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Sample records for abnormal fev1 decline

  1. Analysis of FEV1 decline in relatively healthy heavy smokers: implications of expressing changes in FEV1 in relative terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Laura H; Dirksen, Asger; Shaker, Saher B; Skovgaard, Lene T; Dahlbäck, Magnus; Pedersen, Jesper H

    2014-02-01

    Progressive decline in lung function has been widely accepted as the hallmark of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, recent evidence indicates that the rate of decline measured as decline in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) is higher in mild to moderate COPD than in severe COPD. Usually changes in FEV1 are measured in ml that is "absolute"; however, changes can also be measured "relative" as a percentage of the actual FEV1. We hypothesize that relative measurements could be more appropriate than absolute measurements for describing changes in lung function. We analyzed data from 3,218 relatively healthy heavy smokers who participated in the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial. The influences of age, sex, height, body mass index, smoking, and severity of airflow limitation on FEV1 were analyzed in mixed effects models. In absolute terms those with the best lung function consistently showed the steepest decline, whereas in relative terms most fast decliners are found among those with low lung function. Measuring changes in relative terms implied statistically significant acceleration of decline with advancing age, smoking (pack-years) and severity of airflow limitation. Relative measurements may lead to a better understanding of changes in lung function. Smoking and severity of airflow limitation speed up the loss of lung function, and this emphasizes the importance of abstaining from smoking the sooner the better. Measuring changes in relative terms could have important implications for the interpretation of results from clinical trials where FEV1 is the primary outcome. DLCST; www.ClinicalTrials.org , registration number: NCT00496977.

  2. Spirometry, rapid FEV1 decline, and lung cancer among asbestos exposed heavy smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Jason W; Au, David H; Barnett, Matt J; Goodman, Gary E

    2007-12-01

    We assessed whether spirometric measurements are associated with the development of accelerated FEV(1) decline and lung cancer among active and previous smokers with a wide range of lung function. Bivariate and multivariate analyses that adjusted for age, intervention arm, smoking status at enrollment and smoking history, years exposed to asbestos, and evidence of asbestosis were used to assess whether baseline FEV(1) and FEV(1)/FVC ratio were associated with accelerated FEV(1) decline and incident lung cancer. The 3,041 participants enrolled from 1985 to 1994 were followed through April 30, 2005. Baseline FEV(1)/FVC ratio80%. Lung cancer risk among participants with baseline airflow obstruction and FEV(1)80% (psmokers. These data indicate an FEV(1)/FVCsmokers is significantly associated with faster airflow loss, and an increased risk for developing lung cancer, even among those individuals with a normal FEV(1).

  3. Dietary Antioxidants and FEV1 Decline: the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Amy R; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Harris, Tamara B; Holvoet, Paul; Jensen, Robert L; Newman, Anne B; Lee, Jung Sun; Yende, Sachin; Bauer, Doug; Cassano, Patricia A

    2012-01-01

    Increased antioxidant defenses are hypothesized to decrease age- and smoking-related decline in lung function. The relation of dietary antioxidants, smoking, and forced expiratory volume in the 1st second of effort (FEV1) was investigated in community-dwelling older adults in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study. 1,443 participants completed a food frequency questionnaire, self-reported smoking history, and had measurements of FEV1 at both baseline and after 4 years of follow-up. The association of dietary intake of nutrients and foods with antioxidant properties and rate of FEV1 decline was investigated using hierarchical linear regression models. In continuing smokers (current smokers at both time points), higher vitamin C and higher intake of fruits and vegetables were associated with an 18 and 24 ml/year slower rate of FEV1 decline compared to lower intake (Pantioxidant properties may modulate lung function decline in older adults exposed to cigarette smoke. PMID:22005919

  4. A pooled analysis of FEV1 decline in COPD patients randomized to inhaled corticosteroids or placebo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soriano, JB; Sin, DD; Zhang, X

    2007-01-01

    on smoking status and gender. Smokers who continued to smoke had a smaller increase in FEV1 during the first 6 months than did ex-smokers. Female ex-smokers had a larger increase in FEV1 with ICS therapy than did male ex-smokers. Conclusions: We conclude that in COPD in the first 6 months of treatment, ICS......Background: There is controversy about whether therapy with inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) modifies the natural history of COPD, characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Methods: The Inhaled Steroids Effect Evaluation in COPD (ISEEC) study is a pooled study of patient-level data from seven...... long-term randomized controlled trials of ICS vs placebo lasting 12 months in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. We have previously reported a survival benefit for ICS therapy in COPD patients using ISEEC data. We aimed to determine whether the regular use of ICSs vs placebo improves FEV1 decline...

  5. A pooled analysis of FEV1 decline in COPD patients randomized to inhaled corticosteroids or placebo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soriano, JB; Sin, DD; Zhang, X

    2007-01-01

    .19% compared with placebo (p placebo and ICS therapy in terms of FEV1 decline (-0.01 ± 0.09%; p = 0.86). The initial treatment effect was dependent......Background: There is controversy about whether therapy with inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) modifies the natural history of COPD, characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Methods: The Inhaled Steroids Effect Evaluation in COPD (ISEEC) study is a pooled study of patient-level data from seven...... long-term randomized controlled trials of ICS vs placebo lasting 12 months in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD. We have previously reported a survival benefit for ICS therapy in COPD patients using ISEEC data. We aimed to determine whether the regular use of ICSs vs placebo improves FEV1 decline...

  6. Understanding the natural progression in %FEV1 decline in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor-Robinson, David; Whitehead, Margaret; Diderichsen, Finn

    2012-01-01

    is partitioned into three components (between patient, within patient and measurement error) using the empirical variogram. Then a linear mixed effects model is developed to explore factors influencing %FEV(1) in this population. Lung function measures are correlated for over 15 years. A baseline %FEV(1) value...

  7. Systematic review of the evidence relating FEV1 decline to giving up smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Peter N

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 decline ("beta" is a marker of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease risk. The reduction in beta after quitting smoking is an upper limit for the reduction achievable from switching to novel nicotine delivery products. We review available evidence to estimate this reduction and quantify the relationship of smoking to beta. Methods Studies were identified, in healthy individuals or patients with respiratory disease, that provided data on beta over at least 2 years of follow-up, separately for those who gave up smoking and other smoking groups. Publications to June 2010 were considered. Independent beta estimates were derived for four main smoking groups: never smokers, ex-smokers (before baseline, quitters (during follow-up and continuing smokers. Unweighted and inverse variance-weighted regression analyses compared betas in the smoking groups, and in continuing smokers by amount smoked, and estimated whether beta or beta differences between smoking groups varied by age, sex and other factors. Results Forty-seven studies had relevant data, 28 for both sexes and 19 for males. Sixteen studies started before 1970. Mean follow-up was 11 years. On the basis of weighted analysis of 303 betas for the four smoking groups, never smokers had a beta 10.8 mL/yr (95% confidence interval (CI, 8.9 to 12.8 less than continuing smokers. Betas for ex-smokers were 12.4 mL/yr (95% CI, 10.1 to 14.7 less than for continuing smokers, and for quitters, 8.5 mL/yr (95% CI, 5.6 to 11.4 less. These betas were similar to that for never smokers. In continuing smokers, beta increased 0.33 mL/yr per cigarette/day. Beta differences between continuing smokers and those who gave up were greater in patients with respiratory disease or with reduced baseline lung function, but were not clearly related to age or sex. Conclusion The available data have numerous limitations, but clearly show that continuing

  8. Blood Leukocyte Concentrations, FEV1Decline, and Airflow Limitation. A 15-Year Longitudinal Study of World Trade Center-exposed Firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Singh, Ankura; Aldrich, Thomas K; Hall, Charles B; Schwartz, Theresa; Webber, Mayris P; Cohen, Hillel W; Kelly, Kerry J; Nolan, Anna; Prezant, David J; Weiden, Michael D

    2018-02-01

    Rescue/recovery work at the World Trade Center disaster site (WTC) caused a proximate decline in lung function in Fire Department of the City of New York firefighters. A subset of this cohort experienced an accelerated rate of lung function decline over 15 years of post-September 11, 2001 (9/11) follow-up. To determine if early postexposure blood leukocyte concentrations are biomarkers for subsequent FEV 1 decline and incident airflow limitation. Individual rates of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ) change were calculated for 9,434 firefighters using 88,709 spirometric measurements taken between September 11, 2001, and September 10, 2016. We categorized FEV 1 change rates into three trajectories: accelerated FEV 1 decline (FEV 1 loss >64 ml/yr), expected FEV 1 decline (FEV 1 loss between 0 and 64 ml/yr), and improved FEV 1 (positive rate of change >0 ml/yr). Occurrence of FEV 1 /FVC less than 0.70 after 9/11 defined incident airflow limitation. Using regression models, we assessed associations of post-9/11 blood eosinophil and neutrophil concentrations with subsequent FEV 1 decline and airflow limitation, adjusted for age, race, smoking, height, WTC exposure level, weight change, and baseline lung function. Accelerated FEV 1 decline occurred in 12.7% of participants (1,199 of 9,434), whereas post-9/11 FEV 1 improvement occurred in 8.3% (780 of 9,434). Higher blood eosinophil and neutrophil concentrations were each associated with accelerated FEV 1 decline after adjustment for covariates (odds ratio [OR], 1.10 per 100 eosinophils/μl; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.15; and OR, 1.10 per 1,000 neutrophils/μl; 95% CI, 1.05-1.15, respectively). Multivariable-adjusted linear regression models showed that a higher blood neutrophil concentration was associated with a faster rate of FEV 1 decline (1.14 ml/yr decline per 1,000 neutrophils/μl; 95% CI, 0.69-1.60 ml/yr; P < 0.001). Higher blood eosinophil concentrations were associated with a faster rate

  9. Systematic review with meta-analysis of the epidemiological evidence relating FEV1 decline to lung cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fry John S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduced FEV1 is known to predict increased lung cancer risk, but previous reviews are limited. To quantify this relationship more precisely, and study heterogeneity, we derived estimates of β for the relationship RR(diff = exp(βdiff, where diff is the reduction in FEV1 expressed as a percentage of predicted (FEV1%P and RR(diff the associated relative risk. We used results reported directly as β, and as grouped levels of RR in terms of FEV1%P and of associated measures (e.g. FEV1/FVC. Methods Papers describing cohort studies involving at least three years follow-up which recorded FEV1 at baseline and presented results relating lung cancer to FEV1 or associated measures were sought from Medline and other sources. Data were recorded on study design and quality and, for each data block identified, on details of the results, including population characteristics, adjustment factors, lung function measure, and analysis type. Regression estimates were converted to β estimates where appropriate. For results reported by grouped levels, we used the NHANES III dataset to estimate mean FEV1%P values for each level, regardless of the measure used, then derived β using regression analysis which accounted for non-independence of the RR estimates. Goodness-of-fit was tested by comparing observed and predicted lung cancer cases for each level. Inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis allowed derivation of overall β estimates and testing for heterogeneity by factors including sex, age, location, timing, duration, study quality, smoking adjustment, measure of FEV1 reported, and inverse-variance weight of β. Results Thirty-three publications satisfying the inclusion/exclusion criteria were identified, seven being rejected as not allowing estimation of β. The remaining 26 described 22 distinct studies, from which 32 independent β estimates were derived. Goodness-of-fit was satisfactory, and exp(β, the RR increase per one unit FEV1%P

  10. Rise and fall of the FEV(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, W K; Reger, R B

    2000-12-01

    Most studies of the rate of decline in ventilatory capacity in normal subjects take into account a relatively restricted number of factors, such as age, smoking, and dust exposure. There is increasing evidence to suggest that such a limited approach is inadequate. To carry out a prospective study of those factors influencing the rate of decline of the ventilatory capacity in a cohort of automobile workers. Prospective cohort study. Southern Ontario, Canada. A cohort of 181 workers employed in assembling and spray painting the chassis of new cars, a minority of whom used paints containing isocyanates. All participants underwent annual anthropometric measurements. Spirometry was carried out at yearly intervals, and a questionnaire relating to respiratory symptoms and smoking habits was completed annually by all participants. Daily monitoring of the isocyanate levels was carried out. There was no indication of any effect from isocyanate exposure. The annual decline in the FEV(1) was similar to that found in other studies, with the respective annual decrements for smokers, ex-smokers, and nonsmokers being 0.055 L, 0.046 L, and 0.035 L, respectively. The decline of the FEV(1) in those > 35 years old and < 35 years old differed appreciably. The decrements in the FEV(1) in subjects < 35 years old were influenced as much by excessive weight gain as by cigarette smoking. Loss of weight in those significantly overweight was frequently associated with improved lung function. While age and smoking play an important role in determining the rate of decline in the ventilatory capacity, it is clear that body weight plays a significant role and needs to be taken into account in all epidemiologic studies of the ventilatory capacity.

  11. Comparison of FEV1reference equations for evaluating a cystic fibrosis therapeutic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstan, Michael W; Wagener, Jeffrey S; VanDevanter, Donald R; Pasta, David J; Millar, Stefanie J; Morgan, Wayne J

    2017-08-01

    The Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI, 2012) developed reference equations for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ). Previous equations were developed by groups led by Knudson (1983), Wang (1993), Hankinson (1999), and Stanojevic (2008). 1,2,4,6 We assessed how different prediction equations affect the conclusions from a therapeutic intervention study that evaluated the rate of percent predicted FEV 1 (ppFEV 1 ) decline. Using data from the Epidemiologic Study of cystic fibrosis (CF), we re-analyzed our previous study evaluating the relationship of dornase alfa (DA) use with ppFEV 1 using the Knudson, Wang & Hankinson, Stanojevic, and GLI equations. The change in intercept and change in slope of ppFEV 1 from a 2-year pre-index period and 2-year post-index period were compared between the treated (N = 2483) and comparator groups (N = 6992, from 4110 unique patients). Change in intercept for the comparator group was similar across equations except that Wang & Hankinson values were more negative. The difference in change in intercept between the DA and comparator groups ranged from 3.38 to 4.02% predicted. The change in slope for the comparator group ranged from -0.58 to +0.30 ppFEV 1 /year, but the difference in change in slope between the DA and comparator groups was in a narrower range from +0.53 to +0.89 ppFEV 1 /year. Although individual patient results are impacted by the choice of reference equations, the study conclusions from this evaluation of a therapeutic intervention were minimally affected. GLI equations are recommended for future studies, but prior results based on other equations should be accepted as reliable. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in an adult population in Helsinki: decreased FEV1, the main determinant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juusela, Maria; Pallasaho, Paula; Sarna, Seppo; Piirilä, Päivi; Lundbäck, Bo; Sovijärvi, Anssi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) elevates the risk for development of respiratory symptoms and accelerates the decline in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1). We thus aimed to assess the prevalence, determinants and quantity of BHR in Helsinki. Objectives This study involved 292 randomly selected subjects age 26–66 years, women comprising 58%. Methods Following a structured interview, a spirometry, a bronchodilation test, and a skin-prick test, we assessed a bronchial challenge test with inhaled histamine using a dosimetric tidal breathing method. Results included the provocative dose inducing a decrease in FEV1 by 15% (PD15FEV1) and the dose-response slope. For statistical risk factor-analyses, the severity of BHR was considered; PD15 values ≤1.6 mg (BHR) and ≤0.4 mg [moderate or severe BHR (BHRms)] served as cut-off levels. Results BHR presented in 21.2% and BHRms in 6.2% of the subjects. FEV1 Sarna S, Piirilä P, Lundbäck B and Sovijärvi A. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in an adult population in Helsinki: decreased FEV1, the main determinant. Clin Respir J 2013; 7: 34–44. PMID:22221737

  13. Exacerbations and duration of smoking abstinence are associated with the annual loss of FEV1 in individuals with PiZZ alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fähndrich, Sebastian; Bernhard, Nikolas; Lepper, Philipp M; Vogelmeier, Claus; Seibert, Martina; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Bals, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a genetic disorder that is associated with a higher risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and emphysema. The annual declines in lung function (FEV 1 ) and transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide (TLCO) predict all-cause mortality. We investigated the longitudinal follow-up data over 11 years (mean follow-up period of 4.89 years) from the German AATD registry and analyzed the relationship between annual loss of FEV 1 and TLCO and sex, age, body mass index (BMI), nicotine consumption, occupational dust exposure, St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) score, baseline FEV 1 or TLCO, alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) serum level, exacerbation frequency and the duration of smoking abstinence by multiple linear generalized estimating equations models (GEE-models). We evaluated the data of 100 individuals with post-bronchodilator FEV 1 measurements and from 116 individuals with TLCO measurements. The mean overall decline was -54.06 ± 164.62 ml/year in FEV 1 and -0.17 ± 0.70 mmol/min/kPa/year in TLCO. Accelerated deterioration of FEV 1 was associated with occupational dust exposure (p = 0.026), shorter duration of smoking abstinence (p = 0.008), higher baseline FEV 1 (p = 0.003), higher annual exacerbation frequency (p = 0.003) and higher frequency of glucocorticoids intake (p = 0.004). Furthermore, patients with an elevated decline in TLCO showed significant impaired health-related quality of life at baseline (p = 0.039) and lower AAT serum levels (p < 0.001) in multivariate analysis. Annual decline in FEV 1 is related to the exacerbation rate, occupational dust exposure and the duration of smoking abstinence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Post-bronchodilator Reversibility of FEV1and Eosinophilic Airway Inflammation in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Kun-Ta; Su, Kang-Cheng; Hsiao, Yi-Han; Huang, Shiang-Fen; Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Tseng, Ching-Min; Su, Vincent Yi-Fong; Perng, Diahn-Warng

    2017-10-01

    The relationship between bronchodilator responsiveness and eosinophilic airway inflammation has not been well documented in COPD. It has been investigated in this retrospective study. This issue has grown in importance due to increasing interest in the asthma-COPD overlap syndrome. 264 stable COPD patients with no past history of asthma were retrospectively analyzed. Correlation analyses between FEV 1 reversibility and sputum eosinophil levels were conducted. Sputum eosinophil levels were dichotomized using FEV 1 reversibility cut-off points (>0.4L and >15% vs. >0.2L and >12%) and compared. The effectiveness of FEV 1 reversibility to predict sputum eosinophilia (>3%) was analyzed with a logistic regression and a ROC analysis. 82 (31.1%) patients with higher FEV 1 reversibility values (0.14 vs. 0.11L, P=.01) presented sputum eosinophilia. FEV 1 reversibility was weakly correlated with the sputum eosinophil level (r=0.162, P=.008). Patients with FEV 1 >0.4L and >15% increment had higher sputum eosinophil levels (6.11 vs. 1.02%, P=.049) whereas the level did not differ when dichotomized by FEV 1 increment >0.2L and >12%. Very positive FEV 1 reversibility (>0.4L and >15%) predicted sputum eosinophilia after adjustment forage, baseline FEV 1 and FVC (OR: 4.262, P=.029). In the ROC analysis, the AUC was 0.58 (P=.034), and FEV 1 increment>0.4L and >15% had a positive predictive value of 63.6% and an overall accuracy of 70.1%. FEV 1 reversibility was weakly correlated with sputum eosinophil levels in COPD. Positive FEV 1 reversibility (>0.4L and >15%) is moderately successful in predicting sputum eosinophilia (>3%). Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Inflammatory and immunological profiles in patients with COPD: relationship with FEV 1 reversibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Cleriston Farias; Lemos, Antonio Carlos Moreira; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes Santana; Neves, Margarida Célia Lima Costa; Camelier, Aquiles Assunção; Carvalho, Natália Barbosa; de Carvalho, Edgar Marcelino

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine whether COPD severity correlates with sputum cell counts, atopy, and asthma. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 37 patients with COPD and 22 healthy subjects with normal lung function (controls). Sputum cell counts were determined by microscopy after centrifugation of samples. Skin prick tests were performed, and serum cytokines were determined by ELISA. Results: Patients were stratified by bronchodilator response: a non-reversible airflow limitation (nonRAL) group comprised 24 patients showing no significant post-bronchodilator change in FEV1; and a partially reversible airflow limitation (partialRAL) group comprised 13 patients showing FEV1 reversibility (post-bronchodilator FEV1 increase ≥ 12%). The proportion of eosinophils in sputum was higher in the partialRAL group than in the nonRAL group (p < 0.01), and there was an inverse correlation between the proportion of eosinophils and FEV1 (p < 0.05). However, none of the patients had a history of asthma and skin prick test results did not differ between the two groups. In the patient sputum samples, neutrophils predominated. Serum levels of TNF, IL-6, IL-8, and RANTES (CCL5) were higher in patients than in controls (p < 0.001) but did not differ between the two patient groups. Conclusions: COPD patients with partial FEV1 reversibility appear to have higher sputum eosinophil counts and greater airway hyperresponsiveness than do those with no FEV1 reversibility. However, we found that COPD severity did not correlate with atopy or with the cytokine profile. PMID:27832230

  16. LOW COST METHODOLOGIES TO ANALYZE AND CORRECT ABNORMAL PRODUCTION DECLINE IN STRIPPER GAS WELLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerry James; Gene Huck; Tim Knobloch

    2001-01-01

    A study group of 376 Clinton Sand wells in Ohio provided data to determine the historic frequency of the problem of abnormal production declines in stripper gas wells and the causes of the abnormal production decline. Analysis of the historic frequency of the problem indicates over 70% of the wells experienced abnormal production decline. The most frequently occurring causes of abnormal production declines were determined to be fluid accumulation (46%), gas gathering restrictions (24%), and mechanical failures (23%). Data collection forms and decision trees were developed to cost-effectively diagnose the abnormal production declines and suggest corrective action. The decision trees and data collection sheets were incorporated into a procedure guide to provide stripper gas well operators with a methodology to analyze and correct abnormal production declines. The systematic methodologies and techniques developed should increase the efficiency of problem well assessment and implementation of solutions for stripper gas wells. This eight quarterly technical progress report provides a summary of the deliverables completed to date, including the results of the remediations, the procedure guide, and the technology transfer. Due to the successful results of the study to date and the efficiency of the methodology development, two to three additional wells will be selected for remediation for inclusion into the study. The results of the additional remediations will be included in the final report

  17. 28 CFR Appendix A to Part 79 - FVC and FEV-1 Lower Limits of Normal Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false FVC and FEV-1 Lower Limits of Normal... Normal Values Table 1—Caucasian Males FVC Lower Limit of Normal Values, Hankinson, et al. (1999) Heightin... Lower Limit of Normal Values, Hankinson, et al. (1999) Heightin inches Heightin centimeters Age in years...

  18. Changes in the FEV1/FVC ratio during childhood and adolescence: an intercontinental study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quanjer, P.H.; Stanojevic, S.; Stocks, J.; Hall, G.L.; Prasad, K.V.; Cole, T.J.; Rosenthal, M.; Perez-Padilla, R.; Hankinson, J.L.; Falaschetti, E.; Golshan, M.; Brunekreef, B.; Al-Rawas, O.; Kühr, J.; Trabelsi, Y.; Ip, M.S.M.

    2010-01-01

    In children, the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) to forced vital capacity (FVC) is reportedly constant or falls linearly with age, whereas the ratio of residual volume (RV) to total lung capacity (TLC) remains constant. This seems counter-intuitive given the changes in airway

  19. Long-range correlations of serial FEV1 measurements in emphysematous patients and normal subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, A; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Madsen, F

    1998-01-01

    are autocorrelated. The purpose of this study was to describe the correlation structure in time series of FEV1 measurements. Nineteen patients with severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (phenotype PiZ) and moderate to severe emphysema and two subjects with normal lungs were followed for several years with daily self...... patients was approximately 0.35 for short intervals and decreased almost exponentially with a half time of 38 days. Between 3 and 4 mo, the autocorrelation function became negative. It reached a minimum of -0.1 at approximately 8 mo and then increased toward zero over the following 12 mo...... measurements show long-range correlations. The practical implication is that FEV1 need not be measured more often than once every 3 mo in studies of the long-term trends in lung function....

  20. Psychological and educational factors: better predictors of work status than FEV1 in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burker, Eileen J; Sedway, Jan; Carone, Stacia

    2004-11-01

    Now that more individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) are living into adulthood, vocational attainment is an increasingly important consideration. Work is a key factor in quality of life. The purpose of the present paper was to evaluate the factors that are associated with work status in 183 adults with CF. Approximately half of the participants were working at the time of evaluation, an impressive figure given that the mean forced expired volume in 1 sec (FEV1) was 31.9%. The average number of hours worked was 32.7 hr/week. The majority of individuals were employed in professional, technical, or managerial occupations (accounting, teaching, law, or social work). A third were employed in clerical and sales occupations, and the remaining individuals were employed in a wide range of other occupations (hotel manager, undercover shopper, artist, or dental technician). Interestingly, FEV1 and age did not differentiate between subjects who were working and those who were not. Individuals who were working had significantly lower depression scores and a higher educational level than those who were not working. Future research is needed to determine whether it is the increased socialization and the resulting social support that may come from a work environment, or a reduction in financial stress because of better income and health benefits that helps to explain this difference. Alternatively, work may serve as a distraction from the symptoms of CF. It is likely that those with higher educational levels had more professional jobs that were more easily modified as health declined. Future research needs to assess how career choices are made, and what factors into a patient's decision to keep working. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. The effect of domestic factors on respiratory symptoms and FEV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein, H R; Corey, P; Robertson, J M

    1989-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether indoor air pollution factors affected respiratory function and symptoms in 1357 non-smoking Caucasian children. Interviews were conducted to determine: exposure to pets and to gases, vapours and dusts from hobbies; the use of gas stoves; fireplaces, air conditioners and humidifiers; type of heating systems; and the number of residents, and the number of smokers in the home. The forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was obtained from maximum expiratory flow volume curves, and symptoms from the application of a standardized questionnaire. Indoor pets and the use of fireplaces and humidifiers had no consistent relationships with FEV1 when considered individually or in combination with the other factors. Hobbies, the use of gas stoves, the absence of air conditioning, the use of hot water heating, crowded homes, and the presence of smokers in the home all had negative relationships with FEV1. The largest effect on lung function was observed in children from homes with hot water heating systems, whereas the smallest effect was observed in children with smokers in the home. Children who lived in homes with hot water heating systems with no air conditioning had mean FEV1 of up to 0.4 litres lower than did their counterparts who lived in homes with forced air heating and air conditioning. Pets, heating systems, cooking fuel, crowding and passive smoking showed no consistent effects on the reporting of any of the symptoms. Girls who were exposed to the emissions from indoor hobbies reported more phlegm, wheeze and dyspnoea.

  2. Exercise-induced bronchospasm in children: comparison of FEV1 and FEF25-75% responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Guedes, Cristina H F; Cabral, Anna Lúcia B; Martins, Milton A

    2003-07-01

    The response of asthmatic children to exercise has usually been evaluated by forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV(1)). We reasoned that other respiratory indexes derived from the forced vital capacity maneuver such as forced expiratory flow between 25-75% of vital capacity (FEF(25-75%)) would add significant information in the evaluation of the relationship between asthma severity and response to exercise. We studied 164 children with intermittent (n = 63), mild persistent (n = 30), moderate persistent (n = 40), and severe persistent asthma (n = 31). Subjects exercised for 6 min on a cycle ergometer at 80% of their maximum heart rate, and spirometry was performed before and 5, 10, and 20 min after exercise. There was good correlation between changes in FEV(1) and FEF(25-75%) after exercise (r = 0.60, P /=10%) and in FEF(25-75%) (>/=26%) when compared to a decrease in only one of these two indexes was significantly greater in children with more severe asthma (60.0% for intermittent asthma and 94.4% for severe persistent asthma, P = 0.022). FEF(25-75%) can decrease in response to exercise without changes in FEV(1), mainly in children with mild asthma. In the evaluation of the response to exercise in children with different asthma severities, more than one maximum expiratory flow-volume parameter should be used. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Inflammatory and immunological profiles in patients with COPD: relationship with FEV 1 reversibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Cleriston Farias; Lemos, Antonio Carlos Moreira; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes Santana; Neves, Margarida Célia Lima Costa; Camelier, Aquiles Assunção; Carvalho, Natália Barbosa; Carvalho, Edgar Marcelino de

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether COPD severity correlates with sputum cell counts, atopy, and asthma. This was a cross-sectional study involving 37 patients with COPD and 22 healthy subjects with normal lung function (controls). Sputum cell counts were determined by microscopy after centrifugation of samples. Skin prick tests were performed, and serum cytokines were determined by ELISA. Patients were stratified by bronchodilator response: a non-reversible airflow limitation (nonRAL) group comprised 24 patients showing no significant post-bronchodilator change in FEV1; and a partially reversible airflow limitation (partialRAL) group comprised 13 patients showing FEV1 reversibility (post-bronchodilator FEV1 increase ≥ 12%). The proportion of eosinophils in sputum was higher in the partialRAL group than in the nonRAL group (p hiper-responsividade das vias aéreas que aqueles sem reversibilidade do VEF1. Entretanto, a gravidade da DPOC não se correlacionou com atopia ou perfil das citocinas.

  4. Fixed ratio or lower limit of normal for the FEV1/VC ratio: relation to symptoms and extended lung function tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmer, Per; Frantz, Sophia; Engström, Gunnar; Dencker, Magnus; Löfdahl, Claes-Göran; Nihlén, Ulf

    2017-05-01

    There is no general agreement on the spirometric definition of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The global initiative for obstructive lung disease recommends a fixed ratio between forced expiratory volume in one-second (FEV 1 ) and forced vital capacity (FVC) of System (IOS) and answered a questionnaire on respiratory symptoms and diseases. Seventy subjects fulfilled both spirometric COPD criteria (FR+LLN+), 62 subjects the fixed ratio criterion (FR+) only. Of the remaining 318 subjects, 236 were ever smokers (N-ES). Significant differences between all groups were seen for FEV 1 and D L,CO . Significant differences between groups were also seen for residual volume (RV) and RV/total lung capacity. For IOS, variables and symptoms increasingly abnormal values were seen from never smokers to FR+LLN+. This study shows that subjects meeting both spirometric COPD criteria frequently have symptoms and findings at extended lung function tests compatible with the diagnosis. Also subjects meeting the fixed ratio criterion only tend to have more symptoms and lung function findings compatible with COPD than ever-smoking subjects with FEV 1 /VC > 0·7. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A single measure of FEV1 is associated with risk of asthma attacks in long-term follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kitch, BT; Paltiel, AD; Kuntz, KM; Dockery, DW; Schouten, JP; Weiss, ST; Fuhlbrigge, AL

    2004-01-01

    Background: Clinical practice guidelines for asthma care emphasize the use of objective measures of asthma severity, and vet little data exist oil the relationship between FEV1 and asthma outcomes over long-term follow-up. Methods: We explored the association between measures of FEV1 percentage of

  6. Relationship between depression with FEV1 percent predicted and BODE index in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, H.; Hanum, H.; Abidin, A.; Hanida, W.

    2018-03-01

    WHO reported more than 3 million people die from COPD in 2012 and are expected to rank third after cardiovascular and cancer diseases in the future. Recent studies reported the prevalence of depression in COPD patients was higher than in control group. So, it’s important for clinicians to understand the relationship of depression symptoms with clinical aspects of COPD. For determining the association of depression symptoms with lung function and BODE index in patients with stable COPD, a cross-sectional study was in 98 stable COPD outpatients from January to June 2017. Data were analyzed using Independent t-test, Mann-Whitney test, and Spearman’s rank correlation. COPD patients with depression had higher mMRC scores, and lower FEV1 percent predicted, and then 6-Minutes Walk Test compared to those without depression. There was a moderate strength of correlation (r=-0.43) between depression symptoms and FEV1 percent predicted, and strong correlation (r=0.614) between depression symptoms and BODE index. It indicates that BODE index is more accurate to describe symptoms of depression in COPD patients.

  7. Computed Tomography Measure of Lung at Risk and Lung Function Decline in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Surya P; Bodduluri, Sandeep; Hoffman, Eric A; Newell, John D; Sieren, Jessica C; Dransfield, Mark T; Reinhardt, Joseph M

    2017-09-01

    The rate of decline of lung function is greater than age-related change in a substantial proportion of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, even after smoking cessation. Regions of the lung adjacent to emphysematous areas are subject to abnormal stretch during respiration, and this biomechanical stress likely influences emphysema initiation and progression. To assess whether quantifying this penumbra of lung at risk would predict FEV 1 decline. We analyzed paired inspiratory-expiratory computed tomography images at baseline of 680 subjects participating in a large multicenter study (COPDGene) over approximately 5 years. By matching inspiratory and expiratory images voxel by voxel using image registration, we calculated the Jacobian determinant, a measure of local lung expansion and contraction with respiration. We measured the distance between each normal voxel to the nearest emphysematous voxel, and quantified the percentage of normal voxels within each millimeter distance from emphysematous voxels as mechanically affected lung (MAL). Multivariable regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between the Jacobian determinant, MAL, and FEV 1 decline. The mean (SD) rate of decline in FEV 1 was 39.0 (58.6) ml/yr. There was a progressive decrease in the mean Jacobian determinant of both emphysematous and normal voxels with increasing disease stage (P < 0.001). On multivariable analyses, the mean Jacobian determinant of normal voxels within 2 mm of emphysematous voxels (MAL 2 ) was significantly associated with FEV 1 decline. In mild-moderate disease, for participants at or above the median MAL 2 (threshold, 36.9%), the mean decline in FEV 1 was 56.4 (68.0) ml/yr versus 43.2 (59.9) ml/yr for those below the median (P = 0.044). Areas of normal-appearing lung are mechanically influenced by emphysematous areas and this lung at risk is associated with lung function decline. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT

  8. Lost in interpretation: should the highest VC value be used to calculate the FEV1/VC ratio?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortis S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Spyridon FortisDepartment of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Occupational Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAAirflow obstruction or obstructive ventilatory defect (OVD is defined as low forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 to vital capacity (VC ratio. VC can be measured in various ways, and the definition of “low FEV1/VC” ratio varies.     VC can be measured during forced expiration before bronchodilators (forced vital capacity [FVC] and after bronchodilators (post-FVC, and during slow expiration (slow vital capacity [SVC] and during inspiration (inspiratory vital capacity [IVC]. Theoretically, in a healthy person, VC values should be the same regardless of the maneuver used. Nevertheless, SVC is usually larger than FVC except in patients with no OVD and body mass index <25 kg/m2.1 In obstructive lung diseases, FVC may be reduced, which may result in an increase of FEV1/FVC ratio and misdiagnosis.2 For that reason, American Thoracic Society–European Respiratory Society recommends using SVC or IVC to calculate the FEV1/VC ratio.2 Approximately, 10% of smokers have FEV1% predicted <80% and FEV1/FVC >70%, a pattern known as preserved ratio impaired spirometry.3 Of all the subjects with FVC below the lower limit of normal (LLN and FEV1/FVC > LLN, only 64% have restriction in lung volumes. The rest 36% have a nonspecific Pulmonary Function Test pattern.4 Approximately, 15% of patients with this nonspecific PFT pattern develop OVD in follow-up PFTs.4 It is possible that a portion of patients with obstructive lung disease remain underdiagnosed when FVC is used to compute FEV1/FVC ratio.View the original paper by Torén and colleagues.

  9. Long-range correlations of serial FEV1 measurements in emphysematous patients and normal subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, A; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Madsen, F

    1998-01-01

    are autocorrelated. The purpose of this study was to describe the correlation structure in time series of FEV1 measurements. Nineteen patients with severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (phenotype PiZ) and moderate to severe emphysema and two subjects with normal lungs were followed for several years with daily self...... patients was approximately 0.35 for short intervals and decreased almost exponentially with a half time of 38 days. Between 3 and 4 mo, the autocorrelation function became negative. It reached a minimum of -0.1 at approximately 8 mo and then increased toward zero over the following 12 mo....... The autocorrelation function in the two normal subjects showed a similar pattern, but with a faster decay toward zero. In the patients, the power spectrum had a peak at 1 cycle/wk and showed a 1/f pattern, where f is frequency, with a slope of -0.88 at lower frequencies. We conclude that serial spirometric...

  10. Beyond FEV1 in COPD: a review of patient-reported outcomes and their measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Paul Jones,1 Marc Miravitlles,2 Thys van der Molen,3 Karoly Kulich41Division of Clinical Science, University of London, London, UK; 2Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, Hospital Clínic, Ciber de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Barcelona, Spain; 3Department of Primary Care, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands; 4Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, SwitzerlandAbstract: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD present with a variety of symptoms and pathological consequences. Although primarily viewed as a respiratory disease, COPD has both pulmonary and extrapulmonary effects, which have an impact on many aspects of physical, emotional, and mental well-being. Traditional assessment of COPD relies heavily on measuring lung function, specifically forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1. However, the evidence suggests that FEV1 is a relatively poor correlate of symptoms such as breathlessness and the impact of COPD on daily life. Furthermore, many consequences of the disease, including anxiety and depression and the ability to perform daily activities, can only be described and reported reliably by the patient. Thus, in order to provide a comprehensive view of the effects of interventions in clinical trials, it is essential that spirometry is accompanied by assessments using patient-reported outcome (PRO instruments. We provide an overview of patient-reported outcome concepts in COPD, such as breathlessness, physical functioning, and health status, and evaluate the tools used for measuring these concepts. Particular attention is given to the newly developed instruments emerging in response to recent regulatory guidelines for the development and use of PROs in clinical trials. We conclude that although data from the development and validation of these new PRO instruments are emerging, to build the body of evidence that supports the use of a new instrument takes many years. Furthermore, new

  11. Acute cellular rejection is a risk factor for bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome independent of post-transplant baseline FEV1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burton, C.M.; Iversen, M.; Carlsen, J.

    2009-01-01

    : A multivariate survival and competing risk analysis of a large consecutive series of patients (n = 389) from a national center 1992 to 2004. Exclusion criteria were patients not surviving at least 3 months after transplantation (n = 39) and no available lung function measurements (n = 4). RESULTS: The first......BACKGROUND: Post-transplant baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) constitutes a systematic bias in analyses of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). This retrospective study evaluates risk factors for BOS adjusting for the confounding of post-transplant baseline FEV(1). METHODS...... maximum FEV(1) occurred at a median 183 days post-transplant. Freedom from BOS was 81%, 53%, 38% and 15%, and cumulative incidence of BOS was 18%, 43%, 57% and 77% at 1, 3, 5 and 10 years post-transplantation, respectively. Acute cellular rejection was independently associated with an increased cause...

  12. Epiphytic lichen growth abnormalities and element concentrations as early indicators of forest decline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otnyukova, T. [V.N. Sukachev' s Institute for Forest Research, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk 660036 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: t_otn@ksc.krasn.ru

    2007-03-15

    Thallus morphology and element concentrations (S, Al, Fe, Sr, Mn, Ni, Zn, Cu, Pb, As, F, and Cl) were compared in samples of the fruticose lichen genus Usnea at two heights of the Abies sibirica canopy in the East Sayan Mountains (Krasnoyarsk District, Russia) sampled from three stations at 15, 25 and 35 km from Krasnoyark. Usnea species with an abnormal morphology dominated on branches in the upper canopy, 15-22 m above ground level, and normal thalli on lower tree branches, 2-5 m above ground. Abnormal thalli at the tree-top level contained higher Al, Fe, Zn, F, Sr and Pb concentrations compared with normal thalli growing below, confirming a dust impact. No such clear trend was observed between sampling stations. Crown canopy architecture, surface microtopography and the balance between the processes of deposition and the movement and loss of particles play a major role in particle interception and in pollutant delivery to Usnea. - Differences in the morphology and element content of Usnea species at two distinct heights of the Abies sibirica canopy provide an early indication of forest decline.

  13. CORRELATION OF SEVERITY OF APNOEA HYPOPNOEA INDEX (AHI WITH FORCED EXPIRATORY VOLUME 1 (FEV1 IN OVERLAP SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Narasimhan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Overlap syndrome was first described by David Flenley in 1980 refers to the coexistence of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD and Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA. The global prevalence of Overlap syndrome is 11-14% and 7.5% in India Overlap patients are at higher risk of developing Nocturnal desaturations, hypertension, congestive heart failure, stroke etc. resulting in greater mortality and morbidity. There are very few studies in India correlating factors like poor lung function, body mass index, high ESS score, MMRC dyspnea grading in COPD patients with OSA .Hence, this study was undertaken to correlate the association and severity of OSA using AHI with Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 sec (FEV1, Body Mass Index (BMI, Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea grade (MRC and high Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective observational study, done in 66 COPD patients in Department of Respiratory Medicine, CHRI, Chennai. The diagnosis of COPD was based upon GOLD guidelines 2016. The OSA was diagnosed based on the American Academy of Sleep Medicine guidelines (AASMA. All COPD patients were subjected to detailed clinical history, thorough physical examination, ENT examination to rule out Upper airway obstruction. All patients were asked to fill up the Epworth sleepiness questionnaire. BMI was recorded. Dyspnea grading was done using MMRC scale. Patient was also subjected to Spirometry and overnight Polysomnography, RESULTS In patients with overlap syndrome, no correlation of statistical significance between the AHI and FEV1. Though, the grade of AHI showed an increase as the FEV1 decreased. Significant positive correlation was observed between AHI and MMRC as well as AHI and ESS. CONCLUSION In COPD patients FEV1 did not correlate with AHI grade and hence lung function cannot be used as predictor of OSA in COPD. However, simple clinical parameters like ESS and MMRC which show a positive correlation with AHI

  14. FEV6 and FEV1/FEV6 in Japanese participants of the community-based annual health check: the Takahata study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Yoko; Osaka, Daisuke; Abe, Shuichi; Inoue, Sumito; Tokairin, Yoshikane; Igarashi, Akira; Yamauchi, Keiko; Kimura, Tomomi; Sato, Michiko; Aida, Yasuko; Watanabe, Tetsu; Konta, Tsuneo; Kawata, Sumio; Kato, Takeo; Kubota, Isao

    2011-01-01

    Forced expiratory volume in 6 seconds (FEV(6)) is becoming a substitute of forced vital capacity (FVC). However, the Japanese predictive equation for FEV(6) has not been established, and the validity for the use of FEV(1)/FEV(6) for diagnosing airflow limitation in Japanese has not been confirmed. Subjects aged 40 or older, who had participated in a community-based health check in Takahata, Japan, from 2004 through 2005, were enrolled. The smoking histories of these subjects were investigated using a self-reporting questionnaire. FVC, FEV(1), and FEV(6) were measured using spirometric machines. Predictive equations of FEV(6) were obtained from never-smoking subjects without history of pulmonary diseases by multiple linear regression assay. FEV(6) and FEV(1)/FEV(6) were significantly correlated with FVC (r=0.998, pvalues of percent predicted (%) FEV(6) and FEV(1)/FEV(6) for discrimination of having the restrictive lung disorder determined by %FVC limitation determined by FEV(1)/FVC value =0.832, negative predictive value =1.000; FEV(1)/FEV(6): sensitivity=0.942; specificity=0.971; PPV=0.787; NPV=0.993). When the 5th percentile the lower limit of normal values was used as criterion for discrimination of having airflow limitation, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of FEV(1)/FEV(6) were 0.932, 0.985, 0.808, and 0.995, respectively. The results of the present study suggest that %FEV(6) and FEV(1)/FEV(6) are excellent substitutes for %FVC and FEV(1)/FVC, respectively. We confirmed the validity of the use of FEV(6) and FEV(1)/FEV(6) for identifying pulmonary diseases in Japanese individuals.

  15. Probability of treatment following acute decline in lung function in children with cystic fibrosis is related to baseline pulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Wayne J; Wagener, Jeffrey S; Yegin, Ashley; Pasta, David J; Millar, Stefanie J; Konstan, Michael W

    2013-10-01

    To determine whether the association between high forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and increased rate of decline in FEV1 in children with cystic fibrosis could be due to less frequent intervention after acute declines (sudden decline events) in FEV1. Patients with cystic fibrosis aged 6-17 years enrolled in the Epidemiologic Study of Cystic Fibrosis were assessed for a sudden decline event, defined as a 10% relative decline in FEV1% predicted from an average of 3 consecutive stable baseline spirometries. The likelihood of therapeutic intervention within 14 days before and 56 days after this event was then related to their baseline FEV1% predicted age-specific decile using a logistic regression adjusting for age group (6-12 years, 13-17 years) and presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on respiratory culture. A total of 10 888 patients had at least 1 sudden decline event in FEV1. Patients in the highest FEV1 decile were significantly less likely than those in the lowest decile to receive intravenous antibiotics (OR, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.11-0.18; P < .001) or be hospitalized (OR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.14-0.23; P < .001) following decline. Children and adolescents with high baseline lung function are less likely to receive a therapeutic intervention following an acute decline in FEV1, which may explain their greater rate of FEV1 decline. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Airway Measurement for Airway Remodeling Defined by Post-Bronchodilator FEV1/FVC in Asthma: Investigation Using Inspiration-Expiration Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Chae, Eun Jin; Kim, Tae-Bum; Cho, You Sook; Park, Chan-Sun; Seo, Joon Beom; Kim, Namkug; Moon, Hee-Bom

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Airway remodeling may be responsible for irreversible airway obstruction in asthma, and a low post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio can be used as a noninvasive marker of airway remodeling. We investigated correlations between airway wall indices on computed tomography (CT) and various clinical indices, including post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio, in patients with asthma. Methods Volumetric CT was performed on 22 stable asthma patients who were taking inhaled corticosteroids. Airway dim...

  17. Isolation of filamentous fungi from sputum in asthma is associated with reduced post-bronchodilator FEV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbetile, J; Fairs, A; Desai, D; Hargadon, B; Bourne, M; Mutalithas, K; Edwards, R; Morley, J P; Monteiro, W R; Kulkarni, N S; Green, R H; Pavord, I D; Bradding, P; Brightling, C E; Wardlaw, A J; Pashley, C H

    2012-05-01

    Fungal sensitization is common in severe asthma, but the clinical relevance of this and the relationship with airway colonization by fungi remain unclear. The range of fungi that may colonize the airways in asthma is unknown. To provide a comprehensive analysis on the range of filamentous fungi isolated in sputum from people with asthma and report the relationship with their clinico-immunological features of their disease. We recruited 126 subjects with a diagnosis of asthma, 94% with moderate-severe disease, and 18 healthy volunteers. At a single stable visit, subjects underwent spirometry; sputum fungal culture and a sputum cell differential count; skin prick testing to both common aeroallergens and an extended fungal panel; specific IgE to Aspergillus fumigatus. Fungi were identified by morphology and species identity was confirmed by sequencing. Four patients had allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. Forty-eight percent of asthma subjects were IgE-sensitized to one fungal allergen and 22% to ≥ 2. Twenty-seven different taxa of filamentous fungi were isolated from 54% of their sputa, more than one species being detected in 17%. This compared with 3 (17%) healthy controls culturing any fungus (P < 0.01). Aspergillus species were most frequently cultured in isolation followed by Penicillium species. Post-bronchodilator FEV (1) (% predicted) in the subjects with asthma was 71(± 25) in those with a positive fungal culture vs. 83 (± 25) in those culture-negative, (P < 0.01). Numerous thermotolerant fungi other than A. fumigatus can be cultured from sputum of people with moderate-to-severe asthma; a positive culture is associated with an impaired post-bronchodilator FEV (1) , which might be partly responsible for the development of fixed airflow obstruction in asthma. Sensitization to these fungi is also common. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Biomarkers of collagen turnover are related to annual change in FEV1 in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease within the ECLIPSE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeming, Diana J; Byrjalsen, Inger; Sand, Jannie M B; Bihlet, Asger R; Lange, Peter; Thal-Singer, Ruth; Miller, Bruce E; Karsdal, Morten A; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2017-12-04

    Change in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1 ) is important for defining severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Serological neoepitope markers of collagen turnover may predict rate of change in FEV 1 . One thousand COPD subjects from the observational, multicentre, three-year ECLIPSE (Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints) study (NCT00292552, trial registration in February 2006) were included. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-generated fragments of collagen type I, and type VI (C1M and C6M) were assessed in month six serum samples. A random-coefficient model with both a random intercept and a random slope was used to test the ability of the markers to predict post-dose bronchodilator FEV 1 (PD-FEV 1 ) change over two years adjusting for sex, age, BMI, smoking, bronchodilator reversibility, prior exacerbations, emphysema and chronic bronchitis status at baseline. Annual change of PD-FEV 1 was estimated from a linear model for the two-year study period. Serum C1M and C6M were independent predictors of lung function change (p = 0.007/0.005). Smoking, bronchodilator reversibility, plasma hsCRP and emphysema were also significant predictors. The effect estimate between annual change in PD-FEV 1 per one standard deviation (1SD) increase of C1M and C6M was +10.4 mL/yr. and +8.6 mL/yr. C1M, and C6M, had a significant association with baseline FEV 1 . We demonstrated that markers of tissue turnover were significantly associated with lung function change. These markers may function as prognostic biomarkers and possibly as efficacy biomarkers in clinical trials focusing on lung function change in COPD. NCT00292552 , Retrospectively registered, trial registration in February 2006.

  19. Correlations between FEV1 and patient-reported outcomes: A pooled analysis of 23 clinical trials in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, James F; Jones, Paul W; Bartels, Christian; Marvel, Jessica; D'Andrea, Peter; Banerji, Donald; Morris, David G; Patalano, Francesco; Fogel, Robert

    2018-04-01

    In clinical trials of inhaled bronchodilators, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) guidelines recommend that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are assessed alongside lung function. How these endpoints are related is unclear. Pooled longitudinal data from 23 randomised controlled COPD studies were analyzed (N = 23,213). Treatments included long-acting β 2 agonists, long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LABAs or LAMAs) and the LABA/LAMA combination QVA149. Outcome measures were Transition Dyspnoea Index (TDI) and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) scores, COPD exacerbation frequency and rescue medication use. Relationships between changes in trough forced expiratory volume in one second (ΔFEV 1 ) and outcomes following treatment were assessed using correlations of data summaries and model-based analysis: generalized linear mixed-effect regression modelling to determine if ΔFEV 1 could predict patient outcomes with different treatments. Mean age was 64 years, 73% were male, and most had moderate (45%) or severe (52%) disease. Statistically significant correlations were observed between ΔFEV 1 and each outcome measure (exacerbations Rs = 0.05; rescue medication, SGRQ, TDI, r = 0.11-0.16; all p < .001). Patients with greater improvements in trough FEV 1 had on average better SGRQ and TDI scores, fewer exacerbations, and used less rescue medication. For SGRQ and TDI scores, minimal clinically important differences were observed over the range of pooled ΔFEV 1 values. Model-based predictions confirmed the treatment effect was partly explained by changes in FEV 1 from baseline with improvements in PROs observed across all treatments when trough FEV 1 improved. Across all endpoints active treatments were better than placebo (p < .0001), and LABA/LAMA treatment resulted in numerically better treatment outcomes than either monocomponent. These data suggest that FEV 1 improvements post-bronchodilation correlate with PRO improvements

  20. Combined effect of lung function level and decline increases morbidity and mortality risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baughman, Penelope; Marott, Jacob Louis; Lange, Peter

    2012-01-01

    by combinations of baseline predicted FEV1 and quartiles of slope. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % con¿dence intervals (CI) were estimated using strati¿ed analysis by gender, smoking status, and baseline age (B45 and [45). For COPD morbidity, quartiles of increasing FEV1 decline increased HRs (95 % CI...

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of pre-bronchodilator FEV1/FEV6 from microspirometry to detect airflow obstruction in primary care: a randomised cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemt, L. van den; Wouters, B.C.; Grootens, J.; Denis, J.; Poels, P.J.P.; Schermer, T.R.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Forced expiratory volume in 1s/forced expiratory volume in 6 s ( FEV1/FEV6) assessment with a microspirometer may be useful in the diagnostic work up of subjects who are suspected of having COPD in primary care. AIM: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of a negative pre-bronchodilator

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of pre-bronchodilator FEV1/FEV6 from microspirometry to detect airflow obstruction in primary care: a randomised cross-sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemt, L. van den; Wouters, B.C.W.; Grootens, J.; Denis, J.; Poels, P.; Schermer, T.R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Forced expiratory volume in 1s/forced expiratory volume in 6 s ( FEV1/FEV6) assessment with a microspirometer may be useful in the diagnostic work up of subjects who are suspected of having COPD in primary care. Aim: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of a negative pre-bronchodilator

  3. Effect of a mixture of pyridostigmine and atropine on forced expiratory volume (FEV1), and serum cholinesterase activity in normal subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B F; Gefke, Kaj; Mosbech, H

    1985-01-01

    Pyridostigmine 0.143 mg kg-1 (maximum 10 mg) and atropine 0.0143 mg kg-1 (maximum 1 mg) were administered i.v. to six healthy male volunteers. Peripheral venous blood samples were drawn for measurement of serum cholinesterase activity. Maximum inhibition of the enzyme was found 5 min after...... injection with a decrease to 27 +/- 5% (mean +/- SEM) of the original activity. Forced expiratory volume in the first 1s (FEV1) was measured at fixed time intervals for 90 min. No decrease in FEV1 was observed; on the contrary, there was a small increase. We conclude that atropine effectively antagonizes...... the muscarinic side-effects of pyridostigmine on bronchial smooth muscle tone and bronchial secretions, when administered in clinical doses to normal human subjects....

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of pre-bronchodilator FEV1/FEV6 from microspirometry to detect airflow obstruction in primary care: a randomised cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bemt, Lisette; Wouters, Bram C W; Grootens, Joke; Denis, Joke; Poels, Patrick J; Schermer, Tjard R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Forced expiratory volume in 1s/forced expiratory volume in 6 s ( FEV1/FEV6) assessment with a microspirometer may be useful in the diagnostic work up of subjects who are suspected of having COPD in primary care. Aim: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of a negative pre-bronchodilator (BD) microspirometry test relative to a full diagnostic spirometry test in subjects in whom general practitioners (GPs) suspect airflow obstruction. Methods: Cross-sectional study in which the order of microspirometry and diagnostic spirometry tests was randomised. Study subjects were (ex-)smokers aged ⩾50 years referred for diagnostic spirometry to a primary care diagnostic centre by their GPs. A pre-BD FEV1/FEV6 value spirometry. Results: One hundred and four subjects were analysed (59.6% males, 42.3% current smokers). Negative predictive values from microspirometry for airflow obstruction based on the fixed and LLN cut-off points were 94.4% (95% confidence interval (CI), 86.4–98.5) and 96.3% (95% CI, 88.2–99.3), respectively. In all, 18% of positive microspirometry results were not confirmed by a post-BD FEV1/FVC spirometry. However, use of microspirometry alone would result in overestimation of airflow obstruction and should not replace regular spirometry when diagnosing COPD in primary care. PMID:25119686

  5. Longitudinal decline in lung function in patients with occupational asthma due to western red cedar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, F J; Dimich-Ward, H; Chan-Yeung, M

    1996-11-01

    There are few reports about longitudinal changes in lung function in asthmatic patients. Patients with asthma had a greater loss of lung function than normal healthy adults. To date, there have been no studies about the longitudinal changes in lung function in patients with occupational asthma. 280 male patients with red cedar asthma (RCA) who were followed up for at least one year were the study group. The exposed controls consisted of 399 male sawmill workers. Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was measured with a Collins water spirometer. Changes in FEV1 over time (FEV1 slope) were calculated by a two point method for each subject. Atopy was considered to be present if the subjects showed at least one positive response to three allergens by skin prick test. Multiple regression analysis was carried out to examine factors that might affect longitudinal decline in FEV1. Patients with RCA who were still exposed had a greater decline in FEV1 slope (-26 ml/y) than sawmill workers. Smokers also showed a greater rate of decline in FEV1 (-43 ml/y) than non-smokers. Patients with RCA who continued to be exposed had a greater rate of decline in FEV1 than sawmill workers. Early diagnosis of occupational asthma and removal of these patients from a specific sensitiser is important in the prevention of further deterioration of lung function and respiratory symptoms.

