WorldWideScience

Sample records for absorption freezing vapor

  1. Water vapor movement in freezing aggregate base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to 1) measure the extent to which water vapor movement results in : water accumulation in freezing base materials; 2) evaluate the effect of soil stabilization on water vapor movement : in freezing base materials;...

  2. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  3. Atmospheric water vapor absorption at 1.3 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, S L; Kelley, J D

    1987-02-01

    Absolute absorption cross sections for water vapor and water vapor/air mixtures were measured in a frequency range encompassing that of the chemically pumped atomic iodine laser. Measurements were made with a temperature-controlled multipass absorption cell and a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. The measurements covered a broad range of water vapor and air pressures. Several techniques of data analysis were used, and the absorption cross section of 2 kPa of water vapor in an atmosphere of air was determined to be 1.1 +/- 0.2 x 10(-24) cm(2) . In this paper, an expression is derived which allows estimation of the absorption cross section for any pressure of water vapor and air.

  4. Water vapor absorption of carbon dioxide laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumate, M. S.; Menzies, R. T.; Margolis, J. S.; Rosengren, L.-G.

    1976-01-01

    An optoacoustic detector or spectrophone has been used to perform detailed measurements of the absorptivity of mixtures of water vapor in air. A (C-12) (O-16)2 laser was used as the source, and measurements were made at forty-nine different wavelengths from 9.2 to 10.7 microns. The details of the optoacoustic detector and its calibration are presented, along with a discussion of its performance characteristics. The results of the measurements of water vapor absorption show that the continuum absorption in the wavelength range covered is 5-10% lower than previous measurements.

  5. Distribution of Vapor Pressure in the Vacuum Freeze-Drying Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwei Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the big vacuum freeze-drying equipment, the drying rate of materials is uneven at different positions. This phenomenon can be explained by the uneven distribution of vapor pressure in chamber during the freeze-drying process. In this paper, a mathematical model is developed to describe the vapor flow in the passageways either between material plates and in the channel between plate groups. The distribution of vapor pressure along flow passageway is given. Two characteristic factors of passageways are defined to express the effects of structural and process parameters on vapor pressure distribution. The affecting factors and their actions are quantitatively discussed in detail. Two examples are calculated and analyzed. The analysis method and the conclusions are useful to estimate the difference of material drying rate at different parts in equipment and to direct the choice of structural and process parameters.

  6. Reappraisal of disparities between osmolality estimates by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzor, Donald J

    2004-02-15

    As a response to recent expression of concern about possible unreliability of vapor pressure deficit measurements (K. Kiyosawa, Biophys. Chem. 104 (2003) 171-188), the results of published studies on the temperature dependence of the osmotic pressure of aqueous polyethylene glycol solutions are shown to account for the observed discrepancies between osmolality estimates obtained by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit osmometry--the cause of the concern.

  7. Water vapor absorption in the atmospheric window at 239 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, A.; Godon, M.; Carlier, J.; Ma, Q.

    1995-01-01

    Absolute absorption rates of pure water vapor and mixtures of water vapor and nitrogen have been measured in the atmospheric window at 239 GHz. The dependence on pressure as well as temperature has been obtained. The experimental data are compared with several theoretical or empirical models, and satisfactory agreement is obtained with the models involving a continuum; in the case of pure water vapor, the continuum contribution based upon recent theoretical developments gives good results. The temperature dependence is stronger than that proposed in a commonly used atmospheric transmission model.

  8. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for water vapor investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, E. V.; Carter, A. F.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1981-01-01

    Range-resolved water vapor measurements using the differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is described in detail. The system uses two independently tunable optically pumped lasers operating in the near infrared with laser pulses of less than 100 microseconds separation, to minimize concentration errors caused by atmospheric scattering. Water vapor concentration profiles are calculated for each measurement by a minicomputer, in real time. The work is needed in the study of atmospheric motion and thermodynamics as well as in forestry and agriculture problems.

  9. Water vapor-nitrogen absorption at CO2 laser frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, J. C.; Thomas, M. E.; Nordstrom, R. J.; Damon, E. K.; Long, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reports the results of a series of pressure-broadened water vapor absorption measurements at 27 CO2 laser frequencies between 935 and 1082 kaysers. Both multiple traversal cell and optoacoustic (spectrophone) techniques were utilized together with an electronically stabilized CW CO2 laser. Comparison of the results obtained by these two methods shows remarkable agreement, indicating a precision which has not been previously achieved in pressure-broadened studies of water vapor. The data of 10.59 microns substantiate the existence of the large (greater than 200) self-broadening coefficients determined in an earlier study by McCoy. In this work, the case of water vapor in N2 at a total pressure of 1 atm has been treated.

  10. Water vapor differential absorption lidar development and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, E. V.; Wilkerson, T. D.; Mcllrath, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    A ground-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system is described which has been developed for vertical range-resolved measurements of water vapor. The laser transmitter consists of a ruby-pumped dye laser, which is operated on a water vapor absorption line at 724.372 nm. Part of the ruby laser output is transmitted simultaneously with the dye laser output to determine atmospheric scattering and attenuation characteristics. The dye and ruby laser backscattered light is collected by a 0.5-m diam telescope, optically separated in the receiver package, and independently detected using photomultiplier tubes. Measurements of vertical water vapor concentration profiles using the DIAL system at night are discussed, and comparisons are made between the water vapor DIAL measurements and data obtained from locally launched rawinsondes. Agreement between these measurements was found to be within the uncertainty of the rawinsonde data to an altitude of 3 km. Theoretical simulations of this measurement were found to give reasonably accurate predictions of the random error of the DIAL measurements. Confidence in these calculations will permit the design of aircraft and Shuttle DIAL systems and experiments using simulation results as the basis for defining lidar system performance requirements

  11. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1988-01-01

    Relative absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor were measured over the temperature ranges 285-381 K for lambda = 230 nm-295 nm and 300-381 K for lambda = 193 nm-350 nm. The well established 298 K cross sections at 202.6 and 228.8 nm were used as an absolute calibration. A significant temperature dependence was observed at the important tropospheric photolysis wavelengths lambda over 300 nm. Measured cross sections were extrapolated to lower temperatures, using a simple model which attributes the observed temperature dependence to enhanced absorption by molecules possessing one quantum of O-O stretch vibrational excitation. Upper tropospheric photodissociation rates calculated using the extrapolated cross sections are about 25 percent lower than those calculated using currently recommended 298 K cross sections.

  12. Theoretical Calculation and Validation of the Water Vapor Continuum Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiancheng; Tipping, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is the development of an improved parameterization of the water vapor continuum absorption through the refinement and validation of our existing theoretical formalism. The chief advantage of our approach is the self-consistent, first principles, basis of the formalism which allows us to predict the frequency, temperature and pressure dependence of the continuum absorption as well as provide insights into the physical mechanisms responsible for the continuum absorption. Moreover, our approach is such that the calculated continuum absorption can be easily incorporated into satellite retrieval algorithms and climate models. Accurate determination of the water vapor continuum is essential for the next generation of retrieval algorithms which propose to use the combined constraints of multi-spectral measurements such as those under development for EOS data analysis (e.g., retrieval algorithms based on MODIS and AIRS measurements); current Pathfinder activities which seek to use the combined constraints of infrared and microwave (e.g., HIRS and MSU) measurements to improve temperature and water profile retrievals, and field campaigns which seek to reconcile spectrally-resolved and broad-band measurements such as those obtained as part of FIRE. Current widely used continuum treatments have been shown to produce spectrally dependent errors, with the magnitude of the error dependent on temperature and abundance which produces errors with a seasonal and latitude dependence. Translated into flux, current water vapor continuum parameterizations produce flux errors of order 10 W/ml, which compared to the 4 W/m' magnitude of the greenhouse gas forcing and the 1-2 W/m' estimated aerosol forcing is certainly climatologically significant and unacceptably large. While it is possible to tune the empirical formalisms, the paucity of laboratory measurements, especially at temperatures of interest for atmospheric applications, preclude tuning

  13. Fast membrane osmometer as alternative to freezing point and vapor pressure osmometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattoni, Alessandro; Canavese, Giancarlo; Montevecchi, Franco Maria; Ferrari, Mauro

    2008-04-01

    Osmometry is an essential technique for solution analysis and the investigation of chemical and biological phenomena. Commercially available osmometers rely on the measurements of freezing point, vapor pressure, and osmotic pressure of solutions. Although vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) and freezing point osmometry (FPO) can perform rapid and inexpensive measurements, they are indirect techniques, which rely on thermodynamic assumptions, which limit their applicability. While membrane osmometry (MO) provides a potentially unlimited direct measurement of osmotic pressure and solution osmolality, the conventional technique is often time-consuming and difficult to operate. In the present work, a novel membrane osmometer is presented. The instrument significantly reduces the conventional MO measurement time and is not subject to the limitations of VPO and FPO. For this paper, the osmotic pressure of aqueous sucrose solutions was collected in a molality range 0-5.5, by way of demonstration of the new instrument. When compared with data found in the literature, the experimental data were generally in good agreement. However, differences among results from the three techniques were observed.

  14. Measurement of atmospheric precipitable water using a solar radiometer. [water vapor absorption effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, D. E.; Dillinger, A. E.; Mcallum, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described and tested that allows the determination of atmospheric precipitable water from two measurements of solar intensity: one in a water-vapor absorption band and another in a nearby spectral region unaffected by water vapor.

  15. Mathematical prediction of freezing times of bovine semen in straws placed in static vapor over liquid nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2013-02-01

    A widespread practice in cryopreservation is to freeze spermatozoa by suspending the straws in stagnant nitrogen vapor over liquid nitrogen (N(2)V/LN(2)) for variable periods of time before plunging into liquid nitrogen (-196°C) for indefinite storage. A mathematical heat transfer model was developed to predict freezing times (phase change was considered) required for bull semen and extender packaged in 0.5ml plastic straws and suspended in static liquid nitrogen vapor. Thermophysical properties (i.e. thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, initial freezing temperature) of bovine semen and extender as a function of temperature were determined considering the water change of phase. The non-stationary heat transfer partial differential equations with variable properties (nonlinear mathematical problem) were numerically solved considering in series thermal resistances (semen suspension-straw) and the temperature profiles were obtained for both semen suspension and plastic straw. It was observed both the external heat transfer coefficient in stagnant nitrogen vapor and its temperature (controlled by the distance from the surface of liquid nitrogen to the straw) affected freezing times. The accuracy of the model to estimate freezing times of the straws was further confirmed by comparing with experimental literature data. Results of this study will be useful to select "safe" holding times of bull semen in plastic straws placed N(2)V/LN(2) to ensure that complete freezing of the sample has occurred in the nitrogen vapor and avoid cryodamage when plunging in LN(2). Freezing times predicted by the numerical model can be applied to optimize freezing protocols of bull semen in straws. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. New expressions to describe solution nonideal osmotic pressure, freezing point depression, and vapor pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, G D; Zimmerman, R J; Cantu, C; Cameron, I L

    1992-12-01

    New empirical expressions for osmotic pressure, freezing point depression, and vapor pressure are proposed based on the concepts of volume occupancy and (or) hydration force. These expressions are in general inverse relationships in comparison to the standard ideal expressions for the same properties. The slopes of the new equations are determined by the molecular weight of the solute and known constants. The accuracy and precision of the molecular weights calculated from the slope are identical and approximately 1% for the experiments reported here. The nonideality of all three colligative expressions is described by a dimensionless constant called the solute-solvent interaction parameter I. The results on sucrose have the same I = 0.26 for all three solution properties. The nonideality parameter I increased from 0.26 on sucrose to 1.7 on hemoglobin to successfully describe the well-known nonideal response of macromolecules.

  17. How important are internal temperature gradients in french straws during freezing of bovine sperm in nitrogen vapor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2013-01-01

    The subject of present work was to predict internal temperature gradients developed during freezing of bovine sperm diluted in extender, packaged in 0.5 ml French plastic straws and suspended in static liquid nitrogen vapor at -100 degree C. For this purpose, a mathematical heat transfer model previously developed to predict freezing times (phase change was considered) of semen/extender packaged in straw was extended to predict internal temperature gradients during the cooling/freezing process. Results showed maximum temperature differences between the centre and the periphery of semen/extender "liquid" column was 1.5 degree C for an external heat transfer coefficient, h = 15 W per (m(2) K), and only 0.5 degree C for h = 5 W per (m(2) K). It is concluded that if a thermocouple wire were inserted in a 0.5 ml plastic straw to monitor the freezing process in nitrogen vapor, its radial position would have little importance since expected internal gradients may be safely neglected. This finding facilitates the interpretation of freezing rates in 0.5 ml plastic straws immersed in nitrogen vapor over liquid nitrogen, a widely used method for cryopreservation of bovine spermatozoa.

  18. Vapor Pressure Plus: An Experiment for Studying Phase Equilibria in Water, with Observation of Supercooling, Spontaneous Freezing, and the Triple Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Liquid-vapor, solid-vapor, and solid-liquid-vapor equilibria are studied for the pure substance water, using modern equipment that includes specially fabricated glass cells. Samples are evaporatively frozen initially, during which they typically supercool to -5 to -10 [degrees]C before spontaneously freezing. Vacuum pumping lowers the temperature…

  19. Theoretical and experimental studies on freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit as methods to measure osmotic pressure of aqueous polyethylene glycol and bovine serum albumin solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyosawa, Keitaro

    2003-05-01

    For survival in adverse environments where there is drought, high salt concentration or low temperature, some plants seem to be able to synthesize biochemical compounds, including proteins, in response to changes in water activity or osmotic pressure. Measurement of the water activity or osmotic pressure of simple aqueous solutions has been based on freezing point depression or vapor pressure deficit. Measurement of the osmotic pressure of plants under water stress has been mainly based on vapor pressure deficit. However, differences have been noted for osmotic pressure values of aqueous polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit. For this paper, the physicochemical basis of freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit were first examined theoretically and then, the osmotic pressure of aqueous ethylene glycol and of PEG solutions were measured by both freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit in comparison with other aqueous solutions such as NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions. The results showed that: (1) freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit share theoretically the same physicochemical basis; (2) theoretically, they are proportional to the molal concentration of the aqueous solutions to be measured; (3) in practice, the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, and raffinose solutions increase in proportion to their molal concentrations and there is little inconsistency between those measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit; (4) the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous ethylene glycol and PEG solutions measured by freezing point depression differed from the values measured by vapor pressure deficit; (5) the osmotic pressure of aqueous BSA solution measured by freezing point depression differed slightly from that measured by vapor pressure deficit.

  20. Water vapor measurements in the 0.94 micron absorption band - Calibration, measurements and data applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, J. A.; Thome, K.; Herman, B.; Gall, R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes methods and presents results for sensing the columnar content of atmospheric water vapor via differential solar transmission measurements in and adjacent to the 0.94-micron water-vapor absorption band. Calibration and measurement techniques are presented for obtaining the water vapor transmission from the radiometer measurements. Models are also presented for retrieving the columnar water vapor amount from the estimated transmission. Example retrievals are presented for radiometer measurements made during the 1986 Arizona Monsoon Season to track temporal variations in columnar water vapor amount.

  1. Optoacoustic measurements of water vapor absorption at selected CO laser wavelengths in the 5-micron region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption were taken with a resonant optoacoustical detector (cylindrical pyrex detector, two BaF2 windows fitted into end plates at slight tilt to suppress Fabry-Perot resonances), for lack of confidence in existing spectral tabular data for the 5-7 micron region, as line shapes in the wing regions of water vapor lines are difficult to characterize. The measurements are required for air pollution studies using a CO laser, to find the differential absorption at the wavelengths in question due to atmospheric constituents other than water vapor. The design and performance of the optoacoustical detector are presented. Effects of absorption by ambient NO are considered, and the fixed-frequency discretely tunable CO laser is found suitable for monitoring urban NO concentrations in a fairly dry climate, using the water vapor absorption data obtained in the study.

  2. Absorption coefficients for water vapor at 193 nm from 300 to 1073 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, W. J.; Carleton, K. L.; Marinelli, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the water absorption coefficient at 193 nm from 300 to 1073 K are reported. The measurements were made using broadband VUV radiation and a monochromator-based detection system. The water vapor was generated by a saturator and metered into a flowing, 99 cm absorption cell via a water vapor mass flow meter. The 193 nm absorption coefficient measurements are compared to room temperature and high temperature shock tube measurements with good agreement. The absorption can be parameterized by a nu3 vibrational mode reaction coordinate and the thermal population of the nu3 mode.

  3. Influence of absorption by environmental water vapor on radiation transfer in wildland fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Frankman; B. W. Webb; B. W. Butler

    2008-01-01

    The attenuation of radiation transfer from wildland flames to fuel by environmental water vapor is investigated. Emission is tracked from points on an idealized flame to locations along the fuel bed while accounting for absorption by environmental water vapor in the intervening medium. The Spectral Line Weighted-sum-of-gray-gases approach was employed for treating the...

  4. Improvements to water vapor transmission and capillary absorption measurements in porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Samuel V. Glass; Charles R. Boardman

    2016-01-01

    The vapor permeability (or equivalently the vapor diffusion resistance factor) and the capillary absorption coefficient are frequently used as inputs to hygrothermal or heat, air, and moisture (HAM) models. However, it has been well documented that the methods used to determine these properties are sensitive to the operator, and wide variations in the properties have...

  5. Absorption of Irrigation Fluid During Thulium Laser Vaporization of the Prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllhaupt, Gautier; Abt, Dominik; Mordasini, Livio; Köhle, Olivia; Engeler, Daniel S; Lüthi, Andreas; Sauter, Rafael; Schmid, Hans-Peter; Schwab, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    To assess the prevalence and extent of irrigation fluid absorption during thulium laser vaporization of the prostate. Fifty-four patients undergoing thulium laser vaporization of the prostate were prospectively included into the trial at a tertiary referral center. Isotonic saline containing 1% ethanol was used for intraoperative irrigation. Absorption of irrigation fluid was measured periodically during the operation using the expired breath ethanol technique. Among others, intra- and postoperative changes in biochemical and hematological laboratory findings were assessed. Absorption of irrigation fluid was detected in 7 out of 54 (13%) patients with a median absorption volume of 265 mL (227-615). No significant differences of intra- and postoperative blood parameters were observed between absorbers and nonabsorbers. No risk factor (i.e., age, prostate size, surgery duration, applied energy, and amount of irrigation fluid) for the occurrence of fluid absorption could be identified. Absorption of irrigation fluid also occurs during thulium laser vaporization of the prostate and should be kept in mind, especially in patients at a high cardiovascular risk. However, compared with previously assessed resection and vaporization techniques, thulium vaporization might have a favorable safety profile regarding fluid absorption.

  6. Relative spectral absorption of solar radiation by water vapor and cloud droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, R.; Ridgway, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    A moderate (20/cm) spectral resolution model which accounts for both the highly variable spectral transmission of solar radiation through water vapor within and above cloud, as well as the more slowly varying features of absorption and anisotropic multiple scattering by the cloud droplets, is presented. Results from this model as applied to the case of a typical 1 km thick stratus cloud in a standard atmosphere, with cloud top altitude of 2 km and overhead sun, are discussed, showing the relative importance of water vapor above the cloud, water vapor within the cloud, and cloud droplets on the spectral absorption of solar radiation.

  7. Upper limits for absorption by water vapor in the near-UV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Eoin M.; Wenger, John C.; Venables, Dean S.

    2016-01-01

    There are few experimental measurements of absorption by water vapor in the near-UV. Here we report the results of spectral measurements of water vapor absorption at ambient temperature and pressure from 325 nm to 420 nm, covering most tropospherically relevant short wavelengths. Spectra were recorded using a broadband optical cavity in the chemically controlled environment of an atmospheric simulation chamber. No absorption attributable to the water monomer (or the dimer) was observed at the 0.5 nm resolution of our system. Our results are consistent with calculated spectra and recent DOAS field observations, but contradict a report of significant water absorption in the near-UV. Based on the detection limit of our instrument, we report upper limits for the water absorption cross section of less than 5×10 −26 cm 2 molecule −1 at our instrument resolution. For a typical, indicative slant column density of 4×10 23 cm 2 , we calculate a maximum optical depth of 0.02 arising from absorption of water vapor in the atmosphere at wavelengths between 340 nm and 420 nm, with slightly higher maximum optical depths below 340 nm. The results of this work, together with recent atmospheric observations and computational results, suggest that water vapor absorption across most of the near-UV is small compared to visible and infrared wavelengths. - Highlights: • The absorption cross section of water vapor was studied from 325 to 420 nm. • The upper limit was 5×10 −26 cm 2 molecule −1 above 340 nm at 0.5 nm resolution. • Our result contradicts a recent report of appreciable absorption by water vapor.

  8. A parameterization for the absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in the earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.-C.

    1976-01-01

    A parameterization for the absorption of solar radiation as a function of the amount of water vapor in the earth's atmosphere is obtained. Absorption computations are based on the Goody band model and the near-infrared absorption band data of Ludwig et al. A two-parameter Curtis-Godson approximation is used to treat the inhomogeneous atmosphere. Heating rates based on a frequently used one-parameter pressure-scaling approximation are also discussed and compared with the present parameterization.

  9. Continuum and discrete pulsed cavity ring down laser absorption spectra of Br2 vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ramesh C; Huang, Hong-Yi; Chuang, Wang-Ting; Lin, King-Chuen

    2005-07-01

    The absorption cross-sections at room temperature are reported for the first time, of Br2 vapor in overlapping bound-free and bound-bound transition of A(3)pi1u Br2. We obtained discrete absorption cross-section in the rotational structure, the continuum absorption cross-sections, and were also able to measure the absorption cross-section in separate contribution of A(3)pi1u Br2. The absorption cross-sections are increasing with increasing excitation energy in the wavelength region 510-535 nm.

  10. Water vapor spectroscopy in the 815-nm wavelength region for Differential Absorption Lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Browell, Edward V.

    1995-01-01

    The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique was first applied to the remote measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles from airborne platforms in 1981. The successful interpretation of the lidar profiles relies strongly on an accurate knowledge of specific water vapor absorption line parameters: line strength, pressure broadening coefficient, pressure-induced shift coefficient and the respective temperature-dependence factors. NASA Langley Research Center has developed and is currently testing an autonomous airborne water vapor lidar system: LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment). This DIAL system uses a Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser seeded by a diode laser as a lidar transmitter. The tunable diode has been selected to operate in the 813-818 nm wavelength region. This 5-nm spectral interval offers a large distribution of strengths for temperature-insensitive water vapor absorption lines. In support of the LASE project, a series of spectroscopic measurements were conducted for the 16 absorption lines that have been identified for use in the LASE measurements. Prior to this work, the experimental data for this water vapor absorption band were limited - to our knowledge - to the line strengths and to the line positions.

  11. Diode Laser Pumped Alkali Vapor Lasers with Exciplex-Assisted Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    gas pressure in the discharge cell was measured by a capacitance manometer (MKS Baratron). Tunable radiation with spectral bandwidth of 0 .3 cm·1...of low pressure Rb and Cs vapors from ground states and by low pressure Ar* and Kr* from metastable states. Exposed and developed PTR glass with an...provides efficient absorption of radiation by low pressure Rb and Cs vapors from ground states and by low pressure Ar* and Kr* from metastable states. The

  12. An Accurate Method for Computing the Absorption of Solar Radiation by Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    The method is based upon molecular line parameters and makes use of a far wing scaling approximation and k distribution approach previously applied to the computation of the infrared cooling rate due to water vapor. Taking into account the wave number dependence of the incident solar flux, the solar heating rate is computed for the entire water vapor spectrum and for individual absorption bands. The accuracy of the method is tested against line by line calculations. The method introduces a maximum error of 0.06 C/day. The method has the additional advantage over previous methods in that it can be applied to any portion of the spectral region containing the water vapor bands. The integrated absorptances and line intensities computed from the molecular line parameters were compared with laboratory measurements. The comparison reveals that, among the three different sources, absorptance is the largest for the laboratory measurements.

  13. Visualizing the Solute Vaporization Interference in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockery, Christopher R.; Blew, Michael J.; Goode, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Every day, tens of thousands of chemists use analytical atomic spectroscopy in their work, often without knowledge of possible interferences. We present a unique approach to study these interferences by using modern response surface methods to visualize an interference in which aluminum depresses the calcium atomic absorption signal. Calcium…

  14. Real-time monitoring of atom vapor concentration with laser absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Fengying; Gao Peng; Jiang Tao

    2012-01-01

    The technology of laser absorption spectroscopy was used for real-time monitoring of gadolinium atom vapor concentration measurement and the solid state laser pumped ring dye laser was used as optical source. The optical fiber was taken to improve the stability of laser transmission. The multi-pass absorption technology combined with reference optical signal avoided the influence of laser power fluctuation. The experiment result shows that the system based on this detection method has a standard error of 4%. It is proved that the monitoring system provides reliable data for atom vapor laser isotope separation process and the separation efficiency can be improved. (authors)

  15. Optimization of the freezing process for hematopoietic progenitor cells: effect of precooling, initial dimethyl sulfoxide concentration, freezing program, and storage in vapor-phase or liquid nitrogen on in vitro white blood cell quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra-Tiekstra, Margriet J; Setroikromo, Airies C; Kraan, Marcha; Gkoumassi, Effimia; de Wildt-Eggen, Janny

    2014-12-01

    Adding dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) causes an exothermic reaction, potentially affecting their viability. The freezing method might also influence this. The aim was to investigate the effect of 1) precooling of DMSO and plasma (D/P) and white blood cell (WBC)-enriched product, 2) DMSO concentration of D/P, 3) freezing program, and 4) storage method on WBC quality. WBC-enriched product without CD34+ cells was used instead of HPCs. This was divided into six or eight portions. D/P (20 or 50%; precooled or room temperature [RT]) was added to the WBC-enriched product (precooled or RT), resulting in 10% DMSO, while monitoring temperature. The product was frozen using controlled-rate freezing ("fast-rate" or "slow-rate") and placed in vapor-phase or liquid nitrogen. After thawing, WBC recovery and viability were determined. Temperature increased most for precooled D/P to precooled WBC-enriched product, without influence of 20 or 50% D/P, but remained for all variations below 30°C. WBC recovery for both freezing programs was more than 95%. Recovery of WBC viability was higher for slow-rate freezing compared to fast-rate freezing (74% vs. 61%; p Effect of precooling D/P or WBC-enriched product and of storage in vapor-phase or liquid nitrogen was marginal. Based on these results, precooling is not necessary. Fifty percent D/P is preferred over 20% D/P. Slow-rate freezing is preferred over fast-rate freezing. For safety reasons storage in vapor-phase nitrogen is preferred over storage in liquid nitrogen. Additional testing using real HPCs might be necessary. © 2014 AABB.

  16. Generalized correlation of latent heats of vaporization of coal liquid model compounds between their freezing points and critical points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaraman, A.; Kobuyashi, R.; Mayee, J.W.

    1984-02-01

    Based on Pitzer's three-parameter corresponding states principle, the authors have developed a correlation of the latent heat of vaporization of aromatic coal liquid model compounds for a temperature range from the freezing point to the critical point. An expansion of the form L = L/sub 0/ + ..omega..L /sub 1/ is used for the dimensionless latent heat of vaporization. This model utilizes a nonanalytic functional form based on results derived from renormalization group theory of fluids in the vicinity of the critical point. A simple expression for the latent heat of vaporization L = D/sub 1/epsilon /SUP 0.3333/ + D/sub 2/epsilon /SUP 0.8333/ + D/sub 4/epsilon /SUP 1.2083/ + E/sub 1/epsilon + E/sub 2/epsilon/sup 2/ + E/sub 3/epsilon/sup 3/ is cast in a corresponding states principle correlation for coal liquid compounds. Benzene, the basic constituent of the functional groups of the multi-ring coal liquid compounds, is used as the reference compound in the present correlation. This model works very well at both low and high reduced temperatures approaching the critical point (0.02 < epsilon = (T /SUB c/ - T)/(T /SUB c/- 0.69)). About 16 compounds, including single, two, and three-ring compounds, have been tested and the percent root-mean-square deviations in latent heat of vaporization reported and estimated through the model are 0.42 to 5.27%. Tables of the coefficients of L/sub 0/ and L/sub 1/ are presented. The contributing terms of the latent heat of vaporization function are also presented in a table for small increments of epsilon.

  17. Spectral control of an alexandrite laser for an airborne water-vapor differential absorption lidar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1994-01-01

    A narrow-linewidth pulsed alexandrite laser has been greatly modified for improved spectral stability in an aircraft environment, and its operation has been evaluated in the laboratory for making water-vapor differential absorption lidar measurements. An alignment technique is described to achieve the optimum free spectral range ratio for the two etalons inserted in the alexandrite laser cavity, and the sensitivity of this ratio is analyzed. This technique drastically decreases the occurrence of mode hopping, which is commonly observed in a tunable, two-intracavity-etalon laser system. High spectral purity (greater than 99.85%) at 730 nm is demonstrated by the use of a water-vapor absorption line as a notch filter. The effective cross sections of 760-nm oxygen and 730-nm water-vapor absorption lines are measured at different pressures by using this laser, which has a finite linewidth of 0.02 cm(exp -1) (FWHM). It is found that for water-vapor absorption linewidths greater than 0.04 cm(exp -1) (HWHM), or for altitudes below 10 km, the laser line can be considered monochromatic because the measured effective absorption cross section is within 1% of the calculated monochromatic cross section. An analysis of the environmental sensitivity of the two intracavity etalons is presented, and a closed-loop computer control for active stabilization of the two intracavity etalons in the alexandrite laser is described. Using a water-vapor absorption line as a wavelength reference, we measure a long-term frequency drift (approximately 1.5 h) of less than 0.7 pm in the laboratory.

  18. Temperature Dependences of Mechanisms Responsible for the Water-Vapor Continuum Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiancheng

    2014-01-01

    The water-vapor continuum absorption plays an important role in the radiative balance in the Earth's atmosphere. It has been experimentally shown that for ambient atmospheric conditions, the continuum absorption scales quadratically with the H2O number density and has a strong, negative temperature dependence (T dependence). Over the years, there have been three different theoretical mechanisms postulated: far-wings of allowed transition lines, water dimers, and collision-induced absorption. The first mechanism proposed was the accumulation of absorptions from the far-wings of the strong allowed transition lines. Later, absorption by water dimers was proposed, and this mechanism provides a qualitative explanation for the continuum characters mentioned above. Despite the improvements in experimental data, at present there is no consensus on which mechanism is primarily responsible for the continuum absorption.

  19. Water vapor absorption in arthropods by accumulation of myoinositol and glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayley, Mark; Holmstrup

    1999-01-01

    adaptations to more realistic desiccation regimes, such as at the permanent wilting point of plants (98.9 percent relative humidity). A water vapor absorption mechanism is described that allows a common soil collembolan, Folsomia candida, to remain active down to below the permanent wilting point....... A reevaluation of the water physiology of this widespread and diverse animal group is required....

  20. Influence of radiation absorption by environmental water vapor on radiation transfer in wildland fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Frankman; Brent W. Webb; Bret W. Butler

    2007-01-01

    Thermal radiation emission from a simulated black flame surface to a fuel bed is analyzed by a ray-tracing technique, tracking emission from points along the flame to locations along the fuel bed while accounting for absorption by environmental water vapor in the intervening medium. The Spectral Line Weighted-sum-of-gray-gases approach was adopted for treating the...

  1. Selenium determination in biological material by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in graphite furnace and using vapor generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Vidal, M. de F. de.

    1984-01-01

    The applicability of the atomic absorption spectrophotometry to the determination of selenium in biological material using vapor generation and electrothermal atomization in the graphite furnace was investigated. Instrumental parameters and the analytical conditions of the methods were studied. Decomposition methods for the samples were tested, and the combustion in the Wickbold apparatus was chosen. (author) [pt

  2. Temporal Variations of Telluric Water Vapor Absorption at Apache Point Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Blake, Cullen H.; Nidever, David; Halverson, Samuel P.

    2018-01-01

    Time-variable absorption by water vapor in Earth’s atmosphere presents an important source of systematic error for a wide range of ground-based astronomical measurements, particularly at near-infrared wavelengths. We present results from the first study on the temporal and spatial variability of water vapor absorption at Apache Point Observatory (APO). We analyze ∼400,000 high-resolution, near-infrared (H-band) spectra of hot stars collected as calibration data for the APO Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey. We fit for the optical depths of telluric water vapor absorption features in APOGEE spectra and convert these optical depths to Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) using contemporaneous data from a GPS-based PWV monitoring station at APO. Based on simultaneous measurements obtained over a 3° field of view, we estimate that our PWV measurement precision is ±0.11 mm. We explore the statistics of PWV variations over a range of timescales from less than an hour to days. We find that the amplitude of PWV variations within an hour is less than 1 mm for most (96.5%) APOGEE field visits. By considering APOGEE observations that are close in time but separated by large distances on the sky, we find that PWV is homogeneous across the sky at a given epoch, with 90% of measurements taken up to 70° apart within 1.5 hr having ΔPWV < 1.0 mm. Our results can be used to help simulate the impact of water vapor absorption on upcoming surveys at continental observing sites like APO, and also to help plan for simultaneous water vapor metrology that may be carried out in support of upcoming photometric and spectroscopic surveys.

  3. Impact of freeze-drying, mixing and horizontal transport on water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poshyvailo, Liubov; Ploeger, Felix; Müller, Rolf; Tao, Mengchu; Konopka, Paul; Abdoulaye Diallo, Mohamadou; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Günther, Gebhard; Riese, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) is a key player in the global radiation budget. Therefore, a realistic representation of the water vapor distribution in this region and the involved control processes is critical for climate models, but largely uncertain hitherto. It is known that the extremely low temperatures around the tropical tropopause cause the dominant factor controlling water vapor in the lower stratosphere. Here, we focus on additional processes, such as horizontal transport between tropics and extratropics, small-scale mixing, and freeze-drying. We assess the sensitivities of simulated water vapor in the UTLS from simulations with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS). CLaMS is a Lagrangian transport model, with a parameterization of small-scale mixing (model diffusion) which is coupled to deformations in the large-scale flow. First, to assess the robustness of water vapor with respect to the meteorological datasets we examine CLaMS driven by ECMWF ERA-Interim and the Japanese 55-year reanalysis. Second, to investigate the effects of small-scale mixing we vary the parameterized mixing strength in the CLaMS model between the reference case with the mixing strength optimized to reproduce atmospheric trace gas observations and a purely advective simulation with parameterized mixing turned off. Also calculation of Lagrangian cold points gives further insight of the processes involved. Third, to assess the effects of horizontal transport between the tropics and extratropics we carry out sensitivity simulations with horizontal transport barriers along latitude circles at the equator, 15°N/S and 35°N/S. Finally, the impact of Antarctic dehydration is estimated from additional sensitivity simulations with switched off freeze-drying in the model at high latitudes of 50°N/S. Our results show that the uncertainty in the tropical tropopause temperatures between current reanalysis datasets causes significant

  4. Differential Absorption Radar: An Emerging Technology for Remote Sounding of Water Vapor Within Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebsock, M. D.; Millan Valle, L. F.; Cooper, K. B.; Siles, J.; Monje, R.

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of our efforts to build and demonstrate the first Differential Absorption Radar (DAR), which will provide unique capabilities to remotely sound for water vapor within cloudy and precipitating atmospheres. The approach leverages multiple radar channels located near the 183 GHz water vapor absorption feature to simultaneously derive microphysical and water vapor profiles. The DAR technique has the potential to neatly complement existing water vapor sounding techniques such as infrared and microwave sounding and GPS radio occultation. These precisions rival those of existing water vapor remote sensing instruments. The approach works best from above clouds because the water vapor burden and line width increases towards the Earth surface allowing increased sampling from the top-down compared with bottom-up. From an airborne or satellite platform channels can be selected that target either upper-tropospheric or lower-tropospheric clouds. Our theoretical studies suggest that the water vapor concentration can be retrieved to within 1-3 gm-3 and the column integrated water vapor can be retrieved to within 1 kgm-2. The high-frequency radar is only recently enabled by technological advances that have allowed us to demonstrate 0.5 W of continuous power near 183 GHz. We are currently developing an airborne DAR using a Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) architecture with a quasi-optical duplexer providing 80 dB of transmit/receive isolation. A prototype of this instrument recently made the first ever range resolved DAR measurements of humidity out to several hundred meters during a light rain event at JPL. The spectral dependence of the attenuation was in excellent agreement with the predicted attenuation based on nearby weather stations, proving for the first time the feasibility of the concept. A major impediment to implementing DAR is the international regulation of radio-frequency transmissions below 300 GHz. The major roadblocks and potential

  5. Differential absorption and Raman lidar for water vapor profile measurements - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar and Raman lidar have been applied to the range-resolved measurements of water vapor density for more than 20 years. Results have been obtained using both lidar techniques that have led to improved understanding of water vapor distributions in the atmosphere. This paper reviews the theory of the measurements, including the sources of systematic and random error; the progress in lidar technology and techniques during that period, including a brief look at some of the lidar systems in development or proposed; and the steps being taken to improve such lidar systems.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide vapor cross sections: A flow cell study using laser absorption in the near infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, B. L.; Ronney, P. D.; DeSain, J. D.

    2018-01-01

    The absorption spectra of vapors of concentrated hydrogen peroxide/water mixtures (without a carrier gas) were characterized at wavelengths from 1390 to 1470 nm utilizing a near-infrared diode laser. Low pressures were employed to examine these spectral features near the Doppler-broadened limit. An advantageous portion of the spectra near 1420 nm containing several distinct H2O2 peaks and one well-known H2O peak (for calibration) was identified and the cross-sections of these peaks determined. These cross section values can be employed to measure vapor-phase concentrations of H2O2 in propulsion, atmospheric chemistry, and sterilization applications.

  7. Absorption of Sunlight by Water Vapor in Cloudy Conditions: A Partial Explanation for the Cloud Absorption Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, D.

    1997-01-01

    The atmospheric radiative transfer algorithms used in most global general circulation models underestimate the globally-averaged solar energy absorbed by cloudy atmospheres by up to 25 W/sq m. The origin of this anomalous absorption is not yet known, but it has been attributed to a variety of sources including oversimplified or missing physical processes in these models, uncertainties in the input data, and even measurement errors. Here, a sophisticated atmospheric radiative transfer model was used to provide a more comprehensive description of the physical processes that contribute to the absorption of solar radiation by the Earth's atmosphere. We found that the amount of sunlight absorbed by a cloudy atmosphere is inversely proportional to the solar zenith angle and the cloud top height, and directly proportional to the cloud optical depth and the water vapor concentration within the clouds. Atmospheres with saturated, optically-thick, low clouds absorbed about 12 W/sq m more than clear atmospheres. This accounts for about 1/2 to 1/3 of the anomalous ab- sorption. Atmospheres with optically thick middle and high clouds usually absorb less than clear atmospheres. Because water vapor is concentrated within and below the cloud tops, this absorber is most effective at small solar zenith angles. An additional absorber that is distributed at or above the cloud tops is needed to produce the amplitude and zenith angle dependence of the observed anomalous absorption.

  8. Dynamic Leidenfrost temperature on micro-textured surfaces: Acoustic wave absorption into thin vapor layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerng, Dong Wook; Kim, Dong Eok

    2018-01-01

    The dynamic Leidenfrost phenomenon is governed by three types of pressure potentials induced via vapor hydrodynamics, liquid dynamic pressure, and the water hammer effect resulting from the generation of acoustic waves at the liquid-vapor interface. The prediction of the Leidenfrost temperature for a dynamic droplet needs quantitative evaluation and definition for each of the pressure fields. In particular, the textures on a heated surface can significantly affect the vapor hydrodynamics and the water hammer pressure. We present a quantitative model for evaluating the water hammer pressure on micro-textured surfaces taking into account the absorption of acoustic waves into the thin vapor layer. The model demonstrates that the strength of the acoustic flow into the liquid droplet, which directly contributes to the water hammer pressure, depends on the magnitude of the acoustic resistance (impedance) in the droplet and the vapor region. In consequence, the micro-textures of the surface and the increased spacing between them reduce the water hammer coefficient ( kh ) defined as the ratio of the acoustic flow into the droplet to total generated flow. Aided by numerical calculations that solve the laminar Navier-Stokes equation for the vapor flow, we also predict the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature on a micro-textured surface with reliable accuracy consistent with the experimental data.

  9. Near-infrared diode laser absorption diagnostic for temperature and water vapor in a scramjet combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jonathan T.C.; Rieker, Gregory B.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Gruber, Mark R.; Carter, Campbell D.; Mathur, Tarun; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2005-01-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption measurements of gas temperature and water concentration were made at the exit of a model scramjet combustor fueled on JP-7. Multiplexed, fiber-coupled, near-infrared distributed feedback lasers were used to probe three water vapor absorption features in the 1.34-1.47 μm spectral region (2v1and v1+ v3overtone bands). Ratio thermometry was performed using direct-absorption wavelength scans of isolated features at a 4-kHz repetition rate, as well as 2f wavelength modulation scans at a 2-kHz scan rate. Large signal-to-noise ratios demonstrate the ability of the optimally engineered optical hardware to reject beam steering and vibration noise. Successful measurements were made at full combustion conditions for a variety of fuel/air equivalence ratios and at eight vertical positions in the duct to investigate spatial uniformity. The use of three water vapor absorption features allowed for preliminary estimates of temperature distributions along the line of sight. The improved signal quality afforded by 2f measurements, in the case of weak absorption, demonstrates the utility of a scanned wavelength modulation strategy in such situations

  10. Enhanced Water Vapor Absorption within Tropospheric Clouds: A Partial Explanation for Anomalous Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, David; Zuffada, Cinzia

    1996-01-01

    Comparisons between solar flux measurements and predictions obtained from theoretical radiative transfer models indicate that most of these models underestimate the globally averaged solar energy absorbed by cloudy atmospheres by up to 25Wm&sup-2;.The origin of this anomalous absorption has not yet been established, but it has been attributed to a variety of sources including oversimplified or missing physical processes in the existing models, uncertainties in the input data, and even measurement errors. We used a sophisticated atmospheric radiative transfer model to provide improved constraints on the physical processes that contribute to the absorption of solar radiation by Earth's atmosphere. The results are described herein.

  11. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Theory and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, Christoph C.; Schlaepfer, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels; (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels. (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an "Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption" (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than +5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  12. Differential Absorption Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor with a Coherent Lidar at 2050.532 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Grady J.; Dharamsi, Amin; Davis, Richard E.; Petros, Mulugeta; McCarthy, John C.

    1999-01-01

    Wind and water vapor are two major factors driving the Earth's atmospheric circulation, and direct measurement of these factors is needed for better understanding of basic atmospheric science, weather forecasting, and climate studies. Coherent lidar has proved to be a valuable tool for Doppler profiling of wind fields, and differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has shown its effectiveness in profiling water vapor. These two lidar techniques are generally considered distinctly different, but this paper explores an experimental combination of the Doppler and DIAL techniques for measuring both wind and water vapor with an eye-safe wavelength based on a solid-state laser material. Researchers have analyzed and demonstrated coherent DIAL water vapor measurements at 10 micrometers wavelength based on CO2 lasers. The hope of the research presented here is that the 2 gm wavelength in a holmium or thulium-based laser may offer smaller packaging and more rugged operation that the CO2-based approach. Researchers have extensively modeled 2 um coherent lasers for water vapor profiling, but no published demonstration is known. Studies have also been made, and results published on the Doppler portion, of a Nd:YAG-based coherent DIAL operating at 1.12 micrometers. Eye-safety of the 1.12 micrometer wavelength may be a concern, whereas the longer 2 micrometer and 10 micrometer systems allow a high level of eyesafety.

  13. Satellite- and ground-based observations of atmospheric water vapor absorption in the 940 nm region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, P.; Smith, K.M.; Bennartz, R.; Newnham, D.A.; Fischer, J.

    2004-01-01

    Ground-based measurements of direct absorption of solar radiation between 9000 and 13,000 cm -1 (770-1100 nm) with a spectral resolution of 0.05 cm -1 are compared with line-by-line simulations of atmospheric absorption based on different molecular databases (HITRAN 2000, HITRAN 99, HITRAN 96 and ESA-WVR). Differences between measurements and simulations can be reduced to a great amount by scaling the individual line intensities with spectral and database dependent scaling factors. Scaling factors are calculated for the selected databases using a Marquardt non-linear least-squares fit together with a forward model for 100 cm -1 wide intervals between 10,150 and 11,250 cm -1 as well as for the water vapor absorption channels of the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) onboard the European Space Agency's (ESA) ENVISAT platform and the Modular Optoelectronic Scanner (MOS) on the Indian IRSP-3 platform, developed by the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). For the latter, the scaling coefficients are converted into correction factors for retrieved total columnar water vapor content and used for a comparison of MOS-based retrievals of total columnar atmospheric water vapor above cloud-free land surfaces with radio soundings. The scaling factors determined for 100 cm -1 wide intervals range from 0.85 for the ESA-WVR molecular database to 1.15 for HITRAN 96. The best agreement between measurements and simulations is achieved with HITRAN 99 and HITRAN 2000, respectively, using scaling factors between 0.9 and 1. The effects on the satellite-based retrievals of columnar atmospheric water vapor range from 2% (HITRAN 2000) to 12% (ESA-WVR)

  14. Water vapor absorption coefficients in the 8-13-micron spectral region - A critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption coefficients in the thermal IR atmospheric window (8-13 microns) during the past 20 years obtained by a variety of techniques are reviewed for consistency and compared with computed values based on the AFGL spectral data tapes. The methods of data collection considered were atmospheric long path absorption with a CO2 laser or a broadband source and filters, a White cell and a CO2 laser or a broadband source and a spectrometer, and a spectrophone with a CO2 laser. Advantages and disadvantages of each measurement approach are given as a guide to further research. Continuum absorption has apparently been measured accurately to about the 5-10 percent level in five of the measurements reported.

  15. Activity coefficients and free energies of nonionic mixed surfactant solutions from vapor-pressure and freezing-point osmometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Jennifer A; Ray, Gargi Basu; Leaist, Derek G

    2011-05-19

    The thermodynamic properties of mixed surfactant solutions are widely investigated, prompted by numerous practical applications of these systems and by interest in molecular association and self-organization. General techniques for measuring thermodynamic activities, such as isopiestic equilibration, are well-established for multicomponent solutions. Surprisingly, these techniques have not yet been applied to mixed surfactant solutions, despite the importance of the free energy for micelle stability. In this study, equations are developed for the osmotic coefficients of solutions of nonionic surfactant A + nonionic surfactant B. A mass-action model is used, with virial equations for the activity coefficients of the micelles and free surfactant monomer species. The equations are fitted to osmotic coefficients of aqueous decylsulfobetaine + dodecylsulfobetaine solutions measured by vapor-pressure and freezing-point osmometry. Equilibrium constants for mixed-micelle formation are calculated from the free monomer concentrations at the critical micelle concentrations. The derived activity coefficients of the micelles and free monomers indicate large departures from ideal solution behavior, even for dilute solutions of the surfactants. Stoichiometric activity coefficients of the total surfactant components are evaluated by Gibbs-Duhem integration of the osmotic coefficients. Relatively simple colligative property measurements hold considerable promise for free energy studies of multicomponent surfactant solutions. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Effect of oil films on moisture vapor absorption on human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keis, K; Huemmer, C L; Kamath, Y K

    2007-01-01

    In this paper sorption and desorption of water vapor on hair fibers treated with various oils is investigated, using a dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) apparatus. Results show lower "equilibrium" sorption of moisture for various oil-treated samples compared to the untreated sample. Coconut oil-treated hair had a higher regain than mineral oil-treated hair. Although treating the hair samples with oil reduced moisture pickup, a considerable amount of moisture vapor was still able to penetrate into hair fibers. Calculated hysteresis plots show that the samples treated with different oils have slightly higher moisture retention at low relative humidities compared to that of the untreated sample, which suggests a beneficial effect. The calculated moisture diffusion coefficients for oil-treated samples were much lower compared to the untreated hair fibers, suggesting that surface oil films and penetrated oil molecules form a diffusion barrier. A moisture diffusion model is discussed in terms of the possible role of fiber swelling on restrictive narrowing of the cell membrane complexes (CMCs), which form the diffusion pathways in the fiber. The effect of film thickness on moisture absorption and the reverting of the sorption isotherm to that of the untreated hair after removal of the oil film shows that oil film is the main resistance to moisture diffusion. The lowering of the diffusion coefficient of water vapor by oil films will slow the loss of moisture, an effect similar to "moisturization" of hair.

  17. Temperature sensitivity of differential absorption lidar measurements of water vapor in the 720-nm region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed; Grossmann, Benoist E.

    1991-01-01

    Recently measured properties of water vapor (H2O) absorption lines have been used in calculations to evalute the temperature sensitivity of differential absorption lidar (Dial) H2O measurements. This paper estimates the temperature sensitivity of H2O lines in the 717-733-nm region for both H2O mixing ratio and number density measurements, and discusses the influence of the H2O line ground state energies E-double-prime, the H2O absorption linewidths, the linewidth temperature dependence parameter, and the atmospheric temperature and pressure variations with altitude and location on the temperature sensitivity calculations. Line parameters and temperature sensitivity calculations for 67 H2O lines in the 720-nm band are given which can be directly used in field experiments. Water vapor lines with E-double-prime values in the 100-300/cm range were found to be optimum for Dial measurements of H2O number densities, while E-double-prime values in the 250-500/cm range were found to be optimum for H2O mixing ratio measurements.

  18. An efficient method for computing the absorption of solar radiation by water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, M.-D.; Arking, A.

    1981-01-01

    Chou and Arking (1980) have developed a fast but accurate method for computing the IR cooling rate due to water vapor. Using a similar approach, the considered investigation develops a method for computing the heating rates due to the absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in the wavelength range from 4 to 8.3 micrometers. The validity of the method is verified by comparison with line-by-line calculations. An outline is provided of an efficient method for transmittance and flux computations based upon actual line parameters. High speed is achieved by employing a one-parameter scaling approximation to convert an inhomogeneous path into an equivalent homogeneous path at suitably chosen reference conditions.

  19. The influence of water vapor on atmospheric exchange measurements with an ICOS* based Laser absorption analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunk, Rüdiger; Quan, Zhi; Wandel, Matthias; Yi, Zhigang; Bozem, Heiko; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl sulfide and carbon monoxide are both atmospheric trace gases of high interest. Recent advances in the field of spectroscopy have enabled instruments that measure the concentration of the above and other trace gases very fast and with good precision. Increasing the effective path length by reflecting the light between two mirrors in a cavity, these instruments reach impressive sensitivities. Often it is possible to measure the concentration of more than one trace gas at the same time. The OCS/CO2 Analyzer by LGR (Los Gatos Research, Inc.) measures the concentration of water vapor [H2O], carbonyl sulfide [COS], carbon dioxide [CO2] and carbon monoxide [CO] simultaneously. For that the cavity is saturated with light, than the attenuation of light is measured as in standard absorption spectroscopy. The instrument proved to be very fast with good precision and to be able to detect even very low concentrations, especially for COS (as low as 30ppt in the case of COS). However, we observed a rather strong cross sensitivity to water vapor. Altering the water vapor content of the sampled air with two different methods led to a change in the perceived concentration of COS, CO and CO2. This proved especially problematic for enclosure (cuvette) measurements, where the concentrations of one of the above species in an empty cuvette are compared to the concentration of another cuvette containing a plant whose exchange of trace gases with the atmosphere is of interest. There, the plants transpiration leads to a large difference in water vapor content between the cuvettes and that in turn produces artifacts in the concentration differences between the cuvettes for the other above mentioned trace gases. For CO, simultaneous measurement with a UV-Emission Analyzer (AL 5002, Aerolaser) and the COS/CO Analyzer showed good agreement of perceived concentrations as long as the sample gas was dry and an increasing difference in perceived concentration when the sample gas was

  20. Differential absorption lidar observation on small-time-scale features of water vapor in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wei; Li, Jiatang; Liu, Hao; Chen, Tao; Hong, Guanglie; Shu, Rong

    2017-11-01

    Observation on small-time-scale features of water vapor density is essential for turbulence, convection and many other fast atmospheric processes study. For the high signal-to-noise signal of elastic signal acquired by differential absorption lidar, it has great potential for all-day water vapor turbulence observation. This paper presents a set of differential absorption lidar at 935nm developed by Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics of the Chinese Academy of Science for water vapor turbulence observation. A case at the midday is presented to demonstrate the daytime observation ability of this system. "Autocovariance method" is used to separate the contribution of water vapor fluctuation from random error. The results show that the relative error is less than 10% at temporal and spatial resolution of 10 seconds and 60 meters in the ABL. This indicate that the system has excellent performance for daytime water vapor turbulence observation.

  1. Determination of the Rb atomic number density in dense rubidium vapors by absorption measurements of Rb2 triplet bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvatic, Vlasta; Veza, Damir; Niemax, Kay; Vadla, Cedomil

    2008-01-01

    A simple and accurate way of determining atom number densities in dense rubidium vapors is presented. The method relies on the experimental finding that the reduced absorption coefficients of the Rb triplet satellite bands between 740 nm and 750 nm and the triplet diffuse band between 600 nm and 610 nm are not temperature dependent in the range between 600 K and 800 K. Therefore, the absolute values of the reduced absorption coefficients of these molecular bands can provide accurate information about atomic number density of the vapor. The rubidium absorption spectrum was measured by spatially resolved white-light absorption in overheated rubidium vapor generated in a heat pipe oven. The absolute values for the reduced absorption coefficients of the triplet bands were determined at lower vapor densities, by using an accurate expression for the reduced absorption coefficient in the quasistatic wing of the Rb D1 line, and measured triplet satellite bands to the resonance wing optical depth ratio. These triplet satellite band data were used to calibrate in absolute scale the reduced absorption coefficients of the triplet diffuse band at higher temperatures. The obtained values for the reduced absorption coefficient of these Rb molecular features can be used for accurate determination of rubidium atomic number densities in the range from about 5 x 10 16 cm -3 to 1 x 10 18 cm -3

  2. Simultaneous infrared and UV-visible absorption spectra of matrix-isolated carbon vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Joe; Huffman, Donald R.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon molecules were suggested as possible carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. In particular, it was proposed that the 443 nm diffuse interstellar band is due to the same molecule which gives rise to the 447 nm absorption feature in argon matrix-isolated carbon vapor. If so, then an associated C-C stretching mode should be seen in the IR. By doing spectroscopy in both the IR and UV-visible regions on the same sample, the present work provides evidence for correlating UV-visible absorption features with those found in the IR. Early data indicates no correlation between the strongest IR feature (1997/cm) and the 447 nm band. Correlation with weaker IR features is being investigated.

  3. The solvent absorption-extractive distillation (SAED) process for ethanol recovery from gas/vapor streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, M.C.

    1993-12-31

    A low energy system for ethanol recovery and dehydration has been developed. This system utilizes a solvent for (1) absorption of ethanol vapors, and then the same solvent for (2) extractive distillation. The ideal solvent for this process would have a high affinity for ethanol, and no affinity for water. Heavy alcohols such as dodecanol, and tridecanol, some phosphorals, and some fatty acids have been determined to meet the desired specifications. These solvents have the effect of making water more volatile than ethanol. Thus, a water stream is taken off initially in the dehydration column, and a near anhydrous ethanol stream is recovered from the ethanol/solvent stripper column. Thus the solvent serves dual uses (1) absorption media, and (2) dehydration media. The SAED process as conceptualized would use a solvent similar to solvents used for direct extractive separation of ethanol from aqueous ethanol solutions.

  4. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Arlen F.; Allen, Robert J.; Mayo, M. Neale; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Mayor, Shane D.; hide

    1994-01-01

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and greater than 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H2O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H2O absorption-line parameters were performed to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H2O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H2O radiosondes. The H2O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by less than 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  5. A Water Vapor Differential Absorption LIDAR Design for Unpiloted Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeYoung, Russell J.; Mead, Patricia F.

    2004-01-01

    This system study proposes the deployment of a water vapor Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) system on an Altair unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platform. The Altair offers improved payload weight and volume performance, and longer total flight time as compared to other commercial UAV's. This study has generated a preliminary design for an Altair based water vapor DIAL system. The design includes a proposed DIAL schematic, a review of mechanical challenges such as temperature and humidity stresses on UAV deployed DIAL systems, an assessment of the available capacity for additional instrumentation (based on the proposed design), and an overview of possible weight and volume improvements associated with the use of customized electronic and computer hardware, and through the integration of advanced fiber-optic and laser products. The results of the study show that less than 17% of the available weight, less than 19% of the volume capacity, and approximately 11% of the electrical capacity is utilized by the proposed water vapor DIAL system on the Altair UAV.

