WorldWideScience

Sample records for abundance isotopic

  1. THE ATOMIC WEIGHTS COMMISSION AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO DETERMINATIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-07

    Following Thomson's discovery of stable isotopes in non-radioactive chemical elements, the derivation of atomic weight values from mass spectrometric measurements of isotopic abundance ratios moved very slowly. Forty years later, only 3 1/2 % of the recommended values were based on mass spectrometric measurements and only 38% in the first half century. It might be noted that two chemical elements (tellurium and mercury) are still based on chemical measurements, where the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement either agrees with the value from the chemical measurement or the atomic weight value calculated from the relative isotopic abundance measurement falls within the uncertainty of the chemical measurement of the atomic weight. Of the 19 chemical elements, whose atomic weight is based on non-corrected relative isotopic abundance measurements, five of these are two isotope systems (indium, iridium, lanthanum, lutetium and tantalum) and one is a three-isotope system (oxygen).

  2. Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

    2014-03-18

    A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

  3. LITERATURE SURVEY ON ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO MEASUREMENTS - 2001-2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-13

    Along with my usual weekly review of the published literature for new nuclear data, I also search for new candidates for best measurements of isotopic abundances from a single source. Most of the published articles, that I previously had found in the Research Library at the Brookhaven Lab, have already been sent to the members of the Atomic Weights Commission, by either Michael Berglund or Thomas Walczyk. In the last few days, I checked the published literature for any other articles in the areas of natural variations in isotopic abundance ratios, measurements of isotopic abundance ratios on samples of extra-terrestrial material and isotopic abundance ratio measurements performed using ICPMS instruments. Hopefully this information will be of interest to members of the Commission, the sub-committee on isotopic abundance measurements (SIAM), members of the former sub-committee on natural isotopic fractionation (SNIF), the sub-committee on extra-terrestrial isotope ratios (SETIR), the RTCE Task Group and the Guidelines Task Group, who are dealing with ICPMS and TIMS comparisons. In the following report, I categorize the publications in one of four areas. Measurements performed using either positive or negative ions with Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer, TIMS, instruments; measurements performed on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer, ICPMS, instruments; measurements of natural variations of the isotopic abundance ratios; and finally measurements on extra-terrestrial samples with instrumentation of either type. There is overlap in these areas. I selected out variations and ET results first and then categorized the rest of the papers by TIMS and ICPMS.

  4. Literature survey of isotopic abundance data for 1987-1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, N.E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1989-08-09

    I have compiled all of the data on isotopic abundance measurements and their variation in nature for the time period since the last General Assembly. Most of the data deals with the variations in the abundances as given by per mil deviations from some standard. As such, they are not of major interest to the Atomic Weights Commission. However, there were some measurements which are of general interest in this list.

  5. Carbon abundances and isotope ratios in 70 bright M giants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximate carbon abundances and 12C/13C isotope ratios are obtained for 70 M giant stars from intermediate-resolution spectrophotometry of the CO bands near 2.3 μm. A low mean carbon abundance ([C/H]=-0.64±0.29) is obtained, suggesting that standard mixing is insufficient to explain atmospheric abundances in M giants. HR 8795 appears to be exceptionally carbon deficient, and is worthy of further study as a possible weak G-band star descendant. (author)

  6. Carbon abundances and isotope ratios in 70 bright M giants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazaro, C. (Inst. de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife (Spain)); Lynas-Gray, A.E. (University Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Clegg, R.E.S. (Royal Greenwich Observatory, Cambridge (UK)); Mountain, C.M.; Zadrozny, A. (Imperial Coll. of Science and Technology, London (UK))

    1991-03-01

    Approximate carbon abundances and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C isotope ratios are obtained for 70 M giant stars from intermediate-resolution spectrophotometry of the CO bands near 2.3 {mu}m. A low mean carbon abundance ((C/H)=-0.64+-0.29) is obtained, suggesting that standard mixing is insufficient to explain atmospheric abundances in M giants. HR 8795 appears to be exceptionally carbon deficient, and is worthy of further study as a possible weak G-band star descendant. (author).

  7. Deuterium/hydrogen natural isotopic abundance in fruit juices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable isotopic analyses of various elements such as carbon, hydrogen and oxygen are currently applied for the authentification of naturalness of fruit juices. Deuterium is particularly of interest because of the wide variation of its abundance. Due to evaporation-transpiration the deuterium content of the water in fruit juices is enriched compared to local ground water. In the case of our investigation on apple, another fractionation, originating in technological process, was observed. The concentrated juice water is enriched by 6o/oo as compared to natural fruit juice water. (authors)

  8. Determination of osmium isotope abundances by high resolution laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schieder, R.; Sorgalla, K.H.; Herr, W.

    1981-01-01

    A new optical method for isotopic abundance determinations based on Laser saturation spectroscopy is described. The technique has been applied on gaseous OsO/sub 4/ at low pressure, using a single mode CO/sub 2/-Laser at lambda = 10,4 ..mu..m. Compared with the linear absorption spectroscopy, the saturation method has the advantage that higher sensitivity is easiliy achieved by phase sensitive detection. As an example radiogenic /sup 187/Os in a molybdenite from S.W. Africa is measured and the age of the ore, determined by the Re/Os-method is (5.3 +- 0.4) x 10/sup 8/ years. Further, the /sup 186/Os(n,..gamma..)/sup 187/Os cross section was evaluated by breeding Os-isotopes from Rhenium in a high flux nuclear reactor. In this case, a cross section ratio R = sigmasub(eff)(/sup 186/Os)/ sigmasub(eff)(/sup 187/Os) = O.245 was obtained. The /sup 186/Os-resonance integral was estimated to be Isub(infinite) = 375 +- 90 b. Certain implications of R, with respect to the age of the universe (duration of the nucleosynthesis) are pointed out.

  9. Quantitative and In-Depth Survey of the Isotopic Abundance Distribution Errors in Shotgun Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng; Zhang, Jiyang; Xu, Changming; Zhao, Yan; Ma, Jie; Chen, Tao; He, Fuchu; Xie, Hongwei; Zhu, Yunping

    2016-07-01

    Accuracy is an important metric when mass spectrometry (MS) is used in large-scale quantitative proteomics research. For MS-based quantification by extracting ion chromatogram (XIC), both the mass and intensity dimensions must be accurate. Although much research has focused on mass accuracy in recent years, less attention has been paid to intensity errors. Here, we investigated signal intensity measurement errors systematically and quantitatively using the natural properties of isotopic distributions. First, we defined a normalized isotopic abundance error model and presented its merits and demerits. Second, a comprehensive survey of the isotopic abundance errors using data sets with increasing sample complexities and concentrations was performed. We examined parameters such as error distribution, relationships between signal intensities within one isotopic cluster, and correlations between different peak errors in isotopic profiles. Our data demonstrated that the high resolution MS platforms might also generate large isotopic intensity measurement errors (approximately 20%). Meanwhile, this error can be reduced to less than 5% using a novel correction algorithm, which is based on the theoretical isotopic abundance distribution. Finally, a nonlinear relationship was observed as the abundance error decreased in isotopic profiles with higher intensity. Our findings are expected to provide insight into isotopic abundance recalibration in quantitative proteomics. PMID:27266261

  10. Anatomy of a cluster IDP. Part 2: Noble gas abundances, trace element geochemistry, isotopic abundances, and trace organic chemistry of several fragments from L2008#5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Mckay, David S.; Messenger, S.; Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Walker, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: noble gas content and release temperatures; trace element abundances; heating summary of cluster fragments; isotopic measurements; and trace organic chemistry.

  11. Isotope Abundances of Solar Coronal Material Derived from Solar Energetic Particle Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Mewaldt, R.A; Stone, E. C.

    1987-01-01

    Coronal isotopic abundances for the elements He, C, N, O, Ne, and Mg are derived from previously published measurements of the isotopic composition of solar energetic particles by first measuring, and then correcting for, the charge-to-mass-dependent fractionation due to solar flare acceleration and propagation processes. The resulting coronal composition generally agrees with that of other samples of solar system material, but the previously noted difference between the solar flare and solar...

  12. Measurement of the isotopic abundance of boron-10 by inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the method for measuring the isotopic abundance of 10B in nuclear grade boron carbide using inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS). The results of investigation revealed that both the integration time and the dwell time have a major influence on the reproducibility of ICP-QMS measurements. As a result of optimization of the measurement conditions, reproducibility below 0.2% relative standard deviation (RSD) (0.17% RSD maximum) was achieved. In addition, the measured value of the isotopic abundance of 10B for each sample well agreed with the values measured by the TIMS. Thus, the method described in the present investigation was very effective in the analysis of isotopic abundance of 10B in B4C or H3BO3. The results of this study suggest that ICP-QMS could be applied to the precise analysis of the isotopic abundance of 10B required in the field of nuclear applications. (author)

  13. Determination of 235U isotope abundance by difference method of fission yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Determination of the uranium isotope abundance ratio of fuel pins is a significant stage for the quality control in safe operations of reactor. Purpose: The aim is to establish a method to examine the 235U abundance of fuel rod with fast neutron as an excitation source. Methods: Taking the fission-yield ratios of Y-bar88Rb/Y-bar104Tc and Y-bar92Sr/Y-bar104Tc as the subjects of research, the relation curves between the average yield ratios and the 235U isotopic abundance as well as the expressions Y-bar1/Y-bar2=f(H0), in which the average yield ratio (Y-bari/Y-barj ) is a function of the 235U isotopic abundance (H0), were obtained and presented based on the previous studies. Results: In order to testify the accuracy of the method, the simulation sample of 72.2% is measured by working curve, and RSD is less than 2%. Within the limit of error, the results of sample analysis are in correspondence with those of passive gamma ray method. Conclusion: All of these results indicate that the method is feasible to determine the 235U abundance of fuel rod. (authors)

  14. Improve accuracy and sensibility in glycan structure prediction by matching glycan isotope abundance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Guang [College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ont., K1A 0R6 (Canada); Liu Xin [College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Liu Qingyan [National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ont., Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Zhou Yanhong, E-mail: yhzhou@mail.hust.edu.cn [College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Li Jianjun, E-mail: Jianjun.Li@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ont., Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2012-09-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A glycan isotope pattern recognition strategy for glycomics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new data preprocessing procedure to detect ion peaks in a giving MS spectrum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A linear soft margin SVM classification for isotope pattern recognition. - Abstract: Mass Spectrometry (MS) is a powerful technique for the determination of glycan structures and is capable of providing qualitative and quantitative information. Recent development in computational method offers an opportunity to use glycan structure databases and de novo algorithms for extracting valuable information from MS or MS/MS data. However, detecting low-intensity peaks that are buried in noisy data sets is still a challenge and an algorithm for accurate prediction and annotation of glycan structures from MS data is highly desirable. The present study describes a novel algorithm for glycan structure prediction by matching glycan isotope abundance (mGIA), which takes isotope masses, abundances, and spacing into account. We constructed a comprehensive database containing 808 glycan compositions and their corresponding isotope abundance. Unlike most previously reported methods, not only did we take into count the m/z values of the peaks but also their corresponding logarithmic Euclidean distance of the calculated and detected isotope vectors. Evaluation against a linear classifier, obtained by training mGIA algorithm with datasets of three different human tissue samples from Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG) in association with Support Vector Machine (SVM), was proposed to improve the accuracy of automatic glycan structure annotation. In addition, an effective data preprocessing procedure, including baseline subtraction, smoothing, peak centroiding and composition matching for extracting correct isotope profiles from MS data was incorporated. The algorithm was validated by analyzing the mouse kidney MS data from CFG, resulting in the

  15. The Oxygen Isotopic Composition of MIL 090001: A CR2 Chondrite with Abundant Refractory Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; McKeegan, K. D.; Sharp, Z. D.

    2012-01-01

    MIL 090001 is a large (>6 kg) carbonaceous chondrite that was classified as a member of the CV reduced subgroup (CVred) that was recovered during the 2009-2010 ANSMET field season [1]. Based on the abundance of refractory inclusions and the extent of aqueous alteration, Keller [2] suggested a CV2 classification. Here we report additional mineralogical and petrographic data for MIL 090001, its whole-rock oxygen isotopic composition and ion microprobe analyses of individual phases. The whole rock oxygen isotopic analyses show that MIL 090001 should be classified as a CR chondrite.

  16. Enhancement of the isotopic abundance sensitivity of mass spectrometry by Doppler-free resonance ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of two-photon Doppler-free excitation in atomic resonance ionization offers the possibility of considerable enhancement of the isotopic abundance sensitivity of conventional mass spectrometry. In some applications of interest, e.g. carbon dating, this technique may provide sensitivity comparable to that presently attained by accelerator-based high energy mass spectrometry. The basic physics underlying the method is discussed and preliminary experimental work on three-photon ionization of atomic carbon is described. (author)

  17. Application of mass-predictions to isotope-abundances in breeder-reactor cores

    CERN Document Server

    Kirchner, G

    1981-01-01

    The decay-heat and isotope composition of breeder reactor-cores is calculated at normal shut-down, and a core disintegration event. Using the ORIGEN-code, the influence of the most neutron-rich fission-yield nuclei is studied. Their abundances depend on the assumption about the nuclear data (mass and half-lives). The total decay-heat is not changed from any technical viewpoint. (15 refs).

  18. Application of mass-predictions to isotope-abundances in breeder-reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decay-heat and isotope composition of breeder reactor-cores is calculated at normal shut-down, and a core disintegration event. Using the ORIGRN-code, the influence of the most neutron-rich fission-yield nuclei is studied. Their abundances depend on the assumption about the nuclear data (mass and half-lives). The total decay-heat is not changed from any technically view-point. (orig.)

  19. Boron abundances and isotopic ratios of olivine grains on Itokawa returned by the Hayabusa spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiya, Wataru; Hoppe, Peter; Ott, Ulrich

    2016-09-01

    We report the B abundances and isotopic ratios of two olivine grains from the S-type asteroid Itokawa sampled by the Hayabusa spacecraft. Olivine grains from the Dar al Gani (DaG) 989 LL6 chondrite were used as a reference. Since we analyzed polished thin sections in both cases, we expect the contribution from the solar wind B (rich in 10B) to be minimal because the solar wind was implanted only within very thin layers of the grain surface. The Itokawa and DaG 989 olivine grains have homogeneous B abundances (~400 ppb) and 11B/10B ratios compatible with the terrestrial standard and bulk chondrites. The observed homogeneous B abundances and isotopic ratios of the Itokawa olivine grains are likely the result of thermal metamorphism which occurred in the parent asteroid of Itokawa, which had a similar composition as LL chondrites. The chondritic B isotopic ratios of the Itokawa samples suggest that they contain little cosmogenic B (from cosmic-ray spallation reactions) rich in 10B. This observation is consistent with the short cosmic-ray exposure ages of Itokawa samples inferred from the small concentrations of cosmogenic 21Ne. If other Itokawa samples have little cosmogenic B as well, the enrichment in 10B found previously on the surface of another Itokawa particle (as opposed to the bulk grain study here) may be attributed to implanted solar wind B.

  20. Boron abundances and isotopic ratios of olivine grains on Itokawa returned by the Hayabusa spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiya, Wataru; Hoppe, Peter; Ott, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    We report the B abundances and isotopic ratios of two olivine grains from the S-type asteroid Itokawa sampled by the Hayabusa spacecraft. Olivine grains from the Dar al Gani (DaG) 989 LL6 chondrite were used as a reference. Since we analyzed polished thin sections in both cases, we expect the contribution from the solar wind B (rich in 10B) to be minimal because the solar wind was implanted only within very thin layers of the grain surface. The Itokawa and DaG 989 olivine grains have homogeneous B abundances (~400 ppb) and 11B/10B ratios compatible with the terrestrial standard and bulk chondrites. The observed homogeneous B abundances and isotopic ratios of the Itokawa olivine grains are likely the result of thermal metamorphism which occurred in the parent asteroid of Itokawa, which had a similar composition as LL chondrites. The chondritic B isotopic ratios of the Itokawa samples suggest that they contain little cosmogenic B (from cosmic-ray spallation reactions) rich in 10B. This observation is consistent with the short cosmic-ray exposure ages of Itokawa samples inferred from the small concentrations of cosmogenic 21Ne. If other Itokawa samples have little cosmogenic B as well, the enrichment in 10B found previously on the surface of another Itokawa particle (as opposed to the bulk grain study here) may be attributed to implanted solar wind B.

  1. Isotope abundance measurements. A key to an exotic problem solving: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the paleotemperature measurements carried out by Urey and Epstein, early in the nineteen fifties, isotope abundance measurements have developed outside the boundary of research. They have become in the European Union an official method for food analysis. In France, customs employ them to find the origin of seized drugs. Frauds, such as 'chaptalization' (i.e. adding sugar to wine), are detected by isotope analysis. Disulfur monoxide, S2O, was discovered during the investigation of the mass spectrometer background when analysing sulphur dioxide isotope composition from masses 64 to 72. At the request of our meteorological bureau we investigated the formation and isotopic compositions of hailstones. It was possible to correlate deuterium contents to the formation temperature and to draw trajectories of hailstones within clouds where they grew. A growth model, NMR (Nief, Merlivat, Roth), was established. 18O and deuterium analysis were carried out on the same hailstone samples to validate this model, that implied equilibrium between vapour and condensed phases within hail forming clouds. Additional confirmation of some results could be found in tritium measurements. Also, the formation of deuterium by spallation had a further consequence: the study of this formation by reaction of the 'solar wind' on meteorites that can be used to measure the time spent by a meteorite within the solar system. We shall briefly discuss, among less frequent applications of isotope measurements, the losses of water, from closed or semi closed water pools, by evaporation and other causes. Such investigations have mainly been performed in arid countries. (author)

  2. Noble gas abundances and isotopic compositions in mantle-derived xenoliths,NE China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Following the researches of helium isotopic compositions in mantle-derived xenoliths in eastern China,this study reported noble gas abundances and isotopic compositions of mantle-derived xenoliths from Kuandian of Liaoning Province, Huinan of Jilin Province and Hannuoba of Hebei Province. Compared with the middle ocean ridge basalt (MORB) and other continental areas, mantle-derived xenoliths in NE China are characterized by slightly low noble gas abundances, 3He/4He equivalent to or lower than that of MORB, 40Ar/36Ar lower than that of MORB, 38Ar/36Ar and Ne-Kr-Xe isotopic ratios equivalent to those of atmosphere. These results indicate the heterogeneity of subcontinentai lithospheric mantle beneath northeastern China, that is, a MORB reservoir-like mantle beneath Kuandian and an enriched/metasomatized mantle beneath Huinan. Low 40Ar/36Ar ratios in the three studied areas may imply that a subducted atmospheric component has been preserved in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle.``

  3. Discussion on the Key Factors of Abundance Ratios About Zn Isotope Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of Zn isotope analysis is well known in geochemistry and diet study. An inter-lab comparison of five samples with isotopic ratio covering from 0.02 to 15.00 was organized in order to develop measurement ability and keep consistency of the results of isotopic ratios measurement among the participants. Multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) and multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS) were used. For MC-ICP-MS, blank-corrected and blank-no corrected results were submitted. For MC-TIMS, total evaporation method (TE) was applied to the samples while a certified reference material IRMM3702 was analyzed together. All the results showed that the uncertainties were 1.29%-0.03% for 64Zn/66Zn, and the uncertainty was obviously relative to isotopic abundances. The blank-corrected and blank-no corrected and the influence of blank and non-linear of K factor of mass discrimination for MC-ICP-MS were convinced of contributing to the unsatisfied uncertainties. (authors)

  4. 13C and 15N natural isotope abundance reflects breast cancer cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tea, Illa; Martineau, Estelle; Antheaume, Ingrid; Lalande, Julie; Mauve, Caroline; Gilard, Francoise; Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Blackburn, Anneke C.; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Despite the information provided by anatomopathological assessment and molecular markers (such as receptor expression ER, PR, HER2), breast cancer therapies and prognostics depend on the metabolic properties of tumor cells. However, metabolomics have not provided a robust and congruent biomarker yet, likely because individual metabolite contents are insufficient to encapsulate all of the alterations in metabolic fluxes. Here, we took advantage of natural 13C and 15N isotope abundance to show there are isotopic differences between healthy and cancer biopsy tissues or between healthy and malignant cultured cell lines. Isotope mass balance further suggests that these differences are mostly related to lipid metabolism, anaplerosis and urea cycle, three pathways known to be impacted in malignant cells. Our results demonstrate that the isotope signature is a good descriptor of metabolism since it integrates modifications in C partitioning and N excretion altogether. Our present study is thus a starting point to possible clinical applications such as patient screening and biopsy characterization in every cancer that is associated with metabolic changes. PMID:27678172

  5. The determination of minor isotope abundances in naturally occurring uranium materials. The tracing power of isotopic signatures for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mass spectrometric determination of minor abundant isotopes, 234U and 236U in naturally occurring uranium materials requires instruments of high abundance sensitivity and the use of highly sensitive detection systems. In this study the thermal ionisation mass spectrometer Finnigan MAT 262RPQ was used. It was equipped with 6 Faraday cups and a Secondary Electron Multiplier (SEM), which was operated in pulse counting mode for the detection of extremely low ion currents. The dynamic measurement range was increased considerably combining these two different detectors. The instrument calibration was performed carefully. The linearity of each detector, the deadtime of the ion counting detector, the detector normalisation factor, the baseline of each detector and the mass discrimination in the ion source were checked and optimised. A measurement technique based on the combination of a Gas Source Mass Spectrometry (GSMS) and a Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) was developed for the accurate determination of isotopic composition in naturally occurring uranium materials. Because the expected ratio of n(234U)/n(238U) exceeded the dynamic measurement range of the Faraday detectors of the TIMS instrument, an experimental design using a combination of two detectors was developed. The n(234U)/n(235U) and n(236U)/n(235U) ratios were determined using ion counting in combination with the decelerating device. The n(235U)/n(238U) ratio was determined by the Faraday detector. This experimental design allowed the detector cross calibration to be circumvented. Precisions of less than 1 percent for the n(234U)/n(235U) ratios and 5-25 percent for the n(236U)/n(235U) ratios were achieved. The purpose of the study was to establish a register of isotopic signatures for natural uranium materials. The amount ratio, and isotopic composition of 18 ore concentrates, collected by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from uranium milling and mining facilities (Australia

  6. The determination of minor isotope abundances in naturally occurring uranium materials. The tracing power of isotopic signatures for uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovaskainen, R

    1999-11-01

    The mass spectrometric determination of minor abundant isotopes, {sup 234}U and {sup 236}U in naturally occurring uranium materials requires instruments of high abundance sensitivity and the use of highly sensitive detection systems. In this study the thermal ionisation mass spectrometer Finnigan MAT 262RPQ was used. It was equipped with 6 Faraday cups and a Secondary Electron Multiplier (SEM), which was operated in pulse counting mode for the detection of extremely low ion currents. The dynamic measurement range was increased considerably combining these two different detectors. The instrument calibration was performed carefully. The linearity of each detector, the deadtime of the ion counting detector, the detector normalisation factor, the baseline of each detector and the mass discrimination in the ion source were checked and optimised. A measurement technique based on the combination of a Gas Source Mass Spectrometry (GSMS) and a Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) was developed for the accurate determination of isotopic composition in naturally occurring uranium materials. Because the expected ratio of n({sup 234}U)/n({sup 238}U) exceeded the dynamic measurement range of the Faraday detectors of the TIMS instrument, an experimental design using a combination of two detectors was developed. The n({sup 234}U)/n({sup 235}U) and n({sup 236}U)/n({sup 235}U) ratios were determined using ion counting in combination with the decelerating device. The n({sup 235}U)/n({sup 238}U) ratio was determined by the Faraday detector. This experimental design allowed the detector cross calibration to be circumvented. Precisions of less than 1 percent for the n({sup 234}U)/n({sup 235}U) ratios and 5-25 percent for the n({sup 236}U)/n({sup 235}U) ratios were achieved. The purpose of the study was to establish a register of isotopic signatures for natural uranium materials. The amount ratio, and isotopic composition of 18 ore concentrates, collected by the International

  7. Abundances in red giant stars - Carbon and oxygen isotopes in carbon-rich molecular envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannier, P. G.; Sahai, R.

    1987-01-01

    Millimeter-wave observations have been made of isotopically substituted CO toward the envelopes of 11 carbon-rich stars. In every case, C-13O was detected and model calculations were used to estimate the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio. C-17O was detected toward three, and possibly four, envelopes, with sensitive upper limits for two others. The CO-18 variant was detected in two envelopes. New results include determinations of oxygen isotopic ratios in the two carbon-rich protoplanetary nebulae CRL 26688 and CRL 618. As with other classes of red giant stars, the carbon-rich giants seem to be significantly, though variably, enriched in O-17. These results, in combination with observations in interstellar molecular clouds, indicate that current knowledge of stellar production of the CNO nuclides is far from satisfactory.

  8. ISO/GUM UNCERTAINTIES AND CIAAW (UNCERTAINTY TREATMENT FOR RECOMMENDED ATOMIC WEIGHTS AND ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2007-07-23

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has published a Guide to the expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM). The IUPAC Commission on Isotopic Abundance and Atomic Weight (CIAAW) began attaching uncertainty limits to their recommended values about forty years ago. CIAAW's method for determining and assigning uncertainties has evolved over time. We trace this evolution to their present method and their effort to incorporate the basic ISO/GUM procedures into evaluations of these uncertainties. We discuss some dilemma the CIAAW faces in their present method and whether it is consistent with the application of the ISO/GUM rules. We discuss the attempt to incorporate variations in measured isotope ratios, due to natural fractionation, into the ISO/GUM system. We make some observations about the inconsistent treatment in the incorporation of natural variations into recommended data and uncertainties. A recommendation for expressing atomic weight values using a tabulated range of values for various chemical elements is discussed.

  9. Influence of Biofield Energy Treatment on Isotopic Abundance Ratio in Aniline Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendra Kumar Trivedi; Alice Branton; Dahryn Trivedi; Gopal Nayak

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance of 13C/12C or 2H/1H or 15N/14N ≡ (PM+1)/PM in aniline; and (PM+1)/PM and 81Br/79Br ≡ (PM+2)/PM in 4-bromoaniline using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Aniline and 4-bromoaniline samples were divided into two parts: control and treated. The control part remained as untreated, while the treated part was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment. The ...

  10. The evolution of the global selenium cycle: Secular trends in Se isotopes and abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüeken, E. E.; Buick, R.; Bekker, A.; Catling, D.; Foriel, J.; Guy, B. M.; Kah, L. C.; Machel, H. G.; Montañez, I. P.; Poulton, S. W.

    2015-08-01

    The Earth's surface has undergone major transitions in its redox state over the past three billion years, which have affected the mobility and distribution of many elements. Here we use Se isotopic and abundance measurements of marine and non-marine mudrocks to reconstruct the evolution of the biogeochemical Se cycle from ∼3.2 Gyr onwards. The six stable isotopes of Se are predominantly fractionated during redox reactions under suboxic conditions, which makes Se a potentially valuable new tool for identifying intermediate stages from an anoxic to a fully oxygenated world. δ82/78Se shows small fractionations of mostly less than 2‰ throughout Earth's history and all are mass-dependent within error. In the Archean, especially after 2.7 Gyr, we find an isotopic enrichment in marine (+0.37 ± 0.27‰) relative to non-marine samples (-0.28 ± 0.67‰), paired with increasing Se abundances. Student t-tests show that these trends are statistically significant. Although we cannot completely rule out the possibility of volcanic Se addition, these trends may indicate the onset of oxidative weathering on land, followed by non-quantitative reduction of Se oxyanions during fluvial transport. The Paleoproterozoic Great Oxidation Event (GOE) is not reflected in the marine δ82/78Se record. However, we find a major inflection in the secular δ82/78Se trend during the Neoproterozoic, from a Precambrian mean of +0.42 ± 0.45‰ to a Phanerozoic mean of -0.19 ± 0.59‰. This drop probably reflects the oxygenation of the deep ocean at this time, stabilizing Se oxyanions throughout the water column. Since then, reduction of Se oxyanions has likely been restricted to anoxic basins and diagenetic environments in sediments. In light of recent Cr isotope data, it is likely that oxidative weathering before the Neoproterozoic produced Se oxyanions in the intermediate redox state SeIV, whereas the fully oxidized species SeVI became more abundant after the Neoproterozoic rise of

  11. Characterizing uranium oxide reference particles for isotopic abundances and uranium mass by single particle isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A method to quantify the U mass in single micron particles by ID-TIMS was developed. ► Well-characterized monodisperse U-oxide particles produced by an aerosol generator were used. ► A linear correlation between the mass of U and the volume of particle(s) was found. ► The method developed is suitable for determining the amount of U in a particulate reference material. - Abstract: Uranium and plutonium particulate test materials are becoming increasingly important as the reliability of measurement results has to be demonstrated to regulatory bodies responsible for maintaining effective nuclear safeguards. In order to address this issue, the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in collaboration with the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) has initiated a study to investigate the feasibility of preparing and characterizing a uranium particle reference material for nuclear safeguards, which is finally certified for isotopic abundances and for the uranium mass per particle. Such control particles are specifically required to evaluate responses of instruments based on mass spectrometric detection (e.g. SIMS, TIMS, LA-ICPMS) and to help ensuring the reliability and comparability of measurement results worldwide. In this paper, a methodology is described which allows quantifying the uranium mass in single micron particles by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS). This methodology is characterized by substantial improvements recently achieved at IRMM in terms of sensitivity and measurement accuracy in the field of uranium particle analysis by TIMS. The use of monodisperse uranium oxide particles prepared using an aerosol generation technique developed at ITU, which is capable of producing particles of well-characterized size and isotopic composition was exploited. The evidence of a straightforward correlation between the particle volume and the mass of uranium was demonstrated in this study

  12. Study of isotopic fractions and abundances of the neutron-capture elements in HD 175305

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiang; Zhang, Bo; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.15947.x

    2010-01-01

    The chemical abundances of metal-poor stars are excellent sources of information for setting new constraints on models of Galactic chemical evolution at low metallicities. In this paper we present an attempt to fit the elemental abundances observed in the bright, metal-poor giant HD 175305, and derive isotopic fractions using a parametric model. The observed abundances can be wellmatched by the combined contributions froms- and r-processmaterial. The component coefficients of the r- and s-processes are C1 = 3.220 and C3 = 1.134, respectively. The Smisotopic fraction in this star where the observed neutron-capture elements are produced is predicted to be f 152+154 =0.582,which suggests that, even though the r-process is predominantly responsible for the synthesis of the neutron-capture elements in the early Galaxy, the onset of the s-process had already occurred at this metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.6.

  13. Abundance, distribution, and isotopic composition of particulate black carbon in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weifeng; Guo, Laodong

    2014-11-01

    There exists increasing evidence supporting the important role of black carbon in global carbon cycles. Particulate black carbon (PBC) is allochthonous and has distinct reactivities compared to the bulk particulate organic carbon (tot-POC) in marine environments. However, the abundance, geochemical behavior of PBC and its importance in oceanic carbon budget remain poorly understood. Here we report the abundance, distribution, and stable isotopic signatures of BC derived from the chemo-thermal oxidation (CTO-375) method (BCCTO) in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results show that BCCTO abundance decreased from shelf to basin, and more than a half of riverine BCCTO could be removed over the shelf. Moreover, BCCTO is much more refractory compared to the tot-POC and has δ13C values lower than those of BC-excluded POC. These results highlight the significance of PBC in marine carbon cycles and potentially suggest the need for a new end-member term in quantifying POC sources in the ocean.

  14. Standard test method for 238Pu isotopic abundance by alpha spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the use of alpha spectrometry for determining the 238Pu isotopic abundance in plutonium samples. It is particularly useful for samples in which the 238Pu content is less than 1 % of the total plutonium content. For such samples, mass spectrometric results are less reliable than those from alpha spectrometry because of interference from any 238U isobar remaining after ion exchange. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  15. [Humus composition and stable carbon isotope natural abundance in paddy soil under long-term fertilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Yang, Lin-Zhang; Ci, En; Wang, Yan; Yin, Shi-Xue; Shen, Ming-Xing

    2008-09-01

    Soil samples were collected from an experimental paddy field with long-term (26 years) fertilization in Taihu Lake region of Jiangsu Province to study the effects of different fertilization on the organic carbon distribution and stable carbon isotope natural abundance (delta 13C) in the soil profile, and on the humus composition. The results showed that long-term fertilization increased the organic carbon content in top soil significantly, and there was a significantly negative exponential correlation between soil organic carbon content and soil depth (P humus (humin) was the main humus composition in the soil, occupying 50% or more, and the rest were loosely and stably combined humus. Long-term fertilization increased the content of loosely combined humus and the ratio of humic acid (HA) to fulvic acid (FA).

  16. ANALYSIS OF RICIN TOXIN PREPARATIONS FOR CARBOHYDRATE AND FATTY ACID ABUNDANCE AND ISOTOPE RATIO INFORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Colburn, Heather A.; Moran, James J.; Melville, Angela M.

    2009-12-01

    employing a quadrupole MS system for compound identification and an isotope ratio MS for measuring the stable isotope ratios of deuterium and hydrogen (D/H) in fatty acids. Finally, the method for analyzing the compound abundance data is included. This study indicates that removal of ricinoleic acid is a conserved consequence of each processing step we tested. Furthermore, the stable isotope D/H ratio of ricinoleic acid distinguished between two of the three castor seed sources. Concentrations of arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucosamine and myo-inositol differentiated between crude or acetone extracted samples and samples produced by protein precipitation. Taken together these data illustrate the ability to distinguish between processes used to purify a ricin sample as well as potentially the source seeds.

  17. Evaluation of the Isotopic Abundance Ratio in Biofield Energy Treated Resorcinol Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra; Branton, Alice; Trivedi, Dahryn; Nayak, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    The stable isotope ratio analysis is widely used in several scientific fields such as agricultural, food authenticity, biochemistry, metabolism, medical research, etc. Resorcinol is one of the most versatile chemicals used for the synthesis of several pharmaceuticals, dyes, polymers, organic compounds, etc. The current research work was designed to investigate the impact of the biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance ratios of 13C/12C or 2H/1H or 17O/16O (P 18O/16O (P M+1/PM) and ...

  18. Investigation of the {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U isotope abundance ratio in uranium ores and yellow cake samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srncik, M. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry; European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany). Institute for Transuranium Elements; Mayer, K.; Hrnecek, E.; Wallenius, M.; Varga, Z. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany). Institute for Transuranium Elements; Steier, P. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). VERA Lab.; Wallner, G. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry

    2011-07-01

    Uranium ores and yellow cake samples of known geographic origin were investigated for their n({sup 236}U)/n({sup 238}U) isotope abundance ratio. Samples from four different uranium mines in Australia, Brazil and Canada were selected. Uranium was separated by UTEVA {sup registered} Resin and was measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA). The measurement of the isotope abundance ratio n({sup 236}U)/n({sup 238}U) will be used to investigate possible correlations between the original mineral (uranium ore) and the intermediate product (yellow cake). Such correlations are useful indicators for nuclear forensic or for non-proliferation purposes. (orig.)

  19. Mercury (Hg) in meteorites: variations in abundance, thermal release profile, mass-dependent and mass-independent isotopic fractionation

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, Matthias M M; Marty, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the concentration, isotopic composition and thermal release profiles of Mercury (Hg) in a suite of meteorites, including both chondrites and achondrites. We find large variations in Hg concentration between different meteorites (ca. 10 ppb to 14'000 ppb), with the highest concentration orders of magnitude above the expected bulk solar system silicates value. From the presence of several different Hg carrier phases in thermal release profiles (150 to 650 {\\deg}C), we argue that these variations are unlikely to be mainly due to terrestrial contamination. The Hg abundance of meteorites shows no correlation with petrographic type, or mass-dependent fractionation of Hg isotopes. Most carbonaceous chondrites show mass-independent enrichments in the odd-numbered isotopes 199Hg and 201Hg. We show that the enrichments are not nucleosynthetic, as we do not find corresponding nucleosynthetic deficits of 196Hg. Instead, they can partially be explained by Hg evaporation and redeposition during heating of ...

  20. Mass Accuracy and Isotopic Abundance Measurements for HR-MS Instrumentation: Capabilities for Non-Targeted Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knolhoff, Ann M.; Callahan, John H.; Croley, Timothy R.

    2014-07-01

    The development of automated non-targeted workflows for small molecule analyses is highly desirable in many areas of research and diagnostics. Sufficient mass and chromatographic resolution is necessary for the detectability of compounds and subsequent componentization and interpretation of ions. The mass accuracy and relative isotopic abundance are critical in correct molecular formulae generation for unknown compounds. While high-resolution instrumentation provides accurate mass information, sample complexity can greatly influence data quality and the measurement of compounds of interest. Two high-resolution instruments, an Orbitrap and a Q-TOF, were evaluated for mass accuracy and relative isotopic abundance with various concentrations of a standard mixture in four complex sample matrices. The overall average ± standard deviation of the mass accuracy was 1.06 ± 0.76 ppm and 1.62 ± 1.88 ppm for the Orbitrap and the Q-TOF, respectively; however, individual measurements were ± 5 ppm for the Orbitrap and greater than 10 ppm for the Q-TOF. Relative isotopic abundance measurements for A + 1 were within 5% of the theoretical value if the intensity of the monoisotopic peak was greater than 1E7 for the Orbitrap and 1E5 for the Q-TOF, where an increase in error is observed with a decrease in intensity. Furthermore, complicating factors were found in the data that would impact automated data analysis strategies, including coeluting species that interfere with detectability and relative isotopic abundance measurements. The implications of these findings will be discussed with an emphasis on reasonable expectations from these instruments, guidelines for experimental workflows, data analysis considerations, and software design for non-targeted analyses.

  1. CNO abundances and carbon isotope ratios in evolved stars of the open clusters NGC 2324, NGC 2477, and NGC 3960

    CERN Document Server

    Tautvaisiene, Grazina; Bragaglia, Angela; Randich, Sofia; Zenoviene, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Our main aim is to determine carbon-to-nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios for evolved giants in the open clusters NGC 2324, NGC 2477, and NGC 3960, which have turn-off masses of about 2 Msun, and to compare them with predictions of theoretical models. High-resolution spectra were analysed using a differential synthetic spectrum method. Abundances of carbon were derived using the C2 Swan (0,1) band heads at 5135 and 5635.5 A. The wavelength interval 7940-8130 A with strong CN features was analysed to determine nitrogen abundances and carbon isotope ratios. The oxygen abundances were determined from the [Oi] line at 6300 A. The mean values of the CNO abundances are [C/Fe]=-0.35+-0.06 (s.d.), [N/Fe]=0.28+-0.05, and [O/Fe]=-0.02+-0.10 in seven stars of NGC 2324; [C/Fe]=-0.26+-0.02, [N/Fe]=0.39+-0.04, and [O/Fe]=-0.11+-0.06 in six stars of NGC 2477; and [C/Fe]=-0.39+-0.04, [N/Fe]=0.32+-0.05, and [O/Fe]=-0.19+-0.06 in six stars of NGC 3960. The mean C/N ratio is equal to 0.92+-0.12, 0.91+-0.09, and 0.80+-0.13, resp...

  2. Characterization of uranium isotopic abundances in depleted uranium metal assay standard 115

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certified reference material (CRM) 115, Uranium (Depleted) Metal (Uranium Assay Standard), was analyzed using a TRITON Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer to characterize the uranium isotope-amount ratios. The certified 235U/238U 'major' isotope-amount ratio of 0.0020337 (12) in CRM 115 was determined using the total evaporation (TE) and the modified total evaporation (MTE) analytical techniques. In the MTE method, the total evaporation process is interrupted on a regular basis to allow correction of background from peak tailing, internal calibration of the secondary electron multiplier detector versus the Faraday cups, peak-centering, and ion source re-focusing. For the 'minor' 234U/238U and 236U/238U isotope-amount ratio measurements using MTE, precision and accuracy comparable to conventional analyses are achieved, without compromising the quality of the 235U/238U isotope-amount ratios. Characterized values of the 234U/238U and 236U/238U isotope-amount ratios in CRM 115 are 0.000007545 (10) and 0.000032213 (84), respectively. The 233U/238U isotope-amount ratio in CRM 115 is estimated to be -9. The homogeneity of the CRM 115 materials is established through the absence of any statistically significant unit-to-unit variation in the uranium isotope-amount ratios. The measurements leading to the certification of uranium isotope-amount ratios are discussed. (author)

  3. Standard test method for uranium and plutonium concentrations and isotopic abundances by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the concentration and isotopic composition of uranium and plutonium in solutions. The purified uranium or plutonium from samples ranging from nuclear materials to environmental or bioassay matrices is loaded onto a mass spectrometric filament. The isotopic ratio is determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry, the concentration is determined by isotope dilution. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  4. Determination of the natural abundance δ15N of taurine by gas chromatography-isotope ratio measurement mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tea, Illa; Antheaume, Ingrid; Besnard, Jorick; Robins, Richard J

    2010-12-15

    The measurement of the nitrogen isotope ratio of taurine (2-aminoethanesulphonic acid) in biological samples has a large number of potential applications. Taurine is a small water-soluble molecule which is notoriously difficult to analyze due to its polarity and functionality. A method is described which allows the determination of the natural abundance δ(15)N values of taurine and structural analogues, such as 3-amino-1-propanesulphonic acid (APSA), by isotope ratio mass spectrometry interfaced to gas chromatography (GC-irm-MS). The one-step protocol exploits the simultaneous derivatization of both functionalities of these aminosulphonic acids by reaction with triethylorthoacetate (TEOA). Conditions have been established which ensure quantitative reaction thus avoiding any nitrogen isotope fractionation during derivatization and workup. The differences in the δ(15)N values of derivatized and non-derivatized taurine and APSA all fall within the working range of 0.4‰ (-0.02 to 0.39‰). When applied to four sources of taurine with various δ(15)N values, the method achieved excellent reproducibility and accuracy. The optimized method enables the determination of the natural abundance δ(15)N values of taurine over the concentration range 1.5-7.84 µmol.mL(-1) in samples of biological origin.

  5. Mercury (Hg) in meteorites: Variations in abundance, thermal release profile, mass-dependent and mass-independent isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Matthias M. M.; Cloquet, Christophe; Marty, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the concentration, isotopic composition and thermal release profiles of Mercury (Hg) in a suite of meteorites, including both chondrites and achondrites. We find large variations in Hg concentration between different meteorites (ca. 10 ppb to 14,000 ppb), with the highest concentration orders of magnitude above the expected bulk solar system silicates value. From the presence of several different Hg carrier phases in thermal release profiles (150-650 °C), we argue that these variations are unlikely to be mainly due to terrestrial contamination. The Hg abundance of meteorites shows no correlation with petrographic type, or mass-dependent fractionation of Hg isotopes. Most carbonaceous chondrites show mass-independent enrichments in the odd-numbered isotopes 199Hg and 201Hg. We show that the enrichments are not nucleosynthetic, as we do not find corresponding nucleosynthetic deficits of 196Hg. Instead, they can partially be explained by Hg evaporation and redeposition during heating of asteroids from primordial radionuclides and late-stage impact heating. Non-carbonaceous chondrites, most achondrites and the Earth do not show these enrichments in vapor-phase Hg. All meteorites studied here have however isotopically light Hg (δ202Hg = ∼-7 to -1) relative to the Earth's average crustal values, which could suggest that the Earth has lost a significant fraction of its primordial Hg. However, the late accretion of carbonaceous chondritic material on the order of ∼2%, which has been suggested to account for the water, carbon, nitrogen and noble gas inventories of the Earth, can also contribute most or all of the Earth's current Hg budget. In this case, the isotopically heavy Hg of the Earth's crust would have to be the result of isotopic fractionation between surface and deep-Earth reservoirs.

  6. Determination of Isotopic Abundance of 2H, 13C, 18O, and 37Cl in Biofield Energy Treated Dichlorophenol Isomers

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendra Kumar Trivedi

    2015-01-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) and 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP) are two isomers of dichlorophenols, have been used as preservative agents for wood, paints, vegetable fibers and as intermediates in the production of pharmaceuticals and dyes. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance ratios of 2H/1H or 13C/12C, and 18O/16O or 37Cl/35Cl, in dichlorophenol isomers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The 2,4- DCP and 2,6-DC...

  7. Stable isotope labelled mass spectrometry for quantification of the relative abundances for expressed proteins induced by PeaT1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The protein elicitor from the mycelium of Alternaria tenuissima has been isolated.The elicitor triggered resistance to the tobacco mosaic virus in tobacco by inducing relative oxygen species,but without causing hypersensitive necrosis.The elicitor is reported to impart resistance against Verticillium dahliae and to increase yield in cotton,but its mechanism is not yet clear.In this study,the stable isotope labelled mass spectrometry method was used to quantify the relative abundances of protein expression induced by PeaT1 in Arabidopsis.A significant difference in the relative abundances for the expression of different proteins related to metabolism,modification,regulatory,defense,stress and antioxidation was found in Arabidopsis.

  8. Plutonium isotopic abundance measurements on CBNM NRM 271 analyzed with the FRAM and MGA codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friar, R.J.; Sampson, T.E.

    1992-05-01

    We report results of gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements of the isotopic distributions of plutonium in the reference-material set CBNM NRM 271 as analyzed by the FRAM and MGA plutonium isotopic codes. We acquired high-quality spectral data under measurement conditions approximating field-use conditions recommended by the code developers. Bias and precision results from these measurements are presented for both codes. Both codes performed very well for these measurements. These standards have proven to be very useful for testing the Los Alamos FRAM code in the high-burnup region where well-characterized materials have been unavailable at Los Alamos.

  9. Isotopic abundance in the CN coma of comets: Ten years of measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, R.; Jehin, E.; Manfroid, J.; Hutsemékers, D.; Arpigny, C.; Cochran, A.; Zucconi, J.-M.; Stüwe, J. A.

    2008-11-01

    Over the past 10 years the isotopic ratios of carbon ( 12C/ 13C) and nitrogen ( 14N/ 15N) have been determined for a dozen comets, bright enough to allow obtaining the required measurements from the ground. The ratios were derived from high-resolution spectra of the CN coma measured in the B 2∑ +-X 2∑ + (0, 0) emission band around 387 nm. The observed comets belong to different dynamical classes, including dynamically new as well as long- and short-period comets from the Halley- and Jupiter-family. In some cases the comets could be observed at various heliocentric distances. All values determined for the carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios were consistent within the error margin irrespective of the type of comet or the heliocentric distance at which it was observed. Our investigations resulted in average ratios of 12C/ 13C=91±21 and nitrogen 14N/ 15N=141±29. Whilst the value for the carbon isotopic ratio is in good agreement with the solar and terrestrial value of 89, the nitrogen isotopic ratio is very different from the telluric value of 272.

  10. The reduction and oxidation of ceria: A natural abundance triple oxygen isotope perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayles, Justin; Bao, Huiming

    2015-06-01

    Ceria (CeO2) is a heavily studied material in catalytic chemistry for use as an oxygen storage medium, oxygen partial pressure regulator, fuel additive, and for the production of syngas, among other applications. Ceria powders are readily reduced and lose structural oxygen when subjected to low pO2 and/or high temperature conditions. Such dis-stoichiometric ceria can then re-oxidize under higher pO2 and/or lower temperature by incorporating new oxygen into the previously formed oxygen site vacancies. Despite extensive studies on ceria, the mechanisms for oxygen adsorption-desorption, dissociation-association, and diffusion of oxygen species on ceria surface and within the crystal structure are not well known. We predict that a large kinetic oxygen isotope effect should accompany the release and incorporation of ceria oxygen. As the first attempt to determine the existence and the degree of the isotope effect, this study focuses on a set of simple room-temperature re-oxidation experiments that are also relevant to a laboratory procedure using ceria to measure the triple oxygen isotope composition of CO2. Triple-oxygen-isotope labeled ceria powders are heated at 700 °C and cooled under vacuum prior to exposure to air. By combining results from independent experimental sets with different initial oxygen isotope labels and using a combined mass-balance and triangulation approach, we have determined the isotope fractionation factors for both high temperature reduction in vacuum (⩽10-4 mbar) and room temperature re-oxidation in air. Results indicate that there is a 1.5‰ ± 0.8‰ increase in the δ18O value of ceria after being heated in vacuum at 700 °C for 1 h. When the vacuum is broken at room temperature, the previously heated ceria incorporates 3-19% of its final structural oxygen from air, with a δ18O value of 2.1-4.1+7.7 ‰ for the incorporated oxygen. The substantial incorporation of oxygen from air supports that oxygen mobility is high in vacancy

  11. First measurement of Mg isotope abundances at high redshifts and accurate estimate of Delta alpha/alpha

    CERN Document Server

    Agafonova, I I; Levshakov, S A; Hou, J L

    2011-01-01

    (Abridged) We use a high-resolution spectrum of the quasar HE0001-2340 observed with the UVES/VLT to measure Mg isotope abundances in the intervening absorption-line systems at high redshifts. Line profiles are prepared accounting for possible shifts between the individual exposures. Due to unique composition of the selected systems - the presence of several transitions of the same ion - we can test the local accuracy of the wavelength scale calibration which is the main source of errors in the sub-pixel line position measurements. In the system at zabs = 0.45 which is probably a fragment of the outflow caused by SN Ia explosion of high-metallicity white dwarf(s) we measured velocity shifts of MgII and MgI lines relative to other lines (FeI, FeII, CaI, CaII): Delta V(MgII) = -0.44 +/- 0.05 km/s and Delta V(MgI) = -0.17 +/- 0.17$ km/s. This translates into the isotopic ratio 24Mg:25Mg:26Mg = (19 +/- 11):(22 +/- 13):(59 +/- 6) with a strong relative overabundance of heavy Mg isotopes, (25Mg+26Mg)/24Mg = 4, as c...

  12. Determining the isotopic abundance of a labeled compound by mass spectrometry and how correcting for natural abundance distribution using analogous data from the unlabeled compound leads to a systematic error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, David J; Lockley, William J S; Elmore, Charles S; Hesk, Dave; Roberts, Drew

    2016-04-01

    When the isotopic abundance or specific activity of a labeled compound is determined by mass spectrometry (MS), it is necessary to correct the raw MS data to eliminate ion intensity contributions, which arise from the presence of heavy isotopes at natural abundance (e.g., a typical carbon compound contains ~1.1% (13) C per carbon atom). The most common approach is to employ a correction in which the mass-to-charge distribution of the corresponding unlabeled compound is used to subtract the natural abundance contributions from the raw mass-to-charge distribution pattern of the labeled compound. Following this correction, the residual intensities should be due to the presence of the newly introduced labeled atoms only. However, this will only be the case when the natural abundance mass isotopomer distribution of the unlabeled compound is the same as that of the labeled species. Although this may be a good approximation, it cannot be accurate in all cases. The implications of this approximation for the determination of isotopic abundance and specific activity have been examined in practice. Isotopically mixed stable-atom labeled valine batches were produced, and both these and [(14) C6 ]carbamazepine were analyzed by MS to determine the extent of the error introduced by the approach. Our studies revealed that significant errors are possible for small highly-labeled compounds, such as valine, under some circumstances. In the case with [(14) C6 ]carbamazepine, the errors introduced were minor but could be significant for (14) C-labeled compounds with particular isotopic distributions. This source of systematic error can be minimized, although not eliminated, by the selection of an appropriate isotopic correction pattern or by the use of a program that varies the natural abundance distribution throughout the correction. PMID:26916110

  13. CNO abundances and carbon isotope ratios in evolved stars of the open clusters NGC 2324, NGC 2477, and NGC 3960

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautvaišienė, Gražina; Drazdauskas, Arnas; Bragaglia, Angela; Randich, Sofia; Ženovienė, Renata

    2016-10-01

    Aims: Our main aim is to determine carbon-to-nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios for evolved giants in the open clusters NGC 2324, NGC 2477, and NGC 3960, which have turn-off masses of about 2 M⊙, and to compare them with predictions of theoretical models. Methods: High-resolution spectra were analysed using a differential synthetic spectrum method. Abundances of carbon were derived using the C2 Swan (0, 1) band heads at 5135 and 5635.5 Å. The wavelength interval 7940-8130 Å with strong CN features was analysed to determine nitrogen abundances and carbon isotope ratios. The oxygen abundances were determined from the [O i] line at 6300 Å. Results: The mean values of the CNO abundances are [C/Fe] = -0.35 ± 0.06 (s.d.), [N/Fe] = 0.28 ± 0.05, and [O/Fe] = -0.02 ± 0.10 in seven stars of NGC 2324; [C/Fe] = -0.26 ± 0.02, [N/Fe] = 0.39 ± 0.04, and [O/Fe] = -0.11 ± 0.06 in six stars of NGC 2477; and [C/Fe] = -0.39 ± 0.04, [N/Fe] = 0.32 ± 0.05, and [O/Fe] = -0.19 ± 0.06 in six stars of NGC 3960. The mean C/N ratio is equal to 0.92 ± 0.12, 0.91 ± 0.09, and 0.80 ± 0.13, respectively. The mean 12C /13C ratio is equal to 21 ± 1, 20 ± 1, and 16 ± 4, respectively. The 12C /13C and C/N ratios of stars in the investigated open clusters were compared with the ratios predicted by stellar evolution models. Conclusions: The mean values of the 12C /13C and C/N ratios in NGC 2324 and NGC 2477 agree well with the first dredge-up and thermohaline-induced extra-mixing models, which are similar for intermediate turn-off mass stars. The 12C /13C ratios in the investigated clump stars of NGC 3960 span from 10 to 20. The mean carbon isotope and C/N ratios in NGC 3960 are close to predictions of the model in which the thermohaline- and rotation-induced (if rotation velocity at the zero-age main sequence was 30% of the critical velocity) extra-mixing act together. Based on observations collected at ESO telescopes under programmes 072.D-0550 and 074.D-0571.

  14. Theoretical effect of diffusion on isotopic abundance ratios in rocks and associated fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senftle, F.E.; Bracken, J.T.

    1955-01-01

    Diffusion is considered as a possible process of isotope fractionation taking place throughout geologic time. Both diffusion in solids and diffusion in liquids are taken as possible mechanisms, the latter being more important. Arguments are presented to show that if significant fractionation takes place within a crystal by outward diffusion under solid-state conditions, enrichment will be evident only in elements of minor concentration. Similar conclusions are inferred for solid-state diffusion across a boundary or for diffusion in liquids. No isotopic enrichment can be expected in relatively large bodies of diffusion transported material. Although the necessary data to confirm these conclusions are scanty, it seems worth while to undertake further work in this direction. ?? 1955.

  15. Accurate experimental determination of the isotope effects on the triple point temperature of water. I. Dependence on the 2H abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, V.; Peruzzi, A.; Aerts-Bijma, A. T.; Jansen, H. G.; Spriensma, J. J.; van Geel, J.; Meijer, H. A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Variation in the isotopic composition of water is one of the major contributors to uncertainty in the realization of the triple point of water (TPW). Although the dependence of the TPW on the isotopic composition of the water has been known for years, there is still a lack of a detailed and accurate experimental determination of the values for the correction constants. This paper is the first of two articles (Part I and Part II) that address quantification of isotope abundance effects on the triple point temperature of water. In this paper, we describe our experimental assessment of the 2H isotope effect. We manufactured five triple point cells with prepared water mixtures with a range of 2H isotopic abundances encompassing widely the natural abundance range, while the 18O and 17O isotopic abundance were kept approximately constant and the 18O  -  17O ratio was close to the Meijer-Li relationship for natural waters. The selected range of 2H isotopic abundances led to cells that realised TPW temperatures between approximately  -140 μK to  +2500 μK with respect to the TPW temperature as realized by VSMOW (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water). Our experiment led to determination of the value for the δ2H correction parameter of A2H  =  673 μK / (‰ deviation of δ2H from VSMOW) with a combined uncertainty of 4 μK (k  =  1, or 1σ).

  16. Light Isotope Abundances in Solar Energetic Particles Measured by the NINA-2 Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, V. V.; Bakaldin, A.; Galper, A.; Koldashov, S.; Korotkov, M.; Leonov, A.; Mikhaylova, J.; Voronov, S.; Bidoli, V.; Casolino, M.; De Pascale, M.; Furano, G.; Iannucci, A.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Sparvoli, R.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, N.; Ambriola, M.; Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Circella, M.; De Marzo, C.; Adriani, O.; Papini, P.; Spillantini, P.; Straulino, S.; Vannuccini, E.; Ricci, M.; Castellini, G.

    2003-07-01

    The instrument NINA-2 flew on board the satellite MITA between July 2000 and August 2001, in circular polar orbit. This paper reports about a set of Solar Energetic Particle events measured by the NINA-2 instrument. The detector has mass resolution of about 0.15 amu for light nuclei and gives the possibility to observe hydrogen and helium isotop es in the energy range 10-50 MeV/n. Data of 3 He and 4 He were used to determine the 3 He/4 He ratio. For each event the deuterium-to-proton ratio was also estimated. This ratio, averaged over all events, is less than 3×10-5 .