  6. The mediating role of cytokine IL-6 on the relationship of FEV1 upon 6-minute walk distance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldi S

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Simonetta Baldi,1 Paul E Jose,2 Claudio Bruschi,1 Gian Domenico Pinna,3 Roberto Maestri,3 Antonella Rezzani,1 Ezio Bellinzona,1 Claudio Fracchia,1 Elena Dacosto,1 Paola Crotti,1 Silvia Montemartini1 1Department of Pneumology, Scientific Institute of Montescano, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation IRCCS, Montescano, Pavia, Italy; 2School of Psychology, Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Scientific Institute of Montescano, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation IRCCS, Montescano, Pavia, ItalyObjectives: To explore the mediating role of protein interleukin-6 (IL-6 on the relationship between forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 and 6-minute walk distance (6MWD and, further, to determine whether status variables (such as age, sex, and body mass index [BMI] operate as moderators of this mediation relationship.Design: Moderated mediation model.Setting: An inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation center in Italy.Participants: All 153 patients involved in the screening of a randomized controlled clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01253941 were included in this study. All patients were Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD stages I–IV and were aged 70.1±9.1 years.Measurements: At run-in phase of the protocol, clinical and functional screening included BMI, fasting plasma levels of protein (IL-6, spirometry, and standardized 6-minute walking test, measured at the start of the respiratory rehabilitation program.Methods: The size of the indirect effect of the initial variable (FEV1 upon the outcome variable (6MWD through the intervening variable (IL-6 was computed and tested for statistical significance. Moderated mediation analyses were subsequently conducted with age, sex, and BMI.Results: FEV1 averaged 53.4%±21.2%, and 6MWD 66.4%±41.3% of predicted. Median protein IL-6 was 6.68 pg/mL (interquartile range: 5.96. A bootstrapped mediation test supported the predicted indirect

  7. Relationship between depression in patients with COPD and the percent of predicted FEV(1), BODE index, and health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Asuka; Senjyu, Hideaki; Hayashi, Yoshika; Kanada, Rumi; Iwai, Shoko; Honda, Sumihisa; Kitagawa, Chika; Ozawa, Hiroki; Rikitomi, Naoto

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the prevalence of depression among patients with COPD treated in long-term in-patient rehabilitation facilities, using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D). Furthermore, the relationship between the severity of air-flow obstruction (the percent of predicted FEV(1)), BODE (body mass index, degree of air-flow obstruction, dyspnea, exercise capacity) index, health-related quality of life (St George's Respiratory Questionnaire [SGRQ]), and depression were investigated. We recruited 74 in-patients (64 males, 10 females) with COPD. The mean age of the subjects was 72.7 years (range 52-85 y). Subjects completed the CES-D, and measurements were made of pulmonary function, body mass index, Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale, 6-min walk test (6MWT), and SGRQ. Depression was evident in 48.6% (n = 36) of the subjects. A weak correlation was found between the CES-D scores and the percent of predicted FEV(1). The prevalence of depression showed a significant association with BODE stage. Scores for the SGRQ activity and impacts domains, and total SGRQ score were significantly worse in the subjects who were depressed. We found a high prevalence of depression among patients with stable COPD treated in long-term in-patient rehabilitation facilities. Depression among these patients, as measured by the CES-D, was associated with greater impairment in respiratory function and with poorer Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale and SGRQ scores. The prevalence of depression increased with BODE stage. © 2013 Daedalus Enterprises.

  8. The Concave Shape of the Forced Expiratory Flow-Volume Curve in 3 Seconds Is a Practical Surrogate of FEV1/FVC for the Diagnosis of Airway Limitation in Inadequate Spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Liu, Chunhong; Zhang, Yi; Xiao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Spirometry is important for the differential diagnosis of dyspnea. However, some patients cannot exhale for ≥6 s to achieve the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society criteria. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the reliability of a new parameter that quantifies the degree of concavity in the first 3 s to define airway limitation as a surrogate for the FEV 1 /FVC. Four hundred spirometry test results were selected through complete random sampling. The new parameter, termed the AUC 3 /AT 3 , was calculated as the area under the descending limb of the expiratory flow-volume curve before the end of the first 3 s (AUC 3 ) divided by the area of the triangle before the end of the first 3 s (AT 3 ). The AUC 3 /AT 3 was compared with the FEV 1 /FVC using Pearson's correlation analysis. The level of agreement between the AUC 3 /AT 3 and the FEV 1 /FVC in the detection of airway obstruction was analyzed using the kappa statistic. We also compared the diagnostic accuracy of the new index with that of the FEV 1 /forced expiratory volume in the first 3 s (FEV 3 ). There was a strong correlation (r = 0.88, P < .001) between the AUC 3 /AT 3 and the FEV 1 /FVC. There was also strong agreement between the AUC 3 /AT 3 and the FEV 1 /FVC in the detection of obstruction with kappa indices of 0.72 (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] criterion) and 0.67 (lower limit of normal criterion), and these values were greater than those obtained for the FEV 1 /FEV 3 . The AUC 3 /AT 3 also exhibited acceptable sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. The diagnostic accuracies of the AUC 3 /AT 3 were 86.3% (GOLD criterion) and 83.8% (lower limit of normal criterion), which were greater than the 76.0 and 74.0% obtained for the FEV 1 /FEV 3 , respectively. The AUC 3 /AT 3 can be utilized as a surrogate parameter for the FEV 1 /FVC when patients cannot complete a 6-s expiratory effort. Additionally, the

  9. Glutathione S-transferase genotypes modify lung function decline in the general population: SAPALDIA cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann-Liebrich Ursula

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the environmental and genetic risk factors of accelerated lung function decline in the general population is a first step in a prevention strategy against the worldwide increasing respiratory pathology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Deficiency in antioxidative and detoxifying Glutathione S-transferase (GST gene has been associated with poorer lung function in children, smokers and patients with respiratory diseases. In the present study, we assessed whether low activity variants in GST genes are also associated with accelerated lung function decline in the general adult population. Methods We examined with multiple regression analysis the association of polymorphisms in GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genes with annual decline in FEV1, FVC, and FEF25–75 during 11 years of follow-up in 4686 subjects of the prospective SAPALDIA cohort representative of the Swiss general population. Effect modification by smoking, gender, bronchial hyperresponisveness and age was studied. Results The associations of GST genotypes with FEV1, FVC, and FEF25–75 were comparable in direction, but most consistent for FEV1. GSTT1 homozygous gene deletion alone or in combination with GSTM1 homozygous gene deletion was associated with excess decline in FEV1 in men, but not women, irrespective of smoking status. The additional mean annual decline in FEV1 in men with GSTT1 and concurrent GSTM1 gene deletion was -8.3 ml/yr (95% confidence interval: -12.6 to -3.9 relative to men without these gene deletions. The GSTT1 effect on the FEV1 decline comparable to the observed difference in FEV1 decline between never and persistent smoking men. Effect modification by gender was statistically significant. Conclusion Our results suggest that genetic GSTT1 deficiency is a prevalent and strong determinant of accelerated lung function decline in the male general population.

  10. Rapid decline in lung function is temporally associated with greater metabolically active adiposity in a longitudinal study of healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moualla, Maan; Qualls, Clifford; Arynchyn, Alexander; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Kalhan, Ravi; Smith, Lewis J; Carr, John J; Jacobs, David R; Sood, Akshay

    2017-12-01

    Adiposity is associated with low lung function, but the longitudinal relationship between lung function and adiposity is inadequately studied. To examine the bidirectional longitudinal associations between rapid decline in lung function and adiposity phenotypes in healthy adults. This secondary analysis used a 25-year longitudinal dataset from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study that enrolled 5115 participants. In the first analysis, metabolic syndrome at or before CARDIA year (Y) 10 (Y10) was the predictor, and subsequent rapid decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) or forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) between Y10 and Y20 was the outcome. In the second analysis, rapid decline was the predictor, and incident metabolic syndrome at Y20 and/or Y25 was the outcome. In the third analysis, rapid decline was the predictor, and subsequent CT-assessed regional fat depots at Y25 were the outcome. Metabolic syndrome at or before Y10 is temporally associated with rapid decline in FVC between Y10 and Y20 (adjusted p=0.04), but this association was explained by body mass index (BMI) at Y10. Rapid decline in FVC or FEV 1 is temporally associated with greater incident metabolic syndrome at Y20 and/or Y25 (adjusted OR 2.10 (1.69, 2.61); prapid decline in lung function are at risk for developing metabolic syndrome and for disproportionate accumulation of intrathoracic visceral fat. Metabolic abnormalities may be an early extrapulmonary manifestation of lung impairment that may be preventable by improving lung health. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Vigorous Exercise Can Cause Abnormal Pulmonary Function in Healthy Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abosaida, Alladdin; Chen, Jen Jen; Nussbaum, Eliezer; Leu, Szu-Yun; Chin, Terry; Schwindt, Christina D

    2015-06-01

    Although exercise-induced bronchoconstriction is more common in adolescents with asthma, it also manifests in healthy individuals without asthma. The steady-state exercise protocol is widely used and recommended by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) as a method to diagnose exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Airway narrowing in response to exercise is thought to be related to airway wall dehydration secondary to hyperventilation. More rigorous exercise protocols may have a role in detecting exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in those who otherwise have a normal response to steady-state exercise challenge. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of two different exercise protocols--a constant work rate protocol and a progressive ramp protocol--on pulmonary function testing in healthy adolescents. We hypothesized that vigorous exercise protocols would lead to reductions in lung function in healthy adolescents. A total of 56 healthy adolescents (mean age, 15.2 ± 3.3 [SD] years) were recruited to perform two exercise protocols: constant work rate exercise test to evaluate for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (as defined by ATS) and standardized progressive ramp protocol. Pulmonary function abnormalities were defined as a decline from baseline in FEV1 of greater than 10%. Ten participants (17.8%) had a significant drop in FEV1. Among those with abnormal lung function after exercise, three (30%) were after the ATS test only, five (50%) were after the ramp test only, and two (20%) were after both ATS and ramp tests. Healthy adolescents demonstrate subtle bronchoconstriction after exercise. This exercise-induced bronchoconstriction may be detected in healthy adolescents via constant work rate or the progressive ramp protocol. In a clinical setting, ramp testing warrants consideration in adolescents suspected of having exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and who have normal responses to steady-state exercise testing.

  12. Genetic variants affecting cross-sectional lung function in adults show little or no effect on longitudinal lung function decline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    John, Catherine; Soler Artigas, María; Hui, Jennie

    2017-01-01

    across eight time points). A mixed model was fitted and weighted risk scores were calculated for the joint effect of 26 known regions on baseline and longitudinal changes in FEV1 and FEV1/FVC. Potential additional regions of interest were identified and followed up in two independent cohorts. RESULTS......: The 26 regions previously associated with cross-sectional lung function jointly showed a strong effect on baseline lung function (p=4.44×10-16 for FEV1/FVC) but no effect on longitudinal decline (p=0.160 for FEV1/FVC). This was replicated in an independent cohort. 39 additional regions of interest (48...... variants) were identified; these associations were not replicated in two further cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: Previously identified genetic variants jointly have a strong effect on cross-sectional lung function in adults but little or no effect on the rate of decline of lung function. It is possible...

  13. Daily oral intake of theanine prevents the decline of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation in hippocampal dentate gyrus with concomitant alleviation of behavioral abnormalities in adult mice with severe traumatic stress

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    Takeshi Takarada

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stress disorder is a long-lasting psychiatric disease with the consequence of hippocampal atrophy in humans exposed to severe fatal stress. We demonstrated a positive correlation between the transient decline of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG and long-lasting behavioral abnormalities in mice with traumatic stress. Here, we investigated pharmacological properties of theanine on the declined BrdU incorporation and abnormal behaviors in mice with traumatic stress. Prior daily oral administration of theanine at 50–500 mg/kg for 5 days significantly prevented the decline of BrdU incorporation, while theanine significantly prevented the decline in the DG even when administered for 5 days after stress. Consecutive daily administration of theanine significantly inhibited the prolonged immobility in mice with stress in forced swimming test seen 14 days later. Although traumatic stress significantly increased spontaneous locomotor activity over 30 min even when determined 14 days later, the increased total locomotion was significantly ameliorated following the administration of theanine at 50 mg/kg for 14 days after stress. These results suggest that theanine alleviates behavioral abnormalities together with prevention of the transient decline of BrdU incorporation in the hippocampal DG in adult mice with severe traumatic stress.

  14. Lung function decline is delayed but not decreased in patients with cystic fibrosis and the R117H gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Jeffrey S; Millar, Stefanie J; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Sawicki, Gregory S; McKone, Edward F; Goss, Christopher H; Konstan, Michael W; Morgan, Wayne J; Pasta, David J; Moss, Richard B

    2017-10-31

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) experience variable lung disease phenotypes. The R117H mutation is often associated with preserved lung function. Our objective was to compare the rate of lung function decline in patients with the R117H mutation and patients homozygous for the F508del mutation. Rate of decline in percentage-of-predicted FEV 1 (ppFEV 1 ) was analyzed using the 2006-2010 US CF Foundation Patient Registry. 4-year rate of decline was slower in 156 R117H patients compared with 6251 F508del patients (-0.61 vs -2.03 ppFEV 1 /year, P<0.001). Rates of decline in children were slower in R117H vs F508del patients (6-12-year-olds: +0.73 vs -1.91 ppFEV 1 /year, P<0.001 and 13-17-year-olds: -1.55 vs -2.66 ppFEV 1 /year, P=0.046), whereas rates in adults were not significantly different (18-24-year-olds: -1.52 vs -2.12, P=0.26 and ≥25-year-olds: -1.17 vs -1.40, P=0.33). These findings are consistent with a delayed onset, but ultimately similar progression, of lung disease in R117H compared with homozygous F508del patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Individualized prediction of lung-function decline in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafari, Zafar; Sin, Don D.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Löfdahl, Claes-Göran; Vonk, Judith; Bryan, Stirling; Lam, Stephen; Tammemagi, C. Martin; Khakban, Rahman; Man, S.F. Paul; Tashkin, Donald; Wise, Robert A.; Connett, John E.; McManus, Bruce; Ng, Raymond; Hollander, Zsuszanna; Sadatsafavi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The rate of lung-function decline in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) varies substantially among individuals. We sought to develop and validate an individualized prediction model for forced expiratory volume at 1 second (FEV1) in current smokers with mild-to-moderate COPD. Methods: Using data from a large long-term clinical trial (the Lung Health Study), we derived mixed-effects regression models to predict future FEV1 values over 11 years according to clinical traits. We modelled heterogeneity by allowing regression coefficients to vary across individuals. Two independent cohorts with COPD were used for validating the equations. Results: We used data from 5594 patients (mean age 48.4 yr, 63% men, mean baseline FEV1 2.75 L) to create the individualized prediction equations. There was significant between-individual variability in the rate of FEV1 decline, with the interval for the annual rate of decline that contained 95% of individuals being −124 to −15 mL/yr for smokers and −83 to 15 mL/yr for sustained quitters. Clinical variables in the final model explained 88% of variation around follow-up FEV1. The C statistic for predicting severity grades was 0.90. Prediction equations performed robustly in the 2 external data sets. Interpretation: A substantial part of individual variation in FEV1 decline can be explained by easily measured clinical variables. The model developed in this work can be used for prediction of future lung health in patients with mild-to-moderate COPD. Trial registration: Lung Health Study — ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT00000568; Pan-Canadian Early Detection of Lung Cancer Study — ClinicalTrials.gov, no. NCT00751660 PMID:27486205

  16. Lower leptin/adiponectin ratio and risk of rapid lung function decline in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suzuki, Masaru; Makita, Hironi; Östling, Jörgen

    2014-01-01

    COPD cohort study (P = 0.003, P = 0.004, respectively). A lower plasma leptin/adiponectin ratio was also significantly associated with an annual decline in FEV1 in subjects with airflow limitation in the CBQ study (P = 0.014), the patients of which had largely different clinical characteristics...... compared with the Hokkaido COPD cohort study. There were no significant associations between lung function decline and adipokine levels in subjects without airflow limitation. CONCLUSIONS: A lower leptin/adiponectin ratio was associated with lung function decline in patients with COPD in two independent......RATIONALE: The rate of annual change in FEV1 is highly variable among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Reliable blood biomarkers are needed to predict prognosis. OBJECTIVES: To explore plasma biomarkers associated with an annual change in FEV1 in patients with COPD...

  17. Lung function decline rates according to GOLD group in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joohae; Yoon, Ho Il; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lim, Seong Yong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Lee, Sang Yeub; Lee, Jin Hwa; Lee, Sang-Do; Lee, Chang-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Since the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) groups A-D were introduced, the lung function changes according to group have been evaluated rarely. We investigated the rate of decline in annual lung function in patients categorized according to the 2014 GOLD guidelines. Patients with COPD included in the Korean Obstructive Lung Disease (KOLD) prospective study, who underwent yearly postbronchodilator spirometry at least three times, were included. The main outcome was the annual decline in postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), which was analyzed by random-slope and random-intercept mixed linear regression. A total 175 participants were included. No significant postbronchodilator FEV1 decline was observed between the groups (-34.4±7.9 [group A]; -26.2±9.4 [group B]; -22.7±16.0 [group C]; and -24.0±8.7 mL/year [group D]) (P=0.79). The group with less symptoms (-32.3±7.2 vs -25.0±6.5 mL/year) (P=0.44) and the low risk group (-31.0±6.1 vs -23.6±7.7 mL/year) (P=0.44) at baseline showed a more rapid decline in the postbronchodilator FEV1, but the trends were not statistically significant. However, GOLD stages classified by FEV1 were significantly related to the annual lung function decline. There was no significant difference in lung function decline rates according to the GOLD groups. Prior classification using postbronchodilator FEV1 predicts decline in lung function better than does the new classification.

  18. Comparison of the fixed ratio and the Z-score of FEV1/FVC in the elderly population: a long-term mortality analysis from the Third National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey

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    Oh DK

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Dong Kyu Oh,1 Seunghee Baek,2 Sei Won Lee,1 Jae Seung Lee,1 Sang-Do Lee,1 Yeon-Mok Oh1 1Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Clinical Research Center for Chronic Obstructive Airway Diseases, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea Background and objective: Despite the ongoing intense debate on the definition of airflow limitation by spirometry in the elderly population, there have only been few studies comparing the fixed ratio and the Z-score of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC in terms of long-term mortalities. In this study, we aimed to identify the proper method for accurately defining the airflow limitation in terms of long-term mortality prediction in the elderly population. Methods: Data were collected from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in the US. Non-Hispanic Caucasians aged 65–80 years were included. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves of both methods were plotted and compared for 10-year all-cause, respiratory, and COPD mortalities. Results: Of 1,331 subjects, the mean age was 71.7 years and 805 (60.5% were males. For the 10-year all-cause mortality, the area under the curve (AUC of the fixed ratio was significantly greater than that of the Z-score of FEV1/FVC, but both showed poor prediction performance (0.633 vs 0.616, p<0.001. For the 10-year respiratory and COPD mortalities, both the fixed ratio and the Z-score of FEV1/FVC showed comparable prediction performance with greater AUCs (0.784 vs 0.778, p=0.160, and 0.896 vs 0.896, p=0.971, respectively. Interestingly, the conventional cutoff of 0.7 in the fixed ratio was consistently higher than the optimal for the 10-year all-cause, respiratory, and COPD mortalities (0.70 vs 0.69, 0.62, and 0.61, respectively

  19. Detection of COPD, lung function decline and emphysema progression in heavy smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohamed Hoesein, F.A.A.

    2012-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis has improved our insights in important determinants of lung function decline and emphysema progression in heavy smokers. Secondly, it improved our insight on the question which threshold of FEV1/FVC is most appropriate in diagnosing COPD. We showed in chapter 2 that

  20. Genome-wide association study of lung function decline in adults with and without asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imboden, Medea; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Curjuric, Ivan; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Kumar, Ashish; Hancock, Dana B; Wilk, Jemma B; Vonk, Judith M; Thun, Gian A; Siroux, Valerie; Nadif, Rachel; Monier, Florent; Gonzalez, Juan R; Wjst, Matthias; Heinrich, Joachim; Loehr, Laura R; Franceschini, Nora; North, Kari E; Altmüller, Janine; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Guerra, Stefano; Kronenberg, Florian; Lathrop, Mark; Moffatt, Miriam F; O’Connor, George T; Strachan, David P; Postma, Dirkje S; London, Stephanie J; Schindler, Christian; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kauffmann, Francine; Jarvis, Debbie L; Demenais, Florence; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M

    2012-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified determinants of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and lung function level, however none addressed decline in lung function. Aim We conducted the first GWAS on age-related decline in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) and in its ratio to forced vital capacity (FVC) stratified a priori by asthma status. Methods Discovery cohorts included adults of European ancestry (1441 asthmatics, 2677 non-asthmatics; Epidemiological Study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA); Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution And Lung And Heart Disease In Adults (SAPALDIA); European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS)). The associations of FEV1 and FEV1/FVC decline with 2.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were estimated. Thirty loci were followed-up by in silico replication (1160 asthmatics, 10858 non-asthmatics: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC); Framingham Heart Study (FHS); British 1958 Birth Cohort (B58C); Dutch asthma study). Results Main signals identified differed between asthmatics and non-asthmatics. None of the SNPs reached genome-wide significance. The association between the height related gene DLEU7 and FEV1 decline suggested for non-asthmatics in the discovery phase was replicated (discovery P=4.8×10−6; replication P=0.03) and additional sensitivity analyses point to a relation to growth. The top ranking signal, TUSC3, associated with FEV1/FVC decline in asthmatics (P=5.3×10−8) did not replicate. SNPs previously associated with cross-sectional lung function were not prominently associated with decline. Conclusions Genetic heterogeneity of lung function may be extensive. Our results suggest that genetic determinants of longitudinal and cross-sectional lung function differ and vary by asthma status. PMID:22424883

  1. Regular physical activity modifies smoking-related lung function decline and reduces risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Aymerich, J; Lange, Peter; Benet, M

    2007-01-01

    RATIONALE: We have previously reported that regular physical activity reduces risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation. We hypothesized that higher levels of regular physical activity could reduce the risk of COPD by modifying smoking-related lung function decline....... OBJECTIVE: To estimate the longitudinal association between regular physical activity and FEV(1) and FVC decline and COPD risk. METHODS: A population-based sample (n = 6,790) was recruited and assessed with respect to physical activity, smoking, lung function, and other covariates, in Copenhagen in 1981......-1983, and followed until 1991-1994. Mean level of physical activity between baseline and follow-up was classified into "low," "moderate," and "high." FEV(1) and FVC decline rates were expressed as milliliters per year. COPD was defined as FEV(1)/FVC physical activity and FEV...

  2. The impact of birth weight on the level of lung function and lung function decline in the general adult population. The Inter99 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumann, Sophie; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Lange, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have reported an association between low birth weight and low adult lung function, but findings have not been consistent. The aim of this study was to investigate whether birth weight is associated with both the level and the decline in adult lung function in general......'s age at birth, parity, prematurity, multiple pregnancy, socioeconomic and lifestyle factors and lung symptoms as covariates. RESULTS: Birth weight was positively associated with spirometric variables. For a 1 kg increase in birth weight, FEV1 increased by 86 ml (CI95%: 34-139) and FVC by 88 ml (CI95......1 and FVC. CONCLUSION: Low birth weight was significantly associated with lower adult FEV1 and FVC but not with the decline in these variables during a 5-year observation. Although FEV1/FVC ratio was not related to birth weight, persons with low birth weight experienced a steeper decline...

  3. [Physiological aspects of the decline of pulmonary function with age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guénard, H; Rouatbi, S

    2004-11-01

    After peaking between the age of 20 and 30 years, pulmonary function declines gradually with age. This decline is related to changes in respiratory dynamics (lung mechanics, gas exchange) and also to non-respiratory factors (e.g. changes in the immune system). This age-related fall in pulmonary function is not linear, for example there is no further decline in mean PaO2 in men and women, nor in the FEV1/FVC ratio in men, afterthe age of 70 years. Caution is required when interpreting changes in pulmonary mechanics in the elderly due to greater variability of reference values in this age group.

  4. Age and sensory processing abnormalities predict declines in encoding and recall of temporally manipulated speech in high-functioning adults with ASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Jennifer L; Heaton, Pamela F

    2014-02-01

    While temporal and perceptual processing abnormalities, identified in a number of electrophysiological and brain imaging studies of individuals with (ASD), are likely to impact on speech perception, surprisingly little is known about the behavioral outcomes of such abnormalities. It has been hypothesized that rapid temporal processing deficits may be linked to impaired language development through interference with acoustic information during speech perception. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of temporal changes on encoding and recall of speech, and the associated cognitive, clinical, and behavioral correlates in adults with ASD. Research carried out with typically developing (TD) adults has shown that word recall diminishes as the speed of speech increases, and it was predicted that the magnitude of this effect would be far greater in those with ASD because of a preexisting rapid temporal processing deficit. Nineteen high-functioning adults with ASD, and age- and intelligence-matched TD controls performed verbatim recall of temporally manipulated sentences. Reduced levels of word recall in response to increases in presentation speed were observed, and this effect was greater in the older participants in the ASD group than in the control group. This is the first study to show that both sensory abnormalities and aging impact on speech encoding in ASD. Auditory processing deficits in ASD may be indicative of an association with the sensory abnormalities and social and communication impairments characterizing the disorder. © 2013 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Mannose binding lectin (MBL levels predict lung function decline in severe asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilonka. H. van Veen

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that activation of the complement system in asthma contributes to ongoing inflammation, tissue damage and airway remodeling. Mannose binding lectin (MBL is a pattern recognition molecule that serves as the key mediator of the lectin pathway of complement activation. MBL levels are genetically determined and vary widely amongst individuals. In the present study we hypothesized that high MBL levels in asthma are associated with increased loss of lung function over time, as a consequence of inflammatory tissue damage. We measured serum MBL levels by ELISA in 68 patients with severe asthma and prospectively determined the change in post-bronchodilator (pb FEV1 over a mean period of 5.7 years. The relationship between MBL and change in pbFEV1 (FEV1 was analysed using (multiple regression analysis and corrected for possible confounders (age, sex, age of onset, asthma duration, and pbFEV1. The median (range MBL level was 332 (10.8-3587 ng·ml–1. MBL was significantly associated with FEV1 (p<0.04. Patients with a high MBL level (332 ng·ml–1 had an increased risk of lung function decline compared to those with low MBL levels (OR (CI: 3.16 (1.14-8.79, p = 0.027; the excess decline being 42 ml·yr–1 (p = 0.01. We conclude that a high MBL level is associated with an increased decline in lung function in patients with severe asthma. MBL might provide a clue towards better understanding of the pathophysiology of ongoing inflammation and subsequent decline in lung function of patients with severe asthma.

  6. Increased lung function decline in blue-collar workers exposed to welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaon, Isabelle; Demange, Valérie; Herin, Fabrice; Touranchet, Annie; Paris, Christophe

    2012-07-01

    There is no consensus at the present time about the effect of welding on lung function decline. This study compared lung function decline between blue-collar workers exposed and not exposed to welding fumes in a French longitudinal cohort of 21,238 subjects aged 37 to 52 years at inclusion. Medical data, occupation, sector of activity, and spirometry were recorded twice by occupational physicians in 1990 and 1995. A job-exposure matrix was used to identify 503 male blue-collar workers exposed to welding fumes and 709 control subjects and to define the weekly duration of exposure to welding fumes. Baseline lung function parameters were higher in workers exposed to welding fumes than in control subjects. After a 5-year follow-up, welding-fume exposure was associated with a nonsignificant decline in FVC (P = .06) and FEV(1) (P = .07) after adjustment for age, pack-years, BMI, and baseline value of the parameter. A significant accelerated decline in FEV(1) (P = .046) was also observed in never smokers exposed to welding fumes. An “exposure-response” relationship was observed between FEV(1) decline and weekly duration of exposure to welding fumes in nonsmokers but not in smokers. Blue-collar workers exposed to welding fumes showed accelerated decline in lung function, which, in nonsmokers, was related to weekly duration of exposure.

  7. A declining CD4 count and diagnosis of HIV-associated Hodgkin lymphoma: do prior clinical symptoms and laboratory abnormalities aid diagnosis?

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    Ravindra K Gupta

    Full Text Available The incidence of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL among HIV-infected individuals remains unchanged since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART. Recent epidemiological data suggest that CD4 count decline over a year is associated with subsequent diagnosis of HL. In an era of economic austerity monitoring the efficacy of cART by CD4 counts may no longer be required where CD4 count>350 cells/µl and viral load is suppressed (350 may not have delayed diagnosis.

  8. Hippocampal Mutant APP and Amyloid Beta Induced Cognitive Decline, Dendritic Spine Loss, Defective Autophagy, Mitophagy and Mitochondrial Abnormalities in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manczak, Maria; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Yin, Xiangling; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the toxic effects of hippocampal mutant APP and amyloid beta (Aβ) in 12-month-old APP transgenic mice. Using rotarod and Morris Water Maze tests, immunoblotting & immunofluorescence, Golgi-cox staining and transmission electron microscopy, we assessed cognitive behavior, protein levels of synaptic, autophagy, mitophagy, mitochondrial dynamics, biogenesis, dendritic protein MAP2, and quantified dendritic spines and mitochondrial number and length in 12-month-old APP mice that express swedish mutation. Mitochondrial function was assessed by measuring the levels of hydrogen peroxide, lipid peroxidation, cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial ATP. Morris Water Maze and rotarod tests revealed that hippocampal learning and memory and motor learning & coordination were impaired in APP mice relative to wild-type (WT) mice. Increased levels of mitochondrial fission proteins, Drp1 and Fis1 and decreased levels fusion (Mfn1, Mfn2 and Opa1) biogenesis (PGC1α, NRF1, NRF2 & TFAM), autophagy (ATG5 & LC3BI, LC3BII), Mitophagy (PINK1 & TERT), synaptic (synaptophysin & PSD95) and dendritic (MAP2) proteins were found in 12-month-old APP mice relative to age-matched non-transgenic WT mice. Golgi-cox staining analysis revealed that dendritic spines are significantly reduced. Transmission electron microscopy revealed significantly increased mitochondrial numbers and reduced mitochondrial length in APP mice. These findings suggest that hippocampal accumulation of mutant APP and Aβ is responsible for abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and defective biogenesis, reduced MAP2, autophagy, mitophagy and synaptic proteins & reduced dendritic spines and hippocampal based learning and memory impairments, and mitochondrial structural and functional changes in 12-month-old APP mice. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Determinação da eficiência do VEF6 como substituto da CVF na triagem diagnóstica da doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica através da comparação entre as relações VEF1/CVF e VEF1/VEF6 Determination of the efficacy of FEV6 as a surrogate for FVC in the diagnostic screening for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease through the comparison of FEV1/FVC and FEV1/FEV6 ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Luiz Cavalcanti Lundgren

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a eficácia do uso do volume expiratório forçado nos primeiros seis segundos (VEF6 como substituto da capacidade vital forçada (CVF na triagem diagnóstica da doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica (DPOC através da comparação entre as medidas da relação VEF1/CVF e as medidas da relação VEF1/VEF6. MÉTODOS: No ano de 2003, durante o Dia Mundial da DPOC, realizamos uma campanha de triagem diagnóstica da DPOC. Os participantes da campanha respondiam ao questionário clínico do projeto Global Initiative for -Obstructive Lung Disease e aqueles que apresentavam pelo menos três respostas positivas submetiam-se a espirometria. RESULTADOS: Um total de 134 indivíduos respondeu positivamente a três questões e realizou espirometria. Destes, 59 foram excluídos: 45 por serem não fumantes e 14 pelo fato de seus exames não obedecerem aos critérios da American Thoracic Society para espirometria de qualidade. O número de resultados abaixo de 70% foi similar para VEF1/CVF e para VEF1/VEF6. A sensibilidade de VEF1/VEF6 para o diagnóstico de obstrução de vias aéreas definida por VEF1/CVF abaixo de 70% foi de 92% e a especificidade foi de 99%. O valor preditivo positivo foi de 100% e o valor preditivo negativo foi de 98%. O teste de correlação de Kendall mostrou r = 0,99 (p OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of using forced expiratory volume in six seconds (FEV6 as a surrogate for forced vital capacity (FVC in the diagnostic screening for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD by comparing FEV1/FVC ratios with FEV1/FEV6 ratios. METHODS: In November of 2003, on World COPD Day, we conducted a campaign of diagnostic screening for COPD. The participants completed the clinical questionnaire of the Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease, and those who responded affirmatively to at least three questions underwent spirometry. RESULTS: A total of 134 individuals responded to three questions affirmatively and

  10. Symptoms and lung function decline in a middle-aged cohort of males and females in Australia

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    Abramson MJ

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Abramson,1 Sonia Kaushik,1 Geza P Benke,1 Brigitte M Borg,2 Catherine L Smith,1 Shyamali C Dharmage,3 Bruce R Thompson21Department of Epidemiology & Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Monash University, 2Department of Allergy, Immunology & Respiratory Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, 3Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaBackground: The European Community Respiratory Health Survey is a major international study designed to assess lung health in adults. This Australian follow-up investigated changes in symptoms between sexes and the roles of asthma, smoking, age, sex, height, and change in body mass index (ΔBMI on lung function decline (LFD, which is a major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.Methods: LFD was measured as the rate of decline over time in FEV1 (mL/year (ΔFEV1 and FVC (ΔFVC between 1993 and 2013. Multiple linear regression was used to estimate associations between risk factors and LFD, separately for males and females. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess sex differences and changes in respiratory symptoms over time.Results: In Melbourne, 318 subjects (53.8% females participated. The prevalence of most respiratory symptoms had either remained relatively stable over 20 years or decreased (significantly so for wheeze. The exception was shortness of breath after activity, which had increased. Among the 262 subjects who completed spirometry, current smoking declined from 20.2% to 7.3%. Overall mean (± standard deviation FEV1 declined by 23.1 (±17.1 and FVC by 22.9 (±20.2 mL/year. Predictors of ΔFEV1 in males were age, maternal smoking, and baseline FEV1; and in females they were age, ΔBMI, baseline FEV1, and pack-years in current smokers. Decline in FVC was predicted by baseline FVC, age, and ΔBMI in both sexes; however, baseline FVC predicted

  11. FEV 1 , FVC, FEV 1 /FVVC as predictors of rhinitis among saw mill ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data on sociodemographic variables, symptoms of rhinitis, etc was obtained using a modified semi structured British medical research council questionnaire while respiratory function data was measured using a spirometry. Result: A total of 400 responds comprising of 200 saw mill workers and 200 controls participated in ...

  12. Declination Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Declination is calculated using the current International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model. Declination is calculated using the current World Magnetic Model...

  13. Cognitive decline affects diabetic women

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    Perzyński Adam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: DM provokes peripheral complications and changes in central nervous system. Central changes in the course of diabetes mellitus (DM include changes in brain tissue structure, electrophysiological abnormalities but also disturbances in neurotransmission leading to cognitive decline.

  14. Oak Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip M. Wargo; David R. Houston; Leon A. LaMadeleine

    1983-01-01

    Periodic occurrences of decline and death of oaks over widespread areas have been recorded since 1900. These outbreaks, variously named oak decline, oak dieback, or oak mortality, are caused by a complex interaction of environmental stresses and pests and given the name oak decline.

  15. Oak Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon Ammon; T. Evan Nebeker; Ted H. Filer; Francis I. McCracken; J. D. Solomon; H. E. Kennedy

    1989-01-01

    Occurrence of decline and mortality in this nation's hardwood forests has been documented in reports for the past 130 years. From 1856 through 1981, more than 26 decline events were reported from eight eastern states affecting almost all species of oaks. Fourteen factors have been implicated as either primary or secondary agents responsible for decline and...

  16. Lower leptin/adiponectin ratio and risk of rapid lung function decline in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masaru; Makita, Hironi; Östling, Jörgen; Thomsen, Laura H; Konno, Satoshi; Nagai, Katsura; Shimizu, Kaoruko; Pedersen, Jesper H; Ashraf, Haseem; Bruijnzeel, Piet L B; Maciewicz, Rose A; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2014-12-01

    The rate of annual change in FEV1 is highly variable among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Reliable blood biomarkers are needed to predict prognosis. To explore plasma biomarkers associated with an annual change in FEV1 in patients with COPD. Plasma samples of 261 subjects, all Japanese, with COPD from the 5-year Hokkaido COPD cohort study were analyzed as a hypothesis-generating cohort, and the results were validated using data of 226 subjects with and 268 subjects without airflow limitation, mainly white, from the 4-year COPD Quantification by Computed Tomography, Biomarkers, and Quality of Life (CBQ) study conducted in Denmark. The plasma samples were measured using Human CardiovascularMAP (Myriad RBM, Austin, TX), which could analyze 50 biomarkers potentially linked with inflammatory, metabolic, and tissue remodeling pathways, and single ELISAs were used to confirm the results. Higher plasma adiponectin levels and a lower leptin/adiponectin ratio at enrollment were significantly associated with an annual decline in FEV1 even after controlling for age, sex, height, and body mass index in the Hokkaido COPD cohort study (P = 0.003, P = 0.004, respectively). A lower plasma leptin/adiponectin ratio was also significantly associated with an annual decline in FEV1 in subjects with airflow limitation in the CBQ study (P = 0.014), the patients of which had largely different clinical characteristics compared with the Hokkaido COPD cohort study. There were no significant associations between lung function decline and adipokine levels in subjects without airflow limitation. A lower leptin/adiponectin ratio was associated with lung function decline in patients with COPD in two independent Japanese and Western cohort studies of populations of different ethnicity. Measure of systemic adipokines may provide utility in predicting patients with COPD at higher risk of lung function decline.

  17. Menopause Is Associated with Accelerated Lung Function Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triebner, Kai; Matulonga, Bobette; Johannessen, Ane; Suske, Sandra; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Demoly, Pascal; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Franklin, Karl A; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Gullón Blanco, José Antonio; Heinrich, Joachim; Holm, Mathias; Jarvis, Debbie; Jõgi, Rain; Lindberg, Eva; Moratalla Rovira, Jesús Martínez; Muniozguren Agirre, Nerea; Pin, Isabelle; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Puggini, Luca; Raherison, Chantal; Sánchez-Ramos, José Luis; Schlünssen, Vivi; Sunyer, Jordi; Svanes, Cecilie; Hustad, Steinar; Leynaert, Bénédicte; Gómez Real, Francisco

    2017-04-15

    Menopause is associated with changes in sex hormones, which affect immunity, inflammation, and osteoporosis and may impair lung function. Lung function decline has not previously been investigated in relation to menopause. To study whether lung function decline, assessed by FVC and FEV 1 , is accelerated in women who undergo menopause. The population-based longitudinal European Community Respiratory Health Survey provided serum samples, spirometry, and questionnaire data about respiratory and reproductive health from three study waves (n = 1,438). We measured follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone and added information on menstrual patterns to determine menopausal status using latent class analysis. Associations with lung function decline were investigated using linear mixed effects models, adjusting for age, height, weight, pack-years, current smoking, age at completed full-time education, spirometer, and including study center as random effect. Menopausal status was associated with accelerated lung function decline. The adjusted mean FVC decline was increased by -10.2 ml/yr (95% confidence interval [CI], -13.1 to -7.2) in transitional women and -12.5 ml/yr (95% CI, -16.2 to -8.9) in post-menopausal women, compared with women menstruating regularly. The adjusted mean FEV 1 decline increased by -3.8 ml/yr (95% CI, -6.3 to -2.9) in transitional women and -5.2 ml/yr (95% CI, -8.3 to -2.0) in post-menopausal women. Lung function declined more rapidly among transitional and post-menopausal women, in particular for FVC, beyond the expected age change. Clinicians should be aware that respiratory health often deteriorates during reproductive aging.

  18. Reduced survival in adult cystic fibrosis despite attenuated lung function decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Claire; Poor, Armeen D; Liu, Xinhua; Chiuzan, Codruta; Backenroth, Daniel; Zhang, Yuan; DiMango, Emily

    2017-01-01

    There is limited data on disease progression and survival in adult diagnosis cystic fibrosis (CF). This study evaluates change of lung function over time and rates of death/lung transplant in adult diagnosis CF. The CF Foundation Patient Registry was reviewed for patients diagnosed 1993-2003. Rate of FEV1 decline was calculated up to 2010 for age groups 6-11, 12-17, and 18 and above. Kaplan Meier method was used for 10 and 15year survival rate calculations for patients diagnosed as adults. Cox Proportional hazards models using predictors affecting disease progression and survival without transplant were run. Between 1993 and 2003, 11,884 patients were diagnosed with CF, of which 2848 were ages 6 and older. Annual rate of change of FEV1% predicted over 5years differed by diagnosis age group: -1.42% per year for ages 6-11, -2.04% for ages 12-17 and -1.13% for ages 18-65 (p70% predicted at diagnosis, 95% were alive without transplant at 10years, whereas of those with FEV1diagnosis, 31% were alive without transplant at 10years. Lung function declines at a slower rate in adult diagnosis CF. However, particularly in those with low lung function at diagnosis, rates of death or transplant in adult diagnosis CF after 10 and 15years is not negligible. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Low Vital Capacity and Electrocardiographic ST-T Abnormalities in Asymptomatic Adults

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    Kei Nakajima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that low forced vital capacity (LFVC is associated with atherosclerosis. However, it is unclear whether LFVC is associated with resting electrocardiographic ST-T abnormalities, a common finding that is prognostic for cardiovascular events. Therefore, pulmonary functions, ST-T abnormalities defined with Minnesota Code, and cardiometabolic risk factors were examined in a cross-sectional study of 1,653 asymptomatic adults without past history of coronary heart diseases. The prevalence of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and ST-T abnormalities significantly increased with decreasing percent of predicted forced vital capacity (%PFVC. ST-T abnormalities were observed in 73 subjects (4.4% in total. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that, compared with the highest quartile of %PFVC (≥99.7%, the lowest quartile of %PFVC (≤84.2% was persistently associated with ST-T abnormalities even after further adjustment for diabetes or metabolic syndrome (odds ratio (95%CI: 2.44 (1.16–5.14 and 2.42 (1.15–5.10, resp.. Similar trends were observed when subjects were divided into quartiles according to percent of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, but not the ratio of FEV1/FVC. In conclusion, LFVC may be associated with ST-T abnormalities independent of metabolic abnormalities in asymptomatic adults, suggesting a plausible link between impaired pulmonary defects and cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Low Vital Capacity and Electrocardiographic ST-T Abnormalities in Asymptomatic Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kei; Li, Yulan; Fuchigami, Hiroshi; Munakata, Hiromi

    2012-01-01

    Studies have shown that low forced vital capacity (LFVC) is associated with atherosclerosis. However, it is unclear whether LFVC is associated with resting electrocardiographic ST-T abnormalities, a common finding that is prognostic for cardiovascular events. Therefore, pulmonary functions, ST-T abnormalities defined with Minnesota Code, and cardiometabolic risk factors were examined in a cross-sectional study of 1,653 asymptomatic adults without past history of coronary heart diseases. The prevalence of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and ST-T abnormalities significantly increased with decreasing percent of predicted forced vital capacity (%PFVC). ST-T abnormalities were observed in 73 subjects (4.4% in total). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that, compared with the highest quartile of %PFVC (≥99.7%), the lowest quartile of %PFVC (≤84.2%) was persistently associated with ST-T abnormalities even after further adjustment for diabetes or metabolic syndrome (odds ratio (95%CI): 2.44 (1.16–5.14) and 2.42 (1.15–5.10), resp.). Similar trends were observed when subjects were divided into quartiles according to percent of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), but not the ratio of FEV1/FVC. In conclusion, LFVC may be associated with ST-T abnormalities independent of metabolic abnormalities in asymptomatic adults, suggesting a plausible link between impaired pulmonary defects and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22685652

  1. Accelerated decline in lung function in smoking women with airway obstruction: SAPALDIA 2 cohort study

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    Zemp Elisabeth

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim was to determine if effects from smoking on lung function measured over 11 years differ between men and women. Methods In a prospective population based cohort study (Swiss Study on Air Pollution and Lung Diseases in Adults current smokers in 1991 (18 – 60 yrs were reassessed in 2002 (n = 1792. Multiple linear regression was used to estimate effects from pack-years of cigarettes smoked to 1991 and mean packs of cigarettes smoked per day between 1991 and 2002 on change in lung volume and flows over the 11 years. Results In both sexes, packs smoked between assessments were related to lung function decline but pack-years smoked before 1991 were not. Mean annual decline in FEV1 was -10.4 mL(95%CI -15.3, -5.5 per pack per day between assessments in men and -13.8 mL(95%CI-19.5,-8.1 in women. Decline per pack per day between 1991 and 2002 was lower in women who smoked in 1991 but quit before 2002 compared to persistent smokers (-6.4 vs -11.6 mL, p = 0.05 but this was not seen in men (-14.3 vs -8.8 mL p = 0.49. Smoking related decline was accelerated in men and women with airway obstruction, particularly in women where decline in FEV1 was three fold higher in participants with FEV1/FVC Conclusion There are differences in effects from smoking on lung function between men and women. Lung function recovers faster in women quitters than in men. Women current smokers with airway obstruction experience a greater smoking related decline in lung function than men.

  2. Effect of tiotropium on lung function decline in early-stage of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients: propensity score-matched analysis of real-world data

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    Lee HY

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ha Youn Lee,1,2 Sun Mi Choi,1,2 Jinwoo Lee,1,2 Young Sik Park,1,2 Chang-Hoon Lee,1,2 Deog Kyeom Kim,2,3 Sang-Min Lee,1,2 Ho Il Yoon,2,4 Jae-Joon Yim,1,2 Young Whan Kim,1,2 Sung Koo Han,1,2 Chul-Gyu Yoo1,2 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 4Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea Background: Tiotropium failed to slow the annual rate of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 decline in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients with <70% predicted FEV1. However, the rate of FEV1 decline is known to be faster at early stages, which suggests that the effects of tiotropium may be more prominent in early-stage of COPD patients. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that tiotropium modifies the rate of FEV1 decline in COPD patients with an FEV1≥70%.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of COPD patients diagnosed between January 1, 2004, and July 31, 2012, at Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, and Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center. The inclusion criteria were as follows: age ≥40 years, postbronchodilator (BD FEV1≥70% of predicted and FEV1/FVC (forced vital capacity <0.70, and spirometry more than two times at certain times of the year. Conversely, the exclusion criteria were as follows: asthma, lung cancer, pulmonary tuberculosis, pulmonary resection, or long-term use of a short-acting muscarinic antagonist. The annual lung function decline in patients using tiotropium was compared with that in patients not

  3. Effect of tiotropium on lung function decline in early-stage of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients: propensity score-matched analysis of real-world data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ha Youn; Choi, Sun Mi; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Young Sik; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Lee, Sang-Min; Yoon, Ho Il; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Yoo, Chul-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Tiotropium failed to slow the annual rate of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) decline in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, pulmonary resection, or long-term use of a short-acting muscarinic antagonist. The annual lung function decline in patients using tiotropium was compared with that in patients not using the drug. Of the 587 patients enrolled in the study, 257 took tiotropium. Following propensity score matching, 404 patients were included in the analysis. The mean annual rate of post-BD FEV1 decline was 23.9 (tiotropium) and 22.5 (control) mL/yr (P=0.86); corresponding pre-BD values were 30.4 and 21.9 mL/yr (P=0.31), respectively. Mean annual rate of post-BD FVC decline was 55.1 (tiotropium) and 43.5 (control) mL/yr (P=0.33); corresponding pre-BD values were 37.1 and 33.3 mL/yr (P=0.13). Therefore, tiotropium does not reduce the rate of lung function decline in COPD patients with FEV1≥70%.

  4. Is TNF-α gene polymorphism related to pulmonary functions and prognosis as determined by FEV1, BMI, COPD exacerbation and hospitalization in patients with smoking-related COPD in a Turkish population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezihe Özdoğan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some conflicting results have been published about the relationship between TNF-α-308 gene polymorphism and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The aim of this study was to determine whether TNF-α-308 gene polymorphism was associated with smoking-related COPD and whether it was associated with pulmonary function parameters (PFTs, body mass index (BMI, and prognosis. Methods: We studied the frequencies of TNF-α-308 gene polymorphism in 90 male subjects (60 subjects with COPD and 30 healthy smokers in a Caucasian population. Results: There was no significant difference in the frequency of G/G and G/A gene polymorphisms in the COPD group compared with control subjects (p > 0.05. We compared COPD patients as G/A gene polymorphism and G/G gene polymorphism; the PFTs and BMI before and after one year were not statistically significant (p > 0.05. Also, the exacerbation and hospitalization data of COPD patients were not significant between these groups. Conclusion: In conclusion, there was no difference between smoking-related COPD and the control group according to TNF α-308 gene polymorphism in a Caucasian population. In addition, it was shown that important determinants of prognosis of COPD such as FEV1, BMI, COPD exacerbation and hospitalization were not associated with TNF-α-308 gene polymorphism. Resumo: Introdução: Foram publicados alguns resultados contraditórios sobre a relação entre o polimorfismo do gene TNF-α -308 e a doença pulmonar obstrutiva crónica (DPOC. O objectivo deste estudo foi determinar se o polimorfismo do gene TNF-α -308 estava associado à DPOC ligada ao tabagismo e se foi associado aos parâmetros de função pulmonar (PFTs, índice de massa corporal (IMC, e prognóstico. Métodos: Estudámos as frequências do polimorfismo do gene TNF-α -308 em 90 indivíduos do sexo masculino (60 indivíduos com DPOC e 30 fumadores saud

  5. Congenital Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Ages and Stages Prenatal Baby (0-12 mos.) Toddler 1-3yrs. Preschool 3-5yrs Grade School ... Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic material inherited from one generation ...

  6. Smoking status and gene susceptibility play important roles in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung function decline: A population-based prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junling; Li, Miao; Chen, Jinkun; Wu, Xiaomei; Ning, Qin; Zhao, Jianping; Xu, Yongjian; Xie, Jungang; Yu, Jun

    2017-06-01

    We conducted this study to identify the influences and synergistic effects of smoking status and polymorphisms in hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung function decline. A cohort containing 306 COPD patients and 743 healthy subjects was recruited from 25,000 subjects. All selected subjects had chronic cough for over 2 years or a smoking history above 20 pack-years. After 8 years, all subjects were divided into 2 cohorts according to whether they had quit smoking or not. A follow-up of all patients was completed after another period of 10 years. Three variants in HHIP were genotyped to investigate the impacts of gene susceptibility on the development of COPD and lung function decline. During the follow-up tests, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) ratios decreased more significantly in COPD patients than in healthy subjects. For variant rs7654947, FEV1 decreased more significantly in CC and CT subjects than in TT subjects. FEV1 in COPD patients with a CC genotype from smoking cohorts reduced markedly when compared to ex-smoking cohorts (case, 30.75% vs. 35.5%; total, 28% vs. 32%). Our results showed that smoking and HHIP variant rs7654947 were associated with COPD development and lung function decline. Moreover, we found that cigarette smoking and gene susceptibility have cooperative effects on COPD risk and lung function decline.

  7. Lung function decline over 25 years of follow-up among black and white adults in the ARIC study cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabelli, Maria C; Preisser, John S; Loehr, Laura R; Agarwal, Sunil K; Barr, R Graham; Couper, David J; Hankinson, John L; Hyun, Noorie; Folsom, Aaron R; London, Stephanie J

    2016-04-01

    Interpretation of longitudinal information about lung function decline from middle to older age has been limited by loss to follow-up that may be correlated with baseline lung function or the rate of decline. We conducted these analyses to estimate age-related decline in lung function across groups of race, sex, and smoking status while accounting for dropout from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. We analyzed data from 13,896 black and white participants, aged 45-64 years at the 1987-1989 baseline clinical examination. Using spirometry data collected at baseline and two follow-up visits, we estimated annual population-averaged mean changes in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) by race, sex, and smoking status using inverse-probability-weighted independence estimating equations conditioning-on-being-alive. Estimated rates of FEV1 decline estimated using inverse-probability-weighted independence estimating equations conditioning on being alive were higher among white than black participants at age 45 years (e.g., male never smokers: black: -29.5 ml/year; white: -51.9 ml/year), but higher among black than white participants by age 75 (black: -51.2 ml/year; white: -26). Observed differences by race were more pronounced among men than among women. By smoking status, FEV1 declines were larger among current than former or never smokers at age 45 across all categories of race and sex. By age 60, FEV1 decline was larger among former and never than current smokers. Estimated annual declines generated using unweighted generalized estimating equations were smaller for current smokers at younger ages in all four groups of race and sex compared with results from weighted analyses that accounted for attrition. Using methods accounting for dropout from an approximately 25-year health study, estimated rates of lung function decline varied by age, race, sex, and smoking status, with largest declines observed among current

  8. Meiotic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...... at evaluating age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) as an independent predictor of the transition to disability (according to Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale) or death in independent elderly subjects that were followed up for 3 years. At baseline, a standardized neurological examination.......0 years, 45 % males), 327 (51.7 %) presented at the initial visit with ≥1 neurological abnormality and 242 (38 %) reached the main study outcome. Cox regression analyses, adjusting for MRI features and other determinants of functional decline, showed that the baseline presence of any neurological...

  10. Walking abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a mental disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  11. Abnormal lung function at preschool age - asthma in adolescence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajunen, Katariina; Kalliola, Satu; Kotaniemi-Syrjänen, Anne; Sarna, Seppo; Malmberg, L Pekka; Pelkonen, Anna S; Mäkelä, Mika J

    2018-03-06

    Asthma often begins early in childhood. However, the risk for persistence is challenging to evaluate. This longitudinal study relates lung function assessed with impulse oscillometry (IOS) in preschool children to asthma in adolescence. Lung function was measured with IOS in 255 children with asthma-like symptoms aged 4-7 years. Baseline measurements were followed by exercise challenge and bronchodilation tests. At age 12-16 years, 121 children participated in the follow-up visit, when lung function was assessed with spirometry, followed by a bronchodilation test. Asthma symptoms and medication were recorded by a questionnaire and atopy defined by skin prick tests. Abnormal baseline values in preschool IOS were significantly associated with low lung function, the need for asthma medication, and asthma symptoms in adolescence. Preschool abnormal R5 at baseline (z-score ≥1.645 SD) showed 9.2 odds ratio (95%CI 2.7;31.7) for abnormal FEV1/FVC, use of asthma medication in adolescence, and 9.9 odds ratio (95%CI 2.9;34.4) for asthma symptoms. Positive exercise challenge and modified asthma-predictive index at preschool age predicted asthma symptoms and the need for asthma medication, but not abnormal lung function at teenage. Abnormal preschool IOS is associated with asthma and poor lung function in adolescence and might be utilised for identification of asthma persistence. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Analysis of FEV1 decline in relatively healthy heavy smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Laura H.; Dirksen, Asger; Shaker, Saher B.