  6. Modified determination of total and inorganic mercury in urine by cold vapor atomic absorption sectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohn, D; Fell, G S; Ottaway, J M

    1976-10-01

    In this procedure a single-beam spectrophotometer is used without background correction. By the method of Magos [Analyst (London) 96, 847 (1971)] mercury in undigested urine is complexed to L-cysteine in acid solution. At high pH and in the presence of stannous ions, mercury ions are reduced to elemental mercury. The mercury vapor is partitioned above the reagent solution in a specially designed chemical reduction apparatus similar in principle to that used by Kubasik et al. [Clin. Chem. 18, 1326 (1972)]. The vapor is then flushed by air through an "absorption" cell, where the absorption of the mercury line at 253.7 nm is measured. The value obtained for inorganic mercury subtracted from that for total mercury gives a value for organic mercury. CV's for the inorganic mercury procedure at 40 and 5 mug/liter concentrations were 3.1% and 7.5%, respectively. The detection limit is 0.82 mug/liter. The CV for the total-mercury procedure (20 mug/liter) was 2.6%. Mean analytical recoveries of organic and inorganic mercury were 96.5% and 101%, respectively. We investigated storage conditions for urine and compared results by the present technique with those by activation analysis. Our method is a convenient way to screen individuals who have been exposed to a mercury hazard.

  7. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor using a pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs laser. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Lidar measurements using pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs lasers are reported. Horizontal path lidar measurements were made at night to terrestrial targets at ranges of 5 and 13 km with 35 mW of average power and integration times of one second. Cloud and aerosol lidar measurements were made to thin cirrus clouds at 13 km altitude with Rayleigh (molecular) backscatter evident up to 9 km. Average transmitter power was 35 mW and measurement integration time was 20 minutes. An AlGaAs laser was used to characterize spectral properties of water vapor absorption lines at 811.617, 816.024, and 815.769 nm in a multipass absorption cell using derivative spectroscopy techniques. Frequency locking of an AlGaAs laser to a water vapor absorption line was achieved with a laser center frequency stability measured to better than one-fifth of the water vapor Doppler linewidth over several minutes. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor were made in both integrated path and range-resolved modes using an externally modulated AlGaAs laser. Mean water vapor number density was estimated from both integrated path and range-resolved DIAL measurements and agreed with measured humidity values to within 6.5 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Error sources were identified and their effects on estimates of water vapor number density calculated.

  8. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Application to AVIRIS 91/95 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaepfer, Daniel; Borel, Christoph C.; Keller, Johannes; Itten, Klaus I.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the main forces for weather development as well as for mesoscale air transport processes. The monitoring of water vapor is therefore an important aim in remote sensing of the atmosphere. Current operational systems for water vapor detection use primarily the emission in the thermal infrared (AVHRR, GOES, ATSR, Meteosat) or in the microwave radiation bands (DMSP). The disadvantage of current satellite systems is either a coarse spatial (horizontal) resolution ranging from one to tens of kilometers or a limited insight into the lower atmosphere. Imaging spectrometry on the other hand measures total column water vapor contents at a high spatial horizontal resolution and has therefore the potential of filling these gaps. The sensors of the AVIRIS instrument are capable of acquiring hyperspectral data in 224 bands located in the visible and near infrared at 10 nm resolution. This data includes the information on constituents of the earth's surface as well as of the atmosphere. The optical measurement of water vapor can be performed using sensor channels located in bands or lines of the absorption spectrum. The AVIRIS sensor has been used to retrieve water vapor and with less accuracy carbon dioxide, oxygen and ozone. To retrieve the water vapor amount, the so called differential absorption technique has been applied. The goal of this technique is to eliminate background factors by taking a ratio between channels within the absorption band and others besides the band. Various ratioing methods on the basis of different channels and calculation techniques were developed. The influence of a trace gas of interest on the radiance at the sensor level is usually simulated by using radiative transfer codes. In this study, the spectral transmittance and radiance are calculated by MODTRAN3 simulations with the new DISORT option. The objective of this work is to test the best performing differential absorption techniques for imaging spectrometry of

  9. Water vapor concentration measurement in singlet oxygen generator by using emission spectroscopy method and absorption at 1392nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weili; Wang, Zengqiang; Fang, Benjie; Li, Qingwei; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2005-12-01

    By using emission spectroscopy method and absorption at 1392nm, partial water pressure at the exit of a square pipe-array jet-type singlet oxygen generator (SPJSOG) for chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was measured. The water vapor fraction was calculated from the partial water pressure in the diagnostic cell when we assumed the water vapor fraction in the diagnostic cell is the same as that in the generator. The results from the two methods showed that the water vapor concentration is less than 0.08 in this SPJSOG during normal operation. The water vapor fraction decreases with the increasing of the pressure in the generator and rises with the increasing of buffer gas flow rate and the basic hydrogen peroxide (BHP) temperature in the case of constant chlorine flow rate. Measurements showed that the change of water vapor fraction due to BHP temperature could be ignored during normal operation. It is indicated that the gas flow velocity is the main reason that affects on the water vapor fraction in COIL. It is proved that the emission spectroscopy method is one of the simple and convenient ways to measure the water vapor concentration in singlet oxygen generator (SOG), especially in real time measurements. But absorption spectroscopy method, as a direct measurement, can give the more factual results of the water concentration.

  10. Predictions of silicon avalanche photodiode detector performance in water vapor differential absorption lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenimer, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    Performance analyses are presented which establish that over most of the range of signals expected for a down-looking differential absorption lidar (DIAL) operated at 16 km the silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) is the preferred detector for DIAL measurements of atmospheric water vapor in the 730 nm spectral region. The higher quantum efficiency of the APD's, (0.8-0.9) compared to a photomultiplier's (0.04-0.18) more than offsets the higher noise of an APD receiver. In addition to offering lower noise and hence lower random error the APD's excellent linearity and impulse recovery minimize DIAL systematic errors attributable to the detector. Estimates of the effect of detector system parameters on overall random and systematic DIAL errors are presented, and performance predictions are supported by laboratory characterization data for an APD receiver system.

  11. Freeze-dried Lactobacillus plantarum 299v increases iron absorption in young females-Double isotope sequential single-blind studies in menstruating women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hoppe

    Full Text Available The probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum 299v has earlier been shown to increase iron absorption when added to foods. However, it is not known if the same probiotic strain in a freeze-dried format included in a capsule increases the iron absorption.The aim of this study was to test the hypotheses that non-heme iron absorption from a light meal is promoted by a simultaneous intake of freeze-dried Lactobacillus plantarum 299v (Lp299v, DSM 9843.With a single blinded placebo controlled sequential design, iron absorption from a light breakfast meal administered with or without capsules containing 1010 cfu freeze-dried Lp299v was studied in healthy female volunteers of fertile age. The methodology used was a double isotope technique (59Fe and 55Fe. Two studies were performed using the same protocol.In study 1, the absorption of iron from a meal without Lp299v was found to be 17.4 ± 13.4%, and from an identical meal with Lp299v was found to be 22.4 ± 17.3% (mean ± SD. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.040, n = 14. In study 2, the absorption of iron from a meal without Lp299v was found to be 20.9 ± 13.1%, and from an identical meal with Lp299v found to be 24.5 ± 12.0% (mean ± SD, n = 28, which again was statistically significant (p = 0.003.Freeze-dried Lp299v enhances the absorption of iron when administered together with a meal with a high iron bioavailability.ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02131870.

  12. Forward modeling and retrieval of water vapor from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment: Treatment of narrowband absorption spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lang, R.; Maurellis, A.N.; van der Zande, W.J.; Aben, I.; Landgraf, J.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2002-01-01

    [1] We present the algorithm and results for a new fast forward modeling technique applied to the retrieval of atmospheric water vapor from satellite measurements using a weak ro-vibrational overtone band in the visible. The algorithm uses an Optical Absorption Coefficient Spectroscopy (OACS) method

  13. A Simplified Digestion Protocol for the Analysis of Hg in Fish by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.; Friedbauer, Scott; Kabashi, Donika; Ferencz, Kristen M.; Barajas, Jennifer C.; O'Brien, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mercury in fish is an interesting problem with the potential to motivate students in chemistry laboratory courses. The recommended method for mercury analysis in fish is cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS), which requires homogeneous analyte solutions, typically prepared by acid digestion. Previously published digestion…

  14. Laboratory Measurements of the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm Water Vapor Absorption Band Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Gore, Warren J.; Pilewskie, P.; Freedman, R. S.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Varanasi, P.

    2001-01-01

    We have used the solar spectral flux radiometer (SSFR) flight instrument with the Ames 25 meter base-path White cell to obtain about 20 moderate resolution (8 nm) pure water vapor spectra from 650 to 1650 nm, with absorbing paths from 806 to 1506 meters and pressures up to 14 torr. We also obtained a set at 806 meters with several different air-broadening pressures. Model simulations were made for the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm absorption bands for some of these laboratory conditions using the Rothman, et al HITRAN-2000 linelist. This new compilation of HITRAN includes new intensity measurements for the 940 nm region. We compared simulations for our spectra of this band using HITRAN-2000 with simulations using the prior HITRAN-1996. The simulations of the 1130 nm band show about 10% less absorption than we measured. There is some evidence that the total intensity of this band is about 38% stronger than the sum of the HITRAN line intensities in this region. In our laboratory conditions the absorption depends approximately on the square root of the intensity. Thus, our measurements agree that the band is stronger than tabulated in HITRAN, but by about 20%, substantially less than the published value. Significant differences have been shown between Doppler-limited resolution spectra of the 1370 nm band obtained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and HITRAN simulations. Additional new intensity measurements in this region are continuing to be made. We expect the simulations of our SSFR lab data of this band will show the relative importance of improving the HITRAN line intensities of this band for atmospheric measurements.

  15. [Measurement of atomic number of alkali vapor and pressure of buffer gas based on atomic absorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui-jie; Quan, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi

    2015-02-01

    High sensitivitymagnetic measurementscanbe achieved by utilizing atomic spinmanipulation in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) regime, which uses an alkali cell as a sensing element. The atomic number density of the alkali vapor and the pressure of the buffer gasare among the most important parameters of the cell andrequire accurate measurement. A method has been proposed and developedto measure the atomic number density and the pressure based on absorption spectroscopy, by sweeping the absorption line and fittingthe experiment data with a Lorentzian profile to obtainboth parameters. Due to Doppler broadening and pressure broadening, which is mainly dominated by the temperature of the cell and the pressure of buffer gas respectively, this work demonstrates a simulation of the errorbetween the peaks of the Lorentzian profile and the Voigt profile caused by bothfactors. The results indicates that the Doppler broadening contribution is insignificant with an error less than 0.015% at 313-513 K for a 4He density of 2 amg, and an error of 0.1% in the presence of 0.6-5 amg at 393 K. We conclude that the Doppler broadening could be ignored under above conditions, and that the Lorentzianprofile is suitably applied to fit the absorption spectrumobtainingboth parameters simultaneously. In addition we discuss the resolution and the instability due to thelight source, wavelength and the temperature of the cell. We find that the cell temperature, whose uncertainty is two orders of magnitude larger than the instability of the light source and the wavelength, is one of the main factors which contributes to the error.

  16. BELINDA: Broadband Emission Lidar with Narrowband Determination of Absorption. A new concept for measuring water vapor and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theopold, F. A.; Weitkamp, C.; Michaelis, W.

    1992-01-01

    We present a new concept for differential absorption lidar measurements of water vapor and temperature profiles. The idea is to use one broadband emission laser and a narrowband filter system for separation of the 'online' and 'offline' return signals. It is shown that BELINDA offers improvements as to laser emission shape and stability requirements, background suppression, and last and most important a significant reduction of the influence of Rayleigh scattering. A suitably designed system based on this concept is presented, capable of measuring water vapor or temperature profiles throughout the planetary boundary layer.

  17. Influence of vapor absorption cooling on humidification-dehumidification (HDH desalination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chiranjeevi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The desalination yield in humidification-dehumidification (HDH process is increased by proposing cooling plant integration with two stage operation. The current work is targeted on the investigation of vapor absorption refrigeration (VAR parameters on overall energy utilization factor (EUF. The dephlegmator heat is recovered internally in VAR instead of rejecting to environment. This work can be used to control the operational conditions of VAR to enhance the desalination and cooling together. The studied process parameters in VAR are strong solution concentration, separator or generator temperature, dephlegmator effectiveness, circulating water inlet temperature and evaporator temperature. Out of these five variables, lower limit of separator temperature, upper limit of dephlegmator effectiveness and lower limit of circulating water temperature are fixed in the specified range to attain the optimum strong solution concentration and optimum evaporator temperature. At the specified boundaries of three variables, the optimized strong solution concentration and evaporator temperature are 0.47 and 10 °C respectively. At this condition, the maximized cycle EUF is 0.358.

  18. Determination of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer in Tongkat Ali preparations obtained in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Hooi-Hoon; Lee, Ee-Lin; Cheang, Hui-Seong

    2004-01-01

    The DCA (Drug Control Authority), Malaysia, has implemented the phase 3 registration of traditional medicines on 1 January 1992, with special emphasis on the quality, efficacy, and safety (including the presence of heavy metals) in all pharmaceutical dosage forms of traditional medicine preparations. As such, a total of 100 products in various pharmaceutical dosage forms of a herbal preparation, containing Tongkat Ali, were analyzed for mercury content using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results showed that 36% of the above products possessed 0.52 to 5.30 ppm of mercury and, therefore, do not comply with the quality requirement for traditional medicines in Malaysia. Out of these 36 products, 5 products that possessed 1.05 to 4.41 ppm of mercury were in fact have already registered with the DCA, Malaysia. However, the rest of the products that contain 0.52 to 5.30 ppm of mercury still have not registered with the DCA, Malaysia. Although this study showed that only 64% of the products complied with the quality requirement for traditional medicines in Malaysia pertaining to mercury, they cannot be assumed safe from mercury contamination because of batch-to-batch inconsistency.

  19. Laser beam absorption study of a 238U(5L60) vapor obtained with a hollow cathode lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, J.M.; Leblanc, B.; Mongeau, B.; Carleer, M.; Bertrand, L.

    1979-01-01

    The density of U atoms in the 5 L 0 6 ground state present in a vapor of this element from a hollow cathode lamp has been measured using laser absorption spectroscopy. The influence of the carrier gases (Ar, Kr, Xe) on the density, the absorption coefficient profiles, and on the ratio of U atoms to the dissipated electrical power has been investigated. It has been found that, in our range of operating conditions, the xenon gas is the most efficient. With xenon, a density of 2.2 x 10 12 cm -3 ground-state U atoms is obtained when the lamp dissipates 40 W of electrical power

  20. Feasibility of tropospheric water vapor profiling using infrared heterodyne differential absorption lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratoy, Boulder, CO (United States); Rye, B.J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance and the correction of other site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. In this study, we develop system performance models and examine the potential of infrared differential absoroption lidar (DIAL) to determine the concentration of water vapor.

  1. A Two-Line Absorption Instrument for Scramjet Temperature and Water Vapor Concentration Measurement in HYPULSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C. Y.

    1998-01-01

    A three beam water vapor sensor system has been modified to provide for near simultaneous temperature measurement. The system employs a tunable diode laser to scan spectral line of water vapor. The application to measurements in a scramjet combustor environment of a shock tunnel facility is discussed. This report presents and discusses die initial calibration of the measurement system.

  2. Water-vapor absorption line measurements in the 940-nm band by using a Raman-shifted dye laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhiping; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Singh, Upendra N.

    1993-01-01

    We report water-vapor absorption line measurements that are made by using the first Stokes radiation (930-982 nm) with HWHM 0.015/cm generated by a narrow-linewidth, tunable dye laser. Forty-five absorption line strengths are measured with an uncertainty of 6 percent and among them are fourteen strong lines that are compared with previous measurements for the assessment of spectral purity of the light source. Thirty air-broadened linewidths are measured with 8 percent uncertainty at ambient atmospheric pressure with an average of 0.101/cm. The lines are selected for the purpose of temperature-sensitive or temperature-insensitive lidar measurements. Results for these line strengths and linewidths are corrected for broadband radiation and finite laser linewidth broadening effects and compared with the high-resolution transmission molecular absorption.

  3. Emission characteristics of a discharge iodine vapor plasma in the spectral region of the main absorption maximum of DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuaibov, A. K.; Grabovaya, I. A.; Minya, A. Ĭ.; Gomoki, Z. T.

    2008-11-01

    Radiation of glow and capacitive discharges in inert gas-iodine vapor mixtures is studied in the spectral range 150-210 nm, which coincides with the main absorption maximum of the DNA molecules. Iodine atomic spectral lines at 150.7, 161.8, 170.2, 183.0, and 206.2 nm are observed in the spectra. The emission intensity of the iodine spectral lines is optimized by varying the glow discharge current, capacitive discharge frequency, as well as pressure and composition of the gas mixtures. The glow and capacitive discharges are ignited in cylindrical quartz tubes with interelectrode gaps of 10 and 6 cm. Helium and neon are found to be the most effective buffer gases. The optimum partial pressures of the light inert gases and iodine vapor in the glow discharge are within 0.4-0.6 kPa and 100-150 Pa, respectively. In the capacitive discharge in He(Ne)-I2 mixtures, the optimum partial helium, neon, and iodine vapor pressures are within 0.8-2.0 kPa, 0.5-1.0 kPa, and ≤ 60 Pa, respectively. It is demonstrated that pulsed bactericidal radiation sources with light pulse lengths of 400-500 ns and continuous radiation sources emitting within the spectral range 150-207 nm can be designed on the basis of low-density iodine vapor plasma.

  4. Absorption of Sunlight by Water Vapor in Cloudy Conditions: A Partial Explaination for the Cloud Absorption Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, D.

    1996-01-01

    The atmospheric radiative transfer algorithms used in most global general circulation models underestimate the globally-averaged solar energy absorbed by cloudy atmospheres by up to 25 Wm(sup -2)...Here, a sophisticated atmospheric radiative transfer model was used to provide a more comprehensive description of the physical processes that contribute to the absorption of solar radiation by the Earth's atmosphere.

  5. A differential absorption technique to estimate atmospheric total water vapor amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouin, Robert; Middleton, Elizabeth

    1990-01-01

    Vertically integrated water-vapor amounts can be remotely determined by measuring the solar radiance reflected by the earth's surface with satellites or aircraft-based instruments. The technique is based on the method by Fowle (1912, 1913) and utilizes the 0.940-micron water-vapor band to retrieve total-water-vapor data that is independent of surface reflectance properties and other atmospheric constituents. A channel combination is proposed to provide more accurate results, the SE-590 spectrometer is used to verify the data, and the effects of atmospheric photon backscattering is examined. The spectrometer and radiosonde data confirm the accuracy of using a narrow and a wide channel centered on the same wavelength to determine water vapor amounts. The technique is suitable for cloudless conditions and can contribute to atmospheric corrections of land-surface parameters.

  6. An evaluation of absorption spectroscopy to monitor YBa2Cu3O7-x precursors for metal organics chemical vapor deposition processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthew Edward Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Absorption spectroscopy was evaluated as a technique to monitor the metal organics chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process for forming YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x superconducting coated conductors. Specifically, this study analyzed the feasibility of using absorption spectroscopy to monitor the MOCVD supply vapor concentrations of the organic ligand 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionate (TMHD) metal chelates of barium, copper, and yttrium. Ba(TMHD) 2 , Cu(TMHD) 2 , and Y(TMHD) 3 compounds have successfully been vaporized in the MOCVD processing technique to form high temperature superconducting ''coated conductors,'' a promising technology for wire fabrication. The absorption study of the barium, copper, and yttrium (TMHD) precursors was conducted in the ultraviolet wavelength region from 200nm to 400nm. To simulate the MOCVD precursor flows the Ba(TMHD) 2 , Cu(TMHD) 2 , and Y(TMHD) 3 complexes were vaporized at vacuum pressures of (0.03--10)Torr. Spectral absorption scans of each precursor were conducted to examine potential measurement wavelengths for determining vapor concentrations of each precursor via Beer's law. The experimental results show that under vacuum conditions the barium, copper, and yttrium (TMHD) precursors begin to vaporize between 90 C and 135 C, which are considerably lower vaporization temperatures than atmospheric thermal gravimetric analyses indicate. Additionally, complete vaporization of the copper and yttrium (TMHD) precursors occurred during rapid heating at temperatures between 145 C and 195 C and after heating at constant temperatures between 90 C and 125 C for approximately one hour, whereas the Ba(TMHD) 2 precursor did not completely vaporize. At constant temperatures, near constant vaporization levels for each precursor were observed for extended periods of time. Detailed spectroscopic scans at stable vaporization conditions were conducted

  7. Method and apparatus for simulating atomospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO.sub.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth's surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO.sub.2 and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO.sub.2 and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO.sub.2 and moisture.

  8. Method and apparatus for simulating atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO{sub 2}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-06-20

    A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth`s surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO{sub 2} and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO{sub 2} and moisture. 8 figs.

  9. Remote measurement of high preeruptive water vapor emissions at Sabancaya volcano by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Masias, Pablo; Apaza, Fredy; Reath, Kevin; Platt, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Water (H2O) is by far the most abundant volcanic volatile species and plays a predominant role in driving volcanic eruptions. However, numerous difficulties associated with making accurate measurements of water vapor in volcanic plumes have limited their use as a diagnostic tool. Here we present the first detection of water vapor in a volcanic plume using passive visible-light differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Ultraviolet and visible-light DOAS measurements were made on 21 May 2016 at Sabancaya Volcano, Peru. We find that Sabancaya's plume contained an exceptionally high relative water vapor abundance 6 months prior to its November 2016 eruption. Our measurements yielded average sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates of 800–900 t/d, H2O emission rates of around 250,000 t/d, and an H2O/SO2 molecular ratio of 1000 which is about an order of magnitude larger than typically found in high-temperature volcanic gases. We attribute the high water vapor emissions to a boiling-off of Sabancaya's hydrothermal system caused by intrusion of magma to shallow depths. This hypothesis is supported by a significant increase in the thermal output of the volcanic edifice detected in infrared satellite imagery leading up to and after our measurements. Though the measurement conditions encountered at Sabancaya were very favorable for our experiment, we show that visible-light DOAS systems could be used to measure water vapor emissions at numerous other high-elevation volcanoes. Such measurements would provide observatories with additional information particularly useful for forecasting eruptions at volcanoes harboring significant hydrothermal systems.

  10. Remote measurement of high preeruptive water vapor emissions at Sabancaya volcano by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Masias, Pablo; Apaza, Fredy; Reath, Kevin A.; Platt, Ulrich

    2017-05-01

    Water (H2O) is by far the most abundant volcanic volatile species and plays a predominant role in driving volcanic eruptions. However, numerous difficulties associated with making accurate measurements of water vapor in volcanic plumes have limited their use as a diagnostic tool. Here we present the first detection of water vapor in a volcanic plume using passive visible-light differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Ultraviolet and visible-light DOAS measurements were made on 21 May 2016 at Sabancaya Volcano, Peru. We find that Sabancaya's plume contained an exceptionally high relative water vapor abundance 6 months prior to its November 2016 eruption. Our measurements yielded average sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates of 800-900 t/d, H2O emission rates of around 250,000 t/d, and an H2O/SO2 molecular ratio of 1000 which is about an order of magnitude larger than typically found in high-temperature volcanic gases. We attribute the high water vapor emissions to a boiling-off of Sabancaya's hydrothermal system caused by intrusion of magma to shallow depths. This hypothesis is supported by a significant increase in the thermal output of the volcanic edifice detected in infrared satellite imagery leading up to and after our measurements. Though the measurement conditions encountered at Sabancaya were very favorable for our experiment, we show that visible-light DOAS systems could be used to measure water vapor emissions at numerous other high-elevation volcanoes. Such measurements would provide observatories with additional information particularly useful for forecasting eruptions at volcanoes harboring significant hydrothermal systems.

  11. The effect of firing temperature on the irreversible expansion, water absorption and pore structure of a brick body during freeze-thaw cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikuláš ŠVEDA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the monitoring of brick body in the process of volumetric freezing and thawing. The samples were fired at temperatures of 900, 1000 and 1060 °C. Attention is focused on monitoring of the irreversible expansion, water absorption and pore structure of a brick body. We found that in all cases the endpoints take place continuously, where the amount firing temperature plays a crucial role. The greatest influence of freeze/thaw cycles on the change of the pore structure was also observed at the lowest temperature. The change of the pore system during the freeze-thaw cycles occurs in such a way, that the pore volume of small pores further decreases and conversely, the pore volume of large pores increases. The knowledge gained can be used not only in the production of new but also in predicting the remaining durability of older clay roofing tiles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.4.2741

  12. Total absorption and photoionization cross sections of water vapor between 100 and 1000 A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, G. N.; Samson, J. A. R.

    1986-01-01

    Absolute photoabsorption and photoionization cross sections of water vapor are reported at a large number of discrete wavelengths between 100 and 1000 A with an estimate error of + or - 3 percent in regions free from any discrete structure. The double ionization chamber technique utilized is described. Recent calculations are shown to be in reasonable agreement with the present data.

  13. Emission from water vapor and absorption from other gases at 5-7.5 μm in Spitzer-IRS Spectra Of Protoplanetary Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargent, B. A. [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Forrest, W.; Watson, Dan M.; Kim, K. H.; Richter, I.; Tayrien, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); D' Alessio, P.; Calvet, N. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Furlan, E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Green, J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Pontoppidan, K., E-mail: baspci@rit.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We present spectra of 13 T Tauri stars in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region showing emission in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph 5-7.5 μm spectra from water vapor and absorption from other gases in these stars' protoplanetary disks. Seven stars' spectra show an emission feature at 6.6 μm due to the ν{sub 2} = 1-0 bending mode of water vapor, with the shape of the spectrum suggesting water vapor temperatures >500 K, though some of these spectra also show indications of an absorption band, likely from another molecule. This water vapor emission contrasts with the absorption from warm water vapor seen in the spectrum of the FU Orionis star V1057 Cyg. The other 6 of the 13 stars have spectra showing a strong absorption band, peaking in strength at 5.6-5.7 μm, which for some is consistent with gaseous formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) and for others is consistent with gaseous formic acid (HCOOH). There are indications that some of these six stars may also have weak water vapor emission. Modeling of these stars' spectra suggests these gases are present in the inner few AU of their host disks, consistent with recent studies of infrared spectra showing gas in protoplanetary disks.

  14. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor Utilizing Robotic Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Ngoc; DeYoung, Russell J.; Prasad, Coorg R.; Laufer, Gabriel

    1998-01-01

    A new unpiloted air vehicle (UAV) based water vapor DIAL system will be described. This system is expected to offer lower operating costs, longer test duration and severe weather capabilities. A new high-efficiency, compact, light weight, diode-pumped, tunable Cr:LiSAF laser will be developed to meet the UAV payload weight and size limitations and its constraints in cooling capacity, physical size and payload. Similarly, a new receiver system using a single mirror telescope and an avalanche photo diode (APD) will be developed. Projected UAV parameters are expected to allow operation at altitudes up to 20 km, endurance of 24 hrs and speed of 400 km/hr. At these conditions measurements of water vapor at an uncertainty of 2-10% with a vertical resolution of 200 m and horizontal resolution of 10 km will be possible.

  15. Line-shape asymmetry of water vapor absorption lines in the 720-nm wavelength region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1991-01-01

    Spectral line-shape analyses were performed for water vapor lines broadened by argon, oxygen, and xenon in the 720-nm wavelength region. A line-shape asymmetry was observed, which is attributed to statistical dependence or correlation between velocity- and state-changing collisions. The generalized (asymmetric) Galatry profile, which results from the soft-collision profile and includes correlation between velocity- and state-changing collisions, was fitted to the observed line shapes and was found to compare favorably with the observed data. The most prominent asymmetries were observed with xenon as the buffer gas.

  16. Freeze drying method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppa, N.V.; Stewart, P.; Renzi, E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser

  17. Interference of nitrite and nitrogen dioxide on mercury and selenium determination by chemical vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes Nunes, Dayana; Pereira dos Santos, Eliane Pereira; Barin, Juliano Smanioto; Mortari, Sergio Roberto; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Moraes Flores, Erico Marlon de

    2005-01-01

    In this study, a systematic investigation was performed concerning the interference of nitrogen oxides on the determination of selenium and mercury by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG AAS) and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV AAS). The effect of nitrate, nitrite and NO 2 dissolved in the condensed phase was evaluated. No effect of NO 3 - on Se and Hg determination was observed up to 100 mg of sodium nitrate added to the reaction vessel. The Se signal was reduced by about 80% upon the addition of 6.8 mg NO 2 - . For Hg, no interference of nitrite was observed up to 20 mg of NO 2 - . A complete suppression of the Se signal was observed when gaseous NO 2 was introduced into analytical solutions. For Hg, a signal decrease between 8 and 13% occurred. For Se, bubbling argon or heating the solution was not able to recover the original absorbance values, whereas Hg signals were recovered with these procedures. When gaseous NO 2 was passed directly into the atomizer, Se signals decreased similarly to when NO 2 was bubbled in analytical solutions. The addition of urea, hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sulfamic acid (SA) was investigated to reduce the NO 2 effect in sample digests containing residual NO 2 , but only SA was effective in reducing the interference. Based on the results, it is possible to propose the use of SA to prevent interferences in Se and Hg determinations by HG AAS and CV AAS, respectively

  18. Use of process steam in vapor absorption refrigeration system for cooling and heating applications: An exergy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Anand

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The exponential increase in cost of conventional fuels shifts the interest toward the use of alternative as well waste energy sources for the operation of refrigeration and air-conditioning units. The present study therefore analyzes the performance of a process steam-operated vapor absorption system for cooling and heating applications using ammonia and water as working fluids based on first and second laws of thermodynamics. A mathematical model has been developed based on exergy analysis to investigate the performance of the system. The different performance parameters such as coefficient of performance (COP and exergetic efficiency of absorption system for cooling and heating applications are also calculated under different operating conditions. The results obtained show that cooling and heating COP along with second law efficiency (exergy efficiency increases with the heat source temperature at constant evaporator, condenser, and absorber temperature. Also, COP as well as exergy efficiency increases with an increase in the evaporator temperature at constant generator, condenser, and absorber temperature. The effect of ambient temperature on the exergetic efficiency for cooling and heating applications is also studied. The results obtained from the simulation studies can be used to optimize different components of the system so that the performance can be improved significantly.

  19. Water vapor absorption spectra of the upper atmosphere /45-185 per cm/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augason, G. C.; Mord, A. J.; Witteborn, F. C.; Erickson, E. F.; Swift, C. D.; Caroff, L. J.; Kunz, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    The far IR nighttime absorption spectrum of the earth's atmosphere above 14 km is determined from observations of the bright moon. The spectra were obtained using a Michelson interferometer attached to a 30-cm telescope aboard a high-altitude jet aircraft. Comparison with a single-layer model atmosphere implies a vertical column of 3.4 plus or minus 0.4 microns of precipitable water on 30 August 1971 and 2.4 plus or minus 0.3 microns of precipitable water on 6 January 1972.-

  20. Single and Double Infrared Transitions in Rapid Vapor Deposited Parahydrogen Solids: Application to Sample Thickness Determination and Quantitative Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tam, Simon

    2001-01-01

    ...) solid from its infrared (IR) absorption spectrum. Millimeters-thick pH2 solids of exceptional optical clarity can be produced by the rapid vapor deposition method M.E. Fajardo and S. Tam, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 4237 (1998...

  1. Multilayer Cloud Detection with the MODIS Near-Infrared Water Vapor Absorption Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Galina; Platnick, Steven; King, Michael D.; Hubanks, Paul A,; Pavolonis, Michael J.; Heidinger, Andrew K.; Yang, Ping; Baum, Bryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Data Collection 5 processing for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard the NASA Earth Observing System EOS Terra and Aqua spacecraft includes an algorithm for detecting multilayered clouds in daytime. The main objective of this algorithm is to detect multilayered cloud scenes, specifically optically thin ice cloud overlying a lower-level water cloud, that presents difficulties for retrieving cloud effective radius using single layer plane-parallel cloud models. The algorithm uses the MODIS 0.94 micron water vapor band along with CO2 bands to obtain two above-cloud precipitable water retrievals, the difference of which, in conjunction with additional tests, provides a map of where multilayered clouds might potentially exist. The presence of a multilayered cloud results in a large difference in retrievals of above-cloud properties between the CO2 and the 0.94 micron methods. In this paper the MODIS multilayered cloud algorithm is described, results of using the algorithm over example scenes are shown, and global statistics for multilayered clouds as observed by MODIS are discussed. A theoretical study of the algorithm behavior for simulated multilayered clouds is also given. Results are compared to two other comparable passive imager methods. A set of standard cloudy atmospheric profiles developed during the course of this investigation is also presented. The results lead to the conclusion that the MODIS multilayer cloud detection algorithm has some skill in identifying multilayered clouds with different thermodynamic phases

  2. Effect of water vapor on sound absorption in nitrogen at low frequency/pressure ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Griffin, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    Sound absorption measurements were made in N2-H2O binary mixtures at 297 K over the frequency/pressure range f/P of 0.1-2500 Hz/atm to investigate the vibrational relaxation peak of N2 and its location on f/P axis as a function of humidity. At low humidities the best fit to a linear relationship between the f/P(max) and humidity yields an intercept of 0.013 Hz/atm and a slope of 20,000 Hz/atm-mole fraction. The reaction rate constants derived from this model are lower than those obtained from the extrapolation of previous high-temperature data.

  3. Determination of inorganic and total mercury by vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry using different temperatures of the measurement cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, Luiz Eduardo [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Quimica, Campus de Camobi, 97105900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Goldschmidt, Fabiane [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Quimica, Campus de Camobi, 97105900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Paniz, Jose Neri Gottfried [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Quimica, Campus de Camobi, 97105900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Moraes Flores, Erico Marlon de [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Quimica, Campus de Camobi, 97105900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Dressler, Valderi Luiz [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Quimica, Campus de Camobi, 97105900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)]. E-mail: valdres@quimica.ufsm.br

    2005-06-30

    A simple and inexpensive laboratory-built flow injection vapor generation system coupled to atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-VG AAS) for inorganic and total mercury determination has been developed. It is based on the vapor generation of total mercury and a selective detection of Hg{sup 2+} or total mercury by varying the temperature of the measurement cell. Only the inorganic mercury is measured when the quartz cell is at room temperature, and when the cell is heated to 650 deg. C or higher the total Hg concentration is measured. The organic Hg concentration in the sample is calculated from the difference between the total Hg and Hg{sup 2+} concentrations. Parameters such as the type of acid (HCl or HNO{sub 3}) and its concentration, reductant (NaBH{sub 4}) concentration, carrier solution (HCl) flow rate, carrier gas flow rate, sample volume and quartz cell temperature, which influence FI-VG AAS system performance, were systematically investigated. The optimized conditions for Hg{sup 2+} and total Hg determinations were: 1.0 mol l{sup -1} HCl as carrier solution, carrier flow rate of 3.5 ml min{sup -1}, 0.1% (m/v) NaBH{sub 4}, reductant flow rate of 1.0 ml min{sup -1} and carrier gas flow rate of 200 ml min{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation (RSD) is lower than 5.0% for a 1.0 {mu}g l{sup -1} Hg solution and the limit of quantification (LOQ, 10 s) is 55 ng g{sup -1}. Certified samples of dogfish muscle (DORM-1 and DORM-2) and non-certified fish samples were analyzed, using a 6.0 mol l{sup -1} HCl solution for analyte extraction. The Hg{sup 2+} and CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +} concentrations found were in agreement with certified ones.

  4. Organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish by chemical vapor generation with collection on a gold gauze and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, Fabio Andrei; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Goldschmidt Antes, Fabiane; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Flores, Erico Marlon de Moraes

    2009-01-01

    A method for organic, inorganic and total mercury determination in fish tissue has been developed using chemical vapor generation and collection of mercury vapor on a gold gauze inside a graphite tube and further atomization by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. After drying and cryogenic grinding, potassium bromide and hydrochloric acid solution (1 mol L - 1 KBr in 6 mol L - 1 HCl) was added to the samples. After centrifugation, total mercury was determined in the supernatant. Organomercury compounds were selectively extracted from KBr solution using chloroform and the resultant solution was back extracted with 1% m/v L-cysteine. This solution was used for organic Hg determination. Inorganic Hg remaining in KBr solution was directly determined by chemical vapor generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Mercury vapor generation from extracts was performed using 1 mol L - 1 HCl and 2.5% m/v NaBH 4 solutions and a batch chemical vapor generation system. Mercury vapor was collected on the gold gauze heated resistively at 80 deg. C and the atomization temperature was set at 650 deg. C. The selectivity of extraction was evaluated using liquid chromatography coupled to chemical vapor generation and determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The proposed method was applied for mercury analysis in shark, croaker and tuna fish tissues. Certified reference materials were used to check accuracy and the agreement was better than 95%. The characteristic mass was 60 pg and method limits of detection were 5, 1 and 1 ng g - 1 for organic, inorganic and total mercury, respectively. With the proposed method it was possible to analyze up to 2, 2 and 6 samples per hour for organic, inorganic and total Hg determination, respectively.

  5. Vaporization reduction characteristics of aqueous ammonia solutions by the addition of ethylene glycol, glycerol and glycine to the CO2 absorption process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jong-Beom; Jeon, Soo-Bin; Kim, Je-Young; Lee, Gang-Woo; Jung, Jong-Hyeon; Oh, Kwang-Joong

    2012-01-01

    Aqueous ammonia (NH3) solution can be used as an alternative absorption for the control of CO2 emitted from flue gases due to its high absorption capacity, fast absorption rate and low corrosion problem. The emission of CO2 from iron and steel plants requires much attention, as they are higher than those emitted from power plants at a single point source. In the present work, low concentration ammonia liquor, 9 wt.%, was used with various additives to obtain the kinetic properties using the blast furnace gas model. Although a solution with a high ammonia concentration enables high CO2 absorption efficiency, ammonium ions are lost as ammonia vapor, resulting in reduced CO2 absorption due to the lower concentration of the ammonia absorbent. To decrease the vaporization of ammonia, ethylene glycol, glycerol and glycine, which contain more than one hydroxyl radical, were chosen. The experiments were conducted at 313 K similar to the CO2 absorption conditions for the blast furnace gas model.

  6. Time-Resolved Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectroscopy of Pulsed Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition Processes Containing BCl3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Norbert; Hempel, Frank; Strämke, Siegfried; Röpcke, Jürgen

    2011-08-01

    In situ measurements are reported giving insight into the plasma chemical conversion of the precursor BCl3 in industrial applications of boriding plasmas. For the online monitoring of its ground state concentration, quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS) in the mid-infrared spectral range was applied in a plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) reactor. A compact quantum cascade laser measurement and control system (Q-MACS) was developed to allow a flexible and completely dust-sealed optical coupling to the reactor chamber of an industrial plasma surface modification system. The process under the study was a pulsed DC plasma with periodically injected BCl3 at 200 Pa. A synchronization of the Q-MACS with the process control unit enabled an insight into individual process cycles with a sensitivity of 10-6 cm-1·Hz-1/2. Different fragmentation rates of the precursor were found during an individual process cycle. The detected BCl3 concentrations were in the order of 1014 molecules·cm-3. The reported results of in situ monitoring with QCLAS demonstrate the potential for effective optimization procedures in industrial PACVD processes.

  7. On-line preconcentration and determination of mercury in biological and environmental samples by cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrua, N.; Cerutti, S.; Salonia, J.A.; Olsina, R.A.; Martinez, L.D.

    2007-01-01

    An on-line procedure for the determination of traces of total mercury in environmental and biological samples is described. The present methodology combines cold vapor generation associated to atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) with preconcentration of the analyte on a minicolumn packed with activated carbon. The retained analyte was quantitatively eluted from the minicolumn with nitric acid. After that, volatile specie of mercury was generated by merging the acidified sample and sodium tetrahydroborate(III) in a continuous flow system. The gaseous analyte was subsequently introduced via a stream of Ar carrier into the atomizer device. Optimizations of both, preconcentration and mercury volatile specie generation variables were carried out using two level full factorial design (2 3 ) with 3 replicates of the central point. Considering a sample consumption of 25 mL, an enrichment factor of 13-fold was obtained. The detection limit (3σ) was 10 ng L -1 and the precision (relative standard deviation) was 3.1% (n = 10) at the 5 μg L -1 level. The calibration curve using the preconcentration system for mercury was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995 at levels near the detection limit up to at least 1000 μg L -1 . Satisfactory results were obtained for the analysis of mercury in tap water and hair samples

  8. Spatial transport of atomic coherence in electromagnetically induced absorption with a paraffin-coated Rb vapor cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Moon, Han Seb

    2014-06-30

    We report the spatial transport of spontaneously transferred atomic coherence (STAC) in electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA), which resulted from moving atoms with the STAC of the 5S(1/2) (F = 2)-5P(3/2) (F' = 3) transition of (87)Rb in a paraffin-coated vapor cell. In our experiment, two channels were spatially separate; the writing channel (WC) generated STAC in the EIA configuration, and the reading channel (RC) retrieved the optical field from the spatially transported STAC. Transported between the spatially separated positions, the fast light pulse of EIA in the WC and the delayed light pulse in the RC were observed. When the laser direction of the RC was counter-propagated in the direction of the WC, we observed direction reversal of the transported light pulse in the EIA medium. Furthermore, the delay time, the magnitude, and the width of the spatially transported light pulse were investigated with respect to the distance between the two channels.

  9. The Utilization of Nitrogen Gas as a Carrier Gas in the Determination of Hg Ions Using Cold Vapor-Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (CV-AAS)

    OpenAIRE

    Panggabean, Aman Sentosa; Pasaribu, Subur P; Kristiana, Farida

    2018-01-01

    The research about utilization of nitrogen gas as a carrier gas in the determination of Hg ions by using Cold Vapor-Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (CV-AAS) method has been conducted. To optimize the measurement results, several parameters that affect hydride generator have been studied. Some specified important parameters are SnCl2 concentration as reductant, acid concentration, and the analytical performance such as repeatability and reproducibility (% RSD), linearity (r), limits of det...

  10. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water after preconcentration and separation by DLLME-SFO method coupled with cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollahi Atousa; Amirkavehei Mooud; Gheisari Mohammad Mehdi; Tadayon Fariba

    2014-01-01

    A novel dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) for simultaneous separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of mercury was used. A method based on amalgamation was used for collection of gaseous mercury on gold coated sand (Gold trap). The concentration of mercury was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). The DLLME-SFO behavior of mercury by using dithizone as complexing agent was systematically ...

  11. Intercomparison of atmospheric water vapor soundings from the differential absorption lidar (DIAL and the solar FTIR system on Mt. Zugspitze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vogelmann

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We present an intercomparison of three years of measurements of integrated water vapor (IWV performed by the mid-infrared solar FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra-Red instrument on the summit of Mt. Zugspitze (2964 m a.s.l. and by the nearby near-infrared differential absorption lidar (DIAL at the Schneefernerhaus research station (2675 m a.s.l.. The solar FTIR was shown to be one of the most accurate and precise IWV sounders in recent work (Sussmann et al., 2009 and is taken as the reference here. By calculating the FTIR-DIAL correlation (22 min coincidence interval, 15 min integration time we derive an almost ideal slope of 0.996 (10, a correlation coefficient of R = 0.99, an IWV intercept of −0.039 (42 mm (−1.2 % of the mean, and a bias of −0.052 (26 mm (−1.6 % of the mean from the scatter plot. By selecting a subset of coincidences with an optimum temporal and spatial matching between DIAL and FTIR, we obtain a conservative estimate of the precision of the DIAL in measuring IWV which is better than 0.1 mm (3.2 % of the mean. We found that for a temporal coincidence interval of 22 min the difference in IWV measured by these two systems is dominated by the volume mismatch (horizontal distance: 680 m. The outcome from this paper is twofold: (1 the IWV soundings by FTIR and DIAL agree very well in spite of the differing wavelength regions with different spectroscopic line parameters and retrieval algorithms used. (2 In order to derive an estimate of the precision of state-of-the-art IWV sounders from intercomparison experiments, it is necessary to use a temporal matching on time scales shorter than 10 min and a spatial matching on the 100-m scale.

  12. The effect of dryer load on freeze drying process design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sajal M; Jameel, Feroz; Pikal, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    Freeze-drying using a partial load is a common occurrence during the early manufacturing stages when insufficient amounts of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) are available. In such cases, the immediate production needs are met by performing lyophilization with less than a full freeze dryer load. However, it is not obvious at what fractional load significant deviations from full load behavior begin. The objective of this research was to systematically study the effects of variation in product load on freeze drying behavior in laboratory, pilot and clinical scale freeze-dryers. Experiments were conducted with 5% mannitol (high heat and mass flux) and 5% sucrose (low heat and mass flux) at different product loads (100%, 50%, 10%, and 2%). Product temperature was measured in edge as well as center vials with thermocouples. Specific surface area (SSA) was measured by BET gas adsorption analysis and residual moisture was measured by Karl Fischer. In the lab scale freeze-dryer, the molar flux of inert gas was determined by direct flow measurement using a flowmeter and the molar flux of water vapor was determined by manometric temperature measurement (MTM) and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) techniques. Comparative pressure measurement (capacitance manometer vs. Pirani) was used to determine primary drying time. For both 5% mannitol and 5% sucrose, primary drying time decreases and product temperature increases as the load on the shelves decreases. No systematic variation was observed in residual moisture and vapor composition as load decreased. Further, SSA data suggests that there are no significant freezing differences under different load conditions. Independent of dryer scale, among all the effects, variation in radiation heat transfer from the chamber walls to the product seems to be the dominant effect resulting in shorter primary drying time as the load on the shelf decreases (i.e., the fraction of edge vials increases).

  13. Accurate Laser Measurements of the Water Vapor Self-Continuum Absorption in Four Near Infrared Atmospheric Windows. a Test of the MT_CKD Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campargue, Alain; Kassi, Samir; Mondelain, Didier; Romanini, Daniele; Lechevallier, Loïc; Vasilchenko, Semyon

    2017-06-01

    The semi empirical MT_CKD model of the absorption continuum of water vapor is widely used in atmospheric radiative transfer codes of the atmosphere of Earth and exoplanets but lacks of experimental validation in the atmospheric windows. Recent laboratory measurements by Fourier transform Spectroscopy have led to self-continuum cross-sections much larger than the MT_CKD values in the near infrared transparency windows. In the present work, we report on accurate water vapor absorption continuum measurements by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and Optical-Feedback-Cavity Enhanced Laser Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) at selected spectral points of the transparency windows centered around 4.0, 2.1 and 1.25 μm. The temperature dependence of the absorption continuum at 4.38 μm and 3.32 μm is measured in the 23-39 °C range. The self-continuum water vapor absorption is derived either from the baseline variation of spectra recorded for a series of pressure values over a small spectral interval or from baseline monitoring at fixed laser frequency, during pressure ramps. In order to avoid possible bias approaching the water saturation pressure, the maximum pressure value was limited to about 16 Torr, corresponding to a 75% humidity rate. After subtraction of the local water monomer lines contribution, self-continuum cross-sections, C_{S}, were determined with a few % accuracy from the pressure squared dependence of the spectra base line level. Together with our previous CRDS and OF-CEAS measurements in the 2.1 and 1.6 μm windows, the derived water vapor self-continuum provides a unique set of water vapor self-continuum cross-sections for a test of the MT_CKD model in four transparency windows. Although showing some important deviations of the absolute values (up to a factor of 4 at the center of the 2.1 μm window), our accurate measurements validate the overall frequency dependence of the MT_CKD2.8 model.

  14. Progress towards an Autonomous Field Deployable Diode-Laser-Based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL for Profiling Water Vapor in the Lower Troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin S. Repasky

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A laser transmitter has been developed and incorporated into a micro-pulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL for water vapor profiling in the lower troposphere as an important step towards long-term autonomous field operation. The laser transmitter utilizes two distributed Bragg reflector (DBR diode lasers to injection seed a pulsed tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA, and is capable of producing up to 10 mJ of pulse energy with a 1 ms pulse duration and a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. The on-line wavelength of the laser transmitter can operate anywhere along the water vapor absorption feature centered at 828.187 nm (in vacuum depending on the prevailing atmospheric conditions, while the off-line wavelength operates at 828.287 nm. This laser transmitter has been incorporated into a DIAL instrument utilizing a 35.6 cm Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope and fiber coupled avalanche photodiode (APD operating in the photon counting mode. The performance of the DIAL instrument was demonstrated over a ten-day observation period. During this observation period, data from radiosondes were used to retrieve water vapor number density profiles for comparisons with the number density profiles retrieved from the DIAL data.

  15. A simulation study on performance evaluation of single-stage LiBr–H2O vapor absorption heat pump for chip cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu S.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth of Lithium Bromide–Water (LiBr–H2O absorption based heat pump is encouraged for the necessity of extracting high heat from the electronic chips. This paper presents a simulation study of single-stage LiBr–H2O vapor absorption heat pump for chip cooling. In this study, a detailed thermodynamic analysis of the single-stage LiBr–H2O vapor absorption heat pump for chip cooling in the nonexistence of solution heat exchanger was performed and a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI package including visual components was developed by using MATlab (2008b. The influence of chip temperature on COP (Coefficient of Performance, flow rates and conductance was examined by using the developed package. The model is validated by using the values available in the literature and indicates that there is a greater reduction in the absorber load. The influence of chip temperature on the performance and thermal loads of individual components was studied and it was concluded that, COP increases from 0.7145 to 0.8421 with an increase in chip temperature.

  16. Accurate measurements and temperature dependence of the water vapor self-continuum absorption in the 2.1 μm atmospheric window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventrillard, I.; Romanini, D.; Mondelain, D.; Campargue, A.

    2015-01-01

    In spite of its importance for the evaluation of the Earth radiative budget, thus for climate change, very few measurements of the water vapor continuum are available in the near infrared atmospheric windows especially at temperature conditions relevant for our atmosphere. In addition, as a result of the difficulty to measure weak broadband absorption signals, the few available measurements show large disagreements. We report here accurate measurements of the water vapor self-continuum absorption in the 2.1 μm window by Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) for two spectral points located at the low energy edge and at the center of the 2.1 μm transparency window, at 4302 and 4723 cm −1 , respectively. Self-continuum cross sections, C S , were retrieved with a few % relative uncertainty, from the quadratic dependence of the spectrum base line level measured as a function of water vapor pressure, between 0 and 16 Torr. At 296 K, the C S value at 4302 cm −1 is found 40% higher than predicted by the MT-CKD V2.5 model, while at 4723 cm −1 , our value is 5 times larger than the MT-CKD value. On the other hand, these OF-CEAS C S values are significantly smaller than recent measurements by Fourier transform spectroscopy at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the self-continuum cross sections was also investigated for temperatures between 296 K and 323 K (23-50 °C). The derived temperature variation is found to be similar to that derived from previous Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) measurements performed at higher temperatures, between 350 K and 472 K. The whole set of measurements spanning the 296-472 K temperature range follows a simple exponential law in 1/T with a slope close to the dissociation energy of the water dimer, D 0 ≈ 1100 cm −1

  17. Solar desalination by freezing and distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvajic, G.

    It is noted that among seawater desalination processes the absorption-freeze vapor compression processes based on the thermal heat pump, although untested commercially and still in the development stage, appears technically and economically an attractive application of low-grade (exergy) solar heat. The distillation processes proposed here may be conveniently powered by low-grade solar heat (from flat plate solar collectors). It is expected that the scaling problem will be insignificant in comparison with that encountered in the conventional multistage flash process. The novel feature here is the use of enlarged capacity for heat exchange between distillate and brine via latent heat of solid-liquid phase change of a suitable hydrophobic intermediate heat transfer material.

  18. Vapor pressure of heat transfer fluids of absorption refrigeration machines and heat pumps: Binary solutions of lithium nitrate with methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safarov, Javid T.

    2005-01-01

    Vapor pressure p of LiNO 3 + CH 3 OH solutions at T = (298.15 to 323.15) K was reported, osmotic φ and activity coefficients γ; and activity of solvent a s have been evaluated. The experiments were carried out in molality range m = (0.18032 to 5.2369) mol . kg -1 . The Antoine equation was used for the empiric description of experimental vapor pressure results. The Pitzer-Mayorga model with inclusion of Archer's ionic strength dependence of the third virial coefficient was used for the description of calculated osmotic coefficients. The parameters of Archer extended Pitzer model were used for evaluation of activity coefficients

  19. Water vapor self-continuum absorption measurements in the 4.0 and 2.1 μm transparency windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, L.; Vasilchenko, S.; Mondelain, D.; Ventrillard, I.; Romanini, D.; Campargue, A.

    2017-11-01

    In a recent contribution [A. Campargue, S. Kassi, D. Mondelain, S. Vasilchenko, D. Romanini, Accurate laboratory determination of the near infrared water vapor self-continuum: A test of the MT_CKD model. J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 121,13,180-13,203, doi:10.1002/2016JD025531], we reported accurate water vapor absorption continuum measurements by Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and Optical-Feedback-Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) at selected spectral points of 4 near infrared transparency windows. In the present work, the self-continuum cross-sections, CS, are determined for two new spectral points. The 2491 cm-1 spectral point in the region of maximum transparency of the 4.0 μm window was measured by OF-CEAS in the 23-52 °C temperature range. The 4435 cm-1 spectral point of the 2.1 μm window was measured by CRDS at room temperature. The self-continuum cross-sections were determined from the pressure squared dependence of the continuum absorption. Comparison to the literature shows a reasonable agreement with 1970 s and 1980 s measurements using a grating spectrograph in the 4.0 μm window and a very good consistency with our previous laser measurements in the 2.1 μm window. For both studied spectral points, our values are much smaller than previous room temperature measurements by Fourier Transform Spectroscopy. Significant deviations (up to about a factor 4) are noted compared to the widely used semi empirical MT_CKD model of the absorption continuum. The measured temperature dependence at 2491 cm-1 is consistent with previous high temperature measurements in the 4.0 μm window and follows an exp(D0/kT) law, D0 being the dissociation energy of the water dimer.

  20. In Situ Water Vapor Measurements Using Coupled UV Fragment Fluorescence/Absorption Spectroscopy in Support of CRYSTAL-FACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James G.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the coupling of dynamics, chemistry, and radiation within the context of the NASA Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) and the national Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) requires, as a first-order priority, high spatial resolution, high-accuracy observations of water in its various phases. Given the powerful diagnostic importance of the condensed phases of water for dynamics and the impact of phase changes in water on the radiation field, the accurate, in situ observation of water vapor is of central importance to CRYSTAL FACE (CF). This is clear both from the defined scientific objectives of the NRA and from developments in the coupled fields of stratosphere/troposphere exchange, cirrus cloud formation/removal and mechanisms for the distribution of water vapor in the middle/upper troposphere. Accordingly, we were funded under NASA Grant NAG5-11548 to perform the following tasks for the CF mission: 1. Prepare the water vapor instrument for integration into the WB57F and test flights scheduled for Spring 2002. 2. Calibrate and prepare the water vapor instrument for the Summer 2002 CF science flights based in Jacksonville, Florida. 3. Provide both science and engineering support for the above-mentioned efforts. 4. Analyze and interpret the CF data in collaboration with other mission scientists. 5. Attend the science workshop in Spring 2003. 6. Publish the data and analysis in peer-reviewed journals.

  1. Determination of the Telluric Water Vapor Absorption Correction for Astronomical Data Obtained from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, E. F.; Simpson, J. P.; Kuhn, P. M.; Stearns, L. P.

    1979-01-01

    The amount of telluric water vapor along the line of sight of the Kuiper Airborne Observatory telescope as obtained concommitantly on 23 flights is compared with the NASA-Ames Michelson interferometer and with the NOAA-Boulder radiometer. A strong correlation between the two determinations exists, and a method for computing the atmospheric transmission for a given radiometer reading is established.

