WorldWideScience

Sample records for abiotic organic chemistry

  1. Organic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    This book with sixteen chapter explains organic chemistry on linkage isomerism such as alkane, cycloalkane, alkene, aromatic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, aromatic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, organic compounds, stereo selective isomerization, organic halogen compound, alcohol, ether, aldehyde and ketone, carboxylic acid, dicarboxylic acid, fat and detergent, amino, carbohydrate, amino acid and protein, nucleotide and nucleic acid and spectroscopy, a polymer and medical chemistry. Each chapter has introduction structure and characteristic and using of organic chemistry.

  2. Abiotic Bromination of Soil Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leri, Alessandra C; Ravel, Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Biogeochemical transformations of plant-derived soil organic matter (SOM) involve complex abiotic and microbially mediated reactions. One such reaction is halogenation, which occurs naturally in the soil environment and has been associated with enzymatic activity of decomposer organisms. Building on a recent finding that naturally produced organobromine is ubiquitous in SOM, we hypothesized that inorganic bromide could be subject to abiotic oxidations resulting in bromination of SOM. Through lab-based degradation treatments of plant material and soil humus, we have shown that abiotic bromination of particulate organic matter occurs in the presence of a range of inorganic oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide and assorted forms of ferric iron, producing both aliphatic and aromatic forms of organobromine. Bromination of oak and pine litter is limited primarily by bromide concentration. Fresh plant material is more susceptible to bromination than decayed litter and soil humus, due to a labile pool of mainly aliphatic compounds that break down during early stages of SOM formation. As the first evidence of abiotic bromination of particulate SOM, this study identifies a mechanistic source of the natural organobromine in humic substances and the soil organic horizon. Formation of organobromine through oxidative treatments of plant material also provides insights into the relative stability of aromatic and aliphatic components of SOM.

  3. Organic chemistry experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, Seok Sik

    2005-02-01

    This book deals with organic chemistry experiments, it is divided five chapters, which have introduction, the way to write the experiment report and safety in the laboratory, basic experiment technic like recrystallization and extraction, a lot of organic chemistry experiments such as fischer esterification, ester hydrolysis, electrophilic aromatic substitution, aldol reaction, benzoin condensation, wittig reaction grignard reaction, epoxidation reaction and selective reduction. The last chapter introduces chemistry site on the internet and way to find out reference on chemistry.

  4. Current organic chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    Provides in depth reviews on current progress in the fields of asymmetric synthesis, organometallic chemistry, bioorganic chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, natural product chemistry, and analytical...

  5. Organic Chemistry in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical observations, theoretical modeling, laboratory simulation and analysis of extraterrestrial material have enhanced our knowledge of the inventory of organic matter in the interstellar medium (ISM) and on small bodies such as comets and asteroids (Ehrenfreund & Charnley 2000). Comets, asteroids and their fragments, meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), contributed significant amounts of extraterrestrial organic matter to the young Earth. This material degraded and reacted in a terrestrial prebiotic chemistry to form organic structures that may have served as building blocks for life on the early Earth. In this talk I will summarize our current understanding of the organic composition and chemistry of interstellar clouds. Molecules of astrobiological relevance include the building blocks of our genetic material: nucleic acids, composed of subunits such as N-heterocycles (purines and pyrimidines), sugars and amino acids. Signatures indicative of inheritance of pristine and modified interstellar material in comets and meteorites will also be discussed.

  6. Organic chemistry on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1979-01-01

    Features taken from various models of Titan's atmosphere are combined in a working composite model that provides environmental constraints within which different pathways for organic chemical synthesis are determined. Experimental results and theoretical modeling suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite is dominated by two processes: photochemistry and energetic particle bombardment. Photochemical reactions of CH4 in the upper atmosphere can account for the presence of C2 hydrocarbons. Reactions initiated at various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic rays, Saturn 'wind', and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4-N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the UV-visible absorbing stratospheric haze, the reddish appearance of the satellite, and some of the C2 hydrocarbons. In the lower atmosphere photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. It is concluded that the surface of Titan may contain ancient or recent organic matter (or both) produced in the atmosphere.

  7. Plastic Organic Scintillator Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brightwell, C. R.; Temanson, E. S.; Febbraro, M. T.

    2017-09-01

    Due to their high light output, quick decay time, affordability, durability and ability to be molded, plastic organic scintillators are increasingly becoming a more viable method of particle detection. Since the plastic is composed entirely of single molecular chains with repeating units, scintillating properties remain stable despite changes in experimental conditions. Different scintillating plastics can be modified and tailored to suit specific experiments depending on a variety of requirements such as light output, scintillating wavelength, and PMT compatibility. The synthesis chemistry of a recent but well-known scintillating polyester, polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) will be presented to demonstrate how plastic organic scintillators can be modified for different particle detection experiments. PEN has been successfully synthesized at ORNL, and procedures are currently being investigated to modify PEN using different reactants and catalysts. The goal is to achieve a transparent scintillating plastic with an incorporated wavelength shifter in the chain that scintillates with a wavelength around 440 nm. The status of this project will be presented. This research is supported by the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Science.

  8. Coupled biotic-abiotic oxidation of organic matter by biogenic MnO_{2}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Julia; Peña, Jasquelin

    2016-04-01

    Some reactive soil minerals are strongly implicated in stabilising organic matter. However, others can play an active role in the oxidation of organic molecules. In natural systems, layer-type manganese oxide minerals (MnO2) typically occur as biomineral assemblages consisting of mineral particles and microbial biomass. Both the mineral and biological fractions of the assemblage can be powerful oxidants of organic C. The biological compartment relies on a set of enzymes to drive oxidative transformations of reduced C-substrates, whereas MnO2 minerals are strong, less specific abiotic oxidants that are assumed to rely on interfacial interactions between C-substrates and the mineral surface. This project aims to understand the coupling between microbial C mineralization and abiotic C oxidation mediated by MnO2 in bacterial-MnO2 assemblages. Specifically, under conditions of high C turnover, microbial respiration can significantly alter local pH, dissolved oxygen and pool of available reductants, which may modify rates and mechanism of C oxidation by biotic and abiotic components. We first investigated changes in the solution chemistry of Pseudomonas putida suspensions exposed to varying concentrations of glucose, chosen to represent readily bioavailable substrates in soils. Glucose concentrations tested ranged between 0 and 5.5mM and changes in pH, dissolved oxygen and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon were tracked over 48h. We then combined literature review and wet-chemical experiments to compile the pH dependence of rates of organic substrate oxidation by MnO2, including glucose. Our results demonstrate a strong pH dependence for these abiotic reactions. In assemblages of P. putida - MnO2, kinetic limitations for abiotic C oxidation by MnO2 are overcome by changes in biogeochemical conditions that result from bacterial C metabolism. When extrapolated to a soil solution confronted to an input of fresh dissolved organic matter, bacterial C metabolism of the

  9. Experimental Evidence for Abiotic Sulfurization of Marine Dissolved Organic Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika M. Pohlabeln

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic sulfur (DOS is the largest pool of organic sulfur in the oceans, and as such it is an important component of the global sulfur cycle. DOS in the ocean is resistant against microbial degradation and turns over on a millennium time scale. However, sources and mechanisms behind its stability are largely unknown. Here, we hypothesize that in sulfate-reducing sediments sulfur is abiotically incorporated into dissolved organic matter (DOM and released to the ocean. We exposed natural seawater and the filtrate of a plankton culture to sulfidic conditions. Already after 1-h at 20°C, DOS concentrations had increased 4-fold in these experiments, and 14-fold after 4 weeks at 50°C, indicating that organic matter does not need long residence times in natural sulfidic environments to be affected by sulfurization. Molecular analysis via ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry showed that sulfur was covalently and unselectively bound to DOM. Experimentally produced and natural DOS from sediments were highly similar on a molecular and structural level. By combining our data with published benthic DOC fluxes we estimate that 30–200 Tg DOS are annually transported from anaerobic and sulfate reducing sediments to the oceans. Uncertainties in this first speculative assessment are large. However, this first attempt illustrates that benthic DOS flux is potentially one order of magnitude larger than that via rivers indicating that this could balance the estimated global net removal of refractory DOS.

  10. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  11. Titan's organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager discovered nine simple organic molecules in the atmosphere of Titan. Complex organic solids, called tholins, produced by irradiation of the simulated Titanian atmosphere, are consistent with measured properties of Titan from ultraviolet to microwave frequencies and are the likely main constituents of the observed red aerosols. The tholins contain many of the organic building blocks central to life on earth. At least 100-m, and possibly kms thicknesses of complex organics have been produced on Titan during the age of the solar system, and may exist today as submarine deposits beneath an extensive ocean of simple hydrocarbons.

  12. The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to oxalic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan; Schöler, H. F.

    2010-05-01

    The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to volatile organic compounds was studied intensely over the last years (Keppler et al., 2000; Huber et al., 2009). It was shown that soil organic matter is oxidised due to the presence of iron (III), hydrogen peroxide and chloride and thereby produces diverse alkyl halides, which are emitted into the atmosphere. The formation of polar halogenated compounds like chlorinated acetic acids which are relevant toxic environmental substances was also found in soils and sediments (Kilian et al., 2002). The investigation of the formation of other polar halogenated and non-halogenated compounds like diverse mono- and dicarboxylic acids is going to attain more and more importance. Due to its high acidity oxalic acid might have impacts on the environment e.g., nutrient leaching, plant diseases and negative influence on microbial growth. In this study, the abiotic formation of oxalic acid in soil is examined. For a better understanding of natural degradation processes mechanistic studies were conducted using the model compound catechol as representative for structural elements of the humic substances and its reaction with iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide. Iron is one of the most abundant elements on earth and hydrogen peroxide is produced by bacteria or through incomplete reduction of oxygen. To find suitable parameters for an optimal reaction and a qualitative and quantitative analysis method the following reaction parameters are varied: concentration of iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide, time dependence, pH-value and influence of chloride. Analysis of oxalic acid was performed employing an ion chromatograph equipped with a conductivity detector. The time dependent reaction shows a relatively fast formation of oxalic acid, the optimum yield is achieved after 60 minutes. Compared to the concentration of catechol an excess of hydrogen peroxide as well as a low concentration of iron (III) are required. In absence of chloride the

  13. Interstellar organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.

    1972-01-01

    Most of the interstellar organic molecules have been found in the large radio source Sagittarius B2 toward the galactic center, and in such regions as W51 and the IR source in the Orion nebula. Questions of the reliability of molecular identifications are discussed together with aspects of organic synthesis in condensing clouds, degradational origin, synthesis on grains, UV natural selection, interstellar biology, and contributions to planetary biology.

  14. Organic Chemistry of Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Studies of the molecular structures and C,N,H-isotopic compositions of organic matter in meteorites reveal a complex history beginning in the parent interstellar cloud which spawned the solar system. Incorporation of interstellar dust and gas in the protosolar nebula followed by further thermal and aqueous processing on primordial parent bodies of carbonaceous, meteorites have produced an inventory of diverse organic compounds including classes now utilized in biochemistry. This inventory represents one possible set of reactants for chemical models for the origin of living systems on the early Earth. Evidence bearing on the history of meteoritic organic matter from astronomical observations and laboratory investigations will be reviewed and future research directions discussed.

  15. Photoredox Catalysis in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, photoredox catalysis has come to the forefront in organic chemistry as a powerful strategy for the activation of small molecules. In a general sense, these approaches rely on the ability of metal complexes and organic dyes to convert visible light into chemical energy by engaging in single-electron transfer with organic substrates, thereby generating reactive intermediates. In this Perspective, we highlight the unique ability of photoredox catalysis to expedite the development of completely new reaction mechanisms, with particular emphasis placed on multicatalytic strategies that enable the construction of challenging carbon–carbon and carbon–heteroatom bonds. PMID:27477076

  16. Medicinal Chemistry/Pharmacology in Sophomore Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Aline M.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is a series of lectures designed to illustrate the use of general organic chemical principles in molecular biology, introduce current research in interdisciplinary areas to the beginner, increase interest in organic chemistry, and bridge the gap between traditional organic chemistry, biology, and the consumer. An outline is presented.…

  17. Atmospheric Prebiotic Chemistry and Organic Hazes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, Melissa G.

    2012-01-01

    Earth's atmospheric composition at the time of the origin of life is not known, but it has often been suggested that chemical transformation of reactive species in the atmosphere was a significant source of pre biotic organic molecules. Experimental and theoretical studies over the past half century have shown that atmospheric synthesis can yield molecules such as amino acids and nucleobases, but these processes are very sensitive to gas composition and energy source. Abiotic synthesis of organic molecules is more productive in reduced atmospheres, yet the primitive Earth may not have been as reducing as earlier workers assumed, and recent research has reflected this shift in thinking. This work provides a survey of the range of chemical products that can be produced given a set of atmospheric conditions, with a particular focus on recent reports. Intertwined with the discussion of atmospheric synthesis is the consideration of an organic haze layer, which has been suggested as a possible ultraviolet shield on the anoxic early Earth. Since such a haze layer - if formed - would serve as a reservoir for organic molecules, the chemical composition of the aerosol should be closely examined. The results highlighted here show that a variety of products can be formed in mildly reducing or even neutral atmospheres, demonstrating that contributions of atmospheric synthesis to the organic inventory on early Earth should not be discounted. This review intends to bridge current knowledge of the range of possible atmospheric conditions in the prebiotic environment and pathways for synthesis under such conditions by examining the possible products of organic chemistry in the early atmosphere.

  18. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 2: Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet, one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland, provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The…

  19. Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murov, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry lists all the most commonly studied reactions in organic chemistry on one page. The discussed Reaction-Map will act as another learning aide for the students, making the study of organic chemistry much easier.

  20. Organic chemistry of elemental phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milyukov, V A; Budnikova, Yulia H; Sinyashin, Oleg G

    2005-01-01

    The principal achievements and the modern trends in the development of the chemistry of elemental phosphorus are analysed, described systematically and generalised. The possibilities and advantages of the preparation of organophosphorus compounds directly from white phosphorus are demonstrated. Attention is focused on the activation and transformation of elemental phosphorus in the coordination sphere of transition metal complexes. The mechanisms of the reactions of white phosphorus with nucleophilic and electrophilic reagents are discussed. Electrochemical approaches to the synthesis of organic phosphorus derivatives based on white phosphorus are considered.

  1. Chemistry of Covalent Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Peter J; Gándara, Felipe; Yaghi, Omar M

    2015-12-15

    growing library of linkers amenable to the synthesis of COFs is now available, and new COFs and topologies made by reticular synthesis are being reported. Much research is also directed toward the development of new methods of linking organic building units to generate other crystalline COFs. These efforts promise not only new COF chemistry and materials, but also the chance to extend the precision of molecular covalent chemistry to extended solids.

  2. Microwaves in organic chemistry and organic chemical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijin Dušan Ž.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The usual way of applying heat to a chemical reaction is the use of a Bunsen burner, an oil or some other type of bath, or an electric heater. In inorganic chemistry, microwave technology has been used since the late 1970s while it has been implemented in organic chemistry since the mid-1980s. Microwave heating has been used in the food industry for almost fifty years. The shorter reaction times and expanded reaction range that is offered by microwave technology are suited to the increased demands in industry. For example, there is a requirement in the pharmaceutical industry for a higher number of a novel chemical entities to be produced, which requires chemists to employ a number of resources to reduce time for the production of compounds. Also, microwaves are used in the food industry, as well as in the pyrolysis of waste materials, sample preparation, the solvent extraction of natural products and the hydrolysis of proteins and peptides.

  3. Incorporation of Medicinal Chemistry into the Organic Chemistry Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Application of concepts presented in organic chemistry lecture using a virtual project involving the sythesis of medicinally important compounds is emphasized. The importance of reinforcing the concepts from lecture in lab, thus providing a powerful instructional means is discussed.

  4. Sterility Caused by Floral Organ Degeneration and Abiotic Stresses in Arabidopsis and Cereal Grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Rae Smith

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural floral organ degeneration or abortion results in unisexual or fully sterile flowers, while abiotic stresses lead to sterility after initiation of floral reproductive organs. Since normal flower development is essential for plant sexual reproduction and crop yield, it is imperative to have a better understanding of plant sterility under regular and stress conditions. Here, we review the functions of ABC genes together with their downstream genes in floral organ degeneration and the formation of unisexual flowers in Arabidopsis and several agriculturally significant cereal grains. We further explore the roles of hormones, including auxin, brassinosteroids, jasmonic acid, gibberellic acid, and ethylene, in floral organ formation and fertility. We show that alterations in genes affecting hormone biosynthesis, hormone transport and perception cause loss of stamens/carpels, abnormal floral organ development, poor pollen production, which consequently result in unisexual flowers and male/female sterility. Moreover, abiotic stresses, such as heat, cold, and drought, commonly affect floral organ development and fertility. Sterility is induced by abiotic stresses mostly in male floral organ development, particularly during meiosis, tapetum development, anthesis, dehiscence, and fertilization. A variety of genes including those involved in heat shock, hormone signaling, cold tolerance, metabolisms of starch and sucrose, meiosis, and tapetum development are essential for plants to maintain normal fertility under abiotic stress conditions. Further elucidation of cellular, biochemical and molecular mechanisms about regulation of fertility will improve yield and quality for many agriculturally valuable crops.

  5. Statistical Automatic Summarization in Organic Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Boudin, Florian; Velazquez-Morales, Patricia; Torres-Moreno, Juan-Manuel

    2009-01-01

    We present an oriented numerical summarizer algorithm, applied to producing automatic summaries of scientific documents in Organic Chemistry. We present its implementation named Yachs (Yet Another Chemistry Summarizer) that combines a specific document pre-processing with a sentence scoring method relying on the statistical properties of documents. We show that Yachs achieves the best results among several other summarizers on a corpus of Organic Chemistry articles.

  6. Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckenbaugh, Raymond W.

    1996-11-01

    Each organic chemistry student should become familiar with the educational and governmental laboratory safety requirements. One method for teaching laboratory safety is to assign each student to locate safety resources for a specific class laboratory experiment. The student should obtain toxicity and hazardous information for all chemicals used or produced during the assigned experiment. For example, what is the LD50 or LC50 for each chemical? Are there any specific hazards for these chemicals, carcinogen, mutagen, teratogen, neurotixin, chronic toxin, corrosive, flammable, or explosive agent? The school's "Chemical Hygiene Plan", "Prudent Practices for Handling Hazardous Chemicals in the Laboratory" (National Academy Press), and "Laboratory Standards, Part 1910 - Occupational Safety and Health Standards" (Fed. Register 1/31/90, 55, 3227-3335) should be reviewed for laboratory safety requirements for the assigned experiment. For example, what are the procedures for safe handling of vacuum systems, if a vacuum distillation is used in the assigned experiment? The literature survey must be submitted to the laboratory instructor one week prior to the laboratory session for review and approval. The student should then give a short presentation to the class on the chemicals' toxicity and hazards and describe the safety precautions that must be followed. This procedure gives the student first-hand knowledge on how to find and evaluate information to meet laboartory safety requirements.

  7. Green chemistry oriented organic synthesis in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Marc-Olivier; Li, Chao-Jun

    2012-02-21

    The use of water as solvent features many benefits such as improving reactivities and selectivities, simplifying the workup procedures, enabling the recycling of the catalyst and allowing mild reaction conditions and protecting-group free synthesis in addition to being benign itself. In addition, exploring organic chemistry in water can lead to uncommon reactivities and selectivities complementing the organic chemists' synthetic toolbox in organic solvents. Studying chemistry in water also allows insight to be gained into Nature's way of chemical synthesis. However, using water as solvent is not always green. This tutorial review briefly discusses organic synthesis in water with a Green Chemistry perspective.

  8. Physical organic chemistry in the making

    OpenAIRE

    Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    1997-01-01

    The discipline of physical organic chemistry will continue to occupy a central position in chemistry. The rapid increase in instrumentation and important theoretical developments allow the investigation of many problems of great complexity and challenge. In the next century the leading theme will continue to be the quantitative analysis of the effects of structural variation on the properties of molecules and molecular assemblies.

  9. Physical organic chemistry in the making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engberts, J.B.F.N.

    The discipline of physical organic chemistry will continue to occupy a central position in chemistry. The rapid increase in instrumentation and important theoretical developments allow the investigation of many problems of great complexity and challenge. In the next century the leading theme will

  10. A Colorful Solubility Exercise for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugrue, Christopher R.; Mentzen, Hans H., II; Linton, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    A discovery chemistry laboratory has been developed for the introductory organic chemistry student to investigate the concepts of polarity, miscibility, solubility, and density. The simple procedure takes advantage of the solubility of two colored dyes in a series of solvents or solvent mixtures, and the diffusion of colors can be easily…

  11. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 1. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products Natural Products - A Kaleidoscopic View. N R Krishnaswamy. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 56-62 ...

  12. Organic chemistry - Fast reactions 'on water'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, JE; Engberts, JBFN

    2005-01-01

    Efficient reactions in aqueous organic chemistry do not require soluble reactants, as had been thought. A newly developed ‘on-water’ protocol is characterized by short reaction times, and the products are easy to isolate.

  13. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products Determination of Absolute Stereochemistry. N R Krishnaswamy. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 40-46 ...

  14. Newer Reagents in Preparative Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, J.

    1990-01-01

    Outlined is the development and use of oxidants for use in elementary organic chemistry classes. Discussed is the oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds, and the oxidation of primary alcohols or aldehydes to carboxylic acids. (CW)

  15. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products - Architectural Designs in Molecular Constructions. N R Krishnaswamy. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1287-1293 ...

  16. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 10. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products Architectural Designs in Molecular Constructions. N R Krishnaswamy. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 10 October 1996 pp 37-43 ...

  17. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 7. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural engine Products - Structure and Biological Functions. N R Krishnaswamy. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 7 July 1996 pp 23-30 ...

  18. Organic chemistry in Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scattergood, T.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory photochemical simulations and other types of chemical simulations are discussed. The chemistry of methane, which is the major known constituent of Titan's atmosphere was examined with stress on what can be learned from photochemistry and particle irradiation. The composition of dust that comprises the haze layer was determined. Isotope fractionation in planetary atmospheres is also discussed.

  19. Abiotic synthesis of organic compounds from carbon disulfide under hydrothermal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushdi, Ahmed I; Simoneit, Bernd R T

    2005-12-01

    Abiotic formation of organic compounds under hydrothermal conditions is of interest to bio, geo-, and cosmochemists. Oceanic sulfur-rich hydrothermal systems have been proposed as settings for the abiotic synthesis of organic compounds. Carbon disulfide is a common component of magmatic and hot spring gases, and is present in marine and terrestrial hydrothermal systems. Thus, its reactivity should be considered as another carbon source in addition to carbon dioxide in reductive aqueous thermosynthesis. We have examined the formation of organic compounds in aqueous solutions of carbon disulfide and oxalic acid at 175 degrees C for 5 and 72 h. The synthesis products from carbon disulfide in acidic aqueous solutions yielded a series of organic sulfur compounds. The major compounds after 5 h of reaction included dimethyl polysulfides (54.5%), methyl perthioacetate (27.6%), dimethyl trithiocarbonate (6.8%), trithianes (2.7%), hexathiepane (1.4%), trithiolanes (0.8%), and trithiacycloheptanes (0.3%). The main compounds after 72 h of reaction consisted of trithiacycloheptanes (39.4%), pentathiepane (11.6%), tetrathiocyclooctanes (11.5%), trithiolanes (10.6%), tetrathianes (4.4%), trithianes (1.2%), dimethyl trisulfide (1.1%), and numerous minor compounds. It is concluded that the abiotic formation of aliphatic straight-chain and cyclic polysulfides is possible under hydrothermal conditions and warrants further studies.

  20. Abiotic Stress Tolerance: From Gene Discovery in Model Organisms to Crop Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Bressan, Ray; Bohnert, Hans; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2009-01-01

    Productive and sustainable agriculture necessitates growing plants in sub-optimal environments with less input of precious resources such as fresh water. For a better understanding and rapid improvement of abiotic stress tolerance, it is important to link physiological and biochemical work to molecular studies in genetically tractable model organisms. With the use of several technologies for the discovery of stress tolerance genes and their appropriate alleles, transgenic approaches to improv...

  1. The 'wired' universe of organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, Bartosz A; Bishop, Kyle J M; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; Wilmer, Christopher E

    2009-04-01

    The millions of reactions performed and compounds synthesized by organic chemists over the past two centuries connect to form a network larger than the metabolic networks of higher organisms and rivalling the complexity of the World Wide Web. Despite its apparent randomness, the network of chemistry has a well-defined, modular architecture. The network evolves in time according to trends that have not changed since the inception of the discipline, and thus project into chemistry's future. Analysis of organic chemistry using the tools of network theory enables the identification of most 'central' organic molecules, and for the prediction of which and how many molecules will be made in the future. Statistical analyses based on network connectivity are useful in optimizing parallel syntheses, in estimating chemical reactivity, and more.

  2. Titan: a laboratory for prebiological organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B. N.

    1992-01-01

    When we examine the atmospheres of the Jovian planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune), the satellites in the outer solar system, comets, and even--through microwave and infrared spectroscopy--the cold dilute gas and grains between the stars, we find a rich organic chemistry, presumably abiological, not only in most of the solar system but throughout the Milky Way galaxy. In part because the composition and surface pressure of the Earth's atmosphere 4 x 10(9) years ago are unknown, laboratory experiments on prebiological organic chemistry are at best suggestive; but we can test our understanding by looking more closely at the observed extraterrestrial organic chemistry. The present Account is restricted to atmospheric organic chemistry, primarily on the large moon of Saturn. Titan is a test of our understanding of the organic chemistry of planetary atmospheres. Its atmospheric bulk composition (N2/CH4) is intermediate between the highly reducing (H2/He/CH4/NH3/H2O) atmospheres of the Jovian planets and the more oxidized (N2/CO2/H2O) atmospheres of the terrestrial planets Mars and Venus. It has long been recognized that Titan's organic chemistry may have some relevance to the events that led to the origin of life on Earth. But with Titan surface temperatures approximately equal to 94 K and pressures approximately equal to 1.6 bar, the oceans of the early Earth have no ready analogue on Titan. Nevertheless, tectonic events in the water ice-rich interior or impact melting and slow re-freezing may lead to an episodic availability of liquid water. Indeed, the latter process is the equivalent of a approximately 10(3)-year-duration shallow aqueous sea over the entire surface of Titan.

  3. Wilson and Gisvold's textbook of organic medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Charles Owens; Beale, John Marlowe; Block, John H

    2011-01-01

    "For over half a century, Wilson and Gisvold's Textbook of Organic Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry has served the discipline of medicinal chemistry for both graduate and undergraduate pharmacy...

  4. Interfacial photochemistry of biogenic surfactants: a major source of abiotic volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Martin; Hayeck, Nathalie; Bonnineau, Chloé; Pesce, Stéphane; Alpert, Peter A; Perrier, Sébastien; Zuth, Christoph; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Chen, Jianmin; George, Christian

    2017-08-24

    Films of biogenic compounds exposed to the atmosphere are ubiquitously found on the surfaces of cloud droplets, aerosol particles, buildings, plants, soils and the ocean. These air/water interfaces host countless amphiphilic compounds concentrated there with respect to in bulk water, leading to a unique chemical environment. Here, photochemical processes at the air/water interface of biofilm-containing solutions were studied, demonstrating abiotic VOC production from authentic biogenic surfactants under ambient conditions. Using a combination of online-APCI-HRMS and PTR-ToF-MS, unsaturated and functionalized VOCs were identified and quantified, giving emission fluxes comparable to previous field and laboratory observations. Interestingly, VOC fluxes increased with the decay of microbial cells in the samples, indicating that cell lysis due to cell death was the main source for surfactants and VOC production. In particular, irradiation of samples containing solely biofilm cells without matrix components exhibited the strongest VOC production upon irradiation. In agreement with previous studies, LC-MS measurements of the liquid phase suggested the presence of fatty acids and known photosensitizers, possibly inducing the observed VOC production via peroxy radical chemistry. Up to now, such VOC emissions were directly accounted to high biological activity in surface waters. However, the results obtained suggest that abiotic photochemistry can lead to similar emissions into the atmosphere, especially in less biologically-active regions. Furthermore, chamber experiments suggest that oxidation (O 3 /OH radicals) of the photochemically-produced VOCs leads to aerosol formation and growth, possibly affecting atmospheric chemistry and climate-related processes, such as cloud formation or the Earth's radiation budget.

  5. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 9. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products A Practical Approach. N R Krishnaswamy. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 9 September 1996 pp 25-33. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  6. Measuring Student Performance in General Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ara C.; Ben-Daat, Hagit; Zhu, Mary; Atkinson, Robert; Barrows, Nathan; Gould, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Student performance in general organic chemistry courses is determined by a wide range of factors including cognitive ability, motivation and cultural capital. Previous work on cognitive factors has tended to focus on specific areas rather than exploring performance across all problem types and cognitive skills. In this study, we have categorized…

  7. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 5. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products From Molecular and Electronic Structures to Reactivity. N R Krishnaswamy. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 5 May 1996 pp 12-18 ...

  8. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 2. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products Determination of Absolute ... Author Affiliations. N R Krishnaswamy1. Visiting Professor, NMKRV College for Women with PG Centre, Jayanagar III Block, Bangalore 560011, India.

  9. Experimental interstellar organic chemistry - Preliminary findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the results of some explicit experimental simulation of interstellar organic chemistry consisting in low-temperature high-vacuum UV irradiation of condensed simple gases known or suspected to be present in the interstellar medium. The results include the finding that acetonitrile may be present in the interstellar medium. The implication of this and other findings are discussed.

  10. Abiotic stress tolerance: from gene discovery in model organisms to crop improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Ray; Bohnert, Hans; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2009-01-01

    Productive and sustainable agriculture necessitates growing plants in sub-optimal environments with less input of precious resources such as fresh water. For a better understanding and rapid improvement of abiotic stress tolerance, it is important to link physiological and biochemical work to molecular studies in genetically tractable model organisms. With the use of several technologies for the discovery of stress tolerance genes and their appropriate alleles, transgenic approaches to improving stress tolerance in crops remarkably parallels breeding principles with a greatly expanded germplasm base and will succeed eventually.

