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Sample records for abnormal muscle movements

  1. Abnormal vibration induced illusion of movement in essential tremor: evidence for abnormal muscle spindle afferent function

    OpenAIRE

    Frima, N; Grunewald, R

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Vibration induced illusion of movement (VIIM) is abnormal in patients with idiopathic focal dystonia, an abnormality which corrects with fatigue of the vibrated muscle. Since dystonia and essential tremor sometimes coexist in families, we investigated the perception of VIIM and the effect of fatigue on VIIM in patients with essential tremor.

  2. An application of dynamic CT for diagnosis of abnormal external ocular muscle movement

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    Tomita, Kazumi; Ogura, Yuuko; Takeshita, Gen; Koga, Sukehiko (Fujita Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan). School of Medicine); Katada, Kazuhiro; Anno, Hirofumi

    1993-10-01

    To evaluate the movements of retrobulbar structures radiologically, we have developed a new technique called external ocular muscle movement CT (EOM CT), in which dynamic CT scanning is performed while the patient performs controlled eye movements. This new technique was applied in one volunteer and 72 patients with external ophthalmoplegia due to orbital mass lesion, hyperthyroid ophthalmopathy, blowout fracture, and other retrobulbar lesions. EOM CT permits the assessment of extraocular muscle contraction in cases of blowout fracture, the evaluation of muscular contraction in hypertrophy of the extraocular muscles, and the diagnosis of adhesions between the extraocular muscles and intraorbital masses. Radiation dose to the lens from EOM CT was measured using a phantom and TLD, and was compared with that of conventional CT scanning with a 5 mm slice thickness. The dose to the lens from EOM CT was three times higher than that for conventional CT in axial scanning, but in the coronal section of the retrobulbar region, the dose to the lens from EOM CT decreases to one twelfth of that of conventional CT. EOM CT promises to be a powerful modality for functional evaluation of the extraocular muscles and other retrobulbar structures. (author).

  3. Muscle Activation and Movement Coordination.

    OpenAIRE

    Ljung, Carl

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to empirically develop a method of using electromyography to identify how humans coordinate their muscles during certain sequences of movement and the effect of an injured anterior cruciate ligament to muscle coordination. In this study, more simple movements of the lower extremities are examined and relatively accurate hypothesizes can be made solely based on anatomical theory. However, a general method for electromyographic studies would open up the possibili...

  4. Abnormal Fixational Eye Movements in Amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Kumar, Priyanka; Ghasia, Fatema F

    2016-01-01

    Fixational saccades shift the foveal image to counteract visual fading related to neural adaptation. Drifts are slow eye movements between two adjacent fixational saccades. We quantified fixational saccades and asked whether their changes could be attributed to pathologic drifts seen in amblyopia, one of the most common causes of blindness in childhood. Thirty-six pediatric subjects with varying severity of amblyopia and eleven healthy age-matched controls held their gaze on a visual target. Eye movements were measured with high-resolution video-oculography during fellow eye-viewing and amblyopic eye-viewing conditions. Fixational saccades and drifts were analyzed in the amblyopic and fellow eye and compared with controls. We found an increase in the amplitude with decreased frequency of fixational saccades in children with amblyopia. These alterations in fixational eye movements correlated with the severity of their amblyopia. There was also an increase in eye position variance during drifts in amblyopes. There was no correlation between the eye position variance or the eye velocity during ocular drifts and the amplitude of subsequent fixational saccade. Our findings suggest that abnormalities in fixational saccades in amblyopia are independent of the ocular drift. This investigation of amblyopia in pediatric age group quantitatively characterizes the fixation instability. Impaired properties of fixational saccades could be the consequence of abnormal processing and reorganization of the visual system in amblyopia. Paucity in the visual feedback during amblyopic eye-viewing condition can attribute to the increased eye position variance and drift velocity.

  5. Abnormality of Auricular Muscles in Congenital Auricular Deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotsuyanagi, Takatoshi; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamashita, Ken; Sugai, Asuka; Gonda, Ayako; Kitada, Ayaka; Saito, Tamotsu; Urushidate, Satoshi

    2015-07-01

    It has been suggested that there is a close association of abnormality in auricular muscles with various congenital auricular deformities. However, there has been no investigation to determine what muscles are involved and how they affect the deformity. The authors examined abnormalities of auricular muscles for patients with various auricular deformities. The authors examined 77 auricles of 62 patients with congenital auricular deformities, including cryptotia, Stahl's ear, prominent ear, lop ear, and others. The superior and posterior auricular muscles from the extrinsic auricular muscle group and the auricular oblique and transverse muscles from the auricular intrinsic muscle group were investigated. The authors found characteristic features of the abnormality of the muscle for each auricular deformity. In nearly all cases of cryptotia, abnormality was found in the superior auricular, auricular oblique, and auricular transverse muscles. Abnormal insertion was found mainly in the superior auricular muscle and was the main cause of cryptotia. In Stahl's ear, the major abnormality was abnormal insertion of the auricular transverse muscle, which creates an abnormal cartilaginous prominence in the scapha. The abnormality in cases of prominent ear was clearly limited mostly to the auricular transverse muscle and, in some cases, to the posterior auricular muscle. In lop ear, abnormality was mostly found in the auricular transverse muscle, with elongation, and in the superior auricular or auricular oblique muscle in some cases. There is a tendency for a specific muscle abnormality to be found in each deformity. It is important to identify the abnormal muscle and correct the abnormality during the operation.

  6. Effect of 4-Horizontal Rectus Muscle Tenotomy on Visual Function and Eye Movement Records in Patients with Infantile Nystagmus Syndrome without Abnormal Head Posture and Strabismus: A Prospective Study

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    Ahmad Ameri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effect of tenotomy on visual function and eye movement records in patients with infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS without abnormal head posture (AHP and strabismusMethods: A prospective interventional case-series of patients with INS with no AHP or strabismus. Patients underwent 4-horizontal muscle tenotomy. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA and eye movement recordings were compared pre and postoperatively.Results: Eight patients were recruited in this study with 3 to 15.5 months of follow-up. Patients showed significant improvement in their visual function. Overall nystagmus amplitude and velocity was decreased 30.7% and 19.8%, respectively. Improvements were more marked at right and left gazes. Conclusion: Tenotomy improves both visual function and eye movement records in INS with no strabismus and eccentric null point. The procedure has more effect on lateral gazes with worse waveforms, thus can broaden area with better visual function. We recommend this surgery in patients with INS but no associated AHP or strabismus.

  7. QUALITATIVE ABNORMAL FETAL BREATHING MOVEMENTS, ASSOCIATED WITH TRACHEAL ATRESIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BAARSMA, R; BEKEDAM, DJ; VISSER, GHA

    A case is reported in which qualitatively, grossly abnormal fetal breathing movements turned out to be indicative of complete tracheal atresia. Fetal breathing movements were vigorous and jerky and of large amplitude; similarly abnormal movements were observed after birth. At postmortem tracheal

  8. Abnormal fixational eye movements in strabismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasia, Fatema F; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Shaikh, Aasef G

    2018-02-01

    Fixational saccades are miniature eye movements that constantly change the gaze during attempted visual fixation. Visually guided saccades and fixational saccades represent an oculomotor continuum and are produced by common neural machinery. Patients with strabismus have disconjugate binocular horizontal saccades. We examined the stability and variability of eye position during fixation in patients with strabismus and correlated the severity of fixational instability with strabismus angle and binocular vision. Eye movements were measured in 13 patients with strabismus and 16 controls during fixation and visually guided saccades under monocular viewing conditions. Fixational saccades and intersaccadic drifts were analysed in the viewing and non-viewing eye of patients with strabismus and controls. We found an increase in fixational instability in patients with strabismus compared with controls. We also found an increase in the disconjugacy of fixational saccades and intrasaccadic ocular drift in patients with strabismus compared with controls. The disconjugacy was worse in patients with large-angle strabismus and absent stereopsis. There was an increase in eye position variance during drifts in patients with strabismus. Our findings suggest that both fixational saccades and intersaccadic drifts are abnormal and likely contribute to the fixational instability in patients with strabismus. Fixational instability could be a useful tool for mass screenings of children to diagnose strabismus in the absence of amblyopia and latent nystagmus. The increased disconjugacy of fixational eye movements and visually guided saccades in patients with strabismus reflects the disruption of the fine-tuning of the motor and visual systems responsible for achieving binocular fusion in these patients. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Abnormal Involuntary Movements: Side-Effect of Neuroleptic Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Oyewumi, L. K.

    1982-01-01

    Neuroleptics are antipsychotic drugs. In addition to their antipsychotic properties, many physicians use them as anti-anxiety or antiemetics. Indeed, most patients referred to psychiatrists would have been given one, or a combination, of these drugs. Physicians should therefore be aware of their side-effects. Abnormal involuntary movements, now recognized as side-effects of neuroleptics, are broadly classified as acute early occurring movement disorders and late appearing movement disorders. ...

  10. Abnormal fetal movements, micrognathia and pulmonary hypoplasia: a case report. Abnormal fetal movements

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    Morokuma Seiichi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Micrognathia is a facial malformation characterized by mandibular hypoplasia and a small, receding chin that fails to maintain the tongue in a forward position. We previously reported a system of prenatal screening that we developed to identify fetuses with compromised central nervous system function by observing fetal behavior. In this paper we report the case of a preterm infant with micrognathia and pulmonary hypoplasia who presented abnormal fetal movements. Case presentation A 27-year-old Japanese primigravida at 33 weeks of gestation was referred to our hospital. Ultrasonographic examination revealed clinical polyhydramnios. Micrognathia was evident on midsagittal and 3 D scan. The lung area was less than the mean -2.0 standard deviations for the gestational age. The infant had mandibular hypoplasia and glossoptosis. After emergency cesarean delivery for non-reasuring fetal status, required immediate tracheostomy and cardiopulmonary resuscitation with mechanical ventilatory support. However, the infant's cardiopulmonary condition did not improve and she died 21 hours after birth. Conclusions The findings of our ultrasound exam are suggestive of brain dysfunction. The observation of fetal behavior appears to be effective for the prediction of prognosis of cases with micrognathia.

  11. Eye Movement Abnormalities in Multiple Sclerosis: Pathogenesis, Modeling, and Treatment

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    Alessandro Serra

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS commonly causes eye movement abnormalities that may have a significant impact on patients’ disability. Inflammatory demyelinating lesions, especially occurring in the posterior fossa, result in a wide range of disorders, spanning from acquired pendular nystagmus (APN to internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO, among the most common. As the control of eye movements is well understood in terms of anatomical substrate and underlying physiological network, studying ocular motor abnormalities in MS provides a unique opportunity to gain insights into mechanisms of disease. Quantitative measurement and modeling of eye movement disorders, such as INO, may lead to a better understanding of common symptoms encountered in MS, such as Uhthoff’s phenomenon and fatigue. In turn, the pathophysiology of a range of eye movement abnormalities, such as APN, has been clarified based on correlation of experimental model with lesion localization by neuroimaging in MS. Eye movement disorders have the potential of being utilized as structural and functional biomarkers of early cognitive deficit, and possibly help in assessing disease status and progression, and to serve as platform and functional outcome to test novel therapeutic agents for MS. Knowledge of neuropharmacology applied to eye movement dysfunction has guided testing and use of a number of pharmacological agents to treat some eye movement disorders found in MS, such as APN and other forms of central nystagmus.

  12. Skeletal muscle abnormalities and genetic factors related to vertical talus.

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    Merrill, Laura J; Gurnett, Christina A; Connolly, Anne M; Pestronk, Alan; Dobbs, Matthew B

    2011-04-01

    Congenital vertical talus is a fixed dorsal dislocation of the talonavicular joint and fixed equinus contracture of the hindfoot, causing a rigid deformity recognizable at birth. The etiology and epidemiology of this condition are largely unknown, but some evidence suggests it relates to aberrations of skeletal muscle. Identifying the tissue abnormalities and genetic causes responsible for vertical talus has the potential to lead to improved treatment and preventive strategies. We therefore (1) determined whether skeletal muscle abnormalities are present in patients with vertical talus and (2) identified associated congenital anomalies and genetic abnormalities in these patients. We identified associated congenital anomalies and genetic abnormalities present in 61 patients affected with vertical talus. We obtained abductor hallucis muscle biopsy specimens from the affected limbs of 11 of the 61 patients and compared the histopathologic characteristics with those of age-matched control subjects. All muscle biopsy specimens (n = 11) had abnormalities compared with those from control subjects including combinations of abnormal variation in muscle fiber size (n = 7), type I muscle fiber smallness (n = 6), and abnormal fiber type predominance (n = 5). Isolated vertical talus occurred in 23 of the 61 patients (38%), whereas the remaining 38 patients had associated nervous system, musculoskeletal system, and/or genetic and genomic abnormalities. Ten of the 61 patients (16%) had vertical talus in one foot and clubfoot in the other. Chromosomal abnormalities, all complete or partial trisomies, were identified in three patients with vertical talus who had additional congenital abnormalities. Vertical talus is a heterogeneous birth defect resulting from many diverse etiologies. Abnormal skeletal muscle biopsies are common in patients with vertical talus although it is unclear whether this is primary or secondary to the joint deformity. Associated anomalies are present in 62

  13. Gross Motor Development, Movement Abnormalities, and Early Identification of Autism

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    Ozonoff, Sally; Young, Gregory S.; Goldring, Stacy; Greiss-Hess, Laura; Herrera, Adriana M.; Steele, Joel; Macari, Suzanne; Hepburn, Susan; Rogers, Sally J.

    2008-01-01

    Gross motor development (supine, prone, rolling, sitting, crawling, walking) and movement abnormalities were examined in the home videos of infants later diagnosed with autism (regression and no regression subgroups), developmental delays (DD), or typical development. Group differences in maturity were found for walking, prone, and supine, with…

  14. Spinal osteoblastoma: relationship between paravertebral muscle abnormalities and scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saifuddin, A. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital Trust, 45-51 Bolsover Street, London W1P 8AQ (United Kingdom)]|[Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital Trust, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Sherazi, Z. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital Trust, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Shaikh, M.I. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital Trust, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Natali, C. [Department of Orthopaedics, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital Trust, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Ransford, A.O. [Department of Orthopaedics, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital Trust, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Pringle, J.A.S. [Department of Histopathology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital Trust, Stanmore (United Kingdom)

    1996-08-01

    Objective. To illustrate the variety of paravertebral muscle abnormalities as seen on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in association with spinal osteoblastomas and correlate the findings with the presence of scoliosis. Design. In a retrospective study the clinical notes, plain radiographic, CT and/or MRI features were reviewed for the presence of scoliosis and paravertebral muscle abnormality (either inflammation or atrophy). Patients. Twelve patients (7 male, 5 female) with a mean age of 17 years were studied. Three lesions occurred in the cervical spine, five in the thoracic spine and four in the lumbar spine. Results and conclusions. Nine patients had scoliosis. All patients with a thoracic or lumbar lesion and scoliosis (n=8) had an associated abnormality of the paravertebral muscles (usually atrophy with fatty replacement). One patient with a lumbar lesion and no scoliosis had normal paravertebral muscles. One patient with a cervical lesion had thoracic scoliosis but no muscle abnormality in the cervical region, while two patients with cervical lesions and no scoliosis showed muscle abnormalities. The results support the clinical hypothesis that scoliosis in patients with spinal osteoblastoma is due to paravertebral muscle spasm, although this would not appear to be the case for cervical lesions. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Spinal osteoblastoma: relationship between paravertebral muscle abnormalities and scoliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saifuddin, A.; Sherazi, Z.; Shaikh, M.I.; Natali, C.; Ransford, A.O.; Pringle, J.A.S.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To illustrate the variety of paravertebral muscle abnormalities as seen on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in association with spinal osteoblastomas and correlate the findings with the presence of scoliosis. Design. In a retrospective study the clinical notes, plain radiographic, CT and/or MRI features were reviewed for the presence of scoliosis and paravertebral muscle abnormality (either inflammation or atrophy). Patients. Twelve patients (7 male, 5 female) with a mean age of 17 years were studied. Three lesions occurred in the cervical spine, five in the thoracic spine and four in the lumbar spine. Results and conclusions. Nine patients had scoliosis. All patients with a thoracic or lumbar lesion and scoliosis (n=8) had an associated abnormality of the paravertebral muscles (usually atrophy with fatty replacement). One patient with a lumbar lesion and no scoliosis had normal paravertebral muscles. One patient with a cervical lesion had thoracic scoliosis but no muscle abnormality in the cervical region, while two patients with cervical lesions and no scoliosis showed muscle abnormalities. The results support the clinical hypothesis that scoliosis in patients with spinal osteoblastoma is due to paravertebral muscle spasm, although this would not appear to be the case for cervical lesions. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  16. Assessment of Specific Characteristics of Abnormal General Movements: Does It Enhance the Prediction of Cerebral Palsy?

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    Hamer, Elisa G.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Abnormal general movements at around 3 months corrected age indicate a high risk of cerebral palsy (CP). We aimed to determine whether specific movement characteristics can improve the predictive power of definitely abnormal general movements. Method: Video recordings of 46 infants with definitely abnormal general movements at 9 to 13 weeks…

  17. Skeletal muscle abnormalities in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

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    Ana Paula Breda

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive disease that is characterized by dyspnea and exercise intolerance. Impairment in skeletal muscle has recently been described in PAH, although the degree to which this impairment is solely determined by the hemodynamic profile remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to verify the association of structural and functional skeletal muscle characteristics with maximum exercise in PAH.The exercise capacity, body composition, CT area of limb muscle, quality of life, quadriceps biopsy and hemodynamics of 16 PAH patients were compared with those of 10 controls.PAH patients had a significantly poorer quality of life, reduced percentage of lean body mass, reduced respiratory muscle strength, reduced resistance and strength of quadriceps and increased functional limitation at 6MWT and CPET. VO2 max was correlated with muscular variables and cardiac output. Bivariate linear regression models showed that the association between muscular structural and functional variables remained significant even after correcting for cardiac output.Our study showed the coexistence of ventilatory and quadriceps weakness in face of exercise intolerance in the same group of PAH patients. More interestingly, it is the first time that the independent association between muscular pattern and maximum exercise capacity is evidenced in PAH, independently of cardiac index highlighting the importance of considering rehabilitation in the treatment strategy for PAH.

  18. Central crosstalk for somatic tinnitus: abnormal vergence eye movements.

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    Qing Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Frequent oulomotricity problems with orthoptic testing were reported in patients with tinnitus. This study examines with objective recordings vergence eye movements in patients with somatic tinnitus patients with ability to modify their subjective tinnitus percept by various movements, such as jaw, neck, eye movements or skin pressure. METHODS: Vergence eye movements were recorded with the Eyelink II video system in 15 (23-63 years control adults and 19 (36-62 years subjects with somatic tinnitus. FINDINGS: 1 Accuracy of divergence but not of convergence was lower in subjects with somatic tinnitus than in control subjects. 2 Vergence duration was longer and peak velocity was lower in subjects with somatic tinnitus than in control subjects. 3 The number of embedded saccades and the amplitude of saccades coinciding with the peak velocity of vergence were higher for tinnitus subjects. Yet, saccades did not increase peak velocity of vergence for tinnitus subjects, but they did so for controls. 4 In contrast, there was no significant difference of vergence latency between these two groups. INTERPRETATION: The results suggest dysfunction of vergence areas involving cortical-brainstem-cerebellar circuits. We hypothesize that central auditory dysfunction related to tinnitus percept could trigger mild cerebellar-brainstem dysfunction or that tinnitus and vergence dysfunction could both be manifestations of mild cortical-brainstem-cerebellar syndrome reflecting abnormal cross-modality interactions between vergence eye movements and auditory signals.

  19. Slow charge movement in mammalian skeletal muscle.

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    Simon, B J; Beam, K G

    1985-01-01

    Voltage-dependent charge movements were measured in the rat omohyoid muscle with the three-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. Contraction was abolished with hypertonic sucrose. The standard (ON-OFF) protocol for eliciting charge movements was to depolarize the fiber from -90 mV to a variable test potential (V) and then repolarize the fiber to -90 mV. The quantity of charge moved saturated at test potentials of approximately 0 mV. The steady state dependence of the amount of charge that moves as a function of test potential could be well fitted by the Boltzmann relation: Q = Qmax/(1 + exp[-(V - V)/k]), where Qmax is the maximum charge that can be moved, V is the potential at which half the charge moves, and k is a constant. At 15 degrees C, these values were Qmax = 28.5 nC/microF, V = -34.2 mV, and k = 8.7 mV. Qmax, k, and V exhibited little temperature dependence over the range 7-25 degrees C. "Stepped OFF" charge movements were elicited by depolarizing the fiber from -90 mV to a fixed conditioning level that moved nearly all the mobile charge (0 mV), and then repolarizing the fiber to varying test potentials. The sum of the charge that moved when the fiber was depolarized directly from -90 mV to a given test potential and the stepped OFF charge that moved when the fiber was repolarized to the same test potential had at all test potentials a value close to Qmax for that fiber. In nearly all cases, the decay phase of ON, OFF, and stepped OFF charge movements could be well fitted with a single exponential. The time constant, tau decay, for an ON charge movement at a given test potential was comparable to tau decay for a stepped OFF charge movement at the same test potential. Tau decay had a bell-shaped dependence on membrane potential: it was slowest at a potential near V (the midpoint of the steady state charge distribution) and became symmetrically faster on either side of this potential. Raising the temperature from 7 to 15 degrees C caused tau decay to

  20. Reprimed charge movement in skeletal muscle fibres.

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    Rakowski, R F

    1978-08-01

    1. The three intracellular micro-electrode voltage-clamp technique was used to study the recovery of membrane charge movement in semitendinosus muscles of Rana pipiens. Muscles were placed in a hypertonic depolarizing solution to inactivate voltage dependent charge movement. Tetrodotoxin and tetraethylammonium ions (TEA+) were present to block voltage dependent ionic conductances. Rb+ and SO4(2-) were present to reduce inward rectification and leakage conductance. 2. The recovery ('repriming') of membrane charge movement was studied following hyperpolarizing pulses from a holding potential of -20 mV to membrane potentials from -30 to -140 mV for durations of 2--100 sec. The reprimed charge movement measured as the difference in membrane current required for identical voltage steps before and after long duration hyperpolarizing pulses was a linear function of membrane potential and symmetrical in shape. Reprimed charge is, therefore, simply the result of an increase in the linear capacitance of the fibre. 3. The mean value of the percent increase in capacitance for repriming at -100 mV was 12.3 +/- 1.7% (S.E. of mean) for 25 sec duration pulses and 27.8 +/- 2.9% for 100 sec duration pulses. If these data are corrected to the steady state and the surface contribution subtracted, the mean increase in 'volume' capacity is 40.3 +/- 3.6% (n = 21) for fibres with a mean diameter of 51 +/- 4 micron. 4. The increase in capacity can arise either by an increase in the transverse tubular length constant (lambdaT) or by gaining electrical access to additional linear capacitance within the fibre volume. If the capacitance arises solely from the transverse tubular system, the value of lambdaT before repriming can be no larger than 20 micron in order to explain the observed increase in volume capacity. A value of lambdaT as small as this seems unlikely. 5. The observation that reprimed charge is simply the result of an increase in linear capacitance is not consistent with the

  1. Abnormal Eye Movements in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

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    Grant, Michael P.; Cohen, Mark; Petersen, Robert B.; Halmagyi, G. Michael; McDougall, Alan; Tusa, Ronald J.; Leigh, R. John

    1993-01-01

    We report 3 patients with autopsy-proven Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease who, early in their course, developed abnormal eye movements that included periodic alternating nystagmus and slow vertical saccades. These findings suggested involvement of the cerebellar nodulus and uvula, and the brainstem reticular formation, respectively. Cerebellar ataxia was also an early manifestation and, in one patient, a frontal lobe brain biopsy was normal at a time when ocular motor and cerebellar signs were conspicuous. As the disease progressed, all saccades and quick phases of nystagmus were lost, but periodic alternating gaze deviation persisted. At autopsy, 2 of the 3 patients had pronounced involvement of the cerebellum, especially of the midline structures. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease should be considered in patients with subacute progressive neurological disease when cognitive changes are overshadowed by ocular motor findings or ataxia.

  2. Movement Disorders and Other Motor Abnormalities in Adults With 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

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    Boot, Erik; Butcher, Nancy J; van Amelsvoort, Thérèse AMJ; Lang, Anthony E; Marras, Connie; Pondal, Margarita; Andrade, Danielle M; Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Bassett, Anne S

    2015-01-01

    Movement abnormalities are frequently reported in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), but knowledge in this area is scarce in the increasing adult population. We report on five individuals illustrative of movement disorders and other motor abnormalities in adults with 22q11.2DS. In addition to an increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders, seizures, and early-onset Parkinson disease, the underlying brain dysfunction associated with 22q11.2DS may give rise to an increased vulnerability to multiple movement abnormalities, including those influenced by medications. Movement abnormalities may also be secondary to treatable endocrine diseases and congenital musculoskeletal abnormalities. We propose that movement abnormalities may be common in adults with 22q11.2DS and discuss the implications and challenges important to clinical practice. PMID:25684639

  3. Changes in abnormal muscle tension pattern after fiberoptic injection laryngoplasty.

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    Ziade, Georges; Haddad, Ghassan; Assaad, Sarah; Kasti, Maher; Hamdan, Abdul-Latif

    2017-12-01

    We performed a retrospective chart review to compare the presence and types of abnormal muscle tension patterns (MTPs) in patients who had been diagnosed with glottal insufficiency before and after fiberoptic injection laryngoplasty. The main cause of glottal insufficiency had been unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Our review included an analysis of the medical records and laryngeal videostroboscopic recordings of 16 patients-9 men and 7 women, aged 25 to 87 years (mean: 59). Stroboscopic frames were analyzed for the presence of one or more types of abnormal MTP. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the significance of the change in scores for type II and type III MTP before injection and 1 month after injection. Before injection laryngoplasty, 15 of the 16 patients exhibited evidence of an abnormal MTP; 10 patients had MTP II only, 2 had MTP III only, and 3 patients had both. The mean percentage of frames showing MTP (i.e., MTP score) in patients with MTP II was 66.2% before the injection and 28.9% 1 month after; the decrease was statistically significant (p = 0.001). For MTP III, the corresponding figures were 71.6 and 37.7% (p = 0.043). We conclude that injection laryngoplasty has a positive effect on reducing muscle tension in patients with glottal insufficiency.

  4. Myomodulation with Injectable Fillers: An Innovative Approach to Addressing Facial Muscle Movement.

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    de Maio, Maurício

    2018-03-16

    Consideration of facial muscle dynamics is underappreciated among clinicians who provide injectable filler treatment. Injectable fillers are customarily used to fill static wrinkles, folds, and localized areas of volume loss, whereas neuromodulators are used to address excessive muscle movement. However, a more comprehensive understanding of the role of muscle function in facial appearance, taking into account biomechanical concepts such as the balance of activity among synergistic and antagonistic muscle groups, is critical to restoring facial appearance to that of a typical youthful individual with facial esthetic treatments. Failure to fully understand the effects of loss of support (due to aging or congenital structural deficiency) on muscle stability and interaction can result in inadequate or inappropriate treatment, producing an unnatural appearance. This article outlines these concepts to provide an innovative framework for an understanding of the role of muscle movement on facial appearance and presents cases that illustrate how modulation of muscle movement with injectable fillers can address structural deficiencies, rebalance abnormal muscle activity, and restore facial appearance. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  5. Movement disorders and other motor abnormalities in adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, Erik; Butcher, Nancy J.; van Amelsvoort, Thérèse A. M. J.; Lang, Anthony E.; Marras, Connie; Pondal, Margarita; Andrade, Danielle M.; Fung, Wai Lun Alan; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Movement abnormalities are frequently reported in children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), but knowledge in this area is scarce in the increasing adult population. We report on five individuals illustrative of movement disorders and other motor abnormalities in adults with 22q11.2DS. In

  6. Muscle synergy extraction during arm reaching movements at different speeds.

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    Sabzevari, Vahid Reza; Jafari, Amir Homayoun; Boostani, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Muscle synergy is the activation of a group of muscles that contribute to a particular movement. The goal of the present study is to examine the hypothesis that human reaching movements at different speeds share similar muscle synergies and to investigate the kinesiology basis and innervation of muscles. Electromyographic activity from six muscles of the upper limb and shoulder girdle were recorded during three movements at different speeds, i.e. slow, moderate and fast. The effect of window length on the RMS signal of the EMG was analyzed and then EMG envelope signals were decomposed using non-negative matrix factorization. For each of the ten subjects, three synergies were extracted which accounted for at least 99% of the VAF. For each movement, the muscle synergies and muscle activation coefficients of all participants were clustered in to three partitions. Investigation showed a high similarity and dependency of cluster members due to the cosine similarity and mutual information in muscle synergy clustering. For further verification, the EMG envelope signals for all subjects were reconstructed. The results indicated a lower reconstruction error using the center of the muscle synergy clusters in comparison with the average of the activation coefficients, which confirms the current research's hypothesis.

  7. Periodic leg movement, nasal CPAP, and expiratory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Won Hee; Guilleminault, Christian

    2012-07-01

    Periodic leg movements (PLMs) may appear during nasal CPAP titration, persisting despite the elimination of hypopneas. Systematic recordings of expiratory abdominal muscles on the right and left sides with surface electromyographic (EMG) electrodes lateral to navel, and close from the lateral side of abdomen, were added during nasal CPAP titration for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Positive airway pressure was titrated during nocturnal polysomnography, based on analysis of the flow curve derived from the CPAP equipment and EEG analysis, including persistence of phases A2 and A3 of the cyclic alternating pattern (CAP). The requirement was to eliminate American Association of Sleep Medicine (AASM)-defined hypopnea and also flow limitation and abnormal EEG patterns. When CPAP reached valid results, it was lowered at the time of awakening by 2 or 3 cm H(2)O, and titration was performed again. Data collected during a 7-month period on adults with a prior diagnosis of OSA who had received treatment with nasal CPAP regardless of age and sex were rendered anonymous and were retrospectively rescored by a blinded investigator. Eighty-one successively seen patients with PLMs during CPAP titration were investigated. Elimination of AASM-defined hypopnea was not sufficient to eliminate the PLMs observed during the titration; higher CPAP eliminated flow limitation and CAP phases A2 and A3 and persisting PLMs. PLMs were associated with simultaneous EMG bursts in expiratory abdominal muscles. The presence of PLMs during CPAP titration indicates the persistence of sleep-disordered breathing. PLMs during CPAP titration are related to the presence of abdominal expiratory muscle activity.

  8. Proximal and distal muscle fatigue differentially affect movement coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Jeffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Muscle fatigue can cause people to change their movement patterns and these changes could contribute to acute or overuse injuries. However, these effects depend on which muscles are fatigued. The purpose of this study was to determine the differential effects of proximal and distal upper extremity muscle fatigue on repetitive movements. Fourteen subjects completed a repetitive ratcheting task before and after a fatigue protocol on separate days. The fatigue protocol either fatigued the proximal (shoulder flexor) or distal (finger flexor) muscles. Pre/Post changes in trunk, shoulder, elbow, and wrist kinematics were compared to determine how proximal and distal fatigue affected multi-joint movement patterns and variability. Proximal fatigue caused a significant increase (7°, p fatigue caused small but significant changes in trunk angles (2°, p fatigue protocols (p fatigue at either proximal or distal joints. The identified differences between proximal and distal muscle fatigue adaptations could facilitate risk assessment of occupational tasks. PMID:28235005

  9. Prevalence of abnormal general movements in three-month-old infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwstra, Hylco; Dijk-Stigter, Geerteke R.; Grooten, Hedwig M. J.; Janssen-Plas, Femke E. M.; Koopmans, Alice J.; Mulder, Christien D.; van Belle, Ans; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    Background: The quality of general movements (GMs) is a sensitive tool to measure neurodevelopmental condition in early infancy. No information is available on prevalence rates of abnormal GMs in the general population. Objective: To assess the prevalence of abnormal GMs in the general population of

  10. Speech Motor Development: Integrating Muscles, Movements, and Linguistic Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anne

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental problem for those interested in human communication is to determine how ideas and the various units of language structure are communicated through speaking. The physiological concepts involved in the control of muscle contraction and movement are theoretically distant from the processing levels and units postulated to exist in…

  11. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: focus on abnormal muscle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaggio, R; Midrio, P; Sgrò, A; Piovan, G; Guzzardo, V; Donato, R; Sorci, G; Lago, P; Gamba, P G

    2015-03-01

    markers were negative in cases and controls. CDH shows a thick muscular border, with high number of mature muscle cells and significant increase of quiescent satellite cells (PAX7+, Mib1-). Abnormal architecture may affect the normal process of myogenesis and thus signaling and cell-cell interactions of myocytes. The expression of Fog2 in mesothelial and mesenchymal cells in CDH demonstrates the absence of a genetic defect involving Fog2 in our cases. Being Fog2 expressed in muscle cells at early stage supports the hypothesis that the altered diaphragmatic genesis may undermine also the muscular component instead of the only mesenchymal one. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Reincarnation in cultured muscle of mitochondrial abnormalities. Two patients with epilepsy and lactic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askanas, V; Engel, W K; Britton, D E; Adornato, B T; Eiben, R M

    1978-12-01

    Two unrelated 9-year-old boys failed to thrive from ages 5 and 4 years, and had focal cerebral seizures followed by transcent hemipareses. Histochemistry of their muscle biopsies showed "ragged-red" fibers, which ultrastructurally contained clusters of mitochondria having loss of crisp delineation of crista membranes and contained amorphous inclusion material and parallel-packed cristae and sometimes paracrystalline inclusions. In the patients' cultured muscles, similar mitochondrial abnormalities were present. 2,4-Dinitrophenol, introduced to the medium of cultures of normal human muscle, produced mitochondrial abnormalities similar to those of the patients', and the medium of the patients' muscle cultures worsened the mitochondrial abnormalities. This study, in demonstrating a mitochondrial defect reproducible in the cultured muscle fibers and, therefore, intrinsic to the ragged-red muscle fibers themselves, raises the possibility of a collateral mitochondrial defect in CNS cells as part of a multicellular mitochondriopathy.

  13. Charge movement in a fast twitch skeletal muscle from rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B J; Beam, K G

    1983-02-01

    Voltage-dependent charge movement in the rat omohyoid muscle was investigated using the three microelectrode voltage clamp technique. The charge that moved during a depolarization from the holding potential (-90 mV) to the test potential, V, increased with increasing V, saturating around 0 mV. The charge vs. voltage relationship was well fitted by Q = Q(max)/{1 + exp[-(V - V)/k]}, with Q(max) = 28.5 nC/muF, V = -34.2 mV, and k = 8.7 mV. Repolarization of the fiber from the test potential back to the holding potential caused an equal but opposite amount of charge to move. The kinetics of ON charge movement could be well described by a model developed for frog muscle by Horowicz and Schneider (1981b), which suggests that rat and frog charge movements are similar. This model failed to describe the kinetics of OFF charge movement for steps in potential from 0 mV to test potentials of -10 to -90 mV. OFF-charge movement rose to a peak more slowly and decayed more slowly than predicted by the theory.

  14. Charge movement and depolarization-contraction coupling in arthropod vs. vertebrate skeletal muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Scheuer, T; Gilly, W F

    1986-01-01

    Voltage-dependent charge movement has been characterized in arthropod skeletal muscle. Charge movement in scorpion (Centuroides sculpturatus) muscle is distinguishable from that in vertebrate skeletal muscle by criteria of kinetics, voltage dependence, and pharmacology. The function of scorpion charge movement is gating of calcium channels in the sarcolemma, and depolarization-contraction coupling relies on calcium influx through these channels.

  15. Charge movement and depolarization-contraction coupling in arthropod vs. vertebrate skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuer, T; Gilly, W F

    1986-11-01

    Voltage-dependent charge movement has been characterized in arthropod skeletal muscle. Charge movement in scorpion (Centuroides sculpturatus) muscle is distinguishable from that in vertebrate skeletal muscle by criteria of kinetics, voltage dependence, and pharmacology. The function of scorpion charge movement is gating of calcium channels in the sarcolemma, and depolarization-contraction coupling relies on calcium influx through these channels.

  16. Coordinated alpha and gamma control of muscles and spindles in movement and posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si; Zhuang, Cheng; Hao, Manzhao; He, Xin; Marquez, Juan C.; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Lan, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that both α and γ motoneurons are active during movement and posture, but how does the central motor system coordinate the α-γ controls in these tasks remains sketchy due to lack of in vivo data. Here a computational model of α-γ control of muscles and spindles was used to investigate α-γ integration and coordination for movement and posture. The model comprised physiologically realistic spinal circuitry, muscles, proprioceptors, and skeletal biomechanics. In the model, we divided the cortical descending commands into static and dynamic sets, where static commands (αs and γs) were for posture maintenance and dynamic commands (αd and γd) were responsible for movement. We matched our model to human reaching movement data by straightforward adjustments of descending commands derived from either minimal-jerk trajectories or human EMGs. The matched movement showed smooth reach-to-hold trajectories qualitatively close to human behaviors, and the reproduced EMGs showed the classic tri-phasic patterns. In particular, the function of γd was to gate the αd command at the propriospinal neurons (PN) such that antagonistic muscles can accelerate or decelerate the limb with proper timing. Independent control of joint position and stiffness could be achieved by adjusting static commands. Deefferentation in the model indicated that accurate static commands of αs and γs are essential to achieve stable terminal posture precisely, and that the γd command is as important as the αd command in controlling antagonistic muscles for desired movements. Deafferentation in the model showed that losing proprioceptive afferents mainly affected the terminal position of movement, similar to the abnormal behaviors observed in human and animals. Our results illustrated that tuning the simple forms of α-γ commands can reproduce a range of human reach-to-hold movements, and it is necessary to coordinate the set of α-γ descending commands for accurate

  17. Effects of observing normal and abnormal goal-directed hand movements on somatosensory cortical activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chia-Hsiung

    2018-01-01

    Existing evidence indicates the importance of observing correct, normal actions on the motor cortical activities. However, the exact neurophysiological mechanisms, particularly in the somatosensory system, remain unclear. This study aimed to elucidate the effects of observing normal and abnormal hand movements on the contralateral primary somatosensory (cSI), contralateral (cSII) and ipsilateral (iSII) secondary somatosensory activities. Experiment I was designed to investigate the effects of motor outputs on the somatosensory processing, in which subjects were instructed to relax or manipulate a small cube. Experiment II was tailored to examine the somatosensory responses to the observation of normal (Normal) and abnormal (Abnormal) hand movements. The subjects received electrical stimulation to right median nerve and magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings during the whole experimental period. Regional cortical activation and functional connectivity were analyzed. Compared to the resting condition, a reduction in cSI and an enhancement of SII activation was found when subjects manipulated a cube, suggesting the motor outputs have an influence on the somatosensory responses. Further investigation of the effects of observing different hand movements showed that cSII activity was significantly stronger in the Normal than Abnormal condition. Moreover, compared with Abnormal condition, a higher cortical coherence of cSI-iSII at theta bands and cSII-iSII at beta bands was found in Normal condition. Conclusively, the present results suggest stronger activation and enhanced functional connectivity within the somatosensory system during the observation of normal than abnormal hand movements. These findings also highlight the importance of viewing normal, correct hands movements in the stroke rehabilitation. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Absent abdominal muscles, nephro-urologic abnormalities, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Absent abdominal muscles, cryptorchidism, and hydroureteronephrosis are known to occur in the prune belly syndrome (PBS). We present a male with absent abdominal muscles, severe neurologic damage, with global developmental delay, hydroureteronephrosis, and cryptorchidism. The patient also had arthrogryposis ...

  19. Absent abdominal muscles, nephro-urologic abnormalities, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kamal F. Akl

    2014-12-23

    Dec 23, 2014 ... Abstract Absent abdominal muscles, cryptorchidism, and hydroureteronephrosis are known to occur in the prune belly syndrome (PBS). We present a male with absent abdominal muscles, severe neurologic damage, with global devel- opmental ... hands with bilateral simian creases, contractures at elbows.

  20. Abnormal movements in first-episode, nonaffective psychosis: dyskinesias, stereotypies, and catatonic-like signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Michael T; Fantes, Francisco; Wan, Claire Ramsay; Johnson, Stephanie; Walker, Elaine F

    2015-03-30

    Motor abnormalities represent a neurobehavioral domain of signs intrinsic to schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, though they are commonly attributed to medication side effects and remain understudied. Individuals with first-episode psychosis represent an ideal group to study innate movement disorders due to minimal prior antipsychotic exposure. We measured dyskinesias, stereotypies, and catatonic-like signs and examined their associations with: (1) age at onset of psychotic symptoms and duration of untreated psychosis; (2) positive, negative, and disorganized symptoms; (3) neurocognition; and (4) neurological soft signs. Among 47 predominantly African American first-episode psychosis patients in a public-sector hospital, the presence and severity of dyskinesias, stereotypies, and catatonic-like features were assessed using approximately 30-min video recordings. Movement abnormalities were rated utilizing three scales (Dyskinesia Identification System Condensed User Scale, Stereotypy Checklist, and Catatonia Rating Scale). Correlational analyses were conducted. Scores for each of three movement abnormality types were modestly inter-correlated (r=0.29-0.40). Stereotypy score was significantly associated with age at onset of psychotic symptoms (r=0.32) and positive symptom severity scores (r=0.29-0.41). There were no meaningful or consistent associations with negative symptom severity, neurocognition, or neurological soft signs. Abnormal movements appear to represent a relatively distinct phenotypic domain deserving of further research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Abnormal fetal muscle forces result in defects in spinal curvature and alterations in vertebral segmentation and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Rebecca A; Bezer, James H; Kim, Tyler; Zaidon, Ahmed Z; Oyen, Michelle L; Iatridis, James C; Nowlan, Niamh C

    2017-10-01

    The incidence of congenital spine deformities, including congenital scoliosis, kyphosis, and lordosis, may be influenced by the in utero mechanical environment, and particularly by fetal movements at critical time-points. There is a limited understanding of the influence of fetal movements on spinal development, despite the fact that mechanical forces have been shown to play an essential role in skeletal development of the limb. This study investigates the effects of muscle forces on spinal curvature, vertebral segmentation, and vertebral shape by inducing rigid or flaccid paralysis in the embryonic chick. The critical time-points for the influence of fetal movements on spinal development were identified by varying the time of onset of paralysis. Prolonged rigid paralysis induced severe defects in the spine, including curvature abnormalities, posterior and anterior vertebral fusions, and altered vertebral shape, while flaccid paralysis did not affect spinal curvature or vertebral segmentation. Early rigid paralysis resulted in more severe abnormalities in the spine than later rigid paralysis. The findings of this study support the hypothesis that the timing and nature of fetal muscle activity are critical influences on the normal development of the spine, with implications for the understanding of congenital spine deformities. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2135-2144, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Abnormally Small Neuromuscular Junctions in the Extraocular Muscles From Subjects With Idiopathic Nystagmus and Nystagmus Associated With Albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoon, Linda K; Willoughby, Christy L; Anderson, Jill S; Bothun, Erick D; Stager, David; Felius, Joost; Lee, Helena; Gottlob, Irene

    2016-04-01

    Infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) is often associated with abnormalities of axonal outgrowth and connectivity. To determine if this manifests in extraocular muscle innervation, specimens from children with idiopathic INS or INS and albinism were examined and compared to normal age-matched control extraocular muscles. Extraocular muscles removed during normal surgery on children with idiopathic INS or INS and albinism were immunostained for neuromuscular junctions, myofiber type, the immature form of the acetylcholine receptor, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and compared to age-matched controls. Muscles from both the idiopathic INS and INS and albinism groups had neuromuscular junctions that were 35% to 71% smaller based on myofiber area and myofiber perimeter than found in age-matched controls, and this was seen on both fast and slow myosin heavy chain isoform-expressing myofibers (all P albinism showed a 7-fold increase in neuromuscular junction numbers on fast myofibers expressing the immature gamma subunit of the acetylcholine receptor. The extraocular muscles from both INS subgroups showed a significant increase in the number and size of slow myofibers compared to age-matched controls. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor was expressed in control muscle but was virtually absent in the INS muscles. These studies suggest that, relative to the final common pathway, INS is not the same between different patient etiologies. It should be possible to modulate these final common pathway abnormalities, via exogenous application of appropriate drugs, with the hope that this type of treatment may reduce the involuntary oscillatory movements in these children.

  3. An unusual presentation of muscle-eye-brain disease: severe eye abnormalities with mild muscle and brain involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ercan; Gucuyener, Kivilcim; Akturk, Aysima; Talim, Beril; Konus, Oznur; Del Bo, Roberto; Ghezzi, Serena; Comi, Giacomo P

    2009-10-01

    Muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB) is characterised by congenital muscular dystrophy, structural brain malformations and eye abnormalities. We report a MEB case whose presenting sign was congenital blindness. She was investigated primarily for eye abnormalities at onset. She had bilateral retinal detachment and microphthalmia. Mild axial hypotonia and motor retardation were attributed to cerebral disorder in another center. Muscle biopsy showed mild myopathic changes and significant alpha-dystroglycan deficiency. Analysis of the POMGnT1 showed a novel homozygous mutation 1814G>C, causing p.Arg605Pro change. This case expands the clinical spectrum of MEB with unusually severe eye abnormalities compared to mild skeletal muscle and brain involvement.

  4. Charge Movement in a Fast Twitch Skeletal Muscle from Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, B. J.; Beam, K. G.

    1983-01-01

    Voltage-dependent charge movement in the rat omohyoid muscle was investigated using the three microelectrode voltage clamp technique. The charge that moved during a depolarization from the holding potential (-90 mV) to the test potential, V, increased with increasing V, saturating around 0 mV. The charge vs. voltage relationship was well fitted by Q = Qmax/{1 + exp[-(V - V)/k]}, with Qmax = 28.5 nC/μF, V = -34.2 mV, and k = 8.7 mV. Repolarization of the fiber from the test potential back to t...

  5. Charge movement and mechanical repriming in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, R H; Chandler, W K; Rakowski, R F

    1976-01-01

    1. Muscles were placed in a solution which depolarized the membrane to -30 to -20 mV so that mechanical activation was made refractory. Mechanical repriming and the recovery of voltage dependent charge movement were studied using a voltage clamp technique. 2. Mechanical repriming was investigated by determining the duration of a hyperpolarizing pulse required to elicit a just-visible contraction for various post-pulse potentials. As the post-pulse potential was made more positive shorter repriming times were required to produce a threshold contraction. The relationship approached a minimum repriming time for very positive post-pulse potentials. 3. These results suggest that hyperpolarization gradually removes some component of the activation mechanism from a refractory state and that the effectiveness of the amount which has recovered depends on the post-pulse potential. A quantitative explanation is given using a simple model in which the essential component is assumed to be the charge movement process. 4. The rate of repriming contraction is voltage dependent; at -160 mV the rate is about twice that at -120 mV. Between 4 and 10 degrees C the rate has a Q10 of about 9. 5. Recovery of charge movement was studied using a repriming duration less than that required to produce a threshold contraction. The observed charge movement increased linearly with repriming time, consistent with the approximately linear initial segment of a slow exponential recovery process. Extrapolation of the recovery curve indicated that 2-5 n/CmuF of charge is reprimed in the time necessary to reprime a threshold contraction. 6. The charge which recovers during a subthreshold repriming pulse is distributed according to membrane potential in the same way as a fully reprimed charge. 7. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that voltage dependent charge movement is an intermediate step in excitation-contraction coupling. 8. The characteristics of a second type of charge movement are

  6. [A woman with skin abnormalities and muscle weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steggink, L.C.; Hettema, M.E.; Delsing, C.E.

    2013-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with progressive proximal muscle weakness and a symmetric skin rash. Physical examination demonstrated a heliotrope rash, Gottron lesions, mechanic's hands and symmetrical erythema of the face, neck and upper legs. The diagnosis

  7. Muscle fiber conduction abnormalities in early diabetic polyneuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J. W. G.; Lange, F.; Links, T. P.; van der Hoeven, J. H.

    Objective: Diabetic polyneuropathy (PNP) has been proposed to be a primary disorder of sensory nerves. At an early stage motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and muscle strength remain preserved due to compensatory mechanisms (axonal sprouting, reinnervation). We evaluated the use of invasive

  8. Separation of charge movement components in mammalian skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francini, F; Bencini, C; Piperio, C; Squecco, R

    2001-11-15

    1. Intramembrane charge movements, I(ICM), were measured in rat skeletal muscle fibres in response to voltage steps from a -90 mV holding potential to a wide test voltage range (-85 to 30 mV), using a double Vaseline-gap voltage-clamp technique. Solutions were designed to minimise ionic currents. Ca(2+) current was blocked by adding Cd(2+) (0.8 mM) to the external solution. In a subset of experiments Cd(2+) was omitted to determine which components of the charge movement best correlated with L-type Ca(2+) channel gating. 2. Detailed kinetic analysis of I(ICM) identified two major groups of charges. The first two components, designated Q(a) and Q(b), were the only charges moved by small depolarising steps. The second group of components, Q(c) and Q(d), showed a more positive voltage threshold, -35.6 +/- 2.0 mV, (n = 6) in external solution with Cd(2+), and -41.1 +/- 2.0 mV (n = 12) in external solution without Cd(2+). Notably, in external solution without Cd(2+) the voltage threshold of Ca(2+) current, I(Ca), activation had a similar value, being -38.1 +/- 2.4 mV. 3. The sum of three Boltzmann functions, Q(1), Q(2) and Q(3), showing progressively more positive transition voltages, could be fitted to charge versus voltage, Q(ICM)-V, plots. The three Boltzmann terms identified three charge components: Q(1) described the shallow voltage-dependent Q(a) and Q(b) charges, Q(2) and Q(3) described the steep voltage-dependent Q(c) and Q(d) charges. 4. In external solution without Cd(2+) the charge kinetics changed: a slow decaying phase was replaced by a pronounced delayed hump. Moreover, the transition voltages of the individual steady-state charge components were shifted towards negative potentials (from 6.3 to 8.2 mV). Nevertheless, the overall charge and steepness factors were conserved. 5. In conclusion, these experiments allowed a clear separation of four components of intramembrane charge movements in rat skeletal muscle, showing that there are no fundamental

  9. Brain Abnormalities in Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles Type 1: A Multimodal MRI Imaging Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Miao

    Full Text Available To explore the possible brain structural and functional alterations in congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles type 1 (CFEOM1 patients using multimodal MRI imaging.T1-weighted, diffusion tensor images and functional MRI data were obtained from 9 KIF21A positive patients and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Voxel based morphometry and tract based spatial statistics were applied to the T1-weighted and diffusion tensor images, respectively. Amplitude of low frequency fluctuations and regional homogeneity were used to process the functional MRI data. We then compared these multimodal characteristics between CFEOM1 patients and healthy controls.Compared with healthy controls, CFEOM1 patients demonstrated increased grey matter volume in bilateral frontal orbital cortex and in the right temporal pole. No diffusion indices changes were detected, indicating unaffected white matter microstructure. In addition, from resting state functional MRI data, trend of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations increases were noted in the right inferior parietal lobe and in the right frontal cortex, and a trend of ReHo increase (p<0.001 uncorrected in the left precentral gyrus, left orbital frontal cortex, temporal pole and cingulate gyrus.CFEOM1 patients had structural and functional changes in grey matter, but the white matter was unaffected. These alterations in the brain may be due to the abnormality of extraocular muscles and their innervating nerves. Future studies should consider the possible correlations between brain morphological/functional findings and clinical data, especially pertaining to eye movements, to obtain more precise answers about the role of brain area changes and their functional consequence in CFEOM1.

  10. Movement-related cortical potentials in paraplegic patients: abnormal patterns and considerations for BCI-rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren eXu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive EEG-based Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI can be promising for the motor neuro-rehabilitation of paraplegic patients. However, this shall require detailed knowledge of the abnormalities in the EEG signatures of paraplegic patients. The association of abnormalities in different subgroups of patients and their relation to the sensorimotor integration are relevant for the design, implementation and use of BCI systems in patient populations. This study explores the patterns of abnormalities of movement related cortical potentials (MRCP during motor imagery tasks of feet and right hand in patients with paraplegia (including the subgroups with/without central neuropathic pain and complete/incomplete injury patients and the level of distinctiveness of abnormalities in these groups using pattern classification. The most notable observed abnormalities were the amplified execution negativity and its slower rebound in the patient group. The potential underlying mechanisms behind these changes and other minor dissimilarities in patients’ subgroups, as well as the relevance to BCI applications, are discussed. The findings are of interest from a neurological perspective as well as for BCI-assisted neuro-rehabilitation and therapy.

  11. Corticospinal Excitability in the Hand Muscles is Decreased During Eye Movement with Visual Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chujo, Yuta; Jono, Yasutomo; Tani, Keisuke; Nomura, Yoshifumi; Hiraoka, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Corticospinal excitability in the hand muscles decreases during smooth pursuit eye movement. The present study tested a hypothesis that the decrease in corticospinal excitability in the hand muscles at rest during eye movement is not caused by visual feedback but caused by motor commands to the eye muscles. Healthy men (M age = 28.4 yr., SD = 5.2) moved their eyes to the right with visual occlusion (dark goggles) while their arms and hands remained at rest. The motor-evoked potential in the hand muscles was suppressed by 19% in the third quarter of the eye-movement period, supporting a view that motor commands to the eye muscles are the cause of the decrease in corticospinal excitability in the hand muscles. The amount of the suppression was not significantly different among the muscles, indicating that modulation of corticospinal excitability in one muscle induced by eye movement is not dependent on whether eye movement direction and the direction of finger movement when the muscle contracts are identical. Thus, the finding failed to support a hypothetical view that motor commands to the eye muscles concomittantly produce motor commands to the hand muscles. Moreover, the amount of the suppression was not significantly different between the forearm positions, indicating that the suppression was not affected by proprioception of the forearm muscles when visual feedback is absent. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Laryngeal movements during inspiratory muscle training in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandnes, Astrid; Andersen, Tiina; Hilland, Magnus; Ellingsen, Thor Andre; Halvorsen, Thomas; Heimdal, John-Helge; Røksund, Ola Drange

    2013-07-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been used to treat patients with exercise-induced vocal cord dysfunction (VCD); the theoretical basis being the close relationship between the diaphragm and the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle, which is the main abductor of the larynx. Before launching a treatment protocol in patients with VCD, we aimed to substantiate this theory by performing laryngoscopy in healthy subjects during standardized IMT programs. Twenty healthy volunteers at mean age 24 years were examined with video-recorded continuous transnasal flexible laryngoscopy while performing standardized training programs using a resistive loading IMT device (Respifit S). All subjects were exposed to two modes of training, that is, the resistance set to generate mouth pressures ≥80% of the maximal attainable inspiratory mouth pressure (PImax) and 60-80% of PImax. Laryngeal movements were scored in retrospect from the video recordings by a senior laryngologist. At pressure settings of ≥80% of PImax, laryngeal movements could not be assessed in one subject. Abduction was observed in 10 (53%) subjects, six to a maximal extent and four to a moderate extent. At pressure settings of 60-80% of PImax, abduction was observed in 18 (90%) subjects, seven to a maximal extent and 11 to a moderate extent. IMT can produce laryngeal abduction in healthy subjects, and training programs may conceivably contribute positively in patients suffering from laryngeal adduction during exercise. Individual response patterns varied between subjects and individualized programs seem crucial for effect. Use of high resistances seemed to be counterproductive. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanistic role of movement and strain sensitivity in muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Julien S; Epstein, Neal D

    2009-04-14

    Tension generation can be studied by applying step perturbations to contracting muscle fibers and subdividing the mechanical response into exponential phases. The de novo tension-generating isomerization is associated with one of these phases. Earlier work has shown that a temperature jump perturbs the equilibrium constant directly to increase tension. Here, we show that a length jump functions quite differently. A step release (relative movement of thick and thin filaments) appears to release a steric constraint on an ensemble of noncompetent postphosphate release actomyosin cross-bridges, enabling them to generate tension, a concentration jump in effect. Structural studies [Taylor KA, et al. (1999) Tomographic 3D reconstruction of quick-frozen, Ca(2+)-activated contracting insect flight muscle. Cell 99:421-431] that map to these kinetics indicate that both catalytic and lever arm domains of noncompetent myosin heads change angle on actin, whereas lever arm movement alone mediates the power stroke. Together, these kinetic and structural observations show a 13-nm overall interaction distance of myosin with actin, including a final 4- to 6-nm power stroke when the catalytic domain is fixed on actin. Raising fiber temperature with both perturbation techniques accelerates the forward, but slows the reverse rate constant of tension generation, kinetics akin to the unfolding/folding of small proteins. Decreasing strain, however, causes both forward and reverse rate constants to increase. Despite these changes in rate, the equilibrium constant is strain-insensitive. Activation enthalpy and entropy data show this invariance to be the result of enthalpy-entropy compensation. Reaction amplitudes confirm a strain-invariant equilibrium constant and thus a strain-insensitive ratio of pretension- to tension-generating states as work is done.

  14. Sporadic inclusion-body myositis: A degenerative muscle disease associated with aging, impaired muscle protein homeostasis and abnormal mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askanas, Valerie; Engel, W King; Nogalska, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Sporadic inclusion-body myositis (s-IBM) is the most common degenerative muscle disease in which aging appears to be a key risk factor. In this review we focus on several cellular molecular mechanisms responsible for multiprotein aggregation and accumulations within s-IBM muscle fibers, and their possible consequences. Those include mechanisms leading to: a) accumulation in the form of aggregates within the muscle fibers, of several proteins, including amyloid-β42 and its oligomers, and phosphorylated tau in the form of paired helical filaments, and we consider their putative detrimental influence; and b) protein misfolding and aggregation, including evidence of abnormal myoproteostasis, such as increased protein transcription, inadequate protein disposal, and abnormal posttranslational modifications of proteins. Pathogenic importance of our recently demonstrated abnormal mitophagy is also discussed. The intriguing phenotypic similarities between s-IBM muscle fibers and the brains of Alzheimer and Parkinson's disease patients, the two most common neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging, are also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Proteomics analysis of human skeletal muscle reveals novel abnormalities in obesity and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, Hyonson; Bowen, Benjamin P; Lefort, Natalie

    2010-01-01

    changes involving the use of proteomics was used here. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Muscle biopsies were obtained basally from lean, obese, and type 2 diabetic volunteers (n = 8 each); glucose clamps were used to assess insulin sensitivity. Muscle protein was subjected to mass spectrometry......OBJECTIVE : Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is an early phenomenon in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Studies of insulin resistance usually are highly focused. However, approaches that give a more global picture of abnormalities in insulin resistance are useful in pointing out new...

  16. [Intercultural adaptation of the AIMS in German language: A scale for abnormal involuntary movements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhmann, C; Rizos, A; Emmans, D; Jost, W H

    2016-04-01

    Dyskinesias are abnormal involuntary movements and occur across many movement disorders. In Parkinson's disease dyskinesias can be troublesome and are a determinant of the quality of life throughout the course of the disease. Assessment and rating of dyskinesias is thus important for clinical assessment of patients, as well as for academic studies and clinical trials. The abnormal involuntary movement scale (AIMS) is an English language standardised, reliable and validated scale to evaluate dyskinesias. In this article we present a linguistically validated German version of AIMS. The intercultural adaptation of the German translation was performed following an internationally accepted procedure. Firstly, two neurologists independently translated the original into German. Taking both versions into account, a consensus version was agreed on by both translators and was tested on 10 patients. This preliminary German version was then independently translated back into the original language by two different neurologists, and again, a consensus version was agreed on. All translators then compared this English version to the original. Subsequently, the German version was linguistically modified until it resulted in a final German version, which was agreed on by all translators, deemed linguistically acceptable, and the translation back into English was considered to be as unambiguous as possible. This final German version of AIMS was applied to 50 patients in two different hospitals for diagnostic purposes and tested for feasibility and comprehension. In this paper, we present an intercultural adaptation of a linguistically validated German version of AIMS.

  17. A systems biology approach identifies molecular networks defining skeletal muscle abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nil Turan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is an inflammatory process of the lung inducing persistent airflow limitation. Extensive systemic effects, such as skeletal muscle dysfunction, often characterize these patients and severely limit life expectancy. Despite considerable research efforts, the molecular basis of muscle degeneration in COPD is still a matter of intense debate. In this study, we have applied a network biology approach to model the relationship between muscle molecular and physiological response to training and systemic inflammatory mediators. Our model shows that failure to co-ordinately activate expression of several tissue remodelling and bioenergetics pathways is a specific landmark of COPD diseased muscles. Our findings also suggest that this phenomenon may be linked to an abnormal expression of a number of histone modifiers, which we discovered correlate with oxygen utilization. These observations raised the interesting possibility that cell hypoxia may be a key factor driving skeletal muscle degeneration in COPD patients.

  18. Petri net-based prediction of therapeutic targets that recover abnormally phosphorylated proteins in muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinmyung; Kwon, Mijin; Bae, Sunghwa; Yim, Soorin; Lee, Doheon

    2018-03-05

    Muscle atrophy, an involuntary loss of muscle mass, is involved in various diseases and sometimes leads to mortality. However, therapeutics for muscle atrophy thus far have had limited effects. Here, we present a new approach for therapeutic target prediction using Petri net simulation of the status of phosphorylation, with a reasonable assumption that the recovery of abnormally phosphorylated proteins can be a treatment for muscle atrophy. The Petri net model was employed to simulate phosphorylation status in three states, i.e. reference, atrophic and each gene-inhibited state based on the myocyte-specific phosphorylation network. Here, we newly devised a phosphorylation specific Petri net that involves two types of transitions (phosphorylation or de-phosphorylation) and two types of places (activation with or without phosphorylation). Before predicting therapeutic targets, the simulation results in reference and atrophic states were validated by Western blotting experiments detecting five marker proteins, i.e. RELA, SMAD2, SMAD3, FOXO1 and FOXO3. Finally, we determined 37 potential therapeutic targets whose inhibition recovers the phosphorylation status from an atrophic state as indicated by the five validated marker proteins. In the evaluation, we confirmed that the 37 potential targets were enriched for muscle atrophy-related terms such as actin and muscle contraction processes, and they were also significantly overlapping with the genes associated with muscle atrophy reported in the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (p-value net. We generated a list of the potential therapeutic targets whose inhibition recovers abnormally phosphorylated proteins in an atrophic state. They were evaluated by various approaches, such as Western blotting, GO terms, literature, known muscle atrophy-related genes and shortest path analysis. We expect the new proposed strategy to provide an understanding of phosphorylation status in muscle atrophy and to provide assistance towards

  19. The averaged EMGs recorded from the arm muscles during bimanual rowing movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz eTomiak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose was to analyze quantitatively the the average surface EMGs of the muscles that function around the elbow and shoulder joints of both arms in similar bimanual ‘rowing’ movements, which were produced under identical elastic loads applied to the levers (‘oars’. The muscles of PM group (‘pulling’ muscles: elbow flexors, shoulder extensors generated noticeable velocity-dependent dynamic EMG components during the pulling and returning phases of movement and supported a steady-state activity during the hold phase. The muscles of RM group (‘returning’ muscles: elbow extensors, shoulder flexors co-contracted with PM group during the movement phases and decreased activity during the hold phase. The dynamic components of the EMGs strongly depended on the velocity factor in both muscle groups, whereas the side and load factors and combinations of various factors acted only in PM group muscles. Various subjects demonstrated diverse patterns of activity redistribution among muscles. We assume that central commands to the same muscles in two arms may be essentially different during execution of similar movement programs. Extent of the diversity in the EMG patterns of such muscles may reflect the subject’s skilling in motor performance; on the other hand, the diversity can reflect redistribution of activity between synergic muscles, thus providing a mechanism directed against development of the muscle fatigue.