    2014-01-01

    function consistently showed the steepest decline, whereas in relative terms most fast decliners are found among those with low lung function. Measuring changes in relative terms implied statistically significant acceleration of decline with advancing age, smoking (pack-years) and severity of airflow...... analyzed data from 3,218 relatively healthy heavy smokers who participated in the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial. The influences of age, sex, height, body mass index, smoking, and severity of airflow limitation on FEV1 were analyzed in mixed effects models. In absolute terms those with the best lung...... limitation. Relative measurements may lead to a better understanding of changes in lung function. Smoking and severity of airflow limitation speed up the loss of lung function, and this emphasizes the importance of abstaining from smoking the sooner the better. Measuring changes in relative terms could have...

  13. Interpretation of Spirometry: Selection of Predicted Values and Defining Abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, S K

    2015-01-01

    Spirometry is the most frequently performed investigation to evaluate pulmonary function. It provides clinically useful information on the mechanical properties of the lung and the thoracic cage and aids in taking management-related decisions in a wide spectrum of diseases and disorders. Few measurements in medicine are so dependent on factors related to equipment, operator and the patient. Good spirometry requires quality assured measurements and a systematic approach to interpretation. Standard guidelines on the technical aspects of equipment and their calibration as well as the test procedure have been developed and revised from time-to-time. Strict compliance with standardisation guidelines ensures quality control. Interpretation of spirometry data is based only on two basic measurements--the forced vital capacity (FVC) and the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and their ratio, FEV1/FVC. A meaningful and clinically useful interpretation of the measured data requires a systematic approach and consideration of several important issues. Central to interpretation is the understanding of the development and application of prediction equations. Selection of prediction equations that are appropriate for the ethnic origin of the patient is vital to avoid erroneous interpretation. Defining abnormal values is a debatable but critical aspect of spirometry. A statistically valid definition of the lower limits of normal has been advocated as the better method over the more commonly used approach of defining abnormality as a fixed percentage of the predicted value. Spirometry rarely provides a specific diagnosis. Examination of the flow-volume curve and the measured data provides information to define patterns of ventilatory impairment. Spirometry must be interpreted in conjunction with clinical information including results of other investigations.

  14. Spirometry and impulse oscillometry (IOS) for detection of respiratory abnormalities in metropolitan firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard; Malbon, Winifred; Newbury, Wendy; Holton, Christine; Smith, Michael; Morgan, Michael; Crockett, Alan

    2010-08-01

    As firefighters are at increased risk of adverse health effects, periodic examination of their respiratory health is important. The objective of this study was to establish whether the use of impulse oscillometry (IOS) reveals respiratory abnormalities in metropolitan firefighters that go undetected during routine respiratory health screening by spirometry and assessment of respiratory symptoms. This was a cross-sectional analysis of spirometry, IOS and questionnaire data from 488 male firefighters. Abnormal spirometry was defined as FEV(1), FEV(1)/FVC and/or FEF(50) below the lower limit of normal. Abnormal IOS was defined as resistance at 5 Hz (R5), frequency dependence of resistance (DeltaR5-R20) and/or reactance area (AX) above the upper limit of normal. Respiratory symptoms, smoking history, exposures and medical history were assessed. Data were analysed using logistic and linear regression models. The mean age of the firefighters was 43.8 (SD 8.4) years. There were 123 (25%) former smokers and 50 (10%) current smokers. Abnormal spirometry was detected in 12%, abnormal IOS in 9% and respiratory symptoms in 20% of firefighters. Current smoking was associated with all IOS parameters (OR for R5 = 3.1, OR for DeltaR5-R20 = 7.7, OR for AX = 4.3), and with FEF(50) (OR = 9.1), chronic productive cough (OR = 4.0) and breathlessness (OR = 5.4) (P spirometry or IOS parameters. Interaction terms in the linear regression models indicated associations between smoking and DeltaR5-R20, and also between smoking and AX, in the lowest and second lowest quartiles of spirometry parameters. Application of IOS for the assessment of respiratory health in firefighters identified airways dysfunction in some individuals, even when spirometry values were within the normal range and there were no respiratory symptoms.

  15. A Rare Stapes Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Kanona

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to increase awareness of rare presentations, diagnostic difficulties alongside management of conductive hearing loss and ossicular abnormalities. We report the case of a 13-year-old female reporting progressive left-sided hearing loss and high resolution computed tomography was initially reported as normal. Exploratory tympanotomy revealed an absent stapedius tendon and lack of connection between the stapes superstructure and footplate. The footplate was fixed. Stapedotomy and stapes prosthesis insertion resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 50 dB. A review of world literature was performed using MedLine. Middle ear ossicular discontinuity can result in significant conductive hearing loss. This can be managed effectively with surgery to help restore hearing. However, some patients may not be suitable or decline surgical intervention and can be managed safely conservatively.

  16. Occupation and three-year incidence of respiratory symptoms and lung function decline: the ARIC Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirabelli Maria C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific occupations are associated with adverse respiratory health. Inhalation exposures encountered in these jobs may place workers at risk of new-onset respiratory disease. Methods We analyzed data from 8,967 participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC study, a longitudinal cohort study. Participants included in this analysis were free of chronic cough and phlegm, wheezing, asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and other chronic lung conditions at the baseline examination, when they were aged 45-64 years. Using data collected in the baseline and first follow-up examination, we evaluated associations between occupation and the three-year incidence of cough, phlegm, wheezing, and airway obstruction and changes in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC measured by spirometry. All associations were adjusted for age, cigarettes per day, race, smoking status, and study center. Results During the approximately three-year follow-up, the percentage of participants developing chronic cough was 3%; chronic phlegm, 3%; wheezing, 3%; and airway obstruction, defined as FEV1 1/FVC 1 and FVC were 56 mL and 66 mL, respectively, among men and 40 mL and 52 mL, respectively, among women. Relative to a referent category of managerial and administrative support occupations, elevated risks of new-onset chronic cough and chronic phlegm were observed for mechanics and repairers (chronic cough: RR: 1.81, 95% CI: 1.02, 3.21; chronic phlegm: RR: 2.10, 95% CI: 1.23, 3.57 and cleaning and building service workers (chronic cough: RR: 1.85, 95% CI: 1.01, 3.37; chronic phlegm: RR: 2.28, 95% CI: 1.27, 4.08. Despite the elevated risk of new-onset symptoms, employment in cleaning and building services was associated with attenuated lung function decline, particularly among men, who averaged annual declines in FEV1 and FVC of 14 mL and 23 mL, respectively, less than the declines observed in the

  17. Broncodilatação na DPOC: muito além do VEF1-efeito do salbutamol nas propriedades resistivas e reativas do sistema respiratório Bronchodilation in COPD: beyond FEV1-the effect of albuterol on resistive and reactive properties of the respiratory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerusa Marítimo da Costa

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Atualmente existem importantes debates na literatura sobre a resposta broncodilatadora em pacientes com DPOC e se a variação do VEF1 pode ser considerada uma indicação completa de reversibilidade neste caso particular. O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar o efeito do salbutamol nas propriedades resistivas e elásticas do sistema respiratório de portadores de DPOC. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 70 indivíduos com DPOC, classificados através da espirometria em dois grupos: broncodilatador (BD-negativo (n = 39; e BD-positivo (n = 31. Utilizou-se a técnica de oscilações forçadas (TOF para avaliar os seguintes parâmetros: a resistência no intercepto (R0, associada à resistência total do sistema respiratório; a resistência média (Rm, relacionada à resistência de vias aéreas centrais; e a complacência dinâmica (Cdyn; assim como o coeficiente angular da resistência (S e a reatância média (Xm, relacionados com a homogeneidade do sistema respiratório. RESULTADOS: O uso do salbutamol resultou em reduções significativas de R0 (p OBJECTIVE: Current debates on the bronchodilator response in COPD patients and whether the variation in FEV1 can be considered as an indicator of complete reversibility in such patients motivated us to conduct this study. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of albuterol on the resistive and reactive properties of the respiratory system in COPD patients. METHODS: We evaluated 70 patients with COPD, divided into two groups based on spirometry findings: bronchodilator (BD-negative (n = 39; and BD-positive (n = 31. We used the forced oscillation technique (FOT to evaluate the following parameters: resistance at the intercept (R0, associated with the total resistance of the respiratory system; mean resistance (Rm, associated with central airway resistance; dynamic compliance (Cdyn; and the slope of resistance (S and mean reactance (Xm, both of which are associated with the

  18. Persistent Chlamydia Pneumoniae serology is related to decline in lung function in women but not in men. Effect of persistent Chlamydia pneumoniae infection on lung function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislason Thorarinn

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydia pneumoniae (C pn infection causes an acute inflammation in the respiratory system that may become persistent, but little is known about the long-term respiratory effects of C pn infections. Aim: To estimate the long term respiratory effects of C pn with change in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC as a main outcome variable. Methods The study comprised of 1109 subjects (500 men and 609 women, mean age 28 ± 6 years that participated in the Reykjavik Heart Study of the Young. Spirometry and blood samples for measurements of IgG antibodies for C pn were done at inclusion and at the end of the follow-up period (mean follow-up time 27 ± 4 years. Results Having IgG against C pn at both examinations was significantly associated to a larger decrease in FEV1 (6 mL/year and FVC (7 mL/year in women but not in men. In women the association between C pn and larger FEV1 decline was only found in women that smoked at baseline where having C pn IgG was associated with 10 mL/year decline compared to smokers without C pn IgG. These results were still significant after adjustment for age, smoking and change in body weight. Conclusion Our results indicate that persistent C pn serology is related to increased decline in lung function in women but not in men. This effect was, however, primarily found in smoking women. This study is a further indication that the pathophysiological process leading to lung impairment may differ between men and women.

  19. Dietary anthocyanin intake and age-related decline in lung function: longitudinal findings from the VA Normative Aging Study123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amar J; Cassidy, Aedín; Litonjua, Augusto A; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is unknown whether habitual intake of dietary flavonoids, known for their antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties, affects longitudinal change in lung function. Objective: We investigated whether different flavonoid subclasses present in the habitual diet were associated with beneficial changes in lung function over time in the elderly. Design: This longitudinal analysis included 839 participants from the VA (Veterans Affairs) Normative Aging Study whose lung function [forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC)] was measured at 2 and up to 5 visits between 1992 and 2008 (n = 2623 measurements). Yearly average intake of major flavonoid subclasses (anthocyanins, flavanones, flavan-3-ols, flavonols, flavones, and polymers) was calculated from food-frequency questionnaires at each visit. We estimated adjusted differences in annual change in lung function associated with each flavonoid subclass, categorized into quartiles, in linear mixed-effects regression models after adjustment for lifestyle and dietary confounders. Results: Strong inverse associations were found between anthocyanin intake and age-related decline in lung function. Independent of dietary and nondietary risk factors, slower rates of FEV1 and FVC decline by 23.6 (95% CI: 16.6, 30.7) and 37.3 (95% CI: 27.8, 46.8) mL/y, respectively, were observed in participants in the fourth quartile of intake compared with participants in the first quartile (P-trend < 0.0001). The protective associations observed for anthocyanin intake were present in both current/former and never smokers. Compared with no or very low intakes, an intake of ≥2 servings of anthocyanin-rich blueberries/wk was associated with slower decline in FEV1 and FVC by 22.5 (95% CI: 10.8, 34.2) and 37.9 (95% CI: 22.1, 53.7) mL/y, respectively. To a lesser extent, higher flavan-3-ol intake was also associated with slower lung function decline. Conclusions: An attenuation of age-related lung function

  20. Abnormal Head Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Abnormal Head Position En Español Read in Chinese What is an abnormal head posture? An abnormal or compensatory head posture occurs ...

  1. What Makes Clusters Decline?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on regional clusters focus on identifying factors and processes that make clusters grow. However, sometimes technologies and market conditions suddenly shift, and clusters decline. This paper analyses the process of decline of the wireless communication cluster in Denmark. The longit...

  2. Relationships (II) of International Classification of High-resolution Computed Tomography for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases with ventilatory functions indices for parenchymal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Taro; Suganuma, Narufumi; Hering, Kurt G; Vehmas, Tapio; Itoh, Harumi; Akira, Masanori; Takashima, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Harukazu; Kusaka, Yukinori

    2015-01-01

    The International Classification of High-Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases (ICOERD) is used to screen and diagnose respiratory illnesses. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we investigated the relationship between subject characteristics and parenchymal abnormalities according to ICOERD, and the results of ventilatory function tests (VFT). Thirty-five patients with and 27 controls without mineral-dust exposure underwent VFT and HRCT. We recorded all subjects' occupational history for mineral dust exposure and smoking history. Experts independently assessed HRCT using the ICOERD parenchymal abnormalities (Items) grades for well-defined rounded opacities (RO), linear and/or irregular opacities (IR), and emphysema (EM). High-resolution computed tomography showed that 11 patients had RO; 15 patients, IR; and 19 patients, EM. According to the multiple regression model, age and height had significant associations with many indices ventilatory functions such as vital capacity, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The EM summed grades on the upper, middle, and lower zones of the right and left lungs also had significant associations with FEV1 and the maximum mid-expiratory flow rate. The results suggest the ICOERD notation is adequate based on the good and significant multiple regression modeling of ventilatory function with the EM summed grades.

  3. Tooth - abnormal colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  4. Urine - abnormal color

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  5. Abnormal uterine bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovulatory bleeding; Abnormal uterine bleeding - hormonal; Polymenorrhea - dysfunctional uterine bleeding ... ACOG committee opinion no. 557: Management of acute abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-aged women. Reaffirmed 2015. ACOG. ...

  6. US Historic Declination Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This programs derives a table of secular change in magnetic declination for a specified point in the conterminous United States. It utilizes the USD polynomial and...

  7. Declining job security

    OpenAIRE

    Robert G. Valletta

    1998-01-01

    Although common belief and recent evidence point to a decline in "job security," the academic literature to date has been noticeably silent regarding the behavioral underpinnings of declining job security. In this paper, I define job security in the context of implicit contracts designed to overcome incentive problems in the employment relationship. Contracts of this nature imply the possibility of inefficient separations in response to adverse shocks, and they generate predictions concerning...

  8. Abnormal mitochondrial function in locomotor and respiratory muscles of COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente-Maestu, L; Pérez-Parra, J; Godoy, R; Moreno, N; Tejedor, A; González-Aragoneses, F; Bravo, J-L; Alvarez, F Villar; Camaño, S; Agustí, A

    2009-05-01

    Several cellular and molecular alterations have been described in skeletal and respiratory muscles of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but information on potential abnormalities of mitochondrial function is scarce. The aim of the present study was to investigate mitochondrial function in the vastus lateralis (VL) and external intercostalis (EI) of COPD patients. Biopsies from VL and EI were obtained during surgery for lung cancer in 13 patients with mild to moderate COPD (age 68+/-6 yrs, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) 66+/-15% predicted) and 19 control subjects (age 67+/-9 yrs, FEV(1) 95+/-18% pred). State 3 and 4 mitochondrial oxygen consumption (V'(O(2),m)), ATP synthesis, citrate synthase, cytochrome oxidase (COX) and complex I-III activities, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, were determined. In COPD patients, in both muscles, COX activity (VL: COPD 3.0+/-0.8 versus control 2.0+/-0.8; EI: 3.7+/-1.6 versus 2.4+/-0.9 micromol min(-1) mg(-1)) and ROS production (VL: 1,643+/-290 versus 1,285+/-468; EI: 1,033+/-210 versus 848+/-288 arbitrary units) were increased, whereas state 3 V'(O(2),m) was reduced (VL: 2.9+/-0.3 versus 3.6+/-0.4; EI: 3.6+/-0.3 versus 4.1+/-0.4 mmol min(-1) kg(-1)). Skeletal muscle mitochondria of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease show electron transport chain blockade and excessive production of reactive oxygen species. The concurrent involvement of both vastus lateralis and external intercostalis suggests a systemic (rather than a local) mechanism(s) already occurring in relatively early stages (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage II) of the disease.

  9. Forest decline through radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichelt, G.; Kollert, R.

    1985-01-01

    Is more serious damage of forest observed in the vicinity of nuclear reactors. How are those decline patterns to be explained. Does the combined effect of radioactivity and different air pollutants (such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, oxidants etc.) have an influence in the decline of the forest. In what way do synergisms, i.e. mutually enhanced effects, participate. How does natural and artificial radioactivity affect the chemistry of air in the polluted atmosphere. What does this mean for the extension of nuclear energy, especially for the reprocessing plant planned. Damage in the forests near nuclear and industrial plants was mapped and the resulting hypotheses on possible emittors were statistically verified. Quantitative calculations as to the connection between nuclear energy and forest decline were carried through: they demand action. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Defining Abnormally Low Tenders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølykke, Grith Skovgaard; Nyström, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The concept of an abnormally low tender is not defined in EU public procurement law. This article takes an interdisciplinary law and economics approach to examine a dataset consisting of Swedish and Danish judgments and verdicts concerning the concept of an abnormally low tender. The purpose...

  11. Declining Black Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedder, Richard; Gallaway, Lowell

    1993-01-01

    Explores income inequality during declining African-American employment, examines current welfare systems, and suggests ways to improve the economic disadvantages of minority groups. Letting markets work can improve the economic status of African Americans. The present dual African-American economy, a market economy and an entitlement economy, is…

  12. Plant abnormality diagnosis device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Akira.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention diagnose an abnormal event occurred in a large-scaled plant, such as a nuclear power plant. The device comprises the following four functions. (1) Abnormality candidates are estimated based on an intelligence base storing characteristics established between the characteristics/functions and physical amounts of the plant components, and detected abnormality and measured values. Among the candidates, one which coincidents with the measured value such as an actual process amount is judged as a first cause. (2) In addition, a real time plant behavior is estimated based on parameters determining a plant operation mode. The candidate for the abnormality cause is estimated by the comparison between the result of the estimation and the measured value such as a process amount. (3) Characteristics established between the characteristics/functions and the physical amount of the plant components are structured stepwise thereby identifying the first abnormality cause. (4) Inactuated or failed portions of the components for restoring the abnormality to normal state are identified based on the intelligence base simultaneously with the estimation for the first abnormality cause. (I.S.)

  13. Chromosomal Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, and other cytogenetic abnormalities among 100 children (64 boys with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence was assessed at the NIMH and Georgetown University Medical Center.

  14. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  15. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  16. Abnormal sound detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Izumi; Matsui, Yuji.

    1995-01-01

    Only components synchronized with rotation of pumps are sampled from detected acoustic sounds, to judge the presence or absence of abnormality based on the magnitude of the synchronized components. A synchronized component sampling means can remove resonance sounds and other acoustic sounds generated at a synchronously with the rotation based on the knowledge that generated acoustic components in a normal state are a sort of resonance sounds and are not precisely synchronized with the number of rotation. On the other hand, abnormal sounds of a rotating body are often caused by compulsory force accompanying the rotation as a generation source, and the abnormal sounds can be detected by extracting only the rotation-synchronized components. Since components of normal acoustic sounds generated at present are discriminated from the detected sounds, reduction of the abnormal sounds due to a signal processing can be avoided and, as a result, abnormal sound detection sensitivity can be improved. Further, since it is adapted to discriminate the occurrence of the abnormal sound from the actually detected sounds, the other frequency components which are forecast but not generated actually are not removed, so that it is further effective for the improvement of detection sensitivity. (N.H.)

  17. Radiological abnormalities associated with Aspergillus colonization in a cystic fibrosis population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, Michelle A.; Chotirmall, Sanjay Haresh; McCullagh, Brian; Branagan, Peter; McElvaney, N.G.; Logan, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine if sputum colonization with Aspergillus species in patients with cystic fibrosis (PWCF) correlates with radiological abnormalities and/or a reduction in pulmonary function (FEV1). Methods: We prospectively evaluated 32 PWCF utilizing high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the thorax and pulmonary function testing (PFT). The cohort was assessed as two groups: Aspergillus positive (n = 16) and Aspergillus negative (n = 16) based on sputum culture for Aspergillus species. A modified Bhalla scoring system was applied to each HRCT scan by two blinded radiologists. Results: Aspergillus positive patients had more severe and significant bronchiectasis compared to those Aspergillus negative (p < 0.05). This was most marked in the right upper and lower lobes (RUL, RLL). Total Bhalla score was clinically significant in both groups and approached statistical significance between groups (p = 0.063). No difference in pulmonary function between the groups was detected. Conclusion: PWCF colonized by Aspergillus species have greater radiological abnormalities undetectable by PFTs. Early radiological evaluation of Aspergillus colonized PWCF is therefore warranted.

  18. Mangrove forest decline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malik, Abdul; Mertz, Ole; Fensholt, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    Mangrove forests in the tropics and subtropics grow in saline sediments in coastal and estuarine environments. Preservation of mangrove forests is important for many reasons, including the prevention of coastal erosion and seawater intrusion; the provision of spawning, nursery, and feeding grounds...... change in dense mangrove forest cover (8.37 %) occurred during the period 2006–2011. The changes were caused mainly by the mangrove clearing and conversion to aquaculture, and consequences have been increasing forest degradation, coastal abrasion, seawater intrusion, a decline in fish capture...

  19. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...

  20. CT of pleural abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    Briefly discussed were CT diagnosis of pleural thickening, CT technique for examining the pleura or pleuro-pulmonary disease, diagnosis of pleural collections, diagnosis of pleural fluid abnormalities in patients with pneumonia, pleural neoplasms, malignant (diffuse) mesothelioma, metastases, local fibrous tumor of the pleura (benign mesothelioma) (21 refs.)

  1. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farida El-Baz

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism. Farida El-Baz a. , Mohamed Saad Zaghloul a. , Ezzat El Sobky a. ,. Reham M Elhossiny a,. *, Heba Salah a. , Neveen Ezy Abdelaziz b a Pediatric Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt b Children with Special ...

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 predicts pulmonary status declines in α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rames Alexis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 may be important in the progression of emphysema, but there have been few longitudinal clinical studies of MMP-9 including pulmonary status and COPD exacerbation outcomes. Methods We utilized data from the placebo arm (n = 126 of a clinical trial of patients with alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD and emphysema to examine the links between plasma MMP-9 levels, pulmonary status, and COPD exacerbations over a one year observation period. Pulmonary function, computed tomography lung density, incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT, and COPD exacerbations were assessed at regular intervals over 12 months. Prospective analyses used generalized estimating equations to incorporate repeated longitudinal measurements of MMP-9 and all endpoints, controlling for age, gender, race-ethnicity, leukocyte count, and tobacco history. A secondary analysis also incorporated highly-sensitive C-reactive protein levels in predictive models. Results At baseline, higher plasma MMP-9 levels were cross-sectionally associated with lower FEV1 (p = 0.03, FVC (p Conclusions Increased plasma MMP-9 levels generally predicted pulmonary status declines, including worsening transfer factor and lung density as well as greater COPD exacerbations in AATD-associated emphysema.

  3. Migraine and structural abnormalities in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim is to provide an overview of recent studies of structural brain abnormalities in migraine and to discuss the potential clinical significance of their findings. RECENT FINDINGS: Brain structure continues to be a topic of extensive research in migraine. Despite advances...... in neuroimaging techniques, it is not yet clear if migraine is associated with grey matter changes. Recent large population-based studies sustain the notion of increased prevalence of white matter abnormalities in migraine, and possibly of silent infarct-like lesions. The clinical relevance of this association...... is not clear. Structural changes are not related to cognitive decline, but a link to an increased risk of stroke, especially in patients with aura, cannot be ruled out. SUMMARY: Migraine may be a risk factor for structural changes in the brain. It is not yet clear how factors such as migraine sub-type, attack...

  4. Equipment abnormality monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yasumasa

    1991-01-01

    When an operator hears sounds in a plantsite, the operator compares normal sounds of equipment which he previously heard and remembered with sounds he actually hears, to judge if they are normal or abnormal. According to the method, there is a worry that abnormal conditions can not be appropriately judged in a case where the number of objective equipments is increased and in a case that the sounds are changed gradually slightly. Then, the device of the present invention comprises a plurality of monitors for monitoring the operation sound of equipments, a recording/reproducing device for recording and reproducing the signals, a selection device for selecting the reproducing signals among the recorded signals, an acoustic device for converting the signals to sounds, a switching device for switching the signals to be transmitted to the acoustic device between to signals of the monitor and the recording/reproducing signals. The abnormality of the equipments can be determined easily by comparing the sounds representing the operation conditions of equipments for controlling the plant operation and the sounds recorded in their normal conditions. (N.H.)

  5. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  6. Abnormal glucose tolerance and lipid abnormalities in Indian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Discussion. Regardless of varying diagnostic classification, abnormal glucose tolerance is a well-documented risk factor. 16 Abnormalities in. Because ofthe small number offemale MI survivors, the effect of obesity and abnormal glucose tolerance on lipid levels was studied in the male patients only. There was no significant.

  7. Elevated circulating PAI-1 levels are related to lung function decline, systemic inflammation, and small airway obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Ting; Li, Diandian; Wu, Yanqiu; Zhang, Xue; Pang, Caishuang; Zhang, Junlong; Ying, Binwu; Wang, Tao; Wen, Fuqiang

    2016-01-01

    showed that FEV 1 /FVC, CRP, and TIMP-1 were independent parameters associated with PAI-1. Our findings first illustrate that elevated serum PAI-1 levels are related to the lung function decline, systemic inflammation, and SAO in COPD, suggesting that PAI-1 may play critical roles in the pathogenesis of COPD.

  8. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner of how a ...

  9. Rapid cognitive decline: not always Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, A; Ellis, R; Hywel, B; Davies, R R; Alusi, S H; Larner, A J

    2015-01-01

    A patient with rapidly progressive cognitive decline over an approximately four month period was suspected to have sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Features thought to support this diagnosis included psychiatric symptoms (anxiety and depression), visual hallucinations and a visual field defect. However, the finding of papilloedema broadened the differential diagnosis. Although standard brain imaging and electroencephalography had shown only non-specific abnormalities, subsequent cerebral angiography disclosed an intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula. Following embolisation, the patient made a good functional recovery. Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula merits consideration in any patient with subacute cognitive decline, and should be included in the differential diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

  10. Mobility decline in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rantakokko, Merja; Mänty, Minna Regina; Rantanen, Taina

    2013-01-01

    Mobility is important for community independence. With increasing age, underlying pathologies, genetic vulnerabilities, physiological and sensory impairments, and environmental barriers increase the risk for mobility decline. Understanding how mobility declines is paramount to finding ways...... to promote mobility in old age....

  11. [Penile congenital abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boillot, B; Teklali, Y; Moog, R; Droupy, S

    2013-07-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the penis are usually diagnosed at birth and pose aesthetic and functional problems sometimes requiring surgical management. A literature review was conducted on Medline considering the articles listed until January 2012. Hypospadias is the most common malformation (1 in 250 boys. Familial forms: 7%). The causes remain hypothetical but the doubling of the incidence in 30 years could be linked to fetal exposure to endocrine disruptors "estrogen-like" used in the food industry in particular. Surgical treatment is usually intended to improve the aesthetic appearance but sometimes, in case of significant curvature or posterior meatus, necessary for normal sexual life and fertility. Other malformations (epispades, buried penis, transpositions, twists and preputial abnormalities) as well as management for functional or aesthetic consequences of these malformations in adulthood require complex surgical care in a specialized environment. The improvement of surgical techniques and pediatric anesthesia allows an early and effective specialized surgical approach of penile malformations. Management of sequelae in adulthood must be discussed and requires experience of surgical techniques on pediatric and adult penis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Abnormal Gas Diffusing Capacity and Portosystemic Shunt in Patients With Chronic Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Moon-Seung; Lee, Min-Ho; Park, Yoo-Sin; Kim, Shin-Hee; Kwak, Min-Jung; Kang, Ju-Seop

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary dysfunctions including the hepatopulmonary syndrome and portosystemic shunt are important complications of hepatic cirrhosis. To investigate the severity and nature of abnormal gas diffusing capacity and its correlation to portosystemic shunt in patients with chronic liver disease. Methods Forty-four patients with chronic liver disease (15 chronic active hepatitis (CAH), 16 Child-Pugh class A, and 13 Child-Pugh class B) without other diseases history were enrolled in the study. Evaluation of liver function tests, arterial blood gases analysis, ultrasonography, pulmonary function test including lung diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (DLco), forced vital capacity(FVC), forced expiratory volume 1 seconds(FEV1), total lung capacity(TLC), DLco/AV(alveolar volume) and thallium-201 per rectum scintigraphy were performed. We were analyzed correlations between pulmonary function abnormalities and heart/liver (H/L) ratio in patients with chronic liver diseases. Results In CAH, percentage of patients with DLco and DLco/VA (Child-Pugh class A and B patients. The means of DLco and DLco/VA were significantly (P Child-Pugh class. The mean H/L ratio in Child-Pugh class B increased markedly (P Child-Pugh class A. The frequency of specific pulmonary function abnormality in patients with Child-Pugh class B was significantly (P Child-Pugh class A and CAH. There was a inverse linear correlation between H/L ratio and DLco (r = -0.339, P < 0.05) and DLco/VA (r = -0.480, P < 0.01). Conclusion A total of 62% of patients with advanced liver disease have abnormal pulmonary diffusion capacity with a reduced DLco or DLco/VA and abnormal portosystemic shunt (increased H/L ratio) is common hemodynamic abnormality. Therefore, inverse linear correlation between DLco or DLco/VA and H/L ratio may be an important factor in predicting pulmonary complication and meaningful diagnostic and prognostic parameters in patients with advanced chronic liver disease. PMID:27785203

  13. A novel scoring system to measure radiographic abnormalities and related spirometric values in cured pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Báez-Saldaña

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite chemotherapy, patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis may result in lung functional impairment. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a novel scoring system based on the degree of radiographic abnormalities and related spirometric values in patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: One hundred and twenty seven patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis were prospectively enrolled in a referral hospital specializing in respiratory diseases. Spirometry was performed and the extent of radiographic abnormalities was evaluated twice by each of two readers to generate a novel quantitative score. Scoring reproducibility was analyzed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC and the Bland-Altman method. Multiple linear regression models were performed to assess the association of the extent of radiographic abnormalities with spirometric values. RESULTS: The intra-observer agreement for scoring of radiographic abnormalities (SRA showed an ICC of 0.81 (CI:95%, 0.67-0.95 and 0.78 (CI:95%, 0.65-0.92, for reader 1 and 2, respectively. Inter-observer reproducibility for the first measurement was 0.83 (CI:95%, 0.71-0.95, and for the second measurement was 0.74 (CI:95%, 0.58-0.90. The Bland-Altman analysis of the intra-observer agreement showed a mean bias of 0.87% and -0.55% and an inter-observer agreement of -0.35% and -1.78%, indicating a minor average systematic variability. After adjustment for age, gender, height, smoking status, pack-years of smoking, and degree of dyspnea, the scoring degree of radiographic abnormalities was significantly and negatively associated with absolute and percent predicted values of FVC: -0.07 (CI:95%, -0.01 to -0.04; -2.48 (CI:95%, -3.45 to -1.50; and FEV1 -0.07 (CI:95%, -0.10 to -0.05; -2.92 (CI:95%, -3.87 to -1.97 respectively, in the patients studied. CONCLUSION: The extent of radiographic abnormalities, as evaluated through our novel scoring system, was inversely associated with spirometric values

  14. Genetic polymorphisms in antioxidative enzymes are associated to FEV(1) in smokers independently of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malling, T H; Sigsgaard, Torben; Andersen, Charlotte Brasch

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that the genotypes coding for low antioxidative enzyme activity are associated with asthma and reduced lung function. Using the ECRHS protocol, we enlisted 1,091 Danish subjects in this cross-sectional study. Asthma phenotypes were defined as asthma symptoms......), GSTT1 (gene copy number), and GSTM1 (gene copy number). We found no associations between these genotypes and the asthma phenotypes. For the 201 subjects identified as current smokers and recruited via random sampling, an association was seen between increasing number of genotypes coding for high...... of genotypes coding for low antioxidative enzyme activity. The present study does not support the hypothesis that asthma is associated with genotypes of these major antioxidative enzymes. However, we speculate that since we see an impact of these genotypes on lung function in young adult smokers, polymorphisms...

  15. Reference values for peak flow and FEV1 variation in healthy schoolchildren using home spirometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A. F. J.; Duiverman, E. J.; Brand, P. L. P.

    2008-01-01

    Current reference values for diurnal peak flow variation in healthy children (median 8.2%; 95th percentile 31%) are so high that considerable overlap exists with those of asthmatic children. These values have been obtained using written peak flow diaries, which are unreliable. The aim of the present

  16. Forced Expiratory Volume in 6 s (FEV 6 ) and FEV 1 /FEV 6 Values ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Values were recorded as mean (standard deviation), and also median and interquartile ranges. The one‑way analysis of variance, Mann–Whitey U and the Kruskal–Wallis were used to test for significance where applicable. P <0.05 were considered to be significant. Results: All the values were within normal range, but the ...

  17. Recent Honey Bee Colony Declines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Renee

    2007-01-01

    ...). Current reports indicate that beekeepers in 35 states have been affected. Recent surveys indicate that about one-half of surveyed beekeepers have experienced "abnormal" or "severe" colony losses...

  18. Recurrent miscarriage in translocation carriers : No differences in clinical characteristics between couples who accept and couples who decline PGD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Krom, G.; Arens, Y. H J M; Coonen, E.; Van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C. M A; Meijer-Hoogeveen, M.; Evers, J. L H; van Golde, Ron J T; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M

    2015-01-01

    Study question: Doclinical characteristics of recurrent miscarriage couples with a chromosomal abnormality and who opt for PGD differ from couples that decline PGD after extensive genetic counselling? Summary answer: No differences in clinical characteristics are identified between recurrent

  19. Recurrent miscarriage in translocation carriers : no differences in clinical characteristics between couples who accept and couples who decline PGD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Krom, G.; Arens, Y. H. J. M.; Coonen, E.; Van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C. M. A.; Meijer-Hoogeveen, M.; Evers, J. L. H.; Van Golde, R. J. T.; De Die-Smulders, C. E. M.

    STUDY QUESTION: Do clinical characteristics of recurrent miscarriage couples with a chromosomal abnormality and who opt for PGD differ from couples that decline PGD after extensive genetic counselling? SUMMARY ANSWER: No differences in clinical characteristics are identified between recurrent

  20. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  1. Strong families and declining fertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilevych, Yuliya

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the role of family and social relationships in individuals’ reproductive careers during the fertility decline in Soviet Ukraine from around 1950 to 1975. These three decades after the Second World War signified the end of the First Demographic Transition in Ukraine

  2. Do people fear population decline?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen, H.P.; Henkens, C.J.I.M.

    2011-01-01

    This week the world population is projected to reach seven billion. Yet in some countries the prospect of a decline in population is worrying policymakers far more. This columns asks what the people think, focusing on a survey from the Netherlands. It turns out that most people are in favour of

  3. French Wines on the Decline?:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Bodo

    2004-01-01

    French wines, differentiated by geographic origin, served for many decades as a basis for the French success in the British wine market. However in the early 1990s, market share began to decline. This article explores the values that market participants placed on labelling information on French...

  4. Strong families and declining fertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilevych, Yuliya

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the role of family and social relationships in individuals’ reproductive careers during the fertility decline in Soviet Ukraine from around 1950 to 1975. These three decades after the Second World War signified the end of the First Demographic Transition in Ukraine

  5. Somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Palmer, Shea; Learmonth, Ian D; Dieppe, Paul

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to use quantitative sensory testing (QST) to explore the range and prevalence of somatosensory abnormalities demonstrated by patients with advanced knee OA. One hundred and seven knee OA patients and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy participants attended a 1-h QST session. Testing was performed on the medial side of the knee and the pain-free forearm. Light-touch thresholds were assessed using von Frey filaments, pressure pain thresholds using a digital pressure algometer, and thermal sensation and pain thresholds using a Thermotest MSA. Significant differences in median threshold values from knee OA patients and healthy participants were identified using Mann-Whitney U-tests. The z-score transformations were used to determine the prevalence of the different somatosensory abnormalities in knee OA patients. Testing identified 70% of knee OA patients as having at least one somatosensory abnormality. Comparison of median threshold values between knee OA patients and healthy participants revealed that patients had localized thermal and tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia at the osteoarthritic knee. Tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia were also present at the pain-free forearm. The most prevalent somatosensory abnormalities were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia, evident in between 20 and 34% of patients. This study found that OA patients demonstrate an array of somatosensory abnormalities, of which the most prevalent were tactile hypoaesthesia and pressure hyperalgesia. Further research is now needed to establish the clinical implications of these somatosensory abnormalities.

  6. Energy consumption declined in 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    On presenting the energy consumption figures for 1993 the Minister for Economic Affairs of Baden-Wuerttemberg Dieter Spoeri (SPD) spoke of the eternal task of saving energy. In his view the slight decline in energy consumption from 1992 to 1993 should not be interpreted as a greater willingness to save energy; its main cause is rather to be seen in the course of the economy. According to estimations, total energy consumption fell 0.5% and electricity consumption 1.0% from 1992 to 1993. The economy on the other hand, still a decisive factor in energy consumption, is estimated to have declined 3% during that period. In the ten years from 1983 to 1993 total energy consumption in the Land rose an average annual 1.8% while electricity consumption kept astride with the economy with an average annual rise 2.7%, he said. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Cardiovascular Prevention of Cognitive Decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Jacques Monsuez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Midlife cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipemia, and an unhealthy lifestyle, have been linked to subsequent incidence, delay of onset, and progression rate of Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia. Conversely, optimal treatment of cardiovascular risk factors prevents and slows down age-related cognitive disorders. The impact of antihypertensive therapy on cognitive outcome in patients with hypertension was assessed in large trials which demonstrated a reduction in progression of MRI white matter hyperintensities, in cognitive decline and in incidence of dementia. Large-scale database correlated statin use and reduction in the incidence of dementia, mainly in patients with documented atherosclerosis, but clinical trials failed to reach similar conclusions. Whether a multitargeted intervention would substantially improve protection, quality of life, and reduce medical cost expenditures in patients with lower risk profile has not been ascertained. This would require appropriately designed trials targeting large populations and focusing on cognitive decline as a primary outcome endpoint.

  8. Recent Honey Bee Colony Declines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-20

    the scientists who are researching this phenomenon, include but may not be limited to ! parasites , mites, and disease loads in the bees and brood ...thrips; ants; butterflies; moths; bats; and hummingbirds and other birds . 2 Berenbaum, M.R., University of Illinois, Statement before the...bee population losses due to bee pests, parasites , pathogens, and disease. Most notable are declines due to two parasitic mites, the so-called

  9. Singapore’s Declining Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ethnic groups work . In addition, they get married later in life and had fewer children. What does a declining population mean for Singapore...other countries. BACKGROUND Since gaining independence, Singapore’s population has grown along with its economy . As Singapore’s gross domestic...in the country mean fewer consumers. Fewer people in the country also means there are less people to support the elderly. As the population ages

  10. Cognitive decline in Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarsland, Dag; Creese, Byron; Politis, Marios; Chaudhuri, K. Ray; ffytche, Dominic H.; Weintraub, Daniel; Ballard, Clive

    2017-01-01

    Dementia is a frequent problem encountered in advanced stages of Parkinson disease (PD). In recent years, research has focused on the pre-dementia stages of cognitive impairment in PD, including mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Several longitudinal studies have shown that MCI is a harbinger of dementia in PD, although the course is variable, and stabilization of cognition — or even reversal to normal cognition — is not uncommon. In addition to limbic and cortical spread of Lewy pathology, several other mechanisms are likely to contribute to cognitive decline in PD, and a variety of biomarker studies, some using novel structural and functional imaging techniques, have documented in vivo brain changes associated with cognitive impairment. The evidence consistently suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid levels of amyloid-β42, a marker of comorbid Alzheimer disease (AD), predict future cognitive decline and dementia in PD. Emerging genetic evidence indicates that in addition to the APOE*ε4 allele (an established risk factor for AD), GBA mutations and SCNA mutations and triplications are associated with cognitive decline in PD, whereas the findings are mixed for MAPT polymorphisms. Cognitive enhancing medications have some effect in PD dementia, but no convincing evidence that progression from MCI to dementia can be delayed or prevented is available, although cognitive training has shown promising results. PMID:28257128

  11. Pulmonary Gas Exchange Abnormalities in Mild Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Implications for Dyspnea and Exercise Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbehairy, Amany F; Ciavaglia, Casey E; Webb, Katherine A; Guenette, Jordan A; Jensen, Dennis; Mourad, Sahar M; Neder, J Alberto; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2015-06-15

    Several studies in mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have shown a higher than normal ventilatory equivalent for carbon dioxide ([Formula: see text]e/[Formula: see text]co2) during exercise. Our objective was to examine pulmonary gas exchange abnormalities and the mechanisms of high [Formula: see text]e/[Formula: see text]co2 in mild COPD and its impact on dyspnea and exercise intolerance. Twenty-two subjects (11 patients with GOLD [Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease] grade 1B COPD, 11 age-matched healthy control subjects) undertook physiological testing and a symptom-limited incremental cycle exercise test with arterial blood gas collection. Patients (post-bronchodilator FEV1: 94 ± 10% predicted; mean ± SD) had evidence of peripheral airway dysfunction and reduced peak oxygen uptake compared with control subjects (80 ± 18 vs. 113 ± 24% predicted; Pexercise. The alveolar-arterial O2 tension gradient was elevated at rest and throughout exercise in COPD (Ppatients with COPD than in control subjects during exercise. In patients with COPD versus control subjects, there was significant dynamic hyperinflation and greater tidal volume constraints (Ppatients with COPD versus control subjects in association with higher ventilatory requirements. Within all subjects, Vd/Vt correlated with the [Formula: see text]e/[Formula: see text]co2 ratio during submaximal exercise (r=0.780, Pexercise maintained alveolar ventilation and arterial blood gas homeostasis but at the expense of earlier dynamic mechanical constraints, greater dyspnea, and exercise intolerance in mild COPD.

  12. Pulmonary abnormalities and carotid atherosclerosis in ex-smokers without airflow limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Damien; Kirby, Miranda; Lindenmaier, Tamas J; Sheikh, Khadija; Neron, Casey E; Hackam, Daniel G; Spence, J David; Fenster, Aaron; Paterson, Nigel A M; Sin, Don D; Coxson, Harvey O; McCormack, David G; Parraga, Grace

    2015-02-01

    It is well-established that COPD patients have a burden of vascular disease that cannot be fully-explained by smoking history but the mechanistic links between atherosclerosis and pulmonary disease in COPD patients are not well-understood. Moreover, in ex-smokers without symptoms or other evidence of COPD, subclinical pulmonary and vascular disease, although potentially present, has not been described or evaluated. Hence our aim was to use sensitive three-dimensional (3D) pulmonary and carotid imaging to quantify pulmonary airway/parenchyma abnormalities and atherosclerosis in ex-smokers without airflow limitation or symptoms consistent with COPD. We evaluated 61 subjects without airflow limitation including 34 never- (72 ± 6 years) and 27 ex-smokers (73 ± 9 years), who provided written informed consent to spirometry, plethysmography, (3)He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and carotid ultrasound (US) and, for ex-smokers alone, thoracic X-ray computed tomography (CT). Ex-smokers had significantly greater (3)He ventilation defect percent (VDP = 7%, p = 0.001) and carotid total plaque volume (TPV = 250 mm(3), p = 0.002) than never-smokers, although there were no significant differences for spirometry or plethysmography, and CT airway and emphysema measurements were normal. There were univariate relationships for (3)He VDP with carotid intima media thickness (IMT, r = 0.42, p = 0.004), TPV (r = 0.41, p = 0.006) and vessel wall volume (VWV, r = 0.40, p = 0.007). Multivariate models that included age, BMI, FEV1, DLCO and VDP showed that only VDP significantly predicted IMT (β = 0.41, p = 0.001), VWV (β = 0.45, p = 0.003) and TPV (β = 0.38, p = 0.005). In summary, there was imaging evidence of mild airways disease and carotid plaque burden that were related and significantly greater in ex-smokers without airflow limitation than in never-smokers.

  13. The fertility decline in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, W C; Harbison, S F

    1995-01-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa Kenya is a prime example of a country experiencing a rapid decline in fertility and greater contraceptive prevalence. These changes have occurred since 1980 when fertility was high at 8.0 children per woman. In 1993 the total fertility rate (TFR) was 5.4, and the growth rate declined to about 2.0%. This transition is swifter than any country in contemporary Asia or historical Europe. The likely projection for Kenya is attainment of replacement level fertility during the 2020s and a leveling of population at about 100 million persons. Fertility has declined the most in urban areas and central and eastern regions. Bongaarts' proximate determinants (TFR, total marital fertility rate, total natural marital fertility rate, and total fecundity) are reduced to the proportion of currently married women using contraception, the proportion in lactational nonfecund status, and the proportion currently married. Actual fertility change is accounted for by total fertility change of 3.0 children. Lactational infecundability accounts for 0.5 potential births, and changes in marital fertility account for 1.0 reduced births per woman. About 70% of fertility reduction is accounted for by contraception and abortion. During 1977-78 80% of fertility control was due to lactational nonfecundity, 10% to nonmarriage, and 10% to contraception. In 1993 lactational nonfecundity accounted for 50% of the reduction, nonmarriage for 20%, and abortion about 30%. Future fertility is expected to be dependent on contraceptive prevalence. Kenya has experienced the Coale paradigm of preconditions necessary for demographic transition (willing, ready, and able). High fertility in Africa is not intractable. Creating the change in attitudes that leads to readiness is linked to education, health, and exposure to modernizing media and urban lifestyles. The public sector family planning program in Kenya has created the opportunity for access and availability of contraception. The key

  14. Neuroimaging abnormalities in Griscelli's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarper, Nazan; Akansel, Guer; Aydogan, Metin; Gedikbasi, Demet; Babaoglu, Kadir; Goekalp, Ayse Sevim

    2002-01-01

    Griscelli's disease is a rare autosomal recessive immunodeficiency syndrome. We report a 7-1/2-month-old white girl who presented with this syndrome, but initially without neurological abnormalities. Initial CT of the brain was normal. Despite haematological remission with chemotherapy, she developed neurological symptoms, progressing to coma. At this time, CT showed areas of coarse calcification in the globi pallidi, left parietal white matter and left brachium pontis. Hypodense areas were present in the genu and posterior limb of the internal capsule on the right side, as well as posterior aspects of both thalami, together with minimal generalised atrophy. MRI revealed areas of increased T2 signal and a focal area of abnormal enhancement in the subcortical white matter. Griscelli's disease should be added to the list of acquired neuroimaging abnormalities in infants. (orig.)

  15. Triorchidism: A Rare Genitourinary Abnormality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During early adulthood it will be carried out by palpation, ultrasonography, semen analysis, serum testosterone and follicle stimulating hormone levels and during late adulthood follow up will be done by ultrasonography for malignancy every 2 years. CONCLUSION. Polyorchidism is a rare genitourinary abnormality and its.

  16. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping

    2007-03-01

    Fetuses with omphalocele have an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with umbilical cord cysts, complexity of associated anomalies, and the contents of omphalocele. There is considerable evidence that genetics contributes to the etiology of omphalocele. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele and a comprehensive review of associated full aneuploidy such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploidy, trisomy 21, 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XXX, partial aneuploidy such as dup (3q), dup (11p), inv (11), dup (1q), del (1q), dup (4q), dup (5p), dup (6q), del (9p), dup (15q), dup(17q), Pallister-Killian syndrome with mosaic tetrasomy 12p and Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome with deletion of 17p13.3, and uniparental disomy (UPD) such as UPD 11 and UPD 14. Omphalocele is a prominent marker for chromosomal abnormalities. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert chromosomal abnormalities and familial unbalanced translocations, and prompt thorough cytogenetic investigations and genetic counseling.

  17. Chromosomal Abnormalities Associated With Omphalocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses with omphalocele have an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with umbilical cord cysts, complexity of associated anomalies, and the contents of omphalocele. There is considerable evidence that genetics contributes to the etiology of omphalocele. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele and a comprehensive review of associated full aneuploidy such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploidy, trisomy 21, 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XXX, partial aneuploidy such as dup(3q, dup(11p, inv(11, dup(1q, del(1q, dup(4q, dup(5p, dup(6q, del(9p, dup(15q, dup(17q, Pallister-Killian syndrome with mosaic tetrasomy 12p and Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome with deletion of 17p13.3, and uniparental disomy (UPD such as UPD 11 and UPD 14. Omphalocele is a prominent marker for chromosomal abnormalities. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert chromosomal abnormalities and familial unbalanced translocations, and prompt thorough cytogenetic investigations and genetic counseling.

  18. Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative outcomes in neonates with acute surgical conditions in Alexandria, Egypt. HL Wella, SMM Farahat. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals ...

  19. Who fears and who welcomes population decline?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik P. Van Dalen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available European countries are experiencing population decline and the tacit assumption in most analyses is that the decline may have detrimental welfare effects. In this paper we use a survey among the population in the Netherlands to discover whether population decline is always met with fear. A number of results stand out: population size preferences differ by geographic proximity: at a global level the majority of respondents favors a (global population decline, but closer to home one supports a stationary population. Population decline is clearly not always met with fear: 31 percent would like the population to decline at the national level and they generally perceive decline to be accompanied by immaterial welfare gains (improvement environment as well as material welfare losses (tax increases, economic stagnation. In addition to these driving forces it appears that the attitude towards immigrants is a very strong determinant at all geographical levels: immigrants seem to be a stronger fear factor than population decline.

  20. Decline in breast cancer mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njor, Sisse Helle; Schwartz, Walter; Blichert-Toft, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Funen/rest of Denmark. As multidisciplinary teams were introduced gradually in the rest of Denmark from 1994, the screening effect was slightly underestimated. RESULTS: Over 14 years, women targeted by screening in Funen experienced a 22% (95% confidence interval 11%-32%) reduction in breast cancer......OBJECTIVES: When estimating the decline in breast cancer mortality attributable to screening, the challenge is to provide valid comparison groups and to distinguish the screening effect from other effects. In Funen, Denmark, multidisciplinary breast cancer management teams started before screening...... was introduced; both activities came later in the rest of Denmark. Because Denmark had national protocols for breast cancer treatment, but hardly any opportunistic screening, Funen formed a "natural experiment", providing valid comparison groups and enabling the separation of the effect of screening from other...

  1. Are snake populations in widespread decline?

    OpenAIRE

    Reading, C. J.; Luiselli, L. M.; Akani, G. C.; Bonnet, X.; Amori, G.; Ballouard, J. M.; Filippi, E.; Naulleau, G.; Pearson, D.; Rugiero, L.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term studies have revealed population declines in fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. In birds, and particularly amphibians, these declines are a global phenomenon whose causes are often unclear. Among reptiles, snakes are top predators and therefore a decline in their numbers may have serious consequences for the functioning of many ecosystems. Our results show that, of 17 snake populations (eight species) from the UK, France, Italy, Nigeria and Australia, 11 have declined ...

  2. Novel Method of Production Decline Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shan; Lan, Yifei; He, Lei; Jiao, Yang; Wu, Yong

    2018-02-01

    ARPS decline curves is the most commonly used in oil and gas field due to its minimal data requirements and ease application. And prediction of production decline which is based on ARPS analysis rely on known decline type. However, when coefficient index are very approximate under different decline type, it is difficult to directly recognize decline trend of matched curves. Due to difficulties above, based on simulation results of multi-factor response experiments, a new dynamic decline prediction model is introduced with using multiple linear regression of influence factors. First of all, according to study of effect factors of production decline, interaction experimental schemes are designed. Based on simulated results, annual decline rate is predicted by decline model. Moreover, the new method is applied in A gas filed of Ordos Basin as example to illustrate reliability. The result commit that the new model can directly predict decline tendency without needing recognize decline style. From arithmetic aspect, it also take advantage of high veracity. Finally, the new method improves the evaluation method of gas well production decline in low permeability gas reservoir, which also provides technical support for further understanding of tight gas field development laws.

  3. Echocardiographic abnormalities in hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodulfo Garcia, Maikel; Tornes Perez, Victor Manuel; Castellanos Tardo, Juan Ramon

    2012-01-01

    A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in 120 hypertensive patients with a course of 5 or more years, who went to the emergency room of 'Saturnino Lora' Provincial Teaching Hospital from November 2010 to November 2011 in order to determine the presence or absence of echocardiographic abnormalities typical of hypertension. Of these, 78,3 % was affected, most of whom reported not to continue with regular previous medical treatment, and 21,7 % had not these abnormalities. Age group of 50-60 years, males and blacks prevailed in the case material. The most significant echocardiographic findings were left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure with ejection fraction of left ventricle preserved

  4. Glial abnormalities in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öngür, Dost; Bechtholt, Anita J; Carlezon, William A; Cohen, Bruce M

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that mood disorders are associated with abnormalities in the brain's cellular composition, especially in glial cells. Considered inert support cells in the past, glial cells are now known to be important for brain function. Treatments for mood disorders enhance glial cell proliferation, and experimental stimulation of cell growth has antidepressant effects in animal models of mood disorders. These findings suggest that the proliferation and survival of glial cells may be important in the pathogenesis of mood disorders and may be possible targets for the development of new treatments. In this article we review the evidence for glial abnormalities in mood disorders, and we discuss glial cell biology and evidence from postmortem studies of mood disorders. The goal is not to carry out a comprehensive review but to selectively discuss existing evidence in support of an argument for the role of glial cells in mood disorders.

  5. Abnormal Metabolite in Alcoholic Subjects,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    0.01 0.12 81 A.A. 51 M 0 ɘ.01 0.09 Schizophrenia 85a W.G. 67 M 0 ɘ.01 0.21 Proteins & Ketones in Urine b 0 ɘ.01 0.11 86a W.H. 67 M 0 ɘ.01 0.15 b 0...AD-AS 90 TOTTS GAP MEDICAL RESEARCH LABS INC BANGOR PA F/G 6/5 ABNORMAL METABOLITE IN ALCOHOLIC SUBJECTS, U) 1982 R L BEECH, M E FELVER, M R...LAKSCHMANAN NOOBIN 70 C 0233 UNJCLASSIFIED NL I ,I/ ABNORMAL METABOLITE IN ALCOHOLIC SUBJECTS Richard L . Veech, Michael E. Felver, M.R. Lakschmanan, Stewart

  6. Lung-function trajectories leading to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Celli, B.; Agustí, A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is thought to result from an accelerated decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) over time. Yet it is possible that a normal decline in FEV1 could also lead to COPD in persons whose maximally attained FEV1 is less than popula...