  11. Dynamic covalent chemistry enables formation of antimicrobial peptide quaternary assemblies in a completely abiotic manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, James F.; Dees, Justine L.; Kolesnichenko, Igor V.; Hernandez, Erik T.; Ukraintsev, Dmitri V.; Guduru, Rusheel; Whiteley, Marvin; Anslyn, Eric V.

    2018-01-01

    Naturally occurring peptides and proteins often use dynamic disulfide bonds to impart defined tertiary/quaternary structures for the formation of binding pockets with uniform size and function. Although peptide synthesis and modification are well established, controlling quaternary structure formation remains a significant challenge. Here, we report the facile incorporation of aryl aldehyde and acyl hydrazide functionalities into peptide oligomers via solid-phase copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SP-CuAAC) click reactions. When mixed, these complementary functional groups rapidly react in aqueous media at neutral pH to form peptide-peptide intermolecular macrocycles with highly tunable ring sizes. Moreover, sequence-specific figure-of-eight, dumbbell-shaped, zipper-like and multi-loop quaternary structures were formed selectively. Controlling the proportions of reacting peptides with mismatched numbers of complementary reactive groups results in the formation of higher-molecular-weight sequence-defined ladder polymers. This also amplified antimicrobial effectiveness in select cases. This strategy represents a general approach to the creation of complex abiotic peptide quaternary structures.

  12. Experimental interstellar organic chemistry: Preliminary findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.

    1971-01-01

    In a simulation of interstellar organic chemistry in dense interstellar clouds or on grain surfaces, formaldehyde, water vapor, ammonia and ethane are deposited on a quartz cold finger and ultraviolet-irradiated in high vacuum at 77K. The HCHO photolytic pathway which produces an aldehyde radical and a superthermal hydrogen atom initiates solid phase chain reactions leading to a range of new compounds, including methanol, ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetonitrile, acetone, methyl formate, and possibly formic acid. Higher nitriles are anticipated. Genetic relations among these interstellar organic molecules (e.g., the Cannizzaro and Tischenko reactions) must exist. Some of them, rather than being synthesized from smaller molecules, may be degradation products of larger organic molecules, such as hexamethylene tetramine, which are candidate consitituents of the interstellar grains. The experiments reported here may also be relevant to cometary chemistry.

  13. Organic Chemistry in Action! What Is the Reaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Anne; Childs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The "Organic Chemistry in Action!" ("OCIA!") program is a set of teaching resources designed to facilitate the teaching and learning of introductory level organic chemistry. The "OCIA!" program was developed in collaboration with practicing and experienced chemistry teachers, using findings from Chemistry Education…

  14. Titan's organic chemistry: Results of simulation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl; Thompson, W. Reid; Khare, Bishun N.

    1992-01-01

    Recent low pressure continuous low plasma discharge simulations of the auroral electron driven organic chemistry in Titan's mesosphere are reviewed. These simulations yielded results in good accord with Voyager observations of gas phase organic species. Optical constants of the brownish solid tholins produced in similar experiments are in good accord with Voyager observations of the Titan haze. Titan tholins are rich in prebiotic organic constituents; the Huygens entry probe may shed light on some of the processes that led to the origin of life on Earth.

  15. The Distribution of Macromolecular Principles throughout Introductory Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Joel I.

    2017-01-01

    Many of the principles of organic polymer chemistry are direct extensions of the information contained in the standard introductory organic chemistry course. Often, however, the discussion of macromolecules is relegated to a chapter at the end of the organic chemistry text and is covered briefly, if at all. Connecting the organic-chemical…

  16. Cellular uptake: lessons from supramolecular organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Giulio; Bang, Eun-Kyoung; Montenegro, Javier; Matile, Stefan

    2015-07-04

    The objective of this Feature Article is to reflect on the importance of established and emerging principles of supramolecular organic chemistry to address one of the most persistent problems in life sciences. The main topic is dynamic covalent chemistry on cell surfaces, particularly disulfide exchange for thiol-mediated uptake. Examples of boronate and hydrazone exchange are added for contrast, comparison and completion. Of equal importance are the discussions of proximity effects in polyions and counterion hopping, and more recent highlights on ring tension and ion pair-π interactions. These lessons from supramolecular organic chemistry apply to cell-penetrating peptides, particularly the origin of "arginine magic" and the "pyrenebutyrate trick," and the currently emerging complementary "disulfide magic" with cell-penetrating poly(disulfide)s. They further extend to the voltage gating of neuronal potassium channels, gene transfection, and the delivery of siRNA. The collected examples illustrate that the input from conceptually innovative chemistry is essential to address the true challenges in biology beyond incremental progress and random screening.

  17. Modified spiral organic curriculum on organic chemistry courses for chemistry education undergraduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauzi'ah, Lina; Diniaty, Artina; Arlianty, Widinda Normalia; Febriana, Beta Wulan

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to know the effect of implementation modified spiral (or two-cycle) organic curriculum for Chemistry Education Undergraduate Students. The changing of curriculum that impacted in the organization of topics, was due to the low of student's achievement in Organic Chemistry courses. In a spiral curriculum, the first cycle was surveyed course which students learned about general organic chemistry that must be studied in year-long courses in the previous curriculum. The survey course discussed topics in less detail but with some emphasis on the topics that related to the chemistry for high school. The second course was the spiral of the first cycle that discussed the same chapter but in a more advanced discussion. In this cycle, students began to study about stereochemistry, mechanism of organic reaction and its application for daily need and industry. From the data analysis, there was a significant difference of students' achievement that learned with previous and spiral organic curriculum. It can be concluded that this modified curriculum is more appropriate to be applied for Chemistry Education students.

  18. Synthesis-Spectroscopy Roadmap Problems: Discovering Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Laurie L.; Kurth, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Organic chemistry problems that interrelate and integrate synthesis with spectroscopy are presented. These synthesis-spectroscopy roadmap (SSR) problems uniquely engage second-year undergraduate organic chemistry students in the personal discovery of organic chemistry. SSR problems counter the memorize-or-bust strategy that many students tend to…

  19. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 15: Benzene, Aromaticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet, one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland, provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The…

  20. Analysis of Cell Wall-Related Genes in Organs of Medicago sativa L. under Different Abiotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Marc; Legay, Sylvain; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Guerriero, Gea

    2015-07-16

    Abiotic constraints are a source of concern in agriculture, because they can have a strong impact on plant growth and development, thereby affecting crop yield. The response of plants to abiotic constraints varies depending on the type of stress, on the species and on the organs. Although many studies have addressed different aspects of the plant response to abiotic stresses, only a handful has focused on the role of the cell wall. A targeted approach has been used here to study the expression of cell wall-related genes in different organs of alfalfa plants subjected for four days to three different abiotic stress treatments, namely salt, cold and heat stress. Genes involved in different steps of cell wall formation (cellulose biosynthesis, monolignol biosynthesis and polymerization) have been analyzed in different organs of Medicago sativa L. Prior to this analysis, an in silico classification of dirigent/dirigent-like proteins and class III peroxidases has been performed in Medicago truncatula and M. sativa. The final goal of this study is to infer and compare the expression patterns of cell wall-related genes in response to different abiotic stressors in the organs of an important legume crop.

  1. Salt lakes of Western Australia - Natural abiotic formation of volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, T.; Studenroth, S.; Mulder, I.; Tubbesing, C.; Kotte, K.; Ofner, J.; Junkermann, W.; Schöler, H. F.

    2012-04-01

    Western Australia is a semi-/arid region that is heavily influenced by global climate change and agricultural land use. The area is known for its many ephemeral saline and hypersaline lakes with a wide range of hydrogeochemical parameters that have gradually changed over the last fifty years. Historically, the region was covered by eucalyptus trees and shrubs, but was cleared mainly within 10 years after WWII to make room for wheat and live stock. After the clearance of the deep rooted native plants the groundwater started to rise, bringing increased amounts of dissolved salts and minerals to the surface and discharging them into streams and lakes. Thus most of Western Australia is influenced by secondary salinisation (soil salting) [1]. Another problem is that the discharged minerals affect the pH of ground and surface water, which ranges from acidic to slightly basic. During the 2011 campaign surface water was measured with a pH between 2.5 and 7.1. Another phenomenon in Western Australia is the decrease of rainfall over the last decades assumed to be linked to the secondary salinisation. The rising saline and mineral rich groundwater increases the biotical and abiotical activity of the salt lakes. Halogenated and non-halogenated volatile organic compounds emitted from those lakes undergo fast oxidation and chemical reactions to form small particles modifying cloud microphysics and thus suppressing rain events [2]. Our objective is to gain a better understanding of this extreme environment with its hypersaline acidic lakes with regard to the potential abiotic formation of volatile organic compounds and its impact on the local climate. In spring 2011 fifty-three sediment samples from ten salt lakes in the Lake King region where taken, freeze-dried and ground. In order to simulate the abiotic formation of volatile organic compounds the soil samples were resuspended with water in gas-tight headspace vials. The headspace was measured using a purge and trap GC

  2. Atmospheric Chemistry of Micrometeoritic Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, M. E.; Belle, C. L.; Pevyhouse, A. R.; Iraci, L. T.

    2011-01-01

    Micrometeorites approx.100 m in diameter deliver most of the Earth s annual accumulation of extraterrestrial material. These small particles are so strongly heated upon atmospheric entry that most of their volatile content is vaporized. Here we present preliminary results from two sets of experiments to investigate the fate of the organic fraction of micrometeorites. In the first set of experiments, 300 m particles of a CM carbonaceous chondrite were subject to flash pyrolysis, simulating atmospheric entry. In addition to CO and CO2, many organic compounds were released, including functionalized benzenes, hydrocarbons, and small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In the second set of experiments, we subjected two of these compounds to conditions that simulate the heterogeneous chemistry of Earth s upper atmosphere. We find evidence that meteor-derived compounds can follow reaction pathways leading to the formation of more complex organic compounds.

  3. Investigating Students' Similarity Judgments in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graulich, N.; Bhattacharyya, G.

    2017-01-01

    Organic chemistry is possibly the most visual science of all chemistry disciplines. The process of scientific inquiry in organic chemistry relies on external representations, such as Lewis structures, mechanisms, and electron arrows. Information about chemical properties or driving forces of mechanistic steps is not available through direct…

  4. Organic Chemistry in Action! Developing an Intervention Program for Introductory Organic Chemistry to Improve Learners' Understanding, Interest, and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Anne; Childs, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The main areas of difficulty experienced by those teaching and learning organic chemistry at high school and introductory university level in Ireland have been identified, and the findings support previous studies in Ireland and globally. Using these findings and insights from chemistry education research (CER), the Organic Chemistry in Action!…

  5. Novel Aryne Chemistry in Organic Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhijian [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-12-12

    Arynes are among the most intensively studied systems in chemistry. However, many aspects of the chemistry of these reactive intermediates are not well understood yet and their use as reagents in synthetic organic chemistry has been somewhat limited, due to the harsh conditions needed to generate arynes and the often uncontrolled reactivity exhibited by these species. Recently, o-silylaryl triflates, which can generate the corresponding arynes under very mild reaction conditions, have been found very useful in organic synthesis. This thesis describes several novel and useful methodologies by employing arynes, which generate from o-silylaryl triflates, in organic synthesis. An efficient, reliable method for the N-arylation of amines, sulfonamides and carbamates, and the O-arylation of phenols and carboxylic acids is described in Chapter 1. Amines, sulfonamides, phenols, and carboxylic acids are good nucleophiles, which can react with arynes generated from a-silylaryl triflates to afford the corresponding N- and O-arylated products in very high yields. The regioselectivity of unsymmetrical arynes has also been studied. A lot of useful, functional groups can tolerate our reaction conditions. Carbazoles and dibenzofurans are important heteroaromatic compounds, which have a variety of biological activities. A variety of substituted carbazoles and dibenzofwans are readily prepared in good to excellent yields starting with the corresponding o-iodoanilines or o-iodophenols and o-silylaryl triflates by a treatment with CsF, followed by a Pd-catalyzed cyclization, which overall provides a one-pot, two-step process. By using this methodology, the carbazole alkaloid mukonine has been concisely synthesized in a very good yield. Insertion of an aryne into a σ-bond between a nucleophile and an electrophile (Nu-E) should potentially be a very beneficial process from the standpoint of organic synthesis. A variety of substituted ketones and sulfoxides have been synthesized in good

  6. Understanding the Impact of a General Chemistry Course on Students' Transition to Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins-Webb, Alexandra; Jeffery, Kathleen A.; Sweeder, Ryan D.

    2016-01-01

    The move from general chemistry to organic chemistry can be a challenge for students as it often involves a transition from quantitatively-oriented to mechanistically-oriented thinking. This study found that the design of the general chemistry course can change the student experience of this transition as assessed by a reflective survey. The…

  7. Cocrystal Controlled Solid-State Synthesis: A Green Chemistry Experiment for Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Miranda L.; Zaworotko, Michael J.; Beaton, Steve; Singer, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Green chemistry has become an important area of concern for all chemists from practitioners in the pharmaceutical industry to professors and the students they teach and is now being incorporated into lectures of general and organic chemistry courses. However, there are relatively few green chemistry experiments that are easily incorporated into…

  8. Criegee Chemistry on Aqueous Organic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enami, Shinichi; Colussi, A J

    2017-04-06

    In the troposphere, the fate of gas-phase Criegee intermediates (CIs) is deemed to be determined by their reactions with water molecules. Here it is shown that CIs produced in situ on the surface of water/acetonitrile (W/AN) solutions react competitively with millimolar carboxylic acids. Present experiments probe, via online electrospray mass spectrometry, CIs' chemistry on the surface of α-humulene and β-caryophyllene in W/AN microjets exposed to O 3 (g) for competitiveness being an increasing function of n. Present findings demonstrate that CIs can react with species other than H 2 O on the surface of aqueous organic aerosols due to the low water concentrations prevalent in the outermost interfacial layers.

  9. Practicing What We Preach: Assessing "Critical Thinking" in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Ryan L.; Cooper, Melanie M.

    2017-01-01

    Organic chemistry is often promoted as a course designed to cultivate skill in scientific "ways of thinking." Expert organic chemists perceive their field as one in which plausible answers to complex questions are arrived at through analytical thought processes. They draw analogy between problem solving in organic chemistry and diagnosis…

  10. Benchmarking Problems Used in Second Year Level Organic Chemistry Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raker, Jeffrey R.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2010-01-01

    Investigations of the problem types used in college-level general chemistry examinations have been reported in this Journal and were first reported in the "Journal of Chemical Education" in 1924. This study extends the findings from general chemistry to the problems of four college-level organic chemistry courses. Three problem…

  11. Coupling microbial catabolic actions with abiotic redox processes: a new recipe for persistent organic pollutant (POP) removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Nam, In-Hyun; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2013-01-01

    The continuous release of toxic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) into the environment has raised a need for effective cleanup methods. The tremendous natural diversity of microbial catabolic mechanisms suggests that catabolic routes may be applied to the remediation of POP-contaminated fields. A large number of the recalcitrant xenobiotics have been shown to be removable via the natural catabolic mechanisms of microbes, and detailed biochemical studies of the catabolic methods, together with the development of sophisticated genetic engineering, have led to the use of synthetic microbes for the bioremediation of POPs. However, the steric effects of substituted halogen moieties, microbe toxicity, and the low bioavailability of POPs still deteriorate the efficiency of removal strategies based on natural and synthetic catabolic mechanisms. Recently, abiotic redox processes that induce rapid reductive dehalogenation, hydroxyl radical-based oxidation, or electron shuttling have been reasonably coupled with microbial catabolic actions, thereby compensating for the drawbacks of biotic processes in POP removal. In this review, we first compare the pros and cons of individual methodologies (i.e., the natural and synthetic catabolism of microbes and the abiotic processes involving zero-valent irons, advanced oxidation processes, and small organic stimulants) for POP removal. We then highlight recent trends in coupling the biotic-abiotic methodologies and discuss how the processes are both feasible and superior to individual methodologies for POP cleanup. Cost-effective and environmentally sustainable abiotic redox actions could enhance the microbial bioremediation potential for POPs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Persistent Organic Pollutants in Biotic and Abiotic Components of Antarctic Pristine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Laxmikant; Chauhan, Abhishek; Ranjan, Anuj; Jindal, Tanu

    2018-02-01

    Over the past decades, research in Antarctica has built a new understanding of Antarctica, its past, present and future. Human activities and long-range pollutants are increasing on the Antarctic continent. Research on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has been carried out internationally by several countries having their permanent research stations to explain the impact of an ever increasing range of POPs in Antarctic ecosystem. POPs have been detected in Antarctica despite its geographical isolation and almost complete absence of human settlements. The presence of POPs in different abiotic (atmosphere, water bodies, sediments, soil, sea ice) and biotic components (mosses, lichens, krill, penguins, skua, etc.) in Antarctica has been studied and documented around for decades and has either been banned or strictly regulated but is still found in the environment. This review focuses on recent research pertaining to sources and occurrence of POPs in Antarctic lake water, soil, sediment, lichen, mosses and other Antarctic marine community. This review also proposes to summarize the current state of research on POPs in Antarctica environment and draw the earliest conclusions on possible significance of POPs in Antarctica based on presently available information from related Antarctic environment.

  13. Organic compounds in fluid inclusions of Archean quartz—Analogues of prebiotic chemistry on early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Ulrich; Mayer, Christian; Schmitz, Oliver J.; Rosendahl, Pia; Bronja, Amela; Greule, Markus; Keppler, Frank; Mulder, Ines; Sattler, Tobias; Schöler, Heinz F.

    2017-01-01

    The origin of life is still an unsolved mystery in science. Hypothetically, prebiotic chemistry and the formation of protocells may have evolved in the hydrothermal environment of tectonic fault zones in the upper continental crust, an environment where sensitive molecules are protected against degradation induced e.g. by UV radiation. The composition of fluid inclusions in minerals such as quartz crystals which have grown in this environment during the Archean period might provide important information about the first organic molecules formed by hydrothermal synthesis. Here we present evidence for organic compounds which were preserved in fluid inclusions of Archean quartz minerals from Western Australia. We found a variety of organic compounds such as alkanes, halocarbons, alcohols and aldehydes which unambiguously show that simple and even more complex prebiotic organic molecules have been formed by hydrothermal processes. Stable-isotope analysis confirms that the methane found in the inclusions has most likely been formed from abiotic sources by hydrothermal chemistry. Obviously, the liquid phase in the continental Archean crust provided an interesting choice of functional organic molecules. We conclude that organic substances such as these could have made an important contribution to prebiotic chemistry which might eventually have led to the formation of living cells. PMID:28614348

  14. Organic compounds in fluid inclusions of Archean quartz-Analogues of prebiotic chemistry on early Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Ulrich; Mayer, Christian; Schmitz, Oliver J; Rosendahl, Pia; Bronja, Amela; Greule, Markus; Keppler, Frank; Mulder, Ines; Sattler, Tobias; Schöler, Heinz F

    2017-01-01

    The origin of life is still an unsolved mystery in science. Hypothetically, prebiotic chemistry and the formation of protocells may have evolved in the hydrothermal environment of tectonic fault zones in the upper continental crust, an environment where sensitive molecules are protected against degradation induced e.g. by UV radiation. The composition of fluid inclusions in minerals such as quartz crystals which have grown in this environment during the Archean period might provide important information about the first organic molecules formed by hydrothermal synthesis. Here we present evidence for organic compounds which were preserved in fluid inclusions of Archean quartz minerals from Western Australia. We found a variety of organic compounds such as alkanes, halocarbons, alcohols and aldehydes which unambiguously show that simple and even more complex prebiotic organic molecules have been formed by hydrothermal processes. Stable-isotope analysis confirms that the methane found in the inclusions has most likely been formed from abiotic sources by hydrothermal chemistry. Obviously, the liquid phase in the continental Archean crust provided an interesting choice of functional organic molecules. We conclude that organic substances such as these could have made an important contribution to prebiotic chemistry which might eventually have led to the formation of living cells.

  15. The 2010 Chemistry Nobel Prize: Pd(0)-Catalyzed Organic Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mechanistic organic chemistry, and clay- catalysed organic reactions (Green. Chemistry). (right) Sunil Kumar is a PhD from Mysore. University. He has the industrial experience of working in Syngene. (Biocon) and has worked as post doctoral fellow at the Indian. Institute of Science,. Bangalore before joining Jain University,.

  16. Who Says Organic Chemistry Is Difficult? Exploring Perspectives and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Anne; Childs, Peter E.

    2017-01-01

    Much research has identified organic chemistry as an area of difficulty for learners. There is also much literature pertaining to the factors that contribute to learners' difficulties. This paper explores the intersections of teachers' and learners' perceptions of teaching and learning organic chemistry respectively. Understanding these nuances…

  17. Organic Chemistry Trivia: A Way to Interest Nonchemistry Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    The use of in-class stories is an excellent way to keep a class interested in subject matter. Many organic chemistry classes are populated by nonchemistry majors, such as pre-med, pre-pharm, and biology students. Trivia questions are presented that are designed to show how organic chemistry is an important subject to students regardless of their…

  18. Students' Understanding of Alkyl Halide Reactions in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Ramirez de Arellano, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry is an essential subject for many undergraduate students completing degrees in science, engineering, and pre-professional programs. However, students often struggle with the concepts and skills required to successfully solve organic chemistry exercises. Since alkyl halides are traditionally the first functional group that is…

  19. A Comparison of How Undergraduates, Graduate Students, and Professors Organize Organic Chemistry Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Leung, Min Wah; Flynn, Alison B.

    2018-01-01

    To explore the differences between how organic chemistry students and organic chemistry professors think about organic chemistry reactions, we administered a card sort task to participants with a range of knowledge and experience levels. Beginning students created a variety of categories ranging from structural similarities to process oriented…

  20. Carbon Isotopes of Alkanes in Hydrothermal Abiotic Organic Synthesis Processes at High Temperatures and Pressures: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Observation of methane in the Martian atmosphere has been reported by different detection techniques [1-4]. With more evidence showing extensive water-rock interaction in Martian history [5-7], abiotic formation by Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) synthesis during serpentization reactions may be one possible process responsible for methane generation on Mars [8, 9]. While the experimental studies performed to date leave little doubt that chemical reactions exist for the abiotic synthesis of organic compounds by mineral surface-catalyzed reactions [10-12], little is known about the reaction pathways by which CO2 and/or CO are reduced under hydrothermal conditions. Carbon and hydrogen isotope measurements of alkanes have been used as an effective tool to constrain the origin and reaction pathways of hydrocarbon formation. Alkanes generated by thermal breakdown of high molecular weight organic compounds have carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures completely distinct from those formed abiotically [13-15]. Recent experimental studies, however, showed that different abiogenic hydrocarbon formation processes (e.g., polymerization vs. depolymerization) may have different carbon and hydrogen isotopic patterns [16]. Results from previous experiments studying decomposition of higher molecular weight organic compounds (lignite) also suggested that pressure could be a crucial factor affecting fractionation of carbon isotopes [17]. Under high pressure conditions, no experimental data are available describing fractionation of carbon isotope during mineral catalyzed FTT synthesis. Thus, hydrothermal experiments present an excellent opportunity to provide the requisite carbon isotope data. Such data can also be used to identify reaction pathways of abiotic organic synthesis under experimental conditions.

  1. Flipping organic chemistry course: Possibilities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, J.; Kim, H. B.

    2016-06-01

    The flipped classroom approach was applied to an introductory organic chemistry course. A total of 76 video clips (15 hours of running time) were developed and delivered to 41 sophomores (21 females and 20 males) through Youtube in addition to the university's learning management system. The students were asked to preview the lecture contents before each class by watching a pre-class video. For in-class activities, exercise problems were presented to groups of 3-5 students. An instructor and a teaching assistant guided each group to solve problems cooperatively, monitored the students’ group activity and answered their questions. At the end of every chapter, the students were asked to evaluate their group work and personal preparedness for the class and also to write a short reflective journal. The muddiest point of each chapter, i.e., the topic posing the most difficulty to students’ understanding, was surveyed through Google Forms®. The students liked watching the videos before each class and performing student-centered, in-class group activities but a few limitations were also found and reported.

  2. Mass spectrometry. [in organic ion and biorganic chemistry and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Cox, R. E.; Derrick, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Review of the present status of mass spectrometry in the light of pertinent recent publications spanning the period from December 1971 to January 1974. Following an initial survey of techniques, instruments, and computer applications, a sharp distinction is made between the chemistry of organic (radical-)ions and analytical applications in biorganic chemistry and medicine. The emphasis is on the chemistry of organic (radical-)ions at the expense of inorganic, organometallic, and surface ion chemistry. Biochemistry and medicine are chosen because of their contemporary importance and because of the stupendous contributions of mass spectroscopy to these fields in the past two years. In the review of gas-phase organic ion chemistry, special attention is given to studies making significant contributions to the understanding of ion chemistry.

  3. 11th National Meeting of Organic Chemistry and 4th Meeting of Therapeutic Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Emília Sousa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available For the first time under the auspices of Sociedade Portuguesa de Química, the competences of two important fields of Chemistry are brought together into a single event, the 11st National Organic Chemistry Meeting and the the 4th National Medicinal Chemistry Meeting, to highlight complementarities and to promote new synergies. Abstracts of plenary lectures, oral communications, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report.

  4. 11th National Meeting of Organic Chemistry and 4th Meeting of Therapeutic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Maria Emília; Araújo, Maria João; do Vale, Maria Luísa; Andrade, Paula B.; Branco, Paula; Gomes, Paula; Moreira, Rui; Pinho e Melo, Teresa M.V.D.; Freitas, Victor

    2016-01-01

    For the first time under the auspices of Sociedade Portuguesa de Química, the competences of two important fields of Chemistry are brought together into a single event, the 11st National Organic Chemistry Meeting and the the 4th National Medicinal Chemistry Meeting, to highlight complementarities and to promote new synergies. Abstracts of plenary lectures, oral communications, and posters presented during the meeting are collected in this report. PMID:27102166

  5. Modeling the Explicit Chemistry of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Organic Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madronich, Sasha [Univ. Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-12-09

    The atmospheric burden of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) remains one of the most important yet uncertain aspects of the radiative forcing of climate. This grant focused on improving our quantitative understanding of SOA formation and evolution, by developing, applying, and improving a highly detailed model of atmospheric organic chemistry, the Generation of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) model. Eleven (11) publications have resulted from this grant.

  6. Inorganic and organic radiation chemistry: state and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyazin, E.P.; Bugaenko, L.T.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation inorganic and organic chemistry is presented on the basis of the general scheme and classification of radiolysis products and elementary processes, by which evolution of radiation-affected substances up to the final radiolysis products takes place. The evolution is traced for the representatives of inorganic and organic compounds. The contribution of radiation inorganic and organic chemistry to radiation technology, radiation materials technology, radiation ecology and medicine, is shown. Tendencies in the development of radiation chemistry and prediction of its certain directions are considered

  7. Creatine Synthesis: An Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andri L.; Tan, Paula

    2006-01-01

    Students in introductory chemistry classes typically appreciate seeing the connection between course content and the "real world". For this reason, we have developed a synthesis of creatine monohydrate--a popular supplement used in sports requiring short bursts of energy--for introductory organic chemistry laboratory courses. Creatine monohydrate…

  8. Aspects and prospects of the chemistry of organic heterocycles (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroth, W.

    1986-01-01

    The systematics of heterocycles, their place in organic chemistry, and their significance for theory and practice are discussed. Problems of the chemistry of heterocycles are discussed on the examples of systems with various types of conjugation and ring sizes. The focus is on the principles of synthesis of heterocycles, in particular, those based on acetylene, various C 3 fragments, carbon disulfide, and maleic anhydride. Individual sections of the survey are devoted to the role of heterocycles in biosynthesis, as well as certain problems common to the chemistry of heterocycles, biochemistry, and macromolecular chemistry

  9. Improvements to the Characterization of Organic Nitrogen Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  10. Evaluation of Learning Processes in an Organic Chemistry Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto, B.; Camusso, C.; Cividini, M.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews a subjective exercise completed by students at the end of each of six units in an introductory organic chemistry course. Argues that instruction should be shaped by Ausubel's concept of meaningful learning. (DDR)

  11. Green chemistry principles in organic compound synthesis and analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ruchi Verma; Lalit Kumar; Vijay Bhaskar Kurba

    2014-01-01

    The present review focus on various green chemistry approaches which could be utilized in the organic compounds in practical classes for undergraduate level in comparison of conventional methods. These methods avoid the usage of hazardous substances and are environmental friendly.

  12. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products -12 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The leaves of this plant are tradi- tionally used for the treatment of jaundice and other liver dis- orders. like T R Seshadri and K. Venkataraman, T R Govinda- chari has also made significant contributions to the chemistry of natural products. He had his initial training from the Ameri- can chemist Roger Adams. Intramolecular.

  13. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In order to keep the focus on chemistry, we defer giving its trivial name and plant source till the end of the discussion. An addi- ... The functional groups are to be determined now. The nature of the oxygen functionality is shown by a ... unaffected . SIRIIS I ARTICLI group since it undergoes acetylation. B moves higher with the.

  14. Looking forward: a glance into the future of organic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compain, Ph.; Desvergnes, V.; Suzenet, F.; Ollivier, C.; Robert, F.; Mihail, Barboiu; Belmont, Ph.; Bleriot, Y.; Bolze, F.; Bouquillon, S.; Bourguet, E.; Braida, B.; Constantieux, Th.; Desaubry, L.; Dupont, D.; Gastaldi, St.; Jerome, F.; Legoupy, St.; Marat, X.; Migaud, M.; Moitessier, N.; Papot, S.; Peri, F.; Petit, M.; Py, S.; Schulz, E.; Tranoy-Opalinski, I.; Vauzeilles, B.; Vayron, Ph.; Vergnes, L.; Vidal, S.; Wilmouth, S.