  17. Authentication of origins of fermentive ethanol in Philippine-made beverages by C,H,O isotope abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper demonstrates the expediency of radiocarbon liquid scintillation counting for detection of synthetic ethanol adulteration in Philippine-manufactured wines/alcoholic beverages. The impure wines are distinguished from the pure beverages by radiocarbon assay, taking advantage of the anticipated minor 14Carbon content of synthetic ethyl alcohol in comparison with the natural 14C abundance of the plant-derived, biogenic products. Biogenic samples give 12-15 dpm/g C activities, while synthetic samples exhibits 0-2 dpm/g C activities. The research moreover explores the utility of Deuterium, Oxygen 16 and 13Carbon/ 12Carbon isotope ratio analysis in the authentication of the botanical and geographical origins of beverages. Initial investigations revealed the mean of δ 18O in the Metro Manila area for precipitation, surface waters and ground waters to be -6.09 ± 2.9, -1.59 ± 2.2, and -6.64 ± 0.7 per mil.respectively. δ2H in Metro Manila for precipitation, surface waters and ground waters were -43.8 ± 1.2,-11.9 ± 16.2, -45.0 ± 4.8 per mil respectively. Vital information such as detection of illegal dilution with water, or enrichment using other sugars before and after fermentation, misrepresentation of geographical origin, and adulteration with petroleum-derived ethanol can be generated from the isotopic data. (author)

  18. MGA: A gamma-ray spectrum analysis code for determining plutonium isotopic abundances. Volume 3, FORTRAN listing of the GA code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnink, R

    1991-09-01

    Nondestructive measurements of x-ray and gamma-ray emissions can be used to determine the abundances of various actinides in a sample. Volume 1 of this report describes the methods and algorithms we have developed to determine the relative isotopic abundances of actinides in a sample, by analyzing gamma-ray spectra obtained using germanium detector systems. Volume 2 is a guide to using the MGA (Multiple Group Analysis) computer program we have written to perform plutonium isotopic analyses. This report contains a listing of the FORTRAN instructions of the code.

  19. Using natural isotopic abundances to determine the source of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothet, A.; Sebilo, M.; Laverman, A. M.; Vaury, V.; Mariotti, A.

    2012-04-01

    Numerous greenhouse gas studies have focused on carbon dioxide (CO2), whereas nitrous oxide (N2O) also plays a major role in global warming. Indeed, while nitrous oxide is 1000 times less concentrated than CO2 in the atmosphere, it is 300 times more efficient in terms of global warming potential. In addition, its atmospheric concentration increases with 0,3 % per year. According to the literature, nitrous oxide is produced, in soils and sediments, by two major processes: (1) Nitrification, mediated by autotrophic nitrifying bacteria under oxic conditions; (2) Denitrification, mediated by heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria under anoxic conditions. Denitrification induces intensive, localized and instantaneous fluxes. N2O emissions can be easily measured and modeled. In contrast, nitrification induces weak emissions, but spatially and temporally extended. Therefore, this process could represent a large potential of N2O emissions from soils and sediments. The study of isotopomer's isotopic composition of N2O, i.e. the intramolecular distribution or site preference (SP) determined by 15N measurement allows the determination of the origin of N2O emissions (nitrification vs. denitrification). Recent studies on pure cultures have showed that SP associated with nitrification is 35 ‰ while SP associated with denitrification is 0 ‰. The aim of this study was to determine SP associated with denitrification in soils and sediments, taking into account the environmental denitrifying bacterial communities, and under different environmental variables. To this end, flow-through reactors were used to determine denitrification rates at different temperatures and varying substrate (nitrate) concentrations. Site preference was measured for the different experiments. Different experiments of denitrification were realized in sediment flow through reactors under denitrifying conditions (anoxia, presence of organic matter and nitrate). We used acetylene (25°C) to block the enzyme

  20. Simultaneous Determination of the 2H/1H, 17O/16O, and 18O/16O Isotope Abundance Ratios in Water by Means of Laser Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstel, E.R.Th.; Trigt, R. van; Dam, N.J.; Reuss, J.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    1999-01-01

    We demonstrate the first successful application of infrared laser spectrometry to the accurate, simultaneous determination of the relative H-2/H-1, O-17/O-16, and O-18/O-16 isotope abundance ratios in water. The method uses a narrow Line width color center laser to record the direct absorption spect

  1. Rb, Sr and strontium isotopic composition, K/Ar age and large ion lithophile trace element abundances in rocks and glasses from the Wanapitei Lake impact structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shock metamorphosed rocks and shock-produced melt glasses from the Wanapitei Lake impact structure have been examined petrographically and by electron microprobe. Eleven clasts exhibiting varying degrees of shock metamorphism and eight impact-produced glasses have been analyzed for Rb, Sr and Sr isotopic composition. Five clasts and one glass have also been analyzed for large ion lithophile (LIL) trace element abundances including Li, Rb, Sr, and Ba and the REE's. The impact event forming the Wanapitei Lake structure occurred 37 m.y. ago based on K/Ar dating of glass and glassy whole-rock samples. Rb/Sr isotopic dating failed to provide a meaningful whole-rock or internal isochron. The isotopic composition of the glasses can be explained by impact-produced mixing and melting of metasediments. Large ion lithophile trace element abundance patterns confirm the origin of the glasses by total shock melting of metasediments. (author)

  2. Ion-microprobe measurements of Mg, Ca, Ti and Fe isotopic ratios and trace element abundance in hibonite-bearing inclusions in primitive meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis reports the isotopic abundances of Mg, Ca, and Ti and rare earth element (REE) abundances in 19 hibonite-bearing inclusions from primative meteorites. The isotopic ratios of Fe were measured in one of the samples, Lance HH-1. These measurements were made by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (CAMECA IMS-3f). The novel hardware and software developments that made this work possible are described in detail. The samples were studied in thin section in order to investigate the relationship between the inclusions and their mineralogical environments. Inclusions from a number of different meteorites, specifically, Mighei, Murray, Murchison, Lance, Efremovka, Vigarano, Qingzhen, Dhajala, and Semarkona, were studied. The isotopes of Ca and Ti show large and correlated abundance anomalies in their most neutron-rich isotopes, 48Ca and 50Ti. The largest anomalies among the samples studied here are in the Murray inclusion MY-F6, with a 4.6% deficit in 48Ca and a 5.2% deficit in 50Ti, and Lance HH-1, with 3.3% and 6.0% deficits in 48Ca and 50Ti respectively. Correlated excesses of 48Ca and 50Ti, up to 2.4% and 1.4% respectively, are found in some other samples studied here. The fact that there is a correlation of isotopic anomalies in two different elements is clear evidence for a nucleosynthetic origin of these effects. Various possibilities for the origin of these isotopic anomalies are discussed and it is shown that a Cosmic Chemical Memory-like model of the incomplete mixing of dust grains from one or several supernovae is sufficient to explain the data. Magnesium isotopes show excesses of 26Mg, attributable to the in-situ decay of 26Al, in 7 of these inclusions

  3. Accurate experimental determination of the isotope effects on the triple point temperature of water. II. Combined dependence on the 18O and 17O abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, V.; Kozicki, M.; Aerts-Bijma, A. T.; Jansen, H. G.; Spriensma, J. J.; Peruzzi, A.; Meijer, H. A. J.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is the second of two articles on the quantification of isotope effects on the triple point temperature of water. In this second article, we address the combined effects of 18O and 17O isotopes. We manufactured five triple point cells with waters with 18O and 17O abundances exceeding widely the natural abundance range while maintaining their natural 18O/17O relationship. The 2H isotopic abundance was kept close to that of VSMOW (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water). These cells realized triple point temperatures ranging between  -220 μK to 1420 μK with respect to the temperature realized by a triple point cell filled with VSMOW. Our experiment allowed us to determine an accurate and reliable value for the newly defined combined 18, 17O correction parameter of AO  =  630 μK with a combined uncertainty of 10 μK. To apply this correction, only the 18O abundance of the TPW needs to be known (and the water needs to be of natural origin). Using the results of our two articles, we recommend a correction equation along with the coefficient values for isotopic compositions differing from that of VSMOW and compare the effect of this new equation on a number of triple point cells from the literature and from our own institute. Using our correction equation, the uncertainty in the isotope correction for triple point cell waters used around the world will be  <1 μK.

  4. Determination of plutonium isotopic abundances by gamma-ray spectrometry. Interim report on the status of methods and techniques developed by the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an overview of methods and techniques developed by the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory for determining plutonium isotopic abundances from gamma-ray spectra that have been measured with germanium detectors. The methodology of fitting the spectral features includes discussions of algorithms for gamma-ray and x-ray peak shape fitting and generation of response spectra profiles characteristic of specific isotopes. Applications of the techniques developed at government, commercial, and Japanese reprocessing plants are described. Current development of the methodology for the nondestructive analysis of samples containing nondescript solid materials is also presented

  5. Cumulative fission yields of short-lived isotopes under natural-abundance-boron-carbide-moderated neutron spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, Erin C.; Metz, Lori A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Pierson, Bruce; Wittman, Richard S.; Friese, Judah I.; Kephart, Rosara F.

    2015-04-09

    The availability of gamma spectroscopy data on samples containing mixed fission products at short times after irradiation is limited. Due to this limitation, data interpretation methods for gamma spectra of mixed fission product samples, where the individual fission products have not been chemically isolated from interferences, are not well-developed. The limitation is particularly pronounced for fast pooled neutron spectra because of the lack of available fast reactors in the United States. Samples containing the actinide isotopes 233, 235, 238U, 237Np, and 239Pu individually were subjected to a 2$ pulse in the Washington State University 1 MW TRIGA reactor. To achieve a fission-energy neutron spectrum, the spectrum was tailored using a natural abundance boron carbide capsule to absorb neutrons in the thermal and epithermal region of the spectrum. Our tailored neutron spectrum is unique to the WSU reactor facility, consisting of a soft fission spectrum that contains some measurable flux in the resonance region. This results in a neutron spectrum at greater than 0.1 keV with an average energy of 70 keV, similar to fast reactor spectra and approaching that of 235U fission. Unique fission product gamma spectra were collected from 4 minutes to 1 week after fission using single-crystal high purity germanium detectors. Cumulative fission product yields measured in the current work generally agree with published fast pooled fission product yield values from ENDF/B-VII, though a bias was noted for 239Pu. The present work contributes to the compilation of energy-resolved fission product yield nuclear data for nuclear forensic purposes.

  6. Assessment of Soil Organic Carbon Stability in Agricultural Systems by Using Natural Abundance Signals of Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on the stability and age of soil organic matter (SOM) pools is of vital importance for assessing the impact of soil management and environmental factors on SOM, an important part of the global carbon (C) cycle. The terrestrial soil organic C pool, up to a depth of 1 m, contains about 1500 Pg C (Batjes, 1996). This is about 2.5 times more organic C than the vegetation (650 Pg C) and about twice as much as in the atmosphere (750 Pg C) (Batjes, 1998), but the assessment of the stability and age of SOM using 14C radio carbon technique are expensive. Conen et al. (2008) developed a model to estimate the SOM stability based on the isotopic discrimination of 15N natural abundance by soil micro-organisms and the change in C/N ratio during organic matter decomposition, for steady state, Alpine and permanent grasslands. In the framework of the IAEA funded coordinated research project (CRP) on Soil Quality and Nutrient Management for Sustainable Food Production in Mulch based Cropping Systems in sub-Saharan Africa, research was initiated to use this model in agricultural systems for developing a cost effective and affordable technique for Member States to determine the stability of SOM. As part of this research, soil samples were taken and analysed in four long term field experiments, established on soils with low and high SOM, in Austria and Belgium. The participating institutions are the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES), the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences in Vienna (BOKU), the University of Leuven (KUL), the Soil Service of Belgium (BDB) and the Centre Wallon de Recherches Agronomiques (CRA-W)

  7. Nitrate dynamics in natural plants: Insights based on the concentration and natural isotope abundances of tissue nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Yan Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of nitrate (NO3-, a major nitrogen (N source for natural plants, has been studied mostly through experimental N addition, enzymatic assay, isotope labeling, and genetic expression. However, artificial N supply may not reasonably reflect the N strategies in natural plants because NO3- uptake and reduction may vary with external N availability. Abrupt application and short operation times, field N addition, and isotopic labeling hinder the elucidation of in situ NO3--use mechanisms. The concentration and natural isotopes of tissue NO3- can offer insights into the plant NO3- sources and dynamics in a natural context. Furthermore, they facilitate the exploration of plant NO3- utilization and its interaction with N pollution and ecosystem N cycles without disturbing the N pools. The present study was conducted to review the application of the denitrifier method for concentration and isotope analyses of NO3- in plants. Moreover, this study highlights the utility and benefits of these parameters in interpreting NO3- sources and dynamics in natural plants. We summarize the major sources and reduction processes of NO3- in plants, and discuss the implications of NO3- concentration in plant tissues based on existing data. Particular emphasis was laid on the regulation of soil NO3 - and plant ecophysiological functions in interspecific and intra-plant NO3- variations. We introduce N and O isotope systematics of NO3- in plants and discusse the principles and feasibilities of using isotopic enrichment and fractionation factors; the correlation between concentration and isotopes (N and O isotopes: δ18O and ∆17O; and isotope mass-balance calculations to constrain sources and reduction of NO3- in possible scenarios for natural plants are deliberated. Finally, we construct a preliminary framework of intraplant δ18O-NO3- variation, and summarize the uncertainties in using tissue NO3- parameters to interpret plant NO3- utilization.

  8. 同位素丰度绝对测量及相对原子质量测定中的不确定度评估%Uncertainty Analysis of Absolute Measurement of Isotopic Abundances and Relative Atomic Mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周涛; 王同兴

    2005-01-01

    The sources of uncertainty of relative atomic mass include measurement errors and isotopic fractionation of terrestrial samples. Measurement errors are composed of measurements of atomic masses and isotopic abundances, the later includes uncertainty of correction factor K and isotopic ratios of natural samples. Through differential of seven factors to gain their propagation factors, the uncertainty of correction factors K can be calculated. With the same differential calculation, the uncertainty of relative atomic mass can be obtained.

  9. 我国城市大气颗粒物的铅同位素丰度比%Lead Isotope Abundance Ratios of Urban Atmospheric Aerosols in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘咸德; 李显芳; 李冰

    2004-01-01

    Determined with ICP-MS, new isotope abundance ratio data of lead for Beijing and Changdao aerosols was presented, in comparison with literature data for Chinese urban aerosols. 206Pb/207Pb ratio falls into a range from 1.13 to 1.18 for urban aerosols and less influenced by vehicle exhaust emission after phase-out of leaded petrol in 2000 in China. Major lead pollution sources may probably include coal combustion, oil combustion,re-suspended dust, metallurgical industry and use and production of cement.

  10. Standard test method for isotopic abundance analysis of uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by multi-collector, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2014-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the isotopic abundance analysis of 234U, 235U, 236U and 238U in samples of hydrolysed uranium hexafluoride (UF6) by inductively coupled plasma source, multicollector, mass spectrometry (ICP-MC-MS). The method applies to material with 235U abundance in the range of 0.2 to 6 % mass. This test method is also described in ASTM STP 1344. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  11. Food Resources of Stream Macronivertebrates Determined by Natural-Abundance stable C and N Isotopes and a 15N Tracer Addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulholland, P. J.

    2000-01-01

    Trophic relationships were examined using natural-abundance {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N analyses and a {sup 15}N-tracer addition experiment in Walker Branch, a 1st-order forested stream in eastern Tennessee. In the {sup 15}N-tracer addition experiment, we added {sup 15}NH{sub 4} to stream water over a 6-wk period in early spring, and measured {sup 15}N:{sup 14}N ratios in different taxa and biomass compartments over distance and time. Samples collected from a station upstream from the {sup 15}N addition provided data on natural-abundance {sup 13}C:{sup 12}C and {sup 15}N:{sup 14}N ratios. The natural-abundance {sup 15}N analysis proved to be of limited value in identifying food resources of macroinvertebrates because {sup 15}N values were not greatly different among food resources. In general, the natural-abundance stable isotope approach was most useful for determining whether epilithon or detritus were important food resources for organisms that may use both (e.g., the snail Elimia clavaeformis), and to provide corroborative evidence of food resources of taxa for which the {sup 15}N tracer results were not definitive. The {sup 15}N tracer results showed that the mayflies Stenonema spp. and Baetis spp. assimilated primarily epilithon, although Baetis appeared to assimilate a portion of the epilithon (e.g., algal cells) with more rapid N turnover than the bulk pool sampled. Although Elimia did not reach isotopic equilibrium during the tracer experiment, application of a N-turnover model to the field data suggested that it assimilated a combination of epilithon and detritus. The amphipod Gammarus minus appeared to depend mostly on fine benthic organic matter (FBOM), and the coleopteran Anchytarsus bicolor on epixylon. The caddisfly Diplectrona modesta appeared to assimilate primarily a fast N-turnover portion of the FBOM pool, and Simuliidae a fast N-turnover component of the suspended particulate organic matter pool rather than the bulk pool sampled. Together, the

  12. Mantle in the Manihiki Plateau source with ultra-depleted incompatible element abundances but FOZO-like isotopic signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golowin, R.; Hoernle, K.; Portnyagin, M.; Hauff, F.; Gurenko, A.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C. D.; Werner, R.

    2014-12-01

    The ~120Ma Manihiki Plateau basement consists of high-Ti tholeiitic basalts with EM-I type isotopic signatures, similar to the Singgalo basalts at Ontong Java, and low-Ti tholeiitic basalts with FOZO (Kwaimbaita/Kroenke) to HIMU-type isotopic compositions, similar to late stage volcanism on Hikurangi and Manihiki Plateaus (Hoernle et al. 2010; Timm et al. 2011). The low-Ti basalts have affinities to boninites and have been interpreted to be derived from residual mantle wedge mantle (Ingle et al. 2007). New major, volatile and trace element and radiogenic isotope data have been generated from fresh low-Ti glass samples recovered during R/V Sonne cruises SO193 and SO225. The low-Ti samples have distinctly lower Ti/V ratios compared to lavas from Ontong Java Plateau (Kwaimbaita-Kroenke and Singgalo), but similar to boninitic rocks. Glasses and melt inclusions in olivine have low volatile contents (0.12-0.25 wt% H2O). Olivine chemistry points to derivation from peridotite source. Therefore we interpret the low-Ti lavas to have formed through melting of dry and depleted peridotite at high temperatures, consistent with Timm et al (2011). The low-Ti group is characterized by U-shaped trace element patterns. The glass samples form linear mixing arrays on radiogenic isotope diagrams, pointing to the involvement of two components: 1) a component ultra-depleted in highly incompatible elements (UDC) but with intermediate Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic compositions, being similar to Kwaimbaita/Kroenke lavas from Ontong Java, and 2) an enriched component with HIMU-type incompatible element and isotopic characteristics, similar to late-stage volcanism on Manihiki, Hikurangi and Ontong Java (e.g. Hoernle et al. 2010). The ultra-depleted, FOZO-like mantle component could represent second stage melting of FOZO type mantle or re-melting of young recycled oceanic lithosphere within the plume head. Enrichment with HIMU type melts is required to explain the enrichment in the most incompatible

  13. Double-neutron capture reaction and natural abundance of 183W, 195Pt and 199Hg isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamian, S. A.; Aksenov, N. V.; Bozhikov, G. A.

    2016-06-01

    There are much data on neutron cross sections over the chart of nuclides for stable isotopes and not as much for the radioactive ones. Double neutron capture experiments could be fruitful to provide more data. Time-integrated mean flux of slow neutrons reaches the value of 2.3-1012 n/cm2 s at the irradiation port near the active zone of the IBR-2 pulsed reactor of JINR. This is enough to detect the double neutron capture products by the activation method. A high capture cross section is obtained in the present experiment for intermediate radioactive 182Ta and 194Ir target nuclides. Together with the known data for 198Au, these values may prove an essential role of double neutron capture process for nucleosynthesis of 183W, 195Pt and 199Hg isotopes at stellar conditions.

  14. A natural abundance stable isotope tracer experiment to define SO2 oxidation pathways and their fractionation during heterogeneous oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, N.; Norman, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols have crucial direct and indirect effects on climate from radiative cooling to modifying clouds by formation of cloud condensation nuclei. Secondary sulfate aerosols are formed by oxidation of SO2 and subsequent nucleation and growth and the characteristics of primary aerosol sulfate can be modified by oxidation of SO2. There are several known oxidation pathways for SO2; gaseous phase OH oxidation and aqueous phase H2O2, O3 and transition metal oxides oxidation. The SO2 oxidation pathway affects the characteristics of the aerosols formed. Stable isotope techniques are useful in determining the oxidation pathway of SO2 due to unique fractionation patterns (Harris et al., 2012). However, there are still gaps in our understanding of the oxidation pathways and fractionations affecting SO2 and secondary sulfate. A tracer experiment to investigate the oxidation of SO2 and fractionation using size segregated aerosols in the presence of different compounds is described. Two high volume samplers situated to measure background sulfate upwind, and the results of a tracer experiment, downwind, is described. After sufficient size segregated aerosol sulfate has been collected, a source of SO2 with known isotopic composition is introduced to the second high volume sampler. Changes in the isotopic composition for size segregated aerosol sulfate in comparison to the first high volume sampler are investigated. The amount of fractionation during heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 on pre-existing aerosols is calculated using the concentrations and known isotopic composition and compared to data from laboratory and field experiments. The experiment is performed downwind of sources of organic compounds such as pine forests, and characterized using co-located canister samples, to determine the effects of SO2 oxidation on secondary aerosol sulfate.

  15. 235Uranium isotope abundance certified reference material for gamma spectrometry EC nuclear reference material 171 certification report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This certification report contains the information necessary for the final certification of EC nuclear reference material 171. It is also intended to inform the user of the reference material concerned on technical/scientific details which are not given in the certificate. The report describes the reference material which consists of sets of U3O8 samples with five different 235U/U abundances, filled in cylindrical aluminium cans. The can bottom serves as window for emitted gamma radiation. The report describes how the 235U/U abundances were characterized, how the other properties relevant for gamma measurements were determined and gives all connected results as well as those from the verification measurements. Appendix A represents the draft certificate. 32 refs

  16. Application of (119)Sn CPMG MAS NMR for Fast Characterization of Sn Sites in Zeolites with Natural (119)Sn Isotope Abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolyagin, Yury G; Yakimov, Alexander V; Tolborg, Søren; Vennestrøm, Peter N R; Ivanova, Irina I

    2016-04-01

    (119)Sn CPMG MAS NMR is demonstrated to be a fast and efficient method for characterization of Sn-sites in Sn-containing zeolites. Tuning of the CPMG echo-train sequence decreases the experimental time by a factor of 5-40 in the case of as-synthesized and hydrated Sn-BEA samples and by 3 orders of magnitude in the case of dehydrated Sn-BEA samples as compared to conventional methods. In the latter case, the reconstruction of the quantitative spectrum without the loss of sensitivity is shown to be possible. The method proposed allows obtaining (119)Sn MAS NMR spectra with improved resolution for Sn-BEA zeolites with natural (119)Sn isotope abundance using conventional MAS NMR equipment. PMID:26978430

  17. An evaluation method of the neutron fluence and spectrum by measuring the change of isotopic abundance ratios of arbitrary pairs of nuclides on heavy irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evaluation method of the neutron fluence and mean spectrum with which samples have been irradiated is proposed. The principle is based on measuring the change of the isotopic abundance ratios of arbitrary pairs of nuclides having different neutron absorption cross sections for both thermal and intermediate neutrons. Advantages of the method are as follows, although sensitivity is lower than that of the ordinary activation method in a short irradiation period. i) Any sample can be used irrespective of irradiation history. ii) Nuclides present as impurities in samples can be used as detectors. iii) Neutron fluences and mean spectra with which samples have been heavily irradiated can be measured with reasonable accuracy, thus making it possible to offer the direct information to radiation damage studies. The present study deals with the principle and applicability of the method. (author)

  18. 3D H2BC: A novel experiment for small-molecule and biomolecular NMR at natural isotopic abundance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sebastian; Benie, Andrew J; Duus, Jens Øllgaard;

    2009-01-01

    3D H2BC is introduced for heteronuclear assignment on natural abundance samples even for biomolecules up to at least 10 kDa in low millimolar concentrations as an overnight experiment using the latest generation of cryogenically cooled probes. The short pulse sequence duration of H2BC is maintain...... in the 3D version due to multiple use of the constant-time delay. Applications ranging from a small lipid to a non-recombinant protein demonstrate the merits of 3D H2BC and the ease of obtaining assignments in chains of protonated carbons....

  19. Natural isotopes abundance of 15N and 13C in leaves of some N2-fixing and non N2-fixing trees and shrubs in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variability in the natural abundance isotopes of 15N and 13C in leaves of several legume and non-legume plant species grown at different sites of two areas in semi-arid regions of Syria was determined. In the first area (non-saline soil), the 15N values of a number of fixing and non-fixing reference plants ranged from -2.09 to +9.46, depending on plant species and studied site. 15N in a number of legume species including Acacia cyanopylla (-1.73), Acacia farnesiana (-0.55), Prosopis juliflora (-1.64) and Medicago arborea (+1.6) were close to the atmospheric value pointing to a major contribution of N2 fixing in these species; whereas, those of reference plants were highly positive (between +3.6 and +9.46%). In the actinorhizal tree, Elaeagnus angustifolia, the 15N abundance was far lower (-0.46 to -2.1%) strongly suggesting that the plant obtained large proportional contribution from BNF. In contrast, δ15N values in some other legumes and actinorhizal plants were relatively similar to those of reference plants, suggesting that the contribution of fixed N2 is negligible. On the other hand, δ13C% values in leaves of C3 plants were affected by plant species, ranging from a minimum of -28.67% to a maximum of -23%. However, they were the same within each plant species although they were grown at different sites. Moreover, dual stable isotope analysis in leaves of Prosopis juliflora and other non- legumes grown on a salt affected soil (second area) was also conducted. Results showed that salinity did not affect C assimilation in this woody legume since a higher carbon discrimination was obtained indicating that this plant is a salt tolerant species; whereas, N2-fixation was drastically affected (δ15N= +7.03). (Author)

  20. Cyanoacetylene and its /sup 13/C species: Evidence against relative isotope fractionation and improved /sup 12/C//sup 13/C abundance ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannier, P.G.; Linke, R.A.

    1978-12-15

    We use the J=9..-->..8 transitions of HCCCN and its /sup 13/C substituted species to obtain several results in Sgr B2 and Ori A. In Sgr B2 we test for relative isotope fractionation among the three carbon sites in HCCCN and find none to a level of +- 5%. We verify that HCCCN has low opacity in both sources and derive /sup 12/C//sup 13/C isotope ratios of 50 (Ori A) and 22 (Sgr B2), an indication of galactic evolution of this important ratio. That the Orion ''plateau'' feature is especially prominent in HCCCN indicates a surprisingly large polyatomic molecule abundance for this energetic source. Our spectra also yield information about other chemical species, including a new transition of NH/sub 2/CN, an improved frequency of U81505, and a new unidentified line U79220. In addition, sensitive upper limits for NH/sub 2/CN, CH/sub 2/CO, and HNO in the Orion ''spike'' source imply that this cloud is relatively deficient in these species.

  1. Volatile abundances and oxygen isotopes in basaltic to dacitic lavas on mid-ocean ridges: The role of assimilation at spreading centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanless, V.D.; Perfit, M.R.; Ridley, W.I.; Wallace, P.J.; Grimes, Craig B.; Klein, E.M.

    2011-01-01

    Most geochemical variability in MOR basalts is consistent with low- to moderate-pressure fractional crystallization of various mantle-derived parental melts. However, our geochemical data from MOR high-silica glasses, including new volatile and oxygen isotope data, suggest that assimilation of altered crustal material plays a significant role in the petrogenesis of dacites and may be important in the formation of basaltic lavas at MOR in general. MOR high-silica andesites and dacites from diverse areas show remarkably similar major element trends, incompatible trace element enrichments, and isotopic signatures suggesting similar processes control their chemistry. In particular, very high Cl and elevated H2O concentrations and relatively light oxygen isotope ratios (~ 5.8‰ vs. expected values of ~ 6.8‰) in fresh dacite glasses can be explained by contamination of magmas from a component of ocean crust altered by hydrothermal fluids. Crystallization of silicate phases and Fe-oxides causes an increase in δ18O in residual magma, but assimilation of material initially altered at high temperatures results in lower δ18O values. The observed geochemical signatures can be explained by extreme fractional crystallization of a MOR basalt parent combined with partial melting and assimilation (AFC) of amphibole-bearing altered oceanic crust. The MOR dacitic lavas do not appear to be simply the extrusive equivalent of oceanic plagiogranites. The combination of partial melting and assimilation produces a distinct geochemical signature that includes higher incompatible trace element abundances and distinct trace element ratios relative to those observed in plagiogranites.

  2. Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios of Individual Pollen Grains as a Proxy for C3- Versus C4-Grass Abundance in Paleorecords: A Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D. M.; Hu, F.; Pearson, A.

    2007-12-01

    C3 and C4 grasses have distinct influences on major biogeochemical processes and unique responses to important environmental controls. Difficulties in distinguishing between these two functional groups of grasses have hindered paleoecological studies of grass-dominated ecosystems. We recently developed a technique to analyze the stable carbon isotope composition of individual grass-pollen grains using a spooling- wire microcombustion device interfaced with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (Nelson et al. 2007). This technique holds promise for improving C3 and C4 grass reconstructions. It requires ~90% fewer grains than typical methods and avoids assumptions associated with mixing models. However, our previous work was based on known C3 and C4 grasses from herbarium specimens and field collections and the technique had not been test using geological samples. To test the ability of this technique to reproduce the abundance of C3 and C4 grasses on the landscape, we measured δ13C values of >1500 individual grains of grass pollen isolated from the surface sediments of 10 North American lakes that span a large gradient of C3 and C4 grass abundance. Results indicate a strong positive correlation (r=0.94) between % C4-grass pollen (derived from classifying δ13C values from single grains as C3 and C4) and the literature-reported abundance of C4 grasses on the landscape. However, the measured % C4-grass pollen shows some deviation from the actual abundance at sites with high proportions of C4 grasses. This is likely caused by uncertainty in the magnitude, composition, and variability of the analytical blank associated with these measurements. Correcting for this deviation using regression analysis improves the estimation of the abundance of C4 grasses on the landscape. Comparison of the % C4-grass pollen with C/N and δ13C measurements of total organic matter in the same lake-sediment samples illustrates the distinct advantage of grass-pollen δ13C as a proxy for

  3. Earthworm eco-physiological characteristics and quantification of earthworm feeding in vermifiltration system for sewage sludge stabilization using stable isotopic natural abundance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaowei; Xing, Meiyan, E-mail: lixiaowei419@163.com; Yang, Jian; Dai, Xiaohu

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Earthworm growth biomass and activity decreased with the VF depth. • Earthworm gut microbial communities were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria. • δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 13}C in earthworms decreased with time, and increased with the VF depth. • Effect of earthworm feeding in enhanced VSS reduction was analyzed quantitatively. • Earthworm feeding had low contribution to the enhanced VSS reduction. - Abstract: Previous studies showed that the presence of earthworm improves treatment performance of vermifilter (VF) for sewage sludge stabilization, but earthworm eco-physiological characteristics and effects in VF were not fully investigated. In this study, earthworm population, enzymatic activity, gut microbial community and stable isotopic abundance were investigated in the VF. Results showed that biomass, average weight, number and alkaline phosphatase activity of the earthworms tended to decrease, while protein content and activities of peroxidase and catalase had an increasing tendency as the VF depth. Earthworm gut microbial communities were dominated by Gammaproteobacteria, and the percentages arrived to 76–92% of the microbial species detected. {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C natural abundance of the earthworms decreased with operation time, and increased as the VF depth. Quantitative analysis using δ{sup 15}N showed that earthworm feeding and earthworm–microorganism interaction were responsible for approximately 21% and 79%, respectively, of the enhanced volatile suspended solid reduction due to the presence of earthworm. The finding provides a quantitative insight into how earthworms influence on sewage sludge stabilization in vermifiltration system.

  4. Distribution, abundance and carbon isotopic composition of gaseous hydrocarbons in Big Soda Lake, Nevada: an alkaline, meromictic lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distribution and isotopic composition (delta13C) of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases were studied in Big Soda Lake, an alkaline, meromictic lake with permanently anoxic bottom waters. Methane increased with depth in the anoxic mixolimnion, reached uniform concentrations in the monimolimnion and again increased with depth in monimolimnion bottom sediments. The delta13C[CH4] values in bottom sediment below 1 m sub-bottom depth increased with vertical distance up the core. Monimolimnion delta13C[CH4] values were greater than most delta13C[CH4] values found in the anoxic mixolimnion. No significant concentrations of ethylene or propylene were found in the lake. However ethane, propane, isobutane and n-butane concentrations all increased with water column depth, with respective maximum concentrations of 260, 80, 23 and 22 nM/l encountered between 50 to 60 m depth. Concentrations of ethane, propane and butanes decreased with depth in the bottom sediments. Ratios of CH4/[C2H6 + C3H8] were high in the anoxic mixolimnion, decreased in the monimolimnion and increased with depth in the sediment. We concluded that methane has a biogenic origin in both the sediments and the anoxic water column and that C2-C4 alkanes have biogenic origins in the monimolimnion water and shallow sediments. (author)

  5. Micron-scale coupled carbon isotope and nitrogen abundance variations in diamonds: Evidence for episodic diamond formation beneath the Siberian Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggers de Vries, D. F.; Bulanova, G. P.; De Corte, K.; Pearson, D. G.; Craven, J. A.; Davies, G. R.

    2013-01-01

    The internal structure and growth history of six macro-diamonds from kimberlite pipes in Yakutia (Russia) were investigated with cathodoluminescence imaging and coupled carbon isotope and nitrogen abundance analyses along detailed core to rim traverses. The diamonds are characterised by octahedral zonation with layer-by-layer growth. High spatial resolution SIMS profiles establish that there is no exchange of the carbon isotope composition across growth boundaries at the μm scale and that isotopic variations observed between (sub)zones within the diamonds are primary. The macro-diamonds have δ13C values that vary within 2‰ of -5.3‰ and their nitrogen contents range between 0-1334 at. ppm. There are markedly different nitrogen aggregation states between major growth zones within individual diamonds that demonstrate Yakutian diamonds grew in multiple growth events. Growth intervals were punctuated by stages of dissolution now associated with <10 μm wide zones of nitrogen absent type II diamond. Across these resorption interfaces carbon isotope ratios and nitrogen contents record shifts between 0.5-2.3‰ and up to 407 at. ppm, respectively. Co-variation in δ13C value-nitrogen content suggests that parts of individual diamonds precipitated in a Rayleigh process from either oxidised or reduced fluids/melts, with two single diamonds showing evidence of both fluid types. Modelling the co-variation establishes that nitrogen is a compatible element in diamond relative to its growth medium and that the nitrogen partition coefficient is different between oxidised (3-4.1) and reduced (3) sources. The reduced sources have δ13C values between -7.3‰ and -4.6‰, while the oxidised sources have higher δ13C values between -5.8‰ and -1.8‰ (if grown from carbonatitic media) or between -3.8‰ and +0.2‰ (if grown from CO2-rich media). It is therefore concluded that individual Yakutian diamonds originate from distinct fluids/melts of variable compositions. The

  6. Evaluation of relative isotopic abundance measurements in a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer for elemental composition determination of natural products in traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-Jun; Huo, Jia-Li; Chen, Jian-Zhong; Li, Na; Fang, Dong-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Zhen; Zhang, Guo-Lin; Wang, Jian-Hua; Xu, Xiao-Ying

    2013-01-01

    The relative isotopic abundance (RIA) measurement errors of a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-ToF) instrument incorporating analog-to-digital converter detectors were systemically evaluated by stochastically collecting about 200 data in positive ion mass spectrometry (MS) mode. Errors varied with peak intensities at definite spectral acquisition rates but were very close, even if peak intensities changed sharply at different spectral acquisition rates with the same concentration. Intensity thresholds were systematically defined at 1 Hz of spectral acquisition rates. RIA measurement errors were also evaluated using peak area. It seemed that peak area was better adapted for the high-intensity ions while peak intensity was suited for very low-intensity ions. Several known compounds were selected for RIA measurements for product ions in tandem mass spectropmetry (MS/MS) mode. An extract of a representative traditional Chinese medicinal, Paederia scandens was analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-QToF-MS/MS. The unique elemental compositions of some compounds could not be identified even with exact masses and MS/MS spectra of measured and reference compounds. RIA errors, especially of (M+2)M(-1), provided vital information for determining the elemental composition. PMID:24261081

  7. Climate as the dominant control on C3 and C4 plant abundance in the Loess Plateau: Organic carbon isotope evidence from the last glacial-interglacial loess-soil sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Abundance of C3 and C4 photosynthesis plants can be inferred relatively from stable carbon isotopic composition of organic matter in soils. The samples from five sequences of the last glacial-interglacial loess-soil in the Chinese Loess Plateau have been measured for organic carbon isotopic ratios (? 13Corg). The organic carbon isotope data show that relative abundance (or biomass) of C4 plants was increased ca. 40% for each sampling site from the last glacial maximum (LGM) to Holocene optimum, and increased southeastward on the Loess Plateau during both periods of LGM and Holocene. Statistic analyses on the steady maximumδ 13Corg values of Holocene soils and modern climatic data from the Loess Plateau and Inner Mongolia indicate that the C4 plant abundance increases with increasing temperature and decreasing precipitation. The C4 plant abundance is related much closer with mean April temperature and precipitation than annual. These results lead us to deduce following conclusions. First, temperature is the major factor for control on variations in C4 plant abundance in the Loess Plateau from the last glacial to interglacial. In the absence of favorable temperature condition, both of low moisture and low atmospheric CO2 concentration are insufficient to drive an expansion of the C4 plants in the plateau. Second, ? 13Corg in the loess-paleosol sequences, as a proxy of the relative abundance of C4 plants in the Loess Plateau, could not be used as an indicator of changes in the summer monsoon intensity unless the temperature had changed without great amplitude. Since all C4 plants are grasses, finally, the increase of the C4 plants supports that forest has not been dominant in the ecosystem on the Loess Plateau during Holocene although precipitation and atmospheric CO2 were largely increased relative to those during LGM.

  8. [Distribution characteristics of soil humus fractions stable carbon isotope natural abundance (delta 13C) in paddy field under long-term ridge culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-hong; Luo, You-jin; Ren, Zhen-jiang; Lü, Jia-ke; Wei, Chao-fu

    2011-04-01

    A 16-year field experiment was conducted in a ridge culture paddy field in the hilly region of Sichuan Basin, aimed to investigate the distribution characteristics of stable carbon isotope natural abundance (delta 13C) in soil humus fractions. The soil organic carbon (SOC) content in the paddy field under different cultivation modes ranked in the order of wide ridge culture > ridge culture > paddy and upland rotation. In soil humus substances (HS), humin (HU) was the main composition, occupying 21% - 30% of the total SOC. In the extracted soil carbon, humic acid (HA) dominated, occupying 17% - 21% of SOC and 38% - 65% of HS. The delta 13C value of SOC ranged from -27.9 per thousand to -25.6 per thousand, and the difference of the delta 13C value between 0-5 cm and 20-40 cm soil layers was about 1.9 per thousand. The delta 13C value of HA under different cultivation modes was 1 per thousand - 2 per thousand lower than that of SOC, and more approached to the delta 13C value of rapeseed and rice residues. As for fulvic acid (FA), its delta 13C value was about 2 per thousand and 4 per thousand higher than that of SOC and HA, respectively. The delta 13C value of HU in plough layer (0-20 cm) and plow layer (20-40 cm) ranged from -23.7 per thousand - -24.9 per thousand and -22.6 per thousand - -24.2 per thousand, respectively, reflecting the admixture of young and old HS. The delta 13C value in various organic carbon fractions was HU>FA>SOC>rapeseed and rice residues>HA. Long-term rice planting benefited the increase of SOC content, and cultivation mode played an important role in affecting the distribution patterns of soil humus delta 13C in plough layer and plow layer.

  9. Analysis of Isotopic Abundance of SeF6 by Mass Spectrometry%六氟化硒中同位素丰度质谱分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    窦秀英; 李胡平; 薛永珍

    2004-01-01

    Natural Se element have six kinds of isotope 74Se, 76Se, 77Se, 78Se, 80Se and 82Se,and the natural content of 74Se is 0. 87%. After being shot by neutron, 78Se isotope can be changed to be short decayed period to radioisotope. The radiation source made up fro mhigh density 75Se isotope, which content is more than 90%, is quite valuable for application of agriculture and nuclear medical science and such aspect. This study mainly presents experimental research on gas mass spectrograph, establishes the analysis method for isotope content of Se F6, gives best temperature needed to eradicate impurity from sample,relative strength of Se F6 fragment ion summit under the best electron energy, characteristic summit and data processing technique etc. Using this method, the measuring accuracy of 74Se isotope content of natural Se F6 is 0.4%. The technique can also be applied to examine products.

  10. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level2H-,13C- and15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, A.; Albertino, A.; Sauer, P.E.; Qi, H.; Molinie, R.; Mesnard, F.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the S values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown S values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for ??13C and ??13N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: ??2Hnicotine -162 to -45%o, ??13Cnicotine -30.05 to +7.72%, ?? 15Nnicotine -6.03 to +33.62%; ??15N acetanilide +1-18 to +40.57%; ??13Curea -34.13 to +11.71%, ??15Nurea +0.26 to +40.61% (recommended ?? values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as the first organic nitrogen stable isotope reference materials for GC-IRMS that are available with different ??13N

  11. Principles of stable isotope distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Criss, Robert E

    1999-01-01

    1. Abundance and Measurement of Stable Isotopes 1.1. Discovery of Isotopes 1.2. Nuclide Types, Abundances, and Atomic Weights 1.3. Properties and Fractionation of Isotopic Molecules 1.4. Material Balance Relationships 1.5. Mass Spectrometers 1.6. Notation and Standards 1.7. Summary 1.8. Problems References 2. Isotopic Exchange and Equilibrium Fractionation 2.1. Isotopic Exchange Reactions 2.2. Basic Equations 2.3. Molecular Models 2.4. Theory of Isotopic Fractionation 2.5. Temperature Dependence of Isotopic Fractionation Factors 2.6. Rule of the Mean 2.7. Isotopic Thermometers

  12. Study of the Role of Terrestrial Processes in the Carbon Cycle Based on Measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, Stephen C; Keeling, Ralph F

    2012-01-03

    The main objective of this project was to continue research to develop carbon cycle relationships related to the land biosphere based on remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its isotopic ratios 13C/12C, 18O/16O, and 14C/12C. The project continued time-series observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and isotopic composition begun by Charles D. Keeling at remote sites, including Mauna Loa, the South Pole, and eight other sites. Using models of varying complexity, the concentration and isotopic measurements were used to study long-term change in the interhemispheric gradients in CO2 and 13C/12C to assess the magnitude and evolution of the northern terrestrial carbon sink, to study the increase in amplitude of the seasonal cycle of CO2, to use isotopic data to refine constraints on large scale changes in isotopic fractionation which may be related to changes in stomatal conductance, and to motivate improvements in terrestrial carbon cycle models. The original proposal called for a continuation of the new time series of 14C measurements but subsequent descoping to meet budgetary constraints required termination of measurements in 2007.

  13. The 13C-Pocket Structure in AGB Models: Constraints from Zirconium Isotope Abundances in Single Mainstream SiC Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Nan; Bisterzo, Sara; Davis, Andrew M; Savina, Michael R; Pellin, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    We present postprocess AGB nucleosynthesis models with different $^{13}$C-pocket internal structures to better explain zirconium isotope measurements in mainstream presolar SiC grains by Nicolussi et al. (1997) and Barzyk et al. (2007). We show that higher-than-solar $^{92}$Zr/$^{94}$Zr ratios can be predicted by adopting a $^{13}$C-pocket with a flat $^{13}$C profile, instead of the previous decreasing-with-depth $^{13}$C profile. The improved agreement between grain data for zirconium isotopes and AGB models provides additional support for a recent proposal of a flat $^{13}$C profile based on barium isotopes in mainstream SiC grains by Liu et al. (2014).

  14. Carbon-13 isotopic abundance and concentration of atmospheric methane for background air in the Southern and Northern Hemispheres from 1978 to 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric methane (CH4) may become an increasingly important contributor to global warming in future years. Its atmospheric concentration has risen, doubling over the past several hundred years, and additional methane is thought to have a much greater effect on climate, on a per molecule basis, than additional C02 at present day concentrations (Shine et al. 1990). The causes of the increase of atmospheric CH4 have been difficult to ascertain because of a lack of quantitative knowledge of the fluxes (i.e., net emissions) from the numerous anthropogenic and natural sources. The goal of CH4 isotopic studies is to provide a constraint (and so reduce the uncertainties) in estimating the relative fluxes from the various isotopically distinct sources, whose combined fluxes must result in the measured atmospheric isotopic composition, after the fractionating effect of the atmospheric removal process is considered. In addition, knowledge of the spatial and temporal changes in the isotopic composition of atmospheric CH4, along with estimates of the fluxes from some of the major sources, makes it possible to calculate growth rates for sources whose temporal emissions trends would be difficult to measure directly

  15. Carbon-13 isotopic abundance and concentration of atmospheric methane for background air in the Southern and Northern Hemispheres from 1978 to 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, C.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sepanski; Morris, L.J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment, and Resources Center

    1995-03-01

    Atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}) may become an increasingly important contributor to global warming in future years. Its atmospheric concentration has risen, doubling over the past several hundred years, and additional methane is thought to have a much greater effect on climate, on a per molecule basis, than additional C0{sub 2} at present day concentrations (Shine et al. 1990). The causes of the increase of atmospheric CH{sub 4} have been difficult to ascertain because of a lack of quantitative knowledge of the fluxes (i.e., net emissions) from the numerous anthropogenic and natural sources. The goal of CH{sub 4} isotopic studies is to provide a constraint (and so reduce the uncertainties) in estimating the relative fluxes from the various isotopically distinct sources, whose combined fluxes must result in the measured atmospheric isotopic composition, after the fractionating effect of the atmospheric removal process is considered. In addition, knowledge of the spatial and temporal changes in the isotopic composition of atmospheric CH{sub 4}, along with estimates of the fluxes from some of the major sources, makes it possible to calculate growth rates for sources whose temporal emissions trends would be difficult to measure directly.

  16. Assessment of marine-derived nutrients in the Copper River Delta, Alaska, using natural abundance of the stable isotopes of nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Thomas C.; Woody, Carol Ann; Bishop, Mary Anne; Powers, Sean P.; Knudsen, E. Eric

    2007-01-01

    We performed nitrogen, sulfur, and carbon stable isotope analysis (SIA) on maturing and juvenile anadromous sockeye and coho salmon, and periphyton in two Copper River delta watersheds of Alaska to trace salmonderived nutrients during 2003–2004. Maturing salmon were isotopically enriched relative to alternate freshwater N, S, and C sources as expected, with differences consistent with species trophic level differences, and minor system, sex, and year-to-year differences, enabling use of SIA to trace these salmon-derived nutrients. Periphyton naturally colonized, incubated, and collected using Wildco Periphtyon Samplers in and near spawning sites was 34S- and 15N-enriched, as expected, and at all freshwater sites was 13C-depleted. At nonspawning and coho-only sites, periphyton 34S and 15N was generally low. However, 34S was low enough at some sites to be suggestive of sulfate reduction, complicating the use of S isotopes. Juvenile salmon SIA ranged in values consistent with using production derived from re-mineralization as well as direct utilization, but only by a minority fraction of coho salmon. Dependency on salmon-derived nutrients ranged from relatively high to relatively low, suggesting a space-limited system. No one particular isotope was found to be superior for determining the relative importance of salmon-derived nutrients.

  17. Re-Os Abundance and Isotope Systematics of Al-undepleted Komatiites in the Kidd-Munro Assemblage: Results From Dundonald Beach, Abitibi Greenstone Belt, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, A.; Sproule, R. A.; Walker, R. J.; Lesher, C. M.

    2004-05-01

    Petrographic and geochemical studies suggest that all Precambrian komatiites have undergone variable degrees of weathering, hydrothermal alteration and metamorphism. The effects of these secondary processes in some suites have manifested into large-scale open-system behavior of Re-Os elemental and isotope systematics of whole rocks, which, in some cases, yield inaccurate age and large uncertainties in calculated initial Os isotopic compositions of the emplaced lavas. Thus, some of the previous Os isotopic studies of Precambrian komatiites for which the crystallization ages were known from other radiogenic isotope systematics (e.g., Sm-Nd, Pb-Pb) have relied on Os-rich, relatively well-preserved primary igneous minerals (e.g., olivine and chromite) in order to calculate the initial Os isotopic compositions of the host lavas. Consequently, the whole-rock concentrations of Re and Os in these altered komatiites can neither be used to infer their concentrations in the parental liquids nor their partitioning behaviors during generation and subsequent differentiation of komatiitic magmas. Here we report the Re-Os concentrations of whole rocks from a suite of ca. 2.7-Ga komatiitic rocks from the Dundonald Beach area, part of the Kidd-Munro volcanic assemblage in the Abitibi greenstone belt, Canada. We show that it is possible to calculate the original Re concentrations in the emplaced lavas, and to estimate the gain or loss of Re through comparison of their measured concentrations and those recalculated from their correlations with other incompatible, yet relatively immobile major oxide and trace elements (e.g., Al2O3, Zr, Hf, Yb). We also demonstrate the statistical significance of this scheme of correction with the reduced values of MSWD (by an order of magnitude) and respective uncertainties in slope (by 2-3 orders of magnitude) of regressions involving Re and the immobile elements. Based on the absence of a correlation between loss of Re and the Os isotopic

  18. Determining the Local Abundance of Martian Methane and its 13-C/l2-C and D/H Isotopic Ratios for Comparison with Related Gas and Soil Analysis on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Christopher R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the origin of Martian methane will require numerous complementary measurements from both in situ and remote sensing investigations and laboratory work to correlate planetary surface geophysics with atmospheric dynamics and chemistry. Three instruments (Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), Gas Chromatograph (GC) and Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS)) with sophisticated sample handling and processing capability make up the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) analytical chemistry suite on NASA s 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission. Leveraging off the SAM sample and gas processing capability that includes methane enrichment, TLS has unprecedented sensitivity for measuring absolute methane (parts-per-trillion), water, and carbon dioxide abundances in both the Martian atmosphere and evolved from heated soil samples. In concert with a wide variety of associated trace gases (e.g. SO2, H2S, NH3, higher hydrocarbons, organics, etc.) and other isotope ratios measured by SAM, TLS will focus on determining the absolute abundances of methane, water and carbon dioxide, and their isotope ratios: 13C/12C and D/H in methane; 13C/12C and 18O/17O/16O in carbon dioxide; and 18O/17O/16O and D/H in water. Measurements near the MSL landing site will be correlated with satellite (Mars Express, Mars 2016) and ground-based observations.

  19. Human baby hair amino acid natural abundance 15N-isotope values are not related to the 15N-isotope values of amino acids in mother's breast milk protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romek, Katarzyna M; Julien, Maxime; Frasquet-Darrieux, Marine; Tea, Illa; Antheaume, Ingrid; Hankard, Régis; Robins, Richard J

    2013-12-01

    Since exclusively breast-suckled infants obtain their nutrient only from their mother's milk, it might be anticipated that a correlation will exist between the (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios of amino acids of protein of young infants and those supplied by their mother. The work presented here aimed to determine whether amino nitrogen transfer from human milk to infant hair protein synthesized within the first month of life conserves the maternal isotopic signature or whether post-ingestion fractionation dominates the nitrogen isotope spectrum. The study was conducted at 1 month post-birth on 100 mother-infant pairs. Isotope ratios (15)N/(14)N and (13)C/(12)C were measured using isotope ratio measurement by Mass Spectrometry (irm-MS) for whole maternal milk, and infant hair and (15)N/(14)N ratios were also measured by GC-irm-MS for the N-pivaloyl-O-isopropyl esters of amino acids obtained from the hydrolysis of milk and hair proteins. The δ(15)N and δ(13)C (‰) were found to be significantly higher in infant hair than in breast milk (δ(15)N, P amino acids in infant hair was also significantly higher than that in maternal milk (P < 0.001). By calculation, the observed shift in isotope ratio was shown not to be accounted for by the amino acid composition of hair and milk proteins, indicating that it is not simply due to differences in the composition in the proteins present. Rather, it would appear that each pool-mother and infant-turns over independently, and that fractionation in infant N-metabolism even in the first month of life dominates over the nutrient N-content.

  20. Method for the Purification of Inorganic Phosphate in Soil- and Sediment Samples Prior to Analysis of the δ18O Isotopic Abundance in Phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ratio of stable oxygen isotopes in phosphate has been used successfully to study the biological cycling of phosphorus in seawater and marine sediments, and now this approach is being applied to study phosphorus cycling in agricultural soils. As an important major element, phosphorus can limit agricultural production and on the other hand excess of phosphorus can lead to water pollution. A better understanding of phosphorus cycling is essential to improve agricultural and environmental management

  1. Developing Model Constraints on Northern Extra-Tropical Carbon Cycling Based on measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeling, Ralph [UCSD-SIO

    2014-12-12

    The objective of this project was to perform CO2 data syntheses and modeling activities to address two central questions: 1) how much has the seasonal cycle in atmospheric CO2 at northern high latitudes changed since the 1960s, and 2) how well do prognostic biospheric models represent these changes. This project also supported the continuation of the Scripps time series of CO2 isotopes and concentration at ten baseline stations distributed globally.

  2. Carbon isotopes: variations of their natural abundance. Application to correction of radiocarbon dates, to the study of plant metabolism and to paleoclimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiocarbon activity of contemporaneous samples shows: i) variations in the specific activity of the atmospheric C14, which varies with time and locality. ii) variations due to isotope discrimination, or fractionation, of the carbon isotope ratio during the fixation of carbon by organic or inorganic matter. The variation in the atmospheric concentration of carbon 14 as observed in tree rings are synchronous and of the same amplitude for both hemispheres (southern and northern). A curve for correction of radiocarbon dates of the southern hemisphere is given for the last 500 years. The activity of atmospheric radiocarbon as measured in tree rings varies with latitude, showing a difference of (4.5+-1) per mille between the northern and southern hemispheres, the latter having lower concentration of radiocarbon, equivalent to an age difference of about 35 years. This variation can be explained by a larger exchange of carbon 14 between the atmosphere and the sea in the southern hemisphere to a larger free ocean surface (40%) and a higher agitation by winds. The main differences of the isotope fractionation by different types of plants are correlated to their photosynthetic pathways and thus to the enzyme which effects the primary fixation of carbon. The delta C13 values can be used as basis of a paleoclimate indicator

  3. Origin of the eclogitic clasts with graphite-bearing and graphite-free lithologies in the Northwest Africa 801 (CR2) chondrite: Possible origin from a Moon-sized planetary body inferred from chemistry, oxygen isotopes and REE abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyagon, H.; Sugiura, N.; Kita, N. T.; Kimura, M.; Morishita, Y.; Takehana, Y.