  2. UV-photochemical vapor generation of selenium for atomic absorption spectrometry: Optimization and 75Se radiotracer efficiency study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rybínová, M.; Musil, Stanislav; Červený, J.; Vobecký, Miloslav; Rychlovský, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 123, SEP (2016), s. 134-142 ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : UV-photochemical vapor generation * Selenium * 75Se radiotracer Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.241, year: 2016

  3. UV-photochemical vapor generation of selenium for atomic absorption spectrometry: Optimization and 75Se radiotracer efficiency study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rybínová, M.; Musil, Stanislav; Červený, J.; Vobecký, Miloslav; Rychlovský, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 123, SEP (2016), s. 134-142 ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : UV- photochemical vapor generation * Selenium * 75Se radiotracer Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.241, year: 2016

  4. Green method for ultrasensitive determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry following sono-induced cold vapor generation and 'in-atomizer trapping'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Sono-induced cold vapor generation (SI-CVG) has been used for the first time in combination with a graphite furnace atomizer for determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry after in situ trapping onto a noble metal-pretreated platform (Pd, Pt or Rh) inserted into a graphite tube. The system allows 'in-atomizer trapping' of Hg without the use of conventional reduction reactions based on sodium borohydride or tin chloride in acid medium for cold vapor generation. The sono-induced reaction is accomplished by applying ultrasound irradiation to the sample solution containing Hg(II) in the presence of an organic compound such as formic acid. As this organic acid is partly degraded upon ultrasound irradiation to yield CO, CO 2 , H 2 and H 2 O, the amount of lab wastes is minimized and a green methodology is achieved. For this purpose, experimental variables influencing the generation/trapping process are fully investigated. The limit of detection for a 10 min trapping time and 10 mL sample volume was 0.03 μg L -1 (Integrated absorbance) and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was about 3%. Carbonates and chlorides at 100 mg L -1 level caused a signal depression by 20-30%. The enhanced trapping efficiency observed with the sono-induced cold vapor generation as compared with 'in-atomizer trapping' methods employing chemical vapor generation is discussed. A reaction pathway for SI-CVG is proposed on the basis of the current knowledge for synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles by ultrasound

  5. Effect of carbon dioxide on the rate of iodine vapor absorption by aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Wataru; Adachi, Motonari; Miyake, Yoshikazu

    1978-01-01

    There is always carbon dioxide in the atmosphere as an impurity. Since this is an acid gas similar to iodine, each absorption rate seems to be affected by the other due to the coexistence of these two. Experiments have been conducted to clarify the absorption rate and absorption mechanism of iodine in the simultaneous absorption of iodine and carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide coexisting with gas phases as an impurity decreases the absorption rate of iodine in the removal by washing with water of iodine mixed in the air. The first cause of this is that the diffusion coefficient of iodine in gas phase decreases with the carbon dioxide content in the gas phase. The second cause is that coexistent carbon dioxide is an acid gas, dissociates by dissolving into the absorbing solution, increases hydrogen ion concentration together with the formation of negative ions of bicarbonate and carbonate, and reduces hydroxyl ion concentration as a result. It is more important that existence of iodine has a catalytic effect to the rate of basic catalytic hydrolysis of carbon dioxide simultaneously dissolved in water phase, and accelerates this reaction rate. The mechanism of catalytic effect of iodine for the hydrolysis of carbon dioxide can not be clarified in detail only by this experiment, but the simultaneous absorption rate of iodine and carbon dioxide can be explained satisfactorily. (Wakatsuki, Y

  6. Silver chemical vapor generation for atomic absorption spectrometry: Minimization of transport losses, interferences and application to water analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Musil, Stanislav; Kratzer, Jan; Vobecký, Miloslav; Benada, Oldřich; Matoušek, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 10 (2010), s. 1618-1626 ISSN 0267-9477 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1783 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : chemical vapor generation * 111Ag radioindicator * transport losses Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.372, year: 2010

  7. Near-Infrared Diode Laser Absorption Diagnostic for Temperature and Water Vapor in a Scramjet Combustor (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Jonathan T. C; Rieker, Gregory B; Jeffries, Jay B; Gruber, Mark R; Carter, Campbell D; Mathur, Tarun; Hanson, Ronald K

    2005-01-01

    ... to 1.47 mum spectral region (2v1 and v1 + v3 overtone bands). Ratio thermometry was performed using direct absorption wavelength scans of isolated features at a 4-kHz repetition rate, as well as 2f wavelength modulation scans at a 2-kHz scan rate...

  8. Thiomersal photo-degradation with visible light mediated by graphene quantum dots: Indirect quantification using optical multipath mercury cold-vapor absorption spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Andrades, Jarol R.; Khan, Sarzamin; Toloza, Carlos A. T.; Romani, Eric C.; Freire Júnior, Fernando L.; Aucelio, Ricardo Q.

    2017-12-01

    Thiomersal is employed as preservative in vaccines, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products due to its capacity to inhibit bacterial growth. Thiomersal contains 49.55% of mercury in its composition and its highly toxic ethylmercury degradation product has been linked to neurological disorders. The photo-degradation of thiomersal has been achieved by visible light using graphene quantum dots as catalysts. The generated mercury cold vapor (using adjusted experimental conditions) was detected by multipath atomic absorption spectrometry allowing the quantification of thiomersal at values as low as 20 ng L- 1 even in complex samples as aqueous effluents of pharmaceutical industry and urine. A kinetic study (pseudo-first order with k = 0.11 min- 1) and insights on the photo-degradation process are presented.

  9. Photoassisted vapor generation in the presence of organic acids for ultrasensitive determination of Se by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry following headspace single-drop microextraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, Raul; Garcia, Monica; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of selenium at the pg/mL level by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry using in situ photogeneration of Se vapors, headspace sequestration onto an aqueous microdrop containing Pd(II) and subsequent injection in a graphite tube. Several organic acids (formic, oxalic, acetic, citric and ethylenediaminetetraacetic) have been tried for photoreduction of Se(IV) into volatile Se compounds under UV irradiation. Experimental variables such as UV irradiation time, organic acid concentration, Pd(II) concentration in the drop, sample and drop volumes, extraction time and pH were fully optimized. Low-molecular weight acids such as formic and acetic provided optimal photogeneration of volatile Se species at a 0.6 mol/L concentration. Citric and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid allowed to use a concentration as low as 1 mmol/L, but extraction times were longer than for formic and acetic acids. Photogeneration of (CH 3 ) 2 Se from Se(IV) in the presence of acetic acid provided a detection limit of 20 pg/mL, a preconcentration factor of nearly 285 and a precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, of 4%. Analytical performance seemed to depend not only on the photogeneration efficiency obtained with each acid but also on the stability of the vapors in the headspace. The method showed a high freedom from interferences caused by saline matrices, but interferences were observed for transition metals at a relatively low concentration

  10. Software for the design of acoustical steam silencers of the reaction-absorption type; Software para el diseno de silenciadores acusticos de vapor del tipo reaccion-absorcion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buendia Dominguez, Eduardo H.; Alvarez Chavez, Jose M. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1989-12-31

    This paper describes the computer program named SILRA, that determines the outline dimensions of an acoustic steam silencer of the reaction-absorption type. These silencers are employed in the geothermoelectric power plants to lower the high levels of pressure and sound caused by the steam discharge to the surrounding atmosphere. The program has the capacity of predicting the noise level generated by the discharge without silencer depending on the emitting source. On SIRLA was successfully coupled the theory described in specialized literature with optimization techniques and experiences acquired in former designs. SIRLA is a powerful tool that allows the designer to optimize the equipment as well as the design time. [Espanol] En este trabajo se describe el programa de computo SILRA, que determina las dimensiones generales de un silenciador acustico de vapor tipo reaccion-absorcion, estos silenciadores se emplean en las centrales geotermoelectricas para abatir los altos niveles de presion de sonido provocados por la descarga del vapor a la atmosfera. El programa tiene la capacidad de predecir el nivel de ruido que genera la descarga sin silenciador, dependiendo de la fuente emisora. En SILRA se acoplaron con exito la teoria descrita en la literatura especializada con tecnicas de optimacion y experiencias adquiridas en disenos anteriores. SILRA es una poderosa herramienta que permite al disenador optimar tanto el equipo como el tiempo de diseno.

  11. The Zugspitze radiative closure experiment for quantifying water vapor absorption over the terrestrial and solar infrared – Part 1: Setup, uncertainty analysis, and assessment of far-infrared water vapor continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sussmann

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative knowledge of water vapor radiative processes in the atmosphere throughout the terrestrial and solar infrared spectrum is still incomplete even though this is crucial input to the radiation codes forming the core of both remote sensing methods and climate simulations. Beside laboratory spectroscopy, ground-based remote sensing field studies in the context of so-called radiative closure experiments are a powerful approach because this is the only way to quantify water absorption under cold atmospheric conditions. For this purpose, we have set up at the Zugspitze (47.42° N, 10.98° E; 2964 m a.s.l. a long-term radiative closure experiment designed to cover the infrared spectrum between 400 and 7800 cm−1 (1.28–25 µm. As a benefit for such experiments, the atmospheric states at the Zugspitze frequently comprise very low integrated water vapor (IWV; minimum  =  0.1 mm, median  =  2.3 mm and very low aerosol optical depth (AOD  =  0.0024–0.0032 at 7800 cm−1 at air mass 1. All instruments for radiance measurements and atmospheric-state measurements are described along with their measurement uncertainties. Based on all parameter uncertainties and the corresponding radiance Jacobians, a systematic residual radiance uncertainty budget has been set up to characterize the sensitivity of the radiative closure over the whole infrared spectral range. The dominant uncertainty contribution in the spectral windows used for far-infrared (FIR continuum quantification is from IWV uncertainties, while T profile uncertainties dominate in the mid-infrared (MIR. Uncertainty contributions to near-infrared (NIR radiance residuals are dominated by water vapor line parameters in the vicinity of the strong water vapor bands. The window regions in between these bands are dominated by solar Fourier transform infrared (FTIR calibration uncertainties at low NIR wavenumbers, while uncertainties due to AOD become an

  12. Modeled and Empirical Approaches for Retrieving Columnar Water Vapor from Solar Transmittance Measurements in the 0.72, 0.82, and 0.94 Micrometer Absorption Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingold, T.; Schmid, B.; Maetzler, C.; Demoulin, P.; Kaempfer, N.

    2000-01-01

    A Sun photometer (18 channels between 300 and 1024 nm) has been used for measuring the columnar content of atmospheric water vapor (CWV) by solar transmittance measurements in absorption bands with channels centered at 719, 817, and 946 nm. The observable is the band-weighted transmittance function defined by the spectral absorption of water vapor and the spectral features of solar irradiance and system response. The transmittance function is approximated by a three-parameter model. Its parameters are determined from MODTRAN and LBLRTM simulations or empirical approaches using CWV data of a dual-channel microwave radiometer (MWR) or a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). Data acquired over a 2-year period during 1996-1998 at two different sites in Switzerland, Bern (560 m above sea level (asl)) and Jungfraujoch (3580 m asl) were compared to MWR, radiosonde (RS), and FTS retrievals. At the low-altitude station with an average CWV amount of 15 mm the LBLRTM approach (based on recently corrected line intensities) leads to negligible biases at 719 and 946 nm if compared to an average of MWR, RS, and GPS retrievals. However, at 817 nm an overestimate of 2.7 to 4.3 mm (18-29%) remains. At the high-altitude station with an average CWV amount of 1.4 mm the LBLRTM approaches overestimate the CWV by 1.0, 1.4. and 0.1 mm (58, 76, and 3%) at 719, 817, and 946 nm, compared to the ITS instrument. At the low-altitude station, CWV estimates, based on empirical approaches, agree with the MWR within 0.4 mm (2.5% of the mean); at the high-altitude site with a factor of 10 less water vapor the agreement of the sun photometers (SPM) with the ITS is 0.0 to 0.2 mm (1 to 9% of the mean CWV there). Sensitivity analyses show that for the conditions met at the two stations with CWV ranging from 0.2 to 30 mm, the retrieval errors are smallest if the 946 nm channel is used.

  13. Column carbon dioxide and water vapor measurements by an airborne triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption lidar: novel lidar technologies and techniques with path to space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, U. N.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Yu, J.; Ismail, S.

    2017-09-01

    The 2-micron wavelength region is suitable for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements due to the existence of distinct absorption features for the gas at this wavelength region [1]. For more than 20 years, researchers at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) have developed several high-energy and high repetition rate 2-micron pulsed lasers [2]. Currently, LaRC team is engaged in designing, developing and demonstrating a triple-pulsed 2-micron direct detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar to measure the weighted-average column dry-air mixing ratios of carbon dioxide (XCO2) and water vapor (XH2O) from an airborne platform [1, 3-5]. This novel technique allows measurement of the two most dominant greenhouse gases, simultaneously and independently, using a single instrument. This paper will provide status and details of the development of this airborne 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar. The presented work will focus on the advancement of critical IPDA lidar components. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver and detector upgrades, laser packaging and lidar integration. Future plans for IPDA lidar ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be discussed. This work enables new Earth observation measurements, while reducing risk, cost, size, volume, mass and development time of required instruments.

  14. The absorption spectrum of water vapor in the 2.2 μm transparency window: High sensitivity measurements and spectroscopic database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campargue, A.; Mikhailenko, S.N.; Vasilchenko, S.; Reynaud, C.; Béguier, S.; Čermák, P.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Romanini, D.

    2017-01-01

    The weak absorption spectrum of water vapor in the important 2.2 μm transparency window is investigated with very high sensitivity. Overall, about 400 absorption lines were measured by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and Optical-Feedback-Cavity Enhanced Laser Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) in five spectral intervals: 4248.2–4257.3, 4298.4–4302.6, 4336.8.5-4367.5, 4422.4-4441.2 and 4514.6-4533.7 cm −1 . The achieved sensitivity of the recordings (noise equivalent absorption, α min , on the order of 2×10 −10 cm −1 ) allowed detecting transitions with intensity values down to 1×10 −28 cm/molecule, more than one order of magnitude better than previous studies by Fourier Transform spectroscopy. The rovibrational assignment was performed on the basis of variational calculations and of previously determined empirical energy values. Most of the newly assigned lines correspond to transitions of the ν 1 , ν 3 and 3ν 2 bands of H 2 17 O in natural isotopic abundance. Fourteen energy levels of H 2 17 O, H 2 18 O and HD 18 O are newly determined. An accurate and complete spectroscopic database is constructed for natural water in the 4190–4550 cm −1 region (2.39–2.20 µm). The list includes about 4500 transitions with intensity greater than 1×10 −29 cm/molecule, for the six most abundant isotopologues in natural isotopic abundance. Line positions were obtained by difference of empirical energy values determined from literature data and complemented with the present CRDS results. The list is made mostly complete by including weak transitions not yet detected, with positions calculated from empirical levels and variational intensities. The variational intensities computed by a collaboration between the University College London and the Institute of Applied Physics in Nizhny Novgorod are found to improve significantly previous results by Schwenke and Partridge. Examples of comparison of the constructed line list to CRDS spectra and to simulations based on

  15. Development and Ecological-Energy Comparative Analysis оf Vapor Compression and Solar Absorption Schemes of Air Conditioning Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doroshenko A.V.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The mission of the research included the following objectives: the development of new circuit decisions for the alternate refrigerating systems based on the use of an open absorptive circuit and on the use of solar energy for absorbent solution regeneration; an assessment of the energy and envi-ronmental characteristics of the developed systems; obtaining of the experimental data for an assess-ment of the principal capabilities of the proposed new solar air-conditioning systems. New principles for design of heat and mass transfer equipment in the version with a movable packing of heat exchange elements (fluidized bed packing "gas - liquid - solid body" placed in the packed bed were developed, which allows self-cleaning of the working surfaces and walls of the heat and mass transfer equipment HMT. This new solution, when working with outdoor air and solutions of absorbents, seems to be a fundamentally important condition for maintaining the working capacity of solar absorption systems. The new schemes of absorber with internal steam cooling allowing the improve-ment of the new scheme of the alternate refrigerating system were developed. Comparative analysis based on the methodology of the "Life Cycle Assessment" (LCA showed that new, developed solar systems provide the considerable decrease in energy consumption, their use leads to the decrease of exhaustion of natural resources, influences less global climate change.

  16. Determination of boron isotope ratios by high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry using graphite furnace vaporizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Carlos; Florek, Stefan; Becker-Ross, Helmut; Huang, Mao-Dong; Heinrich, Hans-Joachim; Recknagel, Sebastian; Vogl, Jochen; Jakubowski, Norbert; Panne, Ulrich

    2017-10-01

    Boron isotope amount ratios n(10B)/n(11B) have been determined by monitoring the absorption spectrum of boron monohydride (BH) in a graphite furnace using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-MAS). Bands (0 → 0) and (1 → 1) for the electronic transition X1Σ+ → A1Π were evaluated around wavelengths 433.1 nm and 437.1 nm respectively. Clean and free of memory effect molecular spectra of BH were recorded. In order to eliminate the memory effect of boron, a combination of 2% (v/v) hydrogen gas in argon and 1% trifluoromethane in argon, an acid solution of calcium chloride and mannitol as chemical modifiers was used. Partial least square regression (PLS) for analysis of samples and reference materials were applied. For this, a spectral library with different isotopes ratios for PLS regression was built. Results obtained around the 433.1 nm and 437.1 nm spectral regions are metrologically compatible with those reported by mass spectrometric methods. Moreover, for the evaluated region of 437 nm, an accuracy of 0.15‰ is obtained as the average deviation from the isotope reference materials. Expanded uncertainties with a coverage factor of k = 2 range between 0.15 and 0.44‰. This accuracy and precision are compatible with those obtained by mass spectrometry for boron isotope ratio measurements.

  17. Exergy based parametric analysis of a combined reheat regenerative thermal power plant and water–LiBr vapor absorption refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogoi, T.K.; Talukdar, K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Exergy analysis of a combined power–absorption cooling system is provided. • Exergetic efficiency of the power cycle and absorption cooling system are calculated. • Irreversibility in each component and total system irreversibility are calculated. • Effect of operating parameters on exergetic performance and irreversibility is analyzed. • Optimum operating parameters are identified based on energy and exergy based results. - Abstract: In this paper, exergy analysis of a combined reheat regenerative steam turbine (ST) based power cycle and water–LiBr vapor absorption refrigeration system (VARS) is presented. Exergetic efficiency of the power cycle and VARS, energy utilization factor (EUF) of the combined system (CS) and irreversibility in each system component are calculated. The effect of fuel flow rate, boiler pressure, cooling capacity and VARS components’ temperature on performance, component and total system irreversibility is analyzed. The second law based results indicate optimum performance at 150 bar boiler pressure and VARS generator, condenser, evaporator and absorber temperature of 80 °C, 37.5 °C, 15 °C and 35 °C respectively. The present exergy based results conform well to the first law based results obtained in a previous analysis done on the same combined system. Irreversibility distribution among various power cycle components shows the highest irreversibility in the cooling tower. Irreversibility of the exhaust flue gas leaving the boiler and the boiler are the next major contributors. Among the VARS components, exergy destruction in the generator is the highest followed by irreversibility contribution of the absorber, condenser and the evaporator

  18. The Zugspitze radiative closure experiment for quantifying water vapor absorption over the terrestrial and solar infrared – Part 3: Quantification of the mid- and near-infrared water vapor continuum in the 2500 to 7800 cm−1 spectral range under atmospheric conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Reichert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a first quantification of the near-infrared (NIR water vapor continuum absorption from an atmospheric radiative closure experiment carried out at the Zugspitze (47.42° N, 10.98° E; 2964 m a.s.l.. Continuum quantification is achieved via radiative closure using radiometrically calibrated solar Fourier transform infrared (FTIR absorption spectra covering the 2500 to 7800 cm−1 spectral range. The dry atmospheric conditions at the Zugspitze site (IWV 1.4 to 3.3 mm enable continuum quantification even within water vapor absorption bands, while upper limits for continuum absorption can be provided in the centers of window regions. Throughout 75 % of the 2500 to 7800 cm−1 spectral range, the Zugspitze results agree within our estimated uncertainty with the widely used MT_CKD 2.5.2 model (Mlawer et al., 2012. In the wings of water vapor absorption bands, our measurements indicate about 2–5 times stronger continuum absorption than MT_CKD, namely in the 2800 to 3000 cm−1 and 4100 to 4200 cm−1 spectral ranges. The measurements are consistent with the laboratory measurements of Mondelain et al. (2015, which rely on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CDRS, and the calorimetric–interferometric measurements of Bicknell et al. (2006. Compared to the recent FTIR laboratory studies of Ptashnik et al. (2012, 2013, our measurements are consistent within the estimated errors throughout most of the spectral range. However, in the wings of water vapor absorption bands our measurements indicate typically 2–3 times weaker continuum absorption under atmospheric conditions, namely in the 3200 to 3400, 4050 to 4200, and 6950 to 7050 cm−1 spectral regions.

  19. Thermal design of lithium bromide-water solution vapor absorption cooling system for indirect evaporative cooling for IT pod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Digvijay Ramkrishna

    Nowadays with increase use of internet, mobile there is increase in heat which ultimately increases the efficient cooling system of server room or IT POD. Use of traditional ways of cooling system has ultimately increased CO2 emission and depletion of CFC's are serious environmental issues which led scientific people to improve cooling techniques and eliminate use of CFC's. To reduce dependency on fossil fuels and 4environmental friendly system needed to be design. For being utilizing low grade energy source such as solar collector and reducing dependency on fossil fuel vapour absorption cooling system has shown a great driving force in today's refrigeration systems. This LiBr-water aabsorption cooling consists of five heat exchanger namely: Evaporator, Absorber, Solution Heat Exchanger, Generator, Condenser. The thermal design was done for a load of 23 kW and the procedure was described in the thesis. There are 120 servers in the IT POD emitting 196 W of heat each on full load and some of the heat was generated by the computer placed inside the IT POD. A detailed procedure has been discussed. A excel spreadsheet was to prepared with varying tube sizes to see the effect on flows and ultimately overall heat transfer coefficient.

  20. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water samples by room temperature ionic liquid based-preconcentration and flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinis, Estefania M.; Berton, Paula [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Services of Mendoza (LISAMEN), (CCT - CONICET - Mendoza), Av. Ruiz Leal S/N Parque General San Martin, CC. 131, M 5502 IRA Mendoza (Argentina); Olsina, Roberto A. [INQUISAL-CONICET, Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina); Altamirano, Jorgelina C. [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Services of Mendoza (LISAMEN), (CCT - CONICET - Mendoza), Av. Ruiz Leal S/N Parque General San Martin, CC. 131, M 5502 IRA Mendoza (Argentina); Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza (Argentina); Wuilloud, Rodolfo G., E-mail: rwuilloud@lab.cricyt.edu.ar [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Services of Mendoza (LISAMEN), (CCT - CONICET - Mendoza), Av. Ruiz Leal S/N Parque General San Martin, CC. 131, M 5502 IRA Mendoza (Argentina); Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza (Argentina)

    2009-08-15

    A liquid-liquid extraction procedure (L-L) based on room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) was developed for the preconcentration and determination of mercury in different water samples. The analyte was quantitatively extracted with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C{sub 4}mim][PF{sub 6}]) under the form of Hg-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (Hg-5-Br-PADAP) complex. A volume of 500 {mu}l of 9.0 mol L{sup -1} hydrochloric acid was used to back-extract the analyte from the RTIL phase into an aqueous media prior to its analysis by flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-CV-AAS). A preconcentration factor of 36 was achieved upon preconcentration of 20 mL of sample. The limit of detection (LOD) obtained under the optimal conditions was 2.3 ng L{sup -1} and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for 10 replicates at 1 {mu}g L{sup -1} Hg{sup 2+} was 2.8%, calculated with peaks height. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in river, sea, mineral and tap water samples and a certified reference material (CRM).

  1. An analytical method for determination of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy; Determinazione di mercurio. Metodo per spettrometria di assorbimento atomico a vapori freddi (CV-AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanella, L. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Mastroianni, D.; Capri, S.; Pettine, M. [CNR, Rome (Italy). Ist. di Ricerca sulle Acque; Spezia, S.; Bettinelli, M. [ENEL, Unified Modelling Language, Piacenza (Italy)

    1999-09-01

    An analytical procedure for the determination of total mercury in wastewaters and natural waters is described. Aqueous samples are fast digested with nitric acid by using the microwave-oven technique; the analysis of mercury is then performed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) using two possible instrumental apparatus (batch system or flow injection). Sodium borohydride is used as the reducing agent for mercury in solution (Method A). The use of amalgamation traps on gold for the preconcentration of mercury lowers the detection limit of the analyte (Method B). [Italian] Viene descritta una procedura analitica per la determinazione del mercurio totale in acque di scarico e naturali. Il campione acquoso viene sottoposto a mineralizzazione con acido nitrico in forno a microonde e analizzato mediante spettroscopia di assorbimento atomico a vapori freddi (CV-AAS) in due possibili configurazioni strumentali (sistema batch oppure flow injection), utilizzando sodio boro idruro come agente riducente del mercurio (metodo A). L'impiego della trappola di oro per la preconcentrazione del mercurio mediante amalgama consente di determinare l'analita a livelli di pochi ng/L (metodo B).

  2. Evaluation and Modeling of Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium and CO2 Absorption Enthalpies of Aqueous Designer Diamines for Post Combustion Capture Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weiliang; Yang, Qi; Conway, William; Puxty, Graeme; Feron, Paul; Chen, Jian

    2017-06-20

    Novel absorbents with improved characteristics are required to reduce the existing cost and environmental barriers to deployment of large scale CO 2 capture. Recently, bespoke absorbent molecules have been specifically designed for CO 2 capture applications, and their fundamental properties and suitability for CO 2 capture processes evaluated. From the study, two unique diamine molecules, 4-(2-hydroxyethylamino)piperidine (A4) and 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-aminopiperidine (C4), were selected for further evaluation including thermodynamic characterization. The solubilities of CO 2 in two diamine solutions with a mass fraction of 15% and 30% were measured at different temperatures (313.15-393.15 K) and CO 2 partial pressures (up to 400 kPa) by thermostatic vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) stirred cell. The absorption enthalpies of reactions between diamines and CO 2 were evaluated at different temperatures (313.15 and 333.15 K) using a CPA201 reaction calorimeter. The amine protonation constants and associated protonation enthalpies were determined by potentiometric titration. The interaction of CO 2 with the diamine solutions was summarized and a simple mathematical model established that could make a preliminary but good prediction of the VLE and thermodynamic properties. Based on the analyses in this work, the two designer diamines A4 and C4 showed superior performance compared to amines typically used for CO 2 capture and further research will be completed at larger scale.

  3. Automatic flow-batch system for cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy determination of mercury in honey from Argentina using online sample treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Marina A; Grünhut, Marcos; Pistonesi, Marcelo F; Di Nezio, María S; Centurión, María E

    2012-05-16

    An automatic flow-batch system that includes two borosilicate glass chambers to perform sample digestion and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy determination of mercury in honey samples was designed. The sample digestion was performed by using a low-cost halogen lamp to obtain the optimum temperature. Optimization of the digestion procedure was done using a Box-Behnken experimental design. A linear response was observed from 2.30 to 11.20 μg Hg L(-1). The relative standard deviation was 3.20% (n = 11, 6.81 μg Hg L(-1)), the sample throughput was 4 sample h(-1), and the detection limit was 0.68 μg Hg L(-1). The obtained results with the flow-batch method are in good agreement with those obtained with the reference method. The flow-batch system is simple, allows the use of both chambers simultaneously, is seen as a promising methodology for achieving green chemistry goals, and is a good proposal to improving the quality control of honey.

  4. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water samples by room temperature ionic liquid based-preconcentration and flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinis, Estefanía M; Bertón, Paula; Olsina, Roberto A; Altamirano, Jorgelina C; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G

    2009-08-15

    A liquid-liquid extraction procedure (L-L) based on room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) was developed for the preconcentration and determination of mercury in different water samples. The analyte was quantitatively extracted with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C(4)mim][PF(6)]) under the form of Hg-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (Hg-5-Br-PADAP) complex. A volume of 500 microl of 9.0 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid was used to back-extract the analyte from the RTIL phase into an aqueous media prior to its analysis by flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-CV-AAS). A preconcentration factor of 36 was achieved upon preconcentration of 20 mL of sample. The limit of detection (LOD) obtained under the optimal conditions was 2.3ngL(-1) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for 10 replicates at 1 microg L(-1) Hg(2+) was 2.8%, calculated with peaks height. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in river, sea, mineral and tap water samples and a certified reference material (CRM).

  5. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water after preconcentration and separation by DLLME-SFO method coupled with cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi Atousa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO for simultaneous separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of mercury was used. A method based on amalgamation was used for collection of gaseous mercury on gold coated sand (Gold trap. The concentration of mercury was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS. The DLLME-SFO behavior of mercury by using dithizone as complexing agent was systematically investigated. The factors influencing, the complex formation and extraction of DLLME-SFO method such as type and volume of extraction and disperser solvents, pH, concentration of salt, centrifuging time and concentration of the chelating agent were optimized. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in drinking and natural water and satisfactory relative recoveries (95–105% were achieved. The proposed procedure was based on very low consumption of organic solvents. The other benefits of the system were sensitive, simple, friendly to the environment, rejection of matrix constituent, low cost, the time consuming and high enrichment factor.

  6. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water samples by room temperature ionic liquid based-preconcentration and flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinis, Estefania M.; Berton, Paula; Olsina, Roberto A.; Altamirano, Jorgelina C.; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G.

    2009-01-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction procedure (L-L) based on room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) was developed for the preconcentration and determination of mercury in different water samples. The analyte was quantitatively extracted with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C 4 mim][PF 6 ]) under the form of Hg-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (Hg-5-Br-PADAP) complex. A volume of 500 μl of 9.0 mol L -1 hydrochloric acid was used to back-extract the analyte from the RTIL phase into an aqueous media prior to its analysis by flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-CV-AAS). A preconcentration factor of 36 was achieved upon preconcentration of 20 mL of sample. The limit of detection (LOD) obtained under the optimal conditions was 2.3 ng L -1 and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for 10 replicates at 1 μg L -1 Hg 2+ was 2.8%, calculated with peaks height. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in river, sea, mineral and tap water samples and a certified reference material (CRM).

  7. Preconcentration, speciation and determination of ultra trace amounts of mercury by modified octadecyl silica membrane disk/electron beam irradiation and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashkenani, Hamid [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dadfarnia, Shayessteh [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sdadfarnia@yazduni.ac.ir; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Jaffari, Abbas Ali [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behjat, Abbas [Department of physics, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-01-15

    Mercury (II) and methyl mercury cations at the Sub-ppb level were adsorbed quantitatively from aqueous solution onto an octadecyl-bonded silica membrane disk modified by 2-[(2-mercaptophyenylimino)methyl] phenol (MPMP). The trapped mercury was then eluted with 3 ml ethanol and Hg{sup 2+} ion was directly measured by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, utilizing tin (II) chloride. Total mercury (Hgt) was determined after conversion of MeHg{sup +} into Hg{sup 2+} ion by electron beam irradiation. A sample volume of 1500 ml resulted in a preconcentration factor of 500 and the precision for a sampling volume of 500 ml at a concentration of 2.5 {mu}g l{sup -1} (n = 7) was 3.1%. The limit of detection of the proposed method is 3.8 ng l{sup -1}. The method was successfully applied to analysis of water samples, and the accuracy was assessed via recovery experiment.

  8. Moisture absorption and dynamic flavor changes in hydrolysed and freeze-dried pine nut (Pinus koraiensis) by-products during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Songyi; Yang, Ruiwen; Cheng, Sheng; Wang, Ke; Qin, Lei

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, two different fractions of pine nut (Pinus koraiensis) protein hydrolysate powder (PNPHP 1-3kDa and PNPHP 3-10kDa ) were prepared and stored for fifteen days at 25°C and 50% relative humidity. Changes in moisture absorption, secondary structure and flavor compounds were measured at various time intervals over fifteen days. Results showed that the PNPHP 3-10kDa had higher moisture absorption capacity from day 6 to day 15 and that the secondary structure of two PNPHP fractions was changed. Major nine and eight flavor compounds were identified from PNPHP 1-3kDa and PNPHP 3-10kDa , respectively. PNPHP 1-3kDa mainly generated aldehydes and PNPHP 3-10kDa generated pyrazines. Finally, the formation of pyrazines was conjectured. The data suggests that Maillard reaction, microbial fermentation and lipid oxidation occurred during storage. The reactions appeared to be strongest by the sixth day. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz

    2009-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal applied to a variety of products and processes, representing a risk to the health of occupationally or accidentally exposed subjects. Dental amalgam is a restorative material composed of metallic mercury, which use has been widely debated in the last decades. Due to the dubiety of the studies concerning dental amalgam, many efforts concerning this issue have been conducted. The Tropical Medicine Foundation (Tocantins, Brazil) has recently initiated a study to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in dentistry attendants at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaina (TO). In collaboration with this study, the laboratory of analysis at IPEN's Chemistry and Environment Center is undertaking the analysis of mercury levels in exposed subjects' urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. This analysis requires the definition of a methodology capable of generating reliable results. Such methodology can only be implemented after a rigorous validation procedure. As part of this work, a series of tests were conducted in order to confirm the suitability of the selected methodology and to assert that the laboratory addresses all requirements needed for a successful implementation of the methodology. The following parameters were considered in order to test the method's performance: detection and quantitation limits, selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy and precision. The assays were carried out with certified reference material, which assures the traceability of the results. Taking into account the estimated parameters, the method can be considered suitable for the afore mentioned purpose. The mercury concentration found for the reference material was of (95,12 +- 11,70)mug.L -1 with a recovery rate of 97%. The method was also applied to 39 urine samples, six of which (15%) showing urinary mercury levels above the normal limit of 10μg.L -1 . The obtained results fall into a

  10. Fundamentals of freeze-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nail, Steven L; Jiang, Shan; Chongprasert, Suchart; Knopp, Shawn A

    2002-01-01

    --the dominant mechanism of heat transfer in freeze-drying--is inefficient at the pressures used in freeze-drying. Steps should be taken to improve the thermal contact between the product and the shelf of the freeze dryer, such as eliminating metal trays from the drying process. Quantitation of the heat transfer coefficient for the geometry used is a useful way of assessing the impact of changes in the system such as elimination of product trays and changes in the vial. Because heat transfer by conduction through the vapor increases with increasing pressure, the commonly held point of view that "the lower the pressure, the better" is not true with respect to process efficiency. The optimum pressure for a given product is a function of the temperature at which freeze-drying is carried out, and lower pressures are needed at low product temperatures. The controlling resistance to mass transfer is almost always the resistance of the partially dried solids above the submination interface. This resistance can be minimized by avoiding fill volumes of more than about half the volume of the container. The development scientist should also recognize that very high concentrations of solute may not be appropriate for optimum freeze-drying, particularly if the resistance of the dried product layer increases sharply with concentration. Although the last 10 years has seen the publication of a significant body of literature of great value in allowing development scientists and engineers to "work smarter," there is still much work needed in both the science and the technology of freeze-drying. Scientific development is needed for improving analytical methodology for characterization of frozen systems and freeze-dried solids. A better understanding of the relationship between molecular mobility and reactivity is needed to allow accurate prediction of product stability at the intended storage temperature based on accelerated stability at higher temperatures. This requires that the temperature

  11. Evaluation of the effect of 16% carbamide peroxide gel (Nite White on mercury release from Iranian and foreign spherical and admixed amalgams by cold vapor atomic absorption method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasraie Sh.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Nowadays, esthetic dentistry has become an important part of modern dentistry. Bleaching is considered as a conservative, safe and effective way for treatment of discolored teeth. Although bleaching is commonly used on anterior teeth, the bleaching gel may come into contact with patient's former amalgam restorations and result in corrosive effects, dissolution of amalgam phases and increasing release of mercury. Mercury released from dental amalgam during mouthguard bleaching can be absorbed and increase the total mercury body burden. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of mercury released from Iranian and foreign brands of amalgams with spherical and admixed particles, polished and unpolished, after 16%carbamide peroxide gel application.Materials and Methods: This experimental in vitro study was performed on 256 Iranian and foreign amalgam samples with spherical and admixed particles. The provided samples were put in distilled water and classified according to the type of amalgam, shape of particles and quality of surface polishing. The test samples were placed in Nite White 16% carbamid peroxide gel and control samples were put in phosphate buffer (Ph=6.5 for 14 and 28 hours. The amount of released mercury was calculated using AVA-440 Mercury Analysis System (Thermo Jarrell Ash model SH/229 with cold-vapor atomic absorption. Data were analyzed using t-test, four way and three way ANOVA tests with P<0.05 as the level of significance.Results: 16% Nite White carbamide peroxide gel caused a significant increase in amount of mercury released from amalgams in all groups (P<0.05. Mercury release from Iranian amalgam was higher than that from the foreign brands (P<0.05. There was no significant difference in mercury released from spherical and admixed amalgams (P>0.05. The amount of mercury released from Iranian and foreign amalgams was time dependent (P<0.05. Furthermore, the amount of mercury released from

  12. Direct As, Bi, Ge, Hg and Se(IV) cold vapor/hydride generation from coal fly ash slurry samples and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreda-Pineiro, J.; Lopez-Mahia, P; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S.; Fernandez-Fernandez, E.; Prada-Rodriguez, D. [University of La Coruna, La Coruna (Spain). Faculty of Science, Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2002-07-01

    Direct cold vapor and hydride generation procedures for As, Bi, Ge, Hg and Se(IV) from aqueous slurry of coal fly ash samples have been developed by using a batch mode generation system. Ir-treated graphite tubes have been used as a preconcentration and atomization medium of the vapors generated. A Plackett-Burman experimental design has been used as a strategy for evaluation of the effects of several parameters affecting the vapor generation efficiency from solid particles, vapor trapping and atomization efficiency from Ir-treated graphite tubes. The effects of parameters such as hydrochloric acid and sodium tetrahydroborate, argon flow rate, trapping and atomization temperatures, trapping time, acid solution volume and mean particle size have been investigated. Optimum values of the parameters have been selected for the development of direct cold vapor/hydride generation methods from slurry particles. The accuracy of methods have been verified by using NIST-1633a coal fly ash certified reference material. Absolute detection limits of 11.5, 48.0, 600, 55.0 and 11.0 ng l{sup -1} for As, Bi, Ge, Hg and Se have been achieved, respectively. A particle size less than 50 {mu}m has shown to be adequate to obtain total cold vapor/hydride generation of metals content in the aqueous slurry particles.

  13. Cirrus Cloud Optical and Microphysical Property Retrievals from eMAS During SEAC4RS Using Bi-Spectral Reflectance Measurements Within the 1.88 micron Water Vapor Absorption Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K.; Platnick, S.; Arnold, G. T.; Holz, R. E.; Veglio, P.; Yorks, J.; Wang, C.

    2016-01-01

    Previous bi-spectral imager retrievals of cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective particle radius (CER) based on the Nakajima and King (1990) approach, such as those of the operational MODIS cloud optical property retrieval product (MOD06), have typically paired a non-absorbing visible or near-infrared wavelength, sensitive to COT, with an absorbing shortwave or midwave infrared wavelength sensitive to CER. However, in practice it is only necessary to select two spectral channels that exhibit a strong contrast in cloud particle absorption. Here it is shown, using eMAS observations obtained during NASAs SEAC4RS field campaign, that selecting two absorbing wavelength channels within the broader 1.88 micron water vapor absorption band, namely the 1.83 and 1.93 micron channels that have sufficient differences in ice crystal single scattering albedo, can yield COT and CER retrievals for thin to moderately thick single-layer cirrus that are reasonably consistent with other solar and IR imager-based and lidar-based retrievals. A distinct advantage of this channel selection for cirrus cloud retrievals is that the below cloud water vapor absorption minimizes the surface contribution to measured cloudy TOA reflectance, in particular compared to the solar window channels used in heritage retrievals such as MOD06. This reduces retrieval uncertainty resulting from errors in the surface reflectance assumption, as well as reduces the frequency of retrieval failures for thin cirrus clouds.

  14. Vapor concentration monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayly, John G.; Booth, Ronald J.

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

  15. Direct As, Bi, Ge, Hg and Se(IV) cold vapor/hydride generation from coal fly ash slurry samples and determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreda-Piñeiro, Jorge; López-Mahía, Purificación; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad; Fernández-Fernández, Esther; Prada-Rodríguez, Darío.

    2002-05-01

    Direct cold vapor and hydride generation procedures for As, Bi, Ge, Hg and Se(IV) from aqueous slurry of coal fly ash samples have been developed by using a batch mode generation system. Ir-treated graphite tubes have been used as a preconcentration and atomization medium of the vapors generated. A Plackett-Burman experimental design has been used as a strategy for evaluation of the effects of several parameters affecting the vapor generation efficiency from solid particles, vapor trapping and atomization efficiency from Ir-treated graphite tubes. The effects of parameters such as hydrochloric acid and sodium tetrahydroborate, argon flow rate, trapping and atomization temperatures, trapping time, acid solution volume and mean particle size have been investigated. The significant parameters obtained (trapping and atomization temperatures for As and Ge; trapping temperature and trapping time for Bi; argon flow rate and atomization temperature for Se) have been optimized by 2 2+star central composite design. For Hg, the trapping temperature has been also significant. Optimum values of the parameters have been selected for the development of direct cold vapor/hydride generation methods from slurry particles. The accuracy of methods have been verified by using NIST-1633a coal fly ash certified reference material. Absolute detection limits of 11.5, 48.0, 600, 55.0 and 11.0 ng l -1 for As, Bi, Ge, Hg and Se have been achieved, respectively. A particle size less than 50 μm has shown to be adequate to obtain total cold vapor/hydride generation of metals content in the aqueous slurry particles.

  16. Solid phase extraction of cadmium on 2-mercaptobenzothiazole loaded on sulfur powder in the medium of ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and cold vapor generation-atomic absorption spectrometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourreza, N.; Ghanemi, K.

    2010-01-01

    A novel solid phase extractor for preconcentration of cadmium at ng L -1 levels has been developed. Cadmium ions were retained on a column packed with sulfur powder modified with 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (2-MBT) in the medium of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim] + PF 6 - ) ionic liquid. The presence of ionic liquid during modification of sulfur enhanced the retention of cadmium ions on the column. The retained cadmium ions were eluted with 2 mol L -1 solution of HCl and measured by cold vapor generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (CVG-AAS). By using reaction cell-gas liquid separator (RC-GLS), gaseous cadmium vapors were produced and reached the atomic absorption spectrometer, instantaneously. The influence of different variables on both processes of solid phase extraction and CVG-AAS determination of cadmium ions was investigated. The calibration curve was linear in the range of 10-200 ng L -1 of cadmium in the initial solution with r = 0.9992 (n = 8) under optimum conditions. The limit of detection based on three times the standard deviation of the blank (3S b , n = 10) was 4.6 ng L -1 . The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of 25 and 150 ng L -1 of cadmium was 4.1 and 2.2% (n = 8), respectively. The procedure was validated by the analysis of a certified reference material (DORM-3), water and fish samples.

  17. Green method for ultrasensitive determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry following sono-induced cold vapor generation and ‘in-atomizer trapping’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Sono-induced cold vapor generation (SI-CVG) has been used for the first time in combination with a graphite furnace atomizer for determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry after in situ trapping onto a noble metal-pretreated platform (Pd, Pt or Rh) inserted into a graphite tube. The system allows 'in-atomizer trapping' of Hg without the use of conventional reduction reactions based on sodium borohydride or tin chloride in acid medium for cold vapor generation. The sono-induced reaction is accomplished by applying ultrasound irradiation to the sample solution containing Hg(II) in the presence of an organic compound such as formic acid. As this organic acid is partly degraded upon ultrasound irradiation to yield CO, CO 2, H 2 and H 2O, the amount of lab wastes is minimized and a green methodology is achieved. For this purpose, experimental variables influencing the generation/trapping process are fully investigated. The limit of detection for a 10 min trapping time and 10 mL sample volume was 0.03 μg L - 1 (Integrated absorbance) and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was about 3%. Carbonates and chlorides at 100 mg L - 1 level caused a signal depression by 20-30%. The enhanced trapping efficiency observed with the sono-induced cold vapor generation as compared with 'in-atomizer trapping' methods employing chemical vapor generation is discussed. A reaction pathway for SI-CVG is proposed on the basis of the current knowledge for synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles by ultrasound.

  18. Green method for ultrasensitive determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry following sono-induced cold vapor generation and 'in-atomizer trapping'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, Sandra; Lavilla, Isela [Departamento de Quimica Analitica y Alimentaria, Area de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de Vigo, Campus As Lagoas-Marcosende s/n, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Bendicho, Carlos [Departamento de Quimica Analitica y Alimentaria, Area de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de Vigo, Campus As Lagoas-Marcosende s/n, 36310 Vigo (Spain)], E-mail: bendicho@uvigo.es

    2007-01-15

    Sono-induced cold vapor generation (SI-CVG) has been used for the first time in combination with a graphite furnace atomizer for determination of Hg in natural waters by electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry after in situ trapping onto a noble metal-pretreated platform (Pd, Pt or Rh) inserted into a graphite tube. The system allows 'in-atomizer trapping' of Hg without the use of conventional reduction reactions based on sodium borohydride or tin chloride in acid medium for cold vapor generation. The sono-induced reaction is accomplished by applying ultrasound irradiation to the sample solution containing Hg(II) in the presence of an organic compound such as formic acid. As this organic acid is partly degraded upon ultrasound irradiation to yield CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, the amount of lab wastes is minimized and a green methodology is achieved. For this purpose, experimental variables influencing the generation/trapping process are fully investigated. The limit of detection for a 10 min trapping time and 10 mL sample volume was 0.03 {mu}g L{sup -1} (Integrated absorbance) and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was about 3%. Carbonates and chlorides at 100 mg L{sup -1} level caused a signal depression by 20-30%. The enhanced trapping efficiency observed with the sono-induced cold vapor generation as compared with 'in-atomizer trapping' methods employing chemical vapor generation is discussed. A reaction pathway for SI-CVG is proposed on the basis of the current knowledge for synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles by ultrasound.

  19. Application of the Positron Annihilation Technique to the study of vapors absorption process in polyethylene (LDPE) and in imide polymer (6FDA-TMPD PI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Mendieta, V.

    1992-01-01

    It is well recognized that positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) spectra in polymers have a long-lived component that can be ascribed to ortho-positronium (o-Ps). The lifetime, τ 3 , is considered to be a measure of the size of the micro-vacancies in which o-Ps is trapped and is annihilated through pick-off annihilation with the rate which depends on the size of the vacancy. Positron lifetime measurements were performed for two different kinds of polymers (low density polyethylene and a polyimide (6FDA-TMPD) during sorption of various vapors (hexane, cyclohexane, benzene, acrylic acid, methyl acrylate, water and oxygen). The vapor sorption affected the long-lived component (ortho-positronium component) in a systematic way regardless of the kind of the vapor molecules, i.e. for the polyethylene both the lifetime and the intensity of the long-lived component were enhanced, while for the polyimide they were decreased significantly. These different effects are interpreted in terms of different states of sorbed molecules in rubbery (the polyethylene) and in glassy (the polyimide) polymers. (Author)

  20. Vapor Intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vapor intrusion occurs when there is a migration of volatile chemicals from contaminated groundwater or soil into an overlying building. Volatile chemicals can emit vapors that may migrate through subsurface soils and into indoor air spaces.

  1. Freezing for Love

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carroll, Katherine; Kroløkke, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    their eggs. Our analysis draws on semi-structured interviews with 16 women from the Midwest and East Coast regions of the USA who froze their eggs. Rather than freezing to balance career choices and ‘have it all’, the women in this cohort were largely ‘freezing for love’ and in the hope of having their ‘own...

  2. Development of an Airborne Triple-Pulse 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar being developed at NASA Langley Research Center with support from NASA ESTO Instrument Incubator Program. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver and detector upgrades, laser packaging and lidar integration. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  3. Quantitative absorption spectroscopy of residual water vapor in high-purity gases: pressure broadening of the 1.39253-microm H2O transition by N2, HCl, HBr, Cl2, and O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorsa, Vasil; Dheandhanoo, Seksan; Ketkar, Suhas N; Hodges, Joseph T

    2005-02-01

    We determined the respective pressure-broadening coefficients of HCl, HBr, Cl2, and O2 (expressed relative to that of the reference gas N2) for the (v1,v2,v3)J(Ka,Kc) = (0,0,0)3(0,3) --> (1,0,1)2(0,2) rovibrational transition of H2 16O that occurs at 1.39253 microm. The experiment used a continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy analyzer to measure the peak absorption losses as a function of added moisture concentration. The measured pressure-broadening coefficients for HCl, HBr, Cl2, and O2 are, respectively, 2.76, 2.48, 1.39, and 0.49 times that of the N2 pressure-broadening coefficient, and detection limits for water vapor range from 0.22 nmol mol(-1) for O2 matrix gas to 2.3 nmol mol(-1) for HBr matrix gas. The degradation of the detection limit (relative to the N2 matrix gas) is ascribed to a pressure-broadening-induced reduction in peak absorption cross section and to elevated background loss from the matrix gas.

  4. Removal of Thin Cirrus Path Radiances in the 0.4-1.0 micron Spectral Region Using the 1.375-micron Strong Water Vapor Absorption Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Han, Wei; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    1998-01-01

    Through analysis of spectral imaging data acquired with the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) from an ER-2 aircraft at 20 km altitude during several field programs, it was found that narrow channels near the center of the strong 1.38-micron water vapor band are very sensitive in detecting thin cirrus clouds. Based on this observation from AVIRIS data, a channel centered at 1.375 microns with a width of 30 nm was selected for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) for remote sensing of cirrus clouds from space. The sensitivity of the 1.375-micron MODIS channel to detect thin cirrus clouds during the day time is expected to be one to two orders of magnitude better than the current infrared emission techniques. As a result, a larger fraction of the satellite data will likely be identified as containing cirrus clouds. In order to make better studies of surface reflectance properties, thin cirrus effects must be removed from satellite images. We have developed an empirical approach for removing/correcting thin cirrus effects in the 0.4 - 1.0 micron region using channels near 1.375 microns. This algorithm will be incorporated into the present MODIS atmospheric correction algorithms for ocean color and land applications and will yield improved MODIS atmospheric aerosol, land surface, and ocean color products.

  5. 2-Micron Triple-Pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has contributed in developing several 2-micron carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the DIAL technique. Currently, an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development at NASA LaRC. This paper focuses on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of wavelength control, packaging and lidar integration. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented, including telescope integration, detection systems and data acquisition electronics. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be presented.

  6. Modeling of Artificial Neural Network for Predicting Specific Heat capacity of working fluid LiBr-H2O used in Vapor Absorption Refrigeration System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dheerendra Vikram Singh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to model an artificial neural network (ANN to predict the value of specific heat capacity of working fluid LiBr-H2O used in vapour absorption refrigeration systems. A feed forward back propagation algorithm is used for the network, which is most popular for ANN. The consistence between experimental and ANN’s approach result was achieved by a mean relative error -0.00573, sum of the squares due to error0.00321, coefficient of multiple determination R-square 0.99961and root mean square error 0.01573 for test data. These results had been achieved in Matlab environment and the use of derived equations in any programmable language for deriving the specific heat capacity of LiBr-H2O solution.

  7. Polymerization with freezing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Naim, E; Krapivsky, P L

    2005-01-01

    Irreversible aggregation processes involving reactive and frozen clusters are investigated using the rate equation approach. In aggregation events, two clusters join irreversibly to form a larger cluster; additionally, reactive clusters may spontaneously freeze. Frozen clusters do not participate in merger events. Generally, freezing controls the nature of the aggregation process, as demonstrated by the final distribution of frozen clusters. The cluster mass distribution has a power-law tail, F k ∼k -γ , when the freezing process is sufficiently slow. Different exponents, γ = 1 and 3, are found for the constant and the product aggregation rates, respectively. For the latter case, the standard polymerization model, either no gels, or a single gel, or even multiple gels, may be produced

  8. Absorption fluids data survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macriss, R. A.; Zawacki, T. S.

    Development of improved data for the thermodynamic, transport and physical properties of absorption fluids were studied. A specific objective of this phase of the study is to compile, catalog and coarse screen the available US data of known absorption fluid systems and publish it as a first edition document to be distributed to manufacturers, researchers and others active in absorption heat pump activities. The methodology and findings of the compilation, cataloguing and coarse screening of the available US data on absorption fluid properties and presents current status and future work on this project are summarized. Both in house file and literature searches were undertaken to obtain available US publications with pertinent physical, thermodynamic and transport properties data for absorption fluids. Cross checks of literature searches were also made, using available published bibliographies and literature review articles, to eliminate secondary sources for the data and include only original sources and manuscripts. The properties of these fluids relate to the liquid and/or vapor state, as encountered in normal operation of absorption equipment employing such fluids, and to the crystallization boundary of the liquid phase, where applicable. The actual data were systematically classified according to the type of fluid and property, as well as temperature, pressure and concentration ranges over which data were available. Data were sought for 14 different properties: Vapor-Liquid Equilibria, Crystallization Temperature, Corrosion Characteristics, Heat of Mixing, Liquid-Phase-Densities, Vapor-Liquid-Phase Enthalpies, Specific Heat, Stability, Viscosity, Mass Transfer Rate, Heat Transfer Rate, Thermal Conductivity, Flammability, and Toxicity.

  9. Role of Water Vapor Content in the Effects of Aerosol on the Electrification of Thunderstorms: A Numerical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengguo Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We explored the role of the water vapor content below the freezing level in the response of idealized supercell storm electrical processes to increased concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with parameterizations electrification and discharging, we performed 30 simulations by varying both the CCN concentration and water vapor content below the freezing level. The sensitivity simulations showed a distinct response to increased concentrations of CCN, depending on the water vapor content below the freezing level. Enhancing CCN concentrations increased electrification processes of thunderstorms and produced a new negative charge region above the main positive charge center when there were ample amounts of water vapor below the freezing level. Conversely, there were weak effects on electrification and the charge structure in numerical experiments initialized with lower water vapor content below the freezing level.

  10. Freezing and Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page ] Enzymes Enzyme activity can lead to the deterioration of food quality. Enzymes present in animals, vegetables, and fruit ... slows the enzyme activity that takes place in foods. It does not halt ... deterioration. This is called "blanching." For successful freezing, blanch ...

  11. Administrative Freezing of Capital Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kropacheva A. V.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The author estimates administrative freezing of capital construction as a type of punishment for violating laws in this sphere. The article provides the mechanism of freezing of capital construction as a serious alternative for fine sanctions

  12. Extracellular freezing in leaves of freezing-sensitive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Edward N; Pearce, Roger S

    2002-03-01

    Low-temperature scanning-electron microscopy was used to study the freezing of leaves of five species that have no resistance to freezing: bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.), cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), and corn (Zea mays L.). In the leaves of the four dicotyledonous species, ice was extracellular and the cells of all tissues were collapsed. In contrast, in maize leaves ice was extracellular in the mesophyll, and these cells were collapsed, but the epidermal and bundle-sheath cells apparently retained their original shapes and volume. It is concluded that the leaves of the freezing-sensitive dicotyledonous species tested were killed by cellular dehydration induced by extracellular freezing, and not by intracellular freezing. Freezing injury in maize leaves apparently resulted from a combination of freezing-induced cellular dehydration of some cells and intracellular ice formation in epidermal and bundle-sheath cells.

  13. The use of emulsions for the determination of methylmercury and inorganic mercury in fish-eggs oil by cold vapor generation in a flow injection system with atomic absorption spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguera, J L; Quintana, I A; Salager, J L; Burguera, M; Rondón, C; Carrero, P; Anton de Salager, R; Petit de Peña, Y

    1999-04-01

    An on-line time based injection system used in conjunction with cold vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry and microwave-aided oxidation with potassium persulfate has been developed for the determination of the different mercury species in fish-eggs oil samples. A three-phase surfactant-oil-water emulsion produced an advantageous flow when a peristaltic pump was used to introduce the highly viscous sample into the system. The optimum proportion of the oil-water mixture ratio was 2:3 v/v with a Tween 20 surfactant concentration in the emulsion of 0.008% v/v. Inorganic mercury was determined after reduction with sodium borohydride while total mercury was determined after an oxidation step with persulfate prior to the reduction step to elemental mercury with the same reducing agent. The difference between total and inorganic mercury determined the organomercury content in samples. A linear calibration graph was obtained in the range 0.1-20 micrograms l-1 of Hg2+ by injecting 0.7 ml of samples. The detection limits based on 3 sigma of the blank signals were 0.11 and 0.12 microgram l-1 for total and inorganic mercury, respectively. The relative standard deviation of ten independent measurements were 2.8 and 2.2% for 10 micrograms l-1 and 8.8 and 9.0% for 0.1 microgram l-1 amounts of total and inorganic mercury, respectively. The recoveries of 0.3, 0.6 and 8 micrograms l-1 of inorganic and organic mercury added to fish-eggs oil samples ranged from 93.0 to 94.8% and from 100 to 106%, respectively. Good agreement with those values obtained for total mercury content in real samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was also obtained, differences between mean values were catfish-eggs oil samples from the northwestern coast of Venezuela were measured; while the organic mercury lay in the range 2.0 and 3.3 micrograms l-1, inorganic mercury was not detected.