  20. Pharmacological separation of charge movement components in frog skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C L

    1982-03-01

    1. Charge movements to small 10 mV steps superimposed upon a wide range of closely spaced depolarizing voltage-clamp pulses were studied in frog skeletal muscles under different pharmacological conditions in hypertonic solutions.2. In control fibres, capacitance was strongly voltage-dependent, especially between potentials of -60 and -20 mV, confirming earlier work. There was a sharp increase in capacitance at around -50 mV. The dependence of non-linear charge on potential was asymmetrical and saturated at around 25 nC/muF.3. The presence of tetracaine abolished the ;hump' in the non-linear transients, which became simple monotonic decays. The dependence of capacitance upon potential was reduced. The maximum available amount of non-linear charge fell to 10 nC/muF.4. The presence of lidocaine abolished both the ;hump' as well as the monotonic part of the non-linear transients. This resulted in capacitance falling with depolarization from -85 mV.5. Comparing the steady-state properties of the non-linear charge under the different pharmacological conditions made it possible to deduce empirically the following components:(i) A lidocaine-resistant component (q(alpha)), which was responsible for the fall in observed capacitance with depolarization from the control voltage.(ii) A component resistant to tetracaine yet abolished by lidocaine (q(beta)). This possesses quasi-exponential kinetics, and a maximum charge of about 20 nC/muF.(iii) A component abolished by both lidocaine and tetracaine (q(gamma)), which possesses a maximum charge of 15 nC/muF. This has complex kinetics, and its steep dependence upon voltage resembles the potential-dependence of the development of tension in skeletal muscle.

  1. Developmental visual perception deficits with no indications of prosopagnosia in a child with abnormal eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilaie-Dotan, Sharon; Doron, Ravid

    2017-06-01

    Visual categories are associated with eccentricity biases in high-order visual cortex: Faces and reading with foveally-biased regions, while common objects and space with mid- and peripherally-biased regions. As face perception and reading are among the most challenging human visual skills, and are often regarded as the peak achievements of a distributed neural network supporting common objects perception, it is unclear why objects, which also rely on foveal vision to be processed, are associated with mid-peripheral rather than with a foveal bias. Here, we studied BN, a 9 y.o. boy who has normal basic-level vision, abnormal (limited) oculomotor pursuit and saccades, and shows developmental object and contour integration deficits but with no indication of prosopagnosia. Although we cannot infer causation from the data presented here, we suggest that normal pursuit and saccades could be critical for the development of contour integration and object perception. While faces and perhaps reading, when fixated upon, take up a small portion of central visual field and require only small eye movements to be properly processed, common objects typically prevail in mid-peripheral visual field and rely on longer-distance voluntary eye movements as saccades to be brought to fixation. While retinal information feeds into early visual cortex in an eccentricity orderly manner, we hypothesize that propagation of non-foveal information to mid and high-order visual cortex critically relies on circuitry involving eye movements. Limited or atypical eye movements, as in the case of BN, may hinder normal information flow to mid-eccentricity biased high-order visual cortex, adversely affecting its development and consequently inducing visual perceptual deficits predominantly for categories associated with these regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Extreme Performance and Functional Robustness of Movement are Linked to Muscle Architecture: Comparing Elastic and Nonelastic Feeding Movements in Salamanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Jeffrey A; Stinson, Charlotte M; Deban, Stephen M

    2016-07-01

    Muscle-powered movements are limited by the contractile properties of muscles and are sensitive to temperature changes. Elastic-recoil mechanisms can both increase performance and mitigate the effects of temperature on performance. Here, we compare feeding movements in two species of plethodontid salamanders, Bolitoglossa franklini and Desmognathus quadramaculatus, across a range of body temperatures (5-25°C) to better understand the mechanism of elastically powered, thermally robust movements. Bolitoglossa exhibited ballistic, elastically powered tongue projection with a maximum muscle mass specific power of 4,642 W kg(-1) while Desmognathus demonstrated nonballistic, muscle-powered tongue projection with a maximum power of 359 W kg(-1) . Tongue-projection performance in Bolitoglossa was more thermally robust than that of Desmognathus, especially below 15°C. The improved performance and thermal robustness of Bolitoglossa was associated with morphological changes in the projector muscle, including elaborated collagen aponeuroses and the absence of myofibers attaching directly to the tongue skeleton. The elongated aponeuroses likely increase the capacity for elastic energy storage, and the lack of myofibers inserting on the tongue skeleton permits ballistic projection. These results suggest that relatively simple changes in myofiber architecture and the amount of connective tissue can improve the performance and functional robustness of movements in the face of environmental challenges such as variable temperature. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effects of a subsequent task after sit-to-stand movement on muscle activation and initiation of movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciele Camila da Silva

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscle activation (activation time and the beginning of movement (motor reaction time can be changed depending on the complexity of the task. The objectives of this study were to compare the time for activation of the paraspinal and the vastus lateralis muscles, and the motor reaction time during the execution of the tasks sit-to-stand (STS and sit-to-walk (STW, which includes the execution of the subsequent task of gait initiation. Twelve healthy young subjects participated in the study. They performed two tasks(STS and STW, five times each, randomly, separated by two minutes of rest. The kinematics of the movement were recorded using a digital electrogoniometer attached to the hip joint and muscle activation using surface electromyographyin both muscles. The average of the five repetitions was calculated for each task. The beginning of the task was signaled by a luminous device, which was also used to identify the initial point for calculating the activation time andmotor reaction time. Both muscles showed a longer latency for the activation time and motor reaction time during the STW task when compared with STS. Basedon these results, it can be concluded that both the postural (paraspinal and prime mover muscles (vastus lateralis undergo change in the motor programming during the execution of the STS task when a subsequent task (gait initiation is included. Motor programming is dependent on task complexity, where a more complex task (STW will result in delays of movement programming and execution.

  4. Verapamil reverses PTH- or CRF-induced abnormal fatty acid oxidation in muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, A.F.; Smogorzewski, M.; Massry, S.G.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with impaired long chain fatty acids (LCFA) oxidation by skeletal muscle mitochondria. This is due to reduced activity of carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT). These derangements were attributed to the secondary hyperparathyroidism of CRF, since prior parathyroidectomy in CRF rats reversed these abnormalities and PTH administration to normal rats reproduced them. It was proposed that these effects of PTH are mediated by its ionophoric property leading to increased entry of calcium into skeletal muscle. A calcium channel blocker may, therefore, correct these derangements. The present study examined the effects of verapamil on LCFA oxidation, CPT activity by skeletal muscle mitochondria, and 45 Ca uptake by skeletal muscle obtained from CRF rats and normal animals treated with PTH with and without verapamil. Both four days of PTH administration and 21 days of CRF produced significant (P less than 0.01) reduction in LCFA oxidation and CPT activity of skeletal muscle mitochondria, and significant (P less than 0.01) increment in 45 Ca uptake by skeletal muscle. Simultaneous treatment with verapamil corrected all these derangements. Administration of verapamil alone to normal rats did not cause a significant change in any of these parameters. The data are consistent with the proposition that the alterations in LCFA in CRF or after PTH treatment are related to the ionophoric action of the hormone and could be reversed by a calcium channel blocker

  5. Verapamil reverses PTH- or CRF-induced abnormal fatty acid oxidation in muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perna, A.F.; Smogorzewski, M.; Massry, S.G.

    1988-12-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with impaired long chain fatty acids (LCFA) oxidation by skeletal muscle mitochondria. This is due to reduced activity of carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT). These derangements were attributed to the secondary hyperparathyroidism of CRF, since prior parathyroidectomy in CRF rats reversed these abnormalities and PTH administration to normal rats reproduced them. It was proposed that these effects of PTH are mediated by its ionophoric property leading to increased entry of calcium into skeletal muscle. A calcium channel blocker may, therefore, correct these derangements. The present study examined the effects of verapamil on LCFA oxidation, CPT activity by skeletal muscle mitochondria, and /sup 45/Ca uptake by skeletal muscle obtained from CRF rats and normal animals treated with PTH with and without verapamil. Both four days of PTH administration and 21 days of CRF produced significant (P less than 0.01) reduction in LCFA oxidation and CPT activity of skeletal muscle mitochondria, and significant (P less than 0.01) increment in /sup 45/Ca uptake by skeletal muscle. Simultaneous treatment with verapamil corrected all these derangements. Administration of verapamil alone to normal rats did not cause a significant change in any of these parameters. The data are consistent with the proposition that the alterations in LCFA in CRF or after PTH treatment are related to the ionophoric action of the hormone and could be reversed by a calcium channel blocker.

  6. Economy, Movement Dynamics, and Muscle Activity of Human Walking at Different Speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Peter Christian; Guul, Martin Kjær; Nielsen, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    The complex behaviour of human walking with respect to movement variability, economy and muscle activity is speed dependent. It is well known that a U-shaped relationship between walking speed and economy exists. However, it is an open question if the movement dynamics of joint angles and centre...... healthy males. The muscle activation strategy and walking economy were also assessed. The movement dynamics was investigated using a combination of the largest Lyapunov exponent and correlation dimension. We observed an intermediate stage of the movement dynamics of the knee joint angle and the anterior...

  7. NEUROMUSCULAR ELECTRICAL STIMULATION OF THE HINDLIMB MUSCLES FOR MOVEMENT THERAPY IN A RODENT MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Ichihara, Kazuhiko; Venkatasubramanian, Ganapriya; Abbas, James J.; Jung, Ranu

    2008-01-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) can provide functional movements in people after central nervous system injury. The neuroplastic effects of long-term NMES induced repetitive limb movement are not well understood. A rodent model of neurotrauma in which NMES can be implemented may be effective for such investigations. We present a rodent model for NMES of the flexor and extensor muscles of the hip, knee, and ankle hindlimb muscles. Custom fabricated intramuscular stimulating electro...

  8. Transversus abdominis is part of a global not local muscle synergy during arm movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S L; Lay, B; Allison, G T

    2013-10-01

    The trunk muscle transversus abdominis (TrA) is thought to be controlled independently of the global trunk muscles. Methodological issues in the 1990s research such as unilateral electromyography and a limited range of arm movements justify a re-examination of this theory. The hypothesis tested is that TrA bilateral co-contraction is a typical muscle synergy during arm movement. The activity of 6 pairs of trunk and lower limb muscles was recorded using bilateral electromyography during anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) associated with the arm movements. The integrated APA electromyographical signals were analyzed for muscle synergy using Principle Component Analysis. TrA does not typically bilaterally co-contract during arm movements (1 out of 6 participants did). APA muscle activity of all muscles during asymmetrical arm movements typically reflected a direction specific diagonal pattern incorporating a twisting motion to transfer energy from the ground up. This finding is not consistent with the hypothesis that TrA plays a unique role providing bilateral, feedforward, multidirectional stiffening of the spine. This has significant implications to the theories underlying the role of TrA in back pain and in the training of isolated bilateral co-contraction of TrA in the prophylaxis of back pain. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Branched-chain amino acid metabolism in rat muscle: abnormal regulation in acidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, R.C.; Hara, Y.; Kelly, R.A.; Block, K.P.; Buse, M.G.; Mitch, W.E.

    1987-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism is frequently abnormal in pathological conditions accompanied by chronic metabolic acidosis. To study how metabolic acidosis affects BCAA metabolism in muscle, rats were gavage fed a 14% protein diet with or without 4 mmol NH/sub 4/Cl x 100 g body wt/sup -1/ x day/sup -1/. Epitrochlearis muscles were incubated with L-(1-/sup 14/C)-valine and L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine, and rates of decarboxylation, net transamination, and incorporation into muscle protein were measured. Plasma and muscle BCAA levels were lower in acidotic rats. Rates of valine and leucine decarboxylation and net transamination were higher in muscles from acidotic rats; these differences were associated with a 79% increase in the total activity of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase and a 146% increase in the activated form of the enzyme. They conclude that acidosis affects the regulation of BCAA metabolism by enhancing flux through the transaminase and by directly stimulating oxidative catabolism through activation of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase.

  10. Structural abnormalities in the levator palpebrae superioris muscle in patients with congenital blepharoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iljin, Aleksandra; Zielinska, Anna; Karasek, Michal; Zielinski, Andrzej; Omulecka, Aleksandra

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate structural and ultrastructural abnormalities of the levator palpebrae superioris (LPS) complex in patients with congenital blepharoptosis. Samples of the LPS complex were obtained from patients operated on for congenital blepharoptosis between 2000 and 2001 and studied under light microscopy (15 cases) and electron microscopy (9 cases). Findings of light microscopy evaluation of the LPS complex correlated closely with the clinical grading of congenital blepharoptosis-hypoplasia, decreased number and varying diameter of muscle fibers, and fibrous tissue hyperplasia in the endomysium and perimysium. The Müller's muscle preserved a normal appearance. Mild blepharoptosis revealed proliferation of collagen fibers on electron microscopy. Moderate blepharoptosis showed abnormal distribution of myofibrils and distortion of the tubular system and mitochondria in addition to the changes observed in mild blepharoptosis. Severe blepharoptosis showed mitochondria loss, cytoplasm thinning, and homogenous fiber areas in addition to the changes observed in mild and moderate blepharoptosis. The clinical degree of severity of congenital blepharoptosis correlates positively with the degree of histopathologic changes in the levator palpebrae superioris muscle.

  11. Trunk Muscle Activation at the Initiation and Braking of Bilateral Shoulder Flexion Movements of Different Amplitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson Crommert, M; Halvorsen, K; Ekblom, M M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if trunk muscle activation patterns during rapid bilateral shoulder flexions are affected by movement amplitude. Eleven healthy males performed shoulder flexion movements starting from a position with arms along sides (0°) to either 45°, 90° or 180°. EMG was measured bilaterally from transversus abdominis (TrA), obliquus internus (OI) with intra-muscular electrodes, and from rectus abdominis (RA), erector spinae (ES) and deltoideus with surface electrodes. 3D kinematics was recorded and inverse dynamics was used to calculate the reactive linear forces and torque about the shoulders and the linear and angular impulses. The sequencing of trunk muscle onsets at the initiation of arm movements was the same across movement amplitudes with ES as the first muscle activated, followed by TrA, RA and OI. All arm movements induced a flexion angular impulse about the shoulders during acceleration that was reversed during deceleration. Increased movement amplitude led to shortened onset latencies of the abdominal muscles and increased level of activation in TrA and ES. The activation magnitude of TrA was similar in acceleration and deceleration where the other muscles were specific to acceleration or deceleration. The findings show that arm movements need to be standardized when used as a method to evaluate trunk muscle activation patterns and that inclusion of the deceleration of the arms in the analysis allow the study of the relationship between trunk muscle activation and direction of perturbing torque during one and the same arm movement.

  12. Trunk Muscle Activation at the Initiation and Braking of Bilateral Shoulder Flexion Movements of Different Amplitudes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Eriksson Crommert

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate if trunk muscle activation patterns during rapid bilateral shoulder flexions are affected by movement amplitude. Eleven healthy males performed shoulder flexion movements starting from a position with arms along sides (0° to either 45°, 90° or 180°. EMG was measured bilaterally from transversus abdominis (TrA, obliquus internus (OI with intra-muscular electrodes, and from rectus abdominis (RA, erector spinae (ES and deltoideus with surface electrodes. 3D kinematics was recorded and inverse dynamics was used to calculate the reactive linear forces and torque about the shoulders and the linear and angular impulses. The sequencing of trunk muscle onsets at the initiation of arm movements was the same across movement amplitudes with ES as the first muscle activated, followed by TrA, RA and OI. All arm movements induced a flexion angular impulse about the shoulders during acceleration that was reversed during deceleration. Increased movement amplitude led to shortened onset latencies of the abdominal muscles and increased level of activation in TrA and ES. The activation magnitude of TrA was similar in acceleration and deceleration where the other muscles were specific to acceleration or deceleration. The findings show that arm movements need to be standardized when used as a method to evaluate trunk muscle activation patterns and that inclusion of the deceleration of the arms in the analysis allow the study of the relationship between trunk muscle activation and direction of perturbing torque during one and the same arm movement.

  13. The effect of passive movement training on angiogenic factors and capillary growth in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Birgitte; Rufener, Nora; Bojsen-Møller, Jens

    2010-01-01

    legs. Acute passive movement increased (P effect, determined in vitro, of the muscle interstitial fluid ~16-fold compared to perfusate. These increases were similar for active exercise. The results demonstrate......Abstract The effect of a period of passive movement training on angiogenic factors and capillarization in skeletal muscle was examined. Seven young males were subjected to passive training for 90 min, four times/week in a motor-driven knee extensor device that extended one knee passively at 80...... cycles/min. The other leg was used as control. Muscle biopsies were obtained from m. v. lateralis of both legs before as well as after 2 and 4 weeks of training. After the training period, passive movement and active exercise were performed with both legs and muscle interstitial fluid was sampled from...

  14. Pairing Voluntary Movement and Muscle-Located Electrical Stimulation Increases Cortical Excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochumsen, Mads; Niazi, Imran K.; Signal, Nada; Nedergaard, Rasmus W.; Holt, Kelly; Haavik, Heidi; Taylor, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Learning new motor skills has been correlated with increased cortical excitability. In this study, different location of electrical stimulation (ES), nerve, or muscle, was paired with voluntary movement to investigate if ES paired with voluntary movement (a) would increase the excitability of cortical projections to tibialis anterior and (b) if stimulation location mattered. Cortical excitability changes were quantified using motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) at varying intensities during four conditions. Twelve healthy subjects performed 50 dorsiflexions at the ankle during nerve or muscle ES at motor threshold (MTh). ES alone was delivered 50 times and the movement was performed 50 times. A significant increase in the excitability from pre- to post-intervention (P = 0.0061) and pre- to 30 min post-intervention (P = 0.017) measurements was observed when voluntary movement was paired with muscle ES located at tibialis anterior. An increase of 50 ± 57 and 28 ± 54% in the maximum MEPs was obtained for voluntary movement paired with muscle-located and nerve-located ES, respectively. The maximum MEPs for voluntary movement alone and muscle-located ES alone were −5 ± 28 and 2 ± 42%, respectively. Pairing voluntary movement with muscle-located ES increases excitability of corticospinal projections of tibialis anterior in healthy participants. This finding suggests that active participation during muscle-located ES protocols increases cortical excitability to a greater extent than stimulation alone. The next stage of this research is to investigate the effect in people with stroke. The results may have implications for motor recovery in patients with motor impairments following neurological injury. PMID:27733823

  15. Pairing voluntary movement and muscle-located electrical stimulation increases cortical excitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads Jochumsen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Learning new motor skills has been correlated with increased cortical excitability. In this study, different location of electrical stimulation (ES, nerve or muscle, was paired with voluntary movement to investigate if ES paired with voluntary movement a would increase the excitability of cortical projections to tibialis anterior and b if stimulation location mattered. Cortical excitability changes were quantified using motor evoked potentials (MEPs elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation at varying intensities during four conditions. Twelve healthy subjects performed 50 dorsiflexions at the ankle during nerve or muscle ES at motor threshold. ES alone was delivered 50 times and the movement was performed 50 times. A significant increase in the excitability from pre- to post-intervention (P=0.0061 and pre- to 30 minutes post-intervention (P=0.017 measurements was observed when voluntary movement was paired with muscle ES located at tibialis anterior. An increase of 50±57% and 28±54% in the maximum MEPs was obtained for voluntary movement paired with muscle-located and nerve-located ES, respectively. The maximum MEPs for voluntary movement alone and muscle-located ES alone were -5±28% and 2±42%, respectively. Pairing voluntary movement with muscle-located ES increases excitability of corticospinal projections of tibialis anterior in healthy participants. This finding suggests that active participation during muscle-located ES protocols increases cortical excitability to a greater extent than stimulation alone. The next stage of this research is to investigate the effect in people with stroke. The results may have implications for motor recovery in patients with motor impairments following neurological injury.

  16. Transcriptional abnormalities of hamstring muscle contractures in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lucas R; Chambers, Henry G; Subramaniam, Shankar; Lieber, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is an upper motor neuron disease that results in a spectrum of movement disorders. Secondary to the neurological lesion, muscles from patients with CP are often spastic and form debilitating contractures that limit range of motion and joint function. With no genetic component, the pathology of skeletal muscle in CP is a response to aberrant complex neurological input in ways that are not fully understood. This study was designed to gain further understanding of the skeletal muscle response in CP using transcriptional profiling correlated with functional measures to broadly investigate muscle adaptations leading to mechanical deficits.Biopsies were obtained from both the gracilis and semitendinosus muscles from a cohort of patients with CP (n = 10) and typically developing patients (n = 10) undergoing surgery. Biopsies were obtained to define the unique expression profile of the contractures and passive mechanical testing was conducted to determine stiffness values in previously published work. Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 chips (n = 40) generated expression data, which was validated for selected transcripts using quantitative real-time PCR. Chips were clustered based on their expression and those from patients with CP clustered separately. Significant genes were determined conservatively based on the overlap of three summarization algorithms (n = 1,398). Significantly altered genes were analyzed for over-representation among gene ontologies and muscle specific networks.The majority of altered transcripts were related to increased extracellular matrix expression in CP and a decrease in metabolism and ubiquitin ligase activity. The increase in extracellular matrix products was correlated with mechanical measures demonstrating the importance in disability. These data lay a framework for further studies and development of novel therapies.

  17. Transcriptional abnormalities of hamstring muscle contractures in children with cerebral palsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas R Smith

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP is an upper motor neuron disease that results in a spectrum of movement disorders. Secondary to the neurological lesion, muscles from patients with CP are often spastic and form debilitating contractures that limit range of motion and joint function. With no genetic component, the pathology of skeletal muscle in CP is a response to aberrant complex neurological input in ways that are not fully understood. This study was designed to gain further understanding of the skeletal muscle response in CP using transcriptional profiling correlated with functional measures to broadly investigate muscle adaptations leading to mechanical deficits.Biopsies were obtained from both the gracilis and semitendinosus muscles from a cohort of patients with CP (n = 10 and typically developing patients (n = 10 undergoing surgery. Biopsies were obtained to define the unique expression profile of the contractures and passive mechanical testing was conducted to determine stiffness values in previously published work. Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 chips (n = 40 generated expression data, which was validated for selected transcripts using quantitative real-time PCR. Chips were clustered based on their expression and those from patients with CP clustered separately. Significant genes were determined conservatively based on the overlap of three summarization algorithms (n = 1,398. Significantly altered genes were analyzed for over-representation among gene ontologies and muscle specific networks.The majority of altered transcripts were related to increased extracellular matrix expression in CP and a decrease in metabolism and ubiquitin ligase activity. The increase in extracellular matrix products was correlated with mechanical measures demonstrating the importance in disability. These data lay a framework for further studies and development of novel therapies.

  18. A Longitudinal Electromyography Study of Complex Movements in Poststroke Therapy. 2: Changes in Coordinated Muscle Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Hesam-Shariati

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fine motor control is achieved through the coordinated activation of groups of muscles, or “muscle synergies.” Muscle synergies change after stroke as a consequence of the motor deficit. We investigated the pattern and longitudinal changes in upper limb muscle synergies during therapy in a largely unconstrained movement in patients with a broad spectrum of poststroke residual voluntary motor capacity. Electromyography (EMG was recorded using wireless telemetry from 6 muscles acting on the more-affected upper body in 24 stroke patients at early and late therapy during formal Wii-based Movement Therapy (WMT sessions, and in a subset of 13 patients at 6-month follow-up. Patients were classified with low, moderate, or high motor-function. The Wii-baseball swing was analyzed using a non-negative matrix factorization (NMF algorithm to extract muscle synergies from EMG recordings based on the temporal activation of each synergy and the contribution of each muscle to a synergy. Motor-function was clinically assessed immediately pre- and post-therapy and at 6-month follow-up using the Wolf Motor Function Test, upper limb motor Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and Motor Activity Log Quality of Movement scale. Clinical assessments and game performance demonstrated improved motor-function for all patients at post-therapy (p < 0.01, and these improvements were sustained at 6-month follow-up (p > 0.05. NMF analysis revealed fewer muscle synergies (mean ± SE for patients with low motor-function (3.38 ± 0.2 than those with high motor-function (4.00 ± 0.3 at early therapy (p = 0.036 with an association trend between the number of synergies and the level of motor-function. By late therapy, there was no significant change between groups, although there was a pattern of increase for those with low motor-function over time. The variability accounted for demonstrated differences with motor-function level (p < 0.05 but not time. Cluster

  19. Contribution of elastic tissues to the mechanics and energetics of muscle function during movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Muscle force production occurs within an environment of tissues that exhibit spring-like behavior, and this elasticity is a critical determinant of muscle performance during locomotion. Muscle force and power output both depend on the speed of contraction, as described by the isotonic force-velocity curve. By influencing the speed of contractile elements, elastic structures can have a profound effect on muscle force, power and work. In very rapid movements, elastic mechanisms can amplify muscle power by storing the work of muscle contraction slowly and releasing it rapidly. When energy must be dissipated rapidly, such as in landing from a jump, energy stored rapidly in elastic elements can be released more slowly to stretch muscle contractile elements, reducing the power input to muscle and possibly protecting it from damage. Elastic mechanisms identified so far rely primarily on in-series tendons, but many structures within muscles exhibit spring-like properties. Actomyosin cross-bridges, actin and myosin filaments, titin, and the connective tissue scaffolding of the extracellular matrix all have the potential to store and recover elastic energy during muscle contraction. The potential contribution of these elements can be assessed from their stiffness and estimates of the strain they undergo during muscle function. Such calculations provide boundaries for the possible roles these springs might play in locomotion, and may help to direct future studies of the uses of elastic elements in muscle. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Abnormal brain activation during movement observation in patients with conversion paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgmer, Markus; Konrad, Carsten; Jansen, Andreas; Kugel, Harald; Sommer, Jens; Heindel, Walter; Ringelstein, Erich B; Heuft, Gereon; Knecht, Stefan

    2006-02-15

    Dissociative paralysis in conversion disorders has variably been attributed to a lack of movement initiation or an inhibition of movement. While psychodynamic theory suggests altered movement conceptualization, brain activation associated with observation and replication of movements has so far not been assessed neurobiologically. Here, we measured brain activation by functional magnetic resonance imaging during observation and subsequent imitative execution of movements in four patients with dissociative hand paralysis. Compared to healthy controls conversion disorder patients showed decreased activation of cortical hand areas during movement observation. This effect was specific to the side of their dissociative paralysis. No brain activation compatible with movement inhibition was observed. These findings indicate that in dissociative paralysis, there is not only derangement of movement initiation but already of movement conceptualization. This raises the possibility that strategies targeted at reestablishing appropriate movement conceptualization may contribute to the therapy of dissociative paralysis.

  1. Resolved lower limb muscle tone abnormalities in children with HIV encephalopathy receiving standard antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Theresa N; Donald, Kirsten A; Walker, Kathleen G; Langerak, Nelleke G

    2015-01-01

    This short report arose from a follow-up study of children previously diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalopathy and spastic diplegia and is among the first to describe that increased lower limb muscle tone in children with a confirmed HIV encephalopathy diagnosis may resolve over time in some cases. Of 19 children previously diagnosed with HIV encephalopathy and increased lower limb muscle tone, some were found to have resolved muscle tone abnormalities during a follow-up physical examination [resolved group, n = 13, median age 9 years 7 months (interquartile range 7 years 3 months-10 years 9 months)] whereas others continued to show increased lower limb muscle tone at follow-up [unresolved group, n = 6 median age 8 years 6 months (interquartile range 7 years 9 months-9 years 7 months)]. A review of clinical records showed no significant differences in age or follow-up time between the resolved and unresolved groups. However, the unresolved group appeared to have severe disease at an earlier age than the resolved group, based on the age at antiretroviral treatment initiation [median age at start of treatment 2 years 3 months (interquartile range 7 months-5 years 3 months) vs. 8 months (interquartile range 6-12 months), p = 0.08] and had more severe neurological signs at the initial assessment. It is anticipated that this information may be of immediate value to those involved in the treatment of children with HIV encephalopathy and increased lower limb muscle tone whilst awaiting the outcome of future controlled clinical trials.

  2. Abnormal reflex activation of hamstring muscles in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Graham M; Granger, Nicolas; Langley-Hobbs, Sorrel J; Jeffery, Nick D

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms underlying cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) in dogs are poorly understood. In this study hamstring muscle reflexes in response to cranial tibial translation were analysed to determine whether these active stabilisers of the stifle joint are differently activated in dogs with CCLR compared to control dogs. In a prospective clinical study reflex muscle activity from the lateral and medial hamstring muscles (biceps femoris and semimembranosus) was recorded using surface electrodes in control dogs (n=21) and dogs with CCLR (n=22). These electromyographic recordings were analysed using an algorithm previously validated in humans. The hamstring reflex was reliably and reproducibly recorded in normal dogs. Both a short latency response (SLR, 17.6±2.1ms) and a medium latency response (MLR, 37.7±2.7ms) could be identified. In dogs with unilateral CCLR, the SLR and MLR were not significantly different between the affected and the unaffected limbs, but the MLR latency of both affected and unaffected limbs in CCLR dogs were significantly prolonged compared to controls. In conclusion, the hamstring reflex can be recorded in dogs and the MLR is prolonged in dogs with CCLR. Since both affected and unaffected limbs exhibit prolonged MLR, it is possible that abnormal hamstring reflex activation is a mechanism by which progressive CCL damage may occur. The methodology allows for further investigation of the relationship between neuromuscular imbalance and CCLR or limitations in functional recovery following surgical intervention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Computational Modelling and Movement Analysis of Hip Joint with Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siswanto, W. A.; Yoon, C. C.; Salleh, S. Md.; Ngali, M. Z.; Yusup, Eliza M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the model of hip joint and the main muscles are modelled by finite elements. The parts included in the model are hip joint, hemi pelvis, gluteus maximus, quadratus femoris and gamellus inferior. The materials that used in these model are isotropic elastic, Mooney Rivlin and Neo-hookean. The hip resultant force of the normal gait and stair climbing are applied on the model of hip joint. The responses of displacement, stress and strain of the muscles are then recorded. FEBio non-linear solver for biomechanics is employed to conduct the simulation of the model of hip joint with muscles. The contact interfaces that used in this model are sliding contact and tied contact. From the analysis results, the gluteus maximus has the maximum displacement, stress and strain in the stair climbing. Quadratus femoris and gamellus inferior has the maximum displacement and strain in the normal gait however the maximum stress in the stair climbing. Besides that, the computational model of hip joint with muscles is produced for research and investigation platform. The model can be used as a visualization platform of hip joint.

  4. Pharmacological studies of charge movement in frog skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, C S

    1983-04-01

    Charge movements in frog twitch fibres were studied using the three-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. In a solution made moderately hypertonic with 350 mM-sucrose, fibre contraction was effectively blocked and a secondary hump appeared in the decay phase of the 'on' part of charge movement. At small depolarizations, the hump (Q gamma) is small and slow. As depolarization is increased, Q gamma becomes larger in magnitude and faster in kinetics until it merges with the main part of charge movement (Q beta). As the fibre is perfused extracellularly with a test solution saturated with dantrolene sodium, Q gamma disappears in about 30 min whereas the kinetics of Q beta are slowed down. After equilibration in the dantrolene sodium solution, the total moveable charge is reduced by about 20%, which could very well be the charge carried by Q gamma. Tetracaine also suppresses Q gamma but does not seem to have any effect on the kinetics of Q beta. The suppression of Q gamma appears to be dose-dependent, with complete abolition occurring at about 4 mM-tetracaine. Dissection of charge movement with tetracaine indicates that Q gamma might be bell-shaped and capacitive in nature. Q beta and Q gamma might be two distinct species of charge and Q gamma would probably be more closely associated with calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  5. Differential Contributions of Vision, Touch and Muscle Proprioception to the Coding of Hand Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Caroline; Roll, Régine; Roll, Jean-Pierre; Kavounoudias, Anne

    2013-01-01

    To further elucidate the mechanisms underlying multisensory integration, this study examines the controversial issue of whether congruent inputs from three different sensory sources can enhance the perception of hand movement. Illusory sensations of clockwise rotations of the right hand were induced by either separately or simultaneously stimulating visual, tactile and muscle proprioceptive channels at various intensity levels. For this purpose, mechanical vibrations were applied to the pollicis longus muscle group in the subjects’ wrists, and a textured disk was rotated under the palmar skin of the subjects’ right hands while a background visual scene was projected onto the rotating disk. The elicited kinaesthetic illusions were copied by the subjects in real time and the EMG activity in the adductor and abductor wrist muscles was recorded. The results show that the velocity of the perceived movements and the amplitude of the corresponding motor responses were modulated by the nature and intensity of the stimulation. Combining two sensory modalities resulted in faster movement illusions, except for the case of visuo-tactile co-stimulation. When a third sensory input was added to the bimodal combinations, the perceptual responses increased only when a muscle proprioceptive stimulation was added to a visuo-tactile combination. Otherwise, trisensory stimulation did not override bimodal conditions that already included a muscle proprioceptive stimulation. We confirmed that vision or touch alone can encode the kinematic parameters of hand movement, as is known for muscle proprioception. When these three sensory modalities are available, they contribute unequally to kinaesthesia. In addition to muscle proprioception, the complementary kinaesthetic content of visual or tactile inputs may optimize the velocity estimation of an on-going movement, whereas the redundant kinaesthetic content of the visual and tactile inputs may rather enhance the latency of the perception

  6. A Real-Time Fatigue Monitoring and Analysis System for Lower Extremity Muscles with Cycling Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szi-Wen Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A real-time muscle fatigue monitoring system was developed to quantitatively detect the muscle fatigue of subjects during cycling movement, where a fatigue progression measure (FPM was built-in. During the cycling movement, the electromyogram (EMG signals of the vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius muscles in one leg as well as cycling speed are synchronously measured in a real-time fashion. In addition, the heart rate (HR and the Borg rating of perceived exertion scale value are recorded per minute. Using the EMG signals, the electrical activity and median frequency (MF are calculated per cycle. Moreover, the updated FPM, based on the percentage of reduced MF counts during cycling movement, is calculated to measure the onset time and the progressive process of muscle fatigue. To demonstrate the performance of our system, five young healthy subjects were recruited. Each subject was asked to maintain a fixed speed of 60 RPM, as best he/she could, under a constant load during the pedaling. When the speed reached 20 RPM or the HR reached the maximal training HR, the experiment was then terminated immediately. The experimental results show that the proposed system may provide an on-line fatigue monitoring and analysis for the lower extremity muscles during cycling movement.

  7. Movement based artifacts may contaminate extracellular electrical recordings from GI muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayguinov, O; Hennig, G W; Sanders, K M

    2011-11-01

    Electrical slow waves drive peristaltic contractions in the stomach and facilitate gastric emptying. In gastroparesis and other disorders associated with altered gastric emptying, motility defects have been related to altered slow wave frequency and disordered propagation. Experimental and clinical measurements of slow waves are made with extracellular or abdominal surface recording. We tested the consequences of muscle contractions and movement on biopotentials recorded from murine gastric muscles with array electrodes and pairs of silver electrodes. Propagating biopotentials were readily recorded from gastric sheets composed of the entire murine stomach. The biopotentials were completely blocked by nifedipine (2 μmol L(-1) ) that blocked contractile movements and peristaltic contractions. Wortmannin, an inhibitor of myosin light chain kinase, also blocked contractions and biopotentials. Stimulation of muscles with carbachol increased the frequency of biopotentials in control conditions but failed to elicit biopotentials with nifedipine or wortmannin present. Intracellular recording with microelectrodes showed that authentic gastric slow waves occur at a faster frequency typically than biopotentials recorded with extracellular electrodes, and electrical slow waves recorded with intracellular electrodes were unaffected by suppression of movement. Electrical transients, equal in amplitude to biopotentials recorded with extracellular electrodes, were induced by movements produced by small transient stretches (artifacts in extracellular recordings of biopotentials from murine gastric muscles and suggest that movement suppression should be an obligatory control when monitoring electrical activity and characterizing propagation and coordination of electrical events with extracellular recording techniques. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Prediction of muscle activity during loaded movements of the upper limb

    OpenAIRE

    Tibold, Robert; Fuglevand, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Background Accurate prediction of electromyographic (EMG) signals associated with a variety of motor behaviors could, in theory, serve as activity templates needed to evoke movements in paralyzed individuals using functional electrical stimulation. Such predictions should encompass complex multi-joint movements and include interactions with objects in the environment. Methods Here we tested the ability of different artificial neural networks (ANNs) to predict EMG activities of 12 arm muscles ...

  9. Arm position influences the activation patterns of trunk muscles during trunk range-of-motion movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Aaron; Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Drake, Janessa Dm

    2016-10-01

    To understand the activation patterns of the trunk musculature, it is also important to consider the implications of adjacent structures such as the upper limbs, and the muscles that act to move the arms. This study investigated the effects of arm positions on the activation patterns and co-activation of the trunk musculature and muscles that move the arm during trunk range-of-motion movements (maximum trunk axial twist, flexion, and lateral bend). Fifteen males and fifteen females, asymptomatic for low back pain, performed maximum trunk range-of-motion movements, with three arm positions for axial twist (loose, crossed, abducted) and two positions for flexion and lateral bend (loose, crossed). Electromyographical data were collected for eight muscles bilaterally, and activation signals were cross-correlated between trunk muscles and the muscles that move the arms (upper trapezius, latissimus dorsi). Results revealed consistently greater muscle co-activation (higher cross-correlation coefficients) between the trunk muscles and upper trapezius for the abducted arm position during maximum trunk axial twist, while results for the latissimus dorsi-trunk pairings were more dependent on the specific trunk muscles (either abdominal or back) and latissimus dorsi muscle (either right or left side), as well as the range-of-motion movement. The findings of this study contribute to the understanding of interactions between the upper limbs and trunk, and highlight the influence of arm positions on the trunk musculature. In addition, the comparison of the present results to those of individuals with back or shoulder conditions may ultimately aid in elucidating underlying mechanisms or contributing factors to those conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Spectrum of congenital mitral valve abnormalities associated with solitary undifferentiated papillary muscle in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Jagdish C; Shukla, Madhu; Mohan, Vishwas; Sethi, Arvind

    Congenital anomaly wherein the mitral valve leaflets are directly attached to the papillary muscle(s) (PM) with or without short under-developed chords is rarely reported in adults. Patients with two PMs with an intervening fibrous bridge have also been included under this head in previous studies. Echocardiography enables accurate evaluation of the morphology and function of valve leaflets, chordae tendineae, and PM. This report describes a series of six patients aged 56-84 years who had abnormal mitral valve with a large solitary and anomalously inserted PM seen over a period of 3 years. Only those patients who had a single pillar or bridge-like PM and either absent tendinous chords or small under-developed chords were included in the analysis. Among 9600 consecutive echocardiograms performed, six patients met the criteria of an abnormal mitral valve with solitary large PM. Two patients underwent mitral valve replacement with partial excision of the PM wherein echocardiographic observations were confirmed. The patients were previously followed with the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (3) and rheumatic mitral valve disease (3). Multi-planar reconstruction of 3D echocardiographic images provided incremental value in assessing the detailed patho-anatomy of PMs in these cases. In adult patients, a high index of suspicion is required to detect congenital mitral stenosis/regurgitation with large solitary PM (resembling a parachute mitral valve) which may masquerade as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or rheumatic mitral valve disease. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Muscle fatigue effects can be anticipated to reproduce a movement kinematics learned without fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjo, Florian; Forestier, Nicolas

    2016-12-17

    Muscle fatigue modifies the gain between motor command magnitude and the mechanical muscular response. In other words, post-fatigue, central drives to the muscles must increase to maintain a particular submaximum mechanical output. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that this modified gain can be predicted by the central nervous system (CNS) during discrete ballistic movements. In two separate experiments, subjects were required to perform shoulder flexions in standing and sitting positions at submaximum target peak accelerations. They were assisted with visual feedback informing them on their performance after each trial. Shoulder flexions were performed before and after fatiguing protocols of the focal muscles. Acceleration signals, focal and postural muscle electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded. The results demonstrated that participants were able to reach with precision the target acceleration during the first movements post-fatigue at the cost of significant increase in focal motor command magnitude. Decreased variance of peak accelerations associated with increased focal command variability was observed post-fatigue. During the standing experiment, postural muscle EMGs revealed that anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) scaled to focal movement acceleration post-fatigue. All these results support that fatigue effects are taken into account during movement planning. Indeed, given that no feedback could enable participants to adjust acceleration during movement, this capacity to anticipate fatigue effects is the exclusive result of feedforward processes. To account for this prediction capacity, we discuss the role of fatigue-related modifications in sensory inputs from the working muscles. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigating reduction of dimensionality during single-joint elbow movements: a case study on muscle synergies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico eChiovetto

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A long standing hypothesis in the neuroscience community is that the CNS generates the muscle activities to accomplish movements by combining a relatively small number of stereotyped patterns of muscle activations, often referred to as muscle synergies. Different definitions of synergies have been given in the literature. The most well-known are those of synchronous, time-varying and temporal muscle synergies. Each one of them is based on a different mathematical model used to factor some EMG array recordings collected during the execution of variety of motor tasks into a well-determined spatial, temporal or spatio-temporal organization. This plurality of definitions and their separate application to complex tasks have so far complicated the comparison and interpretation of the results obtained across studies, and it has always remained unclear why and when one synergistic decomposition should be preferred to another one. By using well-understood motor tasks such as elbow flexions and extensions, we aimed in this study to clarify better what are the motor features characterized by each kind of decomposition and to assess whether, when and why one of them should be preferred to the others. We found that three temporal synergies, each one of them accounting for specific temporal phases of the movements could account for the majority of the data variation. Similar performances could be achieved by two synchronous synergies, encoding the agonist-antagonist nature of the two muscles considered, and by two time-varying muscle synergies, encoding each one a task-related feature of the elbow movements, specifically their direction. Our findings support the notion that each EMG decomposition provides a set of well-interpretable muscle synergies, identifying reduction of dimensionality in different aspects of the movements. Taken together, our findings suggest that all decompositions are not equivalent and may imply different neurophysiological substrates

  13. Investigating reduction of dimensionality during single-joint elbow movements: a case study on muscle synergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiovetto, Enrico; Berret, Bastien; Delis, Ioannis; Panzeri, Stefano; Pozzo, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    A long standing hypothesis in the neuroscience community is that the central nervous system (CNS) generates the muscle activities to accomplish movements by combining a relatively small number of stereotyped patterns of muscle activations, often referred to as "muscle synergies." Different definitions of synergies have been given in the literature. The most well-known are those of synchronous, time-varying and temporal muscle synergies. Each one of them is based on a different mathematical model used to factor some EMG array recordings collected during the execution of variety of motor tasks into a well-determined spatial, temporal or spatio-temporal organization. This plurality of definitions and their separate application to complex tasks have so far complicated the comparison and interpretation of the results obtained across studies, and it has always remained unclear why and when one synergistic decomposition should be preferred to another one. By using well-understood motor tasks such as elbow flexions and extensions, we aimed in this study to clarify better what are the motor features characterized by each kind of decomposition and to assess whether, when and why one of them should be preferred to the others. We found that three temporal synergies, each one of them accounting for specific temporal phases of the movements could account for the majority of the data variation. Similar performances could be achieved by two synchronous synergies, encoding the agonist-antagonist nature of the two muscles considered, and by two time-varying muscle synergies, encoding each one a task-related feature of the elbow movements, specifically their direction. Our findings support the notion that each EMG decomposition provides a set of well-interpretable muscle synergies, identifying reduction of dimensionality in different aspects of the movements. Taken together, our findings suggest that all decompositions are not equivalent and may imply different neurophysiological

  14. Congenital abnormalities of cranial nerve development: overview, molecular mechanisms, and further evidence of heterogeneity and complexity of syndromes with congenital limitation of eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traboulsi, Elias I

    2004-01-01

    The clinical and molecular genetic classification of syndromes with congenital limitation of eye movements and evidence of cranial nerve dysgenesis continues to evolve. This monograph details clinical and molecular genetic data on a number of families and isolated patients with congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM) and related disorders, and presents an overview of the mechanisms of abnormal patterns of motor and sensory cranial nerve development in these rare syndromes. Clinical examination of one patient with CFEOM1, one family with clinical features of CFEOM2, one family with recessive CFEOM3, one family with horizontal gaze palsy and progressive scoliosis (HGPPS), and four patients with various combinations of congenital cranial nerve abnormalities. Genotyping of families with CFEOM and HGPPS for polymorphic markers in the regions of the three known CFEOM loci and in the HGPPS region, and mutation analysis of the ARIX and KIF21A genes in patients with CFEOM were performed according to standard published protocols. The patient with CFEOM1 had the second most common mutation in KIF21A, a 2861 G>A mutation that resulted in an R954Q substitution. The family with CFEOM2 phenotype did not map to the CFEOM2 locus. The family with recessive CFEOM3 did not map to any of the known loci. The HGPPS family mapped to 11q23-q25. One patient had optic nerve hypoplasia and fifth nerve dysfunction. Two patients had the rare combination of Möbius syndrome and CFEOM. One patient had Möbius syndrome and fifth nerve dysfunction. There is genetic heterogeneity in CFEOM2 and CFEOM3. Abnormalities in sensory nerves can also accompany abnormalities of motor nerves, further substantiating the effect of individual mutations on developing motor as well as sensory cranial nerve nuclei.

  15. Nocturnal agitation in Huntington disease is caused by arousal-related abnormal movements rather than by rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutel, Dulce; Tchikviladzé, Maya; Charles, Perrine; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Roze, Emmanuel; Durr, Alexandra; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2015-06-01

    Patients with Huntington disease (HD) and their spouses often complain of agitation during sleep, but the causes are mostly unknown. To evaluate sleep and nocturnal movements in patients with various HD stages and CAG repeats length. The clinical features and sleep studies of 29 patients with HD were retrospectively collected (11 referred for genotype-phenotype correlations and 18 for agitation during sleep) and compared with those of 29 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. All patients had videopolysomnography, but the movements during arousals were re-analyzed in six patients with HD with stored video. The patients had a longer total sleep period and REM sleep onset latency, but no other differences in sleep than controls. There was no correlation between CAG repeat length and sleep measures, but total sleep time and sleep efficiency were lower in the subgroup with moderate than milder form of HD. Periodic limb movements and REM sleep behavior disorders were excluded, although 2/29 patients had abnormal REM sleep without atonia. In contrast, they had clumsy and opisthotonos-like movements during arousals from non-REM or REM sleep. Some movements were violent and harmful. They might consist of voluntary movements inappropriately involving the proximal part of the limbs on a background of exaggerated hypotonia. Giant (>65 mcV) sleep spindles were observed in seven (24%) patients with HD and one control. The nocturnal agitation in patients with HD seems related to anosognostic voluntary movements on arousals, rather than to REM sleep behavior disorder and other sleep problems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Abnormal mitochondrial function in locomotor and respiratory muscles of COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente-Maestu, L; Pérez-Parra, J; Godoy, R; Moreno, N; Tejedor, A; González-Aragoneses, F; Bravo, J-L; Alvarez, F Villar; Camaño, S; Agustí, A

    2009-05-01

    Several cellular and molecular alterations have been described in skeletal and respiratory muscles of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but information on potential abnormalities of mitochondrial function is scarce. The aim of the present study was to investigate mitochondrial function in the vastus lateralis (VL) and external intercostalis (EI) of COPD patients. Biopsies from VL and EI were obtained during surgery for lung cancer in 13 patients with mild to moderate COPD (age 68+/-6 yrs, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) 66+/-15% predicted) and 19 control subjects (age 67+/-9 yrs, FEV(1) 95+/-18% pred). State 3 and 4 mitochondrial oxygen consumption (V'(O(2),m)), ATP synthesis, citrate synthase, cytochrome oxidase (COX) and complex I-III activities, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, were determined. In COPD patients, in both muscles, COX activity (VL: COPD 3.0+/-0.8 versus control 2.0+/-0.8; EI: 3.7+/-1.6 versus 2.4+/-0.9 micromol min(-1) mg(-1)) and ROS production (VL: 1,643+/-290 versus 1,285+/-468; EI: 1,033+/-210 versus 848+/-288 arbitrary units) were increased, whereas state 3 V'(O(2),m) was reduced (VL: 2.9+/-0.3 versus 3.6+/-0.4; EI: 3.6+/-0.3 versus 4.1+/-0.4 mmol min(-1) kg(-1)). Skeletal muscle mitochondria of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease show electron transport chain blockade and excessive production of reactive oxygen species. The concurrent involvement of both vastus lateralis and external intercostalis suggests a systemic (rather than a local) mechanism(s) already occurring in relatively early stages (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage II) of the disease.

  17. The unique action of bi-articular muscles in complex movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ingen Schenau, G J; Bobbert, M F; Rozendal, R H

    1987-01-01

    Actions of muscles that pass over more than one joint are mainly described with respect to movements in the joints that are crossed. In a previous study of push-off without plantar flexion it was shown that the transformation of knee angular velocity into translation of the body is constrained by

  18. The effect of handedness on electromyographic activity of human shoulder muscles during movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Nørregaard, Jesper; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether there was a difference in the electromyographic (EMG) activity of human shoulder muscles between the dominant and nondominant side during movement and to explore whether a possible side-difference depends on the specific task. We compared the EMG ac...

  19. Active controlled muscles in numerical model of human arm for movement in two degrees of freedom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budziszewski, P.; Nunen, E. van; Mordaka, J.K.; Kȩdzior, K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of numerical model of human upper extremity able to perform movements and stabilization tasks in two degrees of freedom as a result of muscle activation controlled by a PID-based controller. These tasks are defined by functions of specified angle for every degree

  20. Evaluation of document location during computer use in terms of neck muscle activity and neck movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goostrey, Sonya; Treleaven, Julia; Johnston, Venerina

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the impact on neck movement and muscle activity of placing documents in three commonly used locations: in-line, flat desktop left of the keyboard and laterally placed level with the computer screen. Neck excursion during three standard head movements between the computer monitor and each document location and neck extensor and upper trapezius muscle activity during a 5 min typing task for each of the document locations was measured in 20 healthy participants. Results indicated that muscle activity and neck flexion were least when documents were placed laterally suggesting it may be the optimal location. The desktop option produced both the greatest neck movement and muscle activity in all muscle groups. The in-line document location required significantly more neck flexion but less lateral flexion and rotation than the laterally placed document. Evaluation of other holders is needed to guide decision making for this commonly used office equipment. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Brain Abnormalities in Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles Type 1: A Multimodal MRI Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Wen; Man, Fengyuan; Wu, Shaoqin; Lv, Bin; Wang, Zhenchang; Xian, Junfang; Sabel, Bernhard A; He, Huiguang; Jiao, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    To explore the possible brain structural and functional alterations in congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles type 1 (CFEOM1) patients using multimodal MRI imaging. T1-weighted, diffusion tensor images and functional MRI data were obtained from 9 KIF21A positive patients and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Voxel based morphometry and tract based spatial statistics were applied to the T1-weighted and diffusion tensor images, respectively. Amplitude of low frequency fluctuations and regional homogeneity were used to process the functional MRI data. We then compared these multimodal characteristics between CFEOM1 patients and healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, CFEOM1 patients demonstrated increased grey matter volume in bilateral frontal orbital cortex and in the right temporal pole. No diffusion indices changes were detected, indicating unaffected white matter microstructure. In addition, from resting state functional MRI data, trend of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations increases were noted in the right inferior parietal lobe and in the right frontal cortex, and a trend of ReHo increase (pabnormality of extraocular muscles and their innervating nerves. Future studies should consider the possible correlations between brain morphological/functional findings and clinical data, especially pertaining to eye movements, to obtain more precise answers about the role of brain area changes and their functional consequence in CFEOM1.

  2. Morphology, ultrastructure and contractile properties of muscles responsible for superior tentacle movements of the snail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcs, Nóra; Márk, L; Elekes, K; Kiss, T

    2012-01-01

    Bending, twitching and quivering are different types of tentacle movements observed during olfactory orientation of the snail. Three recently discovered special muscles, spanning along the length of superior tentacles from the tip to the base, seem to be responsible for the execution of these movements. In this study we have investigated the ultrastructure, contractile properties and protein composition of these muscles. Our ultrastructural studies show that smooth muscle fibers are loosely embedded in a collagen matrix and they are coupled with long sarcolemma protrusions. The muscle fibers apparently lack organized SR and transverse tubular system. Instead subsarcolemmal vesicles and mitochondria have been shown to be possible Ca2+ pools for contraction. It was shown that external Ca2+ is required for contraction elicited by high (40 mM) K+ or 10-4 M ACh. Caffeine (5 mM) induced contraction in Ca2+-free solution suggesting the presence of a substantial intracellular Ca2+ pool. High-resolution electrophoretic analysis of columellar and tentacular muscles did not reveal differences in major contractile proteins, such as actin, myosin and paramyosin. Differences were observed however in several bands representing presumably regulatory enzymes. It is concluded that, the ultrastructural, biochemical and contractile properties of the string muscles support their special physiological function.

  3. Comparison of muscles activity of abled bodied and amputee subjects for around shoulder movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amanpreet; Agarwal, Ravinder; Kumar, Amod

    2016-05-12

    Worldwide, about 56% of the amputees are upper limb amputees. This research deals a method with two-channel surface electromyogram (SEMG) signal recorded from around shoulder to estimate the changes in muscle activity in non-amputee and the residual limb of trans humeral amputees with different movements of arm. Identification of different muscles activity of near shoulder amputee and non-amputee persons. SEMG signal were acquired during three distinct exercises from three-selected muscles location around shoulder. The participants were asked to move their dominant arm from an assigned position to record their muscles activity recorded with change in position. Results shows the muscles activity in scalene is more than the other muscles like pectoralis and infraspinatus with the same shoulder motion. In addition, STFT (Short-Time Fourier Transform) spectrogram with window length of 256 samples at maximum of 512 frequency bins using hamming window has used to identify the signal for the maximum muscles activity with best resolution in spectrum plot. The results suggest that one can use this analysis for making a suitable device for around shoulder prosthetic users based on muscles activation of amputee persons.

  4. Abnormal fetal muscle forces result in defects in spinal curvature and alterations in vertebral segmentation and shape.

    OpenAIRE

    Rolfe, RA; Bezer, JH; Kim, T; Zaidon, AZ; Oyen, Michelle Lynn; Iatridis, JC; Nowlan, NC

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of congenital spine deformities, including congenital scoliosis, kyphosis and lordosis, may be influenced by the in utero mechanical environment, and particularly by fetal movements at critical time-points. There is a limited understanding of the influence of fetal movements on spinal development, despite the fact that mechanical forces have been shown to play an essential role in skeletal development of the limb. This study investigates the effects of muscle forces on spinal cu...

  5. The effect of arm weight support on upper limb muscle synergies during reaching movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Compensating for the effect of gravity by providing arm-weight support (WS) is a technique often utilized in the rehabilitation of patients with neurological conditions such as stroke to facilitate the performance of arm movements during therapy. Although it has been shown that, in healthy subjects as well as in stroke survivors, the use of arm WS during the performance of reaching movements leads to a general reduction, as expected, in the level of activation of upper limb muscles, the effects of different levels of WS on the characteristics of the kinematics of motion and of the activity of upper limb muscles have not been thoroughly investigated before. Methods In this study, we systematically assessed the characteristics of the kinematics of motion and of the activity of 14 upper limb muscles in a group of 9 healthy subjects who performed 3-D arm reaching movements while provided with different levels of arm WS. We studied the hand trajectory and the trunk, shoulder, and elbow joint angular displacement trajectories for different levels of arm WS. Besides, we analyzed the amplitude of the surface electromyographic (EMG) data collected from upper limb muscles and investigated patterns of coordination via the analysis of muscle synergies. Results The characteristics of the kinematics of motion varied across WS conditions but did not show distinct trends with the level of arm WS. The level of activation of upper limb muscles generally decreased, as expected, with the increase in arm WS. The same eight muscle synergies were identified in all WS conditions. Their level of activation depended on the provided level of arm WS. Conclusions The analysis of muscle synergies allowed us to identify a modular organization underlying the generation of arm reaching movements that appears to be invariant to the level of arm WS. The results of this study provide a normative dataset for the assessment of the effects of the level of arm WS on muscle synergies in stroke

  6. The effects of tetracaine on charge movement in fast twitch rat skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingworth, S; Marshall, M W; Robson, E

    1990-02-01

    1. The effects of tetracaine, a local anaesthetic that inhibits muscle contraction, on membrane potential and intramembrane charge movements were investigated in fast twitch rat muscle fibres (extensor digitorum longus). 2. The resting membrane potentials of surface fibres from muscles bathed in isotonic Ringer solution containing 2 mM-tetracaine were well maintained, but higher concentrations of tetracaine caused a time-dependent fall of potential. Muscle fibres bathed in hypertonic solutions containing 2 mM-tetracaine were rapidly depolarized. In both isotonic and hypertonic solutions, the depolarizing effect of tetracaine could not be reversed. 3. Charge movement measurements were made using the middle-of-the-fibre voltage clamp technique. The voltage dependence of charge movements measured in cold isotonic solutions was well fitted by a Boltzmann distribution (Q(V) = Qmax/(1 + exp(-(V-V)/k] where Qmax = 37.3 +/- 2.8 nC muF-1, V = -17.9 +/- 1.2 mV and k = 12.6 +/- 0.8 mV (n = 6, 2 degrees C; means +/- S.E. of means). Similar values were obtained when 2 mM-tetracaine was added to the isotonic bathing fluid (Qmax = 40.6 +/- 2.3 nC microF-1, V = -14.1 +/- 1.3 mV, k = 15.3 +/- 0.8 mV; n = 8, 2 degrees C). 4. Charge movements measured around mechanical threshold in muscle fibres bathed in hypertonic solutions were reduced when 2 mM-tetracaine was added to the bathing fluid. The tetracaine-sensitive component of charge was well fitted with an unconstrained Boltzmann distribution which gave: Qmax = 7.5 nC microF-1, V = -46.5 mV, k = 5.5 mV. The e-fold rise of the foot of the curve was 9.3 mV.

  7. Slow-time changes in human EMG muscle fatigue states are fully represented in movement kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Miao; Segala, David B; Dingwell, Jonathan B; Chelidze, David

    2009-02-01

    The ability to identify physiologic fatigue and related changes in kinematics can provide an important tool for diagnosing fatigue-related injuries. This study examined an exhaustive cycling task to demonstrate how changes in movement kinematics and variability reflect underlying changes in local muscle states. Motion kinematics data were used to construct fatigue features. Their multivariate analysis, based on smooth orthogonal decomposition, was used to reconstruct physiological fatigue. Two different features composed of (1) standard statistical metrics (SSM), which were a collection of standard long-time measures, and (2) phase space warping (PSW)-based metrics, which characterized short-time variations in the phase space trajectories, were considered. Movement kinematics and surface electromyography (EMG) signals were measured from the lower extremities of seven highly trained cyclists as they cycled to voluntary exhaustion on a stationary bicycle. Mean and median frequencies from the EMG time series were computed to measure the local fatigue dynamics of individual muscles independent of the SSM- and PSW-based features, which were extracted solely from the kinematics data. A nonlinear analysis of kinematic features was shown to be essential for capturing full multidimensional fatigue dynamics. A four-dimensional fatigue manifold identified using a nonlinear PSW-based analysis of kinematics data was shown to adequately predict all EMG-based individual muscle fatigue trends. While SSM-based analyses showed similar dominant global fatigue trends, they failed to capture individual muscle activities in a low-dimensional manifold. Therefore, the nonlinear PSW-based analysis of strictly kinematic time series data directly predicted all of the local muscle fatigue trends in a low-dimensional systemic fatigue trajectory. These results provide the first direct quantitative link between changes in muscle fatigue dynamics and resulting changes in movement kinematics.

  8. Muscle Synergies-Based Characterization and Clustering of Poststroke Patients in Reaching Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Scano

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundA deep characterization of neurological patients is a crucial step for a detailed knowledge of the pathology and maximal exploitation and customization of the rehabilitation therapy. The muscle synergies analysis was designed to investigate how muscles coactivate and how their eliciting commands change in time during movement production. Few studies investigated the value of muscle synergies for the characterization of neurological patients before rehabilitation therapies. In this article, the synergy analysis was used to characterize a group of chronic poststroke hemiplegic patients.MethodsTwenty-two poststroke patients performed a session composed of a sequence of 3D reaching movements. They were assessed through an instrumental assessment, by recording kinematics and electromyography to extract muscle synergies and their activation commands. Patients’ motor synergies were grouped by the means of cluster analysis. Consistency and characterization of each cluster was assessed and clinically profiled by comparison with standard motor assessments.ResultsMotor synergies were successfully extracted on all 22 patients. Five basic clusters were identified as a trade-off between clustering precision and synthesis power, representing: healthy-like activations, two shoulder compensatory strategies, two elbow predominance patterns. Each cluster was provided with a deep characterization and correlation with clinical scales, range of motion, and smoothness.ConclusionThe clustering of muscle synergies enabled a pretherapy characterization of patients. Such technique may affect several aspects of the therapy: prediction of outcomes, evaluation of the treatments, customization of doses, and therapies.

  9. [Central nervous system abnormalities related to congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moguel-Ancheita, Silvia; Rodríguez-Garcidueñas, Wendolyn

    2009-01-01

    We undertook this study to describe central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities associated with congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDD). This was a retrospective, observational, transversal and descriptive study including patients with congenital fibrotic strabismus. We analyzed clinical files of patients from 2001 to 2006. Neurological lesions were reported. Restrictive strabismus was demonstrated in all cases. Sixteen patients were included: nine males and seven females. Different neurological lesions were reported: corpus callosum anomalies, severe cortipathy, epilepsy, cavum vergae, nystagmus, occipital subarachnoid cyst, and hydrocephalus. Mental retardation was reported in 56% of patients. Different malformations were reported: genital malformations, trigonocephalus, camptodactyly, mild facial hypoplasia, low set ears, and agenesis of left ear. Blepharoptosis was present in 81% of patients. The most frequent form of strabismus was exotropia (56%), hypotropia in 37.5%, hypertropia 18.7%, "A" pattern 18.7%, and esotropia in 6.25%. Affection was cranial nerve III, 93.75%; cranial nerve VI, 6.25%; cranial nerve VII, 6.25%; and lesion to cranial nerve II in eight cases (50%). We have suggested that failure in early stages of embryology of the CNS can lead to the development of paralytic strabismus and generate secondary fibrotic changes, not only in muscle structures but also in other orbital tissues. That is the reason why we have used the term "congenital fibrotic strabismus" to report cases included in CCDD. We have demonstrated the strong association of mental retardation and neurological alterations. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation is relevant for these patients.

  10. PGC-1alpha deficiency causes multi-system energy metabolic derangements: muscle dysfunction, abnormal weight control and hepatic steatosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa C Leone

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The gene encoding the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha was targeted in mice. PGC-1alpha null (PGC-1alpha(-/- mice were viable. However, extensive phenotyping revealed multi-system abnormalities indicative of an abnormal energy metabolic phenotype. The postnatal growth of heart and slow-twitch skeletal muscle, organs with high mitochondrial energy demands, is blunted in PGC-1alpha(-/- mice. With age, the PGC-1alpha(-/- mice develop abnormally increased body fat, a phenotype that is more severe in females. Mitochondrial number and respiratory capacity is diminished in slow-twitch skeletal muscle of PGC-1alpha(-/- mice, leading to reduced muscle performance and exercise capacity. PGC-1alpha(-/- mice exhibit a modest diminution in cardiac function related largely to abnormal control of heart rate. The PGC-1alpha(-/- mice were unable to maintain core body temperature following exposure to cold, consistent with an altered thermogenic response. Following short-term starvation, PGC-1alpha(-/- mice develop hepatic steatosis due to a combination of reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity and an increased expression of lipogenic genes. Surprisingly, PGC-1alpha(-/- mice were less susceptible to diet-induced insulin resistance than wild-type controls. Lastly, vacuolar lesions were detected in the central nervous system of PGC-1alpha(-/- mice. These results demonstrate that PGC-1alpha is necessary for appropriate adaptation to the metabolic and physiologic stressors of postnatal life.