    2016-08-01

    In order to clarify the origin of the eclogitic clasts found in the NWA801 (CR2) chondrite (Kimura et al., 2013), especially, that of the high pressure and temperature (P-T) condition (∼3 GPa and ∼1000 °C), we conducted ion microprobe analyses of oxygen isotopes and rare earth element (REE) abundances in the clasts. Oxygen isotopic compositions of the graphite-bearing lithology (GBL) and graphite-free lithology (GFL) show a slope ∼0.6 correlation slightly below the CR-CH-CB chondrites field in the O three-isotope-diagram, with a large variation for the former and almost homogeneous composition for the latter. The average REE abundances of the two lithologies show almost unfractionated patterns. Based on these newly obtained data, as well as mineralogical observations, bulk chemistry, and considerations about diffusion timescales for various elements, we discuss in detail the formation history of the clasts. Consistency of the geothermobarometers used by Kimura et al. (2013), suggesting equilibration of various elements among different mineral pairs, provides a strong constraint for the duration of the high P-T condition. We suggest that the high P-T condition lasted 102-103 years. This clearly precludes a shock high pressure (HP) model, and hence, strongly supports a static HP model. A static HP model requires a Moon-sized planetary body of ∼1500 km in radius. Furthermore, it implies two successive violent collisions, first at the formation of the large planetary body, when the clasts were placed its deep interior, and second, at the disruption of the large planetary body, when the clasts were expelled out of the parent body and later on transported to the accretion region of the CR chondrites. We also discuss possible origin of O isotopic variations in GBL, and presence/absence of graphite in GBL/GFL, respectively, in relation to smelting possibly occurred during the igneous process(es) which formed the two lithologies. Finally we present a possible

  4. Abundance Anomaly of the $^{13}$C Isotopic Species of c-C$_3$H$_2$ in the Low-Mass Star Formation Region L1527

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Kento; Tokudome, Tomoya; Lopez-Sepulcre, Ana; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Takano, Shuro; Lefloch, Bertrand; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Bachiller, Rafael; Caux, Emmanuel; Vastel, Charlotte; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The rotational spectral lines of c-C$_3$H$_2$ and two kinds of the $^{13}$C isotopic species, c-$^{13}$CCCH$_2$ ($C_{2v}$ symmetry) and c-CC$^{13}$CH$_2$ ($C_s$ symmetry) have been observed in the 1-3 mm band toward the low-mass star-forming region L1527. We have detected 7, 3, and 6 lines of c-C$_3$H$_2$, c-$^{13}$CCCH$_2$ , and c-CC$^{13}$CH$_2$, respectively, with the Nobeyama 45 m telescope, and 34, 6, and 13 lines, respectively, with the IRAM 30 m telescope, where 7, 2, and 2 transitions, respectively, are observed with the both telescopes. With these data, we have evaluated the column densities of the normal and $^{13}$C isotopic species. The [c-C$_3$H$_2$]/[c-$^{13}$CCCH$_2$] ratio is determined to be $310\\pm80$, while the [c-C$_3$H$_2$]/[c-CC$^{13}$CH$_2$] ratio is determined to be $61\\pm11$. The [c-C$_3$H$_2$]/[c-$^{13}$CCCH$_2$] and [c-C$_3$H$_2$]/[c-CC$^{13}$CH$_2$] ratios expected from the elemental $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C ratio are 60-70 and 30-35, respectively, where the latter takes into account the ...

  5. Application of Natural Isotopic Abundance ¹H-¹³C- and ¹H-¹⁵N-Correlated Two-Dimensional NMR for Evaluation of the Structure of Protein Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbogast, Luke W; Brinson, Robert G; Marino, John P

    2016-01-01

    Methods for characterizing the higher-order structure of protein therapeutics are in great demand for establishing consistency in drug manufacturing, for detecting drug product variations resulting from modifications in the manufacturing process, and for comparing a biosimilar to an innovator reference product. In principle, solution NMR can provide a robust approach for characterization of the conformation(s) of protein therapeutics in formulation at atomic resolution. However, molecular weight limitations and the perceived need for stable isotope labeling have to date limited its practical applications in the biopharmaceutical industry. Advances in NMR magnet and console technologies, cryogenically cooled probes, and new rapid acquisition methodologies, particularly selective optimized flip-angle short transient pulse schemes and nonuniform sampling, have greatly ameliorated these limitations. Here, we describe experimental methods for the collection and analysis of 2D (1)H(N)-(15)N-amide- and (1)H-(13)C-methyl-correlated spectra applied to protein drug products at natural isotopic abundance, including representatives from the rapidly growing class of monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics. Practical aspects of experimental setup and data acquisition for both standard and rapid acquisition NMR techniques are described. Furthermore, strategies for the statistical comparison of 2D (1)H(N)-(15)N-amide- and (1)H-(13)C-methyl-correlated spectra are detailed. PMID:26791974

  6. On the pros and cons of the IRMS technique of data processing: uncertainty in results, a case study for determining carbon and oxygen isotopic abundance ratios as CO_2^+

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, B P

    2011-01-01

    The properties of different relationships, representing the basic evaluation as well as its inputs and outputs shaping processes in the CO_2^+ isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), are studied. It is thus shown that the input generation by using only one auxiliary reference CO2 gas (ARCG) is an accuracy enhancing process, and clarified how the input-by-measurement uncertainty-ratio(s) could be ensured to be tens of folds less than unity. However, the known relationship for using two ARCGs appears to be neither of a logistical base nor better by application. A mathematically correct means for involving two or more than two ARCGs is worked out. However, the same is observed to be worse by behavior, i.e. causes the scale converted data to be more inaccurate than the measured data. The basic evaluation requires solving a set of equations. Using a typical set, it is exemplified that, and explained why, the solutions (determined elemental isotopic abundance ratios (EIARs)) are generally as representative as the i...

  7. 238U series isotopes and 232Th in carbonates and black shales from the Lesser Himalaya: implications to dissolved uranium abundances in Ganga-Indus source waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S K; Dalai, Tarun K; Krishnaswami, S

    2003-01-01

    238U and (232)Th concentrations and the extent of (238)U-(234)U-(230)Th radioactive equilibrium have been measured in a suite of Precambrian carbonates and black shales from the Lesser Himalaya. These measurements were made to determine their abundances in these deposits, their contributions to dissolved uranium budget of the headwaters of the Ganga and the Indus in the Himalaya and to assess the impact of weathering on (238)U-(234)U-(230)Th radioactive equilibrium in them. (238)U concentrations in Precambrian carbonates range from 0.06 to 2.07 microg g(-1). The 'mean' U/Ca in these carbonates is 2.9 ng U mg(-1) Ca. This ratio, coupled with the assumption that all Ca in the Ganga-Indus headwaters is of carbonate origin and that U and Ca behave conservatively in rivers after their release from carbonates, provides an upper limit on the U contribution from these carbonates, to be a few percent of dissolved uranium in rivers. There are, however, a few streams with low uranium concentrations, for which the carbonate contribution could be much higher. These results suggest that Precambrian carbonates make only minor contributions to the uranium budget of the Ganga-Indus headwaters in the Himalaya on a basin wide scale, however, they could be important for particular streams. Similar estimates of silicate contribution to uranium budget of these rivers using U/Na in silicates and Na* (Na corrected for cyclic and halite contributions) in river waters show that silicates can contribute significantly (approximately 40% on average) to their U balance. If, however, much of the uranium in these silicates is associated with weathering resistant minerals, then the estimated silicate uranium component would be upper limits. Uranium concentration in black shales averages about 37 microg g(-1). Based on this concentration, supply of U from at least approximately 50 mg of black shales per liter of river water is needed to balance the average river water U concentration, 1.7 microg L

  8. Natural isotopes abundance of sup 1 sup 5 N and sup 1 sup 3 C in leaves of some N sub 2 -fixing and non N sub 2 -fixing trees and shrubs in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varability in the natural abundance isotopes of sup 1 sup 5 N and sup 1 sup 3 C in leaves of several legume and non-legume plant species grown at different sites of two areas in semi-arid regions of Syria was determined. In the first area (non-saline soil), the sup 1 sup 5 N values of a number of fixing and non-fixing reference plants ranged from -2.09 to +9.46, depending on plant species and studied site. sup 1 sup 5 N in a number of legume species including Acacia cyanopylla (-1.73), Acacia farnesiana (-0.55), Prosopis juliflora (-1.64) and Medicago arborea (+1.6) were close to the atmospheric value pointing to a major contribution of N sub 2 fixing in these species; whereas, those of reference plants were highly positive (between +3.6 and +9.46%). In the actinorhizal tree, Elaeagnus angustifolia, the sup 1 sup 5 N abundance was far lower (-0.46 to -2.1%) strongly suggesting that the plant obtained large proportional contribution from BNF. In contrast, delta sup 1 sup 5 N values in some other legumes and actinorhizal plants were relatively similar to those of reference plants, suggesting that the contribution of fixed N sub 2 is negligible. On the other hand, delta sup 1 sup 3 C% values in leaves of C3 plants were affected by plant species, ranging from a minimum of -28.67% to a maximum of -23%. However, they were the same within each plant species although they were grown at different sites. Moreover, dual stable isotope analysis in leaves of Prosopis juliflora and other non- legumes grown on a salt affected soil (second area) was also conducted. Results showed that salinity did not affect C assimilation in this woody legume since a higher carbon discrimination was obtained indicating that this plant is a salt tolerant species; whereas, N2-fixation was drastically affected (delta sup 1 sup 5 N= +7.03). (Author)

  9. Isotope Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Caffau, E; Bonifacio, P; Ludwig, H -G; Monaco, L; Curto, G Lo; Kamp, I

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of isotopic ratios provides a privileged insight both into nucleosynthesis and into the mechanisms operating in stellar envelopes, such as gravitational settling. In this article, we give a few examples of how isotopic ratios can be determined from high-resolution, high-quality stellar spectra. We consider examples of the lightest elements, H and He, for which the isotopic shifts are very large and easily measurable, and examples of heavier elements for which the determination of isotopic ratios is more difficult. The presence of 6Li in the stellar atmospheres causes a subtle extra depression in the red wing of the 7Li 670.7 nm doublet which can only be detected in spectra of the highest quality. But even with the best spectra, the derived $^6$Li abundance can only be as good as the synthetic spectra used for their interpretation. It is now known that 3D non-LTE modelling of the lithium spectral line profiles is necessary to account properly for the intrinsic line asymmetry, which is produced ...

  10. Analysis of Isotopic Abundance of Plutonium by Multicollector-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry%多接收电感耦合等离子体质谱法测量痕量钚同位素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张继龙; 王同兴; 李力力; 常志远; 赵永刚; 刘俊岭

    2005-01-01

    The isotopic analysis of 232Pu plutonium in 5×10-12 g/g samples using a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) is described. IRMM-290b and uranium (UTB750) were used to correct the metrical data, and the analytical precision is about 0.5%.

  11. Study of the primordial lithium abundance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Lithium isotopes have attracted an intense interest because the abundance of both 6Li and 6Li from big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is one of the puzzles in nuclear astrophysics. Many investigations of both astrophysical observation and nucleosynthesis calculation have been carried out to solve the puzzle, but it is not solved yet. Several nuclear reactions involving lithium have been indirectly measured at China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing. The Standard BBN (SBBN) network calculations are then performed to investigate the primordial Lithium abundance. The result shows that these nuclear reactions have minimal effect on the SBBN abundances of 6Li and 7Li.

  12. Stable isotope utilization methodology; Methodologie de l`emploi des isotopes stables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, E. [Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (CNAM), 75 - Paris (France)

    1994-12-31

    The various applications of stable isotope utilization are reviewed, as a function of their specific properties: poly-isotopic abundance modification is used for tracer applications; the accurate measurement of the stable isotope abundance may be applied to isotopic dilution for ultra-trace measurement, physical constant determination, fluid volume and concentration measurement; isotopic effects, such as reaction equilibrium differences are used for separation and identification of molecule active centers (pharmacology, paleoclimatology, hydrogeological studies) while reaction rate differences (competitive and non competitive methods) are used for the study of reaction mechanisms, such as enzymatic reactions. Analysis techniques (mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, optical methods) are reviewed. 2 figs., 18 refs.

  13. Oxygen Isotopes in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R. N.

    2003-12-01

    Oxygen isotope abundance variations in meteorites are very useful in elucidating chemical and physical processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system (Clayton, 1993). On Earth, the mean abundances of the three stable isotopes are 16O: 99.76%, 17O: 0.039%, and 18O: 0.202%. It is conventional to express variations in abundances of the isotopes in terms of isotopic ratios, relative to an arbitrary standard, called SMOW (for standard mean ocean water), as follows:The isotopic composition of any sample can then be represented by one point on a "three-isotope plot," a graph of δ17O versus δ18O. It will be seen that such plots are invaluable in interpreting meteoritic data. Figure 1 shows schematically the effect of various processes on an initial composition at the center of the diagram. Almost all terrestrial materials lie along a "fractionation" trend; most meteoritic materials lie near a line of "16O addition" (or subtraction). (4K)Figure 1. Schematic representation of various isotopic processes shown on an oxygen three-isotope plot. Almost all terrestrial materials plot along a line of "fractionation"; most primitive meteoritic materials plot near a line of "16O addition." The three isotopes of oxygen are produced by nucleosynthesis in stars, but by different nuclear processes in different stellar environments. The principal isotope, 16O, is a primary isotope (capable of being produced from hydrogen and helium alone), formed in massive stars (>10 solar masses), and ejected by supernova explosions. The two rare isotopes are secondary nuclei (produced in stars from nuclei formed in an earlier generation of stars), with 17O coming primarily from low- and intermediate-mass stars (radiation in the wavelength range 90-100 nm. The reaction proceeds by a predissociation mechanism, in which the excited electronic state lives long enough to have well-defined vibrational and rotational energy levels. As a consequence, the three isotopic species - C16O, C17O

  14. Accurate Determination of 13 C Isotopic Abundances of Free Intracellular Amino acids with Low Concentration by GC-MS-Selective Ion Monitoring Method%气相色谱-质谱联用选择离子监测方法定量分析低浓度胞内游离氨基酸的13 C同位素丰度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敏超; 黄明志; 刘玉伟; 储炬; 庄英萍; 张嗣良

    2014-01-01

    13 C isotopic abundance of intracellular free amino acid with a characteristic of fast- turnover can quickly reflect changes in intracellular metabolic state. But the concentration of intracellular free amino acid is low, the existed 13 C isotope detection method based on GC-MS can not satisfy the requirement with full scan mode. In this study, the selected ion monitoring method was used to detect accuracy higher likelihood of analysis of 13 C isotopic abundance of free intracellular amino acid. First, in the full scan mode we analyzed of the fracture law of different amino acids, found the feature corresponding to each amino acid fragments, and established 16 kinds of free intracellular amino acids characteristic fragment library. Then using this characteristic fragment library, only specific m/z signal was detected in sample analysis, which realized the selected ion monitoring and improved the quality of signal. The results of amino acid standards showed that the signal-to-noise ratio, measurement precision and accuracy were improved by 17, 2. 0 and 3. 8 times compared with the full scan mode. In the analysis of coenzyme Q10 producing strains of samples, this method was successfully used to detect isotopic abundance of 8 kinds of free intracellular amino acids. This method plays an important role in the detection of 13 C isotopic abundance of the intracellular free amino acid in cell metabolism research.%胞内游离氨基酸具有周转快的特点,其13 C同位素丰度能快速反映胞内代谢状态的变化。但胞内游离氨基酸的浓度很低,现有的基于气相色谱-质谱联用全扫描模式的13 C同位素丰度检测方法不能满足要求。本研究考察理论上检测精度更高的选择离子监测方法在胞内游离氨基酸13 C同位素丰度分析中应用的可能性。首先在全扫描模式下分析了不同氨基酸的断裂规律,找出与每种氨基酸对应的特征碎片,建立起包含有16种胞内游离氨基

  15. Electrochemically controlled iron isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jay R.; Young, Edward D.; Kavner, Abby

    2010-02-01

    Variations in the stable isotope abundances of transition metals have been observed in the geologic record and trying to understand and reconstruct the physical/environmental conditions that produced these signatures is an area of active research. It is clear that changes in oxidation state lead to large fractionations of the stable isotopes of many transition metals such as iron, suggesting that transition metal stable isotope signatures could be used as a paleo-redox proxy. However, the factors contributing to these observed stable isotope variations are poorly understood. Here we investigate how the kinetics of iron redox electrochemistry generates isotope fractionation. Through a combination of electrodeposition experiments and modeling of electrochemical processes including mass-transport, we show that electron transfer reactions are the cause of a large isotope separation, while mass transport-limited supply of reactant to the electrode attenuates the observed isotopic fractionation. Furthermore, the stable isotope composition of electroplated transition metals can be tuned in the laboratory by controlling parameters such as solution chemistry, reaction overpotential, and solution convection. These methods are potentially useful for generating isotopically-marked metal surfaces for tracking and forensic purposes. In addition, our studies will help interpret stable isotope data in terms of identifying underlying electron transfer processes in laboratory and natural samples.

  16. Calcium isotope analysis by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, Sergei F

    2010-01-01

    The variations in the isotopic composition of calcium caused by fractionation in heterogeneous systems and by nuclear reactions can provide insight into numerous biological, geological, and cosmic processes, and therefore isotopic analysis finds a wide spectrum of applications in cosmo- and geochemistry, paleoclimatic, nutritional, and biomedical studies. The measurement of calcium isotopic abundances in natural samples has challenged the analysts for more than three decades. Practically all Ca isotopes suffer from significant isobaric interferences, whereas low-abundant isotopes can be particularly affected by neighboring major isotopes. The extent of natural variations of stable isotopes appears to be relatively limited, and highly precise techniques are required to resolve isotopic effects. Isotope fractionation during sample preparation and measurements and instrumental mass bias can significantly exceed small isotope abundance variations in samples, which have to be investigated. Not surprisingly, a TIMS procedure developed by Russell et al. (Russell et al., 1978. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 42: 1075-1090) for Ca isotope measurements was considered as revolutionary for isotopic measurements in general, and that approach is used nowadays (with small modifications) for practically all isotopic systems and with different mass spectrometric techniques. Nevertheless, despite several decades of calcium research and corresponding development of mass spectrometers, the available precision and accuracy is still not always sufficient to achieve the challenging goals. The present article discusses figures of merits of presently used analytical methods and instrumentation, and attempts to critically assess their limitations. In Sections 2 and 3, mass spectrometric methods applied to precise stable isotope analysis and to the determination of (41)Ca are described. Section 4 contains a short summary of selected applications, and includes tracer experiments and the potential use

  17. Isotopic geology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Born from the application to geology of nuclear physics techniques, the isotopic geology has revolutionized the Earth's sciences. Beyond the dating of rocks, the tracer techniques have permitted to reconstruct the Earth's dynamics, to measure the temperatures of the past (giving birth to paleoclimatology) and to understand the history of chemical elements thanks to the analysis of meteorites. Today, all domains of Earth sciences appeal more or less to the methods of isotopic geology. In this book, the author explains the principles, methods and recent advances of this science: 1 - isotopes and radioactivity; 2 - principles of isotope dating; 3 - radio-chronological methods; 4 - cosmogenic isotope chronologies; 5 - uncertainties and radio-chronological results; 6 - geochemistry of radiogenic isotopes; 7 - geochemistry of stable isotopes; 8 - isotopic geology and dynamical analysis of reservoirs. (J.S.)

  18. Isotopic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectra of isotopically mixed clusters (dimers of SF6) are calculated as well as transition frequencies. The result leads to speculations about the suitability of the laser-cluster fragmentation process for isotope separation. (Auth.)

  19. Carbon isotope geochemistry and geobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon isotope fractionation values were used to understand the history of the biosphere. For example, plankton analyses confirmed that marine extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous period were indeed severe (see Hsu's article in Sundquist and Broeker, 1984). Variations in the isotopic compositions of carbonates and evaporitic sulfates during the Paleozoic reflect the relative abundances of euxinic (anoxic) marine environments and organic deposits from terrestrial flora. The carbon isotopic composition of Precambrian sediments suggest that the enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase has existed for perhaps 3.5 billion years.

  20. New method of the 17 O + p reaction rate determination by means of the measurement of the partial widths of 18 F levels. Consequences on the oxygen isotopes abundance ratio of red giant stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 17 O destruction by the CNO cycle in the 17 O (p, α) 14 N and 17 O(p, γ) 18 F reactions is studied. The consequences on the isotropic abundance ratio at the surface of some red giants and supergiants, with mass values about 2 and 15 of the solar mass, are discussed. The results of the energy measurements of the first level and above the threshold value of 17 O + p are reported, as well as the tranfer reaction formulation. The utilization of the new reaction ratio in the evolution and stellar nucleosynthesis is explained. The results are in good agreement with the most part of the observations performed

  1. New approaches to the Moon's isotopic crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Melosh, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent comparisons of the isotopic compositions of the Earth and the Moon show that, unlike nearly every other body known in the Solar System, our satellite's isotopic ratios are nearly identical to the Earth's for nearly every isotopic system. The Moon's chemical make-up, however, differs from the Earth's in its low volatile content and perhaps in the elevated abundance of oxidized iron. This surprising situation is not readily explained by current impact models of the Moon's origin and offe...

  2. Precision Chemical Abundance Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yong, David; Grundahl, Frank; Meléndez, Jorge;

    2012-01-01

    This talk covers preliminary work in which we apply a strictly differential line-by-line chemical abundance analysis to high quality UVES spectra of the globular cluster NGC 6752. We achieve extremely high precision in the measurement of relative abundance ratios. Our results indicate that the ob......This talk covers preliminary work in which we apply a strictly differential line-by-line chemical abundance analysis to high quality UVES spectra of the globular cluster NGC 6752. We achieve extremely high precision in the measurement of relative abundance ratios. Our results indicate...... that the observed abundance dispersion exceeds the measurement uncertainties and that many pairs of elements show significant correlations when plotting [X1/H] vs. [X2/H]. Our tentative conclusions are that either NGC 6752 is not chemically homogeneous at the ~=0.03 dex level or the abundance variations...

  3. Abrupt sea surface pH change at the end of the Younger Dryas in the central sub-equatorial Pacific inferred from boron isotope abundance in corals (Porites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Juillet-Leclerc

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The "δ11B-pH" technique was applied to modern and ancient corals Porites from the sub-equatorial Pacific areas (Tahiti and Marquesas spanning a time interval from 0 to 20.720 calendar years to determine the amplitude of pH changes between the Last Glacial Period and the Holocene. Boron isotopes were measured by Multi-Collector – Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICPMS with an external reproducibility of 0.25‰, allowing a precision of about ±0.03 pH-units for pH values between 8 and 8.3. The boron concentration [B] and isotopic composition of modern samples indicate that the temperature strongly controls the partition coefficient KD for different aragonite species. Modern coral δ11B values and the reconstructed sea surface pH values for different Pacific areas match the measured pH expressed on the seawater scale and confirm the calculation parameters that were previously determined by laboratory calibration exercises. Most ancient sea surface pH reconstructions near Marquesas are higher than modern values. These values range between 8.19 and 8.27 for the Holocene and reached 8.30 at the end of the last glacial period (20.7 kyr BP. At the end of the Younger Dryas (11.50±0.1 kyr BP, the central sub-equatorial Pacific experienced a dramatic drop of up to 0.2 pH-units from the average pH of 8.2 before and after this short event. Using the marine carbonate algorithms, we recalculated the aqueous pCO2 to be 440±25 ppmV at around 11.5 kyr BP for corals at Marquesas and ~500 ppmV near Tahiti where it was assumed that pCO2 in the atmosphere was 250 ppmV. Throughout the Holocene, the difference in pCO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere at Marquesas (ΔpCO2 indicates that the surface waters behave as a moderate CO2 sink or source (−53 to 20 ppmV during El Niño-like conditions. By contrast, during the last glacial/interglacial transition, this area was a marked source of CO2 (21 to 92 ppmV for the atmosphere, highlighting

  4. Developing a Clinically Useful Calcium Isotope Biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniello, Stephen J.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Gordon, Gwyneth W.; Skulan, Joseph L.; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.; Monge, Jorge; Fonseca, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Naturally-occurring Ca is mixture of six isotopes Ca-40, Ca-42, Ca-43, Ca-44, Ca-46, Ca-48). Biological reaction rates and equilibrium constants depend slightly, but measurably, on atomic mass, causing the relative abundances of Ca isotopes to vary between different tissues. During bone formation, light isotopes of Ca are preferentially incorporated into bone, leaving soft tissue depleted in light isotopes. In contrast, bone resorption exhibits no isotopic preference, and thus transfers the light isotope signature of bone back to soft tissue. This balance makes the Ca isotope composition of soft tissue (e.g. serum, urine) a highly sensitive, quantitative tracer for whole-body bone mineral balance (BMB).

  5. {sup 238}U series isotopes and {sup 232}Th in carbonates and black shales from the Lesser Himalaya: implications to dissolved uranium abundances in Ganga-Indus source waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.K.; Dalai, Tarun K.; Krishnaswami, S. E-mail: swami@prl.ernet.in

    2003-07-01

    {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th concentrations and the extent of {sup 238}U-{sup 234}U-{sup 230}Th radioactive equilibrium have been measured in a suite of Precambrian carbonates and black shales from the Lesser Himalaya. These measurements were made to determine their abundances in these deposits, their contributions to dissolved uranium budget of the headwaters of the Ganga and the Indus in the Himalaya and to assess the impact of weathering on {sup 238}U-{sup 234}U-{sup 230}Th radioactive equilibrium in them. {sup 238}U concentrations in Precambrian carbonates range from 0.06 to 2.07 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The 'mean' U/Ca in these carbonates is 2.9 ng U mg{sup -1} Ca. This ratio, coupled with the assumption that all Ca in the Ganga-Indus headwaters is of carbonate origin and that U and Ca behave conservatively in rivers after their release from carbonates, provides an upper limit on the U contribution from these carbonates, to be a few percent of dissolved uranium in rivers. There are, however, a few streams with low uranium concentrations, for which the carbonate contribution could be much higher. These results suggest that Precambrian carbonates make only minor contributions to the uranium budget of the Ganga-Indus headwaters in the Himalaya on a basin wide scale, however, they could be important for particular streams. Similar estimates of silicate contribution to uranium budget of these rivers using U/Na in silicates and Na* (Na corrected for cyclic and halite contributions) in river waters show that silicates can contribute significantly ({approx}40% on average) to their U balance. If, however, much of the uranium in these silicates is associated with weathering resistant minerals, then the estimated silicate uranium component would be upper limits. Uranium concentration in black shales averages about 37 {mu}g g{sup -1}. Based on this concentration, supply of U from at least {approx}50 mg of black shales per liter of river water is needed to balance the

  6. Short course on St-02 applications of isotope dilutions and isotopic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P.

    1998-01-05

    This short course includes information on these topics and subtopics: (I) Nuclear Properties: (A) Historic roots; (B) Nomenclature; (C) Nuclear Stability and abundance; (D) Uses of isotopic techniques; (II) Instrumentation: (A) Sources; (B) Mass resolving elements; (C) Detectors; (III) Making Isotopic Measurements by ICP-MS: (A) Deadtime Correction; (B) Mass Discrimination; (C) Signal /Noise considerations; (IV) Applications and examples: (A) Isotope dilution; (B) Double Spike; (C) Biological Application; (D) Environmental Application; (E) Geological.

  7. Ultrasensitive laser isotope analysis of krypton in an ion storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new instrument is being developed for ultrasensitive isotope analysis that combines magnetic mass selection, resonant charge exchange, and laser reionization. For krypton, this technique is expected to achieve isotope abundance sensitivities better than 10-12. (author)

  8. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M. [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-7215 (United States); Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V., E-mail: luck@fafnir.astr.cwru.edu, E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua, E-mail: val@deneb1.odessa.ua, E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua [Department of Astronomy and Astronomical Observatory, Odessa National University, Isaac Newton Institute of Chile, Odessa Branch, Shevchenko Park, 65014 Odessa (Ukraine)

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  9. Leatherback Isotopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SWFSC is currently working on a project identifying global marine isotopes using leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) as the indicator species. We currently...

  10. Calculation of isotope shifts and relativistic shifts in CI, CII, CIII and CIV

    OpenAIRE

    Berengut, J. C.; Flambaum, V. V.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2005-01-01

    We present an accurate ab initio method of calculating isotope shifts and relativistic shifts in atomic spectra. We test the method on neutral carbon and three carbon ions. The relativistic shift of carbon lines may allow them to be included in analyses of quasar absorption spectra that seek to measure possible variations in the fine structure constant, alpha, over the lifetime of the Universe. Carbon isotope shifts can be used to measure isotope abundances in gas clouds: isotope abundances a...

  11. Isotopic chirality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, H.G. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This paper deals with compounds that are chiral-at least in part, due to isotope substitution-and their use in tracing the steric course of enzyme reaction in vitro and in vivo. There are other applications of isotopically chiral compounds (for example, in analyzing the steric course of nonenzymatic reactions and in probing the conformation of biomolecules) that are important but they will not be discussed in this context.

  12. Isotopic Paleoclimatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, R.

    Paleotemperature scales were calculated by H. C. Urey and others in the 1950s to assess past temperatures, and later work using the stable isotopes of oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon employed standards such as Peedee belemnite (PDB) and Standard Mean Ocean Water (SMOW). Subsequently, subjects as diverse as ice volume and paleotemperatures, oceanic ice and sediment cores, Pleistocene/Holocene climatic changes, and isotope chronostratigraphy extending back to the Precambrian were investigated.

  13. Natural fractionation of uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topic of this thesis was the investigation of U (n(238U) / n(235U)) isotope variations in nature with a focus on samples (1) that represent the continental crust and its weathering products (i.e. granites, shales and river water) (2) that represent products of hydrothermal alteration on mid-ocean ridges (i.e. altered basalts, carbonate veins and hydrothermal water) and (3) from restricted euxinic basins (i.e. from the water column and respective sediments). The overall goal was to explore the environmental conditions and unravel the mechanisms that fractionate the two most abundant U isotopes, n(238U) and n(235U), on Earth.

  14. Abundant Solar Nebula Solids in Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Clemett, S.

    2016-01-01

    Comets have been proposed to consist of unprocessed interstellar materials together with a variable amount of thermally annealed interstellar grains. Recent studies of cometary solids in the laboratory have shown that comets instead consist of a wide range of materials from across the protoplanetary disk, in addition to a minor complement of interstellar materials. These advances were made possible by the return of direct samples of comet 81P/Wild 2 coma dust by the NASA Stardust mission and recent advances in microscale analytical techniques. Isotopic studies of 'cometary' chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and comet 81P/Wild 2 Stardust samples show that preserved interstellar materials are more abundant in comets than in any class of meteorite. Identified interstellar materials include sub-micron-sized presolar silicates, oxides, and SiC dust grains and some fraction of the organic material that binds the samples together. Presolar grain abundances reach 1 weight percentage in the most stardust-rich CP-IDPs, 50 times greater than in meteorites. Yet, order of magnitude variations in presolar grain abundances among CP-IDPs suggest cometary solids experienced significant variations in the degree of processing in the solar nebula. Comets contain a surprisingly high abundance of nebular solids formed or altered at high temperatures. Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples include 10-40 micron-sized, refractory Ca- Al-rich inclusion (CAI)-, chondrule-, and ameboid olivine aggregate (AOA)-like materials. The O isotopic compositions of these refractory materials are remarkably similar to their meteoritic counterparts, ranging from 5 percent enrichments in (sup 16) O to near-terrestrial values. Comet 81P/Wild 2 and CP-IDPs also contain abundant Mg-Fe crystalline and amorphous silicates whose O isotopic compositions are also consistent with Solar System origins. Unlike meteorites, that are dominated by locally-produced materials, comets appear to be composed of

  15. Applications of C and N stable isotopes to ecological and environmental studies in seagrass ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Lepoint, Gilles; Dauby, Patrick; Gobert, Sylvie

    2004-01-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen are increasingly used in marine ecosystems, for ecological and environmental studies. Here, we examine some applications of stable isotopes as ecological integrators or tracers in seagrass ecosystem studies. We focus on both the use of natural isotope abundance as food web integrators or environmental tracers and on the use of stable isotopes as experimental tools. As ecosystem integrators, stable isotopes have helped to elucidate the general structure o...

  16. Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry: Parameter influence on boron isotope measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) was recently reported for optical isotopic analysis of condensed samples in ambient air and at ambient pressure. LAMIS utilizes molecular emissions which exhibit larger isotopic spectral shits than in atomic transitions. For boron monoxide 10BO and 11BO, the isotopic shifts extend from 114 cm-1 (0.74 nm) to 145-238 cm-1 (5-8 nm) at the B2Σ+ (v = 0) → X2Σ+ (v = 2) and A2Πi (v = 0) → X2Σ+ (v = 3) transitions, respectively. These molecular isotopic shifts are over two orders of magnitude larger than the maximum isotopic shift of approximately 0.6 cm-1 in atomic boron. This paper describes how boron isotope abundance can be quantitatively determined using LAMIS and how atomic, ionic, and molecular optical emission develops in a plasma emanating from laser ablation of solid samples with various boron isotopic composition. We demonstrate that requirements for spectral resolution of the measurement system can be significantly relaxed when the isotopic abundance ratio is determined using chemometric analysis of spectra. Sensitivity can be improved by using a second slightly delayed laser pulse arriving into an expanding plume created by the first ablation pulse.

  17. The isotope correlation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ESARDA working group on Isotopic Correlation Techniques, ICT and Reprocessing Input Analysis performed an Isotope Correlation Experiment, ICE with the aim to check the feasibility of the new technique. Ten input batches of the reprocessing of the KWO fuel at the WAK plant were analysed by 4 laboratories. All information to compare ICT with the gravimetric and volumetric methods was available. ICT combined with simplified reactor physics calculation was included. The main objectives of the statistical data evaluation were detection of outliers, the estimation of random errors and of systematic errors of the measurements performed by the 4 laboratories. Different methods for outlier detection, analysis of variances, Grubbs' analysis for the constant-bias model and Jaech's non-constant-bias model were applied. Some of the results of the statistical analysis may seem inconsistent which is due to the following reasons. For the statistical evaluations isotope abundance data (weight percent) as well as nuclear concentration data (atoms/initial metal atoms) were subjected to different outlier criteria before being used for further statistical evaluations. None of the four data evaluation groups performed a complete statistical data analysis which would render possible a comparison of the different methods applied since no commonly agreed statistical evaluation procedure existed. The results prove that ICT is as accurate as conventional techniques which have to rely on costly mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis. The potential of outlier detection by ICT on the basis of the results from a single laboratory is as good as outlier detection by costly interlaboratory comparison. The application of fission product or Cm-244 correlations would be more timely than remeasurements at safeguards laboratories

  18. Abundances in galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard (or mildly inhomogeneous) Big Bang nucleosynthesis theory is well confirmed by abundance measurements of light elements up to 7Li and the resulting upper limit to the number of neutrino families confirmed in accelerator experiments. Extreme inhomogeneous models with a closure density in form of baryons seem to be ruled out and there is no evidence for a cosmic 'floor' to 9Be or heavier elements predicted in some versions of those models. Galaxies show a correlation between luminous mass and abundance of carbon and heavier elements, usually attributed to escape of hot gas from shallow potential wells. Uncertainties include the role of dark matter and biparametric behaviour of ellipticals. Spirals have radial gradients which may arise from a variety of causes. In our own Galaxy one can distinguish three stellar populations - disk, halo and bulge - characterised by differing metallicity distribution functions. Differential abundance effects are found among different elements in stars as a function of metallicity and presumably age, notably in the ratio of oxygen and α-particle elements to iron. These may eventually be exploitable to set a time scale for the formation of the halo, bulge and disk. (orig.)

  19. Interstellar Atomic Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, E B

    2003-01-01

    A broad array of interstellar absorption features that appear in the ultraviolet spectra of bright sources allows us to measure the abundances and ionization states of many important heavy elements that exist as free atoms in the interstellar medium. By comparing these abundances with reference values in the Sun, we find that some elements have abundances relative to hydrogen that are approximately consistent with their respective solar values, while others are depleted by factors that range from a few up to around 1000. These depletions are caused by the atoms condensing into solid form onto dust grains. Their strengths are governed by the volatility of compounds that are produced, together with the densities and velocities of the gas clouds. We may characterize the depletion trends in terms of a limited set of parameters; ones derived here are based on measurements of 15 elements toward 144 stars with known values of N(H I) and N(H2). In turn, these parameters may be applied to studies of the production, de...

  20. Atlas of isotope hydrology - Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although there are abundant water resources in Africa - about 17 large rivers and 160 lakes greater than 27 km2 - most of these resources are located in the humid and sub-humid regions around the equator. The surface runoff in Africa, on average, is much lower than average precipitation as a result of high evaporation and evapotranspiration, resulting in endemic drought in parts of the continent. Consequently, groundwater is a very important resource for Africa, providing nearly two-thirds of drinking water on the continent, and an even greater proportion in northern Africa. Despite the importance of groundwater for many societies, there is a lack of corresponding public concern about its protection, perhaps because the extent and availability of groundwater are not easily measured. The impact of increasing degrees of temporal and spatial climatic variability on water resources is also an important consideration, and groundwater to some extent provides an opportunity to mitigate the impacts of climate change. Applications of isotopes in hydrology are based on the general concept of 'tracing', in which naturally occurring or environmental isotopes (either radioactive or stable) are used to study hydrological processes on large temporal and spatial scales through their natural distribution in a hydrological system. Thus, environmental isotope methodologies are unique in regional studies of water resources to obtain integrated characteristics of groundwater systems. The most frequently used environmental isotopes include those of the water molecule, hydrogen (2H or D, also called deuterium, and 3H, also called tritium) and oxygen (18O), as well as of carbon (13C and 14C, also called radiocarbon or carbon-14) occurring in water as constituents of dissolved inorganic and organic carbon compounds. 2H, 13C and 18O are stable isotopes of the respective elements, whereas 3H and 14C are radioactive isotopes. Among the most important areas where isotopes are useful in

  1. Principles of isotopic analysis by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of magnetic sector field mass spectrometers in isotopic analysis, especially for nitrogen gas, is outlined. Two measuring methods are pointed out: the scanning mode for significantly enriched samples and the double collector method for samples near the natural abundance of 15N. The calculation formulas are derived and advice is given for corrections. (author)

  2. Abundance, Excess, Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rox De Luca

    2016-02-01

    Her recent work focuses on the concepts of abundance, excess and waste. These concerns translate directly into vibrant and colourful garlands that she constructs from discarded plastics collected on Bondi Beach where she lives. The process of collecting is fastidious, as is the process of sorting and grading the plastics by colour and size. This initial gathering and sorting process is followed by threading the components onto strings of wire. When completed, these assemblages stand in stark contrast to the ease of disposability associated with the materials that arrive on the shoreline as evidence of our collective human neglect and destruction of the environment around us. The contrast is heightened by the fact that the constructed garlands embody the paradoxical beauty of our plastic waste byproducts, while also evoking the ways by which those byproducts similarly accumulate in randomly assorted patterns across the oceans and beaches of the planet.

  3. Environmental and biomedical applications of natural metal stable isotope variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, T.D.; Walczyk, T.

    2009-01-01

    etal stable isotopes are now being used to trace metal contaminants in the environment and as indicators of human systemic function where metals play a role. Stable isotope abundance variations provide information about metal sources and the processes affecting metals in complex natural systems, complementing information gained from surrogate tracers, such as metal abundance ratios or biochemical markers of metal metabolism. The science is still in its infancy, but the results of initial studies confirm that metal stable isotopes can provide a powerful tool for forensic and biomedical investigations.

  4. Isotopic analysis of bullet lead samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of using the isotopic composition of lead for the identification of bullet lead is investigated. Lead from several spent bullets were converted to lead sulphide and analysed for the isotopic abundances using an MS-7 mass spectrometer. The abundances are measured relative to that for Pb204 was too small to permit differentiation, while the range of variation of Pb206 and Pb207 and the better precision in their analyses permitted differentiating samples from one another. The correlation among the samples examined has been pointed out. The method is complementary to characterisation of bullet leads by the trace element composition. The possibility of using isotopically enriched lead for tagging bullet lead is pointed out. (author)

  5. Primordial Deuterium Abundance Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Levshakov, S A; Takahara, F; Levshakov, Sergei A.; Kegel, Wilhelm H.; Takahara, Fumio

    1997-01-01

    Deuterium abundances measured recently from QSO absorption-line systems lie in the range from 3 10^{-5} to 3 10^{-4}, which shed some questions on standard big bang theory. We show that this discordance may simply be an artifact caused by inadequate analysis ignoring spatial correlations in the velocity field in turbulent media. The generalized procedure (accounting for such correlations) is suggested to reconcile the D/H measurements. An example is presented based on two high-resolution observations of Q1009+2956 (low D/H) [1,2] and Q1718+4807 (high D/H) [8,9]. We show that both observations are compatible with D/H = 4.1 - 4.6 10^{-5}, and thus support SBBN. The estimated mean value = 4.4 10^{-5} corresponds to the baryon-to-photon ratio during SBBN eta = 4.4 10^{-10} which yields the present-day baryon density Omega_b h^2 = 0.015.

  6. Carbon isotopic fractionation in heterotrophic microbial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, N.; Leu, A.; Munoz, E.; Olsen, J.; Kwong, E.; Des Marais, D.

    1985-01-01

    Differences in the natural-abundance carbon stable isotopic compositions between products from aerobic cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 were measured. Respired CO2 was 3.4 percent depleted in C-13 relative to the glucose used as the carbon source, whereas the acetate was 12.3 percent enriched in C-13. The acetate C-13 enrichment was solely in the carboxyl group. Even though the total cellular carbon was only 0.6 percent depleted in C-13, intracellular components exhibited a significant isotopic heterogeneity. The protein and lipid fractions were -1.1 and -2.7 percent, respectively. Aspartic and glutamic acids were -1.6 and +2.7 percent, respectively, yet citrate was isotopically identical to the glucose. Probable sites of carbon isotopic fractionation include the enzyme, phosphotransacetylase, and the Krebs cycle.

  7. Abundance and Impact of Doubly Charged Polyatomic Argon Interferences in ICPMS Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattendorf, Bodo; Gusmini, Bianca; Dorta, Ladina; Houk, Robert S; Günther, Detlef

    2016-07-19

    Doubly charged molecular ions of alkaline earth metals and argon could be identified as spectral interferences in an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. These molecular ions were found to occur at abundances reaching about 10(-4) relative to the alkaline earth atomic ion abundances. They can thus substantially affect ultratrace analyses and, when present at similar concentration as the analyte elements, also isotope ratio measurements. For the case of Cu and Zn isotope ratio analyses, the same mass concentration of Sr was found to alter the measured (63)Cu/(65)Cu and (64)Zn/(66)Zn isotope ratios by -0.036‰ to -0.95‰ due to SrAr(2+), appearing at m/Q 63 and 64. BaAr(2+) can affect Sr isotope analyses, MgAr(2+) may impair S isotope ratio measurements, while CaAr(2+) may cause interference to Ca(+) isotopes. The abundances of the doubly charged molecular ions were higher than those of the corresponding singly charged species, which is in accordance with their generally higher bond dissociation energies. The relative abundances were found to depend significantly on the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) operating conditions and generally increase with increasing carrier gas flow rates or lower gas temperature of the ICP. They also increase by about an order of magnitude when a desolvated aerosol is introduced to the ICP. PMID:27306032

  8. Natural fractionation of uranium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noordmann, Janine

    2015-01-24

    The topic of this thesis was the investigation of U (n({sup 238}U) / n({sup 235}U)) isotope variations in nature with a focus on samples (1) that represent the continental crust and its weathering products (i.e. granites, shales and river water) (2) that represent products of hydrothermal alteration on mid-ocean ridges (i.e. altered basalts, carbonate veins and hydrothermal water) and (3) from restricted euxinic basins (i.e. from the water column and respective sediments). The overall goal was to explore the environmental conditions and unravel the mechanisms that fractionate the two most abundant U isotopes, n({sup 238}U) and n({sup 235}U), on Earth.

  9. Stable isotope deltas: Tiny, yet robust signatures in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including 14C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. 13C, 2H, and 18O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as−25 per mil can be written as−25 mUr (or−2.5 cUr or−0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg ‘units’ are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg

  10. Utilization of stable isotopes for characterizing an underground gas generator; Utilisation des isotopes stables pour caracteriser un gazogene souterrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirard, J.P.; Antenucci, D.; Renard, X. [Liege Univ. (Belgium); Letolle, R. [Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France)

    1994-12-31

    The principles of isotopic exchange and isotope ratio result interpretation are first reviewed; then, in the framework of an underground coal gasification project in Belgium, experiments and modelling of the underground gas generator have been carried out: isotopic abundances of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen have been measured in the gasifying agent (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O) and in the effluent (CO{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, O{sub 2}, heavy oils and various organic and mineral substances). Gasification kinetics and temperatures have been evaluated and isotope application to thermometry is discussed. 1 fig., 9 refs.

  11. Ultratrace Uranium Fingerprinting with Isotope Selective Laser Ionization Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium isotope ratios can provide source information for tracking uranium contamination in a variety of fields, ranging from occupational bioassay to monitoring aftereffects of nuclear accidents. We describe the development of Isotope Selective Laser Ionization Spectrometry (ISLIS) for ultratrace measurement of the minor isotopes 234U, 235U, and 236U with respect to 238U. Optical isotopic selectivity in three-step excitation with single-mode continuous wave lasers is capable of measuring the minor isotopes at relative abundances below 1 ppm, and is not limited by isobaric interferences such as 235UH+ during measurement of 236U. This relative abundance limit approaches the threshold for measurement of uranium minor isotopes with conventional mass spectrometry, typically 10-7, but without mass spectrometric analysis of the laser-created ions. Uranyl nitrate standards from an international blind comparison were used to test analytical performance for different isotopic compositions and with quantities ranging from 11 ng to 10 (micro)g total uranium. Isotopic ratio determination was demonstrated over a linear dynamic range of 7 orders of magnitude with a few percent relative precision and detection limits below 500 fg for the minor isotopes

  12. Stable isotope studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  13. Method for separating isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, B.E.

    1975-10-21

    Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether.

  14. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  15. Combinatorial effects on clumped isotopes and their significance in biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Laurence Y.

    2016-01-01

    The arrangement of isotopes within a collection of molecules records their physical and chemical histories. Clumped-isotope analysis interrogates these arrangements, i.e., how often rare isotopes are bound together, which in many cases can be explained by equilibrium and/or kinetic isotope fractionation. However, purely combinatorial effects, rooted in the statistics of pairing atoms in a closed system, are also relevant, and not well understood. Here, I show that combinatorial isotope effects are most important when two identical atoms are neighbors on the same molecule (e.g., O2, N2, and D-D clumping in CH4). When the two halves of an atom pair are either assembled with different isotopic preferences or drawn from different reservoirs, combinatorial effects cause depletions in clumped-isotope abundance that are most likely between zero and -1‰, although they could potentially be -10‰ or larger for D-D pairs. These depletions are of similar magnitude, but of opposite sign, to low-temperature equilibrium clumped-isotope effects for many small molecules. Enzymatic isotope-pairing reactions, which can have site-specific isotopic fractionation factors and atom reservoirs, should express this class of combinatorial isotope effect, although it is not limited to biological reactions. Chemical-kinetic isotope effects, which are related to a bond-forming transition state, arise independently and express second-order combinatorial effects related to the abundance of the rare isotope. Heteronuclear moeties (e.g., Csbnd O and Csbnd H), are insensitive to direct combinatorial influences, but secondary combinatorial influences are evident. In general, both combinatorial and chemical-kinetic factors are important for calculating and interpreting clumped-isotope signatures of kinetically controlled reactions. I apply this analytical framework to isotope-pairing reactions relevant to geochemical oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen cycling that may be influenced by combinatorial

  16. Identification of isotopically primitive interplanetary dust particles: A NanoSIMS isotopic imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floss, C; Stadermann, F J; Bradley, J P; Dai, Z R; Bajt, S; Graham, G; Lea, A S

    2005-09-02

    We have carried out a comprehensive survey of the isotopic compositions (H, B, C, N, O, S) of a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), including both cluster and individual particles. Isotopic imaging with the NanoSIMS shows the presence of numerous discrete hotspots that are strongly enriched in {sup 15}N, including the largest {sup 15}N enrichments ({approx}1300 {per_thousand}) observed in IDPs to date. A number of the IDPs also contain larger regions with more modest enrichments in {sup 15}N, leading to average bulk N isotopic compositions that are {sup 15}N-enriched in these IDPs. Although C isotopic compositions are normal in most of the IDPs, two {sup 15}N-rich N-hotspots have correlated {sup 13}C anomalies. CN{sup -}/C{sup -} ratios suggest that most of the {sup 15}N-rich hotspots are associated with relatively N-poor carbonaceous matter, although specific carriers have not been determined. H isotopic distributions are similar to those of N: D anomalies are present both as distinct very D-rich hotspots and as larger regions with more modest enrichments. Nevertheless, H and N isotopic anomalies are not directly correlated, consistent with results from previous studies. Oxygen isotopic imaging shows the presence of abundant presolar silicate grains in the IDPs. The O isotopic compositions of the grains are similar to those found in presolar oxide and silicate grains from primitive meteorites. Most of the silicate grains in the IDPs have isotopic ratios consistent with meteoritic Group 1 oxide grains, indicating origins in oxygen-rich red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars, but several presolar silicates exhibit the {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O enrichments of Group 4 oxide grains, whose origin is less well understood. Based on their N isotopic compositions, the IDPs studied here can be divided into two groups. One group is characterized as being ''isotopically primitive'' and consists of those IDPs that have anomalous bulk N isotopic

  17. Clumped-isotope geochemistry of carbonates: A new tool for the reconstruction of temperature and oxygen isotope composition of seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernasconi, Stefano M., E-mail: Stefano.bernasconi@erdw.ethz.ch [Geological Institute, ETH Zuerich, Sonneggstrasse 5, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Schmid, Thomas W.; Grauel, Anna-Lena [Geological Institute, ETH Zuerich, Sonneggstrasse 5, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Mutterlose, Joerg [Institut fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Geophysik, Ruhr Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Clumped-isotope thermometry of carbonates is discussed. > Clumped isotopes of Belemnites show higher sea surface temperatures than commonly assumed for the lower Cretaceous. > The potential of clumped-isotope measurement on foraminifera is discussed. - Abstract: Clumped-isotope geochemistry deals with State of ordering of rare isotopes in molecules, in particular with their tendency to form bonds with other rare isotopes rather than with the most abundant ones. Among its possible applications, carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry is the one that has gained most attention because of the wide potential of applications in many disciplines of the earth sciences. In particular, it allows reconstructing the temperature of formation of carbonate minerals without knowledge of the isotopic composition of the water from which they were formed. In addition, the O isotope composition of the waters from which they were formed can be calculated using the {delta}{sup 18}O of the same carbonate sample. This feature offers new approaches in paleoclimatology for reconstructing past global geochemical cycles. In this contribution two applications of this method are presented. First the potential of a new analytical method of measurement of clumped isotopes on small samples of foraminifera, for high-resolution SST and seawater {delta}{sup 18}O reconstructions from marine sediments is shown. Furthermore the potential of clumped isotope analysis of belemnites, for reconstructing seawater {delta}{sup 18}O and temperatures in the Cretaceous is shown.

  18. Isotopic fractionation of zinc in tektites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynier, Frederic; Beck, Pierre; Jourdan, Fred; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Reimold, Uwe; Koeberl, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Tektites are terrestrial natural glasses produced during a hypervelocity impact of an extraterrestrial projectile onto the Earth's surface. The similarity between the chemical and isotopic compositions of tektites and terrestrial upper continental crust implies that the tektites formed by fusion of such target rock. Tektites are among the driest rocks on Earth. Although volatilization at high temperature may have caused this extreme dryness, the exact mechanism of the water loss and the behavior of other volatile species during tektite formation are still debated. Volatilization can fractionate isotopes, therefore, comparing the isotope composition of volatile elements in tektites with that of their source rocks may help to understand the physical conditions during tektite formation. For this study, we have measured the Zn isotopic composition of 20 tektites from four different strewn fields. Almost all samples are enriched in heavy isotopes of Zn compared to the upper continental crust. On average, the different groups of tektites are isotopically distinct (listed from the isotopically lightest to the heaviest): Muong-Nong type indochinites ( δ66/64Zn = 0.61 ± 0.30‰); North American bediasites ( δ66/64Zn = 1.61 ± 0.49‰); Ivory Coast tektites ( δ66/64Zn = 1.66 ± 0.18‰); the Australasian tektites (others than the Muong Nong-type indochinites) ( δ66/64Zn = 1.84 ± 0.42‰); and Central European moldavites ( δ66/64Zn = 2.04 ± 0.19‰). These results are contrasted with a narrow range of δ66/64Zn = 0-0.7‰ for a diverse spectrum of upper continental crust materials. The elemental abundance of Zn is negatively correlated with δ66/64Zn, which may reflect that isotopic fractionation occurred by evaporation during the heating event upon tektite formation. Simple Rayleigh distillation predicts isotopic fractionations much larger than what is actually observed, therefore, such a model cannot account for the observed Zn isotope fractionation in tektites. We

  19. Stable Vanadium Isotope Fractionation at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prytulak, J.; Parkinson, I. J.; Savage, P. S.; Nielsen, S. G.; Halliday, A. N.

    2011-12-01

    Vanadium is a redox sensitive transition metal existing in multiple valence states at terrestrial conditions. Stable vanadium isotopes (reported as δ51V in % relative to an Alfa Aesar standard [1]) are a potentially powerful tracer of oxidation-reduction processes. However, the determination of δ51V is analytically challenging, primarily due to the extreme abundance ratio between the only two stable isotopes (51V/50V ~ 400) and, also, significant isobaric interferences of 50Ti and 50Cr on the minor 50V isotope. We have developed the first method able to determine δ51V to a precision (2 s.d. ~ 0.15%, [1,2]) that enables application of this isotope system to geological processes. To usefully investigate high temperature processes using vanadium isotopes, knowledge of the isotope composition and range of values present in the ambient mantle is required. Here we discuss the first δ51V measured in igneous materials encompassing peridotites, MORB, and primitive mantle-derived melts such as picrites. This first dataset provides a preliminary reconnaissance of the magnitude of natural fractionation. We find little isotope fractionation in suites of peridotites and MORB (vanadium isotope fractionation that may be expected at high temperatures. The presence of significant isotope variation outside of analytical precision in these materials bodes well for the use of δ51V to address a variety of broad scale questions in high temperature planetary processes. [1] Nielsen, S.G., Prytulak, J., Halliday, A.N. 2011. Geost. Geoanal. Res., in press. [2] Prytulak, J., Nielsen, S.G., Halliday, A.N. 2011. Geost. Geoanal. Res., in press. [3] Parkinson and Pearce, 1998. Journal of Petrology, 39, 1577-1618. [4] Lee et al., 2005. Journal of Petrology, 46, 2313-2336. [5] Cottrell and Kelley, 2011. Earth and Planetary Sciences Letters, 305, 270-282.

  20. Solar System Abundances of the Elements

    CERN Document Server

    Lodders, Katharina

    2010-01-01

    Representative abundances of the chemical elements for use as a solar abundance standard in astronomical and planetary studies are summarized. Updated abundance tables for solar system abundances based on meteorites and photospheric measurements are presented.

  1. Chlorine Isotopes: As a Possible Tracer of Fluid/Bio-Activities on Mars and a Progress Report on Chlorine Isotope Analysis by TIMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L.E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y.; Numata, M.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2009-01-01

    Significantly large mass fractionations between chlorine isotopes (Cl-35, Cl-37) have been reported for terrestrial materials including both geological samples and laboratory materials. Also, the chlorine isotopic composition can be used as a tracer for early solar system processes. Moreover, chlorine is ubiquitous on the Martian surface. Typical chlorine abundances in Gusev soils are approx.0.5 %. The global surface average chlorine abundance also is approx.0.5 %. Striking variations among outcrop rocks at Meridiani were reported with some chlorine abundances as high as approx.2%. Characterizing conditions under which chlorine isotopic fractionation may occur is clearly of interest to planetary science. Thus, we have initiated development of a chlorine isotopic analysis technique using TIMS at NASA-JSC. We present here a progress report on the current status of development at JSC and discuss the possible application of chlorine isotopic analysis to Martian meteorites in a search for fluid- and possibly biological activity on Mars.

  2. Ultratrace uranium fingerprinting with isotope selective laser ionization spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Summer L; Bushaw, Bruce A

    2008-08-01

    Uranium isotope ratios can provide source information for tracking uranium contamination in a variety of fields, ranging from occupational bioassay to monitoring aftereffects of nuclear accidents. We describe the development of isotope selective laser ionization spectrometry for ultratrace measurement of the minor isotopes (234)U, (235)U, and (236)U with respect to (238)U. The inherent isotopic selectivity of three-step excitation with single-mode continuous wave lasers results in measurement of the minor isotopes at relative abundances below 1 ppm and is not limited by isobaric interferences such as (235)UH(+) during measurement of (236)U. This relative abundance limit is attained without mass spectrometric analysis of the laser-created ions. Uranyl nitrate standards from an international blind comparison were used to test analytical performance for different isotopic compositions and with quantities ranging from 11 ng to 10 microg total uranium. Isotopic ratio determination was demonstrated over a linear dynamic range of 7 orders of magnitude with a few percent relative precision and detection limits below 500 fg for the minor isotopes. PMID:18613650

  3. Application of transition metal isotope tracers in global change research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jinming; Thomas F. Pedersen

    2005-01-01

    High-precision isotope composition determinations using multicollector, magnetic-sector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) have recently revealed that some transition metal isotopes such as those of Mo, Fe, Cu, Zn etc. can be used as biogeochemical tracers in global change research.The Mo isotope system may be useful in paleoredox investigations indicating that δ 97/95Mo in seawater may co-vary with changes in the relative proportions of anoxic and oxic sedimentation in the ocean, and that this variation may be recorded in δ 97/95Mo of anoxic sediments. The Mo continental flux into the oceans and the global Mo isotope budget can be estimated fromδ 97/95MO values. The Fe isotope composition in seawater is an important issue because Fe plays a controlling role in biological productivity in the oceans and its abundance in seawater may have substantial effect on climate changes. Iron isotope fractionations could result from bio- and abio-processes and have about 0.1% variation (δ 56/54Fe), so Fe isotopes considered alone cannot be used to distinguish the products of abiotic and biotic Fe processing in geological records. Cu and Zn isotopes are also used as biogeochemical tracers, but the researches are relatively less. This review mainly focuses on the methods for preparation, purification and determination of new isotope tracer samples, and on isotope applications in marine environmental changes.