  14. Vapor Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, H. M.; Garrard, G. C.; Houston, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Detector eliminates need for removing covers to take samples. Detector is canister consisting of screw-in base and clear plastic tube that contains two colors of silica gel. Monoethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide vapors are visually monitored with canister containing color-changing gels.

  15. Spectroscopic investigation of the aggregation state of amphotericin B during loading, freeze-drying, and reconstitution of polymeric micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Monica; Kwon, Glen S

    2004-11-22

    To investigate the relative aggregation state of amphotericin B (AmB) during loading and reconstitution of polymeric micelles. Hexanoate and stearate derivatives of PEO-b-p (L-Asp) were prepared. The polymers and AmB were dissolved in methanol (MeOH). Milli-Q water was then added slowly, and the MeOH was removed via rotary evaporation. The solutions were freeze-dried in the presence of trehalose. During micelle preparation, the aggregation state of AmB was assessed using absorption spectroscopy. Upon reconstitution, the samples were analyzed using vapor-pressure osmometry, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), and absorption spectroscopy. The absorption spectrum of AmB in the presence of the block copolymers was compared to that of AmB alone under the same conditions. AmB was loaded into micelles prepared from acyl derivatives of PEO-b-p (L-Asp). Absorption spectroscopy indicated that the aggregation state was preserved during the loading process. AmB exists in a self-aggregated state in polymeric micelles containing hexanoate ester cores and in a relatively monomeric state in polymeric micelles containing stearate ester cores. Vapor-pressure osmometry confirmed the isotonicity of the formulations, while SEC indicated that the micelles were approximately 10(6) g/mol. Depending on the polymer structure and assembly conditions, it is possible to encapsulate AmB in a relatively nonaggregated or aggregated state in micelles prepared from acyl derivatives of PEO-b-p (L-Asp). In polymeric micelles containing stearate side chains, AmB was loaded in a nearly monomeric state, possibly due to interaction with the stearate side chains. The final aggregation state of the drug is preserved during lyophilization and reconstitution of polymeric micelles prepared by a novel solvent evaporation procedure.

  16. Freezing of Coulomb liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.

    1989-03-01

    Recent progress in the theory of liquid-solid coexistence as approached from the liquid phase in systems with Coulomb forces is reviewed. Main attention is given to (i) Wigner crystallization of the electron gas in the degenerate and classical limits, and (ii) localization of bond particles leading to freezing in a pseudoclassical liquid-state version of the bond-charge model for elemental semiconductors. These models serve to illustrate crystallization driven by pure Coulomb repulsions and crystallization resulting from the interplay of attraction and repulsions in multicomponent systems, respectively. (author). 29 refs, 4 figs

  17. Anhydrobiosis and Freezing-Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGill, Lorraine; Shannon, Adam; Pisani, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Panagrolaimus strains from tropical, temperate, continental and polar habitats and we analysed their phylogenetic relationships. We found that several other Panagrolaimus isolates can also survive freezing when fully hydrated and that tissue extracts from these freezing-tolerant nematodes can inhibit the growth...... Pennsylvania, USA. Ancestral state reconstructions show that anhydrobiosis evolved deep in the phylogeny of Panagrolaimus. The early-diverging Panagrolaimus lineages are strongly anhydrobiotic but weakly freezing-tolerant, suggesting that freezing tolerance is most likely a derived trait. The common ancestors...

  18. NMR Pore Structure and Dynamic Characteristics of Sandstone Caused by Ambient Freeze-Thaw Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For a deeper understanding of the freeze-thaw weathering effects on the microstructure evolution and deterioration of dynamic mechanical properties of rock, the present paper conducted the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR tests and impact loading experiments on sandstone under different freeze-thaw cycles. The results of NMR test show that, with the increase of freeze-thaw cycles, the pores expand and pores size tends to be uniform. The experimental results show that the stress-strain curves all go through four stages, namely, densification, elasticity, yielding, and failure. The densification curve is shorter, and the slope of elasticity curve decreases as the freeze-thaw cycles increase. With increasing freeze-thaw cycles, the dynamic peak stress decreases and energy absorption of sandstone increases. The dynamic failure form is an axial splitting failure, and the fragments increase and the size diminishes with increasing freeze-thaw cycles. The higher the porosity is, the more severe the degradation of dynamic characteristics is. An increase model for the relationships between the porosity or energy absorption and freeze-thaw cycles number was built to reveal the increasing trend with the freeze-thaw cycles increase; meanwhile, a decay model was built to predict the dynamic compressive strength degradation of rock after repeated freeze-thaw cycles.

  19. Dependence of surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) enhancement and spectral quality on the choice of underlying substrate: a closer look at silver (Ag) films prepared by physical vapor deposition (PVD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, Michelle M; Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Sun, Zhelin; Crittenden, Scott; Leverette, Chad L

    2011-03-01

    Silver (Ag) films of varying thickness were simultaneously deposited using physical vapor deposition (PVD) onto six infrared (IR) substrates (BaF(2), CaF(2), Ge, AMTIR, KRS-5, and ZnSe) in order to correlate the morphology of the deposited film with optimal SEIRA response and spectral band symmetry and quality. Significant differences were observed in the surface morphology of the deposited silver films, the degree of enhancement provided, and the spectral appearance of para-nitrobenzoic acid (PNBA) cast films for each silver-coated substrate. These differences were attributed to each substrate's chemical properties, which dictate the morphology of the Ag film and ultimately determine the spectral appearance of the adsorbed analyte and the magnitude of SEIRA enhancement. Routine SEIRA enhancement factors (EFs) for all substrates were between 5 and 150. For single-step Ag depositions, the following ranking identifies the greatest SEIRA enhancement factor and the maximum absorption of the 1345 cm(-1) spectral marker of PNBA at the optimal silver thickness for each substrate: BaF(2) (EF = 85 ± 19, 0.059 A, 10 nm Ag) > CaF(2) (EF = 75 ± 30, 0.052 A, 10 nm Ag) > Ge (EF = 45 ± 8, 0.019 A, 5 nm Ag) > AMTIR (EF = 38 ± 8, 0.024 A, 15 nm Ag) > KRS-5 (EF = 24 ± 1, 0.015 A, 12 nm Ag) > ZnSe (EF = 9 ± 5, 0.008 A, 8 nm Ag). A two-step deposition provides 59% larger EFs than single-step depositions of Ag on CaF(2). A maximum EF of 147 was calculated for a cast film of PNBA (surface coverage = 341 ng/cm(2)) on a 10 nm two-step Ag film on CaF(2) (0.102 A, 1345 cm(-1) symmetric NO(2) stretching band). The morphology of the two-step Ag film has smaller particles and greater particle density than the single-step Ag film.

  20. Freezing on a sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Rodrigo E.; Kelleher, Colm P.; Hollingsworth, Andrew D.; Chaikin, Paul M.

    2018-02-01

    The best understood crystal ordering transition is that of two-dimensional freezing, which proceeds by the rapid eradication of lattice defects as the temperature is lowered below a critical threshold. But crystals that assemble on closed surfaces are required by topology to have a minimum number of lattice defects, called disclinations, that act as conserved topological charges—consider the 12 pentagons on a football or the 12 pentamers on a viral capsid. Moreover, crystals assembled on curved surfaces can spontaneously develop additional lattice defects to alleviate the stress imposed by the curvature. It is therefore unclear how crystallization can proceed on a sphere, the simplest curved surface on which it is impossible to eliminate such defects. Here we show that freezing on the surface of a sphere proceeds by the formation of a single, encompassing crystalline ‘continent’, which forces defects into 12 isolated ‘seas’ with the same icosahedral symmetry as footballs and viruses. We use this broken symmetry—aligning the vertices of an icosahedron with the defect seas and unfolding the faces onto a plane—to construct a new order parameter that reveals the underlying long-range orientational order of the lattice. The effects of geometry on crystallization could be taken into account in the design of nanometre- and micrometre-scale structures in which mobile defects are sequestered into self-ordered arrays. Our results may also be relevant in understanding the properties and occurrence of natural icosahedral structures such as viruses.

  1. Freezing on a sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Rodrigo E; Kelleher, Colm P; Hollingsworth, Andrew D; Chaikin, Paul M

    2018-02-14

    The best understood crystal ordering transition is that of two-dimensional freezing, which proceeds by the rapid eradication of lattice defects as the temperature is lowered below a critical threshold. But crystals that assemble on closed surfaces are required by topology to have a minimum number of lattice defects, called disclinations, that act as conserved topological charges-consider the 12 pentagons on a football or the 12 pentamers on a viral capsid. Moreover, crystals assembled on curved surfaces can spontaneously develop additional lattice defects to alleviate the stress imposed by the curvature. It is therefore unclear how crystallization can proceed on a sphere, the simplest curved surface on which it is impossible to eliminate such defects. Here we show that freezing on the surface of a sphere proceeds by the formation of a single, encompassing crystalline 'continent', which forces defects into 12 isolated 'seas' with the same icosahedral symmetry as footballs and viruses. We use this broken symmetry-aligning the vertices of an icosahedron with the defect seas and unfolding the faces onto a plane-to construct a new order parameter that reveals the underlying long-range orientational order of the lattice. The effects of geometry on crystallization could be taken into account in the design of nanometre- and micrometre-scale structures in which mobile defects are sequestered into self-ordered arrays. Our results may also be relevant in understanding the properties and occurrence of natural icosahedral structures such as viruses.

  2. Cryoprotectant-free freezing of the goat epididymal sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katanbafzadeh, H; Barati, F; Tabandeh, M

    2014-01-01

    Cryoprotectant free approach successfully removed the impact of physical and chemical damages in preserving human sperm in a vitrification protocol. There is no any report on this technology in farm animal sperm freezing. The aim of the present study was to find the efficacy of cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrin (CLC; 1 mg per 60 million) and sucrose (0.1 and 0.2 M) on freezing of the goat epididymal sperm. Caudal epididymides (n=5 pairs) were dissected, incised and incubated in the Tris-BSA solution for 15 min, followed by swim-up at room temperature. Sperm was loaded in 0.25 mL French straws and cooled on nitrogen vapor for 3 min then immersed in liquid nitrogen and remained for 48 h. Then the straws thawed by immersing in 37 degree C waterbath for 30 sec and analyzed. The results showed the impact of freezing on the goat epididymal sperm motility, viability and DNA fragmentation that were improved by incorporation of CLC and sucrose (0.2 M). In conclusion, the goat epididymal sperm was frozen in a cryoprotectant-free freezing model. CLC and 0.4 M sucrose protected the goat epididymal sperm against freezing-induced damages.

  3. Optical monitor for water vapor concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebabian, P.

    1998-06-02

    A system for measuring and monitoring water vapor concentration in a sample uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to a water vapor absorption line. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split by a magnetic field parallel to the direction of light propagation from the lamp into sets of components of downshifted and upshifted frequencies of approximately 1575 Gauss. The downshifted components are centered on a water vapor absorption line and are thus readily absorbed by water vapor in the sample; the upshifted components are moved away from that absorption line and are minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the upshifted components or downshifted components and passes the selected components to the sample. After transmission through the sample, the transmitted intensity of a component of the argon line varies as a result of absorption by the water vapor. The system then determines the concentration of water vapor in the sample based on differences in the transmitted intensity between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments alternate selection of sets of components is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to the emitting plasma. 5 figs.

  4. Fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen preserves bulk dissolved organic matter concentrations, but not its composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieme, Lisa; Graeber, Daniel; Kaupenjohann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    -freezing with liquid nitrogen) on DOM concentrations measured as organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and on spectroscopic properties of DOM from different terrestrial ecosystems (forest and grassland). Fresh and differently frozen throughfall, stemflow, litter leachate and soil solution samples were analyzed for DOC......Freezing can affect concentrations and spectroscopic properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in water samples. Nevertheless, water samples are regularly frozen for sample preservation. In this study we tested the effect of different freezing methods (standard freezing at −18 °C and fast...... concentrations, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence excitation–emission matrices combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen prevented a significant decrease of DOC concentrations observed after freezing at −18 °C. Nonetheless, the share of PARAFAC components 1 (EXmax...

  5. Freeze Protection in Gas Holders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Duursma, Gail

    In cold weather, the water seals of gasholders need protection from freez- ing to avoid compromising the seal. These holders have a large reservoir of “tank water” at the base which is below ground. At present freeze- protection is achieved by external heating of the seal water which is in a slot...

  6. Generalized structural theory of freezing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yussouff, M.

    1980-10-01

    The first-principles order parameter theory of freezing, proposed in an earlier work, has been successful in yielding quantitative agreement with known freezing parameters for monoatomic liquids forming solids with one atom per unit cell. A generalization of this theory is presented here to include the effects of a basis set of many atoms per unit cell. The basic equations get modified by the 'density structure factors' fsub(i) which arise from the density variations within the unit cell. Calculations are presented for the important case of monoatomic liquids freezing into hexagonal close packed solids. It is concluded that all freezing transitions can be described by using structural correlations in the liquid instead of the pair potential; and that the three body correlations are important in deciding the type of solid formed after freezing. (author)

  7. Vapor Species Over Te Precious Metal Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, Sonia; Wildeman, Thomas; Yarar, Baki

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on two developments of interest to extractive metallurgists: how the knowledge of the vapors over tellurium minerals can be used to develop better processing methods and how graphite furnace atomic absorption, used at moderate temperatures, can be used to characterize the vapors over ore minerals. Elemental tellurium, Ag2Te, and AuTe2 were studied from 250°C through 1050°C. The vapors over these solids were analyzed in-situ by placing the solids directly into the graphite furnace of an atomic absorption spectrophotometer and adjusting the temperature accordingly. Atomic Ag, Au, and Te and molecular Te were analyzed in the vapor above the solids. Using absorbance versus temperature data, Clausius-Clapeyron plots were made to determine how the solids were changing.

  8. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS); Validacao de metodologia analitica para determinacao de mercurio total em amostras de urina por espectrometria de absorcao atomica com geracao de vapor frio (CV-AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz

    2009-07-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal applied to a variety of products and processes, representing a risk to the health of occupationally or accidentally exposed subjects. Dental amalgam is a restorative material composed of metallic mercury, which use has been widely debated in the last decades. Due to the dubiety of the studies concerning dental amalgam, many efforts concerning this issue have been conducted. The Tropical Medicine Foundation (Tocantins, Brazil) has recently initiated a study to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in dentistry attendants at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaina (TO). In collaboration with this study, the laboratory of analysis at IPEN's Chemistry and Environment Center is undertaking the analysis of mercury levels in exposed subjects' urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. This analysis requires the definition of a methodology capable of generating reliable results. Such methodology can only be implemented after a rigorous validation procedure. As part of this work, a series of tests were conducted in order to confirm the suitability of the selected methodology and to assert that the laboratory addresses all requirements needed for a successful implementation of the methodology. The following parameters were considered in order to test the method’s performance: detection and quantitation limits, selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy and precision. The assays were carried out with certified reference material, which assures the traceability of the results. Taking into account the estimated parameters, the method can be considered suitable for the afore mentioned purpose. The mercury concentration found for the reference material was of (95,12 ± 11,70)μg.L{sup -1} with a recovery rate of 97%. The method was also applied to 39 urine samples, six of which (15%) showing urinary mercury levels above the normal limit of 10μg.L{sup −1}. The obtained

  9. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS); Validacao de metodologia analitica para determinacao de mercurio total em amostras de urina para espectrometria de absorcao atomica com geracao de vapor frio (CV-AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz

    2009-07-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal applied to a variety of products and processes, representing a risk to the health of occupationally or accidentally exposed subjects. Dental amalgam is a restorative material composed of metallic mercury, which use has been widely debated in the last decades. Due to the dubiety of the studies concerning dental amalgam, many efforts concerning this issue have been conducted. The Tropical Medicine Foundation (Tocantins, Brazil) has recently initiated a study to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in dentistry attendants at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaina (TO). In collaboration with this study, the laboratory of analysis at IPEN's Chemistry and Environment Center is undertaking the analysis of mercury levels in exposed subjects' urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. This analysis requires the definition of a methodology capable of generating reliable results. Such methodology can only be implemented after a rigorous validation procedure. As part of this work, a series of tests were conducted in order to confirm the suitability of the selected methodology and to assert that the laboratory addresses all requirements needed for a successful implementation of the methodology. The following parameters were considered in order to test the method's performance: detection and quantitation limits, selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy and precision. The assays were carried out with certified reference material, which assures the traceability of the results. Taking into account the estimated parameters, the method can be considered suitable for the afore mentioned purpose. The mercury concentration found for the reference material was of (95,12 +- 11,70)mug.L{sup -1} with a recovery rate of 97%. The method was also applied to 39 urine samples, six of which (15%) showing urinary mercury levels above the normal limit of 10{mu}g.L{sup -1}. The

  10. Validação de metodologia analítica para determinação de mercúrio total em amostras de urina por espectrometria de absorção atômica com geração de vapor frio (CV-AAS: estudo de caso Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Neusatz Guilhen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is a toxic metal used in a variety of substances over the course history. One of its more dubious uses is in dental amalgam restorations. It is possible to measure very small concentrations of this metal in the urine of exposed subjects by the cold vapor atomic absorption technique. The present work features the validation as an essential tool to confirm the suitability of the analytical method chosen to accomplish such determination. An initial analysis will be carried out in order to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in 39 members of the auxiliary dental staff at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaína (TO.

  11. X-ray absorption in atomic potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomilsek, Jana Padeznik; Kodre, Alojz; Arcon, Iztok; Nemanic, Vincenc

    2008-01-01

    A new high-temperature absorption cell for potassium vapor is described. X-ray absorption coefficient of atomic potassium is determined in the energy interval of 600 eV above the K edge where thresholds for simultaneous excitations of 1s and outer electrons, down to [1s2p] excitation, appear. The result represents also the atomic absorption background for XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) structure analysis. The K ionization energy in the potassium vapor is determined and compared with theoretical data and with the value for the metal

  12. Petroleum Vapor Intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    One type of vapor intrusion is PVI, in which vapors from petroleum hydrocarbons such as gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel enter a building. Intrusion of contaminant vapors into indoor spaces is of concern.

  13. FREEZE DRYING PROCESS: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Soham Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Among the various methods of drying, this article has mentioned only one most important method, “Freeze drying”. This method is mainly used for the drying of thermo labile materials. This method works on the principle of sublimation. This method is divided into 3 steps for its better understanding; these are Freezing, Primary drying, and secondary drying. There are many advantages and disadvantages of this method, but still this is the most useful drying method nowadays.

  14. A validated hybrid computational fluid dynamics-physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for respiratory tract vapor absorption in the human and rat and its application to inhalation dosimetry of diacetyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloede, Eric; Cichocki, Joseph A; Baldino, Joshua B; Morris, John B

    2011-09-01

    Diacetyl vapor is associated with bronchiolar injury in man but primarily large airway injury in the rat. The goal of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for inspired vapor dosimetry and to apply the model to diacetyl. The respiratory tract was modeled as a series of airways: nose, trachea, main bronchi, large bronchi, small bronchi, bronchioles, and alveoli with tissue dimensions obtained from the literature. Airborne vapor was allowed to absorb (or desorb) from tissues based on mass transfer coefficients. Transfer of vapor within tissues was based on molecular diffusivity with direct reaction with tissue substrates and/or metabolism being allowed in each tissue compartment. In vitro studies were performed to provide measures of diacetyl metabolism kinetics and direct reaction rates allowing for the development of a model with no unassigned variables. Respiratory tract uptake of halothane, acetone, ethanol and diacetyl was measured in male F344 rat to obtain data for model validation. The human model was validated against published values for inspired vapor uptake. For both the human and rat models, a close concordance of model estimates with experimental measurements was observed, validating the model. The model estimates that limited amounts of inspired diacetyl penetrate to the bronchioles of the rat (<2%), whereas in the lightly exercising human, 24% penetration to the bronchioles is estimated. Bronchiolar tissue concentrations of diacetyl in the human are estimated to exceed those in the rat by 40-fold. These inhalation dosimetric differences may contribute to the human-rat differences in diacetyl-induced airway injury.

  15. Microstructure study of a material on the basis of YSZ obtained be freeze-drying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizea, A.; Abrudeanu, M.; Petot, C.; Petot Ervas, G.

    2001-01-01

    Freeze-drying is a dehydration proceeding of the products in a frozen state, which is based on the ice sublimation process. It is a method, which leads to a very good homogeneity of the products and it allows obtaining very fine powders, which directs to reducing the sintering temperature. Freeze drying always supposes three stages: - freezing, sublimation and absorption of the residual water. The preparation of ZrO 20.91 Y 2 O 30.09 samples proceeds through the following stages: - a. solution preparation; b. solution spraying (into small droplets in liquid nitrogen); c. freeze drying processing; d. calcination of the freeze dried powder; e. powder compacting; f. sintering at four different temperature. The different structure of samples with different density are characterized on basis of micrographs. The results of these analyses are presented, discussed and explained through the chemical composition of the samples

  16. Simulation of absorption refrigeration system for automobile application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Anand

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An automotive air-conditioning system based on absorption refrigeration cycle has been simulated. This waste heat driven vapor absorption refrigeration system is one alternate to the currently used vapour compression refrigeration system for automotive air-conditioning. Performance analysis of vapor absorption refrigeration system has been done by developing a steady-state simulation model to find the limitation of the proposed system. The water-lithium bromide pair is used as a working mixture for its favorable thermodynamic and transport properties compared to the conventional refrigerants utilized in vapor compression refrigeration applications. The pump power required for the proposed vapor absorption refrigeration system was found lesser than the power required to operate the compressor used in the conventional vapor compression refrigeration system. A possible arrangement of the absorption system for automobile application is proposed.

  17. EPA Method 245.2: Mercury (Automated Cold Vapor Technique)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Method 245.2 describes procedures for preparation and analysis of drinking water samples for analysis of mercury using acid digestion and cold vapor atomic absorption. Samples are prepared using an acid digestion technique.

  18. A Theory of Immersion Freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Donifan

    2017-01-01

    Immersion freezing is likely involved in the initiation of precipitation and determines to large extent the phase partitioning in convective clouds. Theoretical models commonly used to describe immersion freezing in atmospheric models are based on the classical nucleation theory which however neglects important interactions near the immersed particle that may affect nucleation rates. This work introduces a new theory of immersion freezing based on two premises. First, immersion ice nucleation is mediated by the modification of the properties of water near the particle-liquid interface, rather than by the geometry of the ice germ. Second, the same mechanism that leads to the decrease in the work of germ formation also decreases the mobility of water molecules near the immersed particle. These two premises allow establishing general thermodynamic constraints to the ice nucleation rate. Analysis of the new theory shows that active sites likely trigger ice nucleation, but they do not control the overall nucleation rate nor the probability of freezing. It also suggests that materials with different ice nucleation efficiency may exhibit similar freezing temperatures under similar conditions but differ in their sensitivity to particle surface area and cooling rate. Predicted nucleation rates show good agreement with observations for a diverse set of materials including dust, black carbon and bacterial ice nucleating particles. The application of the new theory within the NASA Global Earth System Model (GEOS-5) is also discussed.

  19. Nanocompósitos de polipropileno e argila organofílica: difração de raio X, espectroscopia de absorção na região do infravermelho e permeação ao vapor d'água Nanocomposites of polypropylene and organophilic clay: X ray diffraction, absorption infrared spectroscopy with fourier transform and water vapor permeation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C. Morelli

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foram preparados nanocompósitos de polipropileno, polipropileno graftizado com anidrido maleico como agente compatibilizante e argila organofílica comercial (montmorilonita de codinome Cloisite 20A em concentrações de 1,5, 2,5, 5,0 e 7,5% por meio da técnica de intercalação no estado fundido utilizando extrusora de dupla rosca. Os materiais obtidos foram caracterizados por difração de raio X, espectroscopia de absorção na região do infravermelho com transformada de Fourier e análise da permeaç��o ao vapor d'água. Os resultados de difração de raio X e da espectroscopia de absorção na região do infravermelho indicaram a formação de nanocompósitos com estruturas provavelmente esfoliadas e/ou intercaladas para as concentrações de 1,5 e 2,5% de argila organofílica, e proporcionaram uma acentuada diminuição da permeabilidade, corroborando com as demais análises.In this work nanocomposites were prepared from polypropylene, graft polypropylene with maleic anhydride as compatibilizer and organophilic montmorillonite Cloisite 20A with concentrations of 1.5, 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5% clay. The mixture was made in the melt state using a twin screw extruder. The materials were characterized by X ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy with Fourier transform and analysis of water vapor permeation. The results of X ray diffraction and absorption infrared spectroscopy indicates the formation of nanocomposites with structures probably exfoliate and / or intercalated for concentrations of 1.5 and 2.5% clay, and provided a marked decrease in the water permeability, corroborating with other analyses.

  20. Ultrasonic absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews studies of ultrasonic absorption in liquid alkali metals. The experimental methods to measure the absorption coefficients are briefly described. Experimental results reported for the liquid metals: sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium, at medium temperatures, are presented, as well as data for liquid alloys. Absorption losses due to the presence of an external magnetic field, and the effects of viscosity on the absorption in metals, are both discussed. (U.K.)

  1. Freeze-in through portals

    CERN Document Server

    Blennow, Mattias; Zaldivar, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The popular freeze-out paradigm for Dark Matter (DM) production, relies on DM-baryon couplings of the order of the weak interactions. However, different search strategies for DM have failed to provide a conclusive evidence of such (non-gravitational) interactions, while greatly reducing the parameter space of many representative models. This motivates the study of alternative mechanisms for DM genesis. In the freeze-in framework, the DM is slowly populated from the thermal bath while never reaching equilibrium. In this work, we analyse in detail the possibility of producing a frozen-in DM via a mediator particle which acts as a portal. We give analytical estimates of different freeze-in regimes and support them with full numerical analyses, taking into account the proper distribution functions of bath particles. Finally, we constrain the parameter space of generic models by requiring agreement with DM relic abundance observations.

  2. Simulation of absorption refrigeration system for automobile application

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanathan Anand; Gunasekaran Prabhakaran

    2008-01-01

    An automotive air-conditioning system based on absorption refrigeration cycle has been simulated. This waste heat driven vapor absorption refrigeration system is one alternate to the currently used vapour compression refrigeration system for automotive air-conditioning. Performance analysis of vapor absorption refrigeration system has been done by developing a steady-state simulation model to find the limitation of the proposed system. The water-lithium bromide pair is used as a working mixtu...

  3. Accelerated redox reaction between chromate and phenolic pollutants during freezing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Jinjung; Kim, Jaesung [Department of Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 24252 (Korea, Republic of); Vetráková, Ľubica [Department of Chemistry and Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Seo, Jiwon [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Heger, Dominik [Department of Chemistry and Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Lee, Changha [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ho-Il [Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI), Incheon 21990 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kitae, E-mail: ktkim@kopri.re.kr [Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI), Incheon 21990 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jungwon, E-mail: jwk@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 24252 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-05

    Highlights: • Redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) was significantly accelerated during freezing. • Accelerated redox conversion in ice is ascribed to the freeze concentration effect. • 4-CP, Cr(VI), and protons are concentrated in the liquid brine by freezing. • Redox conversions of various phenolic pollutants/Cr(VI) were significant in ice. • Freezing-accelerated redox conversion was observed in real polluted water. - Abstract: The redox reaction between 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) and chromate (Cr(VI)) (i.e., the simultaneous oxidation of 4-CP by Cr(VI) and reduction of Cr(VI) by 4-CP) in ice (i.e., at −20 °C) was compared with the corresponding reaction in water (i.e., at 25 °C). The redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI), which was negligible in water, was significantly accelerated in ice. This accelerated redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) in ice is ascribed to the freeze concentration effect occurring during freezing, which excludes solutes (i.e., 4-CP and Cr(VI)) and protons from the ice crystals and subsequently concentrates them in the liquid brine. The concentrations of Cr(VI) and protons in the liquid brine were confirmed by measuring the optical image and the UV–vis absorption spectra of cresol red (CR) as a pH indicator of frozen solution. The redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) was observed in water when the concentrations of 4-CP/protons or Cr(VI)/protons increased by 100/1000-fold. These results corroborate the freeze concentration effect as the reason for the accelerated redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) in ice. The redox conversion of various phenolic pollutants/Cr(VI) and 4-CP/Cr(VI) in real wastewater was successfully achieved in ice, which verifies the environmental relevance and importance of freezing-accelerated redox conversion of phenolic pollutants/Cr(VI) in cold regions.

  4. PWFA plasma source - interferometric diagnostics for Li vapor density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivakumaran, V.; Mohandas, K.K.; Singh, Sneha; Ravi Kumar, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    A prototype (40 cm long) plasma source based on Li heat pipe oven has been developed for the Plasma Wakefield Acceleration (PWFA) experiments at IPR (IPR), Gujarat as a part of the ongoing Accelerator Programme. Li vapor in the oven is produced by heating solid Li in helium buffer gas. A uniform column of Li plasma is generated by UV photo ionization (193 nm) of the Li vapor in the heat pipe oven. In these experiments, an accurate measurement of Li vapor density is important as it has got a direct consequence on the plasma electron density. In the present experiment, the vapor density is measured optically by using Hook method (spectrally resolved white light interferometry). The hook like structure formed near the vicinity of the Li 670.8 nm resonance line was recorded with a white light Mach Zehnder interferometer crossed with an imaging spectrograph to estimate the Li vapor density. The vapor density measurements have been carried out as a function of external oven temperature and the He buffer gas pressure. This technique has the advantage of being insensitive to line broadening and line shape, and its high dynamic range even with optically thick absorption line. Here, we present the line integrated Lithium vapor density measurement using Hook method and also compare the same with other optical diagnostic techniques (White light absorption and UV absorption) for Li vapor density measurements. (author)

  5. Extended Pulse-Powered Humidity-Freeze Cycling for Testing Module-Level Power Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacke, Peter L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rodriguez, Miguel [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kempe, Michael D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Repins, Ingrid L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-28

    An EMI suppression capacitor (polypropylene film type) failed by 'popcorning' due to vapor outgassing in pulse powered humidity-freeze cycles. No shorts or shunts could be detected despite mildly corroded metallization visible in the failed capacitor. Humidity-freeze cycling is optimized to break into moisture barriers. However, further studies will be required on additional module level power electronic (MLPE) devices to optimize the stress testing for condensation to precipitate any weakness to short circuiting and other humidity/bias failure modes.

  6. Non-Toxic, Low-Freezing, Drop-In Replacement Heat Transfer Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutbirth, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    A non-toxic, non-flammable, low-freezing heat transfer fluid is being developed for drop-in replacement within current and future heat transfer loops currently using water or alcohol-based coolants. Numerous water-soluble compounds were down-selected and screened for toxicological, physical, chemical, compatibility, thermodynamic, and heat transfer properties. Two fluids were developed, one with a freezing point near 0 C, and one with a suppressed freezing point. Both fluids contain an additive package to improve material compatibility and microbial resistance. The optimized sub-zero solution had a freezing point of 30 C, and a freezing volume expansion of 10-percent of water. The toxicity of the solutions was experimentally determined as LD(50) greater than 5g/kg. The solutions were found to produce minimal corrosion with materials identified by NASA as potentially existing in secondary cooling loops. Thermal/hydrodynamic performance exceeded that of glycol-based fluids with comparable freezing points for temperatures Tf greater than 20 C. The additive package was demonstrated as a buffering agent to compensate for CO2 absorption, and to prevent microbial growth. The optimized solutions were determined to have physically/chemically stable shelf lives for freeze/thaw cycles and longterm test loop tests.

  7. Absorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Absorption studies were once quite popular but hardly anyone does them these days. It is easier to estimate the blood level of the nutrient directly by radioimmunoassay (RIA). However, the information obtained by estimating the blood levels of the nutrients is not the same that can be obtained from the absorption studies. Absorption studies are primarily done to find out whether some of the essential nutrients are absorbed from the gut or not and if they are absorbed, to determine how much is being absorbed. In the advanced countries, these tests were mostly done to detect pernicious anaemia where vitamin B 12 is not absorbed because of the lack of the intrinsic factor in the stomach. In the tropical countries, ''malabsorption syndrome'' is quire common. In this condition, several nutrients like fat, folic acid and vitamin B 12 are not absorbed. It is possible to study absorption of these nutrients by radioisotopic absorption studies

  8. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas; Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2016-01-01

    Although the freezing of liquids and melting of crystals are fundamental for many areas of the sciences, even simple properties like the temperature?pressure relation along the melting line cannot be predicted today. Here we present a theory in which properties of the coexisting crystal and liquid phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variatio...

  9. Medical and social egg freezing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lallemant, Camille; Vassard, Ditte; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Until recently, limited options for preserving fertility in order to delay childbearing were available. Although egg freezing and successful thawing is now possible, it remains unclear to what extent women are aware of the availability of this technique, their attitudes towards its ...... planning. Reassurance regarding its efficacy appears more important than its potential adverse effects on their health or that of future children, or the costs of the procedure....

  10. Impregnation of leather during "freeze-drying"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storch, Mikkel; Vestergaard Poulsen Sommer, Dorte; Hovmand, Ida

    2016-01-01

    Freeze-drying is a recognized method for the preservation of waterlogged objects. Naturally, freeze-drying has also been used for waterlogged archaeological leather often after treatment with Na2.EDTA and impregnation with PEG; but the treated leather sometimes suffers from “excessive drying......” becoming too stiff and brittle. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a conventional freeze-drying method against an alternative freeze-drying method that preserves the natural moisture content of the leather. Both new and archaeological waterlogged leather were included in the study...... suggest that the process which takes place within the leather during the freeze-drying in not actual freeze-drying, but rather a sophisticated way of distributing the impregnating agent. The pure ice phase freezes out, but the impregnating agent remains liquid as the temperature does not become low enough...

  11. Folate absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S.J.

    1976-01-01

    Folate is the generic term given to numerous compounds of pteroic acid with glutamic acid. Knowledge of absorption is limited because of the complexities introduced by the variety of compounds and because of the inadequacy of investigational methods. Two assay methods are in use, namely microbiological and radioactive. Techniques used to study absorption include measurement of urinary excretion, serum concentration, faecal excretion, intestinal perfusion, and haematological response. It is probably necessary to test absorption of both pteroylmonoglutamic acid and one or more polyglutamates, and such tests would be facilitated by availability of synthesized compounds labelled with radioactive tracers at specifically selected sites. (author)

  12. Computational investigation of surface freezing in a molecular model of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Akbari, Amir; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2017-03-28

    Water freezes in a wide variety of low-temperature environments, from meteors and atmospheric clouds to soil and biological cells. In nature, ice usually nucleates at or near interfaces, because homogenous nucleation in the bulk can only be observed at deep supercoolings. Although the effect of proximal surfaces on freezing has been extensively studied, major gaps in understanding remain regarding freezing near vapor-liquid interfaces, with earlier experimental studies being mostly inconclusive. The question of how a vapor-liquid interface affects freezing in its vicinity is therefore still a major open question in ice physics. Here, we address this question computationally by using the forward-flux sampling algorithm to compute the nucleation rate in a freestanding nanofilm of supercooled water. We use the TIP4P/ice force field, one of the best existing molecular models of water, and observe that the nucleation rate in the film increases by seven orders of magnitude with respect to bulk at the same temperature. By analyzing the nucleation pathway, we conclude that freezing in the film initiates not at the surface, but within an interior region where the formation of double-diamond cages (DDCs) is favored in comparison with the bulk. This, in turn, facilitates freezing by favoring the formation of nuclei rich in cubic ice, which, as demonstrated by us earlier, are more likely to grow and overcome the nucleation barrier. The films considered here are ultrathin because their interior regions are not truly bulk-like, due to their subtle structural differences with the bulk.

  13. Narrative absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narrative Absorption brings together research from the social sciences and Humanities to solve a number of mysteries: Most of us will have had those moments, of being totally absorbed in a book, a movie, or computer game. Typically we do not have any idea about how we ended up in such a state. Nor...... do we fully realize how we might have changed as we return for the fictional worlds we have visited. The feeling of being absorbed is one of the most illusive and transient feelings, but also one that motivates audiences to spend considerable amounts of time in narrative worlds, and one...... that is central to our understanding of the effects of narratives on beliefs and behavior. Key specialists inform the reader of this book about the nature of the peculiar state of consciousness during episodes of absorption, the perception of absorption in history, the role of absorption in meaningful experiences...

  14. An exposure system for measuring nasal and lung uptake of vapors in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, A.R.; Brookins, L.K.; Gerde, P. [National Inst. for Working Life, Solna (Sweden)

    1995-12-01

    Inhaled gases and vapors often produce biological damage in the nasal cavity and lower respiratory tract. The specific site within the respirator tract at which a gas or vapor is absorbed strongly influences the tissues at risk to potential toxic effects; to predict or to explain tissue or cell specific toxicity of inhaled gases or vapors, the sites at which they are absorbed must be known. The purpose of the work reported here was to develop a system for determining nose and lung absorption of vapors in rats, an animal commonly used in inhalation toxicity studies. In summary, the exposure system described allows us to measure in the rate: (1) nasal absorption and desorption of vapors; (2) net lung uptake of vapors; and (3) the effects of changed breathing parameters on vapor uptake.

  15. Sequential Strangeness Freeze-out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellwied, Rene

    2018-02-01

    I will describe the latest results from lattice QCD pertaining to a potential flavour hierarchy in the hadronic freeze-out from the QCD crossover region. I will compare these results to a variety of improved hadronic resonance gas calculations and to experimental data of fluctuations of net-charge, net-proton and net-kaon multiplicity distributions, which serve as a proxy for the susceptibilities of conserved quantum numbers on the lattice. I will conclude that there is intriguing evidence for a flavour dependent freezeout, and I will suggest expansions to the experimental program at RHIC and the LHC that could potentially demonstrate the impact of a flavour separation during hadronization.

  16. Field Measurements of Water Continuum and Water Dimer Absorption by Active Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS)

    OpenAIRE

    Lotter, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Water vapor plays an important role in Earth's radiative budget since water molecules strongly absorb the incoming solar shortwave and the outgoing thermal infrared radiation. Superimposed on the water monomer absorption, a water continuum absorption has long been recognized, but its true nature still remains controversial. On the one hand, this absorption is explained by a deformation of the line shape of the water monomer absorption lines as a consequence of a molecular collision. One the o...

  17. Well-plate freeze-drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trnka, Hjalte; Rantanen, Jukka; Grohganz, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context: Freeze-drying in presence of excipients is a common practice to stabilize biomacromolecular formulations. The composition of this formulation is known to affect the quality of the final product. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate freeze-drying in well...... no significant edge effect was found for any of the quality attributes analyzed. Conclusion: Freeze-drying in well-plates was found to be a suitable and representative high throughput platform for formulation screening....

  18. Long-term water absorption tests for frost insulation materials taking into account frost attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni A. Pakkala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water absorption of several different frost insulation materials was tested for four years. The test took into account both immersion and frost attack to materials. On the basis of the research the water absorption on XPS specimens is significantly minor compared to EPS specimens that were studied. The most significant result was that freezing of test specimens did not affect on water absorption of XPS specimens but had a major effect on water absorption of EPS specimens. With frozen EPS specimen the absorption continued increasing even after 48 months of immersion. Presumably the reason for such a behaviour is that the pore structure of EPS is not able to resist the tension caused by freezing water and therefore cracks are formed. Thus, more water absorbs inside the EPS through the cracks and it causes cracking deeper in the specimen which is why absorption increases after every freezing period.

  19. Fundamental Technical Elements of Freeze-fracture/Freeze-etch in Biological Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeze-fracture/freeze-etch describes a process whereby specimens, typically biological or nanomaterial in nature, are frozen, fractured, and replicated to generate a carbon/platinum "cast" intended for examination by transmission electron microscopy. Specimens are subjected to u...

  20. Freeze dehydration of milk using microwave energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souda, K.B.; Akyel, C.; Bilgen, E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental studies on heat and mass transfer during a microwave freeze dehydration process. An experimental system and procedure was developed to freeze dry milk. A 2500-W microwave system with an appropriate wave guide was set up and instrumented, and a procedure was experimentally developed to obtain milk powder first by freezing milk and then dehydrating it at low pressure using microwave energy. An unsteady-state analysis was used to derive a one-dimensional mathematical model of the freeze dehydration process in a microwave electromagnetic field

  1. [Social freezing - the male perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromoll, J; Tüttelmann, F; Kliesch, S

    2016-01-01

    In Germany there is an emerging trend for postponing parenthood due to non-medical, sociocultural reasons. This clearly impacts on the reproductive success due to an age-dependent decrease in fertility. Thus, strategies and techniques are currently discussed which could preserve the female fertility status, among which social freezing (cryopreservation of oocytes) for later fertilization is the most realistic one; however, while there is an intensive discussion on the procedure and timing of oocyte cryopreservation, virtually no attention has been paid to the male side and the aging effects on the male germ cells. To evaluate the risk paternal age poses for the integrity of germ cells. For this review a literature search using PubMed, data from the Federal Statistical Office of Germany, the German in vitro fertilization (IVF) register as well as own data were used. Sperm cell integrity is clearly affected by age both at the genetic as well as at the epigenetic levels. The estimated mutation rate for spermatozoa doubles every 16.5 years. Monogenic and multifactorial diseases are strongly associated with paternal age. Men aged >40 years have an increased risk of passing age-related mutations to their children. Cryopreservation of spermatozoa is an option for men who postpone planning a family. Genetic counseling is recommended for couples undertaking social freezing and a male age of >40 years.

  2. Extended UNIQUAC model for thermodynamic modeling of CO2 absorption in aqueous alkanolamine solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faramarzi, Leila; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Thomsen, Kaj

    2009-01-01

    The extended UNIQUAC model [K. Thomsen, R Rasmussen, Chem. Eng. Sci. 54 (1999) 1787-1802] was applied to the thermodynamic representation of carbon dioxide absorption in aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA), methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and varied strength mixtures of the two alkanolamines (MEA-MDEA). F......The extended UNIQUAC model [K. Thomsen, R Rasmussen, Chem. Eng. Sci. 54 (1999) 1787-1802] was applied to the thermodynamic representation of carbon dioxide absorption in aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA), methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and varied strength mixtures of the two alkanolamines (MEA...... alkanolamine systems (MEA-water and MDEA-water). The two just mentioned types of data cover the full concentration range of alkanolamines from extremely dilute to almost pure. The experimental freezing point depression data down to the temperature of -20 degrees C are used. Experimental excess enthalpy (H......-E) data of the binary MEA-water and MDEA-water systems at 25, 40, 65 and 69 degrees C are used as well. In order to enhance the calculation of the infinite dilution activity coefficients of MEA and MDEA, the pure alkanolamines vapor pressure data in a relevant temperature range (up to almost 230 degrees C...

  3. Freezing and thawing of processed meat in an industrial freezing tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    Glaucio Antonio Marini; Eduarda Molardi Bainy; Marcelo Kaminski Lenzi; Marcos Lúcio Corazza

    2014-01-01

    Freezing is a commonly used preservation method in the meat industry. The understanding of the product behavior during the freezing process can assist in a better process management and quality control. This work reports the study of freezing and thawing of three types of processed meat in order to determine process parameters in an industrial forced‑air freezing tunnel at ‑30oC. Chicken sausages (frankfurter type), mortadela (bologna type) and mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM) were st...

  4. Mechanisms of deterioration of nutrients. [of freeze dried foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karel, M.; Flink, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Methods which produce freeze dried foods of improved quality were examined with emphasis on storage stability. Specific topics discussed include: microstructure of freeze dried systems, investigation of structural changes in freeze dried systems, artificial food matrices, osmotic preconcentration to yield improved quality freeze dried fruits, and storage stability of osmotically preconcentrated freeze dried fruits.

  5. A New Mechanism of Canopy Effect in Unsaturated Freezing Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Jidong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Canopy effect refers to the phenomenon where moisture accumulates underneath an impervious cover. Field observation reveals that canopy effect can take place in relatively dry soils where the groundwater table is deep and can lead to full saturation of the soil immediately underneath the impervious cover. On the other hand, numerical analysis based on existing theories of heat and mass transfer in unsaturated soils can only reproduce a minor amount of moisture accumulation due to an impervious cover, particularly when the groundwater table is relatively deep. In attempt to explain the observed canopy effect in field, this paper proposes a new mechanism of moisture accumulation in unsaturated freezing soils: vapour transfer in such a soil is accelerated by the process of vapour-ice desublimation. A new approach for modelling moisture and heat movements is proposed, in which the phase change of evaporation, condensation and de-sublimation of vapor flow are taken into account. The computed results show that the proposed model can indeed reproduce the unusual moisture accumulation observed in relatively dry soils. The results also demonstrate that soil freezing fed by vapour transfer can result in a water content close to full saturation. Since vapour transfer is seldom considered in geotechnical design, the canopy effect deserves more attention during construction and earth works in cold and arid regions.

  6. Method for Determining Vaporization Parameters

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An accurate method of measuring vaporization coefficients will be very useful to each of these disciplines: Cosmochemistry,Evaporative Vapor Deposition, Durability...

  7. Vapor compression distiller and membrane technology for water revitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, A.; Mitani, K.; Ebara, K.; Kurokawa, H.; Sawada, I.; Kashiwagi, H.; Tsuji, T.; Hayashi, S.; Otsubo, K.; Nitta, K.

    1987-01-01

    Water revitalization for a space station can consist of membrane filtration processes and a distillation process. Water recycling equipment using membrane filtration processes was manufactured for ground testing. It was assembled using commercially available components. Two systems for the distillation are studied: one is absorption type thermopervaporation cell and the other is a vapor compression distiller. Absorption type thermopervaporation, able to easily produce condensed water under zero gravity, was investigated experimentally and through simulated calculation. The vapor compression distiller was studied experimentally and it offers significant energy savings for evaporation of water.

  8. Determinação de mercúrio total em amostras de água, sedimento e sólidos em suspensão de corpos aquáticos por espectrofotometria de absorção atômica com gerador de vapor a frio Determination of total mercury in water, sediments and solids in suspension in aquatic systems by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. F. Vieira

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available O emprego de mercúrio metálico nos processos de extração do ouro libera toneladas de mercúrio ao meio ambiente, provocando um aumento considerável nas concentrações presentes. Com a finalidade de prevenir a exposição humana a concentrações excessivas, o que poderá resultar em graves episódios de intoxicação mercurial, bem como avaliar a possibilidade de sedimentos tornarem-se fontes potenciais de contaminação para os seres vivos, é de fundamental importância a monitorização do mercúrio em diversos compartimentos ambientais. Efetuou-se a padronização de uma metodologia analítica para determinação de mercúrio total em amostras de água, sólidos em suspensão e sedimentos de corpos aquáticos para monitorização ambiental do xenobiótico. Posteriormente, foram analisadas amostras oriundas de regiões garimpeiras, com vistas a avaliar o desempenho do método em amostras reais e efetuar levantamento preliminar sobre a contaminação mercurial na área de estudo.The use of metallic mercury in the extraction and concentration of gold causes the discarding of tons of this metal in the environment, leading to a considerable increase in the natural levels of the same and the contamination of the surrounding areas. Thus it is extremely important to monitor the presence of this metal in various sectors of the environment with a view aiming to previnting human exposure to excessive concentrations which can result in serious episodes of mercury poisoning. It is also important to estimate the possibility of river sediments becoming potential sources of contamination of human beings. The determination of total mercury was undertaken by using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. River waters, as well as sediments and suspended solids were used as samples for the standardization of the analytical procedure. Later on, this method was tested on samples originating in gold mining areas for the purpose of assessing its validity.

  9. Applicable technical method for lower temperature freeze ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cryo-fixation and freeze substitution followed by microscopy are commonly used sample preparation methods for visualizing the morphology of intracellular organelles. Freeze substitution is an especially important preparative step because it enables the preservation of intracellular structures in cryo-fixed cells close to the ...

  10. Estimation of the freezing point of concentrated fruit juices for application in freeze concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Auleda Amorós, Josep Maria; Raventós Santamaria, Mercè; Sánchez Machado, José; Hernández Yáñez, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    In freeze concentration operations the fluids remain at temperatures below 0 °C. For a good study of this concentration operation is very important to know the values of freezing point. The aim of this work was to establish a model that predicts the freezing point of fruit juices at various concentrations within the range of interest for freeze concentration (10–40 °Brix). The model proposed relates the freezing point of a juice with the concentrations of main sugars present in the juice: suc...

  11. Monitoring the Freezing Point of Buffalo Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Antonella; Salzano, Caterina; De Felice, Anna; Garofalo, Francesca; Liguori, Salvatore; De Santo, Annunziata; Palermo, Pierpaolo; Guarino, Achille

    2016-04-19

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the basic freezing point of buffalo milk. Bulk milk samples were collected from buffalo and cattle farms in Caserta area from 2008 to 2014. The analysis involved a total of 1886 buffalo milk samples and 1711 bovine milk samples. These were also tested for fat, protein and lactose contents by means of infrared spectrometry. The freezing point was determined by means of a thermistor cryoscope. Data underwent statistical analysis. Our research showed an average freezing point of -0.528°C for buffalo milk and -0.522°C for bovine milk. Given the lack of data on the freezing point of buffalo milk, our study provides the first indication of a basic freezing point of the milk of this species in Italy.

  12. Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA regulates the vapor pressure of gasoline sold at retail stations during the summer ozone season to reduce evaporative emissions from gasoline that contribute to ground-level ozone and diminish the effects of ozone-related health problems.

  13. Absorption of Flue-Gas Components by Ionic Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolding, Helene; Thomassen, Peter Langelund; Mossin, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    for absorption of NOX, CO2 and SO2 are demonstrated and the possible mechanism of absorption described on the molecular level. Special focus regards the interaction of the ILs with water vapor, which is an important feature in envisaged application of flue gas cleaning in power plants, waste incineration plants...

  14. Directed vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, James Frederick

    This dissertation describes the invention, design, construction, experimental evaluation and modeling of a new physical vapor deposition technique (U.S. Patent #5,534,314) for high rate, efficient deposition of refractory elements, alloys, and compounds onto flat or curved surfaces. The new Directed Vapor Deposition (DVD) technique examined in this dissertation was distinct from previous physical vapor deposition techniques because it used low vacuum electron beam (e-beam) evaporation in combination with a carrier gas stream to transport and vapor spray deposit metals, ceramics, and semiconducting materials. Because of the system's unique approach to vapor phase materials processing, detailed analyses of critical concepts (e.g. the e-beam accelerating voltage and power required for evaporation, the vacuum pumping capacity necessary to generate specific gas flow velocities exiting a nozzle) were used to reduce to practice a functioning materials synthesis tool. After construction, the ability to create low contamination films of pure metals, semi-conducting materials, and compounds via this new method was demonstrated, and oxide deposition using an oxygen-doped gas stream in combination with a pure metal evaporant source was shown to be feasible. DVD vapor transport characteristics were experimentally investigated with deposition chamber pressure, carrier gas type, and e-beam power being identified as major processing parameters which affected vapor atom trajectories. The low vacuum carrier gas streams employed in DVD showed a dramatic ability to focus the vapor stream during transport to the substrate and thereby enhance material deposition rates and efficiencies significantly under certain process conditions. Conditions for maximum deposition efficiency onto flat substrates and continuous fibers were experimentally identified by varying chamber pressure, carrier gas velocity (Mach number), and e-beam power. Deposition efficiencies peaked at about 0.5 Torr when

  15. Comparison of three-dimensional printing and vacuum freeze-dried techniques for fabricating composite scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Kai; Li, Ruixin; Jiang, Wenxue; Sun, Yufu; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the performances of different preparation methods of the scaffolds were analyzed for chondrocyte tissue engineering. Silk fibroin/collagen (SF/C) was fabricated using a vacuum freeze-dried technique and by 3D printing. The porosity, water absorption expansion rates, mechanical properties, and pore sizes of the resulting materials were evaluated. The proliferation and metabolism of the cells was detected at different time points using an MTT assay. Cell morphologies and distributions were observed by histological analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The porosity, water absorption expansion rate, and Young’s modulus of the material obtained via 3D printing were significantly higher than those obtained by the freeze-dried method, while the pore size did not differ significantly between the two methods. MTT assay results showed that the metabolism of cells seeded on the 3D printed scaffolds was more viable than the metabolism on the freeze-dried material. H&E staining of the scaffolds revealed that the number of cells in the 3D printed scaffold was higher in comparison to a similar measurement on the freeze-dried material. Consequently, stem cells grew well inside the 3D printed scaffolds, as measured by SEM, while the internal structure of the freeze-dried scaffold was disordered. Compared with the freeze-dried technique, the 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance and was more suitable for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Silk fibroin/collagen was fabricated using 3D printing. • Physical characterization and Cell compatibility were compared. • 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance.

  16. Comparison of three-dimensional printing and vacuum freeze-dried techniques for fabricating composite scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Kai [Tianjin First Center Hospital, No. 24 Fukang Road, Tianjin, TJ 300192 (China); Li, Ruixin [Institute of Medical Equipment, Academy of Military and Medical Sciences, No. 106, Wandong Street, Hedong District, Tianjin 300000 (China); Jiang, Wenxue, E-mail: jiangortholivea@sina.cn [Tianjin First Center Hospital, No. 24 Fukang Road, Tianjin, TJ 300192 (China); Sun, Yufu [Tianjin First Center Hospital, No. 24 Fukang Road, Tianjin, TJ 300192 (China); Li, Hui [Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, No. 154 Anshan Road, Tianjin, TJ 300052 (China)

    2016-09-02

    In this study, the performances of different preparation methods of the scaffolds were analyzed for chondrocyte tissue engineering. Silk fibroin/collagen (SF/C) was fabricated using a vacuum freeze-dried technique and by 3D printing. The porosity, water absorption expansion rates, mechanical properties, and pore sizes of the resulting materials were evaluated. The proliferation and metabolism of the cells was detected at different time points using an MTT assay. Cell morphologies and distributions were observed by histological analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The porosity, water absorption expansion rate, and Young’s modulus of the material obtained via 3D printing were significantly higher than those obtained by the freeze-dried method, while the pore size did not differ significantly between the two methods. MTT assay results showed that the metabolism of cells seeded on the 3D printed scaffolds was more viable than the metabolism on the freeze-dried material. H&E staining of the scaffolds revealed that the number of cells in the 3D printed scaffold was higher in comparison to a similar measurement on the freeze-dried material. Consequently, stem cells grew well inside the 3D printed scaffolds, as measured by SEM, while the internal structure of the freeze-dried scaffold was disordered. Compared with the freeze-dried technique, the 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance and was more suitable for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Silk fibroin/collagen was fabricated using 3D printing. • Physical characterization and Cell compatibility were compared. • 3D printed scaffold exhibited better overall performance.

  17. Protein freeze concentration and micro-segregation analysed in a temperature-controlled freeze container

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Roessl

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To examine effects of varied freezing conditions on the development of spatial heterogeneity in the frozen protein solution, macroscopic freeze concentration and micro-segregation of bovine serum albumin (BSA were investigated in a temperature-controlled 200-ml freeze container. Freezing to −40 °C promoted formation of protein concentration gradients (69–114 μg ml−1 in frozen samples taken from 12 different freezer positions, whereby slow freezing in 4 h or longer facilitated the evolution of strong spatial heterogeneities and caused local concentration increases by 1.15-fold relative to the initial protein concentration (100 μg ml−1. To visualize protein micro-segregation during phase separation, BSA was conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate and confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy was used to localize and size the freeze-concentrated protein regions. Slow freezing resulted in distinctly fewer and larger protein domains in the frozen bulk than fast freezing. Surface stress on the protein during freezing would therefore be minimized at low cooling rates; microscopic freeze concentration would however be highest under these conditions, potentially favoring protein aggregation.

  18. Hot big bang or slow freeze?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterich, C.

    2014-09-01

    We confront the big bang for the beginning of the universe with an equivalent picture of a slow freeze - a very cold and slowly evolving universe. In the freeze picture the masses of elementary particles increase and the gravitational constant decreases with cosmic time, while the Newtonian attraction remains unchanged. The freeze and big bang pictures both describe the same observations or physical reality. We present a simple ;crossover model; without a big bang singularity. In the infinite past space-time is flat. Our model is compatible with present observations, describing the generation of primordial density fluctuations during inflation as well as the present transition to a dark energy-dominated universe.