  11. Persistent Nipple Pain in Breastfeeding Mothers Associated with Abnormal Infant Tongue Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Holly L; Kent, Jacqueline C; Hepworth, Anna R; Hartmann, Peter E; Geddes, Donna T

    2015-09-02

    Infants of breastfeeding mothers with persistent nipple pain have been shown to apply stronger vacuums to the breast and transfer less milk during one monitored feed. This may be associated with differences in the movement of the tongue. The aim was to analyse the intra-oral nipple shape and movement of the tongue of infants of mothers with and without nipple pain. Breastfeeding infants of mothers with or without nipple pain were monitored using ultrasound and intra-oral vacuum during one breastfeed. From cine clips of the ultrasound scans measurements were made of the depth of the intra-oral space between the hard-soft palate junction (HSPJ) and the mid-tongue; the distance of the tip of the nipple to the HSPJ; and nipple diameters from the tip to the base. During nutritive sucking, tongue movements of infants of mothers with nipple pain resulted in a smaller intra-oral space (p = 0.040) and restricted nipple expansion compared to controls (p mothers, nipple pain was associated with restricted infant tongue movement. Ultrasound may complement measurement of intra-oral vacuum in monitoring treatment strategies in breastfeeding women experiencing nipple pain.

  12. Active Bio-sensor System, Compatible with Arm Muscle Movement or Blinking Signals in BCI Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Mehrkanoon

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a bionic active sensor system for the BCI application. Proposed system involves analog and digital parts. Two types of accurate sensors are used to pickup the blinking and muscle movement signals. A precision micro-power instrumentation amplifier with the adjustable gain, a sixth order low pass active filter with cutoff frequency 0.1 Hz, and a sixth order band pas filter with the bandwidth of 2-6 Hz are constructed to provide the clean blinking and arm muscle movement signals. TMS320C25 DSP processor is used for independent and unique command signals which are prepared for BCI application by a power amplifier and driver.

  13. Load emphasizes muscle effort minimization during selection of arm movement direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wanyue

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Directional preferences during center-out horizontal shoulder-elbow movements were previously established for both the dominant and non-dominant arm with the use of a free-stroke drawing task that required random selection of movement directions. While the preferred directions were mirror-symmetrical in both arms, they were attributed to a tendency specific for the dominant arm to simplify control of interaction torque by actively accelerating one joint and producing largely passive motion at the other joint. No conclusive evidence has been obtained in support of muscle effort minimization as a contributing factor to the directional preferences. Here, we tested whether distal load changes directional preferences, making the influence of muscle effort minimization on the selection of movement direction more apparent. Methods The free-stroke drawing task was performed by the dominant and non-dominant arm with no load and with 0.454 kg load at the wrist. Motion of each arm was limited to rotation of the shoulder and elbow in the horizontal plane. Directional histograms of strokes produced by the fingertip were calculated to assess directional preferences in each arm and load condition. Possible causes for directional preferences were further investigated by studying optimization across directions of a number of cost functions. Results Preferences in both arms to move in the diagonal directions were revealed. The previously suggested tendency to actively accelerate one joint and produce passive motion at the other joint was supported in both arms and load conditions. However, the load increased the tendency to produce strokes in the transverse diagonal directions (perpendicular to the forearm orientation in both arms. Increases in required muscle effort caused by the load suggested that the higher frequency of movements in the transverse directions represented increased influence of muscle effort minimization on the selection of

  14. Load emphasizes muscle effort minimization during selection of arm movement direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanyue; Dounskaia, Natalia

    2012-10-04

    Directional preferences during center-out horizontal shoulder-elbow movements were previously established for both the dominant and non-dominant arm with the use of a free-stroke drawing task that required random selection of movement directions. While the preferred directions were mirror-symmetrical in both arms, they were attributed to a tendency specific for the dominant arm to simplify control of interaction torque by actively accelerating one joint and producing largely passive motion at the other joint. No conclusive evidence has been obtained in support of muscle effort minimization as a contributing factor to the directional preferences. Here, we tested whether distal load changes directional preferences, making the influence of muscle effort minimization on the selection of movement direction more apparent. The free-stroke drawing task was performed by the dominant and non-dominant arm with no load and with 0.454 kg load at the wrist. Motion of each arm was limited to rotation of the shoulder and elbow in the horizontal plane. Directional histograms of strokes produced by the fingertip were calculated to assess directional preferences in each arm and load condition. Possible causes for directional preferences were further investigated by studying optimization across directions of a number of cost functions. Preferences in both arms to move in the diagonal directions were revealed. The previously suggested tendency to actively accelerate one joint and produce passive motion at the other joint was supported in both arms and load conditions. However, the load increased the tendency to produce strokes in the transverse diagonal directions (perpendicular to the forearm orientation) in both arms. Increases in required muscle effort caused by the load suggested that the higher frequency of movements in the transverse directions represented increased influence of muscle effort minimization on the selection of movement direction. This interpretation was supported

  15. Quantifying forearm muscle activity during wrist and finger movements by means of multi-channel electromyography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Gazzoni

    Full Text Available The study of hand and finger movement is an important topic with applications in prosthetics, rehabilitation, and ergonomics. Surface electromyography (sEMG is the gold standard for the analysis of muscle activation. Previous studies investigated the optimal electrode number and positioning on the forearm to obtain information representative of muscle activation and robust to movements. However, the sEMG spatial distribution on the forearm during hand and finger movements and its changes due to different hand positions has never been quantified. The aim of this work is to quantify 1 the spatial localization of surface EMG activity of distinct forearm muscles during dynamic free movements of wrist and single fingers and 2 the effect of hand position on sEMG activity distribution. The subjects performed cyclic dynamic tasks involving the wrist and the fingers. The wrist tasks and the hand opening/closing task were performed with the hand in prone and neutral positions. A sensorized glove was used for kinematics recording. sEMG signals were acquired from the forearm muscles using a grid of 112 electrodes integrated into a stretchable textile sleeve. The areas of sEMG activity have been identified by a segmentation technique after a data dimensionality reduction step based on Non Negative Matrix Factorization applied to the EMG envelopes. The results show that 1 it is possible to identify distinct areas of sEMG activity on the forearm for different fingers; 2 hand position influences sEMG activity level and spatial distribution. This work gives new quantitative information about sEMG activity distribution on the forearm in healthy subjects and provides a basis for future works on the identification of optimal electrode configuration for sEMG based control of prostheses, exoskeletons, or orthoses. An example of use of this information for the optimization of the detection system for the estimation of joint kinematics from sEMG is reported.

  16. Quantifying forearm muscle activity during wrist and finger movements by means of multi-channel electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzoni, Marco; Celadon, Nicolò; Mastrapasqua, Davide; Paleari, Marco; Margaria, Valentina; Ariano, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The study of hand and finger movement is an important topic with applications in prosthetics, rehabilitation, and ergonomics. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is the gold standard for the analysis of muscle activation. Previous studies investigated the optimal electrode number and positioning on the forearm to obtain information representative of muscle activation and robust to movements. However, the sEMG spatial distribution on the forearm during hand and finger movements and its changes due to different hand positions has never been quantified. The aim of this work is to quantify 1) the spatial localization of surface EMG activity of distinct forearm muscles during dynamic free movements of wrist and single fingers and 2) the effect of hand position on sEMG activity distribution. The subjects performed cyclic dynamic tasks involving the wrist and the fingers. The wrist tasks and the hand opening/closing task were performed with the hand in prone and neutral positions. A sensorized glove was used for kinematics recording. sEMG signals were acquired from the forearm muscles using a grid of 112 electrodes integrated into a stretchable textile sleeve. The areas of sEMG activity have been identified by a segmentation technique after a data dimensionality reduction step based on Non Negative Matrix Factorization applied to the EMG envelopes. The results show that 1) it is possible to identify distinct areas of sEMG activity on the forearm for different fingers; 2) hand position influences sEMG activity level and spatial distribution. This work gives new quantitative information about sEMG activity distribution on the forearm in healthy subjects and provides a basis for future works on the identification of optimal electrode configuration for sEMG based control of prostheses, exoskeletons, or orthoses. An example of use of this information for the optimization of the detection system for the estimation of joint kinematics from sEMG is reported.

  17. Out-of-plane trunk movements and trunk muscle activity after a trip during walking

    OpenAIRE

    van der Burg, J.C.E.; Pijnappels, M.A.G.M.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2005-01-01

    Tripping during gait occurs frequently. A successful balance recovery implies that the forward body rotation is sufficiently reduced. In view of this, adequate control of the trunk momentum is important, as the trunk has a high inertia. The aim of this study was to establish out-of-plane trunk movements after a trip and to determine trunk muscle responses. Ten male volunteers repeatedly walked over a platform in which 21 obstacles were hidden. Each subject was tripped over one of these obstac...

  18. The influence of transverse tubular delays on the kinetics of charge movement in mammalian skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    A model was developed to describe the kinetics of slow, voltage- dependent charge movement in the rat omohyoid muscle. To represent the electrically distributed nature of the transverse tubular system (t- system), we followed an approach similar to that described by Adrian and Peachey (1973 J. Physiol. [Lond.]. 235:103), and approximated the fiber with 12 concentric cylindrical shells. Incorporated into each shell were capacitative and conductive elements that represented the passive electric...

  19. Effects of D-600 on intramembrane charge movement of polarized and depolarized frog muscle fibers

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Intramembrane charge movement has been measured in frog cut skeletal muscle fibers using the triple vaseline gap voltage-clamp technique. Ionic currents were reduced using an external solution prepared with tetraethylammonium to block potassium currents, and O sodium + tetrodotoxin to abolish sodium currents. The internal solution contained 10 mM EGTA to prevent contractions. Both the internal and external solutions were prepared with impermeant anions. Linear capacitive currents were subtrac...

  20. The effect of handedness on electromyographic activity of human shoulder muscles during movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Nørregaard, Jesper; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether there was a difference in the electromyographic (EMG) activity of human shoulder muscles between the dominant and nondominant side during movement and to explore whether a possible side-difference depends on the specific task. We compared the EMG...... activity with surface and intramuscular electrodes in eight muscles of both shoulders in 20 healthy subjects whose hand preference was evaluated using a standard questionnaire. EMG signals were recorded during abduction and external rotation. During abduction, the normalized EMG activity was significantly...... smaller on the dominant side compared to the nondominant side for all the muscles except for infraspinatus and lower trapezius (P Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Aug...

  1. Facial Muscle Coordination in Monkeys During Rhythmic Facial Expressions and Ingestive Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Stephen V.; Lanzilotto, Marco; Ghazanfar, Asif A.

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary hypotheses regarding the origins of communication signals generally, and primate orofacial communication signals in particular, suggest that these signals derive by ritualization of noncommunicative behaviors, notably including ingestive behaviors such as chewing and nursing. These theories are appealing in part because of the prominent periodicities in both types of behavior. Despite their intuitive appeal, however, there are little or no data with which to evaluate these theories because the coordination of muscles innervated by the facial nucleus has not been carefully compared between communicative and ingestive movements. Such data are especially crucial for reconciling neurophysiological assumptions regarding facial motor control in communication and ingestion. We here address this gap by contrasting the coordination of facial muscles during different types of rhythmic orofacial behavior in macaque monkeys, finding that the perioral muscles innervated by the facial nucleus are rhythmically coordinated during lipsmacks and that this coordination appears distinct from that observed during ingestion. PMID:22553017

  2. Familial diffuse Lewy body disease, eye movement abnormalities, and distribution of pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Francesca M; Henson, Craig; Staunton, Hugh

    2002-03-01

    Familial diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD) is rare and not yet associated with a defect in the synuclein gene. In the differential diagnosis of the parkinsonian syndromes, defects in vertical gaze tend to be identified with progressive supranuclear palsy. False-positive diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy can occur, and defects in vertical gaze have been reported in DLBD, although so far a pure vertical gaze palsy associated with pathological abnormalities in the substrate for vertical gaze has not been described. To report the clinical and pathological findings in 2 siblings with DLBD, and to relate the distribution of the pathological abnormalities in the brainstem to centers for vertical gaze. For several years, 2 Irish siblings experienced a progressive parkinsonism-dementia complex associated in one with a defect in vertical gaze and in both with visual hallucinations. In both patients, results of pathological examination revealed (1) Lewy bodies positive for ubiquitin and alpha-synuclein together with cell loss and gliosis in the substantia nigra, locus ceruleus, and neocortex; and (2) similar findings in the rostral interstitial nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus, the posterior commissure, and the interstitial nucleus of Cajal (substrates for vertical gaze). Familial DLBD (not shown to be genetically as distinct from environmentally transmitted) has been shown to exist in an Irish family. Caution should be enjoined in the interpretation of defects in vertical gaze in the differential diagnosis of the parkinsonian syndromes.

  3. Association between maximal hamstring muscle strength and hamstring muscle pre-activity during a movement associated with non-contact ACL injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zebis, M. K.; Sorensen, R. S.; Thorborg, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reduced hamstring pre-activity during sidecutting increases the risk for non-contact ACL injury. During the last decade resistance training of the lower limb muscles has become an integral part ofACLinjury prevention in e.g. soccer and handball. However, it is not known whether a strong...... levels of muscle pre-activity during movements like the sidecutting maneuver. Implications: Other exercise modalities (i.e. neuromuscular training) are needed to optimize hamstring muscle pre-activity during movements associated with non-contact ACL injury....

  4. Diagnosis abnormalities of limb movement in disorders of the nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymchik, Gregory S.; Skytsiouk, Volodymyr I.; Klotchko, Tatiana R.; Bezsmertna, Halyna; Wójcik, Waldemar; Luganskaya, Saule; Orazbekov, Zhassulan; Iskakova, Aigul

    2017-08-01

    The paper deals with important issues of diagnosis early signs of diseases of the nervous system, including Parkinson's disease and other specific diseases. Small quantities of violation trajectory of spatial movement of the extremities of human disease at the primary level as the most appropriate features are studied. In modern medical practice is very actual the control the emergence of diseases of the nervous system, including Parkinson's disease. In work a model limbs with six rotational kinematic pairs for diagnosis of early signs of diseases of the nervous system is considered. subject.

  5. A modeling investigation of vowel-to-vowel movement planning in acoustic and muscle spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandipour, Majid

    The primary objective of this research was to explore the coordinate space in which speech movements are planned. A two dimensional biomechanical model of the vocal tract (tongue, lips, jaw, and pharynx) was constructed based on anatomical and physiological data from a subject. The model transforms neural command signals into the actions of muscles. The tongue was modeled by a 221-node finite element mesh. Each of the eight tongue muscles defined within the mesh was controlled by a virtual muscle model. The other vocal-tract components were modeled as simple 2nd-order systems. The model's geometry was adapted to a speaker, using MRI scans of the speaker's vocal tract. The vocal tract model, combined with an adaptive controller that consisted of a forward model (mapping 12-dimensional motor commands to a 64-dimensional acoustic spectrum) and an inverse model (mapping acoustic trajectories to motor command trajectories), was used to simulate and explore the implications of two planning hypotheses: planning in motor space vs. acoustic space. The acoustic, kinematic, and muscle activation (EMG) patterns of vowel-to-vowel sequences generated by the model were compared to data from the speaker whose acoustic, kinematic and EMG were also recorded. The simulation results showed that: (a) modulations of the motor commands effectively accounted for the effects of speaking rate on EMG, kinematic, and acoustic outputs; (b) the movement and acoustic trajectories were influenced by vocal tract biomechanics; and (c) both planning schemes produced similar articulatory movement, EMG, muscle length, force, and acoustic trajectories, which were also comparable to the subject's data under normal speaking conditions. In addition, the effects of a bite-block on measured EMG, kinematics and formants were simulated by the model. Acoustic planning produced successful simulations but motor planning did not. The simulation results suggest that with somatosensory feedback but no auditory

  6. Julio Cortázar quotes on normal and abnormal movements: magical realism or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merello, Marcelo

    2006-08-01

    Together with Mario Vargas Llosa and Gabriel García Márquez, Julio Cortázar was one of the most representative authors of the Latin American magical realism genre. Within his extensive body of work, many descriptions of characters suffering physical disabilities, as well as situations suggesting such medical conditions, can be extracted. In this review, two short stories by Cortázar are presented. In the first one, the main character could easily be a man suffering from corticobasal degeneration; in the second, an old woman with symptoms suggestive of progressive supranuclear palsy is clearly depicted. Despite the fact that one of the main ingredients in Cortázar's magical realism is fiction, cases described here fit real medical conditions quite well, making it hard to believe that they represent purely fantastic descriptions rather than the product of Cortázar's inquisitive observation and the description of real patients. (c) 2006 Movement Disorder Society

  7. Muscle and eye movement artifact removal prior to EEG source localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallez, Hans; Vergult, Anneleen; Phlypo, Ronald; Van Hese, Peter; De Clercq, Wim; D'Asseler, Yves; Van de Walle, Rik; Vanrumste, Bart; Van Paesschen, Wim; Van Huffel, Sabine; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2006-01-01

    Muscle and eye movement artifacts are very prominent in the ictal EEG of patients suffering from epilepsy, thus making the dipole localization of ictal activity very unreliable. Recently, two techniques (BSS-CCA and pSVD) were developed to remove those artifacts. The purpose of this study is to assess whether the removal of muscle and eye movement artifacts improves the EEG dipole source localization. We used a total of 8 EEG fragments, each from another patient, first unfiltered, then filtered by the BSS-CCA and pSVD. In both the filtered and unfiltered EEG fragments we estimated multiple dipoles using RAP-MUSIC. The resulting dipoles were subjected to a K-means clustering algorithm, to extract the most prominent cluster. We found that the removal of muscle and eye artifact results to tighter and more clear dipole clusters. Furthermore, we found that localization of the filtered EEG corresponded with the localization derived from the ictal SPECT in 7 of the 8 patients. Therefore, we can conclude that the BSS-CCA and pSVD improve localization of ictal activity, thus making the localization more reliable for the presurgical evaluation of the patient.

  8. The abnormalities of trapezius muscle might be a component of Poland's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiyit, Nurettin; Işıtmangil, Turgut; Oztürker, Coşkun

    2014-11-01

    Poland's syndrome is a rare unilateral congenital anomaly characterized by the absence of the pectoral muscle and hand anomalies. By the time, new components including the absence or hypoplasia of many muscles have been identified, however, the anomalies of trapezius muscle have not been reported in patients with Poland's syndrome. The accepted etiological theory is the temporary interruption of blood supply of the subclavian artery and its branches in the early gestational period. The artery of the trapezius muscle is also one of the branches of subclavian artery. Just because of that, it is likely to trapezius muscle be affected in patients with Poland's syndrome. We are presenting a case of Poland's syndrome associated with unilateral partial absence of trapezius muscle to support this hypothesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Correlates of muscle strength in diabetes: The study on the assessment of determinants of muscle and bone strength abnormalities in diabetes (SAMBA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balducci, S; Sacchetti, M; Orlando, G; Salvi, L; Pugliese, L; Salerno, G; D'Errico, V; Iacobini, C; Conti, F G; Zanuso, S; Nicolucci, A; Pugliese, G

    2014-01-01

    Apart from late motor nerve dysfunction, factors affecting muscle strength in diabetes are largely unknown. This study was aimed at assessing muscle strength correlates in diabetic subjects encompassing a wide range of peripheral nerve function and various degrees of micro and macrovascular complications. Four-hundred consecutive patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes (aged 46.4 ± 13.9 and 65.8 ± 10.3 years, respectively) from the Study on the Assessment of Determinants of Muscle and Bone Strength Abnormalities in Diabetes (SAMBA) were examined for upper and lower body muscle isometric maximal voluntary contraction by dynamometry. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were applied to identify strength correlates. Isometric force at both the upper and lower limbs was significantly lower in subjects with than in those without any complication. At univariate analysis, it was strongly associated with age, diabetes duration, physical activity (PA) level, cardio-respiratory fitness, anthropometric parameters, surrogate measures of complications, and parameters of sensory and autonomic, but not motor (except amplitude) neuropathy. Multivariate analysis revealed that upper and lower body strength correlated independently with male gender and, inversely, with age, autonomic neuropathy score (or individual autonomic function abnormalities), and vibration perception threshold, but not sensory-motor neuropathy score. Diabetes duration and PA level were excluded from the model. Both upper and lower body muscle strength correlate with measures of diabetic complications and particularly with parameters of sensory and especially autonomic nerve function, independently of diabetes duration and PA level, thus suggesting the involvement of mechanisms other than manifest motor nerve impairment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of muscle activity and ankle joint movement during the side-hop test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Taniguchi, Keigo; Katayose, Masaki

    2011-08-01

    Functional performance tests (FPTs) that consist of movements, such as hopping, landing, and cutting, provide useful measurements. Although some tests have been established for kinematic studies of the knee joint, very few tests have been established for the ankle joint. To use the FPT as a test battery for patients with an ankle sprain, it is necessary to document typical patterns of muscle activation and range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint during FPTs. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the pattern of the ROM of the ankle inversion/eversion and the muscle activity of the peroneus longus muscle (PL) and the tibial anterior muscle (TA) in normal subjects during the side-hop test. To emphasize the characteristics of ROM and electromyography (EMG) at each phase, the side-hop tests were divided into 4 phases: lateral-hop contact phase (LC), lateral-hop flight phase (LF), medial hop contact phase (MC), and medial hop flight phase (MF), and the ROM of ankle inversion/eversion, a peak angle of ankle inversion, and Integral EMG (IEMG) of PL and TA compared among 4 phases. Fifteen male subjects with no symptoms of ankle joint problems participated in this research. The ROM of ankle inversion/eversion during the side-hop test was 27 ± 3.8° (mean ± SD), and there was a significant difference in the ROM of ankle inversion/eversion among 4 phases (p sprain.

  11. Phantom movements from physiologically inappropriate muscles: A case study with a high transhumeral amputee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Julie; Hugosdottir, Rosa; Kamavuako, Ernest N

    2015-08-01

    Individuals with high-level amputation have a great need for functional prostheses because of their vast functional deficits. Conventional techniques are considered inappropriate for high-level amputees due to the lack of physiologically appropriate muscles. This study investigates how accurate phantom movements (PMs) can be classified from physiologically inappropriate muscles. The study involves a case study of a 42-year-old transhumeral amputee. Suitable PMs and best electrode configuration were identified using the sequential forward selection method and brute-force technique. Using linear discriminant analysis, the best PMs (elbow extension/flexion, wrist supination/pronation) and rest were classified with error ranging from 3% to 0.18% when using 3 to 8 EMG channels respectively. A completion rate of 93 % was obtained during a targeted achievement control test in a virtual reality environment. This case indicates that a proximal transhumeral amputee can generate muscle activation patterns related to distinct PMs; and these PMs can be decoded from physiologically inappropriate muscles.

  12. The pectoralis minor muscle and shoulder movement-related impairments and pain: Rationale, assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Nuno; Cruz, Joana

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive shortening or tightness of the pectoralis minor muscle (PMm) is one of the potential biomechanical mechanisms associated with altered scapular alignment at rest and scapular motion during arm elevation (scapular dyskinesis) in patients with shoulder complaints. This masterclass briefly reviews the role of the PMm in shoulder movement-related impairments and provides a critical overview of the assessment of PMm tightness and the conventional approaches to increase its resting length and extensibility. A rehabilitation approach focused on PMm stretching and simultaneous optimization of the kinematic chain of arm elevation is also discussed, hoping to improve the management of shoulder movement-related impairments and pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Voltage-dependent block of charge movement components by nifedipine in frog skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    Potential-dependent inhibition of charge movement components by nifedipine was studied in intact, voltage-clamped, frog skeletal muscle fibers. Available charge was reduced by small shifts in holding potential (from -100 mV to -70 mV) in 2 microM nifedipine, without changes in the capacitance deduced from control (-120 mV to -100 mV) voltage steps made at a fully polarized (-100 mV) holding potential. These voltage-dependent effects did not occur in lower (0-0.5 microM) nifedipine concentrati...

  14. Hypoglossal-Facial Nerve Reconstruction Using a Y-Tube-Conduit Reduces Aberrant Synkinetic Movements of the Orbicularis Oculi and Vibrissal Muscles in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Kaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The facial nerve is the most frequently damaged nerve in head and neck trauma. Patients undergoing facial nerve reconstruction often complain about disturbing abnormal synkinetic movements of the facial muscles (mass movements, synkinesis which are thought to result from misguided collateral branching of regenerating motor axons and reinnervation of inappropriate muscles. Here, we examined whether use of an aorta Y-tube conduit during reconstructive surgery after facial nerve injury reduces synkinesis of orbicularis oris (blink reflex and vibrissal (whisking musculature. The abdominal aorta plus its bifurcation was harvested (N = 12 for Y-tube conduits. Animal groups comprised intact animals (Group 1, those receiving hypoglossal-facial nerve end-to-end coaptation alone (HFA; Group 2, and those receiving hypoglossal-facial nerve reconstruction using a Y-tube (HFA-Y-tube, Group 3. Videotape motion analysis at 4 months showed that HFA-Y-tube group showed a reduced synkinesis of eyelid and whisker movements compared to HFA alone.

  15. Plane of vertebral movement eliciting muscle lengthening history in the low back influences the decrease in muscle spindle responsiveness of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Weiqing; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Long, Cynthia R; Pickar, Joel G

    2011-12-01

    Proprioceptive feedback is thought to play a significant role in controlling both lumbopelvic and intervertebral orientations. In the lumbar spine, a vertebra's positional history along the dorsal-ventral axis has been shown to alter the position, movement, and velocity sensitivity of muscle spindles in the multifidus and longissimus muscles. These effects appear due to muscle history. Because spinal motion segments have up to 6 degrees of freedom for movement, we were interested in whether the axis along which the history is applied differentially affects paraspinal muscle spindles. We tested the null hypothesis that the loading axis, which creates a vertebra's positional history, has no effect on a lumbar muscle spindle's subsequent response to vertebral position or movement. Identical displacements were applied along three orthogonal axes directly at the L(6) spinous process using a feedback motor system under displacement control. Single-unit nerve activity was recorded from 60 muscle spindle afferents in teased filaments from L(6) dorsal rootlets innervating intact longissimus or multifidus muscles of deeply anesthetized cats. Muscle lengthening histories along the caudal-cranial and dorsal-ventral axis, compared with the left-right axis, produced significantly greater reductions in spindle responses to vertebral position and movement. The spinal anatomy suggested that the effect of a lengthening history is greatest when that history had occurred along an axis lying within the anatomical plane of the facet joint. Speculation is made that the interaction between normal spinal mechanics and the inherent thixotropic property of muscle spindles poses a challenge for feedback and feedforward motor control of the lumbar spine.

  16. Oedema and fatty degeneration of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles on MR images in patients with achilles tendon abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Adrienne [University Hospital Balgrist Zuerich, Radiology Department, Zuerich (Switzerland); Hirslanden Klinik Aarau, Radiology Department, Aarau (Switzerland); Mamisch, Nadja; Buck, Florian M.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Zanetti, Marco [University Hospital Balgrist Zuerich, Radiology Department, Zuerich (Switzerland); Espinosa, Norman [University Hospital Balgrist Zuerich, Orthopedic Surgery Department, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of oedema and fatty degeneration of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles in patients with Achilles tendon abnormalities. Forty-five consecutive patients (mean 51 years; range 14-84 years) with achillodynia were examined with magnetic resonance (MR) images of the calf. The frequency of oedema and fatty degeneration in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles was determined in patients with normal tendons, tendinopathy and in patients with a partial tear or a complete tear of the Achilles tendon. Oedema was encountered in 35% (7/20) of the patients with tendinopathy (n = 20; range 13-81 years), and in 47% (9/19) of the patients with partial tears or complete tears (n = 19; 28-78 years). Fatty degeneration was encountered in 10% (2/20) of the patients with tendinopathy, and in 32% (6/19) of the patients with tears. The prevalence of fatty degeneration was significantly more common in patients with a partial or complete tear compared with the patients with a normal Achilles tendon (p = 0.032 and p = 0.021, respectively). Oedema and fatty degeneration of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles are common in patients with Achilles tendon abnormalities. (orig.)

  17. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease versus anti-LGI1 limbic encephalitis in a patient with progressive cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms, involuntary facio-brachio-crural movement, and an abnormal electroencephalogram: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun L

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Li Sun, Jie Cao, Chang Liu, Yudan LvDepartment of Neurology, The First Hospital of JiLin University, ChangChun, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is often challenging in elderly individuals, not only because of its variable clinical features but also because of nonspecific changes on the electroencephalogram (EEG in the early stages of the disease. Here we report on a patient who presented with progressive cognitive dysfunction, psychiatric symptoms, involuntary facio-brachio-crural movement, and an abnormal EEG. We provide a detailed analysis and differential diagnosis between anti-leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1 limbic encephalitis versus CJD, in the hope of providing a new understanding of CJD. A 65-year-old Chinese man presented with slowly progressive cognitive decline with psychiatric symptoms. On admission, he presented with facial grimacing and brief left upper limb dystonic posturing lasting 1–2 seconds, with hyponatremia that was difficult to rectify. Neurological examination showed increased muscle tension in the left limb but without pathological reflexes. His early EEG showed focal periodic wave complexes. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed a suspected “lace sign” in the occipital cortex. His cerebrospinal fluid was negative for LGI1 antibodies and positive for 14-3-3 brain protein. Therefore, we made a presumptive diagnosis of CJD. At the following visit, a second EEG showed paroxysmal sharp wave complexes, but the patient had a poor prognosis. Atypical facio-brachio-crural movement and nonspecific EEG changes may occasionally be found in patients with CJD or anti-LGI1 encephalitis. Clinicians should not be dissuaded from a diagnosis of CJD where the EEG does not show paroxysmal sharp wave complexes in the early stages but abnormal facio-brachio-crural movement is present.Keywords: abnormal facio-brachio-crural movement, hyponatremia, Creutzfeldt

  18. The influence of transverse tubular delays on the kinetics of charge movement in mammalian skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B J; Beam, K G

    1985-01-01

    A model was developed to describe the kinetics of slow, voltage-dependent charge movement in the rat omohyoid muscle. To represent the electrically distributed nature of the transverse tubular system (t-system), we followed an approach similar to that described by Adrian and Peachey (1973 J. Physiol. [Lond.]. 235:103), and approximated the fiber with 12 concentric cylindrical shells. Incorporated into each shell were capacitative and conductive elements that represented the passive electrical properties of the t-system, and an element representing the mobile charge. The charge was assumed to obey a two-state scheme, in which the redistribution of charge is governed by a first-order reaction, and the rate constants linking the two states were assumed to depend on potential according to the constant field expression. The predictions of this "distributed two-state model" were compared with charge movements experimentally measured in individual fibers. For this comparison, first, the passive electrical parameters of the model were adjusted to fit the experimental linear capacity transient. Next, the Boltzmann expression was fitted to the steady state Q vs. V data of the fiber, thereby constraining the voltage dependence of the rate constants, but not their absolute magnitude. The absolute magnitude was determined by fitting the theory to an experimental charge movement at a single test potential, which in turn constrained the fits at all other test potentials. The distributed two-state model well described the rising and falling phases of ON, OFF, and stepped OFF charge movements at temperatures ranging from 3 to 25 degrees C. We thus conclude that tubular delays are sufficient to account for the rounded rising phase of experimental charge movements, and that it is unnecessary to postulate higher-order reaction schemes for the underlying charge redistribution.

  19. Early ultrastructural alterations in adult dermatomyositis. Capillary abnormalities precede other structural changes in muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, M.; Emslie-Smith, A. M.; Engel, A. G.

    1989-01-01

    In 6 adults with dermatomyositis, minimally weak or nonweak muscles that showed inconclusive light-microscopic alterations were examined by electron microscopy. In all 6 specimens, this revealed pathologic changes in endomysial capillaries. The endothelial cells harbored microtubular inclusions and

  20. Spectrum of congenital mitral valve abnormalities associated with solitary undifferentiated papillary muscle in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, Jagdish C.; Shukla, Madhu; Mohan, Vishwas; Sethi, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital anomaly wherein the mitral valve leaflets are directly attached to the papillary muscle(s) (PM) with or without short under-developed chords is rarely reported in adults. Patients with two PMs with an intervening fibrous bridge have also been included under this head in previous studies. Methods: Echocardiography enables accurate evaluation of the morphology and function of valve leaflets, chordae tendineae, and PM. This report describes a series of six patients aged...

  1. Control of Leg Movements Driven by EMG Activity of Shoulder Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Scaleia, Valentina; Sylos-Labini, Francesca; Hoellinger, Thomas; Wang, Letian; Cheron, Guy; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Ivanenko, Yuri P.

    2014-01-01

    During human walking, there exists a functional neural coupling between arms and legs, and between cervical and lumbosacral pattern generators. Here, we present a novel approach for associating the electromyographic (EMG) activity from upper limb muscles with leg kinematics. Our methodology takes advantage of the high involvement of shoulder muscles in most locomotor-related movements and of the natural co-ordination between arms and legs. Nine healthy subjects were asked to walk at different constant and variable speeds (3–5 km/h), while EMG activity of shoulder (deltoid) muscles and the kinematics of walking were recorded. To ensure a high level of EMG activity in deltoid, the subjects performed slightly larger arm swinging than they usually do. The temporal structure of the burst-like EMG activity was used to predict the spatiotemporal kinematic pattern of the forthcoming step. A comparison of actual and predicted stride leg kinematics showed a high degree of correspondence (r > 0.9). This algorithm has been also implemented in pilot experiments for controlling avatar walking in a virtual reality setup and an exoskeleton during over-ground stepping. The proposed approach may have important implications for the design of human–machine interfaces and neuroprosthetic technologies such as those of assistive lower limb exoskeletons. PMID:25368569

  2. The effect of temperature on charge movement repriming in amphibian skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, A; Caputo, C

    1996-03-01

    Cut twitch muscle fibers, mounted in a triple Vaseline-gap chamber, were used to study the effects of temperature on intramembranous charge movement and, in particular, on the repriming of charge 1 (the intramembranous charge that normally moves in the potential range between -100 and +40 mV). Changing the holding potential from -90 to 0 mV modified the voltage distribution of charge movement but not the maximum movable charge. Temperature changes between 16 and 5 degrees C did not modify the fiber linear capacitance, the maximum nonlinear intramembranous charge, or the voltage distribution of charge 1 and charge 2 (the intramembranous charge moving in the membrane potential range between approximately -4 and -160 mV). We used a pulse protocol designed to study the repriming time course of charge 1, with little contamination from charge 2. The time course of charge movement repriming at 15 degrees C is described by a double exponential with time constants of 4.2 and 25 s. Repriming kinetics were found to be highly temperature dependent, with two rate-limiting steps having Q10 (increase in rate of a process by raising temperature 10 degrees C) values of 1.7 and 7.1 above and below 11.5 degrees C, respectively. This is characteristic of processes with a high energy of activation and could be associated with a conformational change of the voltage sensor or with the interaction between the voltage sensor and the calcium release channel.

  3. Effects of gallopamil on calcium release and intramembrane charge movements in frog skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmeyer, D; Melzer, W; Pohl, B

    1990-02-01

    1. Intramembrane charge movements and changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration were studied in voltage clamp experiments on cut twitch muscle fibres of the frog. The restoration from inactivation caused by steady depolarization and its modification by the phenylalkylamine Ca2+ channel antagonist gallopamil (D600, 10-30 microM) were investigated. 2. D600 prevented the restoration from inactivation of Ca2+ release which normally occurred at -80 mV. In D600 Ca2+ release recovered from inactivation at -120 mV. 3. D600 did not alter the characteristics of intramembrane charge movements in the depolarized fibre (charge 2) but the increase in the amount of mobile charge in the test voltage range above -60 mV, which normally occurs after changing the holding potential to -80 mV, was suppressed. The charge movement characteristics of D600-paralysed fibres, which were held at -80 mV, equalled those of normal depolarized and inactivated fibres. 4. Control records for the charge movement analysis were always obtained by voltage steps above 0 mV. Using the 'conventional' control in the potential range between -80 and -160 mV led to an underestimation and a kinetic deformation of charge movements in D600-treated fibres, which was due to various amounts of nonlinear charge in the control. 5. Like the restoration of Ca2+ release at -80 mV in normal fibres the recovery from paralysis at -120 mV in D600-treated fibres was accompanied by a significant increase in mobile charge in the potential range positive of -60 mV. Both Ca2+ release and charge movement at test potentials above -60 mV recovered with almost identical time course. 6. Restoration of Ca2+ release at a holding potential of -80 mV in normal fibres or at -120 mV in D600-treated fibres could not be clearly correlated to charge movement changes in the voltage range negative of -60 mV (charge 2). 7. Our results are consistent with a voltage-dependent inhibitory effect of D600 on the charge displacement that controls Ca2

  4. Receptor and post-receptor abnormalities contribute to insulin resistance in myotonic dystrophy type 1 and type 2 skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Valentina Renna

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 and type 2 (DM2 are autosomal dominant multisystemic disorders caused by expansion of microsatellite repeats. In both forms, the mutant transcripts accumulate in nuclear foci altering the function of alternative splicing regulators which are necessary for the physiological mRNA processing. Missplicing of insulin receptor (IR gene (INSR has been associated with insulin resistance, however, it cannot be excluded that post-receptor signalling abnormalities could also contribute to this feature in DM. We have analysed the insulin pathway in skeletal muscle biopsies and in myotube cultures from DM patients to assess whether downstream metabolism might be dysregulated and to better characterize the mechanism inducing insulin resistance. DM skeletal muscle exhibits alterations of basal phosphorylation levels of Akt/PKB, p70S6K, GSK3β and ERK1/2, suggesting that these changes might be accompanied by a lack of further insulin stimulation. Alterations of insulin pathway have been confirmed on control and DM myotubes expressing fetal INSR isoform (INSR-A. The results indicate that insulin action appears to be lower in DM than in control myotubes in terms of protein activation and glucose uptake. Our data indicate that post-receptor signalling abnormalities might contribute to DM insulin resistance regardless the alteration of INSR splicing.

  5. Correlation between dopamine receptor D2 expression and presence of abnormal involuntary movements in Wistar rats with hemiparkinsonism and dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro Aponte, P A; Otálora, C A; Guzmán, J C; Turner, L F; Alcázar, J P; Mayorga, E L

    2018-03-07

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterised by motor alterations, which are commonly treated with L-DOPA. However, long-term L-DOPA use may cause dyskinesia. Although the pathogenic mechanism of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia is unclear, the condition has been associated with alterations in dopamine receptors, among which D2 receptors (D2R) have received little attention. This study aims to: (i)develop and standardise an experimental model of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in rats with hemiparkinsonism; and (ii)evaluate the correlation between D2R expression and presence of abnormal involuntary movements (AIM). We allocated 21 male Wistar rats into 3 groups: intact controls, lesioned rats (with neurotoxin 6-OHDA), and dyskinetic rats (injected with L-DOPA for 19 days). Sensorimotor impairment was assessed with behavioural tests. Dyskinetic rats gradually developed AIMs during the treatment period; front leg AIMs were more severe and locomotor AIMs less severe (Pde Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Abnormal amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations associated with rapid-eye movement in chronic primary insomnia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Qian; Chen, Jia; Li, Chuan; Wen, Li; Yue, Faguo; Shu, Tongsheng; Mi, Jianxun; Wang, Guangxian; Zhang, Lei; Gao, Dong; Zhang, Dong

    2017-10-17

    Chronic primary insomnia (CPI) is the most prevalent sleep disorder worldwide. CPI manifests as difficulties in sleep onset, maintaining sleep, prolonged sleep latency, and daytime impairment and is often accompanied by cognitive problems such as poor academic performance, poor attention, and decreased memory. The most popular explanation of insomnia is hyperarousal or increased activities of neurons. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep detected by polysomnography (PSG) exhibits a positive relationship with brain homeostasis and can be helpful for optimally preparing an organism for emotional and social function. Limited work has been performed to explore brain function of insomnia patients in combination with PSG analysis. We observed increased ALFF within areas related to hyperarousal such as the midbrain and bilateral extra-nucleus, whereas decreased ALFF was observed within areas associated with memory and attention involving the parietal and occipital lobule and others. Furthermore, the altered ALFF was associated with the duration of insomnia, sleep efficiency, duration of REM, latency of RME and ratio of REM. In this study, we recruited twenty-five CPI patients and twenty-five normal sleep (NS) volunteers as a control group to investigate the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) and the correlation between those altered ALFF regions through resting-state fMRI and PSG data. These findings suggest that hyperarousal reflected by ALFF abnormality within brain areas related to cognition and emotion in insomnia associated with REM sleep.

  7. Abnormal response of melanin-concentrating hormone deficient mice to fasting: hyperactivity and rapid eye movement sleep suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willie, J T; Sinton, C M; Maratos-Flier, E; Yanagisawa, M

    2008-10-28

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that has been implicated in energy homeostasis. Pharmacological studies with MCH and its receptor antagonists have suggested additional behavioral roles for the neuropeptide in the control of mood and vigilance states. These suggestions have been supported by a report of modified sleep in the MCH-1 receptor knockout mouse. Here we found that MCH knockout (MCH(-)(/)(-)) mice slept less during both the light and dark phases under baseline conditions. In response to fasting, MCH(-)(/)(-) mice exhibited marked hyperactivity, accelerated weight loss and an exaggerated decrease in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Following a 6-h period of sleep deprivation, however, the sleep rebound in MCH(-)(/)(-) mice was normal. Thus MCH(-)(/)(-) mice adapt poorly to fasting, and their loss of bodyweight under this condition is associated with behavioral hyperactivity and abnormal expression of REM sleep. These results support a role for MCH in vigilance state regulation in response to changes in energy homeostasis and may relate to a recent report of initial clinical trials with a novel MCH-1 receptor antagonist. When combined with caloric restriction, the treatment of healthy, obese subjects with this compound resulted in some subjects experiencing vivid dreams and sleep disturbances.

  8. Abnormal epigenetic changes during differentiation of human skeletal muscle stem cells from obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davegårdh, Cajsa; Broholm, Christa; Perfilyev, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    subjects. Interestingly, numerous genes implicated in metabolic diseases and epigenetic regulation showed differential methylation and expression during differentiation only in obese subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Our study identifies IL-32 as a novel myogenic regulator, provides a comprehensive map of the dynamic......BACKGROUND: Human skeletal muscle stem cells are important for muscle regeneration. However, the combined genome-wide DNA methylation and expression changes taking place during adult myogenesis have not been described in detail and novel myogenic factors may be discovered. Additionally, obesity...... is associated with low relative muscle mass and diminished metabolism. Epigenetic alterations taking place during myogenesis might contribute to these defects. METHODS: We used Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip Kit (Illumina) and HumanHT-12 Expression BeadChip (Illumina) to analyze genome-wide DNA...

  9. Warm-up with weighted bat and adjustment of upper limb muscle activity in bat swinging under movement correction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yoichi; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Nakamoto, Hiroki

    2014-02-01

    The effects of weighted bat warm-up on adjustment of upper limb muscle activity were investigated during baseball bat swinging under dynamic conditions that require a spatial and temporal adjustment of the swinging to hit a moving target. Seven male college baseball players participated in this study. Using a batting simulator, the task was to swing the standard bat coincident with the arrival timing and position of a moving target after three warm-up swings using a standard or weighted bat. There was no significant effect of weighted bat warm-up on muscle activity before impact associated with temporal or spatial movement corrections. However, lower inhibition of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle activity was observed in a velocity-changed condition in the weighted bat warm-up, as compared to a standard bat warm-up. It is suggested that weighted bat warm-up decreases the adjustment ability associated with inhibition of muscle activation under movement correction conditions.

  10. Abnormal muscle and hematopoietic gene expression may be important for clinical morbidity in primary hyperparathyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reppe, Sjur; Stilgren, Lis; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2007-01-01

    out in biopsies obtained before and 1 yr after parathyroidectomy in seven patients discovered by routine blood [Ca(2+)] screening. The tissue distribution of PTH receptor (PTHR1 and PTHR2) mRNAs were quantitated using real-time RT-PCR in unrelated persons to define PTH target tissues. Of about 10......, muscle, and hematopoietic cells have to be considered as one independent, important cause of molecular disease in PHPT leading to profound alterations in gene expression that may help explain symptoms like muscle fatigue, cardiovascular pathology, and precipitation of psychiatric illness....

  11. Effect of postnatal development on calcium currents and slow charge movement in mammalian skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, K G; Knudson, C M

    1988-06-01

    Single- (whole-cell patch) and two-electrode voltage-clamp techniques were used to measure transient (Ifast) and sustained (Islow) calcium currents, linear capacitance, and slow, voltage-dependent charge movements in freshly dissociated fibers of the flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle of rats of various postnatal ages. Peak Ifast was largest in FDB fibers of neonatal (1-5 d) rats, having a magnitude in 10 mM external Ca of 1.4 +/- 0.9 pA/pF (mean +/- SD; current normalized by linear fiber capacitance). Peak Ifast was smaller in FDB fibers of older animals, and by approximately 3 wk postnatal, it was so small as to be unmeasurable. By contrast, the magnitudes of Islow and charge movement increased substantially during postnatal development. Peak Islow was 3.6 +/- 2.5 pA/pF in FDB fibers of 1-5-d rats and increased to 16.4 +/- 6.5 pA/pF in 45-50-d-old rats; for these same two age groups, Qmax, the total mobile charge measurable as charge movement, was 6.0 +/- 1.7 and 23.8 +/- 4.0 nC/microF, respectively. As both Islow and charge movement are thought to arise in the transverse-tubular system, linear capacitance normalized by the area of fiber surface was determined as an indirect measure of the membrane area of the t-system relative to that of the fiber surface. This parameter increased from 1.5 +/- 0.2 microF/cm2 in 2-d fibers to 2.9 +/- 0.4 microF/cm2 in 44-d fibers. The increases in peak Islow, Qmax, and normalized linear capacitance all had similar time courses. Although the function of Islow is unknown, the substantial postnatal increase in its magnitude suggests that it plays an important role in the physiology of skeletal muscle.

  12. Abnormal muscle and hematopoietic gene expression may be important for clinical morbidity in primary hyperparathyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reppe, Sjur; Stilgren, Lis; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2007-01-01

    , kidney stones and metabolic bone disease. Our objective was to characterize changes in muscle and hematopoietic gene expression in patients with reversible mild PHPT after parathyroidectomy and possibly link molecular pathology to symptoms. Global mRNA profiling using Affymetrix gene chips was carried...

  13. Ca2+ handling abnormalities in early-onset muscle diseases: Novel concepts and perspectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treves, S.; Jungbluth, H.; Voermans, N.C.; Muntoni, F.; Zorzato, F.

    2017-01-01

    The physiological process by which Ca2+ is released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum is called excitation-contraction coupling; it is initiated by an action potential which travels deep into the muscle fiber where it is sensed by the dihydropyridine receptor, a voltage sensing L-type Ca2+channel

  14. Ca2+handling abnormalities in early-onset muscle diseases: Novel concepts and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves, Susan; Jungbluth, Heinz; Voermans, Nicol; Muntoni, Francesco; Zorzato, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    The physiological process by which Ca 2+ is released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum is called excitation-contraction coupling; it is initiated by an action potential which travels deep into the muscle fiber where it is sensed by the dihydropyridine receptor, a voltage sensing L-type Ca 2+ channel localized on the transverse tubules. Voltage-induced conformational changes in the dihydropyridine receptor activate the ryanodine receptor Ca 2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The released Ca 2+ binds to troponin C, enabling contractile thick-thin filament interactions. The Ca 2+ is subsequently transported back into the sarcoplasmic reticulum by specialized Ca 2+ pumps (SERCA), preparing the muscle for a new cycle of contraction. Although other proteins are involved in excitation-contraction coupling, the mechanism described above emphasizes the unique role played by the two Ca 2+ channels (the dihydropyridine receptor and the ryanodine receptor), the SERCA Ca 2+ pumps and the exquisite spatial organization of the membrane compartments endowed with the proteins responsible for this mechanism to function rapidly and efficiently. Research over the past two decades has uncovered the fine details of excitation-contraction coupling under normal conditions while advances in genomics have helped to identify mutations in novel genes in patients with neuromuscular disorders. While it is now clear that many patients with congenital muscle diseases carry mutations in genes encoding proteins directly involved in Ca 2+ homeostasis, it has become apparent that mutations are also present in genes encoding for proteins not thought to be directly involved in Ca 2+ regulation. Ongoing research in the field now focuses on understanding the functional effect of individual mutations, as well as understanding the role of proteins not specifically located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum which nevertheless are involved in Ca 2+ regulation or excitation-contraction coupling. The

  15. Detection of Abnormal Muscle Activations during Walking Following Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Low, K. H.; McGregor, Alison H.; Tow, Adela

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify optimal rehabilitation strategies for spinal cord injury (SCI) participants, assessment of impaired walking is required to detect, monitor and quantify movement disorders. In the proposed assessment, ten healthy and seven SCI participants were recruited to perform an over-ground walking test at slow walking speeds. SCI…

  16. Prolonging the duration of masseter muscle reduction by adjusting the masticatory movements after the treatment of masseter muscle hypertrophy with botulinum toxin type a injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiao; Xu, Hua; Dong, Jiasheng; Li, Qingfeng; Dai, Chuanchang

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) is widely used for the clinical treatment of masseteric hypertrophy. Until now, few reports have discussed how to prolong the duration of its effectiveness. This study evaluated that purposely adjusting the masticatory movements is possible of postponing the masseter muscle rehypertrophy. Ninety-eight patients were randomly and equally divided into 2 groups, and 35 U BTX-A per side was injected into the masseters. The thickness and volume of the masticatory muscles were measured by ultrasound and computerized tomography, respectively. Patients in Group 1 were instructed to strengthen their masticatory effort during the denervated atrophic stage of the masseter (the interval was evaluated by real-time ultrasound monitoring), whereas patients in Group 2 were not given this instruction. When the masseter muscle began to recover, patients in both groups were instructed to reduce their chewing. The duration of the masseter muscle rehypertrophy was significantly prolonged in Group 1 patients. The thickness and the volume of the other masticatory muscles were significantly increased in Group 1 but were either slightly decreased or insignificantly different in Group 2. Purposely strengthening masticatory muscle movement during the denervated atrophic stage of the masseter can prolong the duration of masseter rehypertrophy.

  17. Perceived exertion during muscle fatigue as reflected in movement-related cortical potentials: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Sun, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Ri-Hui

    2017-02-08

    The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism on perceived exertion during muscle fatigue. A total of 15 individuals in the fatigue group and 13 individuals in the nonfatigue group were recruited into this study, performing 200 intermittent handgrip contractions with 30% maximal voluntary contraction. The force, surface electromyography (sEMG), movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs), and rating perception of effort (RPE) were combined to evaluate the perceived exertion during muscle fatigue. The maximal handgrip force significantly decreased (Pfatigue. The RPE scores reported by the individuals and the motor potential amplitude of MRCPs in the fatigue group significantly increased (Pfatigue but could also reflect the peripheral local muscle fatigue.

  18. The postural control can be optimized by the first movement initiation condition encountered when submitted to muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjo, Florian; Forestier, Nicolas

    2017-08-01

    We investigated whether and how the movement initiation condition (IC) encountered during the early movements performed following focal muscle fatigue affects the postural control of discrete ballistic movements. For this purpose, subjects performed shoulder flexions in a standing posture at maximal velocity under two movement IC, i.e., in self-paced conditions and submitted to a Stroop-like task in which participants had to trigger fast shoulder flexions at the presentation of incongruent colors. Shoulder flexion kinematics, surface muscle activity of focal and postural muscles as well as center-of-pressure kinematics were recorded. The initial IC and the order in which subjects were submitted to these two conditions were varied within two separate experimental sessions. IC schedule was repeated before and after fatigue protocols involving shoulder flexors. The aim of this fatigue procedure was to affect acceleration-generating capacities of focal muscles. In such conditions, the postural muscle activity preceding and accompanying movement execution is expected to decrease. Following fatigue, when subjects initially moved in self-paced conditions, postural muscle activity decreased and scaled to the lower focal peak acceleration. This postural strategy then transferred to the Stroop-like task. In contrast, when subjects initially moved submitted to the Stroop-like task, postural muscle activity did not decrease and this transferred to self-paced movements. Regarding the center-of-pressure peak velocity, which is indicative of the efficiency of the postural actions generated in stabilizing posture, no difference appeared between the two sessions post-fatigue. This highlights an optimization of the postural actions when subjects first moved in self-paced conditions, smaller postural muscle activation levels resulting in similar postural consequences. In conclusion, the level of neuromuscular activity associated with the postural control is affected and can be

  19. Effect of lipophilic ions on the intramembrane charge movement and intracellular Ca2+ release in fetal mouse skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, I; Shimahara, T; Bournaud, R

    1997-12-01

    The effects of lipophilic ions on the intramembrane charge movement and intracellular calcium transient were studied using freshly dissociated skeletal muscle cells from mice fetuses. The lipophilic cations Rhodamine 6G and tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP) immobilized part of the intramembrane charge movement in a dose-dependent manner, and inhibited both calcium transient and contraction evoked by membrane depolarization. In contrast, the lipophilic anion 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) had no effect on intramembrane charge movement. We suggest that the lipophilic cations block the voltage-sensing mechanism for the excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling mechanism.

  20. Accessory coracobrachialis muscle with two bellies and abnormal insertion - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Paraskevas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. In the current study a brief review is presented of the coracobrachialis muscle’s morphological variability, action, embryological development and clinical significance. Case report. We report a case of a left-sided coracobrachialis muscle consisting of two bellies. The deep belly inserts into the usual site in the middle area of the anteromedial aspect of the left humerus, whereas the superficial belly inserts through a muscular slip into the brachial fascia and the medial intermuscular septum, forming a musculo-aponeurotic tunnel in the middle region of the left arm, for the passage of the median nerve, brachial artery and veins, medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve and ulnar nerve. Conclusion. Awareness of such a muscle variant should be kept in mind by physicians and surgeons during interpretation of neural and vascular disorders of the upper limb, since such a variant may potentially lead to entrapment neuropathy and/or vascular compression, predisposing to neurovascular disorders, as well as during preparation of that muscle in cases of utilizing it as a graft in reconstruction of defects.

  1. Effects of D-600 on intramembrane charge movement of polarized and depolarized frog muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, C; Bolaños, P

    1989-07-01

    Intramembrane charge movement has been measured in frog cut skeletal muscle fibers using the triple vaseline gap voltage-clamp technique. Ionic currents were reduced using an external solution prepared with tetraethylammonium to block potassium currents, and O sodium + tetrodotoxin to abolish sodium currents. The internal solution contained 10 mM EGTA to prevent contractions. Both the internal and external solutions were prepared with impermeant anions. Linear capacitive currents were subtracted using the P-P/4 procedure, with the control pulses being subtracted either at very negative potentials, for the case of polarized fibers, or at positive potentials, for the case of depolarized fibers. In 63 polarized fibers dissected from Rana pipiens or Leptodactylus insularis frogs the following values were obtained for charge movement parameters: Qmax = 39 nC/microF, V = 36 mV, k = 18.5 mV. After depolarization we found that the total amount of movable charge was not appreciably reduced, while the voltage sensitivity was much changed. For 10 fibers, in which charge movement was measured at -100 and at 0 mV, Qmax changed from 46 to 41 nC/microF, while V changed from -41 to -103 mV and k changed from 20.5 to 30 mV. Thus membrane depolarization to 0 mV produces a shift of greater than 50 mV in the Q-V relationship and a decrease of the slope. Membrane depolarization to -20 and -30 mV, caused a smaller shift of the Q-V relationship. In normally polarized fibers addition of D-600 at concentrations of 50-100 microM, does not cause important changes in charge movement parameters. However, the drug appears to have a use-dependent effect after depolarization. Thus in depolarized fibers, total charge is reduced by approximately 20%. D-600 causes no further changes in the voltage sensitivity of charge movement in fibers depolarized to 0 mV, while in fibers depolarized to -20 and -30 mV it causes the same effects as that obtained with depolarization to 0 mV. These results are

  2. Voltage dependence of membrane charge movement and calcium release in frog skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakowski, R F; Best, P M; James-Kracke, M R

    1985-08-01

    Voltage dependent membrane charge movement (gating current) and the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores have been measured simultaneously in intact frog skeletal muscle fibres. Charge movement was measured using the three microelectrode voltage clamp technique. Ca2+ release was measured using the metallochromic indicator dye arsenazo III. Fibres were bathed in 2.3 X hypertonic solutions to prevent contraction. Rb+, tetraethylammonium and tetrodotoxin (TTX) were used to eliminate voltage-dependent ionic currents. The maximum rate of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in response to voltage-clamp step depolarizations to 0 mV was calculated using the dye-related parameters of model 2 of Baylor et al. (1983) and a method described in the Appendix for calculating a scaling factor (1 + p) that accounts for the additional Ca2+ buffering power of the indicator dye. The estimates of the maximum rate of Ca2+ release at 5-6 degrees C ranged from 3 to 19 microM ms-1 in the 17 fibres examined. The mean value was 8.9 +/- 1.1 microM ms-1 (S.E.M.) The maximum rate of Ca2+ release was linearly related to the magnitude of the nonlinear membrane change moved during suprathreshold depolarizing steps. The voltage dependence of charge movement and the maximum rate of Ca2+ releases were nearly identical at 6 degrees C. The voltage-dependence of the delay between the test step and the onset of Ca2+ release could be adequately described by an equation having the same functional form as the voltage dependence of nonlinear charge movement. The relationship between the test pulse voltage and the delay was shifted to more negative voltages and to shorter delays as the temperature was raised from 6 degrees C to 15 degrees C. The inactivation of Ca2+ release was found to occur at more negative holding voltages and to be more steeply voltage dependent than the immobilization of nonlinear membrane charge movement. The above data are discussed using the 'hypothetical coupler' model

  3. Association between the MnSOD Ala-9Val polymorphism and development of schizophrenia and abnormal involuntary movements in the Xhosa population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzeroth, Angelika; Niehaus, Dana J H; Koen, Liezl; Botes, Willem C; Deleuze, J F; Warnich, Louise

    2007-04-13

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated damage has been hypothesized to play a role in the development and poor outcome of schizophrenia, as well as the development of neuroleptic-induced abnormal involuntary movements. Recently, the functional polymorphism (Ala-9Val) in the manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) gene (part of the antioxidant defense mechanism) was found to be associated with schizophrenia in a Turkish population. This study was aimed at replicating this finding in a Xhosa population. In addition, the role of Ala-9Val in abnormal involuntary movement and tardive dyskinesia development in the Xhosa population was also investigated. The schizophrenic patient group (n=286) and a healthy control group (n=243) were genotyped for the Ala-9Val polymorphism using heteroduplex-single stranded conformational polymorphism (HEX-SSCP) analysis. No significant difference in genotype or allele frequency could be observed between the schizophrenia and control group (P=0.294 and P=0.528 respectively). In addition no association could be found between the polymorphism and symptom severity (SANS and SAPS). The Xhosa schizophrenia patient group with abnormal involuntary movements (n=54) and a subgroup with tardive dyskinesia (n=30) was found to significantly differ in Ala-9Val genotype frequency (P=0.008 and P=0.011 respectively) compared to the Xhosa schizophrenia patient group without abnormal involuntary movements (n=204). However, no significant difference was found for the allele frequencies (P=0.955 and P=0.161). Further, using ANCOVA no association was found between AIMS score and genotype in the group with abnormal involuntary movements (P=0.1234). However, in the patient group with tardive dyskinesia an association was observed between genotype and AIMS score (P=0.0365). These results do not support a major role of the MnSOD Ala-9Val polymorphism in the development of schizophrenia or symptom severity in the Xhosa population. Yet it seems to be involved in the

  4. Magnitudes of gluteus medius muscle activation during standing hip joint movements in spiral-diagonal patterns using elastic tubing resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youdas, James W; Adams, Kady E; Bertucci, John E; Brooks, Koel J; Steiner, Meghan M; Hollman, John H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to simultaneously quantify electromyographic (EMG) activation levels (% maximum voluntary isometric contraction [MVIC]) within the gluteus medius muscles on both moving and stance limbs across the performance of four proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) spiral-diagonal patterns in standing using resistance provided by elastic tubing. Differential EMG activity was recorded from the gluteus medius muscle of 26 healthy participants. EMG signals were collected with surface electrodes at a sampling frequency of 1000 Hz during three consecutive repetitions of each spiral-diagonal movement pattern. Significant differences existed among the four-spiral-diagonal movement patterns (F3,75 = 19.8; p gluteus medius muscle recruitment (50 SD 29.3% MVIC) than any of the other three patterns and the diagonal one extension [D1E] (39 SD 37% MVIC) and diagonal two extension [D2E] (35 SD 29% MVIC) patterns generated more gluteus medius muscle recruitment than diagonal one flexion [D1F] (22 SD 21% MVIC). From a clinical efficiency standpoint, a fitness professional using the spiral-diagonal movement pattern of D2F and elastic tubing with an average peak tension of about 9% body mass may be able to concurrently strengthen the gluteus medius muscle on both stance and moving lower limbs.

  5. Extracellular matrix and nuclear abnormalities in skeletal muscle of a patient with Walker-Warburg syndrome caused by POMT1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatelli, Patrizia; Columbaro, Marta; Mura, Isabella; Capanni, Cristina; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Maraldi, Nadir M; Beltràn-Valero de Barnabè, Daniel; van Bokoven, Hans; Squarzoni, Stefano; Merlini, Luciano

    2003-05-20

    Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy, structural eye abnormalities and severe brain malformations. We performed an immunohistochemical and electron microscopy study of a muscle biopsy from a patient affected by WWS carrying a homozygous frameshift mutation in O-mannosyltransferase 1 gene (POMT1). alpha-Dystroglycan glycosylated epitope was not detected in muscle fibers and intramuscular peripheral nerves. Laminin alpha2 chain and perlecan were reduced in muscle fibers and well preserved in intramuscular peripheral nerves. The basal lamina in several muscle fibers showed discontinuities and detachment from the plasmalemma. Most nuclei, including myonuclei and satellite cell nuclei, showed detachment or complete absence of peripheral heterochromatin from the nuclear envelope. Apoptotic changes were detected in 3% of muscle fibers. The particular combination of basal lamina and nuclear changes may suggest that a complex pathogenetic mechanism, affecting several subcellular compartments, underlies the degenerative process in WWS muscle.

  6. Fatigue-Induced Changes in Movement Pattern and Muscle Activity During Ballet Releve on Demi-Pointe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Lee, Wan-Chin; Chen, Yi-An; Hsue, Bih-Jen

    2016-08-01

    Fatigue in ballet dancers may lead to injury, particularly in the lower extremities. However, few studies have investigated the effects of fatigue on ballet dancers' performance and movement patterns. Thus, the current study examines the effect of fatigue on the balance, movement pattern, and muscle activities of the lower extremities in ballet dancers. Twenty healthy, female ballet dancers performed releve on demi-pointe before and after fatigue. The trajectory of the whole body movement and the muscle activities of the major lower extremity muscles were recorded continuously during task performance. The results show that fatigue increases the medial-lateral center of mass (COM) displacement and hip and trunk motion, but decreases the COM velocity and ankle motion. Moreover, fatigue reduces the activities of the hamstrings and tibialis anterior, but increases that of the soleus. Finally, greater proximal hip and trunk motions are applied to compensate for the effects of fatigue, leading to a greater COM movement. Overall, the present findings show that fatigue results in impaired movement control and may therefore increase the risk of dance injury.