  4. Gaseous abundances in M82

    CERN Document Server

    Ranalli, P; Origlia, L; Maiolino, R; Makishima, K; Ranalli, Piero; Comastri, Andrea; Origlia, Livia; Maiolino, Roberto; Makishima, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    We present the preliminary analysis of a deep (100ks) XMM-Newton observation of M82. The spatial distribution of the abundances of chemical elements (Fe, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S) is investigated through narrow-band imaging analisys and spatially-resolved spectroscopy. We find that the abundances of alpha-elements follow a bipolar distribution, these elements being more abundant in the gaseous outflow than in the galaxy centre. This behaviour is found to be more marked for lighter elements (O, Ne) than for heavier elements.

  5. Carbon Isotope Chemistry in Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Amy N.; Willacy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Few details of carbon isotope chemistry are known, especially the chemical processes that occur in astronomical environments like molecular clouds. Observational evidence shows that the C-12/C-13 abundance ratios vary due to the location of the C-13 atom within the molecular structure. The different abundances are a result of the diverse formation pathways that can occur. Modeling can be used to explore the production pathways of carbon molecules in an effort to understand and explain the chemical evolution of molecular clouds.

  6. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  7. Determination of zinc stable isotopes in biological materials using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for using isotope dilution to determine both the amount of natural zinc and enriched isotopes of zinc in biological samples. Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry offers a way to quantify not only the natural zinc found in a sample but also the enriched isotope tracers of zinc. Accurate values for the enriched isotopes and natural zinc are obtained by adjusting the mass count rate data for measurable instrumental biases. Analytical interferences from the matrix are avoided by extracting the zinc from the sample matrix using diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate. The extraction technique separates the zinc from elements which form interfering molecular ions at the same nominal masses as the zinc isotopes. Accuracy of the method is verified using standard reference materials. The detection limit is 0.06 μg Zn per sample. Precision of the abundance ratios range from 0.3-0.8%. R.S.D. for natural zinc concentrations is about 200-600 μg g-1. The accuracy and precision of the measurements make it possible to follow enriched isotopic tracers of zinc in biological samples in metabolic tracer studies. (author). 19 refs.; 1 fig., 4 tabs

  8. A versatile method for simultaneous stable carbon isotope analysis of DNA and RNA nucleotides by liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, T.C.W.; Brasser, J.; de Ruiter, G.; Houtekamer, M.; Bolhuis, H.; Stal, L.J.; Boschker, H.T.S.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALELiquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS) is currently the most accurate and precise technique for the measurement of compound-specific stable carbon isotope ratios (C-13/C-12) in biological metabolites, at their natural abundance. However, until now this technique cou

  9. Chlorine Abundances in Cool Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Maas, Z G; Hinkle, K

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and one M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H$^{35}$Cl at 3.69851 $\\mu$m. The high resolution L-band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4m telescope. The average [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with --0.72$<$[Fe/H]$<$0.20 is [$^{35}$Cl/Fe]=(--0.10$\\pm$0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [$^{35}$Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16$\\pm$0.15) dex. The [$^{35}$Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of $\\sim$0.35 dex above model predictions suggesting chemical evolution models are under producing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and \\ion{H}{2} regions. In one star where both H$^{35}$Cl a...

  10. Perchlorate in The Great Lakes: Isotopic Composition and Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Poghosyan, Armen; Sturchio, Neil C.; Morrison, Candice G.; Beloso, Abelardo D., Jr.; Guan, Yunbin; Eiler, John M.; Jackson, W. Andrew; Hatzinger, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Perchlorate is a persistent and mobile contaminant in the environment with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Stable isotope ratios of oxygen (δ^(18)O, Δ^(17)O) and chlorine (δ^(37)Cl) along with the abundance of the radioactive isotope ^(36)Cl were used to trace perchlorate sources and behavior in the Laurentian Great Lakes. These lakes were selected for study as a likely repository of recent atmospheric perchlorate deposition. Perchlorate concentrations in the Great Lakes range from 0....

  11. Isotopic geology; Geologie isotopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allegre, C. [Paris-7 Univ. Denis Diderot, 75 (France); Institut de physique du globe de Paris, 75 - Paris (France)

    2005-07-01

    Born from the application to geology of nuclear physics techniques, the isotopic geology has revolutionized the Earth's sciences. Beyond the dating of rocks, the tracer techniques have permitted to reconstruct the Earth's dynamics, to measure the temperatures of the past (giving birth to paleoclimatology) and to understand the history of chemical elements thanks to the analysis of meteorites. Today, all domains of Earth sciences appeal more or less to the methods of isotopic geology. In this book, the author explains the principles, methods and recent advances of this science: 1 - isotopes and radioactivity; 2 - principles of isotope dating; 3 - radio-chronological methods; 4 - cosmogenic isotope chronologies; 5 - uncertainties and radio-chronological results; 6 - geochemistry of radiogenic isotopes; 7 - geochemistry of stable isotopes; 8 - isotopic geology and dynamical analysis of reservoirs. (J.S.)

  12. Optical isotope shifts for unstable samarium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a tunable dye laser beam intersecting a thermal atomic beam, optical isotope shifts and hyperfine splittings have been measured for the four unstable samarium isotopes between 144Sm and 154Sm, covering the well known transition region from spherical to deformed shapes. (orig.)

  13. Abundance anomaly of the 13C species of CCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, N.; Saruwatari, O.; Sakai, T.; Takano, S.; Yamamoto, S.

    2010-03-01

    Aims: We have observed the N = 1-0 lines of CCH and its 13C isotopic species toward a cold dark cloud, TMC-1 and a star-forming region, L1527, to investigate the 13C abundances and formation pathways of CCH. Methods: The observations have been carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Results: We have successfully detected the lines of 13CCH and C13CH toward the both sources and found a significant intensity difference between the two 13C isotopic species. The [C13CH] /[13CCH] abundance ratios are 1.6 ± 0.4 (3σ) and 1.6 ± 0.1 (3σ) for TMC-1 and L1527, respectively. The abundance difference between C13CH and 13CCH means that the two carbon atoms of CCH are not equivalent in the formation pathway. On the other hand, the [CCH]/[C13CH] and [CCH]/[13CCH] ratios are evaluated to be larger than 170 and 250 toward TMC-1, and to be larger than 80 and 135 toward L1527, respectively. Therefore, both of the 13C species are significantly diluted in comparison with the interstellar 12C/13C ratio of 60. The dilution is discussed in terms of a behavior of 13C in molecular clouds.

  14. Nitrogen 15 abundance in protein fractions of beans fertilized with (15NH42SO4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaud Saula Goulart

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies evaluating the protein nutritive value of beans labelled with 15N, ussing nitrogen balance and the quantitation of faecal and urinary endogenous nitrogen, determined by isotopic dilution, have been extensively used. The objective of this research was to verify if the isotopic labelling of raw, freeze dried beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cultivar Piratã 1 with 1.394 atoms%15N, resulted in the same abundance of the whole flour and of the protein fractions extracted from the beans with 0.5 mol L-1 NaCl. The isotopic abundance found in the whole bean flour, in the protein extract, in the globulin and albumin fractions were respectively: 1.394 ± 0.011; 1.403 ± 0.012; 1.399 ± 0.007 and 1.399 ± 0.028 atoms % of 15N, presenting no difference (P > 0.05. However, a difference was found (P < 0.05 between the above mentioned abundances and the isotopic abundance found in the nitrogen of the proteins in the extraction residue, which was 0.969 ± 0.084. Since the abundances did not differ, the protein nutritive indexes, such as digestibility and biological value, determined from the nitrogen balance and corrected for isotopic dilution, would not be affected by extracting the proteins from the beans with 0.5 mol L¹ NaCl. If working with the nitrogen balance of the residual proteins after extraction and even with the whole flours, these indexes could present incorrect values, since the isotopic labelling of the residual proteins was less than that of the protein fractions.

  15. Statistical clumped isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röckmann, T; Popa, M E; Krol, M C; Hofmann, M E G

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  16. Rapid photochemical equilibration of isotope bond ordering in O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Laurence Y.; Ash, Jeanine L.; Young, Edward D.

    2014-09-01

    The abundances of 18O18O and 17O18O in the atmosphere were recently found to be enriched relative to the stochastic distribution of isotopes in O2. The enrichment is believed to arise from O(3P) + O2 isotope exchange reactions, which reorder the isotopes in O2 to a distribution that favors bonds between heavy isotopes. Theoretical predictions and laboratory experiments suggest that the reordered distribution of isotopes should reflect internal isotopic equilibrium, but a laboratory test of this hypothesis for the complete O2 isotopologue system has not yet been realized. Here we use a simple photochemical experiment that reorders the isotopes in O2 at temperatures between 200 K and 350 K. Using simultaneous measurements of five O2 isotopologues, we show that O(3P) + O2 reorders the isotopes in O2 to isotopic equilibrium. Furthermore, we use this scheme to calibrate measurements of isotopic ordering in samples of O2, obtaining Δ36 and Δ35 values within ±0.1‰. Measurements of atmospheric O2 sampled at the University of California, Los Angeles, from 2012 to 2014 have mean values of Δ36 = 1.97 ± 0.07‰ and Δ35 = 1.0 ± 0.1‰ (2 SE; n = 23), with no detectable long-term trend. These measurements are consistent with values for air reported earlier, but with a threefold to fourfold improvement in precision. Together, the experiments and observations support the case that isotopic ordering in tropospheric O2 is altered by O(3P) + O2; however, they also suggest that tropospheric Δ36 and Δ35 values do not reflect complete isotopic equilibration in the troposphere. Isotopic ordering in atmospheric O2 likely reflects the decadal-scale balance of stratospheric and tropospheric air masses modulated by variations in tropospheric photochemistry and convection.

  17. Applications of C and N stable isotopes to ecological and environmental studies in seagrass ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepoint, Gilles [Centre MARE, Laboratoire d' Oceanologie, Institut de Chimie, B6, Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium)]. E-mail: g.lepoint@ulg.ac.be; Dauby, Patrick [Centre MARE, Laboratoire d' Oceanologie, Institut de Chimie, B6, Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique, rue Vautier, B1000 Brussels (Belgium); Gobert, Sylvie [Centre MARE, Laboratoire d' Oceanologie, Institut de Chimie, B6, Universite de Liege, B-4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2004-12-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen are increasingly used in marine ecosystems, for ecological and environmental studies. Here, we examine some applications of stable isotopes as ecological integrators or tracers in seagrass ecosystem studies. We focus on both the use of natural isotope abundance as food web integrators or environmental tracers and on the use of stable isotopes as experimental tools. As ecosystem integrators, stable isotopes have helped to elucidate the general structure of trophic webs in temperate, Mediterranean and tropical seagrass ecosystems. As environmental tracers, stable isotopes have proven their utility in sewage impact measuring and mapping. However, to make such environmental studies more comprehensible, future works on understanding of basic reasons for variations of N and C stable isotopes in seagrasses should be encouraged. At least, as experimental tracers, stable isotopes allow the study of many aspects of N and C cycles at the scale of a plant or at the scale of the seagrass ecosystem.

  18. Applications of C and N stable isotopes to ecological and environmental studies in seagrass ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepoint, Gilles; Dauby, Patrick; Gobert, Sylvie

    2004-12-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen are increasingly used in marine ecosystems, for ecological and environmental studies. Here, we examine some applications of stable isotopes as ecological integrators or tracers in seagrass ecosystem studies. We focus on both the use of natural isotope abundance as food web integrators or environmental tracers and on the use of stable isotopes as experimental tools. As ecosystem integrators, stable isotopes have helped to elucidate the general structure of trophic webs in temperate, Mediterranean and tropical seagrass ecosystems. As environmental tracers, stable isotopes have proven their utility in sewage impact measuring and mapping. However, to make such environmental studies more comprehensible, future works on understanding of basic reasons for variations of N and C stable isotopes in seagrasses should be encouraged. At least, as experimental tracers, stable isotopes allow the study of many aspects of N and C cycles at the scale of a plant or at the scale of the seagrass ecosystem. PMID:15556172

  19. The chlorine isotope fingerprint of the lunar magma ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Boyce, Jeremy W.; Treiman, Allan H.; Guan, Yunbin; Ma, Chi; Eiler, John M.; Gross, Juliane; Greenwood, James P.; Stolper, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    The Moon contains chlorine that is isotopically unlike that of any other body yet studied in the Solar System, an observation that has been interpreted to support traditional models of the formation of a nominally hydrogen-free (“dry”) Moon. We have analyzed abundances and isotopic compositions of Cl and H in lunar mare basalts, and find little evidence that anhydrous lava outgassing was important in generating chlorine isotope anomalies, because ^(37)Cl/^(35)Cl ratios are not related to Cl a...

  20. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  1. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, Eugene E.

    2001-12-21

    Semiconductor bulk crystals and multilayer structures with controlled isotopic composition have attracted much scientific and technical interest in the past few years. Isotopic composition affects a large number of physical properties, including phonon energies and lifetimes, bandgaps, the thermal conductivity and expansion coefficient and spin-related effects. Isotope superlattices are ideal media for self-diffusion studies. In combination with neutron transmutation doping, isotope control offers a novel approach to metal-insulator transition studies. Spintronics, quantum computing and nanoparticle science are emerging fields using isotope control.

  2. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  3. Surface abundances of OC supergiants

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, F; Bouret, J -C; Barba, R; Howarth, I

    2016-01-01

    Some O and B stars show unusually strong or weak lines of carbon and/or nitrogen. These objects are classified as OBN or OBC stars. It has recently been shown that nitrogen enrichment and carbon depletion are the most likely explanations for the existence of the ON class. We investigate OC stars (all being supergiants) to check that surface abundances are responsible for the observed anomalous line strengths. We perform a spectroscopic analysis of three OC supergiants using atmosphere models. A fourth star was previously studied by us. Our sample thus comprises all OC stars known to date in the Galaxy. We determine the stellar parameters and He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We show that all stars have effective temperatures and surface gravities fully consistent with morphologically normal O supergiants. However, OC stars show little, if any, nitrogen enrichment and carbon surface abundances consistent with the initial composition. OC supergiants are thus barely chemically evolved, unlike morphologically n...

  4. Solar and Stellar Photospheric Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Prieto, Carlos Allende

    2016-01-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  5. Evidence of fissiogenic Cs estimated from Ba isotopic deviations in an Oklo natural reactor zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Hiroshi; Holliger, Philippe; Masuda, Akimasa

    1993-01-01

    Isotopic studies of many elements from the uranium ore natural nuclear reactors at Oklo provide useful information on the migration of radioactive nuclides. The fissiogenic isotopic composition of Ba is particularly interesting, as it is an important indication in the search for fissiogenic Cs. In this report we detail the detection of remarkable isotopic deviations of Ba in the Oklo samples and estimate the geochemical behaviour of fissiogenic Cs from excess Ba isotopes. Six samples systematically collected from borehole SF84 (zone 10) at the Oklo uranium mine have been analyzed. Isotopic deviations of Ba indicate the existence of fissiogenic Cs and Ba. A good correlation between the elemental abundance of Cs and isotopic abundances of excess 135Ba and 137Ba suggests that fissiogenic 135Ba and 137Ba behaved as Cs rather than Ba.

  6. Molecular Paleohydrology: Interpreting the Hydrogen- Isotopic Composition of Lipid Biomarkers from Photosynthesizing Organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachse, D.; Billault, I.; Bowen, G.J.; Chikaraishi, Y.; Dawson, T.E.; Feakins, S.J.; Freeman, Katherine; Magill, C.R.; McInerney, F.A.; van der Meer, M.T.J.; Polissar, P.; Robins, R.J.; Sachs, J.P.; Schmidt, H.L.; Sessions, A.L.; White, J.W.C.; West, J.B.; Kahmen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen-isotopic abundances of lipid biomarkers are emerging as important proxies in the study of ancient environments and ecosystems. A decade ago, pioneering studies made use of new analytical methods and demonstrated that the hydrogen-isotopic composition of individual lipids from aquatic and te

  7. Environmental isotope investigation of groundwater flow in the Honey Lake Basin, California and Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, T.P.; Davisson, M.L.; Hudson, G.B.; Varian, A.R.

    1997-07-01

    The hydrology of Honey Lake Basin was studied using environmental isotope measurements of approximately 130 water samples collected during 1995 and 1996. The principal analytical methods included hydrogen, oxygen and carbon stable isotope ratio measurements, radiocarbon and tritium dating, and measurements of dissolved noble gas abundances.

  8. Isotope fractionation of selenium by biomethylation in microcosm incubations of soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilling, K.; Johnson, T.M.; Wilcke, W.

    2013-01-01

    The natural abundance of stable Se isotopes in methylselenides reflects sources and formation conditions of methylselenides. We tested the effects of (i) different inorganic Se species spiked to soils and (ii) different soil samples on the extent of fungal biomethylation of Se and the Se isotope rat

  9. On the isotope ratio of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental investigations of the isotope ratio of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, nitrogen and sulfur in urine of persons living at different locations show considerable variations. A distinct relation to the isotope ratio of the local drinking water has only been observed in the case of hydrogen. The variations are far from being within the experimental limits of error. Therefore, they are decisive in selecting the relative abundance of the labelling isotope in tracer experiments on human metabolism. (author)

  10. Coho Abundance - Point Features [ds182

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  11. Coho Abundance - Linear Features [ds183

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  12. Chinook Abundance - Point Features [ds180

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  13. Steelhead Abundance - Linear Features [ds185

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  14. Steelhead Abundance - Point Features [ds184

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  15. Abundance estimation and Conservation Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichols, J. D.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001. The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959 and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965 open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992, and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993. However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001. The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004 is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004 emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004 also suggest that

  16. Generating potassium abundance variations in the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    An intriguing aspect of chondritic meteorites is that they are complementary: while their separate components have wildly varying abundances, bulk chondrites have nearly solar composition. This implies that the nearly solar reservoirs in which chondrites were born were in turn assembled from sub-reservoirs of differing compositions that birthed the different components. We focus on explaining the potassium abundance variations between chondrules even within a single chondrite, while maintaining the observed CI 41K to 39K ratios. This requires physically separating potassium and chondrules while the temperature is high enough for K to be in the gas phase. We examine several mechanisms which could drive the dust through gas and show that to do so locally would have required long (sub-orbital to many orbits) time scales; with shortest potassium depletion time-scales occurring in a scenario where chondrules formed high above the mid-plane and settled out of the evaporated potassium. While orbital time-scales are at odds with laboratory chondrule cooling rate estimates, any other model for the origin for the potassium abundance variation has to wrestle with the severe logistical difficulty of generating a plethora of correlated reservoirs which varied strongly in their potassium abundances, but not in their potassium isotope ratios.

  17. Oxygen isotopic ratios in intermediate-mass red giants

    CERN Document Server

    Lebzelter, Thomas; Hinkle, Kenneth; Nowotny, Walter; Aringer, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Context. The abundances of the three main isotopes of oxygen are altered in the course of the CNO-cycle. When the first dredge-up mixes the burning products to the surface, the nucleosynthesis processes can be probed by measuring oxygen isotopic ratios. Aims. By measuring 16O/17O and 16O/18O in red giants of known mass we compare the isotope ratios with predictions from stellar and galactic evolution modelling. Methods. Oxygen isotopic ratios were derived from the K-band spectra of six red giants. The sample red giants are open cluster members with known masses of between 1.8 and 4.5 Msun . The abundance determination employs synthetic spectra calculated with the COMARCS code. The effect of uncertainties in the nuclear reaction rates, the mixing length, and of a change in the initial abundance of the oxygen isotopes was determined by a set of nucleosynthesis and mixing models using the FUNS code. Results. The observed 16O/17O ratios are in good agreement with the model results, even if the measured values do ...

  18. MULTIPLE ORIGINS OF NITROGEN ISOTOPIC ANOMALIES IN METEORITES AND COMETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic fractionation and mixing calculations compared with coupled hydrogen and nitrogen isotopic composition of organic molecules from primitive chondrites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), and comets C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and 81P/Wild2 reveal that meteoritic and cometary organic matter contains three different isotopic components of different origins. (1) A major component of carbonaceous chondrites, IDPs, and comets Hale-Bopp and Wild2 shows correlated H and N isotopic compositions attributable to isotope exchange between an organic matter of solar composition and a reservoir formed by ion-molecule reactions at T 15N-rich component having identical 15N and D enrichments relative to the protosolar gas. Temperatures > 100 K deduced from the low D/H ratio and an anti-correlation between the abundance of this component and meteoritic age indicate a late origin in the solar protoplanetary disk. N2 self-shielding and the non-thermal nucleosynthesis of 15N upon irradiation are possible but unlikely sources of this component, and a chemical origin is preferred. (3) An interstellar component with highly fractionated hydrogen isotopes and unfractionated nitrogen isotopes is present in ordinary chondrites. A dominantly solar origin of D and 15N excesses in primitive solar system bodies shows that isotopic anomalies do not necessarily fingerprint an interstellar origin and implies that only a very small fraction of volatile interstellar matter survived the events of solar system formation.

  19. Isotope separation principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedict, Manson

    1963-03-15

    Isotope separation theory of ideal cascades is discussed. It is shown how the most important characteristics of an isotope separation process can be worked out from the compositions and flow rates of the feed and product streams. These characteristics include plant size, dependence of product rate on product purity, minimum power consumption, costs of isotope separation, minimum time for reaching steady production, and effect of third component on process performance and product costs. The concepts of value functions, separative power, and separative work are used to derive the characteristics, and the analogy between isotope separation theory and thermodynamics is emphasized. (D.L.C.)

  20. The isotope breathe test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foundations of the breath diagnostic test, based on application of the carbon compounds, labeled with the stable (13C) or radioactive isotope are presented. The methodology for conducting the breath isotope test and the apparatuses, making it possible to determine under clinical conditions the isotope composition of the carbon, contained in the expired air, depending on the introduced tracer type, is briefly described. The safety of the method and prospects of its application are discussed. The examples of the breath isotope test practical application are presented

  1. Abundances in stars with exoplanets

    OpenAIRE

    Israelian, Garik

    2003-01-01

    Extensive spectroscopic studies of stars with and without planets have concluded that stars hosting planets are significantly more metal-rich than those without planets. More subtle trends of different chemical elements begin to appear as the number of detected extrasolar planetary systems continues to grow. I review our current knowledge concerning the observed abundance trends of various chemical elements in stars with exoplanets and their possible implications.

  2. Oxygen Gas Phase Abundance Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    André, M K; Howk, J C; Ferlet, R; Désert, J M; Hébrard, G; Lacour, S; Lecavelier-des-Etangs, A; Vidal-Madjar, A; Moos, H W

    2003-01-01

    We present new measurements of the interstellar gas-phase oxygen abundance along the sight lines towards 19 early-type galactic stars at an average distance of 2.6 kpc. We derive O {\\small I} column densities from {\\it HST}/STIS observations of the weak 1355 \\AA intersystem transition. We derive total hydrogen column densities [N(H {\\small I})+2N(H$_2$)] using {\\it HST}/STIS observations of \\lya and {\\it FUSE} observations of molecular hydrogen. The molecular hydrogen content of these sight lines ranges from f(H$_2$) = 2N(H$_2$)/[N(H {\\small I})+2N(H$_2$)] = 0.03 to 0.47. The average $$ of 6.3$\\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ mag$^{-1}$ with a standard deviation of 15% is consistent with previous surveys. The mean oxygen abundance along these sight lines, which probe a wide range of galactic environments in the distant ISM, is 10$^6$ \\oh = $408 \\pm 13$ (1 $\\sigma$ in the mean). %$({\\rm O/H})_{gas} = 408 \\pm 14$(1 $\\sigma$). We see no evidence for decreasing gas-phase oxygen abundance with increasing molecular hydroge...

  3. Al-26, Pu-244, Ti-50, REE, and trace element abundances in hibonite grains from CM and CV meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, A. J.; Mckeegan, K. D.; Zinner, E.; Goswami, J. N.

    1987-01-01

    Hibonites from the CM meteorites Murchison, Murray, and Cold Bokkeveld, and hibonites and Ti-rich pyroxene from the CV chondrite Allende are studied. Electron microprobe measurements of major element concentrations and track and ion probe measurements of Mg and Ti isotopic ratios, rare earth elements (REEs), and trace element abundances are analyzed. Correlations between isotopic anomalies in Ti, Al-26, Pu-244, and Mg-26(asterisk) are examined. Ti isotopic anomalies are compared with REE and trace element abundance patterns. Reasons for the lack of Al-26 in the hibonites are investigated and discussed. It is observed that there is no correlation between the Ti isotopic compositions, and the presence of Mg-26(asterisk), Pu-244, and REE and trace element patterns in individual hibonite samples. The data reveal that hibonites are not interstellar dust grains but formed on a short time scale and in localized regions of the early solar system.

  4. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  5. Planetary nebulae abundances and stellar evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Pottasch, S. R.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    2006-01-01

    A summary is given of planetary nebulae abundances from ISO measurements. It is shown that these nebulae show abundance gradients (with galactocentric distance), which in the case of neon, argon, sulfur and oxygen (with four exceptions) are the same as HII regions and early type star abundance gradients. The abundance of these elements predicted from these gradients at the distance of the Sun from the center are exactly the solar abundance. Sulfur is the exception to this; the reason for this...

  6. Discovery of the Arsenic Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, A; Heim, M; Schuh, A; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-nine arsenic isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  7. Discovery of the Scandium Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Meierfrankenfeld, D

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-three scandium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  8. Discovery of the Tungsten Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    A. Fritsch; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-five tungsten isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  9. Discovery of the Vanadium Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    SHORE, A.; A. Fritsch; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-four vanadium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  10. Discovery of the Barium Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    SHORE, A.; A. Fritsch; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-eight barium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  11. Discovery of the Silver Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Schuh, A.; A. Fritsch; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-eight silver isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  12. Discovery of the Cadmium Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Amos, S.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-seven cadmium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  13. Discovery of the Krypton Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Heim, M.; A. Fritsch; Schuh, A.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-two krypton isotopes have been observed so far; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  14. Discovery of the Iron Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Schuh, A.; A. Fritsch; Heim, M.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-eight iron isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  15. Discovery of the Gold Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Schuh, A.; A. Fritsch; Ginepro, J. Q.; Heim, M.; SHORE, A.; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-six gold isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  16. Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Szymanski, T; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-six cobalt isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  17. Krypton isotope analysis using near-resonant stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for measuring low relative abundances of 85Kr in one liter or less samples of air has been under development here at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of the Krypton Isotope Laser Analysis (KILA) method is to measure ratios of 10-10 or less of 85Kr to more abundant stable krypton. Mass spectrometry and beta counting are the main competing technologies used in rare-gas trace analysis and are limited in application by such factors as sample size, counting times, and selectivity. The use of high-resolution lasers to probe hyperfine levels to determine isotopic abundance has received much attention recently. In this study, we report our progress on identifying and implementing techniques for trace 85Kr analysis on small gas samples in a static cell as well as limitations on sensitivity and selectivity for the technique. High-resolution pulsed and cw lasers are employed in a laser-induced fluorescence technique that preserves the original sample. This technique, is based on resonant isotopic depletion spectroscopy (RIDS) in which one isotope is optically depleted while preserving the population of a less abundant isotope. The KILA method consists of three steps. In the first step, the 1s5 metastable level of krypton is populated via radiative cascade following two-photon excitation of the 2p6 energy level. Next, using RBDS, the stable krypton isotopes are optically depleted to the ground state through the 1s4 level with the bulk of the 85Kr population being preserved. Finally, the remaining metastable population is probed to determine 85Kr concentration. The experimental requirements for each of these steps are outlined below

  18. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  19. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Making an honest measurement scale out of the oxygen isotope delta-values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gat, Joel R; DeBievre, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The differential measurement of the abundance of oxygen isotopes based on reference materials, such as VSMOW for the case of water, was used because the precision of the absolute mass-spectrometric determination of the abundance fell short of the differences to be measured. Since then these measurements have been much improved, so that a calibration scheme of the oxygen isotope abundance in water, carbonates, silica, phosphates, sulfates, nitrates and organic materials is suggested, based on an accredited primary standard of oxygen in air and using standard fluorination and O(2) to CO(2) conversion techniques. PMID:12442297

  1. Isotopes in Greenland Precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Anne-Katrine

    Greenland ice cores offer a unique opportunity to investigate the climate system behaviour. The objective of this PhD project is to investigate isotope modelling of present- day conditions and conduct model-data comparison using Greenland ice cores. Thus this thesis investigates how the integration...... of model and data can be used to improve the understanding of climate changes. This is done through analysis of isotope modelling, observations and ice core measurements. This dissertation comprises three projects: (1) Modelling the isotopic response to changes in Arctic sea surface conditions, (2......) Constructing a new Greenland database of observations and present-day ice core measurements, and (3) Performance test of isotope-enabled CAM5 for Greenland. The recent decades of rapid Arctic sea ice decline are used as a basis for an observational-based model experiment using the isotope-enabled CAM model 3...

  2. Helium and neon isotopes in deep Pacific Ocean sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    Helium and neon concentration measurements, along with isotope ratio determinations, have been made for particles collected in the deep Pacific with a magnetic sled, and they are believed to be of extraterrestrial origin. Analyses were made for samples consisting of composites of many extremely fine particles and for several individual particles large enough to contain sufficient gas for analysis but small enough to escape melting in their passage through the atmosphere. Step-heating was employed to extract the gas. Cosmic-ray spallation products or solar-wind helium and neon, if present, were not abundant enough to account for the isotopic compositions measured. In the case of the samples of magnetic fines, the low temperature extractions provided elemental and isotopic ratios in the general range found for the primordial gas in carbonaceous chondrites and gas-rich meteorites. The isotopic ratios found in the high temperature extractions suggest the presence of solar-flare helium and neon.

  3. Lead abundance in the uranium star CS 31082-001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plez, B.; Hill, V.; Cayrel, R.;

    2004-01-01

    stars:abundances- physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances- atomic data......stars:abundances- physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances- atomic data...

  4. Selenium Isotopes as Biosignatures in Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxel, O.; Ludden, J.; Fouquet, Y.

    2001-12-01

    Chemically similar to sulphur, Se occurs as +6, +4, 0 and -2 valences in a variety of organic compounds and geological settings. This makes the study of Se stable isotope ratios a potential indicator of geological and biological processes. Se isotopes were first determined in the early 60's (Krouse and Thode, 1962; Rashid et al., 1978) using gas-source MS and recently by N-TIMS (Herbel et al., 2000; Johnson et al., 1999) using the double spike technique. The previous results showed that the 82Se/76Se ratio vary by as much as 15‰ and indicate that abiotic and bacterial reduction of soluble oxyanions is the dominant cause of Se isotope fractionation. Our isotopic analyses of Se were performed using a continuous flow hydride generation system coupled to a Micromass MC-ICP-MS after chemical purification. The estimated external precision of the 82Se/76Se isotope ratio is 0.25‰ (2σ ) for a quantity of Se per analysis as low as 50 ng and the data are reported relative to our internal standards (MERCK elemental standard solution). In this study we have used Se isotopes in conjunction with S isotopes to provide additional constraints on the fractionation processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems. Several fields were studied along the Mid Atlantic Ridge and include the Lucky Strike field where the setting is in a caldera system with abundant low-permeability layers of cemented breccia which result in fluid cooling and mixing below the hydrothermal vents. Based on vent structures, mineral abundance, and geochemistry, two types of hydrothermal deposits were identified: (1) high-T vents with δ 34S between 1.5 and 4.5‰ and Se values up to 2000 ppm; (2) low-T vents where pyrite and marcasite generally have lower δ 34S values (down to -1.0‰ ) and low concentration of Se (hydrothermal deposits is interpreted as a result of subsurface precipitation of sulfides (scavenging Se from the fluid) during the conductive cooling of the hydrothermal fluid beneath the impermeable

  5. BIPAL - a data library for computing the burnup of fissionable isotopes and products of their decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BIPAL databank contains data on 100 heavy metal isotopes starting with 206Tl and finishing with 253Es. Four are stable, the others are unstable. The following data are currently stored in the databank: the serial number and name of isotopes, decay modes and, for stable isotopes, the isotopic abundance (%), numbers of P decays and Q captures, numbers of corresponding final products, branching ratios, half-lives and their units, decay constants, thermal neutron captures, and fission cross sections, and other data (mainly alpha, beta and gamma intensities). The description of data and a printout of the BIPAL library are presented. (J.B.)

  6. Single atom detection of calcium isotopes by atom trap trace analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hoekstra, S; Morgenstern, R; Wilschut, H W; Hoekstra, R

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate a combination of an isotopically purified atom beam and a magneto-optical trap which enables the single atom detection of all stable isotopes of calcium (40, 42, 43, 44, 46 and 48). These isotopes range in abundance from 96.9 % (40Ca) to 0.004 (46Ca). The trap is loaded from an atomic beam which is decelerated in a Zeeman slower and subsequently deflected over an angle of 30 degrees by optical molasses. The isotope selectivity of the Zeeman slower and the deflection stage is investigated experimentally and compared with Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Static, Mixed-Array Total Evaporation for Improved Quantitation of Plutonium Minor Isotopes in Small Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, F. E.; Byerly, Benjamin L.; Thomas, Mariam R.; Spencer, Khalil J.

    2016-06-01

    Actinide isotope measurements are a critical signature capability in the modern nuclear forensics "toolbox", especially when interrogating anthropogenic constituents in real-world scenarios. Unfortunately, established methodologies, such as traditional total evaporation via thermal ionization mass spectrometry, struggle to confidently measure low abundance isotope ratios (plutonium minor isotope measurements, which have been resistant to enhancement in recent years because of elevated radiologic concerns. Results are presented for small sample (~20 ng) applications involving a well-known plutonium isotope reference material, CRM-126a, and compared with traditional total evaporation methods.

  8. Surface abundances of ON stars

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, F; Palacios, A; Howarth, I; Georgy, C; Walborn, N R; Bouret, J -C; Barba, R

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle during most of their evolution. When mixing is efficient, or when mass transfer in binary systems happens, chemically processed material is observed at the surface of O and B stars. ON stars show stronger lines of nitrogen than morphologically normal counterparts. Whether this corresponds to the presence of material processed through the CNO cycle or not is not known. Our goal is to answer this question. We perform a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of ON stars with atmosphere models. We determine the fundamental parameters as well as the He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We also measure the projected rotational velocities. We compare the properties of the ON stars to those of normal O stars. We show that ON stars are usually helium-rich. Their CNO surface abundances are fully consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis. ON stars are more chemically evolved and rotate - on average - faster than normal O stars. Evolutionary models including rotation cann...

  9. Big Bang nucleosynthesis, microwave anisotropy, and the light element abundances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coc, A. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CNRS/IN2P3/UPS, Bat. 104, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Angulo, C. [Centre de Recherches du Cyclotron, Universite catholique de Louvain, Chemin du cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Vangioni-Flam, E. [lnstitut d' Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, 98bis Bd. Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Descouvemont, P. [Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, CP229, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Adahchour, A. [Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, CP229, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-04-18

    From the observations of the anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the WMAP satellite has provided a determination of the baryonic density of the Universe, with an unprecedented precision: 4%. This imposes a careful reanalysis of the standard Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (SBBN) calculations. In a recent paper, we used the R-matrix theory to fit S-factor data on nuclear reactions involved in Big Bang nucleosynthesis. We derived the reaction rates with associated uncertainties, which were evaluated on statistical grounds (available at http://pntpm3.ulb.ac.be/bigbang). Combining these BBN results with the {omega}bh2 value from WMAP, we deduced the light element ({sup 4}He, D, {sup 3}He and {sup 7}Li) primordial abundances and compare them with spectroscopic observations. There is a very good agreement with deuterium observed in cosmological clouds, which strengthens the confidence on the estimated baryonic density of the Universe. However, there is a discrepancy between the deduced {sup 7}Li abundance and the one observed in halo stars of our Galaxy, supposed, until now, to represent the primordial abundance of this isotope. The origin of this discrepancy, observational, nuclear or more fundamental remains to be clarified. The possible role of the up to now neglected {sup 7}Be(d,p)2{alpha} and {sup 7}Be(d,{alpha}){sup 5}Li reactions is considered and we present here a dedicated experiment performed at Louvain-la-Neuve to measure these cross sections.

  10. Big Bang nucleosynthesis, microwave anisotropy, and the light element abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coc, A.; Angulo, C.; Vangioni-Flam, E.; Descouvemont, P.; Adahchour, A.

    2005-04-01

    From the observations of the anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the WMAP satellite has provided a determination of the baryonic density of the Universe, with an unprecedented precision: 4%. This imposes a careful reanalysis of the standard Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (SBBN) calculations. In a recent paper, we used the R-matrix theory to fit S-factor data on nuclear reactions involved in Big Bang nucleosynthesis. We derived the reaction rates with associated uncertainties, which were evaluated on statistical grounds (available at http://pntpm3.ulb.ac.be/bigbang). Combining these BBN results with the Ωbh2 value from WMAP, we deduced the light element (4He, D,3He and 7Li) primordial abundances and compare them with spectroscopic observations. There is a very good agreement with deuterium observed in cosmological clouds, which strengthens the confidence on the estimated baryonic density of the Universe. However, there is a discrepancy between the deduced 7Li abundance and the one observed in halo stars of our Galaxy, supposed, until now, to represent the primordial abundance of this isotope. The origin of this discrepancy, observational, nuclear or more fundamental remains to be clarified. The possible role of the up to now neglected 7Be(d,p)2α and 7Be(d,α)5Li reactions is considered and we present here a dedicated experiment performed at Louvain-la-Neuve to measure these cross sections.

  11. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, Eugene E.

    2006-06-19

    The following article is an edited transcript based on the Turnbull Lecture given by Eugene E. Haller at the 2005 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting in Boston on November 29, 2005. The David Turnbull Lectureship is awarded to recognize the career of a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to understanding materials phenomena and properties through research, writing, and lecturing, as exemplified by the life work of David Turnbull. Haller was named the 2005 David Turnbull Lecturer for his 'pioneering achievements and leadership in establishing the field of isotopically engineered semiconductors; for outstanding contributions to materials growth, doping and diffusion; and for excellence in lecturing, writing, and fostering international collaborations'. The scientific interest, increased availability, and technological promise of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This article reviews results obtained with isotopically controlled semiconductor bulk and thin-film heterostructures. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, band structure, and lattice constant in subtle, but, for their physical understanding, significant ways. Large isotope-related effects are observed for thermal conductivity in local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping. Spectacularly sharp photoluminescence lines have been observed in ultrapure, isotopically enriched silicon crystals. Isotope multilayer structures are especially well suited for simultaneous self- and dopant-diffusion studies. The absence of any chemical, mechanical, or electrical driving forces makes possible the study of an ideal random-walk problem. Isotopically controlled semiconductors may find applications in quantum computing, nanoscience, and spintronics.

  12. Oxygen isotopes and lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Leng, Melanie; Dean, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Isotopes are variations of a particular chemical element. It is all to do with the number of neutrons. Oxygen has two main isotopes: 18O which has 10 neutrons and 8 protons; and 16O which has 8 neutrons and 8 protons. Although these variants have a different number of neutrons (and therefore a different atomic mass), the number of protons remains the same, and they are still classed as the same element. Isotopes are analysed in terms of ratios such as 18O/16O which is shortened to δ18O (δ...

  13. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    fractionate during oxidative weathering of the continents. High river water δ53Cr values (+1.6‰) indicate that dissolved Cr has been back-reduced either in the weathering profile or during river transport. The main conclusion from this study is that δ53Cr value for continental runoff is not uniform....... The positive excursion does not correlated with other redox proxies (carbon and sulphur stable isotopes profiles from the Lower Ordovician), suggesting that Cr isotopes behave non-conservatively and are more sensitive to changes in local redox conditions. These results demonstrate that Cr isotope composition...

  14. Solar System chemical abundances corrected for systematics

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    The relative chemical abundances between CI meteorites and the solar photosphere exhibit a significant trend with condensation temperature. A trend with condensation temperature is also seen when the solar photospheric abundances are compared to those of nearby solar twins. We use both these trends to determine the alteration of the elemental abundances of the meteorties and the photosphere by fractionation and calculate a new set of primordial Solar System abundances.

  15. Planetary nebulae abundances and stellar evolution II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pottasch, S. R.; Bernard-Salas, J.

    2010-01-01

    Context. In recent years mid-and far infrared spectra of planetary nebulae have been analysed and lead to more accurate abundances. It may be expected that these better abundances lead to a better understanding of the evolution of these objects. Aims. The observed abundances in planetary nebulae are

  16. Trophodynamics and functional feeding groups of North Sea fauna: a combined stable isotope and fatty acid approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kürten, B.; Frutos, I.; Struck, U.; Painting, S.J.; Polunin, N.V.C.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    The trophodynamics of pelagic and benthic animals of the North Sea, North Atlantic shelf, were assessed using stable isotope analysis (SIA) of natural abundance carbon and nitrogen isotopes, lipid fingerprinting and compound-specific SIA (CSIA) of phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFAs). Zooplankto

  17. Trophodynamics and functional feeding groups of North Sea fauna: a combined stable isotope and fatty acid approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kürten, B.; Frutos, I.; Struck, U.; Painting, S.J.; Polunin, N.V.C.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    The trophodynamics of pelagic and benthic animals of the North Sea, North Atlantic shelf, were assessed using stable isotope analysis (SIA) of natural abundance carbon and nitrogen isotopes, lipid fingerprinting and compound-specific SIA (CSIA) of phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFAs). Zooplankto

  18. Application of high-precision isotope ratio monitoring mass spectrometry to identify the biosynthetic origins of proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Apostol, Izydor; Brooks, Paul D.; Mathews, Antony J.

    2001-01-01

    Isotope ratio monitoring (IRM) mass spectrometry was used to measure the relative abundance of stable isotopes in several samples of adult human hemoglobin expressed in E. coli, yeast, and human blood. The results showed significant differences in the distribution of 15N and 13C isotopes among hemoglobin samples produced in these organisms. This indicates that IRM mass spectrometry can be used in forensic protein chemistry to identify the origin of protein expression.

  19. Isotope Production Facility (IPF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced radioactive isotopes for medicine and research since the mid 1970s, when targets were first irradiated using the 800...

  20. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  1. Perchlorate isotope forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, J.K.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Horita, J.; Brown, G.M.; Jackson, W.A.; Batista, J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate has been detected recently in a variety of soils, waters, plants, and food products at levels that may be detrimental to human health. These discoveries have generated considerable interest in perchlorate source identification. In this study, comprehensive stable isotope analyses ( 37Cl/35Cl and 18O/17O/ 16O) of perchlorate from known synthetic and natural sources reveal systematic differences in isotopic characteristics that are related to the formation mechanisms. In addition, isotopic analyses of perchlorate extracted from groundwater and surface water demonstrate the feasibility of identifying perchlorate sources in contaminated environments on the basis of this technique. Both natural and synthetic sources of perchlorate have been identified in water samples from some perchlorate occurrences in the United States by the isotopic method. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  2. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, E.E.

    2004-11-15

    A review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors is presented. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, can be considered the most important one for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples. Manuel Cardona, the longtime editor-in-chief of Solid State Communications has been and continues to be one of the major contributors to this field of solid state physics and it is a great pleasure to dedicate this review to him.

  3. The primordial and evolutionary abundance variations in globular-cluster stars: a problem with two unknowns

    CERN Document Server

    Denissenkov, Pavel; Hartwick, David; Herwig, Falk; Weiss, Achim; Paxton, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Abundances of the proton-capture elements and their isotopes in globular-cluster stars correlate with each other in such a manner as if their variations were produced in high-temperature hydrogen burning at the same time in the past. In addition to these primordial abundance variations, the RGB stars in globular clusters, like their field counterparts, show the evolutionary variations of the C and N abundances and 12C/13C isotopic ratio. The latter are caused by extra mixing operating in the RGB star's radiative zone that separates the H-burning shell from the bottom of its convective envelope. We demonstrate that among the potential sources of the primordial abundance variations in globular-cluster stars proposed so far, such as the hot-bottom burning in massive AGB stars and H burning in the convective cores of supermassive and fast-rotating massive MS stars, only the supermassive MS stars with M > 10,000 Msun can explain all the abundance correlations without any fine-tuning of free parameters. We use our ...

  4. Isotopes in everyday life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopes represent a tool which can do certain jobs better, easier, quicker, more simply and cheaper than competitive methods. Some measurements could not be done at all without the use of isotopes as there are no alternative methods available. A short review of these tools of science in their different fields is given: food and agriculture, human health applications, industry, hydrology, geology, geochemistry, geophysics and dating, environment, basic scientific research

  5. Methods of isotopic geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorokhov, I. M.; Levchenkov, O. A.

    Papers are presented on such topics as the age of the chemical elements; the age of meteorites, the moon, and the earth; isotopic ages of the most ancient terrestrial formations; and the Archean evolution of Enderby Land in the Antarctic as evidenced by isotopic dating. Consideration is also given to a uranium-lead geochronology technique for investigating Precambrian ore deposits, a Pb-Pb technique of zircon dating, and the potentials and limitations of Sm-Nd geochronology.

  6. Isotope toolbox turns 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenander, Fredrik; Riisager, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    REX-ISOLDE, one of CERN’s most compact accelerators, has just celebrated its 10th anniversary. The machine’s versatility provides radioactive ion beams across the range of nuclear isotopes.......REX-ISOLDE, one of CERN’s most compact accelerators, has just celebrated its 10th anniversary. The machine’s versatility provides radioactive ion beams across the range of nuclear isotopes....

  7. Isotopes in environmental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive and stable isotopes have long been considered a very efficient tool for studying physical and biological aspects of how the global ecosystem functions. Their applications in environmental research are numerous, embracing research at all levels. This article looks at only a few of the approaches to environmental problems that involve the use of isotopes. Special attention is given to studies of the Amazon Basin. Environmental isotopes are very efficient tools in water cycle studies. Tritium, a radioactive tracer, is especially useful in studying dynamics of water movement in different compartments of the hydrosphere, both on the local and global scales. Heavy stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen (deuterium and oxygen-18) provide information about steady-state characteristics of the water cycle. Isotope methods, some relatively new, have a major role in site-specific studies. Some indicative examples include: Studying turnover of organic matter. Changes in the carbon-13/carbon-12 isotopic ratio of organic matter were used to determine the respective contributions of organic carbon derived from forest and pasture. Studying biological nitrogen fixation. One of the ways nitrogen levels in soil can be maintained for productivity is by biological nitrogen fixation. Studying nitrogen availability and losses. The experimental use of nitrogen-15 is invaluable for defining losses of soil nitrogen to the atmosphere and to groundwater. Studies can similarly be done with stable and radioactive sulphur isotopes. This article indicates some potential uses of isotopes in environmental research. While the major problem of global climate change has not been specifically addressed here, the clearing of the Amazon forest, one focus of the IAEA's environmental programme, may have serious consequences for the global climate. These include substantial reduction of the amount of latent heat transported to the regions outside the tropics and acceleration of the greenhouse

  8. The Isotopic History of Western North American Grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, B. E.; Koch, P. L.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last 20 years, researchers have detected a rise in carbon isotope values of fossil mammals, paleosol minerals, and organic substrates roughly 6 to 8 Ma, which indicates an increase in the relative abundance of C4 grass at localities around the world. Prior research has shown that this increase in C4 abundance did not occur in cool high latitude regions, nor did it occur at sites around the Mediterranean. Similarly, modern California and Nevada do not support native C4 grasses. These states have a water regime similar to the Mediterranean region, with hot and dry summers, and most precipitation occurring during the cool winter months. Because the amount of C4 grass in North American ecosystems correlates positively with growing season temperature, it is not surprising that these western states, which have a winter growing season, do not support C4 plants. This does not necessarily imply, however, that C4 plants have never been favored in these western states. We used the carbon isotope composition of fossil ungulate tooth enamel as a proxy for C4 plant abundance in California and Nevada from 18 Ma to the present. Our carbon isotope data suggest that whereas there are very few native C4 species living in California or Nevada today, C4 plants may have been present in the region as early as the Late Miocene. Furthermore, there is an indication that C4 plants may have increased in abundance in the region during Pleistocene glacial periods.

  9. Oxygen isotopic ratios toward molecular clouds in the Galactic disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present our observations of the J = 1 − 0 rotation transitions in molecular isotopes C18O and C17O toward a sample of molecular clouds with different galactocentric distances, using the Delingha 13.7m (DLH 13.7 m) telescope, administered by Purple Mountain Observatory, and its 9-beam SIS receiver. Complementary observations toward several sources with large galactocentric distance are obtained with the IRAM 30m and Mopra 22m telescopes. C18O/C17O abundance ratios reflecting the 18O/17O isotope ratios are obtained from integrated intensity ratios of C18O and C17O. We derived the ratio value for 13 sources covering a galactocentric distance range of 3kpc to 16kpc. In combination with our mapping results that provide a ratio value of 3.01±0.14 in the Galactic center region, it shows that the abundance ratio tends to increase with galactocentric distance, i.e., it supports a radial gradient along the Galactic disk for the abundance ratio. This is consistent with the inside-out formation scenario of our Galaxy. However, our results may suffer from small samples with large galactocentric distance. Combining our data with multi-transition lines of C18O and C17O will be helpful for constraining opacities and abundances and further confirming the Galactic radial gradient shown by the isotope ratio 18O/17O. (paper)

  10. The chemical composition of red giants in 47 Tucanae. II. Magnesium isotopes and pollution scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Thygesen, A O; Ludwig, H -G; Ventura, P; Yong, D; Collet, R; Christlieb, N; Melendez, J; Zaggia, S

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of multiple populations in globular clusters is still far from understood, with several proposed mechanisms to explain the observed behaviour. The study of elemental and isotopic abundance patterns are crucial for investigating the differences among candidate pollution mechanisms. We derive magnesium isotopic ratios for 13 stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) to provide new, detailed information about the nucleosynthesis that has occurred within the cluster. For the first time, the impact of 3D model stellar atmospheres on the derived Mg isotopic ratios is investigated. Using both tailored 1D atmospheric models and 3D hydrodynamical models, we derive magnesium isotopic ratios from four features of MgH near 5135{\\AA} in 13 giants near the tip of the RGB, using high signal-to-noise, high-resolution spectra. We derive the magnesium isotopic ratios for all stars and find no significant offset of the isotopic distribution between the pristine and the polluted populations. Furthermore, ...

  11. Rubidium isotopes in primitive chondrites: Constraints on Earth's volatile element depletion and lead isotope evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, O.; Mezger, K.; van Westrenen, W.

    2011-05-01

    The bulk silicate Earth (BSE) shows substantial deficits in volatile elements compared to CI-chondrites and solar abundances. These deficits could be caused by pre-accretionary depletion in the solar nebula during condensation of solids, or by later heat-driven evaporation during collision of small bodies that later accreted to form the Earth. The latter is considered to result in isotope fractionation for elements with low condensation temperatures that correlates with the degree of depletion. Here, we report first high-precision isotope ratio measurements of the moderately volatile and lithophile trace element Rb. Data from seventeen chondrite meteorites show that their Rb isotope abundances are nearly indistinguishable from Earth, not deviating more than 1 per mil in their 87Rb/85Rb. The almost uniform solar system Rb isotope pool suggests incomplete condensation or evaporation in a single stage is unlikely to be the cause of the volatile element deficit of the Earth. As Rb and Pb have similar condensation temperatures, we use their different degrees of depletion in the BSE to address the mechanisms and timing of terrestrial volatile depletion. The Rb isotope data are consistent with a scenario in which the volatile budget of the Earth was generated by a mixture of a highly volatile-element depleted early Proto-Earth with undepleted material in the course of terrestrial accretion. Observed Pb and Rb abundances and U-Pb and Rb-Sr isotope systematics suggest that volatile addition occurred at approximately the same time at which last core-mantle equilibration was achieved. In line with previous suggestions, this last equilibration involved a second stage of Pb (but not Rb) depletion from the BSE. The timing of this second Pb loss event can be constrained to ~ 110 Ma after the start of the solar system. This model supports a scenario with core storage of Pb in the aftermath of a putative Moon forming giant impact that also delivered the bulk of the volatile

  12. Investigating uranium isotopic distributions in environmental samples using AMS and MC-ICPMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major, minor and trace uranium isotopes were measured at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in environmentally acquired samples using different instruments to span large variations in concentrations. Multi-collector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) can be used to measure major and minor isotopes: 238U, 235U, 234U and 236U. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) can be used to measure minor and trace isotopes: 234U, 236U and 233U. The main limit of quantification for minor or trace uranium isotopes is the abundance sensitivity of the measurement technique; i.e. the ability to measure a minor or trace isotope of mass M in the presence of a major isotope at M ± 1 mass units. The abundance sensitivity for 236U/235U isotope ratio measurements using MC-ICPMS is around ∼2 x 10-6. This compares with a 236U/235U abundance sensitivity of ∼1 x 10-7 for the current AMS system, with the expectation of 2-3 orders of magnitude improvement in sensitivity with the addition of another high energy filter. Comparing 236U/234U from MC-ICPMS and AMS produced agreement within ∼10% for samples at 236U levels high enough to be measurable by both techniques

  13. The isotopic distribution conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkenborg, Dirk; Mertens, Inge; Lemière, Filip; Witters, Erwin; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Although access to high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS), especially in the field of biomolecular MS, is becoming readily available due to recent advances in MS technology, the accompanied information on isotopic distribution in high-resolution spectra is not used at its full potential, mainly because of lack of knowledge and/or awareness. In this review, we give an insight into the practical problems related to calculating the isotopic distribution for large biomolecules, and present an overview of methods for the calculation of the isotopic distribution. We discuss the key events that triggered the development of various algorithms and explain the rationale of how and why the various isotopic-distribution calculations were performed. The review is focused around the developmental stages as briefly outlined below, starting with the first observation of an isotopic distribution. The observations of Beynon in the field of organic MS that chlorine appeared in a mass spectrum as two variants with odds 3:1 lie at the basis of the first wave of algorithms for the calculation of the isotopic distribution, based on the atomic composition of a molecule. From here on, we explain why more complex biomolecules such as peptides exhibit a highly complex isotope pattern when assayed by MS, and we discuss how combinatorial difficulties complicate the calculation of the isotopic distribution on computers. For this purpose, we highlight three methods, which were introduced in the 1980s. These are the stepwise procedure introduced by Kubinyi, the polynomial expansion from Brownawell and Fillippo, and the multinomial expansion from Yergey. The next development was instigated by Rockwood, who suggested to decompose the isotopic distribution in terms of their nucleon count instead of the exact mass. In this respect, we could claim that the term "aggregated" isotopic distribution is more appropriate. Due to the simplification of the isotopic distribution to its aggregated counterpart

  14. Surface abundances of ON stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, F.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Palacios, A.; Howarth, I.; Georgy, C.; Walborn, N. R.; Bouret, J.-C.; Barbá, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Massive stars burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle during most of their evolution. When mixing is efficient or when mass transfer in binary systems occurs, chemically processed material is observed at the surface of O and B stars. Aims: ON stars show stronger lines of nitrogen than morphologically normal counterparts. Whether this corresponds to the presence of material processed through the CNO cycle is not known. Our goal is to answer this question. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of ON stars with atmosphere models. We determined the fundamental parameters as well as the He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We also measured the projected rotational velocities. We compared the properties of the ON stars to those of normal O stars. Results: We show that ON stars are usually rich in helium. Their CNO surface abundances are fully consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis. ON stars are more chemically evolved and rotate - on average - faster than normal O stars. Evolutionary models including rotation cannot account for the extreme enrichment observed among ON main sequence stars. Some ON stars are members of binary systems, but others are single stars as indicated by stable radial velocities. Mass transfer is therefore not a simple explanation for the observed chemical properties. Conclusions: We conclude that ON stars show extreme chemical enrichment at their surface, consistent with nucleosynthesis through the CNO cycle. Its origin is not clear at present. Based on observations obtained 1) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope; 2) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii; 3) at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under programs 081.D-2008, 083.D-0589, 086.D-0997; 4) the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La

  15. The nature of Earth's building blocks as revealed by calcium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Maria C.; Moreira, Manuel; Foriel, Julien; Moynier, Frédéric

    2014-05-01

    Calcium is the fifth most abundant element in the Earth and in chondrites and is a pure lithophile element which does not partition into planetary cores. Therefore, the calcium isotopic composition of the mantle represents the bulk Earth and calcium isotopes have the potential to reveal genetic links between Earth and meteorites. However, whether calcium exhibits significant mass-dependent variations among Earth and the various chondrite groups, and the magnitude of these variations, is still contentious. Here we have developed a new method to analyze calcium isotope ratios with high precision using multiple-collector inductively-coupled-plasma mass-spectrometry. The method has been applied to a range of terrestrial and meteoritic samples. We find that the Earth, the Moon, and the aubrite parent body are indistinguishable from enstatite, ordinary, and CO chondritic meteorites. Therefore, enstatite chondrites cannot be excluded as components of Earth's building blocks based on calcium isotopes, as has been proposed previously. In contrast, CI, CV, CM and CR carbonaceous chondrites are largely enriched in lighter calcium isotopes compared to Earth, and, overall, exhibit a wide range in calcium isotopic composition. Calcium is the only major element, along with oxygen, for which isotopic variations are observed among carbonaceous chondrite groups. These calcium isotope variations cannot be attributed to volatility effects, and it is difficult to ascribe them to the abundance of isotopically light refractory inclusions. The calcium isotope data presented in this study suggest that both ordinary and enstatite chondrites are representative of the bulk of the refractory materials that formed Earth. On the basis of calcium isotopes, carbonaceous chondrites (with the exception of CO) are not representative of the fraction of condensable material that accreted to form the terrestrial planets and can be excluded as unique contenders for the building blocks of Earth; however

  16. Overview of Uranium Isotopic Reference Materials at IRMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Munoz, A.; Richter, S.; Eykens, R.; Aregbe, Y.; Kuehn, H.; Verbruggen, A.