  7. Computed tomography abnormalities in hanging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, F.; Floris, R.

    1987-01-01

    The CT pattern of bilateral and symmetrical round low density areas in the globi pallidi has been observed in a young man who attempted suicide by hanging. These CT abnormalities are similar to those described in other conditions such as carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide, cyanide and methanol poisoning, hypoglycaemia, drowning and acute global central nervous system hypoperfusion.The findings appear to be correlated with acute cerebral hypoxia. (orig.)

  8. GLIAL ABNORMALITIES IN MOOD DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Öngür, Dost; Bechtholt, Anita J.; Carlezon, William A.; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that mood disorders are associated with abnormalities in the brain's cellular composition, especially in glial cells. Considered inert support cells in the past, glial cells are now known to be important for brain function. Treatments for mood disorders enhance glial cell proliferation, and experimental stimulation of cell growth has antidepressant effects in animal models of mood disorders. These findings suggest that the proliferation and survival of glia...

  9. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Roizen, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development. (orig.)

  10. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Roizen, N.J.

    1989-06-01

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development.

  11. Abnormal uterine bleeding in perimenopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, S R; Lumsden, M A

    2017-10-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the commonest presenting complaints encountered in a gynecologist's office or primary-care setting. The wider availability of diagnostic tools has allowed prompt diagnosis and treatment of an increasing number of menstrual disorders in an office setting. This White Paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of transvaginal ultrasound, blind endometrial sampling and diagnostic hysteroscopy. Once a proper diagnosis has been established, appropriate therapy may be embarked upon. Fortunately, only a minority of such patients will have premalignant or malignant disease. When bleeding is sufficient to cause severe anemia or even hypovolemia, prompt intervention is called for. In most of the cases, however, the abnormal uterine bleeding will be disquieting to the patient and significantly affect her 'quality of life'. Sometimes, reassurance and expectant management will be sufficient in such patients. Overall, however, in cases of benign disease, some intervention will be required. The use of oral contraceptive pills especially those with a short hormone-free interval, the insertion of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system, the incorporation of newer medical therapies including antifibrinolytic drugs and selective progesterone receptor modulators and minimally invasive treatments have made outpatient therapy increasingly effective. For others, operative hysteroscopy and endometrial ablation are proven therapeutic tools to provide both long- and short-term relief of abnormal uterine bleeding, thus avoiding, or deferring, hysterectomy.

  12. Functional decline in older patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy: A multicenter prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenis, Cindy; Decoster, Lore; Bastin, Julie; Bode, Hannelore; Van Puyvelde, Katrien; De Grève, Jacques; Conings, Godelieve; Fagard, Katleen; Flamaing, Johan; Milisen, Koen; Lobelle, Jean-Pierre; Wildiers, Hans

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to evaluate the evolution of functional status (FS) 2 to 3months after initiation of chemotherapy, to identify factors associated with functional decline during chemotherapy treatment and to investigate the prognostic value of functional decline for overall survival (OS). Patients ≥70years with a malignant tumor were included when chemotherapy was initiated. All patients underwent a geriatric assessment (GA) including FS measured by Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL). FS of patients was followed by repeating ADL and IADL to identify functional decline. From 10/2009 until 07/2011, 439 patients were included. At follow-up, ADL and IADL data were available for 387 patients. Functional decline in ADL and IADL was observed in 19.9% and 41.3% of the patients respectively. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, baseline factors associated with decline in ADL are abnormal nutritional status (OR:2.02) and IADL dependency (OR:1.76). Oncological setting (disease progression/relapse vs new diagnosis) (OR:0.59) is the only determinant of decline in IADL. Functional decline in ADL is strongly prognostic for OS (logrank p-valuepatients with cancer receiving chemotherapy and is associated with GA components. It strongly predicts survival, the most prominent for ADL. This knowledge can be used to identify older persons with cancer receiving chemotherapy eligible for interventions to prevent functional decline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Elevated circulating PAI-1 levels are related to lung function decline, systemic inflammation, and small airway obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang H

    2016-09-01

    correlation analysis showed that circulating PAI-1 was inversely correlated with pulmonary function parameters including the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC, FEV1/Pre (justified r=-0.308, P<0.001; justified r=-0.295, P=0.001, respectively and SAO indicators such as FEV3/FVC, MMEF25–75/Pre (justified r=-0.289, P=0.001; justified r=-0.273, P=0.002, respectively, but positively related to the inflammatory marker CRP (justified r=0.351, P<0.001, the small airway remolding biomarker TIMP-1, and MMP-9 (justified r=0.498, P<0.001; justified r=0.267, P=0.002, respectively. Besides, multivariable linear analysis showed that FEV1/FVC, CRP, and TIMP-1 were independent parameters associated with PAI-1. Conclusion: Our findings first illustrate that elevated serum PAI-1 levels are related to the lung function decline, systemic inflammation, and SAO in COPD, suggesting that PAI-1 may play critical roles in the pathogenesis of COPD. Keywords: plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, systemic inflammation, small airway obstruction (SAO

  14. Abnormal thermography in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio-Rubio, I; Madrid-Navarro, C J; Salazar-López, E; Pérez-Navarro, M J; Sáez-Zea, C; Gómez-Milán, E; Mínguez-Castellanos, A; Escamilla-Sevilla, F

    2015-08-01

    An autonomic denervation and abnormal vasomotor reflex in the skin have been described in Parkinson's disease (PD) and might be evaluable using thermography with cold stress test. A cross-sectional pilot study was undertaken in 35 adults: 15 patients with PD and abnormal [(123)I]-metaiodobenzylguanidine cardiac scintigraphy and 20 healthy controls. Baseline thermography of both hands was obtained before immersing one in cold water (3 ± 1 °C) for 2 min. Continuous thermography was performed in: non-immersed hand (right or with lesser motor involvement) during immersion of the contralateral hand and for 6 min afterward; and contralateral immersed hand for 6 min post-immersion. The region of interest was the dorsal skin of the third finger, distal phalanx. PD patients showed a lower mean baseline hand temperature (p = 0.037) and greater thermal difference between dorsum of wrist and third finger (p = 0.036) and between hands (p = 0.0001) versus controls, regardless of the motor laterality. Both tests evidenced an adequate capacity to differentiate between groups: in the non-immersed hand, the PD patients did not show the normal cooling pattern or final thermal overshoot observed in controls (F = 5.29; p = 0.001), and there was an AUC of 0.897 (95%CI 0.796-0.998) for this cooling; in the immersed hand, thermal recovery at 6 min post-immersion was lesser in patients (29 ± 17% vs. 55 ± 28%, p = 0.002), with an AUC of 0.810 (95%CI 0.662-0.958). PD patients reveal abnormal skin thermal responses in thermography with cold stress test, suggesting cutaneous autonomic dysfunction. This simple technique may be useful to evaluate autonomic dysfunction in PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lesion? • What are the different types of abnormal Pap test results? • What testing is needed after an abnormal ... that could lead to cancer. Screening includes the Pap test and, for some women, testing for a virus ...

  16. Cognitive Issues: Decline, Delirium, Depression, Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Melodee

    2017-09-01

    Cognitive decline in older persons can be pathologic or occur as a part of the normal aging process. Delirium, depression, and dementia are geriatric syndromes and neurocognitive disorders that are the result of cognitive decline associated with pathology. This overview is a brief guide on cognitive decline and how to identify, manage, and treat associated neurocognitive disorders, including delirium, depression, and dementia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The paradox of declining female happiness

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Betsey; Wolfers, Justin

    2009-01-01

    By many objective measures the lives of women in the United States have improved over the past 35 years, yet we show that measures of subjective well-being indicate that women's happiness has declined both absolutely and relative to men. The paradox of women's declining relative well-being is found across various datasets, measures of subjective well-being, and is pervasive across demographic groups and industrialized countries. Relative declines in female happiness have eroded a gender gap i...

  18. MR imaging of abnormal synovial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, S.F.; Sanchez, R.; Murray, W.T.; Silbiger, M.L.; Ogden, J.; Cochran, C.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging can directly image abnormal synovium. The authors reviewed over 50 cases with abnormal synovial processes. The abnormalities include Baker cysts, semimembranous bursitis, chronic shoulder bursitis, peroneal tendon ganglion cyst, periarticular abscesses, thickened synovium from rheumatoid and septic arthritis, and synovial hypertrophy secondary to Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. MR imaging has proved invaluable in identifying abnormal synovium, defining the extent and, to a limited degree, characterizing its makeup

  19. Abnormal visuomotor processing in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siân E. Robson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subtle disturbances of visual and motor function are known features of schizophrenia and can greatly impact quality of life; however, few studies investigate these abnormalities using simple visuomotor stimuli. In healthy people, electrophysiological data show that beta band oscillations in sensorimotor cortex decrease during movement execution (event-related beta desynchronisation (ERBD, then increase above baseline for a short time after the movement (post-movement beta rebound (PMBR; whilst in visual cortex, gamma oscillations are increased throughout stimulus presentation. In this study, we used a self-paced visuomotor paradigm and magnetoencephalography (MEG to contrast these responses in patients with schizophrenia and control volunteers. We found significant reductions in the peak-to-peak change in amplitude from ERBD to PMBR in schizophrenia compared with controls. This effect was strongest in patients who made fewer movements, whereas beta was not modulated by movement in controls. There was no significant difference in the amplitude of visual gamma between patients and controls. These data demonstrate that clear abnormalities in basic sensorimotor processing in schizophrenia can be observed using a very simple MEG paradigm.

  20. Operator training for the abnormal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzec, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    Training of nuclear power plant control room operators, on actions to be taken for an abnormal event, has classically been limited to discussion, on-shift and/or during requalification training classes, of symptoms, logical thought processes, systems analysis, and operator experience. The prerequisites for these discussions are a common technical vocabulary, and a minimum basic comprehension of nuclear power plant fundamentals, plant component theory of operation, system configuration, system control philosophy and operating procedures. Nuclear power plant control room operators are not the only personnel who are or should be involved in these discussions. The shift supervisors, operations management, and auxiliary equipment operators require continuing training in abnormal operations, as well. More in-depth training is necessary for shift supervisors and control room operators. The availability of vendor simulators has improved the effectiveness of training efforts for these individuals to some extent by displaying typical situations and plant performance characteristics and by providing a degree of ''hands on'' experience. The evolution of in-depth training with these simulators is reviewed

  1. Abnormal Event Detection Using Local Sparse Representation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Huamin; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    We propose to detect abnormal events via a sparse subspace clustering algorithm. Unlike most existing approaches, which search for optimized normal bases and detect abnormality based on least square error or reconstruction error from the learned normal patterns, we propose an abnormality...... measurement based on the difference between the normal space and local space. Specifically, we provide a reasonable normal bases through repeated K spectral clustering. Then for each testing feature we first use temporal neighbors to form a local space. An abnormal event is found if any abnormal feature...

  2. Amphibian decline in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debra A. Patla; Charles R. Peterson; Paul Stephen Corn

    2009-01-01

    We conduct long-term amphibian monitoring in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) (1) and read McMenamin et al.'s article (2) with interest. This study documents decline in the extent of seasonal wetlands in the Lamar Valley of YNP during extended drought, but the conclusion, widely reported in the media, of "severe declines in 4 once-common amphibian species,...

  3. The Decline of Black Farming in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Pamela; And Others

    The rapid decline in the number of farms operated by blacks in the United States, and the consequences of this decline on the conditions of black farmers are the focus of this report. Chapter 1 compares the rate of agricultural land loss from 1900 to 1978 among blacks and whites. Chapter 2 outlines historical conditions, such as racism, lack of…

  4. Forest declines in response to environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip M. Wargo; Allan N.D. Auclair

    2000-01-01

    Decline diseases are intimately linked to stress and environmental change. There is strong evidence that, as a category, decline diseases have increased significantly in response to the climate, air chemistry, and other changes documented in the northeastern United States over the past century, and particularly the last two decades. No other forest response to...

  5. Reversing Africa's Decline. Worldwatch Paper 65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lester R.; Wolf, Edward C.

    This paper highlights some of the themes that any successful strategy to reverse the decline of Africa must embrace. Africa is a continent experiencing a breakdown in the relationship between people and their natural support systems. Famine and the threat of famine are among the manifestations of this breakdown. This decline can be reversed. To do…

  6. NIDI scenario. Strong population decline in China

    OpenAIRE

    de Beer, J.A.A.

    2016-01-01

    United Nations projections assume that by the end of this century one third of the world population will live in India, China or Nigeria. While population growth in India will slow down and the population size of China will decline, population growth in Nigeria will accelerate. A new NIDI scenario projects less population growth in Nigeria and sharp population decline in China.

  7. Decline of Ohia Lehua forests in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Burgan; Robert E. Nelson

    1972-01-01

    Thousands of acres of ohia lehua (Metrosidems collina) forests on the island of Hawaii have died, and tree death is progressing rapidly into healthy forests. Most of the losses are on State-owned lands. All of the "ohia decline" cannot be attributed to the same agent. Some of the earlier decline was attributed to frost and sulphur dioxide....

  8. Comprometimento respiratório secundário a acidente ofídico crotálico (Crotalus durissus Respiratory abnormalities following Crotalus durissus snakebite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Faria Santos Amaral

    1991-08-01

    restritivo. O comprometimento respiratório nestes pacientes foi atribuído à ação da crotoxina na musculatura respiratória desde que não se encontravam presentes outras condições etiológicas que pudessem ocasioná-lo como uremia avançada, atelectasias, infecção pulmonar, hipopotassemia, congestão e edema pulmonar agudo.Three patients presented respiratory abnormalities following Crotalus durissus snakebite. These abnormalities appeared in the first 48 h after the snake bite and consisted of dyspnea, tachypnea, use of accessory muscles of respiration (cases 1 and 2 and flaring of the nostrils (case 2. Cases 1 and 2 developed acute respiratory failure. Case 2, 24 h after the snakebite presented difficult breathing and periods of apnea. He was intubated in the emergency room and transferred to the intensive case unit where he arrive with spontaneous breathing. His respiratory pattern worsened and measurement of arterial pH and blood gases showed metabolic and respiratory acidosis with partial carbon dioxide pressure increasing from 40 to 50,3 mmHg compatible with acute ventilatory failure. Both patients needed mechanical ventilation. Weaning from the ventilator was accomplished after 33 days in case 1 and after 15 days in case 2. Both patients also presented acute renal failure treated with peritoneal dialysis with full recovery of the renal function. Measurements of forced vital capacity (FVC and forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV 1.0 was carried out 58 hours after the snakebite in case 3. Both FVC and FEV 1.0 were reduced in relation to the predicted values (60 and 67% respectively but the ratio FEV 1.0/FVC was in the normal range. These findings were compatible with a restrictive pattern of ventilatory failure. Serial measurements showed progressive increase of both FVC and FEV 1.0 reaching 72 and 79% of the predicted values, respectively, in the 10 th day after the snakebite. Case 1 developed deep coma attributed to cerebral hypoxia suffered

  9. Are snake populations in widespread decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, C J; Luiselli, L M; Akani, G C; Bonnet, X; Amori, G; Ballouard, J M; Filippi, E; Naulleau, G; Pearson, D; Rugiero, L

    2010-12-23

    Long-term studies have revealed population declines in fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. In birds, and particularly amphibians, these declines are a global phenomenon whose causes are often unclear. Among reptiles, snakes are top predators and therefore a decline in their numbers may have serious consequences for the functioning of many ecosystems. Our results show that, of 17 snake populations (eight species) from the UK, France, Italy, Nigeria and Australia, 11 have declined sharply over the same relatively short period of time with five remaining stable and one showing signs of a marginal increase. Although the causes of these declines are currently unknown, we suspect that they are multi-faceted (such as habitat quality deterioration, prey availability), and with a common cause, e.g. global climate change, at their root.

  10. Abnormal Returns and Contrarian Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Dall'Agnol

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We test the hypothesis that strategies which are long on portfolios of looser stocks and short on portfolios of winner stocks generate abnormal returns in Brazil. This type of evidence for the US stock market was interpreted by The Bondt and Thaler (1985 as reflecting systematic evaluation mistakes caused by investors overreaction to news related to the firm performance. We found evidence of contrarian strategies profitability for horizons from 3 months to 3 years in a sample of stock returns from BOVESPA and SOMA from 1986 to 2000. The strategies are more profitable for shorter horizons. Therefore, there was no trace of the momentum effect found by Jagadeesh and Titman (1993 for the same horizons with US data. There are remaing unexplained positive returns for contrarian strategies after accounting for risk, size, and liquidity. We also found that the strategy profitability is reduced after the Real Plan, which suggests that the Brazilian stock market became more efficient after inflation stabilization.

  11. Frequency of ECG abnormalities in patients of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease accordigng to disease severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabbir, A.; Zaidi, S. B. H.; Nisar, S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to find out the frequency of ECG abnormalities in patients of COPD in relation to disease severity. Study Design: Cross Sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was carried out at the Department of Medicine, Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Oct 2011 to Jun 2012. Material and Methods: All patients presenting to the Department of Medicine both inpatient and outpatient, with diagnosis of COPD were included in the study. Patients with cardiac comorbidities were excluded. Also, patients on diuretics and long term oxygen therapy were excluded. A total of three hundred and forty three patients (343) were included in the study. Spirometry of all these patients was done to determine the FEV1 and FVC in order to classify the grade of severity of COPD. Standard 12 lead ECG of all these patients was done to find out the various ECG abnormalities. Results: About 77 (22.5 percent) patients had mild COPD, while moderate COPD was seen in 121 (35.3 percent). Severe COPD was seen in 100 (29.2 percent) patients and very severe COPD was seen in 45 (13.1 percent) patients. The most common ECG abnormalities noted was right atrial enlargement (RAE) in 6 (7.8 percent) patients of mild COPD, 27 (22.3 percent) patients of moderate, 48 (48 percent) patients of severe and 24 (53.3 percent) patients of very severe COPD. Right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) in 1 (1.3 percent) patient of mild, 7 (5.8 percent) patients of moderate, 19 (19 percent) patients of severe and 12 (26.7 percent) patients of very severe COPD. Sinus tachycardia was present in 6 (7.8 percent) patients of mild, 17 (14 percent) patients of moderate, 19 (19 percent) patients of severe and 10 (22.2 percent) patients of very severe COPD. Right bundle branch block (RBBB) was seen in 5 (6.5 percent) patients of mild, 9 (7.4 percent) patients of moderate, 13 (13 percent) patients of severe and 9 (20 percent) patients of very severe COPD. SVT was present in 1 (1.3 percent

  12. PREVALENCE OF CARDIAC ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH HIV IN THANJAVUR MEDICAL COLLEGE AND HOSPITAL, THANJAVUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sundararajan

    2017-08-01

    with cardiac abnormalities did not necessarily have cardiac symptoms and the frequency of cardiac symptoms did not correlate with the stage of infection in this study. Cardiac symptoms in HIV infected individuals are likely to be attributed to other concurrent illnesses and the cardiac abnormalities remain undiagnosed further contributing to the morbidity and mortality of HIV patients. Cardiac abnormalities correlated with the increase in the duration of infection and the decline in CD4 count.

  13. Electrical and magnetic properties of (BiNa)1/2(FeV)1/2O3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BNT) (Hosono et al 2001) is consi- dered to be one of the promising candidates ... at different temperatures. The sintered pellets were polished by a fine emery paper to make both the faces flat and para- llel. For electrical characterization, the flat ...

  14. Electrical and magnetic properties of (BiNa)1/2(FeV)1/2O3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electrical properties were investigated in a frequency range (1 kHz–1 MHz) by complex impedance spectroscopy (CIS) technique. The material showed negative temperature coefficient of resis- tance (NTCR) reflecting semiconductor behaviour. A.C. conductivity was found to obey Johnscher's law. Conducti- vity mechanism ...

  15. Using the lower limit of normal for the FEV(1)/FVC ratio reduces the misclassification of airway obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swanney, M. P.; Ruppel, G.; Enright, P. L.; Pedersen, O. F.; Crapo, R. O.; Miller, M. R.; Jensen, R. L.; Falaschetti, E.; Schouten, J. P.; Hankinson, J. L.; Stocks, J.; Quanjer, P. H.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The prevalence of airway obstruction varies widely with the definition used. Objectives: To study differences in the prevalence of airway obstruction when applying four international guidelines to three population samples using four regression equations. Methods: We collected predicted values

  16. Early-Transition Output Decline Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crt Kostevc

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we revisit the issue of aggregate output decline that took place in the early transition period. We propose an alternative explanation of output decline that is applicable to Central- and Eastern-European countries. In the first part of the paper we develop a simple dynamic general equilibrium model that builds on work by Gomulka and Lane (2001. In particular, we consider price liberalization, interpreted as elimination of distortionary taxation, as a trigger of the output decline. We show that price liberalization in interaction with heterogeneous adjustment costs and non-employment benefits lead to aggregate output decline and surge in wage inequality. While these patterns are consistent with actual dynamics in CEE countries, this model cannot generate output decline in all sectors. Instead sectors that were initially taxed even exhibit output growth. Thus, in the second part we consider an alternative general equilibrium model with only one production sector and two types of labor and distortion in a form of wage compression during the socialist era. The trigger for labor mobility and consequently output decline is wage liberalization. Assuming heterogeneity of workers in terms of adjustment costs and non-employment benefits can explain output decline in all industries.

  17. Asymmetric disassembly and robustness in declining networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Uzzi, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Mechanisms that enable declining networks to avert structural collapse and performance degradation are not well understood. This knowledge gap reflects a shortage of data on declining networks and an emphasis on models of network growth. Analyzing >700,000 transactions between firms in the New York garment industry over 19 years, we tracked this network's decline and measured how its topology and global performance evolved. We find that favoring asymmetric (disassortative) links is key to preserving the topology and functionality of the declining network. Based on our findings, we tested a model of network decline that combines an asymmetric disassembly process for contraction with a preferential attachment process for regrowth. Our simulation results indicate that the model can explain robustness under decline even if the total population of nodes contracts by more than an order of magnitude, in line with our observations for the empirical network. These findings suggest that disassembly mechanisms are not simply assembly mechanisms in reverse and that our model is relevant to understanding the process of decline and collapse in a broad range of biological, technological, and financial networks. PMID:18936489

  18. Drivers and moderators of business decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Pretorius

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Reports of business failure elicit various reactions, while research in this domain often appears to be limited by a lack of access to information about failure and by the negativity that surrounds it. Those who have experienced failure do not readily talk about it, or they disappear from the radar screen of researchers. Yet failure is preceded by decline which, when focused on strategically, can reduce eventual failures if early action is taken. The main purpose of this study is to develop a conceptual framework or typology of the drivers and moderators of business decline. Design/methodology/approach: After applying the "grounded theory" approach to the academic literature on decline and failure, a conceptual framework for the variables that drive and moderate business decline is proposed. Findings: The study proposes that decline has three core drivers, three peripheral drivers and four moderators. The core drivers identified are: resource munificence; leadership as origin; and causality (strategic versus operational origin of decline. The three peripheral drivers are: unique preconditions; continuous decisions impact; and extremes dichotomy. The study describes four moderators of the drivers: life cycle stage; stakeholder perspective; quantitative versus qualitative nature of signs and causes; and finally the age and size effects. Research limitations/implications: The proposed conceptual framework is based on literature only, although it has found support during discussions with practitioners. It is proposed to readers of this journal for scrutiny and validation. Practical implications: Strategists need to understand what drives decline in order to act timeously; practitioners who have an insight into the moderators with their impacts could make better decisions in response to decline in organisations and possibly avoid business failure. Originality/Value: Understanding business decline is still a huge theoretical challenge, which

  19. [On the recent fertility decline in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohara Atoh, M

    1982-05-01

    After having been maintained at replacement level for about 15 years, Japanese fertility has been declining since 1973. The application of the decomposition technique to the decline in crude birthrate (CBR) between 1973-80 has clarified that 40% of the total change in the CBR is explained by changes in the age composition, 50% by the decline in proportions of couples married, and 10% by a short-term decline in marital fertility. The change in age composition in this period refers to the abrupt shrinkage of the younger cohort, which is most exposed to the prospect of marriage; those in their 20s. This is in turn an echo of the precipitous decline in birth just after the short-term baby boom during the postwar years. If we take into account the historical steadiness of marriage throughout Japan, the decline in the proportions of those married would seem to be the postponement of marriage without any rise in the celibacy rate. Several factors are presumably conducive to the recent marriage squeeze but the recent rise in high school and college enrollment rates for both men and women appears most responsible for the change. It remains to be studied whether the disequilibration of the sex ratio among marriageable cohorts due to the abrupt change in cohort size, the decline in substantive wage rates since the oil crisis in 1973, or changes in the social mechanism for selection of spouses (decrease in arranged marriages), is causally relevant to the marriage squeeze. The cause for the shortterm decline in marital fertility is difficult to discern. According to several recent fertility surveys of married women, there has been little change in completed fertility, fertility goals (by measuring the total intended number of children), and fertility control behavior which is measured by the proportion of contraceptive usage or induced abortion timing of initiation for contraceptive usage, and contraceptive methods used). Thus, the shortterm decline in marital fertility is

  20. Why Do Patients with COPD Decline Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathar, Helle; Fastholm, Pernille; Hansen, Ida Rode

    2016-01-01

    AIM: This paper aimed to suggest possible answers to the question: Why do patients with COPD decline pulmonary rehabilitation (PR)? METHOD: The study is a metasynthesis inspired by Noblit of the existing qualitative research on the area. The data were collected during 2014. Six studies were found...... of PR causing decline. CONCLUSION: The studies included show patients' rational accounts and reflections on declining PR. The included studies tend to describe accounts for deselection of PR in relation to the preferences and beliefs of the patients rather than including the social and economic...

  1. The decline of hysterectomy for benign disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horgan, R P

    2012-01-31

    Hysterectomy is one of the most common gynaecological surgical procedures performed but there appears to be a decline in the performance of this procedure in Ireland in recent times. We set out to establish the extent of the decline of hysterectomy and to explore possible explanations. Data for hysterectomy for benign disease from Ireland was obtained from the Hospital In-Patient Enquiry Scheme (HIPE) section of the Economic and Social Research Institute for the years 1999 to 2006. The total number of hysterectomies performed for benign disease showed a consistent decline during this time. There was a 36% reduction in the number of abdominal hysterectomy procedures performed.

  2. Hemostatic abnormalities in liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendal YALÇIN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 44 patients with liver cirrhosis were investigated for hemostatic parameters. Patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatorenal syndrome and cholestatic liver diseases were excluded. Patients were classified by Child-Pugh criterion and according to this 4 patients were in Class A, 20 in Class B and 20 in C. Regarding to these results, it was aimed to investigate the haematological disturbances in liver cirrhotic patients.In the result there was a correlation between activated partial thromboplastin time, serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, haptoglobin and Child-Pugh classification. Besides there was no correlation between prothrombin time, factor 8 and 9, protein C and S, anti-thrombin 3, fibrinogen, fibrin degradation products, serum iron binding capacity, hemoglobin, leukocyte, mean corpuscular volume and Child-Pugh classification.There were significant difference, in terms of AST, ferritin, haptoglobulin, sex and presence of ascites between groups (p0.05. In the summary, we have found correlation between hemostatic abnormalities and disease activity and clinical prognosis in patients with liver cirrhosis which is important in the management of these patients. This is also important for identification of liver transplant candidiates earlier.

  3. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Is racial prejudice declining in Britain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Robert

    2008-12-01

    This article employs two previously neglected indicators of racial prejudice from the British Social Attitudes surveys to examine the social distribution of prejudices against black and Asian Britons. Three hypotheses are proposed and tested: that racial prejudice is declining in Britain; that this decline is principally generational in nature; and that greater prejudice is shown towards more culturally distinct Asian minorities than black minorities. Strong evidence is found for the first two hypotheses, with evidence of an overall decline in prejudice and of a sharp decline in prejudices among generations who have grown up since mass black and Asian immigration began in the 1950s. Little evidence is found for the third hypothesis: British reactions towards black and Asian minorities are broadly similar suggesting racial differences may still be the main factor prompting white hostility to British minorities.

  5. Declining of forests - biotic and abiotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Zlatan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last several years, a significant decline of different forests in Serbia was recorded. The decline is more widespread in conifer stands, but occurence of decline was recorded in broadleaved forest stands as well. These declines are the result of abiotic, biotic and anthropogenic factors. According to the studies performed so far in Serbia, the predisposing factor were droughts during the 2012 and 2013 vegetation periods that caused physiological weakness of the trees. Among the biotic factors, the most important are fungi (mainly root rot, but rot fungi, and needle diseases and insects (bark beetles in conifer species and defoliators in broadleaved species. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 37008 i br. TR 31070

  6. Predictors of combined cognitive and physical decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, H.H.; Cesari, M.; Kritchevsky, S.B.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Fried, L.P.; Guralnik, J.M.; Williamson, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence and correlates of combined declines in cognitive and physical performance. DESIGN: Cohort study of community-dwelling older women with moderate to severe disability. SETTING: The community surrounding Baltimore, Maryland. PARTICIPANTS: Participants in the

  7. Brain Metastases Treatment Worsens Cognitive Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    In some patients with cancer that has spread to the brain, whole brain radiation following radiosurgery causes more severe cognitive decline and does not improve survival compared with radiosurgery alone, a new study has found.

  8. The Decline in America's Reputation: Why

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2008-01-01

    .... ( We are all Americans now. ) Since then, polls conducted by the U.S. Government and respected private firms have revealed a precipitous decline in favorability toward the United States and its foreign policy...

  9. The global financial crisis and neighborhood decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwiers, M.D.; Bolt, G.; Van Ham, M.; Van Kempen, R.

    2016-01-01

    Neighborhood decline is a complex and multidimensional process. National and regional variations in economic and political structures (including varieties in national welfare state arrangements), combined with differences in neighborhood history, development, and population composition, make it

  10. Evaluation of Chromosomal Abnormalities and Common ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Chromosomal Abnormalities and Common Trombophilic Mutations in Cases with Recurrent Miscarriage. Ahmet Karatas, Recep Eroz, Mustafa Albayrak, Tulay Ozlu, Bulent Cakmak, Fatih Keskin ...

  11. Problems Associated with Declining National Oil Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    Forecasts of peak oil production have focussed on the global impacts of declining production. Meanwhile, national oil production has declined in 20 countries, leading to local problems that receive little comment outside of the effected regions. Two problems deserve wider recognition: declining state revenues and fuel substitution. Most oil producing countries with large reserves adopted licensing practices that provide significant revenues to the host governments such that oil revenues generate from 40 to 80 percent of total government funds. Typically these governments allocate a fraction of this revenue to their state oil companies, utilizing the remainder for other activities. As oil revenues decline with falling production, host governments face a dilemma: either to increase state oil company budgets in order to stem the decline, or to starve the state oil company while maintaining other government programs. The declining oil revenues in these states can significantly reduce the government's ability to address important national issues. Mexico, Indonesia, and Yemen illustrate this situation in its early phases. Fuel substitution occurs whenever one fuel proves less expensive than another. The substitution of coal for wood in the eighteenth century and oil for coal in the twentieth century are classic examples. China and India appear to be at peak oil production, while their economies generate increasing demand for energy. Both countries are substituting coal and natural gas for oil with attendant environmental impacts. Coal-to-liquids projects are proposed in in both China, which will require significant water resources if they are executed. These examples suggest that forecasting the impact of peak oil at a regional level requires more than an assessment of proven-probable-possible reserves and a forecast of supply-demand scenarios. A range of government responses to declining oil income scenarios must also be considered, together with scenarios describing

  12. Repolarization abnormalities in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Peter J; Stramba-Badiale, Marco

    2010-06-01

    The recognition of ventricular repolarization abnormalities in the newborn carries several and significant implications, because it calls attention to the possibility of dealing with an infant affected by the long QT syndrome (LQTS). This article provides key elements for the correct measurement of the QT interval in newborns and succinctly reviews some aspects of the disease. It gives normative values on the QT interval distribution in the first month of life based on a prospective study in more than 44,000 infants. It shows the probability, based on the QTc observed in two recordings, to find disease-causing mutations. The data indicate clearly that widespread electrocardiographic screening in the newborn allows early identification of most, if not all, the infants affected by LQTS with marked QT prolongation and thus of those at higher risk for life-threatening arrhythmias and sudden death. Through the affected infants, it becomes possible to identify the family members affected by LQTS, including the "silent mutation carriers"; our study shows that disease-causing mutations are found in 51% of the family members. Because early recognition leads to the implementation of effective preventive strategies, it follows that electrocardiographic screening will avoid preventable deaths either in the first year of life when they are usually labeled as "sudden infant death syndrome" or later in life. The case is made for medicolegal implications whenever neonatologists and pediatricians fail to inform the parents of a newborn child of the prevalence of LQTS (one in 2000), of the effectiveness of existing therapies, and of the diagnosis with a simple electrocardiogram.

  13. Localized Hotspots Drive Continental Geography of Abnormal Amphibians on U.S. Wildlife Refuges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Mari K.; Medley, Kimberly A.; Pinkney, Alfred E.; Holyoak, Marcel; Johnson, Pieter T. J.; Lannoo, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians with missing, misshapen, and extra limbs have garnered public and scientific attention for two decades, yet the extent of the phenomenon remains poorly understood. Despite progress in identifying the causes of abnormalities in some regions, a lack of knowledge about their broader spatial distribution and temporal dynamics has hindered efforts to understand their implications for amphibian population declines and environmental quality. To address this data gap, we conducted a nationwide, 10-year assessment of 62,947 amphibians on U.S. National Wildlife Refuges. Analysis of a core dataset of 48,081 individuals revealed that consistent with expected background frequencies, an average of 2% were abnormal, but abnormalities exhibited marked spatial variation with a maximum prevalence of 40%. Variance partitioning analysis demonstrated that factors associated with space (rather than species or year sampled) captured 97% of the variation in abnormalities, and the amount of partitioned variance decreased with increasing spatial scale (from site to refuge to region). Consistent with this, abnormalities occurred in local to regional hotspots, clustering at scales of tens to hundreds of kilometers. We detected such hotspot clusters of high-abnormality sites in the Mississippi River Valley, California, and Alaska. Abnormality frequency was more variable within than outside of hotspot clusters. This is consistent with dynamic phenomena such as disturbance or natural enemies (pathogens or predators), whereas similarity of abnormality frequencies at scales of tens to hundreds of kilometers suggests involvement of factors that are spatially consistent at a regional scale. Our characterization of the spatial and temporal variation inherent in continent-wide amphibian abnormalities demonstrates the disproportionate contribution of local factors in predicting hotspots, and the episodic nature of their occurrence. PMID:24260103

  14. Localized hotspots drive continental geography of abnormal amphibians on U.S. wildlife refuges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Mari K; Medley, Kimberly A; Pinkney, Alfred E; Holyoak, Marcel; Johnson, Pieter T J; Lannoo, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Amphibians with missing, misshapen, and extra limbs have garnered public and scientific attention for two decades, yet the extent of the phenomenon remains poorly understood. Despite progress in identifying the causes of abnormalities in some regions, a lack of knowledge about their broader spatial distribution and temporal dynamics has hindered efforts to understand their implications for amphibian population declines and environmental quality. To address this data gap, we conducted a nationwide, 10-year assessment of 62,947 amphibians on U.S. National Wildlife Refuges. Analysis of a core dataset of 48,081 individuals revealed that consistent with expected background frequencies, an average of 2% were abnormal, but abnormalities exhibited marked spatial variation with a maximum prevalence of 40%. Variance partitioning analysis demonstrated that factors associated with space (rather than species or year sampled) captured 97% of the variation in abnormalities, and the amount of partitioned variance decreased with increasing spatial scale (from site to refuge to region). Consistent with this, abnormalities occurred in local to regional hotspots, clustering at scales of tens to hundreds of kilometers. We detected such hotspot clusters of high-abnormality sites in the Mississippi River Valley, California, and Alaska. Abnormality frequency was more variable within than outside of hotspot clusters. This is consistent with dynamic phenomena such as disturbance or natural enemies (pathogens or predators), whereas similarity of abnormality frequencies at scales of tens to hundreds of kilometers suggests involvement of factors that are spatially consistent at a regional scale. Our characterization of the spatial and temporal variation inherent in continent-wide amphibian abnormalities demonstrates the disproportionate contribution of local factors in predicting hotspots, and the episodic nature of their occurrence.

  15. Does cognitive reserve shape cognitive decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmot, Michael G; Glymour, Maria; Sabia, Séverine; Kivimäki, Mika; Dugravot, Aline

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Cognitive reserve is associated with a lower risk of dementia but the extent to which it shapes cognitive aging trajectories remains unclear. Our objective is to examine the impact of three markers of reserve from different points in the lifecourse on cognitive function and decline in late adulthood. Methods Data are from 5234 men and 2220 women, mean age 56 years (standard deviation=6) at baseline, from the Whitehall II cohort study. Memory, reasoning, vocabulary, phonemic and semantic fluency were assessed three times over 10 years. Linear mixed models were used to assess the association between markers of reserve (height, education, and occupation) and cognitive decline, using the 5 cognitive tests and a global cognitive score composed of these tests. Results All three reserve measures were associated with baseline cognitive function, with strongest associations with occupation and the weakest with height. All cognitive functions except vocabulary declined over the 10 year follow-up period. On the global cognitive test, there was greater decline in the high occupation group (−0.27; 95% confidence interval (CI): −0.28, −0.26) compared to the intermediate (−0.23; 95% CI: −0.25, −0.22) and low groups (−0.21; 95% CI: −0.24, −0.19); p=0.001. The decline in reserve groups defined by education (p=0.82) and height (p=0.55) was similar. Interpretation Cognitive performance over the adult lifecourse was remarkably higher in the high reserve groups. However, rate of cognitive decline did not differ between reserve groups except occupation where there was some evidence of greater decline in the high occupation group. PMID:21563209

  16. Nail abnormalities in patients with vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Gungor, Sule; Kocaturk, Ozgur Emek; Duman, Hatice; Durmuscan, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary skin disorder affecting 0.1-4% of the general population. The nails may be affected in patients with an autoimmune disease such as psoriasis, and in those with alopecia areata. It has been suggested that nail abnormalities should be apparent in vitiligo patients. We sought to document the frequency and clinical presentation of nail abnormalities in vitiligo patients compared to healthy volunteers. We also examined the correlations between nail abnormalities and various clinical parameters. This study included 100 vitiligo patients and 100 healthy subjects. Full medical histories were collected from the subjects, who underwent thorough general and nail examinations. All nail changes were noted. In the event of clinical suspicion of a fungal infection, additional mycological investigations were performed. Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in the patients (78%) than in the controls (55%) (p=0.001). Longitudinal ridging was the most common finding (42%), followed by (in descending order): leukonychia, an absent lunula, onycholysis, nail bed pallor, onychomycosis, splinter hemorrhage and nail plate thinning. The frequency of longitudinal ridging was significantly higher in patients than in controls (pNail abnormalities were more prevalent in vitiligo patients than in controls. Systematic examination of the nails in such patients is useful because nail abnormalities are frequent. However, the causes of such abnormalities require further study. Longitudinal ridging and leukonychia were the most common abnormalities observed in this study.

  17. Effects of theophylline administration and intracranial abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine effects of theophylline therapy for recurrent apnoea of prematurity and abnormal early (within the first 24 hours) cranial ultrasound abnormalities on protective neck turning response in preterm infants. Design: A cross sectional descriptive study. Setting: The Neonatal Unit of Hammersmith Hospital, ...

  18. Prevalence of biochemical and immunological abnormalities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tile prevalence of biochemical and immunological abnormalities was studied in a group of 256 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (104 coloureds, 100 whites and 52 blacks). The most common biochemical abnormalities detected were a reduction in the serum creatinine value (43,4%), raised globulins (39,7%), raised serum ...

  19. First Trimester Ultrasound Screening for Congenital Abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    approach used, especially with the introduction of first trimester ultrasound as a reliable screening method. Objective: To give a comprehensive review of the basis for first trimester ultrasound screening for congenital abnormalities, it's utilization in the prenatal screening for chromosomal, structural and genetic abnormalities ...

  20. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  1. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health and safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period January through March 1993. There is one abnormal occurrence at a nuclear power plant disposed in this report that involved a steam generator tube rupture at Palo Verde Unit 2, and none for fuel cycle facilities. Three abnormal occurrences involving medical misadminstrations (two therapeutic and one diagnostic) at NRC-licensed facilities are also discussed in this report. No abnormal occurrences were reported by NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating previously reported abnormal occurrences

  2. Prenatal Diagnosis of Chromosome Abnormalities: A 13-Year Institution Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Comas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze trends in screening and invasive prenatal diagnosis of chromosome abnormalities (CA over a 13-year period and correlate them to changes in the national prenatal screening policy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed Down syndrome (DS screening tests and fetal karyotypes obtained by prenatal invasive testing (IT in our fetal medicine unit between January 1999 and December 2011. Results: A total of 24,226 prenatal screening tests for DS and 11,045 invasive procedures have been analyzed. Over a 13-year period, utilization of non-invasive screening methods has significantly increased from 57% to 89%. The percentage of invasive procedures has declined from 49% to 12%, although the percentage of IT performed for maternal anxiety has increased from 22% to 55%. The percentage of detected CA increased from 2.5% to 5.9%. Overall, 31 invasive procedures are needed to diagnose 1 abnormal case, being 23 procedures in medical indications and 241 procedures in non-medical indications. Conclusions: Our experience on screening and invasive prenatal diagnostic practice shows a decrease of the number of IT, with a parallel decline in medical indications. There is an increasing efficiency of prenatal screening program to detect CA. Despite the increasing screening policies, our population shows a growing request for prenatal IT. The a priori low risk population shows a not negligible residual risk for relevant CA. This observation challenges the current prenatal screening strategy focused on DS; showing that the residual risk is higher than the current cut-off used to indicate an invasive technique.

  3. Periodontitis and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ide

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is common in the elderly and may become more common in Alzheimer's disease because of a reduced ability to take care of oral hygiene as the disease progresses. Elevated antibodies to periodontal bacteria are associated with an increased systemic pro-inflammatory state. Elsewhere raised serum pro-inflammatory cytokines have been associated with an increased rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that periodontitis would be associated with increased dementia severity and a more rapid cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine if periodontitis in Alzheimer's disease is associated with both increased dementia severity and cognitive decline, and an increased systemic pro inflammatory state. In a six month observational cohort study 60 community dwelling participants with mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease were cognitively assessed and a blood sample taken for systemic inflammatory markers. Dental health was assessed by a dental hygienist, blind to cognitive outcomes. All assessments were repeated at six months. The presence of periodontitis at baseline was not related to baseline cognitive state but was associated with a six fold increase in the rate of cognitive decline as assessed by the ADAS-cog over a six month follow up period. Periodontitis at baseline was associated with a relative increase in the pro-inflammatory state over the six month follow up period. Our data showed that periodontitis is associated with an increase in cognitive decline in Alzheimer's Disease, independent to baseline cognitive state, which may be mediated through effects on systemic inflammation.

  4. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with sperm disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Pylyp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in particular, enable the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to the progeny. Therefore, cytogenetic studies are important in patients with male factor infertility before assisted reproduction treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types and frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities in 724 patients with infertility and to estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection in subgroups of patients depending on the severity of spermatogenic disruption, aiming at identifying groups of patients in need of cytogenetic studies. Karyotype analysis was performed in 724 blood samples of men attending infertility clinic. Chromosomal preparation was performed by standard techniques. At least 20 GTG-banded metaphase plates with the resolution from 450 to 750 bands per haploid set were analysed in each case. When chromosomal mosaicism was suspected, this number was increased to 50. Abnormal karyotypes were observed in 48 (6.6% patients, including 67% of autosomal abnormalities and 33% of gonosomal abnormalities. Autosomal abnormalities were represented by structural rearrangements. Reciprocal translocations were the most common type of structural chromosomal abnormalities in the studied group, detected with the frequency of 2.6% (n = 19, followed by Robertsonian translocation, observed with the frequency of 1.2% (n = 9. The frequency of inversions was 0.6% (n = 4. Gonosomal abnormalities included 14 cases

  5. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia and brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samia, Younes-Mhenni; Mahdi, Kamoun; Baha, Zantour; Saida, Jerbi-Ommezine; Tahar, Sfar Mohamed; Habib, Sfar Mohamed

    2010-10-01

    A 15-yr-old male patient with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) was referred to our department with a one year history of gradual worsening of tremors. He was diagnosed with salt-wasting 21-hydroxylase deficiency CAH at 40 d old and was started on hydrocortisone, fludrocortisone and salt. He was found to have hypertension at 8 yr of age. Detailed investigations failed to detect any cause for secondary hypertension. Physical findings on the current hospitalization objectified obesity, blood pressure of 150/80 mmHg, postural and action tremor, left cerebellar syndrome, reflex tetra pyramidal syndrome and mental decline. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed bilateral periventricular white matter hyperintensity that was more pronounced in the posterior regions and associated with cortico-subcortical atrophy and complete agenesis of the corpus callosum. All investigations for leukoencephalopathy were negative. A diagnosis of brain MRI abnormalities related to CAH was made, and the patient received symptomatic treatment of tremors. Our case report provides evidence of an increased frequency of brain MRI abnormalities in CAH. The literature suggests hormonal imbalance and exposure to excess exogenous glucocorticoids as main probable mechanisms. Thus, in clinical practice, CAH should be considered as one of the possible causes of brain white matter involvement associated with or without cerebral atrophy.

  6. Identifying functional decline: a methodological challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimmer K

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Karen Grimmer, Kate Beaton, Kevan Hendry International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia Background: Functional decline (FD in older people has commonly been measured in the hospital setting with instruments which have been validated on decrease over time in capacity to undertake basic activities of daily living (ADL. In a nonhospitalized sample of older people (independently community dwelling, but potentially on the cusp of FD, it is possible that other measures could be used to predict decline. Early, accurate, and efficient identification of older community-dwelling people who are on the cusp of FD can assist in identifying appropriate interventions to slow the rate of decline. Methods: This paper reports on associations between four outcome measures which have been associated with FD (instrumental ADLs [IADLs], quality of life, hospitalizations and falls. The sample was older individuals who were discharged from one large metropolitan emergency department (ED during 2011–2012, without an inpatient admission. Results: Of 597 individuals aged 65+ who provided baseline information, 148 subjects provided four outcome measures at both 1 and 3 months follow up. Overall, approximately 24% demonstrated decreased IADL scores over the 3 months, with domains of home activities, laundry, shopping, and getting places declining the most. Over this time, 18% fell often, and 11% were consistently hospitalized. Between 1 and 3 months follow up, 41% declined in mental component scores, and 50% declined in physical component scores. Low mental and physical component quality of life scores were associated with downstream increased falls and hospitalizations, and decreased quality of life and IADLs. However, change in the four outcome measures was largely independent in factor analysis. Conclusion: Measuring the four outcome measures over 3 months post-discharge from an ED presentation, showed that

  7. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Prediction of heart abnormality using MLP network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Fakroul Ridzuan; Januar, Yulni; Mat, Muhammad Hadzren; Rizman, Zairi Ismael; Awang, Mat Kamil

    2018-02-01

    Heart abnormality does not choose gender, age and races when it strikes. With no warning signs or symptoms, it can result to a sudden death of the patient. Generally, heart's irregular electrical activity is defined as heart abnormality. Via implementation of Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) network, this paper tries to develop a program that allows the detection of heart abnormality activity. Utilizing several training algorithms with Purelin activation function, an amount of heartbeat signals received through the electrocardiogram (ECG) will be employed to condition the MLP network.

  9. Evaluation of the relationship between radiological abnormalities and both pulmonary function and pulmonary hypertension in coal workers' pneumoconiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildiz, O.A.; Gulbay, B.E.; Saryal, S.; Karabiylkoglu, G. [Ankara University, Ankara (Turkey). School of Medicine

    2007-05-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the radiological evidence of emphysema, and the extent of interstitial involvement, on lung function and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) in patients with coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP). All patients showed a mild decrease in FEV1/FVC and a mild increase in FRC. Forty-four per cent of patients developed mild to moderate pulmonary hypertension. Emphysema scores correlated significantly with airflow rates, including FEV1%, FEV1/FVC and FEF25-75%, and with carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO)% predicted as well as FRC% predicted and the ratio RV/TLC, which are indices of air trapping. Additionally, profusion and global profusion scores showed significant correlation with FEV1/FVC, DLCO% predicted, specific airway conductance and smoking. Mean PAP showed a significant negative correlation with FEF50% predicted, DLCO% predicted and profusion score. The impairment of pulmonary function (mainly disturbance in airflow rates and air trapping) and pulmonary hypertension may be present, even in a simple form of CWP. The pulmonary function impairment in patients with CWP is likely to be attributable to the occurrence of emphysema. However, pulmonary hypertension was directly related to the profusion of pneumoconiotic nodules, which may result in obliteration of the vascular bed.

  10. Intelligence quotient-adjusted memory impairment is associated with abnormal single photon emission computed tomography perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentz, Dorene M; Huh, Terri J; Sardinha, Lisa M; Moran, Erin K; Becker, John A; Daffner, Kirk R; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A

    2007-09-01

    Cognitive reserve among highly intelligent older individuals makes detection of early Alzheimer's disease (AD) difficult. We tested the hypothesis that mild memory impairment determined by IQ-adjusted norms is associated with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion abnormality at baseline and predictive of future decline. Twenty-three subjects with a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) score of 0, were reclassified after scores were adjusted for IQ into two groups, 10 as having mild memory impairments for ability (IQ-MI) and 13 as memory-normal (IQ-MN). Subjects underwent cognitive and functional assessments at baseline and annual follow-up for 3 years. Perfusion SPECT was acquired at baseline. At follow-up, the IQ-MI subjects demonstrated decline in memory, visuospatial processing, and phonemic fluency, and 6 of 10 had progressed to a CDR of 0.5, while the IQ-MN subjects did not show decline. The IQ-MI group had significantly lower perfusion than the IQ-MN group in parietal/precuneus, temporal, and opercular frontal regions. In contrast, higher perfusion was observed in IQ-MI compared with IQ-MN in the left medial frontal and rostral anterior cingulate regions. IQ-adjusted memory impairment in individuals with high cognitive reserve is associated with baseline SPECT abnormality in a pattern consistent with prodromal AD and predicts subsequent cognitive and functional decline.

  11. The Decline of Literature: A Public Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albalawi, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    After centuries of dominance, literature has not been in a robust health for the last few decades. Several scholars have addressed the decline of literature in a number of books and articles attributing it to institutional and economic reasons. However, a major factor has not been taken into account. It is the larger audience who receives and…

  12. Declining Enrollments of Sociology Majors: Department Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabianic, David

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the falling enrollments in sociology departments. Suggests that the decline may be a result of quality of subject matter presentation, an increase in career-oriented students, and the development of social work and criminal justice into departments separate from sociology. Urges sociology departments to strengthen their political…

  13. Strategy, Innovation and Revitalizing Declining Newspaper Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Jan; Nielsen, Anders Paarup

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concerned with investigating whether the insights from the strategic management literature can be applied to revitalize so-called mature and declining industries. In line with this literature, the paper argues that the cause of the mature industries’ challenges should be found in ho...

  14. NIDI scenario. Strong population decline in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, J.A.A.

    2016-01-01

    United Nations projections assume that by the end of this century one third of the world population will live in India, China or Nigeria. While population growth in India will slow down and the population size of China will decline, population growth in Nigeria will accelerate. A new NIDI scenario

  15. Why Employee Motivation Has Declined in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Philip C.

    1982-01-01

    Examines possible reasons for declining employee motivation: greater instability and diversity of values; more guaranteed rewards; inability of rewards to satisfy emerging needs; disappearing work ethic; reduced costs of failure; rising income and progressive taxation; more group production and problem solving; decreased employee loyalty; less…

  16. Inferring species decline from collection records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpaneto, Giuseppe Maria; Mazziotta, Adriano; Valerio, Laura

    2007-01-01

    The decline of roller dung beetles (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae) in Italy, at national and regional level, was described using a database of both literature and unpublished data, since the late of 19th century. The probability of finding roller species was assessed for each decade of the 20th centur...

  17. Why NAD(+) Declines during Aging: It's Destroyed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Michael B; Sinclair, David A

    2016-06-14

    NAD(+) is required not only for life but for a long life. In this issue, Camacho-Pereira et al. (2016) implicate CD38 in the decline of NAD(+) during aging, with implications for combating age-related diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Predicting Succession under Conditions of Enrollment Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Michael A.

    Three possible explanations for superintendent succession focus on poor administrative performance, district response strategies, and the politics of the chief executive's relationship with the school board. To analyze succession in the context of declining enrollment, a case study survey was conducted of 56 school districts whose peak enrollment…

  19. Predicting flux decline of reverse osmosis membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schippers, J.C.; Hanemaayer, J.H.; Smolders, C.A.; Kostense, A.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model predicting flux decline of reverse osmosis membranes due to colloidal fouling has been verified. This mathema- tical model is based on the theory of cake or gel filtration and the Modified Fouling Index (MFI). Research was conducted using artificial colloidal solutions and a

  20. Declining national park visitation: An economic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas H. Stevens; Thomas A. More; Marla. Markowski-Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    Visitation to the major nature-based national parks has been declining. This paper specifies an econometric model that estimates the relative impact of consumer incomes, travel costs, entry fees and other factors on per capita attendance from 1993 to 2010. Results suggest that entrance fees have had a statistically significant but small impact on per capita attendance...

  1. Exploring the Global Decline of Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aróstegui, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    This article seeks to explain the disjuncture between the decline of music education in schools and the importance music has in popular youth culture and in creativity within the new knowledge economy. The data discussed in this article have been derived from analyses of major documents on curriculum reform as well as e-mail responses from music…

  2. The "Decline" of Private Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    No topic in private higher education study has attracted as great attention globally as has growth. This is appropriate as private growth has soared to nearly a third of the world's total higher education enrolment. But while private growth continues to be the dominant trend, important declines in private shares have emerged. These must be…

  3. Histopathological Findings of Endometrial Samples and its Correlation Between the Premenopausal and Postmenopausal Women in Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S; Makaju, R; Shrestha, S; Shrestha, A

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is considered as one of the most common problems among women. The therapy is incomplete without knowing the underlying pathology. To determine the types and frequency of endometrial pathologies in patients presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding at Dhulikhel Hospital Kathmandu university Hospital. This is retrospective study total 100 cases were included over a period of one year of Abnormal Uterine bleeding. Out of 100 cases of Abnormal uterine bleeding, 61% were due to non-organic cause with a commonest histopathological findings proliferative endometrium. 27% cases were due to organic cause with pregnancy related condition as most common finding. 12% were reported as inadequate. The rate of postmenopausal bleeding declined with increasing age in the postmenopausal period and endometritis was the predominant finding. There is an age specific association of Abnormal uterine bleeding with increased incidence in perimenopausal age group. Postmenopausal bleeding declined with increasing with endometritis the most common finding. Dilation and curettage is helpful to exclude other organic pathology. It is useful for diagnosis and to know pathological incidence of organic lesions in cases of Abnormal uterine bleeding prior to surgery.