  19. Rehydration of freeze-dried and convective dried boletus edulis mushrooms: effect on some quality parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, I; Sanjuán, N; Pérez-Munuera, I; Mulet, A

    2008-10-01

    Quality of rehydrated products is a key aspect linked to rehydration conditions. To assess the effect of rehydration temperature on some quality parameters, experiments at 20 and 70 degrees C were performed with convective dried and freeze-dried Boletus edulis mushrooms. Rehydration characteristics (through Peleg's parameter, k(1), and equilibrium moisture, W(e)), texture (Kramer), and microstructure (Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy) were evaluated. Freeze-dried samples absorbed water more quickly and attained higher W(e) values than convective dried ones. Convective dehydrated samples rehydrated at 20 degrees C showed significantly lower textural values (11.9 +/- 3.3 N/g) than those rehydrated at 70 degrees C (15.7 +/- 1.2 N/g). For the freeze-dried Boletus edulis, the textural values also exhibited significant differences, being 8.2 +/- 1.3 and 10.5 +/- 2.3 N/g for 20 and 70 degrees C, respectively. Freeze-dried samples showed a porous structure that allows rehydration to take place mainly at the extracellular level. This explains the fact that, regardless of temperature, freeze-dried mushrooms absorbed water more quickly and reached higher W(e) values than convective dried ones. Whatever the dehydration technique used, rehydration at 70 degrees C produced a structural damage that hindered water absorption; consequently lower W(e) values and higher textural values were attained than when rehydrating at 20 degrees C.

  20. Tailorable Porous Ceramics via Freeze Casting

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Freeze casting of ceramics is a novel technique used to produce porous materials. The process involves solidifying a solvent in a ceramic slurry to produce a frozen...

  1. Freezing and refrigerated storage in fisheries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnston, W. A

    1994-01-01

    ...; the factors affecting cold storage conditions, etc. In addition, the publication describes the methods used to calculate cold storage refrigeration loads as well as the costs of freezing and cold storage...

  2. Global Annual Freezing and Thawing Indices

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The total annual freezing and thawing indices are defined as the cumulative number of degree-days when air temperatures are below and above zero degrees Celsius. The...

  3. Compression-absorption (resorption) refrigerating machinery. Modeling of reactors; Machine frigorifique a compression-absorption (resorption). Modelisation des reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottin, O.; Feidt, M.; Benelmir, R. [LEMTA-UHP Nancy-1, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    1997-12-31

    This paper is a series of transparencies presenting a comparative study of the thermal performances of different types of refrigerating machineries: di-thermal with vapor compression, tri-thermal with moto-compressor, with ejector, with free piston, adsorption-type, resorption-type, absorption-type, compression-absorption-type. A prototype of ammonia-water compression-absorption heat pump is presented and modeled. (J.S.)

  4. Freezing tolerance of conifer seeds and germinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, B J; Guest, H J; Kolotelo, D

    2003-12-01

    Survival after freezing was measured for seeds and germinants of four seedlots each of interior spruce (Picea glauca x engelmannii complex), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) and western red cedar (Thuja plicata Donn ex D. Donn). Effects of eight seed treatments on post-freezing survival of seeds and germinants were tested: dry, imbibed and stratified seed, and seed placed in a growth chamber for 2, 5, 10, 15, 20 or 30 days in a 16-h photoperiod and a 22/17 degrees C thermoperiod. Survival was related to the water content of seeds and germinants, germination rate and seedlot origin. After freezing for 3 h at -196 degrees C, dry seed of most seedlots of interior spruce, Douglas-fir and western red cedar had 84-96% germination, whereas lodgepole pine seedlots had 53-82% germination. Freezing tolerance declined significantly after imbibition in lodgepole pine, Douglas-fir and interior spruce seed (western red cedar was not tested), and mean LT50 of imbibed seed of these species was -30, -24.5 and -20 degrees C, respectively. Freezing tolerance continued to decline to a minimum LT50 of -4 to -7 degrees C after 10 days in a growth chamber for interior spruce, Douglas-fir and lodgepole pine, or after 15 days for western red cedar. Minimum freezing tolerance was reached at the stage of rapid hypocotyl elongation. In all species, a slight increase in freezing tolerance of germinants was observed once cotyledons emerged from the seed coat. The decrease in freezing tolerance during the transition from dry to germinating seed correlated with increases in seed water content. Changes in freezing tolerance between 10 and 30 days in the growth chamber were not correlated with seedling water content. Within a species, seedlots differed significantly in freezing tolerance after 2 or 5 days in the growth chamber. Because all seedlots of interior spruce and lodgepole pine germinated quickly, there was no correlation

  5. Influence of Freezing and Storage Procedure on Human Urine Samples in NMR-Based Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Luy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available It is consensus in the metabolomics community that standardized protocols should be followed for sample handling, storage and analysis, as it is of utmost importance to maintain constant measurement conditions to identify subtle biological differences. The aim of this work, therefore, was to systematically investigate the influence of freezing procedures and storage temperatures and their effect on NMR spectra as a potentially disturbing aspect for NMR-based metabolomics studies. Urine samples were collected from two healthy volunteers, centrifuged and divided into aliquots. Urine aliquots were frozen either at −20 °C, on dry ice, at −80 °C or in liquid nitrogen and then stored at −20 °C, −80 °C or in liquid nitrogen vapor phase for 1–5 weeks before NMR analysis. Results show spectral changes depending on the freezing procedure, with samples frozen on dry ice showing the largest deviations. The effect was found to be based on pH differences, which were caused by variations in CO2 concentrations introduced by the freezing procedure. Thus, we recommend that urine samples should be frozen at −20 °C and transferred to lower storage temperatures within one week and that freezing procedures should be part of the publication protocol.

  6. Monitoring the Freezing Point of Buffalo Milk

    OpenAIRE

    Pesce, Antonella; Salzano, Caterina; De Felice, Anna; Garofalo, Francesca; Liguori, Salvatore; De Santo, Annunziata; Palermo, Pierpaolo; Guarino, Achille

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the basic freezing point of buffalo milk. Bulk milk samples were collected from buffalo and cattle farms in Caserta area from 2008 to 2014. The analysis involved a total of 1886 buffalo milk samples and 1711 bovine milk samples. These were also tested for fat, protein and lactose contents by means of infrared spectrometry. The freezing point was determined by means of a thermistor cryoscope. Data underwent statistical analysis. Our research showed an aver...

  7. Vapor-Phase Infrared Absorptivity Coefficient of Cyclohexyl Isothiocyanate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Samuels, Alan C; Miles, Jr., Ronald W; Williams, Barry R; Hulet, Melissa S

    2008-01-01

    ...)) at a spectral resolution of 0.125 cm(-1). The chemical used in the feedstock was subjected to a rigorous analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and Karl-Fischer titration to verify its purity...

  8. Bulk water freezing dynamics on superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, S.; Carpenter, J.; Nallapaneni, M.; Chen, J. Y.; Miljkovic, N.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we elucidate the mechanisms governing the heat-transfer mediated, non-thermodynamic limited, freezing delay on non-wetting surfaces for a variety of characteristic length scales, Lc (volume/surface area, 3 mm commercial superhydrophobic spray coatings, showing a monotonic increase in freezing time with coating thickness. The added thermal resistance of thicker coatings was much larger than that of the nanoscale superhydrophobic features, which reduced the droplet heat transfer and increased the total freezing time. Transient finite element method heat transfer simulations of the water slab freezing process were performed to calculate the overall heat transfer coefficient at the substrate-water/ice interface during freezing, and shown to be in the range of 1-2.5 kW/m2K for these experiments. The results shown here suggest that in order to exploit the heat-transfer mediated freezing delay, thicker superhydrophobic coatings must be deposited on the surface, where the coating resistance is comparable to the bulk water/ice conduction resistance.

  9. Formation of stable submicron peptide or protein particles by thin film freezing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Keith P.; Engstrom, Joshua; Williams, III, Robert O.

    2017-04-18

    The present invention includes compositions and methods for preparing micron-sized or submicron-sized particles by dissolving a water soluble effective ingredient in one or more solvents; spraying or dripping droplets solvent such that the effective ingredient is exposed to a vapor-liquid interface of less than 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 200, 400 or 500 cm.sup.-1 area/volume to, e.g., increase protein stability; and contacting the droplet with a freezing surface that has a temperature differential of at least 30.degree. C. between the droplet and the surface, wherein the surface freezes the droplet into a thin film with a thickness of less than 500 micrometers and a surface area to volume between 25 to 500 cm.sup.-1.

  10. Effects of freezing on soil temperature, freezing front propagation and moisture redistribution in peat: laboratory investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Nagare

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available There are not many studies that report water movement in freezing peat. Soil column studies under controlled laboratory settings can help isolate and understand the effects of different factors controlling freezing of the active layer in organic covered permafrost terrain. In this study, four peat Mesocosms were subjected to temperature gradients by bringing the Mesocosm tops in contact with sub-zero air temperature while maintaining a continuously frozen layer at the bottom (proxy permafrost. Soil water movement towards the freezing front (from warmer to colder regions was inferred from soil freezing curves, liquid water content time series and from the total water content of frozen core samples collected at the end of freezing cycle. A substantial amount of water, enough to raise the upper surface of frozen saturated soil within 15 cm of the soil surface at the end of freezing period appeared to have moved upwards during freezing. Diffusion under moisture gradients and effects of temperature on soil matric potential, at least in the initial period, appear to drive such movement as seen from analysis of freezing curves. Freezing front (separation front between soil zones containing and free of ice propagation is controlled by latent heat for a long time during freezing. A simple conceptual model describing freezing of an organic active layer initially resembling a variable moisture landscape is proposed based upon the results of this study. The results of this study will help in understanding, and ultimately forecasting, the hydrologic response of wetland-dominated terrain underlain by discontinuous permafrost.

  11. Evaluation of mercury vapor in dental offices in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasani Tabatabaei M.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Dental Amalgam is a common restorative material for posterior teeth. Because of Hg content in the composition of amalgam, during the handling of material, mercury may release as vapor in the environment. Excess amount of mercury vapor can cause serious health problems in dental personnel. The aim of this investigation was to determine mercury vapor concentration in working environment of dentists in Tehran. Materials and Methods: 211 dental clinics were participated in this cross-sectional study. The clinics were randomly selected from different regions of Tehran (north, center, south, east and west. The dentists were asked to complete a questionnaire including items on demographic characteristics such as age, sex and work history, method of handling of amalgam, environmental characteristics and general health conditions. Environmental measurements of mercury vapor in dentists’ offices were done by mercury absorption tubes (Hydrar and personal pumps (SKC, 222-3, England as suggested in NIOSH method. Analysis of air samples was done by atomic absorption spectrophotometery (cold vapor. The data were analyzed by non-parametric tests (Kruskall Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Kendall.P<0.05 as the level of significance. Results: The mean mercury vapor concentration in dentists’ offices was 8.39(±9.68 µg/m³.There was no significant relationship between the urine mercury of dentists (3.107±3.95 and the air Hg vapor concentration of their offices. Using precapsulated amalgam showed significantly less Hg vapor than bulk amalgam (P=0.034. Also the surface area of working room and air Hg vapor (P=0.009 had a significant relationship (P=0.009 r=0.81. There was not any significant correlation between mercury vapor and other factors such as working hours per day and working days per week, squeezing of triturated amalgam or not, storage medium of set amalgam (water or fixer solution, mercury storage method and type of ventilation

  12. Freezing the Master Production Schedule Under Rolling Planning Horizons

    OpenAIRE

    V. Sridharan; William L. Berry; V. Udayabhanu

    1987-01-01

    The stability of the Master Production Schedule (MPS) is a critical issue in managing production operations with a Material Requirements Planning System. One method of achieving stability is to freeze some portion or all of the MPS. While freezing the MPS can limit the number of schedule changes, it can also produce an increase in production and inventory costs. This paper examines three decision variables in freezing the MPS: the freezing method, the freeze interval length, and the planning ...

  13. Spray Irrigation Effects on Surface-Layer Stability in an Experimental Citrus Orchard during Winter Freezes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Harry J.; Smith, Eric A.; Martsolf, J. David

    1997-02-01

    Observations taken by two surface radiation and energy budget stations deployed in the University of Florida/Institute for Food and Agricultural Service experimental citrus orchard in Gainesville, Florida, have been analyzed to identify the effects of sprayer irrigation on thermal stability and circulation processes within the orchard during three 1992 winter freeze episodes. Lapse rates of temperature observed from a micrometeorological tower near the center of the orchard were also recorded during periods of irrigation for incorporation into the analysis. Comparisons of the near-surface temperature lapse rates observed with the two energy budget stations show consistency between the two sites and with the tower-based lapse rates taken over a vertical layer from 1.5 to 15 m above ground level. A theoretical framework was developed that demonstrates that turbulent-scale processes originating within the canopy, driven by latent heat release associated with condensation and freezing processes from water vapor and liquid water released from sprayer nozzles, can destabilize lapse rates and promote warm air mixing above the orchard canopy. The orchard data were then analyzed in the context of the theory for evidence of local overturning and displacement of surface-layer air, with warmer air from aloft driven by locally buoyant plumes generated by water vapor injected into the orchard during the irrigation periods. It was found that surface-layer lapse rates were lower during irrigation periods than under similar conditions when irrigation was not occurring, indicating a greater degree of vertical mixing of surface-layer air with air from above treetops, as a result of local convective overturning induced by the condensation heating of water vapor released at the nozzles of the sprinklers. This provides an additional explanation to the well-accepted heat of fusion release effect, of how undertree irrigation of a citrus orchard during a freeze period helps protect crops

  14. Enthalpy of Vaporization and Vapor Pressures: An Inexpensive Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battino, Rubin; Dolson, David A.; Hall, Michael A.; Letcher, Trevor M.

    2007-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive method to determine the enthalpy of vaporization of liquids by measuring vapor pressure as a function of temperature is described. The vapor pressures measured with the stopcock cell were higher than the literature values and those measured with the sidearm rubber septum cell were both higher and lower than literature…

  15. Vaporization of irradiated droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, R.L.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Zardecki, A.

    1986-01-01

    The vaporization of a spherically symmetric liquid droplet subject to a high-intensity laser flux is investigated on the basis of a hydrodynamic description of the system composed of the vapor and ambient gas. In the limit of the convective vaporization, the boundary conditions at the fluid--gas interface are formulated by using the notion of a Knudsen layer in which translational equilibrium is established. This leads to approximate jump conditions at the interface. For homogeneous energy deposition, the hydrodynamic equations are solved numerically with the aid of the CON1D computer code (''CON1D: A computer program for calculating spherically symmetric droplet combustion,'' Los Alamos National Laboratory Report No. LA-10269-MS, December, 1984), based on the implict continuous--fluid Eulerian (ICE) [J. Comput. Phys. 8, 197 (1971)] and arbitrary Lagrangian--Eulerian (ALE) [J. Comput. Phys. 14, 1227 (1974)] numerical mehtods. The solutions exhibit the existence of two shock waves propagating in opposite directions with respect to the contact discontinuity surface that separates the ambient gas and vapor

  16. Vapor liquid fraction determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This invention describes a method of measuring liquid and vapor fractions in a non-homogeneous fluid flowing through an elongate conduit, such as may be required with boiling water, non-boiling turbulent flows, fluidized bed experiments, water-gas mixing analysis, and nuclear plant cooling. (UK)

  17. Heat of vaporization spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, D. Jr.

    1979-03-01

    Multilayer desorption measurements of various substances adsorbed on a stainless-steel substrate are found to exhibit desorption profiles consistent with a zeroth-order desorption model. The singleness of the desorption transients together with their narrow peak widths makes the technique ideally suited for a heat of vaporization spectrometer for either substance analysis or identification.

  18. Heat of vaporization spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, D. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Multilayer desorption measurements of various substances adsorbed on a stainless steel substrate are found to exhibit desorption profiles consistent with a zeroth order desorption model. The singleness of the desorption transients together with their narrow peak widths makes the technique ideally suited for a heat of vaporization spectrometer for either substance analysis or identification.

  19. Meat protein fractions enhance nonheme iron absorption in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurrell, Richard F; Reddy, Manju B; Juillerat, Marcel; Cook, James D

    2006-11-01

    The nature of the enhancing effect of muscle tissue on nonheme iron absorption in humans is unclear but thought to be related to muscle proteins. We conducted radioiron absorption studies to compare iron absorption from proteins isolated from beef and chicken muscle with that from freeze-dried beef and chicken muscle and from egg albumin. All meals contained an equivalent amount of protein as part of a semisynthetic liquid formula. Freeze-dried beef and chicken muscle increased iron absorption 180% (P egg albumin. When added to the meal at an equivalent protein level (15 g), the isolated beef protein and the isolated heme-free beef protein with 94 and 98% protein content, respectively, increased iron absorption to the same extent as the native beef muscle. Similarly, when added to the meal at an equivalent protein level (30 g), isolated chicken muscle protein (94% protein) increased iron absorption similarly to native chicken muscle. Iron absorption from the meal containing the isolated heme-free chicken protein, however, was 120% (P extraction and separation procedures. Our results support the hypothesis that the enhancing effect of muscle tissue on iron absorption is mainly protein related but indicate that other factors may also play a role.

  20. Freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are of great importance for the food and biotechnology industry. They are widely used as starters for manufacturing food (e.g., yogurt, cheese, fermented meats, and vegetables) and probiotic products, as well as for green chemistry applications. Freeze-drying or lyophilization is a convenient method for preservation of bacteria. By reducing water activity to values below 0.2, it allows long-term storage and low-cost distribution at suprazero temperatures, while minimizing losses in viability and functionality. Stabilization of bacteria via freeze-drying starts with the addition of a protectant solution to the bacterial suspension. Freeze-drying includes three steps, namely, (1) freezing of the concentrated and protected cell suspension, (2) primary drying to remove ice by sublimation, and (3) secondary drying to remove unfrozen water by desorption. In this chapter we describe a method for freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria at a pilot scale, thus allowing control of the process parameters for maximal survival and functionality recovery.

  1. SENSITIVE TO FREEZING2 Aides in Resilience to Salt and Drought in Freezing-Sensitive Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Hersh, Hope Lynn; Benning, Christoph

    2016-11-01

    SENSITIVE TO FREEZING2 (SFR2) is crucial for protecting chloroplast membranes following freezing in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). It has been shown that SFR2 homologs are present in all land plants, including freezing-sensitive species, raising the question of SFR2 function beyond freezing tolerance. Similar to freezing, salt and drought can cause dehydration. Thus, it is hypothesized that in freezing-sensitive plants SFR2 may play roles in their resilience to salt or drought. To test this hypothesis, SlSFR2 RNAi lines were generated in the cold/freezing-sensitive species tomato (Solanum lycopersicum [M82 cv]). Hypersensitivity to salt and drought of SlSFR2-RNAi lines was observed. Higher tolerance of wild-type tomatoes was correlated with the production of trigalactosyldiacylglycerol, a product of SFR2 activity. Tomato SFR2 in vitro activity is Mg 2+ -dependent and its optimal pH is 7.5, similar to that of Arabidopsis SFR2, but the specific activity of tomato SFR2 in vitro is almost double that of Arabidopsis SFR2. When salt and drought stress were applied to Arabidopsis, no conditions could be identified at which SFR2 was induced prior to irreversibly impacting plant growth, suggesting that SFR2 protects Arabidopsis primarily against freezing. Discovery of tomato SFR2 function in drought and salt resilience provides further insights into general membrane lipid remodeling-based stress tolerance mechanisms and together with protection against freezing in freezing-resistant plants such as Arabidopsis, it adds lipid remodeling as a possible target for the engineering of abiotic stress-resilient crops. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Absorption and Scattering by Molecules and Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoble, Jacqueline; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Herman, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    The Earth's atmosphere absorbs, scatters, and emits electromagnetic radiation. Although air molecules are the primary actors in these processes, aerosol particles are also present ubiquitously and modify the radiation field. In fact, this modification constitutes the very physical basis of aerosol remote sensing. Whenever clouds are present, they have a much larger influence on radiation which largely overshadows the aerosol impact. Therefore, in aerosol remote sensing, one often has to limit observations to cloudless conditions and screen cloudy pixels. In the solar part of the spectrum, molecular absorption is mostly limited to ultraviolet (UV; ozone) and near-infrared (near-IR; carbon dioxide, water vapor) wavelengths and is characterized by strong and narrow oxygen bands. A brief description of atmospheric molecular absorption is presented in Section 2.2. Shortwave aerosol remote sensing is usually performed outside the absorption bands, but some instruments also have channels capturing absorption bands with the objective of quantifying gaseous components.

  3. Effects of Chamber Pressure and Partial Pressure of Water Vapor on Secondary Drying in Lyophilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searles, James A; Aravapalli, Sridhar; Hodge, Cody

    2017-10-01

    Secondary drying is the final step of lyophilization before stoppering, during which water is desorbed from the product to yield the final moisture content. We studied how chamber pressure and partial pressure of water vapor during this step affected the time course of water content of aqueous solutions of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in glass vials. The total chamber pressure had no effect when the partial pressure of water vapor was very low. However, when the vapor phase contained a substantial fraction of water vapor, the PVP moisture content was much higher. We carried out dynamic vapor sorption experiments (DVS) to demonstrate that the higher PVP moisture content was a straightforward result of the higher water vapor content in the lyophilizer. The results highlight that the partial pressure of water vapor is extremely important during secondary drying in lyophilization, and that lower chamber pressure set points for secondary drying may sometimes be justified as a strategy for ensuring low partial pressure of water vapor, especially for lyophilizers that do not inject dry gas to control pressure. These findings have direct application for process transfers/scale ups from freeze-dryers that do not inject dry gas for pressure control to those that do, and vice versa.

  4. The immersion freezing behavior of ash particles from wood and brown coal burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Grawe

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It is generally known that ash particles from coal combustion can trigger ice nucleation when they interact with water vapor and/or supercooled droplets. However, data on the ice nucleation of ash particles from different sources, including both anthropogenic and natural combustion processes, are still scarce. As fossil energy sources still fuel the largest proportion of electric power production worldwide, and biomass burning contributes significantly to the global aerosol loading, further data are needed to better assess the ice nucleating efficiency of ash particles. In the framework of this study, we found that ash particles from brown coal (i.e., lignite burning are up to 2 orders of magnitude more ice active in the immersion mode below −32 °C than those from wood burning. Fly ash from a coal-fired power plant was shown to be the most efficient at nucleating ice. Furthermore, the influence of various particle generation methods on the freezing behavior was studied. For instance, particles were generated either by dispersion of dry sample material, or by atomization of ash–water suspensions, and then led into the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS where the immersion freezing behavior was examined. Whereas the immersion freezing behavior of ashes from wood burning was not affected by the particle generation method, it depended on the type of particle generation for ash from brown coal. It was also found that the common practice of treating prepared suspensions in an ultrasonic bath to avoid aggregation of particles led to an enhanced ice nucleation activity. The findings of this study suggest (a that ash from brown coal burning may influence immersion freezing in clouds close to the source and (b that the freezing behavior of ash particles may be altered by a change in sample preparation and/or particle generation.

  5. The Potential of Water Vapor & Precipitation Estimation with a Differential-frequency Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, Robert; Liao, Liang; Tian, Lin

    2006-01-01

    In the presence of rain, the radar return powers from a three-frequency radar, with center frequency at 22.235 GHz and upper and lower frequencies chosen with equal water vapor absorption coefficients, can be used to estimate water vapor density and parameters of the precipitation. A linear combination of differential measurements between the center and lower frequencies on one hand and the upper and lower frequencies on the other provide an estimate of differential water vapor absorption. Conversely, the difference in radar reflectivity factors (in dB) between the upper and lower frequencies is independent of water vapor absorption and can be used to estimate the median mass diameter of the hydrometeors. For a down-looking radar, path-integrated estimates of water vapor absorption may be possible under rain-free as well as raining conditions by using the surface returns at the three frequencies. Cross-talk or interference between the precipitation and water vapor estimates depends on the frequency separation of the channels as well as on the phase state and the median mass diameter of the hydrometeors. Simulations of the retrieval of water vapor absorption show that the largest source of variability arises from the variance in the measured radar return powers while the largest biases occur in the mixed-phase region. Use of high pulse repetition frequencies and signal whitening methods may be needed to obtain the large number of independent samples required. Measurements over a fractional bandwidth, defined as the ratio of the difference between the upper and lower frequencies to the center frequency, up to about 0.2 should be passible in a differential frequency mode, where a single transceiver and antenna are used. Difficulties in frequency allocation may require alternative choices of frequency where the water vapor absorptions at the low and high frequencies are unequal. We consider the degradation in the retrieval accuracy when the frequencies are not optimum.

  6. Monitoring of MOCVD reactants by UV absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baucom, K.C.; Killeen, K.P.; Moffat, H.K.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper, we describe how UV absorption measurements can be used to measure the flow rates of metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactants. This method utilizes the calculation of UV extinction coefficients by measuring the total pressure and absorbance in the neat reactant system. The development of this quantitative reactant flow rate monitor allows for the direct measurement of the efficiency of a reactant bubbler. We demonstrate bubbler efficiency results for TMGa, and then explain some discrepancies found in the TMAl system due to the monomer to dimer equilibrium. Also, the UV absorption spectra of metal organic and hydride MOCVD reactants over the wavelength range 185 to 400 nm are reported.

  7. Combined infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy matrix-isolated carbon vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Joe; Huffman, Donald R.

    1990-01-01

    Infrared and UV-visible absorption spectra have been measured on the same sample of matrix-isolated carbon vapor in order to establish correlations between absorption intensities of vibrational and electronic transitions as a function of sample annealing. A high degree of correlation has been found between the IR feature at 1998/cm recently assigned to C8 and a UV absorption feature at about 3100 A. Thus, for the first time, direct evidence is given for the assignment of one of the unknown UV-visible features of the long-studied matrix-isolated carbon vapor spectrum.

  8. Heat transfer coefficient of cryotop during freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W J; Zhou, X L; Wang, H S; Liu, B L; Dai, J J

    2013-01-01

    Cryotop is an efficient vitrification method for cryopreservation of oocytes. It has been widely used owing to its simple operation and high freezing rate. Recently, the heat transfer performance of cryotop was studied by numerical simulation in several studies. However, the range of heat transfer coefficient in the simulation is uncertain. In this study, the heat transfer coefficient for cryotop during freezing process was analyzed. The cooling rates of 40 percent ethylene glycol (EG) droplet in cryotop during freezing were measured by ultra-fast measurement system and calculated by numerical simulation at different value of heat transfer coefficient. Compared with the results obtained by two methods, the range of the heat transfer coefficient necessary for the numerical simulation of cryotop was determined, which is between 9000 W/(m(2)·K) and 10000 W/(m (2)·K).

  9. Hot big bang or slow freeze?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetterich, C.

    2014-01-01

    We confront the big bang for the beginning of the universe with an equivalent picture of a slow freeze — a very cold and slowly evolving universe. In the freeze picture the masses of elementary particles increase and the gravitational constant decreases with cosmic time, while the Newtonian attraction remains unchanged. The freeze and big bang pictures both describe the same observations or physical reality. We present a simple “crossover model” without a big bang singularity. In the infinite past space–time is flat. Our model is compatible with present observations, describing the generation of primordial density fluctuations during inflation as well as the present transition to a dark energy-dominated universe

  10. Hot big bang or slow freeze?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetterich, C.

    2014-09-07

    We confront the big bang for the beginning of the universe with an equivalent picture of a slow freeze — a very cold and slowly evolving universe. In the freeze picture the masses of elementary particles increase and the gravitational constant decreases with cosmic time, while the Newtonian attraction remains unchanged. The freeze and big bang pictures both describe the same observations or physical reality. We present a simple “crossover model” without a big bang singularity. In the infinite past space–time is flat. Our model is compatible with present observations, describing the generation of primordial density fluctuations during inflation as well as the present transition to a dark energy-dominated universe.

  11. Hot big bang or slow freeze?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wetterich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We confront the big bang for the beginning of the universe with an equivalent picture of a slow freeze — a very cold and slowly evolving universe. In the freeze picture the masses of elementary particles increase and the gravitational constant decreases with cosmic time, while the Newtonian attraction remains unchanged. The freeze and big bang pictures both describe the same observations or physical reality. We present a simple “crossover model” without a big bang singularity. In the infinite past space–time is flat. Our model is compatible with present observations, describing the generation of primordial density fluctuations during inflation as well as the present transition to a dark energy-dominated universe.

  12. Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Shripad; Plawsky, Joel; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Zheng, Ling; Wang, Ying-Xi

    2002-11-01

    Microgravity experiments on the Constrained Vapor Bubble Heat Exchanger, CVB, are being developed for the International Space Station. In particular, we present results of a precursory experimental and theoretical study of the vertical Constrained Vapor Bubble in the Earth's environment. A novel non-isothermal experimental setup was designed and built to study the transport processes in an ethanol/quartz vertical CVB system. Temperature profiles were measured using an in situ PC (personal computer)-based LabView data acquisition system via thermocouples. Film thickness profiles were measured using interferometry. A theoretical model was developed to predict the curvature profile of the stable film in the evaporator. The concept of the total amount of evaporation, which can be obtained directly by integrating the experimental temperature profile, was introduced. Experimentally measured curvature profiles are in good agreement with modeling results. For microgravity conditions, an analytical expression, which reveals an inherent relation between temperature and curvature profiles, was derived.

  13. Stratified vapor generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathan, Desikan [Lakewood, CO; Hassani, Vahab [Golden, CO

    2008-05-20

    A stratified vapor generator (110) comprises a first heating section (H.sub.1) and a second heating section (H.sub.2). The first and second heating sections (H.sub.1, H.sub.2) are arranged so that the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2) is operatively associated with the outlet of the first heating section (H.sub.1). A moisture separator (126) having a vapor outlet (164) and a liquid outlet (144) is operatively associated with the outlet (124) of the second heating section (H.sub.2). A cooling section (C.sub.1) is operatively associated with the liquid outlet (144) of the moisture separator (126) and includes an outlet that is operatively associated with the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2).

  14. The vapor pressures of explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Hotchkiss, Peter

    2013-01-05

    The vapor pressures of many explosive compounds are extremely low and thus determining accurate values proves difficult. Many researchers, using a variety of methods, have measured and reported the vapor pressures of explosives compounds at single temperatures, or as a function of temperature using vapor pressure equations. There are large variations in reported vapor pressures for many of these compounds, and some errors exist within individual papers. This article provides a review of explosive vapor pressures and describes the methods used to determine them. We have compiled primary vapor pressure relationships traceable to the original citations and include the temperature ranges for which they have been determined. Corrected values are reported as needed and described in the text. In addition, after critically examining the available data, we calculate and tabulate vapor pressures at 25 °C.

  15. Freezing of water droplets colliding with kaolinite particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Erik Anders; Delval, Christophe Eric Ludovic; Freiherr von Und zu Hessberg, P J H

    2009-01-01

    Contact freezing of single supercooled water droplets colliding with kaolinite dust particles has been investigated. The experiments were performed with droplets levitated in an electrodynamic balance at temperatures from 240 to 268 K. Under dry conditions freezing 5 was observed to occur below 249...... K, while a freezing threshold of 267 K was observed at high relative humidity. The effect of relative humidity is attributed to an influence on the contact freezing process for the kaolinite-water droplet system, and it is not related to the lifetime of the droplets in the electrodynamic balance...... studies to describe freezing rates are appropriate for kaolinite aerosol particles. Mechanisms for contact freezing are briefly discussed....

  16. Cryoprotectant Production in Freeze-Tolerant Wood Frogs Is Augmented by Multiple Freeze-Thaw Cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Don J; Barnes, Brian M

    2016-01-01

    Ice nucleation across the skin of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) rapidly induces endogenous production of glucose, a cryoprotectant necessary for freeze tolerance. In laboratory studies of freeze tolerance, wood frogs are cooled slowly, often at -0.05°C h(-1), to facilitate high cryoprotectant production and survival. Under natural conditions in Alaska, however, wood frogs accumulate maximal tissue glucose concentrations while cooling at much faster rates, -0.35° to -1.6°C h(-1), and in addition undergo multiple successive freeze-thaw cycles before remaining frozen for the winter. We examined whether simulating these ecologically relevant cooling rates and repeated freeze-thaw events in captive wood frogs results in the high glucose concentrations found in naturally frozen wood frogs. We found that over successive freezing and thawing events, glucose concentrations increased stepwise in all measured tissues. Short thawing periods did not result in a statistically significant decline of glucose concentrations. Wood frogs that experienced three freeze-thaw events had fresh weight glucose concentrations that approached values found in tissues of wood frogs frozen in natural conditions. Laboratory wood frogs survive frozen for 2 mo, while wood frogs frozen under natural conditions survive frozen for up to 7 mo at temperatures below -18°C. We hypothesize that repeated freeze-thaw cycles with rapid cooling and warming rates allow for greater survival in Alaskan wood frogs through enhanced cryoprotectant production.

  17. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  18. Vacuum outgassing from diffuse-absorptive baffle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egert, C.M.; Basford, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of outgassing for Martin black and a variety of metallic, diffuse absorptive baffle materials under development for stray light management are reported in this paper. Outgassing measurements were made during pumpdown from atmosphere at room temperature. Mass scans indicate water was the major outgassing species for all materials tested. Calibrated measurements of water vapor outgassing as a function of time were also made for each baffle material. Most baffle materials exhibited total water vapor outgassed during pumpdown of between 1 x 10 -5 and 4 x 10 -5 moles/cm 2 . Plasma sprayed beryllium, currently under development exhibited approximately an order of magnitude lower total water vapor outgassed during pumpdown

  19. Enhanced solar energy absorption by internally-mixed black carbon in snow grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Flanner

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Here we explore light absorption by snowpack containing black carbon (BC particles residing within ice grains. Basic considerations of particle volumes and BC/snow mass concentrations show that there are generally 0.05–109 BC particles for each ice grain. This suggests that internal BC is likely distributed as multiple inclusions within ice grains, and thus the dynamic effective medium approximation (DEMA (Chýlek and Srivastava, 1983 is a more appropriate optical representation for BC/ice composites than coated-sphere or standard mixing approximations. DEMA calculations show that the 460 nm absorption cross-section of BC/ice composites, normalized to the mass of BC, is typically enhanced by factors of 1.8–2.1 relative to interstitial BC. BC effective radius is the dominant cause of variation in this enhancement, compared with ice grain size and BC volume fraction. We apply two atmospheric aerosol models that simulate interstitial and within-hydrometeor BC lifecycles. Although only ~2% of the atmospheric BC burden is cloud-borne, 71–83% of the BC deposited to global snow and sea-ice surfaces occurs within hydrometeors. Key processes responsible for within-snow BC deposition are development of hydrophilic coatings on BC, activation of liquid droplets, and subsequent snow formation through riming or ice nucleation by other species and aggregation/accretion of ice particles. Applying deposition fields from these aerosol models in offline snow and sea-ice simulations, we calculate that 32–73% of BC in global surface snow resides within ice grains. This fraction is smaller than the within-hydrometeor deposition fraction because meltwater flux preferentially removes internal BC, while sublimation and freezing within snowpack expose internal BC. Incorporating the DEMA into a global climate model, we simulate increases in BC/snow radiative forcing of 43–86%, relative to scenarios that apply external optical properties to all BC. We

  20. Enhanced Solar Energy Absorption by Internally-mixed Black Carbon in Snow Grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanner, M. G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhou, Cheng; Penner, Joyce E.; Jiao, C.

    2012-05-30

    Here we explore light absorption by snowpack containing black carbon (BC) particles residing within ice grains. Basic considerations of particle volumes and BC/snow mass concentrations show that there are generally 0:05-109 BC particles for each ice grain. This suggests that internal BC is likely distributed as multiple inclusions within ice grains, and thus the dynamic effective medium approximation (DEMA) (Chylek and Srivastava, 1983) is a more appropriate optical representation for BC/ice composites than coated-sphere or standard mixing approximations. DEMA calculations show that the 460 nm absorption cross-section of BC/ice composites, normalized to the mass of BC, is typically enhanced by factors of 1.8-2.1 relative to interstitial BC. BC effective radius is the dominant cause of variation in this enhancement, compared with ice grain size and BC volume fraction. We apply two atmospheric aerosol models that simulate interstitial and within-hydrometeor BC lifecycles. Although only {approx}2% of the atmospheric BC burden is cloud-borne, 71-83% of the BC deposited to global snow and sea-ice surfaces occurs within hydrometeors. Key processes responsible for within-snow BC deposition are development of hydrophilic coatings on BC, activation of liquid droplets, and subsequent snow formation through riming or ice nucleation by other species and aggregation/accretion of ice particles. Applying deposition fields from these aerosol models in offline snow and sea-ice simulations, we calculate that 32-73% of BC in global surface snow resides within ice grains. This fraction is smaller than the within-hydrometeor deposition fraction because meltwater flux preferentially removes internal BC, while sublimation and freezing within snowpack expose internal BC. Incorporating the DEMA into a global climate model, we simulate increases in BC/snow radiative forcing of 43-86%, relative to scenarios that apply external optical properties to all BC. We show that snow metamorphism

  1. Rheological behaviour, freezing curve, and density of coffee solutions at temperatures close to freezing

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Yáñez, Eduard; Moreno, Fabian Leonardo; Raventós Santamaria, Mercè; Santamaría, N.; Acosta, J.; Pirachican, Oscar; Torres, L.; Ruiz Pardo, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of coffee solutions were determined for temperatures close to the freezing point. Rheological behaviour, freezing curve, density, and their relationship between coffee mass fraction and Brix degrees were determined for coffee mass fractions between 5 and 50% (wet basis) in the -6 to 20 degrees C temperature interval. Values of viscosity varied from 1.99 to 1037 mPa center dot s and values of density from 1000 to 1236 kg center dot m(-3). The freezing curve was generate...

  2. Continuous Water Vapor Mass Flux and Temperature Measurements in a Model Scramjet Combustor Using a Diode Laser Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Upschulte, B. L; Miller, M. F; Allen, M. G; Jackson, K; Gruber, M; Mathur, T

    1998-01-01

    A sensor for simultaneous measurements of water vapor density, temperature and velocity has been developed based on absorption techniques using room temperature diode lasers (InGaAsP) operating at 1.31 micrometers...

  3. Compact Integrated DBR Laser Source for Absorption Lidar Instruments, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to demonstrate a compact integrated laser module that addresses the requirements of the laser source in a water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL)...

  4. Device and method for determining freezing points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiprakasam, Balakrishnan (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A freezing point method and device (10) are disclosed. The method and device pertain to an inflection point technique for determining the freezing points of mixtures. In both the method and device (10), the mixture is cooled to a point below its anticipated freezing point and then warmed at a substantially linear rate. During the warming process, the rate of increase of temperature of the mixture is monitored by, for example, thermocouple (28) with the thermocouple output signal being amplified and differentiated by a differentiator (42). The rate of increase of temperature data are analyzed and a peak rate of increase of temperature is identified. In the preferred device (10) a computer (22) is utilized to analyze the rate of increase of temperature data following the warming process. Once the maximum rate of increase of temperature is identified, the corresponding temperature of the mixture is located and earmarked as being substantially equal to the freezing point of the mixture. In a preferred device (10), the computer (22), in addition to collecting the temperature and rate of change of temperature data, controls a programmable power supply (14) to provide a predetermined amount of cooling and warming current to thermoelectric modules (56).

  5. Liquid carbon: structure near the freezing line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghiringhelli, L.M.; Los, J.H.; Meijer, E.J.; Fasolino, A.; Frenkel, D.

    2005-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the structure of liquid carbon near the freezing line. The results are obtained by molecular simulation using a recently developed state-of-the-art bond order potential. We find that along the melting line the liquid is predominantly threefold coordinated up to

  6. Unitarity Constraints on Asymmetric Freeze-In

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, Anson; /SLAC

    2011-08-15

    This paper considers unitarity and CPT constraints on asymmetric freeze-in, the use of freeze-in to store baryon number in a dark sector. In this scenario, Sakharov's out of equilibrium condition is satisfied by placing the visible and hidden sectors at different temperatures while a net visible baryon number is produced by storing negative baryon number in a dark sector. It is shown that unitarity and CPT lead to unexpected cancellations. In particular, the transfer of baryon number cancels completely at leading order. This note has shown that if two sectors are in thermal equilibrium with themselves, but not with each other, then the leading effect transferring conserved quantities between the two sectors is of order the the weak coupling connecting them to the third power. When freeze-in is used to produce a net baryon number density, the leading order effect comes from {Omicron}({lambda}{sup 3}) diagrams where the intermediate state that goes on-shell has a different visible baryon number than the final state visible baryon number. Models in which the correct baryon number is generated with freeze-in as the dominant source of abundance, typically require {lambda} {approx}> 10{sup -6} and m{sub bath} {approx}> TeV. m{sub bath} is the mass of the visible particle which communicates with the hidden sector. The lower window is potentially observable at the LHC.

  7. Anomalous freezing behavior of nanoscale liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangler, E. J.; Kumar, P. B. S.; Laradji, M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the finite size of one-component liposomes on their phase behavior is investigated via simulations of an implicit-solvent model of self-assembled lipid bilayers. We found that the high curvature of nanoscale liposomes has a significant effect on their freezing behavior. While...

  8. Susceptibility of blackberry flowers to freezing temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Injury of tight buds, open flowers and green fruit often occur in fruit crops during spring frost events. In this study, freezing tolerance of ‘Triple Crown’ blackberry flowers at different reproductive stages of development (tight bud to green drupe) was determined using two methods. One method i...

  9. Scaling-Up Eutectic Freeze Crystallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genceli, F.E.

    2008-01-01

    A novel crystallization technology, Eutectic Freeze Crystallization (EFC) has been investigated and further developed in this thesis work. EFC operates around the eutectic temperature and composition of aqueous solutions and can be used for recovery of (valuable) dissolved salts (and/or or acids)

  10. Freeze block testing of buried waste lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, E.D.; Willi, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to demonstrate application of freeze blocking in waste transfer lines such that a hydrostatic pressure test can be applied. A shop test was conducted on a 20-foot length, 3-inch schedule 40, carbon steel pipe using a coolant of dry ice and Freon. The positive results from these tests prompted a similar employment of the freeze block method in hydrostatic pressure testing the feed inlet leading to 241-S-101 Waste Tank. This pipeline is a 3-inch schedule 10, stainless steel pipe approximately 800 feet long. The freeze block was formed near the lower end of the pipe as it entered the 101-S Waste Tank and a pressure hold test was applied to this pipeline. This test proved the integrity of the pipeline in question, and demonstrated the validity of freeze blocking an open-ended pipeline which could not be hydrotested in other conventional ways. The field demonstration facility, costing $30,200 was completed late in 1975

  11. Sysnthesis of powders by freeze-drying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.M.; Gusman, M.I.; Hildenbrand, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The freeze-drying method of synthesizing powders of the superconducting oxide YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 - δ is described. This process produces homogeneous, submicron powders of high purity. The effects of salt selection, solution concentration and pH on the process are described. Some evaluation of the sintering behavior and the effects on critical current density are included

  12. Preservation of flavor in freeze dried green beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, C. S.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Davis, D.

    1973-01-01

    Before freeze drying, green beans are heated to point at which their cell structure is altered. Beans freeze dried with altered cell structure have improved rehydration properties and retain color, flavor, and texture.

  13. Static delectric behavior of charged fluids near freezing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasolino, A.; Parrinello, M.; Tosi, M.P.

    1978-01-01

    The wavenumber-dependent, static dielectric function of classical charged fluids near freezing is obtained from structural data based on computer simulation or neutron diffraction, and its behavior is connected with the freezing process. (Auth.)

  14. Freeze-thaw performance testing of whole concrete railroad ties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Freezing and thawing durability tests of prestressed concrete ties are normally performed according to ASTM C666 specifications. Small specimens are cut from the shoulders of concrete ties and tested through 300 cycles of freezing and thawing. Saw-cu...

  15. Adaptive Control of Freeze-Form Extrusion Fabrication Processes (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Xiyue; Landers, Robert G; Leu, Ming C

    2008-01-01

    Freeze-form Extrusion Fabrication (FEF) is an additive manufacturing process that extrudes high solids loading aqueous ceramic pastes in a layer-by-layer fashion below the paste freezing temperature for component fabrication...

  16. Canalization of freeze tolerance in an alpine grasshopper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Timothy C

    2015-10-01

    In the Rock and Pillar Range, New Zealand, the alpine grasshopper, Sigaus australis Hutton, survives equilibrium freezing (EF) all-year round. A comparison of freeze tolerance (FT) in grasshoppers over four austral seasons for a 1 year period finds that: (a) the majority (>70%) of the sample population of grasshoppers survive single freeze-stress throughout the year; (b) exposure to increased freeze stress (multiple freeze-stress events) does not lead to a loss of freeze tolerance; and (c) responses to increased freeze stress reveal seasonal tuning of the FT adaptation to environmental temperatures. The Rock and Pillar sample population provides a clear example of the canalization of the FT adaptation. Seasonal variability in the extent of tolerance of multiple freezing events indicates that physiology is modulated to environmental temperatures by phenotypic plasticity - i.e. the FT adaptation is permanent and adjustable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Artificial absorption creation for more accurate tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Chang, Jun; Cao, Lihua; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Cunguang; Qin, Zengguang

    2017-09-01

    A novel strategy for more accurate tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) measurement is presented. This method is immune to non-absorption transmission losses, and allows dead zone removal for ultra-low concentration detection, and reference point selection at atmospheric pressure. The method adjusts laser emission and creates artificial absorption peaks according to requirements. By creating an artificial absorption peak next to the real absorption zone, calibration is not necessary. The developed method can be applied to not only wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) but also direct absorption (DA). In WMS, the method does not need two harmonic signals, resulting in higher reliability, better performance, and no electro-optical gain uncertainty. At the same time, non-absorption transmission losses effect is suppressed from 70% to 0.425% with DA and from 70% to 0.225% with WMS method. When the artificial absorption peak coincides with the real one, the dead zone of measurement can be removed to give a lower detection limit, and water vapor still can be detected when concentration is lower than 0.2 ppm in our experiment. Reference point selection uncertainty with the DA method, especially when the signal-to-noise ratio is low and absorption line is broad, can also be facilitated. And the uncertainty of reference point selection is improved from 6% to 0.8% by measuring reference point amplitude. The method is demonstrated and validated by WMS and DA measurements of water vapor (1 atm, 296 K, 1368.597 nm). The measurement results obtained using the new method reveal its promise in TDLAS.

  18. Nanomaterials for efficiently lowering the freezing point of anti-freeze coolants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Haiping; Zheng, Yingsong; Roy, Walter

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we report, for the first time, the effect of the lowered freezing point in a 50% water/50% anti-freeze coolant (PAC) or 50% water/50% ethylene glycol (EG) solution by the addition of carbon nanotubes and other particles. The experimental results indicated that the nano materials are much more efficient (hundreds fold) in lowering the freezing point than the regular ionic materials (e.g., NaCl). The possible explanation for this interesting phenomenon is the colligative property of fluid and relative small size of nano material. It is quite certain that the carbon nanotubes and metal oxide nano particles could be a wonderful candidate for the nano coolant application because they could not only increase the thermal conductivity, but also efficiently lower the freezing point of traditional coolants.

  19. Freeze-drying process design by manometric temperature measurement: design of a smart freeze-dryer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaolin Charlie; Nail, Steven L; Pikal, Michael J

    2005-04-01

    To develop a procedure based on manometric temperature measurement (MTM) and an expert system for good practices in freeze drying that will allow development of an optimized freeze-drying process during a single laboratory freeze-drying experiment. Freeze drying was performed with a FTS Dura-Stop/Dura-Top freeze dryer with the manometric temperature measurement software installed. Five percent solutions of glycine, sucrose, or mannitol with 2 ml to 4 ml fill in 5 ml vials were used, with all vials loaded on one shelf. Details of freezing, optimization of chamber pressure, target product temperature, and some aspects of secondary drying are determined by the expert system algorithms. MTM measurements were used to select the optimum shelf temperature, to determine drying end points, and to evaluate residual moisture content in real-time. MTM measurements were made at 1 hour or half-hour intervals during primary drying and secondary drying, with a data collection frequency of 4 points per second. The improved MTM equations were fit to pressure-time data generated by the MTM procedure using Microcal Origin software to obtain product temperature and dry layer resistance. Using heat and mass transfer theory, the MTM results were used to evaluate mass and heat transfer rates and to estimate the shelf temperature required to maintain the target product temperature. MTM product dry layer resistance is accurate until about two-thirds of total primary drying time is over, and the MTM product temperature is normally accurate almost to the end of primary drying provided that effective thermal shielding is used in the freeze-drying process. The primary drying times can be accurately estimated from mass transfer rates calculated very early in the run, and we find the target product temperature can be achieved and maintained with only a few adjustments of shelf temperature. The freeze-dryer overload conditions can be estimated by calculation of heat/mass flow at the target product

  20. Comparative study of ice nucleating efficiency of K-feldspar in immersion and deposition freezing modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiron, T.; Hoffmann, N.; Peckhaus, A.; Kiselev, A. A.; Leisner, T.; Flossmann, A. I.

    2016-12-01

    One of the main challenges in understanding the evolution of Earth's climate resides in the understanding the role of ice nucleation on the development of tropospheric clouds as well as its initiation. K-feldspar is known to be a very active ice nucleating particle and this study focuses on the characterization of its activity in two heterogeneous nucleation modes, immersion and deposition freezing.We use a newly built humidity-controlled cold stage allowing the simultaneous observation of up to 2000 identical 0.6-nanoliter droplets containing suspension of mineral dust particles. The droplets are first cooled down to observe immersion freezing, the obtained ice crystals are then evaporated and finally, the residual particles are exposed to the water vapor supersaturated with respect to ice.The ice nucleation abilities for the individual residual particles are then compared for the different freezing modes and correlation between immersion ice nuclei and deposition ice nuclei is investigated.Based on the electron microscopy analysis of the residual particles, we discuss the possible relationship between the ice nucleation properties of feldspar and its microstructure. Finally, we discuss the atmospheric implications of our experimental results, using DESCAM, a 1.5D bin-resolved microphysics model.

  1. BINARY: an optical freezing array for assessing temperature and time dependence of heterogeneous ice nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Budke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A new optical freezing array for the study of heterogeneous ice nucleation in microliter-sized droplets is introduced, tested and applied to the study of immersion freezing in aqueous Snomax® suspensions. In the Bielefeld Ice Nucleation ARraY (BINARY ice nucleation can be studied simultaneously in 36 droplets at temperatures down to −40 °C (233 K and at cooling rates between 0.1 and 10 K min−1. The droplets are separated from each other in individual compartments, thus preventing a Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen type water vapor transfer between droplets as well as avoiding the seeding of neighboring droplets by formation and surface growth of frost halos. Analysis of freezing and melting occurs via an automated real-time image analysis of the optical brightness of each individual droplet. As an application ice nucleation in water droplets containing Snomax® at concentrations from 1 ng mL−1 to 1 mg mL−1 was investigated. Using different cooling rates, a small time dependence of ice nucleation induced by two different classes of ice nucleators (INs contained in Snomax® was detected and the corresponding heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient was quantified. The observed time dependence is smaller than those of other types of INs reported in the literature, suggesting that the BINARY setup is suitable for quantifying time dependence for most other INs of atmospheric interest, making it a useful tool for future investigations.

  2. Warm Vapor Atom Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Grant; Wheeler, David; Jau, Yuan-Yu; McGuinness, Hayden

    2014-05-01

    We present a light pulse atom interferometer using room temperature rubidium vapor. Doppler sensitive stimulated Raman transitions forming the atom optical elements inherently select a cold velocity group for the interferometer. The interferometer is configured to be sensitive to accelerations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Immersion freezing in concentrated solution droplets for a variety of ice nucleating particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wex, Heike; Kohn, Monika; Grawe, Sarah; Hartmann, Susan; Hellner, Lisa; Herenz, Paul; Welti, Andre; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The measurement campaign LINC (Leipzig Ice Nucleation counter Comparison) was conducted in September 2015, during which ice nucleation measurements as obtained with the following instruments were compared: - LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, see e.g. Wex et al., 2014) - PIMCA-PINC (Portable Immersion Mode Cooling Chamber together with PINC) - PINC (Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber, Chou et al., 2011) - SPIN (SPectrometer for Ice Nuclei, Droplet Measurement Technologies) While LACIS and PIMCA-PINC measured immersion freezing, PINC and SPIN varied the super-saturation during the measurements and collected data also for relative humidities below 100% RHw. A suite of different types of ice nucleating particles were examined, where particles were generated from suspensions, subsequently dried and size selected. For the following samples, data for all four instruments are available: K-feldspar, K-feldspar treated with nitric acid, Fluka-kaolinite and birch pollen. Immersion freezing measurements by LACIS and PIMCA-PINC were in excellent agreement. Respective parameterizations from these measurement were used to model the ice nucleation behavior below water vapor saturation, assuming that the process can be described as immersion freezing in concentrated solutions. This is equivalent to simply including a concentration dependent freezing point depression in the immersion freezing parameterization, as introduced for coated kaolinite particles in Wex et al. (2014). Overall, measurements performed below water vapor saturation were reproduced by the model, and it will be discussed in detail, why deviations were observed in some cases. Acknowledgement: Part of this work was funded by the DFG Research Unit FOR 1525 INUIT, grant WE 4722/1-2. Literature: Chou, C., O. Stetzer, E. Weingartner, Z. Juranyi, Z. A. Kanji, and U. Lohmann (2011), Ice nuclei properties within a Saharan dust event at the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11(10), 4725

  4. Objective video quality assessment method for freeze distortion based on freeze aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Keishiro; Okamoto, Jun; Kurita, Takaaki

    2006-01-01

    With the development of the broadband network, video communications such as videophone, video distribution, and IPTV services are beginning to become common. In order to provide these services appropriately, we must manage them based on subjective video quality, in addition to designing a network system based on it. Currently, subjective quality assessment is the main method used to quantify video quality. However, it is time-consuming and expensive. Therefore, we need an objective quality assessment technology that can estimate video quality from video characteristics effectively. Video degradation can be categorized into two types: spatial and temporal. Objective quality assessment methods for spatial degradation have been studied extensively, but methods for temporal degradation have hardly been examined even though it occurs frequently due to network degradation and has a large impact on subjective quality. In this paper, we propose an objective quality assessment method for temporal degradation. Our approach is to aggregate multiple freeze distortions into an equivalent freeze distortion and then derive the objective video quality from the equivalent freeze distortion. Specifically, our method considers the total length of all freeze distortions in a video sequence as the length of the equivalent single freeze distortion. In addition, we propose a method using the perceptual characteristics of short freeze distortions. We verified that our method can estimate the objective video quality well within the deviation of subjective video quality.

  5. SLAPex Freeze/Thaw 2015: The First Dedicated Soil Freeze/Thaw Airborne Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward; Wu, Albert; DeMarco, Eugenia; Powers, Jarrett; Berg, Aaron; Rowlandson, Tracy; Freeman, Jacqueline; Gottfried, Kurt; Toose, Peter; Roy, Alexandre; hide

    2016-01-01

    Soil freezing and thawing is an important process in the terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles, marking the change between two very different hydraulic, thermal, and biological regimes. NASA's Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission includes a binary freeze/thaw data product. While there have been ground-based remote sensing field measurements observing soil freeze/thaw at the point scale, and airborne campaigns that observed some frozen soil areas (e.g., BOREAS), the recently-completed SLAPex Freeze/Thaw (F/T) campaign is the first airborne campaign dedicated solely to observing frozen/thawed soil with both passive and active microwave sensors and dedicated ground truth, in order to enable detailed process-level exploration of the remote sensing signatures and in situ soil conditions. SLAPex F/T utilized the Scanning L-band Active/Passive (SLAP) instrument, an airborne simulator of SMAP developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, and was conducted near Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, in October/November, 2015. Future soil moisture missions are also expected to include soil freeze/thaw products, and the loss of the radar on SMAP means that airborne radar-radiometer observations like those that SLAP provides are unique assets for freeze/thaw algorithm development. This paper will present an overview of SLAPex F/T, including descriptions of the site, airborne and ground-based remote sensing, ground truth, as well as preliminary results.

  6. A geração química de vapor em espectrometria atômica Chemical vapor generation in atomic spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iracema Takase

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The historical development of atomic spectrometry techniques based on chemical vapor generation by both batch and flow injection sampling formats is presented. Detection via atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS, microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES , inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and furnace atomic nonthermal excitation spectrometry (FANES are considered. Hydride generation is separately considered in contrast to other methods of generation of volatile derivatives. Hg ¾ CVAAS (cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry is not considered here. The current state-of-the-art, including extension, advantages and limitations of this approach is discussed.

  7. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section 58.620 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall be...

