar medium (ISM). The absorption features of O, Fe, Mg, and Si along this line of sight were measured using spectra from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory's LETG/ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments, and the Spex software package. The spectra were fit with dust analogs measured in the laboratory. The O, Mg, and Si abundances were compared to those from standard references, and the O abundance was compared to that along lines of sight toward other X-ray binaries. The results are as follows. First, it was found that a combination of MgSiO 3 (enstatite) and Mg 1.6 Fe 0.4 SiO 4 (olivine) provided the best fit to the O K edge, with N(MgSiO 3 )/N(Mg 1.6 Fe 0.4 SiO 4 ) = 3.4. Second, the Fe L edge could be fit with models that included metallic iron, but it was not well described by the laboratory spectra currently available. Third, the total abundances of O, Mg, and Si were in very good agreement with that of recently re-analyzed B stars, suggesting that they are good indicators of abundances in the local ISM, and the depletions were also in agreement with expected values for the diffuse ISM. Finally, the O abundances found from X-ray binary absorption spectra show a similar correlation with Galactocentric distances as seen in other objects.

  1. Advanced isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The Study Group briefly reviewed the technical status of the three Advanced Isotope Separation (AIS) processes. It also reviewed the evaluation work that has been carried out by DOE's Process Evaluation Board (PEB) and the Union Carbide Corporation-Nuclear Division (UCCND). The Study Group briefly reviewed a recent draft assessment made for DOE staff of the nonproliferation implications of the AIS technologies. The staff also very briefly summarized the status of GCEP and Advanced Centrifuge development. The Study Group concluded that: (1) there has not been sufficient progress to provide a firm scientific, technical or economic basis on which to select one of the three competing AIS processes for full-scale engineering development at this time; and (2) however, should budgetary restraints or other factors force such a selection, we believe that the evaluation process that is being carried out by the PEB provides the best basis available for making a decision. The Study Group recommended that: (1) any decisions on AIS processes should include a comparison with gas centrifuge processes, and should not be made independently from the plutonium isotope program; (2) in evaluating the various enrichment processes, all applicable costs (including R and D and sales overhead) and an appropriate discounting approach should be included in order to make comparisons on a private industry basis; (3) if the three AIS programs continue with limited resources, the work should be reoriented to focus only on the most pressing technical problems; and (4) if a decision is made to develop the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation process, the solid collector option should be pursued in parallel to alleviate the potential program impact of liquid collector thermal control problems

  2. Carbon isotope ratios in field Population II giant stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneden, C.; Pilachowski, C.A.; Vandenberg, D.A.; Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, AZ; Victoria Univ., Canada)

    1986-01-01

    Carbon isotope ratios have been derived from high-resolution spectra of the CH G-band in 15 very metal-poor Population II giant stars and two similar dwarf stars. Many of the giants possess very low C-12/C-13 ratios, some approaching the CN cycle equilibrium value. The metal-poor dwarfs do not have detectable CH-13 features; thus the low carbon isotope ratios in the giants probably are due to their internal evolutions. These results strongly support the idea that at least part of the anomalously low C/N values in Population II giants arises from very efficient mixing of their envelopes into the CN cycle burning layers. Detailed calculations of the expected CNO surface abundances in Population II giants in different evolutionary states have been performed. These computations demonstrate that the observed carbon isotope ratios cannot be produced during the first dredge-up mixing phases in low-mass, low metal abundance stars. Numerical experiments show that theoretical and observational results can be brought into agreement with artificially induced extra mixing. An agent to provoke this additional mixing has not been identified with certainty yet, although internal stellar rotation is a promising candidate. 63 references

  3. Barium and iron abundances in red giants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Villacanas, J.L.; Rego, M.; Cornide, M.

    1990-01-01

    An intermediate-dispersion abundance analysis has been carried out on a sample of 21 barium and 14 comparison stars. The excess of barium over iron has been used as the most representative indicator of peculiarity. These excesses are higher in the peculiar stars than in the nonpeculiar stars. Particularly interesting is the case of HD 67447, included in the comparison stars, with an excess Ba/Fe abundance = 1.61, probably a new barium star. A trend indicating a possible anticorrelation between barium overabundance and metallicity favors the suggestion that the barium strong group is older than the barium weak one. 36 refs

  4. Trace Element Abundances in an Unusual Hibonite-Perovskite Refractory Inclusion from Allende

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mane, Prajkta; Wadhwa, M.; Keller, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs) are thought to be the first-formed solids in the Solar protoplanetary disk and can provide information about the earliest Solar System processes (e.g., [1]). A hibonite-perovskitebearing CAI from the Allende CV3 chondrite (SHAL, [2]) contains a single of 500 micrometers hibonite grain and coarse-grained perovskite. The mineralogy and oxygen isotopic composition of this CAI shows similarities with FUN inclusions, especially HAL [2]. Here we present trace element abundances in SHAL.