  7. Contribution of abnormal muscle and liver glucose metabolism to postprandial hyperglycemia in NIDDM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrakou, A.; Kelley, D.; Veneman, T.; Jenssen, T.; Pangburn, T.; Reilly, J.; Gerich, J.

    1990-01-01

    To assess the role of muscle and liver in the pathogenesis of postprandial hyperglycemia in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), we administered an oral glucose load enriched with [14C]glucose to 10 NIDDM subjects and 10 age- and weight-matched nondiabetic volunteers and compared muscle glucose disposal by measuring forearm balance of glucose, lactate, alanine, O2, and CO2. In addition, we used the dual-lable isotope method to compare overall rates of glucose appearance (Ra) and disappearance (Rd), suppression of endogenous glucose output, and splanchnic glucose sequestration. During the initial 1-1.5 h after glucose ingestion, plasma glucose increased by approximately 8 mM in NIDDM vs. approximately 3 mM in nondiabetic subjects (P less than 0.01); overall glucose Ra was nearly 11 g greater in NIDDM than nondiabetic subjects, but glucose Rd was not significantly different in NIDDM and nondiabetic subjects. The greater overall glucose Ra of NIDDM subjects was due to 6.8 g greater endogenous glucose output (13.7 +/- 1.1 vs. 6.8 +/- 1.0 g, P less than 0.01) and 3.8 g less oral glucose splanchnic sequestration of the oral load (31.4 +/- 1.5 vs. 27.5 +/- 0.9 g, P less than 0.05). Although glucose taken up by muscle was not significantly different in NIDDM and nondiabetic subjects (39.3 +/- 3.5 vs. 41.0 +/- 2.5 g/5 h), a greater amount of the glucose taken up by muscle in NIDDM was released as lactate and alanine (11.7 +/- 1.0 vs. 5.2 +/- 0.3 g in nondiabetic subjects, P less than 0.01), and less was stored (11.7 +/- 1.3 vs. 16.9 +/- 1.5 g, P less than 0.05). We conclude that increased systemic glucose delivery, due primarily to reduced suppression of endogenous hepatic glucose output and, to a lesser extent, reduced splanchnic glucose sequestration, is the predominant factor responsible for postprandial hyperglycemia in NIDDM

  8. Effects of bodyweight-based exercise training on muscle functions of leg multi-joint movement in elderly individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Junichiro; Nakayama, Satoshi; Ishii, Naokata

    2009-09-01

    Because demands of functional exercise training with using own bodyweight for elderly individuals were increasing, the present study investigated the effects of bodyweight-based exercise training on muscle functions of leg multi-joint movements in elderly individuals. Twenty-seven untrained healthy elderly individuals (mean +/- standard deviation, 66.0 +/- 5.7 years) completed the training program for 10 months. The exercise program consisted mainly of exercises for large leg muscle groups without using external weight, performing 10-50 repetitions and 1-3 sets for each exercise. Before and after the training period, force-velocity relations of knee-hip extension movements were measured with a servo-controlled dynamometer and the maximum force (Fmax), velocity (Vmax) and power (Pmax) were determined. After the training, Fmax and Pmax increased and these increases represented 15% (P elderly individuals; however, the initial training status is important for progressive increases in muscle force.

  9. Abnormalities of the oculomotor nerve in congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles and congenital oculomotor palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Key Hwan; Engle, Elizabeth C; Demer, Joseph L

    2007-04-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can now directly demonstrate innervation to extraocular muscles and quantify optic nerve size. A quantitative MRI technique was developed to study the oculomotor nerve (CN3) and applied to congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles (CFEOM) and congenital oculomotor palsy. The subarachnoid portions of the CN3s were imaged with a 1.5-T MRI scanner and conventional head coils, acquiring heavily T(2)-weighted oblique axial planes 1-mm thick and parallel to the optic chiasm. Thirteen normal subjects, 14 with CFEOM, and 3 with congenital CN3 palsy were included. Digital image analysis was used to measure CN3 diameter, which was correlated with motility findings. In CFEOM, CN3 diameter was bilaterally subnormal in eight subjects, unilaterally subnormal in three subjects, and normal in three subjects. Mean +/- SD CN3 diameter in CFEOM was 1.14 +/- 0.61 mm, significantly smaller than the diameter in normal subjects, which measured 2.01 +/- 0.36 mm (P congenital CN3 palsy showed bilateral CN3 hypoplasia, but CN3 diameter was normal in two other subjects with congenital CN3 palsy. Unilateral or bilateral hypoplasia of CN3 is quantitatively demonstrable using MRI in many cases of CFEOM and occasionally in congenital CN3 palsy. Variations in CN3 diameter in CFEOM and congenital CN3 palsy suggest mechanistic heterogeneity of these disorders that may be clarified by further imaging and genetic studies.

  10. Effect of very low-intensity resistance training with slow movement on muscle size and strength in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yuya; Madarame, Haruhiko; Ogasawara, Riki; Nakazato, Koichi; Ishii, Naokata

    2014-11-01

    We previously reported that low-intensity [50% of one repetition maximum (1RM)] resistance training with slow movement and tonic force generation (LST) causes muscle hypertrophy and strength gain in older participants. The aim of this study was to determine whether resistance training with slow movement and much more reduced intensity (30%1RM) increases muscle size and strength in older adults. Eighteen participants (60-77 years) were randomly assigned to two groups. One group performed very low-intensity (30% 1RM) knee extension exercise with continuous muscle contraction (LST: 3-s eccentric, 3-s concentric, and 1-s isometric actions with no rest between each repetition) twice a week for 12 weeks. The other group underwent intermitted muscle contraction (CON: 1-s concentric and 1-s eccentric actions with 1-s rest between each repetition) for the same time period. The 1RM, isometric and isokinetic strengths, and cross-sectional image of the mid-thigh obtained by magnetic resonance imaging were examined before and after the intervention. LST significantly increased the cross-sectional area of the quadriceps muscle (5.0%, Pstrengths (Pmuscle size (1.1%, P = 0.12), but significantly improved its strength (Pmuscle size and strength in healthy older adults. The large total contraction time may be related to muscle hypertrophy and strength gain. LST would be useful for preventing sarcopenia in older individuals. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Kinetic separation of charge movement components in intact frog skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C L

    1994-12-01

    1. Procedures for a complete charge movement separation employed a combination of its steady-state inactivation and activation properties in intact frog skeletal muscle fibres in gluconate-containing solutions. 2. Holding potential shifts from -70 to -50 mV reduced the total charge available between -90 and -20 mV from 16.76 +/- 1.70 nC microF-1 (mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 4 fibres) to 9.25 +/- 1.43 nC microF-1 without significant loss of tetracaine-resistant charge (q beta). 3. The steady-state and kinetic properties of tetracaine-sensitive charge (q gamma) persisted through holding potential changes from -90 to -70 mV in the presence of gluconate and generally resembled activation properties established hitherto in sulphate-containing solutions. 4. Further holding potential displacement to -50 mV abolished q gamma charge movements and depressed the charge-voltage curve. 5. Test voltage steps applied from a -70 mV prepulse level gave rapid monotonic q beta decays and similarly depressed activation functions in 2 mM tetracaine unchanged by holding potential shifts between -70 and -50 mV. 6. The isolated 'on' q gamma charge movements, I(t), always included early transients that preceded any prolonged charging phases and which increased with depolarization. They decayed to stable baselines in the absence of prolonged time-dependent or inward-current phases and yielded integrals, Q(t), that monotonically increased with test voltage. 7. 'Off' steps always elicited rapid monotonic q gamma decays that fully returned the 'on' charge. 8. 'On' and 'off' q gamma currents, I(t), following voltage steps from fixed conditioning to varying test levels mapped onto topologically distinct higher-order phase-plane trajectories, I(Q), that steeply varied with test voltage. 9. In contrast, voltage steps to fixed test potentials of either -70 or -20 mV elicited identical q gamma phase-plane trajectories independent of prepulse history. 10. The q gamma current thus reflects an independent

  12. The architectural design of the gluteal muscle group: implications for movement and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Samuel R; Winters, Taylor M; Blemker, Silvia S

    2010-02-01

    The organization of fibers within a muscle (architecture) defines the performance capacity of that muscle. In the current commentary, basic architectural terms are reviewed in the context of the major hip muscles and then specific illustrative examples relevant to lower extremity rehabilitation are presented. These data demonstrate the architectural and functional specialization of the hip muscles, and highlight the importance of muscle physiology and joint mechanics when evaluating and treating musculoskeletal disorders.

  13. Comparison of the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles isolation ratios during the sit-to-stand movement in elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2017-06-01

    [Purpose] To compared activation of the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles during the sit-to-stand movement in elderly people. [Subjects and Methods] Ten elderly women were enrolled. The activities of the dominant lower extremity muscles were measured using a wireless electromyography system. Subjects performed natural sit-to-stand tasks. [Results] In the pre-thigh off phase, the tibialis anterior isolation ratio was significantly higher than the soleus isolation ratio. In the post-thigh off phase, the tibialis and soleus isolation ratios did not significantly differ. [Conclusion] This result suggests that selective soleus exercises might help to reduce the risk of falling in the elderly.

  14. Isolation and characterization of sex chromosome rearrangements generating male muscle dystrophy and female abnormal oogenesis in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, T; Yokoyama, T; Ninagi, O; Kakehashi, K; Obara, Y; Nenoi, M; Ishikawa, T; Mita, K; Shimada, T; Abe, H

    2007-07-01

    In deletion-mapping of W-specific RAPD (W-RAPD) markers and putative female determinant gene (Fem), we used X-ray irradiation to break the translocation-carrying W chromosome (W( Ze )). We succeeded in obtaining a fragment of the W( Ze ) chromosome designated as Ze (W), having 3 of 12 W-RAPD markers (W-Bonsai, W-Yukemuri-S, W-Yukemuri-L). Inheritance of the Ze (W) fragment by males indicates that it does not include the Fem gene. On the basis of these results, we determined the relative positions of W-Yukemuri-S and W-Yukemuri-L, and we narrowed down the region where Fem gene is located. In addition to the Ze (W) fragment, the Z chromosome was also broken into a large fragment (Z(1)) having the +( sch ) (1-21.5) and a small fragment (Z(2)) having the +( od ) (1-49.6). Moreover, a new chromosomal fragment (Ze (W)Z(2)) was generated by a fusion event between the Ze (W) and the Z(2) fragments. We analyzed the genetic behavior of the Z(1) fragment and the Ze (W)Z(2) fragment during male (Z/Z(1) Ze (W)Z(2)) and female (Z(1) Ze (W)Z(2)/W) meiosis using phenotypic markers. It was observed that the Z(1) fragment and the Z or the W chromosomes separate without fail. On the other hand, non-disjunction between the Ze (W)Z(2) fragment and the Z chromosome and also between the Ze (W)Z(2) fragment and the W chromosome occurred. Furthermore, the females (2A: Z/Ze (W)Z(2)/W) and males (2A: Z/Z(1)) resulting from non-disjunction between the Ze (W)Z(2) fragment and the W chromosome had phenotypic defects: namely, females exhibited abnormal oogenesis and males were flapless due to abnormal indirect flight muscle structure. These results suggest that Z(2) region of the Z chromosome contains dose-sensitive gene(s), which are involved in oogenesis and indirect flight muscle development.

  15. Slow movement resistance training using body weight improves muscle mass in the elderly: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuku, S; Kajioka, T; Sakakibara, H; Shimaoka, K

    2018-04-01

    To examine the effect of a 12-week slow movement resistance training using body weight as a load (SRT-BW) on muscle mass, strength, and fat distribution in healthy elderly people. Fifty-three men and 35 women aged 70 years old or older without experience in resistance training participated, and they were randomly assigned to a SRT-BW group or control group. The control group did not receive any intervention, but participants in this group underwent a repeat measurement 12 weeks later. The SRT-BW program consisted of 3 different exercises (squat, tabletop push-up, and sit-up), which were designed to stimulate anterior major muscles. Initially, these exercises were performed by 2 sets of 10 repetitions, and subsequently, the number of repetitions was increased progressively by 2 repetitions every 4 weeks. Participants were instructed to perform each eccentric and concentric phase of movement slowly (spending 4 seconds on each movement), covering the full range of motion. We evaluated muscle mass, strength, and fat distribution at baseline and after 12 weeks of training. Changes over 12 weeks were significantly greater in the SRT-BW group than in the control group, with a decrease in waist circumference, hip circumference, and abdominal preperitoneal and subcutaneous fat thickness, and an increase in thigh muscle thickness, knee extension strength, and hip flexion strength. In conclusion, relatively short-term SRT-BW was effective in improving muscle mass, strength, and fat distribution in healthy elderly people. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Intramembrane charge movement in frog skeletal muscle fibres. Properties of charge 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, G; Rios, E

    1987-06-01

    1. Membrane currents were measured in cut skeletal muscle fibres voltage-clamped in a double Vaseline gap in solutions that had impermeant ions substituted for Na+, K+ and Cl-. The fibres were maintained at a holding potential of 0 mV. Pulses to positive voltages elicited outward currents that were proportional to voltage at all times; these were used to estimate linear capacitive currents, which in turn were used in the construction of non-linear current transients. 2. Large negative-going pulses elicited proportionally larger inward currents that decayed during the pulse with voltage-dependent kinetics. A portion of the non-linear current could be eliminated by solutions containing EGTA, as well as by large negative conditioning pulses of 200 ms or more. This portion was probably an inward Ca2+ current. 3. The non-linear current remaining in EGTA-containing solutions had characteristics of intramembrane charge movement ('charge 2'). This charge depended on voltage according to a two-state Boltzmann function of average parameters Qmax = 47.7 nC/microF, V = -115 mV, K = 21.5 mV (seven fibres). 4. The charge movement current transients were single-exponential decays (after a short rising phase) with time constants (tau) that depended on voltage (V). A single-barrier Eyring rate model described well the dependence of time constant on voltage. This fit permitted an independent estimate of a transition voltage, V, and a slope parameter K related to apparent valence of the mobile particle. The values of V and K that best fitted the kinetic data were close to the corresponding values estimated from the charge vs. voltage distribution. 5. Effective capacitance was measured by the transfer of capacitive charge by a small pulse superimposed on a variable pre-pulse. The capacitance was found to depend on pre-pulse voltage. The voltage dependence of the capacitance was as expected from the properties of charge 2 measured independently in the same fibres. 6. The presence of

  17. An Objective Functional Characterisation of Head Movement Impairment in Individuals with Neck Muscle Weakness Due to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pancani

    Full Text Available Neck muscle weakness and head drop are well recognised in patients with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, but an objective characterisation of the consequent head movement impairment is lacking. The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterise head movements in ALS compared to aged matched controls.We evaluated two groups, one of thirteen patients with ALS and one of thirteen age-matched controls, during the execution of a series of controlled head movements, performed while wearing two inertial sensors attached on the forehead and sternum, respectively. We quantified the differences between the two groups from the sensor data using indices of velocity, smoothness and movement coupling (intended as a measure of undesired out of plane movements.Results confirmed a general limitation in the ability of the ALS patients to perform and control head movements. High inter-patient variability was observed due to a wide range of observed functional impairment levels. The ability to extend the head backward and flex it laterally were the most compromised, with significantly lower angular velocity (P 0.8, reduced smoothness and greater presence of coupled movements with respect to the controls. A significant reduction of angular velocity (P 0.8 in extension, axial rotation and lateral flexion was observed when patients were asked to perform the movements as fast as possible.This pilot study is the first study providing a functional objective quantification of head movements in ALS. Further work involving different body areas and correlation with existing methods of evaluating neuromuscular function, such as dynamometry and EMG, is needed to explore the use of this approach as a marker of disease progression in ALS.

  18. Single motor unit firing behavior in the right trapezius muscle during rapid movement of right or left index finger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Karen; Olsen, Henrik B; Blangsted, Anne K

    2014-01-01

    of a general multi joint motor program, while a generally increased and continuous firing rate would support the attention related muscle activation. METHOD: Twelve healthy female subjects were seated at a computer work place with elbows and forearms supported. Ten double clicks (DC) were performed with right......BACKGROUND: Computer work is associated with low level sustained activity in the trapezius muscle that may cause development of trapezius myalgia. Such a low level activity may be attention related or alternatively, be part of a general multi joint motor program providing stabilization...... of the shoulder joint as a biomechanical prerequisite for precise finger manipulation. This study examines single motor unit (MU) firing pattern in the right trapezius muscle during fast movements of ipsilateral or contralateral index finger. A modulation of the MU firing rate would support the existence...

  19. Exercise-induced rib stress fractures: potential risk factors related to thoracic muscle co-contraction and movement pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Knudsen, Archibald; Kanstrup, I-L; Christiansen, E

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of exercise-induced rib stress fractures (RSFs) in elite rowers is unclear. The purpose of the study was to investigate thoracic muscle activity, movement patterns and muscle strength in elite rowers. Electromyographic (EMG) and 2-D video analysis were performed during ergometer rowing......, and isokinetic muscle strength was measured in seven national team rowers with a history of RSF and seven matched controls (C). RSF displayed a higher velocity of the seat in the initial drive phase (RSF: 0.25+/-0.03, 0.25 (0.15-0.33) m/s vs C: 0.15+/-0.06, 0.18 (-0.11-0.29) m/s P=0.028) (Mean+/-SEM, median...

  20. Center of Pressure Displacement of Standing Posture during Rapid Movements Is Reorganised Due to Experimental Lower Extremity Muscle Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Shiozawa

    Full Text Available Postural control during rapid movements may be impaired due to musculoskeletal pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of experimental knee-related muscle pain on the center of pressure (CoP displacement in a reaction time task condition.Nine healthy males performed two reaction time tasks (dominant side shoulder flexion and bilateral heel lift before, during, and after experimental pain induced in the dominant side vastus medialis or the tibialis anterior muscles by hypertonic saline injections. The CoP displacement was extracted from the ipsilateral and contralateral side by two force plates and the net CoP displacement was calculated.Compared with non-painful sessions, tibialis anterior muscle pain during the peak and peak-to-peak displacement for the CoP during anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs of the shoulder task reduced the peak-to-peak displacement of the net CoP in the medial-lateral direction (P<0.05. Tibialis anterior and vastus medialis muscle pain during shoulder flexion task reduced the anterior-posterior peak-to-peak displacement in the ipsilateral side (P<0.05.The central nervous system in healthy individuals was sufficiently robust in maintaining the APA characteristics during pain, although the displacement of net and ipsilateral CoP in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions during unilateral fast shoulder movement was altered.

  1. Voltage-dependent block of charge movement components by nifedipine in frog skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C L

    1990-09-01

    Potential-dependent inhibition of charge movement components by nifedipine was studied in intact, voltage-clamped, frog skeletal muscle fibers. Available charge was reduced by small shifts in holding potential (from -100 mV to -70 mV) in 2 microM nifedipine, without changes in the capacitance deduced from control (-120 mV to -100 mV) voltage steps made at a fully polarized (-100 mV) holding potential. These voltage-dependent effects did not occur in lower (0-0.5 microM) nifedipine concentrations. The voltage dependence of membrane capacitance at higher (10 microM) nifedipine concentrations was reduced even in fully polarized fibers, but shifting the holding voltage produced no further block. Voltage-dependent inhibition by nifedipine was associated with a fall in available charge, and a reduction in the charge and capacitance-voltage relationships and of late (q gamma) charging transients. It thus separated a membrane-capacitance with a distinct and steep steady-state voltage dependence. Tetracaine (2 mM) reduced voltage-dependent membrane capacitance and nonlinear charge more than did nifedipine. However, nifedipine did not exert voltage-dependent effects on charging currents, membrane capacitance, or inactivation of tetracaine-resistant (q beta) charge. This excludes participation of q beta, or the membrane charge as a whole, from the voltage-dependent effects of nifedipine. Rather, the findings suggest that the charge susceptible to potential-dependent block by nifedipine falls within the tetracaine-sensitive (q gamma) category of intramembrane charge.

  2. Charge movements in intact amphibian skeletal muscle fibres in the presence of cardiac glycosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C L

    2001-04-15

    1. Intramembrane charge movements were examined in intact voltage-clamped amphibian muscle fibres following treatment with cardiac glycosides in the hypertonic gluconate-containing solutions hitherto reported to emphasise the features of q(gamma) at the expense of q(beta) charge. 2. The application of chlormadinone acetate (CMA) at concentrations known selectively to block Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase conserved the steady-state voltage dependence of intramembrane charge, contributions from delayed (q(gamma)) charging transients, and their inactivation characteristics brought about by shifts in holding potential. 3. The addition of either ouabain (125, 250 or 500 nM) or digoxin (5 nM) at concentrations previously reported additionally to influence excitation-contraction coupling similarly conserved the steady-state charge-voltage relationships, Q(V), in fully polarised fibres to give values of maximum charge, Q(max), transition voltage, V*, and steepness factor, k, that were consistent with a persistent q component as reported on earlier occasions (Q(max) approximately = 25-27 nC F-1, V* approximately = -45 to -50 mV, k approximately = 7-9 mV). 4. In both cases shifts in holding potential from -90 to -50 mV produced a partial inactivation that separated steeply and more gradually voltage-dependent charge components in agreement with previous characterisations. 5. However, charge movements that were observed in the presence of either digoxin or ouabain were monotonic decays in which delayed (q(gamma)) transients could not be distinguished from the early charging records. These features persisted despite the further addition of chlormadinone acetate over a 10-fold concentration range (5-50 microM) known to displace ouabain from the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. 6. Ouabain (500 nM) restored the steady-state charge movement that was previously abolished by the addition of 2.0 mM tetracaine in common with previous results of using ryanodine receptor (RyR)-specific agents. 7. Perchlorate (8

  3. Cognitive dysfunction, negative symptoms, and tardive dyskinesia in schizophrenia. Their association in relation to topography of involuntary movements and criterion of their abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, J L; Youssef, H A; Dolphin, C; Kinsella, A

    1987-10-01

    Little is known of factors that, on an individual basis, confer vulnerability to the emergence of involuntary movements (tardive dyskinesia) during long-term neuroleptic treatment. In this study of 88 chronic schizophrenic inpatients, 22 variables (four demographic, 14 medication history, and four features of illness) were compared for any association(s) with the presence, by differing topographies and criteria of abnormality, and severity of involuntary movements. Irrespective of the criterion used, the presence of marked cognitive dysfunction-muteness bore a consistent and highly significant primary association with both the presence and the overall severity of orofacial dyskinesia; no such association was found in relation to the presence of limb-truncal dyskinesia. Flattening of affect was the only other variable consistently associated with the presence of orofacial movements. The reliability and prominence of the association between the presence of orofacial, but not of limb-truncal, movements and cognitive dysfunction-negative symptoms suggest that these varying topographies may not constitute a unitary syndrome. This strong association, not with indexes of neuroleptic exposure but rather with features of the illness for which that treatment was prescribed, suggests some neurologic process, more subtle than may previously have been appreciated, as a vulnerability factor of some importance. In schizophrenia it appears to be intimately related to the disease process.

  4. Role of the coordinated activities of trunk and lower limb muscles during the landing-to-jump movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Yoshiaki; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Inaba, Yuki; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify how the activities of trunk and lower limb muscles during a landing-to-jump (L-J) movement are coordinated to perform the task effectively. Electromyography (EMG) activities of trunk and lower limb muscles as well as kinematic and ground reaction force data were recorded while 17 subjects performed 5 L-Js from a height of 35 cm. The L-J was divided into four phases: PRE phase, 100 ms preceding ground contact; ABSORPTION phase, from ground contact through 100 ms; BRAKING phase, from the end of the ABSORPTION phase to the time of the lowest center of mass position; and PROPULSION phase, from the end of the BRAKING phase to takeoff. The trunk extensor and flexors showed reciprocal activation patterns through the L-J. In the PROPULSION phase, the timings when the EMG activities of the extensor muscles peaked were characterized as a sequential proximal-to-distal pattern. Furthermore, the peak vertical ground reaction force in the ABSORPTION phase relative to body mass negatively correlated to the jump height of the L-J movement and positively correlated with the magnitude of the EMG activities of the soleus in the PRE phase and those of the soleus and rectus abdominis in the ABSORPTION phase. These findings indicate that the intensities and peak timings of muscle activities in the trunk and lower limb are coordinated during the L-J movement and, the coordinated activities would play functional roles such as impact absorption, braking against the descent of body and force generation and direction control for jumping.

  5. Evolution and homologies of primate and modern human hand and forearm muscles, with notes on thumb movements and tool use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Rui; Richmond, Brian G; Wood, Bernard

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we explore how the results of a primate-wide higher-level phylogenetic analysis of muscle characters can improve our understanding of the evolution and homologies of the forearm and hand muscles of modern humans. Contrary to what is often suggested in the literature, none of the forearm and hand muscle structures usually present in modern humans are autapomorphic. All are found in one or more extant non-human primate taxa. What is unique is the particular combination of muscles. However, more muscles go to the thumb in modern humans than in almost all other primates, reinforcing the hypothesis that focal thumb movements probably played an important role in human evolution. What makes the modern human thumb myology special within the primate clade is not so much its intrinsic musculature but two extrinsic muscles, extensor pollicis brevis and flexor pollicis longus, that are otherwise only found in hylobatids. It is likely that these two forearm muscles play different functional roles in hylobatids and modern humans. In the former, the thumb is separated from elongated digits by a deep cleft and there is no pulp-to-pulp opposition, whereas modern humans exhibit powerful thumb flexion and greater manipulative abilities, such as those involved in the manufacture and use of tools. The functional and evolutionary significance of a third peculiar structure, the intrinsic hand structure that is often called the 'interosseous volaris primus of Henle' (and which we suggest is referred to as the musculus adductor pollicis accessorius) is still obscure. The presence of distinct contrahentes digitorum and intermetacarpales in adult chimpanzees is likely the result of prolonged or delayed development of the hand musculature of these apes. In relation to these structures, extant chimpanzees are more neotenic than modern humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Photogrammetry of fetal breathing movements during the third trimester of pregnancy: observations in normal and abnormal pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florido, J; Padilla, M C; Soto, V; Camacho, A; Moscoso, G; Navarrete, L

    2008-09-01

    To evaluate parameters of fetal breathing movements-displacement of the fetal abdominal wall during inspiration and expiration, time of inspiration and expiration and speed of inspiration and expiration-between 30 and 36 weeks' gestation in normal pregnancies, and in those complicated by gestational diabetes or maternal hypertension. Three categories of pregnancy were investigated: 49 were normal, 16 had pregnancy-induced diabetes and 10 were hypertensive. According to their gestational age, the patients were divided into two groups: Group A between 30 and 32 weeks' gestation and Group B between 33 and 36 weeks. Using photogrammetry and a computer-operated algorithm, six parameters of fetal breathing movements were investigated. There were significant differences in the various fetal parameters measured among the three categories of pregnant women. Up until 32 weeks of gestation, the displacements during inspiration and expiration were larger, the speeds of inspiration and expiration were higher, and the times for inspiration and expiration were shorter in the diabetic and hypertensive groups than in the normal group. In the later period, between 33 and 36 weeks, fetuses of pregnancy-induced diabetic patients showed the lowest inspiration and expiration times and the highest speeds of inspiration and expiration. Photogrammetry in conjunction with a computer-operated algorithm can be used to assess fetal breathing movements. There are significant differences in fetal breathing movements between normal pregnancies and those that are complicated by gestational diabetes or hypertension.

  7. Inverse relations in the patterns of muscle and center of pressure dynamics during standing still and movement postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, S; Hong, S L; Newell, K M

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the postural center of pressure (COP) and surface muscle (EMG) dynamics of young adult participants under conditions where they were required to voluntarily produce random and regular sway motions in contrast to that of standing still. Frequency, amplitude and regularity measures of the COP excursion and EMG activity were assessed, as were measures of the coupling relations between the COP and EMG outputs. The results demonstrated that, even when standing still, there was a high degree of regularity in the COP output, with little difference in the modal frequency dynamics between standing still and preferred motion. Only during random conditions was a significantly greater degree of irregularity observed in the COP measures. The random-like movements were also characterized by a decrease in the level of synchrony between COP motion on the anterior-posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) axes. In contrast, at muscle level, the random task resulted in the highest level of regularity (decreased ApEn) for the EMG output for soleus and tibialis anterior. The ability of individuals to produce a random motion was achieved through the decoupling of the COP motion in each dimension. This decoupling strategy was reflected by increased regularity of the EMG output as opposed to any significant change in the synchrony in the firing patterns of the muscles examined. Increased regularity across the individual muscles was accompanied by increased irregularity in COP dynamics, which can be characterized as a complexity tradeoff. Collectively, these findings support the view that the dynamics of muscle firing patterns does not necessarily map directly to the dynamics at the movement task level and vice versa.

  8. Center of Pressure Displacement of Standing Posture during Rapid Movements Is Reorganised Due to Experimental Lower Extremity Muscle Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, Shinichiro; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Postural control during rapid movements may be impaired due to musculoskeletal pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of experimental knee-related muscle pain on the center of pressure (CoP) displacement in a reaction time task condition. Nine healthy males performed two reaction time tasks (dominant side shoulder flexion and bilateral heel lift) before, during, and after experimental pain induced in the dominant side vastus medialis or the tibialis anterior muscles by hypertonic saline injections. The CoP displacement was extracted from the ipsilateral and contralateral side by two force plates and the net CoP displacement was calculated. Compared with non-painful sessions, tibialis anterior muscle pain during the peak and peak-to-peak displacement for the CoP during anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) of the shoulder task reduced the peak-to-peak displacement of the net CoP in the medial-lateral direction (Ppain during shoulder flexion task reduced the anterior-posterior peak-to-peak displacement in the ipsilateral side (Ppain, although the displacement of net and ipsilateral CoP in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions during unilateral fast shoulder movement was altered.

  9. Influence of static lumbar flexion on the trunk muscles' response to sudden arm movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Story Stephen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viscoelastic creep of lumbar ligaments (prolonged forward bend has been shown to negatively influence the spine's muscular reflexive behaviour and spinal stability. No studies to date have investigated the influence of spinall viscoelastic creep on the feedforward response of the trunk muscles to sudden arm raises. Methods Surface myoelectric activity was collected from the transversus abdominis/internal oblique, the lower erector spinae and the deltoid muscle during sudden ballistic arm raising before and after 10 minutes of prolonged forward bend in 11 healthy participants free of low back injury. The timing of trunk muscle activity relative to the deltoid muscle was calculated for 5 trials before and 5 trials after the creep procedure. Results Viscoelastic creep had no influence on the feedforward response of the trunk muscles during sudden arm raises. A feedforward response of the trunk muscles was not seen in every study participant and during every trial. Conclusion Passive trunk muscle fatigue does not appear to influence the timing of the stabilizing role of the investigated trunk muscles to sudden arm flexion.

  10. Abnormal amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations associated with rapid-eye movement in chronic primary insomnia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ran, Qian; Chen, Jia; Li, Chuan; Wen, Li; Yue, Faguo; Shu, Tongsheng; Mi, Jianxun; Wang, Guangxian; Zhang, Lei; Gao, Dong; Zhang, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Chronic primary insomnia (CPI) is the most prevalent sleep disorder worldwide. CPI manifests as difficulties in sleep onset, maintaining sleep, prolonged sleep latency, and daytime impairment and is often accompanied by cognitive problems such as poor academic performance, poor attention, and decreased memory. The most popular explanation of insomnia is hyperarousal or increased activities of neurons. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep detected by polysomnography (PSG) exhibits a positive...

  11. Homologous muscle contraction during unilateral movement does not show a dominant effect on leg representation of the ipsilateral primary motor cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Yi Chiou

    Full Text Available Co-activation of homo- and heterotopic representations in the primary motor cortex (M1 ipsilateral to a unilateral motor task has been observed in neuroimaging studies. Further analysis showed that the ipsilateral M1 is involved in motor execution along with the contralateral M1 in humans. Additionally, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS studies have revealed that the size of the co-activation in the ipsilateral M1 has a muscle-dominant effect in the upper limbs, with a prominent decline of inhibition within the ipsilateral M1 occurring when a homologous muscle contracts. However, the homologous muscle-dominant effect in the ipsilateral M1 is less clear in the lower limbs. The present study investigates the response of corticospinal output and intracortical inhibition in the leg representation of the ipsilateral M1 during a unilateral motor task, with homo- or heterogeneous muscles. We assessed functional changes within the ipsilateral M1 and in corticospinal outputs associated with different contracting muscles in 15 right-handed healthy subjects. Motor tasks were performed with the right-side limb, including movements of the upper and lower limbs. TMS paradigms were measured, consisting of short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI and recruitment curves (RCs of motor evoked potentials (MEPs in the right M1, and responses were recorded from the left rectus femoris (RF and left tibialis anterior (TA muscles. TMS results showed that significant declines in SICI and prominent increases in MEPs of the left TA and left RF during unilateral movements. Cortical activations were associated with the muscles contracting during the movements. The present data demonstrate that activation of the ipsilateral M1 on leg representation could be increased during unilateral movement. However, no homologous muscle-dominant effect was evident in the leg muscles. The results may reflect that functional coupling of bilateral leg muscles is a reciprocal

  12. Contraction-specific differences in maximal muscle power during stretch-shortening cycle movements in elderly males and females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caserotti, Paolo; Aagaard, Per; Simonsen, Erik Bruun

    2001-01-01

    Aging, muscle power, stretch-shortening cycle, eccentric muscle actions, concentric contractions......Aging, muscle power, stretch-shortening cycle, eccentric muscle actions, concentric contractions...

  13. Association between maximal hamstring strength and hamstring muscle pre-activity during a movement associated with non-contact ACL injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov Husted, Rasmus; Bencke, Jesper; Thorborg, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Reduced hamstring pre-activity during side-cutting may predispose for non-contact ACL injury. During the last decade resistance training of the lower limb muscles has become an integral part of ACL injury prevention in e.g. soccer and handball. However, it is not known whether a strong...... translate into high levels of muscle pre-activity during movements like the sidecutting maneuver. Thus, other exercise modalities (i.e. neuromuscular training) are needed to optimize hamstring muscle pre-activity during movements associated with non-contact ACL injury....

  14. Single motor unit firing behaviour in the right trapezius muscle during rapid movement of right or left index finger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen eSøgaard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Computer work is associated with low level sustained activity in the trapezius muscle that may cause myalgia. The activity may be attention related or part of a general multijoint motor program providing stabilization of the shoulder girdle for precise finger manipulation. This study examines single motor unit (MU firing pattern in the right trapezius muscle during fast movements of ipsi or contralateral index finger. Modulated firing rate would support a general multi joint motor program, while a generally increased and continuous firing rate would support attention related activation. 12 healthy female subjects were seated at a computer work place with elbows and forearms supported. Ten double clicks (DC were performed with right and left index finger on a computer mouse instrumented with a trigger.Surface EMG was recorded from right and left trapezius muscle. Intramuscular EMG was recorded with a quadripolar wire electrode in the right trapezius.Surface EMG was analysed as %MVE. The intramuscular EMG was decomposed into individual MU action potential trains. Instantaneous firing rate (IFR was calculated from inter-spike interval with ISI shorter than 20 ms defined as doublets. IFR was averaged across 10 DC to show IFR modulation.Surface EMG in both right and left trapezius was 1.8-2.5%MVE. During right hand DC a total of 32 MUs were identified. Four subjects showed no activity. Four showed MU activity with weak or no variations related to the timing of DC. Four subjects showed large modulation in IFR with temporal relation to DC. During left hand DC 15 MUs were identified in 4 subjects, for two of the subjects with IFR modulations related to DC. Doublets was found as an integrated part of MU activation in the trapezius muscle and for one subject temporarily related to DC. In conclusion, DC with ipsi- and contralateral fast movements of the index finger was found to evoke biomechanically as well as attention related activity pattern in the

  15. The relationship of force output characteristics during a sit-to-stand movement with lower limb muscle mass and knee joint extension in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takayoshi; Demura, Shinichi

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the reliability of ground reaction force (GRF) parameters during sit-to-stand (STS) movements and the relationships between the GRF parameters and lower limb muscle mass and knee extension muscle strength. Fifty elderly females performed an STS movement twice from a chair adjusted to their knee height and the GRF, lower limb muscle mass and isometric knee extension muscle strength were measured. Reliabilities of GRF parameters were high (intra-class correlation coefficient=ICC=0.70-0.95). Parameters on force output during trunk flexion phase (ground reaction force at hip-lift off, sum of force output between beginning of STS movement and hip-lift off) differed significantly between trials, but their effect sizes were small (0.15-0.23). GRF parameters during hip-lift off and knee-hip joint extension phases significantly correlated with knee extension strength (|r|=0.29-0.64) but not lower limb muscle mass. In conclusion, the reliability of GRF during STS movement is good in hip-lift off and knee-hip joint extension phases and these phases relate significantly with lower limb muscle function. These two phases are useful for evaluation of leg muscle function of the elderly. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effectiveness of muscle energy technique and Mulligan′s movement with mobilization in the management of lateral epicondylalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandran Hariharasudhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of muscle energy technique (MET and mobilization with the movement of elbow in subjects with lateral epicondylalgia (LE. Settings and Design: This study was conducted in Global Hospitals and Health City, Chennai 100. Subjects were allocated into group A and B through simple randomization method and double-blinded randomized controlled trial was performed. Materials and Methods: An interventional comparative study was conducted on 30 patients having LE. They were randomly assigned to one of the two groups. Group A (n = 15 was treated using movement with mobilization, group B (n = 15 was treated with MET. Both groups received conventional treatment of therapeutic ultrasound, after corresponding interventions. Visual analog scale (VAS and elbow functional assessment (EFA scales were the outcome measures, respectively. Measurements were performed before the beginning of treatment, after 10 days and 3 weeks afterward. Statistical Analysis Used: ANOVA and post-hoc analysis Bonferroni method were used to analyze measurements taken at baseline and follow-up at 10 th day and 3 rd week. Results: Subjects who received mobilization with movement showed a significant improvement in both VAS and EFA than the other group which received MET. Conclusion: We conclude that mobilization with the movement of elbow appears to be more effective manual technique in treating LE in comparison with MET.

  17. Evaluation of the effects of the Arm Light Exoskeleton on movement execution and muscle activities: a pilot study on healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirondini, Elvira; Coscia, Martina; Marcheschi, Simone; Roas, Gianluca; Salsedo, Fabio; Frisoli, Antonio; Bergamasco, Massimo; Micera, Silvestro

    2016-01-23

    Exoskeletons for lower and upper extremities have been introduced in neurorehabilitation because they can guide the patient's limb following its anatomy, covering many degrees of freedom and most of its natural workspace, and allowing the control of the articular joints. The aims of this study were to evaluate the possible use of a novel exoskeleton, the Arm Light Exoskeleton (ALEx), for robot-aided neurorehabilitation and to investigate the effects of some rehabilitative strategies adopted in robot-assisted training. We studied movement execution and muscle activities of 16 upper limb muscles in six healthy subjects, focusing on end-effector and joint kinematics, muscle synergies, and spinal maps. The subjects performed three dimensional point-to-point reaching movements, without and with the exoskeleton in different assistive modalities and control strategies. The results showed that ALEx supported the upper limb in all modalities and control strategies: it reduced the muscular activity of the shoulder's abductors and it increased the activity of the elbow flexors. The different assistive modalities favored kinematics and muscle coordination similar to natural movements, but the muscle activity during the movements assisted by the exoskeleton was reduced with respect to the movements actively performed by the subjects. Moreover, natural trajectories recorded from the movements actively performed by the subjects seemed to promote an activity of muscles and spinal circuitries more similar to the natural one. The preliminary analysis on healthy subjects supported the use of ALEx for post-stroke upper limb robotic assisted rehabilitation, and it provided clues on the effects of different rehabilitative strategies on movement and muscle coordination.

  18. Abnormal Ocular Movement With Executive Dysfunction and Personality Change in Subject With Thalamic Infarction: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ee Jin; Kim, Myeong Ok; Kim, Chang Hwan; Joa, Kyung Lim; Jung, Han Young

    2015-12-01

    The thalamus, located between the cerebrum and midbrain, is a nuclear complex connected to the cerebral cortex that influences motor skills, cognition, and mood. The thalamus is composed of 50-60 nuclei and can be divided into four areas according to vascular supply. In addition, it can be divided into five areas according to function. Many studies have reported on a thalamic infarction causing motor or sensory changes, but few have reported on behavioral and executive aspects of the ophthalmoplegia of the thalamus. This study reports a rare case of a paramedian thalamus infarction affecting the dorsomedial area of the thalamus, manifesting as oculomotor nerve palsy, an abnormal behavioral change, and executive dysfunction. This special case is presented with a review of the anatomical basis and function of the thalamus.

  19. Measuring abnormal movements in free-swimming fish with accelerometers: implications for quantifying tag and parasite load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broell, Franziska; Burnell, Celene; Taggart, Christopher T

    2016-03-01

    Animal-borne data loggers allow movement, associated behaviours and energy expenditure in fish to be quantified without direct observations. As with any tagging, tags that are attached externally may adversely affect fish behaviour, swimming efficiency and survival. We report on free-swimming wild Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) held in a large mesocosm that exhibited distinctly aberrant rotational swimming (scouring) when externally tagged with accelerometer data loggers. To quantify the phenomenon, the cod were tagged with two sizes of loggers (18 and 6 g; parasite-load shedding in the wild. The results infer a more careful interpretation of data derived from external tags and the careful consideration of tag type, drag, buoyancy and placement, as well as animal buoyancy and species. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. The Use of Functional Electrical Stimulation on the Upper Limb and Interscapular Muscles of Patients with Stroke for the Improvement of Reaching Movements: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Cuesta-Gómez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionReaching movements in stroke patients are characterized by decreased amplitudes at the shoulder and elbow joints and greater displacements of the trunk, compared to healthy subjects. The importance of an appropriate and specific contraction of the interscapular and upper limb (UL muscles is crucial to achieving proper reaching movements. Functional electrical stimulation (FES is used to activate the paretic muscles using short-duration electrical pulses.ObjectiveTo evaluate whether the application of FES in the UL and interscapular muscles of stroke patients with motor impairments of the UL modifies patients’ reaching patterns, measured using instrumental movement analysis systems.DesignA cross-sectional study was carried out.SettingThe VICON Motion System® was used to conduct motion analysis.ParticipantsTwenty-one patients with chronic stroke.InterventionThe Compex® electric stimulator was used to provide muscle stimulation during two conditions: a placebo condition and a FES condition.Main outcome measuresWe analyzed the joint kinematics (trunk, shoulder, and elbow from the starting position until the affected hand reached the glass.ResultsParticipants receiving FES carried out the movement with less trunk flexion, while shoulder flexion elbow extension was increased, compared to placebo conditions.ConclusionThe application of FES to the UL and interscapular muscles of stroke patients with motor impairment of the UL has improved reaching movements.

  1. The coordination of shoulder girdle muscles during repetitive arm movements at either slow or fast pace among women with or without neck-shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januario, Leticia Bergamin; Oliveira, Ana Beatriz; Cid, Marina Machado; Madeleine, Pascal; Samani, Afshin

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the coordination of the shoulder girdle muscles among subjects with or without neck-shoulder pain performing repetitive arm movement at either a slow or fast pace. Thirty female adults were allocated to one of two groups-healthy controls or cases with neck-shoulder pain. Surface electromyography (sEMG) signals from the clavicular, acromial, middle and lower trapezius portions and the serratus anterior muscles were recorded during a task performed for 20min at a slow pace and 20min at a fast pace. The root mean square (RMS), relative rest time (RRT) and normalised mutual information (NMI, an index of functional connectivity between two muscles in a pair) were computed. No significant differences on RMS, RRT and NMI were found between groups. For both groups, the fast movement pace resulted in increased levels of RMS, lower degrees of RRT and higher NMI compared to the slow pace. No interaction between group and movement pace was found. This study highlights the change in sEMG activity of muscles to meet the demands of performing a task at fast movement pace. The fast pace imposed a higher muscle demand evidenced by increased sEMG amplitude, low degree of muscle rest and increased functional connectivity for subjects in both the case and control groups. No indication of impaired sEMG activity was found in individuals with neck-shoulder pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Abnormal Gray Matter Shape, Thickness, and Volume in the Motor Cortico-Subcortical Loop in Idiopathic Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder: Association with Clinical and Motor Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahayel, Shady; Postuma, Ronald B; Montplaisir, Jacques; Bedetti, Christophe; Brambati, Simona; Carrier, Julie; Monchi, Oury; Bourgouin, Pierre-Alexandre; Gaubert, Malo; Gagnon, Jean-François

    2018-02-01

    Idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) is a major risk factor for Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. Anatomical gray matter abnormalities in the motor cortico-subcortical loop areas remain under studied in iRBD patients. We acquired T1-weighted images and administrated quantitative motor tasks in 41 patients with polysomnography-confirmed iRBD and 41 healthy subjects. Cortical thickness and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses were performed to investigate local cortical thickness and gray matter volume changes, vertex-based shape analysis to investigate shape of subcortical structures, and structure-based volumetric analyses to investigate volumes of subcortical and brainstem structures. Cortical thickness analysis revealed thinning in iRBD patients in bilateral medial superior frontal, orbitofrontal, anterior cingulate cortices, and the right dorsolateral primary motor cortex. VBM results showed lower gray matter volume in iRBD patients in the frontal lobes, anterior cingulate gyri, and caudate nucleus. Shape analysis revealed extensive surface contraction in the external and internal segments of the left pallidum. Clinical and motor impaired features in iRBD were associated with anomalies of the motor cortico-subcortical loop. In summary, iRBD patients showed numerous gray matter structural abnormalities in the motor cortico-subcortical loop, which are associated with lower motor performance and clinical manifestations of iRBD. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Dihydropyridine-sensitive ion currents and charge movement in vesicles derived from frog skeletal muscle plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, J; Carapia, A; Calvo, J; García, M C; Sánchez, J A

    1999-10-01

    1. Whole-cell voltage clamp experiments were performed in vesicles derived from frog skeletal muscle plasma membranes to characterize the electrophysiological properties of dihydropyridine (DHP) receptors. This preparation allows control of the composition of the internal medium and the recording of currents, without the influence of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). 2. In solutions containing Ba2+, Bay K 8644-sensitive, L-type inward currents were recorded. Peak Ba2+ currents (IBa) averaged 3.0 microA microF-1 and inactivated in a voltage-dependent manner. Half-maximal steady-state inactivation occurred at -40 mV. No major facilitation of tail currents was observed. 3. The time course of activation of L-type Ca2+ channels was voltage dependent and 10 times faster than that in muscle fibres; the current density values were also much lower. 4. Lowering [Mg2+]i from 2 to 0.1 mM shifted the time to peak of IBa versus voltage relation by -13 mV. 5. In solutions that contained mostly impermeant ions, non-linear capacitive currents were recorded. Charge movement with properties resembling charge 1 was observed in polarized vesicles. The charge movement depended on voltage with Boltzmann parameters: Qmax (maximum charge), 45.6 nC microF-1; V (potential at which Q = 0.5 Qmax), -58.4 mV; and k (slope factor), 22. 3 mV. There was no indication of the presence of Qgamma (the 'hump' component of charge movement). 6. In depolarized vesicles, non-linear currents were observed during hyperpolarizing pulses. The currents produced an excessive charge during 'on' transients only. Charge during 'off' transients was linear from -180 to +60 mV. There was no evidence of the presence of charge 2.

  4. Laboratory tests in patients treated with isotretinoin: occurrence of liver and muscle abnormalities and failure of AST and ALT to predict liver abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Guy F; Webster, Timothy G; Grimes, Lorraine R

    2017-05-15

    Current laboratory monitoring may not be optimal. A retrospective chart review was performed on thelaboratory results of 246 patients who were treated with isotretinoin for acne over a 9-year period. Tests obtained were CBC, lipid panel, AST, ALT, CK, GGT,and C-reactive protein. Thirty-five patients had an elevated AST and 35 of these had an elevated CK; 32 had an elevated ALT and 11 of these had an elevated CK. Thirteen patients had an elevated GGT; in 5 this was the only abnormality, whereas 8 had a GGT elevation accompanied by an elevated AST or ALT. Two had an elevated GGT and an elevated CK with normal AST and ALT. Fifty-two patients had a single episode of elevated CK, of which 22 were female. However, 57 had multiple CK elevations and only one was female. Thirty-five patients had CK elevations <2 times normal; 38 had levels between 2 and 3 times normal, 18 had levels between 3 and 4 times normal, and 18 had levels greater than 4 times normal. We suggest that ALT and AST are not useful for monitoring isotretinoin therapy and that GGT and CK may be of greater value in managing patients.

  5. Excitability changes in the left primary motor cortex innervating the hand muscles induced during speech about hand or leg movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onmyoji, Yusuke; Kubota, Shinji; Hirano, Masato; Tanaka, Megumi; Morishita, Takuya; Uehara, Kazumasa; Funase, Kozo

    2015-05-06

    In the present study, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate the changes in the excitability of the left primary motor cortex (M1) innervating the hand muscles and in short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) during speech describing hand or leg movements. In experiment 1, we investigated the effects of the contents of speech on the amplitude of the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) induced during reading aloud and silent reading. In experiment 2, we repeated experiment 1 with an additional condition, the non-vocal oral movement (No-Voc OM) condition, and investigated the change in SICI induced in each condition using the paired TMS paradigm. The MEP observed in the reading aloud and No-Voc OM conditions exhibited significantly greater amplitudes than those seen in the silent reading conditions, irrespective of the content of the sentences spoken by the subjects or the timing of the TMS. There were no significant differences in SICI between the experimental conditions. Our findings suggest that the increased excitability of the left M1 hand area detected during speech was mainly caused by speech-related oral movements and the activation of language processing-related brain functions. The increased left M1 excitability was probably also mediated by neural mechanisms other than reduced SICI; i.e., disinhibition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Association of the Iγ and Iδ Charge Movement with Calcium Release in Frog Skeletal Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, Chiu Shuen

    2004-01-01

    Charge movement and calcium transient were measured simultaneously in stretched frog cut twitch fibers under voltage clamp, with the internal solution containing 20 mM EGTA plus added calcium and antipyrylazo III. When the nominal free [Ca2+]i was 10 nM, the shape of the broad Iγ hump in the ON segments of charge movement traces remained invariant when the calcium release rate was greatly diminished. When the nominal free [Ca2+]i was 50 nM, which was close to the physiological level, the Iγ h...

  7. Movement does not promote recovery of motor output following acute experimental muscle pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schabrun, Siobhan M.; Palsson, Thorvaldur Skuli; Thapa, Tribikram

    2018-01-01

    Objective.:  To examine the effect of motor activity on the magnitude and duration of altered corticomotor output following experimental muscle pain. Design. : Experimental, pre-post test. Setting. : University laboratory. Subjects. : Twenty healthy individuals. Methods.:  Participants were rando...

  8. Insulin-like growth factor-1 enhances rat skeletal muscle charge movement and L-type Ca2+ channel gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Min; Laura Messi, María; Renganathan, Muthukrishnan; Delbono, Osvaldo

    1999-01-01

    We investigated whether insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), an endogenous potent activator of skeletal muscle proliferation and differentiation, enhances L-type Ca2+ channel gene expression resulting in increased functional voltage sensors in single skeletal muscle cells. Charge movement and inward Ca2+ current were recorded in primary cultured rat myoballs using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique. Ca2+ current and maximum charge movement (Qmax) were potentiated in cells treated with IGF-1 without significant changes in their voltage dependence. Peak Ca2+ current in control and IGF-1-treated cells was -7·8 ± 0·44 and -10·5 ± 0·37 pA pF−1, respectively (P charge movement and the level of L-type Ca2+ channel α1-subunits through activation of gene expression in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:10087334

  9. Textile Electrodes Embedded in Clothing: A Practical Alternative to Traditional Surface Electromyography when Assessing Muscle Excitation during Functional Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colyer, Steffi L; McGuigan, Polly M

    2018-03-01

    Textile electromyography (EMG) electrodes embedded in clothing allow muscle excitation to be recorded in previously inaccessible settings; however, their ability to accurately and reliably measure EMG during dynamic tasks remains largely unexplored. To quantify the validity and reliability of textile electrodes, 16 recreationally active males completed two identical testing sessions, within which three functional movements (run, cycle and squat) were performed twice: once wearing EMG shorts (measuring quadriceps, hamstrings and gluteals myoelectric activity) and once with surface EMG electrodes attached to the vastus lateralis, biceps femoris and gluteus maximus. EMG signals were identically processed to provide average rectified EMG (normalized to walking) and excitation length. Results were compared across measurement systems and demonstrated good agreement between the magnitude of muscle excitation when EMG activity was lower, but agreement was poorer when excitation was higher. The length of excitation bursts was consistently longer when measured using textile vs. surface EMG electrodes. Comparable between-session (day-to-day) repeatability was found for average rectified EMG (mean coefficient of variation, CV: 42.6 and 41.2%) and excitation length (CV: 12.9 and 9.8%) when using textile and surface EMG, respectively. Additionally, similar within-session repeatability (CV) was recorded for average rectified EMG (13.8 and 14.1%) and excitation length (13.0 and 12.7%) for textile and surface electrodes, respectively. Generally, textile EMG electrodes appear to be capable of providing comparable muscle excitation information and reproducibility to surface EMG during dynamic tasks. Textile EMG shorts could therefore be a practical alternative to traditional laboratory-based methods allowing muscle excitation information to be collected in more externally-valid training environments.

  10. Textile Electrodes Embedded in Clothing: A Practical Alternative to Traditional Surface Electromyography when Assessing Muscle Excitation during Functional Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffi L. Colyer, Polly M. McGuigan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Textile electromyography (EMG electrodes embedded in clothing allow muscle excitation to be recorded in previously inaccessible settings; however, their ability to accurately and reliably measure EMG during dynamic tasks remains largely unexplored. To quantify the validity and reliability of textile electrodes, 16 recreationally active males completed two identical testing sessions, within which three functional movements (run, cycle and squat were performed twice: once wearing EMG shorts (measuring quadriceps, hamstrings and gluteals myoelectric activity and once with surface EMG electrodes attached to the vastus lateralis, biceps femoris and gluteus maximus. EMG signals were identically processed to provide average rectified EMG (normalized to walking and excitation length. Results were compared across measurement systems and demonstrated good agreement between the magnitude of muscle excitation when EMG activity was lower, but agreement was poorer when excitation was higher. The length of excitation bursts was consistently longer when measured using textile vs. surface EMG electrodes. Comparable between-session (day-to-day repeatability was found for average rectified EMG (mean coefficient of variation, CV: 42.6 and 41.2% and excitation length (CV: 12.9 and 9.8% when using textile and surface EMG, respectively. Additionally, similar within-session repeatability (CV was recorded for average rectified EMG (13.8 and 14.1% and excitation length (13.0 and 12.7% for textile and surface electrodes, respectively. Generally, textile EMG electrodes appear to be capable of providing comparable muscle excitation information and reproducibility to surface EMG during dynamic tasks. Textile EMG shorts could therefore be a practical alternative to traditional laboratory-based methods allowing muscle excitation information to be collected in more externally-valid training environments.

  11. Congenital penile pathology is associated with abnormal development of the dartos muscle: a prospective study of primary penile surgery at a tertiary referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinoit, A-F; Van Praet, C; Groen, L-A; Van Laecke, E; Praet, M; Hoebeke, P

    2015-05-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms leading to chordee in patients with hypospadias and to the hidden state of buried penis in the prepubic fat remain unclear. Resection of dartos tissue usually makes the penis straight in patients with hypospadias and corrects it in those with buried penis, suggesting a common pathophysiology related to dartos tissue. Tissue samples from 113 children undergoing primary penile surgery for hypospadias (94 patients), epispadias (1) or buried penis (18) were collected between November 2011 and September 2013. Tissue samples from 79 children undergoing circumcision for nonmedical reasons served as controls. All samples were stained with smooth muscle actin and analyzed by the same pathologist, who was blinded to indication for surgery. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were applied. Three different dartos tissue patterns were observed. Pattern I (normal) consisted of smooth muscle fibers of dartos tissue organized in a parallel configuration in the subcutaneous tissue. Pattern II was characterized by poorly developed and hypotrophic smooth muscle fibers. Pattern III was determined by randomly distributed smooth muscle fibers in the subcutaneous tissue, without parallel configuration. Pattern I was observed in 45 circumcision specimens (64%). Of buried penis cases 78% were considered abnormal (pattern II in 4 cases and III in 10, p = 0.001). Of hypospadias cases 70% were considered abnormal (pattern II in 31 cases, III in 32, and mixed II and III in 3, p Congenital penile pathology (hypospadias, buried penis) is associated with structural anomalies in dartos tissue. Further research is needed to unveil the pathophysiology of the condition. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sensorimotor integration in movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2003-03-01

    Although current knowledge attributes movement disorders to a dysfunction of the basal ganglia-motor cortex circuits, abnormalities in the peripheral afferent inputs or in their central processing may interfere with motor program execution. We review the abnormalities of sensorimotor integration described in the various types of movement disorders. Several observations, including those of parkinsonian patients' excessive reliance on ongoing visual information during movement tasks, suggest that proprioception is defective in Parkinson's disease (PD). The disturbance of proprioceptive regulation, possibly related to the occurrence of abnormal muscle-stretch reflexes, might be important for generating hypometric or bradykinetic movements. Studies with somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs), prepulse inhibition, and event-related potentials support the hypothesis of central abnormalities of sensorimotor integration in PD. In Huntington's disease (HD), changes in SEPs and long-latency stretch reflexes suggest that a defective gating of peripheral afferent input to the brain might impair sensorimotor integration in cortical motor areas, thus interfering with the processing of motor programs. Defective motor programming might contribute to some features of motor impairment in HD. Sensory symptoms are frequent in focal dystonia and sensory manipulation can modify the dystonic movements. In addition, specific sensory functions (kinaesthesia, spatial-temporal discrimination) can be impaired in patients with focal hand dystonia, thus leading to a "sensory overflow." Sensory input may be abnormal and trigger focal dystonia, or defective "gating" may cause an input-output mismatch in specific motor programs. Altogether, several observations strongly support the idea that sensorimotor integration is impaired in focal dystonia. Although elemental sensation is normal in patients with tics, tics can be associated with sensory phenomena. Some neurophysiological studies suggest that

  13. Skeletal muscle expression of the adhesion-GPCR CD97: CD97 deletion induces an abnormal structure of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum but does not impair skeletal muscle function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Zyryanova

    Full Text Available CD97 is a widely expressed adhesion class G-protein-coupled receptor (aGPCR. Here, we investigated the presence of CD97 in normal and malignant human skeletal muscle as well as the ultrastructural and functional consequences of CD97 deficiency in mice. In normal human skeletal muscle, CD97 was expressed at the peripheral sarcolemma of all myofibers, as revealed by immunostaining of tissue sections and surface labeling of single myocytes using flow cytometry. In muscle cross-sections, an intracellular polygonal, honeycomb-like CD97-staining pattern, typical for molecules located in the T-tubule or sarcoplasmatic reticulum (SR, was additionally found. CD97 co-localized with SR Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA, a constituent of the longitudinal SR, but not with the receptors for dihydropyridine (DHPR or ryanodine (RYR, located in the T-tubule and terminal SR, respectively. Intracellular expression of CD97 was higher in slow-twitch compared to most fast-twitch myofibers. In rhabdomyosarcomas, CD97 was strongly upregulated and in part more N-glycosylated compared to normal skeletal muscle. All tumors were strongly CD97-positive, independent of the underlying histological subtype, suggesting high sensitivity of CD97 for this tumor. Ultrastructural analysis of murine skeletal myofibers confirmed the location of CD97 in the SR. CD97 knock-out mice had a dilated SR, resulting in a partial increase in triad diameter yet not affecting the T-tubule, sarcomeric, and mitochondrial structure. Despite these obvious ultrastructural changes, intracellular Ca2+ release from single myofibers, force generation and fatigability of isolated soleus muscles, and wheel-running capacity of mice were not affected by the lack of CD97. We conclude that CD97 is located in the SR and at the peripheral sarcolemma of human and murine skeletal muscle, where its absence affects the structure of the SR without impairing skeletal muscle function.

  14. Computer-Based Algorithmic Determination of Muscle Movement Onset Using M-Mode Ultrasonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    within each class of algorithm. Linear relationships and agree- ments between computed and visual muscle onset were calculated. The top algorithms were...program (R Develop- ment Core Team 2015) using RStudio (RStudio, Boston, MA, USA) and associated packages (Gordon and Lumley 2016; Kienzle et al. 2014...i.e., higher ICC3,1 value) was chosen as the ‘‘gold standard.’’ The mean MO value of the two investigators’ measure- ments was used for further

  15. Pain-Related Brain Activity Evoked by Active and Dynamic Arm Movement: Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness as a Promising Model for Studying Movement-Related Pain in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoichi; Kan, Shigeyuki; Uematsu, Hironobu; Shibata, Masahiko; Fujino, Yuji

    2015-08-01

    To demonstrate delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a suitable model for the study of movement-evoked pain, we attempted to identify brain regions specifically involved in pain evoked by active and dynamic movement under DOMS condition. Twelve healthy volunteers DOMS was induced in the left upper-arm flexor muscles by an eccentric elbow contraction exercise. Movement-evoked pain in the affected muscles was evaluated just before (day 0) and after (days 1-7 and 30) the exercise using a visual analog scale. Subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scans while performing repeated elbow flexion on day 2 (DOMS condition) and day 30 (painless condition). We compared brain activity between the DOMS and painless conditions. Movement-evoked pain reached peak intensity on day 2 and disappeared by day 30 in all subjects. No subject felt pain at rest on either of these days. Contralateral primary motor cortex (M1), parietal operculum and bilateral presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA) showed greater activity during active and dynamic arm movement with DOMS than during the same movement without pain. There was no difference in activation of brain regions known collectively as the "pain matrix," except for the parietal operculum, between the two conditions. Active and dynamic movement with pain selectively evoked activation of M1, pre-SMA, and parietal operculum, as assessed using DOMS. Our results demonstrate that DOMS is a promising experimental model for the study of movement-evoked pain in humans. 2015 The Authors Pain Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Academy of Pain Medicine.