  4. [Dental abnormalities after treatment for childhood cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladosievičová, B; Jurkovič, R; Izakovičová Hollá, L

    2015-01-01

    Childhood cancer therapy often increases the risk of dental complications, such as tooth and roots agenesis, microdontia, abnormal development of tooth enamel, increased risk of cavity and other abnormalities. In a comparison with other late adverse effects of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantion, a relative small number of clinical stud-ies observing patients for more than two years after completion of anticancer treatment was published. In this article, we review the incidence of dental abnormalities caused by commonly used anticancer treatment modalities as well as discuss their risk factors. Early identification of high-risk patients, early detection and management of dental abnormalities and better education of patients or their guardians, may have an impact on quality of life of cancer survivors.

  5. On two abnormal sharks from Gujarat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalan, U.K.

    The description of the two abnormal sharks, Carchariaswalbeehmi and Eulamia dussumieri collected from Gujarat, India, is given Of these C walbeehmi was double-headed The other shark E dussumieri had thumb snouted albino...

  6. Video Traffic Analysis for Abnormal Event Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    We propose the use of video imaging sensors for the detection and classification of abnormal events to be used primarily for mitigation of traffic congestion. Successful detection of such events will allow for new road guidelines; for rapid deploymen...

  7. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because they do not affect hearing. However, sometimes cosmetic surgery is recommended. Skin tags may be tied off, ... 5 years old. More severe abnormalities may require surgery for cosmetic reasons as well as for function. Surgery to ...

  8. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from April 1 through June 30, 1990. The report discusses six abnormal occurrences, none involving a nuclear power plant. There were five abnormal occurrences at NRC licensees: (1) deficiencies in brachytherapy program; (2) a radiation overexposure of a radiographer; (3) a medical diagnostic misadministration; (4) administration of iodine-131 to a lactating female with subsequent uptake by her infant; and (5) a medical therapy misadministration. An Agreement State (Arizona) reported an abnormal occurrence involving a medical diagnostic misadministration. The report also contains information that updates a previously reported occurrence

  9. Errata :Chromosomal Abnormalities in Couples with Recurrent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromosomal Abnormalities in Couples with Recurrent Abortions in Lagos, Nigeria. Akinde OR, Daramola A O, Taiwo I A, Afolayan M O and Akinsola Af. Sonographic Mammary Gland Density Pattern in Women in Selected ommunities of Southern Nigeria.

  10. Video traffic analysis for abnormal event detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    We propose the use of video imaging sensors for the detection and classification of abnormal events to : be used primarily for mitigation of traffic congestion. Successful detection of such events will allow for : new road guidelines; for rapid deplo...

  11. Prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities in adolescents, first morning clean mid-stream urine specimens were obtained from 2500 individuals and examined by dipstick and light microscopy. Adolescents with abnormal screening results were reexamined after two weeks and those who had abnormal results twice were subjected to systemic clinical examination and further clinical and laboratory investigations. Eight hundred and three (32.1% individuals had urinary abnormalities at the first screening, which significantly decreased to 345 (13.8% at the second screening, (P <0.001. Hematuria was the most common urinary abnormalities detected in 245 (9.8% adolescents who had persistent urine abnormalities; 228 (9.1% individuals had non glomerular hematuria. The hematuria was isolated in 150 (6% individuals, combined with leukocyturia in 83 (3.3% individuals, and combined with proteinuria in 12 (0.5% individuals. Leukocyturia was detected in 150 (6% of all studied adolescents; it was isolated in 39 (1.6% individuals and combined with proteinuria in 28 (1.1% of them. Asymp- tomatic bacteriuria was detected in 23 (0.9% of all studied adolescents; all the cases were females. Proteinuria was detected in 65 (2.6% of all the studied adolescents; 45 (1.8% indivi- duals had <0.5 g/day and twenty (0.8% individuals had 0.5-3 g/day. Asymptomatic urinary abnormalities were more common in males than females and adolescents from rural than urban areas (P <0.01 and (P <0.001, respectively. The present study found a high prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents in our population.

  12. Abnormal ''Contamination' Levels On Garden Appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    German, U.; Levinson, S.; Elmelech, V.; Pelled, O.; Tshuva, A.; Laichter, Y.

    1999-01-01

    During routine contamination checks we encountered an abnormal high level of Alpha and Beta emitting radioisotopes on working gloves of employees of the gardening department. It came out that the source was due to ''contamination'' levels on steering wheels of some gardening machines. In order to ensure that no real contamination of these workers was involved , a series of checks was started to identity the source of the abnormal levels found during monitoring

  13. Normal and Abnormal Behavior in Early Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Spinner, Miriam R.

    1981-01-01

    Evaluation of normal and abnormal behavior in the period to three years of age involves many variables. Parental attitudes, determined by many factors such as previous childrearing experience, the bonding process, parental psychological status and parental temperament, often influence the labeling of behavior as normal or abnormal. This article describes the forms of crying, sleep and wakefulness, and affective responses from infancy to three years of age.

  14. Familial eccrine syringofibroadenomatosis with associated ophthalmologic abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S; Palay, D; Templeton, S F

    1998-08-01

    Eccrine syringofibroadenoma (ESFA) is a rare benign adnexal tumor, generally with sporadic occurrence and not linked to other diseases. Only one familial occurrence of ESFA has been reported. We describe the familial occurrence of multiple ESFAs in a father and his two sons, all of whom also had similar eyelid abnormalities and progressive corneal scarring. This description of hereditary ESFA is the first to link ESFA with periocular and ocular abnormalities.

  15. [Hysteroscopic polypectomy, treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Los Rios, P José F; López, R Claudia; Cifuentes, P Carolina; Angulo, C Mónica; Palacios-Barahona, Arlex U

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the hysteroscopic polypectomy in terms of the decrease of the abnormal uterine bleeding. A cross-sectional and analytical study was done with patients to whom a hysteroscopic polypectomy was done for treating the abnormal uterine bleeding, between January 2009 and December 2013. The response to the treatment was evaluated via a survey given to the patients about the behavior of the abnormal uterine bleeding after the procedure and about overall satisfaction. The results were obtained after a hysteroscopic polypectomy done to 128 patients and were as follows. The average time from the polypectomy applied until the survey was 30.5 months, with a standard deviation of 18 months. 67.2% of the patients reported decreased abnormal uterine bleeding and the 32.8% reported a persistence of symptoms. On average 82.8% of the. patients were satisfied with the treatment. Bivariate and multivariate analysis showed no association between the variables studied and no improvement of abnormal uterine bleeding after surgery (polypectomy). There were no complications. Hysteroscopic polypectomy is a safe surgical treatment, which decreases on two of three patients the abnormal uterine bleeding in the presence of endometrial polyps, with an acceptable level of satisfaction.

  16. Decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content, not myofilament function, contributes to muscle twitch force decline in isolated cardiac trabeculae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Brunello, Lucia; Gyorke, Sándor; Janssen, Paul M L

    2014-08-01

    We set out to determine the factors responsible for twitch force decline in isolated intact rat cardiac trabeculae. The contractile force of trabeculae declined over extended periods of isometric twitch contractions. The force-frequency relationship within the frequency range of 4-8 Hz, at 37 °C, became more positive and the frequency optimum shifted to higher rates with this decline in baseline twitch tensions. The post-rest potentiation (37 °C), a phenomenon highly dependent on calcium handling mechanisms, became more pronounced with decrease in twitch tensions. We show that the main abnormality during muscle run-down was not due to a deficit in the myofilaments; maximal tension achieved using a K(+) contracture protocol was either unaffected or only slightly decreased. Conversely, the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content, as assessed by rapid cooling contractures (from 27 to 0 °C), decreased, and had a close association with the declining twitch tensions (R(2) ~ 0.76). SR Ca(2+)-ATPase, relative to Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger activity, was not altered as there was no significant change in paired rapid cooling contracture ratios. Furthermore, confocal microscopy detected no abnormalities in the overall structure of the cardiomyocytes and t-tubules in the cardiac trabeculae (~23 °C). Overall, the data indicates that the primary mechanism responsible for force run-down in multi-cellular cardiac preparations is a decline in the SR calcium content and not the maximal tension generation capability of the myofilaments.

  17. The Rise and Decline of Japanese Pacifism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Cai

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese pacifist constitution has been a symbol of Japan’s commitment to peace and more importantly its renunciation of wartime militarism. There has been strong support for its continuing existence amongst the Japanese populace despite persistent attempts by the Japanese government to amend it. However, the prevalent pacifist sentiment is showing signs of fading vitality in recent times. This article purports to examine the underlying forces that contributed to the development and the decline of Japanese pacifism. A host of domestic and international factors were responsible for the growth of pacifism and its subsequent decline, but only three important domestic factors will be examined in detail: the concept of victimhood in the development of pacifism and its implication for its continuing strength, the importance of peace education and the role played by the influential Japan’s Teachers’ Union on the formation of pacifist conscience and finally, the influence of leftist organisations on the organised peace movement.

  18. The rise (and decline?) of biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinch, Michael S

    2014-11-01

    Since the 1970s, biotechnology has been a key innovator in drug development. An analysis of FDA-approved therapeutics demonstrates pharmaceutical companies outpace biotechs in terms of new approvals but biotechnology companies are now responsible for earlier-stage activities (patents, INDs or clinical development). The number of biotechnology organizations that contributed to an FDA approval began declining in the 2000s and is at a level not seen since the 1980s. Whereas early biotechnology companies had a decade from first approval until acquisition, the average acquisition of a biotechnology company now occurs months before their first FDA approval. The number of hybrid organizations that arise when pharmaceutical companies acquire biotechnology is likewise declining, raising questions about the sustainability of biotechnology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ocular abnormalities in healthy Standardbred foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsotti, Giovanni; Sgorbini, Micaela; Marmorini, Paola; Corazza, Michele

    2013-07-01

    To determine the prevalence and describe ocular abnormalities in healthy Standardbred foals within 48 h of birth. One hundred and two neonatal foals. All foals had an unassisted delivery. On the basis of physical examination and the results of hematological and biochemical parameters, all foals were unaffected by systemic diseases. A complete ophthalmic examination was performed within 48 h of birth. Foals with ocular hemorrhages were re-examined weekly until the abnormalities were resolved. 65/102 (63.7%) foals did not show ocular abnormalities, while in 37/102 (36.3%) cases, ocular abnormalities were present. Retinal and subconjunctival hemorrhages were recorded in 19/102 (18.6%), and in 13/102 (12.7%), respectively. In 4/102 (3.9%) animals, an entropion of the lower eyelid was present. Only one foal (1%) showed a congenital nuclear unilateral cataract. No other ocular abnormalities were detected. However, all foals showed various degrees of remnants of hyaloid system. One week after the first ocular examination, retinal hemorrhages had resolved in 100% of the eyes, whereas subconjunctival hemorrhages had disappeared in all eyes by the second week following the first examination. The acquired ocular lesions observed with relatively high frequency in the examined healthy Standardbred foals were ocular hemorrhages, which always showed a good outcome. Although these abnormalities were present at birth, they were not considered strictly congenital but likely acquired during parturition. Instead, congenital ocular abnormalities were rarely diagnosed, and the entropion of the lower eyelid was the most common disease in the breed. © 2012 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  20. The Manpower Quality Decline: An Ecological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    impairment. It is commonly known that such substances as alcohol, marijuana, and LSD can cause such impairment. Only recently, however, has evidence begun...and Hoffman reported marked behavioral improvement when chelation therapy was applied to the subgroup that had no known cause for their behavioral...of—and the French failure to use—oranges and lemons on their naval vessels. Rimland, Larson / Manpover Quality Decline 65 Albert Szent-Gyorgyi

  1. The growth and decline of cryonics

    OpenAIRE

    David Sanders Stodolsky

    2016-01-01

    Cryogenic storage has become known as an alternative to burial. While a substantial fraction of the public finds cryonics acceptable, enrollment remains miniscule. One of the greatest unknowns is whether cryonics companies will be able to operate continuously until reanimation of those in storage becomes possible. Two failure modes are considered; organizational decline and political attack. The cryonics industry has adopted a strategy that implicitly targets atheist millionaires and alienate...

  2. Capturing Ambulatory Activity Decline in Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, James T; Ellis, Terry D; Earhart, Gammon M; Ford, Matthew P; Foreman, K. Bo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Relatively little is known about the natural evolution of physical activity-related participation restrictions associated with Parkinson disease (PD). We examined this issue prospectively using continuous monitoring technology to capture the free-living ambulatory activity of persons living with PD engaging in life situations. We specifically sought (1) to explore natural, long-term changes in daily ambulatory activity, and (2) to compare the responsiveness of ambulatory activity parameters to clinical measures of gait and disease severity. Methods Thirty-three persons with PD participated (Hoehn and Yahr range of 1–3). Participants wore a step activity monitor for up to 7 days at baseline and again at 1-year follow-up. Mean daily values were calculated for parameters indicative of amount, intensity, frequency, and duration of ambulatory activity. Clinical measures included the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, the 6-Minute Walk, and Maximal Gait Speed. Parametric tests for paired samples were used to investigate changes in ambulatory activity parameters and clinical measures. Results Participants had significant declines in the amount and intensity of daily ambulatory activity but not in its frequency and duration (p < 0.007). Declines occurred in the absence of changes in clinical measures of gait or disease severity. The greatest 1-year decline occurred in the number of daily minutes participants spent engaging in at least moderate-intensity ambulatory activity. Conclusion Continuous monitoring of ambulatory activity beyond mere step counts may serve as a distinct and important means of quantifying declining ambulatory behavior associated with disease progression or improved ambulatory behavior resulting from rehabilitation, medical, and / or surgical interventions in persons with PD. PMID:22592060

  3. Detecting Kidney and Urinary Tract Abnormalities Before Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide Detecting Kidney and Urinary Tract Abnormalities Before Birth Print Email Ultrasound examinations are often done as ... What causes urinary tract abnormalities to occur before birth? In about one of 500 births, some abnormality ...

  4. Farmer's lung is now in decline.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Arya, A

    2012-02-03

    Farmer\\'s lung incidence in Ireland was constant until 1996, even though hay making methods were revolutionised in late 1980\\'s. We undertook this study to find out the incidence of farmer\\'s lung in Ireland from 1982-2002 and its correlation with rainfall and the effect of changing farm practices. The primary cases of farmer\\'s lung were identified from Hospital in Patients Enquiry (HIPE) unit of the national Economic & Social Research Institute (ESRI) Dublin. Rainfall data were obtained from Met Eireann whereas population, hay production and silage production were obtained from the Central Statistics Office, Dublin. As the farming population is in decline, we used the annual working unit (AWU), which reflects the true population at risk. An AWU is the equivalent of 1800 hours per farm worker per year. The incidence rates were constant from 1982-1996, but from 1997-2002 a marked decline was observed. There was strong positive correlation with hay production (r = 0.81) and strong negative correlation with silage production (r = -0.82). This study indicates that the incidence of farmer\\'s lung is now in decline.

  5. Chromosomal abnormality in patients with secondary amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safai, Akbar; Vasei, Mohammad; Attaranzadeh, Armin; Azad, Fariborz; Tabibi, Narjes

    2012-04-01

    Secondary amenorrhea is a condition in which there is cessation of menses after at least one menstruation. It is a symptom of different diseases, such as hormonal disturbances which range from pituitary to ovarian origin, as well as chromosomal abnormalities. Knowledge of the distinct cause of secondary amenorrhea is of tremendous benefit for the management and monitoring of patients. In this study, we determine the chromosomal abnormalities in patients with secondary amenorrhea in Southwest Iran. We selected 94 patients with secondary amenorrhea who referred to our Cytogenetic Ward from 2004 until 2009. For karyotyping, peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures were set up by conventional technique. In this study, 5.3% (n=5) of patients with secondary amenorrhea presented with chromosomal abnormalities, of which all contained an X element. The chromosomal abnormalities were: i) 45, X (n=1); ii) 47, XXX (n=1); iii) 45, X [13]/ 45, Xi(X)q[17] (n=1);  iv) 45, X[12]/46,X,+mar[12] (n=1); and v) 46,X,del(Xq)(q23q28) (n=1). Our study revealed that some causes of secondary amenorrhea could be due to chromosomal abnormalities. Therefore, cytogenetic studies should be important tests in the evaluation of patients with secondary amenorrhea.

  6. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and 15-Year Cognitive Decline: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsey, Pamela L; Bengtson, Lindsay G S; Punjabi, Naresh M; Shahar, Eyal; Mosley, Thomas H; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Wruck, Lisa M; MacLehose, Richard F; Alonso, Alvaro

    2016-02-01

    Prospective data evaluating abnormal sleep quality and quantity with cognitive decline are limited because most studies used subjective data and/or had short follow-up. We hypothesized that, over 15 y of follow-up, participants with objectively measured obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and other indices of poor sleep quantity and quality would experience greater decline in cognitive functioning than participants with normal sleep patterns. ARIC participants (n = 966; mean age 61 y, 55% women) with in-home polysomnography (1996-1998) and repeated cognitive testing were followed for 15 y. Three cognitive tests (Delayed Word Recall, Word Fluency, and Digit Symbol Substitution) were administered at two time points (1996-1998 and 2011-2013). Ten additional cognitive tests were administered at the 2011-2013 neurocognitive examination. OSA was modeled using established clinical OSA severity categories. Multivariable linear regression was used to explore associations of OSA and other sleep indices with change in cognitive tests between the two assessments. A median of 14.9 y (max: 17.3) passed between the two cognitive assessments. OSA category and additional indices of sleep (other measures of hypoxemia and disordered breathing, sleep fragmentation, sleep duration) were not associated with change in any cognitive test. Analyses of OSA severity categories and 10 cognitive tests administered only in 2011-2013 also showed little evidence of an association. Overall, abnormal sleep quality and quantity at midlife was not related to cognitive decline and later-life cognition. The effect of adverse sleep quality and quantity on cognitive decline among the elderly remains to be determined. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  7. Cognitive decline in temporal lobe epilepsy due to unilateral hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Carolina Mattos; Caboclo, Luís Otávio Sales Ferreira; da Silva, Tatiana Indelicato; Noffs, Maria Helena da Silva; Carrete, Henrique; Lin, Katia; Lin, Jaime; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2007-05-01

    We assessed the cognitive performance of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) caused by unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (HS), in comparison with that of matched, healthy controls. We report the relationship between cognitive measures and duration of epilepsy, correlating with hippocampal volumes, and the impact of educational level on cognitive decline. This study involved 61 outpatients (40 with 8 years of formal education) with unilateral HS and 61 controls. Volumetric MRI was performed on all patients and 10 controls. The results (mean, SD) of the neuropsychological tests of healthy subjects and patients were compared using the Student t and Mann-Whitney tests. Patients performed worse than controls in the neuropsychological evaluation. When adjusted z scores were used to calculate the impairment index, patients had a greater percentage of abnormal tests compared with controls. The cognitive decline, assessed through the impairment index, correlated with duration of epilepsy. Higher level of education did not protect against this decline, thus not supporting the hypothesis of cerebral reserve in this population. A significant correlation between hippocampal volumetric measures and duration of epilepsy was observed only in patients with left HS. Patients with TLE caused by HS present with cognitive morbidity that extends beyond memory deficits. Cognitive decline is associated with duration of epilepsy, and in patients with left-sided HS, duration may correlate with volumetric hippocampal loss.

  8. Cardiac abnormality prediction using HMLP network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Ja'afar; Ahmad, K. A.; Mat, Muhamad Hadzren; Rizman, Zairi Ismael; Ahmad, Shahril

    2018-02-01

    Cardiac abnormality often occurs regardless of gender, age and races but depends on the lifestyle. This problem sometimes does not show any symptoms and usually detected once it already critical which lead to a sudden death to the patient. Basically, cardiac abnormality is the irregular electrical signal that generate by the pacemaker of the heart. This paper attempts to develop a program that can detect cardiac abnormality activity through implementation of Hybrid Multilayer Perceptron (HMLP) network. A certain amount of data of the heartbeat signals from the electrocardiogram (ECG) will be used in this project to train the MLP and HMLP network by using Modified Recursive Prediction Error (MRPE) algorithm and to test the network performance.

  9. Radiographic abnormalities in tricyclic acid overdose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varnell, R.M.; Richardson, M.L.; Vincent, J.M.; Godwin, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Several case reports have described adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to tricyclic acid (TCA) overdose. During a 1-year period 83 patients requiring intubation secondary to drug overdose were evaluated. Abnormalities on chest radiographs occurred in 26 (50%) of the 54 patients with TCA overdose, compared to six (21%) of the 29 patients overdosed with other drugs. In addition, five (9%) of the patients with TCA overdose subsequently had radiographic and clinical abnormalities meeting the criteria for ARDS. Only one (3%) of the patients with non-TCA overdose subsequently had change suggesting ARDS. TCAs should be added to the list of drugs associated with ARDS, and TCA overdose should be considered a major risk factor in the development of radiographically evident abnormalities

  10. Schizophrenia and abnormal brain network hubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinov, Mikail; Bullmore, Ed

    2013-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous psychiatric disorder of unknown cause or characteristic pathology. Clinical neuroscientists increasingly postulate that schizophrenia is a disorder of brain network organization. In this article we discuss the conceptual framework of this dysconnection hypothesis, describe the predominant methodological paradigm for testing this hypothesis, and review recent evidence for disruption of central/hub brain regions, as a promising example of this hypothesis. We summarize studies of brain hubs in large-scale structural and functional brain networks and find strong evidence for network abnormalities of prefrontal hubs, and moderate evidence for network abnormalities of limbic, temporal, and parietal hubs. Future studies are needed to differentiate network dysfunction from previously observed gray- and white-matter abnormalities of these hubs, and to link endogenous network dysfunction phenotypes with perceptual, behavioral, and cognitive clinical phenotypes of schizophrenia.

  11. Folate metabolism abnormalities in autism: potential biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Richard E; Slattery, John C; Quadros, Edward V

    2017-08-03

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been linked to abnormalities in folate metabolism. Polymorphisms in folate genes may act in complex polygenic ways to increase the risk of developing ASD. Autoantibodies that block folate transport into the brain have been associated with ASD and children with ASD and these autoantibodies respond to high doses of a reduced form of folate known as folinic acid (leucovorin calcium). Some of the same abnormalities are also found in mothers of children with ASD and supplementing folate during preconception and gestational periods reduces the risk to the offspring from developing ASD. These data suggest that folate pathway abnormalities may be a major metabolic disturbance underlying ASD that can be leveraged as biomarkers to improve symptoms and prevent ASD.

  12. Abnormal cervical cytology and health care use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Maria Eiholm; Baillet, Miguel Vázquez-Prada; Dugué, Pierre-Antoine

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the long-term use of health care services in women with abnormal cytology results compared to women with normal cytology results. METHODS: We did a nationwide population-based study, using women aged 23 to 59years participating in the national organized...... cervical cancer screening program. We included a study population of 40,153 women with abnormal cytology (exposed) and 752,627 women with normal cytology (non-exposed). We retrieved data from the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish Pathology Data Bank, the National Health Service, the National...... the "before" to the "after" period. This increase was significantly higher for exposed than non-exposed women regarding contacts to GP, admissions to hospitals, and drug use. CONCLUSION: Women with abnormal cytology results constitute a selected group with a higher health care use than other women even before...

  13. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  14. Enhanced monitoring of abnormal emergency department demands

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2016-06-13

    This paper presents a statistical technique for detecting signs of abnormal situation generated by the influx of patients at emergency department (ED). The monitoring strategy developed was able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of abnormal situations caused by abnormal patient arrivals to the ED. More specifically, This work proposed the application of autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models combined with the generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) test for anomaly-detection. ARMA was used as the modelling framework of the ARMA-based GLR anomaly-detection methodology. The GLR test was applied to the uncorrelated residuals obtained from the ARMA model to detect anomalies when the data did not fit the reference ARMA model. The ARMA-based GLR hypothesis testing scheme was successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the pediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital center, France. © 2015 IEEE.

  15. Report on Congress on abnormal occurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    Section 208 of the energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from January 1 through March 31, 1991. The report discusses six abnormal occurrences, none of which involved a nuclear power plant. Five of the events occurred at NRC-licensed facilities: one involved a significant degradation of plant safety at a nuclear fuel cycle facility, one involved a medical diagnostic misadministration, and three involved medical therapy misadministrations. An Agreement State (Arizona) reported one abnormal occurrence that involved medical therapy misadministrations

  16. Abnormal fetal head shape: aetiology and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Olav Bjørn; David, Anna; Thomasson, Louise

    2007-01-01

    and define management pathways for fetuses with an abnormal skull shape. Methods: Our FMU databases were searched to ascertain all fetuses with an abnormal skull shape. Sonographic findings, diagnosis and outcome were reviewed. Results: Of the 370 cases identified, 31.6% were associated with spinabifida......Background: Abnormal head shape is an uncommon finding on prenatal ultrasound, often associated with breech presentation, spinabifida, aneuploidy or secondary to oligohydramnios or fetal position. Other aetiologies are rarer and may be more difficult to define. Objective: To determine the aetiology...... incidence of genetic syndromes, in the absence of a clear diagnosis, referral to a tertiary centre and genetic input is advised as detection of subtle sonographic features may aid diagnosis, allowing for targeted molecular analysis. An algorithm for management will be proposed....

  17. Osseous temporomandibular joint abnormalities in rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Rikshospitalet, Oslo

    1990-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was compared with hypocycloidal tomography in 30 joints of 15 adults with rheumatic disease. CT included 1.5 mm thick axial scans (at 1.0 mm intervals) with reformatted oblique sagittal and oblique coronal sections. Multisection (at 2.0 mm intervals) tomography included oblique sagittal and occasionally, oblique coronal sections. CT demonstrated bone abnormalities in 21 and tomography in 20 joints, indicating high agreement between the imaging modalities regarding number of abnormal TMJs. Bone structures were, however, better visualized by multiplanar CT due to superior contrast and spatial resolution particularly in the most lateral and medial parts of the joint, indicating superiority of CT for depicting subtle bony TMJ abnormalities in patients with rheumatic disease. (orig.)

  18. [Abnormal peripheral circulation in heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Solal, A; Laperche, T; Caviezel, B; Dahan, M; Gourgon, R

    1994-06-01

    Left ventricular failure leads to circulatory failure which causes clinical symptoms and in which regional blood flow changes play an important role. An abnormality of systemic vasodilatation on exercise or on pharmacological intervention has been shown. This affects both the resistance and conductive vessels and is mainly functional, related to neurohormonal stimulation with a predominance of vasoconstrictive factors amongst which increased adrenergic tone probably plays an essential part. A modification of the endothelium-dependent response has recently been confirmed. The presence of structural vascular abnormalities (increase in parietal sodium and water concentrations, "remodelling" remains debatable in the human. These abnormalities have a common factor in their chronicity and take time to regress with medical treatment or after cardiac transplantation. Physical training seems to induce more marked and, above all, more rapid effects.

  19. Abnormal vibration induced illusion of movement in essential tremor: evidence for abnormal muscle spindle afferent function

    OpenAIRE

    Frima, N; Grunewald, R

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Vibration induced illusion of movement (VIIM) is abnormal in patients with idiopathic focal dystonia, an abnormality which corrects with fatigue of the vibrated muscle. Since dystonia and essential tremor sometimes coexist in families, we investigated the perception of VIIM and the effect of fatigue on VIIM in patients with essential tremor.

  20. Nonpathologizing trauma interventions in abnormal psychology courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Stephanie M; Luchner, Andrew F; Pickett, Rachel F

    2016-01-01

    Because abnormal psychology courses presuppose a focus on pathological human functioning, nonpathologizing interventions within these classes are particularly powerful and can reach survivors, bystanders, and perpetrators. Interventions are needed to improve the social response to trauma on college campuses. By applying psychodynamic and feminist multicultural theory, instructors can deliver nonpathologizing interventions about trauma and trauma response within these classes. We recommend class-based interventions with the following aims: (a) intentionally using nonpathologizing language, (b) normalizing trauma responses, (c) subjectively defining trauma, (d) challenging secondary victimization, and (e) questioning the delineation of abnormal and normal. The recommendations promote implications for instructor self-reflection, therapy interventions, and future research.

  1. Temporomandibular joint abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.; Tveito, L.; Dale, K.; Ruud, A.F.

    1981-01-01

    Transantral (infraorbital, transmaxillary) examination of the temporomandibular joint was compared with conventional transcranial examination and lateral tomography of patients with rheumatoid arthritis aged 23 to 83. Abnormalities were most frequently found at tomography, and equally frequent at transantral and transcranial examinations. The various examinations appeared to be rather supplementary. Bone erosion was frequently observed at transantral examination, which appeared to be the preferable radiographic method for detecting arthritis of this joint. Combined with transcranial examination, the method is recommended for the evaluation of temporomandibular joint abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis if tomographic equipment is not available. (Auth.)

  2. Temporal abnormalities in children with developmental dyscalculia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicario, Carmelo Mario; Rappo, Gaetano; Pepi, Annamaria; Pavan, Andrea; Martino, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Recent imaging studies have associated Developmental dyscalculia (DD) to structural and functional alterations corresponding Parietal and the Prefrontal cortex (PFC). Since these areas were shown also to be involved in timing abilities, we hypothesized that time processing is abnormal in DD. We compared time processing abilities between 10 children with pure DD (8 years old) and 11 age-matched healthy children. Results show that the DD group underestimated duration of a sub-second scale when asked to perform a time comparison task. The timing abnormality observed in our DD participants is consistent with evidence of a shared fronto-parietal neural network for representing time and quantity.

  3. Decline in male circumcision in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, DaiSik; Koo, Sung-Ae; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2012-12-11

    To investigate the changing circumcision rate in South Korea in the last decade and to propose underlying causes for this change, in the context of the present fluctuating world-wide trends in circumcision. From 2009 to 2011, 3,296 South Korean males (or their parents) aged 0-64 years were asked about their circumcision status, their age at circumcision, and their information level regarding circumcision. We employed non-probability sampling considering the sensitive questions on the study theme. Currently the age-standardized circumcision rate for South Korean males aged 14-29 is found to be 75.8%. In an earlier study performed in 2002, the rate for the same age group was 86.3%. Of particular interest, males aged 14-16 show a circumcision rate of 56.4%, while the same age group 10 years ago displayed a much higher percentage, at 88.4%. In addition, the extraordinarily high circumcision rate of 95.2% found 10 years ago for the 17-19 age group is now reduced to 74.4%. Interestingly, of the circumcised males, the percentage circumcised in the last decade was only 25.2%; i.e., the majority of the currently circumcised males had undergone the operation prior to 2002, indicating that the actual change in the last decade is far greater. Consistent with this conjecture, the 2002 survey showed that the majority of circumcised males (75.7%) had undergone the operation in the decade prior to that point. Focusing on the flagship age group of 14-16, this drop suggests that, considering the population structure of Korean males, approximately one million fewer circumcision operations have been performed in the last decade relative to the case of non-decline. This decline is strongly correlated with the information available through internet, newspapers, lectures, books, and television: within the circumcised population, both the patients and their parents had less prior knowledge regarding circumcision, other than information obtained from person to person by oral communication

  4. Decline in male circumcision in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim DaiSik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the changing circumcision rate in South Korea in the last decade and to propose underlying causes for this change, in the context of the present fluctuating world-wide trends in circumcision. Methods From 2009 to 2011, 3,296 South Korean males (or their parents aged 0–64 years were asked about their circumcision status, their age at circumcision, and their information level regarding circumcision. We employed non-probability sampling considering the sensitive questions on the study theme. Results Currently the age-standardized circumcision rate for South Korean males aged 14–29 is found to be 75.8%. In an earlier study performed in 2002, the rate for the same age group was 86.3%. Of particular interest, males aged 14–16 show a circumcision rate of 56.4%, while the same age group 10 years ago displayed a much higher percentage, at 88.4%. In addition, the extraordinarily high circumcision rate of 95.2% found 10 years ago for the 17–19 age group is now reduced to 74.4%. Interestingly, of the circumcised males, the percentage circumcised in the last decade was only 25.2%; i.e., the majority of the currently circumcised males had undergone the operation prior to 2002, indicating that the actual change in the last decade is far greater. Consistent with this conjecture, the 2002 survey showed that the majority of circumcised males (75.7% had undergone the operation in the decade prior to that point. Focusing on the flagship age group of 14–16, this drop suggests that, considering the population structure of Korean males, approximately one million fewer circumcision operations have been performed in the last decade relative to the case of non-decline. This decline is strongly correlated with the information available through internet, newspapers, lectures, books, and television: within the circumcised population, both the patients and their parents had less prior knowledge regarding circumcision, other than

  5. Desertification: measuring population decline in rural Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, M E

    1994-10-01

    "This paper addresses the issue of rural population decline in the Republic of Ireland during the past two decades having regard to size of place and estimated net migration for key age groups. The analysis is pursued at the level of some 160 Rural Districts. The results of the analysis confirm expected relationships between peripheral locations, small population size and a depletion of the young working age groups. The method used, however, permits the links between size of place, population change and the composition of that change to be identified with some precision." excerpt

  6. Ophthalmologic abnormalities among deaf students in Kaduna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The association between deafness and ocular problems is well established; however the nature and prevalence of these problems are diverse across the globe. Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the nature and prevalence of ophthalmologic abnormalities in deaf students and offer treatment to ...

  7. Developmental abnormalities of mid and hindbrain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Pediatric Neurology Department, Cairo University, 2Clinical Genetics ... Research Centre,3Human Cytogenetics Department, Human Genetics and. Genome ..... cVH. 2/23 cri du chat. 1/23 del. 18q21.1- qter. 1/23. Breathing abnormalities. 3. 13. 3. -. 1. -. -. -. -. Feeding problems. 8. 34.8. -. 5. 2. -. -. 1. -. Autistic behavior. 3. 13.

  8. Prevelence and Pattern of Electrocardiographic Abnormalities Seen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: There is paucity of published data on the prevalence and pattern of electrocardiographic abnormalities (ECGA) seen in adult Nigerians referred for this investigation. This study determined the prevalence and pattern of some ECGA in Nigerian adults. Methods: This is a hospital based audit to determine the ...

  9. Relationship among sera lipoprotein abnormalities in healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-29

    Aug 29, 2011 ... HOMA-IR (P = 0.03) in the case group as compared to the control group. We conclude that a family history of diabetic parents can lead to lipid parameters abnormalities and CVD risk factor via aggregation of inherited defected genes. Key words: Diabetes, oxidized-low density lipoprotein (LDL), Apo B100, ...

  10. immunological arthritis Prevalence of biochemical and abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-02-02

    Feb 2, 1991 ... Tile prevalence of biochemical and immunological abnormali- ties was studied in a group of 256 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (104 coloureds, 100 whites and 52 blacks). The most common biochemical abnormalities detected were a reduction in the serum creatinine value (43,4%), raised globulins (39 ...

  11. Prevalence Of Dental Abnormalities Among Handicapped Children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Over 34% of them had various dental abnormalities, the most commonly encountered being enamel hypoplasia which constituted 12.3%, and more than half of which was chronologic (58.9%). This was predominant among the mentally handicapped (13.5%) and the blind (12.5%). Tetracyline staining was also a common ...

  12. Dynamic Abnormal Grain Growth in Refractory Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noell, Philip J.; Taleff, Eric M.

    2015-11-01

    High-temperature plastic deformation of the body-centered cubic (BCC) refractory metals Mo and Ta can initiate and propagate abnormal grains at significantly lower temperatures and faster rates than is possible by static annealing alone. This discovery reveals a new and potentially important aspect of abnormal grain growth (AGG) phenomena. The process of AGG during plastic deformation at elevated temperatures, termed dynamic abnormal grain growth (DAGG), was observed at homologous temperatures between 0.52 and 0.72 in both Mo and Ta sheet materials; these temperatures are much lower than those for previous observations of AGG in these materials during static annealing. DAGG was used to repeatedly grow single crystals several centimeters in length. Investigations to date have produced a basic understanding of the conditions that lead to DAGG and how DAGG is affected by microstructure in BCC refractory metals. The current state of understanding for DAGG is reviewed in this paper. Attention is given to the roles of temperature, plastic strain, boundary mobility and preexisting microstructure. DAGG is considered for its potential useful applications in solid-state crystal growth and its possibly detrimental role in creating undesired abnormal grains during thermomechanical processing.

  13. Somatic chromosomal abnormalities in couples undergoing infertility ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1999). Oligozoospermia is .... age of abnormal metaphases needed to distinguish between low level and true mosaicism. This borderline ... Moore A. K., Lynch K., Arny M. J. and Grow D. R. 2008 Turner mosaicism (45,X/46,XX) diagnosed in a ...

  14. Heat stress protection in abnormally hot environments.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schutte, PC

    1994-11-01

    Full Text Available The present report presents the findings of SIMRAC project GAP 045 entitled ‘Heat stress protection in abnormally hot environments’. It is intended as a reference to develop guidelines which, in turn would assist mine management in establishing safe...

  15. The prevalence of electroencephalographic abnormalities and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-05-20

    May 20, 2004 ... South African studies. There is little South African data examining either prevalence or usefulness of EEG abnormalities among adult psychiatric patients. Some work has been done in adolescents. Szabo1 reviewed all admissions to the adolescent inpatient unit at Tara. Hospital between 1990 and 1995.

  16. Lentiginosis, Deafness and Cardiac Abnormalities | Cronje | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three members of a family with features of the 'leopard' syndrome are described. The important findings were generalized lentigo, deafness, and cardiac and electrocardiographic abnormalities. Progressive obstructive cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias are features of the condition which may be present, and are potentially ...

  17. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fabiano M. Rosa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES. METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%. Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%, abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%, prominent occiput (52%, posteriorly rotated (46% and low set ears (44%, and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%. Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%, orofacial clefts (12%, preauricular tags (10%, facial palsy (4%, encephalocele (4%, absence of external auditory canal (2% and asymmetric face (2%. One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature.

  18. Somatic chromosomal abnormalities in couples undergoing infertility ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1996; Johnson 1998). Consid- ering pooled data obtained from more than 9000 azoosper- mic and oligozoospermic men, a 5.8% incidence of chromo- somal abnormalities has been found. Of these, 4.2% affect the gonosomes and 1.5% the autosomes, respectively (John- son 1998). In detail, sex chromosome anomalies ...

  19. Fetal chromosome abnormalities and congenital malformations: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Our objective were to determine and evaluate the role of genetic counseling and amniocentesis in early detection of chromosomal abnormalities or congenital malformations among women at risk. Patients and Methods: The study was performed on 784 pregnant women. Results: The cause for seeking genetic ...

  20. Structural and molecular hair abnormalities in trichothiodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Christine; Morris, Andrea; Schlücker, Sebastian; Imoto, Kyoko; Price, Vera H; Menefee, Emory; Wincovitch, Stephen M; Levin, Ira W; Tamura, Deborah; Strehle, Katrin R; Kraemer, Kenneth H; DiGiovanna, John J

    2006-10-01

    We examined hair from 15 patients with trichothiodystrophy (TTD), a rare inherited disorder with brittle, cystine-deficient hair. They had a wide variety of phenotypes, from brittle hair only to severe intellectual impairment and developmental delay. Polarizing light microscopic examination showed alternating light and dark (tiger tail) bands under polarizing microscopy. Confocal microscopy captured structural features of breaks in intact TTD hairs. The autofluorescent appearance was regular and smooth in normal donors and markedly irregular in sections of TTD hairs possibly reflecting abnormalities in melanin distribution. Scanning electron microscopy revealed numerous surface irregularities. All TTD hair samples had reduced sulfur content. We observed an inverse correlation (R(val)=0.9) between sulfur content and percent of hairs with shaft abnormalities (trichoschisis, trichorrhexis nodosa, or ribbon/twist). There was no association between clinical disease severity and percent of abnormal hairs. Raman spectra of hairs from TTD patients and normal donors revealed a larger contribution of energetically less favored disulfide conformers in TTD hairs. Our data indicate that the brittleness of the TTD hair is dependent upon abnormalities at several levels of organization. These changes make TTD hairs excessively prone to breakage and weathering.

  1. Correcting abnormal speaking through communication partners ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The listed characteristics are called speech disorders. Abnormal speaking attracts some penalties to the speaker. The penalties are usually very disturbing to the speaker that undertaking some therapeutic measures becomes inevitable. Communication partners strategy is a speech correction approach which makes use of ...

  2. Teaching Abnormal Psychology in a Multimedia Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, JoAnne

    1996-01-01

    Examines the techniques used in teaching an abnormal psychology class in a multimedia environment with two computers and a variety of audiovisual equipment. Students respond anonymously to various questions via keypads mounted on their desks, then immediately view and discuss summaries of their responses. (MJP)

  3. Schizophrenogenic Parenting in Abnormal Psychology Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Otto F.

    1989-01-01

    Considers the treatment of family causation of schizophrenia in undergraduate abnormal psychology textbooks. Reviews texts published only after 1986. Points out a number of implications for psychologists which arise from the inclusion in these texts of the idea that parents cause schizophrenia, not the least of which is the potential for…

  4. Abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in male psychopathic offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppenbrouwers, Sylco S; De Jesus, Danilo R; Sun, Yinming; Stirpe, Tania; Hofman, Dennis; McMaster, Jeff; Hughes, Ginny; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2014-01-01

    Psychopathic offenders inevitably violate interpersonal norms and frequently resort to aggressive and criminal behaviour. The affective and cognitive deficits underlying these behaviours have been linked to abnormalities in functional interhemispheric connectivity. However, direct neurophysiological evidence for dysfunctional connectivity in psychopathic offenders is lacking. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography to examine interhemispheric connectivity in the dorsolateral and motor cortex in a sample of psychopathic offenders and healthy controls. We also measured intracortical inhibition and facilitation over the left and right motor cortex to investigate the effects of local cortical processes on interhemispheric connectivity. We enrolled 17 psychopathic offenders and 14 controls in our study. Global abnormalities in right to left functional connectivity were observed in psychopathic offenders compared with controls. Furthermore, in contrast to controls, psychopathic offenders showed increased intracortical inhibition in the right, but not the left, hemisphere. The relatively small sample size limited the sensitivity to show that the abnormalities in interhemispheric connectivity were specifically related to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in psychopathic offenders. To our knowledge, this study provides the first neurophysiological evidence for abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in psychopathic offenders and may further our understanding of the disruptive antisocial behaviour of these offenders.

  5. Psychology Faculty Perceptions of Abnormal Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapport, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    The problem. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the perceptions and opinions of psychology professors regarding the accuracy and inclusiveness of abnormal psychology textbooks. It sought answers from psychology professors to the following questions: (1) What are the expectations of the psychology faculty at a private university of…

  6. Plant abnormality monitoring method and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Yusuke; Uchida, Shunsuke; Fujimori, Haruo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and a device capable of detecting abnormal symptoms of equipments having failed portions and portions to be repaired and requiring concentrated monitoring in a plant during operation, for example, nuclear power plants, in an early stage without losing reliability. Namely, the abnormality of the plant is judged based on the comparison of plant operation parameters and their allowable values in the method of monitoring plant abnormality. In this case, the allowable values of the plant operation parameters allowed to be changed based on the information on the state of equipments which shows the state of constitutional equipments of the plant. In addition, when a measured plant operation parameter exceeds the allowable value of each of the previously set plant operation parameters, allowable values of other plant operation parameters having relation with the plant operation parameters can be changed. According to the present invention, since the allowable range of the plant operation parameters for the equipments to be repaired and failed equipments can be made narrower than that of ordinary equipments, abnormal symptoms can be detected on the normal side in an early stage. (I.S.)

  7. ORIGINAL ARTICLE EEG changes and neuroimaging abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    Background:Autism is currently viewed as a genetically determined neurode- velopmental disorder although its definite underlying etiology remains to be established. Aim of the Study: Our purpose was to assess autism related morphological neuroimaging changes of the brain and EEG abnormalities in correlation to the.

  8. Craniocervical junction abnormalities with atlantoaxial subluxation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Craniocervical junction abnormalities with atlantoaxial subluxation caused by ventral subluxation of C2 were diagnosed in a 6-month-old female Pomeranian with tetraplegia as a clinical sign. Lateral survey radiography of the neck with flexion revealed atlantoaxial subluxation with ventral subluxation of C2. Computed ...

  9. Recurrent chromosome 6 abnormalities in malignant mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribotta, M; Roseo, F; Salvio, M; Castagneto, B; Carbone, M; Procopio, A; Giordano, A; Mutti, L

    1998-04-01

    The long latency period between asbestos exposure and the onset of malignant mesothelioma (MM) suggests that a multistep tumorigenesis process occurs whilst the capability of asbestos fibres to interfere directly with chromosomes focuses on the critical role of the chromosomal abnormalities in this neoplasm. The aim of our study was to identify any recurrent chromosomal changes in ten primary MM cell cultures derived from pleural effusions of patients with MM from the same geographic area and environmental and/or occupational exposure to asbestos fibers. Cytogenetic analysis was performed in accordance with International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature. Our results confirmed a great number of cytogenetic abnormalities in MM cells. Recurrent loss of the long arms of chromosome 6 (6q-) was the most frequent abnormality detected (four epithelial and two mixed subtypes) while, on the whole, abnormalities of chromosome 6 were found in nine out of ten cases whereas chromosome 6 was normal only in the case with fibromatous subtype. Monosomy 13 and 17 was found in five cases, monosomy 14 in four cases and 22 in three cases. Since deletion of 6q- was detected even in relatively undisturbed karyotype, we hypothesize a multistep carcinogenic process in which deletion of 6q- is an early event in the development and progression of malignant mesothelioma.

  10. Ophthalmological abnormalities in wild European hedgehogs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study we aimed to examine wild European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) in rescue centres and to determine ocular abnormalities in this animal population. Three hundred animals varying in age from 2 months to 5 years were examined, 147 being male and 153 female. All animals were evaluated with direct ...

  11. Gastric emptying abnormal in duodenal ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, S.; Heading, R.C.; Taylor, T.V.; Forrest, J.A.; Tothill, P.

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the possibility that an abnormality of gastric emptying exists in duodenal ulcer and to determine if such an abnormality persists after ulcer healing, scintigraphic gastric emptying measurements were undertaken in 16 duodenal ulcer patients before, during, and after therapy with cimetidine; in 12 patients with pernicious anemia, and in 12 control subjects. No difference was detected in the rate or pattern of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients before and after ulcer healing with cimetidine compared with controls, but emptying of the solid component of the test meal was more rapid during treatment with the drug. Comparison of emptying patterns obtained in duodenal ulcer subjects during and after cimetidine treatment with those obtained in pernicious anemia patients and controls revealed a similar relationship that was characterized by a tendency for reduction in the normal differentiation between the emptying of solid and liquid from the stomach. The similarity in emptying patterns in these groups of subjects suggests that gastric emptying of solids may be influenced by changes in the volume of gastric secretion. The failure to detect an abnormality of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer subjects before and after ulcer healing calls into question the widespread belief that abnormally rapid gastric emptying is a feature with pathogenetic significance in duodenal ulcer disease

  12. The impact of freedom on fertility decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Martha M; Prata, Ndola; Potts, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Although fertility decline often correlates with improvements in socioeconomic conditions, many demographers have found flaws in demographic transition theories that depend on changes in distal factors such as increased wealth or education. Human beings worldwide engage in sexual intercourse much more frequently than is needed to conceive the number of children they want, and for women who do not have access to the information and means they need to separate sex from childbearing, the default position is a large family. In many societies, male patriarchal drives to control female reproduction give rise to unnecessary medical rules constraining family planning (including safe abortion) or justifying child marriage. Widespread misinformation about contraception makes women afraid to adopt modern family planning. The barriers to family planning can be so deeply infused that for many women the idea of managing their fertility is not considered an option. Conversely, there is evidence that once family planning is introduced into a society, then it is normal consumer behaviour for individuals to welcome a new technology they had not wanted until it became realistically available. We contend that in societies free from child marriage, wherever women have access to a range of contraceptive methods, along with correct information and backed up by safe abortion, family size will always fall. Education and wealth can make the adoption of family planning easier, but they are not prerequisites for fertility decline. By contrast, access to family planning itself can accelerate economic development and the spread of education.

  13. Declining suburbs in Europe and Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audirac, Ivonne; Cunningham-Sabot, Emmanuèle; Fol, Sylvie; Moraes, Sergio Torres

    2012-01-01

    Suburban shrinkage, understood as a degenerative urban process stemming from the demise of the Fordist mode of urbanism, is generally manifested in a decline in population, industry and employment. It is also intimately linked to the global restructuring of industrial organization associated with the rise of the post-Fordist mode of urbanism and, more recently, the thrust of Asian industrialization. Framed in the discourse of industrial urbanism, this article examines the first ring of industrial suburbs that developed around large cities in their most rapid Fordist urbanization phase. These industrial suburbs, although they were formed at different times, are today experiencing specific mutations and undergoing profound restructuring on account of their particular spatial position between the central area and the expanding peripheries of the post-Fordist metropolis. This article describes and compares suburban decline in two European cities (Glasgow and Paris) and two Latin American Cities (São Paulo, Brazil and Guadalajara, Mexico), as different instances of places asymmetrically and fragmentarily integrated into the geography of globalization.

  14. The cultural evolution of fertility decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colleran, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Cultural evolutionists have long been interested in the problem of why fertility declines as populations develop. By outlining plausible mechanistic links between individual decision-making, information flow in populations and competition between groups, models of cultural evolution offer a novel and powerful approach for integrating multiple levels of explanation of fertility transitions. However, only a modest number of models have been published. Their assumptions often differ from those in other evolutionary approaches to social behaviour, but their empirical predictions are often similar. Here I offer the first overview of cultural evolutionary research on demographic transition, critically compare it with approaches taken by other evolutionary researchers, identify gaps and overlaps, and highlight parallel debates in demography. I suggest that researchers divide their labour between three distinct phases of fertility decline—the origin, spread and maintenance of low fertility—each of which may be driven by different causal processes, at different scales, requiring different theoretical and empirical tools. A comparative, multi-level and mechanistic framework is essential for elucidating both the evolved aspects of our psychology that govern reproductive decision-making, and the social, ecological and cultural contingencies that precipitate and sustain fertility decline. PMID:27022079

  15. The Decline of the Urban Narrative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierluigi Giordani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article there is an attempt to focus in on the decline and disappearance of the concept of  narrative in the decline of the modern period and above all in the post-modern period,  wondering about the unknown future. It has to do with the story of  of  the progressive loss of the characteristics and of the contents of the narrative up to the present day celebration of its negation. In the long “century” (the 1900s, the contradiction between the course of reality and the good intentions of saving the constitutive principle of the city expressed in the “western canon” has been irreversibly amplified. In the contemporary city, there no longer exists the conditions which permit the ascertaining of urban identity, just as the gradual disappearance of every residual trace of configuration and therefore of evidence of narration  certifies the end of the urban narrative.

  16. American World Empire or Declining Hegemony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Boswell

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Gowan challenges the usefulness of world-system theory in accounting for the emergence of an American world empire. His argument is based on one fundamental assumption, that of overwhelming U.S. power in the contemporary period. The assumption, however, is flawed. The U.S. is clearly an uncontested military superpower, a world leader with the ability to project its power and interests around the world. But its economic hegemony is in decline, and it is no longer the overwhelming presence it once was in the world-economy. Moreover, Gowan is unable to support his thesis that the U.S. is becoming an empire over Europe. Although the U.S. occupation and administration of Iraq is an example of colonial imperialism, there is no evidence to show that the U.S. has begun to establish a core-wide empire. On the contrary, U.S. political control over Europe has declined to its lowest level in the post-WWII period. The persuasiveness of world-system theory in explaining the changing global political economy remains strong.

  17. Decline of the world's saline lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtsbaugh, Wayne A.; Miller, Craig; Null, Sarah E.; Derose, R. Justin; Wilcock, Peter; Hahnenberger, Maura; Howe, Frank; Moore, Johnnie

    2017-11-01

    Many of the world's saline lakes are shrinking at alarming rates, reducing waterbird habitat and economic benefits while threatening human health. Saline lakes are long-term basin-wide integrators of climatic conditions that shrink and grow with natural climatic variation. In contrast, water withdrawals for human use exert a sustained reduction in lake inflows and levels. Quantifying the relative contributions of natural variability and human impacts to lake inflows is needed to preserve these lakes. With a credible water balance, causes of lake decline from water diversions or climate variability can be identified and the inflow needed to maintain lake health can be defined. Without a water balance, natural variability can be an excuse for inaction. Here we describe the decline of several of the world's large saline lakes and use a water balance for Great Salt Lake (USA) to demonstrate that consumptive water use rather than long-term climate change has greatly reduced its size. The inflow needed to maintain bird habitat, support lake-related industries and prevent dust storms that threaten human health and agriculture can be identified and provides the information to evaluate the difficult tradeoffs between direct benefits of consumptive water use and ecosystem services provided by saline lakes.

  18. Association of incidental emphysema with annual lung function decline and future development of airflow limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koo HK

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyeon-Kyoung Koo,1 Kwang Nam Jin,2 Deog Kyeom Kim,3 Hee Soon Chung,3 Chang-Hoon Lee3,4 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, College of Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-Do, 2Department of Radiology, Seoul Metropolitan Government – Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea Objectives: Emphysema is one of the prognostic factors for rapid lung function decline in patients with COPD, but the impact of incidentally detected emphysema on population without spirometric abnormalities has not been evaluated. This study aimed to determine whether emphysema detected upon computed tomography (CT screening would accelerate the rate of lung function decline and influence the possibility of future development of airflow limitation in a population without spirometric abnormalities.Materials and methods: Subjects who participated in a routine screening for health checkup and follow-up pulmonary function tests for at least 3 years between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively enrolled. The percentage of low-attenuation area below −950 Hounsfield units (%LAA−950 was calculated automatically. A calculated value of %LAA−950 that exceeded 10% was defined as emphysema. Adjusted annual lung function decline was analyzed using random-slope, random-intercept mixed linear regression models.Results: A total of 628 healthy subjects within the normal range of spriometric values were included. Multivariable analysis showed that the emphysema group exhibited a faster decline in forced vital capacity (−33.9 versus −18.8

  19. Abnormal Selective Attention Normalizes P3 Amplitudes in PDD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksma, Marco R.; Kemner, Chantal; Kenemans, J. Leon; van Engeland, Herman

    2006-01-01

    This paper studied whether abnormal P3 amplitudes in PDD are a corollary of abnormalities in ERP components related to selective attention in visual and auditory tasks. Furthermore, this study sought to clarify possible age differences in such abnormalities. Children with PDD showed smaller P3 amplitudes than controls, but no abnormalities in…

  20. Indoor Environmental Factors and Occurrence of Lung Function Decline in Adult Residents in Summer in Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Yu; Kebin, Li; Yin, Tang; Jie, Xu

    2016-11-01

    There is conflicting reports on the respiratory health effects of indoor risk factor exposure. The aim of this study was to assess the association of indoor environmental factors to pulmonary function in an adult population in Zunyi City of Southwest China. Between July and Sep 2012, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of people aged ≥18 yr in 11 inner-city areas of Zunyi. Data on asthma and asthma-related symptoms and selected home environmental factors were assessed by questionnaire. Lung function measurements, including FVC, FEV 1 , FEV 1 /FVC and PEFR, were assessed and compared. Exposure to indoor and outdoor PM 2.5 was monitored by measurement of PM 2.5 emission relative concentration. Cooking oil fumes, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and coal fuel use were associated with impaired lung function among adults in summer season ( P oil fumes, pest in kitchen, mosquito repellent, fluffy blanket, pets, visible mold in bedroom and ETS (active and passive smoking) tended to exhibit greater decreases in FVC, FEV 1 and PEFR values compared with their non-exposed counterparts ( P kitchen, sleeping area and outdoor were 486.0cpm, 463.0cpm and 459.0cpm, respectively. PM 2.5 relative concentration in indoor kitchen and sleeping area were significant higher than outdoor ( P kitchen, sleeping area risk factors and ETS exposure and a reduction in lung function in summer was revealed in Zunyi.