    2007-12-01

    For many applications in the geological sciences, in particular in geochemistry research, isotope ratio measurements play a significant role. For instance, in geochronology isotope abundances of uranium and its daughter products thorium and lead have been used since more than five decades to determine the age of various samples of geological interest. However, in order to validate mass spectrometric measurement procedures and to calibrate detector systems, suitable isotope reference materials are needed. IRMM is a well recognized provider for nuclear isotope reference materials to the nuclear industry and nuclear safeguards authorities, which can also be used for geological applications. This paper gives an overview of isotope reference materials for uranium prepared and certified at IRMM. These materials are synthetic isotope reference materials prepared based on proven methods of purifying and mixing highly enriched oxides. Firstly, a set of 10 mixtures of 233U, 235U and 238U was made in which the 235U/238U ratios were kept at 1:1 and the 233U/235U ratios varied from 1.0 to 10-6 (IRMM-072). This set is ideal for checking the linearity response of detectors used in isotope mass spectrometry. Recently, after the IRMM-072 series was exhausted, it has been replaced by the IRMM-073 and IRMM-074 series. Secondly the double spike IRMM-3636 with a 233U/236U ratio of 1:1 was prepared which allows internal mass fractionation correction for high precision 235U/238U ratio measurements. The 234U abundance of this double spike material is low enough to allow an accurate and precise correction of 234U/238U ratios, even for measurements of close to equilibrium uranium samples.

  17. Significant biases affecting abundance determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Roger

    2015-08-01

    I have developed two highly efficient codes to automate analyses of emission line nebulae. The tools place particular emphasis on the propagation of uncertainties. The first tool, ALFA, uses a genetic algorithm to rapidly optimise the parameters of gaussian fits to line profiles. It can fit emission line spectra of arbitrary resolution, wavelength range and depth, with no user input at all. It is well suited to highly multiplexed spectroscopy such as that now being carried out with instruments such as MUSE at the VLT. The second tool, NEAT, carries out a full analysis of emission line fluxes, robustly propagating uncertainties using a Monte Carlo technique.Using these tools, I have found that considerable biases can be introduced into abundance determinations if the uncertainty distribution of emission lines is not well characterised. For weak lines, normally distributed uncertainties are generally assumed, though it is incorrect to do so, and significant biases can result. I discuss observational evidence of these biases. The two new codes contain routines to correctly characterise the probability distributions, giving more reliable results in analyses of emission line nebulae.

  18. Origin of Cosmic Chemical Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Maio, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological N-body hydrodynamic computations following atomic and molecular chemistry (e$^-$, H, H$^+$, H$^-$, He, He$^+$, He$^{++}$, D, D$^+$, H$_2$, H$_2^+$, HD, HeH$^+$), gas cooling, star formation and production of heavy elements (C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Fe, etc.) from stars covering a range of mass and metallicity are used to explore the origin of several chemical abundance patterns and to study both the metal and molecular content during simulated galaxy assembly. The resulting trends show a remarkable similarity to up-to-date observations of the most metal-poor damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorbers at redshift $z\\gtrsim 2$. These exhibit a transient nature and represent collapsing gaseous structures captured while cooling is becoming effective in lowering the temperature below $\\sim 10^4\\,\\rm K$, before they are disrupted by episodes of star formation or tidal effects. Our theoretical results agree with the available data for typical elemental ratios, such as [C/O], [Si/Fe], [O/Fe], [Si/O], [Fe/H], [O/...

  19. Analysis of the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane by gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Alison; Sessions, Alex; Lawson, Michael; Ferreira, A. A.; Neto, E. V. Santos; Eiler, John M.

    2016-09-01

    Site-specific isotope ratio measurements potentially provide valuable information about the formation and degradation of complex molecules-information that is lost in conventional bulk isotopic measurements. Here we discuss the background and possible applications of such measurements, and present a technique for studying the site-specific carbon isotope composition of propane at natural abundance based on mass spectrometric analysis of the intact propane molecule and its fragment ions. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach through measurements of mixtures of natural propane and propane synthesized with site-specific 13C enrichment, and we document the limits of precision of our technique. We show that mass balance calculations of the bulk δ13C of propane based on our site-specific measurements is generally consistent with independent constraints on bulk δ13C. We further demonstrate the accuracy of the technique, and illustrate one of its simpler applications by documenting the site-specific carbon isotope signature associated with gas phase diffusion of propane, confirming that our measurements conform to the predictions of the kinetic theory of gases. This method can be applied to propane samples of moderate size (tens of micromoles) isolated from natural gases. Thus, it provides a means of studying the site-specific stable isotope systematics of propane at natural isotope abundances on sample sizes that are readily recovered from many natural environments. This method may also serve as a model for future techniques that apply high-resolution mass spectrometry to study the site-specific isotopic distributions of larger organic molecules, with potential applications to biosynthesis, forensics and other geochemical subjects.

  20. Biological isotopy. Introduction to the isotopic effects and to their applications in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since their discovery in the beginning of the 20. century, the study of stable isotopes has considerably developed. This domain, which remained limited in its applications until the 1990's, has become particularly important thereafter thanks to its practical applications and in particular to its economical impacts. Many techniques used in fraud control, in drugs use control, in selection of high-yield plants etc are based on isotopic abundance measurements. This reference book gives a synthesis of our actual knowledge on the use of stable isotopes and of isotope fractionation in biology. It presents the basic notions of isotopic biochemistry and explains the origin of the isotopic effects. The application principles of these effects to metabolism, to organisms physiology, to environmental biology etc are explained and detailed using examples and exercises. The first chapters present the basic knowledge which defines, from a mathematical point-of-view, the isotopic effects of chemical reactions or of physical processes taking place in biology. The measurements principle of natural isotopes abundance is then synthesised. Finally, all these notions are applied at different scales: enzymes, physiology, metabolism, environment, ecosystems and fraud crackdown. (J.S.)

  1. Operational models of the cryogenic distillation column for 13C isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: There are many domains of life, techniques, industry, environmental analysis and protection, where the heavier isotopes are useful. The predominant isotope of the carbon is (12C), with the natural abundance of 98.9%, but as tracer in many application is required the 13C isotope, initially with the concentration of 1.1%. For industrial output and higher concentration, the method of the cryogenic distillation is a proper solution. This method is a special application, with particular features in distillation and isotope separation. Unlike the air or natural gas cryogenic distillation, the inflow of the material with natural abundance in a heavy isotope has a minor influence on the concentration evolution, but there are many other significant factors. The evolution of the isotope enrichment in time and space may be known only using mathematical models. Practically, no samples in various points of the distillation plant are possible. With these aspects in mind, the necessity of mathematical models is justified. In order to validate the described mathematical model of the cryogenic distillation column structure, the authors use the data from literature, referring to a similar equipment used for 13C and 18O isotope separation. The simulation strategy is to represent the time-evolution of the 13C isotope ratio in three 'points', namely: the top side of the column (stripping section, 'waste'-zone), the middle of the rectifying zone and the bottom side of the column (z=Zc) and to determine the steady-state values. (author)

  2. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may impact on the growth

  3. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may

  4. Matrix effects in laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, it has been shown that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) can be used for the detection of isotopes of elements via isotopic shifts in diatomic species in a technique known as laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). While LAMIS works quite well for isotopic analysis of pure compounds under optimal conditions, it is desirable for it to be applicable for a variety of compounds and matrices. However, the LIBS plasma emission associated with LAMIS depends on several parameters, including the applied electric field of the laser pulse, the physical properties of the material being investigated, and the presence of additional elements other than the element of interest. In this paper, we address some of the pitfalls arising from these dependencies when using LAMIS for the determination of the relative isotopic abundance of boron-containing materials with varying chemical matrices. - Highlights: • LAMIS usually determines isotopic composition of boron compounds within 3 percent. • LaBO3 and some boron-containing mixtures yield inaccurate LAMIS results. • Higher laser energy reduces variability but does not remedy poor LAMIS outcomes

  5. Stable isotope techniques in plant water sources:a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes widely exist in various kinds of natural water.Plants have to cope with various water sources:rainwater,soil water,groundwater,sea water,and mixtures.These are usually characterized by different isotopic signatures (18O/16O and D/H ratios).Because there are relative abundance variations in water,and plant roots do not discriminate against specific water isotopes during water uptake,hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios of water within plants provide new information on water sources,interactions between plant species and water use patterns under natural conditions.At present,the measurement of δD,δ18O composition of various potential water sources and stem water has become significant means to identify plant water sources.Based on previous studies,this review highlights recent advances such as theory basis,methodology,as well as different spatial and temporal scales,and existed questions and prospects.Stable isotope techniques for estimating plant water sources have provided valuable tools for conducting basic and applied research.Future studies emphasize the modification of preparing methods,isotope technique combined with other measurements,and aerial organs of plant water source should be en-couraged.

  6. Stable isotopes in leaf water of terrestrial plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernusak, Lucas A; Barbour, Margaret M; Arndt, Stefan K; Cheesman, Alexander W; English, Nathan B; Feild, Taylor S; Helliker, Brent R; Holloway-Phillips, Meisha M; Holtum, Joseph A M; Kahmen, Ansgar; McInerney, Francesca A; Munksgaard, Niels C; Simonin, Kevin A; Song, Xin; Stuart-Williams, Hilary; West, Jason B; Farquhar, Graham D

    2016-05-01

    Leaf water contains naturally occurring stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in abundances that vary spatially and temporally. When sufficiently understood, these can be harnessed for a wide range of applications. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of stable isotope enrichment of leaf water, and its relevance for isotopic signals incorporated into plant organic matter and atmospheric gases. Models describing evaporative enrichment of leaf water have become increasingly complex over time, reflecting enhanced spatial and temporal resolution. We recommend that practitioners choose a model with a level of complexity suited to their application, and provide guidance. At the same time, there exists some lingering uncertainty about the biophysical processes relevant to patterns of isotopic enrichment in leaf water. An important goal for future research is to link observed variations in isotopic composition to specific anatomical and physiological features of leaves that reflect differences in hydraulic design. New measurement techniques are developing rapidly, enabling determinations of both transpired and leaf water δ(18) O and δ(2) H to be made more easily and at higher temporal resolution than previously possible. We expect these technological advances to spur new developments in our understanding of patterns of stable isotope fractionation in leaf water.

  7. Matrix effects in laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Staci, E-mail: staci.brown@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Ford, Alan, E-mail: alan.ford@alakaidefense.com [Alakai Defense Systems, 197 Replacement Ave, Suite 102, Fort Leonard Wood, MO 65473 (United States); Akpovo, Charlemagne C., E-mail: charlemagne.akpovo@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Martinez, Jorge, E-mail: jmartinez@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Johnson, Lewis, E-mail: lewis@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) can be used for the detection of isotopes of elements via isotopic shifts in diatomic species in a technique known as laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). While LAMIS works quite well for isotopic analysis of pure compounds under optimal conditions, it is desirable for it to be applicable for a variety of compounds and matrices. However, the LIBS plasma emission associated with LAMIS depends on several parameters, including the applied electric field of the laser pulse, the physical properties of the material being investigated, and the presence of additional elements other than the element of interest. In this paper, we address some of the pitfalls arising from these dependencies when using LAMIS for the determination of the relative isotopic abundance of boron-containing materials with varying chemical matrices. - Highlights: • LAMIS usually determines isotopic composition of boron compounds within 3 percent. • LaBO{sub 3} and some boron-containing mixtures yield inaccurate LAMIS results. • Higher laser energy reduces variability but does not remedy poor LAMIS outcomes.

  8. Aberrant water homeostasis detected by stable isotope analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon P O'Grady

    Full Text Available While isotopes are frequently used as tracers in investigations of disease physiology (i.e., 14C labeled glucose, few studies have examined the impact that disease, and disease-related alterations in metabolism, may have on stable isotope ratios at natural abundance levels. The isotopic composition of body water is heavily influenced by water metabolism and dietary patterns and may provide a platform for disease detection. By utilizing a model of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes as an index case of aberrant water homeostasis, we demonstrate that untreated diabetes mellitus results in distinct combinations, or signatures, of the hydrogen (delta2H and oxygen (delta18O isotope ratios in body water. Additionally, we show that the delta2H and delta18O values of body water are correlated with increased water flux, suggesting altered blood osmolality, due to hyperglycemia, as the mechanism behind this correlation. Further, we present a mathematical model describing the impact of water flux on the isotopic composition of body water and compare model predicted values with actual values. These data highlight the importance of factors such as water flux and energy expenditure on predictive models of body water and additionally provide a framework for using naturally occurring stable isotope ratios to monitor diseases that impact water homeostasis.

  9. Separation of uranium isotopes by gas centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium isotope enrichment is studied by means of the countercurrent gas centrifuge driven by thermal convection. A description is given of (a) the transfer and purification of the uranium hexafluoride used as process gas in the present investigation; (b) the countercurrent centrifuge ZG3; (c) the system designed for the introduction and extraction of the process gas from the centrifuge; (d) the measurement of the process gas flow rate through the centrifuge; (e) the determination of the uranium isotopic abundance by mass spectrometry; (f) the operation and mechanical behavior of the centrifuge and (g) the isotope separation experiments, performed, respectively, at total reflux and with production of enriched material. The results from the separation experiments at total reflux are discussed in terms of the enrichment factor variation with the magnitude and flow profile of the countercurrent given by the temperature difference between the rotor covers. As far as the separation experiments with production are concerned, the discussion of their results is presented through the variation of the enrichment factor as a function of the flow rate, the observed asymmetry of the process and the calculated separative power of the centrifuge. (Author)

  10. Isotopes Tell Sun's Origin and Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, O.; Kamat, Sumeet A.; Mozina, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Modern versions of Aston's mass spectrometer enable measurements of two quantities - isotope abundances and masses - that tell the Sun's origin and operation. Isotope analyses of meteorites, the Earth, Moon, Mars, Jupiter, the solar wind, and solar flares over the past 45 years indicate that fresh, poorly-mixed, supernova debris formed the solar system. The iron-rich Sun formed on the collapsed supernova core and now itself acts as a magnetic plasma diffuser, as did the precursor star, separating ions by mass. This process covers the solar surface with lightweight elements and with the lighter isotopes of each element. Running difference imaging provides supporting evidence of a rigid, iron-rich structure below the Sun's fluid outer layer of lightweight elements. Mass measurements of all 2,850 known nuclides expose repulsive interactions between neutrons that trigger neutron-emission at the solar core, followed by neutron-decay and a series of reactions that collectively generate solar luminosity, solar neutrinos, the carrier gas for solar mass separation, and an outpouring of solar-wind hydrogen from the solar surface. Neutron-emission and neutron-decay generate ~ 65% of solar luminosity; H-fusion ~ 35%, and ~ 1% of the neutron-decay product survives to depart as solar-wind hydrogen. The energy source for the Sun and other ordinary stars seems to be neutron-emission and neutron-decay, with partial fusion of the decay product, rather than simple fusion of hydrogen into helium or heavier elements.

  11. THE NITROGEN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF METEORITIC HCN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzarello, Sandra, E-mail: pizzar@asu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85018-1604 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    HCN is ubiquitous in extraterrestrial environments and is central to current theories on the origin of early solar system organic compounds such as amino acids. These compounds, observed in carbonaceous meteorites, were likely important in the origin and/or evolution of early life. As part of our attempts to understand the origin(s) of meteoritic CN{sup –}, we have analyzed the {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N isotopic composition of HCN gas released from water extracts of the Murchison meteorite and found its value to be near those of the terrestrial atmosphere. The findings, when evaluated viz-a-viz molecular abundances and isotopic data of meteoritic organic compounds, suggest that HCN formation could have occurred during the protracted water alteration processes known to have affected the mineralogy of many asteroidal bodies during their solar residence. This was an active synthetic stage, which likely involved simple gasses, organic molecules, their presolar precursors, as well as mineral catalysts and would have lead to the formation of molecules of differing isotopic composition, including some with solar values.

  12. Transportation of medical isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document

  13. Separation of sulfur isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Robert; Jepson, Bernhart E.; Schwind, Roger A.

    1976-06-22

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

  14. Stellar abundances of beryllium and CUBES

    CERN Document Server

    Smiljanic, R

    2014-01-01

    Stellar abundances of beryllium are useful in different areas of astrophysics, including studies of the Galactic chemical evolution, of stellar evolution, and of the formation of globular clusters. Determining Be abundances in stars is, however, a challenging endeavor. The two Be II resonance lines useful for abundance analyses are in the near UV, a region strongly affected by atmospheric extinction. CUBES is a new spectrograph planned for the VLT that will be more sensitive than current instruments in the near UV spectral region. It will allow the observation of fainter stars, expanding the number of targets where Be abundances can be determined. Here, a brief review of stellar abundances of Be is presented together with a discussion of science cases for CUBES. In particular, preliminary simulations of CUBES spectra are presented, highlighting its possible impact in investigations of Be abundances of extremely metal-poor stars and of stars in globular clusters.

  15. Evidence from carbon isotope measurements for diverse origins of sedimentary hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, K. H.; Hayes, J. M.; Trendel, J. M.; Albrecht, P.

    1990-01-01

    The organic matter found in sedimentary rocks must derive from many sources; not only from ancient primary producers but also from consumers and secondary producers. In all of these organisms, isotope effects can affect the abundance and distribution of 13C in metabolites. Here, by using an improved form of a previously described technique in which the effluent of a gas chromatograph is continuously analysed isotopically, we report evidence of the diverse origins of sedimentary organic matter. The record of 13C abundances in sedimentary carbonate and total organic carbon can be interpreted in terms of variations in the global carbon cycle. Our results demonstrate, however, that isotope variations within sedimentary organic mixtures substantially exceed those observed between samples of total organic carbon. Resolution of isotope variations at the molecular level offers a new and convenient means of refining views both of localized palaeoenvironments and of control mechanisms within the global carbon cycle.

  16. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Knouft, Jason H; Anthony, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide va...

  17. Monitoring Butterfly Abundance: Beyond Pollard Walks

    OpenAIRE

    Pellet, Jérôme; Bried, Jason T.; Parietti, David; Gander, Antoine; Heer, Patrick O.; Cherix, Daniel; Arlettaz, Raphaël

    2012-01-01

    Most butterfly monitoring protocols rely on counts along transects (Pollard walks) to generate species abundance indices and track population trends. It is still too often ignored that a population count results from two processes: the biological process (true abundance) and the statistical process (our ability to properly quantify abundance). Because individual detectability tends to vary in space (e.g., among sites) and time (e.g., among years), it remains unclear whether index counts truly...

  18. La138/139 Isotopic Data and Neutron Fluences for Oklo RZ10 Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, C R; 10.1103/PhysRevC.86.027601

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen a renewed interest in the Oklo phenomenon, particularly in relation to the study of time variation of the fine structure constant. The neutron fluence is one of the crucial parameters for Oklo reactors. Several approaches to its determination were elaborated in the past. We consider whether it possible to use the present isotopic La138/139 data for RZ10 as an additional indicator of neutron fluences in the active cores of the reactors. We calculate the dependence of the Oklo La138 abundance on neutron fluence and elemental lanthanum concentration. The neutron fluence in RZ10 can be deduced from lanthanum isotopic data, but requires reliable data on the primordial elemental abundance. Conversely, if the fluence is known, the isotope ratio provides information on the primordial lanthanum abundance that is not otherwise easily determined.

  19. La-138/139 isotopic data and neutron fluences for Oklo RZ10 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, C. R.; Sharapov, E. I.

    2012-08-01

    Background: Recent years have seen a renewed interest in the Oklo phenomenon, particularly in relation to the study of time variation of the fine structure constant α. The neutron fluence is one of the crucial parameters for Oklo reactors. Several approaches to its determination were elaborated in the past.Purpose: We consider whether it is possible to use the present isotopic 138La-139La data for RZ10 as an additional indicator of neutron fluences in the active cores of the reactors.Results: We calculate the dependence of the Oklo 138La abundance on neutron fluence and elemental lanthanum concentration.Conclusion: The neutron fluence in RZ10 can be deduced from lanthanum isotopic data, but requires reliable data on the primordial elemental abundance. Conversely, if the fluence is known, the isotope ratio provides information on the primordial lanthanum abundance that is not otherwise easily determined.

  20. Stable isotopes. Applications and production; Les isotopes stables. Applications - production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, S.; Louvet, P.; Soulie, E. [eds.

    1994-12-31

    This conference presents 46 communications concerning stable isotope production, utilization and application, grouped in 6 sessions and posters. The various themes are: biological applications (pharmacology, medical diagnosis, metabolism and protein studies, toxicity and response studies, labelled compounds), analysis procedures (NMR analysis for macromolecules, tracer studies), nuclear applications (utilization of stable isotopes in nuclear reactors), biological, physical and chemical applications (mass transfer, mobility, crystallography, isotopic exchange), stable isotope production (ion chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, cryogenic distillation).

  1. Lithium isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published methods for 6Li-7Li lithium isotope separation have been reviewed. Future demand for 6Li, whose main use will be as a tritium breeder in blankets surrounding the core of DT fusion power reactors, is likely to exceed 5 Mg/a in the next century. The applicability of the various available methods to such a large scale production rate has been assessed. Research on improving the effectiveness of current lithium isotope separation processes has been carried out worldwide in several major areas during the past decade; these include two-phase chemical exchange systems, ion exchange resin chromatography, highly isotope-selective techniques like laser photoactivation and radiofrequency spectroscopy. Chemical exchange systems appear to offer good potential in the near term for 6Li enrichment

  2. Distribution and carbon isotope patterns of diterpenoids and triterpenoids in modern temperate C3 trees and their geochemical significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefendorf, Aaron F.; Freeman, Katherine H.; Wing, Scott L.

    2012-05-01

    Tricyclic diterpenoids and pentacyclic triterpenoids are nearly exclusively produced by gymnosperms and angiosperms, respectively. Even though both classes of terpenoids have long been recognized as plant biomarkers, their potential use as phylogenetically specific δ13C proxies remains largely unexplored. Little is known of how terpenoid abundance and carbon isotope composition vary either with plant phylogenetic position, functional group, or during synthesis. Here, we report terpenoid abundances and isotopic data for 44 tree species in 21 families, representing both angiosperms and gymnosperms, and both deciduous and evergreen leaf habits. Di- and triterpenoid abundances are significantly higher in evergreens compared to deciduous species, reflecting differences in growth strategies and increased chemical investment in longer-lived leaves. Carbon isotope abundances of terpenoid lipids are similar to leaf tissues, indicating biosynthetic isotope effects are small for both the MVA (-0.4‰) and MEP (-0.6‰) pathways. Leaf and molecular isotopic patterns for modern plants are consistent with observations of amber, resins and plant biomarkers in ancient sediments. The δ13C values of ancient diterpenoids are higher than triterpenoids by 2-5‰, consistent with observed isotopic differences between gymnosperms and angiosperms leaves, and support the relatively small lipid biosynthetic effects reported here. All other factors being equal, evergreen plants will dominate the abundance of terpenoids contributed to soils, sediments and ancient archives, with similar inputs estimated for angiosperm and gymnosperm trees when scaled by litter flux.

  3. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firn, Jennifer; Moore, Joslin L.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Harpole, W. Stanley; Cleland, Elsa E.; Brown, Cynthia S.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Pyke, David A.; Farrell, Kelly A.; Bakker, John D.; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Adler, Peter B.; Collins, Scott L.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Hautier, Yann; Morgan, John W.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Kay, Adam; McCulley, Rebecca; Davies, Kendi F.; Stevens, Carly J.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Holl, Karen D.; Klein, Julia A.; Fay, Phillip A.; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Buckley, Yvonne M.

    2011-01-01

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites - grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of introduced species are assembling similarly on different continents. Overall, we found that substantial changes to populations are not necessarily a pre-condition for invasion success and that increases in species abundance are unusual. Instead, abundance at home predicts abundance away, a potentially useful additional criterion for biosecurity programmes.

  4. The Application of Methane Clumped Isotope Measurements to Determine the Source of Large Methane Seeps in Alaskan Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P. M.; Stolper, D. A.; Eiler, J. M.; Sessions, A. L.; Walter Anthony, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Natural methane emissions from the Arctic present an important potential feedback to global warming. Arctic methane emissions may come from either active microbial sources or from deep fossil reservoirs released by the thawing of permafrost and melting of glaciers. It is often difficult to distinguish between and quantify contributions from these methane sources based on stable isotope data. Analyses of methane clumped isotopes (isotopologues with two or more rare isotopes such as 13CH3D) can complement traditional stable isotope-based classifications of methane sources. This is because clumped isotope abundances (for isotopically equilibrated systems) are a function of temperature and can be used to identify pathways of methane generation. Additionally, distinctive effects of mixing on clumped isotope abundances make this analysis valuable for determining the origins of mixed gasses. We find large variability in clumped isotope compositions of methane from seeps in several lakes, including thermokarst lakes, across Alaska. At Lake Sukok in northern Alaska we observe the emission of dominantly thermogenic methane, with a formation temperature of at least 100° C. At several other lakes we find evidence for mixing between thermogenic methane and biogenic methane that forms in low-temperature isotopic equilibrium. For example, at Eyak Lake in southeastern Alaska, analysis of three methane samples results in a distinctive isotopic mixing line between a high-temperature end-member that formed between 100-170° C, and a biogenic end-member that formed in isotopic equilibrium between 0-20° C. In this respect, biogenic methane in these lakes resembles observations from marine gas seeps, oil degradation, and sub-surface aquifers. Interestingly, at Goldstream Lake in interior Alaska, methane with strongly depleted clumped-isotope abundances, indicative of disequilibrium gas formation, is found, similar to observations from methanogen culture experiments.

  5. Climate and isotopic tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applications of natural radioactivity and isotopic measurements in the sciences concerning Earth and its atmosphere, are numerous: carbon 14 dating with the Tandetron apparatus at the Cea, measurement of oxygen 18 in coral or sediment limestone for the determination of ocean temperature and salinity, carbon 14 dating of corals for the determination of sea level variations, deuterium content in polar ice-cap leads to temperature variations determination; isotopic measurements also enable the determination of present climate features such as global warming, oceanic general circulation

  6. Zinc isotope anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Zn isotope composition in refractory-element-rich inclusions of the Allende meteorite are determined. Typical inclusions contain normal Zn. A unique inclusion of the Allende meteorite shows an excess for Zn-66 of 16.7 + or - 3.7 eu (1 eu = 0.01 percent) and a deficit for Zn-70 of 21 + or - 13 eu. These results indicate the preservation of exotic components even for volatile elements in this inclusion. The observed excess Zn-66 correlates with excesses for the neutron-rich isotopes of Ca-48, Ti-50, Cr-54, and Fe-58 in the same inclusion. 32 refs

  7. Isotopes in condensed matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plekhanov, Vladimir G. [Computer Science College, Tallinn (Estonia). Mathematics and Physics Dept.

    2013-07-01

    This book provides a concise introduction to the newly created sub-discipline of solid state physics isotopetronics. The role of isotopes in materials and their properties are describe in this book. The problem of the enigma of the atomic mass in microphysics is briefly discussed. The range of the applications of isotopes is wide: from biochemical process in living organisms to modern technical applications in quantum information. Isotopetronics promises to improve nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices. With numerous illustrations this book is useful to researchers, engineers and graduate students.

  8. Isotopes in Condensed Matter

    CERN Document Server

    G Plekhanov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a concise introduction to the newly created sub-discipline of solid state physics isotopetronics. The role of isotopes in materials and their properties are describe  in this book. The problem of the enigma of the atomic mass in microphysics is briefly discussed.  The range of the applications of isotopes is wide: from biochemical process in living organisms to modern technical applications in quantum information. Isotopetronics promises to improve nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices. With numerous illustrations this book is useful to researchers, engineers and graduate students.

  9. Environmental isotope survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work was initiated on the 1st of September 1971 with the objective of finding out how best to use environmental isotopes in the interpretation of the hydrology, particularly subsurface hydrology, of Cyprus through a sparse reconnaissance sampling of all the major aquifers and springs covering the whole island. The distribution of sampling was such that the survey in itself could assist in clarifying particular hydrogeologic problems, provide a better understanding of the water systems of the island, establish a general environmental isotope - framework of the hydrologic regimen of Cyprus as well as to provide the basis for specific, more detailed, studies to be undertaken subsequently

  10. Perchlorate in the Great Lakes: isotopic composition and origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, Armen; Sturchio, Neil C; Morrison, Candice G; Beloso, Abelardo D; Guan, Yunbin; Eiler, John M; Jackson, W Andrew; Hatzinger, Paul B

    2014-10-01

    Perchlorate is a persistent and mobile contaminant in the environment with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Stable isotope ratios of oxygen (δ(18)O, Δ(17)O) and chlorine (δ(37)Cl) along with the abundance of the radioactive isotope (36)Cl were used to trace perchlorate sources and behavior in the Laurentian Great Lakes. These lakes were selected for study as a likely repository of recent atmospheric perchlorate deposition. Perchlorate concentrations in the Great Lakes range from 0.05 to 0.13 μg per liter. δ(37)Cl values of perchlorate from the Great Lakes range from +3.0‰ (Lake Ontario) to +4.0‰ (Lake Superior), whereas δ(18)O values range from -4.1‰ (Lake Superior) to +4.0‰ (Lake Erie). Great Lakes perchlorate has mass-independent oxygen isotopic variations with positive Δ(17)O values (+1.6‰ to +2.7‰) divided into two distinct groups: Lake Superior (+2.7‰) and the other four lakes (∼+1.7‰). The stable isotopic results indicate that perchlorate in the Great Lakes is dominantly of natural origin, having isotopic composition resembling that measured for indigenous perchlorate from preindustrial groundwaters of the western USA. The (36)Cl/Cl ratio of perchlorate varies widely from 7.4 × 10(-12) (Lake Ontario) to 6.7 × 10(-11) (Lake Superior). These (36)ClO4(-) abundances are consistent with an atmospheric origin of perchlorate in the Great Lakes. The relatively high (36)ClO4(-) abundances in the larger lakes (Lakes Superior and Michigan) could be explained by the presence of (36)Cl-enriched perchlorate deposited during the period of elevated atmospheric (36)Cl activity following thermonuclear bomb tests in the Pacific Ocean. PMID:25171443

  11. Water enriched in the rare stable isotopes: Preparation, measurement and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Faghihi, Vahideh

    2016-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is water with increased abundances of the rare stable isotopes 2H and 18O (and to some extent also 17O). Such artificially enriched (or "labelled") waters are often used in biomedicine, for establishing the total amount of body water (and thus body composition) of humans and animals and also for measuring their energy expenditure. These non-evasive totally harmless techniques offer great advantages, however they require accurate and precise "isotope ratio" measureme...

  12. Molecular Paleohydrology: Interpreting the Hydrogen- Isotopic Composition of Lipid Biomarkers from Photosynthesizing Organisms

    OpenAIRE

    D. Sachse; Billault, I.; G. J. Bowen; CHIKARAISHI, Y.; Dawson, T E; Feakins, S.J.; Freeman, Katherine; Magill, C.R.; McInerney, F.A.; Meer, M.T.J. van der; Polissar, P.; Robins, R.J.; Sachs, J.P.; Schmidt, H.L.; Sessions, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen-isotopic abundances of lipid biomarkers are emerging as important proxies in the study of ancient environments and ecosystems. A decade ago, pioneering studies made use of new analytical methods and demonstrated that the hydrogen-isotopic composition of individual lipids from aquatic and terrestrial organisms can be related to the composition of their growth (i.e., environmental) water. Subsequently, compound-specific deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios of sedimentary biomarkers have bee...

  13. Si isotopes in tropical rivers as a proxy of the continental silicon cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Harold

    2011-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is one of the most abundant elements in the dissolved phase in rivers and is a key nu-trient in riverine and marine ecosystems. The continental cycle of Si is complex and involves interactions with many secondary reservoirs such as clay minerals and biogenic silica (BSi), making the Si fluxes hard to constrain. Stable isotopes provide a way to trace and describe element cycling. The natural isotopic fractionations that accompany the transfer of the element from one reservoir to a...

  14. Temporal evolution of 36Cl abundances in the Great Lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observed 36Cl isotopic abundance in Great Lakes water decreases from west to east, with the highest 36Cl/Cl ratio of 1332 × 10−15 in Lake Superior and the lowest 36Cl/Cl ratio of 151 × 10−15 in Lake Erie, whereas the 36Cl concentration (36Cl atoms/L) is lowest in Lake Superior and higher in the other Great Lakes. The 36Cl concentration in Lake Superior is much higher than expected from normal atmospheric deposition over the basin, consistent with deposition of nuclear bomb-produced 36Cl during 1952–1964. A conservative mass-balance model constrained by hydrological parameters and available 36Cl fluence measurements predicts the 36Cl abundances in the Great Lakes from 1945 to 2015, in excellent agreement with available data for Lakes Superior, Michigan, and Huron, but the model underestimates 36Cl abundances for Lakes Erie and Ontario. However, assuming that 36Cl demonstrates non-conservative behavior and is significantly retained in the drainage basins, a model incorporating a delayed input parameter successfully predicts observed 36Cl concentrations in all of the Great Lakes. - Highlights: • 36Cl/Cl ratios are the highest in Lake Superior and the lowest in Lake Erie. • 36Cl concentrations in the Great Lakes are much higher than expected natural values. • Conservative 36Cl model underestimates observed values in Lakes Erie and Ontario. • Large fraction of 36Cl atoms deposited on the watersheds are retained for decades

  15. Interlaboratory comparison for boron isotope ratio measurement with inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron isotope ratios were analyzed in seven domestic analytical labs for boric acid solutions with various compositions of boron isotope abundances, using an Inductively Coupled Plasma-Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (ICP-QMS). Five sample solutions with different isotope abundances of 10B were prepared in the range of 10 to 20 % by mixing two boric acid solutions containing natural B and enriched 11B, respectively. Then, the 10B isotope abundances of each sample were certified by analyzing with thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TI-MS) according to ASTM-C791-04. Results obtained from each lab have indicated good coincidences with TI-MS results. Also, the relative standard deviations of results with ICP-QMS of seven analytical labs were 0.11 to 0.81 %. The measurement precision for ICP-QMS would be sufficient in terms of practical use, while taking into consideration a valid requirement required for verifying a depletion of the 10B isotope abundance in the PWR coolant, while this is greater than a nominal analytical error (relative value : 0.22 %) for TI-MS shown in ASTM-C791-04. (author)

  16. Bimodal abundances in the energetic particles of solar and interplanetary origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1988-01-01

    This letter reports the first results from an examination of the daily-averaged abundances of the elements from H through Fe as well as electrons and isotopes of He in energetic particles observed in interplanetary space by the ISEE 3 spacecraft over an 8.5 yr period. The abundances of heavy elements such as Fe/O show, for the first time, clear evidence of the presence of two distinct populations of particles. Earlier observations could be interpreted as extreme variations within a single population. The population with enhanced Fe/O shows correlated enhancements in He-3/He-4, p/e, and He/H. This population is consistent with material that has been processed to high temperatures in the impulsively heated regions of solar flares. The second population, with more normal abundances, is probably accelerated from ambient material by coronal and interplanetary shocks.

  17. Non-explosive hydrogen and helium burnings: abundance predictions from the NACRE reaction rate compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, M.; Goriely, S.; Jorissen, A.

    1999-07-01

    The abundances of the isotopes of the elements from C to Al produced by the non-explosive CNO, NeNa and MgAl modes of hydrogen burning, as well as by helium burning, are calculated with the thermonuclear rates recommended by the European compilation of reaction rates for astrophysics (NACRE). The impact of nuclear physics uncertainties on the derived abundances is discussed in the framework of a simple parametric astrophysical model. These calculations have the virtue of being a guide in the selection of the nuclear uncertainties that have to be duly analyzed in detailed model stars, particularly in order to perform meaningful confrontations between abundance observations and predictions. They are also hoped to help nuclear astrophysicists pinpointing the rate uncertainties that have to be reduced most urgently. An electronic version of this paper, with colour figures, is available at {\\it http://astro.ulb.ac.be}

  18. Discoveries of isotopes by fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Thoennessen

    2015-09-01

    Of the about 3000 isotopes presently known, about 20% have been discovered in fission. The history of fission as it relates to the discovery of isotopes as well as the various reaction mechanisms leading to isotope discoveries involving fission are presented.

  19. Evidence for Magnesium Isotope Heterogeneity in the Solar Protoplanetary Disk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kirsten Kolbjørn; Trinquier, Anne; Paton, Chad;

    2011-01-01

    assumption that the canonical 26Al/27Al ratio of ~5 × 10-5 recorded by the oldest dated solids, calcium–aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), represents the initial abundance of 26 Al for the solar system as a whole. Here, we report high-precision Mg-isotope measurements of inner solar system solids, asteroids...... at the time of CAI formation and/or Mg-isotope heterogeneity. By comparing the U–Pb and 26Al–26Mg ages of pristine solar system materials, we infer that the bulk of theµ26Mg* variability reflects heterogeneity in the initial abundance of 26Al across the solar protoplanetary disk. We conclude...... that the canonical value of ~5 × 10-5 represents the average initial abundance of 26Al only in the CAI-forming region, and that large-scale heterogeneity—perhaps up to 80% of the canonical value—may have existed throughout the inner solar system. If correct, our interpretation of the Mg-isotope composition of inner...

  20. The isotopic composition of solar flare noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    The relative elemental and isotopic abundances of noble gases provide insights into a number of topics related to the solar system. Neon is in many ways the most diagnostic of the noble gases. The diagnostic character is mainly related to the variation in the relative abundance of the two most abundant neon isotopes, Ne-20 and Ne-22. The available evidence suggests that trapped neon found in meteorites and in lunar samples consists of as many as five isotopically distinct components, including neon A, B, C, D, and E. Neon B has been shown to be due to solar wind neon which has been directly implanted into the material found in a meteorite. It appears that neon E is extrasolar in origin. There exist ambiguities regarding the origins of the remaining three components. The present investigation is concerned with a reexamination of the existing data in an effort to eliminate or at least clarify these ambiguities. It is found that neon C is apparently due to directly implanted, low-energy solar flare neon nuclei.

  1. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knouft, Jason H; Anthony, Melissa M

    2016-06-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa. PMID:27429769

  2. Taking species abundance distributions beyond individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morlon, Helene; White, Ethan P.; Etienne, Rampal S.; Green, Jessica L.; Ostling, Annette; Alonso, David; Enquist, Brian J.; He, Fangliang; Hurlbert, Allen; Magurran, Anne E.; Maurer, Brian A.; McGill, Brian J.; Olff, Han; Storch, David; Zillio, Tommaso; Chave, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    The species abundance distribution (SAD) is one of the few universal patterns in ecology. Research on this fundamental distribution has primarily focused on the study of numerical counts, irrespective of the traits of individuals. Here we show that considering a set of Generalized Species Abundance

  3. GEOCHRONOMETRY ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>20040631 Chen Jiangfeng (School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui) ; Xie Zhi Relationships Between Rb-Sr, Ar - Ar Geochronometers and Oxygen Isotopic Equilibrium of Intrusions from Eastern Anhui Province, China (Geological Journal of China Universities, ISSN 1006 - 7493, CN 32 -

  4. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20070454 Bao Zengkuan (Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049, China); Yuan Wanming Apatite (U-Th)/He Dating and Its Application (Acta Petrologica et Mineralogica, ISSN1000-6524, CN11-1966/P, 24(2), 2005, p.126-132, 2 illus., 25 refs.) Key words: isotopic geochronology

  5. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20090432 Zhou Shuqing (School of Energy Resources, China University of Geosciences Beijing 100083, China); Huang Haiping Stable Isotopic Records vs. Important Events in Life Evolution and the Concurrent Environment (Geological Review, ISSN0371-5736, CN11-1952, 54(2), 2008, p.225-231, 3 illus., 1 table, 77 refs.)

  6. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20141014Wang Hairan(State Key Laboratory of Continental Dynamics,Department of Geology,Northwest University,Xi’an710069,China);Zhao Hongge Theory and Application of Zircon U-Pb Isotope Dating Technique(Geology and Resources,ISSN1671-1947,CN21-1458/P,22(3),2013,p.229

  7. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20072750 Huang Sijing(State Key Laboratory of Oil/Gas Reservoir Geology and Exploitation,Chengdu University of Technology,Chengdu 610059,China);Pei Changrong Age Calibration for the Boundary between Lower and Middle Triassic by Strontium Isotope Stratigraphy in Eastern Sichuan Province

  8. Isotope hydrology experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the concentrations of H2 and O18 in the examined ground waters in the Lower Muschelkalk of the SW flank of the Asse mine it can be inferred that the flow field of the ground water with the isotopic composition of the recent precipitations has an effect down to a depth of only 611 to 744 m. (DG)

  9. Isotope hydrograph separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, P. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum, Centre of Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Leipzig (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    Storm-runoff thus reflects the complex hydraulic behaviour of drainage basins and water-links of such systems. Water of different origin may participate in the events and in this lecture, the application of isotope techniques to separate storm hydrographs into different components will be presented.

  10. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  11. Liquid and gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry for the determination of 13C-valine isotopic ratios in complex biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Jean-Philippe; Breuillé, Denis; Obled, Christiane; Papet, Isabelle; Schierbeek, Henk; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Fay, Laurent-Bernard

    2008-10-01

    On-line gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is commonly used to measure isotopic ratios at natural abundance as well as for tracer studies in nutritional and medical research. However, high-precision (13)C isotopic enrichment can also be measured by liquid chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS). Indeed, LC-IRMS can be used, as shown by the new method reported here, to obtain a baseline separation and to measure (13)C isotopic enrichment of underivatised amino acids (Asp, Thr-Ser, Glu, Pro, Gly, Ala, Cys and Val). In case of Val, at natural abundance, the SD(delta(13)C) reported with this method was found to be below 1 per thousand . Another key feature of the new LC-IRMS method reported in this paper is the comparison of the LC-IRMS approach with the conventional GC-C-IRMS determination. To perform this comparative study, isotopic enrichments were measured from underivatised Val and its N(O, S)-ethoxycarbonyl ethyl ester derivative. Between 0.0 and 1.0 molar percent excess (MPE) (delta(13)C= -12.3 to 150.8 per thousand), the calculated root-mean-square (rms) of SD was 0.38 and 0.46 per thousand and the calculated rms of accuracy was 0.023 and 0.005 MPE, respectively, for GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS. Both systems measured accurately low isotopic enrichments (0.002 atom percent excess (APE)) with an SD (APE) of 0.0004. To correlate the relative (delta(13)C) and absolute (atom%, APE and MPE) isotopic enrichment of Val measured by the GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS devices, mathematical equations showing the slope and intercept of the curves were established and validated with experimental data between 0.0 to 2.3 MPE. Finally, both GC-C-IRMS and LC-IRMS instruments were also used to assess isotopic enrichment of protein-bound (13)C-Val in tibial epiphysis in a tracer study performed in rats. Isotopic enrichments measured by LC-IRMS and GC-C-IRMS were not statistically different (p>0.05). The results of this work indicate that

  12. Solar Energetic Particles: Sampling Coronal Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1998-05-01

    In the large solar energetic particle (SEP) events, coronal mass ejections (CMEs) drive shock waves out through the corona that accelerate elements of the ambient material to MeV energies in a fairly democratic, temperature-independent manner. These events provide the most complete source of information on element abundances in the corona. Relative abundances of 22 elements from H through Zn display the well-known dependence on the first ionization potential (FIP) that distinguishes coronal and photospheric material. For most elements, the main abundance variations depend upon the gyrofrequency, and hence on the charge-to-mass ratio, Q/A, of the ion. Abundance variations in the dominant species, H and He, are not Q/A dependent, presumably because of non-linear wave-particle interactions of H and He during acceleration. Impulsive flares provide a different sample of material that confirms the Ne:Mg:Si and He/C abundances in the corona.

  13. Extreme lithium isotopic fractionation in three zircon standards (Plešovice, Qinghu and Temora)

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Ya Gao; Xian-Hua Li; Griffin, William L.; Yan-Jie Tang; Norman J. Pearson; Yu Liu; Mei-Fei Chu; Qiu-Li Li; Guo-Qiang Tang; O’Reilly, Suzanne Y.

    2015-01-01

    To understand the behavior of Li in zircon, we have analyzed the abundance and isotopic composition of Li in three zircon standards (Plešovice, Qinghu and Temora) widely used for microbeam analysis of U-Pb ages and O-Hf isotopes. We have mapped Li concentration ([Li]) on large grains, using a Cameca 1280HR Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS). All zircons have a rim 5–20 μm wide in which [Li] is 5 to 20 times higher than in the core. Up to ~20‰ isotopic fractionation is observed on a small ...

  14. Is my C isotope excursion global, local, or both? Insights from the Mg and Ca isotopic composition of primary, diagenetic, and authigenic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, J. A.; Blättler, C. L.; Husson, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The C isotopic composition of ancient limestones and dolomites is a widely used proxy for the global geochemical cycles of carbon and oxygen in the ocean-atmosphere system and a critical tool for chemostratigraphy in Precambrian rocks. Although relatively robust to diagenesis, the C isotopic composition of bulk carbonates can be reset when conditions favor high water-to-rock ratios or fluids with high C concentrations and distinct isotopic compositions. Authigenic carbonates and different pools of primary carbonate (e.g. calcite vs. aragonite) may also bias the C isotopic composition of bulk carbonates if they are both abundant and isotopically distinct. New approaches to quantifying contributions from diagenesis, authigenesis, and mixing of primary carbonates to the C isotopic composition of bulk sedimentary carbonates are needed. Here we present preliminary Mg and Ca isotope data sets of primary, diagenetic, and authigenic carbonates, both modern and ancient. We show that recrystallization, dolomitization, and authigenesis produce Mg and Ca isotope fingerprints that may be used to identify and characterize these processes in ancient carbonate sediments.

  15. Assessment of international reference materials for isotope-ratio analysis (IUPAC Technical Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.; Vogl, Jochen; Rosner, Martin; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Since the early 1950s, the number of international measurement standards for anchoring stable isotope delta scales has mushroomed from 3 to more than 30, expanding to more than 25 chemical elements. With the development of new instrumentation, along with new and improved measurement procedures for studying naturally occurring isotopic abundance variations in natural and technical samples, the number of internationally distributed, secondary isotopic reference materials with a specified delta value has blossomed in the last six decades to more than 150 materials. More than half of these isotopic reference materials were produced for isotope-delta measurements of seven elements: H, Li, B, C, N, O, and S. The number of isotopic reference materials for other, heavier elements has grown considerably over the last decade. Nevertheless, even primary international measurement standards for isotope-delta measurements are still needed for some elements, including Mg, Fe, Te, Sb, Mo, and Ge. It is recommended that authors publish the delta values of internationally distributed, secondary isotopic reference materials that were used for anchoring their measurement results to the respective primary stable isotope scale.

  16. Models for Water Isotopes Constrained with Data from Crystal Face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Owen B.

    2005-01-01

    During the year covered by this proposal we conducted work on several different topics, as reflected by our publications listed below. One major activity was to work with a group of about 10 scientists from around the country to prepare a science-planning document (Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling Experiment (TC4)) that outlined the rationale, locations, strategy to accomplish the goals, and possible payloads for a set of three tropical missions. We also prepared background materials for various NRAs being prepared at NASA Headquarters for missions in Costa Rica, Darwin and Guam. Unfortunately budgetary constraints prevented these missions from moving forward. In conjunction with the group NASA Ames we built a new numerical model for deep convection and have applied that model to simulate the CRYSTAL isotope data. Our goal in particular has been to better understanding how convection distributes water vapor isotopes. CRYSTAL observations of water isotopes are very different from those suggested by previous workers who assumed the isotopes would obey Rayleigh fractionation. The water isotope study has several implications. First it is a check on the realism of the deep convection model. Second, the isotopes are a measure of the precipitation removal in the atmosphere. Hence they provide a constraint on a parameter that is difficult to otherwise measure. Finally it has been suggested that isotopes may be the key to unraveling the water transport into the stratosphere and upper troposphere. Such transport is critical both for the radiation balance and for stratospheric chemistry. Ours is the first model that is able to treat this transport. Our initial results are now in press in Geophys. Res. Lett. Essentially we are able to explain the vertical profiles of isotopes in the tropical tropopause transition layer. We are also able to account for stratospheric humidity ana isotope abundances with this model. The data suggest that isotopes do not provide a

  17. DANCEing with the Stars: Measuring Neutron Capture on Unstable Isotopes with DANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopes heavier than iron are known to be produced in stars through neutron capture processes. Two major processes, the slow (s) and rapid (r) processes are each responsible for 50% of the abundances of the heavy isotopes. The neutron capture cross sections of the isotopes on the s process path reveal information about the expected abundances of the elements as well as stellar conditions and dynamics. Until recently, measurements on unstable isotopes, which are most important for determining stellar temperatures and reaction flow, have not been experimentally feasible. The Detector for Advance Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) was designed to perform time-of-flight neutron capture measurements on unstable isotopes for nuclear astrophysics, stockpile stewardship, and reactor development. DANCE is a 4-πBaF2 scintillator array which can perform measurements on sub-milligram samples of isotopes with half-lives as short as a few hundred days. These cross sections are critical for advancing our understanding of the production of the heavy isotopes.

  18. Rapidly assessing changes in bone mineral balance using natural stable calcium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Skulan, Joseph L.; Gordon, Gwyneth W.; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Smith, Scott M.; Anbar, Ariel D.

    2012-06-01

    The ability to rapidly detect changes in bone mineral balance (BMB) would be of great value in the early diagnosis and evaluation of therapies for metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis and some cancers. However, measurements of BMB are hampered by difficulties with using biochemical markers to quantify the relative rates of bone resorption and formation and the need to wait months to years for altered BMB to produce changes in bone mineral density large enough to resolve by X-ray densitometry. We show here that, in humans, the natural abundances of Ca isotopes in urine change rapidly in response to changes in BMB. In a bed rest experiment, use of high-precision isotope ratio MS allowed the onset of bone loss to be detected in Ca isotope data after about 1 wk, long before bone mineral density has changed enough to be detectable with densitometry. The physiological basis of the relationship between Ca isotopes and BMB is sufficiently understood to allow quantitative translation of changes in Ca isotope abundances to changes in bone mineral density using a simple model. The rate of change of bone mineral density inferred from Ca isotopes is consistent with the rate observed by densitometry in long-term bed rest studies. Ca isotopic analysis provides a powerful way to monitor bone loss, potentially making it possible to diagnose metabolic bone disease and track the impact of treatments more effectively than is currently possible.

  19. DANCEing with the Stars: Measuring Neutron Capture on Unstable Isotopes with DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, A.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Baker, J. D.; Bayarbadrahk, B.; Becker, J. A.; Bond, E.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Fowler, M.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.

    2009-03-01

    Isotopes heavier than iron are known to be produced in stars through neutron capture processes. Two major processes, the slow (s) and rapid (r) processes are each responsible for 50% of the abundances of the heavy isotopes. The neutron capture cross sections of the isotopes on the s process path reveal information about the expected abundances of the elements as well as stellar conditions and dynamics. Until recently, measurements on unstable isotopes, which are most important for determining stellar temperatures and reaction flow, have not been experimentally feasible. The Detector for Advance Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) was designed to perform time-of-flight neutron capture measurements on unstable isotopes for nuclear astrophysics, stockpile stewardship, and reactor development. DANCE is a 4-π BaF2 scintillator array which can perform measurements on sub-milligram samples of isotopes with half-lives as short as a few hundred days. These cross sections are critical for advancing our understanding of the production of the heavy isotopes.

  20. Silicon abundances in population I giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1992-01-01

    Silicon to carbon abundance ratios for population I giants were determined from emission lines originating in the transition layers between stellar chromospheres and coronae. For effective temperatures larger than 6200 K we find a group of stars with increased silicon to carbon but normal nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios. These stars are presumably descendents from Ap stars with increased surface silicon to carbon abundance ratios. For G stars this anomaly disappears as is to be expected due to the increased depth of the convection zone and therefore deeper mixing which dilutes the surface overabundances. The disappearance of the abundance anomalies proves that the anomalous abundances observed for the F giants are indeed only a surface phenomenon. It also proves that the same holds for their progenitors, the Ap and Am stars, as has been generally believed. Unexplained is the increased silicon to carbon abundance ratio observed for several stars cooler than 5100 L. RS CVn and related stars do not show this increased abundance ratio. There are also some giants which appear to be enriched in carbon, perhaps due to a helium flash with some mixing if the star is a clump star.

  1. Isotope techniques in the study of environmental change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency, among its efforts to promote the wider use of isotope techniques in hydrology and related environmental disciplines, organized an International Symposium on Applications of Isotope Techniques in Studying Past and Current Environmental Changes in the Hydrosphere and the Atmosphere, held in 1993 in Vienna. The broad scientific interest and abundant participation in the symposium, as well as the rapid progress seen in this field since then, encouraged the IAEA to organize a second symposium of this kind. It was held from 14 to 18 April 1997 in Vienna and brought together 177 scientists representing 46 Member States, UNESCO, FAO, WMO, the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) and the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP). The symposium was structured in five sessions of oral presentations, a poster session and a round table discussion that focused on trends and future requirements in isotope hydrology and on applications in climate and environmental research. The major themes covered by the presentations included the use of isotopic tracers in studies of atmospheric and hydrospheric changes and of the human impact on water and the environment. Special emphasis was placed on isotopic archives of climatic and environmental change. Some contributions addressed new technical approaches

  2. Lithium Abundance of Metal-poor Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Wei Zhang; Gang Zhao

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra have been obtained for 32 metal-poor stars. The equivalent widths of Li λ6708A were measured and the lithium abundances were derived. The average lithium abundance of 21 stars on the lithium plateau is 2.33±0.02 dex. The Lithium plateau exhibits a marginal trend along metallicity, dA(Li)/d[Fe/H] = 0.12±0.06, and no clear trend with the effective temperature. The trend indicates that the abundance of lithium plateau may not be primordial and that a part of the lithium was produced in Galactic Chemical Evolution (GCE).