    2006-01-01

    What will organic chemistry do in the next forty years? This Perspective lists six tasks that have emerged during the first edition of ESYOP, a symposium devoted to the future of organic chemistry. The collective answer presented has been elaborated following a 4-step process: stimulating plenary lectures given by outstanding chemists and philosophers, short presentations given by each participant (average age: 34 years old), think-tank sessions and writing of the final report after the symposium. (authors)

  15. Organic chemistry in a CO2 rich early Earth atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Benjamin; Carrasco, Nathalie; Millan, Maëva; Vettier, Ludovic; Szopa, Cyril

    2017-12-01

    The emergence of life on the Earth has required a prior organic chemistry leading to the formation of prebiotic molecules. The origin and the evolution of the organic matter on the early Earth is not yet firmly understood. Several hypothesis, possibly complementary, are considered. They can be divided in two categories: endogenous and exogenous sources. In this work we investigate the contribution of a specific endogenous source: the organic chemistry occurring in the ionosphere of the early Earth where the significant VUV contribution of the young Sun involved an efficient formation of reactive species. We address the issue whether this chemistry can lead to the formation of complex organic compounds with CO2 as only source of carbon in an early atmosphere made of N2, CO2 and H2, by mimicking experimentally this type of chemistry using a low pressure plasma reactor. By analyzing the gaseous phase composition, we strictly identified the formation of H2O, NH3, N2O and C2N2. The formation of a solid organic phase is also observed, confirming the possibility to trigger organic chemistry in the upper atmosphere of the early Earth. The identification of Nitrogen-bearing chemical functions in the solid highlights the possibility for an efficient ionospheric chemistry to provide prebiotic material on the early Earth.

  16. Nitrogenous gas emissions induced by abiotic nitrite reactions with soil organic matter of a Norway spruce forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jing; Vereecken, Harry; Schloter, Michael; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    As an important intermediate of the nitrogen cycle, nitrite is highly reactive to soil organic matter (SOM) in forest soils under acidic conditions. However, there is little knowledge about how much its abiotic reactions with SOM contribute to nitrogen (N) gas emissions of forest soils till now. In this study, we provide data on N gas (N2O, NO, NO2) emissions from abiotic nitrite reactions with different fractions of soil organic matter in spruce forest soil, as well as the mechanisms involved. Soil samples were taken from the Oh layer at the TERENO-Wüstebach catchment, Germany, where Norway spruce (Picea abies) dominates. SOM was fractionated into dissolved organic matter (DOM), fulvic acid (FA), humic acid (HA) and humin (HN) according to their solubility. The dynamics of simultaneous NOx and N2O emissions were analyzed with a dynamic flow-through chamber system, coupled to an infrared laser absorption analyzer for N2O and a chemo-luminescence analyzer for NOx (NO and NO2), which allowed emission measurements with high time resolution. The 15N labelling technique was used for tracing the fate of nitrite-N towards establishment of a total N balance. When nitrite was added to the soil fractions, a large amount of NOx was immediately emitted, mostly in the form of NO. N2O emission was delayed by approximately 0.5-1 h. The NO and N2O emission pattern could be almost perfectly fitted with the Hill equation. The N2O formation rates increased significantly in the following order: DOM, FA, HA and HN, while the total amounts of the gases emitted increased significantly in the opposite order. These results revealed that abiotic reactions of nitrite with SOM in spruce forest soil play an important role in N gas emissions, while the chemical nature of the different SOM fractions determines the rate and amount of N gas emissions.

  17. Organic chemistry and biology of the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Interstellar organic chemistry is discussed as the field of study emerging from the discovery of microwave lines of formaldehyde and of hydrogen cyanide in the interstellar medium. The reliability of molecular identifications and comparisons of interstellar and cometary compounds are considered, along with the degradational origin of simple organics. It is pointed out that the contribution of interstellar organic chemistry to problems in biology is not substantive but analogical. The interstellar medium reveals the operation of chemical processes which, on earth and perhaps on vast numbers of planets throughout the universe, led to the origin of life, but the actual molecules of the interstellar medium are unlikely to play any significant biological role.

  18. Organic chemistry in the atmosphere. [laboratory modeling of Titan atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.

    1974-01-01

    The existence of an at least moderately complex organic chemistry on Titan is stipulated based on clear evidence of methane, and at least presumptive evidence of hydrogen in its atmosphere. The ratio of methane to hydrogen is the highest of any atmosphere in the solar system. Irradiation of hydrogen/methane mixtures produces aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. A very reasonable hypothesis assumes that the red cloud cover of Titan is made of organic chemicals. Two-carbon hydrocarbons experimentally produced from irradiated mixtures of methane, ammonia, water, and hydrogen bear out the possible organic chemistry of the Titanian environment.

  19. Minerals Masquerading As Enzymes: Abiotic Oxidation Of Soil Organic Matter In An Iron-Rich Humid Tropical Forest Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.

    2010-12-01

    Oxidative reactions play an important role in decomposing soil organic matter fractions that resist hydrolytic degradation, and fundamentally affect the cycling of recalcitrant soil carbon across ecosystems. Microbial extracellular oxidative enzymes (e.g. lignin peroxidases and laccases) have been assumed to provide a dominant role in catalyzing soil organic matter oxidation, while other potential oxidative mechanisms remain poorly explored. Here, we show that abiotic reactions mediated by the oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) could explain high potential oxidation rates in humid tropical forest soils, which often contain high concentrations of Fe(II) and experience rapid redox fluctuations between anaerobic and aerobic conditions. These abiotic reactions could provide an additional mechanism to explain high rates of decomposition in these ecosystems, despite frequent oxygen deficits. We sampled humid tropical forest soils in Puerto Rico, USA from various topographic positions, ranging from well-drained ridges to riparian valleys that experience broad fluctuations in redox potential. We measured oxidative activity by adding the model humic compound L-DOPA to soil slurries, followed by colorimetric measurements of the supernatant solution over time. Dilute hydrogen peroxide was added to a subset of slurries to measure peroxidative activity. We found that oxidative and peroxidative activity correlated positively with soil Fe(II) concentrations, counter to prevailing theory that low redox potential should suppress oxidative enzymes. Boiling or autoclaving sub-samples of soil slurries to denature any enzymes present typically increased peroxidative activity and did not eliminate oxidative activity, further suggesting the importance of an abiotic mechanism. We found substantial differences in the oxidation products of the L-DOPA substrate generated by our soil slurries in comparison with oxidation products generated by a purified enzyme (mushroom tyrosinase

  20. Misconception of pre-service chemistry teachers about the concept of resonances in organic chemistry course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widarti, Hayuni Retno; Retnosari, Rini; Marfu'ah, Siti

    2017-08-01

    A descriptive quantitative research has been done to identify the level of understanding and misconceptions of the pre-service chemistry teachers related to the concept of resonance in the organic chemistry course. The subjects of the research were 51 students of State University of Malang, majoring Chemistry Education, currently in their fourth semester, 2015-2016 academic year who have taken the course of Organic Chemistry I. The instruments used in this research is a combination of 8 numbers of multiple choice tests with open answer questions and certainty of response index (CRI). The research findings revealed that there are still misconceptions found in the organic chemistry course, especially about the concept of resonance. There were several misconceptions of the pre-service chemistry teachers, such as resonance structures are in equilibrium with each other; resonance structures are two or more Lewis structures with different in arrangement of both atom and electron; resonance structures are only structures containing charged atoms; formal charge and resonance structures are not related; and the stability of resonance structures are only determined by location of charges in atoms found in such structures. There is also a lack of understanding of curved arrows notation to show electron pair movement.

  1. Using Popular Nonfiction in Organic Chemistry: Teaching More than Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Katie E.; Shibley, Ivan A., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Assigning a popular nonfiction book as a supplemental text in organic chemistry can help students learn valuable skills. An analysis of student feedback on assignments related to a nonfiction book in two different organic courses revealed that students applied the information from the book, improved their communication skills, and were more…

  2. Building Bridges between Science Courses Using Honors Organic Chemistry Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Timothy; Pontrello, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Introductory undergraduate science courses are traditionally offered as distinct units without formalized student interaction between classes. To bridge science courses, the authors used three Honors Organic Chemistry projects paired with other science courses. The honors students delivered presentations to mainstream organic course students and…

  3. Recent advances in the chemistry of organic thiocyanates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanheiro, Thomas; Suffert, Jean; Donnard, Morgan; Gulea, Mihaela

    2016-02-07

    Organic thiocyanates are important synthetic intermediates to access valuable sulfur-containing compounds. In this review the different methods for their preparation and their synthetic applications will be presented. The literature of the last 15 years will be covered, highlighting selected recent advances in the chemistry of this class of compounds. We hope to offer chemists the tools to have a good grasp of this singular functionality and open the door to further progress in this chemistry.

  4. Organic chemistry on Titan: Surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Sagan, Carl

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of Titan's organic sediments with the surface (solubility in nonpolar fluids) is discussed. How Titan's sediments can be exposed to an aqueous medium for short, but perhaps significant, periods of time is also discussed. Interactions with hydrocarbons and with volcanic magmas are considered. The alteration of Titan's organic sediments over geologic time by the impacts of meteorites and comets is discussed.

  5. The Organic Chemistry of Conducting Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolbert, Laren Malcolm [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    For the last several years, we have examined the fundamental principles of conduction in one-dimensional systems, i.e., molecular “wires”. It is, of course, widely recognized that such systems, as components of electronically conductive materials, function in a two- and three-dimensional milieu. Thus interchain hopping and grain-boundary resistivity are limiting conductivity factors in highly conductive materials, and overall conductivity is a function of through-chain and boundary hopping. We have given considerable attention to the basic principles underlying charge transport (the “rules of the game”) in two-dimensional systems by using model systems which allow direct observation of such processes, including the examination of tunneling and hopping as components of charge transfer. In related work, we have spent considerable effort on the chemistry of conjugated heteropolymers, most especially polythiophens, with the aim of using these most efficient of readily available electroactive polymers in photovoltaic devices.

  6. Organic chemistry. Strain-release amination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianatassio, Ryan; Lopchuk, Justin M; Wang, Jie; Pan, Chung-Mao; Malins, Lara R; Prieto, Liher; Brandt, Thomas A; Collins, Michael R; Gallego, Gary M; Sach, Neal W; Spangler, Jillian E; Zhu, Huichin; Zhu, Jinjiang; Baran, Phil S

    2016-01-15

    To optimize drug candidates, modern medicinal chemists are increasingly turning to an unconventional structural motif: small, strained ring systems. However, the difficulty of introducing substituents such as bicyclo[1.1.1]pentanes, azetidines, or cyclobutanes often outweighs the challenge of synthesizing the parent scaffold itself. Thus, there is an urgent need for general methods to rapidly and directly append such groups onto core scaffolds. Here we report a general strategy to harness the embedded potential energy of effectively spring-loaded C-C and C-N bonds with the most oft-encountered nucleophiles in pharmaceutical chemistry, amines. Strain-release amination can diversify a range of substrates with a multitude of desirable bioisosteres at both the early and late stages of a synthesis. The technique has also been applied to peptide labeling and bioconjugation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. "Drug" Discovery with the Help of Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Takayoshi

    2017-01-01

    The first step in "drug" discovery is to find compounds binding to a potential drug target. In modern medicinal chemistry, the screening of a chemical library, structure-based drug design, and ligand-based drug design, or a combination of these methods, are generally used for identifying the desired compounds. However, they do not necessarily lead to success and there is no infallible method for drug discovery. Therefore, it is important to explore medicinal chemistry based on not only the conventional methods but also new ideas. So far, we have found various compounds as drug candidates. In these studies, some strategies based on organic chemistry have allowed us to find drug candidates, through 1) construction of a focused library using organic reactions and 2) rational design of enzyme inhibitors based on chemical reactions catalyzed by the target enzyme. Medicinal chemistry based on organic chemical reactions could be expected to supplement the conventional methods. In this review, we present drug discovery with the help of organic chemistry showing examples of our explorative studies on histone deacetylase inhibitors and lysine-specific demethylase 1 inhibitors.

  8. The Critical Role of Organic Chemistry in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotella, David P

    2016-10-19

    Small molecules remain the backbone for modern drug discovery. They are conceived and synthesized by medicinal chemists, many of whom were originally trained as organic chemists. Support from government and industry to provide training and personnel for continued development of this critical skill set has been declining for many years. This Viewpoint highlights the value of organic chemistry and organic medicinal chemists in the complex journey of drug discovery as a reminder that basic science support must be restored.

  9. Linking the spatial patterns of organisms and abiotic factors to ecosystem function and management: insights from semi-arid environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. T. Maestre

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous theoretical and modeling studies have demonstrated the ecological significance of the spatial patterning of organisms on ecosystem functioning and dynamics. However, there is a paucity of empirical evidence that quantitatively shows how changes in the spatial patterns of the organisms forming biotic communities are directly related to ecosystem structure and functioning. In this article, I review a series of experiments and observational studies conducted in semi-arid environments from Spain (degraded calcareous shrubland, steppes dominated by Stipa tenacissima, and gypsum shrublands to: 1 evaluate whether the spatial patterns of the dominant biotic elements in the community are linked to ecosystem structure and functioning, and 2 test if these patterns, and those of abiotic factors, can be used to improve ecosystem restoration. In the semiarid steppes we found a significant positive relationship between the spatial pattern of the perennial plant community and: i the water status of S. tenacissima and ii perennial species richness and diversity. Experimental plantings conducted in these steppes showed that S. tenacissima facilitated the establishment of shrub seedlings, albeit the magnitude and direction of this effect was dependent on rainfall conditions during the first yr after planting. In the gypsum shrubland, a significant, direct relationship between the spatial pattern of the biological soil crusts and surrogates of ecosystem functioning (soil bulk density and respiration was found. In a degraded shrubland with very low vegetation cover, the survival of an introduced population of the shrub Pistacia lentiscus showed marked spatial patterns, which were related to the spatial patterns of soil properties such as soil compaction and sand content. These results provide empirical evidence on the importance of spatial patterns for maintaining ecosystem structure and functioning in semi-arid ecosystems

  10. Oxidation and Reduction Reactions in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibley, Ivan A., Jr.; Amaral, Katie E.; Aurentz, David J.; McCaully, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    A variety of approaches to the concept of oxidation and reduction appear in organic textbooks. The method proposed here is different than most published approaches. The oxidation state is calculated by totaling the number of heterogeneous atoms, [pi]-bonds, and rings. A comparison of the oxidation states of reactant and product determine what type…

  11. Learning Organic Chemistry Through Natural Products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, geraniol lacks an important feature present in many organic compounds, in general, and in natural products, in particular. The molecular structure of geraniol is superimposable on its mirror image and hence it is achiral. The problem of structure determination has an added dimension in molecules which are chiral.

  12. Applications of the Cambridge Structural Database in organic chemistry and crystal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Frank H; Motherwell, W D Samuel

    2002-06-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and its associated software systems have formed the basis for more than 800 research applications in structural chemistry, crystallography and the life sciences. Relevant references, dating from the mid-1970s, and brief synopses of these papers are collected in a database, DBUse, which is freely available via the CCDC website. This database has been used to review research applications of the CSD in organic chemistry, including supramolecular applications, and in organic crystal chemistry. The review concentrates on applications that have been published since 1990 and covers a wide range of topics, including structure correlation, conformational analysis, hydrogen bonding and other intermolecular interactions, studies of crystal packing, extended structural motifs, crystal engineering and polymorphism, and crystal structure prediction. Applications of CSD information in studies of crystal structure precision, the determination of crystal structures from powder diffraction data, together with applications in chemical informatics, are also discussed.

  13. Piaget and Organic Chemistry: Teaching Introductory Organic Chemistry through Learning Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, R. Daniel

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes the first application of the Piaget-based learning cycle technique (Atkin & Karplus, Sci. Teach. 1962, 29, 45-51) to an introductory organic chemistry course. It also presents the step-by-step process used to convert a lecture course into a discussion-based active learning course. The course is taught in a series of learning cycles. A learning cycle is a three phase process that provides opportunities for students to explore new material and work with an instructor to recognize logical patterns in data, and devise and test hypotheses. In this application, the first phase, exploration, involves out-of-class student evaluation of data in attempts to identify significant trends and develop hypotheses that might explain the trends in terms of fundamental scientific principles. In the second phase, concept invention, the students and instructor work together in-class to evaluate student hypotheses and find concepts that work best in explaining the data. The third phase, application, is an out-of-class application of the concept to new situations. The development of learning cycles from lecture notes is presented as an 8 step procedure. The process involves revaluation and restructuring of the course material to maintain a continuity of concept development according to the instructor's logic, dividing topics into individual concepts or techniques, and refocusing the presentation in terms of large numbers of examples that can serve as data for students in their exploration and application activities. A sample learning cycle and suggestions for ways of limited implementation of learning cycles into existing courses are also provided.

  14. Academia–Industry Symbiosis in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Collaboration between academia and industry is a growing phenomenon within the chemistry community. These sectors have long held strong ties since academia traditionally trains the future scientists of the corporate world, but the recent drastic decrease of public funding is motivating the academic world to seek more private grants. This concept of industrial “sponsoring” is not new, and in the past, some companies granted substantial amounts of money per annum to various academic institutions in exchange for prime access to all their scientific discoveries and inventions. However, academic and industrial interests were not always aligned, and therefore the investment has become increasingly difficult to justify from industry’s point of view. With fluctuating macroeconomic factors, this type of unrestricted grant has become more rare and has been largely replaced by smaller and more focused partnerships. In our view, forging a partnership with industry can be a golden opportunity for both parties and can represent a true symbiosis. This type of project-specific collaboration is engendered by industry’s desire to access very specific academic expertise that is required for the development of new technologies at the forefront of science. Since financial pressures do not allow companies to spend the time to acquire this expertise and even less to explore fundamental research, partnering with an academic laboratory whose research is related to the problem gives them a viable alternative. From an academic standpoint, it represents the perfect occasion to apply “pure science” research concepts to solve problems that benefit humanity. Moreover, it offers a unique opportunity for students to face challenges from the “real world” at an early stage of their career. Although not every problem in industry can be solved by research developments in academia, we argue that there is significant scientific overlap between these two seemingly disparate

  15. Academia-industry symbiosis in organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaudel, Quentin; Ishihara, Yoshihiro; Baran, Phil S

    2015-03-17

    Collaboration between academia and industry is a growing phenomenon within the chemistry community. These sectors have long held strong ties since academia traditionally trains the future scientists of the corporate world, but the recent drastic decrease of public funding is motivating the academic world to seek more private grants. This concept of industrial "sponsoring" is not new, and in the past, some companies granted substantial amounts of money per annum to various academic institutions in exchange for prime access to all their scientific discoveries and inventions. However, academic and industrial interests were not always aligned, and therefore the investment has become increasingly difficult to justify from industry's point of view. With fluctuating macroeconomic factors, this type of unrestricted grant has become more rare and has been largely replaced by smaller and more focused partnerships. In our view, forging a partnership with industry can be a golden opportunity for both parties and can represent a true symbiosis. This type of project-specific collaboration is engendered by industry's desire to access very specific academic expertise that is required for the development of new technologies at the forefront of science. Since financial pressures do not allow companies to spend the time to acquire this expertise and even less to explore fundamental research, partnering with an academic laboratory whose research is related to the problem gives them a viable alternative. From an academic standpoint, it represents the perfect occasion to apply "pure science" research concepts to solve problems that benefit humanity. Moreover, it offers a unique opportunity for students to face challenges from the "real world" at an early stage of their career. Although not every problem in industry can be solved by research developments in academia, we argue that there is significant scientific overlap between these two seemingly disparate groups, thereby presenting an

  16. Alternative Conceptions of Organic Chemistry Topics among Fourth Year Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Hardy, Rebecca C.; Gwaltney, Kevin P.; Lewis, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the conceptual understanding for a series of fundamental organic concepts by fourth year chemistry students from a midsize, southeastern, state university. Student volunteers (n = 19) participated in semi-structured interviews using a think aloud protocol. The interview questions were eleven multiple choice questions selected…

  17. Medical Mycology and the Chemistry Classroom: Germinating Student Interest in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Joseph M.; Reid, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to provide active research context to introductory courses in basic sciences are likely to better engage learners and provide a framework for relevant concepts. A simple teaching and learning experiment was conducted to use concepts in organic chemistry to solve problems in the life sciences. Bryant University is a liberal arts university…

  18. Implementing a Student-Designed Green Chemistry Laboratory Project in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Kate J.; Jones, T. Nicholas; Schaller, Chris P.; McIntee, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    A multiweek organic chemistry laboratory project is described that emphasizes sustainable practices in experimental design. An emphasis on student-driven development of the project is meant to mirror the independent nature of research. Students propose environmentally friendly modifications of several reactions. With instructor feedback, students…

  19. Gender and students' interests in organic chemistry topics at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study is a reflection on the processes of the teaching and learning of science with special attention on gender influence in students' interests in learning organic chemistry in Senior Secondary Schools. Gender studies is gaining wide research attention today and there is increased awareness of activities for eradicating ...

  20. The 2010 Chemistry Nobel Prize: Pd (0)-Catalyzed Organic Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 2. The 2010 Chemistry Nobel Prize: Pd(O)-Catalyzed Organic Synthesis. Gopalpur Nagendrappa Y C Sunil Kumar. General Article Volume 16 Issue 2 February 2011 pp 152-164 ...

  1. Green chemistry principles in organic compound synthesis and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Verma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present review focus on various green chemistry approaches which could be utilized in the organic compounds in practical classes for undergraduate level in comparison of conventional methods. These methods avoid the usage of hazardous substances and are environmental friendly.

  2. Biobased Organic Chemistry Laboratories as Sustainable Experiment Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Julian R.

    2016-01-01

    As nonrenewable resources deplete and educators seek relevant interdisciplinary content for organic chemistry instruction, biobased laboratory experiments present themselves as potential alternatives to petroleum-based transformations, which offer themselves as sustainable variations on important themes. Following the principles of green chemistry…

  3. Synthesis and Chemistry of Organic Geminal Di- and Triazides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häring, Andreas P; Kirsch, Stefan F

    2015-11-06

    This review recapitulates all available literature dealing with the synthesis and reactivity of geminal organic di- and triazides. These compound classes are, to a large extent, unexplored despite their promising chemical properties and their simple preparation. In addition, the chemistry of carbonyl diazide (2) and tetraazidomethane (105) is described in separate sections.

  4. Does Mechanistic Thinking Improve Student Success in Organic Chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Nathaniel P.; Cooper, Melanie M.; Cox, Elizabeth L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of the curved-arrow notation to depict electron flow during mechanistic processes is one of the most important representational conventions in the organic chemistry curriculum. Our previous research documented a disturbing trend: when asked to predict the products of a series of reactions, many students do not spontaneously engage in…

  5. Biodiesel Synthesis and Evaluation: An Organic Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucholtz, Ehren C.

    2007-01-01

    A new lab esterification reaction based on biodiesel preparation and viscosity, which provides a model experience of industrial process to understand oxidation of vicinal alcohols by periodic acid, is presented. This new desertification experiment and periodate analysis of glycerol for the introductory organic chemistry laboratory provides an…

  6. Biodiesel from Seeds: An Experiment for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Plants can store the chemical energy required by their developing offspring in the form of triglycerides. These lipids can be isolated from seeds and then converted into biodiesel through a transesterification reaction. This second-year undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment exemplifies the conversion of an agricultural energy…

  7. Sudoku Puzzles for First-Year Organic Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Alice L.; Lamoureux, G.

    2007-01-01

    Sudoku puzzle was designed to teach about amino acids and functional groups to the students of undergraduate organic chemistry students. The puzzles focus on helping the student learn the name, 3-letter code and 1-letter code of common amino acids and functional groups.

  8. Concept of Green Chemistry-Redesigning Organic Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 11. Concept of Green Chemistry - Redesigning Organic Synthesis. Bharati V Badami. General Article Volume 13 Issue 11 November 2008 pp 1041-1048. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. Promoting Representational Competence with Molecular Models in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, Andrew T.; Gainer, Morgan; Padalkar, Shamin; Hegarty, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Mastering the many different diagrammatic representations of molecules used in organic chemistry is challenging for students. This article summarizes recent research showing that manipulating 3-D molecular models can facilitate the understanding and use of these representations. Results indicate that students are more successful in translating…

  10. A Simple Mnemonic for Tautomerization Mechanisms in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Chad E.

    2010-01-01

    The familiar word OREO (as in the cookie) is presented as a simple mnemonic for remembering the basic steps of the classical tautomerization mechanisms in organic chemistry. For acid-catalyzed tautomerizations, OREO stands for proton on, resonance, proton off. For base-catalyzed tautomerizations, OREO stands for proton off, resonance, proton on.…

  11. Integrating Symmetry in Stereochemical Analysis in Introductory Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taagepera, Mare; Arasasingham, Ramesh D.; King, Susan; Potter, Frank; Martorell, Ingrid; Ford, David; Wu, Jason; Kearney, Aaron M.

    2011-01-01

    We report a comparative study using "knowledge space theory" (KAT) to assess the impact of a hands-on laboratory exercise that used molecular model kits to emphasize the connections between a plane of symmetry, Charity, and isomerism in an introductory organic chemistry course. The experimental design compared three groups of…

  12. Application and Utilization of Electrochemistry in Organic Chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátil, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 17 (2011), s. 2921-2922 ISSN 1385-2728 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : electrochemistry * organic chemistry * applications Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.064, year: 2011

  13. Reduction of nitrogen compounds in oceanic basement and its implications for HCN formation and abiotic organic synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubeck Anna

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hydrogen cyanide is an excellent organic reagent and is central to most of the reaction pathways leading to abiotic formation of simple organic compounds containing nitrogen, such as amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. Reduced carbon and nitrogen precursor compounds for the synthesis of HCN may be formed under off-axis hydrothermal conditions in oceanic lithosphere in the presence of native Fe and Ni and are adsorbed on authigenic layer silicates and zeolites. The native metals as well as the molecular hydrogen reducing CO2 to CO/CH4 and NO3-/NO2- to NH3/NH4+ are a result of serpentinization of mafic rocks. Oceanic plates are conveyor belts of reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds from the off-axis hydrothermal environments to the subduction zones, where compaction, dehydration, desiccation and diagenetic reactions affect the organic precursors. CO/CH4 and NH3/NH4+ in fluids distilled out of layer silicates and zeolites in the subducting plate at an early stage of subduction will react upon heating and form HCN, which is then available for further organic reactions to, for instance, carbohydrates, nucleosides or even nucleotides, under alkaline conditions in hydrated mantle rocks of the overriding plate. Convergent margins in the initial phase of subduction must, therefore, be considered the most potent sites for prebiotic reactions on Earth. This means that origin of life processes are, perhaps, only possible on planets where some kind of plate tectonics occur.

  14. Progress in organic and physical chemistry structures and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Zaikov, Gennady E; Lobanov, Anton V

    2013-01-01

    Progress in Organic and Physical Chemistry: Structures and Mechanisms provides a collection of new research in the field of organic and physical properties, including new research on: The physical principles of the conductivity of electrical conducting polymer compounds The dependence on constants of electromagnetic interactions upon electron spacial-energy characteristics Effects of chitosan molecultural weight on rehological behavior of chitosan modified nanoclay at hight hydrated state Bio-structural energy criteria of functional states in normal and pathological conditions Potentiometric study on the international between devalent cations and sodium carboxylates in aqueous solutions Structural characteristic changes in erythrocyte membranes of mice bearing Alzheimer's-like disease caused by the olfactory bulbetomy This volume is intended to provide an overview of new studies and research for engineers, faculty, researchers, and upper-level students in the field of organic and physical chemistry.

  15. Infusing the Chemistry Curriculum with Green Chemistry Using Real-World Examples, Web Modules, and Atom Economy in Organic Chemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Michael C.; Dickneider, Trudy A.

    2004-01-01

    Green chemistry is the awareness of the damaging environmental effects due to chemical research and inventions. There is emphasis on a need to include green chemistry in synthesis with atom economy in organic chemistry curriculum to ensure an environmentally conscious future generation of chemists, policy makers, health professionals and business…

  16. Coupling effects of abiotic and biotic factors on molecular composition of dissolved organic matter in a freshwater wetland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Wei [Department of Environment and Energy, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ilhwan [Water Analysis and Research Center, K-water, 560 Sintanjin-ro, Daedeok-gu, Daejeon 307-711 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Joon [Department of Biological Education, Daegu University, Gyungbuk 712-714 (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Jin, E-mail: jinhur@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Environment and Energy, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    In this study, temporal and spatial variations in five defined molecular size fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were examined for a well preserved wetland (Upo Wetland) and its surrounding areas, and the influencing factors were explored with many biotic and abioic parameters. For each DOM sample, the five size fractions were determined by size-exclusion chromatography coupled with organic carbon detector (SEC-OCD). For 2-year long monthly monitoring, bio-polymers (BP), humic substances (HS), building blocks (BB), low molecular-weight (LMW) neutrals, and LMW acids displayed the median values of 264, 1884, 1070, 1090, and 11 μg-C L{sup −1}, respectively, accounting for 6.2%, 41.7%, 24.5%, 26.4%, and 0.4% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The dominant presence of HS indicated that terrestrial input played important roles in DOM composition of the freshwater ecosystem, which contrasted with coastal wetlands in other reports. Both seasonal and periodic patterns in the variations were found only for HS and BB among the size fractions. It was also notable that the sources of HS were seasonally shifted from aquagenic origin in winter to pedogenic origin in summer. The correlations among the size fractions revealed that BB and LMW neutrals might be degradation products from HS and humic-like substances (HS + BB), respectively, while LMW acids, from LMW neutrals. Principle component analysis revealed that the humic-like substances and the aromaticity of DOM were associated with temperature, chlorophyll a, phosphorous, and rainfall, whereas the other fractions and the molecular weight of HS were primarily affected by solar irradiation. Significant correlations between DOM composition and some biotic factors further suggested that DOM may even affect the biological communities, which provides an insight into the potential coupling effects of biotic and abiotic factors on DOM molecular composition in freshwater wetlands. - Highlights: • Humic fractions varied

  17. Tc Chemistry in HLW: Role of Organic Complexants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Nancy S.; Conradsen, Steven D.