  8. Polymer blend effect on molecular alignment induced by contact freezing of mesogenic phthalocyanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Takahiro; Fiderana Ramananarivo, Mihary; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2018-04-01

    The polymer blend effect in the fabrication of uniaxially oriented thin films of a mesogenic phthalocyanine, 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octahexylphthalocyanine (C6PcH2), by contact freezing was studied. Contact freezing was induced by thermal stimulation to a supercooled liquid crystal state of the mixture of C6PcH2 and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). With the blending of P3HT with C6PcH2 at an appropriate blend ratio, the cracks observed in a pure C6PcH2 film disappeared while maintaining the uniaxial alignment of C6PcH2. The polymer blend effect was discussed by taking the anisotropic optical absorption and molecular stacking structure in the thin films into consideration.

  9. [Online soft sensing method for freezing point of diesel fuel based on NIR spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, De-Hui

    2008-07-01

    To solve the problems of real-time online measurement for the freezing point of diesel fuel products, a soft sensing method by near-infrared (NIR) spectrometry was proposed. Firstly, the information of diesel fuel samples in the spectral region of 750-1 550 nm was extracted by spectrum analyzer, and the polynomial convolution algorithm was also applied in spectrogram smoothness, baseline correction and standardization. Principal component analysis (PCA) was then used to extract the features of NIR spectrum data sets, which not only reduced the number of input dimension, but increased their sensitivity to output. Finally the soft sensing model for freezing point was built using SVR algorithm. One hundred fifty diesel fuel samples were used as experimental materials, 100 of which were used as training (calibrating) samples and the others as testing samples. Four hundred and one dimensional original NIR absorption spectrum data sets, through PCA, were reduced to 6 dimensions. To investigate the measuring effect, the freezing points of the testing samples were estimated by four different soft sensing models, BP, SVR, PCA-BP and PCA+SVR. Experimental results show that (1) the soft sensing models using PCA to extract features are generally better than those used directly in spectrum wavelength domain; (2) SVR based model outperforms its main competitors-BP model in the limited training data, the error of which is only half of the latter; (3) The MSE between the estimated values by the presented method and the standard chemical values of freezing point by condensing method are less than 4.2. The research suggests that the proposed method can be used in fast measurement of the freezing point of diesel fuel products by NIRS.

  10. Late Spring Freezes in Poland in Relation to Atmospheric Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ustrnul Zbigniew

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Late spring freeze events, a significant agroclimatic hazard, are investigated for Poland. Daily minimum air temperatures from 184 stations for the period 1951-2010 were used to analyze the frequency and conditional probability of late spring freezes. In addition, three classification schemes were employed to investigate the atmospheric circulation responsible for late spring freezes events. The findings suggest that knowledge of the airflow influencing late spring freezes can help to understand the complex historical trends and projected future changes in freeze risk for perennial crops

  11. The freezing and supercooling of garlic (Allium sativum L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Christian; Seignemartin, Violaine; James, Stephen J. [Food Refrigeration and Process Engineering Research Centre (FRPERC), University of Bristol, Churchill Building, Langford, Bristol BS40 5DU (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    This work shows that peeled garlic cloves demonstrate significant supercooling during freezing under standard conditions and can be stored at temperatures well below their freezing point (-2.7 C) without freezing. The nucleation point or 'metastable limit temperature' (the point at which ice crystal nucleation is initiated) of peeled garlic cloves was found to be between -7.7 and -14.6 C. Peeled garlic cloves were stored under static air conditions at temperatures between -6 and -9 C for up to 69 h without freezing, and unpeeled whole garlic bulbs and cloves were stored for 1 week at -6 C without freezing. (author)

  12. Study of freezing-point depression of selected food extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Fumihiko [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Agricultural Systems Engineering; Murata, Satoshi; Habara, Kazuhiro; Amaratunga, K.S.P. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Agricultural Engineering

    1996-12-31

    The phenomenon of freezing-point depression that accompanies the solute concentration of selected food extracts was investigated to reveal the characteristics of solid-liquid phase equilibrium. The freezing curves of various food extracts did not exhibit ideal solution behavior in the higher concentration range. The experimental data were fitted to new freezing-point depression equations by the method of nonlinear least squares, and the results clearly indicated that the calculated freezing points at various concentrations were in good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, by using the determined parameters, the freezing ratio and the activation coefficient were derived.

  13. Development and Design of Sludge Freezing Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    freezing often occurs in nature. A typical example is the desalin - ation of sea ice. Initially, brine is concentrated between ice crystal boundaries...Research, 67(3): 1085-1090. Cox, G.F.N. and W.F. Weeks (1975) Brine drainage and initial salt entrapment in sodium chloride ice. USA Cold Regions...Over a period of time, this brine drains out by gravity leaving relatively pure ice (Cox and Weeks 1975). Another example is the formation of pure ice

  14. SOME STUDIES ON FREEZE - DRIED ARTERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sadeghi - Nejad

    1970-01-01

    Full Text Available (1 The secondary stage of freeze - drying, particularly the last day, is not important and I suggest the whole procedure is reduced to three days, the primary stage occupying two of these. (2 The mothod used obtains the satisfactory low level of residual moisture. RESUME (3 Experiments on reconstitution with saline and distilled water show that distilled water is more satisfactory and I suggest that saline should not he used.

  15. Microwave Augmented Freeze-Drying - Four Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    F.J. 1G76. Pigments in "Principles of Food Science". O.R. Fennema, ed., Marcel Dekkar, Inc., New York. Datta, A.K. and Hu, W. 1992. Optimization of...and Wilke, C.R 1967. The relationship between transport properties and rates of freeze-drying of poultry meat. AIChE J. 13:428. Slater, L.E. 1975

  16. Sperm Preservation using Freeze-Drying Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAKDIR SAILI

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of cryopreservation method for bull semen, cryopreservation become an alternative method for maintaining gamet resources of certain animal which is threatened or near extinction. This technology was then applied to the preservation of embryo, oocyte, ovary and testis. The application of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI for which sperm motility is unnecessary had supported the effort to create simplified method such as freeze-drying for sperm preservation. Due to the benefit of ICSI over the conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF the spermatozoon could be mechanically driven to pass through the zona pellucida and entering the cytoplasm of oocytes prior to fertilization. The freeze-drying method is an alternative method in sperm preservation which ignored the motility of sperm. The sperm resulted from this technique is in drying state, therefore, it might be stored in room temperature or in refrigerator. Many reports have claimed that freeze-dried sperm which is not motile but has an intact DNA was able to fertilize oocytes, even produced offspring in mouse.

  17. Freeze substitution in 3 hours or less.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, K L; Webb, R I

    2011-09-01

    Freeze substitution is a process for low temperature dehydration and fixation of rapidly frozen cells that usually takes days to complete. New methods for freeze substitution have been developed that require only basic laboratory tools: a platform shaker, liquid nitrogen, a metal block with holes for cryotubes and an insulated container such as an ice bucket. With this equipment, excellent freeze substitution results can be obtained in as little as 90 min for cells of small volume such as bacteria and tissue culture cells. For cells of greater volume or that have significant diffusion barriers such as cuticles or thick cell walls, one can extend the time to 3 h or more with dry ice. The 3-h method works well for all manner of specimens, including plants and Caenorhabditis elegans as well as smaller samples. Here, we present the basics of the techniques and some results from Nicotiana leaves, C. elegans adult worms, Escherichia coli and baby hamster kidney tissue culture cells. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2011 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Atmospheric freeze drying assisted by power ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santacatalina, J V; Cárcel, J A; Garcia-Perez, J V; Mulet, A; Simal, S

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric freeze drying (AFD) is considered an alternative to vacuum freeze drying to keep the quality of fresh product. AFD allows continuous drying reducing fix and operating costs, but presents, as main disadvantage, a long drying time required. The application of power ultrasound (US) can accelerate AFD process. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the application of power ultrasound to improve atmospheric freeze drying of carrot. For that purpose, AFD experiments were carried out with carrot cubes (10 mm side) at constant air velocity (2 ms −1 ), temperature (−10°C) and relative humidity (10%) with (20.5 kWm −3 ,USAFD) and without (AFD) ultrasonic application. A diffusion model was used in order to quantify the influence of US in drying kinetics. To evaluate the quality of dry products, rehydration capacity and textural properties were determined. The US application during AFD of carrot involved the increase of drying rate. The effective moisture diffusivity identified in USAFD was 73% higher than in AFD experiments. On the other hand, the rehydration capacity was higher in USAFD than in AFD and the hardness of dried samples did not show significant (p<0.05) differences. Therefore, US application during AFD significantly (p<0.05) sped-up the drying process preserving the quality properties of the dry product.

  19. DETERMINATION OF HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENTS FOR FRENCH PLASTIC SEMEN STRAW SUSPENDED IN STATIC NITROGEN VAPOR OVER LIQUID NITROGEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo, M V; Sansinena, M; Chirife, J; Zaritzky, N

    2015-01-01

    The use of mathematical models describing heat transfer during the freezing process is useful for the improvement of cryopreservation protocols. A widespread practice for cryopreservation of spermatozoa of domestic animal species consists of suspending plastic straws in nitrogen vapor before plunging into liquid nitrogen. Knowledge of surface heat transfer coefficient (h) is mandatory for computational modelling; however, h values for nitrogen vapor are not available. In the present study, surface heat transfer coefficients for plastic French straws immersed in nitrogen vapor over liquid nitrogen was determined; vertical and horizontal positions were considered. Heat transfer coefficients were determined from the measurement of time-temperature curves and from numerical solution of heat transfer partial differential equation under transient conditions using finite elements. The h values experimentally obtained for horizontal and vertically placed straws were compared to those calculated using correlations based on the Nusselt number for natural convection. For horizontal straws the average obtained value was h=12.5 ± 1.2 W m(2) K and in the case of vertical straws h=16 ± 2.48 W m(2) K. The numerical simulation validated against experimental measurements, combined with accurate h values provides a reliable tool for the prediction of freezing curves of semen-filled straws immersed in nitrogen vapor. The present study contributes to the understanding of the cryopreservation techniques for sperm freezing based on engineering concepts, improving the cooling protocols and the manipulation of the straws.

  20. OPTIMIZATION OF A DOUBLE EFFECT LIBR-H20 ABSORPTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the double-effect LiBr-H,0 absorption refrigeration cycle, weak solution leaving the. Absorber is pumped to the pressure of Generator 1,. Fig. l. External heat supplied to the weak solution in. Generator 1 releases water vapor from the solution. To reduce the quantity of external heat required by. Generator 1 and thus ...

  1. Application of the Spectral Structure Parameterization technique: retrieval of total water vapor columns from GOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lang

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We use a recently proposed spectral sampling technique for measurements of atmospheric transmissions called the Spectral Structure Parameterization (SSP in order to retrieve total water vapor columns (WVC from reflectivity spectra measured by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME. SSP provides a good compromise between efficiency and speed when performing retrievals on highly structured spectra of narrow-band absorbers like water vapor. We show that SSP can be implemented in a radiative transfer scheme which treats both direct-path absorption and absorption by singly-scattered light directly. For the retrieval we exploit a ro-vibrational overtone band of water vapor located in the visible around 590 nm. We compare our results to independent values given by the data assimilation model of ECMWF. In addition, results are compared to those obtained from the more accurate, but more computationally expensive, Optical Absorption Coefficient Spectroscopy (OACS.

  2. The influence of freezing rates on bovine pericardium tissue Freeze-drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Figueiredo Borgognoni

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The bovine pericardium has been used as biomaterial in developing bioprostheses. Freeze-drying is a drying process that could be used for heart valve's preservation. The maintenance of the characteristics of the biomaterial is important for a good heart valve performance. This paper describes the initial step in the development of a bovine pericardium tissue freeze-drying to be used in heart valves. Freeze-drying involves three steps: freezing, primary drying and secondary drying. The freezing step influences the ice crystal size and, consequently, the primary and secondary drying stages. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of freezing rates on the bovine pericardium tissue freeze-drying parameters. The glass transition temperature and the structural behaviour of the lyophilized tissues were determined as also primary and secondary drying time. The slow freezing with thermal treatment presented better results than the other freeze-drying protocols.O pericárdio bovino é um material utilizado na fabricação de biopróteses. A liofilização é um método de secagem que vem sendo estudado para a conservação de válvulas cardíacas. A preservação das características do biomaterial é de fundamental importância no bom funcionamento das válvulas. Este artigo é a primeira etapa do desenvolvimento do ciclo de liofilização do pericárdio bovino. Liofilização é o processo de secagem no qual a água é removida do material congelado por sublimação e desorção da água incongelável, sob pressão reduzida. O congelamento influencia o tamanho do cristal de gelo e, consequentemente, a secagem primária e secundária. O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a influência das taxas de congelamento nos parâmetros de liofilização do pericárdio bovino. Determinou-se a temperatura de transição vítrea e o comportamento estrutural do pericárdio bovino liofilizado. Determinou-se o tempo da secagem primária e secundária. O

  3. Response of New zealand mudsnails Potamopyrgus antipodarum to freezing and near freezing fluctuating water temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Christine M.; James, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    We explored the resilience of the invasive New Zealand mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum to fluctuating winter freezing and near-freezing temperature cycles in laboratory tests. Our goal was to provide data to confirm field observations of mortality and presumed mortality in stream habitats with fluctuating freezing to near-freezing temperatures. We tested individuals from 2 locations with distinctly different thermal regimes and population densities. One location had low snail densities and water temperatures with strong diel and seasonal water variation. The other location had high snail densities and nearly constant water temperatures. Groups of individuals from both locations were tested in each of 3 laboratory-created diel thermal cycles around nominal temperatures of 0, 2, or 4°C. Mortality occurred in cycles around 0°C in both populations, and little to no mortality occurred at temperatures >0°C. Individuals from both sources held in diel 0°C cycles for 72 h showed 100% mortality. Our findings support observations from published field studies that survival was limited in infested habitats subject to freezing temperatures.

  4. 33 CFR 154.828 - Vapor recovery and vapor destruction units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vapor recovery and vapor... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.828 Vapor recovery and vapor destruction units. (a) The inlet to a vapor recovery unit which...

  5. Uranium vapor generator: pulsed hollow cathode lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carleer, M.; Gagne, J.; Leblanc, B.; Demers, Y.; Mongeau, B.

    1979-01-01

    The production of uranium vapors has been studied in the 5 L 0 6 ground state using a pulsed hollow cathode lamp. The evolution of the 238 U ( 5 L 0 6 ) concentration with time has been studied with Xe and Ar as buffer gases. A density of 2.7 x 10 13 atoms cm -3 was obtained with Xe as a buffer gas. In addition, those measurements, obtained from the absorption of a laser beam tuned to the 5758.143 A ( 5 L 0 6 -17,361 7 L 6 ) transition, allowed the determination of the transition probability A=2.1 x 10 5 sec -1 and of the branching ratio BR=0.08 for this transition

  6. High increment of economy with modified absorption cooling process between 0 and -30 C; Effizienzsprung fuer die absorptive Kaelteerzeugung zwischen 0 und -30 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, Hans [IFM Ingenieurbuero Dr.-Ing. H. Foerster, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    With a new absorption cooling process for ammoniac-water as working substance it is able to use the heat off smokegas and at the same time the waste heat of motors for generation of chilling/freezing energy. The modified new process is very important for the economy in the decentralized energy-supply industry to utilization of waste heat. (orig.)

  7. A Citizen's Guide to Vapor Intrusion Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guide describes how vapor intrusion is the movement of chemical vapors from contaminated soil and groundwater into nearby buildings.Vapors primarily enter through openings in the building foundation or basement walls.

  8. Numerical method based on transfer function for eliminating water vapor noise from terahertz spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y; Sun, P; Zhang, Z; Jin, C

    2017-07-10

    Water vapor noise in the air affects the accuracy of optical parameters extracted from terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy. In this paper, a numerical method was proposed to eliminate water vapor noise from the THz spectra. According to the Van Vleck-Weisskopf function and the linear absorption spectrum of water molecules in the HITRAN database, we simulated the water vapor absorption spectrum and real refractive index spectrum with a particular line width. The continuum effect of water vapor molecules was also considered. Theoretical transfer function of a different humidity was constructed through the theoretical calculation of the water vapor absorption coefficient and the real refractive index. The THz signal of the Lacidipine sample containing water vapor background noise in the continuous frequency domain of 0.5-1.8 THz was denoised by use of the method. The results show that the optical parameters extracted from the denoised signal are closer to the optical parameters in the dry nitrogen environment.

  9. An environmentally friendly method for the fabrication of reduced graphene oxide foam with a super oil absorption capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Yongqiang; Liu, Yue; Wu, Tao; Ma, Junkui; Wang, Xingrui; Gong, Qiaojuan; Kong, Weina; Xing, Fubao; Liu, Yu; Gao, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • RGO foams were fabricated from GO foams prepared by freeze-drying methods. • The RGO foams made from 2% GO suspension had a maximum value of 122 g g −1 for oil. • The RGO foams had a maximum value of 99 g g −1 for organic solvents. • The RGO foams can be used as a filter to separate oil from water. -- Abstract: Three kinds of graphene oxide (GO) foams were fabricated using different freezing methods (unidirectional freezing drying (UDF), non-directional freezing drying, and air freezing drying), and the corresponding reduced graphene oxide (RGO) foams were prepared by their thermal reduction of those GO foams. These RGO foams were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The absorption process and the factors that influence the absorption capacity were investigated. The RGO foams are hydrophobic and showed extremely high absorbing abilities for organic liquids. The absorption capacity of the RGO foams made by UDF was higher than 100 g g −1 for all the oils tested (gasoline, diesel oil, pump oil, lubricating oil and olive oil) and had the highest value of about 122 g g −1 for olive oil. The oil absorption capacity of the GO foams was lower than that of the RGO foams, but for olive oil, the absorption capacity was still high than 70 g g −1 , which is higher than that of most oil absorbents

  10. Absorption of ammonia by high water content hydrogel lenses: an inexpensive method of analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMotte, J; Smith, G; Chang-Smith, A

    1995-09-01

    Few studies have been done on the absorption and release of chemical vapors by high water content hydrogel lenses. In this study we investigated the absorption of ammonia vapors by this type of contact lens (CL). Ten high water content hydrogel lenses were exposed to vapor generated in a cuvette by 1 drop of aqueous ammonia. The contact lens was transferred to a 0.9% saline solution containing a colorometric indicator for ammonia and the amount of ammonia released into the saline was measured. We found that significant quantities of ammonia were absorbed into the lenses and the relation between average concentration of ammonia vapor and amount absorbed per contact lens was nearly linear from 50 parts per million (ppm) to 250 ppm ammonia vapor. For concentrations greater than 250 ppm there appears to be a saturation effect. Our findings indicate that high water contact lenses will absorb ammonia and release it into a solution similar to tears.

  11. Recent developments in smart freezing technology applied to fresh foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ji-Cheng; Zhang, Min; Mujumdar, Arun S; Adhikari, Benu

    2017-09-02

    Due to the increased awareness of consumers in sensorial and nutritional quality of frozen foods, the freezing technology has to seek new and innovative technologies for better retaining the fresh like quality of foods. In this article, we review the recent developments in smart freezing technology applied to fresh foods. The application of these intelligent technologies and the associated underpinning concepts have greatly improved the quality of frozen foods and the freezing efficiency. These technologies are able to automatically collect the information in-line during freezing and help control the freezing process better. Smart freezing technology includes new and intelligent technologies and concepts applied to the pretreatment of the frozen product, freezing processes, cold chain logistics as well as warehouse management. These technologies enable real-time monitoring of quality during the freezing process and help improve product quality and freezing efficiency. We also provide a brief overview of several sensing technologies used to achieve automatic control of individual steps of freezing process. These sensing technologies include computer vision, electronic nose, electronic tongue, digital simulation, confocal laser, near infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance technology and ultrasound. Understanding of the mechanism of these new technologies will be helpful for applying them to improve the quality of frozen foods.

  12. Passive vapor extraction feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohay, V.J.

    1994-01-01

    Demonstration of a passive vapor extraction remediation system is planned for sites in the 200 West Area used in the past for the disposal of waste liquids containing carbon tetrachloride. The passive vapor extraction units will consist of a 4-in.-diameter pipe, a check valve, a canister filled with granular activated carbon, and a wind turbine. The check valve will prevent inflow of air that otherwise would dilute the soil gas and make its subsequent extraction less efficient. The granular activated carbon is used to adsorb the carbon tetrachloride from the air. The wind turbine enhances extraction rates on windy days. Passive vapor extraction units will be designed and operated to meet all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. Based on a cost analysis, passive vapor extraction was found to be a cost-effective method for remediation of soils containing lower concentrations of volatile contaminants. Passive vapor extraction used on wells that average 10-stdft 3 /min air flow rates was found to be more cost effective than active vapor extraction for concentrations below 500 parts per million by volume (ppm) of carbon tetrachloride. For wells that average 5-stdft 3 /min air flow rates, passive vapor extraction is more cost effective below 100 ppm

  13. Dimers in nucleating vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushnikov, A. A.; Kulmala, M.

    1998-09-01

    The dimer stage of nucleation may affect considerably the rate of the nucleation process at high supersaturation of the nucleating vapor. Assuming that the dimer formation limits the nucleation rate, the kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is studied starting with the definition of dimers as bound states of two associating molecules. The partition function of dimer states is calculated by summing the Boltzmann factor over all classical bound states, and the equilibrium population of dimers is found for two types of intermolecular forces: the Lennard-Jones (LJ) and rectangular well+hard core (RW) potentials. The principle of detailed balance is used for calculating the evaporation rate of dimers. The kinetics of the particle formation-growth process is then investigated under the assumption that the trimers are stable with respect to evaporation and that the condensation rate is a power function of the particle mass. If the power exponent λ=n/(n+1) (n is a non-negative integer), the kinetics of the process is described by a finite set of moments of particle mass distribution. When the characteristic time of the particle formation by nucleation is much shorter than that of the condensational growth, n+2 universal functions of a nondimensional time define the kinetic process. These functions are calculated for λ=2/3 (gas-to-particle conversion in the free molecular regime) and λ=1/2 (formation of islands on surfaces).

  14. Nutrition and magnesium absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Brink, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of various nutrients present in dairy products and soybean-based products on absorption of magnesium has been investigated. The studies demonstrate that soybean protein versus casein lowers apparent magnesium absorption in rats through its phytate component. However, true magnesium absorption was neither affected by soybean protein in the diet nor by supplemental phytate. The inhibitory influence of soybean protein and phytate on apparent magnesium absorption was found ...

  15. Fiber-Optic Gratings for Lidar Measurements of Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, Leila B.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2006-01-01

    Narrow-band filters in the form of phase-shifted Fabry-Perot Bragg gratings incorporated into optical fibers are being developed for differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) instruments used to measure concentrations of atmospheric water vapor. The basic idea is to measure the relative amounts of pulsed laser light scattered from the atmosphere at two nearly equal wavelengths, one of which coincides with an absorption spectral peak of water molecules and the other corresponding to no water vapor absorption. As part of the DIAL measurement process, the scattered light is made to pass through a filter on the way to a photodetector. Omitting other details of DIAL for the sake of brevity, what is required of the filter is to provide a stop band that: Surrounds the water-vapor spectral absorption peaks at a wavelength of 946 nm, Has a spectral width of at least a couple of nanometers, Contains a pass band preferably no wider than necessary to accommodate the 946.0003-nm-wavelength water vapor absorption peak [which has 8.47 pm full width at half maximum (FWHM)], and Contains another pass band at the slightly shorter wavelength of 945.9 nm, where there is scattering of light from aerosol particles but no absorption by water molecules. Whereas filters used heretofore in DIAL have had bandwidths of =300 pm, recent progress in the art of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters has made it feasible to reduce bandwidths to less than or equal to 20 pm and thereby to reduce background noise. Another benefit of substituting fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters for those now in use would be significant reductions in the weights of DIAL instruments. Yet another advantage of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters is that their transmission spectra can be shifted to longer wavelengths by heating or stretching: hence, it is envisioned that future DIAL instruments would contain devices for fine adjustment of transmission wavelengths through stretching or heating of fiber-optic Bragg-grating filters

  16. Freeze Casting for Assembling Bioinspired Structural Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qunfeng; Huang, Chuanjin; Tomsia, Antoni P

    2017-12-01

    Nature is very successful in designing strong and tough, lightweight materials. Examples include seashells, bone, teeth, fish scales, wood, bamboo, silk, and many others. A distinctive feature of all these materials is that their properties are far superior to those of their constituent phases. Many of these natural materials are lamellar or layered in nature. With its "brick and mortar" structure, nacre is an example of a layered material that exhibits extraordinary physical properties. Finding inspiration in living organisms to create bioinspired materials is the subject of intensive research. Several processing techniques have been proposed to design materials mimicking natural materials, such as layer-by-layer deposition, self-assembly, electrophoretic deposition, hydrogel casting, doctor blading, and many others. Freeze casting, also known as ice-templating, is a technique that has received considerable attention in recent years to produce bioinspired bulk materials. Here, recent advances in the freeze-casting technique are reviewed for fabricating lamellar scaffolds by assembling different dimensional building blocks, including nanoparticles, polymer chains, nanofibers, and nanosheets. These lamellar scaffolds are often infiltrated by a second phase, typically a soft polymer matrix, a hard ceramic matrix, or a metal matrix. The unique architecture of the resultant bioinspired structural materials displays excellent mechanical properties. The challenges of the current research in using the freeze-casting technique to create materials large enough to be useful are also discussed, and the technique's promise for fabricating high-performance nacre-inspired structural materials in the future is reviewed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. A new cryosurgical device for controlled freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Y; Coleman, R; Mordohovich, D; Ber, R; Shitzer, A

    1996-02-01

    A new cryosurgical device was developed in this study to facilitate examination of factors affecting the outcome of cryotreatment. Special emphasis was placed on the control of the cooling rate at the freezing front. In the new computer-controlled cryosurgical device, the controlling variable is the cryoprobe temperature, which is calculated to ensure prespecified cooling rates at the freezing front. Details of the new cryodevice, results of a validation test, and the system characteristics are presented in Part I of this study. In this part of the study initial results of 13 in vivo experimental cryotreatments, including histological observations, are presented. The in vivo pilot investigations include the normal, healthy skin and the underlying skeletal muscle of the thighs in rabbits. Using low cooling rate-controlled freezing, the new cryosurgical device is demonstrated here as an effective surgical tool. An in vivo temperature measurement technique is employed based on miniature thermocouples and X-ray images. Thermal analysis of the heat transfer in the cryotreated tissue is presented, based on the temperature measurements and on numerical heat transfer simulations. Cryotreated tissue was extracted either immediately or 4 or 7 days following the procedure. The histological observations on the skeletal muscle of the 4- and 7-day postcryoinjury were not substantially different. The effective penetration depth of the cryolesion was in the range of 5-15 mm, possibly extending up to 25 mm, depending on the specific area treated and operating parameters. The cryotreatment resulted in complete destruction of cells in the skin followed by rapid replacement by epithelial cells. Histological responses to cryotreatment of skeletal muscle were similar to those resulting from a range of traumatic episodes, e.g., crush damage. It was also found that most of the blood vessels in the cryotreated region remained intact without histological evidence of extravasation of

  18. Absorption and excretion tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berberich, R.

    1988-01-01

    The absorption and excretion of radiopharmaceuticals is still of interest in diagnostic investigations of nuclear medicine. In this paper the most common methods of measuring absorption and excretion are described. The performance of the different tests and their standard values are discussed. More over the basic possibilities of measuring absorption and excretion including the needed measurement equipments are presented. (orig.) [de

  19. Freeze-drying of live virus vaccines: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, L J J; Daoussi, R; Vervaet, C; Remon, J-P; De Beer, T R M

    2015-10-13

    Freeze-drying is the preferred method for stabilizing live, attenuated virus vaccines. After decades of research on several aspects of the process like the stabilization and destabilization mechanisms of the live, attenuated viruses during freeze-drying, the optimal formulation components and process settings are still matter of research. The molecular complexity of live, attenuated viruses, the multiple destabilization pathways and the lack of analytical techniques allowing the measurement of physicochemical changes in the antigen's structure during and after freeze-drying mean that they form a particular lyophilization challenge. The purpose of this review is to overview the available information on the development of the freeze-drying process of live, attenuated virus vaccines, herewith focusing on the freezing and drying stresses the viruses can undergo during processing as well as on the mechanisms and strategies (formulation and process) that are used to stabilize them during freeze-drying. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Physical Stability of Freeze-Dried Isomalt Diastereomer Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koskinen, Anna-Kaisa; Fraser-Miller, Sara J.; Bøtker, Johan P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Isomalt is a sugar alcohol used as an excipient in commercially available solid oral dosage forms. The potential of isomalt as a novel freeze-drying excipient was studied in order to increase knowledge of the behavior of isomalt when it is freeze-dried. Methods Isomalt was freeze-dried in......Purpose Isomalt is a sugar alcohol used as an excipient in commercially available solid oral dosage forms. The potential of isomalt as a novel freeze-drying excipient was studied in order to increase knowledge of the behavior of isomalt when it is freeze-dried. Methods Isomalt was freeze......-dried in four different diastereomer compositions and its physical stability was investigated with differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier-transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Karl-Fischer titration and thermogravimetric analysis in order to verify the solid state form...

  1. Soil Vapor Extraction Implementation Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    This issue paper identifies issues and summarizes experiences with soil vapor extraction (SVE) as a remedy for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soils. The issues presented here reflect discussions with over 30 Remedial Project Managers (RPMs)...

  2. Air-cooled steam condensers non-freeze warranties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larinoff, M.W.

    1995-09-01

    What this paper is suggesting is the seller quote a condenser package with a LIMITED NON-FREEZE WARRANTY. Relieve the inexperienced buyer of the responsibility for selecting freeze protection design options. The seller cannot afford to over-design because of the added costs and the need for a competitive price. Yet he cannot under-design and allow the condenser tubes to freeze periodically and then pay the repair bills in accordance with the warranty.

  3. Evaluation of Factors Affecting Freezing Point of Milk

    OpenAIRE

    Jelena Zagorska; Inga Ciprovica

    2013-01-01

    The freezing point of milk is in important indicator of the milk quality. The freezing point of milk is determined primarily to prove milk adulteration with water and to determine the amount of water in it. Chemical composition and properties of milk, thermal treatment and presence of any substance can influence freezing point of product. There are different substances, which can be added to milk with main purpose to prolong shelf-life of raw milk. There are detergent, pr...

  4. Effects of various freezing containers for vitrification freezing on mouse oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Chul; Kim, Jae Myeoung; Seo, Byoung Boo

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, various freezing containers were tested for mouse embryos of respective developmental stages; embryos were vitrified and then their survival rate and developmental rate were monitored. Mouse two cell, 8 cell, and blastula stage embryos underwent vitrification freezing-thawing and then their recovery rate, survival rate, development rate, and hatching rate were investigated. EM-grid, OPS, and cryo-loop were utilized for vitrification freezing-thawing of mouse embryos. It was found that recovery rate and survival rate were higher in the group of cryo-loop compared to those of EM-grid (p containers on vitrified embryos of respective developmental stages; it was demonstrated that higher developmental rate was shown in more progressed (or developed) embryos with more blastomeres. There was however, no difference in embryonic development rate was shown amongst containers. Taken together, further additional studies are warranted with regards to 1) manipulation techniques of embryos for various vitrification freezing containers and 2) preventive measures against contamination via liquid nitrogen.

  5. Design of a blood-freezing system for leukemia research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T. E.; Cygnarowicz, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    Leukemia research involves the use of cryogenic freezing and storage equipment. In a program being carried out at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), bone marrow (white blood cells) was frozen using a standard cryogenic biological freezer. With this system, it is difficult to maintain the desired rate of freezing and repeatability from sample to sample. A freezing system was developed that satisfies the requirements for a repeatable, constant freezing rate. The system was delivered to NIC and is now operational. This report describes the design of the major subsystems, the analyses, the operating procedure, and final system test results.

  6. Effects of freezing conditions on quality changes in blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xuehui; Zhang, Fangfang; Zhao, Dongyu; Zhu, Danshi; Li, Jianrong

    2018-03-12

    freezing preservation is one of the most effective methods used to maintain flavour and nutritional value of fruit. The effects of different freezing conditions, -20 °C, -40 °C, -80 °C, and immersion in liquid nitrogen on quality changes of freeze-thawed blueberries were studied in this research. The water distribution estimates of blueberries were measured based on low-field NMR analysis. The pectin content, drip loss, and fruit texture were also detected to evaluate quality changes in samples. freezing curves of blueberry showed super-cooling points at -20 °C and -40 °C, while super-cooling points were not observed at -80 °C or in liquid nitrogen. After freeze-thaw treatment, the relaxation time of the cell wall water (T 21 ), cytoplasm water and extracellular space (T 22 ), and vacuole water (T 23 ) were significantly shortened compared to fresh samples, which suggested a lower liquidity. Although the freezing speed for samples immersed in liquid nitrogen was faster than other treatments, samples treated at -80 °C showed better qualities on vacuole water holding, drip loss, and original pectin content retention. this study contributed to understanding how freezing temperature affects qualities of blueberries. The super-fast freezing rate might injure fruit, and a proper freezing rate could better preserve blueberries. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Parameter Sensitivity of the Microdroplet Vacuum Freezing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The vacuum freezing process of microdroplets (1 mm. Pressure and droplet diameter have an effect on cooling and freezing stages, but initial temperature only affects the cooling stage. The thermal conductivity coefficient kl affected the cooling stage, whereas ki affected the freezing stage. Heat capacity Cl affected the cooling stage, but Ci has virtually no effect on all stages. The actual latent heat of freezing ΔH was also affected. Higher density corresponds to lower cooling rate in the cooling stage.

  8. Rare earth vapor laser studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupke, W.F.; Jacobs, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    The fluorescence decay rates of vapor phase neodymium aluminum chloride complex (Nd-Al-Cl) and neodymium-thd-chelate have been measured as functions of temperature, partial pressure and optical excitation intensity. Fluorescence quenching due to both ground and excited state collisions was observed in Nd-Al-Cl vapor. In constrast, quenching in the Nd-thd vapor was found to be dominated by multiquantum excitation of molecular vibrations. The fluorescence kinetics of Tb-Al-Cl vapor have also been examined under conditions of intense excitation of terbium 5d levels by a KrF laser source. Both prompt and delayed fluorescence of the 4f 8 ( 5 D 4 ) metastable level were observed together with evidence of excited-state collisional quenching. In laser amplifier experiments, a transient (greater than or equal to 10 μsec) population inversion was produced in Nd-Al-Cl vapor with a small signal gain coefficient greater than or equal to 0.25%/cm and a stored energy density approximately equal to 35 J/liter. Available data for the rare earth vapors are related to scaling requirements of large amplifiers for laser fusion application

  9. Automated assessment of Pavlovian conditioned freezing and shock reactivity in mice using the VideoFreeze system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan G Anagnostaras

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Pavlovian conditioned freezing paradigm has become a prominent mouse and rat model of learning and memory, as well as of pathological fear. Due to its efficiency, reproducibility, and well-defined neurobiology, the paradigm has become widely adopted in large-scale genetic and pharmacological screens. However, one major shortcoming of the use of freezing behavior has been that it has required the use of tedious hand scoring, or a variety of proprietary automated methods that are often poorly validated or difficult to obtain and implement. Here we report an extensive validation of the Video Freeze system in mice, a turn-key all-inclusive system for fear conditioning in small animals. Using digital video and near-infrared lighting, the system achieved outstanding performance in scoring both freezing and movement. Given the large-scale adoption of the conditioned freezing paradigm, we encourage similar validation of other automated systems for scoring freezing, or other behaviors.

  10. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recker, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Defective absorption of calcium has been thought to exist in patients with achlorhydria. The author compared absorption of calcium in its carbonate form with that in a pH-adjusted citrate form in a group of 11 fasting patients with achlorhydria and in 9 fasting normal subjects. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by a modified double-isotope procedure with 0.25 g of calcium used as the carrier. Mean calcium absorption (+/- S.D.) in the patients with achlorhydria was 0.452 +/- 0.125 for citrate and 0.042 +/- 0.021 for carbonate (P less than 0.0001). Fractional calcium absorption in the normal subjects was 0.243 +/- 0.049 for citrate and 0.225 +/- 0.108 for carbonate (not significant). Absorption of calcium from carbonate in patients with achlorhydria was significantly lower than in the normal subjects and was lower than absorption from citrate in either group; absorption from citrate in those with achlorhydria was significantly higher than in the normal subjects, as well as higher than absorption from carbonate in either group. Administration of calcium carbonate as part of a normal breakfast resulted in completely normal absorption in the achlorhydric subjects. These results indicate that calcium absorption from carbonate is impaired in achlorhydria under fasting conditions. Since achlorhydria is common in older persons, calcium carbonate may not be the ideal dietary supplement

  11. Latent fingermark development using low-vacuum vaporization of ninhydrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chieh; Yang, Chao-Kai; Liao, Jeh-Shane; Wang, Sheng-Meng

    2015-12-01

    The vacuum technique is a method of vaporizing a solid material to its gas phase, helping deposit reagents gently on target surfaces to develop latent fingermarks. However, this application is rarely reported in the literature. In this study, a homemade fume hood with a built-in vacuum control system and programmable heating system designed by the Taiwan Criminal Investigation Bureau is introduced. Factors that affect the instrument's performance in developing fingermarks are discussed, including the quantity of chemicals for vaporization, heating program arrangement, and paper of different materials. The results show that fingermarks are effectively developed by vaporizing solid ninhydrin. This would be an alternative application in selecting a solvent-free method for protecting the environment and reducing health hazards in the lab. In terms of the heating program, the result indicates that under a low-vacuum condition (50 mTorr), 80-90 °C is a suitable temperature range for ninhydrin vaporization, allowing ninhydrin to be vaporized without bumping and waste. In terms of the performance on different material papers, this instrument demonstrates its capacity by developing latent fingermarks on thermal paper without discoloration or damaging the original writing, and the same results are also observed on Taiwan and United States banknotes. However, a coherent result could be hardly obtained using the same vaporization setting because different banknotes have their own surface features and water absorption ability or other unique factors may influence the effect of ninhydrin deposition. This study provides a reliable application for developing latent fingermarks without using solvents, and it is also expected to contribute to environmental protection along with the trend of green chemistry technology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Estimating leaf SPAD values of freeze-damaged winter wheat using continuous wavelet analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-fang; Huo, Zhi-guo; Zhou, Guang-sheng; Liao, Qin-hong; Feng, Hai-kuan; Wu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Freeze injury, one of the most destructive agricultural disasters caused by climate, has a significant impact on the growth and production of winter wheat. Chlorophyll content is an important indicator of a plant's growth status. In this study, we analyzed the hyperspectral reflectance of normal and freeze-stressed leaves of winter wheat using a spectro-radiometer in a laboratory. The response of the chlorophyll spectra of plants under freeze stress was analyzed to predict the severity of freeze injury. A continuous wavelet transform (CWT) was conducted in conjunction with a correlation analysis, which generated a correlation scalogram that summarized the correlation between the chlorophyll content (SPAD value) and wavelet power at different wavelengths and decomposition scales. A linear regression model was established to relate the SPAD values and wavelet power coefficients. The results indicated that the most sensitive wavelet feature (region E: 553 nm, scale 5, R(2) = 0.8332) was located near the strong pigment absorption bands, and the model based on this feature could estimate the SPAD value with a high coefficient of determination (R(2) = 0.7444, RMSE = 7.359). The data revealed that the chlorophyll content of leaves under different low temperatures treatments could be accurately estimated using CWT. Also, this emerging spectral analytical approach can be applied to other complex datasets, including a broad range of species, and may be adapted to estimate basic leaf biochemical elements, such as nitrogen, cellulose, and lignin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimization of the secondary drying step in freeze drying using TDLAS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneid, Stefan C; Gieseler, Henning; Kessler, William J; Luthra, Suman A; Pikal, Michael J

    2011-03-01

    The secondary drying phase in freeze drying is mostly developed on a trial-and-error basis due to the lack of appropriate noninvasive process analyzers. This study describes for the first time the application of Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy, a spectroscopic and noninvasive sensor for monitoring secondary drying in laboratory-scale freeze drying with the overall purpose of targeting intermediate moisture contents in the product. Bovine serum albumin/sucrose mixtures were used as a model system to imitate high concentrated antibody formulations. First, the rate of water desorption during secondary drying at constant product temperatures (-22 °C, -10 °C, and 0 °C) was investigated for three different shelf temperatures. Residual moisture contents of sampled vials were determined by Karl Fischer titration. An equilibration step was implemented to ensure homogeneous distribution of moisture (within 1%) in all vials. The residual moisture revealed a linear relationship to the water desorption rate for different temperatures, allowing the evaluation of an anchor point from noninvasive flow rate measurements without removal of samples from the freeze dryer. The accuracy of mass flow integration from this anchor point was found to be about 0.5%. In a second step, the concept was successfully tested in a confirmation experiment. Here, good agreement was found for the initial moisture content (anchor point) and the subsequent monitoring and targeting of intermediate moisture contents. The present approach for monitoring secondary drying indicated great potential to find wider application in sterile operations on production scale in pharmaceutical freeze drying. © 2011 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists

  14. The utilization of freeze-cast scaffolds for burning transuranic elements in SMRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Ana C.A.A.; Maiorino, Jose R., E-mail: ana.fernandes@ufabc.edu.br, E-mail: joserubens.maiorino@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Sociais Aplicadas; Lang, Amanda L., E-mail: amandaleelang@gmail.com [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This work aimed at investigating the viability of burning transuranic elements in SMRs, using the IRIS model as a basis, including freeze-cast sc olds in the fuel pins. The IRIS reactor is an integral design reactor, having all of its primary components inside the pressure vessel, assuring unique characteristics regarding economy, safety and non-proliferation. Freeze-cast scaffolds are strong solid structures, built in a process of freezing powder material. When applied to the fuel pins, they allow a precise placement of different materials. Am-241 is a representative of the transuranic elements with high cross section values in the thermal spectrum, presenting itself as a great candidate for this application. Two models were compared: the Am model, having two types of fuel - the americium alloy and UO{sub 2} -, and a reference model, with the freeze-cast structures but only uranium as a fuel. Through the utilization of the package MCNP5, it was possible to obtain and analyze: (I) k{sub eff} values, (II) axial and radial flux proles, (III) maximum fuel temperature and (IV) power peaking factors. It was possible to observe that the k{sub eff} values, even though higher than 1, are considered small in both models when compared to PWRs in beginning of life, compromising the fuel life, and showing a tendency of neutron absorption by the ceramic scaffolds. The values were even lower for the Am model, confirming the suspicion that americium would be a great neutron absorber due to the resonances observed in the cross section. However, shutdown margin was achieved in both models, both in hot and cold conditions. The flux profiles showed consistency, showing a visible flattening in the radial flux profile for the Am model. The power peaking factors are close to those of a typical PWR, and fuel maximum temperature also showed satisfying numbers. (author)

  15. Physically Accurate Soil Freeze-Thaw Processes in a Global Land Surface Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuntz, Matthias; Haverd, Vanessa

    2014-05-01

    Transfer of energy and moisture in frozen soil, and hence the active layer depth, are strongly influenced by the soil freezing curve which specifies liquid moisture content as a function of temperature. However, the curve is typically not represented in global land surface models, with less physically-based approximations being used instead. In this work, we develop a physically accurate model of soil freeze-thaw processes, suitable for use in a global land surface scheme. We incorporated soil freeze-thaw processes into an existing detailed model for the transfer of heat, liquid water and water vapor in soils, including isotope diagnostics - Soil-Litter-Iso (SLI, Haverd & Cuntz 2010), which has been used successfully for water and carbon balances of the Australian continent (Haverd et al. 2013). A unique feature of SLI is that fluxes of energy and moisture are coupled using a single system of linear equations. The extension to include freeze-thaw processes and snow maintains this elegant coupling, requiring only coefficients in the linear equations to be modified. No impedance factor for hydraulic conductivity is needed because of the formulation by matric flux potential rather than pressure head. Iterations are avoided which results in the same computational speed as without freezing. The extended model is evaluated extensively in stand-alone mode (against theoretical predictions, lab experiments and field data) and as part of the CABLE global land surface scheme. SLI accurately solves the classical Stefan problem of a homogeneous medium undergoing a phase change. The model also accurately reproduces the freezing front, which is observed in laboratory experiments (Hansson et al. 2004). SLI was further tested against observations at a permafrost site in Tibet (Weismüller et al. 2011). It reproduces seasonal thawing and freezing of the active layer to within 3 K of the observed soil temperature and to within 10% of the observed volumetric liquid soil moisture

  16. Effect of freezing on rabbit cultured chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R Filgueiras

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the effect of freezing on chondrocytes maintained in culture, aiming the establishment of a cell bank for future application as heterologous implant. Chondrocytes extracted from joint cartilage of nine healthy New Zealand White rabbits were cultivated and frozen with the cryoprotector 5% dimethylsulfoxide for six months. Phenotypic and scanning electron microscopy analyses were carried out to identify morphological and functional differences between fresh and thawed cells. After enzymatic digestion, a total of 4.8x10(5cells per rabbit were obtained. Fresh chondrocytes showed a high mitotic rate and abundant matrix was present up to 60 days of culture. Loss of phenotypic stability was notable in the thawed chondrocytes, with a low labeling of proteoglycans and weak immunostaining of type II collagen. The present study showed important loss of chondrocyte viability under the freezing conditions. For future in vivo studies of heterologous implant, these results suggests that a high number of cells should be implanted in the host site in order to achieve an adequate number of viable cells. Furthermore, the chondrocytes should be implanted after two weeks of culture, when the highest viability rate is found

  17. Asset Freezing: Smart Sanction or Criminal Charge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa van den Broek

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article the question is asked whether asset freezing can be qualified as a criminal charge within the meaning of Article6 ECHR and if yes, what effects this qualification may have on the legislative framework on so called smart sanctions. Byanalysing Community and EU law and case law of the European Court of Human Rights, General Court of Instance andCourt of Justice of the European Communities the authors give an overview of the notion and possible qualification of assetfreezing as a criminal charge. The article further focusses on the consequenses of qualifying asset freezing as a criminal chargeunder ECHR and EC/EU law and concludes by answering the aforementioned question.This article is a rewrite of a research paper written under supervision of prof. dr. J.A.E. Vervaele and prof. dr. C.H. Brants(Willem Pompe Institute for Criminal Law and Criminology, Utrecht University School of Law, whom the authors wouldlike to thank for their useful comments and supervision.

  18. Constraints for the thawing and freezing potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Anna; Saka, Shogo; Tanigawa, Takuma

    2018-01-01

    We study the accelerating present universe in terms of the time evolution of the equation of state w(z) (redshift z) due to thawing and freezing scalar potentials in the quintessence model. The values of dw/da and d^2w/da^2 at a scale factor of a = 1 are associated with two parameters of each potential. For five types of scalar potentials, the scalar fields Q and w as functions of time t and/or z are numerically calculated under the fixed boundary condition of w(z=0)=-1+Δ. The observational constraint w_obs (Planck Collaboration, arXiv:1502.01590) is imposed to test whether the numerical w(z) is in w_obs. Some solutions show thawing features in the freezing potentials. Mutually exclusive allowed regions in the dw/da vs. d^2w/da^2 diagram are obtained in order to identify the likely scalar potential and even the potential parameters for future observational tests.

  19. Novel Receiver-Enhanced Solar Vapor Generation: Review and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikifa Raza

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient solar vapor/steam generation is important for various applications ranging from power generation, cooling, desalination systems to compact and portable devices like drinking water purification and sterilization units. However, conventional solar steam generation techniques usually rely on costly and cumbersome optical concentration systems and have relatively low efficiency due to bulk heating of the entire liquid volume. Recently, by incorporating novel light harvesting receivers, a new class of solar steam generation systems has emerged with high vapor generation efficiency. They are categorized in two research streams: volumetric and floating solar receivers. In this paper, we review the basic principles of these solar receivers, the mechanism involving from light absorption to the vapor generation, and the associated challenges. We also highlight the two routes to produce high temperature steam using optical and thermal concentration. Finally, we propose a scalable approach to efficiently harvest solar energy using a semi-spectrally selective absorber with near-perfect visible light absorption and low thermal emittance. Our proposed approach represents a new development in thermally concentrated solar distillation systems, which is also cost-effective and easy to fabricate for rapid industrial deployment.

  20. Concurrent freezing and sublimation of a liquid-saturated porous slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidyanathan, N.; Shamsundar, N.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper analytical models are formulated for describing heat and mass transport during concurrent freezing and sublimation of a one-dimensional liquid-saturated porous slab. The models are based on transient heat transfer in the frozen and wet regions, and quasi-steady heat and mass transfer in the dried region. The enthalpy method in conjunction with a fully implicit finite-difference scheme is employed to obtain the solution in the frozen and wet regions. A quasi-steady solution is used in the dried region. The governing equations are nondimensionalized and parametric studies are performed. The results indicate that the Luikov number, the ambient vapor pressure, and the heat transfer Biot number are important parameters. The results also confirm that the sublimation interface temperature may show significant variations, in contrast to earlier studies in which it was assumed constant

  1. Application of the Quality by Design Approach to the Freezing Step of Freeze-Drying: Building the Design Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsiccio, Andrea; Pisano, Roberto

    2018-02-09

    The present work shows a rational method for the development of the freezing step of a freeze-drying cycle. The current approach to the selection of freezing conditions is still empirical and non-systematic, thus resulting in poor robustness of control strategy. The final aim of this work is to fill this gap, describing a rational procedure, based on mathematical modelling, for properly choosing the freezing conditions. Mechanistic models are used for the prediction of temperature profiles during freezing and dimension of ice crystals being formed. Mathematical description of the drying phase of freeze-drying is also coupled with results obtained by freezing models, thus providing a comprehensive characterization of the lyophilization process. In this framework, deep understanding of the phenomena involved is required, and, according to the Quality by Design approach, this knowledge can be used to build the design space. The step by step procedure for building the design space for freezing is thus described and examples of applications are provided. The calculated design space is validated upon experimental data and we show that it allows easy control of the freezing process and fast selection of appropriate operating conditions. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Probability of freezing in the freeze-avoiding beetle larvae Cucujus clavipes puniceus (Coleoptera: Cucujidae) from interior Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sformo, T; McIntyre, J; Walters, K R; Barnes, B M; Duman, J

    2011-08-01

    Freeze-avoiding insects must resist freezing or die. A suite of adaptations to low temperatures, including the production of antifreeze proteins, colligative antifreezes (polyols), and dehydration allows most individuals to prevent freezing below the lowest ambient temperatures experienced in situ; however, there can be a wide variance in the minimum temperatures that individuals of freeze-avoiding species reach before freezing. We used logistic regression to explore factors that affect this variance and to estimate the probability of freezing in larvae of the freeze-avoiding beetle Cucujus clavipes puniceus. We hypothesized that water content ≤0.5 mg mg(-1) dry mass would lead to deep supercooling (avoidance of freezing below -58°C). We found a significant interaction between water content and ambient below-snow temperature and a significant difference between individuals collected from two locations in Alaska: Wiseman and Fairbanks. Individuals collected in Wiseman deep supercooled with greater water content and to a greater range of ambient temperatures than individuals collected in Fairbanks, leading to significantly different lethal water contents associated with 50% probability of freezing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrated vacuum absorption steam cycle gas separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiaguo [Champaign, IL; Lu, Yonggi [Urbana, IL; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud [Champaign, IL

    2011-11-22

    Methods and systems for separating a targeted gas from a gas stream emitted from a power plant. The gas stream is brought into contact with an absorption solution to preferentially absorb the targeted gas to be separated from the gas stream so that an absorbed gas is present within the absorption solution. This provides a gas-rich solution, which is introduced into a stripper. Low pressure exhaust steam from a low pressure steam turbine of the power plant is injected into the stripper with the gas-rich solution. The absorbed gas from the gas-rich solution is stripped in the stripper using the injected low pressure steam to provide a gas stream containing the targeted gas. The stripper is at or near vacuum. Water vapor in a gas stream from the stripper is condensed in a condenser operating at a pressure lower than the stripper to concentrate the targeted gas. Condensed water is separated from the concentrated targeted gas.

  4. THE STABILITY OF VAPOR CONDENSATION EQUILIBRIUM

    OpenAIRE

    SHIMIN ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    The system must get across an energy peak of unstable equilibrium during the condensation of pure vapor; as the supersaturated extent of vapor increases and the temperature decreases, the energy peak shortens and vapor condensation becomes easier. The system must get across an energy peak of unstable equilibrium first, and then get into an energy valley of stable equilibrium during the condensation of impure vapor; as the partial pressure of vapor decreases, the energy peak becomes taller, th...

  5. [Study on lead absorption in pumpkin by atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Xia; Sun, Yong-Dong; Chen, Bi-Hua; Li, Xin-Zheng

    2008-07-01

    A study was carried out on the characteristic of lead absorption in pumpkin via atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed that lead absorption amount in pumpkin increased with time, but the absorption rate decreased with time; And the lead absorption amount reached the peak in pH 7. Lead and cadmium have similar characteristic of absorption in pumpkin.

  6. Use of soft sensors to monitor a pharmaceuticals freeze-drying process in vials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosca, Serena; Barresi, Antonello A; Fissore, Davide

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a soft sensor that can be effectively used for in-line monitoring of the primary drying step of a pharmaceuticals freeze-drying process in vials. Process modeling and product temperature measurements are used to estimate the residual amount of ice in the vial and the heat transfer coefficient from the shelf to the product in the vial. The resistance of the dried cake to vapor flow is determined through the heat balance equation at the interface of sublimation. Mathematical simulation and experimental tests have been carried out to validate the estimations provided by the soft sensor. Accurate estimations of the dynamics of the product until the end of primary drying are obtained, as well as of the heat and mass transfer coefficients, even in the case of a highly non-uniform batch. The reduction in the number of variables directly estimated by the soft sensor allows increasing the robustness of the tool with respect to other sensors presented in the literature. The proposed soft sensor is thus effective for process monitoring and it allows using model-based tools for cycle development in lab-scale units, where thermocouples are usually available, and for process monitoring in industrial-scale freeze-dryers, in case wireless sensors are used.

  7. Thermodynamic performances of [mmim]DMP/Methanol absorption refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Liang, Shiqiang; Guo, Yongxian; Cheng, Keyong; Gui, Xiaohong; Tang, Dawei

    2012-12-01

    In order to study the theoretical cycle characteristic of [mmim]DMP (1-methyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate) /methanol absorption refrigeration, the modified UNIFAC group contribution model and the Wilson model are established through correlating the experimental vapor pressure data of [mmim]DMP/methanol at T=280˜370 K and methanol mole fraction x= 0.529˜0.965. Thermodynamic performances of absorption refrigeration utilizing [mmim]DMP/methanol, LiBr/H2O and H2O/NH3 are investigated and compared with each other under the same operating conditions. From the results, some conclusions are obtained as follows: 1) the circulation ratio of the [mmim]DMP /methanol absorption refrigeration is higher than that of the LiBr/H2O absorption refrigeration, but still can be acceptable and tolerable. 2) The COP of the [mmim]DMP/methanol absorption refrigeration is smaller than that of the LiBr/H2O absorption refrigeration, while it is higher than that of the H2O/NH3 absorption refrigeration under most operating conditions. 3) The [mmim]DMP/methanol absorption refrigeration are still available with high COP when the heat source temperature is too high to drive LiBr/H2O absorption refrigeration.

  8. A New Criterion to Evaluate Water Vapor Interference in Protein Secondary Structural Analysis by FTIR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Zou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Second derivative and Fourier self-deconvolution (FSD are two commonly used techniques to resolve the overlapped component peaks from the often featureless amide I band in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR curve-fitting approach for protein secondary structural analysis. Yet, the reliability of these two techniques is greatly affected by the omnipresent water vapor in the atmosphere. Several criteria are currently in use as quality controls to ensure the protein absorption spectrum is negligibly affected by water vapor interference. In this study, through a second derivative study of liquid water, we first argue that the previously established criteria cannot guarantee a reliable evaluation of water vapor interference due to a phenomenon that we refer to as sample’s absorbance-dependent water vapor interference. Then, through a comparative study of protein and liquid water, we show that a protein absorption spectrum can still be significantly affected by water vapor interference even though it satisfies the established criteria. At last, we propose to use the comparison between the second derivative spectra of protein and liquid water as a new criterion to better evaluate water vapor interference for more reliable second derivative and FSD treatments on the protein amide I band.