  3. Obtaining and separation of isotopically pure {sup 88}Y as component of calibration multisources; Otrzymywanie czystego nuklidowo itru {sup 88}Y jako skladnika wieloizotopowych zrodel kalibracyjnych

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misiak, R.; Ochab, E. [The H. Niewodniczanski Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1997-12-01

    Strontium chloride of natural isotopic abundance was bombarded with 13 MeV deuterons and then processed chemically. The thick target yields of {sup 88}Y and other yttrium isotopes were determined. The yield of chemical preparation was found to be 91,2%. Optimum conditions for obtaining and separation of {sup 88}Y were discussed. (author) 3 refs, 5 figs

  4. Abundances of presolar silicon carbide grains in primitive meteorites determined by NanoSIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jemma; Busemann, Henner; Nittler, Larry R.; Alexander, Conel M. O.'D.; Orthous-Daunay, François-Régis; Franchi, Ian A.; Hoppe, Peter

    2014-08-01

    It has been suggested that the matrices of all chondrites are dominated by a common material with Ivuna-like (CI) abundances of volatiles, presolar grains and insoluble organic matter (IOM) (e.g., Alexander, 2005). However, matrix-normalized abundances of presolar silicon carbide (SiC) grains estimated from their noble gas components show significant variations in even the most primitive chondrites (Huss and Lewis, 1995; Huss et al., 2003), in contradiction to there being a common chondrite matrix material. Here we report presolar SiC abundances determined by NanoSIMS raster ion imaging of IOM extracted from primitive members of different meteorite groups. We show that presolar SiC abundance determinations are comparable between NanoSIMS instruments located at three different institutes, between residues prepared by different demineralization techniques, and between microtomed and non-microtomed samples. Our derived SiC abundances in CR chondrites are comparable to those found in the CI chondrites (∼30 ppm) and are much higher than previously determined by noble gas analyses. The revised higher CR SiC abundances are consistent with the CRs being amongst the most primitive chondrites in terms of the isotopic compositions and disordered nature of their organic matter. Similar abundances between CR1, CR2, and CR3 chondrites indicate aqueous alteration on the CR chondrite parent body has not progressively destroyed SiC grains in them. A low SiC abundance for the reduced CV3 RBT 04133 can be explained by parent body thermal metamorphism at an estimated temperature of ∼440 °C. Minor differences between primitive members of other meteorite classes, which did not experience such high temperatures, may be explained by prolonged oxidation at lower temperatures under which SiC grains formed outer layers of SiO2 that were not thermodynamically stable, leading to progressive degassing/destruction of SiC.

  5. Isotope geochemistry of the Amazon Basin: A reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longinelli, A.; Edmond, J. M.

    1983-04-01

    On the transects of the Amazon River made by the Alpha Helix in 1976 and 1977, an extensive suite of samples was collected for isotopic analyses. The water isotopes (18O/16O, D/H) were determined in atmospheric water vapour and in river, rain, and leaf waters. 13C/12C ratios were measured in the dissolved and atmospheric CO2. Determinations were made of 34S/32S and oxygen isotopes in dissolved sulphate. The effect of `continentality' on the water isotopes is minor reflecting the large scale recycling by evapotranspiration from the huge area of forest within the basin. Variations in the isotopic abundances between 1976 (June-July, dry season) and 1977 (May-June, end of wet season) are consistent with the changes in meteorological conditions. The isotopic composition of the CO2, both atmospheric and dissolved, is dominated by biological effects. In 1976 the dissolved CO2 showed downstream variations from -14‰ at Iquitos in Peru to -22‰ in the lower reaches. In 1977, no systematic trend was apparent, the data ranging around -19‰. The values for atmospheric CO2 decrease inland from marine values at the mouth to around -15‰ at Manaus. During the dry season (1976) the values in the interior, western basin were homogeneous at -20‰. In the wet season there were considerable variations reflecting atmospheric instabilities with the average value being about -13‰. The sulphur isotopic composition of the dissolved sulphate is remarkably uniform at around 7‰. In 1977 the 18O values in the sulphate decreased systematically downstream from 8‰ in Peru to 3‰ at the mouth, consistent with a progressive, redox-mediated exchange with water and dissolved oxygen. In 1977 the values increased to over 11‰, apparently indicating exchange with a highly fractionated reservoir of dissolved oxygen perhaps in the semireducing environment of the flood plain lakes.

  6. Iron isotope biosignatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C. M.; Cox, L.; Sun, H.; Nealson, K. H.; Aguilar, C.

    1999-01-01

    The (56)Fe/(54)Fe of Fe-bearing phases precipitated in sedimentary environments varies by 2.5 per mil (delta(56)Fe values of +0.9 to -1. 6 per mil). In contrast, the (56)Fe/(54)Fe of Fe-bearing phases in igneous rocks from Earth and the moon does not vary measurably (delta(56)Fe = 0.0 +/- 0.3 per mil). Experiments with dissimilatory Fe-reducing bacteria of the genus Shewanella algae grown on a ferrihydrite substrate indicate that the delta(56)Fe of ferrous Fe in solution is isotopically lighter than the ferrihydrite substrate by 1.3 per mil. Therefore, the range in delta(56)Fe values of sedimentary rocks may reflect biogenic fractionation, and the isotopic composition of Fe may be used to trace the distribution of microorganisms in modern and ancient Earth.

  7. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20132601 Cui Yurong(Tianjin Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources,China Geological Survey,Tianjin 300170,China);Zhou Hongying In Situ LA-MC-ICP-MS U-Pb Isotopic Dating of Monazite(Acta Geoscientica Sinica,ISSN0375-5444,CN11-1856/P,33(6),2012,p.865-876,6illus.,4tables,41refs.)Key words:monazite,U-Pb dating

  8. GEOCHRONOMETRY & ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    <正>20050934 Chen Zhihong (Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Beijing 100037, China); Lu Songnian Age of the Fushui Intermediate-Mafic Intrusive Complex in the Qinling Orogen, New Zircon U - Pb and Whole -Rock Sm and Nd Isotope Chronological Evidence (Geological Bulletin of China, ISSN 1671-2552, CN11-4648/P, 23(4), 2004, p. 322-328, 3 illus. , 3 tables, 10 refs. )

  9. GEOCHRONOMETRY &ISOTOPE GEOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>20131727 Huang Xiaowen(State Key Laboratory of Ore Deposit Geochemistry,Institute of Geochemistry,Chinese Academy of Sciences,Guiyang 550002,China);Qi Liang Preliminary Study on Sample-Preparation for Re-Os Isotopic Dating of Pyrite(Geochimica,ISSN0379-1726,CN44-1398/P,41(4),2012,p.380-386,3illus.,2tables,25refs)Key words:pyrite,Re-Os dating

  10. Isotopes and agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The agriculture is defined as the art of desturbing the ecosystems in economical terms with the minimum of irreversible damage. Man survival in the biosphere will depend on its ability of using four technologies - mechanization, fertilizers, irrigation and pest disease control. The isotopes are usefull to establish means of producing more food and to preserve it; and clains of unbearable damages to the ecosystems caused by fertilizers and pesticides are not true, are presented. (author)

  11. Iron abundance in the atmosphere of Arcturus

    CERN Document Server

    Sheminova, V A

    2015-01-01

    Abundance of iron in the atmosphere of Arcturus has been determined from the profiles or regions of the profiles of the weak lines sensitive to iron abundance. The selected lines of Fe I and Fe II were synthesized with the MARCS theoretical models of the atmosphere. From the observed profiles of lines available with a high spectral resolution in the atlas by Hinkle and Wallace (2005), the values of the iron abundance $A = 6.95 \\pm 0.03$ and the radial-tangential macroturbulent velocity $5.6 \\pm 0.2$ km/s were obtained for Arcturus. The same physical quantities were found for the Sun as a star; they are $7.42 \\pm 0.02$ and $3.4 \\pm 0.3$ km/s, respectively. For Arcturus, the iron abundance relative to the solar one was determined with the differential method as [Fe/H] $=-0.48 \\pm 0.02$.

  12. Chemical abundance analysis of 19 barium stars

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, G C; Spite, M; Chen, Y Q; Zhao, G; Zhang, B; Liu, G Q; Liu, Y J; Liu, N; Deng, L C; Spite, F; Hill, V; Zhang, C X

    2016-01-01

    We aim at deriving accurate atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances of 19 barium (Ba) stars, including both strong and mild Ba stars, based on the high signal-to-noise ratio and high resolution Echelle spectra obtained from the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The chemical abundances of the sample stars were obtained from an LTE, plane-parallel and line-blanketed atmospheric model by inputting the atmospheric parameters (effective temperatures, surface gravities, metallicity and microturbulent velocity) and equivalent widths of stellar absorption lines. These samples of Ba stars are giants indicated by atmospheric parameters, metallicities and kinematic analysis about UVW velocity. Chemical abundances of 17 elements were obtained for these Ba stars. Their light elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn and Ni) are similar to the solar abundances. Our samples of Ba stars show obvious overabundances of neutron-capture (n-ca...

  13. SWFSC/MMTD: Vaquita Abundance Survey 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1997, the Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC) conducted a survey designed to estimate the abundance of vaquita, the Gulf of California harbor porpoise...

  14. Chinook Abundance - Linear Features [ds181

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The dataset 'ds181_Chinook_ln' is a product of the CalFish Adult Salmonid Abundance Database. Data in this shapefile are collected from stream sections or reaches...

  15. Testing Relationships between Energy and Vertebrate Abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding what drives variation in the abundance of organisms is fundamental to evolutionary ecology and wildlife management. Yet despite its importance, there is still great uncertainty about the main factors influencing variation in vertebrate abundance across taxa. We believe valuable knowledge and increased predictive power could be gained by taking into account both the intrinsic factors of species and the extrinsic factors related to environmental surroundings in the commonly cited RQ model, which provides a simple conceptual framework valid at both the interspecific and the intraspecific scales. Approaches comparing studies undertaken at different spatial and taxonomic scales could be key to our ability to better predict abundance, and thanks to the increased availability of population size data, global geographic datasets, and improved comparative methods, there might be unprecedented opportunities to (1) gain a greater understanding of vertebrate abundance patterns and (2) test existing theories on free-ranging animals.

  16. Isotope Fractionation During N Mineralization and the N Isotope Composition of Terrestrial Ecosystem N Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, P.; Schwartz, E.; Hungate, B. A.; Hart, S. C.

    2008-12-01

    It has been an open question for several decades whether N mineralization is a fractionating process. This question is important for N cycling in terrestrial ecosystems because even a small fractionation during N mineralization could potentially have a large influence on the N isotope composition of other ecosystem N pools. Fractionation during N mineralization should result in a difference between the N isotope composition of the soil microorganisms, that of its substrates, and products. We analyzed the N isotope composition of the soil microbial biomass in a variety of ecosystems, and found that it was 15N enriched compared to that of other soil N pools, such as soil soluble, organic and inorganic N (Dijkstra et al. 2006a,b). We observed a negative correlation between the 15N enrichment of the microorganisms and the relative C and N availability for soil from ecosystems in Hawaii and Arizona, across a broad range of climates, grasslands and forests, and more than four million years of ecosystem development. This suggests that during N dissimilation (and associated transaminations) and N export, the lighter 14N N isotope is preferentially removed in a manner similar to that proposed for animals and ectomycorrhizae. This was further confirmed by the positive correlation between microbial 15N enrichment and net N mineralization rate (Dijkstra et al. 2008, Ecology Letters 11: 389-397) and by culture experiments with Escherichia coli (Collins et al. 2008). Since mineralization is the largest flux of N in ecosystems, fractionation during N mineralization has the potential to influence the N isotope composition of other N pools, such as inorganic N, plant N and soil organic matter N. We demonstrate that the N isotope compositions of these ecosystem N pools exhibit differences that are consistent with fractionation during N mineralization. Our results show that the N isotope composition can be used as a measure to trace N mineralization and decomposition in ecosystems

  17. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  18. Primordial Deuterium Abundance and Cosmic Baryon Density

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of cosmic abundances of the light elements with the density of baryonic stars and gas in the universe today provides a critical test of big bang theory and a powerful probe of the nature of dark matter. A new technique allows determination of cosmic deuterium abundances in quasar absorption clouds at large redshift, allowing a new test of big bang homogeneity in diverse, very distant systems. The first results of these studies are summarized, along with their implications. The ...

  19. Estimating whale abundance using sparse hydrophone arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Danielle Veronica

    2012-01-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring has been used to investigate many aspects of marine mammal ecology, although methods to estimate absolute abundance and density using acoustic data have only been developed in recent years. The instrument configuration in an acoustic survey determines which abundance estimation methods can be used. Sparsely distributed arrays of instruments are useful because wide geographic areas can be covered. However, instrument spacing in sparse arrays is such that the same...

  20. Coronae of Stars with Supersolar Elemental Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Uria; Behar, Ehud; Drake, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Coronal elemental abundances are known to deviate from the photospheric values of their parent star, with the degree of deviation depending on the first ionization potential (FIP). This study focuses on the coronal composition of stars with supersolar photospheric abundances. We present the coronal abundances of six such stars: 11 LMi, iota Hor, HR 7291, tau Boo, and alpha Cen A and B. These stars all have high-statistics X-ray spectra, three of which are presented for the first time. The abundances we measured were obtained using the line-resolved spectra of the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) in conjunction with the higher throughput EPIC-pn camera spectra onboard the XMM-Newton observatory. A collisionally ionized plasma model with two or three temperature components is found to represent the spectra well. All elements are found to be consistently depleted in the coronae compared to their respective photospheres. For 11 LMi and tau Boo no FIP effect is present, while iota Hor, HR 7291, and alpha Cen A and B show a clear FIP trend. These conclusions hold whether the comparison is made with solar abundances or the individual stellar abundances. Unlike the solar corona, where low-FIP elements are enriched, in these stars the FIP effect is consistently due to a depletion of high-FIP elements with respect to actual photospheric abundances. A comparison with solar (instead of stellar) abundances yields the same fractionation trend as on the Sun. In both cases, a similar FIP bias is inferred, but different fractionation mechanisms need to be invoked.

  1. Spatial scaling of species abundance distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Borda-de-Água, Luís; Borges, Paulo A. V.; Hubbell, Stephen P.; Pereira, Henrique M

    2012-01-01

    Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Ecography © 2012 Nordic Society Oikos. Species abundance distributions are an essential tool in describing the biodiversity of ecological communities. We now know that their shape changes as a function of the size of area sampled. Here we analyze the scaling properties of species abundance distributions by using the moments of the logarithmically transformed number of individuals. We find that the moments as a function of area size are well fitted by power law...

  2. How selection structures species abundance distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Magurran, A.E; Henderson, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    How do species divide resources to produce the characteristic species abundance distributions seen in nature? One way to resolve this problem is to examine how the biomass (or capacity) of the spatial guilds that combine to produce an abundance distribution is allocated among species. Here we argue that selection on body size varies across guilds occupying spatially distinct habitats. Using an exceptionally well-characterized estuarine fish community, we show that biomass is concentrated in l...

  3. Scale-dependent linkages between nitrate isotopes and denitrification in surface soils: implications for isotope measurements and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Steven J; Weintraub, Samantha R; Bowling, David R

    2016-08-01

    Natural abundance nitrate (NO3 (-)) isotopes represent a powerful tool for assessing denitrification, yet the scale and context dependence of relationships between isotopes and denitrification have received little attention, especially in surface soils. We measured the NO3 (-) isotope compositions in soil extractions and lysimeter water from a semi-arid meadow and lawn during snowmelt, along with the denitrification potential, bulk O2, and a proxy for anaerobic microsites. Denitrification potential varied by three orders of magnitude and the slope of δ(18)O/δ(15)N in soil-extracted NO3 (-) from all samples measured 1.04 ± 0.12 (R (2) = 0.64, p < 0.0001), consistent with fractionation from denitrification. However, δ(15)N of extracted NO3 (-) was often lower than bulk soil δ(15)N (by up to 24 ‰), indicative of fractionation during nitrification that was partially overprinted by denitrification. Mean NO3 (-) isotopes in lysimeter water differed from soil extractions by up to 19 ‰ in δ(18)O and 12 ‰ in δ(15)N, indicating distinct biogeochemical processing in relatively mobile water versus soil microsites. This implies that NO3 (-) isotopes in streams, which are predominantly fed by mobile water, do not fully reflect terrestrial soil N cycling. Relationships between potential denitrification and δ(15)N of extracted NO3 (-) showed a strong threshold effect culminating in a null relationship at high denitrification rates. Our observations of (1) competing fractionation from nitrification and denitrification in redox-heterogeneous surface soils, (2) large NO3 (-) isotopic differences between relatively immobile and mobile water pools, (3) and the spatial dependence of δ(18)O/δ(15)N relationships suggest caution in using NO3 (-) isotopes to infer site or watershed-scale patterns in denitrification.

  4. Scale-dependent linkages between nitrate isotopes and denitrification in surface soils: implications for isotope measurements and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Steven J; Weintraub, Samantha R; Bowling, David R

    2016-08-01

    Natural abundance nitrate (NO3 (-)) isotopes represent a powerful tool for assessing denitrification, yet the scale and context dependence of relationships between isotopes and denitrification have received little attention, especially in surface soils. We measured the NO3 (-) isotope compositions in soil extractions and lysimeter water from a semi-arid meadow and lawn during snowmelt, along with the denitrification potential, bulk O2, and a proxy for anaerobic microsites. Denitrification potential varied by three orders of magnitude and the slope of δ(18)O/δ(15)N in soil-extracted NO3 (-) from all samples measured 1.04 ± 0.12 (R (2) = 0.64, p soil δ(15)N (by up to 24 ‰), indicative of fractionation during nitrification that was partially overprinted by denitrification. Mean NO3 (-) isotopes in lysimeter water differed from soil extractions by up to 19 ‰ in δ(18)O and 12 ‰ in δ(15)N, indicating distinct biogeochemical processing in relatively mobile water versus soil microsites. This implies that NO3 (-) isotopes in streams, which are predominantly fed by mobile water, do not fully reflect terrestrial soil N cycling. Relationships between potential denitrification and δ(15)N of extracted NO3 (-) showed a strong threshold effect culminating in a null relationship at high denitrification rates. Our observations of (1) competing fractionation from nitrification and denitrification in redox-heterogeneous surface soils, (2) large NO3 (-) isotopic differences between relatively immobile and mobile water pools, (3) and the spatial dependence of δ(18)O/δ(15)N relationships suggest caution in using NO3 (-) isotopes to infer site or watershed-scale patterns in denitrification. PMID:27102809

  5. Nuclear physics and stable isotopes; Physique nucleaire et isotopes stables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutte, D. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee

    1994-12-31

    The aim of this paper is to show that fundamental research in nuclear physics requires utilization of stable isotopes; stable isotopes are essential as target material since a large quantity of nucleus have to be studied in order to appreciate all the complexity of the nuclear structure, but also as a tool, such as beams, for the same purpose. Examples are given with samarium, tin and germanium isotopes. 7 figs.

  6. Molybdenum isotopes and mass balance during early stages of pedogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E. K.; Thompson, A.; Chadwick, O.; Pett-Ridge, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is an essential micronutrient and redox sensitive trace metal that has the potential to be a tracer of pedogenic processes. Globally, riverine δ98Mo values are elevated relative to bedrock, suggesting weathering processes preferentially retain light Mo isotopes, however, the mechanisms governing this process in soils are poorly understood. To elucidate these mechanisms, we studied seven soil profiles developed on a 10ka lava flow in Hawaii receiving 600 to 2000 mm mean annual precipitation. We assessed Mo abundance and isotopic composition as a function of soil organic matter (OM) content, iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) (oxyhydr)oxide abundance, and Mo loss/gain. We found net accumulation of Mo across all sites (+48% to +289%) that was positively correlated with increasing precipitation, OM content, and Fe and Mn (oxyhydr)oxide content and inversely correlated with soil depth. Thus, the highest Mo gains are in the wettest surface soil horizons, which also have high OM content. Selective extractions of surface soils indicate that 13% to 40% of mobile Mo is predominately associated with OM; whereas Mo associated with Fe and Mn (oxyhydr)oxides is an order of magnitude lower (0.6% to 6%). The isotopic composition of soil Mo deviated from parent material values (δ98Mo ~-0.15‰). Mo isotopic values were lightest at the dry sites (δ98Mo values of -0.29‰ to -0.63‰) and become heavy with increasing precipitation (δ98Mo -0.2‰ to +0.3‰). At all sites, the surface horizons were isotopically heavy relative to the subsurface horizons, and samples with the heaviest δ98Mo values corresponded with horizons that have gained Mo and have higher OM content. Subsurface Mo isotopic values are lighter than bedrock isotopic composition and may reflect associations with Fe and Mn (oxyhydr)oxides. In order further to constrain Mo fluxes into and out of the soil system, we measured Mo isotopes in local rainwater, groundwater, and vegetation. Based on this data, we

  7. Modelling Void Abundance in Modified Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Voivodic, Rodrigo; Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F

    2016-01-01

    We use a spherical model and an extended excursion set formalism with drifting diffusive barriers to predict the abundance of cosmic voids in the context of general relativity as well as f(R) and symmetron models of modified gravity. We detect spherical voids from a suite of N-body simulations of these gravity theories and compare the measured void abundance to theory predictions. We find that our model correctly describes the abundance of both dark matter and galaxy voids, providing a better fit than previous proposals in the literature based on static barriers. We use the simulation abundance results to fit for the abundance model free parameters as a function of modified gravity parameters, and show that counts of dark matter voids can provide interesting constraints on modified gravity. For galaxy voids, more closely related to optical observations, we find that constraining modified gravity from void abundance alone may be significantly more challenging. In the context of current and upcoming galaxy surv...

  8. TEA: A Code Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature-pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows & Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  9. TEA: A Code Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature–pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows & Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  10. Report on carbon and nitrogen abundance studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the proposal was to determine the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios from transition layer lines in stars with different T(sub eff) and luminosities. The equations which give the surface emission line fluxes and the measured ratio of the NV to CIV emission line fluxes are presented and explained. The abundance results are compared with those of photospheric abundance studies for stars in common with the photospheric investigations. The results show that the analyses are at least as accurate as the photospheric determinations. These studies can be extended to F and early G stars for which photospheric abundance determinations for giants are hard to do because molecular bands become too weak. The abundance determination in the context of stellar evolution is addressed. The N/C abundance ratio increases steeply at the point of evolution for which the convection zone reaches deepest. Looking at the evolution of the rotation velocities v sin i, a steep decrease in v sin i is related to the increasing depth of the convection zone. It is concluded that the decrease in v sin i for T(sub eff) less than or approximately = 5800 K is most probably due to the rearrangement of the angular momentum in the stars due to deep convective mixing. It appears that the convection zone is rotating with nearly depth independent angular momentum. Other research results and ongoing projects are discussed.

  11. Planetary nebulae abundances and stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Pottasch, S R

    2006-01-01

    A summary is given of planetary nebulae abundances from ISO measurements. It is shown that these nebulae show abundance gradients (with galactocentric distance), which in the case of neon, argon, sulfur and oxygen (with four exceptions) are the same as HII regions and early type star abundance gradients. The abundance of these elements predicted from these gradients at the distance of the Sun from the center are exactly the solar abundance. Sulfur is the exception to this; the reason for this is discussed. The higher solar neon abundance is confirmed; this is discussed in terms of the results of helioseismology. Evidence is presented for oxygen destruction via ON cycling having occurred in the progenitors of four planetary nebulae with bilobal structure. These progenitor stars had a high mass, probably greater than 5 solar masses. This is deduced from the high values of He/H and N/H found in these nebulae. Formation of nitrogen, helium and carbon are discussed. The high mass progenitors which showed oxygen de...

  12. Laser Spectroscopic Measurement of Helium Isotope Ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, L B; Holt, R J; Lu, Z T; O'Connor, T P; Sano, Y; Sturchio, N C

    2003-01-01

    A sensitive laser spectroscopic method has been applied to the quantitative determination of the isotope ratio of helium at the level of 3He/4He = 10^-7 - 10^-5. The resonant absorption of 1083 nm laser light by the metastable 3He atoms in a discharge cell was measured with the frequency modulation saturation spectroscopy technique while the abundance of 4He was measured by a direct absorption technique. The results on three different samples extracted from the atmosphere and commercial helium gas were in good agreement with values obtained with mass spectrometry. The achieved 3-sigma detection limit of 3He in helium is 4 x 10^-9. This demonstration required a 200 micro-L STP sample of He. The sensitivity can be further improved, and the required sample size reduced, by several orders of magnitude with the addition of cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  13. Silicon isotopic abundance toward evolved stars and its application for presolar grains

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, T -C; Testi, L; Baudry, A; Wittkowski, M; Rawlings, M G; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I; Vlemmings, W; Nyman, L -A; Gray, M D; de Breuck, C

    2013-01-01

    Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) is important for understanding the composition of the present-day interstellar medium (ISM) and of our solar system. In this paper, we aim to track the GCE by using the 29Si/30Si ratios in evolved stars and tentatively relate this to presolar grain composition. We used the APEX telescope to detect thermal SiO isotopologue emission toward four oxygen-rich M-type stars. Together with the data retrieved from the Herschel science archive and from the literature, we were able to obtain the 29Si/30Si ratios for a total of 15 evolved stars inferred from their optically thin 29SiO and 30SiO emission. These stars cover a range of masses and ages, and because they do not significantly alter 29Si/30Si during their lifetimes, they provide excellent probes of the ISM metallicity (or 29Si/30Si ratio) as a function of time. The 29Si/30Si ratios inferred from the thermal SiO emission tend to be lower toward low-mass oxygen-rich stars (e.g., down to about unity for W Hya), and close to an int...

  14. Radio observations of carbon monoxide toward Zeta Ophiuchi - Velocity structure, isotopic abundances, and physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, William D.; Glassgold, Alfred E.; Wilson, Robert W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a small-scale map of the molecular gas around the line of sight toward Zeta Oph made with measurements of the (C-12)O (1-0) emission obtained at high signal-to-noise ratio and high velocity resolution. In addition, a measurement of the (C-12)O (2-1) line emission and a detection of (C-13)O along the line of sight to the star are reported. The results show that the CO emission toward the star is composed from at least four components with peak velocities at -2.0, -0.7, 0.0, and +0.6 km/s. The radio observations yield a total CO column density of 1.4 x 10 to the 15th/sq cm, with about one-half of the total CO column density being in the main component at -0.7 km/s. The main cmponent is uniform over the map, but the other components are variable, suggesting that the cloud is clumpy. The data on the two CO transitions imply that the excitation temperature and the density of the main component are about 7 K and 800/cu cm, respectively.

  15. Relationship between the natural abundance of soil nitrogen isotopes and condition in North Dakota wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    A statewide condition assessment of North Dakota wetlands in the summer of 2011 was conducted as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Wetland Condition Assessment (NWCA). Two other wetland condition assessments, the Index of Plant Community Integrity (IPCI...

  16. Separating soil respiration components with stable isotopes: natural abundance and labelling approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Braig E; Tupek B

    2010-01-01

    Due to the potential of forest ecosystems contributing to CO2 increase as well as to climate change mitigation, forest-atmosphere CO2 exchange has been intensively studied over last decades. However, the contribution of individual components of belowground carbon pools is still poorly known. In particular, there is no unequivocal means to separate root respiration (autotrophic) from heterotrophic respiration by soil microflora and fauna. Most studies investigating soil respiration disturbed t...

  17. An instrument for elemental and isotopic abundance characterization of extra-terrestrial materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veryovkin, I. V.; Calaway, W. F.; Moore, J. F.; Pellin, M. J.; Savina, M. R.; King, B. V.; Petravić, M.; Burnett, D. S.

    2002-12-01

    Samples returned from the Genesis and Stardust missions of NASA's Discovery Program require quantitative analysis at sensitivities unobtainable with present instruments. This has driven development of a new generation of instruments for laser-post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (laser-SNMS). Construction of a prototype time-of-flight (TOF) SNMS instrument has been completed recently at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and testing began in August 2002. This instrument is optimized for laser post-ionization of sputtered neutrals and is capable of locating and analyzing individual sub-micrometer interstellar particles on a sample stage for Stardust or determining elemental concentrations in shallow implants at ultra-trace levels for Genesis. Post-ionization can be accomplished with a variety of laser sources. These include high repetition rate tunable Ti-sapphire lasers for ultra-trace analysis of a single element and two vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light sources for simultaneous ionization of most atomic and molecular species in the sample. The two VUV lasers are an F2 laser with a fixed wavelength of 157 nm and the self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser (SASE FEL) capable of generating tunable VUV at wavelengths down to 60 nm. Fundamental physical theory of ion sputtering forms the scientific basis of the approach used to design the instrument. An ion optics design for the instrument was perfected through extensive three-dimensional computer simulations using SIMION software. Realistic sets of photo-ions were calculated using formalisms derived from sputtering theory. Their trajectories in various instrument designs were then traced by SIMION. Finally, results of the simulations were processed to estimate instrument capabilities including resolution and useful yield. This same approach proved accurate and quantitative during tests of an existing TOF SNMS instrument demonstrating the reliability of the simulation method. The completed prototype instrument and results of recent tests will be presented. This work is supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, BES-Materials Sciences, under Contract W-31-109-ENG-38 and in part by a contract from NASA's Office of Space Science's Cosmochemistry Program.

  18. Early Earth differentiation investigated through 142Nd, 182W, and highly siderophile element abundances in samples from Isua, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizo, H.; Walker, R. J.; Carlson, R. W.; Touboul, M.; Horan, M. F.; Puchtel, I. S.; Boyet, M.; Rosing, M. T.

    2016-02-01

    We report new data for W concentrations, stable W isotopic compositions, high-precision 182W/184W ratios, highly siderophile element (HSE) abundances and 187Re-187Os systematics in a suite of 3.8-3.3 Ga mafic and ultramafic rocks from the Isua supracrustal belt, and the Paleoarchean terrane in the northwestern part of the belt. These data are compared with published data for 146Sm-142Nd systematics in the same samples. The samples from the Isua supracrustal belt show well resolved excesses of 182W/184W of up to ∼21 ppm, consistent with previous W isotopic data reported by Willbold et al. (2011). While there is abundant evidence that W was mobilized in the crust accessed by the Isua supracrustal suite, the isotopic anomalies are interpreted to primarily reflect processes that affected the mantle precursors to these rocks. The origin of the 182W excesses in these rocks remains uncertain. The Isua mantle source could represent a portion of the post-core-formation mantle that was isolated from late accretionary additions (e.g., Willbold et al., 2011). However, the combined 182W, Re-Os isotopic systematics and HSE abundances estimated for the source of the Isua basalts are difficult to reconcile with this interpretation. The W isotope variations were more likely produced as a result of fractionation of the Hf/W ratio in the mantle during the lifetime of 182Hf, i.e., during the first 50 Ma of Solar System history. This could have occurred as a result of differentiation in an early magma ocean. The Isua suite examined is also characterized by variable 142Nd/144Nd, but the variations do not correlate with the variations in 182W/184W. Further, samples with ages between 3.8 and 3.3 Ga show gradual diminution of 142Nd anomalies until these are no longer resolved from the modern mantle isotopic composition. By contrast, there is no diminishment of 182W variability with time, suggesting different mechanisms of origin and retention of isotopic variations for these two extinct

  19. Nickel isotopes and methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubeck, A.; Ivarsson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Methanogens require Ni for their growth and as a consequence the microbial fractionation of Ni isotopes can be used as a biomarker for activity of methanogenic communities1. Anaerobic laboratory experiments was performed using methanogens to investigate methanogenic growth in a modified nutrient media2 with olivine Fo91 (5g/l) added as an additional mineral nutrient source and as the only H2 provider. One of the investigated methanogens showed an increased growth in the experiments with added olivine. There were also a close relationship between the mobilized Ni and the growth of the methanogen. Ni is an element that previously has been neglected in the study of fossilized microorganisms and their interaction with mineral substrates and, thus, there are no records or published data of Ni in association with microfossils. However, we have detected enrichments of Ni in fossilized microorganisms and ichno-fossils, respectively, from three separate locations. Ni is not present in the host rock in any of the samples. Thus, Ni is present in association with fossilized microorganisms from environments and more extensive analysis is required to understand the magnitude, uptake, preservation and fractionation of Ni in microfossils. In order to analyze Ni isotope fractionation from microbe-mineral interaction, we plan to use a high-resolution Laser-Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (LMS)3. In situ profile ablation will provide detailed and localized data on fractionation patterns between microfossils and their host rock. Also, this technique will allow us to identify the change in Ni isotopic fractionation in rock samples caused by abiotic and biogenic processes in a faster and easier way and with less risk for contamination compared to the wet chemistry analyses of Ni isotopes. 1. Cameron, V., Vance, D., Archer, C. & House, C. H. A biomarker based on the stable isotopes of nickel. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106, 10944-10948 (2009). 2. Schn

  20. Does IRAS 16293-2422 have a hot core? Chemical inventory and abundance changes in its protostellar environment

    CERN Document Server

    Schöier, F L; Van Dishoeck, E F; Blake, G A

    2002-01-01

    A detailed radiative transfer analysis of the observed continuum and molecular line emission toward the deeply embedded young stellar object IRAS 16293-2422 is performed. The continuum modelling is used to constrain the temperature and density distributions in the envelope, enabling quantitative estimates of various molecular abundances. The molecular excitation analysis reveals that the emission from some molecular species is well reproduced assuming a constant fractional abundance throughout the envelope. The abundances and isotope ratios are generally close to typical values found in cold molecular clouds in these cases, and there is a high degree of deuterium fractionation. There are, however, a number of notable exceptions. Lines covering a wide range of excitation conditions indicate for some molecules, e.g., H2CO, CH3OH, SO, SO2 and OCS, a drastic increase in their abundances in the warm and dense inner region of the circumstellar envelope. The location at which this increase occurs is consistent with ...

  1. C-isotope composition of fossil sedges and grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurschner, Wolfram M.

    2010-05-01

    C4 plants differ from C3 plants regarding their anatomy and their C-isotope composition. Both features can be used in the geological record to determine the presence of C4 plants. Yet, the evolution of the C4 pathway in the fossil record is enigmatic as palaeobotanical and geological evidence for C4 plants is sparse. The oldest structural evidence for Kranz anatomy has been found in Late Miocene permineralized grass leaf remains. But studies on the C-isotope composition of sedimentary organic matter indicate that abundant C4 biomass was present in N-America and Asia throughout the Miocene in expanding savannahs and grasslands. The success of C4 plants appears to be related also to an increasing seasonal aridity in the tropical climate belts and the co-evolution of grazers. However, C- isotope composition of palaeosols or vertebrate teeth only allows to estimate the abundance of C4 plant biomass in the vegetation or in the diet without further taxonomical specification which plant groups would have had C4 metabolism. In this contribution the first extensive C-isotope analysis of fossil seeds of sedges and a few grasses are presented. The age of the carpological material ranges from Late Eocene to Pliocene and was collected from several central European brown coal deposits. The 52 different taxa studied include several species of Carex, Cladiocarya, Eriopherum, Eleocharis, Scirpus, Sparganium. Most of them representing herbaceous elements of a (sub)tropical vegetation growing near the edge of a lake. The C-isotope composition of the fossil seeds varies between -30 and -23 o/oo indicating C3 photosynthesis. This first systematic inventory shows that C4 plants were absent in the European (sub)tropical brown coal forming wetland vegetation during the Tertiary. These preliminary data are in agreement with phylogenetic studies which predict the origin of C4 plants outside the European realm.

  2. Isotope effects in lattice dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large number of available stable isotopes and well developed isotope separation technology have enabled growing crystals of C, LiH, ZnO, CuCl, CuBr, Cu2O, CdS, α-Sn, Ge, Si, etc. with a controlled isotope composition. Experimental and theoretical studies provide evidence that the isotope effect has an influence on the thermal, elastic, and vibrational properties of crystals. In this paper it is shown that in Ge and C crystals isotope effect causes only weak phonon scattering whereas in LiH the scattering potential changes are so strong that they lead to experimentally observable phonon localization. It is emphasized that a systematic description of isotope effects requires that anharmonicity be taken into account. (reviews of topical problems)

  3. Therapeutic use of radioactive isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Caroline Duc

    2013-01-01

    In December, researchers from ISOLDE-CERN, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) published the results of an in vivo study which successfully proved the effectiveness of four terbium isotopes for diagnosing and treating cancerous tumours.   Four terbium isotopes suitable for clinical purposes. “ISOLDE is the only installation capable of supplying terbium isotopes of such purity and intensity in the case of three out of the four types used in this study,” explains Karl Johnson, a physicist at ISOLDE.  “Producing over a thousand different isotopes, our equipment offers the widest choice of isotopes in the world!” Initially intended for fundamental physics research, ISOLDE has diversified its activities over time to invest in various projects in the materials science, biochemistry and nuclear medicine fields. The proof-of-concept study has confirmed that the four terbium isotopes 149Tb, 152Tb, 155Tb produ...

  4. Exploring masses and CNO surface abundances of red giant stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabi, Ghina M.; Eid, Mounib El

    2015-08-01

    A grid of evolutionary sequences of stars in the mass range 1.2-7M⊙, with solar-like initial composition is presented. We focus on this mass range in order to estimate the masses and calculate the CNO surface abundances of a sample of observed red giants. The stellar models are calculated from the zero-age main sequence till the early asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. Stars of M ≤ 2.2M⊙ are evolved through the core helium flash. In this work, an approach is adopted that improves the mass determination of an observed sample of 21 RGB and early AGB stars. This approach is based on comparing the observationally derived effective temperatures and absolute magnitudes with the calculated values based on our evolutionary tracks in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. A more reliable determination of the stellar masses is achieved by using evolutionary tracks extended to the range of observation. In addition, the predicted CNO surface abundances are compared to the observationally inferred values in order to show how far standard evolutionary calculation can be used to interpret available observations and to illustrate the role of convective mixing. We find that extra mixing beyond the convective boundary determined by the Schwarzschild criterion is needed to explain the observational oxygen isotopic ratios in low-mass stars. The effect of recent determinations of proton capture reactions and their uncertainties on the 16O/17O and 14N/15N ratios is also shown. It is found that the 14N( p, γ)15O reaction is important for predicting the 14N/15N ratio in red giants.

  5. Morphology Composition Isotopes: Recent Results from Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, R.

    2008-07-01

    This article presents some recent imaging and spectroscopic observations that led to results which are significant for understanding the properties of comet nuclei. The coma morphology and/or composition were investigated for 12 comets belonging to different dynamical classes. The data analysis showed that the coma morphology of three non-periodic comets is not consistent with the general assumption that dynamically new comets still have a relatively uniform nucleus surface and therefore do not exhibit gas and/or dust jets in their coma. The determination of carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios revealed the same values for all comets investigated at various heliocentric distances. However, the relative abundance of the rare nitrogen isotope 15N is about twice as high as in the Earth’s atmosphere. Observations of comets at splitting events and during outbursts led to indications for differences between material from the nucleus surface and the interior. The monitoring of the induced outburst of 9P/Temple revealed that under non-steady state conditions the fast disintegration of species is detectable.

  6. Isotope thermometery in nuclear multifragmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, B. K.; Samaddar, S. K.; Sil, Tapas; J. N.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic study of the effect of fragment$-$fragment interaction, quantum statistics, $\\gamma$-feeding and collective flow is made in the extraction of the nuclear temperature from the double ratio of the isotopic yields in the statistical model of one-step (Prompt) multifragmentation. Temperature is also extracted from the isotope yield ratios generated in the sequential binary-decay model. Comparison of the thermodynamic temperature with the extracted temperatures for different isotope r...

  7. 15N and 13C abundances in marine environments with emphasis on biogeochemical structure of food networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distributions of δ15N and δ13C for biogenic substances in the Antarctic Ocean and in the Otsuchi River estuary in Japan were investigated to construct isotope biogeochemical framework for assessing marine ecosystems. The isotopic compositions of phytoplankton were particularly low in the Antarctic Ocean. High nitrate and CO2 concentrations in the surface sea waters, and the low light intensity seem to enhance the kinetic isotope fractionations that preferred the depletion of 15N and 13C in the algal body. A clear-cut linear relationship between animal δ15N and its trophic level was obtained in the Antarctic system. In the estuary, the variation of isotope ratios were principally governed by the mixing of land-derived organic matter, marine phytoplankton, and seagrasses. A food-chain effect of 15N enrichment was also confirmed. An isotopically ordered structure was presented for a marine estuarine ecosystem. The isotopic abundances in a food network vary mainly because of the variation in 15N and 13C contents of primary producers grown under different environmental conditions and because of the enrichment of 15N along food chains. (author)

  8. Clonal growth and plant species abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Zuzana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Both regional and local plant abundances are driven by species' dispersal capacities and their abilities to exploit new habitats and persist there. These processes are affected by clonal growth, which is difficult to evaluate and compare across large numbers of species. This study assessed the influence of clonal reproduction on local and regional abundances of a large set of species and compared the predictive power of morphologically defined traits of clonal growth with data on actual clonal growth from a botanical garden. The role of clonal growth was compared with the effects of seed reproduction, habitat requirements and growth, proxied both by LHS (leaf–height–seed) traits and by actual performance in the botanical garden. Methods Morphological parameters of clonal growth, actual clonal reproduction in the garden and LHS traits (leaf-specific area – height – seed mass) were used as predictors of species abundance, both regional (number of species records in the Czech Republic) and local (mean species cover in vegetation records) for 836 perennial herbaceous species. Species differences in habitat requirements were accounted for by classifying the dataset by habitat type and also by using Ellenberg indicator values as covariates. Key Results After habitat differences were accounted for, clonal growth parameters explained an important part of variation in species abundance, both at regional and at local levels. At both levels, both greater vegetative growth in cultivation and greater lateral expansion trait values were correlated with higher abundance. Seed reproduction had weaker effects, being positive at the regional level and negative at the local level. Conclusions Morphologically defined traits are predictive of species abundance, and it is concluded that simultaneous investigation of several such traits can help develop hypotheses on specific processes (e.g. avoidance of self-competition, support of offspring) potentially

  9. Innovations in isotope techniques to enhance the evaluation and management of nutrient sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing world population and the need to produce more food is putting increasing pressures on soil and water resources. Increasingly, studies of interactions between nutrients rather than single nutrient studies are becoming important as systems intensify and a wider range of nutrients is added. The incorporation of isotopes into these studies will greatly assist in understanding the driving forces that determine system productivity and sustainability. Studies of N dynamics have been greatly assisted by the use of the stable 15N, and studies of water, other nutrients, and C have also been assisted by the use of radioactive isotopes such as 3H, 14C, 32P, 35S and 86Rb. However, increasing restrictions on the use of radioactive substances are beginning to severely limit their availability for such studies. Stable isotopes such as 13C, 15N and 34S offer the prospect of replacing radioactive isotopes, or of their being used in combination with radioactive isotopes, to minimize the perceived risks and/or to allow the tracing of two components in the system. The innovative use of isotopes in plant-nutrient studies utilizing direct labelling with stable isotopes, multiple direct labelling with stable and/or radioactive isotopes and/or utilizing natural abundance, reverse dilution, or a combination of direct labelling and reverse dilution, are presented. (author)

  10. Water enriched in the rare stable isotopes : Preparation, measurement and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faghihi, Vahideh

    2016-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is water with increased abundances of the rare stable isotopes 2H and 18O (and to some extent also 17O). Such artificially enriched (or "labelled") waters are often used in biomedicine, for establishing the total amount of body water (and thus body composition) of humans a

  11. Magnesium and Silicon Isotopes in HASP Glasses from Apollo 16 Lunar Soil 61241

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, G. F.; Delaney, J. S.; Lindsay, F.; Alexander, C. M. O'D; Chakrabarti, R.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Whattam, S.; Korotev, R.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    The high-Al (>28 wt %), silica-poor (silicon, via evaporation [4]. We report Mg and Si isotope abundances in 10 HASP glasses and 2 impact-glass spherules from a 64-105 m grain-size fraction taken from Apollo 16 soil sample 61241.

  12. Cosmic Ray Helium Isotopes From 0.2 to 3.6 GeV/nucleon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimer, O.; Hof, M.; Menn, W.;

    1996-01-01

    The abundances of cosmic ray helium isotopes were measured by the IMAX balloon-borne magnet spectrometer during a flight in July, 1992. A high-resolution time-of-flight system and two silica aerogel Cherenkov counters were used in conjunction with a drift-chamber/MWPC-tracking system to determine...

  13. Stable isotopes' as trophic tracers: combining field sampling and manipulative labelling of food resources for macrobenthos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herman, P.M.J.; Middelburg, J.J.; Widdows, J.; Lucas, C.M.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2000-01-01

    We combined 3 different approaches to determine the relative importance of microphytobenthos production as food for intertidal macrobenthic animals: (1) the natural abundance of stable-isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen, (2) an in situ deliberate tracer addition of C-13-bicarbonate, which was tra

  14. Can the carbon isotopic composition of methane be reconstructed from multi-site firn air measurements?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapart, C.J.; Martinerie, P.; et al, [No Value; van de Wal, R.S.W.; van der Veen, C.; Röckmann, T.

    2013-01-01

    Methane is a strong greenhouse gas and large uncertainties exist concerning the future evolution of its atmospheric abundance. Analyzing methane atmospheric mixing and stable isotope ratios in air trapped in polar ice sheets helps in reconstructing the evolution of its sources and sinks in the past.

  15. Constraints on the creation of a HIMU-Like isotopic reservoir beneath New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Meer, Quinten; Waight, Tod Earle; Scott, James

    2013-01-01

    intrusion of mafic dikes (~88 to 68 Ma). Subsequently, Zealandia has been punctuated by volumetrically minor, intermittent yet widespread intraplate magmatism from ~100 Ma through to recent times. This magmatism has typical OIB-like trace element abundances and radiogenic isotope compositions that trend...

  16. Copper isotope effect in serum of cancer patients. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Télouk, Philippe; Puisieux, Alain; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Balter, Vincent; Bondanese, Victor P; Morel, Anne-Pierre; Clapisson, Gilles; Lamboux, Aline; Albarede, Francis

    2015-02-01

    The isotope effect describes mass-dependent variations of natural isotope abundances for a particular element. In this pilot study, we measured the (65)Cu/(63)Cu ratios in the serums of 20 breast and 8 colorectal cancer patients, which correspond to, respectively, 90 and 49 samples taken at different times with molecular biomarker documentation. Copper isotope compositions were determined by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). When compared with the literature data from a control group of 50 healthy blood donors, abundances of Cu isotopes predict mortality in the colorectal cancer group with a probability p = 0.018. For the breast cancer patients and the group of control women the probability goes down to p = 0.0006 and the AUC under the ROC curve is 0.75. Most patients considered in this preliminary study and with serum δ(65)Cu lower than the threshold value of -0.35‰ (per mil) did not survive. As a marker, a drop in δ(65)Cu precedes molecular biomarkers by several months. The observed decrease of δ(65)Cu in the serum of cancer patients is assigned to the extensive oxidative chelation of copper by cytosolic lactate. The potential of Cu isotope variability as a new diagnostic tool for breast and colorectal cancer seems strong. Shifts in Cu isotope compositions fingerprint cytosolic Cu chelation by lactate mono- and bidentates. This simple scheme provides a straightforward explanation for isotopically light Cu in the serum and isotopically heavy Cu in cancer cells: Cu(+) escaping chelation by lactate and excreted into the blood stream is isotopically light. Low δ(65)Cu values in serum therefore reveal the strength of lactate production by the Warburg effect. PMID:25532497

  17. Copper isotope effect in serum of cancer patients. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Télouk, Philippe; Puisieux, Alain; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Balter, Vincent; Bondanese, Victor P; Morel, Anne-Pierre; Clapisson, Gilles; Lamboux, Aline; Albarede, Francis

    2015-02-01

    The isotope effect describes mass-dependent variations of natural isotope abundances for a particular element. In this pilot study, we measured the (65)Cu/(63)Cu ratios in the serums of 20 breast and 8 colorectal cancer patients, which correspond to, respectively, 90 and 49 samples taken at different times with molecular biomarker documentation. Copper isotope compositions were determined by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). When compared with the literature data from a control group of 50 healthy blood donors, abundances of Cu isotopes predict mortality in the colorectal cancer group with a probability p = 0.018. For the breast cancer patients and the group of control women the probability goes down to p = 0.0006 and the AUC under the ROC curve is 0.75. Most patients considered in this preliminary study and with serum δ(65)Cu lower than the threshold value of -0.35‰ (per mil) did not survive. As a marker, a drop in δ(65)Cu precedes molecular biomarkers by several months. The observed decrease of δ(65)Cu in the serum of cancer patients is assigned to the extensive oxidative chelation of copper by cytosolic lactate. The potential of Cu isotope variability as a new diagnostic tool for breast and colorectal cancer seems strong. Shifts in Cu isotope compositions fingerprint cytosolic Cu chelation by lactate mono- and bidentates. This simple scheme provides a straightforward explanation for isotopically light Cu in the serum and isotopically heavy Cu in cancer cells: Cu(+) escaping chelation by lactate and excreted into the blood stream is isotopically light. Low δ(65)Cu values in serum therefore reveal the strength of lactate production by the Warburg effect.

  18. Linking species abundance distributions in numerical abundance and biomass through simple assumptions about community structure

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Peter A.; Magurran, Anne E

    2010-01-01

    Species abundance distributions (SADs) are widely used as a tool for summarizing ecological communities but may have different shapes, depending on the currency used to measure species importance. We develop a simple plotting method that links SADs in the alternative currencies of numerical abundance and biomass and is underpinned by testable predictions about how organisms occupy physical space. When log numerical abundance is plotted against log biomass, the species lie within an approximat...

  19. Noble gases in presolar diamonds II: Component abundances reflect thermal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Gary R.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1994-01-01

    Using the isotopic compositions derived in Huss and Lewis, 1994a, abundances of the P3, HL, and P6 noble-gas components were determined for 15 diamonds separates from primitive chondrites of 8 chondrite classes. Within a meteorite class, the relative abundances of these components correlate with the petrologic subtype of the host meteorite, indicating that metamorphism is primarily responsible for the variations. Relative abundances of P3, HL, and P6 among diamond samples can be understood in terms of thermal processing of a single mixture of diamonds like those now found in CI and CM2 chondrites. With relatively gentle heating, primitive diamonds first lose their low-temperature P3 gases and a 'labile' fraction of the HL component. Mass loss associated with release of these components produces an increase in the HL and P6 content of the remaining diamond relative to unprocessed diamond. Higher temperatures initiate destruction of the main HL carrier, while the HL content of the surviving diamonds remains essentially constant. At the same time, the P6 carrier begins to preferentially lose light noble gases. Meteorites that have experienced metamorphic temperatures greater than or = 650 C have lost essentially all of their presolar diamond through chemical reactions with surrounding minerals. The P3 abundance seems to be a function only of the maximum temperature experienced by the diamonds and thus is independent of the nature of the surrounding environment. If all classes inherited the same mixture of primitive diamonds, then P3 abundances would tie together the metamorphic scales in different meteorite classes. However, if the P3 abundance indicates a higher temperature than do other thermometers applicable to the host meteorite, then the P3 abundance may contain information about heating prior to accretion. Diamonds in the least metamorphosed EH, CV, and CO chondrites seem to carry a record of pre-accretionary thermal processing.

  20. Experimental determination of barium isotope fractionation during diffusion and adsorption processes at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zuilen, Kirsten; Müller, Thomas; Nägler, Thomas F.; Dietzel, Martin; Küsters, Tim

    2016-08-01

    Variations in barium (Ba) stable isotope abundances measured in low and high temperature environments have recently received increasing attention. The actual processes controlling Ba isotope fractionation, however, remain mostly elusive. In this study, we present the first experimental approach to quantify the contribution of diffusion and adsorption on mass-dependent Ba isotope fractionation during transport of aqueous Ba2+ ions through a porous medium. Experiments have been carried out in which a BaCl2 solution of known isotopic composition diffused through u-shaped glass tubes filled with silica hydrogel at 10 °C and 25 °C for up to 201 days. The diffused Ba was highly fractionated by up to -2.15‰ in δ137/134Ba, despite the low relative difference in atomic mass. The time-dependent isotope fractionation can be successfully reproduced by a diffusive transport model accounting for mass-dependent differences in the effective diffusivities of the Ba isotope species (D137Ba /D134Ba =(m134 /m137) β). Values of β extracted from the transport model were in the range of 0.010-0.011. Independently conducted batch experiments revealed that adsorption of Ba onto the surface of silica hydrogel favoured the heavier Ba isotopes (α = 1.00015 ± 0.00008). The contribution of adsorption on the overall isotope fractionation in the diffusion experiments, however, was found to be small. Our results contribute to the understanding of Ba isotope fractionation processes, which is crucial for interpreting natural isotope variations and the assessment of Ba isotope ratios as geochemical proxies.

  1. The iron abundance of the Magellanic Bridge

    CERN Document Server

    Dufton, P L; Thompson, H M A; Street, R A

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution HST ultra-violet spectra for five B-type stars in the Magellanic Bridge and in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds have been analysed to estimate their iron abundances. Those for the Clouds are lower than estimates obtained from late-type stars or the optical lines in B-type stars by approximately 0.5 dex. This may be due to systematic errors possibly arising from non-LTE effects or from errors in the atomic data as similar low Fe abundances having previously been reported from the analysis of the ultra-violet spectra of Galactic early-type stars. The iron abundance estimates for all three Bridge targets appear to be significantly lower than those found for the SMC and LMC by approximately -0.5 dex and -0.8 dex respectively and these differential results should not be affected by any systematic errors present in the absolute abundance estimates. These differential iron abundance estimates are consistent with the underabundances for C, N, O, Mg and Si of approximately -1.1 dex relative to our...

  2. Oxygen abundance maps of CALIFA galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zinchenko, I A; Grebel, E K; Sanchez, S F; Vilchez, J M

    2016-01-01

    We construct maps of the oxygen abundance distribution across the disks of 88 galaxies using CALIFA data release 2 (DR2) spectra. The position of the center of a galaxy (coordinates on the plate) were also taken from the CALIFA DR2. The galaxy inclination, the position angle of the major axis, and the optical radius were determined from the analysis of the surface brightnesses in the SDSS $g$ and $r$ bands of the photometric maps of SDSS data release 9. We explore the global azimuthal abundance asymmetry in the disks of the CALIFA galaxies and the presence of a break in the radial oxygen abundance distribution. We found that there is no significant global azimuthal asymmetry for our sample of galaxies, i.e., the asymmetry is small, usually lower than 0.05 dex. The scatter in oxygen abundances around the abundance gradient has a comparable value, $\\lesssim 0.05$ dex. A significant (possibly dominant) fraction of the asymmetry can be attributed to the uncertainties in the geometrical parameters of these galaxie...

  3. Good abundances from bad spectra; 1, techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Bryn, J; Wyse, R F G; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F G

    1995-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract true iron abundances and surface gravities from spectra of the type provided by the multiple-object fibre-fed spectroscopic radial-velocity surveys underway with 2dF, HYDRA, NESSIE, and the forthcoming Sloan survey. Our method is optimised for low S/N, intermediate resolution blue spectra of G stars. Spectroscopic indices sensitive to iron abundance and gravity are defined from a set of narrow (few Angstrom) wavelength intervals, and calibrated using synthetic spectra. We have also defined a single abundance indicator which is able to provide useful iron abundance information from spectra having S/N ratios as low as 10 per Angstrom. The theoretical basis and calibration using synthetic spectra are described in this paper. The empirical calibration of these techniques by application to observational data is described in Jones, Wyse and Gilmore (PASP July 1995). The technique provides precise iron abundances, with zero-point correct to \\sim 0.1 dex, and is reliable, with ...

  4. Why is Trichodesmium abundant in the Kuroshio?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozaki, T.; Takeda, S.; Itoh, S.; Kodama, T.; Liu, X.; Hashihama, F.; Furuya, K.

    2015-12-01

    The genus Trichodesmium is recognized as an abundant and major diazotroph in the Kuroshio, but the reason for this remains unclear. The present study investigated the abundance of Trichodesmium spp. and nitrogen fixation together with concentrations of dissolved iron and phosphate in the Kuroshio and its marginal seas. We performed the observations near the Miyako Islands, which form part of the Ryukyu Islands, situated along the Kuroshio, since our satellite analysis suggested that material transport could occur from the islands to the Kuroshio. Trichodesmium spp. bloomed (> 20 000 filaments L-1) near the Miyako Islands, abundance was high in the Kuroshio and the Kuroshio bifurcation region of the East China Sea, but was low in the Philippine Sea. The abundance of Trichodesmium spp. was significantly correlated with the total nitrogen fixation activity. The surface concentrations of dissolved iron (0.19-0.89 nM) and phosphate (differences in Trichodesmium spp. abundance and nitrogen fixation. Numerical particle-tracking experiments simulated the transportation of water around the Ryukyu Islands to the Kuroshio. Our results indicate that Trichodesmium growing around the Ryukyu Islands could be advected into the Kuroshio.

  5. Abundances of Molecular Species in Barnard 68

    CERN Document Server

    Francesco, J D; Welch, W J; Bergin, E A; Francesco, James Di; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Welch, William J.; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2002-01-01

    Abundances for 5 molecules (C18O, CS, NH3, H2CO, and C3H2) and 1 molecular ion (N2H+) and upper limits for the abundances of 1 molecule (13CO) and 1 molecular ion (HCO+) are derived for gas within the Bok globule Barnard 68 (B68). The abundances were determined using our own BIMA millimeter interferometer data and single-dish data gathered from the literature, in conjunction with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. Since B68 is the only starless core to have its density structure strongly constrained via extinction mapping, a major uncertainty has been removed from these determinations. All abundances for B68 are lower than those derived for translucent and cold dense clouds, but perhaps only significantly for N2H+, NH3, and C3H2. Depletion of CS toward the extinction peak of B68 is hinted at by the large offset between the extinction peak and the position of maximum CS line brightness. Abundances derived here for C18O and N2H+ are consistent with other, recently determined values at positions observed in...