    2003-01-01

    Tc complexation with organic compounds in tank waste plays a significant role in the redox chemistry of Tc and the partitioning of Tc between the supernatant and sludge components in waste tanks. These processes need to be understood so that strategies to effectively remove Tc from high-level nuclear waste prior to waste immobilization can be developed and so that long-term consequences of Tc remaining in residual waste after sludge removal can be evaluated. Only limited data on the stability of Tc-organic complexes exists and even less thermodynamic data on which to develop predictive models of Tc chemical behavior is available. To meet these challenges we are conducting a research program to study to develop thermodynamic data on Tc-organic complexation over a wide range of chemical conditions. We will attempt to characterize Tc-speciation in actual tank waste using state-of-the-art analytical organic chemistry, separations, and speciation techniques to validate our model. On the basis of such studies we will develop credible model of Tc chemistry in HLW that will allow prediction of Tc speciation in tank waste and Tc behavior during waste pretreatment processing and in waste tank residuals

  18. Abiotic reaction of iodate with sphagnum peat and other natural organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, S.M.; Kimble, G.; Schmett, G.T.; Emerson, D.W.; Turner, M.F.; Rudin, M.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that iodine (including 129 I) can be strongly retained in organic-rich surface soils and sediment and that a large fraction of soluble iodine may be associated with dissolved humic material. Iodate (IO 3 - ) reacts with natural organic matter (NOM) producing either hypoiodous acid (HIO) or I 2 as an intermediate. This intermediate is subsequently incorporated into the organic matter. Based on reactions of model compounds, we infer that iodine reacts with peat by aromatic substitution of hydrogen on phenolic constituents of the peat. Alternatively, the intermediate, HIO or I 2 , may be reduced to iodide (I - ). The pH (and temperature) dependence of the IO 3 - reaction (reduction) has been explored with sphagnum peat, alkali lignin, and several model compounds. The incorporation of iodine into NOM has been verified by pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Model compound studies indicate that reduction of IO 3 - to HIO may result from reaction with hydroquinone (or semiquinone) moieties of the peat. (author)

  19. A Forty Year Odyssey in Metallo-Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Kenneth M

    2015-07-17

    In this invited Perspective, I provide a personal account highlighting several of my group's research contributions in metallo-organic chemistry over the past 40 years. Our early work focused primarily in stoichiometric structure/reactivity of transition metal-organic compounds and their use in organic synthesis. More recent efforts have centered on the discovery and development of new metal-catalyzed organic reactions via reactive metal-organic intermediates. The major research findings that are described here include (1) propargyl-cobalt complexes as electrophilic agents for C-C and C-Nu coupling; (2) the activation of carbon dioxide by metal complexes; (3) metal-promoted C-H nitrogenation reactions; (4) oxo-metal catalyzed deoxygenation reactions; and (5) catalyst discovery via dynamic templating with substrate- and transition-state analogues.

  20. Mendeleev-2013. VII All-Russian conference of young scientists, postgraduate students and students with international participation on chemistry and nanomaterials. Book of abstracts. Section 4. Organic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    VII All-Russian conference of young scientists, postgraduate students and students with international participation on chemistry and nanomaterials was conducted on the Chemistry department of Saint-Petersburg University on April, 2-5, 2013. In the conference participants from 14 countries took part. There were five sections: Nanochemistry and nanomaterials, Analytic chemistry, Inorganic chemistry, Organic chemistry, Physical chemistry. In the collection (Section 2 - Organic chemistry) there are the abstracts concerning different aspects of organic chemistry: synthesis and study of properties of heterocyclic, organometallic, biologically active, medicinal compounds, new ion exchange materials, reagents for analytic chemistry, etc [ru

  1. Experimental Study of Abiotic Organic Synthesis at High Temperature and Pressure Conditions: Carbon Isotope and Mineral Surface Characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, R. A.; Niles, P. B.

    2010-01-01

    Abiotic organic synthesis processes have been proposed as potential mechanisms for methane generation in subseafloor hydrothermal systems on Earth, and on other planets. To better understand the detailed reaction pathways and carbon isotope fractionations in this process under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, hydrothermal experiments at high temperature (750 C) and pressure (0.55 GPa) were performed using piston cylinder apparatus. Formic acid was used as the source of CO2 and H2, and magnetite was the mineral catalyst. The chemical and carbon isotopic compositions of dissolved organic products were determined by GC-C-MS-IRMS, while organic intermediaries on the mineral catalyst were characterized by Pyrolysis-GC-MS. Among experimental products, dissolved CO2 was the dominant carbon species with a relative abundance of 88 mol%. Dissolved CH4 and C2H6 were also identified with a mole ratio of CH4 over C2H6 of 15:1. No dissolved CO was detected in the experiment, which might be attributable to the loss of H2 through the Au capsule used in the experiments at high temperature and pressure conditions and corresponding conversion of CO to CO2 by the water-gas shift reaction. Carbon isotope results showed that the 13C values of CH4 and C2H6 were -50.3% and -39.3% (V-PDB), respectively. CO2 derived from decarboxylation of formic acid had a (sigma)C-13 value of -19.2%, which was 3.2% heavier than its source, formic acid. The (sigma)C-13 difference between CO2 and CH4 was 31.1%, which was higher than the value of 9.4% calculated from theoretical isotopic equilibrium predictions at experimental conditions, suggesting the presence of a kinetic isotope effect. This number was also higher than the values (4.6 to 27.1%) observed in similar experiments previously performed at 400 C and 50 MPa with longer reaction times. CH4 is 11.0% less enriched in C-13 than C2H6. Alcohols were observed as carbon compounds on magnetite surfaces by Pyrolysis-GC-MS, which confirms

  2. Coupling effects of abiotic and biotic factors on molecular composition of dissolved organic matter in a freshwater wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Choi, Ilhwan; Lee, Jung-Joon; Hur, Jin

    2016-02-15

    In this study, temporal and spatial variations in five defined molecular size fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were examined for a well preserved wetland (Upo Wetland) and its surrounding areas, and the influencing factors were explored with many biotic and abioic parameters. For each DOM sample, the five size fractions were determined by size-exclusion chromatography coupled with organic carbon detector (SEC-OCD). For 2-year long monthly monitoring, bio-polymers (BP), humic substances (HS), building blocks (BB), low molecular-weight (LMW) neutrals, and LMW acids displayed the median values of 264, 1884, 1070, 1090, and 11 μg-CL(-1), respectively, accounting for 6.2%, 41.7%, 24.5%, 26.4%, and 0.4% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The dominant presence of HS indicated that terrestrial input played important roles in DOM composition of the freshwater ecosystem, which contrasted with coastal wetlands in other reports. Both seasonal and periodic patterns in the variations were found only for HS and BB among the size fractions. It was also notable that the sources of HS were seasonally shifted from aquagenic origin in winter to pedogenic origin in summer. The correlations among the size fractions revealed that BB and LMW neutrals might be degradation products from HS and humic-like substances (HS+BB), respectively, while LMW acids, from LMW neutrals. Principle component analysis revealed that the humic-like substances and the aromaticity of DOM were associated with temperature, chlorophyll a, phosphorous, and rainfall, whereas the other fractions and the molecular weight of HS were primarily affected by solar irradiation. Significant correlations between DOM composition and some biotic factors further suggested that DOM may even affect the biological communities, which provides an insight into the potential coupling effects of biotic and abiotic factors on DOM molecular composition in freshwater wetlands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dragonfly: In Situ Exploration of Titan's Organic Chemistry and Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, E. P.; Barnes, J. W.; Trainer, M. G.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2017-12-01

    Titan's abundant complex carbon-rich chemistry, interior ocean, and past presence of liquid water on the surface make it an ideal destination to study prebiotic chemical processes and document the habitability of an extraterrestrial environment. Titan exploration is a high science priority due to the level of organic synthesis that it supports. Moreover, opportunities for organics to have interacted with liquid water at the surface (e.g., in impact melt sheets) increase the potential for chemical processes to progress further, providing an unparalleled opportunity to investigate prebiotic chemistry, as well as to search for signatures of potential water-based or even hydrocarbon-based life. The diversity of Titan's surface materials and environments drives the scientific need to be able to sample a variety of locations, thus mobility is key for in situ measurements. Titan's atmosphere is 4 times denser than Earth's reducing the wing/rotor area required to generate a given amount of lift, and the low gravity reduces the required magnitude of lift, making heavier-than-air mobility highly efficient. Dragonfly is a rotorcraft lander mission proposed to NASA's New Frontiers Program to take advantage of Titan's unique natural laboratory to understand how far chemistry can progress in environments that provide key ingredients for life. Measuring the compositions of materials in different environments will reveal how far organic chemistry has progressed. Surface material can be sampled into a mass spectrometer to identify the chemical components available and processes at work to produce biologically relevant compounds. Bulk elemental surface composition can be determined by a neutron-activated gamma-ray spectrometer. Meteorology measurements can characterize Titan's atmosphere and diurnal and spatial variations therein. Geologic features can be characterized via remote-sensing observations, which also provide context for samples. Seismic sensing can probe subsurface

  4. MIANN models in medicinal, physical and organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Arrasate, Sonia; Sotomayor, Nuria; Lete, Esther; Munteanu, Cristian R; Pazos, Alejandro; Besada-Porto, Lina; Ruso, Juan M

    2013-01-01

    Reducing costs in terms of time, animal sacrifice, and material resources with computational methods has become a promising goal in Medicinal, Biological, Physical and Organic Chemistry. There are many computational techniques that can be used in this sense. In any case, almost all these methods focus on few fundamental aspects including: type (1) methods to quantify the molecular structure, type (2) methods to link the structure with the biological activity, and others. In particular, MARCH-INSIDE (MI), acronym for Markov Chain Invariants for Networks Simulation and Design, is a well-known method for QSAR analysis useful in step (1). In addition, the bio-inspired Artificial-Intelligence (AI) algorithms called Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) are among the most powerful type (2) methods. We can combine MI with ANNs in order to seek QSAR models, a strategy which is called herein MIANN (MI & ANN models). One of the first applications of the MIANN strategy was in the development of new QSAR models for drug discovery. MIANN strategy has been expanded to the QSAR study of proteins, protein-drug interactions, and protein-protein interaction networks. In this paper, we review for the first time many interesting aspects of the MIANN strategy including theoretical basis, implementation in web servers, and examples of applications in Medicinal and Biological chemistry. We also report new applications of the MIANN strategy in Medicinal chemistry and the first examples in Physical and Organic Chemistry, as well. In so doing, we developed new MIANN models for several self-assembly physicochemical properties of surfactants and large reaction networks in organic synthesis. In some of the new examples we also present experimental results which were not published up to date.

  5. Mixed-Methods Study of Online and Written Organic Chemistry Homework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Kinza; Martinez, Nylvia; Romero, Juan; Schubel, Skyler; Janowicz, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Connect for organic chemistry is an online learning tool that gives students the opportunity to learn about all aspects of organic chemistry through the ease of the digital world. This research project consisted of two fundamental questions. The first was to discover whether there was a difference in undergraduate organic chemistry content…

  6. Organic Chemistry Educators' Perspectives on Fundamental Concepts and Misconceptions: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duis, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    An exploratory study was conducted with 23 organic chemistry educators to discover what general chemistry concepts they typically review, the concepts they believe are fundamental to introductory organic chemistry, the topics students find most difficult in the subject, and the misconceptions they observe in undergraduate organic chemistry…

  7. Recent Discoveries and Future Challenges in Atmospheric Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasius, Marianne; Goldstein, Allen H

    2016-03-15

    Earth's atmosphere contains a multitude of organic compounds, which differ by orders of magnitude regarding fundamental properties such as volatility, reactivity, and propensity to form cloud droplets, affecting their impact on global climate and human health. Despite recent major research efforts and advances, there are still substantial gaps in understanding of atmospheric organic chemistry, hampering efforts to understand, model, and mitigate environmental problems such as aerosol formation in both polluted urban and more pristine regions. The analytical toolbox available for chemists to study atmospheric organic components has expanded considerably during the past decade, opening new windows into speciation, time resolution and detection of reactive and semivolatile compounds at low concentrations. This has provided unprecedented opportunities, but also unveiled new scientific challenges. Specific groundbreaking examples include the role of epoxides in aerosol formation especially from isoprene, the importance of highly oxidized, reactive organics in air-surface processes (whether atmosphere-biosphere exchange or aerosols), as well as the extent of interactions of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions and the resulting impact on atmospheric organic chemistry.

  8. What are the Limitations of Enzymes in Synthetic Organic Chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reetz, Manfred T

    2016-12-01

    Enzymes have been used in organic chemistry and biotechnology for 100 years, but their widespread application has been prevented by a number of limitations, including the often-observed limited thermostability, narrow substrate scope, and low or wrong stereo- and/or regioselectivity. Directed evolution provides a means to address and generally solve these problems, especially since recent methodology development has made this protein engineering method faster, more efficient, and more reliable than in the past. This Darwinian approach to asymmetric catalysis has led to a number of industrial applications. Metabolic-pathway engineering, mutasynthesis, and fermentation are likewise enzyme-based techniques that enrich chemistry. This account outlines the scope, and particularly, the limitations, of biocatalysis. The complementary nature of enzymes and man-made catalysts is emphasized. © 2016 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The chemistry of separations ligand degradation by organic radical cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezyk, S.P.; Horne, G.P.; Mincher, B.J.; Zalupski, P.R.; Cook, A.R.; Wishart, J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Solvent based extractions of used nuclear fuel use designer ligands in an organic phase extracting ligand complexed metal ions from an acidic aqueous phase. These extractions will be performed in highly radioactive environments, and the radiation chemistry of all these complexing agents and their diluents will play a major role in determining extraction efficiency, separation factors, and solvent-recycle longevity. Although there has been considerable effort in investigating ligand damage occurring in acidic water radiolysis conditions, only minimal fundamental kinetic and mechanistic data has been reported for the degradation of extraction ligands in the organic phase. Extraction solvent phases typically use normal alkanes such as dodecane, TPH, and kerosene as diluents. The radiolysis of such diluents produce a mixture of radical cations (R .+ ), carbon-centered radicals (R . ), solvated electrons, and molecular products such as hydrogen. Typically, the radical species will preferentially react with the dissolved oxygen present to produce relatively inert peroxyl radicals. This isolates the alkane radical cation species, R .+ as the major radiolytically-induced organic species that can react with, and degrade, extraction agents in this phase. Here we report on our recent studies of organic radical cation reactions with 2 ligands: CMPO and TODGA. Elucidating these parameters, and combining them with the known acidic aqueous phase chemistry, will allow a full, fundamental, understanding of the impact of radiation on solvent extraction based separation processes to be achieved. (authors)

  10. Synthesis and Reactivity of Propargylamines in Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauder, Kate; Toscani, Anita; Scalacci, Nicolò; Castagnolo, Daniele

    2017-12-27

    Propargylamines are a versatile class of compounds which find broad application in many fields of chemistry. This review aims to describe the different strategies developed so far for the synthesis of propargylamines and their derivatives as well as to highlight their reactivity and use as building blocks in the synthesis of chemically relevant organic compounds. In the first part of the review, the different synthetic approaches to synthesize propargylamines, such as A 3 couplings and C-H functionalization of alkynes, have been described and organized on the basis of the catalysts employed in the syntheses. Both racemic and enantioselective approaches have been reported. In the second part, an overview of the transformations of propargylamines into heterocyclic compounds such as pyrroles, pyridines, thiazoles, and oxazoles, as well as other relevant organic derivatives, is presented.

  11. Biocatalysis in organic chemistry and biotechnology: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reetz, Manfred T

    2013-08-28

    Enzymes as catalysts in synthetic organic chemistry gained importance in the latter half of the 20th century, but nevertheless suffered from two major limitations. First, many enzymes were not accessible in large enough quantities for practical applications. The advent of recombinant DNA technology changed this dramatically in the late 1970s. Second, many enzymes showed a narrow substrate scope, often poor stereo- and/or regioselectivity and/or insufficient stability under operating conditions. With the development of directed evolution beginning in the 1990s and continuing to the present day, all of these problems can be addressed and generally solved. The present Perspective focuses on these and other developments which have popularized enzymes as part of the toolkit of synthetic organic chemists and biotechnologists. Included is a discussion of the scope and limitation of cascade reactions using enzyme mixtures in vitro and of metabolic engineering of pathways in cells as factories for the production of simple compounds such as biofuels and complex natural products. Future trends and problems are also highlighted, as is the discussion concerning biocatalysis versus nonbiological catalysis in synthetic organic chemistry. This Perspective does not constitute a comprehensive review, and therefore the author apologizes to those researchers whose work is not specifically treated here.

  12. Modern electronic structure theory and applications in organic chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, ER

    1997-01-01

    This volume focuses on the use of quantum theory to understand and explain experiments in organic chemistry. High level ab initio calculations, when properly performed, are useful in making quantitative distinctions between various possible interpretations of structures, reactions and spectra. Chemical reasoning based on simpler quantum models is, however, essential to enumerating the likely possibilities. The simpler models also often suggest the type of wave function likely to be involved in ground and excited states at various points along reaction paths. This preliminary understanding is n

  13. Modules for Introducing Organometallic Reactions: A Bridge between Organic and Inorganic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Johnson, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal organometallic reactions have become increasingly important in the synthesis of organic molecules. A new approach has been developed to introduce organometallic chemistry, along with organic and inorganic chemistry, at the foundational level. This change highlights applications of organometallic chemistry that have dramatically…

  14. On the Applicability of the Green Chemistry Principles to Sustainability of Organic Matter on Asteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Vera M. Kolb

    2010-01-01

    The connection between astrobiology and green chemistry represents a new approach to sustainability of organic matter on asteroids or similar bodies. Green chemistry is chemistry which is environmentally friendly. One obvious way for chemistry to be green is to use water as a solvent, instead of more toxic organic solvents. Many astrobiological reactions occur in the aqueous medium, for example in the prebiotic soup or during the aqueous alteration period on asteroids. Thus any advances in th...

  15. Benchmarking uranyl peroxide capsule chemistry in organic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neal, Harrison A.; Nyman, May; Szymanowski, Jennifer; Fein, Jeremy B.; Burns, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Uranyl peroxide capsules are a recent addition to polyoxometalate (POM) chemistry. Ten years of development has ensued only in water, while transition metal POMs are commonly exploited in aqueous and organic media, controlled by counterions or ligation to render the clusters hydrophilic or hydrophobic. Here, new uranyl POM behavior is recognized in organic media, including (1) stabilization and immobilization of encapsulated hydrophilic countercations, identified by Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, (2) formation of new cluster species upon phase transfer, (3) extraction of uranyl clusters from different starting materials including simulated spent nuclear fuel, (4) selective phase transfer of one cluster type from a mixture, and (5) phase transfer of clusters from both acidic and alkaline media. The capsule morphology of the uranyl POMs renders accurate characterization by X-ray scattering, including the distinction of geometrically similar clusters. Compositional analysis of the aqueous phase post-extraction provided a quantitative determination of the ion exchange process that enables transfer of the clusters into the organic phase. Preferential partitioning of uranyl POMs into organic media presents new frontiers in metal ion behavior and chemical reactions in the confined space of the cluster capsules in hydrophobic media, as well as the reactivity of clusters at the organic/aqueous interface. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Benchmarking uranyl peroxide capsule chemistry in organic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, Harrison A.; Nyman, May [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Szymanowski, Jennifer; Fein, Jeremy B.; Burns, Peter C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2017-01-03

    Uranyl peroxide capsules are a recent addition to polyoxometalate (POM) chemistry. Ten years of development has ensued only in water, while transition metal POMs are commonly exploited in aqueous and organic media, controlled by counterions or ligation to render the clusters hydrophilic or hydrophobic. Here, new uranyl POM behavior is recognized in organic media, including (1) stabilization and immobilization of encapsulated hydrophilic countercations, identified by Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, (2) formation of new cluster species upon phase transfer, (3) extraction of uranyl clusters from different starting materials including simulated spent nuclear fuel, (4) selective phase transfer of one cluster type from a mixture, and (5) phase transfer of clusters from both acidic and alkaline media. The capsule morphology of the uranyl POMs renders accurate characterization by X-ray scattering, including the distinction of geometrically similar clusters. Compositional analysis of the aqueous phase post-extraction provided a quantitative determination of the ion exchange process that enables transfer of the clusters into the organic phase. Preferential partitioning of uranyl POMs into organic media presents new frontiers in metal ion behavior and chemical reactions in the confined space of the cluster capsules in hydrophobic media, as well as the reactivity of clusters at the organic/aqueous interface. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Using structure-based organic chemistry online tutorials with automated correction for student practice and review

    OpenAIRE

    O'Sullivan, Timothy P.; Hargaden, Gráinne C.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of an open-access organic chemistry question bank for online tutorials and assessments at University College Cork and Dublin Institute of Technology. SOCOT (structure-based organic chemistry online tutorials) may be used to supplement traditional small-group tutorials, thereby allowing students to develop essential problem-solving skills in organic chemistry. This online approach may be used for both formative and summative assessment....

  18. Concept-Oriented Task Design: Making Purposeful Case Comparisons in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graulich, Nicole; Schween, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Acquiring conceptual understanding seems to be one of the main challenges students face when studying organic chemistry. Traditionally, organic chemistry presents an extensive variety of chemical transformations, which often lead students to recall an organic transformation rather than apply conceptual knowledge. Strong surface level focus and…

  19. Organic Chemistry Students' Ideas about Nucleophiles and Electrophiles: The Role of Charges and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzovino, Mary E.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    Organic chemistry students struggle with reaction mechanisms and the electron-pushing formalism (EPF) used by practicing organic chemists. Faculty have identified an understanding of nucleophiles and electrophiles as one conceptual prerequisite to mastery of the EPF, but little is known about organic chemistry students' knowledge of nucleophiles…

  20. Irradiated Benzene Ice Provides Clues to Meteoritic Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael Patrick; Gerakines, Perry Alexander; Martin, Mildred G.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Peeters, Zan

    2013-01-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons account for a significant portion of the organic matter in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, as a component of both the low molecular weight, solvent-extractable compounds and the insoluble organic macromolecular material. Previous work has suggested that the aromatic compounds in carbonaceous chondrites may have originated in the radiation-processed icy mantles of interstellar dust grains. Here we report new studies of the organic residue made from benzene irradiated at 19 K by 0.8 MeV protons. Polyphenyls with up to four rings were unambiguously identified in the residue by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry was used to determine molecular composition, and accurate mass measurements suggested the presence of polyphenyls, partially hydrogenated polyphenyls, and other complex aromatic compounds. The profile of low molecular weight compounds in the residue compared well with extracts from the Murchison and Orgueil meteorites. These results are consistent with the possibility that solid phase radiation chemistry of benzene produced some of the complex aromatics found in meteorites.

  1. What Does the Acid Ionization Constant Tell You? An Organic Chemistry Student Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Many students find the transition from first-year general chemistry to second-year organic chemistry a daunting task. There are many reasons for this, not the least of which is their lack of a solid understanding and appreciation of the importance of some basic concepts and principles from general chemistry that play an extremely critical role in…

  2. [Effect of abiotic and biotic factors on the structural and functional organization of the saline lake ecosystems in Crimea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balushkina, E V; Golubkov, S M; Golubkov, M S; Litvinchuk, L F; Shadrin, N V

    2009-01-01

    Decrease of both zooplankton and zoobenthos species richness and a trend toward decrease of their biomass with the salinity increase was recorded in the hypersaline lakes of Crimea. The most of structural and functional characteristics of macrobenthos is positively correlated with abiotic and biotic characteristics of those lakes. Abundance, biomass, productivity of macrobenthos and ration of non-predating macrozoobenthos decrease with salinity increase, while they increase with the depth and growth of amount of chlorophyll a and primary production. Macrozoobenthos portion in the total zooplankton and macrozoobenthos biomass decreases with both salinity and depth increase. Zooplankton community is less controlled by abiotic factors as compared to macrozoobenthos, while the former's species number significantly decrease with salinity increase. Effect of salinity on zooplankton biomass is slightly significant, unlike that of macrozoobenthos. Comparison of total amount of rations of zooplankton and macrozoobenthos with amount of primary production indicates intense trophic interactions in the lakes under study.

  3. Green analytical chemistry - the use of surfactants as a replacement of organic solvents in spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharr, Daniel Y.

    2017-07-01

    This chapter gives an introduction to the many practical uses of surfactants in analytical chemistry in replacing organic solvents to achieve greener chemistry. Taking a holistic approach, it covers some background of surfactants as chemical solvents, their properties and as green chemicals, including their environmental effects. The achievements of green analytical chemistry with micellar systems are reviewed in all the major areas of analytical chemistry where these reagents have been found to be useful.

  4. Peatland Organic Matter Chemistry Trends Over a Global Latitudinal Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, B. A.; Hodgkins, S. B.; Carson, M. A.; Lamit, L. J.; Lilleskov, E.; Chanton, J.

    2017-12-01

    Peatlands contain a significant amount of the global soil carbon, and the climate feedback of carbon cycling within these peatland systems is still relatively unknown. Organic matter composition of peatlands plays a major role in determining carbon storage, and while high latitude peatlands seem to be the most sensitive to climate change, a global picture of peat organic matter chemistry is required to improve predictions and models of greenhouse gas emissions fueled by peatland decomposition. The objective of this research is to test the hypothesis that carbohydrate content of peatlands near the equator will be lower than high latitude peatlands, while aromatic content will be higher. As a part of the Global Peatland Microbiome Project (GPMP), around 2000 samples of peat from 10 to 70 cm across a latitudinal gradient of 79 N to 53 S were measured with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to examine the organic matter functional groups of peat. Carbohydrate and aromatic content, as determined by FTIR, are useful proxies of decomposition potential and recalcitrance, respectively. We found a highly significant relationship between carbohydrate and aromatic content, latitude, and depth. Carbohydrate content of high latitude sites were significantly greater than at sites near the equator, in contrast to aromatic content which showed the opposite trend. It is also clear that carbohydrate content decreases with depth while aromatic content increases with depth. Higher carbohydrate content at higher latitudes indicates a greater potential for lability and resultant mineralization to form the greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide and methane, whereas the composition of low latitude peatlands is consistent with their apparent stability. We speculate that the combination of low carbohydrates and high aromatics at warmer locations near the equator could foreshadow the organic matter composition of high latitude peat transitioning to a more recalcitrant form with a

  5. Development and Implementation of a Two-Semester Introductory Organic-Bioorganic Chemistry Sequence: Conclusions from the First Six Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goess, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    A two-semester second-year introductory organic chemistry sequence featuring one semester of accelerated organic chemistry followed by one semester of bioorganic chemistry is described. Assessment data collected over a six-year period reveal that such a course sequence can facilitate student mastery of fundamental organic chemistry in the first…

  6. Perception of the Relevance of Organic Chemistry in a German Pharmacy Students' Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehle, Sarah; Decker, Michael

    2016-04-25

    Objective. To investigate German pharmacy students' attitudes toward the relevance of organic chemistry training in Julius Maximilian University (JMU) of Würzburg with regard to subsequent courses in the curricula and in later prospective career options. Methods. Surveys were conducted in the second-year organic chemistry course (50 participants) as well as during the third-year and fourth-year lecture cycle on medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry (66 participants) in 2014. Results. Students' attitudes were surprisingly consistent throughout the progress of the degree course. Students considered organic chemistry very relevant to the pharmacy study program (95% junior and 97% senior students), and of importance for their future pharmacy program (88% junior and 94% senior students). With regard to prospective career options, the perceived relevance was considerably lower and attitudes were less homogenous. Conclusions. German pharmacy students at JMU Würzburg consider organic chemistry of high relevance for medicinal chemistry and other courses in JMU's pharmacy program.

  7. Trends in metallo-organic chemistry of scandium, yttrium, and the lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.

    1994-01-01

    Several interesting aspects of the metallo-organic chemistry of group 3 and the lanthanides have been highlighted, which include: (a) the chemistry of a few notable organolanthanide compounds, alkoxo and aryloxo derivatives derived from sterically demanding ligands, (b) new trends in the chemistry of lanthanide heterometallic alkoxides, (c) an account of zero valent organometallics of yttrium and the lanthanides, and (d) aspects of agostic interactions in the lanthanide metallo-organic compounds. (author). 49 refs

  8. Analysis of the Effect of Sequencing Lecture and Laboratory Instruction on Student Learning and Motivation Towards Learning Chemistry in an Organic Chemistry Lecture Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhira, Deblina

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to organic chemistry concepts in the laboratory can positively affect student performance, learning new chemistry concepts and building motivation towards learning chemistry in the lecture. In this study, quantitative methods were employed to assess differences in student performance, learning, and motivation in an organic chemistry…

  9. Integration of Video-Based Demonstrations to Prepare Students for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Scaggs, Jonathan; Sheffield, Colin; McDougal, Owen M.

    2015-01-01

    Consistent, high-quality introductions to organic chemistry laboratory techniques effectively and efficiently support student learning in the organic chemistry laboratory. In this work, we developed and deployed a series of instructional videos to communicate core laboratory techniques and concepts. Using a quasi-experimental design, we tested the…

  10. Using Structure-Based Organic Chemistry Online Tutorials with Automated Correction for Student Practice and Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Timothy P.; Hargaden, Gra´inne C.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of an open-access organic chemistry question bank for online tutorials and assessments at University College Cork and Dublin Institute of Technology. SOCOT (structure-based organic chemistry online tutorials) may be used to supplement traditional small-group tutorials, thereby allowing…

  11. Evaluation of a Flipped, Large-Enrollment Organic Chemistry Course on Student Attitude and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooring, Suazette R.; Mitchell, Chloe E.; Burrows, Nikita L.

    2016-01-01

    Organic Chemistry is recognized as a course that presents many difficulties and conceptual challenges for students. To combat the high failure rates and poor student attitudes associated with this challenging course, we implemented a "flipped" model for the first-semester, large-enrollment, Organic Chemistry course. In this flipped…

  12. Beyond Rote Learning in Organic Chemistry: The Infusion and Impact of Argumentation in Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabuccu, Aybuke; Erduran, Sibel

    2017-01-01

    There exists bias among students that learning organic chemistry topics requires rote learning. In this paper, we address such bias through an organic chemistry activity designed to promote argumentation. We investigated how pre-service science teachers engage in an argumentation about conformational analysis. Analysis of the outcomes concentrated…

  13. Students' Understanding of Alkyl Halide Reactions in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Ramírez de Arellano, Daniel; Towns, Marcy H.

    2014-01-01

    Organic chemistry is an essential subject for many undergraduate students completing degrees in science, engineering, and pre-professional programs. However, students often struggle with the concepts and skills required to successfully solve organic chemistry exercises. Since alkyl halides are traditionally the first functional group that is…

  14. Student Perceptions of Online Homework Use for Formative Assessment of Learning in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards-Babb, Michelle; Curtis, Reagan; Georgieva, Zornitsa; Penn, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Use of online homework as a formative assessment tool for organic chemistry coursework was examined. Student perceptions of online homework in terms of (i) its ranking relative to other course aspects, (ii) their learning of organic chemistry, and (iii) whether it improved their study habits and how students used it as a learning tool were…

  15. The Use of Computer-Based Instruction in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, George H.

    Thirty-two computer-based lesson modules in organic chemistry were developed at the University of Texas (Austin) over an 18-month period and evaluated in varying classroom situations for three semesters starting in the Fall of 1972. The modules were designed as supplements to the traditional organic chemistry course of the University. As such,…

  16. Stepwise Approach to Writing Journal-Style Lab Reports in the Organic Chemistry Course Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackerly, Jay Wm.