  16. Decoding Lower Limb Muscle Activity and Kinematics from Cortical Neural Spike Trains during Monkey Performing Stand and Squat Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuan; Ma, Chaolin; Huang, Jian; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Jiang; He, Jiping

    2017-01-01

    Extensive literatures have shown approaches for decoding upper limb kinematics or muscle activity using multichannel cortical spike recordings toward brain machine interface (BMI) applications. However, similar topics regarding lower limb remain relatively scarce. We previously reported a system for training monkeys to perform visually guided stand and squat tasks. The current study, as a follow-up extension, investigates whether lower limb kinematics and muscle activity characterized by electromyography (EMG) signals during monkey performing stand/squat movements can be accurately decoded from neural spike trains in primary motor cortex (M1). Two monkeys were used in this study. Subdermal intramuscular EMG electrodes were implanted to 8 right leg/thigh muscles. With ample data collected from neurons from a large brain area, we performed a spike triggered average (SpTA) analysis and got a series of density contours which revealed the spatial distributions of different muscle-innervating neurons corresponding to each given muscle. Based on the guidance of these results, we identified the locations optimal for chronic electrode implantation and subsequently carried on chronic neural data recordings. A recursive Bayesian estimation framework was proposed for decoding EMG signals together with kinematics from M1 spike trains. Two specific algorithms were implemented: a standard Kalman filter and an unscented Kalman filter. For the latter one, an artificial neural network was incorporated to deal with the nonlinearity in neural tuning. High correlation coefficient and signal to noise ratio between the predicted and the actual data were achieved for both EMG signals and kinematics on both monkeys. Higher decoding accuracy and faster convergence rate could be achieved with the unscented Kalman filter. These results demonstrate that lower limb EMG signals and kinematics during monkey stand/squat can be accurately decoded from a group of M1 neurons with the proposed

  17. Repeated tongue lift movement induces neuroplasticity in corticomotor control of tongue and jaw muscles in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoda, Yoshihiro; Iida, Takashi; Kothari, Mohit; Komiyama, Osamu; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Kawara, Misao; Sessle, Barry; Svensson, Peter

    2015-11-19

    This study investigated the effect of repeated tongue lift training (TLT) on the excitability of the corticomotor representation of the human tongue and jaw musculature. Sixteen participants performed three series of TLT for 41 min on each of 5 consecutive days. Each TLT series consisted of two pressure levels (5 kPa and 10 kPa). All participants underwent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electromyographic (EMG) recordings of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in four sessions: (1) before TLT on Day 1 (baseline), (2) after TLT on Day 1, (3) before TLT on Day 5, and (4) after TLT on Day 5. EMG recordings from the left and right tongue dorsum and masseter muscles were made at three pressure levels (5 kPa, 10 kPa, 100% tongue lift), and tongue, masseter, and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) MEPs were measured. There were no significant day-to-day differences in the tongue pressure during maximum voluntary contractions. The amplitudes and thresholds of tongue and masseter MEPs after TLT on Day 5 were respectively higher and lower than before TLT on Day 1 (P<0.005), and there was also a significant increase in tongue and masseter MEP areas; no significant changes occurred in MEP onset latencies. FDI MEP parameters (amplitude, threshold, area, latency) were not significantly different between the four sessions. Our findings suggest that repeated TLT can trigger neuroplasticity reflected in increased excitability of the corticomotor representation of not only the tongue muscles but also the masseter muscles. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Patch-clamp recording of charge movement, Ca(2+) current, and Ca(2+) transients in adult skeletal muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, ZM; Messi, ML; Delbono, O

    1999-01-01

    Intramembrane charge movement (Q), Ca(2+) conductance (G(m)) through the dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type Ca(2+) channel (DHPR) and intracellular Ca(2+) fluorescence (F) have been recorded simultaneously in flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers of adult mice, using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique. The voltage distribution of Q was fitted to a Boltzmann equation; the Q(max), V(1/2Q), and effective valence (z(Q)) values were 41 +/- 3.1 nC/&mgr;F, -17.6 +/- 0.7 mV, and 2.0 +/- 0.12, respectively. V(1/2G) and z(G) values were -0.3 +/- 0.06 mV and 5.6 +/- 0.34, respectively. Peak Ca(2+) transients did not change significantly after 30 min of recording. F was fit to a Boltzmann equation, and the values for V(F1/2) and z(F) were 6.2 +/- 0.04 mV and 2.4, respectively. F was adequately fit to the fourth power of Q. These results demonstrate that the patch-clamp technique is appropriate for recording Q, G(m), and intracellular [Ca(2+)] simultaneously in mature skeletal muscle fibers and that the voltage distribution of the changes in intracellular Ca(2+) can be predicted by a Hodgkin-Huxley model. PMID:10545370

  19. A 35-Å movement of smooth muscle myosin on ADP release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Michael; Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M.; Smith, Joseph E.; Faust, Lynn; Milligan, Ronald A.; Sweeney, H. Lee

    1995-12-01

    MYOSIN II crossbridges interact with F-actin producing power-strokes of around 100 Å (refs 1, 2), during which the products of ATP hydrolysis are released3-5. This has been postulated to involve an articulation of the myosin head (S1) on actin, or substantial conformational changes in S1 itself6-8. Small movements of the regulatory light chain have been detected (see, for example, refs 9, 10), but most data suggest that the bulk of S1 does not move on actin during crossbridge cycling8,11. Here we present three-dimensional maps of S1-decorated F-actin in the presence and absence of MgADP. The myosin motor domain is similar in both states but there are major orientational differences in the light-chain-binding domain. This domain acts as a rigid level arm12,13 pivoting about the end of the motor domain and swinging ~23°, resulting in a ~35-Å step. Small, nucleotide-mediated conformational changes in the motor domain14-16may thus be converted by the light-chain domain into large movement steps.

  20. Association of the Igamma and Idelta charge movement with calcium release in frog skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Chiu Shuen

    2005-02-01

    Charge movement and calcium transient were measured simultaneously in stretched frog cut twitch fibers under voltage clamp, with the internal solution containing 20 mM EGTA plus added calcium and antipyrylazo III. When the nominal free [Ca2+]i was 10 nM, the shape of the broad I(gamma) hump in the ON segments of charge movement traces remained invariant when the calcium release rate was greatly diminished. When the nominal free [Ca2+]i was 50 nM, which was close to the physiological level, the I(gamma) humps were accelerated and a slow calcium-dependent I(delta) component (or state) was generated. The peak of ON I(delta) synchronized perfectly with the peak of the calcium release rate whereas the slow decay of ON I(delta) followed the same time course as the decay of calcium release rate. Suppression of calcium release by TMB-8 reduced the amount of Q(delta) concomitantly but not completely, and the effects were partially reversible. The same simultaneous suppression effects were achieved by depleting the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium store with repetitive stimulation. The results suggest that the mobility of Q(delta) needs to be primed by a physiological level of resting myoplasmic Ca2+. Once the priming is completed, more I(delta) is mobilized by the released Ca2+ during depolarization.

  1. The role of weight loss and exercise in correcting skeletal muscle mitochondrial abnormalities in obesity, diabetes and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Frederico G S; Goodpaster, Bret H

    2013-10-15

    Mitochondria within skeletal muscle have been implicated in insulin resistance of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus as well as impaired muscle function with normal aging. Evaluating the potential of interventions to improve mitochondria is clearly relevant to the prevention or treatment of metabolic diseases and age-related dysfunction. This review provides an overview and critical evaluation of the effects of weight loss and exercise interventions on skeletal muscle mitochondria, along with implications for insulin resistance, obesity, type 2 diabetes and aging. The available literature strongly suggests that the lower mitochondrial capacity associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes and aging is not an irreversible lesion. However, weight loss does not appear to affect this response, even when the weight loss is extreme. In contrast, increasing physical activity improves mitochondrial content and perhaps the function of individual mitochondrion. Despite the consistent effect of exercise to improve mitochondrial capacity, studies mechanistically linking mitochondria to insulin resistance, reductions in intramyocellular lipid or improvement in muscle function remain inconclusive. In summary, studies of diet and exercise training have advanced our understanding of the link between mitochondrial oxidative capacity and insulin resistance in obesity, type 2 diabetes and aging. Nevertheless, additional inquiry is necessary to establish the significance and clinical relevance of those perturbations, which could lead to targeted therapies for a myriad of conditions and diseases involving mitochondria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrasound tissue Doppler imaging reveals no delay in abdominal muscle feed-forward activity during rapid arm movements in patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubler, Deborah; Mannion, Anne F; Schenk, Peter; Gorelick, Mark; Helbling, Daniel; Gerber, Hans; Toma, Valeriu; Sprott, Haiko

    2010-07-15

    Cross-sectional study. Comparison of the timing of onset of lateral abdominal muscle activity during rapid arm movements in patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain (cLBP) and back-pain-free controls. Rapid movements of the arm are normally associated with prior activation of trunk-stabilizing muscles in readiness for the impending postural perturbation. Using invasive intramuscular electromyography techniques, studies have shown that this feed-forward function is delayed in some patients with low back pain (LBP). Ultrasound tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) provides an ultrasound method for quantifying muscle activation in a noninvasive manner, allowing investigation of larger groups of patients and controls. Ninety-six individuals participated (48 patients with cLBP and 48 matched LBP-free controls). During rapid shoulder flexion, abduction, and extension, surface electromyographic signals from the deltoid and motion-mode TDI images from the contralateral lateral abdominal muscles were recorded simultaneously. The onset of muscle activity was given by changes in the tissue velocity of the abdominal muscles, as measured with TDI. Pain and disability in the patients were assessed using standardized questionnaires. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance. In both groups, feed-forward activity of the lateral abdominal muscles was recorded during arm movements in all directions. The main effect of "group membership" revealed no significant difference between the groups for the earliest onset of abdominal muscle activity (P = 0.398). However, a significant "group x body side" interaction (P = 0.015) was observed, and this was the result of earlier onsets in the cLBP group than controls for the abdominal muscles on the right (but not left) body side. No relationship was found between the time of onset of the earliest abdominal muscle activity and pain intensity, pain frequency, pain medication usage, or Roland Morris disability scores. Patients

  3. Time-dependence between upper arm muscles activity during rapid movements: observation of the proportional effects predicted by the kinematic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plamondon, Réjean; Djioua, Moussa; Mathieu, Pierre A

    2013-10-01

    Rapid human movements can be assimilated to the output of a neuromuscular system with an impulse response modeled by a Delta-Lognormal equation. In such a model, the main assumption concerns the cumulative time delays of the response as it propagates toward the effector following a command. To verify the validity of this assumption, delays between bursts in electromyographic (EMG) signals of agonist and antagonist muscles activated during a rapid hand movement were investigated. Delays were measured between the surface EMG signals of six muscles of the upper limb during single rapid handwriting strokes. From EMG envelopes, regressions were obtained between the timing of the burst of activity produced by each monitored muscle. High correlation coefficients were obtained supporting the proportionality of the cumulative time delays, the basic hypothesis of the Delta-Lognormal model. A paradigm governing the sequence of muscle activities in a rapid movement could, in the long run, be useful for applications dealing with the analysis and synthesis of human movements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Managing Lower Extremity Muscle Tone and Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy via Eight-Week Repetitive Passive Knee Movement Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Ju, Yan-Ying; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chang, Ya-Ju; Wong, Alice May-Kuen

    2013-01-01

    This study used a repeated measures design to assess the effect of an eight-week repetitive passive movement (RPM) intervention on lower extremity muscle tone and function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Eighteen children (aged 9.5 [plus or minus] 2.1 years) with spastic CP were randomly assigned to a knee RPM intervention condition of 3…

  5. Muscle activation patterns of knee flexors and extensors during passive and active movement of the spastic lower limb in chronic stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleuren, J.F.M.; Fleuren, J.F.M.; Snoek, G.J.; Voerman, Gerlienke; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of spasticity, quantified as muscle activity during stretch, during passive and active movement. For this cross sectional study 19 stroke patients with spasticity in the lower limb were recruited. Reflex activity was studied with surface

  6. Permanent induction of morphological abnormalities in the penis and penile skeletal muscles in adult rats treated neonatally with diethylstilbestrol or estradiol valerate: a dose-response study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Hari O; Braden, Tim D; Williams, Carol S; Dalvi, Prasad; Mansour, Mansour M; Williams, John W

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of neonatal exposure to different doses of diethylstilbestrol (DES) or estradiol valerate (EV) on penile morphology, penile skeletal muscles, and fertility. Male pups received DES or EV at a dose of 10 microg, 1 microg, 100 ng, 10 ng, or 1 ng per rat on alternate days from postnatal days 2-12. Fertility was tested at 120 days, and tissues were examined at 150 days. Generally, DES and EV induced similar effects within the 10- and 1-microg groups. Fertility was reduced to 0; the weight, length, and diameter of the penis and the weight of penile skeletal muscles, especially bulbocavernosus muscle, were decreased (P penis were replaced by fat cells. Conversely, all of the above parameters were similar in controls and the lower dose groups, except in the 100-ng DES group, in which 4 of 7 males did not sire pups (compared with 1 of 7 in controls and 2 of 6 in the 100-ng EV group). The loss of fertility in these 4 males of the DES group and 1 male of the EV group was associated with partial release of the preputial sheath and abnormal penile morphology. Plasma testosterone was reduced (P testosterone.

  7. Repeated tongue lift movement induces neuroplasticity in corticomotor control of tongue and jaw muscles in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komoda, Yoshihiro; Lida, Takashi; Kothari, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of repeated tongue lift training (TLT) on the excitability of the corticomotor representation of the human tongue and jaw musculature. Sixteen participants performed three series of TLT for 41min on each of 5 consecutive days. Each TLT series consisted of two...... pressure levels (5kPa and 10kPa). All participants underwent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electromyographic (EMG) recordings of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in four sessions: (1) before TLT on Day 1 (baseline), (2) after TLT on Day 1, (3) before TLT on Day 5, and (4) after TLT on Day 5....... EMG recordings from the left and right tongue dorsum and masseter muscles were made at three pressure levels (5kPa, 10kPa, 100% tongue lift), and tongue, masseter, and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) MEPs were measured. There were no significant day-to-day differences in the tongue pressure during...

  8. Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients Without Severe Septal Hypertrophy: Implications of Mitral Valve and Papillary Muscle Abnormalities Assessed Using Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Parag; Dhillon, Ashwat; Popovic, Zoran B; Smedira, Nicholas G; Rizzo, Jessica; Thamilarasan, Maran; Agler, Deborah; Lytle, Bruce W; Lever, Harry M; Desai, Milind Y

    2015-07-01

    In patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction, but without basal septal hypertrophy, we sought to identify mitral valve (MV) and papillary muscle (PM) abnormalities that predisposed to LVOT obstruction, using echo and cardiac magnetic resonance. We studied 121 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (age, 49±17 years; 60% men; 57% on β-blockers) with a basal septal thickness of ≤1.8 cm who underwent echocardiography (rest+stress) and cine cardiac magnetic resonance. Echo measurements included maximal LVOT gradient (rest/provocable), MV leaflet length (parasternal long, 4 and 3-chamber views), and abnormal chordal attachment to mid/base of anterior MV. Cine cardiac magnetic resonance measurements included basal septal thickness, number/area of PM heads, and bifid PM mobility (in systole and diastole). Mean basal septal thickness, LVOT gradient, and LV ejection fraction were 1.5±0.3 cm, 72±54 mm Hg, and 61±6%, respectively. The number of anterolateral and posteromedial PM heads was 2.7±0.7 and 2.6±0.7, respectively. Anterolateral and posteromedial PM areas were 19.9±7 cm(2) and 17.1±6 cm(2), respectively. PM mobility was 11±6°. On multivariable analysis, predictors of maximal LVOT gradient were basal septal thickness, bifid PM mobility, anterior mitral leaflet length, and abnormal chordal attachment to base of anterior mitral leaflet. Forty-five patients underwent surgery to relieve LVOT obstruction, of which 52% needed an additional nonmyectomy (MV repair/replacement or PM reorientation) approach. In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients without significant LV hypertrophy, in addition to basal septal thickness, anterior MV length, abnormal chordal attachment, and bifid PM mobility are associated with LVOT obstruction. In such patients, additional procedures on MV and PM (±myectomy) could be considered. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. The Qgamma component of intra-membrane charge movement is present in mammalian muscle fibres, but suppressed in the absence of S100A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Benjamin L; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Zimmer, Danna B; Schneider, Martin F

    2009-09-15

    S100A1 is a Ca(2+) binding protein that modulates excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in skeletal and cardiac muscle. S100A1 competes with calmodulin for binding to the skeletal muscle SR Ca(2+) release channel (the ryanodine receptor type 1, RyR1) at a site that also interacts with the C-terminal tail of the voltage sensor of EC coupling, the dihydropyridine receptor. Ablation of S100A1 leads to delayed and decreased action potential evoked Ca(2+) transients, possibly linked to altered voltage sensor activation. Here we investigate the effects of S100A1 on voltage sensor activation in skeletal muscle utilizing whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology to record intra-membrane charge movement currents in isolated flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle fibres from wild-type and S100A1 knock-out (KO) mice. In contrast to recent reports, we found that FDB fibres exhibit two distinct components of intra-membrane charge movement, an initial rapid component (Q(beta)), and a delayed, steeply voltage dependent 'hump' component (Q(gamma)) previously recorded primarily in amphibian but not mammalian fibres. Surprisingly, we found that Q(gamma) was selectively suppressed in S100A1 KO fibres, while the Q(beta) component of charge movement was unaffected. This result was specific to S100A1 and not a compensatory result of genetic manipulation, as transient intracellular application of S100A1 restored Q(gamma). Furthermore, we found that exposure to the RyR1 inhibitor dantrolene suppressed a similar component of charge movement in FDB fibres. These results shed light on voltage sensor activation in mammalian muscle, and support S100A1 as a positive regulator of the voltage sensor and Ca(2+) release channel in skeletal muscle EC coupling.

  10. Interfering with calcium release suppresses I gamma, the "hump" component of intramembranous charge movement in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csernoch, L; Pizarro, G; Uribe, I; Rodríguez, M; Ríos, E

    1991-05-01

    Four manifestations of excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling were derived from measurements in cut skeletal muscle fibers of the frog, voltage clamped in a Vaseline-gap chamber: intramembranous charge movement currents, myoplasmic [Ca2+] transients, flux of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and the intrinsic optical transparency change that accompanies calcium release. In attempts to suppress Ca release by direct effects on the SR, three interventions were applied: (a) a conditioning pulse that causes calcium release and inhibits release in subsequent pulses by Ca-dependent inactivation; (b) a series of brief, large pulses, separated by long intervals (greater than 700 ms), which deplete Ca2+ in the SR; and (c) intracellular application of the release channel blocker ruthenium red. All these reduced calcium release flux. None was expected to affect directly the voltage sensor of the T-tubule; however, all of them reduced or eliminated a component of charge movement current with the following characteristics: (a) delayed onset, peaking 10-20 ms into the pulse; (b) current reversal during the pulse, with an inward phase after the outward peak; and (c) OFF transient of smaller magnitude than the ON, of variable polarity, and sometimes biphasic. When the total charge movement current had a visible hump, the positive phase of the current eliminated by the interventions agreed with the hump in timing and size. The component of charge movement current blocked by the interventions was greater and had a greater inward phase in slack fibers with high [EGTA] inside than in stretched fibers with no EGTA. Its amplitude at -40 mV was on average 0.26 A/F (SEM 0.03) in slack fibers. The waveform of release flux determined from the Ca transients measured simultaneously with the membrane currents had, as described previously (Melzer, W., E. Ríos, and M. F. Schneider. 1984. Biophysical Journal. 45:637-641), an early peak followed by a descent to a steady level

  11. Experimental analysis of the relationship between charge movement components in skeletal muscle of Rana temporaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, R H; Huang, C L

    1984-08-01

    Experiments were performed to ascertain whether the monotonic (q beta) and delayed (q gamma) components of non-linear charge in skeletal muscle membranes form a sequential system, or are the result of separate, independent processes. The non-linear capacitance studied in a large number of fibres increased with fibre diameter. This dependence was attributable to tetracaine-sensitive (q gamma) but not to tetracaine-resistant (q beta and q alpha) charge. The kinetics and total quantity of q gamma charge moving in response to voltage steps from varying pre-pulse potentials to a fixed probe potential remained constant despite variations in the size of the early q beta decay. The kinetics of the delayed (q gamma) charging current obtained from a single 20 mV depolarizing step were compared with the sum of the responses to two 10 mV steps adding to the same voltage excursion. The respective transients superimposed only if one of the 10 mV steps did not reach the voltage at which q gamma first appears. In the two preceding experiments, total charge was conserved. These results are consistent with separate and functionally independent q beta and q gamma systems of potential-dependent charge, with q gamma residing in the transverse tubules and q beta on surface membrane. The findings can be discussed in terms of a contractile 'activator' with a steep sensitivity to voltage that begins only with depolarization beyond a level close to the actual mechanical threshold.

  12. Origin of delayed outward ionic current in charge movement traces from frog skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, C S; Chen, W

    1994-08-15

    1. Non-linear membrane ionic current was studied in highly stretched cut frog twitch fibres in a double Vaseline-gap voltage clamp chamber, with the internal solution containing 0.1 mM EGTA and the external solution containing Cl- as the major anion. After the Na+ currents was abolished by TTX in the external solution and the K+ currents were suppressed by external TEA+ and Rb+ and internal Cs+, a delayed outward ionic current with a time course similar to that of the delayed rectifier current was observed during depolarization. 2. The delayed outward ionic current was resistant to 1 mM 3,4-diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP) in the external solution and was unaltered when a fraction of the internal Cs+ was replaced by K+ or Na+, suggesting that the current was not carried by cations flowing through the delayed rectifiers. 3. The delayed outward ionic current was greatly reduced by replacing the external Cl- with CH3SO3-,SO4(2-), glutamate or gluconate, indicating strongly that the current was carried by Cl- flowing through anion channels. The current was also suppressed by 1 mM external 9-anthracenecarboxylic acid (9-ACA). 4. The delayed outward ionic current was reduced by blockers of calcium-dependent Cl- channels, such as SITS and frusemide (furosemide), in a dose- and voltage-dependent manner and by increasing intracellular [EGTA] to 20 mM, suggesting that part of the Cl- current in the muscle fibres could be calcium dependent. 5. The total Cl- current could be dissected into calcium-dependent and calcium-independent components. Each component accounted for roughly half of the total Cl- current. The maximum slope conductance of the calcium-dependent Cl- channels was 60.9 +/- 6.0 microS microF-1 (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 4).

  13. Sustained overexpression of IGF-1 prevents age-dependent decrease in charge movement and intracellular Ca(2+) in mouse skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, María Laura; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2002-03-01

    In this work we tested the hypothesis that transgenic sustained overexpression of IGF-1 prevents age-dependent decreases in charge movement and intracellular Ca(2+) in skeletal muscle fibers. To this end, short flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle fibers from 5-7- and 21-24-month-old FVB (wild-type) and S1S2 (IGF-1 transgenic) mice were studied. Fibers were voltage-clamped in the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique according to described procedures (Wang, Z. M., M. L. Messi, and O. Delbono. 1999. Biophys. J. 77:2709-2716). Charge movement and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration were recorded simultaneously. The maximum charge movement (Q(max)) recorded in young wild-type and transgenic mice was (mean +/- SEM, in nC microF(-1)): 52 +/- 2.1 (n = 46) and 54 +/- 1.9 (n = 38) (non-significant, ns), respectively, whereas in old wild-type and old transgenic mice the values were 36 +/- 2.1 (n = 32) and 49 +/- 2.3 (n = 35), respectively (p voltage distribution or steepness of the Q-V or [Ca(2+)]-V relationship were found. These data support the concept that overexpression of IGF-1 in skeletal muscle prevents age-dependent reduction in charge movement and peak [Ca(2+)](i).

  14. White and gray matter abnormalities in idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: a diffusion-tensor imaging and voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherfler, Christoph; Frauscher, Birgit; Schocke, Michael; Iranzo, Alex; Gschliesser, Viola; Seppi, Klaus; Santamaria, Joan; Tolosa, Eduardo; Högl, Birgit; Poewe, Werner

    2011-02-01

    We applied diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) including measurements of mean diffusivity (MD), a parameter of brain tissue integrity, fractional anisotropy (FA), a parameter of neuronal fiber integrity, as well as voxel-based morphometry (VBM), a measure of gray and white matter volume, to detect brain tissue changes in patients with idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (iRBD). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 26 patients with iRBD (mean disease duration, 9.2 ± 6.4 years) and 14 age-matched healthy control subjects. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was applied to objectively identify focal changes of MRI parameters throughout the entire brain volume. SPM localized significant decreases of FA in the tegmentum of the midbrain and rostral pons and increases of MD within the pontine reticular formation overlapping with a cluster of decreased FA in the midbrain (p < 0.001). VBM revealed increases of gray matter densities in both hippocampi of iRBD patients (p < 0.001). The observed changes in the pontomesencephalic brainstem localized 2 areas harboring key neuronal circuits believed to be involved in the regulation of REM sleep and overlap with areas of structural brainstem damage causing symptomatic RBD in humans. Bilateral increases in gray matter density of the hippocampus suggest functional neuronal reorganization in this brain area in iRBD. This study indicates that DTI detects distinct structural brainstem tissue abnormalities in iRBD in the regions where REM is modulated. Further studies should explore the relationship between MRI pathology and the risk of patients with iRBD of developing alpha-synuclein-related neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson disease. Copyright © 2010 American Neurological Association.

  15. Changes of calf muscle-tendon biomechanical properties induced by passive-stretching and active-movement training in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Heng; Wu, Yi-Ning; Hwang, Miriam; Ren, Yupeng; Gao, Fan; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2011-08-01

    Biomechanical properties of calf muscles and Achilles tendon may be altered considerably in children with cerebral palsy (CP), contributing to childhood disability. It is unclear how muscle fascicles and tendon respond to rehabilitation and contribute to improvement of ankle-joint properties. Biomechanical properties of the calf muscle fascicles of both gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and soleus (SOL), including the fascicle length and pennation angle in seven children with CP, were evaluated using ultrasonography combined with biomechanical measurements before and after a 6-wk treatment of passive-stretching and active-movement training. The passive force contributions from the GM and SOL muscles were separated using flexed and extended knee positions, and fascicular stiffness was calculated based on the fascicular force-length relation. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon, including resting length, cross-sectional area, and stiffness, were also evaluated. The 6-wk training induced elongation of muscle fascicles (SOL: 8%, P = 0.018; GM: 3%, P = 0.018), reduced pennation angle (SOL: 10%, P = 0.028; GM: 5%, P = 0.028), reduced fascicular stiffness (SOL: 17%, P = 0.128; GM: 21%, P = 0.018), decreased tendon length (6%, P = 0.018), increased Achilles tendon stiffness (32%, P = 0.018), and increased Young's modulus (20%, P = 0.018). In vivo characterizations of calf muscles and Achilles tendon mechanical properties help us better understand treatment-induced changes of calf muscle-tendon and facilitate development of more effective treatments.

  16. Changes of calf muscle-tendon biomechanical properties induced by passive-stretching and active-movement training in children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Heng; Wu, Yi-Ning; Hwang, Miriam; Ren, Yupeng; Gao, Fan; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Biomechanical properties of calf muscles and Achilles tendon may be altered considerably in children with cerebral palsy (CP), contributing to childhood disability. It is unclear how muscle fascicles and tendon respond to rehabilitation and contribute to improvement of ankle-joint properties. Biomechanical properties of the calf muscle fascicles of both gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and soleus (SOL), including the fascicle length and pennation angle in seven children with CP, were evaluated using ultrasonography combined with biomechanical measurements before and after a 6-wk treatment of passive-stretching and active-movement training. The passive force contributions from the GM and SOL muscles were separated using flexed and extended knee positions, and fascicular stiffness was calculated based on the fascicular force-length relation. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon, including resting length, cross-sectional area, and stiffness, were also evaluated. The 6-wk training induced elongation of muscle fascicles (SOL: 8%, P = 0.018; GM: 3%, P = 0.018), reduced pennation angle (SOL: 10%, P = 0.028; GM: 5%, P = 0.028), reduced fascicular stiffness (SOL: 17%, P = 0.128; GM: 21%, P = 0.018), decreased tendon length (6%, P = 0.018), increased Achilles tendon stiffness (32%, P = 0.018), and increased Young's modulus (20%, P = 0.018). In vivo characterizations of calf muscles and Achilles tendon mechanical properties help us better understand treatment-induced changes of calf muscle-tendon and facilitate development of more effective treatments. PMID:21596920

  17. Muscle Recruitment and Coordination following Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy with Electrical Stimulation on Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaishou Xu

    Full Text Available To investigate changes of muscle recruitment and coordination following constraint-induced movement therapy, constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation, and traditional occupational therapy in treating hand dysfunction.In a randomized, single-blind, controlled trial, children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy were randomly assigned to receive constraint-induced movement therapy (n = 22, constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation (n = 23, or traditional occupational therapy (n = 23. Three groups received a 2-week hospital-based intervention and a 6-month home-based exercise program following hospital-based intervention. Constraint-induced movement therapy involved intensive functional training of the involved hand during which the uninvolved hand was constrained. Electrical stimulation was applied on wrist extensors of the involved hand. Traditional occupational therapy involved functional unimanual and bimanual training. All children underwent clinical assessments and surface electromyography (EMG at baseline, 2 weeks, 3 and 6 months after treatment. Surface myoelectric signals were integrated EMG, root mean square and cocontraction ratio. Clinical measures were grip strength and upper extremity functional test.Constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation group showed both a greater rate of improvement in integrated EMG of the involved wrist extensors and cocontraction ratio compared to the other two groups at 3 and 6 months, as well as improving in root mean square of the involved wrist extensors than traditional occupational therapy group (p<0.05. Positive correlations were found between both upper extremity functional test scores and integrated EMG of the involved wrist as well as grip strength and integrated EMG of the involved wrist extensors (p<0.05.Constraint-induced movement therapy plus electrical stimulation is likely to produce the best outcome in improving muscle recruitment

  18. Sustained Overexpression of IGF-1 Prevents Age-Dependent Decrease in Charge Movement and Intracellular Ca2+ in Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, María Laura; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2002-01-01

    In this work we tested the hypothesis that transgenic sustained overexpression of IGF-1 prevents age-dependent decreases in charge movement and intracellular Ca(2+) in skeletal muscle fibers. To this end, short flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle fibers from 5-7- and 21-24-month-old FVB (wild-type) and S1S2 (IGF-1 transgenic) mice were studied. Fibers were voltage-clamped in the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique according to described procedures (Wang, Z. M., M. L. Messi,...

  19. Abnormal Activation of RhoA/ROCK-I Signaling in Junctional Zone Smooth Muscle Cells of Patients With Adenomyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Duan, H; Zhang, Y; Sun, F Q

    2016-03-01

    Adenomyosis (ADS) is a common estrogen-dependent gynecological disease with unknown etiology. The RhoA/Rho-kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway is involved in various cellular functions, including migration, proliferation, and smooth muscle contraction. Here we examined the potential role of this pathway in junctional zone (JZ) contraction in women with and without ADS. We demonstrated that in the normal JZ, RhoA and ROCK-I messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression was significantly higher in the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle than in the secretory phase. Expression of RhoA and ROCK-I in the JZ from women with ADS was significantly higher than in the control women and showed no significant differences across the menstrual cycle. Treatment of JZ smooth muscle cells (JZSMCs) with estrogen at 0, 1, 10, or 100 nmol/L for 24 hours resulted in increased expression of RhoA, ROCK-I, and myosin light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation (p-MLC) in a dose-dependent manner. In parallel to its effects on p-MLC, estrogen-mediated, dose-dependent contraction responses in JZSMCs. Estrogen-mediated contraction in the ADS group was significantly higher than in the controls and also showed no significant differences across the menstrual cycle. These effects were suppressed in the presence of ICI 182780 or Y27632, supporting an estrogen receptor-dependent and RhoA activation-dependent mechanism. Our results indicate that the level of RhoA and ROCK-I increases in patients with ADS and the cyclic change is lost. Estrogen may affect uterine JZ contraction of ADS by enhancing RhoA/ ROCK-I signaling. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Respiratory muscle activity and respiratory obstruction after abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, A; Drummond, G B

    2006-04-01

    Respiratory movements in patients after abdominal surgery are frequently abnormal, with associated disturbances in the pattern of inspiratory pressure generation. The reasons for these abnormalities are not clear and have been attributed to impaired action of the diaphragm. However, an alternative is that partial airway obstruction could trigger reflex activation of the inspiratory ribcage muscles, which would cause a similar pattern of inspiratory pressure change. Direct measurement of electrical activity can indicate if reflex activation of inspiratory muscles occurs when partial airway obstruction is present. In an open study, we implanted electrodes to measure the EMG of scalene, intercostal and external oblique abdominal muscles in patients after lower abdominal surgery. Analgesia was with morphine i.v. by patient control. We used nasal cannulae to measure nasal airflow and compared EMG activity when airway obstruction was present with activity when breathing was not obstructed. The pattern of activity of the different muscles was distinct. Intercostal activity reached a maximum during inspiration, before the scalene muscles, whereas scalene activity increased in phase with increasing lung volume. Abdominal muscle activity commenced when expiratory flow had ceased and continued until the next inspiration. In all three muscle groups, partial airway obstruction did not alter muscle activity. Partial airway obstruction does not activate inspiratory ribcage muscles, in patients receiving morphine for postoperative analgesia after lower abdominal surgery. Changes in respiratory pressures and abnormalities of chest wall movement described in previous studies cannot be attributed to reflex responses and probably result from increased airway resistance and abdominal muscle action.

  1. Lasting improvements in left spatial neglect following a protocol combining neck-muscle vibration and voluntary arm movements: a case-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyte, Hadrien; Beis, Jean-Marie; Simon, Mathilde; Rémy, Ariane; Anxionnat, René; Paysant, Jean; Caudron, Sébastien

    2018-01-22

    Beyond promising experimental results of sensory passive stimulations in spatial cognition disorders, some questions still remain regarding interests of these stimulations during the daily activities in neglect. The aim of this case-study was to evaluate the effects of a protocol combining left neck-muscle vibration with daily simple movements, like arm pointing movements, on perceptivo-locomotor deficits in a left spatial neglect patient. Two neuropsychological tests, one subjective straight-ahead pointing (SSA) test and one wheelchair navigation test were carried out before the combination protocol, immediately after, 1 h later, and 24 h later. The results showed a reduction of neglect spatial bias following the protocol lasted at least 24 h in all the tests (except for the SSA test due to the unavailability of the pointing device). The range of improvements in the symptoms of spatial neglect suggests that this therapeutic intervention based on the combining neck-muscle vibration to voluntary arm movements could be a useful treatment for this condition. One of future investigation axes should be the development of a vibratory tool in order to facilitate the combining this proprioceptive stimulation to daily activities. Implications for rehabilitation Spatial neglect is a perplexing neuropsychological syndrome, affecting different domains of spatial cognition and impacting also the functional domain. The treatments based on neck-muscle vibration are simple to use, non-invasive and requires none active participation of patient. A therapeutic intervention based on the combining left neck-muscle vibration and voluntary arm movements in a left-spatial-neglect show a lasting reduction of symptoms especially in daily activities. The combination of treatments based on the Bottom-Up approach opens innovative perspectives in rehabilitation.

  2. Motor Control Abnormalities in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Pietro; Shabbott, Britne; Cortés, Juan Camilo

    2012-01-01

    The primary manifestations of Parkinson’s disease are abnormalities of movement, including movement slowness, difficulties with gait and balance, and tremor. We know a considerable amount about the abnormalities of neuronal and muscle activity that correlate with these symptoms. Motor symptoms can also be described in terms of motor control, a level of description that explains how movement variables, such as a limb’s position and speed, are controlled and coordinated. Understanding motor symptoms as motor control abnormalities means to identify how the disease disrupts normal control processes. In the case of Parkinson’s disease, movement slowness, for example, would be explained by a disruption of the control processes that determine normal movement speed. Two long-term benefits of understanding the motor control basis of motor symptoms include the future design of neural prostheses to replace the function of damaged basal ganglia circuits, and the rational design of rehabilitation strategies. This type of understanding, however, remains limited, partly because of limitations in our knowledge of normal motor control. In this article, we review the concept of motor control and describe a few motor symptoms that illustrate the challenges in understanding such symptoms as motor control abnormalities. PMID:22675667

  3. Effects of regular heel-raise training aimed at the soleus muscle on dynamic balance associated with arm movement in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Katsuo; Toyama, Hiroshi; Asai, Hitoshi; Yaguchi, Chie; Irei, Mariko; Naka, Masami; Kaida, Chizuru

    2011-09-01

    The effects of low-intensity muscle training with heel-raises on dynamic balance associated with bilateral arm flexion were investigated in postmenopausal elderly women. Twenty-six elderly women were evenly grouped into training and control groups. Training group subjects performed 100 heel raises per day for 2 months. The training was aimed at hypertrophy of the soleus muscle, which has a relatively high proportion (ca. 90%) of slow-twitch muscle fibers and is one of the main postural muscles. Dynamic balance was measured while arm flexion was performed in response to a visual stimulus (simple-reaction condition) or at the subjects' own pace (own-timing condition). The following parameters were compared before and after the training period: plantar flexion strength, thicknesses of the gastrocnemius and soleus (by ultrasound), reaction time of the anterior deltoid in the simple-reaction condition, activation onset timing of postural muscles with respect to the deltoid, movement angles of ankle and hip joints, and postural fluctuation. In the training group only, the following training-related effects were demonstrated: (a) increase in plantar flexor strength and thickness of the soleus, (b) shortening of the deltoid reaction time, (c) earlier activation of the erector spinae in the simple-reaction condition and the soleus in the own-timing condition, and (d) increase in ankle movement in the own-timing condition and a decrease in postural fluctuation. This heel-raise training in the elderly can increase soleus thickness within the triceps surae and improve postural control modality and stability that are effectively contributed to by the leg muscle. This training consists of a low-intensity exercise that requires neither special machines nor a specific environment and can be performed safely for all old-aged groups.

  4. Interstitial muscle lactate, pyruvate and potassium dynamics in the trapezius muscle during repetitive low-force arm movements, measured with microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, L; Blangsted, A K; Kristiansen, J

    2004-01-01

    Local muscle metabolic responses to repetitive low-force contractions and to intense static contractions were studied by microdialysis in humans.......Local muscle metabolic responses to repetitive low-force contractions and to intense static contractions were studied by microdialysis in humans....

  5. Sustained overexpression of IGF-1 prevents age-dependent decrease in charge movement and intracellular Ca(2+) in mouse skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, María Laura; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2002-01-01

    In this work we tested the hypothesis that transgenic sustained overexpression of IGF-1 prevents age-dependent decreases in charge movement and intracellular Ca(2+) in skeletal muscle fibers. To this end, short flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle fibers from 5-7- and 21-24-month-old FVB (wild-type) and S1S2 (IGF-1 transgenic) mice were studied. Fibers were voltage-clamped in the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique according to described procedures (Wang, Z. M., M. L. Messi, and O. Delbono. 1999. Biophys. J. 77:2709-2716). Charge movement and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration were recorded simultaneously. The maximum charge movement (Q(max)) recorded in young wild-type and transgenic mice was (mean +/- SEM, in nC microF(-1)): 52 +/- 2.1 (n = 46) and 54 +/- 1.9 (n = 38) (non-significant, ns), respectively, whereas in old wild-type and old transgenic mice the values were 36 +/- 2.1 (n = 32) and 49 +/- 2.3 (n = 35), respectively (p < 0.01). The peak intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)](i) recorded in young wild-type and transgenic mice was (in muM): 14.5 +/- 0.9 and 16 +/- 2.1 (ns), whereas in old wild-type and transgenic mice the values were 9.9 +/- 0.1 and 14 +/- 1.1 (p < 0.01), respectively. No significant changes in the voltage distribution or steepness of the Q-V or [Ca(2+)]-V relationship were found. These data support the concept that overexpression of IGF-1 in skeletal muscle prevents age-dependent reduction in charge movement and peak [Ca(2+)](i). PMID:11867450

  6. Comparison of myoplasmic calcium movements during excitation–contraction coupling in frog twitch and mouse fast-twitch muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingworth, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Single twitch fibers from frog leg muscles were isolated by dissection and micro-injected with furaptra, a rapidly responding fluorescent Ca2+ indicator. Indicator resting fluorescence (FR) and the change evoked by an action potential (ΔF) were measured at long sarcomere length (16°C); ΔF/FR was scaled to units of ΔfCaD, the change in fraction of the indicator in the Ca2+-bound form. ΔfCaD was simulated with a multicompartment model of the underlying myoplasmic Ca2+ movements, and the results were compared with previous measurements and analyses in mouse fast-twitch fibers. In frog fibers, sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release evoked by an action potential appears to be the sum of two components. The time course of the first component is similar to that of the entire Ca2+ release waveform in mouse fibers, whereas that of the second component is severalfold slower; the fractional release amounts are ∼0.8 (first component) and ∼0.2 (second component). Similar results were obtained in frog simulations with a modified model that permitted competition between Mg2+ and Ca2+ for occupancy of the regulatory sites on troponin. An anatomical basis for two release components in frog fibers is the presence of both junctional and parajunctional SR Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors [RyRs]), whereas mouse fibers (usually) have only junctional RyRs. Also, frog fibers have two RyR isoforms, RyRα and RyRβ, whereas the mouse fibers (usually) have only one, RyR1. Our simulations suggest that the second release component in frog fibers functions to supply extra Ca2+ to activate troponin, which, in mouse fibers, is not needed because of the more favorable location of their triadic junctions (near the middle of the thin filament). We speculate that, in general, parajunctional RyRs permit increased myofilament activation in fibers whose triadic junctions are located at the z-line. PMID:23630340

  7. Effect of caffeine on intramembrane charge movement and calcium transients in cut skeletal muscle fibres of the frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, L; Szücs, G

    1983-08-01

    1. The authors have studied the effect of caffeine in subthreshold concentration (0.5 mmol l(-1) at 2-4 degrees C) on the contraction threshold, on intramembrane charge movement and calcium transients in voltage-clamped frog skeletal muscle fibres.2. The single-gap technique (Kovács & Schneider, 1978) was used for the voltage clamping of terminated segments of cut fibres. Ionic conductances were minimized by using caesium glutamate at the open end pool and tetraethylammonium sulphate and tetrodotoxin at the closed end pool.3. Myoplasmic calcium transients evoked by depolarizing pulses were recorded by measuring the changes in absorbance of the fibres at 720 nm after the intracellular application of Antipyrylazo III dye.4. The strength-duration curve for contraction threshold was shifted towards more negative membrane potentials in the presence of caffeine. Shift was more definite at shorter pulse durations than at the rheobase.5. The total amount of charge moving during the depolarizing pulses at different membrane potentials was not changed by caffeine treatment, whereas the threshold amounts of charge moved during the critical periods of the contraction threshold decreased at different voltages (by about 23%).6. In the presence of caffeine, calcium transients accompanying long (100 ms) depolarizing pulses showed increased voltage-dependent peak amplitudes, rising phases and rate coefficients referring to calcium release, but a decreased voltage-dependent re-uptake rate either during or after the pulse.7. Calcium transients evoked by depolarizing pulses along the strength-duration curve for contraction threshold gave the same peak amplitudes (ranging from 0.9 to 2.8 mumol l(-1) free myoplasmic calcium on different fibres), but membrane-potential-dependent latency times and rising phases. The rate coefficients for declining phase did not depend on the preceding pulse voltage.8. On applying caffeine, the calcium transients related to the contraction threshold also

  8. 1988 Volvo award in biomechanics. The triaxial coupling of torque generation of trunk muscles during isometric exertions and the effect of fatiguing isoinertial movements on the motor output and movement patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnianpour, M; Nordin, M; Kahanovitz, N; Frankel, V

    1988-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that reduction of precise motor control accompanies local muscular fatigue. The effects of isodynamic fatiguing of flexion and extension trunk movements on the movement patterns and the motor output of the trunk were investigated. Twenty male subjects with no history of low-back pain for the past 6 months volunteered for the study. A triaxial dynamometer was used that simultaneously provided measurement of torque, angular position and velocity of each axis. Resistances were set independently for each axis by an interfaced computer. The subjects performed trunk flexion and extension movement against a sagittal plane resistance equal to 70% of their maximum isometric extension strength in the upright position. The minimum resistances in the coronal and transverse planes were set up at 7 Newton meters. The subjects were asked to perform trunk movement as quickly and as accurately as possible while exerting the maximum efforts until exhaustion. Analysis of variance, the MANOVA procedure with a repeated measure design, was performed among the selected parameters of the first, middle and last three repetition cycles. The selected parameters are the trunk motor output and movement patterns; the total angular excursion, range of motion, maximum and average torque and angular velocity of the trunk. All the selected parameters were significantly reduced in the sagittal plane. Subjects displayed significantly less motor control and greater range of motion in the coronal and transverse planes in performing the primary task of flexion and extension. The reduction in the functional capacity of the primary muscles performing the required task is compensated by secondary muscle groups and the spinal structure is loaded in a more injury prone pattern, as identified by finite element models. In addition it is suggested that the fatigued muscles would be less able to compensate any perturbation in the load or position of the trunk. The repetitive loading

  9. Intracellular calcium movements during excitation–contraction coupling in mammalian slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingworth, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In skeletal muscle fibers, action potentials elicit contractions by releasing calcium ions (Ca2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Experiments on individual mouse muscle fibers micro-injected with a rapidly responding fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dye reveal that the amount of Ca2+ released is three- to fourfold larger in fast-twitch fibers than in slow-twitch fibers, and the proportion of the released Ca2+ that binds to troponin to activate contraction is substantially smaller. PMID:22450485

  10. Gluteal blood flow and oxygenation during electrical stimulation-induced muscle activation versus pressure relief movements in wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, C A J; Zwinkels, M; van Dijk, T; de Groot, S; Stolwijk-Swuste, J M; Janssen, T W J

    2013-09-01

    Prolonged high ischial tuberosities pressure (IT pressure), decreased regional blood flow (BF) and oxygenation (%SO2) are risk factors for developing pressure ulcers (PUs) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES)-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle activation may improve pressure distribution by changing the shape of the buttocks while sitting and also increase BF and %SO2. To compare acute effects of ES-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle activation with pressure relief movements (PRMs) on IT pressure, BF and %SO2. Twelve men with SCI performed PRMs - push-ups, bending forward and leaning sideward - and received surface ES (87±19 mA) to the gluteal and hamstring muscles while sitting in their wheelchair. Ischial tuberosities pressure was measured using a pressure mapping system; (sub)cutaneous BF and %SO2 were measured using reflection spectroscopy and laser Doppler, respectively. Compared with rest (156±26 mm Hg), IT pressure was significantly lower during all other conditions (push-ups 19±44; bending forward 56±33; leaning sideward 44±38; ES 67±45 mm Hg). For the whole group, all PRMs significantly augmented BF (+39 to -96%) and %SO2 (+6.0 to -7.9%-point), whereas ES-induced muscle activation did only for peak BF. In all, 63% of the participants showed an increased BF (average 52%) with ES. PRMs acutely reduced IT pressure and improved oxygenation and BF in SCI. The currently used ES method cannot replace PRMs, but it may be used additionally. ES-induced muscle activation is not as effective for acute pressure relief, but the frequency of stimulation is much higher than the performance of PRMs and can therefore be more effective in the long term.

  11. Congenital Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Ages and Stages Prenatal Baby (0-12 mos.) Toddler 1-3yrs. Preschool 3-5yrs Grade School ... Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic material inherited from one generation ...

  12. Does focal mechanical stimulation of the lower limb muscles improve postural control and sit to stand movement in elderly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasio, G; Camerota, F; Ralli, M; Galeoto, G; La Torre, G; Galli, M; De Vincentiis, M; Greco, A; Celletti, Claudia

    2018-02-21

    Imbalance in elderly is a common problem strictly related to fall. This study investigates the possibility that a new protocol based on the focal mechanical muscle vibration may improve balance and stability in elderly. Pre-post non-randomized clinical trial has been used. Patients referring postural disequilibrium with negative vestibular bed-side examinations have been treated with focal muscle vibration applied to quadriceps muscles and evaluated before and immediately after therapy and after 1 week and after 1 month with postural stabilometric examination and with an inertial measurement units during the time up and go test. Stabilometric analysis showed statistically significant differences in both the area (p = 0.01) and sway (p elderly patients improve postural stability and mobility.

  13. Levator plate movement during voluntary pelvic floor muscle contraction in subjects with incontinence and prolapse: a cross-sectional study and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Judith A; O'Sullivan, Peter B

    2003-06-01

    Transabdominal ultrasound was used to assess 104 women with incontinence and prolapse. The bladder was used as a marker of levator plate (LP) movement. The women were asked to draw in and lift the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) and a change in position of the LP in a cranial or caudal direction during contraction was documented. Three different patterns of movement of the LP were identified, with 38% of subjects elevating and 43% of subjects depressing the LP; 19% had no change in LP movement. In the stress incontinence group there was a higher than expected number that elevated the LP. In the urgency and prolapse groups there was a higher than expected number of subjects that depressed the LP ( P=0.008).The results highlight three different subgroups based on the patients' attempt to initiate elevation of the LP. Subjects who depressed the LP when instructed to elevate it appeared to adopt straining strategies via the generation of intra-abdominal pressure. Depression of the LP may have long-term negative implications for prolapse and incontinence.

  14. An explorative, cross-sectional study into abnormal muscular coupling during reach in chronic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stienen Arno HA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many stroke patients arm function is limited, which can be related to an abnormal coupling between shoulder and elbow joints. The extent to which this can be translated to activities of daily life (ADL, in terms of muscle activation during ADL-like movements, is rather unknown. Therefore, the present study examined the occurrence of abnormal coupling on functional, ADL-like reaching movements of chronic stroke patients by comparison with healthy persons. Methods Upward multi-joint reaching movements (20 repetitions at a self-selected speed to resemble ADL were compared in two conditions: once facilitated by arm weight compensation and once resisted to provoke a potential abnormal coupling. Changes in movement performance (joint angles and muscle activation (amplitude of activity and co-activation between conditions were compared between healthy persons and stroke patients using a repeated measures ANOVA. Results The present study showed slight changes in joint excursion and muscle activation of stroke patients due to shoulder elevation resistance during functional reach. Remarkably, in healthy persons similar changes were observed. Even the results of a sub-group of the more impaired stroke patients did not point to an abnormal coupling between shoulder elevation and elbow flexion during functional reach. Conclusions The present findings suggest that in mildly and moderately affected chronic stroke patients ADL-like arm movements are not substantially affected by abnormal synergistic coupling. In this case, it is implied that other major contributors to limitations in functional use of the arm should be identified and targeted individually in rehabilitation, to improve use of the arm in activities of daily living.

  15. Abnormal mitochondria in Rett syndrome: one case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, S C; Chi, C S; Chen, C H; Shian, W J

    1993-08-01

    A 6-year-9-month-old girl with the characteristic features of Rett syndrome is reported. Clinically, she had microcephaly, psychomotor arrest, deterioration of communication, autistic behaviour, loss of language development, gait apraxia and stereotyped hand washing movement. Amino acid and organic acid analysis were normal. An abnormal rise in serum lactate was noted 120 minutes after oral glucose loading. Muscle biopsy was performed and there was no specific finding noted under light microscope. Electron microscopic evaluation revealed mild accumulation of mitochondria at subsarcolemmal area with abnormal tubular cristae. The cause of Rett syndrome remains obscure. Several articles concerning abnormal mitochondrial morphology or respiratory enzymes have been reported. The exact pathogenesis requires further investigation.

  16. Influence of Gravity Compensation on Muscle Activation Patterns During Different Temporal Phases of Arm Movements of Stroke Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prange, Grada Berendina; Jannink, M.J.A.; Stienen, Arno; van der Kooij, Herman; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Arm support to help compensate for the effects of gravity may improve functional use of the shoulder and elbow during therapy after stroke, but gravity compensation may alter motor control. Objective. To obtain quantitative information on how gravity compensation influences muscle

  17. Effects of a feedback signal in a computer mouse on movement behaviour, muscle load, productivity, comfort and user friendliness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, E.M. de; Kraker, H. de; Bongers, P.M.; Lingen, P. van

    2008-01-01

    To study the effects of a tactile feedback signal in a computer mouse on reduction of hovering behaviour and consequently on changes in muscle load, productivity, comfort and user friendliness, a comparative, experimental study with repeated measures was conducted. Fifteen subjects performed five

  18. Articulate torque and electromyographic activity of biceps femoris and semitendinosus muscles during isokinetic knee flexion movements in soccer athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Bodnariuc Fontes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to analyze the articulate torque (TO and the electromyographic activity (EMG of soccer athlete’s long head Biceps Femoris (BF and Semitendinosus (ST muscles during isokinetic knee fl exion movements (concentric-CON and eccentric-ECC actions at differing velocities, carried out in the ventral decubitus position. Fourteen soccer players aged 19 and 20 years old (71.2 ± 6.5 kg, 176.6 ± 6.4 cm were enrolled from the Associação Atlética Ponte Preta under- 20 team. They followed a protocol specifying 5 repetitions of fl exion (CON and ECC action of the knee at three velocities (60, 180 and 300º/s at random. The recovery interval between series adopted was 3 minutes. EMG Activity was recorded using surface electrodes and data were expressed in terms of root mean squares (RMS. Statistical analysis employed analysis of variance (Friedman test for repeated measures followed by the Wilcoxon test when necessary, with the level of signifi cance set at P ABSTRACT O objetivo do presente estudo foi analisar o torque articular (TO e a atividade eletromiográfi ca (EMG dos músculos Bíceps Femoral (BF cabeça longa e semitendíneo (ST durante movimentos isocinéticos de fl exão do joelho (ação concêntrica-CON e excêntrica-EXC, em diferentes velocidades de execução, na posição de decúbito ventral em atletas de futebol. Fizeram parte do estudo 14 atletas de futebol da equipe sub-20, da Associação Atlética Ponte Preta, com idade entre 19 e 20 anos (71,24 ± 6,53 kg, 176,59 ± 6,44 cm. Os atletas realizaram uma série de cinco repetições de fl exão (ação CON e EXC do joelho, em 3 velocidades (60, 180 e 300°/s, defi nidas anteriormente aleatoriamente. O intervalo de recuperação adotado entre as séries foi de 3 minutos. A atividade EMG foi coletada, utilizando-se eletrodos de superfície e os dados foram expressos em root mean square (RMS. Para análise estatística, foi empregada a análise de vari

  19. Meiotic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Abnormal lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle tissue of patients with muscular dystrophy: In vitro, high-resolution NMR spectroscopy based observation in early phase of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Niraj Kumar; Yadav, Ramakant; Mukherjee, Somnath; Pal, Lily; Sinha, Neeraj

    2017-05-01

    Qualitative (assignment of lipid components) and quantitative (quantification of lipid components) analysis of lipid components were performed in skeletal muscle tissue of patients with muscular dystrophy in early phase of the disease as compared to control/normal subjects. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy based experiment was performed on the lipid extract of skeletal muscle tissue of patients with muscular dystrophy in early phase of the disease and normal individuals for the analysis of lipid components [triglycerides, phospholipids, total cholesterol and unsaturated fatty acids (arachidonic, linolenic and linoleic acid)]. Specimens of muscle tissue were obtained from patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) [n=11; Age, Mean±SD; 9.2±1.4years; all were males], Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) [n=12; Age, Mean±SD; 21.4±5.0years; all were males], facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) [n=11; Age, Mean±SD; 23.7±7.5years; all were males] and limb girdle muscular dystrophy-2B (LGMD-2B) [n=18; Age, Mean±SD; 24.2±4.1years; all were males]. Muscle specimens were also obtained from [n=30; Mean age±SD 23.1±6.0years; all were males] normal/control subjects. Assigned lipid components in skeletal muscle tissue were triglycerides (TG), phospholipids (PL), total cholesterol (CHOL) and unsaturated fatty acids (arachidonic, linolenic and linoleic acid)]. Quantity of lipid components was observed in skeletal muscle tissue of DMD, BMD, FSHD and LGMD-2B patients as compared to control/normal subjects. TG was significantly elevated in muscle tissue of DMD, BMD and LGMD-2B patients. Increase level of CHOL was found only in muscle of DMD patients. Level of PL was found insignificant for DMD, BMD and LGMD-2B patients. Quantity of TG, PL and CHOL was unaltered in the muscle of patients with FSHD as compared to control/normal subjects. Linoleic acids were significantly reduced in muscle tissue of DMD, BMD, FSHD and LGMD-2B as compared to normal

  1. Acceleration of the sliding movement of actin filaments with the use of a non-motile mutant myosin in in vitro motility assays driven by skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Iwase

    Full Text Available We examined the movement of an actin filament sliding on a mixture of normal and genetically modified myosin molecules that were attached to a glass surface. For this purpose, we used a Dictyostelium G680V mutant myosin II whose release rates of Pi and ADP were highly suppressed relative to normal myosin, leading to a significantly extended life-time of the strongly bound state with actin and virtually no motility. When the mixing ratio of G680V mutant myosin II to skeletal muscle HMM (heavy myosin was 0.01%, the actin filaments moved intermittently. When they moved, their sliding velocities were about two-fold faster than the velocity of skeletal HMM alone. Furthermore, sliding movements were also faster when the actin filaments were allowed to slide on skeletal muscle HMM-coated glass surfaces in the motility buffer solution containing G680V HMM. In this case no intermittent movement was observed. When the actin filaments used were copolymerized with a fusion protein consisting of Dictyostelium actin and Dictyostelium G680V myosin II motor domain, similar faster sliding movements were observed on skeletal muscle HMM-coated surfaces. The filament sliding velocities were about two-fold greater than the velocities of normal actin filaments. We found that the velocity of actin filaments sliding on skeletal muscle myosin molecules increased in the presence of a non-motile G680V mutant myosin motor.

  2. Abnormal pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength findings in Chinese patients with Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy--comparison with normal elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Shao, Wei-bo; Gao, Li; Lu, Jie; Gu, Hao; Sun, Li-hua; Tan, Yan; Zhang, Ying-dong

    2014-01-01

    There have been limited comparative data regarding the investigations on pulmonary and respiratory muscle function in the patients with different parkinsonism disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) versus normal elderly. The present study is aiming to characterize the performance of pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength in PD and MSA, and to investigate the association with severity of motor symptoms and disease duration. Pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength tests were performed in 30 patients with PD, 27 with MSA as well as in 20 age-, sex-, height-, weight-matched normal elderly controls. All the patients underwent United Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) or united multiple system atrophy rating scale (UMSARS) separately as diagnosed. Vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity decreased, residual volume and ratio of residual volume to total lung capacity increased in both PD and MSA groups compared to controls (pRespiratory muscle strength was lower in both PD and MSA groups than in controls (pfunction and respiratory muscle strength were found to have a negative linear correlation with mean score of UPDRS-III in PD and mean score of UMSARS-I in MSA. Respiratory muscle strength showed a negative linear correlation with the mean score of UMSARS-II and disease duration in MSA patients. These findings suggest that respiratory dysfunction is involved in PD and MSA. Respiratory muscle strength is remarkably reduced, and some of the parameters correlate with disease duration and illness severity. The compromised respiratory function in neurodegenerative disorders should be the focus of further researches.

  3. Acute administration of ivacaftor to people with cystic fibrosis and a G551D-CFTR mutation reveals smooth muscle abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Ryan J.; Hisert, Katherine B.; Dodd, Jonathan D.; Grogan, Brenda; Launspach, Janice L.; Barnes, Janel K.; Gallagher, Charles G.; Sieren, Jered P.; Gross, Thomas J.; Fischer, Anthony J.; Cavanaugh, Joseph E.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Singh, Pradeep K.; Welsh, Michael J.; McKone, Edward F.; Stoltz, David A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Airflow obstruction is common in cystic fibrosis (CF), yet the underlying pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. People with CF often exhibit airway hyperresponsiveness, CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is present in airway smooth muscle (ASM), and ASM from newborn CF pigs has increased contractile tone, suggesting that loss of CFTR causes a primary defect in ASM function. We hypothesized that restoring CFTR activity would decrease smooth muscle tone in people with CF. METHODS. To increase or potentiate CFTR function, we administered ivacaftor to 12 adults with CF with the G551D-CFTR mutation; ivacaftor stimulates G551D-CFTR function. We studied people before and immediately after initiation of ivacaftor (48 hours) to minimize secondary consequences of CFTR restoration. We tested smooth muscle function by investigating spirometry, airway distensibility, and vascular tone. RESULTS. Ivacaftor rapidly restored CFTR function, indicated by reduced sweat chloride concentration. Airflow obstruction and air trapping also improved. Airway distensibility increased in airways less than 4.5 mm but not in larger-sized airways. To assess smooth muscle function in a tissue outside the lung, we measured vascular pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index, which both decreased following CFTR potentiation. Finally, change in distensibility of <4.5-mm airways correlated with changes in PWV. CONCLUSIONS. Acute CFTR potentiation provided a unique opportunity to investigate CFTR-dependent mechanisms of CF pathogenesis. The rapid effects of ivacaftor on airway distensibility and vascular tone suggest that CFTR dysfunction may directly cause increased smooth muscle tone in people with CF and that ivacaftor may relax smooth muscle. FUNDING. This work was funded in part from an unrestricted grant from the Vertex Investigator-Initiated Studies Program. PMID:27158673

  4. Walking abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a mental disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  5. MRI for the demonstration of subclinical muscle involvement in muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sookhoo, S.; MacKinnon, I.; Bushby, K.; Chinnery, P.F.; Birchall, D.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with clinical examination for the detection of muscle abnormality in patients with muscular dystrophy. Methods: Muscle power in 20 patients with a variety of forms of muscular dystrophy was examined clinically using the Medical Research Council (MRC) grading scale, and patients were subsequently imaged with MRI. MRI and clinical examination for the detection of muscle normality and abnormality were compared using a McNemar chi-squared test to examine differences between the two methods. Results: MRI demonstrated radiological evidence of muscle abnormality more often than clinical examination; 50% of movements assessed as normal on clinical examination were associated with muscle abnormalities on MRI, including a significant proportion where there was severe radiological abnormality, indicating that focally advanced disease may be undetectable clinically. Conclusion: The combination of clinical examination and MRI could improve the accuracy of phenotypic characterization of patients with muscular dystrophy, and this in turn could allow a more focussed molecular analysis through muscle biopsy or genetic investigation. This may also be very helpful in the assessment of the degree of muscle compromise not only in the early phases of the disease but especially during follow-up and can be used in therapeutic trials

  6. Functional Movement Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychogenic movement may develop as part of a conversion disorder (in which a psychological event causes physical symptoms ... distracted. Many individuals with psychogenic tremor have a conversion disorder. Psychogenic dystonia involves involuntary muscle contractions that cause ...

  7. Altered pharyngeal muscles in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Liancai; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Chen, Jingming; Su, Hungxi; Sanders, Ira; Adler, Charles H; Shill, Holly A; Caviness, John N; Samanta, Johan E; Beach, Thomas G

    2012-06-01

    Dysphagia (impaired swallowing) is common in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and is related to aspiration pneumonia, the primary cause of death in PD. Therapies that ameliorate the limb motor symptoms of PD are ineffective for dysphagia. This suggests that the pathophysiology of PD dysphagia may differ from that affecting limb muscles, but little is known about potential neuromuscular abnormalities in the swallowing muscles in PD. This study examined the fiber histochemistry of pharyngeal constrictor and cricopharyngeal sphincter muscles in postmortem specimens from 8 subjects with PD and 4 age-matched control subjects. Pharyngeal muscles in subjects with PD exhibited many atrophic fibers, fiber type grouping, and fast-to-slow myosin heavy chain transformation. These alterations indicate that the pharyngeal muscles experienced neural degeneration and regeneration over the course of PD. Notably, subjects with PD with dysphagia had a higher percentage of atrophic myofibers versus with those without dysphagia and controls. The fast-to-slow fiber-type transition is consistent with abnormalities in swallowing, slow movement of food, and increased tone in the cricopharyngeal sphincter in subjects with PD. The alterations in the pharyngeal muscles may play a pathogenic role in the development of dysphagia in subjects with PD.