  9. Absorption heat pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formigoni, C.

    1998-01-01

    A brief description of the difference between a compression and an absorption heat pump is made, and the reasons why absorption systems have spread lately are given. Studies and projects recently started in the field of absorption heat pumps, as well as criteria usually followed in project development are described. An outline (performance targets, basic components) of a project on a water/air absorption heat pump, running on natural gas or LPG, is given. The project was developed by the Robur Group as an evolution of a water absorption refrigerator operating with a water/ammonia solution, which has been on the market for a long time and recently innovated. Finally, a list of the main energy and cost advantages deriving from the use of absorption heat pumps is made [it

  10. Accelerated storage testing of freeze-dried Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The viability of freeze-dried P. fluorescens strains (BTP1, PI9 and BB2) was evaluated by using the Arrhenius model. This model was described by measuring the reaction rate constants (D or k) and temperature sensitivity of rate constant (z or Ea). The freeze-dried P. fluorescens strains were stored in glass tubes at 60, ...

  11. Effects of stress on bodily freezing in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niermann, H.C.M.; Figner, B.; Tyborowska, A.B.; Cillessen, A.H.N.; Roelofs, K.

    2015-01-01

    Freezing is a major defensive stress-response, characterized by reduced body-sway and heart rate. Exacerbated freezing in threatening situations has been associated with increased basal and stress-induced glucocorticoid levels and with long-lasting stress-related symptoms in animals. However, the

  12. Nanoclay Performance on Resistance of Clay under Freezing Cycles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    msi

    4 Department of Civil Engineering, Kermanshah Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah, Iran ramin.bayat67@gmail.com. KEYWORDS: Nanoclay, Resistance, Freezing, Sample, Uniaxial. ABSTRACT: This study aims to investigate effect of nanoclay on resistance of the exposed clay soils in freezing in vitro conditions.

  13. Applicable technical method for freeze-substitution of high pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bmshsj

    2011-11-02

    Nov 2, 2011 ... Cryo-fixation and freeze substitution followed by microscopy are commonly used sample preparation methods for visualizing the morphology of intracellular organelles. Freeze substitution is an especially important preparative step because it enables the preservation of intracellular structures in cryo-fixed.

  14. Prospective Primary School Teachers' Perceptions on Boiling and Freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senocak, Erdal

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of prospective primary school teachers on the physical state of water during the processes of boiling and freezing. There were three stages in the investigation: First, open-ended questions concerning the boiling and freezing of water were given to two groups of prospective primary school…

  15. A tissue snap-freezing apparatus without sacrificial cryogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanapalli, Srinivas; Jagga, Sahil; Holland, Harry; ter Brake, H.J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular technologies in cancer diagnosis require a fresh and frozen tissue, which is obtained by means of snap-freezing. Currently, coolants such as solid carbon dioxide and liquid nitrogen are used to preserve good morphology of the tissue. Using these coolants, snap freezing of tissues for

  16. DOES GLUTATHIONE PLAY A ROLE IN FREEZING TOLERANCE OF PLANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, C.E.E.; De Kok, Luit J.; Kuiper, P.J.C.

    1992-01-01

    During low temperature hardening enhanced levels of glutathione (GSH) are generally observed in plant shoots and are often related to the development of freezing tolerance. The present communication shows that there is no direct relation between an increased GSH content and freezing tolerance of

  17. Using infrared thermography to study freezing in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factors that determine when and to what extent a plant will freeze are complex. While thermocouples have served as the main method of monitoring the freezing process in plants, infrared thermography offers distinct advantages, and the use of this latter technology has provided new insights on the p...

  18. Accelerated storage testing of freeze-dried Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erika-Chris

    storage and it would be useful to increase culture viability during storage. The viability of freeze-dried. P. fluorescens ... assessment of viable cells, while the residual water content is omitted (Hernandez et al., 2009). The ..... Effects of micronization on viability andthermotolerance of probiotic freeze-dried cultures. Int. Dairy J.

  19. A subspecies of region crossing change, region freeze crossing change

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Ayumu; Shimizu, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a local move on a link diagram named a region freeze crossing change which is close to a region crossing change, but not the same. We study similarity and difference between region crossing change and region freeze crossing change.

  20. Savanna Tree Seedlings are Physiologically Tolerant to Nighttime Freeze Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Keefe, Kimberly; Nippert, Jesse B.; Swemmer, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    Freeze events can be important disturbances in savanna ecosystems, yet the interactive effect of freezing with other environmental drivers on plant functioning is unknown. Here, we investigated physiological responses of South African tree seedlings to interactions of water availability and freezing temperatures. We grew widely distributed South African tree species (Colophospermum mopane, Combretum apiculatum, Acacia nigrescens, and Cassia abbreviata) under well-watered and water-limited conditions and exposed individuals to nighttime freeze events. Of the four species studied here, C. mopane was the most tolerant of lower water availability. However, all species were similarly tolerant to nighttime freezing and recovered within one week following the last freezing event. We also show that water limitation somewhat increased freezing tolerance in one of the species (C. mopane). Therefore, water limitation, but not freezing temperatures, may restrict the distribution of these species, although the interactions of these stressors may have species-specific impacts on plant physiology. Ultimately, we show that unique physiologies can exist among dominant species within communities and that combined stresses may play a currently unidentified role in driving the function of certain species within southern Africa. PMID:26870065

  1. Estimating pure component vapor pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrdal, P.B.; Yalkowsky, S.H. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1994-12-31

    The hazard of exposure to volatile organic compounds is an increasing concern all chemical industries. Recent EPA and FDA guidelines require the environmental assessment of new chemical entities, which includes the determination or estimation of vapor pressure. This work presents a means for the reliable estimation of pure component vapor pressures. The method presented is an extension of the work proposed by Mishra and Yalkowsky. New equations are presented for the heat capacity change upon boiling and the entropy of boiling. The final vapor pressure equation requires only the knowledge of transition temperatures and molecular structure. The equation developed has been successfully applied to 296 organic compounds, giving an overall average absolute error of 0.12 log units (in atm. at 25 C). In addition, the equation is shown to be very accurate in predicting vapor pressure as a function of temperature. However, for many compounds of environmental interest, the boiling point is not known or cannot be determined due to decomposition. In light of this, a new technique has been developed which can be used to estimate ``hypothetical`` boiling points. This enables the estimation of vapor pressure from as little as one transition temperature and molecular structure.

  2. Cavity-ring-down spectroscopy on water vapor in the range 555-604 nm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.; Ubachs, W.M.G.; Levelt, P.F.; Polyansky, O.L.; Zobov, N.F.; Tennyson, J.

    2001-01-01

    The method of pulsed cavity-ring-down spectroscopy was employed to record the water vapor absorption spectrum in the wavelength range 555-604 nm. The spectrum consists of 1830 lines, calibrated against the iodine standard with an accuracy of 0.01 cm

  3. Polymer-coated vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode vapor sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgaard; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2010-01-01

    We report a new method for monitoring vapor concentration of volatile organic compounds using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The VCSEL is coated with a polymer thin film on the top distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). The analyte absorption is transduced to the electrical domain ...

  4. Hanford Tank Ventilation System Condensates and Headspace Vapors: An Assessment of Potential Dermal Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huckaby, James L.; Springer, David L.

    2006-04-24

    This study considers the question of whether potential dermal exposures to Hanford high-level radioactive waste tank headspace vapors and their condensates could result in significant exposure to workers. Three types of potential exposures were evaluated; dermal contact with aqueous condensate, organic condensate, and direct contact with head space vapors. The dermal absorption rates from aqueous and organic condensates were estimated for selected chemicals using a model described by EPA (1992) with a modified correlation for dermal permeability suggested by Wilschut et al. (1995). Dermal absorption rates of vapors were estimated using a model given by AIHA (2000). Results were compared to an ''equivalent inhalation dose'' calculated by multiplying the inhalation occupational exposure limit by a nominal daily inhalation rate. The results should provide guidance for industrial hygienists to prepare specific recommendations based on specific scenarios.

  5. Limonene encapsulation in freeze dried gellan systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evageliou, Vasiliki; Saliari, Dimitra

    2017-05-15

    The encapsulation of limonene in freeze-dried gellan systems was investigated. Surface and encapsulated limonene content was determined by measurement of the absorbance at 252nm. Gellan matrices were both gels and solutions. For a standard gellan concentration (0.5wt%) gelation was induced by potassium or calcium chloride. Furthermore, gellan solutions of varying concentrations (0.25-1wt%) were also studied. Limonene was added at two different concentrations (1 and 2mL/100g sample). Gellan gels encapsulated greater amounts of limonene than solutions. Among all gellan gels, the KCl gels had the greater encapsulated limonene content. However, when the concentration of limonene was doubled in these KCl gels, the encapsulated limonene decreased. The surface limonene content was significant, especially for gellan solutions. The experimental conditions and not the mechanical properties of the matrices were the dominant factor in the interpretation of the observed results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Climatic variability and the evolution of insect freeze tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Brent J; Addo-Bediako, A; Chown, Steven L

    2003-05-01

    Insects may survive subzero temperatures by two general strategies: Freeze-tolerant insects withstand the formation of internal ice, while freeze-avoiding insects die upon freezing. While it is widely recognized that these represent alternative strategies to survive low temperatures, and mechanistic understanding of the physical and molecular process of cold tolerance are becoming well elucidated, the reasons why one strategy or the other is adopted remain unclear. Freeze avoidance is clearly basal within the arthropod lineages, and it seems that freeze tolerance has evolved convergently at least six times among the insects (in the Blattaria, Orthoptera, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Diptera and Lepidoptera). Of the pterygote insect species whose cold-tolerance strategy has been reported in the literature, 29% (69 of 241 species studied) of those in the Northern Hemisphere, whereas 85 % (11 of 13 species) in the Southern Hemisphere exhibit freeze tolerance. A randomization test indicates that this predominance of freeze tolerance in the Southern Hemisphere is too great to be due to chance, and there is no evidence of a recent publication bias in favour of new reports of freeze-tolerant species. We conclude from this that the specific nature of cold insect habitats in the Southern Hemisphere, which are characterized by oceanic influence and climate variability must lead to strong selection in favour of freeze tolerance in this hemisphere. We envisage two main scenarios where it would prove advantageous for insects to be freeze tolerant. In the first, characteristic of cold continental habitats of the Northern Hemisphere, freeze tolerance allows insects to survive very low temperatures for long periods of time, and to avoid desiccation. These responses tend to be strongly seasonal, and insects in these habitats are only freeze tolerant for the overwintering period. By contrast, in mild and unpredictable environments, characteristic of habitats influenced by the Southern

  7. Effects of freezing rates and cryoprotectant on thermal expansion of articular cartilage during freezing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y; Sun, H J; Lv, Y; Zou, J C; Lin, B L; Hua, T C

    2013-01-01

    The intact articular cartilage has not yet been successfully preserved at low temperature most likely due to the volume expansion from water to ice during freezing. The objective of this current study focuses on examining thermal expansion behavior of articular cartilage (AC) during freezing from 0 degree C to -100 degree C. Thermo Mechanical Analysis (TMA) was used to investigate the effects of different concentrations of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) (0%, 10%, 30% and 60% v/v) and different freezing rates (1 C/min, 3 C/min and 5 C/min). The results showed that: (1) the inhomogeneous thermal expansion (or contraction) presents due to inhomogeneous water distributions in articular cartilage during freezing, which also may be the most likely reason that the matrix has been damaged in cryopreserved intact articular cartilage; (2) at the phase transition temperature range, the maximum thermal strain change value for 5C/min is approximately 1.45 times than that for 1 C/min, but the maximum thermal expansion coefficient of the later is about six times than that of the former; (3) the thermal expansion coefficient decreases with increasing cooling rate at the unfrozen temperature region, but some opposite results are obtained at the frozen temperature region; (4) the higher the DMSO concentration is, at the phase change temperature region, the smaller the thermal strain change as well as the maximum thermal expansion coefficient are, but DMSO concentration exhibits little effect on the thermal expansion coefficient at both unfrozen and frozen region. Once the DMSO concentration increasing enough, e.g. 60% v/v, the thermal strain decreases linearly and smoothly without any abrupt change due to little or no ice crystal forms (i.e. vitrification) in frozen articular cartilage. This study may improve our understanding of the thermal expansion (or contraction) behavior of cryopreserved articular cartilage and it may be useful for the future study on cryopreservation of intact

  8. Predictive modeling of freezing and thawing of frost-susceptible soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Frost depth is an essential factor in design of various transportation infrastructures. In frost : susceptible soils, as soils freezes, water migrates through the soil voids below the freezing line : towards the freezing front and causes excessive he...

  9. Multiple Glass Transitions and Freezing Events of Aqueous Citric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Calorimetric and optical cryo-microscope measurements of 10–64 wt % citric acid (CA) solutions subjected to moderate (3 K/min) and slow (0.5 and 0.1 K/min) cooling/warming rates and also to quenching/moderate warming between 320 and 133 K are presented. Depending on solution concentration and cooling rate, the obtained thermograms show one freezing event and from one to three liquid–glass transitions upon cooling and from one to six liquid–glass and reverse glass–liquid transitions, one or two freezing events, and one melting event upon warming of frozen/glassy CA/H2O. The multiple freezing events and glass transitions pertain to the mother CA/H2O solution itself and two freeze-concentrated solution regions, FCS1 and FCS2, of different concentrations. The FCS1 and FCS2 (or FCS22) are formed during the freezing of CA/H2O upon cooling and/or during the freezing upon warming of partly glassy or entirely glassy mother CA/H2O. The formation of two FCS1 and FCS22 regions during the freezing upon warming to our best knowledge has never been reported before. Using an optical cryo-microscope, we are able to observe the formation of a continuous ice framework (IF) and its morphology and reciprocal distribution of IF/(FCS1 + FCS2). Our results provide a new look at the freezing and glass transition behavior of aqueous solutions and can be used for the optimization of lyophilization and freezing of foods and biopharmaceutical formulations, among many other applications where freezing plays a crucial role. PMID:25482069

  10. The choice of a suitable oligosaccharide to prevent aggregation of PEGylated nanoparticles during freeze thawing and freeze drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinrichs, Wouter; Manceñido, F A; Sanders, N N; Braeckmans, K; De Smedt, S C; Demeester, J; Frijlink, H W

    2006-01-01

    In a previous Study we have shown that the oligosaccharide inulin can prevent aggregation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coated plasmid DNA/cationic liposome complexes ('' PEGylated lipoplexes '') during freeze thawing and freeze drying [Hinrichs et al., 2005. J. Control. Release 103, 465]. By

  11. Chemical vapor deposited boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Smith, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed analytical electron microscope (AEM) studies of yellow whiskers produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) show that two basic types of whiskers are produced at low temperatures (between 1200 0 C and 1400 0 C) and low boron to carbon gas ratios. Both whisker types show planar microstructures such as twin planes and stacking faults oriented parallel to, or at a rhombohedral angle to, the growth direction. For both whisker types, the presence of droplet-like terminations containing both Si and Ni indicate that the growth process during CVD is via a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanisms

  12. Coupled fluid-thermal analysis of low-pressure sublimation and condensation with application to freeze-drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Arnab

    Freeze-drying is a low-pressure, low-temperature condensation pumping process widely used in the manufacture of bio-pharmaceuticals for removal of solvents by sublimation. The goal of the process is to provide a stable dosage form by removing the solvent in such a way that the sensitive molecular structure of the active substance is least disturbed. The vacuum environment presents unique challenges for understanding and controlling heat and mass transfer in the process. As a result, the design of equipment and associated processes has been largely empirical, slow and inefficient. A comprehensive simulation framework to predict both, process and equipment performance is critical to improve current practice. A part of the dissertation is aimed at performing coupled fluid-thermal analysis of low-pressure sublimation-condensation processes typical of freeze-drying technologies. Both, experimental and computational models are used to first understand the key heat transfer modes during the process. A modeling and computational framework, validated with experiments for analysis of sublimation, water-vapor flow and condensation in application to pharmaceutical freeze-drying is developed. Augmented with computational fluid dynamics modeling, the simulation framework presented here allows to predict for the first time, dynamic product/process conditions taking into consideration specifics of equipment design. Moreover, by applying the modeling framework to process design based on a design-space approach, it has demonstrated that there is a viable alternative to empiricism.

  13. Use of a soft sensor for the fast estimation of dried cake resistance during a freeze-drying cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosca, Serena; Barresi, Antonello A; Fissore, Davide

    2013-07-15

    This paper deals with the determination of dried cake resistance in a freeze-drying process using the Smart Soft Sensor, a process analytical technology recently proposed by the authors to monitor the primary drying stage of a freeze-drying process. This sensor uses the measurement of product temperature, a mathematical model of the process, and the Kalman filter algorithm to estimate the residual amount of ice in the vial as a function of time, as well as the coefficient of heat transfer between the shelf and the product and the resistance of the dried cake to vapor flow. It does not require expensive (additional) hardware in a freeze-dryer, provided that thermocouples are available. At first, the effect of the insertion of the thermocouple in a vial on the structure of the product is investigated by means of experimental tests, comparing both sublimation rate and cake structure in vials with and without thermocouple. This is required to assess that the temperature measured by the thermocouple is the same of the product in the non-monitored vials, at least in a non-GMP environment, or when controlled nucleation methods are used. Then, results about cake resistance obtained in an extended experimental campaign with aqueous solutions containing different excipients (sucrose, mannitol and polyvinylpyrrolidone), processed in various operating conditions, are presented, with the goal to point out the accuracy of the proposed methodology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of industrial pre-freezing processing and freezing handling on glucosinolates and antioxidant attributes in broccoli florets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Congxi; Miao, Huiying; Qian, Hongmei; Yao, Leishuan; Wang, Bingliang; Wang, Qiaomei

    2016-11-01

    The effects of industrial pre-freezing processing and freezing handling on the contents of glucosinolates and antioxidants (vitamin C, polyphenols, carotenoid and chlorophyll), as well as the antioxidant capacity in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) florets were investigated in the present study. Our results showed that the glucosinolate accumulations were significantly decreased after pre-freezing processing, whereas elevated levels of phenols, carotenoids, chlorophyll, and also antioxidant capacity were observed in frozen broccoli florets. The contents of vitamin C remained constant during above mentioned processing. In conclusion, the current industrial freezing processing method is a good practice for the preservation of main antioxidant nutrients in broccoli florets, although some improvements in pre-freezing processing, such as steam blanching and ice-water cooling, are needed to attenuate the decrease in glucosinolate content. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Validation on MERSI/FY-3A precipitable water vapor product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shaoqi; Fiifi Hagan, Daniel; Lu, Jing; Wang, Guojie

    2018-01-01

    The precipitable water vapor is one of the most active gases in the atmosphere which strongly affects the climate. China's second-generation polar orbit meteorological satellite FY-3A equipped with a Medium Resolution Spectral Imager (MERSI) is able to detect atmospheric water vapor. In this paper, water vapor data from AERONET, radiosonde and MODIS were used to validate the accuracy of the MERSI water vapor product in the different seasons and climatic regions of East Asia. The results show that the values of MERSI water vapor product are relatively lower than that of the other instruments and its accuracy is generally lower. The mean bias (MB) was -0.8 to -12.7 mm, the root mean square error (RMSE) was 2.2-17.0 mm, and the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) varied from 31.8% to 44.1%. On the spatial variation, the accuracy of MERSI water vapor product in a descending order was from North China, West China, Japan -Korea, East China, to South China, while the seasonal variation of accuracy was the best for winter, followed by spring, then in autumn and the lowest in summer. It was found that the errors of MERSI water vapor product was mainly due to the low accuracy of radiation calibration of the MERSI absorption channel, along with the inaccurate look-up table of apparent reflectance and water vapor within the water vapor retrieved algorithm. In addition, the surface reflectance, the mixed pixels of image cloud, the humidity and temperature of atmospheric vertical profile and the haze were also found to have affected the accuracy of MERSI water vapor product.

  16. Solar absorption surface panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  17. Nutrition and magnesium absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of various nutrients present in dairy products and soybean-based products on absorption of magnesium has been investigated. The studies demonstrate that soybean protein versus casein lowers apparent magnesium absorption in rats through its phytate component. However, true

  18. Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos-Vollebregt, M.T.C. de.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of background correction in atomic absorption spectroscopy has recently been introduced, based on the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in a magnetic field. A theoretical analysis of the background correction capability observed in such instruments is presented. A Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer utilizing a 50 Hz sine wave modulated magnetic field is described. (Auth.)

  19. Waste Tank Vapor Project: Tank vapor database development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seesing, P.R.; Birn, M.B.; Manke, K.L.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the Tank Vapor Database (TVD) Development task in FY 1994 was to create a database to store, retrieve, and analyze data collected from the vapor phase of Hanford waste tanks. The data needed to be accessible over the Hanford Local Area Network to users at both Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The data were restricted to results published in cleared reports from the laboratories analyzing vapor samples. Emphasis was placed on ease of access and flexibility of data formatting and reporting mechanisms. Because of time and budget constraints, a Rapid Application Development strategy was adopted by the database development team. An extensive data modeling exercise was conducted to determine the scope of information contained in the database. a A SUN Sparcstation 1000 was procured as the database file server. A multi-user relational database management system, Sybase reg-sign, was chosen to provide the basic data storage and retrieval capabilities. Two packages were chosen for the user interface to the database: DataPrism reg-sign and Business Objects trademark. A prototype database was constructed to provide the Waste Tank Vapor Project's Toxicology task with summarized and detailed information presented at Vapor Conference 4 by WHC, PNL, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Oregon Graduate Institute. The prototype was used to develop a list of reported compounds, and the range of values for compounds reported by the analytical laboratories using different sample containers and analysis methodologies. The prototype allowed a panel of toxicology experts to identify carcinogens and compounds whose concentrations were within the reach of regulatory limits. The database and user documentation was made available for general access in September 1994

  20. Stable isotopes in atmospheric water vapor and applications to the hydrologic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galewsky, Joseph; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Field, Robert D.; Worden, John; Risi, Camille; Schneider, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    The measurement and simulation of water vapor isotopic composition has matured rapidly over the last decade, with long-term data sets and comprehensive modeling capabilities now available. Theories for water vapor isotopic composition have been developed by extending the theories that have been used for the isotopic composition of precipitation to include a more nuanced understanding of evaporation, large-scale mixing, deep convection, and kinetic fractionation. The technologies for in situ and remote sensing measurements of water vapor isotopic composition have developed especially rapidly over the last decade, with discrete water vapor sampling methods, based on mass spectroscopy, giving way to laser spectroscopic methods and satellite- and ground-based infrared absorption techniques. The simulation of water vapor isotopic composition has evolved from General Circulation Model (GCM) methods for simulating precipitation isotopic composition to sophisticated isotope-enabled microphysics schemes using higher-order moments for water and ice size distributions. The incorporation of isotopes into GCMs has enabled more detailed diagnostics of the water cycle and has led to improvements in its simulation. The combination of improved measurement and modeling of water vapor isotopic composition opens the door to new advances in our understanding of the atmospheric water cycle, in processes ranging from the marine boundary layer, through deep convection and tropospheric mixing, and into the water cycle of the stratosphere. Finally, studies of the processes governing modern water vapor isotopic composition provide an improved framework for the interpretation of paleoclimate proxy records of the hydrological cycle.

  1. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of calibrated vapor samples of explosives compounds remains a challenge due to the low vapor pressures of the explosives, adsorption of explosives on container and tubing walls, and the requirement to manage (typically) multiple temperature zones as the vapor is generated, diluted, and delivered. Methods that have been described to generate vapors can be classified as continuous or pulsed flow vapor generators. Vapor sources for continuous flow generators are typically explosives compounds supported on a solid support, or compounds contained in a permeation or diffusion device. Sources are held at elevated isothermal temperatures. Similar sources can be used for pulsed vapor generators; however, pulsed systems may also use injection of solutions onto heated surfaces with generation of both solvent and explosives vapors, transient peaks from a gas chromatograph, or vapors generated by s programmed thermal desorption. This article reviews vapor generator approaches with emphasis on the method of generating the vapors and on practical aspects of vapor dilution and handling. In addition, a gas chromatographic system with two ovens that is configurable with up to four heating ropes is proposed that could serve as a single integrated platform for explosives vapor generation and device testing. Issues related to standards, calibration, and safety are also discussed.

  2. Physical Chemistry of the Freezing Process of Atmospheric Aqueous Drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Anatoli; Molina, Mario J

    2017-04-27

    In supercooled aqueous solutions, ice nucleation is the initial stage of the freezing process. In this paper, we present experimental results that indicate that during the freezing of aqueous solutions, freeze-induced phase separation (FIPS) into pure ice and a freeze-concentrated solution (FCS) takes place. Our observations involve the use of an optical cryo-microscope (OC-M) to record images and movies. The results visually indicate for the first time that there are two freezing processes for (NH 4 ) 3 H(SO 4 ) 2 /H 2 O solutions: (i) contact freezing, as is the case for pure water drops, and (ii) the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process, which is the growth of frozen drops (ice) at the expense of liquid ones. We also present OC-M images of frozen micrometer-scaled H 2 SO 4 /H 2 O drops that support our previous finding that freezing of these solutions generates mixed-phase particles, namely an ice core coated with a FCS. These results are relevant for atmospheric as well as for pharmaceutical sciences.

  3. Metabolic changes in Avena sativa crowns recovering from freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Cynthia A; Duke, Stanley H; Livingston, David P

    2014-01-01

    Extensive research has been conducted on cold acclimation and freezing tolerance of fall-sown cereal plants due to their economic importance; however, little has been reported on the biochemical changes occurring over time after the freezing conditions are replaced by conditions favorable for recovery and growth such as would occur during spring. In this study, GC-MS was used to detect metabolic changes in the overwintering crown tissue of oat (Avena sativa L.) during a fourteen day time-course after freezing. Metabolomic analysis revealed increases in most amino acids, particularly proline, 5-oxoproline and arginine, which increased greatly in crowns that were frozen compared to controls and correlated very significantly with days after freezing. In contrast, sugar and sugar related metabolites were little changed by freezing, except sucrose and fructose which decreased dramatically. In frozen tissue all TCA cycle metabolites, especially citrate and malate, decreased in relation to unfrozen tissue. Alterations in some amino acid pools after freezing were similar to those observed in cold acclimation whereas most changes in sugar pools after freezing were not. These similarities and differences suggest that there are common as well as unique genetic mechanisms between these two environmental conditions that are crucial to the winter survival of plants.

  4. Freeze-thaw durability of air-entrained concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Huai-Shuai; Yi, Ting-Hua

    2013-01-01

    One of the most damaging actions affecting concrete is the abrupt temperature change (freeze-thaw cycles). The types of deterioration of concrete structures by cyclic freeze-thaw can be largely classified into surface scaling (characterized by the weight loss) and internal crack growth (characterized by the loss of dynamic modulus of elasticity). The present study explored the durability of concrete made with air-entraining agent subjected to 0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 cycles of freeze-thaw. The experimental study of C20, C25, C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete specimens was completed according to "the test method of long-term and durability on ordinary concrete" GB/T 50082-2009. The dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss of specimens were measured after different cycles of freeze-thaw. The influence of freeze-thaw cycles on the relative dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss was analyzed. The findings showed that the dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight decreased as the freeze-thaw cycles were repeated. They revealed that the C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete was still durable after 300 cycles of freeze-thaw according to the experimental results.

  5. Freeze-Thaw Durability of Air-Entrained Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Shuai Shang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most damaging actions affecting concrete is the abrupt temperature change (freeze-thaw cycles. The types of deterioration of concrete structures by cyclic freeze-thaw can be largely classified into surface scaling (characterized by the weight loss and internal crack growth (characterized by the loss of dynamic modulus of elasticity. The present study explored the durability of concrete made with air-entraining agent subjected to 0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 cycles of freeze-thaw. The experimental study of C20, C25, C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete specimens was completed according to “the test method of long-term and durability on ordinary concrete” GB/T 50082-2009. The dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss of specimens were measured after different cycles of freeze-thaw. The influence of freeze-thaw cycles on the relative dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss was analyzed. The findings showed that the dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight decreased as the freeze-thaw cycles were repeated. They revealed that the C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete was still durable after 300 cycles of freeze-thaw according to the experimental results.

  6. Iodine flow rate measurement for COIL with the chemical iodine generator based on absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weili; Zhang, Yuelong; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Mingxiu; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    A dual-components absorption method based on absorption spectroscopy was described in the paper. It can easily eliminate the influence of the serious contamination and aerosol scattering on IFR measurement by utilizing the absorptions of iodine vapor and chlorine on two different wavelengths respectively. According to the character that there is no other gaseous product in the reaction besides iodine vapor, IFR in real time can be obtained by the connections of the pressure and the flow rate among chlorine remainder, iodine vapor, and the buffer gas. We used this method to measure IFR for the first time at the exit of a chemical iodine generator. The average of IFR is coincident with that calculated by chemical weighting mass.

  7. Bénard-Marangoni instability driven by moisture absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sangwoo; Jacobi, Ian; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol is a viscous liquid widely used in industry and known for its strong hygroscopic nature. While this unusual property has been well documented from the perspective of solution chemistry, its impact on the mechanical properties of glycerol remains largely unknown. Here, we report a spontaneous Bénard-Marangoni instability in pure glycerol driven by absorption of water vapor. Even under standard laboratory conditions, ambient humidity is sufficient to drive distinct Bénard-Marangoni convection cells for hours. We describe the mechanism of this instability in terms of the vapor transport process and competition between solutal and thermal Marangoni forces, and provide insight into potential uses and impact of this aspect of dynamics driven by moisture absorption in various common settings.

  8. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  9. Air-Cooled Stack Freeze Tolerance Freeze Failure Modes and Freeze Tolerance Strategies for GenDriveTM Material Handling Application Systems and Stacks Final Scientific Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, David, W.

    2012-02-14

    Air-cooled stack technology offers the potential for a simpler system architecture (versus liquid-cooled) for applications below 4 kilowatts. The combined cooling and cathode air allows for a reduction in part count and hence a lower cost solution. However, efficient heat rejection challenges escalate as power and ambient temperature increase. For applications in ambient temperatures below freezing, the air-cooled approach has additional challenges associated with not overcooling the fuel cell stack. The focus of this project was freeze tolerance while maintaining all other stack and system requirements. Through this project, Plug Power advanced the state of the art in technology for air-cooled PEM fuel cell stacks and related GenDrive material handling application fuel cell systems. This was accomplished through a collaborative work plan to improve freeze tolerance and mitigate freeze-thaw effect failure modes within innovative material handling equipment fuel cell systems designed for use in freezer forklift applications. Freeze tolerance remains an area where additional research and understanding can help fuel cells to become commercially viable. This project evaluated both stack level and system level solutions to improve fuel cell stack freeze tolerance. At this time, the most cost effective solutions are at the system level. The freeze mitigation strategies developed over the course of this project could be used to drive fuel cell commercialization. The fuel cell system studied in this project was Plug Power's commercially available GenDrive platform providing battery replacement for equipment in the material handling industry. The fuel cell stacks were Ballard's commercially available FCvelocity 9SSL (9SSL) liquid-cooled PEM fuel cell stack and FCvelocity 1020ACS (Mk1020) air-cooled PEM fuel cell stack.

  10. Self-tuning method for monitoring the density of a gas vapor component using a tunable laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagans, K.; Berzins, L.; Galkowski, J.; Seng, R.

    1996-08-27

    The present invention relates to a vapor density monitor and laser atomic absorption spectroscopy method for highly accurate, continuous monitoring of vapor densities, composition, flow velocity, internal and kinetic temperatures and constituent distributions. The vapor density monitor employs a diode laser, preferably of an external cavity design. By using a diode laser, the vapor density monitor is significantly less expensive and more reliable than prior art vapor density monitoring devices. In addition, the compact size of diode lasers enables the vapor density monitor to be portable. According to the method of the present invention, the density of a component of a gas vapor is calculated by tuning the diode laser to a frequency at which the amount of light absorbed by the component is at a minimum or a maximum within about 50 MHz of that frequency. Laser light from the diode laser is then transmitted at the determined frequency across a predetermined pathlength of the gas vapor. By comparing the amount of light transmitted by the diode laser to the amount of light transmitted after the laser light passes through the gas vapor, the density of the component can be determined using Beer`s law. 6 figs.

  11. Universal pion freeze-out in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adamova, D; Appelshäuser, H; Belaga, V; Braun-Munzinger, P; Castillo, A; Cherlin, A; Damjanovic, S; Dietel, T; Dietrich, L; Drees, A; Esumi, S I; Filimonov, K; Fomenko, K; Fraenkel, Zeev; Garabatos, C; Glässel, P; Hering, G; Holeczek, J; Kushpil, V; Lenkeit, B C; Ludolphs, W; Maas, A; Marin, A; Milosevic, J; Milov, A; Miskowiec, D; Panebratsev, Yu A; Petchenova, O Yu; Petracek, V; Pfeiffer, A; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Rehak, P; Sako, H; Schükraft, Jürgen; Sedykh, S; Shimansky, S S; Slivova, J; Specht, H J; Stachel, J; Sumbera, M; Tilsner, H; Tserruya, Itzhak; Wessels, J P; Wienold, T; Windelband, B; Wurm, J P; Xie, W; Yurevich, S; Yurevich, V; Schmitz, W

    2003-01-01

    Based on an evaluation of recent systematic data on two-pion interferometry and on measured particle yields at mid-rapidity, we propose a universal condition for thermal freeze-out of pions in heavy-ion collisions. We show that freeze-out occurs when the mean free path of pions lambda_f reaches a value of approximately 2.5 fm, which is much smaller than the spatial extent of the system at freeze-out. This critical mean free path is independent of the centrality of the collision and its value is constant at all currently available beam energies from AGS to RHIC.

  12. Freezing-induced deformation of biomaterials in cryomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcelikkale, Altug

    Cryomedicine utilizes low temperature treatments of biological proteins, cells and tissues for cryopreservation, materials processing and cryotherapy. Lack of proper understanding of cryodamage that occurs during these applications remains to be the primary bottleneck for development of successful tissue cryopreservation and cryosurgery procedures. An engineering approach based on a view of biological systems as functional biomaterials can help identify, predict and control the primary cryodamage mechanisms by developing an understanding of underlying freezing-induced biophysical processes. In particular, freezing constitutes the main structural/mechanical origin of cryodamage and results in significant deformation of biomaterials at multiple length scales. Understanding of these freezing-induced deformation processes and their effects on post-thaw biomaterial functionality is currently lacking but will be critical to engineer improved cryomedicine procedures. This dissertation addresses this problem by presenting three separate but related studies of freezing-induced deformation at multiple length scales including nanometer-scale protein fibrils, single cells and whole tissues. A combination of rigorous experimentation and computational modeling is used to characterize post-thaw biomaterial structure and properties, predict biomaterial behavior and assess its post-thaw biological functionality. Firstly, freezing-induced damage on hierarchical extracellular matrix structure of collagen is investigated at molecular, fibril and matrix levels. Results indicate to a specific kind of fibril damage due to freezing-induced expansion of intrafibrillar fluid. This is followed by a study of freezing-induced cell and tissue deformation coupled to osmotically driven cellular water transport. Computational and semi empirical modeling of these processes indicate that intracellular deformation of the cell during freezing is heterogeneous and can interfere with cellular water

  13. Organic acid catalyzed carbon aerogels with freeze-drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuelong; Yan, Meifang; Liu, Zhenfa

    2017-09-01

    Carbon aerogels (CAs) were synthesized via a sol-gel process by condensation-polymerization of phloroglucinol, resorcinol and formaldehyde using 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid as catalyst with freeze-drying. The effects of the freeze-drying method on the texture and pore structure were studied. Meanwhile the structure of carbon aerogels was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a surface-area analyzer. The results show that the freeze-drying method and acid catalyst were good for the specific surface area of carbon aerogel, up to 765m2 g-1, and pore size distribution.

  14. SOME STUDIES ABOUT CEREALS BEHAVIOR DURING FREEZE DRYING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIELA-VICTORIA MNERIE

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some special method and equipment and the principal advantages of freeze-dried food. The freeze drying is a good method of freeze-drying for make some experiments with many kind of cereals, for the improvement that in food production. It is necessary and is possible to study the corn oil extract, wheat flour, the maltodextrin from corn, modified cornstarch, spice extracts, soy sauce, hydrolyzed wheat gluten, partially hydrogenated soybean and cottonseed oil etc. That is very porous, since it occupies the same volume as the original and so rehydrates rapidly. There is less loss of flavour and texture than with most other methods of drying.

  15. Derivation of water vapour absorption cross-sections in the red region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, M.; Chakrabarty, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    Absorption spectrum in 436 to 448 nm wavelength region gives NO2 and O3 column densities. This spectrum can also give H2O column density. The spectrum in the range of 655 to 667 nm contains absorption due to NO3 and H2O. Combining the absorption spectra in the wavelength ranges of 436 to 448 and 655 to 667 nm, water vapor absorption cross-sections in this range comes out to be of the order of 2.0 x 10(exp -24) cm(exp -2).

  16. Estimating collision efficiencies from contact freezing experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagare, B.; Marcolli, C.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-04-01

    Interactions of atmospheric aerosols with clouds influence cloud properties and modify the aerosol life cycle. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles or become incorporated into cloud droplets by scavenging. For an accurate description of aerosol scavenging and ice nucleation in contact mode, collision efficiency between droplets and aerosol particles needs to be known. This study derives the collision rate from experimental contact freezing data obtained with the ETH Collision Ice Nucleation Chamber CLINCH. Freely falling 80 μm water droplets are exposed to an aerosol consisting of 200 nm diameter silver iodide particles of concentrations from 500-5000 cm-3, which act as ice nucleating particles in contact mode. The chamber is kept at ice saturation in the temperature range from 236-261 K leading to slow evaporation of water droplets giving rise to thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis. Droplets and particles bear charges inducing electrophoresis. The experimentally derived collision efficiency of 0.13 is around one order of magnitude higher than theoretical formulations which include Brownian diffusion, impaction, interception, thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and electric forces. This discrepancy is most probably due to uncertainties and inaccuracies in the description of thermophoretic and diffusiophoretic processes acting together. This is to the authors knowledge the first dataset of collision efficiencies acquired below 273 K. More such experiments with different droplet and particle diameters are needed to improve our understanding of collision processes acting together.

  17. Adaptation to seasonality and the winter freeze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Christine Preston

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Flowering plants initially diversified during the Mesozoic era at least 140 million years ago in regions of the world where temperate seasonal environments were not encountered. Since then several cooling events resulted in the contraction of warm and wet environments and the establishment of novel temperate zones in both hemispheres. In response, less than half of modern angiosperm families have members that evolved specific adaptations to cold seasonal climates, including cold acclimation, freezing tolerance, endodormancy, and vernalization responsiveness. Despite compelling evidence for multiple independent origins, the level of genetic constraint on the evolution of adaptations to seasonal cold is not well understood. However, the recent increase in molecular genetic studies examining the response of model and crop species to seasonal cold offers new insight into the evolutionary lability of these traits. This insight has major implications for our understanding of complex trait evolution, and the potential role of local adaptation in response to past and future climate change. In this review, we discuss the biochemical, morphological, and developmental basis of adaptations to seasonal cold, and synthesize recent literature on the genetic basis of these traits in a phylogenomic context. We find evidence for multiple genetic links between distinct physiological responses to cold, possibly reinforcing the coordinated expression of these traits. Furthermore, repeated recruitment of the same or similar ancestral pathways suggests that land plants might be somewhat pre-adapted to dealing with temperature stress, perhaps making inducible cold traits relatively easy to evolve.

  18. GPR utilization in artificial freezing engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Lei; Yang, Weihao; Huang, Jiahui; Li, Haipeng; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2013-01-01

    To utilize ground penetrating radar (GPR) in artificial freezing engineering (AFE), the electromagnetic parameters (EMP) of frozen soil were measured using a vector network analyser, which showed that the dielectric permittivity and electric conductivity change abruptly at the boundary between the frozen and the non-frozen soil. Then similarity criteria of GPR model experiments were deduced, and GPR laboratory model experiments and field explorations of AFE were carried out. It was found that for AFE, the GPR travel time and profile characters of anomalies in model experiments were similar to those in field explorations, while the amplitude of GPR signals in laboratory model experiments were much stronger than those in field explorations. Numerical simulations were also implemented to analyse the relationship between model experiments and field explorations, which further told us why we could easily find the targets by GPR in the laboratory but not in field explorations. The outputs showed that GPR could be used to detect the thickness of the frozen wall and to find unfrozen soil defects, even though the amplitude of the reflective signals were much weaker than those of laboratory experiments. The research findings have an important theoretical value for AFE and permafrost region engineering, and the deduced GPR similarity criteria could be widely used in other GPR model experiments. (paper)

  19. Contamination of freezing soils: Australia's Antarctic opportunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.

    2002-01-01

    Last month, the Federal government announced that millions of dollars were to be spent cleaning up Antarctica, for which Australia has special responsibilities. Australia's largesse is especially interesting in a world context. Antarctica, by international agreement, is free of any industrial development - mining, storage of wastes, or any other profit-making activity that would disturb the environment (tourism is allowed under increasingly controlled conditions). The importance of the more or less pristine frigid environment lies in the wide range of scientific research that is carried out there. Sophisticated techniques to improve environmental quality are evidently in the early development stage. That cold-loving organisms can thrive in frozen ground in Antarctica and the Arctic was a discovery so unexpected that few people could grasp its importance. Only later was it found that these bugs can eat up contaminants - and the discovery assumed enormous practical significance. Little is known about how to clean up contamination in freezing soils even though there is a pressing need to solve the growing problem with military, industrial and nuclear waste in the Northern Hemisphere

  20. Uranium absorption study pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raievski, V.; Sautiez, B.

    1959-01-01

    The report describes a pile designed to measure the absorption of fuel slugs. The pile is of graphite and comprises a central section composed of uranium rods in a regular lattice. RaBe sources and BF 3 counters are situated on either side of the center. A given uranium charge is compared with a specimen charge of about 560 kg, and the difference in absorption between the two noted. The sensitivity of the equipment will detect absorption variations of about a few ppm boron (10 -6 boron per gr. of uranium) or better. (author) [fr

  1. Improvement of post-thaw sperm survivals using liquid nitrogen vapor in a spermcasting oyster Ostrea angasi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Md Mahbubul; Li, Xiaoxu; Qin, Jian G

    2017-10-01

    Low survival of cryopreserved sperm impedes the application of cryopreservation technique in spermcasting oyster species. This study developed a simple method of liquid nitrogen vapor freezing to improve post-thaw sperm survival in the spermcasting oyster Ostrea angasi. The results indicate that the permeable cryoprotectants, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol (EG) and propylene glycol (PG) were non-toxic to sperm up to 20% concentration and 90 min exposure whereas methanol at 10% or higher was toxic to sperm for any exposure over 30 min. Among the treatments with permeable cryoprotectants, 15% EG produced the highest post-thaw sperm motility. Sperm motility was further improved by the addition of non-permeable cryoprotectants (trehalose and glucose), with 15% EG + 0.2 M trehalose resulting in the highest post-thaw sperm motility among all the combinations evaluated. The durations of 20, 30 and 60 min equilibrations produced a higher post-thaw sperm motility and plasma membrane integrity (PMI) than 10 min. Higher post-thaw motility and PMI were achieved by freezing sperm at the 8 cm height from the liquid nitrogen surface than at the 2, 4, 6, 10 or 12 cm height. Holding sperm for 10 min in liquid nitrogen vapor produced higher post-thaw motility and PMI than for 2, 5 or 20 min. The cryopreservation protocol developed in this study improved both post-thaw motility and PMI of O. angasi sperm at least 15% higher than those cryopreserved using programmable freezing method. Liquid nitrogen vapor freezing might have greater applicability in improving post-thaw sperm quality of spermcasting oyster species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Vapor Pressure Data Analysis and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    SUBJECT TERMS Vapor pressure Antoine equation Statistical analysis Clausius–Clapeyron equation Standard deviation Volatility Enthalpy of volatilization...11 5. Antoine Constants (Equation 3), Standard Deviations , and S for 1-Tetradecanol .............12 6. Vapor...13 7. Antoine Constants (Equation 3), Standard Deviations , and S for DEM ............................13 8. Vapor Pressures

  3. Interaction of extender composition and freezing method for effective semen cryopreservation in the North American river otter (Lontra canadensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Helen L; Swanson, William F

    2017-10-01

    Semen cryopreservation and storage in genome resource banks (GRBs), in combination with artificial insemination (AI), could be invaluable for genetic management and conservation of endangered otter species. For any applied conservation benefit, effective methods for otter sperm processing and cryopreservation first must be established. In this study, our objective was to develop an effective semen cryopreservation method for the North American river otter, evaluating the effect of extender composition (i.e., glycerol concentration, Equex STM paste supplementation) and freezing protocol (timing of glycerol addition, pre-freeze cooling rate, freezing/packaging method) on post-thaw sperm motility, longevity and acrosome status. Semen was collected from 14 otters housed at 9 zoos, and following cryopreservation in an egg-yolk based extender, thawed to assess sperm motility and acrosome status immediately post-thaw and during 6 h of in vitro culture. Results indicated that extender containing 4% glycerol was preferable (p  0.05) post-thaw sperm parameters. Treatments with extender containing Equex and frozen by pelleting on dry ice showed greater (p < 0.05) motility and percentage of intact acrosomes compared to treatments frozen in extender without Equex, regardless of pre-freeze cooling rate. In the absence of Equex, pelleting provided superior post-thaw sperm motility (p < 0.01) and higher (p < 0.001) percentage of sperm with intact acrosomes compared to samples frozen in straws over liquid nitrogen vapor. Results of this study indicate that cryopreservation of otter sperm using an egg-yolk -TEST based extender containing 4% glycerol and 1% Equex, with the pellet freezing method, provided superior post-thaw sperm motility, longevity and acrosomal integrity compared to other combinations. Neither alterations in timing of glycerolated extender addition nor pre-freeze cooling rate had a discernable effect on post-thaw otter sperm parameters. These findings

  4. Determination of end point of primary drying in freeze-drying process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sajal M; Doen, Takayuki; Pikal, Michael J

    2010-03-01

    Freeze-drying is a relatively expensive process requiring long processing time, and hence one of the key objectives during freeze-drying process development is to minimize the primary drying time, which is the longest of the three steps in freeze-drying. However, increasing the shelf temperature into secondary drying before all of the ice is removed from the product will likely cause collapse or eutectic melt. Thus, from product quality as well as process economics standpoint, it is very critical to detect the end of primary drying. Experiments were conducted with 5% mannitol and 5% sucrose as model systems. The apparent end point of primary drying was determined by comparative pressure measurement (i.e., Pirani vs. MKS Baratron), dew point, Lyotrack (gas plasma spectroscopy), water concentration from tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, condenser pressure, pressure rise test (manometric temperature measurement or variations of this method), and product thermocouples. Vials were pulled out from the drying chamber using a sample thief during late primary and early secondary drying to determine percent residual moisture either gravimetrically or by Karl Fischer, and the cake structure was determined visually for melt-back, collapse, and retention of cake structure at the apparent end point of primary drying (i.e., onset, midpoint, and offset). By far, the Pirani is the best choice of the methods tested for evaluation of the end point of primary drying. Also, it is a batch technique, which is cheap, steam sterilizable, and easy to install without requiring any modification to the existing dryer.

  5. Mobile lidar system for measurement of water vapor mixing ratio and ozone number density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Water Vapor Lidar was modified and extended to make differential absorption measurements of ozone. Water vapor measurements make use of a weak molecular scattering process known as Raman scattering. It is characterized by a shift in wavelength of the scattered beam of light relative to the incident one. Some of the energy of the incident photon is converted to vibrational or rotational energy within the molecule leaving the scattered photon shifted to a slightly longer wavelength. When performing water vapor measurements, profiles are acquired of water vapor mixing ratio from near the ground to beyond 7 km every 2 minutes. By forming a color composite image of the individual profiles, the spatial and temporal evolution of water vapor is visible with vertical resolution of 75 to 150m and temporal resolution of 2 minutes. The ozone lidar is intended for use as a cross calibration facility for other stationary ozone lidar systems. The ozone measurement employs the technique known as differential absorption. The backscattered laser radiation from two different wavelengths is measured. Successful measurements of 308 nm returns were made from 80 km with an averaging period of 6 hours. Using these data and a standard atmosphere density curve, an ozone number density profile was made which agrees very well with the standard ozone curve between 20 and 40 km.

  6. Microwave Enhanced Freeze Drying of Solid Waste, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of advanced methods for Microwave Enhanced Freeze Drying of Solid Waste (MEFDSW) is proposed. Methods for the recovery of relatively pure water as a...

  7. Optoacoustic laser monitoring of cooling and freezing of tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larin, Kirill V; Larina, I V; Motamedi, M; Esenaliev, R O

    2002-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of cooling and freezing of tissues, cells, and other biological objects with a high spatial and time resolution, which is necessary for selective destruction of cancer and benign tumours during cryotherapy, as well as for preventing any damage to the structure and functioning of biological objects in cryobiology, is considered. The optoacoustic method, based on the measurement and analysis of acoustic waves induced by short laser pulses, is proposed for monitoring the cooling and freezing of the tissue. The effect of cooling and freezing on the amplitude and time profile of acoustic signals generated in real tissues and in a model object is studied. The experimental results indicate that the optoacoustic laser technique can be used for real-time monitoring of cooling and freezing of biological objects with a submillimeter spatial resolution and a high contrast. (laser biology and medicine)

  8. Natural Electrical Potentials That Arise When Soils Freeze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    phenomena occurring during the freezing of dilute aqueous solutions and their possible relation- ship to thunderstorm electricity . Physical Review, 75(3): 2254-259 24 I. * - -- - , -U. - - S -- ~ v -~

  9. Microwave Enhanced Freeze Drying of Solid Waste, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of technology for Microwave Enhanced Freeze Drying of Solid Waste (MEFDSW) is proposed. The present state of the art for solid waste stabilization using...

  10. Normal freezing of ideal ternary systems of the pseudobinary type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    Perfect liquid mixing but no solid diffusion is assumed in normal freezing. In addition, the molar compositions of the freezing solid and remaining liquid, respectively, follow the solidus and liquidus curves of the constitutional diagram. For the linear case, in which both the liquidus and solidus are perfectly straight lines, the normal freezing equation giving the fraction solidified at each melt temperature and the solute concentration profile in the frozen solid was determined as early as 1902, and has since been repeatedly published. Corresponding equations for quadratic, cubic or higher-degree liquidus and solidus lines have also been obtained. The equation of normal freezing for ideal ternary liquid solutions solidified into ideal solid solutions of the pseudobinary type is given. Sample computations with the use of this new equation were made and are given for the Ga-Al-As system.

  11. Hyperbaric Oxygen as an Adjunct Treatment of Freezing Cold Injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mekjavic, Igor B; Gorjanc, Jurij; Mekjavic, Polana J; Bajrovic, Fajko; Milcinski, Metka

    2005-01-01

    .... With the exception of freezing cold injury, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is now accepted as an adjunct therapy for the management of all other acute traumatic peripheral ischaemias, such as crush...

  12. Freeze-drying of silica nanoparticles: redispersibility toward nanomedicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picco, Agustin S; Ferreira, Larissa F; Liberato, Michelle S; Mondo, Gabriela B; Cardoso, Mateus B

    2018-01-01

    To study freeze-drying of silica nanoparticles (SiO 2 NPs) in order to find suitable conditions to produce lyophilized powders with no aggregation after resuspension and storage. SiO 2 NPs were synthesized using a Stöber-based procedure, and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms. SiO 2 NPs hydrodynamic diameters were compared prior and after freeze-drying in the presence/absence of carbohydrate protectants. Glucose was found to be the most suitable protectant against the detrimental effects of lyophilization. The minimum concentration of carbohydrate required to effectively protect SiO 2 NPs from aggregation during freeze-drying is influenced by the nanoparticle's size and texture. Negligible aggregation was observed during storage. Carbohydrates can be used during SiO 2 NPs freeze-drying process to obtain redispersable solids that maintain original sizes without residual aggregation.

  13. Revisiting Absorptive Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Araújo, Ana Luiza Lara; Ulhøi, John Parm; Lettl, Christopher

    learning processes of absorptive capacity, which comprise combinative and adaptive capabilities. Drawing on survey data (n=169), the study concludes that combinative capabilities primarily enhance transformative and exploratory learning processes, while adaptive capabilities strengthen all three learning......Absorptive capacity has mostly been perceived as a 'passive' outcome of R&D investments. Recently, however, a growing interest into its 'proactive' potentials has emerged. This paper taps into this development and proposes a dynamic model for conceptualizing the determinants of the complementary...

  14. Large p/sub t/ enhancement from freeze out

    CERN Document Server

    Magas, V K; Csernai, László P; Grassi, Frédérique; Greiner, W; Hama, Y; Kodama, T; Lázár, Z I; Stöcker, H

    1999-01-01

    Freeze out of particles across three dimensional space-time hypersurface is discussed in a simple kinetic model. The final momentum distribution of emitted particles, for freeze out surfaces with space-like normal, shows a $9 non-exponential transverse momentum spectrum. The slope parameter of the p/sub t/ distribution increases with increasing p/sub t/, in agreement with recently measured SPS pion and h/sup -/ spectra. (11 refs).

  15. Ice, Ice, Baby? A Sociological Exploration of Social Egg Freezing

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, K.

    2016-01-01

    Social egg freezing is a fertility preservation strategy which enables women to preserve a number of healthy unfertilised eggs for potential future use when faced with the threat of age-related fertility decline. The overall aim of this thesis was to explore how women understand, construct and experience social egg freezing in the context of debates surrounding reproductive ‘choice’ and ‘delayed motherhood’. The study sought to provide insights into how women perceive the risks and benefi...

  16. Boundary lubrication properties of materials with expansive freezing

    OpenAIRE

    Jagla, E. A.

    2001-01-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of solid-solid contacts lubricated by a model fluid displaying many of the properties of water, particularly its expansive freezing. Near the region where expansive freezing occurs, the lubricating film remains fluid, and the friction force decreases linearly as the shear velocity is reduced. No sign of stick-slip motion is observed even at the lowest velocities. We give a simple interpretation of these results, and suggest that in general good...

  17. On the calculation of the electrolyte aqueous solution freezing temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ptitsyn, A.B.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical expression of the dependence of freezing temperature of electrolyte (CdCl 2 , CdSO 4 , BeSO 4 ) aqueous solutions on their composition was found. Three different methods were suggested were suggested for calculation of water activity in multicomponent solution. It was established that sublinear extrapolation of freezing temperature of salt aqueous solutions was possible not up to -5 deg C, but up to -15 deg C, independently of their composition. 6 refs.; 2 figs

  18. RESEARCH OF MOISTURE MIGRATION DURING PARTIAL FREEZING OF GROUND BEEF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Stefanovskiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of «ideal product» is proposed for the study of mass transfer during partial freezing of food products by freezing plate. The ideal product is a product, in which number of factors affecting the «real product» (meat are excluded. These factors include chemical composition of meat, quality grade of raw material (NOR, DFD, PSE, cryoscopic temperature that determines the degree of water transformation into ice, the phenomenon of osmosis, rate of freezing, etc. By using the concept of «ideal product» and its implementation in a physical experiment, it is proved that the “piston effect” causing the migration of moisture is due to frozen crust formation during partial freezing of the body. During partial freezing of the product by freezing plate, «ideal» and «real» food environment is transformed from closed system into open one with inflow of moisture to unfrozen part of the body. In the «ideal product», there is an expulsion of unfrozen moisture from freezing front, so the water appears on the body surface. Thus, the displacement of moisture increases by the same law, according to which the thickness (weight of frozen layer increases. During partial freezing of ground meat, moisture does not appear on the surface of the product, but hydrates the unfrozen part of meat. The reason of this phenomenon is the expulsion of water during formation of frozen crust and water-binding capacity of meat.

  19. Freeze concentration of dairy products Phase 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, D.E.; Vasavada, K.C.

    1993-09-01

    An efficient, electrically driven freeze concentration system offers potential for substantially increasing electricity demand while providing the mature dairy industry with new products for domestic and export markets together with enhanced production efficiencies. Consumer tests indicate that dairy products manufactured from freeze-concentrated ingredients are either preferred or considered equivalent in quality to fresh milk-based products. Economic analyses indicate that this technology should be competitive with thermal evaporation processes on a commercial basis.

  20. Acceleration of oxidation-reduction reactions in freezing solution

    OpenAIRE

    Takenaka,Norimichi; Ueda,Akihiro; Maeda,Yasuaki

    1993-01-01

    In general, most chemical reactions are accelerated at higher temperature, while reactions of which activation energy is negative are accelerated at lower temperature. The reaction rates, however, become much slower in the ice phase because molecule cannot move easily. It was found that a few reactions of which activation energies were positive were accelerated in freezing aqueous solution. The reaction rates in the freezing process were 10 to (10)^5 times faster than those in solution at 25℃...