    2018-01-01

    An approach is described that gradually transitions second-year organic chemistry students to writing full "The Journal of Organic Chemistry" ("JOC") style lab reports. The primary goal was to introduce students to and build rhetorical skills in scientific and technical writing. This was accomplished by focusing on four main…

  17. Organic Chemistry and the Native Plants of the Sonoran Desert: Conversion of Jojoba Oil to Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daconta, Lisa V.; Minger, Timothy; Nedelkova, Valentina; Zikopoulos, John N.

    2015-01-01

    A new, general approach to the organic chemistry laboratory is introduced that is based on learning about organic chemistry techniques and research methods by exploring the natural products found in local native plants. As an example of this approach for the Sonoran desert region, the extraction of jojoba oil and its transesterification to…

  18. Introducing Undergraduates to Research Using a Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling Organic Chemistry Miniproject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Deyvid G. M.; Rosa, Clarissa H.; Vargas, Bruna P.; Rosa, Diego S.; Silveira, Ma´rcia V.; de Moura, Neusa F.; Rosa, Gilber R.

    2015-01-01

    A five-week miniproject is described for an upper-division experimental organic chemistry course. The activities include synthesis of a phenylboronic acid via a Grignard reaction and its use in a Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction. Technical skills and concepts normally presented in practical organic chemistry courses are covered, including…

  19. Sunscreen synthesis and their immobilisation on polymethylmethacrylate: an integrated project in organic chemistry, polymer chemistry and photochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtinho, Dina Maria B.; Serra, Maria Elisa S.; Pineiro, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Dibenzalacetone and other aldol condensation products are known sunscreens commonly used in cosmetics. This type of compounds can easily be prepared in an Organic Chemistry Lab by reaction of aldehydes with ketones in basic medium. These compounds can be incorporated in poly(methyl methacrylate) and used as UV light absorbers, for example in sunglasses. This project has the advantage of using inexpensive reagents which are readily available in Chemistry Laboratories. This experiment can also be a base starting point for discussions of organic, polymer and photochemistry topics. (author)

  20. Comparing Recent Organizing Templates for Test Content between ACS Exams in General Chemistry and AP Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Two different versions of "big ideas" rooted content maps have recently been published for general chemistry. As embodied in the content outline from the College Board, one of these maps is designed to guide curriculum development and testing for advanced placement (AP) chemistry. The Anchoring Concepts Content Map for general chemistry…

  1. Fulminic Acid in the History of Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzer, Frederick

    2000-07-01

    The story of the discovery, investigation, and eventual correct formulation of fulminic acid, HCNO, extends over a period of 200 years and reflects uniquely, in its many stages, the evolution of organic chemistry from post-alchemistic times to the age of wave mechanics. Fulminic acid was discovered in 1800 when E. Howard serendipitously prepared its highly explosive mercury and silver salts. The determination of its structure presented unusual difficulties and taxed the ingenuity of leading chemists of successive generations. Their work generated a procession of proposed and discarded formulations that was only finally ended in the 1960s with the recognition of fulminic acid as the mesomeric structure and hence with its identification as the parent compound of the important class of the nitrile N-oxides. Recently fulminic acid and several of its isotopomers have been subjected to the most searching spectroscopic investigations and ab initio computations, by which its molecular dimensions and geometry, and its "quasi-linear" structure have been revealed. In technology, mercury fulminate occupied for nearly a century a uniquely important position as the only available practical detonator for every kind of conventional explosive.

  2. A context based approach using Green Chemistry/Bio-remediation principles to enhance interest and learning of organic chemistry in a high school AP chemistry classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tricia

    The ability of our planet to sustain life and heal itself is not as predictable as it used to be. Our need for educated future scientists who know what our planet needs, and can passionately apply that knowledge to find solutions should be at the heart of science education today. This study of learning organic chemistry through the lens of the environmental problem "What should be done with our food scraps?" explores student interest, and mastery of certain concepts in organic chemistry. This Green Chemistry/ Bio-remediation context-based teaching approach utilizes the Nature MillRTM, which is an indoor food waste composting machine, to learn about organic chemistry, and how this relates to landfill reduction possibilities, and resource production. During this unit students collected food waste from their cafeteria, and used the Nature MillRTM to convert food waste into compost. The use of these hands on activities, and group discussions in a context-based environment enhanced their interest in organic chemistry, and paper chromatography. According to a one-tailed paired T-test, the result show that this context-based approach is a significant way to increase both student interest and mastery of the content.

  3. Aqueous organic chemistry in the atmosphere: sources and chemical processing of organic aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, V Faye

    2015-02-03

    Over the past decade, it has become clear that aqueous chemical processes occurring in cloud droplets and wet atmospheric particles are an important source of organic atmospheric particulate matter. Reactions of water-soluble volatile (or semivolatile) organic gases (VOCs or SVOCs) in these aqueous media lead to the formation of highly oxidized organic particulate matter (secondary organic aerosol; SOA) and key tracer species, such as organosulfates. These processes are often driven by a combination of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, and therefore their accurate representation in models is important for effective air quality management. Despite considerable progress, mechanistic understanding of some key aqueous processes is still lacking, and these pathways are incompletely represented in 3D atmospheric chemistry and air quality models. In this article, the concepts, historical context, and current state of the science of aqueous pathways of SOA formation are discussed.

  4. Students' Understanding of Acids/Bases in Organic Chemistry Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartrette, David P.; Mayo, Provi M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding key foundational principles is vital to learning chemistry across different contexts. One such foundational principle is the acid/base behavior of molecules. In the general chemistry sequence, the Bronsted-Lowry theory is stressed, because it lends itself well to studying equilibrium and kinetics. However, the Lewis theory of…

  5. Cross-Course Collaboration in the Undergraduate Chemistry Curriculum: Isotopic Labeling with Sodium Borodeuteride in the Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjonaas, Richard A.; Fitch, Richard W.; Noll, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    A microscale isotopic labeling experiment is described for the introductory organic chemistry laboratory course wherein half of the students use sodium borohydride (NaBH[subscript 4]) and the other half use sodium borodeuteride (NaBD[subscript 4]) to reduce acetophenone to 1-phenylethanol and then compare spectral data. The cost is reasonable, and…

  6. Synthetic biology: lessons from the history of synthetic organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Brian J; Lim, Wendell A

    2007-09-01

    The mid-nineteenth century saw the development of a radical new direction in chemistry: instead of simply analyzing existing molecules, chemists began to synthesize them--including molecules that did not exist in nature. The combination of this new synthetic approach with more traditional analytical approaches revolutionized chemistry, leading to a deep understanding of the fundamental principles of chemical structure and reactivity and to the emergence of the modern pharmaceutical and chemical industries. The history of synthetic chemistry offers a possible roadmap for the development and impact of synthetic biology, a nascent field in which the goal is to build novel biological systems.

  7. BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY REPORT. June through August1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    1963-10-02

    This report covers the following titles: (1) The Effects of 8-Methyl Lipoic Acid on the Evolution of Oxygen and Reduction of Carbon Dioxide during Photosynthesis; (2) Further {sup 14}C and {sup 15}N Tracer Studies of Amino Acid Synthesis during Photosynthesis by Chlorella Pyrenoidosa; (3) Two-Dimensional High Voltage, Low-Temperature Paper Electrophoresis of {sup 14}C-Labeled Products of Photosynthesis with {sup 14}CO{sub 2}; (4) A Search for Enzymic and Nonenzymic Reactions Between Thiamine Derivatives and Sugar Phosphates; (5) The Cytochrome Content of Purified Spinach Chloroplast Lamellae; (6) The Osmium Tetroxide Fixation of Chloroplast Lamellae; (7) Kinetics of Exoenzymes and Applications to the Determination of the Sequence of Nucleic Acids; (8) Brain Biochemistry and Behavior in Rats; (9) Experiments on Classical Conditioning and Light Habituation in Planarians; (10) Operant Conditioning in Planarians; (11) Manganese Porphyrin Complexes; (12) EPR Studies of Some Complex Organic Solutions; (13) Transient Response of Light-induced Photosynthetic Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Signals: Rhodospirillum rubrum Chromatophores; (14) Studies of the Tautomerism of Amides; (15) Structure and Mechanism of Hydrolysis of the Product of Reaction of PZ05 and Ethyl Ether; (16) A Study of the Irradiation Products of Several Nitrones; (17) Biosynthesis of the Opium Alkaloids; (18) Synthesis of methyl-{beta}-D-thiogalactoside-{sup 35}S; (19) Effect of Acridine Orange and Visible Light on Thymine Dimer Formation and Disruption; (20) Some Aspects of the Radiation Chemistry of DNA; (21) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; and (22) Studies on the Inhibition of the Photoreduction of FMN.

  8. Organic carbamates in drug design and medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arun K; Brindisi, Margherita

    2015-04-09

    The carbamate group is a key structural motif in many approved drugs and prodrugs. There is an increasing use of carbamates in medicinal chemistry and many derivatives are specifically designed to make drug-target interactions through their carbamate moiety. In this Perspective, we present properties and stabilities of carbamates, reagents and chemical methodologies for the synthesis of carbamates, and recent applications of carbamates in drug design and medicinal chemistry.

  9. Horizons of organic and organoelemental chemistry. 7. All-Russian conference on organometallic chemistry. Program and summaries of communications. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Abstracts of the seventh All-Russian conference on organometallic chemistry are presented. The synthesis of organometallic compounds of rare earth, transition elements, the synthesis of organic boron compounds are played an important role in modern organic chemistry and the main part of reports are devoted to these problems. Methods of labelling by radioactive isotopes of organic compounds used in medicine are discussed

  10. On Study of Teaching Reform of Organic Chemistry Course in Applied Chemical Industry Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunshen

    2017-11-01

    with the implementation of new curriculum reform, the education sees great changes in teaching methods. Teaching reform is profound in organic chemistry course in applied chemical industry technology. However, many problems which have never been noticed before occur when reform programs are implemented which harm students’ ability for learning and enthusiasm in side face. This paper proposes reform measures like combining theory and practice, improving professional quality, supplementing professional needs and integrating teaching into life after analyzing organic chemistry course teaching in applied chemical industry technology currently, hoping to play a role of reference for organic chemistry course teaching reform in applied chemical industry technology.

  11. Integrating Chemical Information Instruction into the Chemistry Curriculum on Borrowed Time: A Multiyear Case Study of a Capstone Research Report for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Danielle L.; Dalal, Heather A.; Dawson, Patricia H.

    2016-01-01

    To develop information literacy skills in chemistry and biochemistry majors at a primarily undergraduate institution, a multiyear collaboration between chemistry faculty and librarians has resulted in the establishment of a semester-long capstone project for Organic Chemistry II. Information literacy skills were instilled via a progressive…

  12. Comparable Educational Benefits in Half the Time: An Alternating Organic Chemistry Laboratory Sequence Targeting Prehealth Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sherri C.; Colabroy, Keri L.; Baar, Marsha R.

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory is a mainstay in STEM education, promoting the development of critical thinking skills, dexterity, and scientific curiosity. The goals in the laboratory for nonchemistry, prehealth majors, though, could be distinguished from those for chemistry majors. In service courses such as organic chemistry, much laboratory time is often spent…

  13. The Tip of the Iceberg in Organic Chemistry Classes: How Do Students Deal with the Invisible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graulich, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Organic chemistry education is one of the youngest research areas among all chemistry related research efforts, and its published scholarly work has become vibrant and diverse over the last 15 years. Research on problem-solving behavior, students' use of the arrow-pushing formalism, the investigation of students' conceptual knowledge and…

  14. Intuitive Judgments Govern Students' Answering Patterns in Multiple-Choice Exercises in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graulich, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Research in chemistry education has revealed that students going through their undergraduate and graduate studies in organic chemistry have a fragmented conceptual knowledge of the subject. Rote memorization, rule-based reasoning, and heuristic strategies seem to strongly influence students' performances. There appears to be a gap between what we…

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Calixarene Tetraethers: An Exercise in Supramolecular Chemistry for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbert, Stefan L.; Hoh, Bradley D.; Dulak, David J.

    2016-01-01

    In this experiment for an introductory undergraduate organic chemistry lab, students tetraalkylate tertbutylcalix[4]arene, a bowl-shaped macrocyclic oligophenol, and examine the supramolecular chemistry of the tetraether product by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Complexation with a sodium ion reduces the conformational…

  16. Coal-related research, organic chemistry, and catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Coal chemistry research topics included: H exchange at 400 0 C, breaking C-C bonds in coal, molecular weight estimation using small-angle neutron scattering, 13 C NMR spectra of coals, and tunneling during H/D isotope effects. Studies of coal conversion chemistry included thermolysis of bibenzyl and 1-naphthol, heating of coals in phenol, advanced indirect liquefaction based on Koelbel slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor, and plasma oxidation of coal minerals. Reactions of PAHs in molten SbCl 3 , a hydrocracking catalyst, were studied. Finally, heterogeneous catalysis (desulfurization etc.) was studied using Cu, Au, and Ni surfaces. 7 figures, 6 tables

  17. Measuring Meaningful Learning in the Undergraduate General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how students learn in the undergraduate chemistry teaching laboratory is an essential component to developing evidence-based laboratory curricula. The Meaningful Learning in the Laboratory Instrument (MLLI) was developed to measure students' cognitive and affective expectations and experiences for learning in the chemistry…

  18. Integration of Computational Chemistry into the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esselman, Brian J.; Hill, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in software and hardware have promoted the use of computational chemistry in all branches of chemical research to probe important chemical concepts and to support experimentation. Consequently, it has become imperative that students in the modern undergraduate curriculum become adept at performing simple calculations using computational…

  19. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez G, H.

    1989-01-01

    A brief description about the development and activities executed in chemistry, in the Instituto de Asuntos Nucleares, during the last years is presented. The plans and feasibility of nuclear techniques in Colombia are also described

  20. Operating experience in correcting severe secondary chemistry upsets by controlling makeup water organics (TOC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flint, W.G.; Mc Intosh, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper following observations are presented: conductivity and chloride excursions in steam condensate were directly linked to makeup water quality. Data strongly suggests that the breakdown of makeup water organics was responsible for substandard condensate water quality; although the short-term effects of gross organic contamination have been documented, the longer term consequences of continuous exposure by moderate organic levels needs to be addressed; a greater understanding of the organic removal efficiency of the various water purification technologies is essential to controlling TOC contamination; and a much better understanding of makeup plant chemistry and the interrelationship of makeup water contamination and plant chemistry has proven essential to optimizing plant performance and guaranteeing the best possible steam chemistry. The role of the chemistry group as an active participant in operations has been proven at Kewaunee Nuclear Plant

  1. Improvements to the characterization of organic nitrogen chemistry and deposition in CMAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  2. Improvements to the treatment of organic nitrogen chemistry & deposition in CMAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  3. Improvements to the characterization of organic nitrogen chemistry and deposition in CMAQ (CMAS Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excess atmospheric nitrogen deposition can cause significant harmful effects to ecosystems. Organic nitrogen deposition can be an important contributor to the total nitrogen budget, contributing 10-30%, however there are large uncertainties in the chemistry and deposition of thes...

  4. A Simple Physical-Organic Chemistry Experiment A s

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Note that this rate constant is much larger [4] than the one determined directly by Steenken et al [3] ... The solvolysis reaction can be initiated by making a 100- fold dilution of a solution of the substrate in .... (b) Calvin D Ritchie, Canadian Journal of Chemistry, Vol.64, pp.2239–. 50, 1986. [6] a) John P Richard and William P ...

  5. Beyond Clickers, Next Generation Classroom Response Systems for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Web-based classroom response systems offer a variety of benefits versus traditional clicker technology. They are simple to use for students and faculty and offer various question types suitable for a broad spectrum of chemistry classes. They facilitate active learning pedagogies like peer instruction and successfully engage students in the…

  6. The 2010 Chemistry Nobel Prize: Pd(0)-Catalyzed Organic Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    all the branches of chemistry. The organometallic compounds find application in producing materials needed in many fields of human activity and have helped in vastly improving the quality of life and our life style. The palladium(0) catalyzed cross-coupling reaction is essentially a nucleophilic displacement at a sp2 carbon, ...

  7. Motivational Beliefs and Learning Strategies in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Douglas Jay; Trujillo, Hernando

    2011-01-01

    Students enter college chemistry courses with different sources of motivation, appropriate or inappropriate assumptions about their probability of success and how to study. This study is theoretically aligned with self-regulated learning research. Clearly, academic performance is closely related to student motivational beliefs and learning…

  8. Molecular Electron Density Theory: A Modern View of Reactivity in Organic Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Luis R. Domingo

    2016-01-01

    A new theory for the study of the reactivity in Organic Chemistry, named Molecular Electron Density Theory (MEDT), is proposed herein. MEDT is based on the idea that while the electron density distribution at the ground state is responsible for physical and chemical molecular properties, as proposed by the Density Functional Theory (DFT), the capability for changes in electron density is responsible for molecular reactivity. Within MEDT, the reactivity in Organic Chemistry is studied through ...

  9. Modeling of iodine radiation chemistry in the presence of organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taghipour, Fariborz; Evans, Greg J.

    2002-01-01

    A kinetic-based model was developed that simulates the radiation chemistry of iodine in the presence of organic compounds. The model's mechanistic description of iodine chemistry and generic semi-mechanistic reactions for various classes of organics, provided a reasonable representation of experimental results. The majority of the model and experimental results of iodine volatilization rates were in agreement within an order of magnitude

  10. Profiles in chemistry: a historical perspective on the national organic symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenlon, Edward E; Myers, Brian J

    2013-06-21

    This perspective delineates the history of the National Organic Chemistry Symposium (NOS) and, in doing so, traces the development of organic chemistry over the past 88 years. The NOS is the premier event sponsored by the ACS Division of Organic Chemistry (ORGN) and has been held in odd-numbered years since 1925, with the exceptions of 1943 and 1945. During the 42 symposia, 332 chemists have given 549 plenary lectures. The role the NOS played in the launch of The Journal of Organic Chemistry and Organic Reactions and the initiation of the Roger Adams Award are discussed. Representative examples highlighting the chemistry presented in each era are described, and the evolution of the field is examined by assigning each NOS talk to one of seven subdisciplines and analyzing how the number of talks in each subdiscipline has changed over time. Comparisons of the demographics of speakers, attendees, and ORGN members are made, and superlatives are noted. Personal interest stories of the speakers are discussed, along with the relationships among them, especially their academic lineage. Logistical aspects of the NOS and their historical trends are reviewed. Finally, the human side of science is examined, where over the past century, the NOS has been intertwined with some of the most heated debates in organic chemistry. Conflicts and controversies involving free radicals, reaction mechanisms, and nonclassical carbocations are discussed.

  11. An expert performance approach to examining factors contributing to academic success in organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandagopal, Kiruthiga

    Successful completion of the introductory course in organic chemistry is a prerequisite for many graduate and professional science programs, yet the failure rate for this course is notoriously high. To date, there have been few studies examining factors contributing to academic success in organic chemistry. This study demonstrates that the online, longitudinal methods used by investigations of expert performance can examine and successfully identify factors contributing to academic success at the college level. Sixty-four students enrolled in introductory organic chemistry during the Fall 2007 and Spring 2008 semesters completed motivation questionnaires, interviews, diaries, and think-aloud reading and problem-solving tasks at three different points across a semester. Measures of spatial ability, general ability, and background preparation were also collected. Each measure was analyzed to determine significant differences between groups differing in grade-point average (GPA) prior to the start of the course and to identify predictors of organic chemistry grade. Variables measuring background preparation, problem-solving strategies and studying strategies were found to be the best predictors of academic success in organic chemistry. Implications for instruction in organic chemistry and effective studying behaviors are discussed.

  12. Problem Types in Synthetic Organic Chemistry Research: Implications for the Development of Curricular Problems for Second-Year Level Organic Chemistry Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raker, Jeffrey R.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of the nature of science is key to the development of new curricular materials that mirror the practice of science. Three problem types (project level, synthetic planning, and day-to-day) in synthetic organic chemistry emerged during a thematic content analysis of the research experiences of eight practising synthetic organic…

  13. COSMETICS AS THEMATIC TO APPROACH ORGANIC FUNCTIONS IN CHEMISTRY TEACHING

    OpenAIRE

    FREITAS, Tasielle Lima; DA COSTA, Maria Aparecida; FREITAS, Fabricia Carla Ribeiro Mendes; OLIVEIRA, Tatiana de Fátima; MORAES, Lilian Marciolina; FIELD’S, Karla Amâncio Pinto; REZENDE, Gláucia Aparecida Andrade; SANTOS, Renato Gomes

    2016-01-01

    The science teaching has become more complex each passing day regarding its approach in an attempt to promote a more effective content learning, what requires from the teachers reflection concerning their education teaching, aiming at the use of different teaching strategies, such as the approach of chemistry contents through their relation to a social context in which they are inserted, as the use of cosmetics. This paper reports on a pedagogical intervention project in the subject of Sup...

  14. "Molecules-in-Medicine": Peer-Evaluated Presentations in a Fast-Paced Organic Chemistry Course for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadnikova, Ekaterina N.

    2013-01-01

    To accentuate the importance of organic chemistry in development of contemporary pharmaceuticals, a three-week unit entitled "Molecules-in-Medicine" was included in the curriculum of a comprehensive one-semester four-credit organic chemistry course. After a lecture on medicinal chemistry concepts and pharmaceutical practices, students…

  15. High Structure Active Learning Pedagogy for the Teaching of Organic Chemistry: Assessing the Impact on Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimmins, Michael T.; Midkiff, Brooke

    2017-01-01

    Organic Chemistry is a required course for programs in chemistry, biology, and many health science careers. It has historically been considered a highly challenging course with significant failure rates. As with many science disciplines, the teaching of Organic Chemistry has traditionally focused on unstructured exposition-centered delivery of…

  16. Effectiveness of Analogy Instructional Strategy on Undergraduate Student's Acquisition of Organic Chemistry Concepts in Mutah University, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Nawaf Ahmad Hasan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effectiveness of analogy instructional strategy on undergraduate students' acquisition of organic chemistry concepts in Mutah University, Jordan. A quasi-experimental design was used in the study; Participants were 97 students who enrolled in organic chemistry course at the department of chemistry during the…

  17. Synthesis and Metalation of a Ligand: An Interdisciplinary Laboratory Experiment for Second-Year Organic and Introductory Inorganic Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, Benjamin J.; Bowser, Andrew K.; Anderson-Wile, Amelia M.; Wile, Bradley M.

    2015-01-01

    An interdisciplinary laboratory experiment involving second-year undergraduate organic chemistry and introductory inorganic chemistry undergraduate students is described. Organic chemistry students prepare a series of amine-bis(phenols) via a Mannich reaction, and characterize their products using melting point; FTIR; and [superscript 1]H,…

  18. Correlation of preadmission organic chemistry courses and academic performance in biochemistry at a midwest chiropractic doctoral program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Marc P

    2010-01-01

    Organic chemistry has been shown to correlate with academic success in the preclinical years of medicine, dentistry, and graduate physiology. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between undergraduate organic chemistry grades and first-semester biochemistry grades at a Midwest chiropractic doctoral program. Students enrolled in a first-semester biochemistry course who had completed the prerequisite courses in organic chemistry offered at this same institution were entered into the study. The total grade for each of the three courses was calculated using the midterm and final exam raw scores with a weighting of 50% each. Analysis consisted of obtaining correlation coefficients between the total grades of organic 1 with biochemistry and organic 2 with biochemistry. Using the biochemistry total grade, the students were divided into quartiles and course grades for both organic chemistry 1 and 2 were calculated. For the 109 students in the study, the correlation coefficient between the biochemistry and organic chemistry 1 and biochemistry and organic chemistry 2 courses was r = 0.744 and r = 0.725, respectively. The difference in organic chemistry grades between those in the first and fourth quartiles was 63.2% and 86.9% for organic chemistry 1 (p organic chemistry 2 (p organic chemistry can be used as an indicator of future academic success in a chiropractic biochemistry course. Knowledge of such a relationship could prove useful to identify students who may potentially run into academic difficulty with first-year biochemistry.

  19. USE OF GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS IN SECONDARY CHEMISTRY LESSONS

    OpenAIRE

    Nakiboglu, Canan

    2017-01-01

    Graphicorganizers are the visual representations that show the organization orstructure of concepts as well as relationships between concepts. The effectiveuse of graphic organizers may be a magnificent strategy to help studentsconnect ideas and they can be added to instructional materials to communicatethe logical structure of the instructional material. This study aims to showhow graphic organizer use within teaching duration by presenting differenttypes of graphic organizers and to provide...

  20. Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    The chemical research and development efforts related to the design and ultimate operation of molten-salt breeder reactor systems are concentrated on fuel- and coolant-salt chemistry, including the development of analytical methods for use in these systems. The chemistry of tellurium in fuel salt is being studied to help elucidate the role of this element in the intergranular cracking of Hastelloy N. Studies were continued of the effect of oxygen-containing species on the equilibrium between dissolved UF 3 and dissolved UF 4 , and, in some cases, between the dissolved uranium fluorides and graphite, and the UC 2 . Several aspects of coolant-salt chemistry are under investigation. Hydroxy and oxy compounds that could be formed in molten NaBF 4 are being synthesized and characterized. Studies of the chemistry of chromium (III) compounds in fluoroborate melts were continued as part of a systematic investigation of the corrosion of structural alloys by coolant salt. An in-line voltammetric method for determining U 4+ /U 3+ ratios in fuel salt was tested in a forced-convection loop over a six-month period. (LK)

  1. Mukilteo water sensor time series - Field work coupling measurements of carbon chemistry and distribution of free-living organisms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To estimate the carbon chemistry conditions experienced by free-living organisms, we will conduct coupled biological/carbon chemistry sampling for key zooplankton...

  2. On the Applicability of the Green Chemistry Principles to Sustainability of Organic Matter on Asteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera M. Kolb

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The connection between astrobiology and green chemistry represents a new approach to sustainability of organic matter on asteroids or similar bodies. Green chemistry is chemistry which is environmentally friendly. One obvious way for chemistry to be green is to use water as a solvent, instead of more toxic organic solvents. Many astrobiological reactions occur in the aqueous medium, for example in the prebiotic soup or during the aqueous alteration period on asteroids. Thus any advances in the green organic reactions in water are directly applicable to astrobiology. Another green chemistry approach is to abolish use of toxic solvents. This can be accomplished by carrying out the reactions without a solvent in the solventless or solid-state reactions. The advances in these green reactions are directly applicable to the chemistry on asteroids during the periods when water was not available. Many reactions on asteroids may have been done in the solid mixtures. These reactions may be responsible for a myriad of organic compounds that have been isolated from the meteorites.

  3. Perception of the Relevance of Organic Chemistry in a German Pharmacy Students’ Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehle, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate German pharmacy students’ attitudes toward the relevance of organic chemistry training in Julius Maximilian University (JMU) of Würzburg with regard to subsequent courses in the curricula and in later prospective career options. Methods. Surveys were conducted in the second-year organic chemistry course (50 participants) as well as during the third-year and fourth-year lecture cycle on medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry (66 participants) in 2014. Results. Students’ attitudes were surprisingly consistent throughout the progress of the degree course. Students considered organic chemistry very relevant to the pharmacy study program (95% junior and 97% senior students), and of importance for their future pharmacy program (88% junior and 94% senior students). With regard to prospective career options, the perceived relevance was considerably lower and attitudes were less homogenous. Conclusions. German pharmacy students at JMU Würzburg consider organic chemistry of high relevance for medicinal chemistry and other courses in JMU’s pharmacy program. PMID:27170811

  4. A study of how precursor key concepts for organic chemistry success are understood by general chemistry students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Patrick Gerard

    This study examines college student understanding of key concepts that will support future organic chemistry success as determined by university instructors. During four one-hour individual interviews the sixteen subjects attempted to solve general chemistry problems. A think-aloud protocol was used along with a whiteboard where the students could draw and illustrate their ideas. The protocols for the interviews were adapted from the Covalent Structure and Bonding two-tiered multiple choice diagnostic instrument (Peterson, Treagust, & Garnett, 1989) and augmented by the Geometry and Polarity of Molecules single-tiered multiple choice instrument (Furio & Calatayud, 1996). The interviews were videotaped, transcribed, and coded for analysis to determine the subjects' understanding of the key ideas. The subjects displayed many misconceptions that were summarized into nine assertions about student conceptualization of chemistry. (1) Many students misunderstand the location and nature of intermolecular forces. (2) Some think electronegativity differences among atoms in a molecule are sufficient to make the molecule polar, regardless of spatial arrangement. (3) Most know that higher phase change temperatures imply stronger intermolecular attractions, but many do not understand the difference between covalent molecular and covalent network substances. (4) Many have difficulty deciding whether a molecule is polar or non-polar, often confusing bilateral symmetry with spatial symmetry in all three dimensions. (5) Many cannot reliably draw correct Lewis structures due to carelessness and overuse of flawed algorithms. (6) Many are confused by how electrons can both repel one other and facilitate bonding between atoms via orbitals---this seems oxymoronic to them. (7) Many cannot explain why the atoms of certain elements do not follow the octet rule and some believe the octet rule alone can determine the shape of a molecule. (8) Most do know that electronegativity and polarity

  5. The effect of soil mineral phases on the abiotic degradation of selected organic compounds. Final report, June 31, 1990--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.

    1994-12-31

    Funds were received from the United States Department of Energy to study the effects of soil mineral phases on the rates of abiotic degradation of tetraphenylborate (TPB) and diphenylboronic acid (DPBA). In addition to kaolinite and montmorillonite clay minerals, the role of goethite, corundum, manganite, and rutile in the degradation of organoborates was also evaluated. The effects of DPBA, argon, molecular dioxygen (O{sub 2}), temperature, and organic matter on the degradation of organoborates were also measured. The results indicated that TPB and DPBA degraded rapidly on the mineral surfaces. The initial products generated from the degradation of TPB were DPBA and biphenyl; however, further degradation resulted in the formation of phenylboric acid and phenol which persisted even after TPB disappeared. The data also showed that the rate of TPB degradation was faster in kaolinite, a 1:1 clay mineral, than in montmorillonite, a double layer mineral. The initial degradation of TPB by corundum was much higher than goethite, manganite and rutile. However, no further degradation by this mineral was observed where as the degradation of TPB continued by goethite and rutile minerals. Over all, the degradation rate of TPB was the highest for goethite as compared to the other metal oxide minerals. The degradation of TPB and DPBA was a redox reaction where metals (Fe, Al, Ti, Mn) acted as Lewis acids. DPBA and argon retarded the TPB degradation where as molecular oxygen organic matter and temperature increased the rate of TPB disappearance.