  1. Corpus callosum abnormalities: neuroradiological and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashim, Aqeela H; Blaser, Susan; Raybaud, Charles; MacGregor, Daune

    2016-05-01

    To study neuroradiological features in pediatric patients with corpus callosum abnormalities, using new functional subtyping for the corpus callosum, and to correlate the features with the clinical presentation. We performed a retrospective review of 125 patients with radiologically identified abnormalities of the corpus callosum seen between 1999 and 2012. The study reviewed clinical features, genetic etiology, and chromosomal microarray (CMA) results. We used a new functional classification for callosal abnormalities based on embryological and anatomical correlations with four classes: complete agenesis, anterior agenesis (rostrum, genu, body), posterior agenesis (isthmus, splenium), and complete hypoplasia (thinning). We also studied the presence of extracallosal abnormalities. The new functional callosal subtyping did not reveal significant differences between the various subtypes in association with neurological outcome; however, the presence of cardiac disease was found more frequently in the group with complete agenesis. Thirty-seven per cent (46/125) had identifiable causes: of these, 48% (22/46) had a monogenic disorder, 30% (14/46) had a pathogenic chromosomal copy-number variant detected by CMA or karyotype, and 22% (10/46) had a recognizable clinical syndrome for which no confirmatory genetic test was available (namely Aicardi syndrome/septo-optic dysplasia and Goldenhar syndrome). The diagnostic yield for a significant CMA change was 19%. The presence of Probst bundles was found to be associated with a better neurodevelopmental outcome. The functional classification system alone 'without clinical data' cannot predict the functional outcome. The presence of extracallosal brain abnormalities and an underlying genetic diagnosis predicted a worse neurodevelopmental outcome. This study highlights the importance of CMA testing and cardiac evaluation as part of a routine screen. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  2. Hemostatic Abnormalities in Multiple Myeloma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogia, Aarti; Sikka, Meera; Sharma, Satender; Rusia, Usha

    2018-01-27

    Background: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic plasma cell disorder characterized by clonal proliferation of plasma cells in the bone marrow. Diverse hemostatic abnormalities have been reported in patients with myeloma which predispose to bleeding and also thrombosis. Methods: Complete blood count, biochemical parameters and parameters of hemostasis i.e. platelet count, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), factor VIII assay results, plasma fibrinogen, D-dimer and lupus anticoagulant, were assessed in 29 MM patients and 30 age matched controls. Results: The most frequent abnormal screening parameter was APTT. Of the six indicative of a bleeding tendency i.e. thrombocytopenia, prolonged PT, APTT, TT, reduced plasma fibrinogen and factor VIII, at least one was abnormal in 8 (27.6%) patients. Of the four prothrombotic markers, lupus anticoagulant, D-dimer, elevated factor VIII and plasma fibrinogen, one or more marker was present in 24 (82.7%). D-dimer was the most common prothrombotic marker, being elevated in 22 (75.9%) patients. One or more laboratory parameter of hemostasis was abnormal in all 29 (100%) patients. Though thrombotic complications are reported to be less frequent as compared to hemorrhagic manifestations, one or more marker of thrombosis was present in 24 (82.7%) patients. Conclusion: This study provided laboratory evidence of hemostatic dysfunction which may be associated with thrombotic or bleeding complications at diagnosis in all MM patients. Hence, screening for these abnormalities at the time of diagnosis should help improved prognosis in such cases. Creative Commons Attribution License

  3. Parenchymal abnormalities associated with developmental venous anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Millan Ruiz, Diego; Gailloud, Philippe [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Delavelle, Jacqueline [Geneva University Hospital, Neuroradiology Section, Department of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Geneva (Switzerland); Yilmaz, Hasan; Ruefenacht, Daniel A. [Geneva University Hospital, Section of Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Geneva (Switzerland); Piovan, Enrico; Bertramello, Alberto; Pizzini, Francesca [Verona City Hospital, Service of Neuroradiology, Verona (Italy)

    2007-12-15

    To report a retrospective series of 84 cerebral developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), focusing on associated parenchymal abnormalities within the drainage territory of the DVA. DVAs were identified during routine diagnostic radiological work-up based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (60 cases), computed tomography (CT) (62 cases) or both (36 cases). Regional parenchymal modifications within the drainage territory of the DVA, such as cortical or subcortical atrophy, white matter density or signal alterations, dystrophic calcifications, presence of haemorrhage or a cavernous-like vascular malformation (CVM), were noted. A stenosis of the collecting vein of the DVA was also sought for. Brain abnormalities within the drainage territory of a DVA were encountered in 65.4% of the cases. Locoregional brain atrophy occurred in 29.7% of the cases, followed by white matter lesions in 28.3% of MRI investigations and 19.3% of CT investigations, CVMs in 13.3% of MRI investigations and dystrophic calcification in 9.6% of CT investigations. An intracranial haemorrhage possibly related to a DVA occurred in 2.4% cases, and a stenosis on the collecting vein was documented in 13.1% of cases. Parenchymal abnormalities were identified for all DVA sizes. Brain parenchymal abnormalities were associated with DVAs in close to two thirds of the cases evaluated. These abnormalities are thought to occur secondarily, likely during post-natal life, as a result of chronic venous hypertension. Outflow obstruction, progressive thickening of the walls of the DVA and their morphological organization into a venous convergence zone are thought to contribute to the development of venous hypertension in DVA. (orig.)

  4. The decline in Australian young male suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Stephen; Page, Andrew N; Taylor, Richard J

    2007-02-01

    Since the late 1990s there has been a sharp downward trend in Australian young male suicide. It is possible that a major government youth suicide prevention initiative, the National Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy (NYSPS), implemented during 1995-1999 may have influenced the decline. In this article, we examine time trends in age- and means-specific male and female Australian suicide rates in relation to unemployment rates and the NYSPS. Based on Australian suicide data over the period 1966-2003, we assess secular changes in the 20-24 year male suicide to total (crude) male suicide rate ratio in relation to the NYSPS, using interrupted time series analysis (ARIMA), since this was previously found to be significantly associated with the 20-24 year male unemployment to total employment ratio. Results show that a dramatic reduction in Australian young male (aged 20-34 years) suicide has occurred since 1997-1998, declining from approximately 40 per 100,000 in 1997-1998 to approximately 20 per 100,000 in 2003. Most of the decline is due to a decrease in suicide by hanging and to a lesser extent from motor vehicle carbon monoxide and other gases. Further, the previously established strong secular association (lasting over 3 decades from 1966) between the rate ratio of 20-24 year male suicide to total (crude) male suicide, and the rate ratio of 20-24 year male unemployment to total unemployment, appears to have been disrupted. ARIMA modelling of the suicide ratio against the initiative indicates a highly significant statistical association between the NYSPS and the suicide ratio reduction but not between the NYSPS and the unemployment indicator trend, suggesting a break in the link between young male suicide and unemployment. The recent sudden turnaround in Australian young male suicide trends and its extent appears to preclude explanations centring on slow-moving social indices traditionally associated with suicide, or on possible cohort effects. This sudden decrease

  5. Cognitive decline after major oncological surgery in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, M.; Rotteveel, E.; Izaks, G. J.; Spikman, J. M.; van der Wal-Huisman, H.; van Etten, B.; Absalom, A. R.; Mourits, M. J. E.; de Bock, G. H.; van Leeuwen, B. L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Elderly patients undergoing oncological surgery experience postoperative cognitive decline. The aims of this study were to examine the incidence of cognitive decline 3 months after surgery and identify potential patient-, disease- and surgery-related risk factors for postoperative

  6. Cognitive abnormalities and neural mechanisms in post-traumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting HU

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD is an anxiety disorder that develops usually in response to an overwhelmingly terrifying or a life-threatening event. The symptoms including intrusion, flashback, re-experiencing, hyperarousal and avoidance can seriously impair the cognitive functions. At present, the researches have found PTSD patients had the difficulty in retrieving autobiographical memory and narrative disorder, attention bias toward traumatic stimulus and intellectual decline. Decrease in hippocampus and amygdala's volumes, excess endoplasmic reticulum stress, medial prefrontal cortex's low activation and highly excited response of the amygdala to the traumatic stimulus may be the neural mechanisms of cognitive abnormalities. In- depth research on cognitive abnormalities provides directions for PTSD prevention and treatment, and the cognitive treatment by prolonged exposure and attention control may be the effective method. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.09.14

  7. Evapotranspiration Partitioning and Response to Abnormally Low Water Levels in a Floodplain Wetland in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaosong Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration (ET is an important component of the wetland water budget. Water level declines in Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China, have caused concerns, especially during low water levels. However, how wetland ET and its partitioning respond to abnormally low water levels is unclear. In this study, wetland ET was estimated with MODIS data and meteorological data. The wetland ET partitioning and its relationship with abnormally low water levels were analyzed for 2000–2013. The results showed that the water evaporation rate (Ewater was larger than the land ET rate (ETland; the ETland/Ewater ranged from 0.77 to 0.99. When the water level was below 12.8 m, the ET partition ratio was larger than 1, which indicates that wetland ET comes from land surface ET more than water evaporation. The negative standardized water level index (SWI was used to represent an abnormally low water level in the wetland. Although the monthly wetland ET decreased as the negative SWI decreased, ETland was higher than the average under negative SWI conditions from September to December, when the water level decreased. The abnormally low water level induced more water loss from the land surface, especially when the water level decreased, which reduced the available water resources along the wetland shore.

  8. World tanker tonnage decline seen this year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-19

    According to a study by the International Association of Independent Tanker Owners (Intertanko), world tanker tonnage will probably decline in 1978 for the first time since World War II; there were about 3800 tankers and combined carriers afloat on 1/1/75, 1000 of which (totaling < 35 million dwt) had been scrapped by 5/1/78; the voyage market has nearly doubled in the past five years, although startup of North Slope oil production, increased North Sea production, and new pipelines in the Middle East have hurt the non-U.S. tanker market; by the early 1980's, new international rules against substandard shipping (tankers without inert-gas plants, crude-washing systems, etc.) may force much otherwise modern tonnage out of the tanker market; and ''an urgently needed temporary conversion of the world's shipbuilding capacity to scrapping is a prerequisite for the revival of the tanker industry''.

  9. Russia's defense spending and the economic decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Oxenstierna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to explore the development of Russian military spending in light of weak and negative growth of the Russian economy and to look at the reasons for the economic decline that has developed after the economic crisis in 2009 and is due to long-term internal structural factors that have existed since the mid-2000s. The confidence crisis resulting from Russia's aggression against Ukraine 2014, Western sanctions and falling oil prices has further aggravated these tendencies and the economy is now contracting. The main conclusions are that the share of the defense budget in GDP has risen substantially, but there is still a trade-off between defense and other public spending in the budget. Political reform would be necessary to implement market institutions and revive the economy.

  10. Medical dominance in Italy: a partial decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousijn, Willem

    2002-09-01

    In the last three decades, a number of changes in health systems has been challenging medical dominance in many countries. It has been widely debated whether the medical profession has been able to cope with these changes and maintain its power or, rather, has been deprofessionalised or proletarianised. In this paper, the effects of these changes in Italy are examined, by using a multi-dimensional concept of medical dominance. As a result of this analysis. medical dominance in Italy is depicted as declining on some dimensions while changing its nature on others. The final part of the paper discusses some current explanations of this trend and suggests that the transition to post-modern society and the "late modernity" argument (Giddens, 1990; The consequences of modernity, Polity Press, Cambridge; Beck, 1992; Risk society: towards a new modernity, Sage, London) may provide an entry into more adequate explanations.

  11. Decline of radionuclides in Columbia River biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushing, C.E.; Watson, D.G.; Scott, A.J.; Gurtisen, J.M.

    1980-03-01

    In January 1971, the last of nine plutonium production reactors using direct discharge of once-through cooling waters into the Columbia River was closed. Sampling was initiated at three stations on the Columbia River to document the decline of the radionuclide body burdens in the biota of the Columbia River ecosystem. The data show that in a river-reservoir complex, the measurable body burden of fission-produced radionuclides decreased to essentially undetectable levels within 18 to 24 mo after cessation of discharge of once-through cooling water into the river. On the basis of data from the free-flowing station, we believe that this decrease would be even more rapid in an unimpounded river.

  12. Global biodiversity: indicators of recent declines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butchart, Stuart H.M.; Walpole, Matt; Collen, Ben; Van Strien, Arco; Scharlemann, Jorn P.W.; Almond, Rosamunde E.A.; Baillie, Jonathan E.M.; Bomhard, Bastian; Brown, Claire; Bruno, John; Carpenter, Kent E.; Carr, Genevieve M.; Chanson, Janice; Chenery, Anna M.; Csirke, Jorge; Davidson, Nick C.; Dentener, Frank; Foster, Matt; Galli, Alessandro; Galloway, James N.; Genovesi, Piero; Gregory, Richard D.; Hockings, Marc; Kapos, Valerie; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Leverington, Fiona; Loh, Jonathan; McGeoch, Melodie A.; McRae, Louise; Minasyan, Anahit; Morcillo, Monica Hernandez; Oldfield, Thomasina E.E.; Pauly, Daniel; Quader, Suhel; Revenga, Carmen; Sauer, John R.; Skolnik, Benjamin; Spear, Dian; Stanwell-Smith, Damon; Stuart, Simon N.; Symes, Andy; Tierney, Megan; Tyrrell, Tristan D.; Vie, Jean-Christophe; Watson, Reg

    2011-01-01

    In 2002, world leaders committed, through the Convention on Biological Diversity, to achieve a significant reduction in the rate of biodiversity loss by 2010. We compiled 31 indicators to report on progress toward this target. Most indicators of the state of biodiversity (covering species' population trends, extinction risk, habitat extent and condition, and community composition) showed declines, with no significant recent reductions in rate, whereas indicators of pressures on biodiversity (including resource consumption, invasive alien species, nitrogen pollution, overexploitation, and climate change impacts) showed increases. Despite some local successes and increasing responses (including extent and biodiversity coverage of protected areas, sustainable forest management, policy responses to invasive alien species, and biodiversity-related aid), the rate of biodiversity loss does not appear to be slowing.

  13. Differential diagnosis for cognitive decline in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive decline has a spectrum of presentations, which manifest from normality as part of senility to the established form of various neurodegenerative illnesses causing dementia. Understanding these various differential diagnoses is of great clinical significance as they have different management and interventional strategies. The neuropsychological deficits which are identified should follow known neuropathological disease patterns that helps in distinguishing different types of cognitive impairment to established dementia. It is important to look at different cognitive impairment in elderly with core diagnostic sense to define severity, type of cognitive impairments, identifying patients need for accommodation or adaptation, associated risks, effectiveness of therapies and predict mortality. This would help clinicians to identify and plan management based on individual needs in cases with variable cognitive impairment.

  14. A formal decomposition of declining youth crime in Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Lars H. Andersen; Anne Sofie Tegner Anker; Signe Hald Andersen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Over the recent decades and across most developed democracies, youth crime has been in steady decline, and declining youth crime now constitutes an important contemporary demographic change. Yet underneath this change lingers the question of how we should best grasp declining youth crime. Objective: To decompose declining youth crime in Denmark into its extensive and intensive margins, and show results from birth cohort analyses. Methods: We apply Das Gupta's (1993) method f...

  15. Inappropriate treatments for patients with cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles Bayón, A; Gude Sampedro, F

    2014-01-01

    Some treatments are inappropriate for patients with cognitive decline. We analyse their use in 500 patients and present a literature review. Benzodiazepines produce dependence, and reduce attention, memory, and motor ability. They can cause disinhibition or aggressive behaviour, facilitate the appearance of delirium, and increase accident and mortality rates in people older than 60. In subjects over 65, low systolic blood pressure is associated with cognitive decline. Maintaining this figure between 130 and 140 mm Hg (145 in patients older than 80) is recommended. Hypocholesterolaemia < 160 mg/dl is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, aggressiveness, and suicide; HDL-cholesterol<40 mg/dl is associated with memory loss and increased vascular and mortality risks. Old age is a predisposing factor for developing cognitive disorders or delirium when taking opioids. The risks of prescribing anticholinesterases and memantine to patients with non-Alzheimer dementia that is not associated with Parkinson disease, mild cognitive impairment, or psychiatric disorders probably outweigh the benefits. Anticholinergic drugs acting preferentially on the peripheral system can also induce cognitive side effects. Practitioners should be aware of steroid-induced dementia and steroid-induced psychosis, and know that risk of delirium increases with polypharmacy. Of 500 patients with cognitive impairment, 70.4% were on multiple medications and 42% were taking benzodiazepines. Both conditions were present in 74.3% of all suspected iatrogenic cases. Polypharmacy should be avoided, if it is not essential, especially in elderly patients and those with cognitive impairment. Benzodiazepines, opioids and anticholinergics often elicit cognitive and behavioural disorders. Moreover, systolic blood pressure must be kept above 130 mm Hg, total cholesterol levels over 160 mg/dl, and HDL-cholesterol over 40 mg/dl in this population. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurolog

  16. Diverging patterns of fertility decline in Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathías Nathan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The total fertility rate (TFR in Uruguay fell from 2.5 to 1.9 children per woman between 1996 and 2011. However, no study to date has examined the decline of the TFR by observing changes in fertility patterns by birth order. Objective: The main aim of this study is to analyze recent changes in fertility level and timing of childbearing by birth order in Uruguay. Methods: We estimate unconditional and conditional age- and birth-order-specific fertility rates for 1996-2011 using data from vital statistics, population census, and national population estimates. Additionally, three period summary measures of birth-order-specific fertility quantum are calculated: TFR, PATFR and TFRp*. Timing changes by birth order are examined with MAB and TMAB, focusing on MAB1 and its standard deviation and comparing their evolutions in Uruguay with those of selected countries. Results: Fertility decline fits a parity-specific stopping model with a moderate increase in the mean ages of first, second, and third births. The distribution of conditional fertility rates for first and second births depicts an asymmetric bimodal shape linked to the increasing heterogeneity of the timing of childbearing. Compared to countries with similar fertility trends, heterogeneity in the age at first birth in Uruguay is remarkably high. Conclusions: Previous studies suggest that heterogeneity in first and second birth timing is related to structural social inequalities, as women from lower social strata have not significantly changed the age at which they bear a first child, whereas women of middle to high social strata have started to postpone it. The new evidence reinforces the idea that postponement transition in Uruguay cannot be studied without considering this consolidation of social status polarization in fertility timing.

  17. Lung Function Abnormalities in Smokers with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Frits M E; Soriano, Joan B; Roche, Nicolas; Bloomfield, Paul H; Brusselle, Guy; Fabbri, Leonardo M; García-Rio, Francisco; Kearney, Mark T; Kwon, Namhee; Lundbäck, Bo; Rabe, Klaus F; Raillard, Alice; Muellerova, Hana; Cockcroft, John R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the ALICE (Airflow Limitation in Cardiac Diseases in Europe) study was to investigate the prevalence of airflow limitation in patients with ischemic heart disease and the effects on quality of life, healthcare use, and future health risk. To examine prebronchodilator and post-bronchodilator spirometry in outpatients aged greater than or equal to 40 years with clinically documented ischemic heart disease who were current or former smokers. This multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 cardiovascular outpatient clinics in nine European countries. Airflow limitation was defined as post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC less than 0.70. Among the 3,103 patients with ischemic heart disease who were recruited, lung function was defined for 2,730 patients. Airflow limitation was observed in 30.5% of patients with ischemic heart disease: 11.3% had mild airflow limitation, 15.8% moderate airflow limitation, 3.3% severe airflow limitation, and 0.1% very severe airflow limitation. Most patients with airflow limitation (70.6%) had no previous spirometry testing or diagnosed pulmonary disease. Airflow limitation was associated with greater respiratory symptomatology, impaired health status, and more frequent emergency room visits (P < 0.05). Airflow limitation compatible with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease affects almost one-third of patients with ischemic heart disease. Although airflow limitation is associated with additional morbidity and societal burden, it is largely undiagnosed and untreated. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01485159).

  18. Depressed Mood Mediates Decline in Cognitive Processing Speed in Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaliano, Peter P.; Zhang, Jianping; Young, Heather M.; Caswell, Lisa W.; Scanlan, James M.; Echeverria, Diana

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Very few studies have examined cognitive decline in caregivers versus noncaregivers, and only 1 study has examined mediators of such decline. We evaluated the relationship between caregiver status and decline on the digit symbol test (DST; a measure of processing speed, attention, cognitive-motor translation, and visual scanning) and…

  19. 32 CFR 776.35 - Declining or terminating representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Declining or terminating representation. 776.35... ADVOCATE GENERAL Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.35 Declining or terminating representation. (a) Declining or terminating representation: (1) Except as stated in paragraph (a)(3) of this section, a covered...

  20. ON THE ROLE OF IMMUNOLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF COGNITIVE DYSFUNCTION IN MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Aleksandrovich Bekker

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Major depression correlates to several known immune and endocrine abnormalities (e.g. HPA axis hyperactivity, thymus atrophy, thymic hormone hyposecretion, among others and is often leading to diminished resistance to infections and oncologic diseases. On the other hand, major depression is one of the leading causes of cognitive decline, and it is well–known fact that functional and social recovery correlates better to cognitive functioning than to general improvement in depressive symptoms. This article thoroughly reviews different correlations between immune functions and cognition, and the existing evidence base for immune correction of cognitive dysfunctions commonly seen in depressions.

  1. [Otoneurologic abnormalities in insulin-dependent diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui-Renaud, K; Domínguez-Rubio, B; Ibarra-Olmos, A; González-Bárcena, D

    1998-01-01

    To assess the auditory and vestibular function in patients with diabetes. We studied and followed for three years, 10 patients (6 females) of 20.6 years of age (SD 5.5 years), with insulindependent diabetes mellitus of 9.5 years (SD 3.7 years). The patients were selected for having peripheral neuropathy without prolipherative retinopathy and otologic disease or individual factors which could cause neurootologic symptoms. Their glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow were 150 mL/min (SD 50) and 543 mL/min (SD 113). Initially all patients had normal audiologic responses, including auditory brainstem responses, but had abnormally and simetrically diminished horizontal vestibulo-ocular responses. A year later one patient had vertigo and asymmetric vestibulo-ocular responses. In the third year, another patient showed similar abnormalities and a third one showed sensorineural hearing loss. Our results suggest that patients with insulindependent diabetes mellitus may suffer neuro-otological deterioration.

  2. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W. [Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States)

    1995-02-27

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awareness to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Cardiovascular Abnormalities in Cirrhosis: the Possible Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Moezi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Cirrhosis is characterized by marked abnormalities in the cardiovascular system. A hyperdynamic splanchnic and systemic circulation is typical of cirrhotic patients and has been observed in all experimental forms of portal hypertension. The hyperdynamic circulation is most likely initiated by arterial vasodilatation, leading to central hypovolemia, sodium retention, and an increased intravascular volume. Despite the baseline increase in cardiac output, ventricular inotropic and chronotropic responses to stimuli are blunted, a condition known as cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. This review briefly examines the major mechanisms that may underlie these cardiovascular abnormalities, concentrating on nitric oxide, endocannabinoids, prostaglandins, carbon monoxide, endogenous opioids, and adrenergic receptor changes. Future work should address the complex interrelationships between these systems.

  4. Selective mutism and abnormal electroencephalography (EEG) tracings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, Keren; Kivity, Sara; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Halevi, Ayelet; Shuper, Avinoam

    2011-11-01

    Epileptic discharges are not considered a part of the clinical picture of selective mutism, and electroencephalography is generally not recommended in its work-up. This report describes 6 children with selective mutism who were found to have a history of epilepsy and abnormal interictal or subclinical electroencephalography recordings. Two of them had benign epilepsy of childhood with centro-temporal spikes. The mutism was not related in time to the presence of active seizures. While seizures could be controlled in all children by medications, the mutism resolved only in 1. Although the discharges could be coincidental, they might represent a co-morbidity of selective mutism or even play a role in its pathogenesis. Selective mutism should be listed among the psychiatric disorders that may be associated with electroencephalographic abnormalities. It can probably be regarded as a symptom of a more complicated organic brain disorder.

  5. Dysglycemia induces abnormal circadian blood pressure variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumarasamy Sivarajan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediabetes (PreDM in asymptomatic adults is associated with abnormal circadian blood pressure variability (abnormal CBPV. Hypothesis Systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. Methods Dahl salt-sensitive (S rats (n = 19 after weaning were fed either an American (AD or a standard (SD diet. The AD (high-glycemic-index, high-fat simulated customary human diet, provided daily overabundant calories which over time lead to body weight gain. The SD (low-glycemic-index, low-fat mirrored desirable balanced human diet for maintaining body weight. Body weight and serum concentrations for fasting glucose (FG, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin, and proinflammatory cytokines [monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α] were measured. Rats were surgically implanted with C40 transmitters and blood pressure (BP-both systolic; SBP and diastolic; DBP and heart rate (HR were recorded by telemetry every 5 minutes during both sleep (day and active (night periods. Pulse pressure (PP was calculated (PP = SBP-DBP. Results [mean(SEM]: The AD fed group displayed significant increase in body weight (after 90 days; p Conclusion These data validate our stated hypothesis that systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. This study, for the first time, demonstrates a cause and effect relationship between caloric excess, enhanced systemic inflammation, dysglycemia, loss of blood pressure control and abnormal CBPV. Our results provide the fundamental basis for examining the relationship between dysglycemia and perturbation of the underlying mechanisms (adipose tissue dysfunction induced local and systemic inflammation, insulin resistance and alteration of adipose tissue precursors for the renin-aldosterone-angiotensin system which generate abnormal CBPV.

  6. Computed tomography in abnormalities of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, J.D.; Jonkers, A.; Klasen, H.J. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); Hillen, B. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Lab. voor Anatomie en Embryologie)

    1982-06-26

    The value of computed tomography in the assessment of abnormalities of the hip is demonstrated with the aid of an anatomical preparation and in patients with, respectively, congenital dislocation of a hip, dislocation of the hip in spina bifida, an acetabular fracture and a Ewing tumour. The anteversion of the acetabulum and femur and the instability index of the hip joint can be measured by means of computed tomography.

  7. Renal abnormalities in congenital chloride diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hamad, Nadia M.; Al-Eisa, Amal A.

    2004-01-01

    Congenital chloride diarrhea CLD is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by a defect in the chloride/ bicarbonate exchange in the ileum and colon. It is characterized by watery diarrhea, abdominal distension, hypochloremic hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis with high fecal content of chloride >90 mmol/l. We report 3 patients with CLD associated with various renal abnormalities including chronic renal failure secondary to renal hypoplasia, nephrocalcinosis and congenital nephrotic syndrome. (author)

  8. White matter microstructure and cognitive decline in metabolic syndrome: a review of diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Freddy J; Gavrieli, Anna; Saade-Lemus, Patricia; Lioutas, Vasileios-Arsenios; Upadhyay, Jagriti; Novak, Vera

    2018-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors defined by the presence of abdominal obesity, glucose intolerance, hypertension and/or dyslipidemia. It is a major public health epidemic worldwide, and a known risk factor for the development of cognitive dysfunction and dementia. Several studies have demonstrated a positive association between the presence of metabolic syndrome and worse cognitive outcomes, however, evidence of brain structure pathology is limited. Diffusion tensor imaging has offered new opportunities to detect microstructural white matter changes in metabolic syndrome, and a possibility to detect associations between functional and structural abnormalities. This review analyzes the impact of metabolic syndrome on white matter microstructural integrity, brain structure abnormalities and their relationship to cognitive function. Each of the metabolic syndrome components exerts a specific signature of white matter microstructural abnormalities. Metabolic syndrome and its components exert both additive/synergistic, as well as, independent effects on brain microstructure thus accelerating brain aging and cognitive decline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-Term Evaluation of Abnormal Behavior in Adult Ex-laboratory Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes Following Re-socialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Crailsheim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse rearing conditions are considered a major factor in the development of abnormal behavior. We investigated the overall levels, the prevalence and the diversity of abnormal behavior of 18 adult former laboratory chimpanzees, who spent about 20 years single caged, over a two-year period following re-socialization. According to the onset of deprivation, the individuals were classified as early deprived (EDs, mean: 1.2 years or late deprived (LDs, mean: 3.6 years. The results are based on 187.5 hours of scan sampling distributed over three sample periods: subsequent to re-socialization and during the first and second year of group-living. While the overall levels and the diversity of abnormal behavior remained stable over time in this study population, the amplifying effects of age at onset of deprivation became apparent as the overall levels of abnormal behavior of EDs were far above those of LDs in the first and second year of group-living, but not immediately after re-socialization. The most prevalent abnormal behaviors, including eating disorders and self-directed behaviors, however, varied in their occurrence within subjects across the periods. Most important, the significance of social companionship became obvious as the most severe forms of abnormal behavior, such as dissociative and self-injurious behaviors declined.

  10. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Content difference between normal and abnormal obsessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Eric; Cougle, Jesse R; Muris, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Although it has long been thought that experiencing an obsession is a psychiatric symptom, more recent literature, has seen the normalisation of obsessions and other presumably clinical phenomena. That is, not only people suffering from psychiatric disorders experience obsessions but non-clinical individuals also do so. Furthermore, it has been argued that such normal obsessions are very similar to abnormal ones, in terms of content. However, in the present study, evidence was obtained indicating that normal and abnormal obsessions do differ in content. A sample of 133 healthy undergraduates was given a list of 70 obsessions, with some originating from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients, and others stemming from healthy volunteers. Participants were asked to indicate whether they had ever experienced these obsessions. Participants endorsed significantly more normal than abnormal obsessions, suggesting that the two kinds of obsessions do differ from each other. In addition, the experience of clinical obsessions was more strongly associated with scores on a measure of OCD symptoms, than was the experience of normal obsessions.

  12. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomu Luo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process.

  13. Recurrent Cytogenetic Abnormalities in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, John J; Park, Tae Sung; Wan, Thomas S K

    2017-01-01

    The spectrum of chromosomal abnormality associated with leukemogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is broad and heterogeneous when compared to chronic myeloid leukemia and other myeloid neoplasms. Recurrent chromosomal translocations such as t(8;21), t(15;17), and inv(16) are frequently detected, but hundreds of other uncommon chromosomal aberrations from AML also exist. This chapter discusses 22 chromosomal abnormalities that are common structural, numerical aberrations, and other important but infrequent (less than 1 %) translocations emphasized in the WHO classification. Brief morphologic, cytogenetic, and clinical characteristics are summarized, so as to provide a concise reference to cancer cytogenetic laboratories. Morphology based on FAB classification is used together with the current WHO classification due to frequent mentioning in a vast number of reference literatures. Characteristic chromosomal aberrations of other myeloid neoplasms such as myelodysplastic syndrome and myeloproliferative neoplasm will be discussed in separate chapters-except for certain abnormalities such as t(9;22) in de novo AML. Gene mutations detected in normal karyotype AML by cutting edge next generation sequencing technology are also briefly mentioned.

  14. Spermatogenesis Abnormalities following Hormonal Therapy in Transwomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirachai Jindarak

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To measure spermatogenesis abnormalities in transwomen at the time of sex reassignment surgery (SRS and to analyze the association between hormonal therapy duration and infertility severity. Design. Retrospective study. Setting. University hospital. Patients. One-hundred seventy-three transwomen who underwent SRS from January 2000 to December 2015. Interventions. All orchidectomy specimens were retrospectively reviewed and classified. History of hormonal therapy duration was retrieved from medical records. Main Outcome Measures. Histological examinations of orchidectomy specimens were performed to assess spermatogenesis. Results. One-hundred seventy-three orchidectomy specimens were evaluated. Histological examinations showed maturation arrest in 36.4%, hypospermatogenesis in 26%, Sertoli cell-only syndrome in 20.2%, normal spermatogenesis in 11%, and seminiferous tubule hyalinization in 6.4% of the specimens. Spermatogenesis abnormality severity was not associated with the total therapy duration (P=0.81 or patient age at the time of surgery (P=0.88. Testicular volumes and sizes were associated with spermatogenesis abnormality severity (P=0.001 and P=0.026, right testicle and left testicle, resp.. Conclusion(s. Feminizing hormonal treatment leads to reductions in testicular germ cell levels. All transwomen should be warned about this consequence, and gamete preservation should be offered before starting hormonal treatment.

  15. Reduction of Endogenous Melatonin Accelerates Cognitive Decline in Mice in a Simulated Occupational Formaldehyde Exposure Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufei Mei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Individuals afflicted with occupational formaldehyde (FA exposure often suffer from abnormal behaviors such as aggression, depression, anxiety, sleep disorders, and in particular, cognitive impairments. Coincidentally, clinical patients with melatonin (MT deficiency also complain of cognitive problems associated with the above mental disorders. Whether and how FA affects endogenous MT metabolism and induces cognitive decline need to be elucidated. To mimic occupational FA exposure environment, 16 healthy adult male mice were exposed to gaseous FA (3 mg/m3 for 7 consecutive days. Results showed that FA exposure impaired spatial memory associated with hippocampal neuronal death. Biochemical analysis revealed that FA exposure elicited an intensive oxidative stress by reducing systemic glutathione levels, in particular, decreasing brain MT concentrations. Inversely, intraperitoneal injection of MT markedly attenuated FA-induced hippocampal neuronal death, restored brain MT levels, and reversed memory decline. At tissue levels, injection of FA into the hippocampus distinctly reduced brain MT concentrations. Furthermore, at cellular and molecular levels, we found that FA directly inactivated MT in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that MT supplementation contributes to the rescue of cognitive decline, and may alleviate mental disorders in the occupational FA-exposed human populations.

  16. Birthspacing and fertility decline in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Gómez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available RESUMENEste trabajo utiliza datos de las Encuestas Comparativas de Fecundidad de América Latina, así como de la Encuesta Mundial de Fecundidad para estudiar las tendencias y diferenciales en el espaciamiento de los nacimientos entre las mujeres alguna vez casadas en Costa Rica durante el período 1945-1974. Una buena parte de la atención se pone en el ritmo de la fecundidad en las etapas umbral, temprana y tardía de la disminución de la fecundidad que este país experimentó durante los años sesenta y principios de los setenta. Los resultados muestran bastante similitud en el tempo de la reproducción en los diferentes niveles paridez y áreas geográficas. Sin embargo, un análisis de las variables del entorno que afectan espaciamiento de los nacimientos muestra diferencias entre las zonas urbanas y rurales. Por último, se postula que el reciente estancamiento en las tasas de período puede ser una consecuencia de los cambios en el tempo de construcción de la familia, con mujeres de baja paridez que postergan los nacimientos, lo que contrarresta las tendencias de descenso que generan las mujeres de mayor paridez quienes aún pueden estar restringiendo su reproducción.ABSTRACTThis paper uses data from the Latin American Comparative Fertility Surveys as well as from the World Fertility Survey to study trends and differentials in birthspacing among ever married women in Costa Rica during the period 1945-1974. A good deal of attention is placed on the pace of fertility in threshold, early and late stages of the fertility decline that this country experienced during the sixties and early seventies. The results show a good deal of similarity in the tempo of reproduction across parities and geographical areas.However, an analysis of the background variables affecting birthspacing shows differences between urban and rural zones. Finally, it is postulated that the recent plateau in period rates may be a consequence of changes in the tempo of

  17. The birth rate decline in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, B

    1993-01-01

    Family planning programs historically have played an important role in providing information and counseling and supplying modern methods. Most programs are effective due to socioeconomic development and strong political support. Potential demand for services will be growing. This means that donor agencies must commit additional funding, and users must begin paying or paying more for contraceptives. Services and method choices need to be expanded, and quality of care needs to be improved. Three primary factors will impact on fertility decline: 1) the rate of social development, 2) the speed with which small family norms spread and contraception is adopted, and 3) the facility of private and public suppliers to meet contraceptive demand. Other factors influence reproductive decisions (women's roles and status, economic hardships or opportunities, religion, ethnicity, culture, and tradition). Contraceptive prevalence has increased from under 10% in the 1960s to 38% of all married, reproductive age women in the developing world, excluding China, which has contraceptive prevalence of 72%. Regional differences are wide. In Latin America, contraceptive use averages nearly 60% and ranges from over 50% in 10 countries and below 38% in Bolivia, Guatemala, and Haiti. Contraceptive prevalence is above average in Indonesia (50%), Sri Lanka (62%), and Thailand (68%) and just below average in Bangladesh (40%), India (45%), Philippines (34%), and Vietnam (53%). Sub-Saharan Africa has the lowest prevalence, except for Zimbabwe (45%), Botswana (35%), and Kenya (27%). 80% of current users rely on modern methods. In most surveyed countries, 20-30% of married women have unmet demand. Fertility decline, unmet demand, and contraceptive use have all been affected by the diffusion of ideas about the use of family planning and the small family norm. Innovators are usually high status, educated women, who spread their views to other social groups or geographic areas. The spread can be rapid

  18. Declining death rates reflect progress against cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmedin Jemal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The success of the "war on cancer" initiated in 1971 continues to be debated, with trends in cancer mortality variably presented as evidence of progress or failure. We examined temporal trends in death rates from all-cancer and the 19 most common cancers in the United States from 1970-2006. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed trends in age-standardized death rates (per 100,000 for all cancers combined, the four most common cancers, and 15 other sites from 1970-2006 in the United States using joinpoint regression model. The age-standardized death rate for all-cancers combined in men increased from 249.3 in 1970 to 279.8 in 1990, and then decreased to 221.1 in 2006, yielding a net decline of 21% and 11% from the 1990 and 1970 rates, respectively. Similarly, the all-cancer death rate in women increased from 163.0 in 1970 to 175.3 in 1991 and then decreased to 153.7 in 2006, a net decline of 12% and 6% from the 1991 and 1970 rates, respectively. These decreases since 1990/91 translate to preventing of 561,400 cancer deaths in men and 205,700 deaths in women. The decrease in death rates from all-cancers involved all ages and racial/ethnic groups. Death rates decreased for 15 of the 19 cancer sites, including the four major cancers, with lung, colorectum and prostate cancers in men and breast and colorectum cancers in women. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Progress in reducing cancer death rates is evident whether measured against baseline rates in 1970 or in 1990. The downturn in cancer death rates since 1990 result mostly from reductions in tobacco use, increased screening allowing early detection of several cancers, and modest to large improvements in treatment for specific cancers. Continued and increased investment in cancer prevention and control, access to high quality health care, and research could accelerate this progress.

  19. Congenital abnormalities associated with hemivertebrae in relation to hemivertebrae location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollini, Gerard; Launay, Franck; Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Viehweger, Elke; Jouve, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    Numerous congenital abnormalities have been reported in association with hemivertebrae (HV). No data exist about their incidence depending on the location of the HV. From 1980 to 2003, 75 patients with 80 HV responsible for evolutive congenital scoliosis were managed by HV resection using a double approach and short anterior and posterior convex fusion. The associated abnormalities were evaluated with MRI, echocardiography and renal ultrasound. Associated genitourinary abnormalities were found in 24% of patients, cardiac abnormalities in 8% and intrathecal abnormalities in 15%. Medullar abnormalities were more frequent in case of vertebral malformations at lumbosacral level.

  20. Abnormal uterine artery Doppler velocimetry predicts adverse outcomes in patients with abnormal analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, Hilary A; Dejbakhsh, Sheila Z; Parast, Mana M; Laurent, Louise C; Woelkers, Douglas A

    2014-10-01

    Our aim was to determine if uterine artery (UtA) Doppler studies would risk-stratify women with abnormal serum analytes on prenatal genetic screening into those at baseline and increased risk for preeclampsia and small-for-gestational age (SGA). This retrospective cohort study examined outcomes of patients with ⩾one abnormal analyte (PAPP-A3.0, AFP>2.5, inhibin>2.0, or unconjugated estriolUtA pulsatility index (PI). Preeclampsia, preterm preeclampsia, SGA (birthweight (BW) one abnormal analyte, UtA Doppler screening, and delivery outcomes. Twenty-four (18%) had an elevated UtA PI (PI>1.6); preeclampsia occurred in 16 (12%) and 26 (20%) delivered a SGA neonate. Abnormal UtA Doppler PI increased the likelihood of a composite outcome of preeclampsia or SGA from 27% to 71% (LR 6.48 (2.93, 14.30)); a negative UtA Doppler PI reduced the likelihood to 18% (LR 0.57 (0.42, 0.78)). Abnormal UtA Doppler PI increased the likelihood of a more severe composite outcome of preterm preeclampsia or IUGR from 11% to 39% (LR 5.49 (3.03, 9.97)); a negative UtA Doppler study reduced the likelihood to 4% (LR 0.35 (0.16, 0.80)). In patients with abnormal serum analytes, abnormal UtA Doppler PI is significantly associated with preeclampsia or SGA and improves the prediction of these adverse outcomes by 9-15-fold. Providers can incorporate UtA Doppler PI into an abbreviated surveillance regimen; they can be reassured that a normal study markedly decreases the risk of a severe early adverse outcome. Copyright © 2014 International Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Indian paradox: Rising education, declining womens' employment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esha Chatterjee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Theories of human capital would suggest that with more education, women acquire greater skills and their earnings increase, resulting in higher labor force participation. However, it has been long known that in India, women's education has a U-shaped relationship with labor force participation. Part of the decline at moderate levels of education may be due to an income effect whereby women with more education marry into richer families that enable them to withdraw from the labor force. Objective: The paper uses the first comprehensive Indian income data to evaluate whether the other family income effect explains the negative relationship between moderate women's education and their labor force participation. Methods: Using two waves of the India Human Development Survey, a comprehensive measure of labor force participation is regressed on educational levels for currently married women aged 25-59. Results: We find a strong other family income effect that explains some but not all of the U-shape education relationship. Further analyses suggest the importance of a lack of suitable employment opportunities for moderately educated women. Conclusions: Other factors need to be identified to explain the paradoxical U-shape relationship. We suggest the importance of occupational sex segregation, which excludes moderately educated Indian women from clerical and sales jobs. Contribution: This paper provides a more definitive test of the other family income effect and identifies new directions for future research that might explain the paradoxical U-curve relationship.

  2. Population Genetic Aspects of Pollinator Decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Packer

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed the theory of conservation genetics, with special emphasis on the influence of haplodiploidy and other aspects of bee biology upon conservation genetic parameters. We then investigated the possibility that pollinator decline can be addressed in this way, using two meta-analytical approaches on genetic data from the Hymenoptera and the Lepidoptera. First, we compared levels of heterozygosity between the orders. As has been found previously, the haplodiploid Hymenoptera had markedly lower levels of genetic variation than the Lepidoptera. Bees had even lower levels, and bumble bees, in particular, often seemed almost monomorphic genetically. However, the statistically confounding effects of phylogeny render detailed interpretation of such data difficult. Second, we investigated patterns of gene flow among populations of these insects. Hymenoptera were far more likely to show genetic effects of population fragmentation than are Lepidoptera, even at similar geographic distances between populations. The reduced effective population sizes resulting from haplodiploidy probably contributed to this result. The proportion of species with low levels of gene flow did not vary among the different taxonomic groups within the Hymenoptera.

  3. Electrical stimulation counteracts muscle decline in seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Helmut; Barberi, Laura; Löfler, Stefan; Sbardella, Simona; Burggraf, Samantha; Fruhmann, Hannah; Carraro, Ugo; Mosole, Simone; Sarabon, Nejc; Vogelauer, Michael; Mayr, Winfried; Krenn, Matthias; Cvecka, Jan; Romanello, Vanina; Pietrangelo, Laura; Protasi, Feliciano; Sandri, Marco; Zampieri, Sandra; Musaro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The loss in muscle mass coupled with a decrease in specific force and shift in fiber composition are hallmarks of aging. Training and regular exercise attenuate the signs of sarcopenia. However, pathologic conditions limit the ability to perform physical exercise. We addressed whether electrical stimulation (ES) is an alternative intervention to improve muscle recovery and defined the molecular mechanism associated with improvement in muscle structure and function. We analyzed, at functional, structural, and molecular level, the effects of ES training on healthy seniors with normal life style, without routine sport activity. ES was able to improve muscle torque and functional performances of seniors and increased the size of fast muscle fibers. At molecular level, ES induced up-regulation of IGF-1 and modulation of MuRF-1, a muscle-specific atrophy-related gene. ES also induced up-regulation of relevant markers of differentiating satellite cells and of extracellular matrix remodeling, which might guarantee shape and mechanical forces of trained skeletal muscle as well as maintenance of satellite cell function, reducing fibrosis. Our data provide evidence that ES is a safe method to counteract muscle decline associated with aging.

  4. The growth and decline of cryonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sanders Stodolsky

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cryogenic storage has become known as an alternative to burial. While a substantial fraction of the public finds cryonics acceptable, enrollment remains miniscule. One of the greatest unknowns is whether cryonics companies will be able to operate continuously until reanimation of those in storage becomes possible. Two failure modes are considered; organizational decline and political attack. The cryonics industry has adopted a strategy that implicitly targets atheist millionaires and alienates women. This is a result of neglecting science in its marketing efforts. American cryonics organizations have also incurred an avoidable political risk by refusing to use the funeral industry as a sales channel. Two alternative strategies are suggested that could minimize failure risk by reversing the stagnation of the industry. A “repackaging” of cryonics could accelerate growth and improve services, as well as the political position of the industry. This repackaging includes a restructuring of the channels for funding cryonics. Integration with the mainstream assumes using the funeral industry as a sales channel. While both political experiences and research results have made the need for these developments apparent, pioneers of the industry have resisted them.

  5. Abnormality of Auricular Muscles in Congenital Auricular Deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotsuyanagi, Takatoshi; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamashita, Ken; Sugai, Asuka; Gonda, Ayako; Kitada, Ayaka; Saito, Tamotsu; Urushidate, Satoshi

    2015-07-01

    It has been suggested that there is a close association of abnormality in auricular muscles with various congenital auricular deformities. However, there has been no investigation to determine what muscles are involved and how they affect the deformity. The authors examined abnormalities of auricular muscles for patients with various auricular deformities. The authors examined 77 auricles of 62 patients with congenital auricular deformities, including cryptotia, Stahl's ear, prominent ear, lop ear, and others. The superior and posterior auricular muscles from the extrinsic auricular muscle group and the auricular oblique and transverse muscles from the auricular intrinsic muscle group were investigated. The authors found characteristic features of the abnormality of the muscle for each auricular deformity. In nearly all cases of cryptotia, abnormality was found in the superior auricular, auricular oblique, and auricular transverse muscles. Abnormal insertion was found mainly in the superior auricular muscle and was the main cause of cryptotia. In Stahl's ear, the major abnormality was abnormal insertion of the auricular transverse muscle, which creates an abnormal cartilaginous prominence in the scapha. The abnormality in cases of prominent ear was clearly limited mostly to the auricular transverse muscle and, in some cases, to the posterior auricular muscle. In lop ear, abnormality was mostly found in the auricular transverse muscle, with elongation, and in the superior auricular or auricular oblique muscle in some cases. There is a tendency for a specific muscle abnormality to be found in each deformity. It is important to identify the abnormal muscle and correct the abnormality during the operation.

  6. Declines in the lethality of suicide attempts explain the decline in suicide deaths in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Spittal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To investigate the epidemiology of a steep decrease in the incidence of suicide deaths in Australia. METHODS: National data on suicide deaths and deliberate self-harm for the period 1994-2007 were obtained from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. We calculated attempt and death rates for five major methods and the lethality of these methods. Negative binomial regression was used to estimate the size and significance of method-specific time-trends in attempts and lethality. RESULTS: Hanging, motor vehicle exhaust and firearms were the most lethal methods, and together accounted for 72% of all deaths. The lethality of motor vehicle exhaust attempts decreased sharply (RR = 0.94 per year, 95% CI 0.93-0.95 while the motor vehicle exhaust attempt rate changed little; this combination of motor vehicle exhaust trends explained nearly half of the overall decline in suicide deaths. Hanging lethality also decreased sharply (RR = 0.96 per year, 95% CI 0.956-0.965 but large increases in hanging attempts negated the effect on death rates. Firearm lethality changed little while attempts decreased. CONCLUSION: Declines in the lethality of suicide attempts-especially attempts by motor vehicle exhaust and hanging-explain the remarkable decline in deaths by suicide in Australia since 1997.

  7. Cognitive declines precede and predict functional declines in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Zahodne

    Full Text Available To investigate the temporal ordering of cognitive and functional declines separately in older adults with or without Alzheimer's disease (AD.A community-based longitudinal study of aging and dementia in Northern Manhattan (Washington Heights/Hamilton Heights Inwood Columbia Aging Project and a multicenter, clinic-based longitudinal study of prevalent AD at Columbia University Medical Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Hôpital de la Salpêtrière in Paris, France (the Predictors Study.3,443 initially non-demented older adults (612 with eventual incident dementia and 517 patients with AD.Cognitive measures included the modified Mini-Mental State Exam and composite scores of memory and language derived from a standardized neuropsychological battery. Function was measured with the Blessed Dementia Rating Scale, completed by the participant (in the sample of non-demented older adults or an informant (in the sample of prevalent AD patients. Data were analyzed with autoregressive cross-lagged panel analysis.Cognitive scores more consistently predicted subsequent functional abilities than vice versa in non-demented older adults, participants with eventual incident dementia, and patients with prevalent AD.Cognitive declines appear to precede and cause functional declines prior to and following dementia diagnosis. Standardized neuropsychological tests are valid predictors of later functional changes in both non-demented and demented older adults.

  8. Subjective cognitive decline and fall risk in community-dwelling older adults with or without objective cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirooka, Hidehiko; Nishiguchi, Shu; Fukutani, Naoto; Tashiro, Yuto; Nozaki, Yuma; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2017-07-19

    The association between subjective cognitive decline and falls has not been clearly determined. Our aim was to explore the effect of subjective cognitive decline on falls in community-dwelling older adults with or without objective cognitive decline. We included 470 older adults (mean age 73.6 ± 5.2; 329 women) living in the community and obtained data on fall history directly from the participants. Subjective cognitive decline was assessed using a self-administered question. Objective cognitive function was measured using the Mini-Mental State Examination. Statistical analyses were carried out separately for participants with objective cognitive decline and those without. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that, among participants without objective cognitive decline, subjective cognitive decline was positively associated with falls [OR 1.91; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17-3.12; p = 0.01). Conversely, among participants with objective cognitive decline, subjective cognitive decline was negatively associated with falls (OR 0.07; 95% CI 0.01-0.85, p = 0.04). The result suggests that the objective-subjective disparity may affect falls in community-dwelling older adults. The presence of subjective cognitive decline was significantly positively associated with falls among cognitively intact older adults. However, among their cognitively impaired peers, the absence of subjective cognitive decline was positively associated with falls.

  9. Contribution of alpha- and beta-defensins to lung function decline and infection in smokers: an association study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthonisen Nicholas R

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-defensins, which are major constituents of neutrophil azurophilic granules, and beta-defensins, which are expressed in airway epithelial cells, could contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by amplifying cigarette smoke-induced and infection-induced inflammatory reactions leading to lung injury. In Japanese and Chinese populations, two different beta-defensin-1 polymorphisms have been associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotypes. We conducted population-based association studies to test whether alpha-defensin and beta-defensin polymorphisms influenced smokers' susceptibility to lung function decline and susceptibility to lower respiratory infection in two groups of white participants in the Lung Health Study (275 = fast decline in lung function and 304 = no decline in lung function. Methods Subjects were genotyped for the alpha-defensin-1/alpha-defensin-3 copy number polymorphism and four beta-defensin-1 polymorphisms (G-20A, C-44G, G-52A and Val38Ile. Results There were no associations between individual polymorphisms or imputed haplotypes and rate of decline in lung function or susceptibility to infection. Conclusion These findings suggest that, in a white population, the defensin polymorphisms tested may not be of importance in determining who develops abnormally rapid lung function decline or is susceptible to developing lower respiratory infections.

  10. MRI study on urinary abnormalities of fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ming; Zhang Yuzhen; Wang Qiuyan; Zhang Zhongyang; Li Yuhua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To illustrate the important complemental function of MRI in dignosing the urinary abnormalities of the fetus by analyzing MR features. Methods: MRI findings in 34 fetal urinary abnormalities were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Upper urinary tract dilatation was found in 12 cases: one case presented obstructed right renal dysplasia and was on the follow-up, postnatal MR imaging proved the duplex anomaly in one case, one case showed left PUJO on postnatal US imaging and prepared to surgery, 7 cases were normal on postnatal US imaging, 2 cases were lost to follow up. Bilateral urinary anomalies were found in 7 cases: Muhicystic renal dysplasia (n=3), Combined horseshoe kidney in 2 fetuses and bilateral renal aplasia in one case. Bilateral renal dysplasia was diagnosed in 2 cases, one was still bom and proved by autopsy and the other was lost to follow up. The case of bilateral renal agenesis displayed the appearance of sirenomelia on general specimen. The case of right renal agenesis associated contralateral kidney dyspalsia (n=1) was lost to follow up. MR imaging showed low signal intensity of lung and oligohydramnios in the bilateral anomalies. Unilateral urinary anomalies was found in 15 cases, including 9 cases of unilateral renal dysplasia. Two fetuses were aborted and 3 fetuses were proved with postnatal US or MR. One was lost to follow up; 3 cases were on the follow-up. There were 4 cases of unilateral renal agenesis, two fetuses were aborted and 2 fetuses were proved with postnatal US or MR imaging. The case of ectopic kidney was proved with postnatal US imaging. One case of urachal cyst was aborted without autopsy. In the unilateral anomalies, the volume of amniotic fluid was normal, and the fetal lung presented homogenious high signal intensity. Conclusion: As a complemental method, MRI is of great value in displaying and dignosing the urinary abnormalities of fetus. (authors)

  11. Remnants of occipital vertebrae: proatlas segmentation abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Arnold H; Fenoy, Kathleen A

    2009-05-01

    Developmental remnants around the foramen magnum, or proatlas segmentation abnormalities, have been recorded in postmortem studies but very rarely in a clinical setting. Because of their rarity, the pathological anatomy has been misunderstood, and treatment has been fraught with failures. The objectives of this prospective study were to understand the correlative anatomy, pathology, and embryology and to recognize the clinical presentation and gain insights on the treatment and management. Our craniovertebral junction (CVJ) database started in 1977 and comprises 5200 cases. This prospective study has retrieval capabilities. Neurodiagnostic studies changed with the evolution of imaging. Seventy-two patients were recognized as having symptomatic proatlas segmentation abnormalities. Ventral bony masses from the clivus or medial occipital condyle occurred in 66% (44/72), lateral or anterolateral compressive masses in 37% (27 of 72 patients), and dorsal bony compression in 17% (12 of 72 patients). Hindbrain herniation was associated in 33%. The age at presentation was 3 to 23 years. Motor symptoms occurred in 72% (52 of 72 patients); palsies in Cranial Nerves IX, X, and XII in 33% (24 of 72 patients); and vertebrobasilar symptoms in 25% (18 of 72 patients). Trauma precipitated symptoms in 55% (40 of 72 patients). The best definition of the abnormality was demonstrated by 3-dimensional computed tomography combined with magnetic resonance imaging. Treatment was aimed at decompression of the pathology and stabilization. Remnants of the occipital vertebrae around the foramen magnum were recognized in 72 of 5200 CVJ cases (7.2%). Magnetic resonance imaging with 3-dimensional computed tomography of the CVJ provides the best definition and understanding of the lesions. Brainstem myelopathy and lower cranial nerve deficits are common clinical presentations in the first and second decades of life. Treatment is aimed at decompression of the pathology and CVJ stabilization.