  1. Simulation Study on Freeze-drying Characteristics of Mashed Beef

    OpenAIRE

    Tambunan, Armansyah H; Solahudin, M; Rahajeng, Estri

    2000-01-01

    Drying characteristic of a particular product is important in analyzing the appropriateness of the drying method for the product. This is especially important for freeze drying, which is known as the most expensive drying method, asideji-om its good drying quality. The objectives of this experiment are to develop a computer simulation program using a retreating drying-frontmodel for predicting freeze drying characteristics of mashed nteat, especially for the influence of sublimation temperatu...

  2. A copper vapor laser by using a copper-vapor-complex reaction at a low temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Kano, Toshiyuki; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Hiroshi

    1987-01-01

    A copper vapor laser performance by using ametal-vapor-complex reaction (Cu+AlBr3) is reported. The laser operation is obtained at a low temperature without externalheating because of the AlBr3 vapors evaporating at a room temperature. The copper vapor laser using this metal-vapor-complex reaction has an advantage of deposition-free of a metallic copper to the laser tube wall, which is different from the copper halide and the organometallic copper lasers.

  3. Gas-particle partitioning of alcohol vapors on organic aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lap P; Lee, Alex K Y; Chan, Chak K

    2010-01-01

    Single particle levitation using an electrodynamic balance (EDB) has been found to give accurate and direct hygroscopic measurements (gas-particle partitioning of water) for a number of inorganic and organic aerosol systems. In this paper, we extend the use of an EDB to examine the gas-particle partitioning of volatile to semivolatile alcohols, including methanol, n-butanol, n-octanol, and n-decanol, on levitated oleic acid particles. The measured K(p) agreed with Pankow's absorptive partitioning model. At high n-butanol vapor concentrations (10(3) ppm), the uptake of n-butanol reduced the average molecular-weight of the oleic acid particle appreciably and hence increased the K(p) according to Pankow's equation. Moreover, the hygroscopicity of mixed oleic acid/n-butanol particles was higher than the predictions given by the UNIFAC model (molecular group contribution method) and the ZSR equation (additive rule), presumably due to molecular interactions between the chemical species in the mixed particles. Despite the high vapor concentrations used, these findings warrant further research on the partitioning of atmospheric organic vapors (K(p)) near sources and how collectively they affect the hygroscopic properties of organic aerosols.

  4. What Good is Raman Water Vapor Lidar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, David

    2011-01-01

    Raman lidar has been used to quantify water vapor in the atmosphere for various scientific studies including mesoscale meteorology and satellite validation. Now the international networks of NDACC and GRUAN have interest in using Raman water vapor lidar for detecting trends in atmospheric water vapor concentrations. What are the data needs for addressing these very different measurement challenges. We will review briefly the scientific needs for water vapor accuracy for each of these three applications and attempt to translate that into performance specifications for Raman lidar in an effort to address the question in the title of "What good is Raman water vapor Iidar."

  5. Vapor deposition of tantalum and tantalum compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkula, M.

    1996-01-01

    Tantalum, and many of its compounds, can be deposited as coatings with techniques ranging from pure, thermal chemical vapor deposition to pure physical vapor deposition. This review concentrates on chemical vapor deposition techniques. The paper takes a historical approach. The authors review classical, metal halide-based techniques and current techniques for tantalum chemical vapor deposition. The advantages and limitations of the techniques will be compared. The need for new lower temperature processes and hence new precursor chemicals will be examined and explained. In the last section, they add some speculation as to possible new, low-temperature precursors for tantalum chemical vapor deposition

  6. Recent advances in vapor intrusion site investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Thomas; Loll, Per; Eklund, Bart

    2017-12-15

    Our understanding of vapor intrusion has evolved rapidly since the discovery of the first high profile vapor intrusion sites in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Research efforts and field investigations have improved our understanding of vapor intrusion processes including the role of preferential pathways and natural barriers to vapor intrusion. This review paper addresses recent developments in the regulatory framework and conceptual model for vapor intrusion. In addition, a number of innovative investigation methods are discussed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. High temperature vapors science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hastie, John

    2012-01-01

    High Temperature Vapors: Science and Technology focuses on the relationship of the basic science of high-temperature vapors to some areas of discernible practical importance in modern science and technology. The major high-temperature problem areas selected for discussion include chemical vapor transport and deposition; the vapor phase aspects of corrosion, combustion, and energy systems; and extraterrestrial high-temperature species. This book is comprised of seven chapters and begins with an introduction to the nature of the high-temperature vapor state, the scope and literature of high-temp

  8. Tert-butyl alcohol used to fabricate nano-cellulose aerogels via freeze-drying technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Hua; Song, Yuxuan; Zhou, Zhaobing; Zhao, Hua

    2017-06-01

    Aerogel, a highly porous material, is attracting increasing attention owing to low thermal conductivity and high specific surface area. Freeze-drying technology has been employed to produce nano-cellulose aerogels; however, the resultant product has low specific surface areas. Here, a modified approach to prepare nano-cellulose aerogels was reported, which involves tert-butyl alcohol as a solvent. Nano-cellulose aerogels were prepared via a spontaneous gelation fashion using calcium chloride solution, followed by tert-butyl alcohol solvent displacement and freeze drying. Addition of calcium chloride (0.25%) accelerated the physical gelation process. The application of tert-butyl alcohol as a solvent contributed to preservation of gel network. The obtained spherical nano-cellulose aerogels had a shrinkage rate of 5.89%. The specific surface area and average pore size was 164. 9666 m2 g-1 and 10.01 nm, respectively. Additionally, nano-cellulose aerogels had a comparable thermal degradation property when compared to microcrystalline cellulose. These biophysical properties make nano-cellulose aerogels as a promising absorption material.

  9. Implications of Thermal Annealing on the Benzene Vapor Sensing Behavior of PEVA-Graphene Nanocomposite Threads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay V; Cemalovic, Sabina; Tolley, William K; Hobson, Stephen T; Anderson, Ryan; Fruhberger, Bernd

    2018-02-14

    The effect of thermal treatments, on the benzene vapor sensitivity of polyethylene (co-)vinylacetate (PEVA)/graphene nanocomposite threads, used as chemiresistive sensors, was investigated using DC resistance measurements, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These flexible threads are being developed as low-cost, easy-to-measure chemical sensors that can be incorporated into smart clothing or disposable sensing patches. Chemiresistive threads were solution-cast or extruded from PEVA and vapor in dry air. In addition, annealing increased the speed of response and recovery upon exposure to and removal of benzene vapor. DSC results showed that the presence of graphene raises the freezing point, and may allow greater crystallinity, in the nanocomposite after annealing. SEM images confirm increased surface roughness/area, which may account for the increase response speed after annealing. Benzene vapor detection at 5 ppm is demonstrated with limits of detection estimated to be as low as 1.5 ppm, reflecting an order of magnitude improvement over unannealed threads.

  10. Tissue Triage and Freezing for Models of Skeletal Muscle Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hui; Janssen, Paul M.L.; Grange, Robert W.; Yang, Lin; Beggs, Alan H.; Swanson, Lindsay C.; Cossette, Stacy A.; Frase, Alison; Childers, Martin K.; Granzier, Henk; Gussoni, Emanuela; Lawlor, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a unique tissue because of its structure and function, which requires specific protocols for tissue collection to obtain optimal results from functional, cellular, molecular, and pathological evaluations. Due to the subtlety of some pathological abnormalities seen in congenital muscle disorders and the potential for fixation to interfere with the recognition of these features, pathological evaluation of frozen muscle is preferable to fixed muscle when evaluating skeletal muscle for congenital muscle disease. Additionally, the potential to produce severe freezing artifacts in muscle requires specific precautions when freezing skeletal muscle for histological examination that are not commonly used when freezing other tissues. This manuscript describes a protocol for rapid freezing of skeletal muscle using isopentane (2-methylbutane) cooled with liquid nitrogen to preserve optimal skeletal muscle morphology. This procedure is also effective for freezing tissue intended for genetic or protein expression studies. Furthermore, we have integrated our freezing protocol into a broader procedure that also describes preferred methods for the short term triage of tissue for (1) single fiber functional studies and (2) myoblast cell culture, with a focus on the minimum effort necessary to collect tissue and transport it to specialized research or reference labs to complete these studies. Overall, this manuscript provides an outline of how fresh tissue can be effectively distributed for a variety of phenotypic studies and thereby provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for pathological studies related to congenital muscle disease. PMID:25078247

  11. Transcriptome Analysis of Spartina pectinata in Response to Freezing Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyoungju Nah

    Full Text Available Prairie cordgrass (Spartina pectinata, a perennial C4 grass native to the North American prairie, has several distinctive characteristics that potentially make it a model crop for production in stressful environments. However, little is known about the transcriptome dynamics of prairie cordgrass despite its unique freezing stress tolerance. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to explore the transcriptome dynamics of prairie cordgrass in response to freezing stress at -5°C for 5 min and 30 min. We used a RNA-sequencing method to assemble the S. pectinata leaf transcriptome and performed gene-expression profiling of the transcripts under freezing treatment. Six differentially expressed gene (DEG groups were categorized from the profiling. In addition, two major consecutive orders of gene expression were observed in response to freezing; the first being the acute up-regulation of genes involved in plasma membrane modification, calcium-mediated signaling, proteasome-related proteins, and transcription regulators (e.g., MYB and WRKY. The follow-up and second response was of genes involved in encoding the putative anti-freezing protein and the previously known DNA and cell-damage-repair proteins. Moreover, we identified the genes involved in epigenetic regulation and circadian-clock expression. Our results indicate that freezing response in S. pectinata reflects dynamic changes in rapid-time duration, as well as in metabolic, transcriptional, post-translational, and epigenetic regulation.

  12. Freeze-drying wet digital prints: An option for salvage?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juergens, M C; Schempp, N

    2010-01-01

    On the occasion of the collapse of the Historical Archive of the City of Cologne in March 2009 and the ensuing salvage effort, questions were raised about the use of freeze-drying for soaked digital prints, a technique that has not yet been evaluated for these materials. This study examines the effects of immersion, air-drying, drying in a blotter stack, freezing and freeze-drying on 35 samples of major digital printing processes. The samples were examined visually before, during and after testing; evaluation of the results was qualitative. Results show that some prints were already damaged by immersion alone (e.g. bleeding inks and soluble coatings) to the extent that the subsequent choice of drying method made no significant difference any more. For those samples that did survive immersion, air-drying proved to be crucial for water-sensitive prints, since any contact with the wet surface caused serious damage. Less water-sensitive prints showed no damage throughout the entire procedure, regardless of drying method. Some prints on coated media suffered from minor surface disruption up to total delamination of the surface coating due to the formation of ice crystals during shock-freezing. With few exceptions, freeze-drying did not cause additional damage to any of the prints that hadn't already been damaged by freezing. It became clear that an understanding of the process and materials is important for choosing an appropriate drying method.

  13. Mechanisms of deterioration of nutrients. [improved quality of freeze-dried foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karel, M.; Flink, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Methods for improving the quality of freeze-dried foods were investigated. Areas discussed include: (1) microstructure of freeze-dried systems, (2) structural changes in freeze-dried systems, (3) artificial food matrices, and (4) osmotic preconcentration to yield improved freeze-dried products.

  14. Absorption cooling device. Absorptions-Kuehlvorrichtung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourne, J.; Vardi, I.; Kimchi, Y.; Ben-Dror, J.

    1980-03-25

    The invention concerns improvements of absorption refrigerators, where a lithium chloride or lithium bromide/water cycle is used. According to the invention an inner separating or dividing structure between different functional parts of a machine of this type is provided. The structure contains two sections of wall, which are separated from one another by a suitable space, in order to achieve thermal insulation. This air space is provided with an opening in the direction towards the inside of the container and the opening is shielded to prevent the entry of liquids (in liquid or spray form).

  15. Importance Profiles for Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Brian; Chandra, Arunchandra S.; Kuang, Zhiming; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by the scientific desire to align observations with quantities of physical interest, we survey how scalar importance functions depend on vertically resolved water vapor. Definitions of importance begin from familiar examples of water mass I m and TOA clear-sky outgoing longwave flux I OLR, in order to establish notation and illustrate graphically how the sensitivity profile or "kernel" depends on whether specific humidity S, relative humidity R, or ln( R) are used as measures of vapor. Then, new results on the sensitivity of convective activity I con to vapor (with implied knock-on effects such as weather prediction skill) are presented. In radiative-convective equilibrium, organized (line-like) convection is much more sensitive to moisture than scattered isotropic convection, but it exists in a drier mean state. The lesson for natural convection may be that organized convection is less susceptible to dryness and can survive and propagate into regions unfavorable for disorganized convection. This counterintuitive interpretive conclusion, with respect to the narrow numerical result behind it, highlights the importance of clarity about what is held constant at what values in sensitivity or susceptibility kernels. Finally, the sensitivities of observable radiance signals I sig for passive remote sensing are considered. While the accuracy of R in the lower free troposphere is crucial for the physical importance scalars, this layer is unfortunately the most difficult to isolate with passive remote sensing: In high emissivity channels, water vapor signals come from too high in the atmosphere (for satellites) or too low (for surface radiometers), while low emissivity channels have poor altitude discrimination and (in the case of satellites) are contaminated by surface emissions. For these reasons, active ranging (LiDAR) is the preferred observing strategy.

  16. Sodium vapor charge exchange cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiddleston, H.R.; Fasolo, J.A.; Minette, D.C.; Chrien, R.E.; Frederick, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational sequential charge-exchange ion source yielding a 50 MeV H - current of approximately 8 mA is planned for use with the Argonne 500 MeV booster synchrotron. Progress is reported on the development of a sodium vapor charge-exchange cell as part of that planned effort. Design, fabrication, and operating results to date are presented and discussed

  17. Sodium vapor charge exchange cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiddleston, H.R.; Fasolo, J.A.; Minette, D.C.; Chrien, R.E.; Frederick, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational sequential charge-exchange ion source yielding a 50 MeV H - current of approximately 8 mA is planned for use with the Argonne 500 MeV booster synchrotron. We report on the progress for development of a sodium vapor charge-exchange cell as part of that planned effort. Design, fabrication, and operating results to date are presented and discussed. (author)

  18. Vapor Growth of III Nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dang; Zheng, Lili; Zhang, Hui

    Good understanding of transport phenomena in vapor deposition systems is critical to fast and effective crystal growth system design. Transport phenomena are complicated and are related to operating conditions, such as temperature, velocity, pressure, and species concentration, and geometrical conditions, such as reactor geometry and source-substrate distance. Due to the limited in situ experimental monitoring, design and optimization of growth is mainly performed through semi-empirical and trial-and-error methods. Such an approach is only able to achieve improvement in the deposition sequence and cannot fulfill the increasingly stringent specifications required in industry. Numerical simulation has become a powerful alternative, as it is fast and easy to obtain critical information for the design and optimization of the growth system. The key challenge in vapor deposition modeling lies in developing an accurate simulation model of gas-phase and surface reactions, since very limited kinetic information is available in the literature. In this chapter, GaN thin-film growth by iodine vapor-phase epitaxy (IVPE) is used as an example to present important steps for system design and optimization by the numerical modeling approach. The advanced deposition model will be presented for multicomponent fluid flow, homogeneous gas-phase reaction inside the reactor, heterogeneous surface reaction on the substrate surface, heat transfer, and species transport. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis will be presented for gas-phase and surface reactions, together with a proposal for the reaction mechanism based on experiments. The prediction of deposition rates is presented. Finally, the surface evolution of film growth from vapor is analyzed for the case in which surface diffusion determines crystal grain size and morphology. Key control parameters for film instability are identified for quality improvement.

  19. Tropical convective onset statistics and establishing causality in the water vapor-precipitation relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelin, J. D.; Kuo, Y. H.; Schiro, K. A.; Langenbrunner, B.; Mechoso, C. R.; Sahany, S.; Bernstein, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    Previous work by various authors has pointed to the role of humidity in the lower free troposphere in affecting the onset of deep convection in the tropics. Empirical relations between column water vapor and the onset of precipitation have been inferred to be related to this. Evidence includes deep-convective conditional instability calculations for entraining plumes, in which the lower free-tropospheric environment affects the onset of deep convection due to the impact on buoyancy of turbulent entrainment of dry versus moist air. Tropical Western Pacific in situ observations, and tropical ocean basin satellite retrievals in comparison to climate model diagnostics each indicate that substantial entrainment is required to explain the observed relationship. In situ observations from the GoAmazon field campaign confirm that the basic relationship holds over tropical land much as it does over tropical ocean (although with greater additional sensitivity to boundary layer variations and to freezing processes). The relationship between deep convection and water vapor is, however, a two-way street, with convection moistening the free troposphere. One might thus argue that there has not yet been a smoking gun in terms of establishing the causality of the precipitation-water vapor relationship. Parameter perturbation experiments in the coupled Community Earth System Model show that when the deep convective scheme has low values of entrainment, the set of statistics associated with the transition to deep convection are radically altered, and the observed pickup of precipitation with column water vapor is no longer seen. In addition to cementing the dominant direction of causality in the fast timescale precipitation-column water vapor relationship, the results point to impacts of this mechanism on the climatology. Because at low entrainment the convection can fire before the lower troposphere is moistened, the climatology of water vapor remains lower than observed. These

  20. Application of water vapor sorption measurements for porosity characterization of hardened cement pastes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2014-01-01

    Water vapor sorption can be used to study important properties of porous materials including specific surface area and pore size distribution (PSD). However, the data analysis is somewhat inconsistent in literature. In this work, the important factors influencing the analyzed results using sorption...... data were reviewed. Water vapor sorption measurements were then applied to two hardened cement pastes and one model porous material MCM-41. The specific surface area was calculated based on different equations accounting for multilayer adsorption and the PSD was analyzed from both the absorption...

  1. Freeze-drying microscopy in mathematical modeling of a biomaterial freeze-drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Figueiredo Borgognoni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation brings hope for many patients. A multidisciplinary approach on this field aims at creating biologically functional tissues to be used as implants and prostheses. The freeze-drying process allows the fundamental properties of these materials to be preserved, making future manipulation and storage easier. Optimizing a freeze-drying cycle is of great importance since it aims at reducing process costs while increasing product quality of this time-and-energy-consuming process. Mathematical modeling comes as a tool to help a better understanding of the process variables behavior and consequently it helps optimization studies. Freeze-drying microscopy is a technique usually applied to determine critical temperatures of liquid formulations. It has been used in this work to determine the sublimation rates of a biological tissue freeze-drying. The sublimation rates were measured from the speed of the moving interface between the dried and the frozen layer under 21.33, 42.66 and 63.99 Pa. The studied variables were used in a theoretical model to simulate various temperature profiles of the freeze-drying process. Good agreement between the experimental and the simulated results was found.A prática da transplantação traz esperança para muitos pacientes. Uma visão multidisciplinar nessa área visa à produção de tecidos biológicos para serem utilizados como implantes e próteses. A liofilização é um processo de secagem que preserva características essenciais desses materiais, facilitando sua manipulação e armazenamento. A liofilização é um processo que requer muito tempo e energia e sua otimização é muito importante, pois permite reduzir custos de processo melhorando a qualidade do produto. A modelagem matemática é uma ferramenta que permite descrever o comportamento do produto durante o processo e, consequentemente, auxilia os estudos de otimização. Microscopia óptica acoplada à liofilização, uma t

  2. Measurement of Vapor Flow As an Important Source of Water in Dry Land Eco-Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; He, Z.; Wang, Y.; Gao, Z.; Hishida, K.

    2014-12-01

    When the temperature of land surface is lower than that of air and deeper soils, water vapor gathers toward the ground surface where dew maybe formed depending on the prevailing dew point and wind speed. Some plants are able to absorb the dew and vapor flow while the soil can readily absorb both. Certain animals such as desert beetles and ants harvest the dew or fog for daily survival. Recently, it is also realized that the dew and vapor flow can be a life-saving amount of water for plant survival at the driest seasons of the year in arid and semi-arid regions. Researches are conducted to quantify the amount of near-surface vapor flow in arid and semi-arid regions in China and USA. Quantitative leaf water absorption and desorption functions were derived based on laboratory experiments. Results show that plant leaves absorb and release water at different speeds depending on species and varieties. The "ideal" native plants in the dry climates can quickly absorb water and slowly release it. This water-holding capacity of plant is characterized by the absorption and desorption functions derived for plant physiology and water balance studies. Field studies are conducted to measure the dynamic vapor flow movements from the atmosphere and the groundwater table to soil surface. Results show that dew is usually formed on soil and plant surfaces during the daily hours when the temperature gradients are inverted toward the soil surface. The amount of dew harvested using gravels on the soil surface was enough to support water melon agriculture on deserts. The vapor flow can be effectively intercepted by artificially seeded plants in semi-arid regions forming new forests. New studies are attempted to quantify the role of vapor flow for the survival of giant sequoias in the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California.

  3. Effect of ageing of K-feldspar on its ice nucleating efficiency in immersion, deposition and contact freezing modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckhaus, Andreas; Bachmann, Felix; Hoffmann, Nadine; Koch, Michael; Kiselev, Alexei; Leisner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Recently K-feldspar was identified as one of the most active atmospheric ice nucleating particles (INP) of mineral origin [1]. Seeking the explanation to this phenomena we have conducted extensive experimental investigation of the ice nucleating efficiency of K-feldspar in three heterogeneous freezing modes. The immersion freezing of K-feldspar was investigated with the cold stage using arrays of nanoliter-size droplets containing aqueous suspension of polydisperse feldspar particles. For contact freezing, the charged droplets of supercooled water were suspended in the laminar flow of the DMA-selected feldspar-containing particles, allowing for determination of freezing probability on a single particle-droplet contact [2]. The nucleation and growth of ice via vapor deposition on the crystalline surfaces of macroscopic feldspar particles have been investigated in the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) under humidified nitrogen atmosphere. The ice nucleation experiments were supplemented with measurements of effective surface area of feldspar particles and ion chromatography (IC) analysis of the leached framework cations (K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+). In this contribution we focus on the role of surface chemistry influencing the IN efficiency of K-feldspar, in particular the connection between the degree of surface hydroxylation and its ability to induce local structural ordering in the interfacial layer in water molecules (as suggested by recent modeling efforts). We mimic the natural process of feldspar ageing by suspending it in water or weak aqueous solution of carbonic acid for different time periods, from minutes to months, and present its freezing efficiency as a function of time. Our immersion freezing experiments show that ageing have a nonlinear effect on the freezing behavior of feldspar within the investigated temperature range (-40°C to -10°C). On the other hand, deposition nucleation of ice observed in the ESEM reveals clear different pattern

  4. Trends of total water vapor column above the Arctic from satellites observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alraddawi, Dunya; Sarkissian, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe; Bock, Olivier; Claud, Chantal; Irbah, Abdenour

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric water vapor (H2O) is the most important natural (as opposed to man-made) greenhouse gas, accounting for about two-thirds of the natural greenhouse effect. Despite this importance, its role in climate and its reaction to climate change are still difficult to assess. Many details of the hydrological cycle are poorly understood, such as the process of cloud formation and the transport and release of latent heat contained in the water vapor. In contrast to other important greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane, water vapor has a much higher temporal and spatial variability. Total precipitable water (TPW) or the total column of water vapor (TCWV) is the amount of liquid water that would result if all the water vapor in the atmospheric column of unit area were condensed. TCWV distribution contains valuable information on the vigor of the hydrological processes and moisture transport in the atmosphere. Measurement of TPW can be obtained based on atmospheric water vapor absorption or emission of radiation in the spectral range from UV to MW. TRENDS were found over the terrestrial Arctic by means of TCWV retrievals (using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) near-infrared (2001-2015) records). More detailed approach was made for comparisons with ground based instruments over Sodankyla - Finland (TCWV from: SCIAMACHY 2003-2011, GOME-2A 2007-2011, SAOZ 2003-2011, GPS 2003-2011, MODIS 2003-2011)

  5. Reproducing Black’s experiments: freezing point depression and supercooling of water

    OpenAIRE

    Güémez, Júlio; Fiolhais, Carlos; Fiolhais, Manuel

    2002-01-01

    We carried out two historical experiments referred to by Joseph Black, one on freezing mixtures of salted water with ice and another on freezing supercooled pure water by a small disturbance. The results confirm thermodynamical predictions for the depression of the freezing point of salted water and for the latent heat of freezing of supercooled water respectively, which came after Black. The depression of the freezing point can hardly be fitted in the framework of the caloric theory of heat,...

  6. Effects of Pressure-shift Freezing on the Structural and Physical Properties of Gelatin Hydrogel Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Byeongsoo; Gil, Hyung Bae; Min, Sang-Gi; Lee, Si-Kyung; Choi, Mi-Jung

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of the gelatin concentration (10-40%, w/v), freezing temperatures (from -20? to -50?) and freezing methods on the structural and physical properties of gelatin matrices. To freeze gelatin, the pressure-shift freezing (PSF) is being applied at 0.1 (under atmospheric control), 50 and 100 MPa, respectively. The freezing point of gelatin solutions decrease with increasing gelatin concentrations, from -0.2? (10% gelatin) to -6.7? (40% gelatin), while the extent ...

  7. Determination of trace impurities in titanium dioxide by direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dočekal, Bohumil; Vojtková, B.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 3 (2007), s. 304-308 ISSN 0584-8547. [European Furnace Symposium on Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, Electrothermal Vaporization and Atomization /7./ and Solid Sampling Colloquium with Atomic Spectrometry /12./. St. Petersburg, 02.07.2006-07.07.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : direct solid sampling * electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry * trace element analysis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.957, year: 2007

  8. Vitamin A absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S.J.

    1976-01-01

    Investigation of the absorption of vitamin A and related substances is complicated by the multiplicity of forms in which they occur in the diet and by the possibility that they may be subject to different mechanisms of absorption. Present knowledge of these mechanisms is inadequate, especially in the case of carotenoids. Numerous tests of absorption have been developed. The most common has been the biochemical measurement of the rise in plasma vitamin A after an oral dose of retinol or retinyl ester, but standardization is inadequate. Radioisotope tests based upon assay of serum or faecal activity following oral administration of tritiated vitamin A derivaties hold considerable promise, but again standardization is inadequate. From investigations hitherto performed it is known that absorption of vitamin A is influenced by several diseases, although as yet the consistency of results and the correlation with other tests of intestinal function have often been poor. However, the test of vitamin A absorption is nevertheless of clinical importance as a specialized measure of intestinal function. (author)

  9. Freezing of gait: Promising avenues for future treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilat, Moran; Lígia Silva de Lima, Ana; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Shine, James M; Nonnekes, Jorik; Lewis, Simon J G

    2018-03-12

    Freezing of gait is a devastating symptom of Parkinson's disease and other forms of parkinsonism. It poses a major burden on both patients and their families, as freezing often leads to falls, fall-related injuries and a loss of independence. Treating freezing of gait is difficult for a variety of reasons: it has a paroxysmal and unpredictable nature; a multifaceted pathophysiology, with an interplay between motor elements (disturbed stepping mechanisms) and non-motor elements (cognitive decline, anxiety); and a complex (and likely heterogeneous) underlying neural substrate, involving multiple failing neural networks. In recent years, advances in translational neuroscience have offered new insights into the pathophysiology underlying freezing. Furthermore, the mechanisms behind the effectiveness of available treatments (or lack thereof) are better understood. Driven by these concepts, researchers and clinicians have begun to improve currently available treatment options, and develop new and better treatment methods. Here, we evaluate the range of pharmacological (i.e. closed-looped approaches), surgical (i.e. multi-target and adaptive deep brain and spinal cord stimulation) and behavioural (i.e. biofeedback and cueing on demand) treatment options that are under development, and propose novel avenues that are likely to play a crucial role in the clinical management of freezing of gait in the near future. The outcomes of this review suggest that the successful future management of freezing of gait will require individualized treatments that can be implemented in an on-demand manner in response to imminent freezing. With this review we hope to guide much-needed advances in treating this devastating symptom of Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An environmentally friendly method for the fabrication of reduced graphene oxide foam with a super oil absorption capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yongqiang, E-mail: heyongqiang@126.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, Yuncheng University, Shanxi 044000 (China); School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu, Yue, E-mail: lyliuyue1990@gmail.com [School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wu, Tao; Ma, Junkui; Wang, Xingrui [School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Gong, Qiaojuan [Department of Applied Chemistry, Yuncheng University, Shanxi 044000 (China); Kong, Weina; Xing, Fubao; Liu, Yu [School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Gao, Jianping, E-mail: jinpinggaols@126.com [School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • RGO foams were fabricated from GO foams prepared by freeze-drying methods. • The RGO foams made from 2% GO suspension had a maximum value of 122 g g{sup −1} for oil. • The RGO foams had a maximum value of 99 g g{sup −1} for organic solvents. • The RGO foams can be used as a filter to separate oil from water. -- Abstract: Three kinds of graphene oxide (GO) foams were fabricated using different freezing methods (unidirectional freezing drying (UDF), non-directional freezing drying, and air freezing drying), and the corresponding reduced graphene oxide (RGO) foams were prepared by their thermal reduction of those GO foams. These RGO foams were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The absorption process and the factors that influence the absorption capacity were investigated. The RGO foams are hydrophobic and showed extremely high absorbing abilities for organic liquids. The absorption capacity of the RGO foams made by UDF was higher than 100 g g{sup −1} for all the oils tested (gasoline, diesel oil, pump oil, lubricating oil and olive oil) and had the highest value of about 122 g g{sup −1} for olive oil. The oil absorption capacity of the GO foams was lower than that of the RGO foams, but for olive oil, the absorption capacity was still high than 70 g g{sup −1}, which is higher than that of most oil absorbents.

  11. Remote laser evaporative molecular absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip; Cohen, Alexander; Madajian, Jonathan; Kulkarni, Neeraj; Zhang, Qicheng; Griswold, Janelle; Brashears, Travis

    2016-09-01

    We describe a novel method for probing bulk molecular and atomic composition of solid targets from a distant vantage. A laser is used to melt and vaporize a spot on the target. With sufficient flux, the spot temperature rises rapidly, and evaporation of surface materials occurs. The melted spot creates a high-temperature blackbody source, and ejected material creates a plume of surface materials in front of the spot. Molecular and atomic absorption occurs as the blackbody radiation passes through the ejected plume. Bulk molecular and atomic composition of the surface material is investigated by using a spectrometer to view the heated spot through the ejected plume. The proposed method is distinct from current stand-off approaches to composition analysis, such as Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), which atomizes and ionizes target material and observes emission spectra to determine bulk atomic composition. Initial simulations of absorption profiles with laser heating show great promise for Remote Laser-Evaporative Molecular Absorption (R-LEMA) spectroscopy. The method is well-suited for exploration of cold solar system targets—asteroids, comets, planets, moons—such as from a spacecraft orbiting the target. Spatial composition maps could be created by scanning the surface. Applying the beam to a single spot continuously produces a borehole or trench, and shallow subsurface composition profiling is possible. This paper describes system concepts for implementing the proposed method to probe the bulk molecular composition of an asteroid from an orbiting spacecraft, including laser array, photovoltaic power, heating and ablation, plume characteristics, absorption, spectrometry and data management.

  12. Rational design of an influenza subunit vaccine powder with sugar glass technology : preventing conformational changes of haemagglutinin during freezing and freeze-drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amorij, J-P; Meulenaar, J; Hinrichs, W L J; Stegmann, T; Huckriede, A; Coenen, F; Frijlink, H W

    2007-01-01

    The development of a stable influenza subunit vaccine in the dry state was investigated. The influence of various carbohydrates, buffer types and freezing rates on the integrity of haemagglutinin after freeze-thawing or freeze-drying was investigated with a range of analytical and immunological

  13. Gastrointestinal absorption of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.P.; Oldham, R.D.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Moretti, E.S.; Austin, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation has been made of the effect of the oxidation state of plutonium on its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. For mice and rats that have been starved prior to gastrointestinal administration, there is no significant difference between the absorption factors for Pu(IV) and Pu(VI). The value obtained for Pu(VI) is an order of magnitude lower than that reported previously. The value obtained for Pu(IV) is two orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously for nitrate solutions and the same as those reported for citrate solutions

  14. Quantum Absorption Refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Amikam; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2012-02-01

    A quantum absorption refrigerator driven by noise is studied with the purpose of determining the limitations of cooling to absolute zero. The model consists of a working medium coupled simultaneously to hot, cold, and noise baths. Explicit expressions for the cooling power are obtained for Gaussian and Poisson white noise. The quantum model is consistent with the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The third law is quantified; the cooling power Jc vanishes as Jc∝Tcα, when Tc→0, where α=d+1 for dissipation by emission and absorption of quanta described by a linear coupling to a thermal bosonic field, where d is the dimension of the bath.

  15. Preparation of Chitosan Nanocompositeswith a Macroporous Structure by Unidirectional Freezing and Subsequent Freeze-Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Aranaz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is the N-deacetylated derivative of chitin, a naturally abundant mucopolysaccharide that consists of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-d-glucose through a β (1→4 linkage and is found in nature as the supporting material of crustaceans, insects, etc. Chitosan has been strongly recommended as a suitable functional material because of its excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-toxicity, and adsorption properties. Boosting all these excellent properties to obtain unprecedented performances requires the core competences of materials chemists to design and develop novel processing strategies that ultimately allow tailoring the structure and/or the composition of the resulting chitosan-based materials. For instance, the preparation of macroporous materials is challenging in catalysis, biocatalysis and biomedicine, because the resulting materials will offer a desirable combination of high internal reactive surface area and straightforward molecular transport through broad “highways” leading to such a surface. Moreover, chitosan-based composites made of two or more distinct components will produce structural or functional properties not present in materials composed of one single component. Our group has been working lately on cryogenic processes based on the unidirectional freezing of water slurries and/or hydrogels, the subsequent freeze-drying of which produce macroporous materials with a well-patterned structure. We have applied this process to different gels and colloidal suspensions of inorganic, organic, and hybrid materials. In this review, we will describe the application of the process to chitosan solutions and gels typically containing a second component (e.g., metal and ceramic nanoparticles, or carbon nanotubes for the formation of chitosan nanocomposites with a macroporous structure. We will also discuss the role played by this tailored composition and structure in the ultimate performance of these materials.

  16. Immersion freezing of ambient dust using WISDOM setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudich, Y.; Reicher, N.

    2017-12-01

    A small subset of the atmospheric particles has the ability to induce ice formation. Among them are mineral dust particles that originate from arid regions. Mineral dust particles are internally mixed with various types of minerals such as kaolinite and illite from the clay minerals, quartz and feldspar. The mineral composition of the dust particles determine their freezing efficiency. Much attention was given to the clay group, as they are the most common minerals transported in the atmosphere. Recently, much focus has been directed to the feldspars, since its ice efficiency is higher at warmer temperatures, and as such is may dominate freezing in mixed phase clouds. Moreover, it was found that samples that contained higher content of feldspar had higher nucleation activity. In this study, we examine the immersion freezing of ambient dust particles that were collected in Rehovot, Israel (31.9N, 34.8E about 80m AMSL), during dust storms from the Sahara and the Syrian deserts. The size-segregated dust particles were collected on cyclopore polycarbonate filters using a Micro-orifice Uniform deposit Impactor (MOUDI). Freezing experiments were done using the WeIzmann Supercooled Droplets Observation on Microarray set (WISDOM). The particles were extracted from the filters by sonication and subsequently immersed in 100μm droplets that were cooled in a rate of 1°CPM to -37°C (homogenous freezing threshold). Investigation of the particles mineralogy was also performed. We observed freezing onset at 253K for particles of different diameters (0.3, 1.0, 1.8 and 3.2 μm). Most of the droplets were completely frozen by 243K. The number of active sites ranged from 108 to 1012 per m-2. Droplets that contained larger particles (higher surface area) froze at slightly warmer temperatures and contained slightly higher number of active sites. The freezing behavior fits well with measurements of K-feldspar particles and this may suggest that the feldspar dominated the dust freezing

  17. A theoretical extension of the soil freezing curve paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Erfan A.; Craig, James R.; Kurylyk, Barret L.

    2018-01-01

    Numerical models of permafrost evolution in porous media typically rely upon a smooth continuous relation between pore ice saturation and sub-freezing temperature, rather than the abrupt phase change that occurs in pure media. Soil scientists have known for decades that this function, known as the soil freezing curve (SFC), is related to the soil water characteristic curve (SWCC) for unfrozen soils due to the analogous capillary and sorptive effects experienced during both soil freezing and drying. Herein we demonstrate that other factors beyond the SFC-SWCC relationship can influence the potential range over which pore water phase change occurs. In particular, we provide a theoretical extension for the functional form of the SFC based upon the presence of spatial heterogeneity in both soil thermal conductivity and the freezing point depression of water. We infer the functional form of the SFC from many abrupt-interface 1-D numerical simulations of heterogeneous systems with prescribed statistical distributions of water and soil properties. The proposed SFC paradigm extension has the appealing features that it (1) is determinable from measurable soil and water properties, (2) collapses into an abrupt phase transition for homogeneous media, (3) describes a wide range of heterogeneity within a single functional expression, and (4) replicates the observed hysteretic behavior of freeze-thaw cycles in soils.

  18. Enhanced enzymatic conversion with freeze pretreatment of rice straw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ken-Lin; Thitikorn-amorn, Jitladda; Ou, Bay-Ming; Chen, Shan-He; Huang, Po-Jung [Institute of Biological Chemistry and Genomics Research Center Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 115 (China); Hsieh, Jung-Feng [Department of Food Science, Fu Jen Catholic University, Xin Zhuang, Taipei 242 (China); Ratanakhanokchai, Khanok [School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Chen, Shui-Tein [Institute of Biological Chemistry and Genomics Research Center Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 115 (China); Institute of Biochemical Sciences, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106 (China)

    2011-01-15

    Production of bioethanol by the conversion of lignocellulosic waste has attracted much interest in recent years, because of its low cost and great potential availability. The pretreatment process is important for increasing the enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulosic materials. Enzymatic conversion with freeze pretreatment of rice straw was evaluated in this study. The freeze pretreatment was found to significantly increase the enzyme digestibility of rice straw from 48% to 84%. According to the results, enzymatic hydrolysis of unpretreated rice straw with 150 U cellulase and 100 U xylanase for 48 h yielded 226.77 g kg{sup -1} and 93.84 g kg{sup -1} substrate-reducing sugars respectively. However, the reducing sugar yields from freeze pretreatment under the same conditions were 417.27 g kg{sup -1} and 138.77 g kg{sup -1} substrate, respectively. In addition, hydrolyzates analysis showed that the highest glucose yield obtained during the enzymatic hydrolysis step in the present study was 371.91 g kg{sup -1} of dry rice straw, following pretreatment. Therefore, the enhanced enzymatic conversion with freeze pretreatment of rice straw was observed in this study. This indicated that freeze pretreatment was highly effective for enzymatic hydrolysis and low environmental impact. (author)

  19. 'Banking time': egg freezing and the negotiation of future fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldby, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the relatively recent practice of non-medical egg freezing, in which women bank their eggs for later use in conceiving a child. Non-medical egg freezing has only been available for about the last five years, as new vitrification techniques have made the success rates for actual conception more reliable than the earlier method of slow freezing. I draw on interviews with both clinicians and women who have banked their eggs to consider how this novel practice articulates with broader issues about the relationship between sexuality, reproduction and the political economy of household formation. Non-medical egg-freezing provides a technical solution to a number of different problems women face with regard to the elongation of the life course, the extension of education, the cost of household establishment and the iterative nature of relationship formation, thematised by the ubiquity of internet dating among the interviewees. I focus on the ways women used egg freezing to manage and reconcile different forms of time.

  20. Apparatus for freeze drying of biologic and sediment samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Freeze drying to obtain water from individual samples, though not complicated, usually requires considerable effort to maintain the cold traps on a 24-hr basis. In addition, the transfer of a sample from sample containers to freeze-dry flasks is usually made with some risk of contamination to the sample. If samples are large, 300 g to 600 g, usually several days are required to dry the samples. The use of an unattended system greatly improves personnel and drying efficiency. Commercial freeze dryers are not readily applicable to the problems of collecting water from individual samples, and lab-designed collectors required sample transfer and continual replenishment of the dry ice. A freeze-dry apparatus for collecting water from individual sediment and/or biological samples was constructed to determine the tritium concentrations in fish for dose calcaluations and the tritium distribution in sediment cores for water movement studies. The freeze, dry apparatus, which can handle eight samples simultaneously and conveniently, is set up for unattended 24-hr operation and is designed to avoid sample transfer problems

  1. A tissue snap-freezing apparatus without sacrificial cryogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanapalli, Srinivas; Jagga, Sahil; Holland, Harry; ter Brake, Marcel

    2017-12-01

    Molecular technologies in cancer diagnosis require a fresh and frozen tissue, which is obtained by means of snap-freezing. Currently, coolants such as solid carbon dioxide and liquid nitrogen are used to preserve good morphology of the tissue. Using these coolants, snap freezing of tissues for diagnostic and research purposes is often time consuming, laborious, even hazardous and not user friendly. For that reason snap-freezing is not routinely applied at the location of biopsy acquisition. Furthermore, the influence of optimal cooling rate and cold sink temperature on the viability of the cells is not well known. In this paper, a snap-freezing apparatus powered by a small cryocooler is presented that will allow bio-medical research of tissue freezing methods and is safe to use in a hospital. To benchmark this apparatus, cooldown of a standard aluminum cryo-vial in liquid nitrogen is measured and the cooling rate is about -25 K/s between 295 K and 120 K. Sufficient cooling rate is obtained by a forced convective helium gas flow through a gap formed between the cryo-vial and a cold surface and is therefore chosen as the preferred cooling method. A conceptual design of the snap-apparatus with forced flow is discussed in this paper.

  2. Thermogravimetric measurements of liquid vapor pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong Yunhong; Gregson, Christopher M.; Parker, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Rapid determination of vapor pressure by TGA. ► Demonstration of limitations of currently available approaches in literature. ► New model for vapor pressure assessment of small size samples in TGA. ► New model accounts for vapor diffusion and sample geometry and measures vapor pressure normally within 10%. - Abstract: A method was developed using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine the vapor pressure of volatile liquids. This is achieved by measuring the rate of evaporation (mass loss) of a pure liquid contained within a cylindrical pan. The influence of factors like sample geometry and vapor diffusion on evaporation rate are discussed. The measurement can be performed across a wide range of temperature yielding reasonable results up to 10 kPa. This approach may be useful as a rapid and automatable method for measuring the volatility of flavor and fragrance raw materials.

  3. A Lithium Vapor Box Divertor Similarity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert A.; Emdee, Eric D.; Goldston, Robert J.; Jaworski, Michael A.; Schwartz, Jacob A.

    2017-10-01

    A lithium vapor box divertor offers an alternate means of managing the extreme power density of divertor plasmas by leveraging gaseous lithium to volumetrically extract power. The vapor box divertor is a baffled slot with liquid lithium coated walls held at temperatures which increase toward the divertor floor. The resulting vapor pressure differential drives gaseous lithium from hotter chambers into cooler ones, where the lithium condenses and returns. A similarity experiment was devised to investigate the advantages offered by a vapor box divertor design. We discuss the design, construction, and early findings of the vapor box divertor experiment including vapor can construction, power transfer calculations, joint integrity tests, and thermocouple data logging. Heat redistribution of an incident plasma-based heat flux from a typical linear plasma device is also presented. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 and The Princeton Environmental Institute.

  4. Study of absorption spectra for alkali and alkaline earth metal salts in flameless atomic absorption spectrometry using a carbon tube atomizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Seiji; Kakiyama, Hitoo

    1975-01-01

    Absorption spectra of various salts such as alkali metal salts, alkaline earth dichlorides, and ammonium halides were investigated and absorptions of some molecular species produced in the carbon tube were identified. The aqueous solution (20 μl) containing 1.0 mg/ml of each salt was placed in the carbon tube atomizer and heated in a similar manner to usual flameless atomic absorption method. D 2 -lamp was used as a continuous light source and argon gas was employed as an inert sheath gas. The spectra were obtained over the range of wavelength 200 to 350 nm. When alkali halides were feeded, the absorption spectra agreed with those of alkali halide vapors. Therefore, in such cases vapors of the alkali halides were probably produced by the sublimation or vaporization in the atomizer. The spectra of alkali perchlorates were considered to be those of alkali chlorides produced by the pyrolysis of the perchlorates in the atomizer. The absorptions of alkaline earth chlorides below 250 nm were probably due to their gaseous states. Sulfur dioxide was found to be produced by the pyrolysis of alkali sulfates, bisulfates and sulfites in the atomizer, Alkali phosphates and pyrophosphates gave almost identical spectra below 300 nm. Gamma band spectrum of nitrogen monoxide was observed from 200 to 240 nm during ashing at bout 330 0 C for alkali nitrates and nitrites. Ammonia vapor was produced from ammonium halides during drying at about 170 0 C. Although the absorptions of alkali carbonates and hydroxides were almost undetectable, the same spectra as those of alkali halides were observed by the addition of ammonium halides to the solutions of alkali compounds. This shows that alkali halides are produced in the atomizer by the addition of halide ions. (auth.)

  5. Retrieval of water vapor vertical distributions in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere from SCIAMACHY limb measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rozanov

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the retrieval of water vapor vertical distributions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS altitude range from space-borne observations of the scattered solar light made in limb viewing geometry. First results using measurements from SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY aboard ENVISAT (Environmental Satellite are presented here. In previous publications, the retrieval of water vapor vertical distributions has been achieved exploiting either the emitted radiance leaving the atmosphere or the transmitted solar radiation. In this study, the scattered solar radiation is used as a new source of information on the water vapor content in the UTLS region. A recently developed retrieval algorithm utilizes the differential absorption structure of the water vapor in 1353–1410 nm spectral range and yields the water vapor content in the 11–25 km altitude range. In this study, the retrieval algorithm is successfully applied to SCIAMACHY limb measurements and the resulting water vapor profiles are compared to in situ balloon-borne observations. The results from both satellite and balloon-borne instruments are found to agree typically within 10 %.

  6. Absorption edge and ion bombardment of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    The optical absorption edge for chemical-vapor-deposited silicon nitride films on sapphire substrates has been measured for different deposition conditions, and as a function of ion bombardment and subsequent annealing. An exponential form for the absorption edge, consistent with a disorder-limited edge, is observed for all films. While the slope of the absorption edge is independent of the measurement temperature, the energy for the edge decreases with increasing temperature by (2--4) x 10 -4 eV/degreeC. The energy and slope of the absorption edge are lower for films deposited at 760 degreeC than for films deposited at 1000 degreeC, and displacement damage introduced by ion bombardment causes a decrease in both the slope and energy for the edge. Ion-bombardment-induced changes saturate when the energy deposition into damage processes is approx.10 eV/atom. The effects of a lower deposition temperature and of ion bombardment upon the absorption edge are attributed to a degradation of short-range order. Annealing of the bombardment-induced effects occurs over a broad temperature range, and the prebombardment absorption edge is essentially recovered by annealing at the deposition temperature

  7. Analysis of crystallization risk in double effect absorption refrigeration systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garousi Farshi, L.; Seyed Mahmoudi, S.M.; Rosen, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Absorption refrigeration systems are an alternative to vapor compression ones in cooling and refrigeration applications. In comparison with single effect absorption units, double effect systems have improved performance. Also, they are more available commercially than the other multi effect absorption cycles. An important challenge in the operation of such systems is the possibility of crystallization within them. This is especially true in developing air-cooled absorption systems, which are attractive because cooling tower and associated installation and maintenance issues can be avoided. Therefore, distinguishing the working conditions that may cause crystallization can be useful in the design and control of these systems. In this paper a computational model has been developed to study and compare the effects of operating parameters on crystallization phenomena in three classes of double effect lithium bromide-water absorption refrigeration systems (series, parallel and reverse parallel) with identical refrigeration capacities. It is shown that the range of operating conditions without crystallization risks in the parallel and the reverse parallel configurations is wider than those of the series flow system. - Highlights: → We study crystallization of double effect absorption refrigeration systems. → We consider series, parallel and reverse parallel cycles. → We study the effect of operating conditions on crystallization. → We choose optimum distribution ratio for parallel and reverse parallel systems. → Crystallization possibility is low in parallel and reverse parallel cycles.

  8. Chemical Absorption Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj

    2011-01-01

    Chemical absorption materials that potentially can be used for post combustion carbon dioxide capture are discussed. They fall into five groups, alkanolamines, alkali carbonates, ammonia, amino acid salts, and ionic liquids. The chemistry of the materials is discussed and advantages and drawbacks...

  9. Neutron resonance absorption theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuss, P.

    1991-11-01

    After some recalls on the physics of neutron resonance absorption during their slowing down, this paper presents the main features of the theoretical developments performed by the french school of reactor physics: the effective reaction rate method so called Livolant-Jeanpierre theory, the generalizations carried out by the author, and the probability table method [fr

  10. NUMERICAL STUDY ON COOLING EFFECT POTENTIAL FROM VAPORIZER DEVICE OF LPG VEHICLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUJI SETIYO

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Over fuel consumption and increased exhaust gas due to the A/C system have become a serious problem. On the other hand, the LPG-fueled vehicle provides potential cooling from LPG phase changes in the vaporizer. Therefore, this article presents the potential cooling effect calculation from 1998 cm3 spark ignition (SI engine. A numerical study is used to calculate the potential heat absorption of latent and sensible heat transfer during LPG is expanded in the vaporizer. Various LPG compositions are also simulated through the engine speed range from 1000 to 6000 rpm. The result shows that the 1998 cm3 engine capable of generating the potential cooling effect of about 1.0 kW at 1000 rpm and a maximum of up to 1.8 kW at 5600 rpm. The potential cooling effects from the LPG vaporizer contributes about 26% to the A/C system works on eco-driving condition.

  11. Measurement of Trace Water Vapor in a Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly Product Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormhoudt, Joda; Shorter, Joanne H.; McManus, J. Barry; Nelson, David D.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Freedman, Andrew; Campbell, Melissa; Chang, Clarence T.; Smith, Frederick D.

    2004-01-01

    The International Space Station Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) uses regenerable adsorption technology to remove carbon dioxide (COP) from cabin air. Product water vapor measurements from a CDRA test bed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center were made using a tunable infrared diode laser differential absorption spectrometer (TILDAS) provided by NASA Glenn Research Center. The TILDAS instrument exceeded all the test specifications, including sensitivity, dynamic range, time response, and unattended operation. During the COP desorption phase, water vapor concentrations as low as 5 ppmv were observed near the peak of CO2 evolution, rising to levels of approx. 40 ppmv at the end of a cycle. Periods of high water concentration (>100 ppmv) were detected and shown to be caused by an experimental artifact. Measured values of total water vapor evolved during a single desorption cycle were as low as 1 mg.

  12. DOUBLE-SHELL TANK (DST) HYDROXIDE DEPLETION MODEL FOR CARBON DIOXIDE ABSORPTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OGDEN DM; KIRCH NW

    2007-01-01

    This document generates a supernatant hydroxide ion depletion model based on mechanistic principles. The carbon dioxide absorption mechanistic model is developed in this report. The report also benchmarks the model against historical tank supernatant hydroxide data and vapor space carbon dioxide data. A comparison of the newly generated mechanistic model with previously applied empirical hydroxide depletion equations is also performed

  13. DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) HYDROXIDE DEPLETION MODEL FOR CARBON DIOXIDE ABSORPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OGDEN DM; KIRCH NW

    2007-10-31

    This document generates a supernatant hydroxide ion depletion model based on mechanistic principles. The carbon dioxide absorption mechanistic model is developed in this report. The report also benchmarks the model against historical tank supernatant hydroxide data and vapor space carbon dioxide data. A comparison of the newly generated mechanistic model with previously applied empirical hydroxide depletion equations is also performed.

  14. Adiabatic pressure dependence of the 2.7 and 1.9 micron water vapor bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, C. V.; Walls, W. L.; Broersma, S.

    1977-01-01

    An acoustic excitation technique is used to determine the adiabatic pressure derivative of the spectral absorptance of the 2.7 and 1.9 micron water vapor bands, and the 3.5 micron HCl band. The dependence of this derivative on thermodynamic parameters such as temperature, concentration, and pressure is evaluated. A cross-flow water vapor system is used to measure spectral absorptance. Taking F as the ratio of nonrigid to rotor line strengths, it is found that an F factor correction is needed for the 2.7 micron band. The F factor for the 1.9 micron band is also determined. In the wings of each band a wavelength can be found where the concentration dependence is predominant. Farther out in the wings a local maximum occurs for the temperature derivative. It is suggested that the pressure derivative is significant in the core of the band.

  15. Monofilament Vaporization Propulsion (MVP) System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Monofilament Vaporization Propulsion (MVP) is a new propulsion technology targeted at secondary payload applications. It does not compromise on performance while...

  16. Monofilament Vaporization Propulsion (MVP) System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Monofilament Vaporization Propulsion (MVP) is an innovative new propulsion technology targeted at secondary payload applications. The approach with MVP, rather than...

  17. Experiences of marijuana-vaporizer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouff, John M; Rooke, Sally E; Copeland, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Using a marijuana vaporizer may have potential harm-reduction advantages on smoking marijuana, in that the user does not inhale smoke. Little research has been published on use of vaporizers. In the first study of individuals using a vaporizer on their own initiative, 96 adults anonymously answered questions about their experiences with a vaporizer and their use of marijuana with tobacco. Users identified 4 advantages to using a vaporizer over smoking marijuana: perceived health benefits, better taste, no smoke smell, and more effect from the same amount of marijuana. Users identified 2 disadvantages: inconvenience of setup and cleaning and the time it takes to get the device operating for each use. Only 2 individuals combined tobacco in the vaporizer mix, whereas 15 combined tobacco with marijuana when they smoked marijuana. Almost all participants intended to continue using a vaporizer. Vaporizers seem to have appeal to marijuana users, who perceive them as having harm-reduction and other benefits. Vaporizers are worthy of experimental research evaluating health-related effects of using them.

  18. Mars water vapor, near-surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. A.; Sharman, R. D.; Lucich, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    In a previous paper we concluded that the temperature sensors aboard the Viking landers (VL-1 and VL-2) were detecting the water vapor frost point. Analysis of one Mars year of data at both lander sites substantiates this conclusion. At VL-1 it is found that the water vapor mixing ratio is constant with height through the bulk of the atmosphere, most of the time. Exceptions are during the onset phases of the two major dust storms when temporary enhancement of near-surface vapor occurs (the same phenomenon is observed at VL-2), and some depletion of near-surface vapor during the decay phase of the first storm, possibly the second storm as well. The former suggests near-surface, northward transport of water vapor with the storms. The latter suggests adsorption of vapor on dust particles followed by surface deposition. At VL-2, severe near-surface depletion of water vapor occurs during northern autumn and winter. The residual vapor is in equilibrium with the surface condensate observed at the site during this period, indicating that the source region for the condensate must be aloft with downward transport by dust fall-out. Since the near-surface water vapor mixing ratio and concentration at VL-1 generally parallels the column abundance over VL-1 obtained by the orbiters, this suggests that VL-1 can be used to give a measure of column abundance for as long as the temperature sensors remain operational.

  19. Vapor pressures and thermophysical properties of selected hexenols and recommended vapor pressure for hexan-1-ol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štejfa, V.; Fulem, Michal; Růžička, K.; Matějka, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 402, Sep (2015), 18-29 ISSN 0378-3812 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : alcohols * vapor pressure * heat capacity * ideal - gas thermodynamic properties * vaporization enthalpy Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.846, year: 2015

  20. High-freezing-point fuels used for aviation turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, R.

    1979-01-01

    Broadened-specification aviation fuels could be produced from a greater fraction of crude source material with improvements in fuel supply and price. These fuels, particularly those with increased final boiling temperatures, would have higher freezing temperatures than current aviation turbine fuels. The higher-freezing-point fuels can be substituted in the majority of present commercial flights, since temperature data indicate that in-flight fuel temperatures are relatively mild. For the small but significant fraction of commercial flights where low fuel temperatures make higher freezing-point fuel use unacceptable, adaptations to the fuel or fuel system may be made to accommodate this fuel. Several techniques are discussed. Fuel heating is the most promising concept. One simple system design uses existing heat rejection from the fuel-lubricating oil cooler, another uses an engine-driven generator for electrical heating. Both systems offer advantages that outweigh the obvious penalties.