  6. Spectroscopy 101: A Practical Introduction to Spectroscopy and Analysis for Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Lucas A.; Kammeyer, Jacquelin K.; Garg, Neil K.

    2017-01-01

    An undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory that provides an introduction to various spectroscopic techniques is reported. Whereas organic spectroscopy is most often learned and practiced in the context of reaction analyses, this laboratory experiment allows students to become comfortable with [superscript 1]H NMR, [superscript 13]C NMR, and IR…

  7. An Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory: The Facile Hydrogenation of Methyl Trans-Cinnamate

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Kenneth J.; Zuspan, Kimberly; Berry, Lonnie

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogenation of alkenes is an important reaction in the synthesis of organic molecules. In this experiment, students conduct a high-yield microscale hydrogenation reaction of methyl "trans"-cinnamate using a readily available, safe, and convenient hydrogen source. The conditions are similar to those seen in an organic chemistry textbook for an…

  8. A Cost-Effective Two-Part Experiment for Teaching Introductory Organic Chemistry Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Christopher M.; Brown, Brenna A.; Wan, Hayley

    2011-01-01

    This two-part laboratory experiment is designed to be a cost-effective method for teaching basic organic laboratory techniques (recrystallization, thin-layer chromatography, column chromatography, vacuum filtration, and melting point determination) to large classes of introductory organic chemistry students. Students are exposed to different…

  9. Acid-Base Learning Outcomes for Students in an Introductory Organic Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanovich, Carlee; Gandhi, Aneri; Flynn, Alison B.

    2015-01-01

    An outcome-based approach to teaching and learning focuses on what the student demonstrably knows and can do after instruction, rather than on what the instructor teaches. This outcome-focused approach can then guide the alignment of teaching strategies, learning activities, and assessment. In organic chemistry, mastery of organic acid-base…

  10. Extraterrestrial organic chemistry: from the interstellar medium to the origins of life. Part 2: complex organic chemistry in the environment of planets and satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raulin, F; Kobayashi, K

    2001-01-01

    During COSPAR'00 in Warsaw, Poland, in the frame of Sub-Commission F.3 events (Planetary Biology and Origins of Life), part of COSPAR Commission F (Life Sciences as Related to Space), and Commission B events (Space Studies of the Earth-Moon System, Planets, and Small Bodies of the Solar System) a large joint symposium (F.3.4/B0.8) was held on extraterrestrial organic chemistry. Part 2 of this symposium was devoted to complex organic chemistry in the environment of planets and satellites. The aim of this event was to cover and review new data which have been recently obtained and to give new insights on data which are expected in the near future to increase our knowledge of the complex organic chemistry occurring in several planets and satellites of the Solar System, outside the earth, and their implications for exobiology and life in the universe. The event was composed of two main parts. The first part was mainly devoted to the inner planets and Europa and the search for signatures of life or organics in those environments. The second part was related to the study of the outer solar system.

  11. A Simple Physical-Organic Chemistry Experiment A s

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A very important intermediate in many organic reactions is the carbocation. As the name implies, carbocation is an organic cation containing a positively charged carbon. It has only a sextet of electrons surrounding the charged carbon and is therefore quite reactive. Originally they were called carbonium ions. The parent.

  12. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 4, Organic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This interim notice covers the following: extractable organic halides in solids, total organic halides, analysis by gas chromatography/Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, hexadecane extracts for volatile organic compounds, GC/MS analysis of VOCs, GC/MS analysis of methanol extracts of cryogenic vapor samples, screening of semivolatile organic extracts, GPC cleanup for semivolatiles, sample preparation for GC/MS for semi-VOCs, analysis for pesticides/PCBs by GC with electron capture detection, sample preparation for pesticides/PCBs in water and soil sediment, report preparation, Florisil column cleanup for pesticide/PCBs, silica gel and acid-base partition cleanup of samples for semi-VOCs, concentrate acid wash cleanup, carbon determination in solids using Coulometrics` CO{sub 2} coulometer, determination of total carbon/total organic carbon/total inorganic carbon in radioactive liquids/soils/sludges by hot persulfate method, analysis of solids for carbonates using Coulometrics` Model 5011 coulometer, and soxhlet extraction.

  13. Molecular mechanism of acrylamide neurotoxicity: lessons learned from organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPachin, Richard M; Gavin, Terrence

    2012-12-01

    Acrylamide (ACR) produces cumulative neurotoxicity in exposed humans and laboratory animals through a direct inhibitory effect on presynaptic function. In this review, we delineate how knowledge of chemistry provided an unprecedented understanding of the ACR neurotoxic mechanism. We also show how application of the hard and soft, acids and bases (HSAB) theory led to the recognition that the α,β-unsaturated carbonyl structure of ACR is a soft electrophile that preferentially forms covalent bonds with soft nucleophiles. In vivo proteomic and in chemico studies demonstrated that ACR formed covalent adducts with highly nucleophilic cysteine thiolate groups located within active sites of presynaptic proteins. Additional research showed that resulting protein inactivation disrupted nerve terminal processes and impaired neurotransmission. ACR is a type-2 alkene, a chemical class that includes structurally related electrophilic environmental pollutants (e.g., acrolein) and endogenous mediators of cellular oxidative stress (e.g., 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal). Members of this chemical family produce toxicity via a common molecular mechanism. Although individual environmental concentrations might not be toxicologically relevant, exposure to an ambient mixture of type-2 alkene pollutants could pose a significant risk to human health. Furthermore, environmentally derived type-2 alkenes might act synergistically with endogenously generated unsaturated aldehydes to amplify cellular damage and thereby accelerate human disease/injury processes that involve oxidative stress. These possibilities have substantial implications for environmental risk assessment and were realized through an understanding of ACR adduct chemistry. The approach delineated here can be broadly applied because many toxicants of different chemical classes are electrophiles that produce toxicity by interacting with cellular proteins.

  14. Molecular Electron Density Theory: A Modern View of Reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Luis R

    2016-09-30

    A new theory for the study of the reactivity in Organic Chemistry, named Molecular Electron Density Theory (MEDT), is proposed herein. MEDT is based on the idea that while the electron density distribution at the ground state is responsible for physical and chemical molecular properties, as proposed by the Density Functional Theory (DFT), the capability for changes in electron density is responsible for molecular reactivity. Within MEDT, the reactivity in Organic Chemistry is studied through a rigorous quantum chemical analysis of the changes of the electron density as well as the energies associated with these changes along the reaction path in order to understand experimental outcomes. Studies performed using MEDT allow establishing a modern rationalisation and to gain insight into molecular mechanisms and reactivity in Organic Chemistry.

  15. A Research Module for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory: Multistep Synthesis of a Fluorous Dye Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Michael C; Raker, Jeffrey R; Kobilka, Brandon; Pohl, Nicola L B

    2014-01-14

    A multi-session research-like module has been developed for use in the undergraduate organic teaching laboratory curriculum. Students are tasked with planning and executing the synthesis of a novel fluorous dye molecule and using it to explore a fluorous affinity chromatography separation technique, which is the first implementation of this technique in a teaching laboratory. Key elements of the project include gradually introducing students to the use of the chemical literature to facilitate their searching, as well as deliberate constraints designed to force them to think critically about reaction design and optimization in organic chemistry. The project also introduces students to some advanced laboratory practices such as Schlenk techniques, degassing of reaction mixtures, affinity chromatography, and microwave-assisted chemistry. This provides students a teaching laboratory experience that closely mirrors authentic synthetic organic chemistry practice in laboratories throughout the world.

  16. Design, Development, and Psychometric Analysis of a General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry Topic Inventory Based on the Identified Main Chemistry Topics Relevant to Nursing Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Corina E.

    2013-01-01

    This two-stage study focused on the undergraduate nursing course that covers topics in general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry. In the first stage, the central objective was to identify the main concepts of GOB chemistry relevant to the clinical practice of nursing. The collection of data was based on open-ended interviews of both nursing…

  17. Using Structure-Based Organic Chemistry Online Tutorials with 2 Automated Correction for Student Practice and Review

    OpenAIRE

    O'Sullivan, Timothy; Hargaden, Grainne

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of an open-access organic chemistry question bank for online tutorials and assessments at University College Cork and Dublin Institute of Technology. SOCOT (structure-based organic chemistry online tutorials) may be used to supplement traditional small-group tutorials, thereby allowing students to develop essential problem-solving skills in organic chemistry. This online approach may be used for both formative and summative assessment....

  18. mu SR in Organic and Free Radical Chemistry

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Experiment SC82 was begun as a simple attempt to substitute positive muons into polymer molecules, and thereby to use the @mSR technique to study the mechanical relaxation of the different molecular groups. \\\\ \\\\ The experiment has since developed in several directions and has produced a wealth of information on the properties of muonic molecules, and adequately demonstrated the potential of @mSR as applied to molecular physics and chemistry. Physics aspects are now covered by a new experiment code SC95.\\\\ \\\\ The present experiment includes studies where the position occupied by the muon in the molecule (or crystal lattice) is readily established and the @mSR signal is exploited to reveal the intrinsic properties of the material. In this respect the @mSR techniques may be regarded simply as an experimental tool to probe the molecular behaviour of a chemical system. \\\\ \\\\ Two main classes of application include the measurement of isotope effects, where differences between muonic and corresponding photonic radi...

  19. Volatile organic compound ratios as probes of halogen atom chemistry in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Shepson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compound concentration ratios can be used as indicators of halogen chemistry that occurs during ozone depletion events in the Arctic during spring. Here we use a combination of modeling and measurements of [acetone]/[propanal] as an indicator of bromine chemistry, and [isobutane]/[n-butane] and [methyl ethyl ketone]/[n-butane] are used to study the extent of chlorine chemistry during four ozone depletion events during the Polar Sunrise Experiment of 1995. Using a 0-D photochemistry model in which the input of halogen atoms is controlled and varied, the approximate ratio of [Br]/[Cl] can be estimated for each ozone depletion event. It is concluded that there must be an additional source of propanal (likely from the snowpack to correctly simulate the VOC chemistry of the Arctic, and further evidence that the ratio of Br atoms to Cl atoms can vary greatly during ozone depletion events is presented.

  20. An Enzyme Kinetics Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Robert J.; Olsen, Julie A.; Giles, Greta A.

    2010-01-01

    An experiment using [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopy to observe the kinetics of the acylase 1-catalyzed hydrolysis of "N"-acetyl-DL-methionine has been developed for the organic laboratory. The L-enantiomer of the reactant is hydrolyzed completely in less than 2 h, and [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopic data from a single sample can be worked up…

  1. Culturing Reality: How Organic Chemistry Graduate Students Develop into Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Bodner, George M.

    2014-01-01

    Although one of the presumed aims of graduate training programs is to help students develop into practitioners of their chosen fields, very little is known about how this transition occurs. In the course of studying how graduate students learn to solve organic synthesis problems, we were able to identify some of the key factors in the epistemic…

  2. Geochemistry and Organic Chemistry on the Surface of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunine, J. I.; Beauchamp, P.; Beauchamp, J.; Dougherty, D.; Welch, C.; Raulin, F.; Shapiro, R.; Smith, M.

    2001-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere produces a wealth of organic products from methane and nitrogen. These products, deposited on the surface in liquid and solid form, may interact with surface ices and energy sources to produce compounds of exobiological interest. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Sunflower breeding for resistance to abiotic stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Škorić D.

    2009-01-01

    Due to a specific structure of its main organs (root, stem, leaves, head), sunflower can be successfully grown on marginal soils and in semi-arid conditions and it is more resistant to abiotic stresses than other field crops. In sunflower breeding for resistance to abiotic stresses, the greatest progress has been made in selection for drought resistance. Breeders use over 30 different parameters in sunflower screening for drought resistance, with physiological ones being the predominant type....

  4. Do organic surface films on sea salt aerosols influence atmospheric chemistry? ─ a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. von Glasow

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Organic material from the ocean's surface can be incorporated into sea salt aerosol particles often producing a surface film on the aerosol. Such an organic coating can reduce the mass transfer between the gas phase and the aerosol phase influencing sea salt chemistry in the marine atmosphere. To investigate these effects and their importance for the marine boundary layer (MBL we used the one-dimensional numerical model MISTRA. We considered the uncertainties regarding the magnitude of uptake reduction, the concentrations of organic compounds in sea salt aerosols and the oxidation rate of the organics to analyse the possible influence of organic surfactants on gas and liquid phase chemistry with a special focus on halogen chemistry. By assuming destruction rates for the organic coating based on laboratory measurements we get a rapid destruction of the organic monolayer within the first meters of the MBL. Larger organic initial concentrations lead to a longer lifetime of the coating but lead also to an unrealistically strong decrease of O3 concentrations as the organic film is destroyed by reaction with O3. The lifetime of the film is increased by assuming smaller reactive uptake coefficients for O3 or by assuming that a part of the organic surfactants react with OH. With regard to tropospheric chemistry we found that gas phase concentrations for chlorine and bromine species decreased due to the decreased mass transfer between gas phase and aerosol phase. Aqueous phase chlorine concentrations also decreased but aqueous phase bromine concentrations increased. Differences for gas phase concentrations are in general smaller than for liquid phase concentrations. The effect on gas phase NO2 or NO is very small (reduction less than 5% whereas liquid phase NO2 concentrations increased in some cases by nearly 100%. We list suggestions for further laboratory studies which are needed for improved model studies.

  5. Organic Chemistry: From the Interstellar Medium to the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Scott; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This talk will review the various types of organic materials observed in different environments in the interstellar medium, discuss the processes by which these materials may have formed and been modified, and present the evidence supporting the contention that at least a fraction of this material survived incorporation, substantially unaltered, into our Solar System during its formation. The nature of this organic material is of direct interest to issues associated with the origin of life, both because this material represents a large fraction of the Solar System inventory of the biogenically-important elements, and because many of the compounds in this inventory have biogenic implications. Several specific examples of such molecules will be briefly discussed.

  6. Flow Electrolysis Cells for the Synthetic Organic Chemistry Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletcher, Derek; Green, Robert A; Brown, Richard C D

    2017-09-18

    Electrosynthesis has much to offer to the synthetic organic chemist. But in order to be widely accepted as a routine procedure in an organic synthesis laboratory, electrosynthesis needs to be presented in a much more user-friendly way. The literature is largely based on electrolysis in a glass beaker or H-cells that often give poor performance for synthesis with a very slow rate of conversion and, often, low selectivity and reproducibility. Flow cells can lead to much improved performance. Electrolysis is participating in the trend toward continuous flow synthesis, and this has led to a number of innovations in flow cell design that make possible selective syntheses with high conversion of reactant to product with a single passage of the reactant solution through the cell. In addition, the needs of the synthetic organic chemist can often be met by flow cells operating with recycle of the reactant solution. These cells give a high rate of product formation while the reactant concentration is high, but they perform best at low conversion. Both approaches are considered in this review and the important features of each cell design are discussed. Throughout, the application of the cell designs is illustrated with syntheses that have been reported.

  7. Supramolecular chemistry: from molecular information towards self-organization and complex matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2004-01-01

    Molecular chemistry has developed a wide range of very powerful procedures for constructing ever more sophisticated molecules from atoms linked by covalent bonds. Beyond molecular chemistry lies supramolecular chemistry, which aims at developing highly complex chemical systems from components interacting via non-covalent intermolecular forces. By the appropriate manipulation of these interactions, supramolecular chemistry became progressively the chemistry of molecular information, involving the storage of information at the molecular level, in the structural features, and its retrieval, transfer, and processing at the supramolecular level, through molecular recognition processes operating via specific interactional algorithms. This has paved the way towards apprehending chemistry also as an information science. Numerous receptors capable of recognizing, i.e. selectively binding, specific substrates have been developed, based on the molecular information stored in the interacting species. Suitably functionalized receptors may perform supramolecular catalysis and selective transport processes. In combination with polymolecular organization, recognition opens ways towards the design of molecular and supramolecular devices based on functional (photoactive, electroactive, ionoactive, etc) components. A step beyond preorganization consists in the design of systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components. Self-organization processes, directed by the molecular information stored in the components and read out at the supramolecular level through specific interactions, represent the operation of programmed chemical systems. They have been implemented for the generation of a variety of discrete functional architectures of either organic or inorganic nature. Self-organization processes also give access to advanced supramolecular materials, such as

  8. Correlation of Preadmission Organic Chemistry Courses and Academic Performance in Biochemistry at a Midwest Chiropractic Doctoral Program*

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Marc P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Organic chemistry has been shown to correlate with academic success in the preclinical years of medicine, dentistry, and graduate physiology. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between undergraduate organic chemistry grades and first-semester biochemistry grades at a Midwest chiropractic doctoral program. Methods: Students enrolled in a first-semester biochemistry course who had completed the prerequisite courses in organic chemistry offered at this same institution were entered into the study. The total grade for each of the three courses was calculated using the midterm and final exam raw scores with a weighting of 50% each. Analysis consisted of obtaining correlation coefficients between the total grades of organic 1 with biochemistry and organic 2 with biochemistry. Using the biochemistry total grade, the students were divided into quartiles and course grades for both organic chemistry 1 and 2 were calculated. Results: For the 109 students in the study, the correlation coefficient between the biochemistry and organic chemistry 1 and biochemistry and organic chemistry 2 courses was r = 0.744 and r = 0.725, respectively. The difference in organic chemistry grades between those in the first and fourth quartiles was 63.2% and 86.9% for organic chemistry 1 (p academic success in a chiropractic biochemistry course. Knowledge of such a relationship could prove useful to identify students who may potentially run into academic difficulty with first-year biochemistry PMID:20480012

  9. Using Green Chemistry Principles as a Framework to Incorporate Research into the Organic Laboratory Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy E.; Gurney, Rich; Soltzberg, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Despite the accepted pedagogical value of integrating research into the laboratory curriculum, this approach has not been widely adopted. The activation barrier to this change is high, especially in organic chemistry, where a large number of students are required to take this course, special glassware or setups may be needed, and dangerous…

  10. Adapting to Student Learning Styles: Engaging Students with Cell Phone Technology in Organic Chemistry Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursell, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Students of organic chemistry traditionally make 3 x 5 in. flash cards to assist learning nomenclature, structures, and reactions. Advances in educational technology have enabled flash cards to be viewed on computers, offering an endless array of drilling and feedback for students. The current generation of students is less inclined to use…

  11. A Learning-Cycle-Based Organic Chemistry Laboratory Program for Students in Dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, William J.

    1982-01-01

    The laboratory of an organic chemistry course for dietetics students is based on the learning cycle approach (exploration, invention-concept introduction, and concept application). The laboratory program is divided into four sections: lab techniques, compound types, reaction types, and reaction characteristics. (SK)

  12. Computer-Assisted Instruction in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry: Design, Application, and Evaluation. Technical Report 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, George

    The computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program in undergraduate organic chemistry at the University of Texas was evaluated by an experimental design in 1969 and found to be successful. This report discusses in detail the formation of the design, its application, and the method of evaluation. The program itself included 15 teaching modules that…

  13. Using Biocatalysis to Integrate Organic Chemistry into a Molecular Biology Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Mande; Archer, Crystal; Feske, Brent D.; Mateer, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Current cutting-edge biomedical investigation requires that the researcher have an operational understanding of several diverse disciplines. Biocatalysis is a field of science that operates at the crossroads of organic chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology, and provides an excellent model for interdisciplinary research. We…

  14. Minimal Impact of Organic Chemistry Prerequisite on Student Performance in Introductory Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robin; Cotner, Sehoya; Winkel, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Curriculum design assumes that successful completion of prerequisite courses will have a positive impact on student performance in courses that require the prerequisite. We recently had the opportunity to test this assumption concerning the relationship between completion of the organic chemistry prerequisite and performance in introductory…

  15. The Role of Spatial Ability and Strategy Preference for Spatial Problem Solving in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieff, Mike; Ryu, Minjung; Dixon, Bonnie; Hegarty, Mary

    2012-01-01

    In organic chemistry, spatial reasoning is critical for reasoning about spatial relationships in three dimensions and representing spatial information in diagrams. Despite its importance, little is known about the underlying cognitive components of spatial reasoning and the strategies that students employ to solve spatial problems in organic…

  16. 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Development of the Olefin Metathesis Method in Organic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P.

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded "for the development of the metathesis method in organic synthesis". The discoveries of the laureates provided a chemical reaction used daily in the chemical industry for the efficient and more environmentally friendly production of important pharmaceuticals, fuels, synthetic fibers, and many other…

  17. A Survey of the Practices, Procedures, and Techniques in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Teaching Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher B.; Schmidt, Monica; Soniat, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A survey was conducted of four-year institutions that teach undergraduate organic chemistry laboratories in the United States. The data include results from over 130 schools, describes the current practices at these institutions, and discusses the statistical results such as the scale of the laboratories performed, the chemical techniques applied,…

  18. Engaging Organic Chemistry Students Using ChemDraw for iPad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsch, Layne A.; Lewis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Drawing structures, mechanisms, and syntheses is a vital part of success in organic chemistry courses. ChemDraw for iPad has been used to increase classroom experiences in the preparation of high quality chemical drawings. The embedded Flick-to-Share allows for simple, real-time exchange of ChemDraw documents. ChemDraw for iPad also allows…

  19. The Relationship of Test Performance to ISDP Rating in Organic Chemistry Texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Young; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes the Instructional Strategy Diagnostic Profile (ISDP)--an analytic tool that facilitates the evaluation and revision of existing instruction and the design of new instruction--and recounts its use in comparing two textbooks to determine the most appropriate for an organic chemistry course. (JEG)

  20. Development and Use of Online Prelaboratory Activities in Organic Chemistry to Improve Students' Laboratory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaytor, Jennifer L.; Al Mughalaq, Mohammad; Butler, Hailee

    2017-01-01

    Online prelaboratory videos and quizzes were prepared for all experiments in CHEM 231, Organic Chemistry I Laboratory. It was anticipated that watching the videos would help students be better prepared for the laboratory, decrease their anxiety surrounding the laboratory, and increase their understanding of the theories and concepts presented.…

  1. A New Higher Education Curriculum in Organic Chemistry: What Questions Should Be Asked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarge, David L.; Morge, Ludovic M.; Méheut, Martine M.

    2014-01-01

    Organic chemistry is often considered to be a difficult subject to teach and to learn, particularly as students prefer to resort to memorization alone rather than reasoning using models from chemical reactivity. Existing studies have led us to suggest principles for redefining the curriculum, ranging from its overall structure to the tasks given…

  2. A Performance Enhanced Interactive Learning Workshop Model as a Supplement for Organic Chemistry Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Karen E. S.; Grose-Fifer, Jilliam

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors describe a Performance Enhanced Interactive Learning (PEIL) workshop model as a supplement for organic chemistry instruction. This workshop model differs from many others in that it includes public presentations by students and other whole-class-discussion components that have not been thoroughly investigated in the…

  3. Formalizing the First Day in an Organic Chemistry Laboratory Using a Studio-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Christina G.; Cody, Jeremy; Smith, Darren; Swartzenberg, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    A novel studio-based lab module that incorporates student-centered activities was designed and implemented to introduce second-year undergraduate students to the first-semester organic chemistry laboratory. The "First Day" studio module incorporates learning objectives for the course, lab safety, and keeping a professional lab notebook.

  4. Gender Fair Efficacy of Concept Mapping Tests in Identifying Students' Difficulties in High School Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafoor, Kunnathodi Abdul; Shilna, V.

    2014-01-01

    In view of the perceived difficulty of organic chemistry unit for high schools students, this study examined the usefulness of concept mapping as a testing device to assess students' difficulty in the select areas. Since many tests used for identifying students misconceptions and difficulties in school subjects are observed to favour one or the…

  5. Students' Perceptions of a Project-Based Organic Chemistry Laboratory Environment: A Phenomenographic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Nikita L.; Nowak, Montana K.; Mooring, Suazette R.

    2017-01-01

    Students can perceive the laboratory environment in a variety of ways that can affect what they take away from the laboratory course. This qualitative study characterizes undergraduate students' perspectives of a project-based Organic Chemistry laboratory using the theoretical framework of phenomenography. Eighteen participants were interviewed in…

  6. Students' Interpretations of Mechanistic Language in Organic Chemistry before Learning Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Stoyanovich, Carlee; Flynn, Alison B.

    2017-01-01

    Research on mechanistic thinking in organic chemistry has shown that students attribute little meaning to the electron-pushing (i.e., curved arrow) formalism. At the University of Ottawa, a new curriculum has been developed in which students are taught the electron-pushing formalism prior to instruction on specific reactions--this formalism is…

  7. Using Web-Based Video as an Assessment Tool for Student Performance in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, John; Bodek, Matthew; Fredricks, Susan; Dudkin, Elizabeth; Kistler, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    This article shows the potential for using video responses to specific questions as part of the assessment process in an organic chemistry class. These exercises have been used with a postbaccalaureate cohort of 40 students, learning in an online environment, over a period of four years. A second cohort of 25 second-year students taking the…

  8. The Flipped Classroom for Teaching Organic Chemistry in Small Classes: Is It Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fautch, Jessica M.

    2015-01-01

    The flipped classroom is a pedagogical approach that moves course content from the classroom to homework, and uses class time for engaging activities and instructor-guided problem solving. The course content in a sophomore level Organic Chemistry I course was assigned as homework using video lectures, followed by a short online quiz. In class,…

  9. A Historical Analysis of the Curriculum of Organic Chemistry Using ACS Exams as Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raker, Jeffrey R.; Holme, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Standardized examinations, such as those developed and disseminated by the ACS Examinations Institute, are artifacts of the teaching of a course and over time may provide a historical perspective on how curricula have changed and evolved. This study investigated changes in organic chemistry curricula across a 60-year period by evaluating 18 ACS…

  10. Effectiveness of E-Content Package on Teaching IUPAC Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry at Undergraduate Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendiran, G.; Vakkil, M.

    2017-01-01

    This study attempts to discover the effectiveness of an e-content package when teaching IUPAC nomenclature of organic chemistry at the undergraduate level. The study consisted of a Pre-test-Post-test Non Equivalent Groups Design, and the sample of 71 (n = 71) students were drawn from two colleges. The overall study was divided into two groups, an…

  11. Independent Synthesis Projects in the Organic Chemistry Teaching Laboratories: Bridging the Gap between Student and Researcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Valerie A.; Kendall, Beatrice Lin

    2017-01-01

    Science educators strive to teach students how to be well-rounded scientists with the ability to problem solve, anticipate errors, and adapt to unexpected roadblocks. Traditional organic chemistry experiments seldom teach these skills, no matter how novel or contemporary the subject material. This paper reports on the success of a quarter-long…

  12. A Guided Inquiry Liquid/Liquid Extractions Laboratory for Introductory Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raydo, Margaret L.; Church, Megan S.; Taylor, Zane W.; Taylor, Christopher E.; Danowitz, Amy M.

    2015-01-01

    A guided inquiry laboratory experiment for teaching liquid/liquid extractions to first semester undergraduate organic chemistry students is described. This laboratory is particularly useful for introductory students as the analytes that are separated are highly colored dye molecules. This allows students to track into which phase each analyte…

  13. Grade/Study-Performance Contracts, Enhanced Communication, Cooperative Learning, and Student Performance in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Ralph C.

    1997-01-01

    Describes and evaluates a teaching strategy, designed to increase student retention while maintaining academic performance levels in undergraduate organic chemistry, that uses grade/study-performance contracts, enhanced communication using electronic mail, and cooperative learning. Concludes that a series of interventions can substantially…

  14. Visualizing Molecular Chirality in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory Using Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Maia; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Hartley, C. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Although stereochemistry is an important topic in second-year undergraduate organic chemistry, there are limited options for laboratory activities that allow direct visualization of macroscopic chiral phenomena. A novel, guided-inquiry experiment was developed that allows students to explore chirality in the context of cholesteric liquid crystals.…

  15. Green Oxidation of Menthol Enantiomers and Analysis by Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy: An Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, H. Cristina; Donohoe, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Green chemistry addresses environmental concerns associated with chemical processes and increases awareness of possible harmful effects of chemical reagents. Efficient reactions that eliminate or reduce the use of organic solvents or toxic reagents are increasingly available. A two-week experiment is reported that entails the calcium hypochlorite…

  16. Solvent-Free Wittig Reaction: A Green Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Sam H.; Angel, Stephen A.

    2004-01-01

    Some Wittig reactions can be carried out by grinding the reactants in a mortar with a pestle for about 20 minutes, as per investigation. A laboratory experiment involving a solvent-free Wittig reaction that can be completed in a three-hour sophomore organic chemistry laboratory class period, are developed.

  17. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  18. Microwave-Assisted Chemistry: Synthetic Applications for Rapid Assembly of Nanomaterials and Organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The magic of microwave (MW) heating technique, termed as the Bunsen burner of the 21th Century, has emerged as valuable alternative in synthesis of organics, polymers, inorganics, and nanomaterials. Important innovations in MW-assisted chemistry now enable chemists to prepare cat...

  19. Interdisciplinary Learning for Chemical Engineering Students from Organic Chemistry Synthesis Lab to Reactor Design to Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Matt; Comitz, Richard L.; Biaglow, Andrew; Lachance, Russ; Sloop, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach to the Chemical Engineering curriculum sequence of courses at West Point enabled our students to experience a much more realistic design process, which more closely replicated a real world scenario. Students conduct the synthesis in the organic chemistry lab, then conduct computer modeling of the reaction with ChemCad and…

  20. Searching for Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptides: An Experiment for Organic Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Thomas E., Jr.; Saldan~a, Cristina; Muzikar, Katy A.; Mashek, Debra; Liu, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    This laboratory experiment provides undergraduate students enrolled in organic chemistry the opportunity to design and synthesize their own peptide, which is then tested for antimicrobial activity. After reading a primary scientific paper on antimicrobial peptides, students design and synthesize their own hexapeptide that they hypothesize will…

  1. Fascinating chemistry or frustrating unpredictability : Observations in crystal engineering of metal–organic frameworks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goesten, M.G.; Kapteijn, F.; Gascon, J.