  12. Haematological abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Aamer; Al Arfaj, Abdurahman Saud; khalil, Najma; Alarfaj, Husain

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the frequency and pattern of haematological abnormalities (HA) in SLE patients at the time of diagnosis and last follow-up, and their relationship with organ involvement. This retrospective study included patients who were diagnosed and treated for SLE from 1982 to 2008 at King Khalid University hospital, Riyadh. Demographic and haematological parameters at diagnosis and the last follow-up, disease manifestations, organ involvement and clinical hematological complications were recorded. Association of HA with organ involvement was explored by multivariate analysis. A total of 624 patients (90.7% females, mean age 34.3±11.9 years) were studied. HA were present in 516 (82.7 %) patients at the time of diagnosis. Anemia was the most frequent HA in 63.0% patients followed by lymphopenia in 40.3%, leukopenia in 30.0%, thrombocytopenia in 10.9% and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in 4.6% patients. Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism were diagnosed in 7.4% and 2.6% patients respectively. After a mean follow-up of 9.3±5.3 years, 329/491 (67%) patients still had some HA present. Anemia remained the most common abnormality (51.7% patients) followed by lymphopenia in 33.1%, and thrombocytopenia in 4.8% patients. Leucopenia was associated with oral ulcers (p=0.021) and alopecia (p=0.031), anemia with renal disease (p=0.017), AIHA with neurological involvement (p=0.003), elevated IgG with malar rash (p=0.027), and low C3 with serositis (p=0.026). HA are very common at the time of diagnosis and during follow-up in SLE, and some of these abnormalities are associated with organ damage. This information may help in better management planning of SLE patients.

  13. Covertly active and progressing neurochemical abnormalities in suppressed HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysique, Lucette A; Jugé, Lauriane; Gates, Thomas; Tobia, Michael; Moffat, Kirsten; Brew, Bruce J; Rae, Caroline

    2018-01-01

    To assess whether HIV-related brain injury is progressive in persons with suppressed HIV infection. Seventy-three HIV+ virally suppressed men and 35 HIV- men, screened for psychiatric and alcohol/drug use disorders, underwent neuropsychological evaluation and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) at baseline and after and 23 ± 5 months. 1 H-MRS included brain regions known to be vulnerable to HIV and aging: frontal white matter (FWM), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and caudate area (CA). Major brain metabolites such as creatine (Cr: marker of cellular energy), N -acetyl aspartate (NAA: marker of neuronal integrity), choline (marker of cellular membrane turnover), glutamate/glutamine (excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmitter), and myo -Inositol (mI: marker of neuroinflammation) were calculated with reference to water signal. Neurocognitive decline was corrected for practice effect and baseline HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) status. Across the study period, 44% had intact cognition, 42% stable HAND (including the single case that improved), 10% progressing HAND, and 4% incident HAND. When analyzing the neurochemical data per neurocognitive trajectories, we found decreasing PCC Cr in all subgroups compared with controls ( p < 0.002). In addition, relative to the HIV- group, stable HAND showed decreasing FWM Cr, incident HAND showed steep FWM Cr reduction, whereas progressing HAND had a sharply decreasing PCC NAA and reduced but stable CA NAA. When analyzing the neurochemical data at the group level (HIV+ vs HIV- groups), we found stable abnormal metabolite concentrations over the study period: decreased FWM and PCC Cr (both p < 0.001), decreased PCC NAA and CA NAA (both p < 0.05) and PCC mI increase ( p < 0.05). HIV duration and historical HAND had modest effects on metabolite changes. Our study reveals covertly active or progressing HIV-related brain injury in the majority of this virally suppressed cohort, reflecting ongoing

  14. Covertly active and progressing neurochemical abnormalities in suppressed HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugé, Lauriane; Gates, Thomas; Tobia, Michael; Moffat, Kirsten; Brew, Bruce J.; Rae, Caroline

    2018-01-01

    Objective To assess whether HIV-related brain injury is progressive in persons with suppressed HIV infection. Methods Seventy-three HIV+ virally suppressed men and 35 HIV− men, screened for psychiatric and alcohol/drug use disorders, underwent neuropsychological evaluation and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) at baseline and after and 23 ± 5 months. 1H-MRS included brain regions known to be vulnerable to HIV and aging: frontal white matter (FWM), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and caudate area (CA). Major brain metabolites such as creatine (Cr: marker of cellular energy), N-acetyl aspartate (NAA: marker of neuronal integrity), choline (marker of cellular membrane turnover), glutamate/glutamine (excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmitter), and myo-Inositol (mI: marker of neuroinflammation) were calculated with reference to water signal. Neurocognitive decline was corrected for practice effect and baseline HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) status. Results Across the study period, 44% had intact cognition, 42% stable HAND (including the single case that improved), 10% progressing HAND, and 4% incident HAND. When analyzing the neurochemical data per neurocognitive trajectories, we found decreasing PCC Cr in all subgroups compared with controls (p < 0.002). In addition, relative to the HIV− group, stable HAND showed decreasing FWM Cr, incident HAND showed steep FWM Cr reduction, whereas progressing HAND had a sharply decreasing PCC NAA and reduced but stable CA NAA. When analyzing the neurochemical data at the group level (HIV+ vs HIV− groups), we found stable abnormal metabolite concentrations over the study period: decreased FWM and PCC Cr (both p < 0.001), decreased PCC NAA and CA NAA (both p < 0.05) and PCC mI increase (p < 0.05). HIV duration and historical HAND had modest effects on metabolite changes. Conclusions Our study reveals covertly active or progressing HIV-related brain injury in the majority of this virally suppressed

  15. Acute Radiological Abnormalities after Bronchial Thermoplasty: A Prospective Cohort Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    d'Hooghe, Julia N. S.; van den Berk, Inge A. H.; Annema, Jouke T.; Bonta, Peter I.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a novel treatment for severe asthma based on radiofrequency energy delivery to the larger airways. Although impressive radiological abnormalities have been reported, the incidence, pattern, and behavior over time of acute radiological abnormalities

  16. Comparisons of stomatal parameters between normal and abnormal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ED), guard cell length (GCL) and guard cell width (GCW) of normal and abnormal leaf of Bougainvillea spectabilis Willd were studied. This can be useful for further research of physical mechanism of abnormal leaf. Epidermal cells were ...

  17. Abnormal brain activation in excoriation (skin-picking) disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odlaug, Brian L.; Hampshire, Adam; Chamberlain, Samuel R

    2016-01-01

    encompassing bilateral dorsal striatum (maximal in right caudate), bilateral anterior cingulate and right medial frontal regions. These abnormalities were, for the most part, outside the dorsal planning network typically activated by executive planning tasks. Conclusions: Abnormalities of neural regions...

  18. Phenotype abnormality: 41 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 41 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u1ria224u547i abnormal for trait of behavioral...ganelle ... abnormal ... anatomical structure arrangement ... behavioral quality

  19. Phenotype abnormality: 38 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 38 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u1ria224u544i abnormal for trait of behavioral...idermis ... abnormal ... anatomical structure arrangement ... behavioral quality

  20. Phenotype abnormality: 36 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 36 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u1ria224u542i abnormal for trait of behavioral...tyledon ... abnormal ... anatomical structure arrangement ... behavioral quality

  1. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... agenesis) of the tissue connecting the left and right halves of the brain ( corpus callosum ). The brain abnormalities can cause severe intellectual disability and developmental delay, abnormal muscle stiffness (spasticity), weak ...

  2. Evidence of brain abnormality in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuber, M.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Bauer, J.; Singh, D.D.; Elger, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    Markers of brain abnormalities in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) were studied to explore whether physical brain disorder is associated with an increased risk of PNES. Evidence of epileptiform EEG changes, MRI abnormalities, and neuropsychological (NPS)

  3. Torpedo maculopathy: A primary choroidal capillary abnormality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Chawla

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old healthy male patient's fundus revealed findings consistent with torpedo maculopathy. Swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT showed a dome-shaped elevation of the retina at the level of ellipsoid zone. On OCT angiography segmented at the level of the choriocapillaris, a cluster of convoluted fine vessels was seen, and further, deeper scans of the larger choroidal vessels showed a slower flow. From these observations along with the embryological correlation of choriocapillaris development, a possibility of an abnormality preventing proper fenestration of the choriocapillaris along the horizontal raphe being responsible for this anomaly is suggested.

  4. MR imaging of cerebral abnormalities in utero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thickman, D; Mintz, M; Mennuti, M; Kressel, H Y

    1984-12-01

    In view of the lack of ionizing radiation, ability to image in a variety of planes, and high contrast resolution, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may have a role in obstetrical management. Three fetuses with severe cerebral abnormalities were studied by MR in utero. The findings were correlated with ultrasound examinations and with autopsy results. Ventricular dilatation and progression of hydrocephalus were detected by MR. Although fetal motion may affect image quality, diagnostically useful images were obtained with imaging times of 2.5 min.

  5. Radiological and orthopedic abnormalities in Satoyoshi syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haymon, M.L.; Willis, R.B.; Ehlayel, M.S.; Louisiana State Medical Center, New Orleans, LA; Lacassie, Y.; Louisiana State Medical Center, New Orleans, LA; Children's Hospital, New Orleans, LA

    1997-01-01

    Satoyoshi syndrome is a are disorder on unknown etiology characterized by progressive, painful intermittent muscle spasms, serve skeletal abnormalities mimicking a skeletal dyplasia, malabsorption, alopecia, and amenorrhea. We further report on a 20 1 / 2 -year-old Caucasian woman whith characteristic manifestation of the syndrome. Since the establishment of the diagnostic 1 year ago, she has been treated with prednisone with good response. However, treatment of the multiple deformities and fractures has been difficult and challenging. The early recognition and treatment of this disorder is of utmost importance, as the skeletal deformities and fractures seem to be secondary to the muscular spasms, as suggested by Satoyoshi

  6. Radiological and orthopedic abnormalities in Satoyoshi syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haymon, M.L. [Children`s Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Willis, R.B. [Children`s Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Orthopedics; Ehlayel, M.S. [Div. of Genetics, Dept. of Pediatrics, Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, Orleans, LA (United States)]|[Louisiana State Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States). Center for Molecular and Human Genetics; Lacassie, Y. [Div. of Genetics, Dept. of Pediatrics, Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, Orleans, LA (United States)]|[Louisiana State Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States). Center for Molecular and Human Genetics]|[Children`s Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics

    1997-05-01

    Satoyoshi syndrome is a are disorder on unknown etiology characterized by progressive, painful intermittent muscle spasms, serve skeletal abnormalities mimicking a skeletal dyplasia, malabsorption, alopecia, and amenorrhea. We further report on a 20{sup 1}/{sub 2}-year-old Caucasian woman whith characteristic manifestation of the syndrome. Since the establishment of the diagnostic 1 year ago, she has been treated with prednisone with good response. However, treatment of the multiple deformities and fractures has been difficult and challenging. The early recognition and treatment of this disorder is of utmost importance, as the skeletal deformities and fractures seem to be secondary to the muscular spasms, as suggested by Satoyoshi.

  7. Childhood autism and auditory system abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitoglou, Magdalini; Ververi, Athina; Antoniadis, Alexandros; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I

    2010-05-01

    Hearing disorders are common among children with autism, ranging from peripheral and sensorineural hearing deficit or loss to auditory hypersensitivity with bizarre reactions to sounds. The auditory abnormalities and consequent sensory deprivation exacerbate the communication deficit of autism, and early auditory assessment holds an important place in the planning of intervention and the overall prognosis of patients. Physiologic, pathologic, imaging, and neurochemical studies have revealed an array of aberrations in the perception and processing of the audiologic stimuli, including (among others) maturational defects, atypical lateralization, and serotonin dysfunction. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content, not myofilament function, contributes to muscle twitch force decline in isolated cardiac trabeculae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Brunello, Lucia; Gyorke, Sándor; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2014-01-01

    We set out to determine the factors responsible for twitch force decline in isolated intact rat cardiac trabeculae. The contractile force of trabeculae declined over extended periods of isometric twitch contractions. The force-frequency relationship within the frequency range of 4–8 Hz, at 37 °C, became more positive and the frequency optimum shifted to higher rates with this decline in baseline twitch tensions. The post-rest potentiation (37 °C), a phenomenon highly dependent on calcium handling mechanisms, became more pronounced with decrease in twitch tensions. We show that the main abnormality during muscle run-down was not due to a deficit in the myofilaments; maximal tension achieved using a K+ contracture protocol was either unaffected or only slightly decreased. Conversely, the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content, as assessed by rapid cooling contractures (from 27 °C to 0 °C), decreased, and had a close association with the declining twitch tensions (R2 ~ 0.76). SR Ca2+-ATPase, relative to Na+/Ca2+ exchanger activity, was not altered as there was no significant change in paired rapid cooling contracture ratios. Furthermore, confocal microscopy detected no abnormalities in the overall structure of the cardiomyocytes and t-tubules in the cardiac trabeculae (~23 °C). Overall, the data indicates that the primary mechanism responsible for force run-down in multi-cellular cardiac preparations is a decline in the SR calcium content and not the maximal tension generation capability of the myofilaments. PMID:25056841

  9. The lognormal handwriter: learning, performing, and declining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plamondon, Réjean; O'Reilly, Christian; Rémi, Céline; Duval, Thérésa

    2013-01-01

    The generation of handwriting is a complex neuromotor skill requiring the interaction of many cognitive processes. It aims at producing a message to be imprinted as an ink trace left on a writing medium. The generated trajectory of the pen tip is made up of strokes superimposed over time. The Kinematic Theory of rapid human movements and its family of lognormal models provide analytical representations of these strokes, often considered as the basic unit of handwriting. This paradigm has not only been experimentally confirmed in numerous predictive and physiologically significant tests but it has also been shown to be the ideal mathematical description for the impulse response of a neuromuscular system. This latter demonstration suggests that the lognormality of the velocity patterns can be interpreted as reflecting the behavior of subjects who are in perfect control of their movements. To illustrate this interpretation, we present a short overview of the main concepts behind the Kinematic Theory and briefly describe how its models can be exploited, using various software tools, to investigate these ideal lognormal behaviors. We emphasize that the parameters extracted during various tasks can be used to analyze some underlying processes associated with their realization. To investigate the operational convergence hypothesis, we report on two original studies. First, we focus on the early steps of the motor learning process as seen as a converging behavior toward the production of more precise lognormal patterns as young children practicing handwriting start to become more fluent writers. Second, we illustrate how aging affects handwriting by pointing out the increasing departure from the ideal lognormal behavior as the control of the fine motricity begins to decline. Overall, the paper highlights this developmental process of merging toward a lognormal behavior with learning, mastering this behavior to succeed in performing a given task, and then gradually

  10. Conifer Decline and Mortality in Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuk, V.; Im, S.; Ranson, K.

    2015-12-01

    "Dark needle conifer" (DNC: Abies sibirica, Pinus sibirica and Picea obovata) decline and mortality increase were documented in Russia during recent decades. Here we analyzed causes and scale of Siberian pine and fir mortality in Altai-Sayan and Baikal Lake Regions and West Siberian Plane based on in situdata and remote sensing (QuickBird, Landsat, GRACE). Geographically, mortality began on the margins of the DNC range (i.e., within the forest-steppe and conifer-broadleaf ecotones) and on terrain features with maximal water stress risk (narrow-shaped hilltops, convex steep south facing slopes, shallow well-drained soils). Within ridges, mortality occurred mainly along mountain passes, where stands faced drying winds. Regularly mortality was observed to decrease with elevation increase with the exception of Baikal Lake Mountains, where it was minimal near the lake shore and increased with elevation (up to about 1000 m a.s.l.). Siberian pine and fir mortality followed a drying trend with consecutive droughts since the 1980s. Dendrochronology analysis showed that mortality was correlated with vapor pressure deficit increase, drought index, soil moisture decrease and occurrence of late frosts. In Baikal region Siberian pine mortality correlated with Baikal watershed meteorological variables. An impact of previous year climate conditions on the current growth was found (r2 = 0.6). Thus, water-stressed trees became sensitive to bark beetles and fungi impact (including Polygraphus proximus and Heterobasidion annosum). At present, an increase in mortality is observed within the majority of DNC range. Results obtained also showed a primary role of water stress in that phenomenon with a secondary role of bark beetles and fungi attacks. In future climate with increased drought severity and frequency Siberian pine and fir will partly disappear from its current range, and will be substituted by drought-tolerant species (e.g., Pinus silvestris, Larix sibirica).

  11. The lognormal handwriter: learning, performing and declining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Réjean ePlamondon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The generation of handwriting is a complex neuromotor skill requiring the interaction of many cognitive processes. It aims at producing a message to be imprinted as an ink trace left on a writing medium. The generated trajectory of the pen tip is made up of strokes superimposed over time. The Kinematic Theory of rapid human movements and its family of lognormal models provide analytical representations of these strokes, often considered as the basic unit of handwriting. This paradigm has not only been experimentally confirmed in numerous predictive and physiologically significant tests but it has also been shown to be the ideal mathematical description for the impulse response of a neuromuscular system. This latter demonstration suggests that the lognormality of the velocity patterns can be interpreted as reflecting the behaviour of subjects who are in perfect control of their movements. To illustrate this interpretation, we present a short overview of the main concepts behind the Kinematic Theory and briefly describe how its models can be exploited, using various software tools, to investigate these ideal lognormal behaviors. We emphasize that the parameters extracted during various tasks can be used to analyze some underlying processes associated with their realization. To investigate the operational convergence hypothesis, we report on two original studies. First, we focus on the early steps of the motor learning process as seen as a converging behaviour toward the production of more precise lognormal patterns as young children practicing handwriting start to become more fluent writers. Second, we illustrate how aging affects handwriting by pointing out the increasing departure from the ideal lognormal behaviour as the control of the fine motricity begins to decline. Overall, the paper highlights this developmental process of merging toward a lognormal behaviour with learning, mastering this behaviour to succeed in performing a given task

  12. Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes after Abnormal First Trimester Screening for Aneuploidy

    OpenAIRE

    Goetzl, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Women with abnormal first trimester screening but with a normal karyotype are at risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes. A nuchal translucency >3.5mm is associated with an increased risk of subsequent pregnancy loss, fetal infection, fetal heart abnormalities and other structural abnormalities. Abnormal first trimester analytes are also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes but the predictive value is less impressive. As a single marker, PAPP-A

  13. Chromosomal Abnormalities Associated with Neural Tube Defects (I): Full Aneuploidy

    OpenAIRE

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-01-01

    Fetuses with neural tube defects (NTDs) carry a risk of chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with other structural abnormalities, and family history of chromosome aberrations. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with NTDs in embryos, fetuses, and newborn patients, and a comprehensive review of numerical chromosomal abnormalities associated with NTDs, such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploi...

  14. Renal function decline predicted by left atrial expansion index in non-diabetic cohort with preserved systolic heart function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Shih-Hung; Chiou, Kuan-Rau

    2017-05-01

    Since natriuretic peptide and troponin are associated with renal prognosis and left atrial (LA) parameters are indicators of subclinical cardiovascular abnormalities, this study investigated whether LA expansion index can predict renal decline. This study analysed 733 (69% male) non-diabetic patients with sinus rhythm, preserved systolic function, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) higher than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. In all patients, echocardiograms were performed and LA expansion index was calculated. Renal function was evaluated annually. The endpoint was a downhill trend in renal function with a final eGFR of renal decline was defined as an annual decline in eGFR >3 mL/min/1.73 m2. The median follow-up time was 5.2 years, and 57 patients (7.8%) had renal function declines (19 had rapid renal declines, and 38 had incidental renal dysfunction). Events were associated with left ventricular mass index, LA expansion index, and heart failure during the follow-up period. The hazard ratio was 1.426 (95% confidence interval, 1.276-1.671; P renal function decline in the unadjusted model and a 6.9-fold risk after adjusting for left ventricular mass index and heart failure during the follow-up period. Left atrial expansion index is a useful early indicator of renal function decline and may enable the possibility of early intervention to prevent renal function from worsening. NCT01171040. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Prevalence of cervical cytology abnormalities among HIV infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To establish the prevalence of cervical cytology abnormalities, determine the correlation between CD4+ cell count and abnormal Pap smear, determine the correlation between WHO-HIV staging and abnormal pap smear among HIV infected women attending HIV clinic at Rwanda Military Hospital. Design: ...

  16. Abnormal Behavior in Relation to Cage Size in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulk, H. H.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Examines the effects of cage size on stereotyped and normal locomotion and on other abnormal behaviors in singly caged animals, whether observed abnormal behaviors tend to co-occur, and if the development of an abnormal behavior repertoire leads to reduction in the number of normal behavior categories. (Author/RK)

  17. Abnormally large magnetospheric electric field on 9 November 2004 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    There was a solar event around 1850 UT on 9th November 2004, associated with an abnormally large solar wind flow pressure and large southward interplanetary magnetic field, causing an abnormally large prompt penetration electric field between 1850 and 2100 UT. Abnormally large vertical F-region drifts by Jicamarca ...

  18. ECG classification and abnormality detection using cascade forward ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes the use of MATLAB based artificial neural network tools for ECG analysis for finding out whether the ECG is normal or abnormal and if it is abnormal, what is the abnormality. There are various arrhythmia like Ventricular premature beats, asystole, couplet, bigeminy, fusion beats etc. To classify this,

  19. What distinguishes passive recipients from active decliners of sales flyers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Orquin, Jacob Lund; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2014-01-01

    While sales flyer ad spending in Denmark has increased over the last decade ,the proportion of consumers declining to receive such flyers has been ever-increasing. To address this paradox, attitudinal and behavioural factors distinguishing passive recipients from active decliners of sales flyers...... are examined. The results reveal that decliners compared to receivers are less price conscious and that they perceive flyers as more inconvenient and less useful. Although decliners generally use other media less for deal searching than receivers, they are more inclined to search for grocery deals...... on the Internet.To reach the decliners, retailers could focus on the possibilities of the Internet, but to stop the trend of escalating numbers of decliners, retailers will have to address the perceived inconvenience and uselessness of sales flyers....

  20. Fast renal decline to end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Skupien, Jan; Rossing, Peter

    2017-01-01

    , progressing steadily (linearly) to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). While an individual's rate of renal decline is constant, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope varies widely among individuals from –72 to –3.0 ml/min/year. Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines define rapid......A new model of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes emerged from our studies of Joslin Clinic patients. The dominant feature is progressive renal decline, not albuminuria. This decline is a unidirectional process commencing while patients have normal renal function and, in the majority......, that very fast and fast decline from normal eGFR to ESRD within 2 to 10 years constitutes 50% of the Joslin cohort. In this review we present data about frequency of fast decliners in both diabetes types, survey some mechanisms underlying fast renal decline, discuss methods of identifying patients at risk...

  1. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  2. Abnormal and normal obsessions: a reconsideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Eric; Muris, Peter

    2007-05-01

    Contemporary cognitive approaches to obsession assume that the content of clinical obsessions does not differ from non-clinical obsessive intrusions. This assumption goes back to a classic study by Rachman and De Silva [(1978). Abnormal and normal obsessions. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 16, 233-248]. In the present paper, it is argued that Rachman and De Silva did not postulate a complete indifference between clinical and non-clinical obsessions. Study 1 is a simple statistical analysis of data presented by Rachman and De Silva. This analysis suggested that psychologists are able to discriminate clinical and non-clinical obsessions beyond chance level, merely by looking at the content of obsessions. In study 2, a list of 23 clinical and 47 non-clinical obsessions was presented to 11 psychotherapists and 90 psychology undergraduates. Both therapists and students were able to distinguish clinical and non-clinical obsession beyond chance level. It is concluded that some clinical obsessions can be identified as being evidently abnormal, and that additional theory and research is needed to identify the causes of these recognisable obsessions.

  3. Screening human populations for abnormal radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.; Morrison, D.P.

    1990-07-01

    A relatively rapid and inexpensive in vitro growback assay was developed that uses the irradiated versus the unirradiated re-growth responses of lymphoblastoid cell lines developed from individual donors as an estimator of donor radioresponse. The purpose of this project was to furnish an estimate of the proportion of strains derived from various study populations that may be regarded as exhibiting abnormal radioresponse. The emphasis in this study was on hypersensitivity, because of the known radiation-hypersensitivity and cancer proneness associated with the genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. Using methods developed especially for survival analyses, the percentage of significantly hypersensitive responses was 5.5% in a donor population composed of ostensibly normal individuals. We also examined lines derived from an unselected cancer patient population. These were not enriched, compared to the reference normal population, for hypersensitive responses. We thus conclude that hypersensitivity in vitro is not associated with increased risk for spontaneous development of cancer. However, the failure to observe an association between hypersensitivity and spontaneous cancer does not preclude a correlation between such sensitivity and radiogenic cancer. At the present stage, we would caution against the application of this assay or related in vitro tests to the situation of an individual, as opposed to a population. While we have clear indications that hypersensitivity in vitro is associated with abnormal radioresponse in vivo, this study has identified sources of variation that must be understood before attempts are made to unambiguously attribute a particular type of radioresponse to an individual

  4. Abnormal Fixational Eye Movements in Amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Kumar, Priyanka; Ghasia, Fatema F

    2016-01-01

    Fixational saccades shift the foveal image to counteract visual fading related to neural adaptation. Drifts are slow eye movements between two adjacent fixational saccades. We quantified fixational saccades and asked whether their changes could be attributed to pathologic drifts seen in amblyopia, one of the most common causes of blindness in childhood. Thirty-six pediatric subjects with varying severity of amblyopia and eleven healthy age-matched controls held their gaze on a visual target. Eye movements were measured with high-resolution video-oculography during fellow eye-viewing and amblyopic eye-viewing conditions. Fixational saccades and drifts were analyzed in the amblyopic and fellow eye and compared with controls. We found an increase in the amplitude with decreased frequency of fixational saccades in children with amblyopia. These alterations in fixational eye movements correlated with the severity of their amblyopia. There was also an increase in eye position variance during drifts in amblyopes. There was no correlation between the eye position variance or the eye velocity during ocular drifts and the amplitude of subsequent fixational saccade. Our findings suggest that abnormalities in fixational saccades in amblyopia are independent of the ocular drift. This investigation of amblyopia in pediatric age group quantitatively characterizes the fixation instability. Impaired properties of fixational saccades could be the consequence of abnormal processing and reorganization of the visual system in amblyopia. Paucity in the visual feedback during amblyopic eye-viewing condition can attribute to the increased eye position variance and drift velocity.

  5. Functional neuroimaging abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L. McGill

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques have been used to quantitatively assess focal and network abnormalities. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE is characterized by bilateral synchronous spike–wave discharges on electroencephalography (EEG but normal clinical MRI. Dysfunctions involving the neocortex, particularly the prefrontal cortex, and thalamus likely contribute to seizure activity. To identify possible morphometric and functional differences in the brains of IGE patients and normal controls, we employed measures of thalamic volumes, cortical thickness, gray–white blurring, fractional anisotropy (FA measures from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF in thalamic subregions from resting state functional MRI. Data from 27 patients with IGE and 27 age- and sex-matched controls showed similar thalamic volumes, cortical thickness and gray–white contrast. There were no differences in FA values on DTI in tracts connecting the thalamus and prefrontal cortex. Functional analysis revealed decreased fALFF in the prefrontal cortex (PFC subregion of the thalamus in patients with IGE. We provide minimum detectable effect sizes for each measure used in the study. Our analysis indicates that fMRI-based methods are more sensitive than quantitative structural techniques for characterizing brain abnormalities in IGE.

  6. Brain Abnormalities in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woojun Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an idiopathic inflammatory syndrome of the central nervous system that is characterized by severe attacks of optic neuritis (ON and myelitis. Until recently, NMO was considered a disease without brain involvement. However, since the discovery of NMO-IgG/antiaqaporin-4 antibody, the concept of NMO was broadened to NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD, and brain lesions are commonly recognized. Furthermore, some patients present with brain symptoms as their first manifestation and develop recurrent brain symptoms without ON or myelitis. Brain lesions with characteristic locations and configurations can be helpful in the diagnosis of NMOSD. Due to the growing recognition of brain abnormalities in NMOSD, these have been included in the NMO and NMOSD diagnostic criteria or guidelines. Recent technical developments such as diffusion tensor imaging, MR spectroscopy, and voxel-based morphometry reveal new findings related to brain abnormalities in NMOSD that were not identified using conventional MRI. This paper focuses on the incidence and characteristics of the brain lesions found in NMOSD and the symptoms that they cause. Recent studies using advanced imaging techniques are also introduced.

  7. Skeleton-Based Abnormal Gait Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trong-Nguyen Nguyen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Human gait analysis plays an important role in musculoskeletal disorder diagnosis. Detecting anomalies in human walking, such as shuffling gait, stiff leg or unsteady gait, can be difficult if the prior knowledge of such a gait pattern is not available. We propose an approach for detecting abnormal human gait based on a normal gait model. Instead of employing the color image, silhouette, or spatio-temporal volume, our model is created based on human joint positions (skeleton in time series. We decompose each sequence of normal gait images into gait cycles. Each human instant posture is represented by a feature vector which describes relationships between pairs of bone joints located in the lower body. Such vectors are then converted into codewords using a clustering technique. The normal human gait model is created based on multiple sequences of codewords corresponding to different gait cycles. In the detection stage, a gait cycle with normality likelihood below a threshold, which is determined automatically in the training step, is assumed as an anomaly. The experimental results on both marker-based mocap data and Kinect skeleton show that our method is very promising in distinguishing normal and abnormal gaits with an overall accuracy of 90.12%.

  8. Prevention of cognitive decline: Lifestyle and other issues

    OpenAIRE

    Cyriac George; Shijin A Ummar; K S Shaji

    2016-01-01

    Ageing often leads to decline in cognitive abilities. Significant cognitive impairment leads to functional impairment and need for care. Prevention of cognitive decline and delaying its progression would help to reduce the need for long-term care. Both genetic and environmental factors are important determinants of cognitive health in late life. A better cognitive reserve helps to prevent cognitive decline. Cognitive reserve is now considered as a functional reserve rather than a structural r...

  9. Cognitive decline in Huntington's disease expansion gene carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baake, Verena; Reijntjes, Robert H A M; Dumas, Eve M; Thompson, Jennifer C; Roos, Raymund A C

    2017-10-01

    In Huntington's Disease (HD) cognitive decline can occur before unequivocal motor signs become apparent. As cognitive decline often starts early in the course of the disease and has a progressive nature over time, cognition can be regarded as a key target for symptomatic treatment. The specific progressive profile of cognitive decline over time is unknown. The aim of this study is to quantify the progression of cognitive decline across all HD stages, from pre-motormanifest to advanced HD, and to investigate if CAG length mediates cognitive decline. In the European REGISTRY study 2669 HD expansion gene carriers underwent annual cognitive assessment. General linear mixed models were used to model the cognitive decline for each cognitive task across all disease stages. Additionally, a model was developed to evaluate the cognitive decline based on CAG length and age rather than disease stage. There was significant cognitive decline on all administered tasks throughout pre-motormanifest (close to estimated disease onset) participants and the subsequent motormanifest participants from stage 1 to stage 4. Performance on the Stroop Word and Stroop Color tests additionally declined significantly across the two pre-motormanifest groups: far and close to estimated disease onset. The evaluation of cognition performance in relation to CAG length and age revealed a more rapid cognitive decline in participants with longer CAG length than participants with shorter CAG length over time. Cognitive performance already shows decline in pre-motormanifest HD gene expansion carriers and gradually worsens to late stage HD. HD gene expansion carriers with certain CAG length have their own cognitive profile, i.e., longer CAG length is associated with more rapid decline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Declining sustained virological response in hepatitis c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batool, U.; Qureshi, S.

    2006-01-01

    gender, baseline ALT and necro inflammatory stage assessed by liver biopsy, probable risk factors and positive family history. Conclusion: Management of hepatitis C with genotype 3a, with standard Interferon and Ribazole for six months appear to show declining SVR compared to that reported in previous international and local data. (author)

  11. Declining sustained virological response in hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batool, Uzma; Qureshi, Saleem

    2006-03-01

    risk factors and positive family history. Management of hepatitis C with genotype 3a, with standard Interferon and Ribazole for six months appear to show declining SVR compared to that reported in previous international and local data.

  12. Evaluating the Association between Diabetes, Cognitive Decline and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omorogieva Ojo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review the association between diabetes mellitus, cognitive decline and dementia, including the effects of cognitive decline and dementia on self management of diabetes. This is a literature review of primary research articles. A number of contemporary research articles that met the inclusion criteria were selected for this review paper. These articles were selected using a number of search strategies and electronic databases, such as EBSCOhost Research and SwetsWise databases. The duration of diabetes, glycated haemoglobin levels and glycaemic fluctuations were associated with cognitive decline and dementia. Similarly, hypoglycaemia was significantly related to increased risk of developing cognitive decline and dementia. Furthermore, cognitive decline and dementia were associated with poorer diabetes management. There is evidence of the association between diabetes, cognitive decline and dementia including the shared pathogenesis between diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, the self management of diabetes is affected by dementia and cognitive decline. It could be suggested that the association between diabetes and dementia is bidirectional with the potential to proceed to a vicious cycle. Further studies are needed in order to fully establish the relationship between diabetes, cognitive decline and dementia. Patients who have diabetes and dementia could benefit from structured education strategies, which should involve empowerment programmes and lifestyle changes. The detection of cognitive decline should highlight the need for education strategies.

  13. Declinations in the Almagest: accuracy, epoch, and observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, John C.; Zimmer, Peter; Jones, Patricia B.

    2014-11-01

    Almagest declinations attributed to Timocharis, Aristyllos, Hipparchus, and Ptolemy are investigated through comparisons of the reported declinations with the declinations computed from modern positions translated to the earlier epochs. Consistent results indicate an observational accuracy of ≈ 0.1° and epochs of: Timocharis, c. 298 BC; Aristyllos, c. 256 BC, and Hipparchus, c. 128 BC.The ≈ 42-year difference between Aristyllos and Timocharis is confirmed to be statistically significant. The declinations attributed to Ptolemy were likely two distinct groups—observations taken c. AD 57 and observations taken c. AD 128. The later observations could have been taken by Ptolemy himself.

  14. Longitudinal personality change associated with cognitive decline in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shumita; Drake, Allison; Fuchs, Tom; Dwyer, Michael G; Zivadinov, Robert; Chapman, Benjamin P; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Benedict, Ralph Hb

    2018-01-01

    We previously reported that personality and cognition were stable over 3 years in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This study examined whether a longer duration would reveal evidence of emerging personality dysfunction. The NEO Five-Factor Inventory and Brief International Cognitive Assessment for MS was used to assess personality and cognition, respectively. Patients were classified as "Cog Stable" or "Cog Decline" based on cognitive deterioration over 5 years. Extraversion and Conscientiousness declined across pooled groups. Follow-up of a group by time interaction found that decline in these traits was more evident in the Cog Decline group, demonstrating a link between personality and cognitive change.

  15. Aboveground net primary production decline with stand age: potential causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, S T; McMurtrie, R E; Murty, D

    1996-09-01

    Aboveground net primary production (ANPP) commonly reaches a maximum in young forest stands and decreases by 0-76% as stands mature. However, the mechanism(s) responsible for the decline are not well understood. Current hypotheses for declining ANPP with stand age include: (1) an altered balance between photosynthetic and respiring tissues, (2) decreasing soil nutrient availability, and (3) increasing stomatal limitation leading to reduced photosynthetic rates. Recent empirical and modeling studies reveal that mechanisms (2) and (3) are largely responsible for age-related decline in ANPP for forests in cold environments. Increasing respiratory costs appear to be relatively unimportant in explaining declining productivity in ageing stands.

  16. Report to congress on abnormal occurrences: January--March 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to congress. This report covers the period from January 1 through March 31, 1992. The abnormal occurrences involving medical therapy misadministrations at NRC-licensed facilities are discussed in this report. There were no abnormal occurrences at a nuclear power plant, and none were reported by NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences

  17. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, October--December 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period from October 1 through December 31, 1992. There are two abnormal occurrences at nuclear power plants and six abnormal occurrences involving medical misadministration (all therapeutic) at NRC-licensed facilities discussed in this report. No abnormal occurrences were reported by the NRC's Agreement States. The report also contains information updating three previously reported abnormal occurrences

  18. Real-time Multiple Abnormality Detection in Video Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Simon Hartmann; Ren, Huamin; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Automatic abnormality detection in video sequences has recently gained an increasing attention within the research community. Although progress has been seen, there are still some limitations in current research. While most systems are designed at detecting specific abnormality, others which...... are capable of detecting more than two types of abnormalities rely on heavy computation. Therefore, we provide a framework for detecting abnormalities in video surveillance by using multiple features and cascade classifiers, yet achieve above real-time processing speed. Experimental results on two datasets...... show that the proposed framework can reliably detect abnormalities in the video sequence, outperforming the current state-of-the-art methods....

  19. Gynecologic anatomic abnormalities following anorectal malformations repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova-Sanchez, Alejandra; Reck, Carlos A; McCracken, Kate A; Lane, Victoria A; Gasior, Alessandra C; Wood, Richard J; Levitt, Marc A; Hewitt, Geri D

    2018-04-01

    Patients may present with gynecologic concerns after previous posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) for repair of an anorectal malformation (ARM). Common findings include an inadequate or shortened perineal body, as well as introital stenosis, retained vaginal septum, and remnant rectovestibular fistula. An inadequate or shortened perineal body may impact fecal continence, sexual function and recommendations regarding obstetrical mode of delivery. We describe our experience with female patients referred to our center for evaluation of their previously repaired ARM, with a specific focus on perineal body anatomy and concomitant gynecologic abnormalities. We outline our collaborative evaluation process and findings as well as subsequent repair and outcomes. A single site retrospective chart review from May 2014 to May 2016 was performed. Female patients with a history of prior ARM repair who required subsequent reoperative surgical repair with perineoplasty were included. The decision for reoperation was made collaboratively after a multidisciplinary evaluation by colorectal surgery, urology, and gynecology which included examination under anesthesia (EUA) with cystoscopy, vaginoscopy, rectal examination, and electrical stimulation of anal sphincters. The type of original malformation, indication for reoperative perineoplasty, findings leading to additional procedures performed at time of perineoplasty, postoperative complications, and the length of follow up were recorded. During the study period 28 patients were referred for evaluation after primary ARM repair elsewhere and 15 patients (60%) met inclusion criteria. Thirteen patients (86.6%) originally had a rectovestibular fistula with prior PSARP and 2 patients (13.4%) originally had a cloacal malformation with prior posterior sagittal anorectovaginourethroplasty. The mean age at the time of the subsequent perineoplasty was 4.6years (0.5-12). Patients had an inadequate perineal body requiring reoperative

  20. Morphological Abnormalities of Thalamic Subnuclei in Migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magon, Stefano; May, Arne; Stankewitz, Anne

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The thalamus contains third-order relay neurons of the trigeminal system, and animal models as well as preliminary imaging studies in small cohorts of migraine patients have suggested a role of the thalamus in headache pathophysiology. However, larger studies using advanced imaging...... techniques in substantial patient populations are lacking. In the present study, we investigated changes of thalamic volume and shape in a large multicenter cohort of patients with migraine. High-resolution T1-weighted MRI data acquired at 3 tesla in 131 patients with migraine (38 with aura; 30.8 ± 9 years...... a fully automated multiatlas approach. Deformation-based shape analysis was performed to localize surface abnormalities. Differences between patients with migraine and healthy subjects were assessed using an ANCOVA model. After correction for multiple comparisons, performed using the false discovery rate...

  1. Abnormal neuronal migration: radiologic-clinic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Fernandez, M.; Menor Serrano, F.; Bordon Ferre, F.; Garcia Tena, J.; Esteban Hernandez, E.; Sanguesa Nebot, C.; Marti Bonnati, L.

    1994-01-01

    We present our experience in 18 pediatric patients with abnormal neuronal migration. Seven cases of heterotopia of the gray matter, 7 agyria-pachygyria complexes, 1 case of polymicrogyria, 2 cases of schizencephaly and 1 case of hemimegalencephaly were diagnosed by means of ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance. The clinical picture was reviewed in each case, with special attention to the occurrence of convulsions, psycho motor development and visual changes. In general, the greater the morphological change, the greater the neurological involvement in these patients. However, the two cases of schizencephaly presented mild clinical expression. Magnetic resonance increases the diagnostic yield in neuronal migration disorders. Nevertheless, either ultrasonography or, especially, computed tomography is useful as a first diagnostic approach in these malformative disorders. (Author)

  2. Congenital abnormalities of the posterior fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Orman, Gunes; Boltshauser, Eugen; Tekes, Aylin; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The frequency and importance of the evaluation of the posterior fossa have increased significantly over the past 20 years owing to advances in neuroimaging. Nowadays, conventional and advanced neuroimaging techniques allow detailed evaluation of the complex anatomic structures within the posterior fossa. A wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities has been demonstrated, including malformations (anomalies due to an alteration of the primary developmental program caused by a genetic defect) and disruptions (anomalies due to the breakdown of a structure that had a normal developmental potential). Familiarity with the spectrum of congenital posterior fossa anomalies and their well-defined diagnostic criteria is crucial for optimal therapy, an accurate prognosis, and correct genetic counseling. The authors discuss the spectrum of posterior fossa malformations and disruptions, with emphasis on neuroimaging findings (including diagnostic criteria), neurologic presentation, systemic involvement, prognosis, and risk of recurrence. RSNA, 2015

  3. Abnormal epidermal changes after argon laser treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, R.A.; Knobler, R.M.; Aberer, E.; Klein, W.; Kocsis, F.; Ott, E. (Univ. of Vienna (Austria))

    1991-02-01

    A 26-year-old woman with a congenital port-wine stain on the forehead was treated three times at 2-month intervals with an argon laser. Six months after the last treatment, moderate blanching and mild scaling confined to the treated area was observed. A biopsy specimen of the treated area revealed a significant decrease in ectatic vessels. However, epidermal changes similar to those of actinic keratosis with disorganized cell layers and marked cytologic abnormalities were seen. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes for a defect in DNA repair was negative. Multiple, argon laser-induced photothermal effects may be responsible for the changes observed in our case and may lead to premalignant epidermal transformation.

  4. Persistent Pain and Sensory Abnormalities after Abdominoplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Presman, Benjamin; Finnerup, Kenneth; Andresen, Sven R

    2015-01-01

    and characteristics of persistent pain after abdominoplasty, which is one of the most frequent cosmetic surgical procedures. METHODS: In September 2014, a link to a web-based questionnaire was mailed to 217 patients who had undergone abdominoplasty between 2006 and 2014 at the Department of Plastic Surgery, Aalborg......BACKGROUND: Persistent postsurgical pain is a well-recognized problem after a number of common surgical procedures, such as amputation, thoracotomy, and inguinal hernia repair. Less is known about persistent pain after cosmetic surgical procedures. We, therefore, decided to study the incidence...... University Hospital, Denmark. The questionnaire included questions about pain and sensory abnormalities located to the abdominal skin, and physical and psychological function; patient satisfaction with surgery was rated on a 4-point scale. RESULTS: One hundred seventy patients answered the questionnaire...

  5. Glutamatergic system abnormalities in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Kenji; Noguchi, Hiroko; Hamazaki, Kei; Hamazaki, Tomohito; Matsuoka, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests involvement of the glutamatergic system in the biological mechanisms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but few studies have demonstrated an association between glutamatergic system abnormalities and PTSD diagnosis or severity. We aimed to examine whether abnormalities in serum glutamate and in the glutamine/glutamate ratio were associated with PTSD diagnosis and severity in severely injured patients at risk for PTSD and major depressive disorder (MDD). This is a nested case-control study in TPOP (Tachikawa project for prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder with polyunsaturated fatty acid) trial. Diagnosis and severity of PTSD were assessed 3 months after the accidents using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale. The associations of glutamate levels and the glutamine/glutamate ratio with diagnosis and severity of PTSD and MDD were investigated by univariate and multiple linear regression analyses. Ninety-seven of 110 participants (88 %) completed assessments at 3 months. Serum glutamate levels were significantly higher for participants with full or partial PTSD than for participants without PTSD (p = 0.049) and for participants with MDD than for participants without MDD (p = 0.048). Multiple linear regression analyses showed serum glutamate levels were significantly positively associated with PTSD severity (p = 0.02) and MDD severity (p = 0.03). The glutamine/glutamate ratio was also significantly inversely associated with PTSD severity (p = 0.03), but not with MDD severity (p = 0.07). These findings suggest that the glutamatergic system may play a major role in the pathogenesis of PTSD and the need for new treatments targeting the glutamatergic system to be developed for PTSD.

  6. Physical activity, structural brain changes and cognitive decline. The SMART-MR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooistra, M; Boss, H M; van der Graaf, Y; Kappelle, L J; Biessels, G J; Geerlings, M I

    2014-05-01

    We aimed to examine the cross-sectional and prospective relationship between leisure time physical activity, brain MRI abnormalities and cognitive performance in patients with vascular disease. Within the SMART-MR study, 1.5 T MRI of the brain and neuropsychological examinations were performed at baseline (n = 1232) and after 3.9 ± 0.4 years follow-up (n = 663). Automatic brain segmentation was used to quantify intracranial (ICV), total brain, ventricular, and white matter lesion (WML) volumes. Brain infarcts were rated visually. Level of physical activity was expressed in metabolic equivalents (MET) hours p/week. With linear regression analysis we examined associations of level of physical activity with brain MRI measures and with cognitive performance, adjusted for potential confounders. For the association with brain infarcts relative risks (RR) were calculated with Poisson regression. At baseline, an increase in physical activity of one SD (39.7 METh/w) was significantly associated with larger total brain volume (B = 0.20% of ICV; 95% CI 0.06; 0.33%). A trend was found for the association of physical activity with smaller ventricular volume (B = -0.04% of ICV; 95% CI -0.09; 0.02%) and with a decreased risk for brain infarcts (RR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.82-1.02). No association was found with smaller WML volume (B = -0.02% of ICV; 95% CI -0.07; 0.04%). No associations with change in brain structures over time were observed. Also, no associations between physical activity and cognitive performance or cognitive decline were found. These data suggest that leisure time physical activity does not have a significant contribution in preventing or slowing down brain abnormalities and cognitive decline in this cohort of middle-aged individuals already burdened with vascular disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Decline of Functional Capacity in Healthy Aging Workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soer, Remko; Brouwer, Sandra; Geertzen, Jan H.; van der Schans, Cees P.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Reneman, Michiel F.

    2012-01-01

    Soer R, Brouwer S, Geertzen JH, van der Schans CP, Groothoff JW, Reneman MF. Decline of functional capacity in healthy aging workers. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2012;93:2326-32. Objectives: (1) To study the natural decline in functional capacity (FC) of healthy aging workers; (2) to compare FC to

  8. The decline in winter excess mortality in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, A. E.; Looman, C. W.; Mackenbach, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    In most countries, numbers of deaths rise considerably during the winter season. This winter excess in mortality has, however, been declining during recent decades. The causes of this decline are hardly known. This paper attempts to derive a number of hypotheses on the basis of a detailed

  9. Globalization and the price decline of illicit drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Storti, Cláudia; De Grauwe, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This study aims at understanding the mechanisms underlying the dramatic decline of the retail prices of major drugs like cocaine and heroin during the past two decades. It also aims at analysing the implications of this decline for drug policies. We use a theoretical model to identify the possible causes of this price decline. This allows us to formulate the hypothesis that the major driving force behind the price decline is a reduction of the intermediation margin (the difference between the retail and producer prices). We also develop the hypothesis that globalization has been an important factor behind the decline of the intermediation margin. We then analyse the statistical information to test these hypotheses. We find that the decline in the retail prices of drugs is related to the strong decline in the intermediation margin in the drug business, and that globalization is the main driving force behind this phenomenon. Globalization has done so by increasing the efficiency of the distribution of drugs, by reducing the risk premium involved in dealing with drugs, and by increasing the degree of competition in the drug markets. We conclude that the cocaine and heroin price declines were due to a sharp fall in the intermediation margin, which was probably influenced by globalization. This phenomenon might have a strong impact on the effectiveness of drug policies, increasing the relative effectiveness of policies aiming at reducing the demand of drugs.

  10. Is the gender wage gap declining in the Netherlands?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, P.H.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I try to answer the question whether the gender wage gap in the Netherlands is declining. I posed this question because on several other indicators labour market differences between men and women in the Netherlands declined or disappeared altogether. First of all the labour market

  11. Rate of pulmonary function decline in South African children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) objectively measure the extent and progression of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. The rate of lung function decline in developing countries has not previously been studied. Aim. To investigate the average annual rates of pulmonary function decline in South African children ...

  12. Serum cholesterol decline and depression in the postpartum period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van R.M.; Schuit, A.J.; Schouten, E.G.; Vader, H.L.; Pop, V.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the relation between total serum cholesterol decline and depression in the postpartum period in a prospective study of 266 Dutch women, who were followed until 34 weeks after delivery. The decline in serum cholesterol between week 32 of pregnancy and week 10 postpartum was similar for

  13. Predicting cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease: an integrated analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Oscar L; Schwam, Elias; Cummings, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Numerous patient- and disease-related factors increase the risk of rapid cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ability of pharmacological treatment to attenuate this risk remains undefined.......Numerous patient- and disease-related factors increase the risk of rapid cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ability of pharmacological treatment to attenuate this risk remains undefined....

  14. Serum cholesterol decline and depression in the postpartum period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, R M; Schuit, A.J.; Schouten, E G; Vader, H L; Pop, V.J.

    We examined the relation between total serum cholesterol decline and depression in the postpartum period in a prospective study of 266 Dutch women, who were followed until 34 weeks after delivery. The decline in serum cholesterol between week 32 of pregnancy and week 10 postpartum was similar for

  15. Did the Decline in Social Connections Depress Americans' Happiness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, Stefano; Bilancini, Ennio; Pugno, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    During the last 30 years US citizens experienced, on average, a decline in reported happiness, social connections, and confidence in institutions. We show that a remarkable portion of the decrease in happiness is predicted by the decline in social connections and confidence in institutions. We carry out our investigation in three steps. First, we…

  16. State of pine decline in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori Eckhardt; Mary Anne Sword Sayer; Don Imm

    2010-01-01

    Pine decline is an emerging forest health issue in the southeastern United States. Observations suggest pine decline is caused by environmental stress arising from competition, weather, insects and fungi, anthropogenic disturbances, and previous management. The problem is most severe for loblolly pine on sites that historically supported longleaf pine, are highly...

  17. Factors contributing to declining enrolments at the University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors contributing to declining enrolments at the University of Transkei. ... This study investigated factors which could explain the decline of student numbers at the University of Transkei. The findings indicated that ... Catering and hostel facilities were not major factors in the students' choice of the institution. South African ...

  18. POPULATION DECLINES OF THE PUERTO RICAN VIREO IN GUANICA FOREST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JOHN FAABORG; KATE M. DUGGER; WAYNE J. ARENDT; BETHANY L. WOODWORTH; MICHAEL E. BALTZ

    1997-01-01

    Abundance of the Puerto Rican Vireo (Vireo Zutimeri) in Guanica Forest, Puerto Rico, has declined gradually over the period 1973-1996 as determined by constant effort mist netting. Concurrent studies of breeding vireos show low nesting success, primarily due to parasitism by Shiny Cowbirds (Molothrus bonariensis). This decline may reflect the rather recent entry of the...

  19. Developmental decline in height growth in Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara J. Bond; Nicole M. Czarnomski; Clifton Cooper; Michael E. Day; Michael S. Greenwood

    2007-01-01

    The characteristic decline in height growth that occurs over a tree's lifespan is often called "age-related decline." But is the reduction in height growth in aging trees a function of age or of size? We grafted shoot tips across different ages and sizes of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) trees to determine whether...

  20. Identification of older hospitalized patients at risk for functional decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerduijn, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Between 30% and 60% of older patients experience functional decline after hospitalization, resulting in a decline in health-related quality of life and autonomy. This is associated with increased risk of readmission, nursing home placement and mortality, increased length of hospital stay and

  1. Prognostic Factors for Cognitive Decline After Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benedictus, M.R.; Hochart, A.; Rossi, C.; Boulouis, G.; Henon, H.; van der Flier, W.M.; Cordonnier, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Stroke and dementia are closely related, but no prospective study ever focused on poststroke cognitive decline in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We aimed to determine prognostic factors for cognitive decline in patients with ICH. Methods-We prospectively

  2. The decline in phytoplankton biomass and prawn catches in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The world's oceans have seen significant declines in phytoplankton-the primary food source in the marine environment. This decline in primary producers is likely to impact the food chain and functions of most coastal and marine ecosystems. Despite being one of the most productive marine fishing grounds in the Western ...

  3. Alarming decline and range reduction of the highly threatened Great ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Great Bustard Otis tarda survey carried out in spring 2015 in Morocco confirmed the decline of this highly endangered population. Bustards were only seen at two of the seven leks occupied ten years ago. The total number of birds counted was 40-44, which represents a 40% decline over the last decade. The sex-ratio ...