  8. Perspectives on functional and hyperkinetic movement disorders : Phenomenology & pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Salm, S.M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Functional movement disorders (FMD), previously known as conversion disorders or psychogenic movement disorders, are abnormal movements which cannot be attributed to other neurological disorders. FMD are frequently encountered in movement disorder outpatient clinics. Yet, most neurologists consider

  9. Is ankle contracture after stroke due to abnormal intermuscular force transmission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diong, Joanna; Herbert, Robert D

    2015-02-01

    Contracture after stroke could be due to abnormal mechanical interactions between muscles. This study examined if ankle plantarflexor muscle contracture after stroke is due to abnormal force transmission between the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Muscle fascicle lengths were measured from ultrasound images of soleus muscles in five subjects with stroke and ankle contracture and six able-bodied subjects. Changes in soleus fascicle length or pennation during passive knee extension at fixed ankle angle were assumed to indicate intermuscular force transmission. Changes in soleus fascicle length or pennation were adjusted for changes in ankle motion. Subjects with stroke had significant ankle contracture. After adjustment for ankle motion, 9 of 11 subjects demonstrated small changes in soleus fascicle length with knee extension, suggestive of intermuscular force transmission. However, the small changes in fascicle length may have been artifacts caused by movement of the ultrasound transducers. There were no systematic differences in change in fascicle length (median between-group difference adjusting for ankle motion = -0.01, 95% CI -0.26-0.08 mm/degree of knee extension) or pennation (-0.05, 95% CI -0.15-0.07 degree/ degree of knee extension). This suggests ankle contractures after stroke were not due to abnormal (systematically increased or decreased) intermuscular force transmission between the gastrocnemius and soleus.

  10. Chest wall abnormalities and their clinical significance in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumbourlis, Anastassios C

    2014-09-01

    The thorax consists of the rib cage and the respiratory muscles. It houses and protects the various intrathoracic organs such as the lungs, heart, vessels, esophagus, nerves etc. It also serves as the so-called "respiratory pump" that generates the movement of air into the lungs while it prevents their total collapse during exhalation. In order to be performed these functions depend on the structural and functional integrity of the rib cage and of the respiratory muscles. Any condition (congenital or acquired) that may affect either one of these components is going to have serious implications on the function of the other. Furthermore, when these abnormalities occur early in life, they may affect the growth of the lungs themselves. The following article reviews the physiology of the respiratory pump, provides a comprehensive list of conditions that affect the thorax and describes their effect(s) on lung growth and function. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Mildly abnormal general movement quality in infants is associated with higher Mead acid and lower arachidonic acid and shows a U-shaped relation with the DHA/AA ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Goor, S A; Schaafsma, A; Erwich, J J H M; Dijck-Brouwer, D A J; Muskiet, F A J

    2010-01-01

    We showed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation during pregnancy and lactation was associated with more mildly abnormal (MA) general movements (GMs) in the infants. Since this finding was unexpected and inter-individual DHA intakes are highly variable, we explored the relationship between GM quality and erythrocyte DHA, arachidonic acid (AA), DHA/AA and Mead acid in 57 infants of this trial. MA GMs were inversely related to AA, associated with Mead acid, and associated with DHA/AA in a U-shaped manner. These relationships may indicate dependence of newborn AA status on synthesis from linoleic acid. This becomes restricted during the intrauterine period by abundant de novo synthesis of oleic and Mead acids from glucose, consistent with reduced insulin sensitivity during the third trimester. The descending part of the U-shaped relation between MA GMs and DHA/AA probably indicates DHA shortage next to AA shortage. The ascending part may reflect a different developmental trajectory that is not necessarily unfavorable. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Alterations in upper limb muscle synergy structure in chronic stroke survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymer, William Z.; Perreault, Eric J.; Yoo, Seng Bum; Beer, Randall F.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies in neurologically intact subjects have shown that motor coordination can be described by task-dependent combinations of a few muscle synergies, defined here as a fixed pattern of activation across a set of muscles. Arm function in severely impaired stroke survivors is characterized by stereotypical postural and movement patterns involving the shoulder and elbow. Accordingly, we hypothesized that muscle synergy composition is altered in severely impaired stroke survivors. Using an isometric force matching protocol, we examined the spatial activation patterns of elbow and shoulder muscles in the affected arm of 10 stroke survivors (Fugl-Meyer synergies were identified using non-negative matrix factorization. In both groups, muscle activation patterns could be reconstructed by combinations of a few muscle synergies (typically 4). We did not find abnormal coupling of shoulder and elbow muscles within individual muscle synergies. In stroke survivors, as in controls, two of the synergies were comprised of isolated activation of the elbow flexors and extensors. However, muscle synergies involving proximal muscles exhibited consistent alterations following stroke. Unlike controls, the anterior deltoid was coactivated with medial and posterior deltoids within the shoulder abductor/extensor synergy and the shoulder adductor/flexor synergy in stroke was dominated by activation of pectoralis major, with limited anterior deltoid activation. Recruitment of the altered shoulder muscle synergies was strongly associated with abnormal task performance. Overall, our results suggest that an impaired control of the individual deltoid heads may contribute to poststroke deficits in arm function. PMID:23155178

  13. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... agenesis) of the tissue connecting the left and right halves of the brain ( corpus callosum ). The brain abnormalities can cause severe intellectual disability and developmental delay, abnormal muscle stiffness (spasticity), weak ...

  14. Deregulation of the protocadherin gene FAT1 alters muscle shapes: implications for the pathogenesis of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Caruso

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Generation of skeletal muscles with forms adapted to their function is essential for normal movement. Muscle shape is patterned by the coordinated polarity of collectively migrating myoblasts. Constitutive inactivation of the protocadherin gene Fat1 uncoupled individual myoblast polarity within chains, altering the shape of selective groups of muscles in the shoulder and face. These shape abnormalities were followed by early onset regionalised muscle defects in adult Fat1-deficient mice. Tissue-specific ablation of Fat1 driven by Pax3-cre reproduced muscle shape defects in limb but not face muscles, indicating a cell-autonomous contribution of Fat1 in migrating muscle precursors. Strikingly, the topography of muscle abnormalities caused by Fat1 loss-of-function resembles that of human patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD. FAT1 lies near the critical locus involved in causing FSHD, and Fat1 mutant mice also show retinal vasculopathy, mimicking another symptom of FSHD, and showed abnormal inner ear patterning, predictive of deafness, reminiscent of another burden of FSHD. Muscle-specific reduction of FAT1 expression and promoter silencing was observed in foetal FSHD1 cases. CGH array-based studies identified deletion polymorphisms within a putative regulatory enhancer of FAT1, predictive of tissue-specific depletion of FAT1 expression, which preferentially segregate with FSHD. Our study identifies FAT1 as a critical determinant of muscle form, misregulation of which associates with FSHD.

  15. Deregulation of the Protocadherin Gene FAT1 Alters Muscle Shapes: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Nathalie; Herberth, Balàzs; Bartoli, Marc; Puppo, Francesca; Dumonceaux, Julie; Zimmermann, Angela; Denadai, Simon; Lebossé, Marie; Roche, Stephane; Geng, Linda; Magdinier, Frederique; Attarian, Shahram; Bernard, Rafaelle; Maina, Flavio; Levy, Nicolas; Helmbacher, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Generation of skeletal muscles with forms adapted to their function is essential for normal movement. Muscle shape is patterned by the coordinated polarity of collectively migrating myoblasts. Constitutive inactivation of the protocadherin gene Fat1 uncoupled individual myoblast polarity within chains, altering the shape of selective groups of muscles in the shoulder and face. These shape abnormalities were followed by early onset regionalised muscle defects in adult Fat1-deficient mice. Tissue-specific ablation of Fat1 driven by Pax3-cre reproduced muscle shape defects in limb but not face muscles, indicating a cell-autonomous contribution of Fat1 in migrating muscle precursors. Strikingly, the topography of muscle abnormalities caused by Fat1 loss-of-function resembles that of human patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD). FAT1 lies near the critical locus involved in causing FSHD, and Fat1 mutant mice also show retinal vasculopathy, mimicking another symptom of FSHD, and showed abnormal inner ear patterning, predictive of deafness, reminiscent of another burden of FSHD. Muscle-specific reduction of FAT1 expression and promoter silencing was observed in foetal FSHD1 cases. CGH array-based studies identified deletion polymorphisms within a putative regulatory enhancer of FAT1, predictive of tissue-specific depletion of FAT1 expression, which preferentially segregate with FSHD. Our study identifies FAT1 as a critical determinant of muscle form, misregulation of which associates with FSHD. PMID:23785297

  16. Gender difference in association between appendicular skeletal muscle mass and cardiometabolic abnormalities in normal-weight and obese adults: Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) IV-3 and V-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehee

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether the relationships of appendicular muscle mass (ASM) with insulin resistance (IR) and metabolic syndrome (MS) vary by gender or obesity. Data of 10 146 normal-weight and obese men and women aged 19 to 93 years from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2009 and 2010 were analyzed. In normal-weight men and women, unadjusted odds ratio (OR) of being MS and IR significantly increased with lower ASM/wt. After adjusting for lifestyle factors, these ORs were still significant in normal-weight men but not in women. After controlling for other covariates, lower ASM/wt was related to higher risk for IR but not to MS in obese men. In obese women, relationship of lower ASM/wt with higher risk for MS disappeared after adjusting for covariates. Association between skeletal muscle mass and cardiometabolic abnormalities is dependent on gender and obesity in Korean adults. © 2012 APJPH.

  17. Cortex integrity relevance in muscle synergies in severe chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana eGarcía-Cossio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent experimental evidence has indicated that the motor system coordinates muscle activations through a linear combination of muscle synergies that are specified at the spinal or brainstem networks level. After stroke upper limb impairment is characterized by abnormal patterns of muscle activations or synergies. Objective: This study aimed at characterizing the muscle synergies in severely affected chronic stroke patients. Furthermore, the influence of integrity of the sensorimotor cortex on synergy modularity and its relation with motor impairment was evaluated. Methods: Surface electromyography from 33 severely impaired chronic stroke patients was recorded during six bilateral movements. Muscle synergies were extracted and synergy patterns were correlated with motor impairment scales. Results: Muscle synergies extracted revealed different physiological patterns dependent on the preservation of the sensorimotor cortex. Patients without intact sensorimotor cortex showed a high preservation of muscle synergies. On the contrary, patients with intact sensorimotor cortex showed poorer muscle synergies preservation and an increase in new generated synergies. Furthermore, the preservation of muscle synergies correlated positively with hand functionality in patients with intact sensorimotor cortex and subcortical lesions only.Conclusions: Our results indicate that severely paralyzed chronic stroke patient with intact sensorimotor cortex might sculpt new synergy patterns as a response to maladaptive compensatory strategies.

  18. Disconjugate eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straumann, Dominik

    2007-01-01

    To foveate targets in different depths, the movements of the two eyes must be disconjugate. Fine measurements of eye rotations about the three principal axes have demonstrated that disconjugate eye movements may appear not only in the horizontal, but also in the vertical and torsional directions. In the presence of visual targets, disconjugate eye movements are driven by the vergence system, but they may also appear during vestibular stimulation. Disconjugate eye movements are highly adaptable by visual disparities, but under normal condition the effects of adaptation only persist when one eye is covered. Finally, disorders of the brainstem and cerebellum may lead to abnormal disconjugate eye movements that are often specific for the topography of the lesion. This chapter reviews the literature on the phenomenology of disconjugate eye movements over the last 15 years.

  19. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E.; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J.; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B.; Bowman, Frederick P.; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; Waxman, Aaron B.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.; Maron, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10−9 to 10−7 M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor–small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro. Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo. Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.—Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery

  20. Effect of muscle fatigue on posture control in soccer players during the short-pass movement. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n5p348

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Manfredini Baroni

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Muscle fatigue is characterized by the inability to generate or maintain an expected effort or force level and negatively affects sports performance. One of the functional consequences of fatigue is a decrease in static and dynamic postural stability. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of muscle fatigue induced by high-intensity exercise on the dynamic postural stability of soccer players during the characteristic motor action of the sport: the short-pass. Twenty-seven male soccer players aged 14 to 16 years performed the short-pass movement on a stabilometric platform before and after a high-intensity exercise protocol performed on a cycle ergometer. After the fatigue protocol, the athletes presented a 31% increase in the mean velocity of the center of pressure displacement. Moreover, although the difference in the center of pressure displacement amplitude in the medial-lateral direction (15% was not significant, displacement increased by 22% in the anterior-posterior direction. It was concluded that muscle fatigue promotes a decrease of postural stability during the short-pass movement in soccer players, probably compromising the sports performance of the athletes.

  1. The Influence of Plantar Short Foot Muscle Exercises on Foot Posture and Fundamental Movement Patterns in Long-Distance Runners, a Non-Randomized, Non-Blinded Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sulowska

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of two kinds of plantar short foot muscles exercise on foot posture and fundamental movement patterns in long-distance runners.A parallel group non-blinded trial with 6-week follow-up.Twenty five long-distance runners aged 22-35 years. They were divided into two groups. In group 1 (n = 13 subjects performed the exercise "Vele's Forward Lean" and "Reverse Tandem Gait" and in Group 2 (n = 12 the "Short Foot Exercise." The runners performed the exercises daily for 6 weeks. The Foot Posture Index (FPI-6 and The Functional Movement Screen (FMS tests were performed twice: at baseline and after 6 weeks of the exercise.A significant improvement was observed in FPI -6 (talar head palpation in Group 1, and inversion/eversion of the calcaneus in Group 2. Also in Group 1 a significant improvement was noted in FMS tests: deep squat, active straight leg raise and in total score.Short foot muscles strengthening exercises have beneficial effect on functional movement patterns and on foot posture, therefore they should be included as a part of daily training program of runners.Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12615001200572.

  2. The Influence of Plantar Short Foot Muscle Exercises on Foot Posture and Fundamental Movement Patterns in Long-Distance Runners, a Non-Randomized, Non-Blinded Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulowska, Iwona; Oleksy, Łukasz; Mika, Anna; Bylina, Dorota; Sołtan, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of two kinds of plantar short foot muscles exercise on foot posture and fundamental movement patterns in long-distance runners. Design A parallel group non-blinded trial with 6-week follow-up. Methods Twenty five long-distance runners aged 22–35 years. They were divided into two groups. In group 1 (n = 13) subjects performed the exercise “Vele’s Forward Lean” and “Reverse Tandem Gait” and in Group 2 (n = 12) the “Short Foot Exercise.” The runners performed the exercises daily for 6 weeks. The Foot Posture Index (FPI-6) and The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) tests were performed twice: at baseline and after 6 weeks of the exercise. Results A significant improvement was observed in FPI -6 (talar head palpation in Group 1, and inversion/eversion of the calcaneus in Group 2). Also in Group 1 a significant improvement was noted in FMS tests: deep squat, active straight leg raise and in total score. Conclusions Short foot muscles strengthening exercises have beneficial effect on functional movement patterns and on foot posture, therefore they should be included as a part of daily training program of runners. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12615001200572 PMID:27336689

  3. Passive leg movement enhances interstitial VEGF protein, endothelial cell proliferation, and eNOS mRNA content in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Rufener, Nora; Nielsen, Jens J

    2008-01-01

    were analyzed for mRNA content of VEGF, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). The passive leg movement caused an increase (P ... to cultured endothelial cells revealed that dialysate obtained during leg movement induced a 3.2-fold higher proliferation rate (P MMP-2 mRNA levels were......The present study used passive limb movement as an experimental model to study the effect of increased blood flow and passive stretch, without enhanced metabolic demand, in young healthy male subjects. The model used was 90 min of passive movement of the leg leading to a 2.8-fold increase (P

  4. Simultaneous bilateral contracture of the infraspinatus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franch, J; Bertran, J; Remolins, G; Fontecha, P; Díaz-Bertrana, M C; Durall, I

    2009-01-01

    A case of bilateral fibrotic contracture of the infraspinatus muscles in a five-year-old Belgian Shepherd dog is described. The dog was presented with progressive forelimb lameness with postural and gait abnormalities three months after an episode of overexertion. When walking, the lower part of both forelimbs swung in a lateral arc causing a circumduction movement and in the standing position, the dog showed elbow adduction with external rotation of the distal part of both front limbs. Orthopaedic examination revealed bilateral atrophy of both infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscles and restriction in the range of motion of both shoulders, especially when attempting abduction and flexion. No specific findings were observed in the shoulder or elbow radiographs but hyperechogenic areas were evident in the ultrasonographic examination of both infraspinatus muscles. A diagnosis of fibrotic contracture of both infraspinatus muscles was established and bilateral tenectomy of the insertion tendons of the infraspinatus muscles was performed. Complete recovery of the animal was achieved after the surgery, which was confirmed in a long-term follow-up (10 months). In conclusion, physical examination and ultrasonography allowed a proper diagnosis of the condition, and tenectomy of the infraspinatus muscles resulted in a complete recovery of the patient even with bilateral involvement.

  5. Abnormal visuomotor processing in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siân E. Robson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subtle disturbances of visual and motor function are known features of schizophrenia and can greatly impact quality of life; however, few studies investigate these abnormalities using simple visuomotor stimuli. In healthy people, electrophysiological data show that beta band oscillations in sensorimotor cortex decrease during movement execution (event-related beta desynchronisation (ERBD, then increase above baseline for a short time after the movement (post-movement beta rebound (PMBR; whilst in visual cortex, gamma oscillations are increased throughout stimulus presentation. In this study, we used a self-paced visuomotor paradigm and magnetoencephalography (MEG to contrast these responses in patients with schizophrenia and control volunteers. We found significant reductions in the peak-to-peak change in amplitude from ERBD to PMBR in schizophrenia compared with controls. This effect was strongest in patients who made fewer movements, whereas beta was not modulated by movement in controls. There was no significant difference in the amplitude of visual gamma between patients and controls. These data demonstrate that clear abnormalities in basic sensorimotor processing in schizophrenia can be observed using a very simple MEG paradigm.

  6. Painful unilateral temporalis muscle enlargement: reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsetos, Christos D; Bianchi, Michael A; Jaffery, Fizza; Koutzaki, Sirma; Zarella, Mark; Slater, Robert

    2014-06-01

    An instance of isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy (reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy with fiber type 1 predominance) confirmed by muscle biopsy with histochemical fiber typing and image analysis in a 62 year-old man is reported. The patient presented with bruxism and a painful swelling of the temple. Absence of asymmetry or other abnormalities of the craniofacial skeleton was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and cephalometric analyses. The patient achieved symptomatic improvement only after undergoing botulinum toxin injections. Muscle biopsy is key in the diagnosis of reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy and its distinction from masticatory muscle myopathy (hypertrophic branchial myopathy) and other non-reactive causes of painful asymmetric temporalis muscle enlargement.

  7. Abnormal Head Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Abnormal Head Position En Español Read in Chinese What is an abnormal head posture? An abnormal or compensatory head posture occurs ...

  8. Gluteal blood flow and oxygenation during electrical stimulation-induced muscle activation versus pressure relief movements in wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C. A.J.; Zwinkels, M.; Van Dijk, T.; De Groot, S.; Stolwijk-Swuste, J. M.; Janssen, T. W.J.

    Background:Prolonged high ischial tuberosities pressure (IT pressure), decreased regional blood flow (BF) and oxygenation (%SO2) are risk factors for developing pressure ulcers (PUs) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES)-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle

  9. Gluteal blood flow and oxygenation during electrical stimulation-induced muscle activation versus pressure relief movements in wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C. A. J.; Zwinkels, M.; van Dijk, T.; de Groot, S.; Stolwijk-Swuste, J. M.; Janssen, T. W. J.

    Background: Prolonged high ischial tuberosities pressure (IT pressure), decreased regional blood flow (BF) and oxygenation (%SO2) are risk factors for developing pressure ulcers (PUs) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES)-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle

  10. Ground Reaction Force in Sit-to-stand Movement Reflects Lower Limb Muscle Strength and Power in Community-dwelling Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taishi Tsuji

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Ground reaction force parameters in an STS movement can accurately reflect the dynamic strength and power in the lower limbs, which is approximately equal to or better than the strength and power reflected by the five-times STS test.

  11. Muscle-skeletal model of the thigh: a tool for understanding the biomechanics of gait in patients with cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravera, Emiliano Pablo; Catalfamo Formento, Paola Andrea; Crespo, Marcos José; Braidot, Ariel Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral Palsy represents the most common cause of physical disability in modern world and within the pediatrics orthopedics units. The gait analysis provides great contributions to the understanding of gait disorders in CP. Giving a more comprehensive treatment plan, including or excluding surgical procedures that can potentially decrease the number of surgical interventions in the life of these patients. Recommendations for orthopedic surgery may be based on a quantitative description of how to alter the properties probably muscle force generation, and how this affects the action of the muscle to determine how these muscles, impaired by disease or surgery, contributing to the movement of the segments of the limb during crouch gait. So the causes and appropriate treatment of gait abnormalities are difficult to determine because the movements generated by the muscular forces of these patients are not clearly understood. A correct determination of the etiology of abnormal patterns of the knee is the key to select the appropriate therapy, presenting a major challenge at present since there is no theoretical basis to determine the biomechanical causes of abnormal gait of these patients. The potential and necessity of using correct biomechanical models that consistently study the abnormalities becomes clear. Reinforcing and correcting a simple gait analysis and eliminating the unknowns when selecting the appropriate treatment is crucial in clinical settings. In this paper a computer muscle-skeletal model is proposed. The model represents a person's thigh simulating the six most representative muscles and joints of the hip and knee. In this way you can have a better understanding of gait abnormalities present in these patients. So the quality of these estimates of individual muscle dynamics facilitate better understanding of the biomechanics of gait pathologies helping to reach better diagnosis prior to surgery and rehabilitation treatments.

  12. Muscle-skeletal model of the thigh: a tool for understanding the biomechanics of gait in patients with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravera, Emiliano Pablo; Catalfamo Formento, Paola Andrea; José Crespo, Marcos; Andrés Braidot, Ariel

    2011-12-01

    Cerebral Palsy represents the most common cause of physical disability in modern world and within the pediatrics orthopedics units. The gait analysis provides great contributions to the understanding of gait disorders in CP. Giving a more comprehensive treatment plan, including or excluding surgical procedures that can potentially decrease the number of surgical interventions in the life of these patients. Recommendations for orthopedic surgery may be based on a quantitative description of how to alter the properties probably muscle force generation, and how this affects the action of the muscle to determine how these muscles, impaired by disease or surgery, contributing to the movement of the segments of the limb during crouch gait. So the causes and appropriate treatment of gait abnormalities are difficult to determine because the movements generated by the muscular forces of these patients are not clearly understood. A correct determination of the etiology of abnormal patterns of the knee is the key to select the appropriate therapy, presenting a major challenge at present since there is no theoretical basis to determine the biomechanical causes of abnormal gait of these patients. The potential and necessity of using correct biomechanical models that consistently study the abnormalities becomes clear. Reinforcing and correcting a simple gait analysis and eliminating the unknowns when selecting the appropriate treatment is crucial in clinical settings. In this paper a computer muscle-skeletal model is proposed. The model represents a person's thigh simulating the six most representative muscles and joints of the hip and knee. In this way you can have a better understanding of gait abnormalities present in these patients. So the quality of these estimates of individual muscle dynamics facilitate better understanding of the biomechanics of gait pathologies helping to reach better diagnosis prior to surgery and rehabilitation treatments.

  13. Sequencing of genes involved in the movement of calcium across human skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum: continuing the search for genes associated with malignant hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorksten, A R; Gillies, R L; Hockey, B M; Du Sart, D

    2016-11-01

    The genetic basis of malignant hyperthermia (MH) is not fully characterised and likely involves more than just the currently classified mutations in the gene encoding the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor ( RYR1 ) and the gene encoding the α1 subunit of the dihydropyridine receptor ( CACNA1S ). In this paper we sequence other genes involved in calcium trafficking within skeletal muscle in patients with positive in vitro contracture tests, searching for alternative genes associated with MH. We identified four rare variants in four different genes ( CACNB1, CASQ1, SERCA1 and CASQ2 ) encoding proteins involved in calcium handling in skeletal muscle in a cohort of 30 Australian MH susceptible probands in whom prior complete sequencing of RYR1 and CACNA1S had yielded no rare variants. These four variants have very low minor allele frequencies and while it is tempting to speculate that they have a role in MH, they remain at present variants of unknown significance. Nevertheless they provide the basis for a new set of functional studies, which may indeed identify novel players in MH.

  14. Functional Echomyography: thickness, ecogenicity, contraction and perfusion of the LMN denervated human muscle before and during h-bFES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Zanato

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Permanent denervated muscles were evaluated by ultrasound to monitor changes in morphology, thickness, contraction-relaxation kinetics and perfusion due to the electrical stimulation program of the Rise2-Italy project. In a case of monolateral lesion, morphology and ultrasonographic structure of the denervated muscles changed during the period of stimulation from a pattern typical of complete denervation-induced muscle atrophy to a pattern which might be considered “normal” when detected in an old patient. Thickness improved significantly more in the middle third of the denervated muscle, reaching the same value as the contralateral innervated muscle. Contraction-relaxation kinetics, measured by recording the muscle movements during electrical stimulation, showed an abnormal behavior of the chronically denervated muscle during the relaxation phase, which resulted to be significantly longer than in normal muscle. The long-term denervated muscles analyzed with Echo Doppler showed at rest a low resistance arterial flow that became pulsed during and after electrical stimulation. As expected, the ultra sound measured electrical stimulation-induced hyperemia lasted longer than the stimulation period. The higher than normal energy of the delivered electrical stimuli of the Vienna home-based Functional Electrical Stimulation strategy (h-b FES demonstrate that the explored muscles were still almost completely denervated during the one-year of training. In conclusion, this pilot study confirms the usefulness of Functional Echomyography in the follow-up and the positive effects of h-b FES of denervated muscles.

  15. Functional Echomyography of the human denervated muscle: first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Zanato

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we followed with ultrasound three patients with permanent denervation to evaluate changes in morphology, thickness, contraction and vascularisation of muscles undergoing the home-based electrical stimulation program of the Rise2-Italy project. During a period of 1 year for the first subject, 6 months for the second subject and 3 months for the third subject we studied with ultrasound the denervated muscle comparing it (if possible to the contralateral normal muscle. We evaluated: 1. Changes in morphology and sonographic structure of the pathologic muscle; 2. Muscular thickness in response to the electrical stimulation therapy; 3. Short-term modifications in muscle perfusion and arterial flow patterns after stimulation; 4. Contraction-relaxation kinetic induced by volitional activity or electrical stimulation. Morphology and ultrasonographic structure of the denervated muscles changed during the period of stimulation from a pattern typical of complete muscular atrophy to a pattern which might be considered “normal” when detected in an old patient. Thickness improved significantly more in the middle third than in the proximal and distal third of the denervated muscle, reaching in the last measurements of the first subject approximately the same thickness as the contralateral normal muscle. In all the measurements done within this study, arterial flow of the denervated muscle showed at rest a low-resistance pattern with Doppler Ultra Sound (US, and a pulsed pattern after electrical stimulation. The stimulation- induced pattern is similar to the trifasic high-resistance pattern of the normal muscle. Contraction- relaxation kinetic, measured by recording the muscular movements during electrical stimulation, showed an abnormal behaviour of the denervated muscle during the relaxation phase, which resulted to be significantly longer than in normal muscle (880 msec in the denervated muscle vs 240 msec in the contralateral normal one

  16. Sensory aspects of movement disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neepa; Jankovic, Joseph; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Movement disorders, which include disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, dystonia, Tourette’s syndrome, restless legs syndrome, and akathisia, have traditionally been considered to be disorders of impaired motor control resulting predominantly from dysfunction of the basal ganglia. This notion has been revised largely because of increasing recognition of associated behavioural, psychiatric, autonomic, and other non-motor symptoms. The sensory aspects of movement disorders include intrinsic sensory abnormalities and the effects of external sensory input on the underlying motor abnormality. The basal ganglia, cerebellum, thalamus, and their connections, coupled with altered sensory input, seem to play a key part in abnormal sensorimotor integration. However, more investigation into the phenomenology and physiological basis of sensory abnormalities, and about the role of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and related structures in somatosensory processing, and its effect on motor control, is needed. PMID:24331796

  17. Simulating the effect of muscle weakness and contracture on neuromuscular control of normal gait in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Aaron S; Carty, Christopher P; Modenese, Luca; Barber, Lee A; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2018-03-01

    Altered neural control of movement and musculoskeletal deficiencies are common in children with spastic cerebral palsy (SCP), with muscle weakness and contracture commonly experienced. Both neural and musculoskeletal deficiencies are likely to contribute to abnormal gait, such as equinus gait (toe-walking), in children with SCP. However, it is not known whether the musculoskeletal deficiencies prevent normal gait or if neural control could be altered to achieve normal gait. This study examined the effect of simulated muscle weakness and contracture of the major plantarflexor/dorsiflexor muscles on the neuromuscular requirements for achieving normal walking gait in children. Initial muscle-driven simulations of walking with normal musculoskeletal properties by typically developing children were undertaken. Additional simulations with altered musculoskeletal properties were then undertaken; with muscle weakness and contracture simulated by reducing the maximum isometric force and tendon slack length, respectively, of selected muscles. Muscle activations and forces required across all simulations were then compared via waveform analysis. Maintenance of normal gait appeared robust to muscle weakness in isolation, with increased activation of weakened muscles the major compensatory strategy. With muscle contracture, reduced activation of the plantarflexors was required across the mid-portion of stance suggesting a greater contribution from passive forces. Increased activation and force during swing was also required from the tibialis anterior to counteract the increased passive forces from the simulated dorsiflexor muscle contracture. Improvements in plantarflexor and dorsiflexor motor function and muscle strength, concomitant with reductions in plantarflexor muscle stiffness may target the deficits associated with SCP that limit normal gait. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Tooth - abnormal colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  19. Urine - abnormal color

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  20. Abnormal uterine bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovulatory bleeding; Abnormal uterine bleeding - hormonal; Polymenorrhea - dysfunctional uterine bleeding ... ACOG committee opinion no. 557: Management of acute abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-aged women. Reaffirmed 2015. ACOG. ...

  1. Muscle Selection for Focal Limb Dystonia

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Illowsky Karp; Katharine Alter

    2017-01-01

    Selection of muscles for botulinum toxin injection for limb dystonia is particularly challenging. Limb dystonias vary more widely in the pattern of dystonic movement and involved muscles than cervical dystonia or blepharospasm. The large variation in how healthy individuals perform skilled hand movements, the large number of muscles in the hand and forearm, and the presence of compensatory actions in patients with dystonia add to the complexity of choosing muscles for injection. In this artic...

  2. Nervous system disruption and concomitant behavioral abnormality in early hatched pufferfish larvae exposed to heavy oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Masahumi; Sugahara, Yuki; Watanabe, Tomoe; Irie, Kouta; Ishida, Minoru; Kurokawa, Daisuke; Kitamura, Shin-Ichi; Takata, Hiromi; Handoh, Itsuki C; Nakayama, Kei; Murakami, Yasunori

    2011-08-01

    Spills of heavy oil (HO) over the oceans have been proven to have an adverse effect on marine life. It has been hypothesized that exposure of early larvae of sinking eggs to HO leads largely to normal morphology, whereas abnormal organization of the developing neural scaffold is likely to be found. HO-induced disruption of the nervous system, which controls animal behavior, may in turn cause abnormalities in the swimming behavior of hatched larvae. To clarify the toxicological effects of HO, we performed exposure experiments and morphological and behavioral analyses in pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes) larvae. Fertilized eggs of pufferfish were exposed to 50 mg/L of HO for 8 days and transferred to fresh seawater before hatching. The hatched larvae were observed for their swimming behavior, morphological appearance, and construction of muscles and nervous system. In HO-exposed larvae, we did not detect any anomaly of body morphology. However, they showed an abnormal swimming pattern and disorganized midbrain, a higher center controlling movement. Our results suggest that HO-exposed fishes suffer developmental disorder of the brain that triggers an abnormal swimming behavior and that HO may be selectively toxic to the brain and cause physical disability throughout the life span of these fishes.

  3. Muscle ultrasound measurements and functional muscle parameters in non-dystrophic myotonias suggest structural muscle changes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, J.; Pillen, S.; Faber, C.G.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Zwarts, M.J.; Drost, G.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with non-dystrophic myotonias, including chloride (myotonia congenita) and sodium channelopathies (paramyotonia congenita/potassium aggravated myotonias), may show muscular hypertrophy in combination with some histopathological abnormalities. However, the extent of muscle changes has never

  4. General movements in early infancy: what do they tell us about the nervous system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadders-Algra, M

    1993-09-01

    Developmental changes in muscle coordination patterns of normal and abnormal general movements (GMs) are described. GMs were studied simultaneously with video-recording and polymyography (polyEMG). GMs of normal full-term infants gradually lose their neonatally slow and 'writhing' character, to be turned into the elegant flow of small movements of 'fidgety' GMs at the age of 2-3 months. This transformation coincides with changes in the polyEMG. Tonic background activity decreases concurrent with a reduction in amplitude and duration of phasic bursts. The coordination between antagonistic muscles does not change, co-activation remains the prevailing pattern. Secondly, preliminary results on healthy preterms (n = 6) are presented. At the examination age of 33-34 weeks postmenstrual age the preterms showed so-called 'preterm' GMs, which are characterized by variation and graceful complexity. EMG burst duration was significantly longer during 'preterm' GMs than during 'writhing' GMs of full-term newborns. The percentage of co-activation during 'preterm' GMs varied considerably. The polyEMG of 'writhing' GMs of two preterms, who were followed longitudinally, differed from that of 'writhing' GMs of full-terms. At 'fidgety' age the EMG differences between preterms and full-terms had disappeared. Finally the first results on abnormal GMs are reported. A synchronized onset of muscle activity in all extremity muscles and 'packaging' of EMG-bursts into subunits of 5-8 Hz. seemed to be specific properties of these abnormal GMs. This could indicate a loss of supraspinal control.

  5. [Stereotypic movements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alvarez, E

    2003-02-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive patterns of movement with certain peculiar features that make them especially interesting. Their physiopathology and their relationship with the neurobehavioural disorders they are frequently associated with are unknown. In this paper our aim is to offer a simple analysis of their dominant characteristics, their differentiation from other processes and a hypothesis of the properties of stereotypic movements, which could all set the foundations for research work into their physiopathology.

  6. [Movement disorders in childhood: therapeutic update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubertie, A; Leydet, J; Rivier, F; Humbertclaude, V; Cheminal, R; Echenne, B

    2004-08-01

    Abnormal movements are not uncommon in childhood. Due to the severity of the abnormal movements or to the functional disability, a medical treatment is often required; the wide range of available pharmacological molecules and the absence of therapeutic consensus highlight the limited efficacy of the medical treatment on dystonic or athetoid movements, or severe tic disorders. The recent identification of the enzymatic defect implicated in metabolic diseases led to the development of specific treatment for newly recognized disorders, with more or less interesting results (creatine ou biotine supplementation). Recent progress in functional neurosurgery opened new fields in the treatment of movement disorders. Intrathecal baclofen was proved effective in the treatment of secondary dystonia, especially in patients with cerebral palsy. Deep brain stimulation is now an established therapy for patients with a generalized dystonic syndrome. Given the successful results of pallidal stimulation in dystonia, the indication of this procedure has been discussed in other types of abnormal movements.

  7. Effects of combination of whey protein intake and rehabilitation on muscle strength and daily movements in patients with hip fracture in the early postoperative period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niitsu, Masaya; Ichinose, Daisuke; Hirooka, Taku; Mitsutomi, Kazuhiko; Morimoto, Yoshitaka; Sarukawa, Junichiro; Nishikino, Shoichi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Kaoru

    2016-08-01

    Elderly patients can be at risk of protein catabolism and malnutrition in the early postoperative period. Whey protein includes most essential amino acids and stimulates the synthesis of muscle protein. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of resistance training in combination with whey protein intake in the early postoperative period. We randomized patients to a whey protein group or a control group. The former group received 32.2 g of whey protein pre- and post-rehabilitation in the early postoperative period for two weeks. Outcomes were knee extension strength on either side by Biodex 4.0, and the ability of transfer, walking, toilet use and stair use by the Barthel Index (BI). We performed initial and final assessments in the second and tenth rehabilitation sessions. A total of 38 patients were recruited: 20 in the whey protein group and 18 in the control group. Participants in the whey protein group showed significantly greater improvement in knee extension strength in the operated limb compared with the control group (F = 6.11, P = 0.02). The non-operated limb also showed a similar tendency (F = 3.51, P = 0.07). The abilities of transfer, walking and toilet use showed greater improvements in the whey protein group than in the control group by BI (P whey protein intake and rehabilitation for two weeks in the early postoperative period has a beneficial effect on knee extension strength in both lower limbs and BI (transfer, walking and toilet use) scores in patients with hip fracture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  8. Muscle as a secretory organ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the body. Skeletal muscles are primarily characterized by their mechanical activity required for posture, movement, and breathing, which depends on muscle fiber contractions. However, skeletal muscle is not just a component in our locomotor system. Recent...... evidence has identified skeletal muscle as a secretory organ. We have suggested that cytokines and other peptides that are produced, expressed, and released by muscle fibers and exert either autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine effects should be classified as "myokines." The muscle secretome consists...... of several hundred secreted peptides. This finding provides a conceptual basis and a whole new paradigm for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs such as adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, bones, and brain. In addition, several myokines exert their effects within the muscle itself. Many...

  9. Determination of the spatial movement of the temporomandibular joints (tmj joint heads in patients with muscle and joint dysfunction according to computed tomography (ct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аркадий Максимович Боян

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT is the one of most objective diagnostic methods of TMJ MJD it allows define amplitudes of joint heads movement in sagittal projections to detect an asymmetry of TMJ elements location.Aim of research. Assessment of location of mandibular joint heads and determination of its spatial position in patients with TMJ MJD before treatment and after it using CT.Materials and methods. 50 patients 28-62 years old, 37 women and 13 men who underwent computed tomography (CT of TMJ were under observation.The results of observation were analyzed in details.The studies were carried out using cone-radial computed tomographic scanner «Vatech Pax uni 3d». CT of TMJ was carried out in habitual occlusion before the start of treatment and after removal of TMJ MJD symptoms and complaints. At the study there were measured the width of joint fissure in front, upper and back segments according to N.A. Rabuhina methodology in N.E. Androsova and so-authors modification. Statistical analysis of the data received was carried out using «Statistics» (Statsoft, Inc program.Results. The results of TMJ CT in patients before the start of treatment demonstrated that the sizes of TMJ joint fissure were different. The width of the upper segment of TMJ joint fissure in patients before the start of treatment was reliably less (≤0,001 comparing with an analogous parameter in the group of patients after treatment that indicates the upper location of mandibular head in TMJ with reducing the height of the lower segment of face.So the data of study of the joint fissure width received using TMJ CT demonstrate formation of specific outlines of joint fissure at displacement of mandible and consequently joint head. Information about the joint fissure parameters allows rationally plan and realize orthopedic treatment and the necessary rehabilitation measures in patients with TMJ MJD.Conclusions. The studies demonstrated that the displacements of mandibular joint

  10. [Diabetic muscle infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Bals, Edske; van der Woude, Henk-Jan; Smets, Yves F C

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic muscle infarction is a rare complication of diabetes mellitus that typically presents in the thigh; microvascular abnormalities may play a role. A 32-year-old female presented at the outpatient clinic with a painful, swollen thigh. She had suffered from type 1 diabetes for 22 years. The patient was admitted to the nephrology ward for further evaluation. Deep-venous thrombosis and abscess were excluded with echography. After additional investigations - MRI and a biopsy of skin, muscle and fascia - the diagnosis diabetic muscle infarction was made. The patient was treated with bed rest and analgesics. With hindsight, the muscle biopsy was not actually required in reaching a diagnosis. The diagnosis 'diabetic muscle infarction' is made on the basis of clinical presentation in combination with MRI findings. The treatment consists of bed rest and analgesics.

  11. [Parkinson Disease With Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by lack of muscle atonia during REM sleep and enactment of dream content. RBD is associated with Parkinson disease (PD) and has high incidence in PD patients. PD patient with RBD mainly presents rigid type, has longer disease duration, more severe motor and non-motor symptoms and poorer activity of daily living and life quality. The pathophysiological mechanisms of RBD may be related to dysfunctions of pontine tegmentum, locus coeruleus/sub-locus coeruleus complex and related projections. The diagnosis of RBD depends on clinical histories and video-polysomnography (v-PSG). Besides treatment for PD, protective measures have to be taken for patients and their sleep partners. If abnormal behaviors during sleep cause distress and danger,patients should be given drug therapy.

  12. Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bickerstaffe, Alice; Beelen, Anita; Zwarts, Machiel J.; Nollet, Frans; van Dijk, Johannes P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether muscle ultrasound can distinguish muscles affected by post-polio syndrome (PPS) from healthy muscles and whether severity of ultrasound abnormalities is associated with muscle strength. Echo intensity, muscle thickness, and isometric strength of the quadriceps muscles were

  13. Muscle Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after ... It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves that malfunction. Sometimes ...

  14. Defining Abnormally Low Tenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølykke, Grith Skovgaard; Nyström, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The concept of an abnormally low tender is not defined in EU public procurement law. This article takes an interdisciplinary law and economics approach to examine a dataset consisting of Swedish and Danish judgments and verdicts concerning the concept of an abnormally low tender. The purpose...

  15. Prenatal imaging of distal limb abnormalities using OCT in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, Irina V.; Syed, Saba H.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Overbeek, Paul; Larin, Kirill V.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the limbs are common birth defects. These include missing or extra fingers or toes, abnormal limb length, and abnormalities in patterning of bones, cartilage or muscles. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a 3-D imaging modality, which can produce high-resolution (~8 μm) images of developing embryos with an imaging depth of a few millimeters. Here we demonstrate the capability of OCT to perform 3D imaging of limb development in normal embryos and a mouse model with congenital abnormalities. Our results suggest that OCT is a promising tool to analyze embryonic limb development in mammalian models of congenital defects.

  16. Spatial pattern analysis of nuclear migration in remodelled muscles during Drosophila metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleesha; Feng, Lin; Wasser, Martin

    2017-07-10

    Many human muscle wasting diseases are associated with abnormal nuclear localization. During metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster, multi-nucleated larval dorsal abdominal muscles either undergo cell death or are remodeled to temporary adult muscles. Muscle remodeling is associated with anti-polar nuclear migration and atrophy during early pupation followed by polar migration and muscle growth during late pupation. Muscle remodeling is a useful model to study genes involved in myonuclear migration. Previously, we showed that loss of Cathepsin-L inhibited anti-polar movements, while knockdown of autophagy-related genes affected nuclear positioning along the medial axis in late metamorphosis. To compare the phenotypic effects of gene perturbations on nuclear migration more objectively, we developed new descriptors of myonuclear distribution. To obtain nuclear pattern features, we designed an algorithm to detect and track nuclear regions inside live muscles. Nuclear tracks were used to distinguish between fast moving nuclei associated with fragments of dead muscles (sarcolytes) and slow-moving nuclei inside remodelled muscles. Nuclear spatial pattern features, such as longitudinal (lonNS) and lateral nuclear spread (latNS), allowed us to compare nuclear migration during muscle remodelling in different genetic backgrounds. Anti-polar migration leads to a lonNS decrease. As expected, lack of myonuclear migration caused by the loss of Cp1 was correlated with a significantly lower lonNS decrease. Unexpectedly, the decrease in lonNS was significantly enhanced by Atg9, Atg5 and Atg18 silencing, indicating that the loss of autophagy promotes the migration and clustering of nuclei. Loss of autophagy also caused a scattering of nuclei along the lateral axis, leading to a two-row as opposed to single row distribution in control muscles. Increased latNS resulting from knockdown of Atg9 and Atg18 was correlated with increased muscle diameter, suggesting that the wider muscle

  17. Protest movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucht, D.

    1989-01-01

    The author describes the development of protest movements in postwar Germay and outlines two essential overlapping 'flow cycles'. The first of these was characterised by the restaurative postwar years. It culminated and ended in the students' revolt. This revolt is at the same time the start of a second cycle of protest which encompasses all subsequent individual movement and is initated by an economic, political and sociocultural procrastination of modernisation. This cycle culminates in the late 70s and early 80s and clearly lost momentum over the last few years. The follwoing phases and themes are described profoundly: against restauration and armament in the 1950; the revolutionary impatience of the students' movement, politisation of everyday life by the womens' movement and citizens' action groups, antinuclear- and ecological movement, differentiation and stabilisation of the movement in the 70s and 80s; break-up and continuity in the German protest behaviour. The paper contains a detailed chronicle of protest activities since 1945. (orig.) [de

  18. Nuclear Positioning in Muscle Development and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eFolker

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Muscle disease as a group is characterized by muscle weakness, muscle loss, and impaired muscle function. Although the phenotype is the same, the underlying cellular pathologies, and the molecular causes of these pathologies, are diverse. One common feature of many muscle disorders is the mispositioning of myonuclei. In unaffected individuals myonuclei are spaced throughout the periphery of the muscle fiber such that the distance between nuclei is maximized. However, in diseased muscles, the nuclei are often clustered within the center of the muscle cell. Although this phenotype has been acknowledged for several decades, it is often ignored as a contributor to muscle weakness. Rather, these nuclei are taken only as a sign of muscle repair. Here we review the evidence that mispositioned myonuclei are not merely a symptom of muscle disease but also a cause. Additionally, we review the working models for how myonuclei move from two different perspectives, from that of the nucleus and from that of the cytoskeleton. We further compare and contrast these mechanisms with the mechanisms of nuclear movement in other cell types both to draw general themes for nuclear movement and to identify muscle-specific considerations. Finally, we focus on factors that can be linked to muscle disease and find that genes that regulate myonuclear movement and positioning have been linked to muscular dystrophy. Although the cause-effect relationship is largely speculative, recent data indicate that the position of nuclei should no longer be considered only a means to diagnose muscle disease.

  19. Plant abnormality diagnosis device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Akira.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention diagnose an abnormal event occurred in a large-scaled plant, such as a nuclear power plant. The device comprises the following four functions. (1) Abnormality candidates are estimated based on an intelligence base storing characteristics established between the characteristics/functions and physical amounts of the plant components, and detected abnormality and measured values. Among the candidates, one which coincidents with the measured value such as an actual process amount is judged as a first cause. (2) In addition, a real time plant behavior is estimated based on parameters determining a plant operation mode. The candidate for the abnormality cause is estimated by the comparison between the result of the estimation and the measured value such as a process amount. (3) Characteristics established between the characteristics/functions and the physical amount of the plant components are structured stepwise thereby identifying the first abnormality cause. (4) Inactuated or failed portions of the components for restoring the abnormality to normal state are identified based on the intelligence base simultaneously with the estimation for the first abnormality cause. (I.S.)

  20. [Comprehensive rehabilitation of the subjects presenting with occupational muscular-skeletal abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miriutova, N F; Zaĭtsev, A A; Bartfel'd, N N; Lazarev, V Ia

    2014-01-01

    The methodological approach to the rehabilitative treatment of the subjects presenting with occupational muscular-skeletal abnormalities in the upper limb girdle associated with their occupational activities implies the combined application of a pulsed magnetic field, therapeutic peloids and ultrasound therapy to the neuromuscular apparatus and tendinous-capsular structures of the rotator cuff undergoing dystrophic degeneration. This therapeutic modality makes it possible to improve the biomechanical conditions of the patients by broadening the range of active painless movements in the affected shoulder joint by 42% (p muscular tone at rest by 27% (p 0.05), changing trophicity of periarticular tissues (elevation of the pain sensitivity threshold of tendons and painful indurations in the functionally active muscles of the thoracic girdle of the upper extremity by 76% (p < 0.05). It is concluded that these changes contribute to the improvement of professional activities of the patients.

  1. Muscle Selection for Focal Limb Dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Barbara Illowsky; Alter, Katharine

    2017-12-29

    Selection of muscles for botulinum toxin injection for limb dystonia is particularly challenging. Limb dystonias vary more widely in the pattern of dystonic movement and involved muscles than cervical dystonia or blepharospasm. The large variation in how healthy individuals perform skilled hand movements, the large number of muscles in the hand and forearm, and the presence of compensatory actions in patients with dystonia add to the complexity of choosing muscles for injection. In this article, we discuss approaches to selecting upper and lower extremity muscles for chemodenervation treatment of limb dystonia.

  2. Muscle Selection for Focal Limb Dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Illowsky Karp

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Selection of muscles for botulinum toxin injection for limb dystonia is particularly challenging. Limb dystonias vary more widely in the pattern of dystonic movement and involved muscles than cervical dystonia or blepharospasm. The large variation in how healthy individuals perform skilled hand movements, the large number of muscles in the hand and forearm, and the presence of compensatory actions in patients with dystonia add to the complexity of choosing muscles for injection. In this article, we discuss approaches to selecting upper and lower extremity muscles for chemodenervation treatment of limb dystonia.

  3. Mechanical modeling of skeletal muscle functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, B.J.J.J.

    1998-01-01

    For movement of body or body segments is combined effort needed of the central nervous system and the muscular-skeletal system. This thesis deals with the mechanical functioning of skeletal muscle. That muscles come in a large variety of geometries, suggest the existence of a relation between muscle

  4. Isolated Infraspinatus Atrophy Secondary to Suprascapular Nerve Neuropathy Results in Altered Shoulder Muscles Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contemori, Samuele; Biscarini, Andrea

    2018-01-24

    Isolated infraspinatus atrophy (IIA) is a common condition among overhead-activity athletes, which affects the hitting shoulder and is caused by suprascapular nerve injury. The loss of infraspinatus function could lead to altered activity of the glenohumeral and scapulothoracic muscles and compromise the optimal shoulder function. To assess the surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity patterns, relationships, and response latencies of relevant shoulder girdle muscles in professional volleyball players with IIA and in healthy control players. Cross-sectional study. Research laboratory. Twenty-four male professional volleyball players (12 players with diagnosed IIA and 12 healthy players) recruited from local volleyball teams. sEMG activity of anterior, middle and posterior deltoid, upper, middle and lower trapezius, and serratus anterior was recorded and evaluated during a movement of shoulder abduction in the scapular plane, monitored with an optoelectronic motion capture system. sEMG activity, relationships, and response latencies of the selected muscles were analyzed with ANOVA models, to highlight statistical differences within and between groups. Athletes with IIA demonstrated significant higher deltoid and trapezius muscles activity, and lower serratus anterior activity, compared with the contralateral shoulder and with healthy athletes. The shoulder with IIA also showed a higher activity ratios between the upper trapezius and the other scapulothoracic muscles, in addition to anticipated activation of the upper trapezius and delayed activation of the serratus anterior, with regard to the onset of shoulder movement. The present study highlighted altered shoulder muscle activity levels, scapulothoracic muscles imbalances, and abnormal scapulothoracic recruitment patterns in the hitting shoulder of professional volleyball players with IIA, secondary to suprascapular nerve neuropathy. Such shoulder girdle muscles impairments may compromise the optimal

  5. Relationship between neck muscles functions and hand muscles strenght in musicians

    OpenAIRE

    Vaina, Mindaugas

    2016-01-01

    Relationship Between Neck Muscles Functions and Hand Muscles Strenght in Musicians The aim of research work: to determine the relationship between musicians hand muscle strength, fatigue and neck strength, endurance and movement amplitude. Tasks of work: 1. To evaluate and compare the musicians playing with string and wind instruments neck muscle strength, endurance, range of motion, hand muscle strength and fatigue between the groups as well as commonly used standards. 2. To determine the re...

  6. Chromosomal Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, and other cytogenetic abnormalities among 100 children (64 boys with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence was assessed at the NIMH and Georgetown University Medical Center.

  7. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  8. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  9. Abnormal sound detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Izumi; Matsui, Yuji.

    1995-01-01

    Only components synchronized with rotation of pumps are sampled from detected acoustic sounds, to judge the presence or absence of abnormality based on the magnitude of the synchronized components. A synchronized component sampling means can remove resonance sounds and other acoustic sounds generated at a synchronously with the rotation based on the knowledge that generated acoustic components in a normal state are a sort of resonance sounds and are not precisely synchronized with the number of rotation. On the other hand, abnormal sounds of a rotating body are often caused by compulsory force accompanying the rotation as a generation source, and the abnormal sounds can be detected by extracting only the rotation-synchronized components. Since components of normal acoustic sounds generated at present are discriminated from the detected sounds, reduction of the abnormal sounds due to a signal processing can be avoided and, as a result, abnormal sound detection sensitivity can be improved. Further, since it is adapted to discriminate the occurrence of the abnormal sound from the actually detected sounds, the other frequency components which are forecast but not generated actually are not removed, so that it is further effective for the improvement of detection sensitivity. (N.H.)

  10. Mixed Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2010-01-01

    levels than those related to building, and this exploration is a special challenge and competence implicit artistic development work. The project Mixed Movements generates drawing-material, not primary as representation, but as a performance-based media, making the body being-in-the-media felt and appear......Mixed Movements is a research project engaged in performance-based architectural drawing. Architectonic implementation questions relations between the human body and a body of architecture by the different ways we handle drawing materials. A drawing may explore architectonic problems at other...

  11. Myocardial Rac1 exhibits partial involvement in thyroxin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and its inhibition is not sufficient to improve cardiac dysfunction or contractile abnormalities in mouse papillary muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnakish, Mohammad T; Moldovan, Leni; Khan, Mahmood; Hassanain, Hamdy H; Janssen, Paul M L

    2013-06-01

    : Development of cardiac hypertrophy after thyroxin (T4) treatment is well recognized. Recently, we observed that T4-induced cardiac hypertrophy is associated with increased cardiac Rac1 expression and activity. Whether this Rac1 increase has a role in inducing this cardiac phenotype is, however, still unknown. Here, we showed that T4 treatment (500 µg/kg/d) for 2 weeks resulted in increased myocardial Rac1 activity with subsequent hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and left ventricular systolic dysfunction in vivo. Isolated right ventricular papillary muscles of T4-treated mice maintained their peak isometric active developed tension but exhibited significant decreases in their corresponding time to peak and in relaxation times. Positive inotropic responses to increasing pacing rate and β-adrenergic stimulation were also depressed in these muscles. Pravastatin (10 mg/kg/d), a Rac1 inhibitor, significantly decreased myocardial Rac1 activity, hypertension, and cardiomyocyte size in T4-treated mice but could not attenuate gross heart weight or functional cardiac changes in these mice. Our data showed that T4 could activate different signaling pathways with distinct cardiovascular outcomes. We also provide the first mechanistic evidence for the partial involvement of Rac1 activation in T4-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and reveal a putative role for Rac1 in the development of T4-induced hypertension.

  12. Normal anatomy and abnormal patterns of the supraspinatus muscle: Ultrasound versus surgery. Analysis of the possible sources of misdiagnosis; Anatomia normale e quadri patologici del muscolo sovraspinato: Confronto tra ecografia e chirurgia. Analisi delle possibili fonti di errore diagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montrucchio, Edgardo [Ospedale S. Andrea, La Spezia (Italy); Iovane, Angelo; Midiri, Massimo; Finazzo, Mario; La Tona, Giuseppe; Lagalla, Roberto [Palermo, Univ. (Italy). Istituto di Radiologia ``Piero Cignolini``

    1997-04-01

    The supraspinatus muscle performs about 60 % of the elevation-abduction motion of the arm; it has a prominent functional role among the extra rotational muscles of the shoulder and is the most injured in subacromial space conditions. Seventy-four patients, aged 21-64 years, were examined to compare ultrasonography (US) results with surgical findings in supraspinatus conditions and to analyze the possible pitfalls in US diagnosis. All the patients underwent conventional X-ray US and then surgery or arthroscopy. The following criteria were considered: morphology, thickness, echotexture, the convexity of the superior border of supraspinatus tendon, the relationships with the subacromial bursa and the tendon of the biceps long head, the regularity of the bone cortex of the humeral head. US showed: perforating focal injuries in 21 patients; deep focal injuries in 10 patients; intramural focal injuries in 6 patients; superficial focal injuries in 8 patients; complete tendon tear with detachment in 19 cases. 62/74 US diagnoses were surgically confirmed, with a specificity of 83.7 %. In their experience, US provided very useful information about the pattern, size and site of the injuries and was very helpful in the surgical planning.

  13. Partial muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, N.S.; Hoppel, C.L.

    1987-01-02

    After initiation of ibuprofen therapy, a 45-year-old woman developed muscle weakness and tenderness with rhabdomyolysis, culminating in respiratory failure. A muscle biopsy specimen showed a vacuolar myopathy, and markedly decreased muscle carnitine content and carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity. Following recovery, muscle carnitine content was normal but carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was still abnormally low. The ratio of palmitoyl-coenzyme A plus carnitine to palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by muscle mitochondria isolated from the patient was markedly decreased. The authors conclude that transiently decreased muscle carnitine content interacted with partial deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A to produce rhabdomyolysis and respiratory failure and that ibuprofen may have precipitated the clinical event.

  14. Partial muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, N.S.; Hoppel, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    After initiation of ibuprofen therapy, a 45-year-old woman developed muscle weakness and tenderness with rhabdomyolysis, culminating in respiratory failure. A muscle biopsy specimen showed a vacuolar myopathy, and markedly decreased muscle carnitine content and carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity. Following recovery, muscle carnitine content was normal but carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was still abnormally low. The ratio of palmitoyl-coenzyme A plus carnitine to palmitoylcarnitine oxidation by muscle mitochondria isolated from the patient was markedly decreased. The authors conclude that transiently decreased muscle carnitine content interacted with partial deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-A to produce rhabdomyolysis and respiratory failure and that ibuprofen may have precipitated the clinical event

  15. Striking movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    Like all music performance, percussion playing requires high control over timing and sound properties. Specific to percussionists, however, is the need to adjust the movement to different instruments with varying physical properties and tactile feedback to the player. Furthermore, the well define...

  16. Movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leenders, K.L.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis describes the measurement of brain-tissue functions in patients with movement disorders using positron emission tomography (PET). This scanning technique is a method for direct in vivo quantitation of the regional tissue content of positron emitting radionuclides in brain (or other organs) in an essentially non-invasive way. Ch. 2 outlines some general features of PET and describes the scanner which has been used for the studies in this thesis. Also the tracer methodology, as applied to data investigations of movement disorders, are discussed. Ch. 3 contains the results of the PET investigations which were performed in the study of movement disorders. The results are presented in the form of 12 papers. The main goals of these studies were the understanding of the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, Huntington's chorea, Steele-Richardson-Olzewski syndrome and special case reports. Ch. 4 summarizes the results of these publications and Ch. 5 concludes the main part of this thesis with a general discussion of movement disorders in relation to PET investigations. 697 refs.; 60 figs.; 31 tabs

  17. Psychodynamic Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This chapter/article describes the historical development of the disciplin Psychodynamic Movement. The importance of this disciplin for self-experience and for training in developing a therapist identy for the music therapy students are emphasized. Prototypeexercises developed and simplified...

  18. Rectus abdominis muscle endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goker, A.

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis is characterized by an abnormal existence of functional endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity, typically occuring within the pelvis of women in reproductive age. We report two cases with endometriosis of the abdominal wall; the first one in the rectus abdominis muscle and the second one in the surgical scar of previous caesarean incision along with the rectus abdominis muscle. Pre-operative evaluation included magnetic resonance imaging. The masses were dissected free from the surrounding tissue and excised with clear margins. Diagnosis of the excised lesions were verified by histopathology. (author)

  19. MeCP2 Affects Skeletal Muscle Growth and Morphology through Non Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Conti

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is an autism spectrum disorder mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene and affecting roughly 1 out of 10.000 born girls. Symptoms range in severity and include stereotypical movement, lack of spoken language, seizures, ataxia and severe intellectual disability. Notably, muscle tone is generally abnormal in RTT girls and women and the Mecp2-null mouse model constitutively reflects this disease feature. We hypothesized that MeCP2 in muscle might physiologically contribute to its development and/or homeostasis, and conversely its defects in RTT might alter the tissue integrity or function. We show here that a disorganized architecture, with hypotrophic fibres and tissue fibrosis, characterizes skeletal muscles retrieved from Mecp2-null mice. Alterations of the IGF-1/Akt/mTOR pathway accompany the muscle phenotype. A conditional mouse model selectively depleted of Mecp2 in skeletal muscles is characterized by healthy muscles that are morphologically and molecularly indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice raising the possibility that hypotonia in RTT is mainly, if not exclusively, mediated by non-cell autonomous effects. Our results suggest that defects in paracrine/endocrine signaling and, in particular, in the GH/IGF axis appear as the major cause of the observed muscular defects. Remarkably, this is the first study describing the selective deletion of Mecp2 outside the brain. Similar future studies will permit to unambiguously define the direct impact of MeCP2 on tissue dysfunctions.

  20. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  1. Altered flexion-relaxation responses exist during asymmetric trunk flexion movements among persons with unilateral lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Brad D; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2014-02-01

    Repetitive exposures to altered gait and movement following lower-limb amputation (LLA) have been suggested to contribute to observed alterations in passive tissue properties and neuromuscular control in/surrounding the lumbar spine. These alterations, in turn, may affect the synergy between passive and active tissues during trunk movements. Eight males with unilateral LLA and eight non-amputation controls completed quasi-static trunk flexion-extension movements in seven distinct conditions of rotation in the transverse plane: 0° (sagittally-symmetric), ±15°, ±30°, and ±45° (sagittally-asymmetric). Electromyographic (EMG) activity of the bilateral lumbar erector spinae and lumbar kinematics were simultaneously recorded. Peak lumbar flexion and EMG-off angles were determined, along with the difference ("DIFF") between these two angles and the magnitude of peak normalized EMG activities. Persons with unilateral LLA exhibited altered and asymmetric synergies between active and passive trunk tissues during both sagittally-symmetric and -asymmetric trunk flexion movements. Specifically, decreased and asymmetric passive contributions to trunk movements were compensated with increases in the magnitude and duration of active trunk muscle responses. Such alterations in trunk passive and active neuromuscular responses may result from repetitive exposures to abnormal gait and movement subsequent to LLA, and may increase the risk for LBP in this population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of muscle fatigue using electromygraphm sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmi, Muhammad Hazimin Bin; Ping, Chew Sue; Ishak, Nur Elliza Binti; Saad, Mohd Alimi Bin Mohd; Mokhtar, Anis Shahida Niza Binti

    2017-08-01

    Muscle fatigue is condition of muscle decline in ability after undergoing any physical activity. Observation of the muscle condition of an athlete during training is crucial to prevent or minimize injury and able to achieve optimum performance in actual competition. The aim of this project is to develop a muscle monitoring system to detect muscle fatigue in swimming athlete. This device is capable to measure muscle stress level of the swimmer and at the same time provide indication of muscle fatigue level to trainer. Electromyography signal was recorded from the muscle movement while practicing the front crawl stroke repetitively. The time domain data was processed to frequency spectra in order to study the effect of muscle fatigue. The results show that the recorded EMG signal is able to sense muscle fatigue.

  3. Abnormalities of satellite cells function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradat, Pierre-François; Barani, Aude; Wanschitz, Julia; Dubourg, Odile; Lombès, Anne; Bigot, Anne; Mouly, Vincent; Bruneteau, Gaelle; Salachas, François; Lenglet, Timothée; Meininger, Vincent; Butler-Browne, Gillian

    2011-07-01

    Abstract Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by progressive denervation leading to muscle atrophy prevented, during the early phase, by compensatory reinnervation. Little is known about muscle fibre regeneration capacity in ALS. We have carried out in vivo and in vitro investigation of skeletal muscle in ALS. Seven ALS patients underwent a deltoid muscle biopsy. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed various degrees of denervation- and reinnervation-related changes in the ALS muscle biopsies including satellite cells (SCs) activation and regenerating fibres. Only 3/7 primary cultures of ALS muscle cells were successfully established and had sufficient myogenicity, as assessed by desmin positivity, to be used without further purification. This was in contrast with the cultures derived from control muscles, predominantly desmin-positive cells. Although capable to proliferate in vitro, ALS-derived SCs presented an abnormal senescent-like morphology. Markers of senescence, including senescent-associated (SA)-βGal activity and p16 expression, were increased. Furthermore, ALS-derived SCs were also unable to fully differentiate in vitro as shown by abnormal myotubes morphology and reduced MHC isoform expression, compared to control myotubes. Our study suggests that SC function is altered in ALS. This could limit the efficacy of compensatory processes and therefore could contribute to the progression of muscle atrophy and weakness.