    2013-01-01

    Reticular design is a highly attractive concept, but coordination chemistry around the tectonic units of metal– organic frameworks (MOFs) and additional interplay with anionic and solvent species provide for dazzling complexity that effectively rules out structure prediction. We can however study

  2. Transforming the Organic Chemistry Lab Experience: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of Reformed Experimental Activities--REActivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Christina G.; Kim, Thomas; Cody, Jeremy; Anderson, Jason; Edelbach, Brian; Marmor, William; Kipsang, Rodgers; Ayotte, Charles; Saviola, Daniel; Niziol, Justin

    2018-01-01

    Reformed experimental activities (REActivities) are an innovative approach to the delivery of the traditional material in an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. A description of the design and implementation of REActivities at both a four- and two-year institution is discussed. The results obtained using a reformed teaching observational…

  3. Student Perceptions of Online Homework Use for Formative Assessment of Learning in Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards-Babb, Michelle; Curtis, Reagan; Georgieva, Zomitsa; Penn, John H

    2015-11-10

    Use of online homework as a formative assessment tool for organic chemistry coursework was examined. Student perceptions of online homework in terms of (i) its ranking relative to other course aspects, (ii) their learning of organic chemistry, and (iii) whether it improved their study habits and how students used it as a learning tool were investigated. Our students perceived the online homework as one of the more useful course aspects for learning organic chemistry content. We found a moderate and statistically significant correlation between online homework performance and final grade. Gender as a variable was ruled out since significant gender differences in overall attitude toward online homework use and course success rates were not found. Our students expressed relatively positive attitudes toward use of online homework with a majority indicating improved study habits (e.g., study in a more consistent manner). Our students used a variety of resources to remediate incorrect responses (e.g., class materials, general online materials, and help from others). However, 39% of our students admitted to guessing at times, instead of working to remediate incorrect responses. In large enrollment organic chemistry courses, online homework may act to bridge the student-instructor gap by providing students with a supportive mechanism for regulated learning of content.

  4. Using the Cambridge Structural Database to Teach Molecular Geometry Concepts in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackerly, Jay Wm.; Janowicz, Philip A.; Ritchey, Joshua A.; Caruso, Mary M.; Elliott, Erin L.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports a set of two homework assignments that can be used in a second-year undergraduate organic chemistry class. These assignments were designed to help reinforce concepts of molecular geometry and to give students the opportunity to use a technological database and data mining to analyze experimentally determined chemical…

  5. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  6. Tholins - Organic chemistry of interstellar grains and gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.; Khare, B. N.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses tholins, defined as complex organic solids formed by the interaction of energy - for example, UV light or spark discharge - with various mixtures of cosmically abundant gases - CH4, C2H6, NH3, H2O, HCHO, and H2S. It is suggested that tholins occur in the interstellar medium and are responsible for some of the properties of the interstellar grains and gas. Additional occurrences of tholins are considered. Tholins have been produced experimentally; 50 or so pyrolytic fragments of the brown, sometimes sticky substances have been identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the incidence of these fragments in tholins produced by different procedures is reported.

  7. Microwave Assisted Organic Synthesis of Heterocycles in Aqueous Media: Recent Advances in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frecentese, Francesco; Saccone, Irene; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Corvino, Angela; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Magli, Elisa; Perissutti, Elisa; Severino, Beatrice; Santagada, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Green chemistry is a discipline of great interest in medicinal chemistry. It involves all fields of chemistry and it is based on the principle to conduct chemical reactions protecting the environment at the same time, through the use of chemical procedures able to avoid pollution. In this context, water as solvent is a good choice because it is abundant, nontoxic, non-caustic, and non-combustible. Even if microwave assisted organic reactions in conventional solvents have quickly progressed, in the recent years medicinal chemists have focused their attention to processes deemed not dangerous for the environment, using nanotechnology and greener solvents as water. Several reports of reaction optimizations and selectivities, demonstrating the capability of microwave to allow the obtaining of increased yields have been recently published using water as solvent. In this review, we selected the available knowledge related to microwave assisted organic synthesis in aqueous medium, furnishing examples of the newest strategies to obtain useful scaffolds and novel derivatives for medicinal chemistry purposes. The intention of this review is to demonstrate the exclusive ability of MAOS in water as solvent or as co-solvent. For this purpose we report here the most representative applications of MAOS using water as solvent, focusing on medicinal chemistry processes leading to interesting nitrogen containing heterocycles with potential pharmaceutical applications.

  8. Apoc Social: A Mobile Interactive and Social Learning Platform for Collaborative Solving of Advanced Problems in Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievertsen, Niels; Carreira, Erick M

    2018-02-01

    Mobile devices such as smartphones are carried in the pockets of university students around the globe and are increasingly cheap to come by. These portable devices have evolved into powerful and interconnected handheld computers, which, among other applications, can be used as advanced learning tools and providers of targeted, curated content. Herein, we describe Apoc Social (Advanced Problems in Organic Chemistry Social), a mobile application that assists both learning and teaching college-level organic chemistry both in the classroom and on the go. With more than 750 chemistry exercises available, Apoc Social facilitates collaborative learning through discussion boards and fosters enthusiasm for complex organic chemistry.

  9. Spicing Things up by Adding Color and Relieving Pain: The Use of "Napoleon's Buttons" in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucholtz, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    For some students, organic chemistry can be a distant subject and unrelated to any courses they have seen in their college careers. To develop a more contextual learning experience in organic chemistry, an additional text, "Napoleon's Buttons: 17 Molecules That Changed History," by Penny Le Couteur and Jay Burreson, was incorporated as a…

  10. Using Commercially Available Techniques to Make Organic Chemistry Representations Tactile and More Accessible to Students with Blindness or Low Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supalo, Cary A.; Kennedy, Sean H.

    2014-01-01

    Organic chemistry courses can present major obstacles to access for students with blindness or low vision (BLV). In recent years, efforts have been made to represent organic chemistry concepts in tactile forms for blind students. These methodologies are described in this manuscript. Further work being done at Illinois State University is also…

  11. Implementation of picoSpin Benchtop NMR Instruments into Organic Chemistry Teaching Laboratories through Spectral Analysis of Fischer Esterification Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yearty, Kasey L.; Sharp, Joseph T.; Meehan, Emma K.; Wallace, Doyle R.; Jackson, Douglas M.; Morrison, Richard W.

    2017-01-01

    [Superscript 1]H NMR analysis is an important analytical technique presented in introductory organic chemistry courses. NMR instrument access is limited for undergraduate organic chemistry students due to the size of the instrument, price of NMR solvents, and the maintenance level required for instrument upkeep. The University of Georgia Chemistry…

  12. Azeotropic Preparation of a "C"-Phenyl "N"-Aryl Imine: An Introductory Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Coyle, David J.; Cannon, Kevin C.; Mathers, Robert T.; Richards, Jeffrey A.; Tierney, John

    2016-01-01

    Imines are important in biological chemistry and as intermediates in organic synthesis. An experiment for introductory undergraduate organic chemistry is presented in which benzaldehyde was condensed with "p"-methoxyaniline in toluene to give 4-methoxy-"N"-(phenylmethylene)benzenamine. Water was removed by azeotropic…

  13. Perry's Scheme of Intellectual and Epistemological Development as a Framework for Describing Student Difficulties in Learning Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Nathaniel P.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated student difficulties with the learning of organic chemistry. Using Perry's Model of Intellectual Development as a framework revealed that organic chemistry students who function as dualistic thinkers struggle with the complexity of the subject matter. Understanding substitution/elimination reactions and multi-step syntheses is…

  14. The use of domestic microwave oven in experimental classes of organic chemistry: salicylaldehyde nitration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Eurides Francisco; Santos, Ana Paula Bernardo dos; Bastos, Renato Saldanha; Pinto, Angelo C.

    2010-01-01

    The use of microwave in chemistry has known benefits over conventional heating methods, e.g. reduced reaction times, chemical yield improvement and the possibility if reducing or eliminating the use of organic solvents. We describe herein a procedure for the nitration of salicylaldehyde in water using a domestic microwave oven, which can be used as an experiment in the undergraduate chemistry laboratory. The experiment involves safe and rapid preparation and identification of the position isomers by thin layer chromatography and 1 H NMR, or by their melting points. (author)

  15. Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Development of the Olefin Metathesis Method in Organic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P.

    2006-02-01

    The 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Yves Chauvin of the Institut Français du Pétrole, Robert H. Grubbs of CalTech, and Richard R. Schrock of MIT "for development of the metathesis method in organic synthesis". The discoveries of the laureates provided a chemical reaction now used daily in the chemical industry for the efficient and more environmentally friendly production of important pharmaceuticals, fuels, synthetic fibers, and many other products. This article tells the story of how olefin metathesis became a truly useful synthetic transformation and a triumph for mechanistic chemistry, and illustrates the importance of fundamental research. See JCE Featured Molecules .

  16. BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY REPORT - MARCH THROUGH MAY1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    1961-06-29

    The study of meteorite Murray has been reported in previous Quarterly Reports. This report gives further results with Murray, and information on another meteorite, Orgueil. A sample of Orgueil was sent from the Museum National d Histoire Naturelle, Paris. It fell in several pieces over an area of 2 square miles near Orgueil, France, in 1864. The elemental analysis of this meteorite is shown in Table 1. They extracted a 10.07-g sample of this meteorite with water, using the same procedure as that for Murray. The water extracted 1.32 g, which is at least twice as much material as was water-extracted from Murray. The elemental analysis of the water extract is given in Table II and its uv spectrum is shown in Figure 1. From an x-ray diffraction pattern it was determined that the water extract contained mostly MgSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O with some calcium sulfate. Their spectrum (Figure 2) shows a strong SO{sub 4} band at 1100 cm{sup -1}, = strong H{sub 2}O bands at 1650 cm{sup -1} and 3200-3600 cm{sup -1}, and some unidentified peaks at 2300, 1400, and 980 cm{sup -1}. The approximately 8 g of Orgueil left after the water extraction was then extracted with purified chloroform. Approximately 50 mg of yellow material was extracted. Its uv spectrum is shown in Figure 3 and is identical to the spectrum of elemental sulfur. Whatever else may be extracted from the meteorites by organic solvents, the uv spectra show only sulfur.

  17. Protection of the Abiotic Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, R.; Hutmacher, K. E.; Landfermann, H. H.

    2004-01-01

    Environmental protection against the dangers arising from ionizing radiation, radioactive materials, and other harmful substances is more than to avoid acute dangers or risks for humans or for non-human living organisms. To allow for a sustainable development the abiotic part of the environment must not be neglected in concepts of environmental protection. The environmental impact of some selected long-lived anthropogenic radionuclides is used to exemplify adverse effects for which a unified approach is needed. To this end, indicators are needed for the assessment of the human impact on the abiotic environment which allows to compare different human actions with respect to sustainability and to choose appropriate measures in the competition for a sustainable development. Such indicators have to account for the dynamics of the different environmental compartments. Using the long-lived radionuclides 14C, 36Cl, 85Kr, and 129I as examples, the importance to consider dynamical models and ecological lifetimes in quantifications of the human impact on the environment is emphasized. Particular problems arise from the natural occurrences and variability of radionuclides and other harmful substances. Suitable indicators for the assessment of human impact on the abiotic compartments air, water, and soil are discussed. (Author) 18 refs

  18. Delayed Reaction: The Tardy Embrace of Physical Organic Chemistry by the German Chemical Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weininger, Stephen J

    2018-02-01

    The emergence of physical organic chemistry, which focuses on the mechanisms and structures of organic reactions and molecules using the tools of physical chemistry, was a major development in twentieth-century chemistry. It first flourished in the interwar period, in the UK and then in the US. Germany, by contrast, did not embrace the field until almost a half century later. The great success of classical organic chemistry, especially in synthesis, encouraged indifference to the new field among German chemists, as did their inductivist research philosophy, as enunciated by Walter Hückel's ground-breaking textbook (1931). This author also resisted new concepts and representations, especially those of the American theoretician, Linus Pauling. The arrival of the Nazi regime reinforced such resistance. Postwar conditions initiated a reaction against this conservative, nationalistic attitude, especially in the American Occupation Zone. Exposure to American textbooks and visiting lecturers influenced attitudes of younger chemists. The accompanying shift towards a more explanatory, less hierarchical mode of pedagogy was consonant with larger social and political developments.

  19. 25th anniversary article: progress in chemistry and applications of functional indigos for organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głowacki, Eric Daniel; Voss, Gundula; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2013-12-17

    Indigo and its derivatives are dyes and pigments with a long and distinguished history in organic chemistry. Recently, applications of this 'old' structure as a functional organic building block for organic electronics applications have renewed interest in these molecules and their remarkable chemical and physical properties. Natural-origin indigos have been processed in fully bio-compatible field effect transistors, operating with ambipolar mobilities up to 0.5 cm(2) /Vs and air-stability. The synthetic derivative isoindigo has emerged as one of the most successful building-blocks for semiconducting polymers for plastic solar cells with efficiencies > 5%. Another isomer of indigo, epindolidione, has also been shown to be one of the best reported organic transistor materials in terms of mobility (∼2 cm(2) /Vs) and stability. This progress report aims to review very recent applications of indigoids in organic electronics, but especially to logically bridge together the hereto independent research directions on indigo, isoindigo, and other materials inspired by historical dye chemistry: a field which was the root of the development of modern chemistry in the first place. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Aqueous chemistry and its role in secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. B. Lim

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing understanding that secondary organic aerosol (SOA can form through reactions in atmospheric waters (i.e., clouds, fogs, and aerosol water. In clouds and wet aerosols, water-soluble organic products of gas-phase photochemistry dissolve into the aqueous phase where they can react further (e.g., with OH radicals to form low volatility products that are largely retained in the particle phase. Organic acids, oligomers and other products form via radical and non-radical reactions, including hemiacetal formation during droplet evaporation, acid/base catalysis, and reaction of organics with other constituents (e.g., NH4+.

    This paper provides an overview of SOA formation through aqueous chemistry, including atmospheric evidence for this process and a review of radical and non-radical chemistry, using glyoxal as a model precursor. Previously unreported analyses and new kinetic modeling are reported herein to support the discussion of radical chemistry. Results suggest that reactions with OH radicals tend to be faster and form more SOA than non-radical reactions. In clouds these reactions yield organic acids, whereas in wet aerosols they yield large multifunctional humic-like substances formed via radical-radical reactions and their O/C ratios are near 1.

  1. Separating the effects of organic matter-mineral interactions and organic matter chemistry on the sorption of diuron and phenanthrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahangar, Ahmad Gholamalizadeh; Smernik, Ronald J; Kookana, Rai S; Chittleborough, David J

    2008-06-01

    Even though it is well established that soil C content is the primary determinant of the sorption affinity of soils for non-ionic compounds, it is also clear that organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficients (K(OC)) vary considerably between soils. Two factors that may contribute to K(OC) variability are variations in organic matter chemistry between soils and interactions between organic matter and soil minerals. Here, we quantify these effects for two non-ionic sorbates-diuron and phenanthrene. The effect of organic matter-mineral interactions were evaluated by comparing K(OC) for demineralized (HF-treated) soils, with K(OC) for the corresponding whole soils. For diuron and phenanthrene, average ratios of K(OC) of the HF-treated soils to K(OC) of the whole soils were 2.5 and 2.3, respectively, indicating a substantial depression of K(OC) due to the presence of minerals in the whole soils. The effect of organic matter chemistry was determined by correlating K(OC) against distributions of C types determined using solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy. For diuron, K(OC) was positively correlated with aryl C and negatively correlated with O-alkyl C, for both whole and HF-treated soils, whereas for phenanthrene, these correlations were only present for the HF-treated soils. We suggest that the lack of a clear effect of organic matter chemistry on whole soil K(OC) for phenanthrene is due to an over-riding influence of organic matter-mineral interactions in this case. This hypothesis is supported by a correlation between the increase in K(OC) on HF-treatment and the soil clay content for phenanthrene, but not for diuron.

  2. #IHeartChemistryNCSU: Free Choice, Content, and Elements of Science Communication as the Framework for an Introductory Organic Chemistry Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohock, Bram H.; Winterrowd, Samantha T.; Gallardo-Williams, Maria T.

    2018-01-01

    Students in a large introductory organic chemistry class were given the freedom to choose an organic compound of interest and were challenged to develop an educational object (physical or digital) designed to be shared with the broader public via social media. Analysis of the project results shows that most students appreciated the open nature of…

  3. "No one does this for fun": Contextualization and process writing in an organic chemistry laboratory course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Andrea

    This study investigated the introduction of curriculum innovations into an introductory organic chemistry laboratory course. Pre-existing experiments in a traditional course were re-written in a broader societal context. Additionally, a new laboratory notebook methodology was introduced, using the Decision/Explanation/Observation/Inference (DEOI) format that required students to explicitly describe the purpose of procedural steps and the meanings of observations. Experts in organic chemistry, science writing, and chemistry education examined the revised curriculum and deemed it appropriate. The revised curriculum was introduced into two sections of organic chemistry laboratory at Columbia University. Field notes were taken during the course, students and teaching assistants were interviewed, and completed student laboratory reports were examined to ascertain the impact of the innovations. The contextualizations were appreciated for making the course more interesting; for lending a sense of purpose to the study of chemistry; and for aiding in students' learning. Both experts and students described a preference for more extensive connections between the experiment content and the introduced context. Generally, students preferred the DEOI method to journal-style laboratory reports believing it to be more efficient and more focused on thinking than stylistic formalities. The students claimed that the DEOI method aided their understanding of the experiments and helped scaffold their thinking, though some students thought that the method was over-structured and disliked the required pre-laboratory work. The method was used in two distinct manners; recursively writing and revising as intended and concept contemplation only after experiment completion. The recursive use may have been influenced by TA attitudes towards the revisions and seemed to engender a sense of preparedness. Students' engagement with the contextualizations and the DEOI method highlight the need for

  4. Modelling iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol: Contributions of inorganic and organic iodine chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pechtl

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The speciation of iodine in atmospheric aerosol is currently poorly understood. Models predict negligible iodide concentrations but accumulation of iodate in aerosol, both of which is not confirmed by recent measurements. We present an updated aqueous phase iodine chemistry scheme for use in atmospheric chemistry models and discuss sensitivity studies with the marine boundary layer model MISTRA. These studies show that iodate can be reduced in acidic aerosol by inorganic reactions, i.e., iodate does not necessarily accumulate in particles. Furthermore, the transformation of particulate iodide to volatile iodine species likely has been overestimated in previous model studies due to negligence of collision-induced upper limits for the reaction rates. However, inorganic reaction cycles still do not seem to be sufficient to reproduce the observed range of iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol. Therefore, we also investigate the effects of the recently suggested reaction of HOI with dissolved organic matter to produce iodide. If this reaction is fast enough to compete with the inorganic mechanism, it would not only directly lead to enhanced iodide concentrations but, indirectly via speed-up of the inorganic iodate reduction cycles, also to a decrease in iodate concentrations. Hence, according to our model studies, organic iodine chemistry, combined with inorganic reaction cycles, is able to reproduce observations. The presented chemistry cycles are highly dependent on pH and thus offer an explanation for the large observed variability of the iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol.

  5. Redox chemistry and natural organic matter (NOM): Geochemists' dream, analytical chemists' nightmare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macalady, Donald L.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is an inherently complex mixture of polyfunctional organic molecules. Because of their universality and chemical reversibility, oxidation/reductions (redox) reactions of NOM have an especially interesting and important role in geochemistry. Variabilities in NOM composition and chemistry make studies of its redox chemistry particularly challenging, and details of NOM-mediated redox reactions are only partially understood. This is in large part due to the analytical difficulties associated with NOM characterization and the wide range of reagents and experimental systems used to study NOM redox reactions. This chapter provides a summary of the ongoing efforts to provide a coherent comprehension of aqueous redox chemistry involving NOM and of techniques for chemical characterization of NOM. It also describes some attempts to confirm the roles of different structural moieties in redox reactions. In addition, we discuss some of the operational parameters used to describe NOM redox capacities and redox states, and describe nomenclature of NOM redox chemistry. Several relatively facile experimental methods applicable to predictions of the NOM redox activity and redox states of NOM samples are discussed, with special attention to the proposed use of fluorescence spectroscopy to predict relevant redox characteristics of NOM samples.

  6. Abiotic tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Bongjun; Sain, Trisha; Lacevic, Naida; Bukharina, Daria; Cha, Sang-Ho; Waas, Anthony M.; Arruda, Ellen M.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2017-03-01

    Tooth enamel comprises parallel microscale and nanoscale ceramic columns or prisms interlaced with a soft protein matrix. This structural motif is unusually consistent across all species from all geological eras. Such invariability—especially when juxtaposed with the diversity of other tissues—suggests the existence of a functional basis. Here we performed ex vivo replication of enamel-inspired columnar nanocomposites by sequential growth of zinc oxide nanowire carpets followed by layer-by-layer deposition of a polymeric matrix around these. We show that the mechanical properties of these nanocomposites, including hardness, are comparable to those of enamel despite the nanocomposites having a smaller hard-phase content. Our abiotic enamels have viscoelastic figures of merit (VFOM) and weight-adjusted VFOM that are similar to, or higher than, those of natural tooth enamels—we achieve values that exceed the traditional materials limits of 0.6 and 0.8, respectively. VFOM values describe resistance to vibrational damage, and our columnar composites demonstrate that light-weight materials of unusually high resistance to structural damage from shocks, environmental vibrations and oscillatory stress can be made using biomimetic design. The previously inaccessible combinations of high stiffness, damping and light weight that we achieve in these layer-by-layer composites are attributed to efficient energy dissipation in the interfacial portion of the organic phase. The in vivo contribution of this interfacial portion to macroscale deformations along the tooth’s normal is maximized when the architecture is columnar, suggesting an evolutionary advantage of the columnar motif in the enamel of living species. We expect our findings to apply to all columnar composites and to lead to the development of high-performance load-bearing materials.

  7. Detection of Organics at Mars: How Wet Chemistry Onboard SAM Helps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, A.; Freissinet, Caroline; Szopa, C.; Glavin, D.; Coll, P.; Cabane, M.; Eigenbrode, J.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Coscia, D.; Teinturier, S.; hide

    2013-01-01

    For the first time in the history of space exploration, a mission of interest to astrobiology could be able to analyze refractory organic compounds in the soil of Mars. Wet chemistry experiment allow organic components to be altered in such a way that improves there detection either by releasing the compounds from sample matricies or by changing the chemical structure to be amenable to analytical conditions. The latter is particular important when polar compounds are present. Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM), on the Curiosity rover of the Mars Science Laboratory mission, has onboard two wet chemistry experiments: derivatization and thermochemolysis. Here we report on the nature of the MTBSTFA derivatization experiment on SAM, the detection of MTBSTFA in initial SAM results, and the implications of this detection.

  8. Handbook of heterocyclic chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katritzky, Alan R

    2010-01-01

    ... Heterocyclic Chemistry I (1984) Comprehensive Heterocyclic Chemistry II (1996) Comprehensive Heterocyclic Chemistry III (2008) Comprehensive Organic Functional Group Transformations I (1995) Compreh...

  9. Column chromatography with almecega resin: a project for experimental organic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira Junior, Gerardo Magela; Carvalho, Adonias Almeida; Gonzaga, Wellington de Abreu; Chaves, Mariana H.

    2007-01-01

    The use of natural products to demonstrate the silica gel column chromatography technique is proposed in the present article. It describes the separation of the triterpenes α- and β-amirin from the diol breine and maniladiol, obtained from almecega resin (Protium heptaphyllum March.). The experiment uses an accessible material, was accomplished in 4 h, and can be applied with success an the experimental course of organic chemistry for undergraduate students. (author)

  10. Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Organic Chemistry: A Case Study of the University Teacher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Lineth Parga-Lozano

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available From Science Education, the Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK is making an important contribution to the analysis of teacher training and the improvement of professionals. As such, a study was conducted to characterise the PCK of a teacher holding a degree in chemistry teaching; he teaches organic chemistry concepts at a higher education institution. The research involved a case study and was qualitative in nature; document analysis was also used as an analytical technique; besides, information was collected by use of Representations of Content (ReCo, Pedagogical and Professional Experience Repertoires (PaP-eR, document analysis of the participating teacher’s work, classroom observation, and interviews. With these tools, we were able to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the participating teacher, and from there, to infer aspects that needed improving in training undergraduates in chemistry. I found that, in this case, the teacher sees himself as chemist and not as chemistry teacher (i.e. there is a lack of professional identity; perhaps, because it is the dominant factor in his disciplinary knowledge at the expense of topics related to the knowledge of school context, as well as historical-epistemological and psycho-pedagogical knowledge. The latter indicates, as a characteristic of the participant’s PCK, that this PCK is incipient due to the disarticulation of its components, which weakens the teaching of organic chemistry concepts. This suggests the need to strengthen the initial training of teachers in their role as teaching professionals, and to integrate components of the PCK.

  11. Connecting biology and organic chemistry introductory laboratory courses through a collaborative research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltax, Ariana L; Armanious, Stephanie; Kosinski-Collins, Melissa S; Pontrello, Jason K

    2015-01-01

    Modern research often requires collaboration of experts in fields, such as math, chemistry, biology, physics, and computer science to develop unique solutions to common problems. Traditional introductory undergraduate laboratory curricula in the sciences often do not emphasize connections possible between the various disciplines. We designed an interdisciplinary, medically relevant, project intended to help students see connections between chemistry and biology. Second term organic chemistry laboratory students designed and synthesized potential polymer inhibitors or inducers of polyglutamine protein aggregation. The use of novel target compounds added the uncertainty of scientific research to the project. Biology laboratory students then tested the novel potential pharmaceuticals in Huntington's disease model assays, using in vitro polyglutamine peptide aggregation and in vivo lethality studies in Drosophila. Students read articles from the primary literature describing the system from both chemical and biological perspectives. Assessment revealed that students emerged from both courses with a deeper understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of biology and chemistry and a heightened interest in basic research. The design of this collaborative project for introductory biology and organic chemistry labs demonstrated how the local interests and expertise at a university can be drawn from to create an effective way to integrate these introductory courses. Rather than simply presenting a series of experiments to be replicated, we hope that our efforts will inspire other scientists to think about how some aspect of authentic work can be brought into their own courses, and we also welcome additional collaborations to extend the scope of the scientific exploration. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  12. Abiotic stressors and stress responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulmon, Cecile; Van Baaren, Joan; Cabello-Hurtado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    life history traits of stressed organisms, and ii) to what extent trait responses influence individual and population responses. Common response mechanisms are evident at molecular and cellular scales but become rather difficult to define at higher levels due to evolutionary distance and environmental......Abstract Organisms are regularly subjected to abiotic stressors related to increasing anthropogenic activities, including chemicals and climatic changes that induce major stresses. Based on various key taxa involved in ecosystem functioning (photosynthetic microorganisms, plants, invertebrates), we...... review how organisms respond and adapt to chemical- and temperature-induced stresses from molecular to population level. Using field-realistic studies, our integrative analysis aims to compare i) how molecular and physiological mechanisms related to protection, repair and energy allocation can impact...

  13. Synthesis of liquid crystals derived from nitroazobenzene: a proposed multistep synthesis applied to organic chemistry laboratory classes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristiano, Rodrigo; Cabral, Marilia Gabriela B.; Aquino, Rafael B. de; Cristiano, Claudia M.Z.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a synthetic route consisting of five steps from aniline to obtain liquid crystal compounds derived from nitroazobenzene. Syntheses were performed during the second half of the semester in organic chemistry laboratory classes. Students characterized the liquid crystal phase by the standard melting point techniques, differential scanning calorimetry and polarized optical microscopy. These experiments allow undergraduate students to explore fundamentally important reactions in Organic Chemistry, as well as modern concepts in Chemistry such as self-assembly and self-organization, nanostructured materials and molecular electronics. (author)

  14. Predicting Complex Organic Mixture Atmospheric Chemistry Using Computer-Generated Reaction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M. T.; Broadbelt, L. J.; Mazurek, M. A.

    2001-12-01

    New measurement and chemical characterization technologies now offer unprecedented capabilities for detecting and describing atmospheric organic matter at the molecular level. As a result, very detailed and extensive chemical inventories are produced routinely in atmospheric field measurements of organic compounds found in the vapor and condensed phases (particles, cloud and fog droplets). Hundreds of organic compounds can constitute the complex chemical mixtures observed for these types of samples, exhibiting a wide spectrum of physical properties such as molecular weight, polarity, pH, and chemical reactivity. The central challenge is describing chemically the complex organic aerosol mixture in a useable fashion that can be linked to predictive models. However, the great compositional complexity of organic aerosols engenders a need for the modeling of the reaction chemistry of these compounds in atmospheric chemical models. On a mechanistic level, atmospheric reactions of organic compounds can involve a network of a very large number of chemical species and reactions. Deriving such large molecular kinetic models by hand is a tedious and time-consuming process. However, such models are usually built upon a few basic chemical principles tempered with the model builder's observations, experience, and intuition that can be summarized as a set of rules. This suggests that given an algorithmic framework, computers (information technology) may be used to apply these chemical principles and rules, thereby building a kinetic model. The framework for this model building process has been developed by means of graph theory. A molecule, which is a set of atoms connected by bonds, may be conceptualized as a set of vertices connected by edges, or to be more precise, a graph. The bond breaking and forming for a reaction can be represented compactly in the form of a matrix operator formally called the "reaction matrix". The addition of the reaction matrix operator to the reduced

  15. What Can We Do about "Parker"? A Case Study of a Good Student Who Didn't "Get" Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Trisha L.; Bodner, George M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on a qualitative study of seven students enrolled in a two-semester organic chemistry course for chemistry and chemical engineering majors that focused on the reasoning the students had used to answer questions on the course exams. Narrative analysis was applied to create case records for each participant that were then…

  16. Changes in Visual/Spatial and Analytic Strategy Use in Organic Chemistry with the Development of Expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlacholia, Maria; Vosniadou, Stella; Roussos, Petros; Salta, Katerina; Kazi, Smaragda; Sigalas, Michael; Tzougraki, Chryssa

    2017-01-01

    We present two studies that investigated the adoption of visual/spatial and analytic strategies by individuals at different levels of expertise in the area of organic chemistry, using the Visual Analytic Chemistry Task (VACT). The VACT allows the direct detection of analytic strategy use without drawing inferences about underlying mental…

  17. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process.