  5. Isotope effect and isotope separation. A chemist's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Takanobu

    2002-01-01

    What causes the isotope effects (IE)? This presentation will be centered around the equilibrium isotope effects due to the differences in the nuclear masses. The occurrence of the equilibrium constant, K, of isotope exchange reactions which differ from the values predicted by the classical theory of statistical mechanics, K cl , is explored. The non-classical K corresponds to the unit-stage separation factor, α, that is different from unity and forms a basis of an isotope separation process involving the chemical exchange reaction. Here, the word 'chemical exchange' includes not only the isotope exchange chemical reactions between two or more chemical species but also the isotope exchanges involving the equilibria between liquid and vapor phases and liquid-gas, liquid solution-gas, liquid-liquid, and solid-liquid phases. In Section I, origins of the isotope effect phenomena will be explored and, in the process, various quantities used in discussions of isotope effect that have often caused confusions will be unambiguously defined. This Section will also correlate equilibrium constant with separation factor. In Section II, various forms of temperature-dependence of IE and separation factor will be discussed. (author)

  6. Container for hydrogen isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-12

    A container is described for storage, shipping and and dispensing of hydrogen isotopes such as hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, or mixtures of the same. The container is compact, safe against fracture or accident, and is reusable. It consists of an outer housing with suitable inlet and outlet openings and electrical feed elements, the housing containing an activated sorber material in the form, for example of titanium sponge or an activated zirconium aluminate cartridge. The gas to be stored is introduced into the chamber under conditions of heat and vacuum and is retained in the sorber material. Subsequently, it may be released by heating the unit to drive off the stored gas at desired rates.

  7. Cold regions isotope applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrigo, L.D.; Divine, T.E.

    1976-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) started the Cold Regions Isotope Applications Program in FY-1975 to identify special conditions in the Arctic and similar geographic areas (Cold Regions) where radioisotope power, heater, or sterilization systems would be desirable and economically viable. Significant progress was made in the first year of this program and all objectives for this initial 12-month period were achieved. The major conclusions and recommendations resulting for this effort are described below. The areas of interest covered include: radiosterilization of sewage; heating of septic tanks; and radioisotope thermoelectric generators as power sources for meteorological instruments and navigational aids

  8. Applied isotope hydrogeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, F.J. jr; Balderer, W.; Gautschi, A.

    1991-01-01

    This volume is a report on the isotopic investigations of ground-water in northern Switzerland and adjacent regions carried out since 1981 by Nagra, the Swiss National Cooperation for the Storage of Radio-active Waste. This study was undertaken to support a programme assessing potential sites for nuclear waste repositories. It includes measurements on a large number of stable- and radioisotopes and noble gases, supported by complete water chemical analyses and many rock and mineral analyses. A synthesis and interpretation of the data, along with the data themselves, are given here. (author). refs.; figs.; tabs

  9. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo and CaNi5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation column. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale multi-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors

  10. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu5 type of crystal structure , particularly LaNiCo and CaNi5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors

  11. Isotope diagnostics apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrschaft, H.

    1976-01-01

    The invention relates to a measuring probe for an isotope diagnostics apparatus to determine the distribution of radioactive substances in a body by measuring the radiation emanating from this body by means of a multiplicity of measuring probes directed simultaneously towards areas of measuring surfae and carried in guidances of a holding block. The measuring results of the individual probes are recorded separately, thus allowing the possibility of being evaluated separately, too. Measuring probes of this kind are used in multi-channel measuring objects and are useful particularly for determining the regional cerebral blood flow. (orig./ORU) [de

  12. Container for hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A container is described for storage, shipping and and dispensing of hydrogen isotopes such as hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, or mixtures of the same. The container is compact, safe against fracture or accident, and is reusable. It consists of an outer housing with suitable inlet and outlet openings and electrical feed elements, the housing containing an activated sorber material in the form, for example of titanium sponge or an activated zirconium aluminate cartridge. The gas to be stored is introduced into the chamber under conditions of heat and vacuum and is retained in the sorber material. Subsequently, it may be released by heating the unit to drive off the stored gas at desired rates

  13. Isotopic Thermionic Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemot, M.; Devin, B.; Durand, J.P.

    1967-01-01

    This report describes the general design of a thermionic direct conversion space generator. The power source used is a radioisotope. Two radioisotopes are considered: Pu 238 and Cm 244. The system is made up of a heat pipe concentrating the thermal flux from the isotope to the emitter, and of a second heat pipe evacuating the waste heat from the collector to the outer wall used as radiating panel. Calculations are given in the particular case of a 100 electrical watts output power. (authors) [fr

  14. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.K.; Kaldor, A.