  4. Critical Decline of the Eastern Caribbean Sperm Whale Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gero, Shane; Whitehead, Hal

    2016-01-01

    Sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) populations were expected to rebuild following the end of commercial whaling. We document the decline of the population in the eastern Caribbean by tracing demographic changes of well-studied social units. We address hypotheses that, over a ten-year period of dedicated effort (2005-2015), unit size, numbers of calves and/or calving rates have each declined. Across 16 units, the number of adults decreased in 12 units, increased in two, and showed no change in two. The number of adults per unit decreased at -0.195 individuals/yr (95% CI: -0.080 to -0.310; P = 0.001). The number of calves also declined, but the decline was not significant. This negative trend of -4.5% per year in unit size started in about 2010, with numbers being fairly stable until then. There are several natural and anthropogenic threats, but no well-substantiated cause for the decline.

  5. Identifying Factors Associated With Mobility Decline Among Hospitalized Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Jo-Ana D; Lozano, Alicia; Hanlon, Alexandra; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2018-02-01

    Hospitalization can negatively affect mobility among older adults. Early detection of older patients most at risk for mobility decline can lead to early intervention and prevention of mobility loss. This study's purpose was to identify factors from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health associated with mobility decline among hospitalized elders. We conducted a secondary analysis of data from 959 hospitalized adults age 65 and older. We estimated the effects of health conditions and environmental and personal factors on mobility decline using logistic regression. Almost half of the sample declined in mobility function during hospitalization. Younger age, longer length of hospital stay, having a hearing impairment, and non-emergency admit type were associated with mobility decline, after adjusting for covariates. Findings may be used to develop an evidence-based, risk-determination tool for hospitalized elders. Future research should focus on individual, environmental, and policy-based interventions promoting physical activity in the hospital.

  6. Cardiometabolic dysregulation and cognitive decline: potential role of depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Norbert; Deschênes, Sonya S; Burns, Rachel J; Danna, Sofia M; Franco, Oscar H; Ikram, M Arfan; Kivimäki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Tiemeier, Henning

    2018-02-01

    Previous studies have examined associations of cardiometabolic factors with depression and cognition separately. Aims To determine if depressive symptoms mediate the association between cardiometabolic factors and cognitive decline in two community studies. Data for the analyses were drawn from the Rotterdam Study, the Netherlands (n = 2940) and the Whitehall II study, UK (n = 4469). Mediation analyses suggested a direct association between cardiometabolic factors and cognitive decline and an indirect association through depression: poorer cardiometabolic status at time 1 was associated with a higher level of depressive symptoms at time 2 (standardised regression coefficient 0.07 and 0.06, respectively), which, in turn, was associated with greater cognitive decline between time 2 and time 3 (standardised regression coefficient of -0.15 and -0.41, respectively). Evidence from two independent cohort studies suggest an association between cardiometabolic dysregulation and cognitive decline and that depressive symptoms tend to precede this decline. Declaration of interest None.

  7. Cognitive decline after major oncological surgery in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plas, M; Rotteveel, E; Izaks, G J; Spikman, J M; van der Wal-Huisman, H; van Etten, B; Absalom, A R; Mourits, M J E; de Bock, G H; van Leeuwen, B L

    2017-11-01

    Elderly patients undergoing oncological surgery experience postoperative cognitive decline. The aims of this study were to examine the incidence of cognitive decline 3 months after surgery and identify potential patient-, disease- and surgery-related risk factors for postoperative cognitive decline in onco-geriatric patients. A consecutive series of elderly patients (≥65 years) undergoing surgery for the removal of a solid tumour were included (n = 307). Cognitive performance was assessed pre-operatively and 3 months postoperatively. Postoperative decline was defined as a decline in scores of cognitive tests of ≥25% on ≥2 of 5 tests. Of the patients who had completed the assessments, 117 (53%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 47-60) had improved cognitive test scores, whereas 26 (12%, 95% CI: 7.6-16) showed cognitive decline at 3 months postoperatively. In patients aged >75 years, the incidence of overall cognitive decline 3 months postoperatively was 18% (95% CI: 9.3-27). In patients with lower pre-operative Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score (≤26) the incidence was 37% (95% CI: 18-57), and in patients undergoing major surgery it was 18% (95% CI: 10.6-26). Of the cognitive domains, executive function was the most vulnerable to decline. About half of the elderly patients show improvement in postoperative cognitive performance after oncological surgery, whereas 12% show cognitive decline. Advanced age, lower pre-operative MMSE score and major surgery are risk factors for cognitive decline at 3 months postoperatively and should be taken into account in the clinical decision-making progress. Research to develop interventions to preserve quality of life should focus on this high-risk subpopulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Recent fertility declines in China and India: a comparative view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, P M; Rani, S

    1995-12-01

    This paper compares fertility transitions in China and parts of India. It is argued that China experienced a more rapid and more "impressive" decline than that of India. Socioeconomic conditions in China were more conducive to fertility decline. Kerala State in India experienced a similar decline as China but at a slower pace. The birth control campaign in China is credited with an important role in speeding the transition. It is posited that the political and administrative system and economic conditions in India are not compatible with the Chinese style program strategies. Both countries had similar fertility levels in the immediate post-revolutionary period. The most rapid decline occurred during the 1970s in China. The fertility transition was almost completed by 1981. In India, the total fertility rate (TFR) declined by only 1 point between the 1950s and 1981. In China TFR declined over 3 points during 1970-81. 76.7% of the decline in China during 1970-81 is attributed to a marked decline in marital fertility in all age groups, with the exception of ages 15-19 years. The decline in India is attributed to the decline in marital fertility. Female age at marriage rose in India, but less "impressively." In 1981 the mean age at marriage in India was 18.4 years, but it was 22.8 years in China. Marital fertility among women aged older than 30 years was considerably lower in China. Both countries experienced an increase in literacy, but in China the level of literacy was much greater. Both countries faced food shortages, but China improved food availability and calorie consumption per capita. Health services also improved in both countries, but the Chinese system of "barefoot" doctors brought services with easier reach of rural populations. Political structures differed in their dominance and organization. Family planning programs were introduced earlier in India, but prevalence was 64.4% in China in 1981 and about 22% in India.

  9. Recurrent miscarriage in translocation carriers: no differences in clinical characteristics between couples who accept and couples who decline PGD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Krom, G; Arens, Y H J M; Coonen, E; Van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C M A; Meijer-Hoogeveen, M; Evers, J L H; Van Golde, R J T; De Die-Smulders, C E M

    2015-02-01

    Do clinical characteristics of recurrent miscarriage couples with a chromosomal abnormality and who opt for PGD differ from couples that decline PGD after extensive genetic counselling? No differences in clinical characteristics are identified between recurrent miscarriage couples carrying a structural chromosomal abnormality who opt for PGD compared with those that decline PGD after extensive genetic counselling. Couples who have experienced two or more miscarriages (recurrent miscarriage) are at increased recurrence risk if one of the partners carries a structural chromosomal abnormality. PGD can be offered to avoid (another) miscarriage or pregnancy termination when (invasive) prenatal diagnosis shows an abnormal result. To date, no reports are available that describe reproductive decision-making after genetic counselling on PGD in these specific couples. Retrospective cohort study of 294 couples carrying a structural chromosomal abnormality seeking genetic counselling on PGD between 1996 and 2012. Participants were recurrent miscarriage couples carrying a structural chromosomal abnormality. They had been referred for genetic counselling to the only national licensed PGD centre. Clinical characteristics analysed included couple associated characteristics, characteristics concerning reproductive history and external characteristics such as type of physician that referred the couple for genetic counselling and the clinical geneticist performing the counselling on PGD. Of 294 couples referred for counselling on PGD, 26 were not accepted because they did not meet the criteria for IVF-PGD. The remaining cohort of 268 couples consisted of two-thirds female and one-third male carriers. Main PGD indications were reciprocal translocations (83.9%) and Robertsonian translocations (16.7%). Following genetic counselling, 76.9% of included couples chose PGD as their reproductive option, the others declined PGD. Reproductive choice is not influenced by sex of the translocation

  10. Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 Second Variability Helps Identify Patients with Cystic Fibrosis at Risk of Greater Loss of Lung Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Wayne J; VanDevanter, Donald R; Pasta, David J; Foreman, Aimee J; Wagener, Jeffrey S; Konstan, Michael W

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate several alternative measures of forced expiratory volume in 1 second percent predicted (FEV1 %pred) variability as potential predictors of future FEV1 %pred decline in patients with cystic fibrosis. We included 13,827 patients age ≥6 years from the Epidemiologic Study of Cystic Fibrosis 1994-2002 with ≥4 FEV1 %pred measurements spanning ≥366 days in both a 2-year baseline period and a 2-year follow-up period. We predicted change from best baseline FEV1 %pred to best follow-up FEV1 %pred and change from baseline to best in the second follow-up year by using multivariable regression stratified by 4 lung-disease stages. We assessed 5 measures of variability (some as deviations from the best and some as deviations from the trend line) both alone and after controlling for demographic and clinical factors and for the slope and level of FEV1 %pred. All 5 measures of FEV1 %pred variability were predictive, but the strongest predictor was median deviation from the best FEV1 %pred in the baseline period. The contribution to explanatory power (R(2)) was substantial and exceeded the total contribution of all other factors excluding the FEV1 %pred rate of decline. Adding the other variability measures provided minimal additional value. Median deviation from the best FEV1 %pred is a simple metric that markedly improves prediction of FEV1 %pred decline even after the inclusion of demographic and clinical characteristics and the FEV1 %pred rate of decline. The routine calculation of this variability measure could allow clinicians to better identify patients at risk and therefore in need of increased intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Capital structure and value firm: an empirical analysis of abnormal returns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris Nasif AL-SHUBIRI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates whether capital structure is value relevant for the equity investor. In this sense, the paper links empirical corporate finance issues with investment analysis. This study also integrates the Miller-Modigliani (MM framework (1958 into an investment approach by estimating abnormal returns on leverage portfolios in the time-series for different risk classes. For most risk classes, abnormal returns decline in firm leverage. Descriptive statistics, simple and multiple regressions are used to test the hold indicator significance. The results reflect that the designed measures are the negative relationship between returns and leverage could also be due to the market’s pricing of the firm’s ability to raise funds if need be. Further avenues for research in this area include examining the stock return performance of companies based on the changes in leverage of the firms relative to their risk classes. It would be particularly noteworthy to examine the rate at which the information content of said changes is incorporated in the share prices of companies as well as in their long run returns This study encompasses all non-financial firms across the five sectors that cover all the various classes of risk. This study investigates neither the determinants of multiple capital structure choices nor changes in capital structures over time. Our main goal is to explore the effect of capital structure on cumulative abnormal returns. This study also examine a firm’s cumulative average abnormal returns by measuring leverage at the firm level and at the average level for the firm’s industry. And also examine other factors, such as size, price earnings, market-to-book and betas.

  12. White Matter Microstructural Abnormalities in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Diffusional Kurtosis Imaging Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y; Zhang, Y; Qin, W; Lu, S; Ni, C; Zhang, Q

    2017-03-01

    Increasing DTI studies have demonstrated that white matter microstructural abnormalities play an important role in type 2 diabetes mellitus-related cognitive impairment. In this study, the diffusional kurtosis imaging method was used to investigate WM microstructural alterations in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and to detect associations between diffusional kurtosis imaging metrics and clinical/cognitive measurements. Diffusional kurtosis imaging and cognitive assessments were performed on 58 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 58 controls. Voxel-based intergroup comparisons of diffusional kurtosis imaging metrics were conducted, and ROI-based intergroup comparisons were further performed. Correlations between the diffusional kurtosis imaging metrics and cognitive/clinical measurements were assessed after controlling for age, sex, and education in both patients and controls. Altered diffusion metrics were observed in the corpus callosum, the bilateral frontal WM, the right superior temporal WM, the left external capsule, and the pons in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus compared with controls. The splenium of the corpus callosum and the pons had abnormal kurtosis metrics in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Additionally, altered diffusion metrics in the right prefrontal WM were significantly correlated with disease duration and attention task performance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. With both conventional diffusion and additional kurtosis metrics, diffusional kurtosis imaging can provide additional information on WM microstructural abnormalities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Our results indicate that WM microstructural abnormalities occur before cognitive decline and may be used as neuroimaging markers for predicting the early cognitive impairment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  13. Is obesity associated with a decline in intelligence quotient during the first half of the life course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsky, Daniel W; Caspi, Avshalom; Goldman-Mellor, Sidra; Meier, Madeline H; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2013-11-01

    Cross-sectional studies have found that obesity is associated with low intellectual ability and neuroimaging abnormalities in adolescence and adulthood. Some have interpreted these associations to suggest that obesity causes intellectual decline in the first half of the life course. We analyzed data from a prospective longitudinal study to test whether becoming obese was associated with intellectual decline from childhood to midlife. We used data from the ongoing Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study, a population-representative birth cohort study of 1,037 children in New Zealand who were followed prospectively from birth (1972-1973) through their fourth decade of life with a 95% retention rate. Intelligence quotient (IQ) was measured in childhood and adulthood. Anthropometric measurements were taken at birth and at 12 subsequent in-person assessments. As expected, cohort members who became obese had lower adulthood IQ scores. However, obese cohort members exhibited no excess decline in IQ. Instead, these cohort members had lower IQ scores since childhood. This pattern remained consistent when we accounted for children's birth weights and growth during the first years of life, as well as for childhood-onset obesity. Lower IQ scores among children who later developed obesity were present as early as 3 years of age. We observed no evidence that obesity contributed to a decline in IQ, even among obese individuals who displayed evidence of the metabolic syndrome and/or elevated systemic inflammation.

  14. Terminal pathologies affect rates of decline to different extents and age accelerates the effects of terminal pathology on cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbitt, Patrick; Lunn, Mary; Pendleton, Neil; Yardefagar, Ghasem

    2011-05-01

    To test whether different terminal pathologies are associated with different rates of age-related decline in fluid and crystallized mental abilities and whether pathology-associated declines are accelerated by age. During a 20-year longitudinal study, 6203 participants were quadrennially assessed on the Heim's (Heim, A 1970) The AH4 series of intelligence tests Slough, U.K.: NEP) AH4-1 and AH4-2 tests of fluid intelligence and on the Raven's (Raven, J. C. 1965) The Mill Hill Vocabulary Scale London: H.K. Lewis) Mill Hill A and B tests of recognition and production vocabulary. Dates and proximate causes of death were logged for 2499 participants. Multilevel modelling compared rates of decline after effects of sex, demographics, and practice were taken into consideration. Rates of cognitive decline markedly differed across pathologies, being most rapid for dementias and infections, slower for malignancies, and most prolonged for cardiovascular conditions. Pathologies were associated with faster declines in older individuals. After sex, age, and demographics have also been considered, different terminal pathologies are associated with markedly different rates of decline. Age accelerates pathology-related decline. This raises the further question as to whether any, or how much of, age-related cognitive decline is brought about by other causes than an increasing burden of pathologies.

  15. Party decline and response: the effects of membership decline on party organisations in Western Europe, 1960-2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kölln, Ann-Kristin

    2014-01-01

    How do parties respond to party decline? Political parties have been facing increasing citizen apathy in the last decades. It is exemplified in declining citizen trust in parties and fewer citizens that identify with or enrol in a party. This study investigates how party organisations in Western

  16. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities, congenital abnormalities and transfusion syndrome in twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperling, Lene; Kiil, C; Larsen, L U

    2007-01-01

    observational study were women with twin pregnancies diagnosed before 14 + 6 gestational weeks. The monochorionic pregnancies were scanned every second week until 23 weeks in order to rule out early TTTS. All pregnancies had an anomaly scan in week 19 and fetal echocardiography in week 21 that was performed...... by specialists in fetal echocardiography. Zygosity was determined by DNA analysis in all twin pairs with the same sex. RESULTS: Among the 495 pregnancies the prenatal detection rate for severe structural abnormalities including chromosomal aneuploidies was 83% by the combination of a first-trimester nuchal...... translucency scan and the anomaly scan in week 19. The incidence of severe structural abnormalities was 2.6% and two-thirds of these anomalies were cardiac. There was no significant difference between the incidence in monozygotic and dizygotic twins, nor between twins conceived naturally or those conceived...

  17. Imaging Characteristics of Venous Parenchymal Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoux, Audrey; Triquenot-Bagan, Aude; Andriuta, Daniela; Wallon, David; Guegan-Massardier, Evelyne; Leclercq, Claire; Martinaud, Olivier; Castier-Amouyel, Mélody; Godefroy, Olivier; Bugnicourt, Jean-Marc

    2017-12-01

    There are few published data on the patterns of parenchymal imaging abnormalities in a context of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). The objectives of the present study were to describe the patterns of parenchymal lesions associated with CVT and to determine the lesion sites. We included 44 consecutively hospitalized patients with CVT and parenchymal lesions on magnetic resonance imaging. The diagnosis of CVT had been confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance venography. Magnetic resonance imaging patterns for CVT were retrospectively analyzed with regard to the lesion's type, shape, and site. The most frequent stroke subtype was hemorrhagic ischemia (in 56.8% of cases), followed by intracerebral hematoma (in 22.72% of cases) and nonhemorrhagic ischemia (in 20.45% of cases). Although there were no significant differences between these 3 groups with regard to the clinical and radiological characteristics, we observed a nonsignificant trend ( P =0.08) toward a shorter time interval between hospital admission and magnetic resonance imaging for nonhemorrhagic stroke. The CVT parenchymal abnormalities were centered on 6 main foci and were related to the site of venous occlusion: (1) the inferior parietal lobule (n=20; 44.5%), associated mainly with occlusion of the transverse sinus (n=10) or pure cortical veins (n=10); (2) the inferior and posterior temporal regions (n=10; 22.75%), associated mainly with occlusion of the transverse sinus (n=9); (3) the parasagittal frontal region (n=6; 13.6%), associated mainly with occlusion of the superior sagittal sinus (n=4) or the transverse sinus (n=4); (4) the thalamus (n=5; 11.3%) associated with occlusion of the straight sinus (n=5); (5) the cerebellar hemisphere (n=2; 4.5%), associated in both cases with occlusion of the transverse sinus; and (6) the deep hemispheric regions (n=3; 6.8%), associated with occlusion of the superior sagittal sinus in all cases. Parenchymal lesions caused by CVT display specific

  18. Antenatal diagnosis and management of urinary abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colodny, A H

    1987-10-01

    Although much time, effort, and money have been expended in the area of fetal surgery and even though considerable unfortunate media publicity has resulted, the actual clinical problem is not one of great magnitude. Currently all those interested in this area agree that consideration of any intrauterine manipulation or surgery should be reserved for a fetus who has bilateral involvement that is progressive, destructive, and associated with oligohydramnios. Except for rare instances, this eliminates all fetuses except those with some type of urethral obstruction. Significant urethral obstruction accounts for approximately 10 per cent of all patients who have a prenatal diagnosis of a urologic abnormality. Of this 10 per cent, some will not be progressive, some will not be destructive, some will not involve both kidneys, and some will not develop oligohydramnios. Some of these patients will be diagnosed early enough in pregnancy to allow termination of the pregnancy if the involvement is significant and if termination is acceptable to the family. Some will be diagnosed late enough in pregnancy so that if the lungs are mature or can be stimulated to mature, early delivery and postnatal management can be elected. Some will have other associated lethal anomalies that can be diagnosed and would preclude any consideration of intrauterine manipulation or therapy. Some will have irreversible renal failure. Occasionally, the mother may refuse any proposed intrauterine therapy. Thus we are probably considering, on a theoretic basis, well under 1 per cent of all fetuses who have a prenatal diagnosis of urologic abnormalities. There may be some unusual situations that justify intrauterine manipulation. One that we encountered involved a fetus with an abdominal mass so large that a cesarean section was deemed necessary (Figs. 12 and 13). Aspiration of the mass just before delivery was performed to allow a vaginal delivery. Another case involved a pregnant woman who developed

  19. Electrocardiogram Abnormalities and Coronary Calcification in Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Sabour

    2010-03-01

    Results: LVH was found in 2.7% (n = 15 of the women. The prevalence of T-axis abnormality was 6% (n = 34, whereas 8.5% (n = 48 had a QRS-T angle abnormality. CAC was found in 62% of the women. Compared to women with a normal T-axis, women with borderline or abnormal T-axes were 3.8 fold more likely to have CAC (95% CI: 1.4-10.2. Similarly, compared to women with a normal QRS-T angle, in women with borderline or abnormal QRS-T angle, CAC was 2.0 fold more likely to be present (95% CI: 1.0-4.1. Conclusion: Among women with ECG abnormalities reflecting subclinical ischemia, CAC is commonly found and may in part explain the increased coronary heart disease risk associated with these ECG abnormalities.

  20. Abnormality degree detection method using negative potential field group detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongli; Liu, Shulin; Li, Dong; Shi, Kunju; Wang, Bo; Cui, Jiqiang

    2015-09-01

    Online monitoring methods have been widely used in many major devices, however the normal and abnormal states of equipment are estimated mainly based on the monitoring results whether monitored parameters exceed the setting thresholds. Using these monitoring methods may cause serious false positive or false negative results. In order to precisely monitor the state of equipment, the problem of abnormality degree detection without fault sample is studied with a new detection method called negative potential field group detectors(NPFG-detectors). This method achieves the quantitative expression of abnormality degree and provides the better detection results compared with other methods. In the process of Iris data set simulation, the new algorithm obtains the successful results in abnormal detection. The detection rates for 3 types of Iris data set respectively reach 100%, 91.6%, and 95.24% with 50% training samples. The problem of Bearing abnormality degree detection via an abnormality degree curve is successfully solved.

  1. Chromosomal Abnormalities in Offspring of Young Cancer Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Betina Frydenlund; Schmidt, Anne Aarslev; Mulvihill, John J

    2018-01-01

    Danish cancer survivors and 40 859 offspring (40 794 live-born children and 65 fetuses) of 19 536 siblings. Chromosomal abnormalities include numeric and structural abnormalities. Odds ratios were estimated by multiple logistic regression models comparing the risk of chromosomal abnormalities among...... compared with their siblings' offspring (odds ratio = 0.99, 95% confidence interval = 0.67 to 1.44, two-sided P = .94), with similar risk between male and female survivors. Cancer survivors were not more likely than their siblings to have children with a chromosomal abnormality.......To examine whether cancer survivors diagnosed before age 35 years are more likely to have offspring with chromosomal abnormalities than their siblings, chromosomal abnormalities were determined in a population-based cohort of 14 611 offspring (14 580 live-born children and 31 fetuses) of 8945...

  2. Incidence of fetal chromosome abnormalities in insulin dependent diabetic women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriques, C U; Damm, P; Tabor, A

    1991-01-01

    In order to screen for fetal neural tube defects and chromosome abnormalities, amniocentesis was carried out in 334 women with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) between 1979 and 1987. Two cases (0.6%; 95% confidence limits 0.1-2.2%) of fetal chromosome abnormality were found: one case...... of Klinefelter's syndrome and one case of de novo translocation. This is comparable to the overall incidence of chromosome abnormality found at birth and is also comparable to the incidence of fetal chromosome abnormality (1.0%) found by amniocentesis at our Department in a group of 2,264 young non......-diabetic women with little risk of contracting genetic disorders. The results suggest that maternal IDDM does not increase the risk of fetal chromosome abnormality and consequently screening by amniocentesis for chromosome abnormalities among diabetic women does not seem to be indicated....

  3. The time of onset of abnormal calcification in spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Gazioğlu, Nurperi; Ungür, Savaş; Aji, Dolly Yafet; Türkmen, Seval

    2009-01-01

    A 1-month-old boy with shortness of extremities on prenatal US was referred to our department with a provisional diagnosis of achondroplasia. His height was normal but he had short extremities and platyspondyly, premature carpal epiphyses on both hands, and short tubular bones with irregular metaphyses on radiographs. Re-evaluation of the patient at the age of 1 year revealed very short height and premature calcification of the costal cartilages and epiphyses. Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type was diagnosed. This condition is a very rare autosomal recessively inherited disorder, and most of the patients die in early childhood due to neurological involvement. At the age of 2 years and 5 months, a CT scan showed narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. One month later he died suddenly because of spinal cord injury. In conclusion early diagnosis is very important because the recurrence risk is high and patients may die due to early neurological complications. The time of onset of abnormal calcifications, a diagnostic finding of the disease, is at the age of around 1 year in most patients. When abnormal calcifications are not yet present, but radiological changes associated with SMED are present, this rare disease must be considered.

  4. The time of onset of abnormal calcification in spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tueysuez, Beyhan [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatric Genetics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Gazioglu, Nurperi [Istanbul University, Department of Neurosurgery, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Uenguer, Savas [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Aji, Dolly Yafet [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatrics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Tuerkmen, Seval [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatric Genetics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Universitatsklinikum Berlin, Charite Virchow-Klinik, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    A 1-month-old boy with shortness of extremities on prenatal US was referred to our department with a provisional diagnosis of achondroplasia. His height was normal but he had short extremities and platyspondyly, premature carpal epiphyses on both hands, and short tubular bones with irregular metaphyses on radiographs. Re-evaluation of the patient at the age of 1 year revealed very short height and premature calcification of the costal cartilages and epiphyses. Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type was diagnosed. This condition is a very rare autosomal recessively inherited disorder, and most of the patients die in early childhood due to neurological involvement. At the age of 2 years and 5 months, a CT scan showed narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. One month later he died suddenly because of spinal cord injury. In conclusion early diagnosis is very important because the recurrence risk is high and patients may die due to early neurological complications. The time of onset of abnormal calcifications, a diagnostic finding of the disease, is at the age of around 1 year in most patients. When abnormal calcifications are not yet present, but radiological changes associated with SMED are present, this rare disease must be considered. (orig.)

  5. Healthy eating and reduced risk of cognitive decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Mahshid; O'Donnell, Martin; Anderson, Craig; Teo, Koon; Gao, Peggy; Sleight, Peter; Dagenais, Gilles; Probstfield, Jeffrey L.; Mente, Andrew; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the association of dietary factors and risk of cognitive decline in a population at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods: Baseline dietary intake and measures of the Mini-Mental State Examination were recorded in 27,860 men and women who were enrolled in 2 international parallel trials of the ONTARGET (Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial) and TRANSCEND (Telmisartan Randomised Assessment Study in ACE Intolerant Subjects with Cardiovascular Disease) studies. We measured diet quality using the modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to determine the association between diet quality and risk of ≥3-point decline in Mini-Mental State Examination score, and reported as hazard ratio with 95% confidence intervals with adjustment for covariates. Results: During 56 months of follow-up, 4,699 cases of cognitive decline occurred. We observed lower risk of cognitive decline among those in the healthiest dietary quintile of modified Alternative Healthy Eating Index compared with lowest quintile (hazard ratio 0.76, 95% confidence interval 0.66–0.86, Q5 vs Q1). Lower risk of cognitive decline was consistent regardless of baseline cognitive level. Conclusion: We found that higher diet quality was associated with a reduced risk of cognitive decline. Improved diet quality represents an important potential target for reducing the global burden of cognitive decline. PMID:25948720

  6. Tree decline and the future of Australian farmland biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Joern; Zerger, Andre; Gibbons, Phil; Stott, Jenny; Law, Bradley S

    2010-11-09

    Farmland biodiversity is greatly enhanced by the presence of trees. However, farmland trees are declining worldwide, including in North America, Central America, and parts of southern Europe. We show that tree decline and its likely consequences are particularly severe in Australia's temperate agricultural zone, which is a threatened ecoregion. Using field data on trees, remotely sensed imagery, and a demographic model for trees, we predict that by 2100, the number of trees on an average farm will contract to two-thirds of its present level. Statistical habitat models suggest that this tree decline will negatively affect many currently common animal species, with predicted declines in birds and bats of up to 50% by 2100. Declines were predicted for 24 of 32 bird species modeled and for all of six bat species modeled. Widespread declines in trees, birds, and bats may lead to a reduction in economically important ecosystem services such as shade provision for livestock and pest control. Moreover, many other species for which we have no empirical data also depend on trees, suggesting that fundamental changes in ecosystem functioning are likely. We conclude that Australia's temperate agricultural zone has crossed a threshold and no longer functions as a self-sustaining woodland ecosystem. A regime shift is occurring, with a woodland system deteriorating into a treeless pasture system. Management options exist to reverse tree decline, but new policy settings are required to encourage their widespread adoption.

  7. A formal decomposition of declining youth crime in Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars H. Andersen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the recent decades and across most developed democracies, youth crime has been in steady decline, and declining youth crime now constitutes an important contemporary demographic change. Yet underneath this change lingers the question of how we should best grasp declining youth crime. Objective: To decompose declining youth crime in Denmark into its extensive and intensive margins, and show results from birth cohort analyses. Methods: We apply Das Gupta's (1993 method for rate decomposition to Danish registry data that holds information on all criminal justice contacts of full birth cohorts. We show results among 15-17-year-old youth by year as well as follow birth cohorts by age. Results: The main driver of declining youth crime in Denmark is that fewer young people are experiencing contact with the criminal justice (extensive margin, and not lower rates of criminal recidivism among youth with criminal justice contact (intensive margin; a result which is found using both year and birth cohort analyses. Contribution: The knowledge provided in our descriptive findings ‒ that change at the extensive margin is the main driver of declining youth crime in Denmark ‒ represents a first step towards understanding the important demographic change that youth crime has been in decline across developed democracies over the past decades.

  8. Adenosine deaminase organic effect in normal and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamad, A.M.; Samarai, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    To study the effect of the organic substances on adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity in normal and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Various concentrations of 2-mercaptopurine, Ame-tycine, Adenosine analogues (Guanine, Thymine) and ATP were tested to see their effect on ADA activity in normal and abnormal CSF. ADA activity in normal and abnormal CSF was remarkably decreased with the increasing of concentrations of substances tested. These effects may have important therapeutic implications. (author)

  9. Long-Term Exposure to Primary Traffic Pollutants and Lung Function in Children: Cross-Sectional Study and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone-Adesi, Francesco; Dent, Jennifer E.; Dajnak, David; Beevers, Sean; Anderson, H Ross; Kelly, Frank J.; Cook, Derek G.; Whincup, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is widespread concern about the possible health effects of traffic-related air pollution. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a convenient marker of primary pollution. We investigated the associations between lung function and current residential exposure to a range of air pollutants (particularly NO2, NO, NOx and particulate matter) in London children. Moreover, we placed the results for NO2 in context with a meta-analysis of published estimates of the association. Methods and Findings Associations between primary traffic pollutants and lung function were investigated in 4884 children aged 9–10 years who participated in the Child Heart and Health Study in England (CHASE). A systematic literature search identified 13 studies eligible for inclusion in a meta-analysis. We combined results from the meta-analysis with the distribution of the values of FEV1 in CHASE to estimate the prevalence of children with abnormal lung function (FEV1<80% of predicted value) expected under different scenarios of NO2 exposure. In CHASE, there were non-significant inverse associations between all pollutants except ozone and both FEV1 and FVC. In the meta-analysis, a 10 μg/m3 increase in NO2 was associated with an 8 ml lower FEV1 (95% CI: -14 to -1 ml; p: 0.016). The observed effect was not modified by a reported asthma diagnosis. On the basis of these results, a 10 μg/m3 increase in NO2 level would translate into a 7% (95% CI: 4% to 12%) increase of the prevalence of children with abnormal lung function. Conclusions Exposure to traffic pollution may cause a small overall reduction in lung function and increase the prevalence of children with clinically relevant declines in lung function. PMID:26619227

  10. Brain MRI abnormalities in neuromyelitis optica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Fei, E-mail: feiwang1973@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Liu Yaou, E-mail: asiaeurope80@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Duan Yunyun, E-mail: duanyun2003@sohu.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Li Kuncheng, E-mail: kunchengli@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Education Ministry Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Disease, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore brain MRI findings in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and to investigate specific brain lesions with respect to the localization of aquaporin-4 (AQP-4). Materials and methods: Forty admitted patients (36 women) who satisfied the 2006 criteria of Wingerchuk et al. for NMO were included in this study. All patients received a neurological examination and MRI scanning including brain and spinal cord. MRIs were classified as normal, nonspecific, multiple sclerosis-like, typical abnormalities. MS-like lesions were too few to satisfy the Barkhof et al. criteria for MS. Confluent lesions involving high AQP-4 regions were considered typical. Non-enhancing deep white matter lesions other than MS-like lesions or typical lesions were classified as nonspecific. Results: Brain MRI lesions were delineated in 12 patients (25%). Four patients (10%) had hypothalamus, brainstem or periventricle lesions. Six (15%) patients were nonspecific, and 2 (5%) patients had multiple sclerosis-like lesions. Conclusion: Brain MRIs are negative in most NMO, and brain lesions do not exclude the diagnosis of NMO. Hypothalamus, brainstem or periventricle lesions, corresponding to high sites of AQP-4 in the brain, are indicative of lesions of NMO.

  11. Pathophysiology of somatosensory abnormalities in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Antonella; Khan, Nashaba; Defazio, Giovanni; Rothwell, John C; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2013-12-01

    Changes in sensory function that have been described in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) can be either 'pure' disorders of conscious perception such as elevations in sensory threshold, or disorders of sensorimotor integration, in which the interaction between sensory input and motor output is altered. In this article, we review the extensive evidence for disrupted tactile, nociceptive, thermal and proprioceptive sensations in PD, as well as the influences exerted on these sensations by dopaminergic therapy and deep brain stimulation. We argue that abnormal spatial and temporal processing of sensory information produces incorrect signals for the preparation and execution of voluntary movement. Sensory deficits are likely to be a consequence of the dopaminergic denervation of the basal ganglia that is the hallmark of PD. A possible mechanism to account for somatosensory deficits is one in which disease-related dopaminergic denervation leads to a loss of response specificity, resulting in transmission of noisier and less-differentiated information to cortical regions. Changes in pain perception might have a different explanation, possibly involving disease-related effects outside the basal ganglia, including involvement of peripheral pain receptors, as well as structures such as the periaqueductal grey matter and non-dopaminergic neurotransmitter systems.

  12. Electroencephalographic abnormalities in antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada-Reyes, Ana; Alvarez-Amador, Alfredo; Galán-García, Lídice; Valdés-Sosa, Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    The presence of brain dysfunction in violent offenders has been frequently examined with inconsistent results. The aim of the study was to assess the EEG of 84 violent offenders by visual inspection and frequency-domain quantitative analysis in 84 violent prisoners. Low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) was also employed for theta band of the EEG spectra. Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) was present in 50 of the offenders and it was absent in the remaining 34. The prevalence of EEG abnormalities, by visual inspection, was similar for both the ASPD group (82%) and non-ASPD group (79%). The brain topography of these anomalies also did not differ between groups, in contrast to results of the EEG quantitative analysis (QEEG) and LORETA that showed remarkable regional differences between both groups. QEEG analysis showed a pattern of excess of theta-delta activities and decrease of alpha band on the right fronto-temporal and left temporo-parietal regions in the ASPD group. LORETA signified an increase of theta activity (5.08 Hz) in ASPD group relative to non-ASPD group within left temporal and parietal regions. Findings indicate that QEEG analysis and techniques of source localization may reveal differences in brain electrical activity among offenders with ASPD, which was not obvious to visual inspection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  13. Abnormal parietal function in conversion paresis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marije van Beilen

    Full Text Available The etiology of medically unexplained symptoms such as conversion disorder is poorly understood. This is partly because the interpretation of neuroimaging results in conversion paresis has been complicated by the use of different control groups, tasks and statistical comparisons. The present study includes these different aspects in a single data set. In our study we included both normal controls and feigners to control for conversion paresis. We studied both movement execution and imagery, and we contrasted both within-group and between-group activation. Moreover, to reveal hemisphere-specific effects that have not been reported before, we performed these analyses using both flipped and unflipped data. This approach resulted in the identification of abnormal parietal activation which was specific for conversion paresis patients. Patients also showed reduced activity in the prefrontal cortex, supramarginal gyrus and precuneus, including hemisphere-specific activation that is lateralized in the same hemisphere, regardless of right- or left-sided paresis. We propose that these regions are candidates for an interface between psychological mechanisms and disturbed higher-order motor control. Our study presents an integrative neurophysiological view of the mechanisms that contribute to the etiology of this puzzling psychological disorder, which can be further investigated with other types of conversion symptoms.

  14. Salivary abnormalities in Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, S.; Poshva, C. [Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Although abnormal saliva is a well documented finding in PWS, little is known about the saliva in these individuals. We have recently undertaken a study to characterize the salivary composition from PW patients and to see if there is any correlation with their underlying molecular diagnosis (deletion vs. disomy). We have collected whole saliva on 3 patients; 2 had normal high-resolution karyotype analysis (Cases 1 & 3) and 1 had a deletion of 15q11q13 (Case 3). For all parameters, Case 3`s values were notably different from those of his unaffected sibling. The salivary flow rates and concentrations for all 3 PW patients are similar and are significantly different from normal controls (mean {plus_minus} SE) (p<0.05). Although this data is from only 3 PW patients, it provides valuable information. First, decreased flow appears to be due to an effect of PWS and not medications since Cases 2 & 3 are not on any medications. Second, decreased flow appears to be present in younger as well as older individuals. Third, deviations from normal in the salivary composition are evident. It is possible that these alterations are concentration effects relative to a decrease in flow rate. We are currently obtaining saliva from more PW individuals to see if these alterations are present in all PW patients and whether they can be applied as a screening test.

  15. Imaging findings in fetal diaphragmatic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamo, Leonor; Gudinchet, Francois [University Hospital Center of Lausanne, Unit of Radiopediatrics, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, Reto [University Hospital Center of Lausanne, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    Imaging plays a key role in the detection of a diaphragmatic pathology in utero. US is the screening method, but MRI is increasingly performed. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is by far the most often diagnosed diaphragmatic pathology, but unilateral or bilateral eventration or paralysis can also be identified. Extralobar pulmonary sequestration can be located in the diaphragm and, exceptionally, diaphragmatic tumors or secondary infiltration of the diaphragm from tumors originating from an adjacent organ have been observed in utero. Congenital abnormalities of the diaphragm impair normal lung development. Prenatal imaging provides a detailed anatomical evaluation of the fetus and allows volumetric lung measurements. The comparison of these data with those from normal fetuses at the same gestational age provides information about the severity of pulmonary hypoplasia and improves predictions about the fetus's outcome. This information can help doctors and families to make decisions about management during pregnancy and after birth. We describe a wide spectrum of congenital pathologies of the diaphragm and analyze their embryological basis. Moreover, we describe their prenatal imaging findings with emphasis on MR studies, discuss their differential diagnosis and evaluate the limits of imaging methods in predicting postnatal outcome. (orig.)

  16. Thyroid abnormalities after therapeutic external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, Steven L.; McDougall, I. Ross; Constine, Louis S.

    1995-01-01

    The thyroid gland is the largest pure endocrine gland in the body and one of the organs most likely to produce clinically significant abnormalities after therapeutic external radiation. Radiation doses to the thyroid that exceed approximately 26 Gy frequently produce hypothyroidism, which may be clinically overt or subclinical, as manifested by increased serum thyrotropin and normal serum-free thyroxine concentrations. Pituitary or hypothalamic hypothyroidism may arise when the pituitary region receives doses exceeding 50 Gy with conventional, 1.8-2 Gy fractionation. Direct irradiation of the thyroid may increase the risk of Graves' disease or euthyroid Graves' opthalmopathy. Silent thyroiditis, cystic degeneration, benign adenoma, and thyroid cancer have been observed after therapeutically relevant doses of external radiation. Direct or incidental thyroid irradiation increases the risk for well-differentiated, papillary, and follicular thyroid cancer from 15- to 53-fold. Thyroid cancer risk is highest following radiation at a young age, decreases with increasing age at treatment, and increases with follow-up duration. The potentially prolonged latent period between radiation exposure and the development of thyroid dysfunction, thyroid nodularity, and thyroid cancer means that individuals who have received neck or pituitary irradiation require careful, periodic clinical and laboratory evaluation to avoid excess morbidity

  17. Abnormal Parietal Function in Conversion Paresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beilen, Marije; de Jong, Bauke M.; Gieteling, Esther W.; Renken, Remco; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of medically unexplained symptoms such as conversion disorder is poorly understood. This is partly because the interpretation of neuroimaging results in conversion paresis has been complicated by the use of different control groups, tasks and statistical comparisons. The present study includes these different aspects in a single data set. In our study we included both normal controls and feigners to control for conversion paresis. We studied both movement execution and imagery, and we contrasted both within-group and between-group activation. Moreover, to reveal hemisphere-specific effects that have not been reported before, we performed these analyses using both flipped and unflipped data. This approach resulted in the identification of abnormal parietal activation which was specific for conversion paresis patients. Patients also showed reduced activity in the prefrontal cortex, supramarginal gyrus and precuneus, including hemisphere-specific activation that is lateralized in the same hemisphere, regardless of right- or left-sided paresis. We propose that these regions are candidates for an interface between psychological mechanisms and disturbed higher-order motor control. Our study presents an integrative neurophysiological view of the mechanisms that contribute to the etiology of this puzzling psychological disorder, which can be further investigated with other types of conversion symptoms. PMID:22039428

  18. Mammillary Body Volume Abnormalities in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, Sahib S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Patel, Vandan; Strober, Michael; Feusner, Jamie D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Several case reports of Wernicke’s Encephalopathy in AN due to thiamine deficiency have described mammillary body (MB) injury, but systematic studies are lacking. Here we evaluated whether underweight and weight-restored individuals with AN demonstrate evidence of abnormal MB morphology, via retrospective examination of a previously collected data set. Method Using standard-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla, we measured MB volume and fornix area in a cross-sectional study of 12 underweight AN, 20 weight-restored AN, and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy comparisons. Due to the small size of these structures, a manual tracing approach was necessary to obtain accurate measurements. A blinded expert rater manually traced MB and fornix structures in each participant. Results We observed significantly smaller MB volumes in the underweight AN group. However, the weight-restored AN group exhibited significantly larger MB volumes. The right fornix was smaller in the weight-restored AN group only. Discussion These findings suggest the possibility that MB volume and fornix area could represent potential biomarkers of acute weight loss and restoration, respectively. Verification of this finding through prospective studies evaluating MB morphology, cognition, and thiamine levels longitudinally across individual illness trajectories might be warranted. PMID:27414055

  19. Fungal grapevine trunk pathogens associated with Syrah decline in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gramaje

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Syrah decline has been increasingly seen and reported in many vineyards worldwide. In recent years, an increase in samples of Vitis vinifera cv. Syrah showing general decline has also been noted in Spain. Sixty-two samples of Syrah grafted grapevines with such symptoms were collected from grapevine nurseries and young vineyards between 2007 and 2009 and subjected to fungal isolation. Species were identified with morphological and molecular methods. Species recovered included Phaeoacremonium, Botryosphaeriaceae and Cylindrocarpon, as well as Pa. chlamydospora and Ca. luteo-olivacea. The study demonstrates that fungal pathogens should be considered potential factors associated with Syrah decline.

  20. Prenatal imaging of distal limb abnormalities using OCT in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, Irina V.; Syed, Saba H.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Overbeek, Paul; Larin, Kirill V.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the limbs are common birth defects. These include missing or extra fingers or toes, abnormal limb length, and abnormalities in patterning of bones, cartilage or muscles. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a 3-D imaging modality, which can produce high-resolution (~8 μm) images of developing embryos with an imaging depth of a few millimeters. Here we demonstrate the capability of OCT to perform 3D imaging of limb development in normal embryos and a mouse model with congenital abnormalities. Our results suggest that OCT is a promising tool to analyze embryonic limb development in mammalian models of congenital defects.

  1. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences, April--June 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    The Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identifies an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determines to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. For this reporting period, there was one abnormal occurrence at nuclear power plants licensed to operate involving significant deficiencies in management controls at Slurry Nuclear Power Station. There was one abnormal occurrence under other NRC-issued licenses; the event involved a medical therapy misadministration. One other abnormal occurrence, involving industrial radiography overexposures, was reported by an Agreement State (Texas). 40 refs

  2. The Persistence of Abnormal Returns: Analysis of Polish Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Puziak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of a company is to build the enterprise value, which is achievable thanks to abnormal profits generated in particular period. Moreover, firms are expected to take measures to maintain abnormal profit in the future. On the other hand, abnormal profits attract competitors, who increase competition and as a result abnormal profits disappear. The persistence of profit is a term that describes a situation, when the company is successful in maintaining the abnormal profit over time. The main aim of this paper is to investigate the persistence of abnormal profit in Polish manufacturing sector. In other words, the question is whether Polish manufacturing companies are able to maintain their abnormal profits over time. The persistence of abnormal profits is investigated using dynamic panel model with generalized method-of-moments estimators. The method is applied to a panel of 5303 Polish companies from manufacturing sector observed over the period 2006-2014. This paper contributes to the existing literature in two ways. First, analysis is performed for developing country. Second, analysis is performed both at the level of entire sector and at division level. Three main conclusions can be drawn from the conducted research: there are significant differences between profit rates within the same industry at division level; estimated persistence of abnormal profit coefficients are at moderate level; there are substantial differences between estimated persistence of profit coefficients for divisions in the same industry.

  3. Pericyte coverage of abnormal blood vessels in myelofibrotic bone marrows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetterberg, Eva; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Myelofibrotic bone marrow displays abnormal angiogenesis but the pathogenic mechanisms of this are poorly understood. Since pericyte abnormalities are described on solid tumor vessels we studied whether vessel morphology and pericyte coverage in bone marrow samples from...... megakaryocytopoesis, wide, pericyte-coated and morphologically aberrant vessels were detected. MVD was significantly greater in bone marrow and spleen samples from animals with myelofibrosis than in wild-type mice. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that angiogenesis is similarly abnormal in human and murine...... myelofibrosis with intense pericyte coating, presumably related to abnormal megakaryocytopoiesis....

  4. Maternal attitude towards first trimester screening for fetal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiz, Nerea; Burgos, Jorge; Barbazán, Maria José; Recio, Virginia; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txanton

    2016-05-01

    To explore the maternal attitude towards the screening for structural abnormalities at the 11-13-week scan, according to the severity of the abnormality. A secondary aim was to analyse which maternal characteristics influence in the maternal response. This is a descriptive study based on the responses to 300 self-administrated questionnaires completed immediately before routine ultrasounds scan. A totally of 296 (98.7%) women participated in the study. If the baby had any abnormality 93.9% would prefer to know at 12 weeks, 96.6% if the abnormality was lethal, 95.3% if the abnormality involves severe handicap, 91.2% if the abnormality can only be suspected, but not confirmed until the pregnancy is more advanced (16 or 20 weeks), 77.0% if the abnormality was minor and 79.4% women would like to know at 12 weeks if the baby appeared normal. Maternal age, gestational age at the time of the questionnaire and maternal attitude towards termination of pregnancy were the only factors affecting maternal responses. Pregnant women prefer to be informed in the first trimester about any abnormality in their fetuses, even in cases of minor or only suspected abnormalities. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Incidence of fetal chromosome abnormalities in insulin dependent diabetic women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriques, C U; Damm, P; Tabor, A

    1991-01-01

    In order to screen for fetal neural tube defects and chromosome abnormalities, amniocentesis was carried out in 334 women with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) between 1979 and 1987. Two cases (0.6%; 95% confidence limits 0.1-2.2%) of fetal chromosome abnormality were found: one case...... of Klinefelter's syndrome and one case of de novo translocation. This is comparable to the overall incidence of chromosome abnormality found at birth and is also comparable to the incidence of fetal chromosome abnormality (1.0%) found by amniocentesis at our Department in a group of 2,264 young non...

  6. Prevalence of hematological abnormalities and malnutrition in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-10-11

    clinical stage 3). Children who were malnourished were 15 (22.4%). Conclusion: Hematological abnormalities and malnutrition occur in HIV positive children. Key words: Haematological, malnutrition, anaemia, children.

  7. A comprehensive study of sparse codes on abnormality detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Huamin; Pan, Hong; Olsen, Søren Ingvor

    2017-01-01

    Sparse representation has been applied successfully in abnor-mal event detection, in which the baseline is to learn a dic-tionary accompanied by sparse codes. While much empha-sis is put on discriminative dictionary construction, there areno comparative studies of sparse codes regarding abnormal-ity...... detection. We comprehensively study two types of sparsecodes solutions - greedy algorithms and convex L1-norm so-lutions - and their impact on abnormality detection perfor-mance. We also propose our framework of combining sparsecodes with different detection methods. Our comparative ex-periments are carried...

  8. Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes after Abnormal First Trimester Screening for Aneuploidy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzl, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Women with abnormal first trimester screening but with a normal karyotype are at risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes. A nuchal translucency >3.5mm is associated with an increased risk of subsequent pregnancy loss, fetal infection, fetal heart abnormalities and other structural abnormalities. Abnormal first trimester analytes are also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes but the predictive value is less impressive. As a single marker, PAPP-A screening with the possible addition of uterine artery PI assessment in the midtrimester. PMID:20638576

  9. BMI, waist circumference at 8 and 12 years of age and FVC and FEV1 at 12 years of age; the PIAMA birth cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, Marga B; Wijga, Alet H; Gehring, Ulrike; Koppelman, Gerard H; de Jongste, Johan C; Smit, Henriette A; Brunekreef, Bert

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In adults, overweight is associated with reduced lung function, in children evidence on this association is conflicting. We examined the association of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) at age 12, and of persistently (at ages 8 and 12 years) high BMI and large WC, with

  10. BMI, waist circumference at 8 and 12 years of age and FVC and FEV1 at 12 years of age; the PIAMA birth cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, Marga B.; Wijga, Alet H.; Gehring, Ulrike; Koppelman, Gerard H.; de Jongste, Johan C.; Smit, Henriette A.; Brunekreef, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Background: In adults, overweight is associated with reduced lung function, in children evidence on this association is conflicting. We examined the association of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) at age 12, and of persistently (at ages 8 and 12 years) high BMI and large WC, with

  11. Biomarkers of collagen turnover are related to annual change in FEV1 in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease within the ECLIPSE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeming, Diana J.; Byrjalsen, Inger; Sand, Jannie M. B.

    2017-01-01

    , multicentre, three-year ECLIPSE (Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints) study (NCT00292552, trial registration in February 2006) were included. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-generated fragments of collagen type I, and type VI (C1M and C6M) were assessed in month six...

  12. When can the cause of a population decline be determined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefley, Trevor J.; Hooten, Mevin B.; Drake, John M.; Russell, Robin E.; Walsh, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Inferring the factors responsible for declines in abundance is a prerequisite to preventing the extinction of wild populations. Many of the policies and programmes intended to prevent extinctions operate on the assumption that the factors driving the decline of a population can be determined. Exogenous factors that cause declines in abundance can be statistically confounded with endogenous factors such as density dependence. To demonstrate the potential for confounding, we used an experiment where replicated populations were driven to extinction by gradually manipulating habitat quality. In many of the replicated populations, habitat quality and density dependence were confounded, which obscured causal inference. Our results show that confounding is likely to occur when the exogenous factors that are driving the decline change gradually over time. Our study has direct implications for wild populations, because many factors that could drive a population to extinction change gradually through time.

  13. Folic Acid Supplements: Can They Slow Cognitive Decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cognitive decline? I've heard that folic acid supplements can improve cognitive function in older adults. Could ... D. There's no conclusive evidence that folic acid supplements improve cognitive function in older adults or in ...

  14. Predicting cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease: an integrated analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Oscar L; Schwam, Elias; Cummings, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Numerous patient- and disease-related factors increase the risk of rapid cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The ability of pharmacological treatment to attenuate this risk remains undefined....

  15. ALIEN SPECIES: THEIR ROLE IN AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES AND RESTORATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alien species (also referred to as exotic, invasive, introduced, or normative species) have been implicated as causal agents in population declines of many amphibian species. Herein, we evaluate the relative contributions of alien species and other factors in adversely affecting ...

  16. Two classes of fast-declining Type Ia supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Suhail; Leibundgut, B.; Spyromilio, J.; Blondin, S.

    2017-06-01

    We aim to characterise a sample of fast-declining Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) using their bolometric and near-infrared (NIR) properties. Based on these properties, we find that fast-declining SN Ia separate into two categories based on their bolometric and NIR properties. The peak bolometric luminosity (Lmax), the phase of the first maximum relative to the optical, the NIR peak luminosity, and the occurrence of a second maximum in the NIR distinguish a group of very faint SN Ia. Fast-declining supernovae show a large range of peak bolometric luminosities (Lmax differing by up to a factor of 8). All fast-declining SN Ia with Lmax 0.5× 1043 erg s-1 appear to smoothly connect to normal SN Ia. The total ejecta mass (Mej) values for SNe with enough late time data are ≲1 M⊙, indicating a sub-Chandrasekhar mass progenitor for these SNe.

  17. The Box Turtle: Room with a View on Species Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzer, Bill; Steisslinger, Mary Beth

    1999-01-01

    Surveys salient aspects of eastern box-turtle natural history. Explores the societal and ecological factors that have contributed to the decline of the box-turtle population. Contains 18 references. (WRM)

  18. Poison blamed for decline of Spain's majestic Black Vultures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-03-01

    catastrophic” decline in numbers because of illegal poisoning by hunters. The use of poisoned bait to kill foxes, badgers, wild dogs, feral cats and smaller birds of prey has reduced the population by almost a half in the past decade,.

  19. Vascular Risk Factors as Treatment Target to Prevent Cognitive Decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richard, Edo; Moll van Charante, Eric P.; van Gool, Willem A.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that vascular risk factors including hypertension, diabetes, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, and lack of physical exercise are associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Neuroradiological and neuropathological studies

  20. Skeletal muscle abnormalities and genetic factors related to vertical talus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Laura J; Gurnett, Christina A; Connolly, Anne M; Pestronk, Alan; Dobbs, Matthew B

    2011-04-01

    Congenital vertical talus is a fixed dorsal dislocation of the talonavicular joint and fixed equinus contracture of the hindfoot, causing a rigid deformity recognizable at birth. The etiology and epidemiology of this condition are largely unknown, but some evidence suggests it relates to aberrations of skeletal muscle. Identifying the tissue abnormalities and genetic causes responsible for vertical talus has the potential to lead to improved treatment and preventive strategies. We therefore (1) determined whether skeletal muscle abnormalities are present in patients with vertical talus and (2) identified associated congenital anomalies and genetic abnormalities in these patients. We identified associated congenital anomalies and genetic abnormalities present in 61 patients affected with vertical talus. We obtained abductor hallucis muscle biopsy specimens from the affected limbs of 11 of the 61 patients and compared the histopathologic characteristics with those of age-matched control subjects. All muscle biopsy specimens (n = 11) had abnormalities compared with those from control subjects including combinations of abnormal variation in muscle fiber size (n = 7), type I muscle fiber smallness (n = 6), and abnormal fiber type predominance (n = 5). Isolated vertical talus occurred in 23 of the 61 patients (38%), whereas the remaining 38 patients had associated nervous system, musculoskeletal system, and/or genetic and genomic abnormalities. Ten of the 61 patients (16%) had vertical talus in one foot and clubfoot in the other. Chromosomal abnormalities, all complete or partial trisomies, were identified in three patients with vertical talus who had additional congenital abnormalities. Vertical talus is a heterogeneous birth defect resulting from many diverse etiologies. Abnormal skeletal muscle biopsies are common in patients with vertical talus although it is unclear whether this is primary or secondary to the joint deformity. Associated anomalies are present in 62