  4. Antinuclear movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Hee; Im, Jaeg Yeong

    1988-08-15

    This book is for antinuclear movement. So, this book introduces many articles on nuclear issues of Asia and the pacific area. The titles of articles are the crusades of Reagan by Werner Plaha, contending between super powers in Europe by Alva Reimer Myrdal, claims of resistance by Daniel Ellsberg, nuclear and the Korean Peninsula by Go, Seung Woo, Liberation but of belief of nuclear weapon by Lee, Young Hee and nuclear weapon in Korea by peter Haze.

  5. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in patients with narcolepsy is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Stine; Gammeltoft, Steen; Jennum, Poul J

    2010-01-01

    cataplexy. Main outcome measures were: rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder symptoms; short and long muscle activations per hour rapid eye movement and non-rapid eye movement sleep; and periodic and non-periodic limb movements per hour rapid eye movement and non-rapid eye movement sleep. Outcome.......01). Likewise, periodic limb movements per hour rapid eye movement and non-rapid eye movement sleep were only associated with hypocretin deficiency (P ... the association of periodic limb movements and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder outcomes (symptoms, non-periodic short and long muscle activity) in rapid eye movement sleep. Our results support the hypothesis that hypocretin deficiency is independently associated with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour...

  6. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...

  7. CT of pleural abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.)

  8. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farida El-Baz

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism. Farida El-Baz a. , Mohamed Saad Zaghloul a. , Ezzat El Sobky a. ,. Reham M Elhossiny a,. *, Heba Salah a. , Neveen Ezy Abdelaziz b a Pediatric Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt b Children with Special ...

  9. Computational movement analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Laube, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief discusses the characteristics of spatiotemporal movement data, including uncertainty and scale. It investigates three core aspects of Computational Movement Analysis: Conceptual modeling of movement and movement spaces, spatiotemporal analysis methods aiming at a better understanding of movement processes (with a focus on data mining for movement patterns), and using decentralized spatial computing methods in movement analysis. The author presents Computational Movement Analysis as an interdisciplinary umbrella for analyzing movement processes with methods from a range of fi

  10. Scapular kinematic and shoulder muscle activity alterations after serratus anterior muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Jun; Kusano, Ken; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Nishishita, Satoru; Tanaka, Hiroki; Shimizu, Itsuroh; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2018-02-23

    Although the serratus anterior muscle has an important role in scapular movement, no study to date has investigated the effect of serratus anterior fatigue on scapular kinematics and shoulder muscle activity. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of serratus anterior fatigue on scapular movement and shoulder muscle activity. The study participants were 16 healthy men. Electrical muscle stimulation was used to fatigue the serratus anterior muscle. Shoulder muscle strength and endurance, scapular movement, and muscle activity were measured before and after the fatigue task. The muscle activity of the serratus anterior, upper and lower trapezius, anterior and middle deltoid, and infraspinatus muscles was recorded, and the median power frequency of these muscles was calculated to examine the degree of muscle fatigue. The muscle endurance and median power frequency of the serratus anterior muscle decreased after the fatigue tasks, whereas the muscle activities of the serratus anterior, upper trapezius, and infraspinatus muscles increased. External rotation of the scapula at the shoulder elevated position increased after the fatigue task. Selective serratus anterior fatigue due to electric muscle stimulation decreased the serratus anterior endurance at the flexed shoulder position. Furthermore, the muscle activities of the serratus anterior, upper trapezius, and infraspinatus increased and the scapular external rotation was greater after serratus anterior fatigue. These results suggest that the rotator cuff and scapular muscle compensated to avoid the increase in internal rotation of the scapula caused by the dysfunction of the serratus anterior muscle. Copyright © 2018 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Muscle pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Summary Points. • Muscle pain, known as myalgia, can be in one targeted area or across many muscles, occurring with overexertion or overuse of these muscles. • Pain can be classified as acute or chronic pain and further categorized as nociceptive or neuropathic. • Causes of muscle pain include stress, physical ...

  12. Pest Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod Bhar

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of woody borders surrounding crop fields is desirable for biodiversity conservation. However, for crop pest management, the desirability of woody borders depends on the trade-off between their effects at the local field scale and the landscape scale. At the local scale, woody borders can reduce pest populations by increasing predation rates, but they can also increase pest populations by providing complementary habitats and reducing movement rate of pests out of crop fields. At the regional scale, woody borders can reduce pest populations by reducing colonization of newly planted crop fields. Our objective was to develop guidelines for maximizing pest control while maintaining woody borders in the landscape. We wished to determine the conditions under which the regional effect of borders on colonization can outweigh local enhancement effects of borders on pest populations. We built a stochastic, individual-based, spatially implicit simulation model of a specialist insect population in a landscape divided into a number of crop fields. We conducted simulations to determine the conditions under which woody borders enhance vs. reduce the regional pest population size. The following factors were considered: landscape fragmentation, crop rotation period, barrier effect of woody borders, disperser success rate, and effect of woody borders on local survival. The simulation results suggest that woody borders are most likely to enhance regional control of crop pests if (1 the woody borders are very effective in reducing insect movement from one crop field to another, and (2 crop rotation is on a very short cycle. Based on these results, our preliminary recommendations are that woody borders should contain dense, tall vegetation to reduce insect movement, and crops should be rotated on as short a cycle as possible. These conditions should ensure that woody borders can be maintained for their conservation value without enhancing crop pest

  13. Radiological and orthopedic abnormalities in Satoyoshi syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haymon, M.L.; Willis, R.B.; Ehlayel, M.S.; Louisiana State Medical Center, New Orleans, LA; Lacassie, Y.; Louisiana State Medical Center, New Orleans, LA; Children's Hospital, New Orleans, LA

    1997-01-01

    Satoyoshi syndrome is a are disorder on unknown etiology characterized by progressive, painful intermittent muscle spasms, serve skeletal abnormalities mimicking a skeletal dyplasia, malabsorption, alopecia, and amenorrhea. We further report on a 20 1 / 2 -year-old Caucasian woman whith characteristic manifestation of the syndrome. Since the establishment of the diagnostic 1 year ago, she has been treated with prednisone with good response. However, treatment of the multiple deformities and fractures has been difficult and challenging. The early recognition and treatment of this disorder is of utmost importance, as the skeletal deformities and fractures seem to be secondary to the muscular spasms, as suggested by Satoyoshi

  14. Radiological and orthopedic abnormalities in Satoyoshi syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haymon, M.L. [Children`s Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Willis, R.B. [Children`s Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Orthopedics; Ehlayel, M.S. [Div. of Genetics, Dept. of Pediatrics, Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, Orleans, LA (United States)]|[Louisiana State Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States). Center for Molecular and Human Genetics; Lacassie, Y. [Div. of Genetics, Dept. of Pediatrics, Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, Orleans, LA (United States)]|[Louisiana State Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States). Center for Molecular and Human Genetics]|[Children`s Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics

    1997-05-01

    Satoyoshi syndrome is a are disorder on unknown etiology characterized by progressive, painful intermittent muscle spasms, serve skeletal abnormalities mimicking a skeletal dyplasia, malabsorption, alopecia, and amenorrhea. We further report on a 20{sup 1}/{sub 2}-year-old Caucasian woman whith characteristic manifestation of the syndrome. Since the establishment of the diagnostic 1 year ago, she has been treated with prednisone with good response. However, treatment of the multiple deformities and fractures has been difficult and challenging. The early recognition and treatment of this disorder is of utmost importance, as the skeletal deformities and fractures seem to be secondary to the muscular spasms, as suggested by Satoyoshi.

  15. Motor imagery reinforces brain compensation of reach-to-grasp movement after cervical spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien eMateo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI that causes tetraplegia are challenged with dramatic sensorimotor deficits. However, certain rehabilitation techniques may significantly enhance their autonomy by restoring reach-to-grasp movements. Among others, evidence of motor imagery (MI benefits for neurological rehabilitation of upper limb movements is growing. This literature review addresses motor imagery (MI effectiveness during reach-to-grasp rehabilitation after tetraplegia. Among articles from MEDLINE published between 1966 and 2015, we selected ten studies including 34 participants with C4 to C7 tetraplegia and 22 healthy controls published during the last fifteen years. We found that MI of possible non-paralyzed movements improved reach-to-grasp performance by i increasing both tenodesis grasp capabilities and muscle strength, ii decreasing movement time, and trajectory variability, and, iii reducing the abnormally increased brain activity. MI can also strengthen motor commands by potentiating recruitment and synchronization of motoneurons, which leads to improved recovery. These improvements reflect brain adaptations induced by MI. Furthermore, MI can be used to control brain computer interfaces (BCI that successfully restore grasp capabilities. These results highlight the growing interest for MI and its potential to recover functional grasping in individuals with tetraplegia, and motivate the need for further studies to substantiate it.

  16. Polysomnography in idiopathic muscle pain syndrome (fibrositis)

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, A. B.; Bertoríni, T. E.; Lemmi, H.

    1991-01-01

    Muscle pain occurs in various neuromuscular disorders with characteristic physiological or biochemical abnormalities. There is, however, a group of patients in whom there is no clear physiological or structural basis for their pains. This syndrome has been called fibrositis or fibromyalgia. Sleep abnormalities have been reported in some of these patients, but have not been confirmed by others. We studied 8 patients with this disorder and found sleep abnormalities that were characterized by no...

  17. Treatment with Riluzole Restores Normal Control of Soleus and Extensor Digitorum Longus Muscles during Locomotion in Adult Rats after Sciatic Nerve Crush at Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmysłowski, Wojciech; Cabaj, Anna M; Sławińska, Urszula

    2017-01-01

    The effects of sciatic nerve crush (SNC) and treatment with Riluzole on muscle activity during unrestrained locomotion were identified in an animal model by analysis of the EMG activity recorded from soleus (Sol) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of both hindlimbs; in intact rats (IN) and in groups of rats treated for 14 days with saline (S) or Riluzole (R) after right limb nerve crush at the 1st (1S and 1R) or 2nd (2S and 2R) day after birth. Changes in the locomotor pattern of EMG activity were correlated with the numbers of survived motor units (MUs) identified in investigated muscles. S rats with 2-8 and 10-28 MUs that survived in Sol and EDL muscles respectively showed increases in the duration and duty factor of muscle EMG activity and a loss of correlation between the duty factors of muscle activity, and abnormal flexor-extensor co-activation 3 months after SNC. R rats with 5, 6 (Sol) and 15-29 MUs (EDL) developed almost normal EMG activity of both Sol and control EDL muscles, whereas EDL muscles with SNC showed a lack of recovery. R rats with 8 (Sol) and 23-33 (EDL) MUs developed almost normal EMG activities of all four muscles. A subgroup of S rats with a lack of recovery and R rats with almost complete recovery that had similar number of MUs (8 and 24-28 vs 8 and 23-26), showed that the number of MUs was not the only determinant of treatment effectiveness. The results demonstrated that rats with SNC failed to develop normal muscle activity due to malfunction of neuronal circuits attenuating EDL muscle activity during the stance phase, whereas treatment with Riluzole enabled almost normal EMG activity of Sol and EDL muscles during locomotor movement.

  18. Treatment with Riluzole Restores Normal Control of Soleus and Extensor Digitorum Longus Muscles during Locomotion in Adult Rats after Sciatic Nerve Crush at Birth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Zmysłowski

    Full Text Available The effects of sciatic nerve crush (SNC and treatment with Riluzole on muscle activity during unrestrained locomotion were identified in an animal model by analysis of the EMG activity recorded from soleus (Sol and extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscles of both hindlimbs; in intact rats (IN and in groups of rats treated for 14 days with saline (S or Riluzole (R after right limb nerve crush at the 1st (1S and 1R or 2nd (2S and 2R day after birth. Changes in the locomotor pattern of EMG activity were correlated with the numbers of survived motor units (MUs identified in investigated muscles. S rats with 2-8 and 10-28 MUs that survived in Sol and EDL muscles respectively showed increases in the duration and duty factor of muscle EMG activity and a loss of correlation between the duty factors of muscle activity, and abnormal flexor-extensor co-activation 3 months after SNC. R rats with 5, 6 (Sol and 15-29 MUs (EDL developed almost normal EMG activity of both Sol and control EDL muscles, whereas EDL muscles with SNC showed a lack of recovery. R rats with 8 (Sol and 23-33 (EDL MUs developed almost normal EMG activities of all four muscles. A subgroup of S rats with a lack of recovery and R rats with almost complete recovery that had similar number of MUs (8 and 24-28 vs 8 and 23-26, showed that the number of MUs was not the only determinant of treatment effectiveness. The results demonstrated that rats with SNC failed to develop normal muscle activity due to malfunction of neuronal circuits attenuating EDL muscle activity during the stance phase, whereas treatment with Riluzole enabled almost normal EMG activity of Sol and EDL muscles during locomotor movement.

  19. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination.......0 years, 45 % males), 327 (51.7 %) presented at the initial visit with ≥1 neurological abnormality and 242 (38 %) reached the main study outcome. Cox regression analyses, adjusting for MRI features and other determinants of functional decline, showed that the baseline presence of any neurological...

  20. Bigorexia: bodybuilding and muscle dysmorphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Philip E

    2009-05-01

    Muscle dysmorphia is an emerging condition that primarily affects male bodybuilders. Such individuals obsess about being inadequately muscular. Compulsions include spending hours in the gym, squandering excessive amounts of money on ineffectual sports supplements, abnormal eating patterns or even substance abuse. In this essay, I illustrate the features of muscle dysmorphia by employing the first-person account of a male bodybuilder afflicted by this condition. I briefly outline the history of bodybuilding and examine whether the growth of this sport is linked to a growing concern with body image amongst males. I suggest that muscle dysmorphia may be a new expression of a common pathology shared with the eating disorders.

  1. How to read an electrocardiogram (ECG). Part 2:Abnormalities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ann Burgess

    Electrical conduction and its abnormalities. Contraction of the heart muscle occurs in response to electrical depolarisation – the rapid spread of electrical activity throughout the myocardium which is facilitated by specialised conduction tissue. This process normally begins with spontaneous depolarisation of cells in the sinus ...

  2. Equipment abnormality monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yasumasa

    1991-01-01

    When an operator hears sounds in a plantsite, the operator compares normal sounds of equipment which he previously heard and remembered with sounds he actually hears, to judge if they are normal or abnormal. According to the method, there is a worry that abnormal conditions can not be appropriately judged in a case where the number of objective equipments is increased and in a case that the sounds are changed gradually slightly. Then, the device of the present invention comprises a plurality of monitors for monitoring the operation sound of equipments, a recording/reproducing device for recording and reproducing the signals, a selection device for selecting the reproducing signals among the recorded signals, an acoustic device for converting the signals to sounds, a switching device for switching the signals to be transmitted to the acoustic device between to signals of the monitor and the recording/reproducing signals. The abnormality of the equipments can be determined easily by comparing the sounds representing the operation conditions of equipments for controlling the plant operation and the sounds recorded in their normal conditions. (N.H.)

  3. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Richter, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The increase in skeletal muscle glucose uptake during exercise results from a coordinated increase in rates of glucose delivery (higher capillary perfusion), surface membrane glucose transport, and intracellular substrate flux through glycolysis. The mechanism behind the movement of GLUT4...

  4. Childhood Laryngeal Dystonia Following Bilateral Globus Pallidus Abnormality: A Case Study and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Saeedi Borujeni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Dystonia is a disorder of movement caused by various etiologies. Laryngeal dystonia is caused by the spasm of laryngeal muscles. It is a disorder caused by vocal fold movement in which excessive adduction or abduction of the vocal folds occurs during speech. The pathophysiology of this type of dystonia is not fully known. Some researchers have suggested that basal ganglia structures and their connections with cortical areas have been involved in the pathogenesis of dystonia. Case Report:In this paper a 7.5-year-old boy suffering from laryngeal dystonia with bilateral lesions in Globus Pallidus is presented. The patient also suffered from swallowing problems, monotone voice, vocal tremor, hypersensitivity of gag reflex, and stuttering. Drug treatment failed to cure him; therefore, he was referred to rehabilitation therapy.  Conclusion:In conclusion, special attention should be brought upon laryngeal dystonia, especially in patients showing Extra-pyramidal symptoms and/or abnormalities of the basal ganglia. In children, laryngeal dystonia may be potentially fatal. Lack of consideration for this condition during rehabilitation therapy can lead to serious consequences for a child.

  5. Ethanol Exposure Causes Muscle Degeneration in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C. Coffey

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic myopathies are characterized by neuromusculoskeletal symptoms such as compromised movement and weakness. Although these symptoms have been attributed to neurological damage, EtOH may also target skeletal muscle. EtOH exposure during zebrafish primary muscle development or adulthood results in smaller muscle fibers. However, the effects of EtOH exposure on skeletal muscle during the growth period that follows primary muscle development are not well understood. We determined the effects of EtOH exposure on muscle during this phase of development. Strikingly, muscle fibers at this stage are acutely sensitive to EtOH treatment: EtOH induces muscle degeneration. The severity of EtOH-induced muscle damage varies but muscle becomes more refractory to EtOH as muscle develops. NF-kB induction in muscle indicates that EtOH triggers a pro-inflammatory response. EtOH-induced muscle damage is p53-independent. Uptake of Evans blue dye shows that EtOH treatment causes sarcolemmal instability before muscle fiber detachment. Dystrophin-null sapje mutant zebrafish also exhibit sarcolemmal instability. We tested whether Trichostatin A (TSA, which reduces muscle degeneration in sapje mutants, would affect EtOH-treated zebrafish. We found that TSA and EtOH are a lethal combination. EtOH does, however, exacerbate muscle degeneration in sapje mutants. EtOH also disrupts adhesion of muscle fibers to their extracellular matrix at the myotendinous junction: some detached muscle fibers retain beta-Dystroglycan indicating failure of muscle end attachments. Overexpression of Paxillin, which reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish deficient for beta-Dystroglycan, is not sufficient to rescue degeneration. Taken together, our results suggest that EtOH exposure has pleiotropic deleterious effects on skeletal muscle.

  6. Empirical Evaluation of Voluntarily Activatable Muscle Synergies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunta Togo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The muscle synergy hypothesis assumes that individual muscle synergies are independent of each other and voluntarily controllable. However, this assumption has not been empirically tested. This study tested if human subjects can voluntarily activate individual muscle synergies extracted by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF, the standard mathematical method for synergy extraction. We defined the activation of a single muscle synergy as the generation of a muscle activity pattern vector parallel to the single muscle synergy vector. Subjects performed an isometric force production task with their right hand, and the 13 muscle activity patterns associated with their elbow and shoulder movements were measured. We extracted muscle synergies during the task using electromyogram (EMG data and the NMF method with varied numbers of muscle synergies. The number (N of muscle synergies was determined by using the variability accounted for (VAF, NVAF and the coefficient of determination (CD, NCD. An additional muscle synergy model with NAD was also considered. We defined a conventional muscle synergy as the muscle synergy extracted by the NVAF, NCD, and NAD. We also defined an extended muscle synergy as the muscle synergy extracted by the NEX> NAD. To examine whether the individual muscle synergy was voluntarily activatable or not, we calculated the index of independent activation, which reflects similarities between a selected single muscle synergy and the current muscle activation pattern of the subject. Subjects were visually feed-backed the index of independent activation, then instructed to generate muscle activity patterns similar to the conventional and extended muscle synergies. As a result, an average of 90.8% of the muscle synergy extracted by the NVAF was independently activated. However, the proportion of activatable muscle synergies extracted by NCD and NAD was lower. These results partly support the assumption of the muscle synergy

  7. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  8. Abnormal glucose tolerance and lipid abnormalities in Indian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Discussion. Regardless of varying diagnostic classification, abnormal glucose tolerance is a well-documented risk factor. 16 Abnormalities in. Because ofthe small number offemale MI survivors, the effect of obesity and abnormal glucose tolerance on lipid levels was studied in the male patients only. There was no significant.

  9. Extraocular muscle architecture in hawks and owls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plochocki, Jeffrey H; Segev, Tamar; Grow, Wade; Hall, Margaret I

    2018-02-06

    A complete and accurate understanding of extraocular muscle function is important to the veterinary care of the avian eye. This is especially true for birds of prey, which rely heavily on vision for survival and yet are prone to ocular injury and disease. To better understand the function of extraocular muscles in birds of prey, we studied extraocular muscle architecture grossly and histologically. This sample was composed of two each of the following species: red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), Harris's hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus), great horned owl (Bubo virginianus), and barn owl (Tyto alba). All extraocular muscles were dissected and weighed. To analyze muscle fiber architecture, the superior oblique and quadratus muscles were dissected, weighed, and sectioned at 5 μm thickness in the transverse plane. We calculated the physiologic cross-sectional area and the ratio of muscle mass to predicted effective maximum tetanic tension. Hawk and owl extraocular muscles exhibit significant physiological differences that play roles in ocular movements and closure of the nictitating membrane. Owls, which do not exhibit extraocular movement, have muscle architecture suited to stabilize the position of a massive, tubular eye that protrudes significantly from the orbit. Hawks, which have a more globose eye that is largely contained within the orbit, do not require as much muscular stability and instead have muscle architecture that facilitates rapid eye movement. © 2018 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  10. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner of how a ...

  11. Neurophysiological basis of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: informing future drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennum, Poul; Christensen, Julie AE; Zoetmulder, Marielle

    2016-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia characterized by a history of recurrent nocturnal dream enactment behavior and loss of skeletal muscle atonia and increased phasic muscle activity during REM sleep: REM sleep without atonia. RBD and associated comorbidities have recently been identified as one of the most specific and potentially sensitive risk factors for later development of any of the alpha-synucleinopathies: Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and other atypical parkinsonian syndromes. Several other sleep-related abnormalities have recently been identified in patients with RBD/Parkinson’s disease who experience abnormalities in sleep electroencephalographic frequencies, sleep–wake transitions, wake and sleep stability, occurrence and morphology of sleep spindles, and electrooculography measures. These findings suggest a gradual involvement of the brainstem and other structures, which is in line with the gradual involvement known in these disorders. We propose that these findings may help identify biomarkers of individuals at high risk of subsequent conversion to parkinsonism. PMID:27186147

  12. Neurophysiological basis of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder: informing future drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennum P

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Poul Jennum, Julie AE Christensen, Marielle Zoetmulder Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Danish Center for Sleep Medicine, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: Rapid eye movement (REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD is a parasomnia characterized by a history of recurrent nocturnal dream enactment behavior and loss of skeletal muscle atonia and increased phasic muscle activity during REM sleep: REM sleep without atonia. RBD and associated comorbidities have recently been identified as one of the most specific and potentially sensitive risk factors for later development of any of the alpha-synucleinopathies: Parkinson’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and other atypical parkinsonian syndromes. Several other sleep-related abnormalities have recently been identified in patients with RBD/Parkinson’s disease who experience abnormalities in sleep electroencephalographic frequencies, sleep–wake transitions, wake and sleep stability, occurrence and morphology of sleep spindles, and electrooculography measures. These findings suggest a gradual involvement of the brainstem and other structures, which is in line with the gradual involvement known in these disorders. We propose that these findings may help identify biomarkers of individuals at high risk of subsequent conversion to parkinsonism. Keywords: motor control, brain stem, hypothalamus, hypocretin

  13. Can Measured Synergy Excitations Accurately Construct Unmeasured Muscle Excitations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Nicholas A; Patten, Carolynn; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2018-01-01

    Accurate prediction of muscle and joint contact forces during human movement could improve treatment planning for disorders such as osteoarthritis, stroke, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral palsy. Recent studies suggest that muscle synergies, a low-dimensional representation of a large set of muscle electromyographic (EMG) signals (henceforth called "muscle excitations"), may reduce the redundancy of muscle excitation solutions predicted by optimization methods. This study explores the feasibility of using muscle synergy information extracted from eight muscle EMG signals (henceforth called "included" muscle excitations) to accurately construct muscle excitations from up to 16 additional EMG signals (henceforth called "excluded" muscle excitations). Using treadmill walking data collected at multiple speeds from two subjects (one healthy, one poststroke), we performed muscle synergy analysis on all possible subsets of eight included muscle excitations and evaluated how well the calculated time-varying synergy excitations could construct the remaining excluded muscle excitations (henceforth called "synergy extrapolation"). We found that some, but not all, eight-muscle subsets yielded synergy excitations that achieved >90% extrapolation variance accounted for (VAF). Using the top 10% of subsets, we developed muscle selection heuristics to identify included muscle combinations whose synergy excitations achieved high extrapolation accuracy. For 3, 4, and 5 synergies, these heuristics yielded extrapolation VAF values approximately 5% lower than corresponding reconstruction VAF values for each associated eight-muscle subset. These results suggest that synergy excitations obtained from experimentally measured muscle excitations can accurately construct unmeasured muscle excitations, which could help limit muscle excitations predicted by muscle force optimizations.

  14. Degeneration of rapid eye movement sleep circuitry underlies rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Dillon; Peever, John

    2017-05-01

    During healthy rapid eye movement sleep, skeletal muscles are actively forced into a state of motor paralysis. However, in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder-a relatively common neurological disorder-this natural process is lost. A lack of motor paralysis (atonia) in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder allows individuals to actively move, which at times can be excessive and violent. At first glance this may sound harmless, but it is not because rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder patients frequently injure themselves or the person they sleep with. It is hypothesized that the degeneration or dysfunction of the brain stem circuits that control rapid eye movement sleep paralysis is an underlying cause of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. The link between brain stem degeneration and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder stems from the fact that rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder precedes, in the majority (∼80%) of cases, the development of synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy, which are known to initially cause degeneration in the caudal brain stem structures where rapid eye movement sleep circuits are located. Furthermore, basic science and clinical evidence demonstrate that lesions within the rapid eye movement sleep circuits can induce rapid eye movement sleep-specific motor deficits that are virtually identical to those observed in rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. This review examines the evidence that rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is caused by synucleinopathic neurodegeneration of the core brain stem circuits that control healthy rapid eye movement sleep and concludes that rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder is not a separate clinical entity from synucleinopathies but, rather, it is the earliest symptom of these disorders. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and

  15. Neurobiology of functional (psychogenic) movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mark J; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini; Pareés, Isabel

    2013-08-01

    This review explores recent developments in understanding the neurobiological mechanism of functional (psychogenic) movement disorders (FMDs). This is particularly relevant given the resurgence of academic and clinical interest in patients with functional neurological symptoms and the clear shift in diagnostic and treatment approaches away from a pure psychological model of functional symptoms. Recent research findings implicate three key processes in the neurobiology of FMD (and by extension other functional neurological symptoms): abnormal attentional focus, abnormal beliefs and expectations, and abnormalities in sense of agency. These three processes have been combined in recent neurobiological models of FMD in which abnormal predictions related to movement are triggered by self-focused attention, and the resulting movement is generated without the normal sense of agency that accompanies voluntary movement. New understanding of the neurobiology of FMD forms an important part of reappraising the way that patients with FMD (and other functional disorders) are characterized and treated. It also provides a testable framework for further exploring the pathophysiology of these common causes of ill health.

  16. Extraocular Muscles Tension, Tonus, and Proprioception in Infantile Strabismus: Role of the Oculomotor System in the Pathogenesis of Infantile Strabismus—Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantino Schiavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role played by the extraocular muscles (EOMs in the etiology of concomitant infantile strabismus is still debated and it has not yet definitively established if the sensory anomalies in concomitant strabismus are a consequence or a primary cause of the deviation. The commonest theory supposes that most strabismus results from abnormal innervation of the EOMs, but the cause of this dysfunction and its origin, whether central or peripheral, are still unknown. The interaction between sensory factors and innervational factors, that is, esotonus, accommodation, convergence, divergence, and vestibular reflexes in visually immature infants with family predisposition, is suspected to create conditions that prevent binocular alignment from stabilizing and strengthening. Some role in the onset of fixation instability and infantile strabismus could be played by the feedback control of eye movements and by dysfunction of eye muscle proprioception during the critical period of development of the visual sensory system. A possible role in the onset, maintenance, or worsening of the deviation of abnormalities of muscle force which have their clinical equivalent in eye muscle overaction and underaction has been investigated under either isometric or isotonic conditions, and in essence no significant anomalies of muscle force have been found in concomitant strabismus.

  17. [Penile congenital abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boillot, B; Teklali, Y; Moog, R; Droupy, S

    2013-07-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the penis are usually diagnosed at birth and pose aesthetic and functional problems sometimes requiring surgical management. A literature review was conducted on Medline considering the articles listed until January 2012. Hypospadias is the most common malformation (1 in 250 boys. Familial forms: 7%). The causes remain hypothetical but the doubling of the incidence in 30 years could be linked to fetal exposure to endocrine disruptors "estrogen-like" used in the food industry in particular. Surgical treatment is usually intended to improve the aesthetic appearance but sometimes, in case of significant curvature or posterior meatus, necessary for normal sexual life and fertility. Other malformations (epispades, buried penis, transpositions, twists and preputial abnormalities) as well as management for functional or aesthetic consequences of these malformations in adulthood require complex surgical care in a specialized environment. The improvement of surgical techniques and pediatric anesthesia allows an early and effective specialized surgical approach of penile malformations. Management of sequelae in adulthood must be discussed and requires experience of surgical techniques on pediatric and adult penis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. A hybrid static optimisation method to estimate muscle forces during muscle co-activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jongsang; Hwang, Sungjae; Kim, Youngho

    2012-01-01

    The general static optimisation (GSO) process is one of various muscle force estimation methods due to its low computational requirements. However, it can show biased muscle force estimation under muscle co-contraction. In the present study, we introduced a novel hybrid static optimisation (HSO) method to estimate reasonable muscle forces during muscle co-activation movements using more specific equality constraints, i.e. agonist and antagonist muscle moments predicted from a new correlation coefficient approach. The new method was evaluated for heel-rise movements. We found that the proposed method improved the potential of antagonist muscle force estimation in comparison to the GSO solutions. The proposed HSO method could be applied in biomechanics and rehabilitation, for example.

  19. Congenital aneurysm of the muscular interventricular septum in association with cardiac arrhythmias and a chromosomal abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sharon H; Coleman, David M; Aftimos, Salim

    2007-01-01

    We report a newborn with a congenital aneurysm of the muscular interventricular septum, a conduction system abnormality involving variable left and right bundle branch block, and an abnormality of the short arm of chromosome 20, This combination of anomalies has not been previously reported. To date, the infant has progressed well from a cardiac perspective but has poor muscle tone and developmental delay.

  20. Human muscle spindle sensitivity reflects the balance of activity between antagonistic muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriou, Michael

    2014-10-08

    Muscle spindles are commonly considered as stretch receptors encoding movement, but the functional consequence of their efferent control has remained unclear. The "α-γ coactivation" hypothesis states that activity in a muscle is positively related to the output of its spindle afferents. However, in addition to the above, possible reciprocal inhibition of spindle controllers entails a negative relationship between contractile activity in one muscle and spindle afferent output from its antagonist. By recording spindle afferent responses from alert humans using microneurography, I show that spindle output does reflect antagonistic muscle balance. Specifically, regardless of identical kinematic profiles across active finger movements, stretch of the loaded antagonist muscle (i.e., extensor) was accompanied by increased afferent firing rates from this muscle compared with the baseline case of no constant external load. In contrast, spindle firing rates from the stretching antagonist were lowest when the agonist muscle powering movement (i.e., flexor) acted against an additional resistive load. Stepwise regressions confirmed that instantaneous velocity, extensor, and flexor muscle activity had a significant effect on spindle afferent responses, with flexor activity having a negative effect. Therefore, the results indicate that, as consequence of their efferent control, spindle sensitivity (gain) to muscle stretch reflects the balance of activity between antagonistic muscles rather than only the activity of the spindle-bearing muscle. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3413644-12$15.00/0.

  1. Skeletal muscle mechanics: questions, problems and possible solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Walter

    2017-09-16

    Skeletal muscle mechanics have been studied ever since people have shown an interest in human movement. However, our understanding of muscle contraction and muscle mechanical properties has changed fundamentally with the discovery of the sliding filament theory in 1954 and associated cross-bridge theory in 1957. Nevertheless, experimental evidence suggests that our knowledge of the mechanisms of contraction is far from complete, and muscle properties and muscle function in human movement remain largely unknown.In this manuscript, I am trying to identify some of the crucial challenges we are faced with in muscle mechanics, offer possible solutions to questions, and identify problems that might be worthwhile exploring in the future. Since it is impossible to tackle all (worthwhile) problems in a single manuscript, I identified three problems that are controversial, important, and close to my heart. They may be identified as follows: (i) mechanisms of muscle contraction, (ii) in vivo whole muscle mechanics and properties, and (iii) force-sharing among synergistic muscles. These topics are fundamental to our understanding of human movement and movement control, and they contain a series of unknowns and challenges to be explored in the future.It is my hope that this paper may serve as an inspiration for some, may challenge current beliefs in selected areas, tackle important problems in the area of muscle mechanics, physiology and movement control, and may guide and focus some of the thinking of future muscle mechanics research.

  2. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Lateral pterygoid muscle volume and migraine in patients with temporomandibular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Lopes, Sergio Lucio Pereira; Ferreira Costa, Andre Luiz; Oliveira Gamba, Thiago; Flores, Isadora Luana; Cruz, Adriana Dibo; Min, Li Li

    2015-01-01

    Lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) plays an important role in jaw movement and has been implicated in Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Migraine has been described as a common symptom in patients with TMDs and may be related to muscle hyperactivity. This study aimed to compare LPM volume in individuals with and without migraine, using segmentation of the LPM in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the TMJ. Twenty patients with migraine and 20 volunteers without migraine underwent a clinical examination of the TMJ, according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMDs. MR imaging was performed and the LPM was segmented using the ITK-SNAP 1.4.1 software, which calculates the volume of each segmented structure in voxels per cubic millimeter. The chi-squared test and the Fisher's exact test were used to relate the TMD variables obtained from the MR images and clinical examinations to the presence of migraine. Logistic binary regression was used to determine the importance of each factor for predicting the presence of a migraine headache. Patients with TMDs and migraine tended to have hypertrophy of the LPM (58.7%). In addition, abnormal mandibular movements (61.2%) and disc displacement (70.0%) were found to be the most common signs in patients with TMDs and migraine. In patients with TMDs and simultaneous migraine, the LPM tends to be hypertrophic. LPM segmentation on MR imaging may be an alternative method to study this muscle in such patients because the hypertrophic LPM is not always palpable.

  4. Lateral pterygoid muscle volume and migraine in patients with temporomandibular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro Lopes, Sergio Lucio Pereira [Dept. of Diagnosis and Surgery, Sao Jose dos Campos Dental School, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ferreira Costa, Andre Luiz [Dept. of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira Gamba, Thiago; Flores, Isadora Luana [Dept. of ral Diagnosis, School of Dentistry, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cruz, Adriana Dibo [Dept. of Specific Formation, Area of Radiology, Nova Friburgo Dental School, Fluminense Federal University, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Min, Li Li [Laboratory of Neuroimaging, Dept. of Neurology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    Lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) plays an important role in jaw movement and has been implicated in Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Migraine has been described as a common symptom in patients with TMDs and may be related to muscle hyperactivity. This study aimed to compare LPM volume in individuals with and without migraine, using segmentation of the LPM in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the TMJ. Twenty patients with migraine and 20 volunteers without migraine underwent a clinical examination of the TMJ, according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMDs. MR imaging was performed and the LPM was segmented using the ITK-SNAP 1.4.1 software, which calculates the volume of each segmented structure in voxels per cubic millimeter. The chi-squared test and the Fisher's exact test were used to relate the TMD variables obtained from the MR images and clinical examinations to the presence of migraine. Logistic binary regression was used to determine the importance of each factor for predicting the presence of a migraine headache. Patients with TMDs and migraine tended to have hypertrophy of the LPM (58.7%). In addition, abnormal mandibular movements (61.2%) and disc displacement (70.0%) were found to be the most common signs in patients with TMDs and migraine. In patients with TMDs and simultaneous migraine, the LPM tends to be hypertrophic. LPM segmentation on MR imaging may be an alternative method to study this muscle in such patients because the hypertrophic LPM is not always palpable.

  5. A Rare Stapes Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Kanona

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to increase awareness of rare presentations, diagnostic difficulties alongside management of conductive hearing loss and ossicular abnormalities. We report the case of a 13-year-old female reporting progressive left-sided hearing loss and high resolution computed tomography was initially reported as normal. Exploratory tympanotomy revealed an absent stapedius tendon and lack of connection between the stapes superstructure and footplate. The footplate was fixed. Stapedotomy and stapes prosthesis insertion resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 50 dB. A review of world literature was performed using MedLine. Middle ear ossicular discontinuity can result in significant conductive hearing loss. This can be managed effectively with surgery to help restore hearing. However, some patients may not be suitable or decline surgical intervention and can be managed safely conservatively.

  6. Muscle mechanics and neuromuscular control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the properties of the mechanical system, especially muscle elasticity and limb mass, to a large degree determine force output and movement. This makes the control demands of the central nervous system simpler and more robust. In human triceps surae, a

  7. Neurophysiological basis of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Zoetmulder, Marielle

    2016-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia characterized by a history of recurrent nocturnal dream enactment behavior and loss of skeletal muscle atonia and increased phasic muscle activity during REM sleep: REM sleep without atonia. RBD and associated comorbidities ha...

  8. Coordination of locomotion with voluntary movements in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanenko, Yuri P; Cappellini, Germana; Dominici, Nadia; Poppele, Richard E; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    Muscle activity occurring during human locomotion can be accounted for by five basic temporal activation patterns in a variety of locomotion conditions. Here, we examined how these activation patterns interact with muscle activity required for a voluntary movement. Subjects produced a voluntary

  9. Relation between body mass index percentile and muscle strength ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Noha Abdel Kader Abdel Kader Hasan

    2016-02-01

    Feb 1, 2016 ... a positive correlation between muscle strength and body mass index percentile while muscle endur- ance time had a negative correlation with it. Conclusion: The study shows that the BMI of children had a positive correlation with the muscle ... lar force in a specific movement pattern at definite velocity.

  10. Quantification of functional weakness and abnormal synergy patterns in the lower limb of individuals with chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichols Diane

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of abnormal muscle activation patterns is a well documented factor limiting the motor rehabilitation of patients following stroke. These abnormal muscle activation patterns, or synergies, have previously been quantified in the upper limbs. Presented here are the lower limb joint torque patterns measured in a standing position of sixteen chronic hemiparetic stroke subjects and sixteen age matched controls used to examine differences in strength and coordination between the two groups. Methods With the trunk stabilized, stroke subjects stood on their unaffected leg while their affected foot was attached to a 6-degree of freedom load cell (JR3, Woodland CA which recorded forces and torques. The subjects were asked to generate a maximum torque about a given joint (hip abduction/adduction; hip, knee, and ankle flexion/extension and provided feedback of the torque they generated for that primary joint axis. In parallel, EMG data from eight muscle groups were recorded, and secondary torques generated about the adjacent joints were calculated. Differences in mean primary torque, secondary torque, and EMG data were compared using a single factor ANOVA. Results The stroke group was significantly weaker in six of the eight directions tested. Analysis of the secondary torques showed that the control and stroke subjects used similar strategies to generate maximum torques during seven of the eight joint movements tested. The only time a different strategy was used was during maximal hip abduction exertions where stroke subjects tended to flex instead of extend their hip, which was consistent with the classically defined "flexion synergy." The EMG data of the stroke group was different than the control group in that there was a strong presence of co-contraction of antagonistic muscle groups, especially during ankle flexion and ankle and knee extension. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that in a standing position

  11. Bilateral Gluteal Dyskinesia: Discussion of a Rare Movement Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sorokin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Involuntary movements of gluteal muscles have rarely been reported. Case Report: This 46‐year‐old female with pelvic endometriosis developed involuntary rhythmic movements in the left gluteus maximus, which within a year became bilateral. The movements gradually increased in intensity and interfered with ambulation. Electromyography, at rest, demonstrated almost continuous periodic gluteal discharges, with left‐sided discharges seeming to lead to those on the right. OnabotulinumtoxinA injections into the gluteal muscles improved the movements. Discussion: A rare and previously unreported form of gluteal involuntary movements with periodic electromyographic discharges is described. The cause is uncertain. The differential diagnosis of this unusual movement disorder is discussed, with the most likely diagnosis being myoclonus.

  12. Synchronous monitoring of muscle dynamics and muscle force for maximum isometric tetanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakir Hossain, M.; Grill, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    Skeletal muscle is a classic example of a biological soft matter . At both macro and microscopic levels, skeletal muscle is exquisitely oriented for force generation and movement. In addition to the dynamics of contracting and relaxing muscle which can be monitored with ultrasound, variations in the muscle force are also expected to be monitored. To observe such force and sideways expansion variations synchronously for the skeletal muscle a novel detection scheme has been developed. As already introduced for the detection of sideways expansion variations of the muscle, ultrasonic transducers are mounted sideways on opposing positions of the monitored muscle. To detect variations of the muscle force, angle of pull of the monitored muscle has been restricted by the mechanical pull of the sonic force sensor. Under this condition, any variation in the time-of-flight (TOF) of the transmitted ultrasonic signals can be introduced by the variation of the path length between the transducers. The observed variations of the TOF are compared to the signals obtained by ultrasound monitoring for the muscle dynamics. The general behavior of the muscle dynamics and muscle force shows almost an identical concept. Since muscle force also relates the psychological boosting-up effects, the influence of boosting-up on muscle force and muscle dynamics can also be quantified form this study. Length-tension or force-length and force-velocity relationship can also be derived quantitatively with such monitoring.

  13. Individual muscle control using an exoskeleton robot for muscle function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Jun; Ming, Ding; Krishnamoorthy, Vijaya; Shinohara, Minoru; Ogasawara, Tsukasa

    2010-08-01

    Healthy individuals modulate muscle activation patterns according to their intended movement and external environment. Persons with neurological disorders (e.g., stroke and spinal cord injury), however, have problems in movement control due primarily to their inability to modulate their muscle activation pattern in an appropriate manner. A functionality test at the level of individual muscles that investigates the activity of a muscle of interest on various motor tasks may enable muscle-level force grading. To date there is no extant work that focuses on the application of exoskeleton robots to induce specific muscle activation in a systematic manner. This paper proposes a new method, named "individual muscle-force control" using a wearable robot (an exoskeleton robot, or a power-assisting device) to obtain a wider variety of muscle activity data than standard motor tasks, e.g., pushing a handle by hand. A computational algorithm systematically computes control commands to a wearable robot so that a desired muscle activation pattern for target muscle forces is induced. It also computes an adequate amount and direction of a force that a subject needs to exert against a handle by his/her hand. This individual muscle control method enables users (e.g., therapists) to efficiently conduct neuromuscular function tests on target muscles by arbitrarily inducing muscle activation patterns. This paper presents a basic concept, mathematical formulation, and solution of the individual muscle-force control and its implementation to a muscle control system with an exoskeleton-type robot for upper extremity. Simulation and experimental results in healthy individuals justify the use of an exoskeleton robot for future muscle function testing in terms of the variety of muscle activity data.

  14. Changes in muscle strength and morphology after muscle unloading in Special Forces missions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, J B; Jakobsen, O; Madsen, T

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the changes in maximal muscle strength, rapid force capacity, jumping performance and muscle morphology following a Special Forces military operation involving 8 days of muscle unloading. Nine male Special Forces soldiers were tested before (pre......) and immediately after (post1) an 8-day simulated special support and reconnaissance (SSR) mission and after 3 h of active recovery (post2). Maximal muscle strength (MVC) and rate of force development (RFD) were measured along with maximal counter movement jump height (JH). Muscle biopsies were obtained from...

  15. The scoring of movements in sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Arthur S; Lavigne, Gilles; Hening, Wayne; Picchietti, Daniel L; Allen, Richard P; Chokroverty, Sudhansu; Kushida, Clete A; Bliwise, Donald L; Mahowald, Mark W; Schenck, Carlos H; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2007-03-15

    The International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-2) has separated sleep-related movement disorders into simple, repetitive movement disorders (such as periodic limb movements in sleep [PLMS], sleep bruxism, and rhythmic movement disorder) and parasomnias (such as REM sleep behavior disorder and disorders of partial arousal, e.g., sleep walking, confusional arousals, night terrors). Many of the parasomnias are characterized by complex behaviors in sleep that appear purposeful, goal directed and voluntary but are outside the conscious awareness of the individual and therefore inappropriate. All of the sleep-related movement disorders described here have specific polysomnographic findings. For the purposes of developing and/or revising specifications and polysomnographic scoring rules, the AASM Scoring Manual Task Force on Movements in Sleep reviewed background literature and executed evidence grading of 81 relevant articles obtained by a literature search of published articles between 1966 and 2004. Subsequent evidence grading identified limited evidence for reliability and/or validity for polysomnographic scoring criteria for periodic limb movements in sleep, REM sleep behavior disorder, and sleep bruxism. Published scoring criteria for rhythmic movement disorder, excessive fragmentary myoclonus, and hypnagogic foot tremor/alternating leg muscle activation were empirical and based on descriptive studies. The literature review disclosed no published evidence defining clinical consequences of excessive fragmentary myoclonus or hypnagogic foot tremor/alternating leg muscle activation. Because of limited or absent evidence for reliability and/or validity, a standardized RAND/UCLA consensus process was employed for recommendation of specific rules for the scoring of sleep-associated movements.

  16. Quantitative muscle ultrasound and quadriceps strength in patients with post-polio syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickerstaffe, Alice; Beelen, Anita; Zwarts, Machiel J; Nollet, Frans; van Dijk, Johannes P

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether muscle ultrasound can distinguish muscles affected by post-polio syndrome (PPS) from healthy muscles and whether severity of ultrasound abnormalities is associated with muscle strength. Echo intensity, muscle thickness, and isometric strength of the quadriceps muscles were measured in 48 patients with PPS and 12 healthy controls. Patients with PPS had significantly higher echo intensity and lower muscle thickness than healthy controls. In patients, both echo intensity and muscle thickness were associated independently with muscle strength. A combined measure of echo intensity and muscle thickness was more strongly related to muscle strength than either parameter alone. Quantitative ultrasound distinguishes healthy muscles from those affected by PPS, and measures of muscle quality and quantity are associated with muscle strength. Hence, ultrasound could be a useful tool for assessing disease severity and monitoring changes resulting from disease progression or clinical intervention in patients with PPS. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Study on distribution of terminal branches of the facial nerve in mimetic muscles (orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Shiozawa, Kei; Satoh, Kaneshige

    2014-01-01

    There have been many anatomical reports to date regarding the course of the facial nerve to the mimetic muscles. However, reports are relatively scarce on the detailed distribution of the terminal branches of the facial nerve to the mimetic muscles. In this study, we performed detailed examination of the terminal facial nerve branches to the mimetic muscles, particularly the branches terminating in the orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle. Examination was performed on 25 Japanese adult autopsy cases, involving 25 hemifaces. The mean age was 87.4 years (range, 60-102 years). There were 12 men and 13 women (12 left hemifaces and 13 right hemifaces). In each case, the facial nerve was exposed through a preauricular skin incision. The main trunk of the facial nerve was dissected from the stylomastoid foramen. A microscope was used to dissect the terminal branches to the periphery and observe them. The course and distribution were examined for all terminal branches of the facial nerve. However, focus was placed on the course and distribution of the zygomatic branch, buccal branch, and mandibular branch to the orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle. The temporal branch was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in all cases and the marginal mandibular branch was distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in all cases. The zygomatic branch was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in all cases, but it was also distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in 10 of 25 cases. The buccal branch was not distributed to the orbicularis oris muscle in 3 of 25 cases, and it was distributed to the orbicularis oculi muscle in 8 cases. There was no significant difference in the variations. The orbicularis oculi muscle and orbicularis oris muscle perform particularly important movements among the facial mimetic muscles. According to textbooks, the temporal branch and zygomatic branch innervate the orbicularis oculi muscle, and the buccal branch

  18. Disorders of Upper Limb Movements in Ataxia-Telangiectasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aasef G Shaikh

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia is known for cerebellar degeneration, but clinical descriptions of abnormal tone, posture, and movements suggest involvement of the network between cerebellum and basal ganglia. We quantitatively assessed the nature of upper-limb movement disorders in ataxia-telangiectasia. We used a three-axis accelerometer to assess the natural history and severity of abnormal upper-limb movements in 80 ataxia-telangiectasia and 19 healthy subjects. Recordings were made during goal-directed movements of upper limb (kinetic task, while arms were outstretched (postural task, and at rest. Almost all ataxia-telangiectasia subjects (79/80 had abnormal involuntary movements, such as rhythmic oscillations (tremor, slow drifts (dystonia or athetosis, and isolated rapid movements (dystonic jerks or myoclonus. All patients with involuntary movements had both kinetic and postural tremor, while 48 (61% also had resting tremor. The tremor was present in transient episodes lasting several seconds during two-minute recording sessions of all three conditions. Percent time during which episodic tremor was present was greater for postural and kinetic tasks compared to rest. Resting tremor had higher frequency but smaller amplitude than postural and kinetic tremor. Rapid non-rhythmic movements were minimal during rest, but were triggered during sustained arm postures and goal directed arm movements suggesting they are best considered a form of dystonic jerks or action myoclonus. Advancing age did not correlate with the severity of involuntary limb movements. Abnormal upper-limb movements in ataxia-telangiectasia feature classic cerebellar impairment, but also suggest involvement of the network between the cerebellum and basal ganglia.

  19. Muscle channelopathies and electrophysiological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherian Ajith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic syndromes and periodic paralyses are rare disorders of skeletal muscle characterized mainly by muscle stiffness or episodic attacks of weakness. Familial forms are caused by mutation in genes coding for skeletal muscle voltage ionic channels. Familial periodic paralysis and nondystrophic myotonias are disorders of skeletal muscle excitability caused by mutations in genes coding for voltage-gated ion channels. These diseases are characterized by episodic failure of motor activity due to muscle weakness (paralysis or stiffness (myotonia. Clinical studies have identified two forms of periodic paralyses: hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hypoKPP and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperKPP, based on changes in serum potassium levels during the attacks, and three distinct forms of myotonias: paramyotonia congenita (PC, potassium-aggravated myotonia (PAM, and myotonia congenita (MC. PC and PAM have been linked to missense mutations in the SCN4A gene, which encodes α subunit of the voltage-gated sodium channel, whereas MC is caused by mutations in the chloride channel gene (CLCN1. Exercise is known to trigger, aggravate, or relieve symptoms. Therefore, exercise can be used as a functional test in electromyography to improve the diagnosis of these muscle disorders. Abnormal changes in the compound muscle action potential can be disclosed using different exercise tests. Five electromyographic (EMG patterns (I-V that may be used in clinical practice as guides for molecular diagnosis are discussed.

  20. The spine and pelvic movement during the dynamic forward bending and returning movement

    OpenAIRE

    岩崎, 富子; 斉藤, 昭彦; 八幡, 純治

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships of the movement of the pelvis and the lumbar spine during the dynamic forward bending and returning movement with knee extended. The subjects were 8 males aged from 19 to 22 who bad no history of low back pain. The video-tape-recorder, the computer and the electromypgraphy were used for analyzing the movements. The muscles were chosen as follows: the right side of erector spinae (ES), rectus abdominis (RA), gluteus maximus (GM), i...

  1. Muscle Synergies in Cycling after Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury: Correlation with Clinical Measures of Motor Function and Spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Filipe O; Torricelli, Diego; Bravo-Esteban, Elisabeth; Taylor, Julian; Gómez-Soriano, Julio; Santos, Cristina; Moreno, Juan C; Pons, José L

    2015-01-01

    After incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI), patients suffer important sensorimotor impairments, such as abnormal locomotion patterns and spasticity. Complementary to current clinical diagnostic procedures, the analysis of muscle synergies has emerged as a promising tool to study muscle coordination, which plays a major role in the control of multi-limb functional movements. Based on recent findings suggesting that walking and cycling share similar synergistic control, the analysis of muscle synergies during cycling might be explored as an early descriptor of gait-related impaired control. This idea was split into the following two hypotheses: (a) iSCI patients present a synergistic control of muscles during cycling; (b) muscle synergies outcomes extracted during cycling correlate with clinical measurements of gait performance and/or spasticity. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of 13 unilateral lower limb muscles was recorded in a group of 10 healthy individuals and 10 iSCI subjects during cycling at four different cadences. A non-negative matrix factorization (NNMF) algorithm was applied to identify synergistic components (i.e., activation coefficients and muscle synergy vectors). Reconstruction goodness scores (VAF and r (2)) were used to evaluate the ability of a given number of synergies to reconstruct the EMG signals. A set of metrics based on the similarity between pathologic and healthy synergies were correlated with clinical scales of gait performance and spasticity. iSCI patients preserved a synergistic control of muscles during cycling. The similarity with the healthy reference was consistent with the degree of the impairment, i.e., less impaired patients showed higher similarities with the healthy reference. There was a strong correlation between reconstruction goodness scores at 42 rpm and motor performance scales (TUG, 10-m test and WISCI II). On the other hand, the similarity between the healthy and affected synergies presented correlation with some

  2. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  3. Impairment of gradual muscle adjustment during wrist circumduction in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolien M Toxopeus

    Full Text Available Purposeful movements are attained by gradually adjusted activity of opposite muscles, or synergists. This requires a motor system that adequately modulates initiation and inhibition of movement and selectively activates the appropriate muscles. In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD initiation and inhibition of movements are impaired which may manifest itself in e.g. difficulty to start and stop walking. At single-joint level, impaired movement initiation is further accompanied by insufficient inhibition of antagonist muscle activity. As the motor symptoms in PD primarily result from cerebral dysfunction, quantitative investigation of gradually adjusted muscle activity during execution of purposeful movement is a first step to gain more insight in the link between impaired modulation of initiation and inhibition at the levels of (i cerebrally coded task performance and (ii final execution by the musculoskeletal system. To that end, the present study investigated changes in gradual adjustment of muscle synergists using a manipulandum that enabled standardized smooth movement by continuous wrist circumduction. Differences between PD patients (N = 15, off-medication and healthy subjects (N = 16 concerning the relation between muscle activity and movement performance in these groups were assessed using kinematic and electromyographic (EMG recordings. The variability in the extent to which a particular muscle was active during wrist circumduction--defined as muscle activity differentiation--was quantified by EMG. We demonstrated that more differentiated muscle activity indeed correlated positively with improved movement performance, i.e. higher movement speed and increased smoothness of movement. Additionally, patients employed a less differentiated muscle activity pattern than healthy subjects. These specific changes during wrist circumduction imply that patients have a decreased ability to gradually adjust muscles causing a decline in

  4. Functional MRI Studies into the Neuroanatomical Basis of the Eye Movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.K.L. Tam (Caroline)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHumans make eye movements to ensure proper processing of visual information. The study of eye movement control provides a window to the brain and can tell us how the brain processes information from the environment. Abnormal eye movement behavior can provide information about the

  5. Muscle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, G; Bugiardini, E; Cardani, R

    2012-04-01

    Muscle biopsy is required to provide a definitive diagnosis in many neuromuscular disorders. It can be performed through an open or needle technique under local anesthesia. The major limitations of the needle biopsy technique are the sample size, which is smaller than that obtained with open biopsy, and the impossibility of direct visualization of the sampling site. However, needle biopsy is a less invasive procedure than open biopsy and is particularly indicated for diagnosis of neuromuscular disease in infancy and childhood. The biopsied muscle should be one affected by the disease but not be too weak or too atrophic. Usually, in case of proximal muscle involvement, the quadriceps and the biceps are biopsied, while under suspicion of mitochondrial disorder, the deltoid is preferred. The samples must be immediately frozen or fixed after excision to prevent loss of enzymatic reactivity, DNA depletion or RNA degradation. A battery of stainings is performed on muscle sections from every frozen muscle biopsy arriving in the pathology laboratory. Histological, histochemical, and histoenzymatic stainings are performed to evaluate fiber atrophy, morphological, and structural changes and metabolic disorders. Moreover, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting analysis may be used for expression analysis of muscle proteins to obtain a specific diagnosis. There are myopathies that do not need muscle biopsy since a genetic test performed on a blood sample is enough for definitive diagnosis. Muscle biopsy is a useful technique which can make an enormous contribution in the field of neuromuscular disorders but should be considered and interpreted together with the patient's family and clinical history.

  6. Congenital skull defect and neurofibroma: without scalp and other abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie-Cong; Wei, Liu; Xu, Jia; Liu, Jian-Feng; Gui, Lai

    2012-07-01

    Congenital skull defect is a rare malformation that is usually associated with congenital anomalies of the scalp and comparable lesions in the brain, spinal cord, limbs, and skeletal muscle. Most previously reported cases have described skull defects with aplasia cutis congenita and other congenital abnormalities. Very few patients with skull defects present with an intact scalp or neurofibroma. The authors report an adult patient with a rare congenital skull defect and local neurofibroma.

  7. Experimental and Simulation Based Dynamic Assessment of Flexion and Extension Movements of Torso

    OpenAIRE

    Gottipati, Pranitha

    2009-01-01

    Low back disorders (LBDs) comprise one of the major health issues in the United States. Previous research used isometric studies to understand the mechanisms that cause LBDs. Occupational tasks involving dynamic trunk movements, muscle fatigue, and spinal instability are identified as major risk factors for developing low back pain. Dynamic stability and muscle forces during trunk flexion-extension movements are studied in this dissertation. Torso muscle fatigue is known to affect th...

  8. Angiogenic response to passive movement and active exercise in individuals with peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høier, Birgitte; Walker, Meegan; Passos, Madla

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is caused by atherosclerosis and is associated with microcirculatory impairments in skeletal muscle. The present study evaluated the angiogenic response to exercise and passive movement in skeletal muscle of PAD patients compared to healthy control subjects. Twen...... increased in response to either passive movement or active exercise in both subject groups. The basal muscle dialysate level of the angiostatic factor trombospondin-1 protein (TSP-1) was markedly higher (P...

  9. Problems with extracellular recording of electrical activity in gastrointestinal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M; Hennig, Grant W

    2016-12-01

    Motility patterns of the gastrointestinal tract are important for efficient processing of nutrients and waste. Peristalsis and segmentation are based on rhythmic electrical slow waves that generate the phasic contractions fundamental to gastrointestinal motility. Slow waves are generated and propagated actively by interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), and these events conduct to smooth muscle cells to elicit excitation-contraction coupling. Extracellular electrical recording has been utilized to characterize slow-wave generation and propagation and abnormalities that might be responsible for gastrointestinal motility disorders. Electrode array recording and digital processing are being used to generate data for models of electrical propagation in normal and pathophysiological conditions. Here, we discuss techniques of extracellular recording as applied to gastrointestinal organs and how mechanical artefacts might contaminate these recordings and confound their interpretation. Without rigorous controls for movement, current interpretations of extracellular recordings might ascribe inaccurate behaviours and electrical anomalies to ICC networks and gastrointestinal muscles, bringing into question the findings and validity of models of gastrointestinal electrophysiology developed from these recordings.

  10. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  11. Evaluation of muscle function of the extensor digitorum longus muscle ex vivo and tibialis anterior muscle in situ in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Chady H; Wasala, Nalinda B; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-02-09

    Body movements are mainly provided by mechanical function of skeletal muscle. Skeletal muscle is composed of numerous bundles of myofibers that are sheathed by intramuscular connective tissues. Each myofiber contains many myofibrils that run longitudinally along the length of the myofiber. Myofibrils are the contractile apparatus of muscle and they are composed of repeated contractile units known as sarcomeres. A sarcomere unit contains actin and myosin filaments that are spaced by the Z discs and titin protein. Mechanical function of skeletal muscle is defined by the contractile and passive properties of muscle. The contractile properties are used to characterize the amount of force generated during muscle contraction, time of force generation and time of muscle relaxation. Any factor that affects muscle contraction (such as interaction between actin and myosin filaments, homeostasis of calcium, ATP/ADP ratio, etc.) influences the contractile properties. The passive properties refer to the elastic and viscous properties (stiffness and viscosity) of the muscle in the absence of contraction. These properties are determined by the extracellular and the intracellular structural components (such as titin) and connective tissues (mainly collagen) (1-2). The contractile and passive properties are two inseparable aspects of muscle function. For example, elbow flexion is accomplished by contraction of muscles in the anterior compartment of the upper arm and passive stretch of muscles in the posterior compartment of the upper arm. To truly understand muscle function, both contractile and passive properties should be studied. The contractile and/or passive mechanical properties of muscle are often compromised in muscle diseases. A good example is Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a severe muscle wasting disease caused by dystrophin deficiency (3). Dystrophin is a cytoskeletal protein that stabilizes the muscle cell membrane (sarcolemma) during muscle contraction (4). In the

  12. Cylindrical spirals in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, S; Karpati, G; Robitaille, Y; Melmed, C

    1979-01-01

    Muscle biopsies from two patients revealed that numerous type 2 fibers contained large abnormal areas filled with cylindrical spirals. The cytochemical profile of these cylindrical spirals was sufficiently characteristic that they could be distinguished from tubular aggregates. Their electron microscopic appearance was unmistakable. Their origin and significance are uncertain. The diverse nature of the patients' conditions (cramps and malignancy, and an unusual form of spinocerebellar degeneration) indicate that these abnormal structures are not disease specific.

  13. Fibre operating lengths of human lower limb muscles during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Edith M; Delp, Scott L

    2011-05-27

    Muscles actuate movement by generating forces. The forces generated by muscles are highly dependent on their fibre lengths, yet it is difficult to measure the lengths over which muscle fibres operate during movement. We combined experimental measurements of joint angles and muscle activation patterns during walking with a musculoskeletal model that captures the relationships between muscle fibre lengths, joint angles and muscle activations for muscles of the lower limb. We used this musculoskeletal model to produce a simulation of muscle-tendon dynamics during walking and calculated fibre operating lengths (i.e. the length of muscle fibres relative to their optimal fibre length) for 17 lower limb muscles. Our results indicate that when musculotendon compliance is low, the muscle fibre operating length is determined predominantly by the joint angles and muscle moment arms. If musculotendon compliance is high, muscle fibre operating length is more dependent on activation level and force-length-velocity effects. We found that muscles operate on multiple limbs of the force-length curve (i.e. ascending, plateau and descending limbs) during the gait cycle, but are active within a smaller portion of their total operating range.

  14. A Neuro-Fuzzy System for Characterization of Arm Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbinot, Alexandre; Favieiro, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    The myoelectric signal reflects the electrical activity of skeletal muscles and contains information about the structure and function of the muscles which make different parts of the body move. Advances in engineering have extended electromyography beyond the traditional diagnostic applications to also include applications in diverse areas such as rehabilitation, movement analysis and myoelectric control of prosthesis. This paper aims to study and develop a system that uses myoelectric signals, acquired by surface electrodes, to characterize certain movements of the human arm. To recognize certain hand-arm segment movements, was developed an algorithm for pattern recognition technique based on neuro-fuzzy, representing the core of this research. This algorithm has as input the preprocessed myoelectric signal, to disclosed specific characteristics of the signal, and as output the performed movement. The average accuracy obtained was 86% to 7 distinct movements in tests of long duration (about three hours). PMID:23429579

  15. A Neuro-Fuzzy System for Characterization of Arm Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Balbinot

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The myoelectric signal reflects the electrical activity of skeletal muscles and contains information about the structure and function of the muscles which make different parts of the body move. Advances in engineering have extended electromyography beyond the traditional diagnostic applications to also include applications in diverse areas such as rehabilitation, movement analysis and myoelectric control of prosthesis. This paper aims to study and develop a system that uses myoelectric signals, acquired by surface electrodes, to characterize certain movements of the human arm. To recognize certain hand-arm segment movements, was developed an algorithm for pattern recognition technique based on neuro-fuzzy, representing the core of this research. This algorithm has as input the preprocessed myoelectric signal, to disclosed specific characteristics of the signal, and as output the performed movement. The average accuracy obtained was 86% to 7 distinct movements in tests of long duration (about three hours.