  6. Mid-IR enhanced laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Staci; Ford, Alan; Akpovo, Codjo A.; Johnson, Lewis

    2016-08-01

    A double-pulsed laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) technique utilizing wavelengths in the mid-infrared (MIR) for the second pulse, referred to as double-pulse LAMIS (DP-LAMIS), was examined for its effect on detection limits compared to single-pulse laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). A MIR carbon dioxide (CO2) laser pulse at 10.6 μm was employed to enhance spectral emissions from nanosecond-laser-induced plasma via mid-IR reheating and in turn, improve the determination of the relative abundance of isotopes in a sample. This technique was demonstrated on a collection of 10BO and 11BO molecular spectra created from enriched boric acid (H3BO3) isotopologues in varying concentrations. Effects on the overall ability of both LAMIS and DP-LAMIS to detect the relative abundance of boron isotopes in a starting sample were considered. Least-squares fitting to theoretical models was used to deduce plasma parameters and understand reproducibility of results. Furthermore, some optimization for conditions of the enhanced emission was achieved, along with a comparison of the overall emission intensity, plasma density, and plasma temperature generated by the two techniques.

  7. Carbon Isotope and Isotopomer Fractionation in Cold Dense Cloud Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Furuya, Kenji; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    We construct the gas-grain chemical network model which includes carbon isotopes (12C and 13C) with an emphasis on isotopomer-exchange reactions. Temporal variations of molecular abundances, the carbon isotope ratios (12CX/13CX) and the isotopomer ratios (12C13CX/13C12CX) of CCH and CCS in cold dense cloud cores are investigated by numerical calculations. We confirm that the isotope ratios of molecules, both in the gas phase and grain surfaces, are significantly different depending on whether the molecule is formed from the carbon atom (ion) or the CO molecule. Molecules formed from carbon atoms have the CX/13CX ratios greater than the elemental abundance ratio of [12C/13C]. On the other hand, molecules formed from CO molecules have the CX/13CX ratios smaller than the [12C/13C] ratio. We reproduce the observed C13CH/13CCH ratio in TMC-1, if the isotopomer exchange reaction, 13CCH + H C13CH + H + 8.1 K, proceeds with the forward rate coefficient kf > 10^-11 cm3 s-1. However, the C13CS/13CCS ratio is lower tha...

  8. Tank waste isotope contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the results of a calculation to determine the relative contribution of selected isotopes to the inhalation and ingestion doses for a postulated release of Hanford tank waste. The fraction of the dose due to 90Sr, 90Y, 137Cs and the alpha emitters for single shell solids and liquids, double shell solids and liquids, aging waste solids and liquids and all solids and liquids. An effective dose conversion factor was also calculated for the alpha emitters for each composite of the tank waste

  9. Cold regions isotope applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrigo, L.D.; Divine, T.E.

    1976-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) started the Cold Regions Isotope Applications Program in FY-1975 to identify special conditions in the Arctic and similar geographic areas (Cold Regions) where radioisotope power, heater, or sterilization systems would be desirable and economically viable. Significant progress was made in the first year of this program and all objectives for this initial 12-month period were achieved. The major conclusions and recommendations resulting for this effort are described below. The areas of interest covered include: radiosterilization of sewage; heating of septic tanks; and radioisotope thermoelectric generators as power sources for meteorological instruments and navigational aids. (TFD)

  10. ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clewett, G.H.; Lee, DeW.A.

    1958-05-20

    A new method is described for isotopic enrichment of uranium. It has been found that when an aqueous acidic solution of ionic tetravalent uraniunn is contacted with chelate complexed tetravalent uranium, the U/sup 238/ preferentially concentrates in the complexed phase while U/sup 235/ concentrates in the ionic phase. The effect is enhanced when the chelate compound is water insoluble and is dissolved in a water-immiscible organic solvent. Cupferron is one of a number of sultable complexing agents, and chloroform is a suitable organic solvent.

  11. Mass-independent fractionation of mercury isotopes in compact fluorescent light bulbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, C.; Anbar, A. D.; Lyons, J. R.; Johnson, T. M.

    2010-12-01

    Compact fluorescent lightbulbs (CFLs) are a growing source of Hg pollution. The high-energy environment of the CFLs combined with the known partitioning of Hg into the bulb walls could provide an environment for unusual isotope fractionation that could be used to trace pollution from improper bulb disposal. To investigate this possibility, we analyzed the isotope composition of Hg in CFL glass, phosphor powder, and whole bulbs from CFLs of known ages. We observed large, mass-independent fractionation of Hg isotopes between Hg embedded in the bulb wall and Hg in the liquid and vapor phases, which are the initial reservoir of Hg in the bulb. This fractionation results in the bulb wall showing enrichment of 198Hg, 199Hg, 200Hg, 201Hg, and 204Hg relative to 202Hg, the most abundant isotope. Both the amount of Hg embedded in the glass and the magnitude of the isotope enrichment were found to increase with the number of hours of light bulb use. For a CFL used for 3600 hours (with a rated lifetime of 10,000 hours), the isotopic composition of the Hg in the glass was enriched by 34.5‰, 4.1‰, 6.3‰, 21.1‰, and 12.1‰ for 198Hg/202Hg, 199Hg/202Hg, 200Hg/202Hg, 201Hg/202Hg, and 204Hg/202Hg, respectively, compared to NIST SRM-3133. This pattern of isotope enrichments is not correlated with mass differences for any of the isotope ratios. In contrast, the other mass-independent effects that have recently been observed in Hg isotopes (i.e., the nuclear volume and magnetic isotope effects) resemble mass-dependent fractionation for the even mass isotopes and are anomalous only for the odd mass isotopes, 199Hg and 201Hg. First order theoretical calculations using Hg absorption and emission data for each of the hyperfine components of the 253.7 nm line have shown that similar fractionation can be produced through an optical self-shielding effect. This effect occurs because each Hg isotope has a different degree of optical saturation at their respective absorption wavelength

  12. Mars and earth - Origin and abundance of volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, E.; Owen, T.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the factors which are responsible for the tenuous nature of the Martian atmosphere in comparison to the terrestrial atmosphere, taking into account new data obtained in connection with the Viking missions. It is found that Mars was poor in volatiles from the start and fell further behind earth by less complete outgassing, by extensive retrapping, and by the partial loss of lighter gases. Attention is given to noble gases on earth and Mars, the condensation of noble gases and other volatiles, the sources of earth's volatiles, the bulk composition of earth, the release of volatiles from earth, clues to the volatile endowment of Mars, an abundance table for Mars, a comparison of terrestrial and Martian conditions, isotopic data on noble gases, xenon-129 on Mars and earth, possibilities concerning the loss of an early Martian atmosphere, the evolution of the atmosphere of Mars, conditions in the case of planet Venus, and the reasons for the poorness of small planets in volatiles.

  13. Chemical Fractionation and Abundances in Coronal Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, J J

    2003-01-01

    Much of modern astrophysics is grounded on the observed chemical compositions of stars and the diffuse plasma that pervades the space between stars, galaxies and clusters of galaxies. X-ray and EUV spectra of the hot plasma in the outer atmospheres of stars have demonstrated that these environments are subject to chemical fractionation in which the abundances of elements can be enhanced and depleted by an order of magnitude or more. These coronal abundance anomalies are discussed and some of the physical mechanisms that might be responsible for producing them are examined. It is argued that coronal abundances can provide important new diagnostics on physical processes at work in solar and stellar coronae. It seems likely that other hot astrophysical plasmas will be subject to similar effects.

  14. Trace Element Abundances in an Unusual Hibonite-Perovskite Refractory Inclusion from Allende

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mane, Prajkta; Wadhwa, M.; Keller, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs) are thought to be the first-formed solids in the Solar protoplanetary disk and can provide information about the earliest Solar System processes (e.g., [1]). A hibonite-perovskitebearing CAI from the Allende CV3 chondrite (SHAL, [2]) contains a single of 500 micrometers hibonite grain and coarse-grained perovskite. The mineralogy and oxygen isotopic composition of this CAI shows similarities with FUN inclusions, especially HAL [2]. Here we present trace element abundances in SHAL.

  15. HETEROGENEITY in 12CO/13CO ABUNDANCE RATIOS TOWARD SOLAR-TYPE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, RL; Pontoppidan, KM; Young, ED; Morris,, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    © 2015. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.. This study reports an unusual heterogeneity in [12C16O]/[13C16O] abundance ratios of carbon monoxide observed in the gas phase toward seven ∼solar-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) and three dense foreground clouds in the nearby star-forming regions, Ophiuchus, Corona Australis, Orion, and Vela, and an isolated core, L43. Robust isotope ratios were derived using infrared absorption spectroscopy of the 4.7 μm fundamental and 2.3 ...

  16. Isotope hydrogeochemistry in exploration for buried and blind mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buried and blind deposits, with no direct geological or geochemical manifestation at the surface, are becoming increasingly important targets in Australia. One of the key exploration challenges relates to assessing and ranking targets established from geophysical and other remotely sensed surveys. Sub-surface geology is reflected in the geochemistry of groundwaters (Giblin, 1996) and hydrogeochemical methods provide a particularly powerful technique in areas of poor surface exposure, deep weathering and where transported overburden obscures the underlying geology (Giblin, 1997). In such areas several hundred samples are used to define locally prospective areas although how these relate to a specific mineralization style may be difficult to determine. The question of proximity to an orebody is fundamental to mineral exploration and isotopic (S, Pb, Sr) methods are uniquely capable of contributing to an answer. The isotopic composition of ores and waters that interact with ores carries important information about the elemental source; S and Pb are direct ore indicators allowing straight-forward interpretation of possible ore associations. The isotopic methods also provide unequivocal evidence for mixing. The isotopic compositions of S, Pb and Sr in rocks are unaffected by weathering and in natural waters are unaffected by precipitation, evaporation or dilution. Isotopic methods provide information that is complementary to that obtainable from major and trace element abundances. The application of integrated isotopic studies to conventional hydrogeochemical interpretations was tested in several areas (Fig. 1); Menninnie Dam (Pb, Zn; Eyre Peninsula SA), Abra (Ag, Pb; Bangemall Basin WA), Benambra (Cu, Zn, Pb: Lachlan Fold Belt Vic), Goonumbla (Cu, Au; Lachlan Fold Belt NSW) and Kanmantoo (Cu, Pb, Zn, Au; Kanmantoo Fold Belt SA). These were chosen to include different deposit types, tectonic regimes, climatic and topographic environments and groundwater chemistry

  17. A Comparison of ACE Measurements of Galactic Cosmic-Ray Abundances and Energy Spectra for Two Successive Solar Minima

    OpenAIRE

    J. Lavé; Binns, W. R.; Cummings, A. C.; de Nolfo, G. A.; Israel, M. H.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R.A; Stone, E. C.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    Using current solar minimum measurements from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we report the observed elemental abundances and energy spectra for C, O, Si, and Fe in the energy range of ~50-500MeV/nucleon. These measurements are compared to prior CRIS observations for the 1997-98 solar minimum period, when the solar magnetic field was of the opposite polarity. By April 2009, the current solar minimum intensities for each of the ...

  18. Isotope separation with improved selective ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Method and apparatus for isotope separation by selective ionization of a desired isotope in an environment of plural isotopes without corresponding ionization of the other isotopes in the environment. The selective ionization is achieved through a three step excitation of atoms of the desired isotope in response to laser radiations applied to the environment. The transition for each step is selected to be less than one half the ionization potential for the isotopes to avoid two step nonselective ionization

  19. Retracing diagenetic processes in marine porewaters using Ca isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockert, C.; Teichert, B. M.; Kaufhold, S.; Gussone, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    ammonium and δ44/40Ca depends on the presence of clay minerals in the lithology, displaying a better fit when clay minerals occur. These findings resolve that exchange of Ca with marine sediments has an important effect on the porewater isotopy which must be considered when interpreting Ca isotope porewater profiles. References: Fantle MS and DePaolo DJ (2007) Ca isotopes in carbonate sediment and pore fluid from ODP Site 807A: The Ca2+(aq)-calcite equilibrium fractionation factor and calcite recrystallization rates in Pleistocene sediments. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 71: 2524-2546. Skulan J, DePaolo DJ and Owens TL (1997) Biological control of calcium isotopic abundances in the global calcium cycle. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 61: 2505-2510. Teichert BMA, Gussone N, Torres ME (2009) Controls on calcium isotope fractionation in sedimentary porewaters. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 279: 373-382. Turchyn A and DePaolo DJ (2011) Calcium isotope evidene for suppression of carbonate dissolution in carbonate bearing organic rich sediments. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 75: 7081-7098. Zhu P, MacDougall JD (1998) Calcium isotopes in the marine environment and the oceanic calcium cycle. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 62:1691-1698.

  20. Organic vs. conventional grassland management: do (15N and (13C isotopic signatures of hay and soil samples differ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin H Klaus

    Full Text Available Distinguishing organic and conventional products is a major issue of food security and authenticity. Previous studies successfully used stable isotopes to separate organic and conventional products, but up to now, this approach was not tested for organic grassland hay and soil. Moreover, isotopic abundances could be a powerful tool to elucidate differences in ecosystem functioning and driving mechanisms of element cycling in organic and conventional management systems. Here, we studied the δ(15N and δ(13C isotopic composition of soil and hay samples of 21 organic and 34 conventional grasslands in two German regions. We also used Δδ(15N (δ(15N plant - δ(15N soil to characterize nitrogen dynamics. In order to detect temporal trends, isotopic abundances in organic grasslands were related to the time since certification. Furthermore, discriminant analysis was used to test whether the respective management type can be deduced from observed isotopic abundances. Isotopic analyses revealed no significant differences in δ(13C in hay and δ(15N in both soil and hay between management types, but showed that δ(13C abundances were significantly lower in soil of organic compared to conventional grasslands. Δδ(15N values implied that management types did not substantially differ in nitrogen cycling. Only δ(13C in soil and hay showed significant negative relationships with the time since certification. Thus, our result suggest that organic grasslands suffered less from drought stress compared to conventional grasslands most likely due to a benefit of higher plant species richness, as previously shown by manipulative biodiversity experiments. Finally, it was possible to correctly classify about two third of the samples according to their management using isotopic abundances in soil and hay. However, as more than half of the organic samples were incorrectly classified, we infer that more research is needed to improve this approach before it can be

  1. Organic vs. Conventional Grassland Management: Do 15N and 13C Isotopic Signatures of Hay and Soil Samples Differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Valentin H.; Hölzel, Norbert; Prati, Daniel; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Fischer, Markus; Kleinebecker, Till

    2013-01-01

    Distinguishing organic and conventional products is a major issue of food security and authenticity. Previous studies successfully used stable isotopes to separate organic and conventional products, but up to now, this approach was not tested for organic grassland hay and soil. Moreover, isotopic abundances could be a powerful tool to elucidate differences in ecosystem functioning and driving mechanisms of element cycling in organic and conventional management systems. Here, we studied the δ15N and δ13C isotopic composition of soil and hay samples of 21 organic and 34 conventional grasslands in two German regions. We also used Δδ15N (δ15N plant - δ15N soil) to characterize nitrogen dynamics. In order to detect temporal trends, isotopic abundances in organic grasslands were related to the time since certification. Furthermore, discriminant analysis was used to test whether the respective management type can be deduced from observed isotopic abundances. Isotopic analyses revealed no significant differences in δ13C in hay and δ15N in both soil and hay between management types, but showed that δ13C abundances were significantly lower in soil of organic compared to conventional grasslands. Δδ15N values implied that management types did not substantially differ in nitrogen cycling. Only δ13C in soil and hay showed significant negative relationships with the time since certification. Thus, our result suggest that organic grasslands suffered less from drought stress compared to conventional grasslands most likely due to a benefit of higher plant species richness, as previously shown by manipulative biodiversity experiments. Finally, it was possible to correctly classify about two third of the samples according to their management using isotopic abundances in soil and hay. However, as more than half of the organic samples were incorrectly classified, we infer that more research is needed to improve this approach before it can be efficiently used in practice

  2. Isotope techniques for hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the body of the Panel's report specific conclusions and recommendations are presented in the context of each subject. The general consensus of the Panel is as follows: by the study of this report, the 1961 Panel report, the Proceedings of the March 1963 Tokyo Symposium and other reports of research and technological advances, isotope-technique applications to hydrologic problems have provided some useful avenues for understanding the nature of the hydrologic cycle and in the solution of specific engineering problems. Some techniques are developed thoroughly enough for fairly routine application as tools for use in the solution of practical problems, but further research and development is needed on other concepts to determined whether or not they can be beneficially applied to either research or engineering problems. A concerted effort is required on the part of both hydrologists and isotope specialists working as teams to assure that proper synthesis of scientific advances in the respective fields and translation of these advances into practical technology is achieved

  3. Si Isotopes of Brownleeite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, Scott R.; Ito, M.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Jones, J. H.; Tatsuoka, H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Tatsuoka, H.

    2010-01-01

    Brownleeite is a manganese silicide, ideally stoichiometric MnSi, not previously observed in nature until its discovery within an interplanetary dust particle (IDP) that likely originated from a comet [1]. Three discrete brownleeite grains in the IDP L2055 I3 (4 microns in size, hereafter IDP I3) were identified with maximum dimensions of 100, 250 and 600 nm and fully analyzed using scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) [1]. One of the grains (100 nm in size) was poikilitically enclosed by low-Fe, Mn-enriched (LIME) olivine. LIME olivine is epitaxial to the brownleeite with the brownleeite (200) parallel to the olivine c* [1]. LIME olivine is an enigmatic phase first reported from chondritic porous IDPs and some unequilibrated ordinary chondrites [ 2], that is commonly observed in chondritic-porous IDPs. Recently, LIME olivine has been also found in comet Wild-2 (Stardust) samples [3], indicating that LIME olivine is a common mineral component of comets. LIME olivine has been proposed to form as a high temperature condensate in the protosolar nebula [2]. Brownleeite grains also likely formed as high-temperature condensates either in the early Solar System or in the outflow of an evolved star or supernova explosion [1]. The isotopic composition of the brownleeite grains may strongly constrain their ultimate source. To test this hypothesis, we performed isotopic analyses of the brownleeite and the associated LIME olivine, using the NASA/JSC NanoSIMS 50L ion microprobe.

  4. Laser isotope separation of gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic studies on laser isotope separation of gadolinium were performed. Spectroscopic data were obtained such as isotope shifts and hyperfine structures using an atomic beam. Enrichment of 157Gd up to 80% was observed by three-step photoionization experiment using linearly polarized dye lasers. Design of an separation system was discussed by the help of computer calculation of excitation dynamics. (author)

  5. Exotic structure of carbon isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground state properties of C isotopes, deformation and electromagnetic moments, as well as electric dipole transition strength are investigated. We first study the ground state properties of C isotopes using a deformed Hartree-Fock (HF) + BCS model with Skyrme interactions. Isotope dependence of the deformation properties is investigated. Shallow deformation minima are found in several neutron-rich C isotopes. It is also shown that the deformation minima appear in both the oblate and the prolate sides in 17C and 19C having almost the same binding energies. Next, we carry out shell model calculations to study electromagnetic moments and electric dipole transitions of C isotopes. We point out the clear configuration dependence of the quadrupole and magnetic moments in the odd C isotopes, which will be useful to find out the deformation and spin-parties of the ground states of these nuclei. Electric dipole states of C isotopes are studied focusing on the interplay between low energy Pigmy strength and giant dipole resonances. Low peak energies, two-peak structure and large widths of the giant resonances show deformation effects. Calculated transition strength below dipole giant resonance in heavier C isotopes than 15C is found to exhaust 12∼15% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule value and 50∼ 80% of the cluster sum rule value. (author)

  6. Boron isotopes in geothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron is a highly mobile element and during water-rock reactions, boron is leached out of rocks with no apparent fractionation. In geothermal systems where the water recharging the systems are meteoric in origin, the B isotope ratio of the geothermal fluid reflects the B isotope ratio of the rocks. Seawater has a distinctive B isotope ratio and where seawater recharges the geothermal system, the B isotope ratio of the geothermal system reflects the mixing of rock derived B and seawater derived B. Any deviations of the actual B isotope ratio of a mixture reflects subtle differences in the water-rock ratios in the cold downwelling limb of the hydrothermal system. This paper will present data from a variety of different geothermal systems, including New Zealand; Iceland; Yellowston, USA; Ibusuki, Japan to show the range in B isotope ratios in active geothermal systems. Some of these systems show well defined mixing trends between seawater and the host rocks, whilst others show the boron isotope ratios of the host rock only. In geothermal systems containing high amounts of CO2 boron isotope ratios from a volatile B source can also be inferred. (auth)

  7. Calcium isotopes in wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmden, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    The δ 44/40Ca values of bottled wine vary between -0.76% to -1.55% on the seawater scale and correlate weakly with inverse Ca concentration and Mg/Ca ratio, such that the lowest δ 44/40Ca values have the highest Ca concentrations and lowest Mg/Ca ratios. The correlation is notable in the sense that the measured wines include both whites and reds sampled from different wine growing regions of the world, and cover a wide range of quality. Trends among the data yield clues regarding the cause of the observed isotopic fractionation. White wines, and wines generally perceived to be of lower quality, have lower δ 44/40Ca values compared to red wines and wines of generally perceived higher quality. Quality was assessed qualitatively through sensory evaluation, price, and scores assigned by critics. The relationship between δ 44/40Ca and wine quality was most apparent when comparing wines of one varietal from one producer from the same growing region. In the vineyard, wine quality is related to factors such as the tonnage of the crop and the ripeness of the grapes at the time of harvesting, the thickness of the skins for reds, the age of the vines, as well as the place where the grapes were grown (terroir). Quality is also influenced by winemaking practices such as fermentation temperature, duration of skin contact, and barrel ageing. Accordingly, the relationship between δ 44/40Ca and wine quality may originate during grape ripening in the vineyard or during winemaking in the cellar. We tested the grape ripening hypothesis using Merlot grapes sampled from a vineyard in the Okanagan, British Columbia, using sugar content (degrees Brix) as an indicator of ripeness. The grapes were separated into pulp, skin, and pip fractions and were analyzed separately. Thus far, there is no clear evidence for a systematic change in δ 44/40Ca values associated with progressive ripening of grapes in the vineyard. On the day of harvesting, the δ 44/40Ca value of juice squeezed from

  8. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Isselhardt, Brett Hallen

    2011-01-01

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with aut...

  9. Re-Os isotope geochemistry of three Chinese chondrites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI XiaChen; QIN Xie; SHI RenDeng; HONG JiAn

    2007-01-01

    Three Chinese ordinary chondrites, including Jilin (H5), Boxian (LL3.8) and Lujiang (LL6), have been studied for their Re and Os abundances and Os isotopic composition in whole-chondrite samples, separated magnetic and nonmagnetic fractions, and nodules.The results indicate that the Re and Os abundances of the whole-chondrite samples are in the ranges of corresponding H- and LL-Groups, respectively.The Re and Os abundances of magnetic fraction from Boxian and Lujiang are within the range of high-Os IIAB and IIIAB irons, whereas those of nonmagnetic fractions of Boxian and Lujiang are lower than the whole-chondrite values.The Re and Os abundances of nodules in Jilin are in the range of the LL-Group.187Re/188Os and 187Os/188Os ratios of the three whole chondrites are in the range of ordinary chondrites which locate around the isochron of IIAB+IIIAB irons.187Re/188Os and 187Os/188Os ratios of the magnetic and nonmagnetic fractions from Boxian have a larger difference.The nonmagnetic fraction of Lujiang may contain a recent addition of Re, which causes deviation of the 187Re/188Os ratio from the irons isochron.The Re and Os abundances of nodules in Jilin are lower than those of the whole-chondrite, but their 187Os/188Os ratios are higher than that of the whole chondrite.

  10. Low temperature Rosseland opacities with varied abundances of carbon and nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Lederer, Michael T

    2008-01-01

    We provide low temperature opacity data that incorporate varied abundances of the elements carbon and nitrogen. In the temperature range that we focus at, molecules are the dominant opacity source. Our dataset spans a large metallicity range and shall deliver the necessary input data for stellar evolution models as well as other applications. We conduct chemical equilibrium calculations in order to evaluate the partial pressures of neutral atoms, ions and molecules. Based on a large dataset containing atomic line and continuum data, and, most importantly, a plethora of molecular lines, we subsequently calculate Rosseland mean opacity coefficients. This is done not only for a number of different metallicities, but also for varied abundances of the isotopes 12C and 14N at each metallicity. The molecular data comprise the main opacity sources at either an oxygen-rich or carbon-rich chemistry. We tabulate the opacity coefficients as a function of temperature and, basically, density. Already within a certain chemi...

  11. Custom synthesis of isotope-labelled Apis mellifera Pheromone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this study is to determine the optimum conditions for the synthesis of the isotope-labelled isopentyl acetate. Isopentyl acetate is widely used as a raw material in industries, in syntheses, and is utilized as a sex attractant (pheromone) by the bee species, Apis mellifera. The isotope labelling of isopentyl acetate will allow tracking of the fate and movement of the isopentyl acetate in the environment, in chemical transformations, and in biological systems. Esterification by alcoholysis of acetic acid was optimized for the preparation of Carbon-14(14C)-labelled isopentyl acetate from 14C-labelled acetic acid and isoamyl alcohol. The different conditions studied were: (1) The effects of acid catalysis and/or reflux on the incorporation and retention of the isotope label on the product. The efficiency of label incorporation and retention was determined through the beta radioactivity of Carbon 14 in each of the synthetic constructs. Determination of the beta radioactivity concentration of 14C in the isopentyl acetate product was done using low level liquid scintillation spectrometry. Each of the synthetic products was mixed with Ultima Gold scintillation cocktail in a low potassium glass scintillation vial, and analysed in a low-level Wallac 1414 scintillation counter. The application of catalysis without reflux resulted in the highest yield (35%). The same condition also resulted in the highest abundance of carbon isotope label with 2.40 Bequerels per cubic centimetre, Bq/cc (measurement unit for radioactivity). (author)

  12. Neutron-rich chromium isotope anomalies in supernova nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Dauphas, Nicolas; Chen, James; Roskosz, Mathieu; Papanastassiou, Dimitri; Stodolna, Julien; Guan, Yunbin; Ma, Chi; Eiler, John

    2010-01-01

    Neutron-rich isotopes with masses near that of iron are produced in type Ia and II supernovae. Traces of such nucleosynthesis are found in primitive meteorites in the form of variations in the isotopic abundance of 54Cr, the most neutron-rich stable isotope of chromium. The hosts of these isotopic anomalies must be presolar grains that condensed in the outflows of supernovae, offering the opportunity to study the nucleosynthesis of iron-peak nuclei in ways that complement spectroscopic observations and can inform models of stellar evolution. However, despite almost two decades of extensive search, the carrier of 54Cr anomalies is still unknown, presumably because it is fine-grained and is chemically labile. Here we identify in the primitive meteorite Orgueil the carrier of 54Cr-anomalies as nanoparticles, most likely spinels that show large enrichments in 54Cr relative to solar composition (54Cr/52Cr ratio >3.6xsolar). Such large enrichments in 54Cr can only be produced in supernovae. The mineralogy of the gr...

  13. Oxygen and carbon isotopic growth record in a reef coral from the florida keys and a deep-sea coral from blake plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emiliani, C.; Harold, Hudson J.; Shinn, E.A.; George, R.Y.

    1978-01-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotope analysis through a 30-year (1944 to 1974) growth of Montastrea annularis from Hen and Chickens Reef (Florida Keys) shows a strong yearly variation in the abundances of both carbon-13 and oxygen-18 and a broad inverse relationship between the two isotopes. Normal annual dense bands are formed during the summer and are characterized by heavy carbon and light oxygen. "Stress bands" are formed during particularly severe winters and are characterized by heavy carbon and heavy oxygen. The isotopic effect of Zooxanthellae metabolism dominates the temperature effect on the oxygen-18/oxygen-16 ratio. The isotopic results on the deep-sea solitary coral Bathypsammia tintinnabulum, where Zooxanthellae are nonexistent, indicates that the abundance of the heavy isotopes carbon-13 and oxygen-18 is inversely related to the growth rate, with both carbon and oxygen approaching equilibrium values with increasing skeletal age.

  14. Influence of 15N enrichment on the net isotopic fractionation factor during the reduction of nitrate to nitrous oxide in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathieu, O.; Levegue, J.; Henault, C.;

    2007-01-01

    Nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas, is mainly emitted from soils during the denitrification process. Nitrogen stable-isotope investigations can help to characterise the N(2)O source and N(2)O production mechanisms. The stable-isotope approach is increasingly used with (15)N natural abundance...... or relatively low (15)N enrichment levels and requires a good knowledge of the isotopic fractionation effect inherent to this biological mechanism. This paper reports the measurement of the net and instantaneous isotopic fractionation factor (alpha(i)(s/p)) during the denitrification of NO(3)(-) to N(2)O over...... a range of (15)N substrate enrichments (0.37 to 1.00 atom% (15)N). At natural abundance level, the isotopic fractionation effect reported falls well within the range of data previously observed. For (15)N-enriched substrate, the value of alpha(i)(s/p) was not constant and decreased from 1.024 to 1...

  15. Zinc isotope separation in acetone by displacement chromatography using benzo-15-crown-5 resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinc isotope separation was studied by column chromatographies using resorcinol-formaldehyde-resin grafted with benzo-15-crown-5 in the porous silica beads. Chromatography was performed in a break-through manner by feeding the acetone solution of zinc chloride into the columns. Zinc isotopic abundance ratios of 66Zn/64Zn and 68Zn/64Zn were measured by ICP-MS. It has been found that the heavier isotopes are preferentially enriched at the front boundary region. This result proves 64Zn depleted zinc can be obtained by collecting the effluents of front boundary region. The separation coefficient (ε) observed by five meters migration treatment is 0.81 x 10-3 for the isotopic pair of 68Zn/64Zn at 25 deg C and higher separation coefficient was obtained from more concentrated zinc chloride solution. (author)

  16. Static, Mixed-Array Total Evaporation for Improved Quantitation of Plutonium Minor Isotopes in Small Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, F E; Byerly, Benjamin L; Thomas, Mariam R; Spencer, Khalil J

    2016-06-01

    Actinide isotope measurements are a critical signature capability in the modern nuclear forensics "toolbox", especially when interrogating anthropogenic constituents in real-world scenarios. Unfortunately, established methodologies, such as traditional total evaporation via thermal ionization mass spectrometry, struggle to confidently measure low abundance isotope ratios (<10(-6)) within already limited quantities of sample. Herein, we investigate the application of static, mixed array total evaporation techniques as a straightforward means of improving plutonium minor isotope measurements, which have been resistant to enhancement in recent years because of elevated radiologic concerns. Results are presented for small sample (~20 ng) applications involving a well-known plutonium isotope reference material, CRM-126a, and compared with traditional total evaporation methods. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  17. Molybdenum Evidence for Inherited Planetary Scale Isotope Heterogeneity of the Protosolar Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Dauphas, N; Reisberg, L

    2001-01-01

    Isotope anomalies provide important information about early solar system evolution. Here we report molybdenum isotope abundances determined in samples of various meteorite classes. There is no fractionation of molybdenum isotopes in our sample set within 0.1 permil and no contribution from the extinct radionuclide 97Tc at mass 97 (97Tc/92Mo<3E-6). Instead, we observe clear anomalies in bulk iron meteorites, mesosiderites, pallasites, and chondrites characterized by a coupled excess in p- and r- or a mirror deficit in s-process nuclides (Mo-HL). This large scale isotope heterogeneity of the solar system observed for molybdenum must have been inherited from the interstellar environment where the sun was born, illustrating the concept of ``cosmic chemical memory''. The presence of molybdenum anomalies is used to discuss the filiation between planetesimals.

  18. Simulation of arthropod abundance from plant composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenJun Zhang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between arthropod abundance and plant composition is extremely complex. It is very hard to develop a mechanistic model to describe the relationship. This study aimed to simulate arthropod abundance from plant composition on grassland using an artificial neural network developed by the author, and to compare simulation performances between the neural network and conventional models. The results revealed that there were complex interactions between plants and arthropods, and the arthropod abundance on grassland was significantly determined of plant families and their cover-degrees rather than plant species and their cover-degrees. Neural network exhibited a better simulation performance than multivariate regression and response surface model. Cross validation indicated that prediction performance of neural network was also superior to these models. It was concluded that neural network is an effective tool to model arthropod abundance from plant composition on grassland. A moderate dimensionality for input space may be determined to produce a reasonably trained neural network. Such procedures for dimensionality reduction as PCE, etc., were suggested being used in the data treatment in neural network modeling. A high dimensionality for input space and a few samples in the input set would result in the deficient learning of neural network. Randomization procedure for sample submission would help to eliminate the sequence correlation but may result in a worse performance in simulation and prediction. It was suggested that randomization procedure could be used to the sample submission for these situations with a lot of samples and a lower dimensionality.

  19. North Sea Elasmobranchs: distribution, abundance and biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, N.; Heessen, H.J.L.; Hofstede, ter R.

    2005-01-01

    Based on data from various international and national surveys, an overview is given of the fine-scale distribution (resolution of 20¿longitude * 10¿ latitude; ¿ 10*10 nm) and trends in abundance of elasmobranch species reported from the North Sea. Presence-absence maps are produced based on 4 survey

  20. The Galactic Thick Disk Stellar Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Prochaska, J X; Carney, B W; McWilliam, A; Wolfe, A M; Prochaska, Jason X.; Naumov, Sergei O.; Carney, Bruce W.; William, Andrew Mc; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    2000-01-01

    We present first results from a program to measure the chemical abundances of a large (N>30) sample of thick disk stars with the principal goal of investigating the formation history of the Galactic thick disk. Our analysis confirms previous studies of O and Mg in the thick disk stars which reported enhancements in excess of the thin disk population. Furthermore, the observations of Si, Ca, Ti, Mn, Co, V, Zn, Al, and Eu all argue that the thick disk population has a distinct chemical history from the thin disk. With the exception of V and Co, the thick disk abundance patterns match or tend towards the values observed for halo stars with [Fe/H]~-1. This suggests that the thick disk stars had a chemical enrichment history similar to the metal-rich halo stars. With the possible exception of Si, the thick disk abundance patterns are in excellent agreement with the chemical abundances observed in the metal-poor bulge stars suggesting the two populations formed from the same gas reservoir at a common epoch. We disc...

  1. Nitrous Oxide Production by Abundant Benthic Macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    that do not ingest large quantities of microorganisms produced insignificant amounts of nitrous oxide. Ephemera danica, a very abundant mayfly larva, was monitored monthly in a nitrate-polluted stream. Nitrous oxide production by this filter-feeder was highly dependent on nitrate availability...

  2. The Abundance of Large Arcs From CLASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Coe, Dan A.; Clash Team

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an automated arc-finding algorithm to perform a rigorous comparison of the observed and simulated abundance of large lensed background galaxies (a.k.a arcs). We use images from the CLASH program to derive our observed arc abundance. Simulated CLASH images are created by performing ray tracing through mock clusters generated by the N-body simulation calibrated tool -- MOKA, and N-body/hydrodynamic simulations -- MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH X-ray selected sample. We derive a lensing efficiency of 15 ± 3 arcs per cluster for the X-ray selected CLASH sample and 4 ± 2 arcs per cluster for the simulated sample. The marginally significant difference (3.0 σ) between the results for the observations and the simulations can be explained by the systematically smaller area with magnification larger than 3 (by a factor of ˜4) in both MOKA and MUSIC mass models relative to those derived from the CLASH data. Accounting for this difference brings the observed and simulated arc statistics into full agreement. We find that the source redshift distribution does not have big impact on the arc abundance but the arc abundance is very sensitive to the concentration of the dark matter halos. Our results suggest that the solution to the "arc statistics problem" lies primarily in matching the cluster dark matter distribution.

  3. Will Abundant Natural Gas Solve Climate Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McJeon, H. C.; Edmonds, J.; Bauer, N.; Leon, C.; Fisher, B.; Flannery, B.; Hilaire, J.; Krey, V.; Marangoni, G.; Mi, R.; Riahi, K.; Rogner, H.; Tavoni, M.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid deployment of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling technologies enabled the production of previously uneconomic shale gas resources in North America. Global deployment of these advanced gas production technologies could bring large influx of economically competitive unconventional gas resources to the energy system. It has been hoped that abundant natural gas substituting for coal could reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, which in turn could reduce climate forcing. Other researchers countered that the non-CO2 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas production make its lifecycle emissions higher than those of coal. In this study, we employ five state-of-the-art integrated assessment models (IAMs) of energy-economy-climate systems to assess the full impact of abundant gas on climate change. The models show large additional natural gas consumption up to +170% by 2050. The impact on CO2 emissions, however, is found to be much smaller (from -2% to +11%), and a majority of the models reported a small increase in climate forcing (from -0.3% to +7%) associated with the increased use of abundant gas. Our results show that while globally abundant gas may substantially change the future energy market equilibrium, it will not significantly mitigate climate change on its own in the absence of climate policies.

  4. Abundance of Terrestrial Planets by Microlensing

    OpenAIRE

    Yock, Philip

    2000-01-01

    Terrestrial planets may be detected using the gravitational microlensing technique. This was demonstrated in the high magnification event MACHO-98-BLG-35. Observing strategies aimed at measuring the abundance of terrestrial planets are discussed, using both existing telescopes and planned telescopes.

  5. Ab initio calculations of the Fe(II) and Fe(III) isotopic effects in citrates, nicotianamine, and phytosiderophore, and new Fe isotopic measurements in higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynier, Frédéric; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Wang, Kun; Foriel, Julien

    2013-05-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant transition metal in higher plants and variations in its isotopic compositions can be used to trace its utilization. In order to better understand the effect of plant-induced isotopic fractionation on the global Fe cycling, we have estimated by quantum chemical calculations the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation between different Fe species relevant to the transport and storage of Fe in higher plants: Fe(II)-citrate, Fe(III)-citrate, Fe(II)-nicotianamine, and Fe(III)-phytosiderophore. The ab initio calculations show firstly, that Fe(II)-nicotianamine is ˜3‰ (56Fe/54Fe) isotopically lighter than Fe(III)-phytosiderophore; secondly, even in the absence of redox changes of Fe, change in the speciation alone can create up to ˜1.5‰ isotopic fractionation. For example, Fe(III)-phytosiderophore is up to 1.5‰ heavier than Fe(III)-citrate2 and Fe(II)-nicotianamine is up to 1‰ heavier than Fe(II)-citrate. In addition, in order to better understand the Fe isotopic fractionation between different plant components, we have analyzed the iron isotopic composition of different organs (roots, seeds, germinated seeds, leaves and stems) from six species of higher plants: the dicot lentil (Lens culinaris), and the graminaceous monocots Virginia wild rye (Elymus virginicus), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis), river oat (Uniola latifolia), and Indian goosegrass (Eleusine indica). The calculations may explain that the roots of strategy-II plants (Fe(III)-phytosiderophore) are isotopically heavier (by about 1‰ for the δ56Fe) than the upper parts of the plants (Fe transported as Fe(III)-citrate in the xylem or Fe(II)-nicotianamine in the phloem). In addition, we suggest that the isotopic variations observed between younger and older leaves could be explained by mixing of Fe received from the xylem and the phloem.

  6. Non-Salmonid Abundance - Line Features [ds186

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. The "Other Fish" category contains data collected...

  7. Short-range spatial variability of soil δ15N natural abundance – effects on symbiotic N2-fixation estimates in pea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdensen, Lars; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Jensen, Erik Steen

    2007-01-01

    abundance in spring barley and N2-fixing pea was measured within the 0.15-4 m scale at flowering and at maturity. The short-range spatial variability of soil δ15N natural abundance and symbiotic nitrogen fixation were high at both growth stages. Along a 4-m row, the δ15N natural abundance in barley......The δ15N natural abundance (‰) of the total soil N pool varies at the landscape level, but knowledge on short-range variability and consequences for the reliability of isotopic methods are poorly understood. The short-range spatial variability of soil δ15N natural abundance as revealed by the 15N......-abundance are that estimates of symbiotic N2-fixation can be obtained from the natural abundance method if at least half a square meter of crop and reference plants is sampled for the isotopic analysis. In fields with small amounts of representative reference crops (weeds) it might be necessary to sow in reference crop...

  8. Diffusion induced Li isotopic fractionation during the cooling of magmatic rocks: The case of pyroxene phenocrysts from nakhlite meteorites

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Pierre; Chaussidon, M.; Barrat, J.A.; Gillet, Ph.; Bohn, Marcel

    2006-01-01

    Ion-microprobe was used to measure Li abundances and isotopic compositions in pyroxenes from three Martian meteorites belonging to the nakhlite family. The profiles performed across augite crystals from Northwest Africa 817 show a large isotopic zoning from crystal cores (delta Li-7 similar to 0 parts per thousand) to rims (delta Li-7 similar to +20 parts per thousand) while Li abundances are almost constant (similar to 9.2 mu g/g). Unlike NWA 817, the pyroxene studied in the Miller Range 033...

  9. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, D. B.; Pereira, C. B.; Roig, F.; Jilinski, E.; Drake, N. A.; Chavero, C.; Sales Silva, J. V.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scaleheight, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, α-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars cannot be represented by a single Gaussian distribution. The abundances of α-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heavy-element abundance pattern as given by the ratio [s/Fe], we found that the barium stars present several degrees of enrichment. We also obtained the [hs/ls] ratio by measuring the photospheric abundances of the Ba-peak and the Zr-peak elements. Our results indicated that the [s/Fe] and the [hs/ls] ratios are strongly anticorrelated with the metallicity. Our kinematical analysis showed that 90 per cent of the barium stars belong to the thin disc population. Based on their luminosities, none of the barium stars are luminous enough to be an asymptotic giant branch star, nor to become self-enriched in the s-process elements. Finally, we determined that the barium stars also follow an age-metallicity relation.

  10. Potassium Isotopic Compositions of NIST Potassium Standards and 40Ar/39Ar Mineral Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Leah; Tappa, Mike; Ellam, Rob; Mark, Darren; Higgins, John; Simon, Justin I.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the isotopic ratios of standards, spikes, and reference materials is fundamental to the accuracy of many geochronological methods. For example, the 238U/235U ratio relevant to U-Pb geochronology was recently re-determined [1] and shown to differ significantly from the previously accepted value employed during age determinations. These underlying values are fundamental to accurate age calculations in many isotopic systems, and uncertainty in these values can represent a significant (and often unrecognized) portion of the uncertainty budget for determined ages. The potassium isotopic composition of mineral standards, or neutron flux monitors, is a critical, but often overlooked component in the calculation of K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages. It is currently assumed that all terrestrial materials have abundances indistinguishable from that of NIST SRM 985 [2]; this is apparently a reasonable assumption at the 0.25per mille level (1s) [3]. The 40Ar/39Ar method further relies on the assumption that standards and samples (including primary and secondary standards) have indistinguishable 40K/39K values. We will present data establishing the potassium isotopic compositions of NIST isotopic K SRM 985, elemental K SRM 999b, and 40Ar/39Ar biotite mineral standard GA1550 (sample MD-2). Stable isotopic compositions (41K/39K) were measured by the peak shoulder method with high resolution MC-ICP-MS (Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus), using the accepted value of NIST isotopic SRM 985 [2] for fractionation [4] corrections [5]. 40K abundances were measured by TIMS (Thermo Scientific TRITON), using 41K/39K values from ICP-MS measurements (or, for SRM 985, values from [2]) for internal fractionation corrections. Collectively these data represent an important step towards a metrologically traceable calibration of 40K concentrations in primary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards and improve uncertainties by ca. an order of magnitude in the potassium isotopic compositions of standards.

  11. Bacterioplankton abundance, biomass and production in a Brazilian coastal lagoon and in two German lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FURTADO ANDRÉ L. S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterioplanktonic abundance, biomass, and production within a tropical lagoon (Cabiúnas, Brazil and two temperate lakes (Stechlin and Dagow, Germany were compared. Bacterial abundance and production were significantly different among the three water bodies. The lowest bacterial production ( 0.8mug C l-1 d-1 was observed in the tropical Cabiúnas Lagoon despite its higher mean temperature and dissolved organic carbon concentration. Highest bacterioplankton abundance ( 2.6 x 10(9 cells l-1 and production ( 68.5mug C l-1 d-1 were measured in eutrophic Lake Dagow. In oligotrophic Lake Stechlin, the lowest bacterial biomass ( 48.05mug C l-1 was observed because of lower bacterial biovolume ( 0.248mum³ and lower bacterial abundance. Bacterial populations in the temperate lakes show higher activity (production/biomass ratio than in the tropical lagoon. The meaning of isotopic dilution and leucine incorporation by non-bacterial micro-organisms were evaluated in the oligotrophic temperate system. Leucine uptake by non-bacterial micro-organisms did not have significant influence on bacterial production.

  12. Penguin tissue as a proxy for relative krill abundance in East Antarctica during the Holocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Sun, Liguang; Long, Nanye; Wang, Yuhong; Huang, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) is a key component of the Southern Ocean food web. It supports a large number of upper trophic-level predators, and is also a major fishery resource. Understanding changes in krill abundance has long been a priority for research and conservation in the Southern Ocean. In this study, we performed stable isotope analyses on ancient Adélie penguin tissues and inferred relative krill abundance during the Holocene epoch from paleodiets of Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae), using inverse of δ¹⁵N (ratio of ¹⁵N/¹⁴N) value as a proxy. We find that variations in krill abundance during the Holocene are in accord with episodes of regional climate changes, showing greater krill abundance in cold periods. Moreover, the low δ¹⁵N values found in modern Adélie penguins indicate relatively high krill availability, which supports the hypothesis of krill surplus in modern ages due to recent hunt for krill-eating seals and whales by humans. PMID:24076768

  13. Container for hydrogen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, David E.

    1977-01-01

    A container for the storage, shipping and dispensing of hydrogen isotopes such as hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, or mixtures of the same which has compactness, which is safe against fracture or accident, and which is reusable. The container consists of an outer housing with suitable inlet and outlet openings and electrical feed elements, the housing containing an activated sorber material in the form, for example, of titanium sponge or an activated zirconium aluminate cartridge. The gas to be stored is introduced into the chamber under conditions of heat and vacuum and will be retained in the sorber material. Subsequently, it may be released by heating the unit to drive off the stored gas at desired rates.

  14. Shear heating and clumped isotope reordering in carbonate faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siman-Tov, Shalev; Affek, Hagit P.; Matthews, Alan; Aharonov, Einat; Reches, Ze'ev

    2016-07-01

    Natural faults are expected to heat rapidly during seismic slip and to cool quite quickly after the slip event. Here we examine clumped isotope thermometry for its ability to identify such short duration elevated temperature events along frictionally heated carbonate faults. Our approach is based on measured Δ47 values that reflect the distribution of oxygen and carbon isotopes in the calcite lattice, measuring the abundance of 13Csbnd 18O bonds, which is affected by temperature. We examine three types of calcite rock samples: (1) crushed limestone grains that were rapidly heated and then cooled in static laboratory experiments, simulating the temperature cycle experienced by fault rock during an earthquake slip; (2) limestone samples that were experimentally sheared to simulate earthquake slip events; and (3) samples from Fault Mirrors (FMs) collected from principle slip surfaces of three natural carbonate faults. Extensive FM surfaces are believed to form during earthquake slip. Our experimental results show that Δ47 values decrease rapidly (in the course of seconds) with increasing temperature and shear velocity. On the other hand, carbonate shear zones from natural faults do not show such Δ47 decrease. We suggest that the Δ47 response may be controlled by nano-size grains, the high abundance of defects, and highly stressed/strained grain boundaries within the carbonate fault zone that can reduce the activation energy for diffusion, and thus lead to an increased rate of isotopic disordering during shear experiments. In our laboratory experiments the high stress and strain on grain contacts and the presence of nanograins thus allows for rapid disordering so that a change in Δ47 occurs in a very short and relatively low intensity heating events. In natural faults it may also lead to isotopic ordering after the cessation of frictional heating thus erasing the high temperature signature of Δ47.

  15. Argon isotopes as tracers for martian atmospheric loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slipski, Marek; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    2016-07-01

    Recent measurements of the present-day Ar abundance and isotopic ratios in the martian atmosphere by the SAM instrument suite onboard the Curiosity rover can be used to constrain the atmospheric and volatile evolution. We have examined the role of volcanic outgassing, escape to space via sputtering, crustal erosion, impact delivery, and impact erosion in reproducing the Ar isotope ratios from an initial state 4.4 billion years ago. To investigate the effects of each of these processes, their timing, and their intensity we have modeled exchanges of Ar isotopes between various reservoirs (mantle, crust, atmosphere, etc.) throughout Mars' history. Furthermore, we use present-day atmospheric measurements to determine the parameter space consistent with observations. We find that significant loss to space (at least 48% of atmospheric 36Ar) is required to match the observed 36Ar/38Ar ratio. Our estimates of volcanic outgassing do not supply sufficient 40Ar to the atmosphere to match observations, so in our model at least 31% of 40Ar produced in the crust must have also been released to the atmosphere. Of the total 40Ar introduced into the atmosphere about 25% must have been lost to space. By adding the present-day isotopic abundances with our results of total integrated Ar loss we find a "restored" value of atmospheric 40Ar/36Ar, which represents what that ratio would be if the total integrated Ar loss had remained in the atmosphere. We determine the restored value to be ∼900-1500. This is below the present martian atmospheric value (1900 ± 300), but 3-5 times greater than the terrestrial value.

  16. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry in forensic science and food adulteration research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (SIRMS) is an established technique for the determination of origin of geological, biological, chemical and physio-chemical samples/materials. With the development of highly precise mass spectrometers, the stable isotope ratio determination of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen have gained considerable interest in the fields of forensic science and food authentication. Natural variations in the isotopic composition of lighter elements occur due to fractionation effects, resulting in the finger printing of specific isotope ratio values that are characteristic of the origin, purity, and manufacturing processes of the products and their constituents. Forensic science uses scientific and technical methods to investigate traceable evidence of criminal acts. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry has been applied to numerous aspects of the forensic science. The analysis of explosives such as ammonium nitrate, gun powder and tri-nitro-toluene (TNT), cases of murder, armed robbery, drug smuggling, terrorism, arson and hit and run traffic accidents are a few of them. The main types of geological evidences in such cases are mud, soil, rocks, sand, gravel, dust particles, biological materials, organic particles and anthropogenic components. Stable isotopes are used as tools to corroborate and confirm the evidential leads in the investigation of such crimes. The variation in natural abundances of carbon and nitrogen and their isotopic ratios δ13C and δ15N can identify links between items found at crime scene with those of suspect. The paper discusses the applications of SIRMS in the field of forensic science and food adulteration research

  17. Isotope Effects in ESR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Herrmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to present the relationship between ESR spectroscopy and isotope effects three levels are considered: (i ESR spectroscopy is described on a general level up to the models for interpretation of the experimental spectra, which go beyond the usually used time and mass independent spin-Hamilton operator, (ii the main characteristics of the generalized isotope effects are worked out, and finally (iii the basic, mainly quantum mechanical effects are used to describe the coupling of electron spins with the degrees of freedom, which are accessible under the selected conditions, of the respective paramagnetic object under investigation. The ESR parameters and the respective models are formalized so far, that they include the time and mass depending influences and reflect the specific isotope effects. Relations will be established between the effects in ESR spectra to spin relaxation, to spin exchange, to the magnetic isotope effect, to the Jahn-Teller effects, as well as to the influence of zero-point vibrations. Examples will be presented which demonstrate the influence of isotopes as well as the kind of accessible information. It will be differentiated with respect to isotope effects in paramagnetic centres itself and in the respective matrices up to the technique of ESR imaging. It is shown that the use of isotope effects is indispensable in ESR spectroscopy.

  18. Microbes: Agents of Isotopic Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Microbes drive many of the important oxidation and reduction reactions on Earth; digest almost all forms of organic matter; and can serve as both primary and secondary producers. Because of their versatile biochemistry and physiology, they impart unique isotopic signatures to organic and inorganic materials, which have proven to be key measurements for understanding elemental cycling now and throughout Earth's history. Understanding microbial isotope fractionations in laboratory experiments has been important for interpreting isotopic patterns measured in natural settings. In fact, the pairing of simple experiment with natural observation has been the pathway for interpreting the fingerprint of microbial processes in ancient sediments and rocks. Examples of how key experiments have explained stable isotope fractionations by microbes and advanced the field of microbial ecology will be presented. Learning the isotopic signatures of Earth's microbes is a valuable exercise for predicting what isotopic signatures could be displayed by possible extant or extinct extraterrestrial life. Given the potential for discovery on Mars, Enceladus, and other solar system bodies, new methods and techniques for pinpointing what is unique about microbial isotope signatures is particularly relevant.

  19. Biomarker and molecular isotope approaches to deconvolve the terrestrial carbon isotope record: modern and Eocene calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefendorf, A. F.; Freeman, K. H.; Wing, S.; Currano, E. D.

    2010-12-01

    Climate, biome, and plant community are important predictors of carbon isotope patterns recorded in leaves and leaf waxes. However, signatures recorded by terrestrial organic carbon and lipids that have mixed floral sources (e.g., n-alkanes) potentially reflect both plant community changes and climate. More taxonomically specific proxies for plants (i.e., di- and tri-terpenoids for conifers and angiosperms, respectively), can help to resolve the relative influences of changing community and climate, provided differences in biomarker production and lipid biosynthetic fractionation among plants can be better constrained. We present biomarker abundance and carbon isotope values for lipids from leaves, branches and bark of 44 tree species, representing 21 families including deciduous and evergreen conifers and angiosperms. n-alkane production differs greatly between conifer and angiosperm leaves. Both deciduous and evergreen angiosperms make significantly more n-alkanes than conifers, with n-alkanes not detected in over half of the conifers in our study. Terpenoid abundances scale strongly with leaf habit: evergreen species have significantly higher abundances. We combine these relative differences in lipid production with published estimates of fluxes for leaf litter from conifer and angiosperm trees to develop a new proxy approach for estimating paleo plant community inputs to ancient soils and sediments. To test our modern calibration results, we have evaluated n-alkanes and terpenoids from laterally extensive (~18 km) carbonaceous shales and mudstones in Eocene sediments (52.6 Ma) at Fifteenmile Creek in the Bighorn Basin (WY, USA). Our terpenoid-based proxy predicts on average a 40% conifer community, which is remarkably close in agreement with a fossil-based estimate of 36%. n-alkane carbon isotope fractionation (leaf-lipid) differs among plant types, with conifer n-alkanes about 2-3‰ 13C enriched relative to those in angiosperms. Since conifer leaves are

  20. Deuterium Abundance in Consciousness and Current Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Elizabeth A.

    We utilize the deuterium-hydrogen abundances and their role in setting limits on the mass and other conditions of cosmogenesis and cosmological evolution. We calculate the dependence of a set of physical variables such as density, temperature, energy mass, entropy and other physical variable parameters through the evolution of the universe under the Schwarzschild conditions as a function from early to present time. Reconciliation with the 3°K and missing mass is made. We first examine the Schwarzschild condition; second, the geometrical constraints of a multidimensional Cartesian space on closed cosmologies, and third we will consider the cosmogenesis and evolution of the universe in a multidimensional Cartesian space, obeying the Schwarzschild condition. Implications of this model for matter creation are made. We also examine experimental evidence for closed versus open cosmologies; x-ray detection of the "missing mass" density. Also the interstellar deuterium abundance, along with the value of the Hubble constant set a general criterion on the value of the curvature constant, k. Once the value of the Hubble constant, H is determined, the deuterium abundance sets stringent restrictions on the value of the curvature constant k by an detailed discussion is presented. The experimental evidences for the determination of H and the primary set of coupled equations to determine D abundance is given. 'The value of k for an open, closed, or flat universe will be discussed in terms of the D abundance which will affect the interpretation of the Schwarzschild, black hole universe. We determine cosmology solutions to Einstein's field obeying the Schwarzschild solutions condition. With this model, we can form a reconciliation of the black hole, from galactic to cosmological scale. Continuous creation occurs at the dynamic blackhole plasma field. We term this new model the multiple big bang or "little whimper model". We utilize the deuteriumhydrogen abundances and their role in

  1. Chemical abundance analysis of 19 barium stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guo-Chao; Liang, Yan-Chun; Spite, Monique; Chen, Yu-Qin; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Guo-Qing; Liu, Yu-Juan; Liu, Nian; Deng, Li-Cai; Spite, Francois; Hill, Vanessa; Zhang, Cai-Xia

    2016-01-01

    We aim at deriving accurate atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances of 19 barium (Ba) stars, including both strong and mild Ba stars, based on the high signal-to-noise ratio and high resolution Echelle spectra obtained from the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station of National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The chemical abundances of the sample stars were obtained from an LTE, plane-parallel and line-blanketed atmospheric model by inputting the atmospheric parameters (effective temperatures Teff, surface gravities log g, metallicity [Fe/H] and microturbulence velocity ξt) and equivalent widths of stellar absorption lines. These samples of Ba stars are giants as indicated by atmospheric parameters, metallicities and kinematic analysis about UVW velocity. Chemical abundances of 17 elements were obtained for these Ba stars. Their Na, Al, α- and iron-peak elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni) are similar to the solar abundances. Our samples of Ba stars show obvious overabundances of neutron-capture (n-capture) process elements relative to the Sun. Their median abundances of [Ba/Fe], [La/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] are 0.54, 0.65 and 0.40, respectively. The Y I and Zr I abundances are lower than Ba, La and Eu, but higher than the α- and iron-peak elements for the strong Ba stars and similar to the iron-peak elements for the mild stars. There exists a positive correlation between Ba intensity and [Ba/Fe]. For the n-capture elements (Y, Zr, Ba, La), there is an anti-correlation between their [X/Fe] and [Fe/H]. We identify nine of our sample stars as strong Ba stars with [Ba/Fe] >0.6 where seven of them have Ba intensity Ba=2-5, one has Ba=1.5 and another one has Ba=1.0. The remaining ten stars are classified as mild Ba stars with 0.17<[Ba/Fe] <0.54.