    1977-01-01

    In a method for the separation of isotopes of uranium in UF 6 , the UF 6 is subjected to ir radiation at a predetermined wavelength or set of wavelengths for less than 10 -3 sec in such a manner that at least 0.1% of the 235 UF 6 molecules absorb an energy of more than 2000 cm -1 . The excited UF 6 is then reacted with a gaseous reagent, F 2 , Cl 2 , or Br 2 , to produce a product which is then recovered by means known in the art

  15. Stable isotope mass spectrometry in petroleum exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Manju

    1997-01-01

    The stable isotope mass spectrometry plays an important role to evaluate the stable isotopic composition of hydrocarbons. The isotopic ratios of certain elements in petroleum samples reflect certain characteristics which are useful for petroleum exploration

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: C and O isotopic ratios in Arcturus and Aldebaran (Abia+ 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abia, C.; Palmerini, S.; Busso, M.; Cristallo, S.

    2012-10-01

    CNO abundances, C and O isotopic ratios and equivalent diffusive coefficients (D) are given for the calculated extra-mixing models. For Arcturus we used the electronic version of the Infrared Atlas Spectrum by Hinkle et al. (1995, Cat. J/PASP/107/1042; resolution 0.01cm-1), and for Aldebaran we used a spectrum obtained on February 6, 1980 at the KPNO 4m Coude telescope using a Fourier transform spectrometer, kindly provided by K. Hinkle (resolution 0.016cm-1) The first 2 rows of table4 report the CNO abundances and isotopic ratios resulting from the observations. The other rows give the CNO abundances and isotopic ratios accounted for by the FDU in the three stellar models considered of 1.3Mo, 1.2Mo and 1.08Mo (see the paper for more details). (1 data file).

  17. Comparison of gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for carbon stable-isotope analysis of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, Tanja C W; Schierbeek, Henk; Houtekamer, Marco; van Engeland, Tom; Derrien, Delphine; Stal, Lucas J; Boschker, Henricus T S

    2015-07-15

    We compared gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) and liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) for the measurement of δ(13)C values in carbohydrates. Contrary to GC/IRMS, no derivatisation is needed for LC/IRMS analysis of carbohydrates. Hence, although LC/IRMS is expected to be more accurate and precise, no direct comparison has been reported. GC/IRMS with the aldonitrile penta-acetate (ANPA) derivatisation method was compared with LC/IRMS without derivatisation. A large number of glucose standards and a variety of natural samples were analysed for five neutral carbohydrates at natural abundance as well as at (13)C-enriched levels. Gas chromatography/chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (GC/CIMS) was applied to check for incomplete derivatisation of the carbohydrate, which would impair the accuracy of the GC/IRMS method. The LC/IRMS technique provided excellent precision (±0.08‰ and ±3.1‰ at natural abundance and enrichment levels, respectively) for the glucose standards and this technique proved to be superior to GC/IRMS (±0.62‰ and ±19.8‰ at natural abundance and enrichment levels, respectively). For GC/IRMS measurements the derivatisation correction and the conversion of carbohydrates into CO2 had a considerable effect on the measured δ(13)C values. However, we did not find any significant differences in the accuracy of the two techniques over the full range of natural δ(13)C abundances and (13)C-labelled glucose. The difference in the performance of GC/IRMS and LC/IRMS diminished when the δ(13)C values were measured in natural samples, because the chromatographic performance and background correction became critical factors, particularly for LC/IRMS. The derivatisation of carbohydrates for the GC/IRMS method was complete. Although both LC/IRMS and GC/IRMS are reliable techniques for compound-specific stable carbon isotope analysis of carbohydrates (provided that derivatisation is complete and the

  18. Bacterial community profiles in low microbial abundance sponges

    KAUST Repository

    Giles, Emily; Kamke, Janine; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Taylor, Michael W.; Hentschel, Ute T E; Ravasi, Timothy; Schmitt, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    It has long been recognized that sponges differ in the abundance of associated microorganisms, and they are therefore termed either 'low microbial abundance' (LMA) or 'high microbial abundance' (HMA) sponges. Many previous studies concentrated

  19. Abundances in planetary nebulae near the galactic centre .1. Abundance determinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratag, MA; Pottasch, [No Value; Dennefeld, M; Menzies, J

    1997-01-01

    Abundance determinations of about 110 planetary nebulae, which are likely to be in the Galactic Bulge are presented. Plasma diagnostics have been performed by making use of the available forbidden line ratios combined with radio continuum measurements. Chemical abundances of He, O, N, Ne, S, Ar, and

  20. Helium flashes on accreting white dwarfs: consequences for type 1 supernova and nova abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillebrandt, W.; Ziegert, W.; Thielemann, F.K.

    1986-01-01

    Helium flashes on an accreting 1 Solar mass carbon-oxygen white dwarf are investigated. It is demonstrated that the outer layers of a white dwarf growing towards the Chandrasekhar limit will be significantly enriched in elements like Mg, Al, Si and S provided the mass accretion rate is of the order of a few times 10 -8 to 10 -7 Solar mass per year. Since these stars are believed to explode as type I supernovae the abundances being ejected will depend also upon the accretion history of the white dwarfs. In addition this matter will have a rather non-solar isotopic composition. Finally, our results may help to explain abundances of heavy elements observed in certain novae if the white dwarf in those binary systems has gone through a high accretion rate phase once in the past before becoming a normal cataclysmic variable