  16. Esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction is often associated with coexistent abnormal esophageal body motility and abnormal bolus transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, E; Gideon, R M; Sloan, J; Katz, P O

    2017-10-01

    Currently, the diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders is in part based upon a hierarchical algorithm in which abnormalities of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) is prioritized. An important metric in evaluating the EGJ is the integrated relaxation pressure (IRP). Patients who do not have achalasia but are found to have an elevated IRP are diagnosed with EGJ outflow obstruction. It has been our observation that a subset of these patients also has a second named motility disorder and may also have abnormal bolus transit. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of abnormal body motility and or abnormal bolus movement in patients with EGJ outflow obstruction. Further, in an effort to evaluate the potential clinical value in measuring bolus transit as a complement to esophageal manometry, specifically in patients with EGJ outflow obstruction, we analyzed the presenting symptoms of these patients. A total of 807 patients with a mean age of 53 years completed esophageal function testing with impedance monitoring and high-resolution manometry between January 2012 and October 2016. There were 74 patients with achalasia who were excluded from the study. Of the remaining 733 patients, 138 (19%) had an elevated IRP and were given a diagnosis of EGJ outflow obstruction. Among these patients, 56 (40%) were diagnosed with an abnormal motility pattern to liquids (ineffective esophageal motility = 28, distal esophageal spasm = 19, Jackhammer = 6), of which 44 (76%) had abnormal bolus transit to liquids, viscous, or both. In contrast, there were 82 patients with EGJ outflow obstruction and normal esophageal motility, of which 33 (40%) had abnormal bolus transit. Patients with preserved esophageal motility and EGJ outflow obstruction were then evaluated. Of the 733 patients, 299 (40%) had intact esophageal motility. Of the 299 patients with normal esophageal motility, 56 patients had an elevated IRP, of which 16 (28%) had abnormal bolus transit. There were 243 (33

  17. Dance Movement Instruction: Effects on Spatial Awareness in Visually Impaired Elementary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, D. I.

    1988-01-01

    Dance movement instruction was shown to enhance spatial awareness in 16 visually impaired elementary students. Initiating such instruction early in life might be beneficial in treating movement inhibitions. Large-muscle and cardiovascular activities in physical education programs are complemented by the positioning, sequencing, movement, and…

  18. Disorders of paravertebral lumbar muscles: from pathology to cross-sectional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierry, Guillaume; Kremer, Stephane; Abu Eid, Maher; Bogorin, Adriana; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Kellner, Frauke

    2008-01-01

    Paravertebral lumbar muscles are important for spine stabilization and mobility. They may be abnormal in several disorders that may be associated with pain or functional impairment. Special attention should be paid to the paravertebral muscles during imaging, so that a possible muscular disease is not overlooked, especially in patients with low back pain. This article reviews such imaging abnormalities. (orig.)

  19. Muscle activity adapts to anti-gravity posture during pedalling in persons with post-stroke hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D A; Kautz, S A; Dairaghi, C A

    1997-05-01

    With hemiplegia following stroke, a person's movement response to anti-gravity posture often appears rigid and inflexible, exacerbating the motor dysfunction. A major determinant of pathological movement in anti-gravity postures is the failure to adapt muscle-activity patterns automatically to changes in posture. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the impaired motor performance observed when persons with hemiplegia pedal in a horizontal position is exacerbated at more vertical anti-gravity body orientations. Twelve healthy elderly subjects and 17 subjects with chronic (> 6 months) post-stroke hemiplegia participated in the study. Subjects pedalled a modified ergometer at different body orientations (from horizontal to vertical), maintaining the same workload, cadence, and hip and knee kinematics. Pedal reaction forces, and crank and pedal kinematics, were measured and then used to calculate the work done by each leg and their net positive and negative components. The EMG was recorded from four leg muscles (tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius, rectus femoris and biceps femoris). The main result from this study was that impaired plegic leg performance, as measured by net negative work done by the plegic leg and abnormal early rectus femoris activity, was exacerbated at the most vertical body orientations. However, contrary to the belief that muscle activity cannot adapt to anti-gravity postures, net positive work increased appropriately and EMG activity in all muscles showed modulated levels of activity similar to those in elderly control subjects. These results support the hypothesis that increased verticality exacerbates the already impaired movement performance. Yet, much of the motor response to verticality was flexible and appropriate, given the mechanics of the task.

  20. Effects of External Loads on Human Head Movement Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, M. H.; Choi, O. M.

    1984-01-01

    The central and reflexive control strategies underlying movements were elucidated by studying the effects of external loads on human head movement control systems. Some experimental results are presented on dynamic changes weigh the addition of aviation helmet (SPH4) and lead weights (6 kg). Intended time-optimal movements, their dynamics and electromyographic activity of neck muscles in normal movements, and also in movements made with external weights applied to the head were measured. It was observed that, when the external loads were added, the subject went through complex adapting processes and the head movement trajectory and its derivatives reached steady conditions only after transient adapting period. The steady adapted state was reached after 15 to 20 seconds (i.e., 5 to 6 movements).

  1. Positron emission tomography in movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Positron emission tomography provides a method for the quantitation of regional function within the living human brain. Studies of cerebral metabolism and blood flow in patients with Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease and focal dystonia have revealed functional abnormalities within substructures of the basal ganglia. Recent developments permit assessment of both pre-synaptic and post-synaptic function ion dopaminergic pathways. These techniques are now being applied to studies of movement disorders in human subjects

  2. Movement and Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard Hansen, Thomas; Eriksson, Eva; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we explore the space in which movement based interaction takes place. We have in several projects explored how fixed and mobile cameras can be used in movement based interaction and will shortly describe these projects. Based on our experience with working with movement-based intera......In this paper we explore the space in which movement based interaction takes place. We have in several projects explored how fixed and mobile cameras can be used in movement based interaction and will shortly describe these projects. Based on our experience with working with movement...

  3. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengle, Gerhard; Carlberg, Valerie; Tufa, Sara F.; Charbonneau, Noe L.; Smaldone, Silvia; Carlson, Eric J.; Ramirez, Francesco; Keene, Douglas R.; Sakai, Lynn Y.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background) are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that fibrillin-2 can

  4. Abnormal Activation of BMP Signaling Causes Myopathy in Fbn2 Null Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Sengle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fibrillins are large extracellular macromolecules that polymerize to form the backbone structure of connective tissue microfibrils. Mutations in the gene for fibrillin-1 cause the Marfan syndrome, while mutations in the gene for fibrillin-2 cause Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly. Both are autosomal dominant disorders, and both disorders affect musculoskeletal tissues. Here we show that Fbn2 null mice (on a 129/Sv background are born with reduced muscle mass, abnormal muscle histology, and signs of activated BMP signaling in skeletal muscle. A delay in Myosin Heavy Chain 8, a perinatal myosin, was found in Fbn2 null forelimb muscle tissue, consistent with the notion that muscle defects underlie forelimb contractures in these mice. In addition, white fat accumulated in the forelimbs during the early postnatal period. Adult Fbn2 null mice are already known to demonstrate persistent muscle weakness. Here we measured elevated creatine kinase levels in adult Fbn2 null mice, indicating ongoing cycles of muscle injury. On a C57Bl/6 background, Fbn2 null mice showed severe defects in musculature, leading to neonatal death from respiratory failure. These new findings demonstrate that loss of fibrillin-2 results in phenotypes similar to those found in congenital muscular dystrophies and that FBN2 should be considered as a candidate gene for recessive congenital muscular dystrophy. Both in vivo and in vitro evidence associated muscle abnormalities and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice with abnormally activated BMP signaling. Genetic rescue of reduced muscle mass and accumulation of white fat in Fbn2 null mice was accomplished by deleting a single allele of Bmp7. In contrast to other reports that activated BMP signaling leads to muscle hypertrophy, our findings demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of BMP signaling to the fibrillin-2 extracellular environment during early postnatal muscle development. New evidence presented here suggests that

  5. Kinesthetic illusion of wrist movement activates motor-related areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, E; Ehrsson, H H

    2001-12-04

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) to test the hypothesis that illusory movement of the right wrist activates the motor-related areas that are activated by real wrist movements. We vibrated the tendons of the relaxed right wrist extensor muscles which elicits a vivid illusory palmar flexion. In a control condition, we vibrated the skin surface over the processes styloideus ulnae, which does not elicit the illusion, using the identical frequency (83 Hz). We provide evidence that kinesthetic illusory wrist movement activates the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortices, supplementary motor area (SMA) and cingulate motor area (CMA). These areas are also active when executing the limb movement.

  6. Getting Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re thinking about aren't possible for kids. Superheroes, of course, aren't real, and professional athletes ... can make you stronger. Why? Because you're using your muscles when you do it. Eat Strong ...

  7. Muscle cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the lower leg/calf Back of the thigh (hamstrings) Front of the thigh (quadriceps) Cramps in the ... Names Cramps - muscle Images Chest stretch Groin stretch Hamstring stretch Hip stretch Thigh stretch Triceps stretch References ...

  8. Muscle Activity Onset Prior to Landing in Patients after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theisen, Daniel; Rada, Isabel; Brau, Amélie; Gette, Paul; Seil, Romain

    2016-01-01

    Muscle activation during landing is paramount to stabilise lower limb joints and avoid abnormal movement patterns. Delayed muscle activity onset measured by electromyography (EMG) has been suggested to be associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to test the hypothesis if ACL-injured patients display different results for muscle onset timing during standard deceleration tasks compared to healthy control participants. PubMed, Embase, Scopus and ScienceDirect databases were systematically searched over the period from January 1980 to February 2015, yielding a total of 1461 citations. Six studies meeting inclusion criteria underwent quality assessment, data extraction and re-computing procedures for the meta-analysis. The quality was rated “moderate” for 2 studies and “poor” for 4. Patients included and procedures used were highly heterogeneous. The tasks investigated were single leg hopping, decelerating from running or walking, tested on a total of 102 ACL-injured participants and 86 controls. EMG analyses of the muscles vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, lateral and medial hamstrings revealed trivial and non-significant standardised mean differences (SMD0.05) between patients and control participants. Furthermore, no differences were found between the contralateral leg of patients and controls for muscle activity onset of the medial and lateral gastrocnemius (SMD0.05). Based on 3 studies, the involved legs of ACL-injured patients showed overall earlier muscle activity onset compared to control participants for the medial gastrocnemius (SMD = 0.5; p = 0.05). Similar results were found for the lateral gastrocnemius (SMD = 2.1; pACL-injured patients and healthy controls regarding the muscle activity onset during landing. However, current evidence is scarce and weak, which highlights the need for further research in this area. PMID:27166929

  9. Motor unit abnormalities in Dystonia musculorum mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves De Repentigny

    Full Text Available Dystonia musculorum (dt is a mouse inherited sensory neuropathy caused by mutations in the dystonin gene. While the primary pathology lies in the sensory neurons of dt mice, the overt movement disorder suggests motor neurons may also be affected. Here, we report on the contribution of motor neurons to the pathology in dt(27J mice. Phenotypic dt(27J mice display reduced alpha motor neuron cell number and eccentric alpha motor nuclei in the ventral horn of the lumbar L1 spinal cord region. A dramatic reduction in the total number of motor axons in the ventral root of postnatal day 15 dt(27J mice was also evident. Moreover, analysis of the trigeminal nerve of the brainstem showed a 2.4 fold increase in number of degenerating neurons coupled with a decrease in motor neuron number relative to wild type. Aberrant phosphorylation of neurofilaments in the perikaryon region and axonal swellings within the pre-synaptic terminal region of motor neurons were observed. Furthermore, neuromuscular junction staining of dt(27J mouse extensor digitorum longus and tibialis anterior muscle fibers showed immature endplates and a significant decrease in axon branching compared to wild type littermates. Muscle atrophy was also observed in dt(27J muscle. Ultrastructure analysis revealed amyelinated motor axons in the ventral root of the spinal nerve, suggesting a possible defect in Schwann cells. Finally, behavioral analysis identified defective motor function in dt(27J mice. This study reveals neuromuscular defects that likely contribute to the dt(27J pathology and identifies a critical role for dystonin outside of sensory neurons.

  10. Somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Palmer, Shea; Learmonth, Ian D; Dieppe, Paul

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use quantitative sensory testing (QST) to explore the range and prevalence of somatosensory abnormalities demonstrated by patients with advanced knee OA. One hundred and seven knee OA patients and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy participants attended a 1-h QST session. Testing was performed on the medial side of the knee and the pain-free forearm. Light-touch thresholds were assessed using von Frey filaments, pressure pain thresholds using a digital pressure algometer, and thermal sensation and pain thresholds using a Thermotest MSA. Significant differences in median threshold values from knee OA patients and healthy participants were identified using Mann-Whitney U-tests. The z-score transformations were used to determine the prevalence of the different somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA patients. Testing identified 70% of knee OA patients as having at least one somatosensory abnormality. Comparison of median threshold values between knee OA patients and healthy participants revealed that patients had localized thermal and tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia at the osteoarthritic knee. Tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia were also present at the pain-free forearm. The most prevalent somatosensory abnormalities were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia, evident in between 20 and 34% of patients. This study found that OA patients demonstrate an array of somatosensory abnormalities, of which the most prevalent were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia. Further research is now needed to establish the clinical implications of these somatosensory abnormalities.

  11. Kinematic analysis quantifies gait abnormalities associated with lameness in broiler chickens and identifies evolutionary gait differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Caplen

    Full Text Available This is the first time that gait characteristics of broiler (meat chickens have been compared with their progenitor, jungle fowl, and the first kinematic study to report a link between broiler gait parameters and defined lameness scores. A commercial motion-capturing system recorded three-dimensional temporospatial information during walking. The hypothesis was that the gait characteristics of non-lame broilers (n = 10 would be intermediate to those of lame broilers (n = 12 and jungle fowl (n = 10, tested at two ages: immature and adult. Data analysed using multi-level models, to define an extensive range of baseline gait parameters, revealed inter-group similarities and differences. Natural selection is likely to have made jungle fowl walking gait highly efficient. Modern broiler chickens possess an unbalanced body conformation due to intense genetic selection for additional breast muscle (pectoral hypertrophy and whole body mass. Together with rapid growth, this promotes compensatory gait adaptations to minimise energy expenditure and triggers high lameness prevalence within commercial flocks; lameness creating further disruption to the gait cycle and being an important welfare issue. Clear differences were observed between the two lines (short stance phase, little double-support, low leg lift, and little back displacement in adult jungle fowl; much double-support, high leg lift, and substantial vertical back movement in sound broilers presumably related to mass and body conformation. Similarities included stride length and duration. Additional modifications were also identified in lame broilers (short stride length and duration, substantial lateral back movement, reduced velocity presumably linked to musculo-skeletal abnormalities. Reduced walking velocity suggests an attempt to minimise skeletal stress and/or discomfort, while a shorter stride length and time, together with longer stance and double-support phases, are associated

  12. Stereotypic movement disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001548.htm Stereotypic movement disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stereotypic movement disorder is a condition in which a person makes ...

  13. Weight-adjusted lean body mass and calf circumference are protective against obesity-associated insulin resistance and metabolic abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinari Takamura

    2017-07-01

    Interpretation: Weight-adjusted lean body mass and skeletal muscle area are protective against weight-associated insulin resistance and metabolic abnormalities. The calf circumference reflects lean body mass and may be useful as a protective marker against obesity-associated metabolic abnormalities.

  14. Recent crustal movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maelzer, H.

    Calculation of temporal height changes for the determination of recent vertical crustal movements in northern, western, and southern Germany is described. Precise geodetic measurements and their analysis for the determination of recent crustal movements in north-eastern Iceland, western Venezuela, and central Peru are described. Determination of recent vertical crustal movements by leveling and gravity data; geodetic modeling of deformations and recent crustal movements; geodetic modeling of plate motions; and instrumental developments in geodetic measuring are discussed.

  15. Congenital hypertrophy of multiple intrinsic muscles of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Tomohiro; Park, Susam; Niu, Atushi; Hasegawa, Hiromi

    2014-12-01

    Congenital hypertrophy of a single intrinsic muscle of the foot is rare, and as far as we know, only six cases have been reported. We describe a case of congenital anomaly that showed hypertrophy of multiple intrinsic muscles of the foot; the affected muscles were all the intrinsic muscles of the foot except the extensor digitorum brevis or extensor hallucis. Other tissues such as adipose tissue, nervous tissue, or osseous tissue showed no abnormalities. To reduce the volume of the foot we removed parts of the enlarged muscles.

  16. Muscle degeneration in chicks caused by Senna occidentalis seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, M; Gorniak, S L; Calore, E E; Cavaliere, M J; Raspantini, P C; Calore, N M; Dagli, M L

    1998-01-01

    Acute intoxication with Senna occidentalis seeds was studied in chicks. Seven-day-old chicks were fed ground dried seeds of this plant mixed with regular chicken ration at a concentration of 4% by weight for 15 days. Feed intake and body weight were markedly affected and a high level of lethality was observed. Necropsy examination of chicks from the experimental group revealed paleness and atrophy of thoracic muscles. Degenerative and necrotic fibres were observed in skeletal muscle by histological examination. Muscle histochemistry showed accumulation of lipids and numerous acid phosphatase-positive muscle fibres. Electron microscopy revealed atrophic muscle fibres, lipid storage, dilatation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and abnormal mitochondria.

  17. Cortex integrity relevance in muscle synergies in severe chronic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Cossio, E.; Brötz, D.; Birbaumer, N.; Ramos-Murguialday, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent experimental evidence has indicated that the motor system coordinates muscle activations through a linear combination of muscle synergies that are specified at the spinal or brainstem networks level. After stroke upper limb impairment is characterized by abnormal patterns of

  18. Movement and Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard Hansen, Thomas; Eriksson, Eva; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we explore the space in which movement based interaction takes place. We have in several projects explored how fixed and mobile cameras can be used in movement based interaction and will shortly describe these projects. Based on our experience with working with movement...

  19. Social movements and science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The article examines the role of social movements in the development of scientific knowledge. Interactions between social movements and science in broad, historical terms are discussed. The relations between the new social movements of the 1960s and 1970s and changes in the contemporary scientific...

  20. Reorganization of muscle synergies during multidirectional reaching in the horizontal plane with experimental muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muceli, Silvia; Falla, Deborah; Farina, Dario

    2014-04-01

    Muscle pain induces a complex reorganization of the motor strategy which cannot be fully explained by current theories. We tested the hypothesis that the neural control of muscles during reaching in the presence of nociceptive input is determined by a reorganization of muscle synergies with respect to control conditions. Muscle pain was induced by injection of hypertonic saline into the anterior deltoid muscle of eight men. Electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from 12 upper limb muscles as subjects performed a reaching task before (baseline) and after the injection of hypertonic (pain) saline, and after the pain sensation vanished. The EMG envelopes were factorized in muscle synergies, and activation signals extracted for each condition. Nociceptive stimulation resulted in a complex muscle reorganization without changes in the kinematic output. The anterior deltoid muscle activity decreased in all subjects while the changes in other muscles were subject specific. Three synergies sufficed to describe the EMG patterns in each condition, suggesting that reaching movements remain modular in the presence of experimental pain. Muscle reorganization in all subjects was accompanied by a change in the activation signals compatible with a change in the central drive to muscles. One, two or three synergies were shared between the baseline and painful conditions, depending on the subject. These results indicate that nociceptive stimulation may induce a reorganization of modular control in reaching. We speculate that such reorganization may be due to the recruitment of synergies specific to the painful condition.

  1. A pneumatic muscle hand therapy device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeneman, E J; Schultz, R S; Wolf, S L; Herring, D E; Koeneman, J B

    2004-01-01

    Intensive repetitive therapy improves function and quality of life for stroke patients. Intense therapies to overcome upper extremity impairment are beneficial, however, they are expensive because, in part, they rely on individualized interaction between the patient and rehabilitation specialist. The development of a pneumatic muscle driven hand therapy device, the Mentortrade mark, reinforces the need for volitional activation of joint movement while concurrently offering knowledge of results about range of motion, muscle activity or resistance to movement. The device is well tolerated and has received favorable comments from stroke survivors, their caregivers, and therapists.

  2. Multi-Joint Dynamics and the Development of Movement Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Otten

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The movement control of articulated limbs in humans has been explained in terms of equilibrium points and moving equilibrium points or virtual trajectories. One hypothesis is that the nervous system controls multi-segment limbs by simply planning in terms of these equilibrium points and trajectories. The present paper describes a planar computer simulation of an articulated three-segment limb, controlled by pairs of muscles. The shape of the virtual trajectory is analyzed when the limb is required to make fast movements with endpoint movements along a straight line with bell-shaped velocity profiles. Apparently, the faster the movement, the more the virtual trajectory deviates from the real trajectory and becomes up to eight times longer. The complexity of the shape of the virtual trajectories and its length in these fast movements makes it unlikely that the nervous system plans using these trajectories. it seems simpler to set up the required bursts of muscle activation, coupled in the nervous system to the direction of movement, the s peed, and the place in workspace. Finally, it is argued that the two types of explanation do not contradict each other: when a relation is established in the nervous system between muscle activation and movements, equilibrium points and virtual trajectories are necessarily part of that relation.

  3. Supplementation of DHA but not DHA with arachidonic acid during pregnancy and lactation influences general movement quality in 12-week-old term infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Saskia A.; Dijck-Brouwer, D. A. Janneke; Doornbos, Bennard; Erwich, Jan Jaap H. M.; Schaafsma, Anne; Muskiet, Frits A. J.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    DHA and arachidonic acid (AA) are important for neurodevelopment. A traditional neonatal neurological examination and the evaluation of general movement quality are sensitive techniques for assessing neurodevelopment in young infants. Mildly abnormal general movement,,; at 3 months have been

  4. High skeletal muscle adenylate cyclase in malignant hyperthermia.

    OpenAIRE

    Willner, J H; Cerri, C G; Wood, D S

    1981-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia occurs in humans with several congenital myopathies, usually in response to general anesthesia. Commonly, individuals who develop this syndrome lack symptoms of muscle disease, and their muscle lacks specific pathological changes. A biochemical marker for this myopathy has not previously been available; we found activity of adenylate cyclase and content of cyclic AMP to be abnormally high in skeletal muscle. Secondary modification of protein phosphorylation could explai...

  5. Objectively Differentiating Movement Patterns between Elite and Novice Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Gwyneth B; Dowling, Brittany; Troje, Nikolaus F; Fischer, Steven L; Graham, Ryan B

    2018-02-05

    Movement screens are frequently used to identify abnormal movement patterns that may increase risk of injury or hinder performance. Abnormal patterns are often detected visually based on the observations of a coach or clinician. Quantitative, or data-driven methods can increase objectivity, remove issues related to inter-rater reliability and offer the potential to detect new and important features that may not be observable by the human eye. Applying principal components analysis (PCA) to whole-body motion data may provide an objective data-driven method to identify unique and statistically important movement patterns, an important first step to objectively characterize optimal patterns or identify abnormalities. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to determine if PCA could detect meaningful differences in athletes' movement patterns when performing a non-sport-specific movement screen. As a proof of concept, athlete skill level was selected a priori as a factor likely to affect movement performance. Motion capture data from 542 athletes performing seven dynamic screening movements (i.e. bird-dog, drop jump, T-balance, step-down, L-hop, hop-down, and lunge) were analyzed. A PCA-based pattern recognition technique and linear discriminant analysis with cross-validation were used to determine if skill level could be predicted objectively using whole-body motion data. Depending on the movement, the validated linear discriminate analysis models accurately classified 70.66-82.91% of athletes as either elite or novice. We have provided proof that an objective data-driven method can detect meaningful movement pattern differences during a movement screening battery based on a binary classifier (i.e. skill level in this case). Improving this method can enhance screening, assessment and rehabilitation in sport, ergonomics and medicine.

  6. Mediators on human airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, C; Johnson, P; Anticevich, S; Ammit, A; McKay, K; Hughes, M; Black, J

    1997-01-01

    1. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in asthma may be due to several abnormalities, but must include alterations in the airway smooth muscle responsiveness and/or volume. 2. Increased responsiveness of airway smooth muscle in vitro can be induced by certain inflammatory cell products and by induction of sensitization (atopy). 3. Increased airway smooth muscle growth can also be induced by inflammatory cell products and atopic serum. 4. Mast cell numbers are increased in the airways of asthmatics and, in our studies, in airway smooth muscle that is sensitized and hyperresponsive. 5. We propose that there is a relationship between mast cells and airway smooth muscle cells which, once an allergic process has been initiated, results in the development of critical features in the lungs in asthma.

  7. Implications of white striping and spaghetti meat abnormalities on meat quality and histological features in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, G; Soglia, F; Mazzoni, M; Sirri, F; Canonico, L; Babini, E; Laghi, L; Cavani, C; Petracci, M

    2018-01-01

    During the past few years, there has been an increasing prevalence of broiler breast muscle abnormalities, such as white striping (WS) and wooden breast conditions. More recently, a new muscular abnormality termed as spaghetti meat (SM) because of the altered structural integrity of the Pectoralis major muscle often associated with WS has emerged. Thus, this study aimed at evaluating the effects of WS and SM conditions, occurring alone or combined within the same P. major muscle, on meat quality traits and muscle histology. In two replications, 96 P. major muscles were classified into four classes: normal (N), WS, SM and WS/SM. The whole fillet was used for weight assessment and morphometric measurements, then each sample was cut in order to separate the superficial layer from the deep one and used to evaluate proximate composition, histological features, nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times, functional properties and both myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins profile. Fillets affected by WS and SM abnormalities exhibited higher weights and increased thickness and length. SM condition was associated with a relevant decrease in protein content coupled with a significant increase in moisture level, whereas fat content was affected only by the simultaneous presence of WS. Histological evaluations revealed that abnormal samples were characterized by several degenerative aspects that almost completely concerned the superficial layer of the fillets. White striped fillets exhibited necrosis and lysis of fibers, fibrosis, lipidosis, loss of cross striation and vacuolar degeneration. Moreover, SM samples were characterized by poor fiber uniformity and a progressive rarefaction of the endo- and peri-mysial connective tissue, whereas WS/SM fillets showed intermediate histological features. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analysis revealed a higher proportion of extra-myofibrillar water in the superficial section of all the abnormal fillets, especially in SM

  8. Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Cooymans

    2010-01-01

    Conclusions : CFEOM is a rare, congenital, and non-progressive disorder with multiple extra ocular muscle restrictions. CFEOM can be associated with neuro-radiological abnormalities; its diagnosis and classification is defined by clinical characteristics and genetics. Options for treatment are limited and difficult.

  9. Computed tomography of the iliopsoas muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nino-Murcia, M.; Wechsler, R.J.; Brennan, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an ideal method for the imaging of the psoas muscle. The authors present 13 cases of patients with psoas abnormalities diagnosed by CT. The CT features of the different pathologic entities and comparison of CT with other imaging modalities are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Prognostic Significance of Preterm Isolated Decreased Fetal Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertuğrul Karahanoğlu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our aim is to evaluate the prognostic significance of isolated, preterm decreased fetal movement following normal initial full diagnostic workup. Study design: A retrospective observational study was conducted at a tertiary centre. The applied protocol was approved by the Medical Research Ethics Department of the hospital where the research was conducted. Obstetrics outcomes of preterm- and term-decreased fetal movement were compared following an initial, normal diagnostic work up. Evaluated outcomes were birth weight, mode of delivery, stillbirth rate, induction of labour, development of gestational hypertension, small for gestational age and oligohydramnios, polyhydramnios during the follow up period. Result: Obstetric complications related to placental insufficiency develops more frequently for decreased fetal movement in preterm cases with respect to that of in term cases. Following the diagnosis of decreased fetal movement, pregnancy hypertension occurred in 17% of preterm decreased fetal movement cases and in 4.7% of term decreased fetal movement cases. Fetal growth restriction developed in 6.6% of preterm decreased fetal movement and in 2.3% of term decreased fetal movement. Amniotic fluid abnormalities more frequently developed in preterm decreased fetal movement. Conclusion: Following an initial normal diagnostic workup, preterm decreased fetal movement convey a higher risk for the development of pregnancy complications associated with placental insufficiency. The patient should be monitored closely and management protocols must be developed for initial normal diagnostic workups in cases of preterm decreased fetal movement.

  11. Vibrating makes for better seeing: from the fly's micro eye movements to hyperacute visual sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphane eViollet

    2014-01-01

    Active vision means that visual perception not only depends closely on the subject's own movements, but that these movements actually contribute to the visual perceptual processes. Vertebrates' and invertebrates' eye movements are probably part of an active visual process, but their exact role still remains to be determined. In this paper, studies on the retinal micro-movements occurring in the compound eye of the fly are reviewed. Several authors have located and identified the muscles invo...

  12. The number and choice of muscles impact the results of muscle synergy analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Muterspaugh Steele

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available One theory for how humans control movement is that muscles are activated in weighted groups or synergies. Studies have shown that electromyography (EMG from a variety of tasks can be described by a low-dimensional space thought to reflect synergies. These studies use algorithms, such as nonnegative matrix factorization, to identify synergies from EMG. Due to experimental constraints, EMG can rarely be taken from all muscles involved in a task. However, it is unclear if the choice of muscles included in the analysis impacts estimated synergies. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of the number and choice of muscles on synergy analyses. We used a musculoskeletal model to calculate muscle activations required to perform an isometric upper-extremity task. Synergies calculated from the activations from the musculoskeletal model were similar to a prior experimental study. To evaluate the impact of the number of muscles included in the analysis, we randomly selected subsets of between 5 and 29 muscles and compared the similarity of the synergies calculated from each subset to a master set of synergies calculated from all muscles. We determined that the structure of synergies is dependent upon the number and choice of muscles included in the analysis. When five muscles were included in the analysis, the similarity of the synergies to the master set was only 0.57 ± 0.54; however, the similarity improved to over 0.8 with more than ten muscles. We identified two methods, selecting dominant muscles from the master set or selecting muscles with the largest maximum isometric force, which significantly improved similarity to the master set and can help guide future experimental design. Analyses that included a small subset of muscles also over-estimated the variance accounted for (VAF by the synergies compared to an analysis with all muscles. Thus, researchers should use caution using VAF to evaluate synergies when EMG is measured from a small

  13. Neuroimaging abnormalities in Griscelli's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarper, Nazan; Akansel, Guer; Aydogan, Metin; Gedikbasi, Demet; Babaoglu, Kadir; Goekalp, Ayse Sevim

    2002-01-01

    Griscelli's disease is a rare autosomal recessive immunodeficiency syndrome. We report a 7-1/2-month-old white girl who presented with this syndrome, but initially without neurological abnormalities. Initial CT of the brain was normal. Despite haematological remission with chemotherapy, she developed neurological symptoms, progressing to coma. At this time, CT showed areas of coarse calcification in the globi pallidi, left parietal white matter and left brachium pontis. Hypodense areas were present in the genu and posterior limb of the internal capsule on the right side, as well as posterior aspects of both thalami, together with minimal generalised atrophy. MRI revealed areas of increased T2 signal and a focal area of abnormal enhancement in the subcortical white matter. Griscelli's disease should be added to the list of acquired neuroimaging abnormalities in infants. (orig.)

  14. Paroxysmal eye-head movements in Glut1 deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Toni S; Pons, Roser; Engelstad, Kristin; Kane, Steven A; Goldberg, Michael E; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2017-04-25

    To describe a characteristic paroxysmal eye-head movement disorder that occurs in infants with Glut1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1 DS). We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of 101 patients with Glut1 DS to obtain clinical data about episodic abnormal eye movements and analyzed video recordings of 18 eye movement episodes from 10 patients. A documented history of paroxysmal abnormal eye movements was found in 32/101 patients (32%), and a detailed description was available in 18 patients, presented here. Episodes started before age 6 months in 15/18 patients (83%), and preceded the onset of seizures in 10/16 patients (63%) who experienced both types of episodes. Eye movement episodes resolved, with or without treatment, by 6 years of age in 7/8 patients with documented long-term course. Episodes were brief (usually <5 minutes). Video analysis revealed that the eye movements were rapid, multidirectional, and often accompanied by a head movement in the same direction. Eye movements were separated by clear intervals of fixation, usually ranging from 200 to 800 ms. The movements were consistent with eye-head gaze saccades. These movements can be distinguished from opsoclonus by the presence of a clear intermovement fixation interval and the association of a same-direction head movement. Paroxysmal eye-head movements, for which we suggest the term aberrant gaze saccades, are an early symptom of Glut1 DS in infancy. Recognition of the episodes will facilitate prompt diagnosis of this treatable neurodevelopmental disorder. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Locomotor-Like Leg Movements Evoked by Rhythmic Arm Movements in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylos-Labini, Francesca; Ivanenko, Yuri P.; MacLellan, Michael J.; Cappellini, Germana; Poppele, Richard E.; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Motion of the upper limbs is often coupled to that of the lower limbs in human bipedal locomotion. It is unclear, however, whether the functional coupling between upper and lower limbs is bi-directional, i.e. whether arm movements can affect the lumbosacral locomotor circuitry. Here we tested the effects of voluntary rhythmic arm movements on the lower limbs. Participants lay horizontally on their side with each leg suspended in an unloading exoskeleton. They moved their arms on an overhead treadmill as if they walked on their hands. Hand-walking in the antero-posterior direction resulted in significant locomotor-like movements of the legs in 58% of the participants. We further investigated quantitatively the responses in a subset of the responsive subjects. We found that the electromyographic (EMG) activity of proximal leg muscles was modulated over each cycle with a timing similar to that of normal locomotion. The frequency of kinematic and EMG oscillations in the legs typically differed from that of arm oscillations. The effect of hand-walking was direction specific since medio-lateral arm movements did not evoke appreciably leg air-stepping. Using externally imposed trunk movements and biomechanical modelling, we ruled out that the leg movements associated with hand-walking were mainly due to the mechanical transmission of trunk oscillations. EMG activity in hamstring muscles associated with hand-walking often continued when the leg movements were transiently blocked by the experimenter or following the termination of arm movements. The present results reinforce the idea that there exists a functional neural coupling between arm and legs. PMID:24608249

  16. Locomotor-like leg movements evoked by rhythmic arm movements in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Sylos-Labini

    Full Text Available Motion of the upper limbs is often coupled to that of the lower limbs in human bipedal locomotion. It is unclear, however, whether the functional coupling between upper and lower limbs is bi-directional, i.e. whether arm movements can affect the lumbosacral locomotor circuitry. Here we tested the effects of voluntary rhythmic arm movements on the lower limbs. Participants lay horizontally on their side with each leg suspended in an unloading exoskeleton. They moved their arms on an overhead treadmill as if they walked on their hands. Hand-walking in the antero-posterior direction resulted in significant locomotor-like movements of the legs in 58% of the participants. We further investigated quantitatively the responses in a subset of the responsive subjects. We found that the electromyographic (EMG activity of proximal leg muscles was modulated over each cycle with a timing similar to that of normal locomotion. The frequency of kinematic and EMG oscillations in the legs typically differed from that of arm oscillations. The effect of hand-walking was direction specific since medio-lateral arm movements did not evoke appreciably leg air-stepping. Using externally imposed trunk movements and biomechanical modelling, we ruled out that the leg movements associated with hand-walking were mainly due to the mechanical transmission of trunk oscillations. EMG activity in hamstring muscles associated with hand-walking often continued when the leg movements were transiently blocked by the experimenter or following the termination of arm movements. The present results reinforce the idea that there exists a functional neural coupling between arm and legs.

  17. Eye movement identification based on accumulated time feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Baobao; Wu, Qiang; Sun, Jiande; Yan, Hua

    2017-06-01

    Eye movement is a new kind of feature for biometrical recognition, it has many advantages compared with other features such as fingerprint, face, and iris. It is not only a sort of static characteristics, but also a combination of brain activity and muscle behavior, which makes it effective to prevent spoofing attack. In addition, eye movements can be incorporated with faces, iris and other features recorded from the face region into multimode systems. In this paper, we do an exploring study on eye movement identification based on the eye movement datasets provided by Komogortsev et al. in 2011 with different classification methods. The time of saccade and fixation are extracted from the eye movement data as the eye movement features. Furthermore, the performance analysis was conducted on different classification methods such as the BP, RBF, ELMAN and SVM in order to provide a reference to the future research in this field.

  18. Psychogenic Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgante, Francesca; Edwards, Mark J.; Espay, Alberto J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review This review describes the main clinical features of psychogenic (functional) movement disorders and reports recent advances in diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment. Recent Findings The terminology and definition of patients with psychogenic movement disorders remain subjects of controversy; the term “functional” has been used more frequently in the literature in recent years regarding the neurobiological substrate underpinning these disorders. Correct diagnosis of psychogenic movement disorders should rely not on the exclusion of organic disorders or the sole presence of psychological factors but on the observation or elicitation of clinical features related to the specific movement disorder (ie, a positive or inclusionary rather than exclusionary diagnosis). Sudden onset, spontaneous remissions, and variability over time or during clinical examination are useful “red flags” suggestive of a psychogenic movement disorder. Imaging studies have demonstrated impaired connectivity between limbic and motor areas involved in movement programming and hypoactivity of a brain region that compares expected data with actual sensory data occurring during voluntary movement. Treatment of psychogenic movement disorders begins with ensuring the patient’s acceptance of the diagnosis during the initial debriefing and includes nonpharmacologic (cognitive-behavioral therapy, physiotherapy) and pharmacologic options. Summary Psychogenic movement disorders represent a challenging disorder for neurologists to diagnose and treat. Recent advances have increased understanding of the neurobiological mechanism of psychogenic movement disorders. Treatment with cognitive strategies and physical rehabilitation can benefit some patients. As short duration of disease correlates with better prognosis, early diagnosis and initiation of treatment are critical. PMID:24092294

  19. Cramped synchronized general movements in preterm infants as an early marker for cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, F; Cioni, G; Einspieler, C; Roversi, MF; Bos, AF; Paolicelli, PB; Ranzi, A; Prechtl, HFR

    Objective: To ascertain whether specific abnormalities (ie, cramped synchronized general movements [GMs]) can predict cerebral palsy and the severity of later motor impairment in preterm infants affected by brain lesions. Design: Traditional neurological examination was performed, and GMs were

  20. MRI evaluation of multifidus muscles in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Yu-Leung; King, A.D.; Griffith, J.F.; Metreweli, C.; Cheng, J.C.Y.; Guo Xia

    1999-01-01

    Background. The role of the multifidus muscles in the initiation and progression of curve in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is not fully understood and controversy exists as to the side of the abnormality. Objective. To evaluate on MRI the multifidus muscles at the apex of the major curve in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis to ascertain if the multifidus muscles on the convex or concave side are abnormal and the relationship to curve severity. Materials and methods. Forty-six patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, separated into two groups, were studied using a 1.5-T MR scanner with the synergy spine coil, employing a modified STIR (short tau inversion recovery) axial sequence obtained at the apex of the major scoliotic curve. Results. No hyperintense signal change was demonstrated in the convex side multifidus muscles in any patient. In group I, 16 of 18 patients with severe or rapidly progressive curve showed increase in signal intensity in the multifidus muscle on the concave side of the apex of the curve. In group II, of the 15 patients with mild curve (Cobb angle 10-30 ), 4 had increased signal intensity in the multifidus muscle on the concave side; of the 13 with more severe curve (Cobb angle greater than 30 ), 10 had increase in multifidus signal intensity on the concave side. Conclusions. The concave-side multifidus muscle at the apex of a scoliotic curve was morphologically abnormal. A significant association between abnormal signal change and curve severity was also established. (orig.)

  1. Triorchidism: A Rare Genitourinary Abnormality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During early adulthood it will be carried out by palpation, ultrasonography, semen analysis, serum testosterone and follicle stimulating hormone levels and during late adulthood follow up will be done by ultrasonography for malignancy every 2 years. CONCLUSION. Polyorchidism is a rare genitourinary abnormality and its.

  2. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping

    2007-03-01

    Fetuses with omphalocele have an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with umbilical cord cysts, complexity of associated anomalies, and the contents of omphalocele. There is considerable evidence that genetics contributes to the etiology of omphalocele. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele and a comprehensive review of associated full aneuploidy such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploidy, trisomy 21, 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XXX, partial aneuploidy such as dup (3q), dup (11p), inv (11), dup (1q), del (1q), dup (4q), dup (5p), dup (6q), del (9p), dup (15q), dup(17q), Pallister-Killian syndrome with mosaic tetrasomy 12p and Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome with deletion of 17p13.3, and uniparental disomy (UPD) such as UPD 11 and UPD 14. Omphalocele is a prominent marker for chromosomal abnormalities. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert chromosomal abnormalities and familial unbalanced translocations, and prompt thorough cytogenetic investigations and genetic counseling.

  3. Chromosomal Abnormalities Associated With Omphalocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses with omphalocele have an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with umbilical cord cysts, complexity of associated anomalies, and the contents of omphalocele. There is considerable evidence that genetics contributes to the etiology of omphalocele. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele and a comprehensive review of associated full aneuploidy such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploidy, trisomy 21, 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XXX, partial aneuploidy such as dup(3q, dup(11p, inv(11, dup(1q, del(1q, dup(4q, dup(5p, dup(6q, del(9p, dup(15q, dup(17q, Pallister-Killian syndrome with mosaic tetrasomy 12p and Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome with deletion of 17p13.3, and uniparental disomy (UPD such as UPD 11 and UPD 14. Omphalocele is a prominent marker for chromosomal abnormalities. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert chromosomal abnormalities and familial unbalanced translocations, and prompt thorough cytogenetic investigations and genetic counseling.

  4. Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative outcomes in neonates with acute surgical conditions in Alexandria, Egypt. HL Wella, SMM Farahat. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals ...

  5. Muscle co-contraction patterns in robot-mediated force field learning to guide specific muscle group training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzamiglio, Sara; Desowska, Adela; Shojaii, Pegah; Taga, Myriam; Turner, Duncan L

    2017-01-01

    Muscle co-contraction is a strategy of increasing movement accuracy and stability employed in dealing with force perturbation of movement. It is often seen in neuropathological populations. The direction of movement influences the pattern of co-contraction, but not all movements are easily achievable for populations with motor deficits. Manipulating the direction of the force instead, may be a promising rehabilitation protocol to train movement with use of a co-contraction reduction strategy. Force field learning paradigms provide a well described procedure to evoke and test muscle co-contraction. The aim of this study was to test the muscle co-contraction pattern in a wide range of arm muscles in different force-field directions utilising a robot-mediated force field learning paradigm of motor adaptation. Forty-two participants volunteered to participate in a study utilising robot-mediated force field motor adaptation paradigm with a clockwise or counter-clockwise force field. Kinematics and surface electromyography (EMG) of eight arm muscles were measured. Both muscle activation and co-contraction was earlier and stronger in flexors in the clockwise condition and in extensors in the counter-clockwise condition. Manipulating the force field direction leads to changes in the pattern of muscle co-contraction.

  6. Fatigue effects on tracking performance and muscle activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huysmans, M.A.; Hoozemans, M.J.M.; van der Beek, A.J.; de Looze, M.P.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested that fatigue affects proprioception and consequently movement accuracy, the effects of which may be counteracted by increased muscle activity. To determine the effects of fatigue on tracking performance and muscle activity in the M. extensor carpi radialis (ECR), 11 female

  7. Abnormal electrochemical skin conductance in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Dominique; Brunswick, Philippe; Calvet, Jean-Henri; Dusser, Daniel; Fajac, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical skin conductance measurement is an active electrophysiologic method in which incremental low direct voltage is applied on the skin. It generates a current due to reverse iontophoresis which previous studies suggested to be mostly related to chloride anion movements. As sweat chloride movements upon electric stimulation were likely to be impaired in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, we designed a proof-of-concept study to measure electrochemical skin conductance in CF patients and control subjects and to test the ability of this method to discriminate CF from controls. Electrochemical skin conductance was measured in 41 adult patients with classical CF and 20 healthy control subjects. Patients placed their hands and feet on nickel electrodes and an incremental low direct voltage was applied on the anode during 2min. The resulting voltage on the cathode and the current generated between anode and cathode were measured and from them, two electrochemical skin conductance variables were calculated: ESC, obtained when a low voltage of 1.6V was applied, and dESC which took into account electrochemical skin conductances obtained when low and high voltages were applied. ESC measurements on hands and feet were significantly different in CF patients (on feet: 75±10μSi), as compared with control subjects (62±13μSi, pconductance which is easily and rapidly measured is abnormal in CF patients. Trial registry name in the European Clinical Trials Database (eudraCT): "EZSCAN MUCO1: Mesure de la conductance cutanée par chronoampérométrie", N°EUDRACT: 2007-A00221-52. Copyright © 2010 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: action identification by a dynamic recurrent neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoetxea, Ana; Leurs, Françoise; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cebolla, Ana M; Dan, Bernard; McIntyre, Joseph; Cheron, Guy

    2014-01-01

    In this study we employed a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) in a novel fashion to reveal characteristics of control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when drawing figures with the outstretched arm. We asked healthy human subjects to perform four different figure-eight movements in each of two workspaces (frontal plane and sagittal plane). We then trained a DRNN to predict the movement of the wrist from information in the EMG signals from seven different muscles. We trained different instances of the same network on a single movement direction, on all four movement directions in a single movement plane, or on all eight possible movement patterns and looked at the ability of the DRNN to generalize and predict movements for trials that were not included in the training set. Within a single movement plane, a DRNN trained on one movement direction was not able to predict movements of the hand for trials in the other three directions, but a DRNN trained simultaneously on all four movement directions could generalize across movement directions within the same plane. Similarly, the DRNN was able to reproduce the kinematics of the hand for both movement planes, but only if it was trained on examples performed in each one. As we will discuss, these results indicate that there are important dynamical constraints on the mapping of EMG to hand movement that depend on both the time sequence of the movement and on the anatomical constraints of the musculoskeletal system. In a second step, we injected EMG signals constructed from different synergies derived by the PCA in order to identify the mechanical significance of each of these components. From these results, one can surmise that discrete-rhythmic movements may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the co-activation of all muscles over the time span of the movement and two others elliciting patterns of reciprocal activation operating in orthogonal directions.

  9. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: action identification by a dynamic recurrent neural network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana eBengoetxea

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we employed a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN in a novel fashion to reveal characteristics of control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when drawing figures with the outstretched arm. We asked healthy human subjects to perform four different figure-eight movements in each of two workspaces (frontal plane and sagittal plane. We then trained a DRNN to predict the movement of the wrist from information in the EMG signals from seven different muscles. We trained different instances of the same network on a single movement direction, on all four movement directions in a single movement plane, or on all eight possible movement patterns and looked at the ability of the DRNN to generalize and predict movements for trials that were not included in the training set. Within a single movement plane, a DRNN trained on one movement direction was not able to predict movements of the hand for trials in the other three directions, but a DRNN trained simultaneously on all four movement directions could generalize across movement directions within the same plane. Similarly, the DRNN was able to reproduce the kinematics of the hand for both movement planes, but only if it was trained on examples performed in each one. As we will discuss, these results indicate that there are important dynamical constraints on the mapping of EMG to hand movement that depend on both the time sequence of the movement and on the anatomical constraints of the musculoskeletal system. In a second step, we injected EMG signals constructed from different synergies derived by the PCA in order to identify the mechanical significance of each of these components. From these results, one can surmise that discrete-rhythmic movements may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the co-activation of all muscles over the time span of the movement and two others patterns of reciprocal activation operating in orthogonal

  10. Anti-Vaccination Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    The current anti-vaccination movements that have established themselves in the United States as well as other regions in the world are like a hydra of discourse. Right when one effective measure is created to convince people to vaccinate two more anti-vaccination movements sprout up in its place. These anti-vaccination movements are driven by cultural beliefs, ideologies, medical exemption laws, non-medical exemption laws, distrust of the government, distrust of large pharmaceutical companies...

  11. Sensation of Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sensation of Movement will discuss the role of sensation in the control of action, bodily self-recognition, and sense of agency. Sensing movement is dependent on a range of information received by the brain, from signalling in the peripheral sensory organs to the establishment of higher order goals....... This volume will question whether one type of information is more relevant for the ability to sense and control movements, and demonstrate the importance of integrating neuroscientific knowledge with philosophical perspectives, in order to arrive at new insights into how sensation of movement can be studied...

  12. The mathematics of movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Review of: Quantitative Analysis of Movement: Measuring and Modeling Population Redistribution in Animals and Plants. Peter Turchin. 1998. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA. 306 pages. $38.95 (paper).

  13. Muscle Sensor Model Using Small Scale Optical Device for Pattern Recognitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreangsak Tamee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new sensor system for measuring contraction and relaxation of muscles by using a PANDA ring resonator is proposed. The small scale optical device is designed and configured to perform the coupling effects between the changes in optical device phase shift and human facial muscle movement, which can be used to form the relationship between optical phase shift and muscle movement. By using the Optiwave and MATLAB programs, the results obtained have shown that the measurement of the contraction and relaxation of muscles can be obtained after the muscle movements, in which the unique pattern of individual muscle movement from facial expression can be established. The obtained simulation results, that is, interference signal patterns, can be used to form the various pattern recognitions, which are useful for the human machine interface and the human computer interface application and discussed in detail.

  14. Spierbelasting en RSI [Muscle load and repetitive strain injury (RSI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoozemans, M.J.M.; Visser, B.; Huysmans, M.A.; Speklé, E.M.; Dieën, J.H. van

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of theories concerning the development of RSI (repetitive strain injury), related to muscle disorders. Movement is a noisy process. The level of noise is affected by factors such as fatigue and psychosocial stress. In order for precision movements to be made in such

  15. Syndrome of Continuous Muscle Fibre Activity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-08-10

    Aug 10, 1974 ... acquired nature of the disorder. 5. Air. Med. l., 48, 1601 (1974). In 1961 the electromyographic and clinical findings of two ... Electromyography de- monstrates the state of continuous activity of the muscles. ... voluntary movements fatigue very rapidly. The extra-ocular. Fig. 3. Spontaneous motor unit activity.

  16. The oculomotor system of decapod cephalopods: eye muscles, eye muscle nerves, and the oculomotor neurons in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budelmann, B U; Young, J Z

    1993-04-29

    Fourteen extraocular eye muscles are described in the decapods Loligo and Sepioteuthis, and thirteen in Sepia; they are supplied by four eye muscle nerves. The main action of most of the muscles is a linear movement of the eyeball, only three muscles produce strong rotations. The arrangement, innervation and action of the decapod eye muscles are compared with those of the seven eye muscles and seven eye muscle nerves in Octopus. The extra muscles in decapods are attached to the anterior and superior faces of the eyes. At least, the anterior muscles, and presumably also the superior muscles, are concerned with convergent eye movements for binocular vision during fixation and capture of prey by the tentacles. The remaining muscles are rather similar in the two cephalopod groups. In decapods, the anterior muscles include conjunctive muscles; these cross the midline and each presumably moves both eyes at the same time during fixation. In the squids Loligo and Sepioteuthis there is an additional superior conjunctive muscle of perhaps similar function. Some of the anterior muscles are associated with a narrow moveable plate, the trochlear cartilage; it is attached to the eyeball by trochlear membranes. Centripetal cobalt fillings showed that all four eye muscle nerves have fibres that originate from somata in the ipsilateral anterior lateral pedal lobe, which is the oculomotor centre. The somata of the individual nerves show different but overlapping distributions. Bundles of small presumably afferent fibres were seen in two of the four nerves. They do not enter the anterior lateral pedal lobe but run to the ventral magnocellular lobe; some afferent fibres enter the brachio-palliovisceral connective and run perhaps as far as the palliovisceral lobe.

  17. In Vivo Sarcomere Length Measurement in Whole Muscles during Passive Stretch and Twitch Contractions

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Kevin W.; Kuo, Bill P.-P.; O’Connor, Shawn M.; Radic, Stojan; Lieber, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    Muscle force is dictated by micrometer-scale contractile machines called sarcomeres. Whole-muscle force drops from peak force production to zero with just a few micrometers of sarcomere length change. No current technology is able to capture adequate dynamic sarcomere data in vivo, and thus we lack fundamental data needed to understand human movement and movement disorders. Methods such as diffraction, endoscopy, and optical coherence tomography have been applied to muscle but are prohibitive...

  18. Pathophysiology of somatosensory abnormalities in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Antonella; Khan, Nashaba; Defazio, Giovanni; Rothwell, John C; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2013-12-01

    Changes in sensory function that have been described in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) can be either 'pure' disorders of conscious perception such as elevations in sensory threshold, or disorders of sensorimotor integration, in which the interaction between sensory input and motor output is altered. In this article, we review the extensive evidence for disrupted tactile, nociceptive, thermal and proprioceptive sensations in PD, as well as the influences exerted on these sensations by dopaminergic therapy and deep brain stimulation. We argue that abnormal spatial and temporal processing of sensory information produces incorrect signals for the preparation and execution of voluntary movement. Sensory deficits are likely to be a consequence of the dopaminergic denervation of the basal ganglia that is the hallmark of PD. A possible mechanism to account for somatosensory deficits is one in which disease-related dopaminergic denervation leads to a loss of response specificity, resulting in transmission of noisier and less-differentiated information to cortical regions. Changes in pain perception might have a different explanation, possibly involving disease-related effects outside the basal ganglia, including involvement of peripheral pain receptors, as well as structures such as the periaqueductal grey matter and non-dopaminergic neurotransmitter systems.

  19. Abnormal parietal function in conversion paresis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marije van Beilen

    Full Text Available The etiology of medically unexplained symptoms such as conversion disorder is poorly understood. This is partly because the interpretation of neuroimaging results in conversion paresis has been complicated by the use of different control groups, tasks and statistical comparisons. The present study includes these different aspects in a single data set. In our study we included both normal controls and feigners to control for conversion paresis. We studied both movement execution and imagery, and we contrasted both within-group and between-group activation. Moreover, to reveal hemisphere-specific effects that have not been reported before, we performed these analyses using both flipped and unflipped data. This approach resulted in the identification of abnormal parietal activation which was specific for conversion paresis patients. Patients also showed reduced activity in the prefrontal cortex, supramarginal gyrus and precuneus, including hemisphere-specific activation that is lateralized in the same hemisphere, regardless of right- or left-sided paresis. We propose that these regions are candidates for an interface between psychological mechanisms and disturbed higher-order motor control. Our study presents an integrative neurophysiological view of the mechanisms that contribute to the etiology of this puzzling psychological disorder, which can be further investigated with other types of conversion symptoms.

  20. Abnormal Parietal Function in Conversion Paresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beilen, Marije; de Jong, Bauke M.; Gieteling, Esther W.; Renken, Remco; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of medically unexplained symptoms such as conversion disorder is poorly understood. This is partly because the interpretation of neuroimaging results in conversion paresis has been complicated by the use of different control groups, tasks and statistical comparisons. The present study includes these different aspects in a single data set. In our study we included both normal controls and feigners to control for conversion paresis. We studied both movement execution and imagery, and we contrasted both within-group and between-group activation. Moreover, to reveal hemisphere-specific effects that have not been reported before, we performed these analyses using both flipped and unflipped data. This approach resulted in the identification of abnormal parietal activation which was specific for conversion paresis patients. Patients also showed reduced activity in the prefrontal cortex, supramarginal gyrus and precuneus, including hemisphere-specific activation that is lateralized in the same hemisphere, regardless of right- or left-sided paresis. We propose that these regions are candidates for an interface between psychological mechanisms and disturbed higher-order motor control. Our study presents an integrative neurophysiological view of the mechanisms that contribute to the etiology of this puzzling psychological disorder, which can be further investigated with other types of conversion symptoms. PMID:22039428

  1. Reliability of the Q Force; a mobile instrument for measuring isometric quadriceps muscle strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. C.P. van der Schans; W. Zijlstra; G.R.H. Regterschot; W.P. Krijnen; K.W. Douma; G.E.C. Slager

    2016-01-01

    Background: The ability to generate muscle strength is a pre-requisite for all human movement. Decreased quadriceps muscle strength is frequently observed in older adults and is associated with a decreased performance and activity limitations. To quantify the quadriceps muscle strength and to

  2. Reliability of the Q Force; a mobile instrument for measuring isometric quadriceps muscle strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, K W; Regterschot, G R H; Krijnen, W P; Slager, G E C; van der Schans, C P; Zijlstra, W

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ability to generate muscle strength is a pre-requisite for all human movement. Decreased quadriceps muscle strength is frequently observed in older adults and is associated with a decreased performance and activity limitations. To quantify the quadriceps muscle strength and to

  3. Echocardiographic abnormalities in hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodulfo Garcia, Maikel; Tornes Perez, Victor Manuel; Castellanos Tardo, Juan Ramon

    2012-01-01

    A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in 120 hypertensive patients with a course of 5 or more years, who went to the emergency room of 'Saturnino Lora' Provincial Teaching Hospital from November 2010 to November 2011 in order to determine the presence or absence of echocardiographic abnormalities typical of hypertension. Of these, 78,3 % was affected, most of whom reported not to continue with regular previous medical treatment, and 21,7 % had not these abnormalities. Age group of 50-60 years, males and blacks prevailed in the case material. The most significant echocardiographic findings were left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure with ejection fraction of left ventricle preserved

  4. Glial abnormalities in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öngür, Dost; Bechtholt, Anita J; Carlezon, William A; Cohen, Bruce M

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that mood disorders are associated with abnormalities in the brain's cellular composition, especially in glial cells. Considered inert support cells in the past, glial cells are now known to be important for brain function. Treatments for mood disorders enhance glial cell proliferation, and experimental stimulation of cell growth has antidepressant effects in animal models of mood disorders. These findings suggest that the proliferation and survival of glial cells may be important in the pathogenesis of mood disorders and may be possible targets for the development of new treatments. In this article we review the evidence for glial abnormalities in mood disorders, and we discuss glial cell biology and evidence from postmortem studies of mood disorders. The goal is not to carry out a comprehensive review but to selectively discuss existing evidence in support of an argument for the role of glial cells in mood disorders.

  5. Abnormal Metabolite in Alcoholic Subjects,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    0.01 0.12 81 A.A. 51 M 0 ɘ.01 0.09 Schizophrenia 85a W.G. 67 M 0 ɘ.01 0.21 Proteins & Ketones in Urine b 0 ɘ.01 0.11 86a W.H. 67 M 0 ɘ.01 0.15 b 0...AD-AS 90 TOTTS GAP MEDICAL RESEARCH LABS INC BANGOR PA F/G 6/5 ABNORMAL METABOLITE IN ALCOHOLIC SUBJECTS, U) 1982 R L BEECH, M E FELVER, M R...LAKSCHMANAN NOOBIN 70 C 0233 UNJCLASSIFIED NL I ,I/ ABNORMAL METABOLITE IN ALCOHOLIC SUBJECTS Richard L . Veech, Michael E. Felver, M.R. Lakschmanan, Stewart

  6. 85 Engaging Movement Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikart, Phyllis S.; Carlton, Elizabeth B.

    This book presents activities to keep K-6 students moving in a variety of ways as they learn. The movement experiences are planned around key curriculum concepts in movement and music as well as in academic curriculum areas. The experiences develop students' basic timing, language abilities, vocabulary, concentration, planning skills, and…

  7. Exploring pedestrian movement patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orellana, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to develop an approach for exploring, analysing and interpreting movement patterns of pedestrians interacting with the environment. This objective is broken down in sub-objectives related to four research questions. A case study of the movement of visitors in a

  8. Dynamics of human movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The part of (bio)mechanics that studies the interaction of forces on the human skeletal system and its effect on the resulting movement is called rigid body dynamics. Some basic concepts are presented: A mathematical formulation to describe human movement and how this relates on the mechanical loads

  9. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  10. Computed tomography abnormalities in hanging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, F.; Floris, R.

    1987-01-01

    The CT pattern of bilateral and symmetrical round low density areas in the globi pallidi has been observed in a young man who attempted suicide by hanging. These CT abnormalities are similar to those described in other conditions such as carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide, cyanide and methanol poisoning, hypoglycaemia, drowning and acute global central nervous system hypoperfusion.The findings appear to be correlated with acute cerebral hypoxia. (orig.)

  11. GLIAL ABNORMALITIES IN MOOD DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Öngür, Dost; Bechtholt, Anita J.; Carlezon, William A.; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that mood disorders are associated with abnormalities in the brain's cellular composition, especially in glial cells. Considered inert support cells in the past, glial cells are now known to be important for brain function. Treatments for mood disorders enhance glial cell proliferation, and experimental stimulation of cell growth has antidepressant effects in animal models of mood disorders. These findings suggest that the proliferation and survival of glia...

  12. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Roizen, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development. (orig.)

  13. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Roizen, N.J.

    1989-06-01

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development.

  14. Abnormal uterine bleeding in perimenopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, S R; Lumsden, M A

    2017-10-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the commonest presenting complaints encountered in a gynecologist's office or primary-care setting. The wider availability of diagnostic tools has allowed prompt diagnosis and treatment of an increasing number of menstrual disorders in an office setting. This White Paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of transvaginal ultrasound, blind endometrial sampling and diagnostic hysteroscopy. Once a proper diagnosis has been established, appropriate therapy may be embarked upon. Fortunately, only a minority of such patients will have premalignant or malignant disease. When bleeding is sufficient to cause severe anemia or even hypovolemia, prompt intervention is called for. In most of the cases, however, the abnormal uterine bleeding will be disquieting to the patient and significantly affect her 'quality of life'. Sometimes, reassurance and expectant management will be sufficient in such patients. Overall, however, in cases of benign disease, some intervention will be required. The use of oral contraceptive pills especially those with a short hormone-free interval, the insertion of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system, the incorporation of newer medical therapies including antifibrinolytic drugs and selective progesterone receptor modulators and minimally invasive treatments have made outpatient therapy increasingly effective. For others, operative hysteroscopy and endometrial ablation are proven therapeutic tools to provide both long- and short-term relief of abnormal uterine bleeding, thus avoiding, or deferring, hysterectomy.

  15. Modulation of reactive oxygen species in skeletal muscle by myostatin is mediated through NF??B

    OpenAIRE

    Sriram, Sandhya; Subramanian, Subha; Sathiakumar, Durga; Venkatesh, Rithika; Salerno, Monica S.; McFarlane, Craig D.; Kambadur, Ravi; Sharma, Mridula

    2011-01-01

    Summary Abnormal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory cytokines have been observed in the skeletal muscle during muscle wasting including sarcopenia. However, the mechanisms that signal ROS production and prolonged maintenance of ROS levels during muscle wasting are not fully understood. Here, we show that myostatin (Mstn) is a pro?oxidant and signals the generation of ROS in muscle cells. Myostatin, a transforming growth factor?? (TGF??) family member, has been shown to p...

  16. Robotic Powered Transfer Mechanism modeling on Human Muscle Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yukio

    It is considered in engineering that one power source can operate one joint. However, support movement mechanism of living organism is multi joint movement mechanism. Considerably different from mechanical movement mechanism, two pairs of uni-articular muscles and a pair of bi-articular muscles are involved in it. In leg, movements observed in short run including leg idling, heel contact and toeing are operated by bi-articular muscles of the thigh showing strong legs to support body weight. Pursuit of versatility in welfare robot bri