  2. The clumped isotopic record of Neoproterozoic carbonates, Sultanate of Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, K. D.; Eiler, J. M.; Fischer, W. W.; Osburn, M. R.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Huqf Supergroup of the Sultanate of Oman records several important events in latest Precambrian time, including two glaciations in the Abu Mahara Group (ca. 725 - isotope excursion in the Nafun Group (ca. Precambrian-Cambrian boundary in the Ara Group (ca. 547-540 Ma). This interval contains several extreme isotopic excursions, hypothesized to record perturbations of the surficial Earth carbon cycle or post-depositional diagenetic processes. Rigorous interpretation of these records requires a more thorough assessment of diagenetic processes. To better understand the significance and cause of these large amplitude isotopic excursions, we employed carbonate clumped isotope thermometry. This method allows us to estimate the absolute temperature of carbonate precipitation, including recrystallization, based on the temperature dependent abundance of carbonate ions containing both 13C and 18O. These estimates are accompanied by a measurement of carbonate δ18O, which in conjunction with temperature, can be used to calculate the oxygen isotopic composition of the fluid from which the carbonate precipitated. We analyzed stratigraphically constrained samples from a range of paleoenvironments with differing burial histories (1 - >10km maximum burial depth) to constrain the temperature and fluid composition of recrystallization. Clumped isotope temperatures from Huqf Supergroup samples range from 35-175°C. The isotopic composition of the fluid these rocks equilibrated with ranges from -3.7 to 15.7% VSMOW. This large range in temperature and fluid composition separates into distinct populations that differ systematically with independent constraints on petrography, stratigraphy and burial history. The data indicate the Abu Mahara, Nafun and Ara groups have unique diagenetic histories. In central Oman, the post-glacial Abu Mahara cap dolostone shows high temperature, rock buffered diagenesis (Tavg = 176°C; δ18Ofluid = 15% VSMOW), the Nafun Group generally experienced

  3. Relative abundance determinations in extremely metal poor giants. II. Transition probabilities and the abundance determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The abundances of Fe and other elements are determined for a star of intermediate metallicity and for nine extremely metal poor stars, including two members of the globular cluster M92 and CD -38 deg 245. The accuracy of the transition probabilities for Fe I and other elements is evaluated. The distribution of the abundances of other elements with respect to Fe is the same for most of the cases studied. Manganese is the only element that shows a different relative abundance in an extremely metal poor star. 120 refs

  4. Halloysite Nanotubes Capturing Isotope Selective Atmospheric CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Subhra Jana; Sankar Das; Chiranjit Ghosh; Abhijit Maity; Manik Pradhan

    2015-01-01

    With the aim to capture and subsequent selective trapping of CO2, a nanocomposite has been developed through selective modification of the outer surface of the halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) with an organosilane to make the nanocomposite a novel solid-phase adsorbent to adsorb CO2 from the atmosphere at standard ambient temperature and pressure. The preferential adsorption of three major abundant isotopes of CO2 (12C16O2, 13C16O2, and 12C16O18O) from the ambient air by amine functionalized HNTs ...

  5. Ground State Structure of Hs Super-heavy Isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Long; ZHOU Xiao-hong; ZHANG Hong-fei; GAN Zai-guo; LI Jun-qing

    2009-01-01

    The ground state properties of Hs nuclei studied in the framework of the relativistic mean field theory revealed that more stable isotopes are located on the proton abundant side of the chain.The last stable nucleus to the proton drip line is ~(256)Hs.The most stable unknown Hs nucleus may be ~(268)Hs.The density dependent delta interaction pairing is used to improve the BCS pairing correction,which results in more reasonable single-particle energy level distributions and nucleon occupation,and it is shown to be available to describe the properties of nuclei in the superheavy region.

  6. Isotope-edited infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Ginka S; Kubelka, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Isotope-edited infrared (IR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying structural and dynamical properties of peptides and proteins with site-specific resolution. Labeling of selected amide carbonyls with (13)C results in detectable sidebands of amide I' vibrations, which provide information about local conformation and/or solvent exposure without structural perturbation to the protein. Incorporation of isotopically labeled amino acids at specific positions is achieved by the chemical synthesis of the studied proteins. We describe the basic procedures for synthesis of (13)C isotopically edited protein samples, experimental IR spectroscopic measurements, and analysis of the site-specific structural changes from the thermal unfolding IR data.

  7. Compelling Research Opportunities using Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-04-23

    Isotopes are vital to the science and technology base of the US economy. Isotopes, both stable and radioactive, are essential tools in the growing science, technology, engineering, and health enterprises of the 21st century. The scientific discoveries and associated advances made as a result of the availability of isotopes today span widely from medicine to biology, physics, chemistry, and a broad range of applications in environmental and material sciences. Isotope issues have become crucial aspects of homeland security. Isotopes are utilized in new resource development, in energy from bio-fuels, petrochemical and nuclear fuels, in drug discovery, health care therapies and diagnostics, in nutrition, in agriculture, and in many other areas. The development and production of isotope products unavailable or difficult to get commercially have been most recently the responsibility of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy program. The President's FY09 Budget request proposed the transfer of the Isotope Production program to the Department of Energy's Office of Science in Nuclear Physics and to rename it the National Isotope Production and Application program (NIPA). The transfer has now taken place with the signing of the 2009 appropriations bill. In preparation for this, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) was requested to establish a standing subcommittee, the NSAC Isotope Subcommittee (NSACI), to advise the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. The request came in the form of two charges: one, on setting research priorities in the short term for the most compelling opportunities from the vast array of disciplines that develop and use isotopes and two, on making a long term strategic plan for the NIPA program. This is the final report to address charge 1. NSACI membership is comprised of experts from the diverse research communities, industry, production, and homeland security. NSACI discussed research opportunities divided into three areas: (1

  8. Isotopic determination of uranium in soil by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Choi, Inhee; Mao, Xianglei; Zorba, Vassilia; Lam, Oanh P.; Shuh, David K.; Russo, Richard E.

    2016-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) operated under ambient pressure has been evaluated for isotopic analysis of uranium in real-world samples such as soil, with U concentrations in the single digit percentage levels. The study addresses the requirements for spectral decomposition of 235U and 238U atomic emission peaks that are only partially resolved. Although non-linear least-square fitting algorithms are typically able to locate the optimal combination of fitting parameters that best describes the experimental spectrum even when all fitting parameters are treated as free independent variables, the analytical results of such an unconstrained free-parameter approach are ambiguous. In this work, five spectral decomposition algorithms were examined, with different known physical properties (e.g., isotopic splitting, hyperfine structure) of the spectral lines sequentially incorporated into the candidate algorithms as constraints. It was found that incorporation of such spectral-line constraints into the decomposition algorithm is essential for the best isotopic analysis. The isotopic abundance of 235U was determined from a simple two-component Lorentzian fit on the U II 424.437 nm spectral profile. For six replicate measurements, each with only fifteen laser shots, on a soil sample with U concentration at 1.1% w/w, the determined 235U isotopic abundance was (64.6 ± 4.8)%, and agreed well with the certified value of 64.4%. Another studied U line - U I 682.691 nm possesses hyperfine structure that is comparatively broad and at a significant fraction as the isotopic shift. Thus, 235U isotopic analysis with this U I line was performed with spectral decomposition involving individual hyperfine components. For the soil sample with 1.1% w/w U, the determined 235U isotopic abundance was (60.9 ± 2.0)%, which exhibited a relative bias about 6% from the certified value. The bias was attributed to the spectral resolution of our measurement system - the measured line

  9. Europium, Samarium, and Neodymium Isotopic Fractions in Metal-Poor Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Lawler, James E.; Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Pilachowski, Catherine A.

    2008-03-01

    We have derived isotopic fractions of europium (Eu), samarium (Sm), and neodymium (Nd) in two metal-poor giants with differing neutron-capture nucleosynthetic histories. These isotopic fractions were measured from new very high resolution (R~120,000), high signal-to-noise (S/N~160-1000) spectra obtained with the 2dCoudé spectrograph of McDonald Observatory's 2.7 m Smith telescope. Synthetic spectra were generated using recent high-precision laboratory measurements of hyperfine and isotopic subcomponents of several transitions of these elements and matched quantitatively to the observed spectra. We interpret our isotopic fractions by the nucleosynthesis predictions of the stellar model, which models s-process nucleosynthesis in the physical conditions expected in a low-mass, thermally-pulsing star on the AGB, and the classical method, which assumes that s-process nucleosynthesis can be approximated by a steady neutron flux impinging upon Fe-peak seed nuclei. These two approaches predict the relative contributions to the Solar System n-capture abundances from the s- and r-processes and, by extension, the relative contributions of these two process to material in metal-poor stars. Our Eu isotopic fraction in HD 175305 is consistent with an r-process origin by the classical method and is consistent with both an r-process and s-process origin by the stellar model. Our Sm isotopic fraction in HD 175305 is consistent with a predominantly r-process origin by both methods, and our Sm isotopic fraction in HD 196944 is consistent with a pure s-process origin by both methods as well. Our Nd isotopic fractions in both stars are consistent with either r-process and s-process origins by both methods. The Eu and Sm isotopic fraction estimates argue for an r-process origin for the rare-earth elements in HD 175305 and an s-process origin for them in HD 196944, in excellent agreement with previous studies of the elemental abundance distributions in these stars. This study for the

  10. Apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, Leung K; Sessions, Henry T; Xiao, Xin

    2013-06-25

    The apparatus and process for separating hydrogen isotopes is provided using dual columns, each column having an opposite hydrogen isotopic effect such that when a hydrogen isotope mixture feedstock is cycled between the two respective columns, two different hydrogen isotopes are separated from the feedstock.

  11. Mg isotopic ratios in giant stars of the globular cluster NGC 6752

    CERN Document Server

    Yong, D; Lambert, D L; Nissen, P E; Shetrone, M; Yong, David; Grundahl, Frank; Lambert, David L.; Nissen, Poul Erik; Shetrone, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Mg isotopic abundance ratios are measured in 20 bright red giants in globular cluster NGC 6752 based on very high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra obtained with UVES on the VLT. There is a considerable spread in the ratio 24Mg:25Mg:26Mg with values ranging from 53:9:39 to 83:10:7. We measured the abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, and Fe combining our sample with 21 RGB bump stars (Grundahl et al. 2002). The abundances of the samples are consistent and exhibit the usual anticorrelations between O-Na and Mg-Al. A positive correlation is found between 26Mg and Al, a mild anticorrelation is found between 24Mg and Al, while no correlation is found between 25Mg and Al. None of the elemental or isotopic abundances show a dependence on evolutionary status and, as shown by Gratton et al. (2001), the abundance variations exist even in main sequence stars. This strongly suggests that the star-to-star abundance variations are a result of varying degrees of pollution with intermediate mass AGB stars being likely pollut...

  12. The primordial deuterium abundance problems and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Levshakov, S A; Kegel, W H; Levshakov, Sergei A.; Takahara, Fumio; Kegel, Wilhelm H.

    1997-01-01

    The current status of extragalactic deuterium abundance is discussed using two examples of `low' and `high' D/H measurements. We show that the discordance of these two types of D abundances may be a consequence of the spatial correlations in the stochastic velocity field. Within the framework of the generalized procedure (accounting for such effects) one finds good agreement between different observations and the theoretical predictions for standard big bang nucleosynthesis (SBBN). In particular, we show that the deuterium absorption seen at z = 2.504 toward Q1009+2956 and the H+D Ly-alpha profile observed at z = 0.701 toward Q1718+4807 are compatible with D/H $\\sim 4.1 - 4.6\\times10^{-5}$. This result supports SBBN and, thus, no inhomogeneity is needed. The problem of precise D/H measurements is discussed.

  13. Earth Abundant Element Type I Clathrate Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Kauzlarich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Earth abundant element clathrate phases are of interest for a number of applications ranging from photovoltaics to thermoelectrics. Silicon-containing type I clathrate is a framework structure with the stoichiometry A8-xSi46 (A = guest atom such as alkali metal that can be tuned by alloying and doping with other elements. The type I clathrate framework can be described as being composed of two types of polyhedral cages made up of tetrahedrally coordinated Si: pentagonal dodecahedra with 20 atoms and tetrakaidecahedra with 24 atoms in the ratio of 2:6. The cation sites, A, are found in the center of each polyhedral cage. This review focuses on the newest discoveries in the group 13-silicon type I clathrate family: A8E8Si38 (A = alkali metal; E = Al, Ga and their properties. Possible approaches to new phases based on earth abundant elements and their potential applications will be discussed.

  14. Attenuation of species abundance distributions by sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimadzu, Hideyasu; Darnell, Ross

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying biodiversity aspects such as species presence/ absence, richness and abundance is an important challenge to answer scientific and resource management questions. In practice, biodiversity can only be assessed from biological material taken by surveys, a difficult task given limited time and resources. A type of random sampling, or often called sub-sampling, is a commonly used technique to reduce the amount of time and effort for investigating large quantities of biological samples. However, it is not immediately clear how (sub-)sampling affects the estimate of biodiversity aspects from a quantitative perspective. This paper specifies the effect of (sub-)sampling as attenuation of the species abundance distribution (SAD), and articulates how the sampling bias is induced to the SAD by random sampling. The framework presented also reveals some confusion in previous theoretical studies. PMID:26064626

  15. The primordial helium abundance from updated emissivities

    CERN Document Server

    Aver, Erik; Porter, R L; Skillman, Evan D

    2013-01-01

    Observations of metal-poor extragalactic H II regions allow the determination of the primordial helium abundance, Y_p. The He I emissivities are the foundation of the model of the H II region's emission. Porter, Ferland, Storey, & Detisch (2012) have recently published updated He I emissivities based on improved photoionization cross-sections. We incorporate these new atomic data and update our recent Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of the dataset published by Izotov, Thuan, & Stasinska (2007). As before, cuts are made to promote quality and reliability, and only solutions which fit the data within 95% confidence level are used to determine the primordial He abundance. The previously qualifying dataset is almost entirely retained and with strong concordance between the physical parameters. Overall, an upward bias from the new emissivities leads to a decrease in Y_p. In addition, we find a general trend to larger uncertainties in individual objects (due to changes in the emissivities) and an increase...

  16. Abundances in the diffuse interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wealth of interstellar absorption line data obtained with the Copernicus and IUE satellites has opened up a new era in studies of the interstellar gas. It is now well established that certain elements, generally those with high condensation temperatures, are substantially under-abundant in the gas-phase relative to total solar or cosmic abundances. This depletion of elements is due to the existence of solid material in the form of dust grains in the interstellar medium. Surprisingly, however, recent surveys indicate that even volatile elements such as Zn and S are significantly depleted in many sight lines. Developments in this field which have been made possible by the large base of UV interstellar absorption line data built up over recent years are reviewed and the implications of the results for our understanding of the physical processes governing depletion are discussed. (author)

  17. Multiple sulfur isotope composition of oxidized Samoan melts and the implications of a sulfur isotope 'mantle array' in chemical geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, J.; Cartigny, P.; Jackson, M. G.

    2015-05-01

    To better address how subducted protoliths drive the Earth's mantle sulfur isotope heterogeneity, we report new data for sulfur (S) and copper (Cu) abundances, S speciation and multiple S isotopic compositions (32S, 33S, 34S, 36S) in 15 fresh submarine basaltic glasses from the Samoan archipelago, which defines the enriched-mantle-2 (EM2) endmember. Bulk S abundances vary between 835 and 2279 ppm. About 17 ± 11% of sulfur is oxidized (S6+) but displays no consistent trend with bulk S abundance or any other geochemical tracer. The S isotope composition of both dissolved sulfide and sulfate yield homogeneous Δ33S and Δ36S values, within error of Canyon Diablo Troilite (CDT). In contrast, δ34S values are variable, ranging between +0.11 and +2.79‰ (±0.12‰ 1σ) for reduced sulfur, whereas oxidized sulfur values vary between +4.19 and +9.71‰ (±0.80‰, 1σ). Importantly, δ34S of the reduced S pool correlates with the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the glasses, in a manner similar to that previously reported for South-Atlantic MORB, extending the trend to δ34S values up to + 2.79 ± 0.04 ‰, the highest value reported for undegassed oceanic basalts. As for EM-1 basalts from the South Atlantic ridge, the linear δ34S-87Sr/86Sr trend requires the EM-2 endmember to be relatively S-rich, and only sediments can account for these isotopic characteristics. While many authors argue that both the EM-1 and EM-2 mantle components record subduction of various protoliths (e.g. upper or lower continental crust, lithospheric mantle versus intra-metasomatized mantle, or others), it is proposed here that they primarily reflect sediment recycling. Their distinct Pb isotope variation can be accounted for by varying the proportion of S-poor recycled oceanic crust in the source of mantle plumes.

  18. Isotopic disequilibrium in Globigerina bulloides and carbon isotope response to productivity increase in Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, K.; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Mohan, K.; Anilkumar, N.

    2016-02-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios in planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides collected from tow samples along a transect from the equatorial Indian ocean to the Southern Ocean (45°E and 80°E and 10°N to 53°S) were analysed and compared with the equilibrium δ18O and δ13C values of calcite calculated using the temperature and isotopic composition of the water column. The results agree within ~0.25‰ for the region between 10°N and 40°S and 75-200 m water depth which is considered to be the habitat of Globigerina bulloides. Further south (from 40°S to 55°S), however, the measured δ18O and δ13C values are higher than the expected values by ~2‰ and ~1‰ respectively. These enrichments can be attributed to either a ‘vital effect’ or a higher calcification rate. An interesting pattern of increase in the δ13C(DIC) value of the surface water with latitude is observed between 35°S and~ 60°S, with a peak at~ 42°S. This can be caused by increased organic matter production and associated removal. A simple model accounting for the increase in the δ13C(DIC) values is proposed which fits well with the observed chlorophyll abundance as a function of latitude.

  19. Application of stable isotopes in environmental studies and food authentication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    adulteration because of their high prices. Traditional analytical methods like HPLC, GS and GC-MS make possible the identification and quantification of all the major molecules present, but more sophisticated analytical methods are required to detect whether natural ingredients have been mixed with similar materials from cheaper (synthetic) sources. The stable isotope techniques based on measuring the natural abundance of isotope ratios 2H/1H, 13C/12C, and 18O/16O in organic molecules have become the most efficient method to authenticate foodstuffs. The relative abundance of stable isotopes in wines and juices from different areas was measured by the isotopic ratio mass spectrometer Delta Plus, Finningan MAT, equipped with auxiliary accessories, as the difference relative to a standard (Vienna - Standard Mean Ocean Water). (author)

  20. Water Abundance in Molecular Cloud Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Snell, R L; Ashby, M L N; Bergin, E A; Chin, G; Erickson, N R; Goldsmith, P F; Harwit, M; Kleiner, S C; Koch, D G; Neufeld, D A; Patten, B M; Plume, R; Schieder, R; Stauffer, J R; Tolls, V; Wang, Z; Winnewisser, G; Zhang, Y F; Melnick, G J

    2000-01-01

    We present Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) observations of the 1_{10}-1_{01} transition of ortho-water at 557 GHz toward 12 molecular cloud cores. The water emission was detected in NGC 7538, Rho Oph A, NGC 2024, CRL 2591, W3, W3(OH), Mon R2, and W33, and was not detected in TMC-1, L134N, and B335. We also present a small map of the water emission in S140. Observations of the H_2^{18}O line were obtained toward S140 and NGC 7538, but no emission was detected. The abundance of ortho-water relative to H_2 in the giant molecular cloud cores was found to vary between 6x10^{-10} and 1x10^{-8}. Five of the cloud cores in our sample have previous water detections; however, in all cases the emission is thought to arise from hot cores with small angular extents. The water abundance estimated for the hot core gas is at least 100 times larger than in the gas probed by SWAS. The most stringent upper limit on the ortho-water abundance in dark clouds is provided in TMC-1, where the 3-sigma upper limit on the ...

  1. The shape of terrestrial abundance distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alroy, John

    2015-09-01

    Ecologists widely accept that the distribution of abundances in most communities is fairly flat but heavily dominated by a few species. The reason for this is that species abundances are thought to follow certain theoretical distributions that predict such a pattern. However, previous studies have focused on either a few theoretical distributions or a few empirical distributions. I illustrate abundance patterns in 1055 samples of trees, bats, small terrestrial mammals, birds, lizards, frogs, ants, dung beetles, butterflies, and odonates. Five existing theoretical distributions make inaccurate predictions about the frequencies of the most common species and of the average species, and most of them fit the overall patterns poorly, according to the maximum likelihood-related Kullback-Leibler divergence statistic. Instead, the data support a low-dominance distribution here called the "double geometric." Depending on the value of its two governing parameters, it may resemble either the geometric series distribution or the lognormal series distribution. However, unlike any other model, it assumes both that richness is finite and that species compete unequally for resources in a two-dimensional niche landscape, which implies that niche breadths are variable and that trait distributions are neither arrayed along a single dimension nor randomly associated. The hypothesis that niche space is multidimensional helps to explain how numerous species can coexist despite interacting strongly. PMID:26601249

  2. Elemental abundances and classification of CEMP stars

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Dinah M; Rossi, Silvia; Beers, Tim C; Tsangarides, Stelios A

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed study of Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor (CEMP) stars, based on high-resolution spectroscopic observations of a sample of 18 stars. The stellar spectra for this sample were obtained at the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in 2001 and 2002, using the Utrecht Echelle Spectrograph (UES), at a resolving power R ~52000 and S/N ~ 40, covering the wavelength range lambda-lambda 3700-5700 A. The atmospheric parameters determined for this sample indicate temperatures ranging from 4750 C to 7100 K, log g from 1.5 to 4.3, and metallicities -3.0 <= [Fe/H] <= -1.7. Elemental abundances for C, Na, Mg, Sc, Ti, Cr, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy are determined. Abundances for an additional 109 stars were taken from the literature and combined with the data of our sample. The literature sample reveals a lack of reliable abundance estimates for species that might be associated with the r-process elements for about 67% of CEMP stars, preventing a complete understanding of this clas...

  3. Stellar Mixing and the Primordial Lithium Abundance

    CERN Document Server

    Pinsonneault, M H; Walker, T P; Narayanan, V K

    2002-01-01

    We compare the properties of recent samples of the lithium abundances in halo stars to one another and to the predictions of theoretical models including rotational mixing, and we examine the data for trends with metal abundance. We find from a KS test that in the absence of any correction for chemical evolution, the Ryan, Norris, & Beers (1999} sample is fully consistent with mild rotational mixing induced depletion and, therefore, with an initial lithium abundance higher than the observed value. Tests for outliers depend sensitively on the threshold for defining their presence, but we find a 10$--$45% probability that the RNB sample is drawn from the rotationally mixed models with a 0.2 dex median depletion (with lower probabilities corresponding to higher depletion factors). When chemical evolution trends (Li/H versus Fe/H) are treated in the linear plane we find that the dispersion in the RNB sample is not explained by chemical evolution; the inferred bounds on lithium depletion from rotational mixing...

  4. Chemical abundances and kinematics of barium stars

    CERN Document Server

    de Castro, D B; Roig, F; Jilinski, E; Drake, N A; Chavero, C; Silva, J V Sales

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present an homogeneous analysis of photospheric abundances based on high-resolution spectroscopy of a sample of 182 barium stars and candidates. We determined atmospheric parameters, spectroscopic distances, stellar masses, ages, luminosities and scale height, radial velocities, abundances of the Na, Al, $alpha$-elements, iron-peak elements, and s-process elements Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. We employed the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code {\\sc moog}. We found that the metallicities, the temperatures and the surface gravities for barium stars can not be represented by a single gaussian distribution. The abundances of $alpha$-elements and iron peak elements are similar to those of field giants with the same metallicity. Sodium presents some degree of enrichment in more evolved stars that could be attributed to the NeNa cycle. As expected, the barium stars show overabundance of the elements created by the s-process. By measuring the mean heav...

  5. Abundances In Very Metal Poor Dwarf Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, J G; McWilliam, A; Shectman, S; Thompson, I; Wasserburg, G J; Ivans, I I; Dehn, M; Karlsson, T; Melendez, J; Cohen, Judith G.; Christlieb, Norbert; William, Andrew Mc; Shectman, Steve; Thompson, Ian; Ivans, Inese; Dehn, Matthias; Karlsson, Torgny

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the detailed composition of 28 extremely metal-poor dwarfs, 22 of which are from the Hamburg/ESO Survey, based on Keck Echelle spectra. Our sample has a median [Fe/H] of -2.7 dex, extends to -3.5 dex, and is somewhat less metal-poor than was expected from [Fe/H](HK,HES) determined from low resolution spectra. Our analysis supports the existence of a sharp decline in the distribution of halo stars with metallicity below [Fe/H] = -3.0 dex. So far no additional turnoff stars with [Fe/H]}<-3.5 have been identified in our follow up efforts. For the best observed elements between Mg and Ni, we find that the abundance ratios appear to have reached a plateau, i.e. [X/Fe] is approximately constant as a function of [Fe/H], except for Cr, Mn and Co, which show trends of abundance ratios varying with [Fe/H]. These abundance ratios at low metallicity correspond approximately to the yield expected from Type II SN with a narrow range in mass and explosion parameters; high mass Type II SN progenitors are requir...

  6. How selection structures species abundance distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magurran, Anne E.; Henderson, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    How do species divide resources to produce the characteristic species abundance distributions seen in nature? One way to resolve this problem is to examine how the biomass (or capacity) of the spatial guilds that combine to produce an abundance distribution is allocated among species. Here we argue that selection on body size varies across guilds occupying spatially distinct habitats. Using an exceptionally well-characterized estuarine fish community, we show that biomass is concentrated in large bodied species in guilds where habitat structure provides protection from predators, but not in those guilds associated with open habitats and where safety in numbers is a mechanism for reducing predation risk. We further demonstrate that while there is temporal turnover in the abundances and identities of species that comprise these guilds, guild rank order is conserved across our 30-year time series. These results demonstrate that ecological communities are not randomly assembled but can be decomposed into guilds where capacity is predictably allocated among species. PMID:22787020

  7. Relative Abundance Measurements in Plumes and Interplumes

    CERN Document Server

    Guennou, Chloé; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) 10 eV). We have used EIS spectroscopic observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over an ~24 hour period to characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we have used a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We have used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we have estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These res...

  8. Aerial survey estimates of fallow deer abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogan, Peter J.; Gates, Natalie B.; Lubow, Bruce C.; Pettit, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Reliable estimates of the distribution and abundance of an ungulate species is essential prior to establishing and implementing a management program. We used ground surveys to determine distribution and ground and aerial surveys and individually marked deer to estimate the abundance of fallow deer (Dama dama) in north-coastal California. Fallow deer had limited distribution and heterogeneous densities. Estimated post-rut densities across 4 annual surveys ranged from a low of 1.4 (SE=0.2) deer/km2 to a high of 3.3 (se=0.5) deer/km2 in a low density stratum and from 49.0 (SE=8.3) deer/km2 to 111.6 deer/km2 in a high density stratum. Sightability was positively influenced by the presence of white color-phase deer in a group and group size, and varied between airial and ground-based observers and by density strata. Our findings underscore the utility of double-observer surveys and aerial surveys with individually marked deer, both incorporating covariates to model sightability, to estimate deer abundance.

  9. CH abundance gradient in TMC-1

    CERN Document Server

    Suutarinen, Aleksi; Harju, Jorma; Heikkilä, Arto; Hotzel, Stephan; Juvela, Mika; Millar, Tom J; Walsh, Catherina; Wouterloot, Jan Gerard Amos

    2011-01-01

    We observed the 9-cm Lambda-doubling lines of CH along the dense filament of TMC-1. The CH column densities were compared with the total H2 column densities derived using the 2MASS NIR data and previously published SCUBA maps and with OH column densities derived using previous observations with Effelsberg. We also modelled the chemical evolution of TMC-1 adopting physical conditions typical of dark clouds using the UMIST Database for Astrochemistry gas-phase reaction network to aid the interpretation of the observed OH/CH abundance ratios. The CH column density has a clear peak in the vicinity of the cyanopolyyne maximum of TMC-1. The fractional CH abundance relative to H2 increases steadily from the northwestern end of the filament where it lies around 1.0e-8, to the southeast where it reaches a value of 2.0e-8. The OH and CH column densities are well correlated, and we obtained OH/CH abundance ratios of ~ 16 - 20. These values are clearly larger than what has been measured recently in diffuse interstellar g...

  10. Galactic abundance gradients from Cepheids : On the iron abundance gradient around 10-12 kpc

    OpenAIRE

    Lemasle, B.; Francois, P.; Piersimoni, A.; Pedicelli, S.; Bono, G.; Laney, C. D.; Primas, F.; Romaniello, M.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Classical Cepheids can be adopted to trace the chemical evolution of the Galactic disk since their distances can be estimated with very high accuracy. Aims: Homogeneous iron abundance measurements for 33 Galactic Cepheids located in the outer disk together with accurate distance determinations based on near-infrared photometry are adopted to constrain the Galactic iron gradient beyond 10 kpc. Methods: Iron abundances were determined using high resolution Cepheid spectra collected wit...

  11. Uranium Isotopic Ratio Measurements of U3O8 Reference Materials by Atom Probe Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahey, Albert J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Bartrand, Jonah AG; Arey, Bruce W.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2016-01-01

    We report results of measurements of isotopic ratios obtained with atom probe tomography on U3O8 reference materials certified for their isotopic abundances of uranium. The results show good agreement with the certified values. High backgrounds due to tails from adjacent peaks complicate the measurement of the integrated peak areas as well as the fact that only oxides of uranium appear in the spectrum, the most intense of which is doubly charged. In addition, lack of knowledge of other instrumental parameters, such as the dead time, may bias the results. Isotopic ratio measurements can be performed at the nanometer-scale with the expectation of sensible results. The abundance sensitivity and mass resolving power of the mass spectrometer are not sufficient to compete with magnetic-sector instruments but are not far from measurements made by ToF-SIMS of other isotopic systems. The agreement of the major isotope ratios is more than sufficient to distinguish most anthropogenic compositions from natural.

  12. Vanadium of petroleum asphaltenes and source kerogens (La Luna Formation, Venezuela): isotopic study and origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premovic, P.I.; Dordevic, D.M.; Pavlovic, M.S. [University of Nis, Nis (Yugoslavia). Lab. for Geochemistry and Cosmochemistry, Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-10-01

    High-resolution mass spectrometry indicates that the isotopic abundance of {sup 50}vanadium (V) of the Late Cretaceous La Luna petroleum asphaltenes and related source kerogens of marine origin (both highly enriched with V > 2000 ppm) is higher by about 3.5% than that of inorganic source (VOSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O, Merck). Similar results are obtained with the isotopic analysis of the asphaltenes (containing high V) extracted from the floating asphalts (Dead Sea, Israel). We propose that the difference in the {sup 50}V/{sup 51}V values between the La Luna petroleum asphaltenes/source kerogens and inorganic source can be best ascribed to the biological processing of the seawater V. The fact that the isotopic composition of V of the vary over a very narrow range (2.46-2.52) suggests an essentially same (or similar) and fixed (micro)-biological source of V. Isotopic analysis was also extended to the methanol-soluble fractions of the La Luna asphaltic petroleum (DM-119/-120/-124) highly enriched with extractable (alkyl) vanadyl-porphyrins (VO{sup 2+}-P). This analysis shows that the isotopic abundance of {sup 50}V for the methanol-soluble fractions agree (within the limits of experimental error) with those of the asphaltenes/kerogen. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. The abundance of potassium in the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Ohtani, E.; Kamada, S.; Miyahara, M.

    2013-12-01

    Potassium (K) has a radioactive isotope (40K), and it has been proposed that potassium might exist in the Earth's core (e.g., Wasserburg et al., 1964). If a large amount of potassium is in the core, it has a large impact on total heat budget and thermal history of the Earth. To reveal the amount of potassium in the core, many previous studies have been reported on potassium partitioning between metallic melts and silicate melts (e.g., Gessmann and Wood, 2002; Murthy et al., 2003; Hirao et al., 2006; Bouhifd et al., 2007; Corgne et al., 2007). Since there are considerable contradictions on temperature, pressure, and metal compositional dependencies, the potassium abundance in the core is not yet constrained well. In order to reveal the abundance accurately, we studied partitioning of potassium between aluminosilicate (adularia, KAlSi3O8) and metal (pure iron, iron-oxygen alloy, and iron-silicon alloy) up to 50 GPa and 3500 K using a double sided laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Our results revealed following pressure, temperature, and compositional dependencies on the partitioning coefficient of potassium DK (= the potassium contents in metal [wt%] / the potassium contents in silicate [wt%]); the pressure effect is a very weak but positive when the results by Hirao et al. (2006) are included, and the temperature effect is a positive but weaker than those reported previously. Oxygen fugacity has a positive effect, and oxygen in the metallic phase increases the K contents in the metallic phase, whereas silicon in the metallic phase has a negative effect. Based on these results, we estimated that the amount of the potassium in the core was less than 10 ppm and that the amount of 40K was about 1.0 ppb resulting generation of about 0.01 TW heat in the core. This amount of heat is relatively small compared to the heat flux at the core-mantle boundary (5 ~ 15 TW, Lay et al., 2008), therefore the radiogenic energy of potassium is not the major heat source of Earth's core.

  14. Special isotope production and separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operations and production of transuranium elements (Cf, Es) at the Transuranium Processing Plant (TRU) are reported. Isotopic separations of Pu, Tl, Zn, Te, and Pb are reported. Separator R and D were conducted for Xe, Ti, Hg, and Tl

  15. Nuclear deformation of lutetium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Ekström, C

    1974-01-01

    For odd-A lutetium isotopes the ground-state equilibrium deformations ( epsilon , epsilon /sub 4/) and the Nilsson model Z=71 single proton levels in an ( epsilon , epsilon /sub 4/)-representation are considered.

  16. Alignments in the nobelium isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shi-Zie; XU Fu-Rong; YUAN Cen-Xi; QI Chong

    2009-01-01

    Total-Routhian-Surface calculations have been performed to investigate the deformation and align-ment properties of the No isotopes. It is found that normal deformed and superdeformed states in these nuclei can coexist at low excitation energies. In neutron-deficient No isotopes, the superdeformed shapes can even become the ground states. Moreover, we plotted the kinematic moments of inertia of the No isotopes, which follow very nicely available experimental data. It is noted that, as the rotational frequency increases, align-ments develop at hω=0.2-0.3 MeV. Our calculations show that the occupation of the vj orbital plays an important role in the alignments of the No isotopes.

  17. Non-linear Isotope Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    The isotopic fractionation associated with photodissociation of N2O, OCS and CO2, at different altitudes in Earth’s atmosphere, is investigated theoretically using constructed quantum mechanical models of the dissociation processes (i.e. potential energy surfaces and relevant coupling elements...... or moderate, and overall sulfur fractionation in the stratosphere is very weak which does not exclude OCS from being an acceptable background the Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosol layer. (iii) CO2 photolysis in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere is highly fractionating in both isotopes, enriching...... the remaining CO2 and depleting the produced CO in heavy isotopes. But photolysis of CO2 is too slow to produce significant fractionation in the remaining CO2. In contrast, the produced CO is highly fractionated and possesses a significant non mass dependent perturbation and a clumped isotope signal. Given...

  18. Isotope-based quantum information

    CERN Document Server

    G Plekhanov, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The present book provides to the main ideas and techniques of the rapid progressing field of quantum information and quantum computation using isotope - mixed materials. It starts with an introduction to the isotope physics and then describes of the isotope - based quantum information and quantum computation. The ability to manipulate and control electron and/or nucleus spin in semiconductor devices provides a new route to expand the capabilities of inorganic semiconductor-based electronics and to design innovative devices with potential application in quantum computing. One of the major challenges towards these objectives is to develop semiconductor-based systems and architectures in which the spatial distribution of spins and their properties can be controlled. For instance, to eliminate electron spin decoherence resulting from hyperfine interaction due to nuclear spin background, isotopically controlled devices are needed (i.e., nuclear spin-depleted). In other emerging concepts, the control of the spatial...

  19. Isotopic Changes During Digestion: Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuross, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nutrient and hydrological inputs traverse a complicated route of pH, enzymatic and cellular processes in digestion in higher animals. The end products of digestion are the starting products for biosynthesis that are often used to interpret past life-ways. Using an artificial gut system, the isotopic changes (dD, d18O, d13C and d15N) of protein are documented. Three separate protein sources are subjected to the conditions, chemical and enzymatic, found in the stomach and upper small intestine with only a small shift in the oxygen isotopic composition of the proteins observed. Middle to lower small intestine parameters produced both greater isotopic effects and significantly lower molecular weight products. The role of the gastric enterocyte and the likely involvement of the internal milieu of this cell in the isotopic composition of amino acids that are transported to the liver are reported.

  20. Estimates of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) diet in Lake Ontario using two and three isotope mixing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colborne, Scott F.; Rush, Scott A.; Paterson, Gordon; Johnson, Timothy B.; Lantry, Brian F.; Fisk, Aaron T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent development of multi-dimensional stable isotope models for estimating both foraging patterns and niches have presented the analytical tools to further assess the food webs of freshwater populations. One approach to refine predictions from these analyses is to include a third isotope to the more common two-isotope carbon and nitrogen mixing models to increase the power to resolve different prey sources. We compared predictions made with two-isotope carbon and nitrogen mixing models and three-isotope models that also included sulphur (δ34S) for the diets of Lake Ontario lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush). We determined the isotopic compositions of lake trout and potential prey fishes sampled from Lake Ontario and then used quantitative estimates of resource use generated by two- and three-isotope Bayesian mixing models (SIAR) to infer feeding patterns of lake trout. Both two- and three-isotope models indicated that alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) were the primary prey items, but the three-isotope models were more consistent with recent measures of prey fish abundances and lake trout diets. The lake trout sampled directly from the hatcheries had isotopic compositions derived from the hatchery food which were distinctively different from those derived from the natural prey sources. Those hatchery signals were retained for months after release, raising the possibility to distinguish hatchery-reared yearlings and similarly sized naturally reproduced lake trout based on isotopic compositions. Addition of a third-isotope resulted in mixing model results that confirmed round goby have become an important component of lake trout diet and may be overtaking alewife as a prey resource.

  1. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. G. Jansen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (13C and 18O abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the δ18O signature of CO2 from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires, and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the 18O signature of the produced CO2 is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects in the order of about 26‰ became obvious, a clear differentiation of about 7‰ was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent 18O signature, sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO2 and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original 18O signature of the material appeared to have little or no influence.

  2. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Brand

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (13C and 18O abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the δ18O signature of CO2 from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires, and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the 18O signature of the produced CO2 is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects on the order of up to 26%permil; became obvious in the derived CO2 from combustion of different kinds of material, a clear differentiation of about 7‰ was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent 18O signature, sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO2 and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original total 18O signature of the material appeared to have little influence, however, a contribution of specific bio

  3. Isotopes and the early evolution of the earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observed isotopic ratios of lead, strontium, neodymium, helium, and argon contain information about the chemical abundances of selected parent and daughter elements in the outer parts of the Earth. By necessity, we observe these isotopic ratios at the Earth's surface, which is a small, highly evolved part of the Earth. The studies of such isotopic ratios permit inferences to be made about interactions between this crust and the upper mantle. Helium has been especially valuable for demonstrating that primordial materials are still being outgassed from the earth. Models based on the observed argon isotopic ratios have lead to contradictory conclusions about the existence of an early period of extensive outgassing of the Earth. Lead has been a particularly interesting element because the ratio of the parents, 235U/238U, was very different in the Earth's early history than it is now. Therefore there is the potential for determining constraints on the early history of the Earth. A number of recently published papers offering lead isotope interpretations that reflect on the Earth's early history are reviewed, with special reference to models that are based upon uni-directional and bi-directional exchange between a protocrust and a residual mantle. Geochemical parameters for uranium, thorium and lead can be inferred for two evolving systems, as well as rate constants for differentiation. The principal conclusions are that the differentiation process extended beyond the first quarter of the Earth's history, and that it is possible to reproduce exactly the apparent oceanic basalt isochron by a simple two-reservoir model. In particular, such a model can explain quantitatively the observed lead-207 deficiency in the oceanic basalts

  4. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, M.; Werner, R. A.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Jansen, H. G.; Brand, W. A.; Geilmann, H.; Neubert, R. E. M.

    2011-02-01

    For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (13C and 18O) abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the δ18O signature of CO2 from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires), and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning) in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the 18O signature of the produced CO2 is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects on the order of up to 26%permil; became obvious in the derived CO2 from combustion of different kinds of material, a clear differentiation of about 7‰ was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent 18O signature), sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios) and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO2 and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive) transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original total 18O signature of the material appeared to have little influence, however, a contribution of specific bio-chemical compounds to

  5. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heumann, Klaus G.

    1992-09-01

    In the past isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) has usually been applied using the formation of positive thermal ions of metals. Especially in calibrating other analytical methods and for the certification of standard reference materials this type of IDMS became a routine method. Today, the progress in this field lies in the determination of ultra trace amounts of elements, e.g. of heavy metals in Antarctic ice and in aerosols in remote areas down to the sub-pg g-1 and sub-pg m-3 levels respectively, in the analysis of uranium and thorium at concentrations of a few pg g-1 in sputter targets for the production of micro- electronic devices or in the determination of sub-picogram amounts of230Th in corals for geochemical age determinations and of226Ra in rock samples. During the last few years negative thermal ionization IDMS has become a frequently used method. The determination of very small amounts of selenium and technetium as well as of other transition metals such as vanadium, chromium, molybdenum and tungsten are important examples in this field. Also the measurement of silicon in connection with a re-determination of Avogadro's number and osmium analyses for geological age determinations by the Re/Os method are of special interest. Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry is increasingly being used for multi-element analyses by the isotope dilution technique. Determinations of heavy metals in samples of marine origin are representative examples for this type of multi-element analysis by IDMS. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems have also been successfully applied after chelation of metals (for example Pt determination in clinical samples) or for the determination of volatile element species in the environment, e.g. dimethyl sulfide. However, IDMS--specially at low concentration levels in the environment--seems likely to be one of the most powerful analytical methods for speciation in the future. This has been shown, up to now, for species of

  6. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry in oceanic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is an important and well established method in many scientific fields as analytical chemistry (isotope dilution MS), physical chemistry, nuclear sciences and technology, environmental, agricultural, geological isotope dating, archaeometric, cosmic, bioavailability and nutrition studies, food authentication and adulteration control, elucidation of chemical reaction mechanism, isotope effect studies on chemical reactions and isotope enrichment/separation processes. This paper is aimed to provide a brief summary of IRMS contribution to sea and oceanic studies

  7. Isotope-Identifying neutron reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitenko, Yu. V., E-mail: nikiten@nf.jinr.ru; Petrenko, A. V.; Gundorin, N. A.; Gledenov, Yu. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Aksenov, V. L. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    The possibilities of an isotope-indentifying study of layered structures in different regimes of a neutron wave field are considered. The detection of specularly reflected neutrons and secondary radiation (caused by neutron capture) in the form of charged particles, γ quanta, and nuclear fission fragments, as well as neutrons spin-flipped in a noncollinear magnetic field and on nuclei of elements with spin, makes it possible to implement isotope-indentifying neutron reflectometry.

  8. New berkelium isotope: 242Bk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new isotope of berkelium, 242Bk, was produced with a cross section of approx. 10 μb in reactions of boron on uranium and nitrogen on thorium. It decays by electron capture with a half-life of 7 +- 1.3 minutes. The branching ratio for this isotope for alpha decay is less than 1% and that for spontaneous fission is less than 0.03%. 2 figures, 2 tables

  9. Neutron skin in Osmium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we have made an attempt to calculate neutron skin thickness in rare earth even-even osmium isotopes. The selected isotopes ranges from 2-p to 2-n drip line. Neutron skin is an important feature of neutron rich nuclei. The ground state proton and neutron rms radii have been calculated using HFB approximation. A comparison of calculated radii have been done by using two different Skyrme parameterizations and two different basis

  10. Pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relatively new field of pharmaceuticals labelled with stable isotopes is reviewed. Scientific, juridical, and ethical questions are discussed concerning the application of these pharmaceuticals in human medicine. 13C, 15N, and 2H are the stable isotopes mainly utilized in metabolic function tests. Methodical contributions are given to the application of 2H, 13C, and 15N pharmaceuticals showing new aspects and different states of development in the field under discussion. (author)

  11. Isotopic study of Karst water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the isotopic composition of water formed part of an extended investigation of the water drainage system in the Slovenian Karst. These studies were planned to complement geological and speleological investigations which are already being performed in this area, with the knowledge of the mechanism of changes in the isotopic composition of water in the natural environment on some smaller locations, Planina cave near Postojna where the vertical percolation of meteoric water through the karstified carbonate ceiling was studied and the water catchment areas of some small rivers, Ljubljanica, Rizana and Idrijca. Mass spectrometric investigations of the isotopic composition of some elements (18O, D, 13C and T) in water and in dissolved carbonates, as well as the isotopic composition of 18O and 13C in cave carbonates were performed. The results allow to conclude that the waters in karst aquifers in spite of producing the homogenisation to a great extent, qualitative determination of the retention time and of the prevailing sources for some springs and surface and underground water flows is nevertheless possible. The isotopic composition of 18O in water and of 18O and 13C in dissolved carbonates depends on climatic conditions and on denudation processes. The investigation of cave carbonates revealed that they have different isotopic compositions of 18O and 13C because of different locations and also different ages

  12. Isotopes of cosmic ray elements from neon to nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, C. J.; Freier, P. S.; Fickle, R. K.; Brewster, N. R.

    1981-01-01

    Results obtained from a balloon exposure of a cosmic ray detector flown in 1977 are reported. The charge resolution ranged from 0.19 to 0.21 charge units between neon and nickel and the mass resolution for nuclei stopped in the emulsions ranged from 0.40 to 0.70 amu for A between 20 and 60 amu. This was enough to correctly identify almost all nuclei, but not to uniquely resolve neighboring mass peaks. Both Ne and Mg show evidence for neutron enrichment relative to the solar system abundance. Si and S are consistent with solar abundances, while Ar has no significant source abundances. P, Cl and K have essentially no primary component and the isotopic distribution observed is quite consistent with that expected from propagation. An excess of Ca-44 at the source is shown, indicating high metallicity in the source. The abundance of Fe-58 is nine percent or less, and Ni shows a one-to-one ratio for Ni-58 to 60, implying intermediate metallicity.

  13. Insects, isotopes and radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA activity on coordinating the IAEA member-state efforts in the field of pest control is considered. A complex program of agricultural pest control (IPM), applied in many parts of the world is developed. The program provides for the use of natural means of control and cases of critical pest numbers-the use of insecticides. When controlling certain types of insects it is advisable to apply the 'large area control' methods which provide for the insect destruction in places of their concentration prior to migration. Methods of pest control over large areas also include radiation sexual sterilization method (SSM), application of insect phoromons (sexual attractants) to prevent mating, other types of chemical attractants, traps, mass cultivation and reproduction of parasite plants and animals, destroying insects, as well as improvement of host-plant resistance. A great attention is paid to isotope and radiation application in pest control (labelling, sexual sterilization using ionising radiation, radiation application in genetic engineering, mutant plant cultivation)

  14. Hydrogen isotope technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen pumping speeds on panels of molecular sieve types 5A and Na-Y were compared for a variety of sieve (and chevron) temperatures between 10 and 30 K. Although pumping speeds declined with time, probably because of the slow diffusion of hydrogen from the surface of the sieve crystals into the internal regions, the different sieve materials and operating conditions could be compared using time-averaged pump speeds. The (average) pumping speeds declined with increasing temperature. Under some conditions, the Na-Y sieve performed much better than the 5A sieve. Studies of the effect of small concentrations (approx. 4%) of hydrogen on helium pumping indicate that compound cryopumps in fusion reactors will not have to provide complete screening of hydrogen from helium panels. The concentrations of hydrogen did not lower effective helium pumping speeds or shorten the helium operating period between instabilities. Studies of tritium recovery from blankets of liquid lithium focused on design and construction of a flowing-lithium test system and on ultimate removal of tritium from yttrium sorbents. At 5050C, tritium release from yttrium behaves as a diffusion-controlled process, but the release rates are very low. Apparently, higher temperatures will be required for effective sorbent regeneration. An innovative technique for separating hydrogen isotopes by using bipolar electrolysis with permeable electrodes was analyzed to determine its potential usefulness in multistage separation

  15. Chemical evolution of Mg isotopes versus the time variation of the fine structure constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the synthesis of Mg25,26 at the base of the convective envelope in low-metallicity asymptotic giant branch stars can produce the isotopic ratios needed to explain the low-z subset (with z<1.8) of the many-multiplet data from quasar absorption systems without invoking a time variation of the fine structure constant. This is supported by observations of high abundances of the neutron-rich Mg isotopes in metal-poor globular-cluster stars. We conclude that the quasar absorption spectra may be providing interesting information on the nucleosynthetic history of such systems

  16. Application of diode lasers to the isotopically selective determination of uranium in oxides by optogalvanic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. P.; Barshick, C. M.; Shaw, R. W.; Ramsey, J. M.

    1995-04-01

    We have observed isotopically selective diode laser-excited optogalvanic effects in uranium at 778.42 and 776.10 nm. The samples were natural abundance uranium oxide, as well as depleted (0.3% 235U), natural (0.7% 235U) and enriched (9.75% 235U) uranium metal or powders. The measurements were carried out in a demountable-cathode glow discharge cell. Preliminary evaluations of precision for uranium isotopic ratios measured using this technique suggest that it should have broad analytical applications for uranium and other amenable actinides or lanthanides.

  17. Paleoproxies: Heavy Stable Isotope Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, T. F.; Hippler, D.; Siebert, C.; Kramers, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    Recent advances in isotope ratio mass spectrometry, namely multiple collector ICP-MS and refined TIMS techniques, will significantly enhance the ability to measure heavy stable isotope fractionation, which will lead to the development of a wide array of process-identifying (bio)-geochemical tools. Thus far research in this area is not easily assessable to scientists outside the isotope field. This is due to the fact that analyzing heavy stable isotopes does not provide routine numbers which are per se true (the preciser the truer) but is still a highly experimental field. On the other hand resolving earth science problems requires specialists familiar with the environment being studied. So what is in there for paleoceanographers? In a first order approach, relating isotope variations to physical processes is straightforward. A prominent example are oxygen isotope variations with temperature. The total geological signal is of course far more complicated. At low temperatures, heavy stable isotopes variations have been reported for e.g. Ca, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Mo and Tl. Fractionation mechanisms and physical parameters responsible for the observed variations are not yet resolved for most elements. Significant equilibrium isotope fractionation is expected from redox reactions of transition metals. However a difference in coordination number between two coexisting speciations of an element in the same oxidation state can also cause fractionation. Protonation of dissolved Mo is one case currently discussed. For paleoceanography studies, a principal distinction between transition metals essential for life (V to Zn plus Mo) or not will be helpful. In case of the former group, distinction between biogenic and abiogenic isotope fractionation will remain an important issue. For example, abiotic Fe redox reactions result in isotope fractionations indistinguishable in direction and magnitude from microbial effects. Only a combination of different stable isotope systems bears the

  18. Individual-specific transgenerational marking of fish populations based on a barium dual-isotope procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelga-Suarez, Gonzalo; Moldovan, Mariella; Garcia-Valiente, America; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva; Alonso, J Ignacio Garcia

    2012-01-01

    The present study focuses on the development and evaluation of an individual-specific transgenerational marking procedure using two enriched barium isotopes, (135)Ba and (137)Ba, mixed at a given and selectable molar ratio. The method is based on the deconvolution of the isotope patterns found in the sample into four molar contribution factors: natural xenon (Xe nat), natural barium (Ba nat), Ba135, and Ba137. The ratio of molar contributions between Ba137 and Ba135 is constant and independent of the contribution of natural barium in the sample. This procedure was tested in brown trout ( Salmo trutta ) kept in captivity. Trout were injected with three different Ba137/Ba135 isotopic signatures ca. 7 months and 7 days before spawning to compare the efficiency of the marking procedure at long and short term, respectively. The barium isotopic profiles were measured in the offspring by means of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Each of the three different isotopic signatures was unequivocally identified in the offspring in both whole eggs and larvae. For 9 month old offspring, the characteristic barium isotope signatures could also be detected in the otoliths even in the presence of a high and variable amount of barium of natural isotope abundance. In conclusion, it can be stated that the proposed dual-isotope marking is inheritable and can be detected after both long-term and short-term marking. Furthermore, the dual-isotope marking can be made individual-specific, so that it allows identification of offspring from a single individual or a group of individuals within a given fish group.

  19. Applying clumped isotopes of O2 to atmospheric and biogeochemical problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Laurence

    2016-04-01

    I will describe recent measurements of isotopic "clumps" in diatomic molecules, e.g., 18O18O in O2, which are being utilized to constrain atmospheric circulation on glacial-interglacial timescales and biogeochemical cycling in the oceans. While our understanding of these tracers is still evolving, several features of their geochemistry are apparent: (1) the proportional abundance of these isotopic "clumps" is governed by traditional chemical effects as well as combinatorial effects unique to clumped isotopes, and (2) when isotopic exchange reactions are disfavoured, chemical-kinetic and/or reservoir effects, rather than thermodynamic equilibrium, determine their clumped-isotope composition. Combinatorial clumped-isotope signatures imparted during photosynthesis are being developed as endmember signatures of gross primary productivity in the oceans. In addition, clumped-isotope measurements of O2 in the atmosphere (i.e., Δ36 values) suggest that isotopic clumping in O2 is continuously being altered by ozone photochemistry in the troposphere and stratosphere. Yet, the contrast in isotope-exchange rates between the stratosphere (where exchange is fast) and the troposphere (where exchange is slow) results in a gradient in Δ36 values with altitude, wherein stratospheric intrusions are detectable as elevated Δ36 values. Moreover, global chemical-transport model simulations suggest that ozone photochemistry in the troposphere re-orders the O2 reservoir in the troposphere on annual timescales. The Δ36 value at the surface is therefore sensitive to the tropospheric residence time of O2 with respect to stratosphere-troposphere exchange. Consequently, Δ36 values at the surface likely respond to changes in the strength of the global overturning circulation.

  20. Determination of plutonium content in high burnup pressurized water reactor fuel samples and its use for isotope correlations for isotopic composition of plutonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Kihsoo; Jeon, Young-Shin; Han, Sun-Ho; Lee, Chang-Heon; Ha, Yeong-Keong; Song, Kyuseok

    2012-06-01

    The content of plutonium isotopes in high burnup pressurized water reactor fuel samples was examined using both alpha spectrometry and mass spectrometry after anion exchange separation. The measured values were compared with results calculated by the ORIGEN-2 code. On average, the ratios (m/c) of the measured values (m) over the calculated values (c) were 1.22±0.16 for (238)Pu, 1.02±0.14 for (239)Pu, 1.08±0.06 for (240)Pu, 1.06±0.16 for (241)Pu, and 1.13±0.08 for (242)Pu. Using the Pu data obtained in this work, correlations were derived between the alpha activity ratios of (238)Pu/((239)Pu+(240)Pu), the alpha specific activities of Pu, and the atom % abundances of the Pu isotopes. Using these correlations, the atom % abundances of the plutonium isotopes in the target samples were calculated. These calculated results agreed within a range from 2 to 8% of the experimentally derived values according to the isotopes of plutonium.