  18. Iron Hydroxide Minerals Drive Organic and Phosphorus Chemistry in Subsurface Redox / pH Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, E.; Barge, L. M.; VanderVelde, D.; Baum, M.

    2017-12-01

    Iron minerals, particularly iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, are prevalent on Mars and may exist in mixed valence or even reduced states beneath the oxidized surface. Iron (II,III) hydroxides, including green rust, are reactive and potentially catalytic minerals that can absorb and concentrate charged species, while also driving chemical reactions. These minerals are highly redox-sensitive and the presence of organics and/or phosphorus species could affect their mineralogy and/or stability. Conversely, the minerals might be able to drive chemical processes such as amino acid formation, phosphorus oxyanion reactions, or could simply selectively preserve organic species via surface adsorption. In an open aqueous sediment column, soluble products of mineral-driven reactions could also diffuse to sites of different chemical conditions to react even further. We synthesized Fe-hydroxide minerals under various conditions relevant to early Earth and ancient Mars (>3.0 Gyr), anoxically and in the presence of salts likely to have been present in surface or ground waters. Using these minerals we conducted experiments to test whether iron hydroxides could promote amino acid formation, and how the reaction is affected by subsurface gradients of redox, pH, and temperature. We also tested the adsorption of organic and phosphorus species onto Fe-hydroxide minerals at different conditions within the gradients. The suite of organic or phosphorus signatures that may be found in a particular mineral system is a combination of what is synthesized there, what is preferentially concentrated / retained there, and what is preserved against degradation. Further work is needed to determine how these processes could have proceeded on Mars and what mineral-organic signatures, abiotic or otherwise, would be produced from such processes.

  19. Using Physical Organic Chemistry To Shape the Course of Electrochemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Kevin D

    2018-03-02

    While organic electrochemistry can look quite different to a chemist not familiar with the technique, the reactions are at their core organic reactions. As such, they are developed and optimized using the same physical organic chemistry principles employed during the development of any other organic reaction. Certainly, the electron transfer that triggers the reactions can require a consideration of new "wrinkles" to those principles, but those considerations are typically minimal relative to the more traditional approaches needed to manipulate the pathways available to the reactive intermediates formed downstream of that electron transfer. In this review, three very different synthetic challenges-the generation and trapping of radical cations, the development of site-selective reactions on microelectrode arrays, and the optimization of current in a paired electrolysis-are used to illustrate this point.

  20. Organic chemistry as a language and the implications of chemical linguistics for structural and retrosynthetic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadeddu, Andrea; Wylie, Elizabeth K; Jurczak, Janusz; Wampler-Doty, Matthew; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2014-07-28

    Methods of computational linguistics are used to demonstrate that a natural language such as English and organic chemistry have the same structure in terms of the frequency of, respectively, text fragments and molecular fragments. This quantitative correspondence suggests that it is possible to extend the methods of computational corpus linguistics to the analysis of organic molecules. It is shown that within organic molecules bonds that have highest information content are the ones that 1) define repeat/symmetry subunits and 2) in asymmetric molecules, define the loci of potential retrosynthetic disconnections. Linguistics-based analysis appears well-suited to the analysis of complex structural and reactivity patterns within organic molecules. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. A Titanium–Organic Framework as an Exemplar of Combining the Chemistry of Metal– and Covalent–Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ha L.; Gándara, Felipe; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Doan, Tan L. H.; Cordova, Kyle E.; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2016-04-06

    A crystalline material with a two-dimensional structure, termed metal–organic framework-901 (MOF-901), was prepared using a strategy that combines the chemistry of MOFs and covalent–organic frameworks (COFs). This strategy involves in situ generation of an amine-functionalized titanium oxo cluster, Ti6O6(OCH3)6(AB)6 (AB = 4-aminobenzoate), which was linked with benzene-1,4-dialdehyde using imine condensation reactions, typical of COFs. The crystal structure of MOF-901 is composed of hexagonal porous layers that are likely stacked in staggered conformation (hxl topology). This MOF represents the first example of combining metal cluster chemistry with dynamic organic covalent bond formation to give a new crystalline, extended framework of titanium metal, which is rarely used in MOFs. The incorporation of Ti(IV) units made MOF-901 useful in the photocatalyzed polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA). The resulting polyMMA product was obtained with a high-number-average molar mass (26 850 g mol–1) and low polydispersity index (1.6), which in many respects are better than those achieved by the commercially available photocatalyst (P-25 TiO2). Additionally, the catalyst can be isolated, reused, and recycled with no loss in performance.

  2. Ion chemistry of some organic molecules studied by field ionization and field desorption mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greef, J. van der.

    1980-01-01

    The chemistry of isolated ions in the gas phase is strongly dependent on the internal energy which they have required upon formation. Since also the average lifetime of an ion depends on its internal energy, ion lifetime studies have been employed for many years to obtain a better insight in the relation between the chemistry and internal energy of gas phase ions. A very powerful tool for such studies is the field ionization kinetic (FIK) method, because it can provide a time-resolved picture of decompositions of ions with lifetimes varying from 10 -11 to 10 -5 s. The FIK method has been used in combination with 2 H, 13 C and 15 N labelling for mechanistic studies on the fragmentation of some selected ionised organic molecules. (Auth.)

  3. Radon, water chemistry and pollution check by volatile organic compounds in springs around Popocatepetl volcano, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mena

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Popocatepetl volcano is a high-risk active volcano in Central Mexico where the highest population density in the country is settled. Radon in the soil and groundwater together with water chemistry from samples of nearby springs were analysed as a function of the 2002-2003 volcanic activity. The measurements of soil radon indicated fluctuations related to both the meteorological and sporadic explosive events. Groundwater radon showed essential differences in concentration due to the specific characteristics of the studied springs. Water chemistry showed also stability along the monitoring period. No anthropogenic pollution from Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs was observed. An overview of the soil radon behaviour as a function of the volcanic activity in the period 1994-2002 is also discussed.

  4. Beta,beta-Disilylated Sulfones as Versatile Building Blocks in Organic Chemistry – A New Sulfonyl Carbanion Transmetalation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Puget, Bertrand; Jahn, Ullrich

    -, č. 17 (2010), s. 2579-2582 ISSN 0936-5214 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : carbanions * transmetalation * silanes * sulfones * Julia olefination Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.447, year: 2010

  5. Nickel-Catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling in a Green Alcohol Solvent for an Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hie, Liana; Chang, Jonah J; Garg, Neil K

    2015-03-10

    A modern undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment involving the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling is reported. Although Suzuki-Miyaura couplings typically employ palladium catalysts in environmentally harmful solvents, this experiment features the use of inexpensive nickel catalysis, in addition to a "green" alcohol solvent. The experiment employs heterocyclic substrates, which are important pharmaceutical building blocks. Thus, this laboratory procedure exposes students to a variety of contemporary topics in organic chemistry, including transition metal-catalyzed cross-couplings, green chemistry, and the importance of heterocycles in drug discovery, none of which are well represented in typical undergraduate organic chemistry curricula. The experimental protocol uses commercially available reagents and is useful in both organic and inorganic instructional laboratories.

  6. Production of hydroxyl radicals from abiotic oxidation of pyrite by oxygen under circumneutral conditions in the presence of low-molecular-weight organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Songhu

    2017-12-01

    Besides acidic environments, pyrite oxidation also occurs in circumneutral environments, such as well-buffered marine and estuarine sediments and salt marshes where low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) (e.g., citrate and oxalate) prevail. However, the production of hydroxyl radicals (radOH) from pyrite oxidation by oxygen (O2) in these circumneutral environments is poorly understood. In this study, radOH production was measured during the abiotic oxidation of pyrite by O2 under circumneutral conditions. A pyrite suspension (50 g/L pyrite) that was buffered at pH 6-8 was exposed to air for oxygenation in the dark. Benzoate (20 mM) was added into the suspension to trap radOH. At pH 7, the cumulative radOH reached 7.5 μM within 420 min in the absence of LMWOAs, whereas it increased to 14.8, 12 and 11.2 μM in the presence of 1 mM ethylenediaminotetraacetate, citrate and oxalate, respectively. When the citrate concentration, which serves as a LMWOAs model, was increased from 0.5 to 5 mM, the cumulative radOH increased from 10.3 to 27.3 μM within 420 min at pH 7. With the decrease in pH from 8 to 6, the cumulative radOH increased from 2.1 to 23.3 μM in the absence of LMWOAs, but it increased from 8.8 to 134.9 μM in the presence of 3 mM citrate. The presence of LMWOAs enhanced the radOH production from pyrite oxidation under circumneutral conditions. In the absence of LMOWAs, radOH is produced mostly from the oxidation of adsorbed Fe(II) by O2. In the presence of citrate, radOH production is attributed mainly to the oxidation of Fe(II)-citrate- by O2 and secondarily to the oxidation of H2O on surface-sulfur defects. The acceleration of pyrite oxidation by Fe(III)-citrate increases radOH production. Fe(II)-citrate- is generated mainly from the complexation of adsorbed Fe(II) by citrate and the reduction of Fe(III)-citrate, and the generation is suppressed by the oxidation of adsorbed Fe(II). Fe(III)-citrate is generated predominantly from Fe

  7. Chemistry, chemoecology, and bioactivity of the South China Sea opisthobranch molluscs and their dietary organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Rong; He, Wen-Fei; Guo, Yue-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Opisthobranchs are slow-moving, brightly colored, and shell-less slug. Interestingly, these naked molluscs appear to be free of predation causing great interests to biologists, chemists, and pharmacologists as well. It is well documented that their ability to escape predation is realized by utilizing chemical substances as defensive allomones. Due to their extraordinary capacity to produce a variety of chemical defensive molecules and in particular, some of which exhibited promising pharmacological activities, opisthobranch molluscs became the hotspot of research subject in the recent years. The authors and co-workers have systematically investigated the possible diet relationship between the South China Sea opisthobranch molluscs and their related prey organisms, including sponges, corals, and algae in the last decade. A series of interesting results have been obtained concerning the chemistry and chemoecology of the studied marine organisms. The present review focuses on recent development dealing with chemistry, chemoecology, and bioactivity of the South China Sea opisthobranch molluscs and their dietary organisms. Some selected representative examples are described in detail.

  8. Thirty-three Years of Synthetic Organic Chemistry in Geneva: Reminiscences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Roger L

    2009-12-01

    After thirty-three years of synthetic organic chemistry research in Geneva, three years as a postdoc at the Université de Genève and over thirty years working at Firmenich, a world-renowned flavour and fragrance company, Dr. Roger L. Snowden, Vice President Synthesis, Corporate R&D Division, Firmenich retraces his career back to 1975 when he arrived in Switzerland. A brief autobiographical sketch of this British national is presented, together with the reasons why Geneva turned out to be where he was to effect the major part of his scientific career.

  9. The Isolation of Rubber from Milkweed Leaves. An Introductory Organic Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volaric, Lisa; Hagen, John P.

    2002-01-01

    We present an introductory organic chemistry lab in which students isolate rubber from the leaves of milkweed plants (Asclepias syriaca). Students isolated rubber with a recovery of 2.4 ± 1.8% and 1.8 ± 0.7% for the microscale and macroscale procedures, respectively. Infrared spectra of their products were compared with the spectrum of synthetic rubber, cis-polyisoprene. Students tested for elasticity of their product by twisting it on a spatula and pulling; all students found some degree of elasticity.

  10. The impact of recirculation, ventilation and filters on secondary organic aerosols generated by indoor chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadeyi, M.O.; Weschler, Charles J.; Tham, K.W.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the impact of recirculation rates (7 and 14 h(-1)), ventilation rates (1 and 2 h(-1)), and filtration on secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated by ozone of outdoor origin reacting with limonene of indoor origin. Experiments were conducted within a recirculating air handling......, but this was more than offset by the increased dilution of SOA derived from ozone-initiated chemistry. The presence of a particle filter (new or used) strikingly lowered SOA number and mass concentrations compared with conditions when no filter was present. Even though the particle filter in this study had only 35...

  11. Teaching Introductory Organic Chemistry: A Problem-Solving and Collaborative-Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Lois M.; Blackburn, Edward V.

    1999-08-01

    A laboratory-centered approach to teaching introductory organic chemistry has been developed to accommodate large (250+ students) course sections. Through collaborative problem-solving, students are required to begin to develop the critical, creative, and complex thinking skills of chemical practitioners. These skills are emphasized in both classroom and lab components of courses. Course evaluations by students and teaching assistants attest to the success of this pedagogical approach. The teaching style required of teaching assistants is discussed and some of the pedagogical tools that have been developed are discussed.

  12. Implementing Interactive Teaching Methods for 9th Grade Organic Chemistry Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traykov, Ivaylo; Galcheva, Petinka

    2017-03-01

    One of the main challenges facing the current educational system is creating conditions suitable for academic skill development that allow students to navigate and adapt to today's modern society, such as locating relevant information quickly as well as effectively utilizing innovations. We can achieve this objective by using interactive teaching methods. These methods take into account the contemporary issues and changing priorities - from the general content building for the courses to independent, student-centered cognitive activities. The propose of this paper is to present tested and proven interactive methods for Grade 9Organic Chemistry classes. These methods significantly improve the quality of teaching and the students' interest in the subject.

  13. Horizons of organic and organoelemental chemistry. 7. All-Russian conference on organometallic chemistry. Summaries of reports. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Abstracts of the seventh All-Russian conference on organometallic chemistry are presented. The main part of reports are devoted to the synthesis of organometallic compounds with assigned properties of rare earths, transition elements and other metals. Data on molecular structure, chemical and electrochemical properties of these compounds are presented

  14. Water and complex organic chemistry in the cold dark cloud Barnard 5: Observations and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirström, Eva; Charnley, Steven B.; Taquet, Vianney; Persson, Carina M.

    2015-08-01

    Studies of complex organic molecule (COM) formation have traditionally been focused on hot cores in regions of massive star formation, where chemistry is driven by the elevated temperatures - evaporating ices and allowing for endothermic reactions in the gas-phase. As more sensitive instruments have become available, the types of objects known to harbour COMs like acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), dimethyl ether (CH3OCH3), methyl formate (CH3OCHO), and ketene (CH2CO) have expanded to include low mass protostars and, recently, even pre-stellar cores. We here report on the first in a new category of objects harbouring COMs: the cold dark cloud Barnard 5 where non-thermal ice desorption induce complex organic chemistry entirely unrelated to local star-formation.Methanol, which only forms efficiently on the surfaces of dust grains, provide evidence of efficient non-thermal desorption of ices in the form of prominent emission peaks offset from protostellar activity and high density tracers in cold molecular clouds. A study with Herschel targeting such methanol emission peaks resulted in the first ever detection of gas-phase water offset from protostellar activity in a dark cloud, at the so called methanol hotspot in Barnard 5.To model the effect a transient injection of ices into the gas-phase has on the chemistry of a cold, dark cloud we have included gas-grain interactions in an existing gas-phase chemical model and connected it to a chemical reaction network updated and expanded to include the formation and destruction paths of the most common COMs. Results from this model will be presented.Ground-based follow-up studies toward the methanol hotspot in B5 have resulted in the detection of a number of COMs, including CH2CO, CH3CHO, CH3OCH3, and CH3OCHO, as well as deuterated methanol (CH2DOH). Observations have also confirmed that COM emission is extended and not localised to a core structure. The implications of these observational and theoretical studies of B5 will be discussed

  15. Organic Chemistry Students' Fragmented Ideas about the Structure and Function of Nucleophiles and Electrophiles: A Concept Map Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzovino, Mary E.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2016-01-01

    Organic chemistry students struggle with multiple aspects of reaction mechanisms and the curved arrow notation used by organic chemists. Many faculty believe that an understanding of nucleophiles and electrophiles, among other concepts, is required before students can develop fluency with the electronpushing formalism (EPF). An expert concept map…

  16. Mechanisms before Reactions: A Mechanistic Approach to the Organic Chemistry Curriculum Based on Patterns of Electron Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Alison B.; Ogilvie, William W.

    2015-01-01

    A significant redesign of the introductory organic chemistry curriculum at the authors' institution is described. There are two aspects that differ greatly from a typical functional group approach. First, organic reaction mechanisms and the electron-pushing formalism are taught before students have learned a single reaction. The conservation of…

  17. Saccharin Derivative Synthesis via [1,3] Thermal Sigmatropic Rearrangement: A Multistep Organic Chemistry Experiment for Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Custódia S. C.

    2016-01-01

    Saccharin (1,2-benzisothiazole-3-one 1,1-dioxide) is an artificial sweetener used in the food industry. It is a cheap and easily available organic compound that may be used in organic chemistry laboratory classes for the synthesis of related heterocyclic compounds and as a derivatizing agent. In this work, saccharin is used as a starting material…

  18. Synthesis of 10-Ethyl Flavin: A Multistep Synthesis Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment for Upper-Division Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichula, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    A multistep synthesis of 10-ethyl flavin was developed as an organic chemistry laboratory experiment for upper-division undergraduate students. Students synthesize 10-ethyl flavin as a bright yellow solid via a five-step sequence. The experiment introduces students to various hands-on experimental organic synthetic techniques, such as column…

  19. Innovation Developments of Coal Chemistry Science in L.M. Litvinenko Institute of Physical-Organic Chemistry and Coal Chemistry of NAS of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shendrik, T.G.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents short historical review and innovation developments of Coal Chemistry Department of L.M. Litvinenko Institute, NAS of Ukraine connected with coal mine exploitation problems, search for decisions toward prevention of spontaneous combustion, dust control in mines, establishing structural chemical features of coal with different genesis and stages of metamorphism with the aim to develop new methods of their modification and rational use. The methods of obtaining inexpensive sorbents from Ukrainian raw materials (including carbon containing waste are proposed. The problems of modern coal chemistry science in IPOCC of NAS of Ukraine are outlined.

  20. Development and Assessment of A Diagnostic Tool to Identify Organic Chemistry Students' Alternative Conceptions Related to Acid Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClary, LaKeisha M.; Lowery Bretz, Stacey

    2012-10-01

    The central goal of this study was to create a new diagnostic tool to identify organic chemistry students' alternative conceptions related to acid strength. Twenty years of research on secondary and college students' conceptions about acids and bases has shown that these important concepts are difficult for students to apply to qualitative problem solving. Yet, few published studies document how students' prior knowledge of acids influences their understanding of acid strength in organic chemistry contexts. We developed a nine-item multiple-tier, multiple-choice concept inventory to identify alternative conceptions that organic chemistry students hold about acid strength, to determine the prevalence of these conceptions, and to determine how strongly these conceptions bias student reasoning. We identified two significant alternative conceptions that organic chemistry students hold about acid strength. Students who answered items incorrectly were more confident about their answers than peers who answered items correctly, suggesting that after one semester of organic chemistry, students do not know what they do not know. Implications for the teaching of acid strength are discussed.

  1. Oxygenated Organic Chemicals in the Pacific Troposphere: Distribution, Sources and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Salas, L.; Chatfield, R.; Czech, E.; Fried, A.; Evans, M.; Jacob, D. J.; Blake, D.; Heikes, B.; Talbot, R.

    2003-01-01

    Airborne measurements of a large number of oxygenated organic chemicals (Oxorgs) were carried out in the Pacific troposphere (0.1-12 km) in the Spring of 2001 (Feb. 24-April 10). Specifically these measuremen ts included acetone, methylethyl ketone (MEK), methanol, ethanol, ace taldehyde, propionaldehyde, PANS, and organic nitrates. Complementary measurements of formaldehyde, organic peroxides, and tracers were al so available. Ox-orgs were abundant in the clean troposphere and were greatly enhanced in the outflow regions from Asia. Their mixing ratios were typically highest in the lower troposphere and declined toward s the upper troposphere and the lowermost stratosphere. Their total a bundance (Ox-orgs) significantly exceeded that of NMHC (C2-C8 NMHC). A comparison of these data with observations collected some seven yea rs earlier (Feb.-March, 1994), did not reveal any significant changes . Throughout the troposphere mixing ratios of Ox-orgs were strongly c orrelated with each other as well as with tracers of fossil and bioma sshiof'uel combustion. Analysis of the relative enhancement of selected Oxorgs with respect to CH3Cl and CO in twelve sampled plumes, origi nating from fires, is used to assess their primary and secondary sour ces from biomass combustion. The composition of these plumes also ind icates a large shift of reactive nitrogen into the PAN reservoir ther eby limiting ozone formation. The Harvard 3-D photochemical model, th at uses state of the art chemistry and source information, is used to compare simulated and observed mixing ratios of selected species. A 1 -D model is used to explore the chemistry of aldehydes. These results will be presented.

  2. Ozone and organic nitrates over the eastern United States: Sensitivity to isoprene chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jingqiu; Paulot, Fabien; Jacob, Daniel J.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Crounse, John D.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Keller, Christoph A.; Hudman, Rynda C.; Barkley, Michael P.; Horowitz, Larry W.

    2013-10-01

    implement a new isoprene oxidation mechanism in a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). Model results are evaluated with observations for ozone, isoprene oxidation products, and related species from the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation aircraft campaign over the eastern United States in summer 2004. The model achieves an unbiased simulation of ozone in the boundary layer and the free troposphere, reflecting canceling effects from recent model updates for isoprene chemistry, bromine chemistry, and HO2 loss to aerosols. Simulation of the ozone-CO correlation is improved relative to previous versions of the model, and this is attributed to a lower and reversible yield of isoprene nitrates, increasing the ozone production efficiency per unit of nitrogen oxides (NOx ≡ NO + NO2). The model successfully reproduces the observed concentrations of organic nitrates (∑ANs) and their correlations with HCHO and ozone. ∑ANs in the model is principally composed of secondary isoprene nitrates, including a major contribution from nighttime isoprene oxidation. The correlations of ∑ANs with HCHO and ozone then provide sensitive tests of isoprene chemistry and argue in particular against a fast isomerization channel for isoprene peroxy radicals. ∑ANs can provide an important reservoir for exporting NOx from the U.S. boundary layer. We find that the dependence of surface ozone on isoprene emission is positive throughout the U.S., even if NOx emissions are reduced by a factor of 4. Previous models showed negative dependences that we attribute to erroneous titration of OH by isoprene.

  3. Integrating medicinal chemistry, organic/combinatorial chemistry, and computational chemistry for the discovery of selective estrogen receptor modulators with Forecaster, a novel platform for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, Eric; Englebienne, Pablo; Arrowsmith, Andrew G; Mendoza-Sanchez, Rodrigo; Corbeil, Christopher R; Weill, Nathanael; Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Moitessier, Nicolas

    2012-01-23

    As part of a large medicinal chemistry program, we wish to develop novel selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) as potential breast cancer treatments using a combination of experimental and computational approaches. However, one of the remaining difficulties nowadays is to fully integrate computational (i.e., virtual, theoretical) and medicinal (i.e., experimental, intuitive) chemistry to take advantage of the full potential of both. For this purpose, we have developed a Web-based platform, Forecaster, and a number of programs (e.g., Prepare, React, Select) with the aim of combining computational chemistry and medicinal chemistry expertise to facilitate drug discovery and development and more specifically to integrate synthesis into computer-aided drug design. In our quest for potent SERMs, this platform was used to build virtual combinatorial libraries, filter and extract a highly diverse library from the NCI database, and dock them to the estrogen receptor (ER), with all of these steps being fully automated by computational chemists for use by medicinal chemists. As a result, virtual screening of a diverse library seeded with active compounds followed by a search for analogs yielded an enrichment factor of 129, with 98% of the seeded active compounds recovered, while the screening of a designed virtual combinatorial library including known actives yielded an area under the receiver operating characteristic (AU-ROC) of 0.78. The lead optimization proved less successful, further demonstrating the challenge to simulate structure activity relationship studies.

  4. Versatile Organic Chemistry on Vanadium-Based Multi-Electron Reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachtigall, Olaf; Spandl, Johann

    2018-02-21

    We report the synthesis, post-functionalization, and redox behavior of two organically functionalized aggregates, [V 6 O 7 (OMe) 9 {(OCH 2 ) 3 C-CH 2 N 3 }] and [V 6 O 7 (OMe) 9 {(OCH 2 ) 3 C-NH 2 }]. All twelve μ 2 -oxo groups on the edges of the Lindqvist-type {V 6 O 19 } core were replaced by alkoxo ligands. The absence of a negative charge and the closed organic shell make these neutral mixed-valence compounds very stable towards hydrolysis and well soluble in almost all common organic solvents. These are important advantages over classical POMs. By post-functionalization through copper(I)-catalyzed Huisgen cycloaddition or imine formation, various organic moieties could be introduced. Even a well-soluble trimer composed of three hexanuclear vanadium units connected through an aromatic triimino core was synthesized and studied. The diverse redox behavior, the versatile reactivity, the good stability, and the excellent solubility make our vanadium compounds highly interesting for applications as building blocks in macromolecular chemistry as well as redox labels in biochemistry. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Boosting lithium storage in covalent organic framework via activation of 14-electron redox chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhendong; Yang, Qinsi; Xu, Yi; Guo, Siyu; Sun, Weiwei; Liu, Hao; Lv, Li-Ping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yong

    2018-02-08

    Conjugated polymeric molecules have been heralded as promising electrode materials for the next-generation energy-storage technologies owing to their chemical flexibility at the molecular level, environmental benefit, and cost advantage. However, before any practical implementation takes place, the low capacity, poor structural stability, and sluggish ion/electron diffusion kinetics remain the obstacles that have to be overcome. Here, we report the synthesis of a few-layered two-dimensional covalent organic framework trapped by carbon nanotubes as the anode of lithium-ion batteries. Remarkably, upon activation, this organic electrode delivers a large reversible capacity of 1536 mAh g -1 and can sustain 500 cycles at 100 mA g -1 . Aided by theoretical calculations and electrochemical probing of the electrochemical behavior at different stages of cycling, the storage mechanism is revealed to be governed by 14-electron redox chemistry for a covalent organic framework monomer with one lithium ion per C=N group and six lithium ions per benzene ring. This work may pave the way to the development of high-capacity electrodes for organic rechargeable batteries.

  6. Chemistry of Mesoporous Organosilica in Nanotechnology: Molecularly Organic-Inorganic Hybridization into Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-05-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials aiming to combine the individual advantages of organic and inorganic components while overcoming their intrinsic drawbacks have shown great potential for future applications in broad fields. In particular, the integration of functional organic fragments into the framework of mesoporous silica to fabricate mesoporous organosilica materials has attracted great attention in the scientific community for decades. The development of such mesoporous organosilica materials has shifted from bulk materials to nanosized mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (designated as MONs, in comparison with traditional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs)) and corresponding applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology. In this comprehensive review, the state-of-art progress of this important hybrid nanomaterial family is summarized, focusing on the structure/composition-performance relationship of MONs of well-defined morphology, nanostructure, and nanoparticulate dimension. The synthetic strategies and the corresponding mechanisms for the design and construction of MONs with varied morphologies, compositions, nanostructures, and functionalities are overviewed initially. Then, the following part specifically concentrates on their broad spectrum of applications in nanotechnology, mainly in nanomedicine, nanocatalysis, and nanofabrication. Finally, some critical issues, presenting challenges and the future development of MONs regarding the rational synthesis and applications in nanotechnology are summarized and discussed. It is highly expected that such a unique molecularly organic-inorganic nanohybrid family will find practical applications in nanotechnology, and promote the advances of this discipline regarding hybrid chemistry and materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Development and analysis of educational technologies for a blended organic chemistry course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael James

    Blended courses incorporate elements of both face-to-face and online instruction. The extent to which blended courses are conducted online, and the proper role of the online components of blended courses, have been debated and may vary. What can be said in general, however, is that online tools for blended courses are typically culled together from a variety of sources, are often very large scale, and may present distractions for students that decrease their utility as teaching tools. Furthermore, large-scale educational technologies may not be amenable to rigorous, detailed study, limiting evaluation of their effectiveness. Small-scale educational technologies run from the instructor's own server have the potential to mitigate many of these issues. Such tools give the instructor or researcher direct access to all available data, facilitating detailed analysis of student use. Code modification is simple and rapid if errors arise, since code is stored where the instructor can easily access it. Finally, the design of a small-scale tool can target a very specific application. With these ideas in mind, this work describes several projects aimed at exploring the use of small-scale, web-based software in a blended organic chemistry course. A number of activities were developed and evaluated using the Student Assessment of Learning Gains survey, and data from the activities were analyzed using quantitative methods of statistics and social network analysis methods. Findings from this work suggest that small-scale educational technologies provide significant learning benefits for students of organic chemistry---with the important caveat that instructors must offer appropriate levels of technical and pedagogical support for students. Most notably, students reported significant learning gains from activities that included collaborative learning supported by novel online tools. For the particular context of organic chemistry, which has a unique semantic language (Lewis

  8. Green Chemistry in the Organic Teaching Laboratory: An Environmentally Benign Synthesis of Adipic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Scott M.; Hutchison, James E.

    2000-12-01

    Environmentally benign ("green") chemical techniques are growing in importance in academic and industrial research laboratories. Such chemistry has been slow to appear in teaching laboratories, owing in part to a lack of published material on this subject. Recent developments in green synthesis provide opportunities to introduce this material in teaching laboratories. We present a synthesis of adipic acid that utilizes green reagents (hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant), solvents (water), and methods (phase-transfer catalysis, catalyst recycling). The synthesis works well and provides an excellent forum for emphasizing green chemical concepts while teaching laboratory skills. It demonstrates reuse of a product, synthesis using a nonhazardous solvent, elimination of deleterious by-products, and use of a recyclable catalyst. It can be carried out on either the macroscale or microscale and generates little waste if the catalyst solution is recycled. This experiment fits well in a sophomore organic sequence; it covers the topics of oxidation, phase-transfer catalysis, and the technique of recrystallization, reinforces lecture topics such as alkene synthesis and reactivity, and provides an opportunity to introduce polymer chemistry.

  9. Genome-wide analysis of the grapevine stilbene synthase multigenic family: genomic organization and expression profiles upon biotic and abiotic stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vannozzi Alessandro

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant stilbenes are a small group of phenylpropanoids, which have been detected in at least 72 unrelated plant species and accumulate in response to biotic and abiotic stresses such as infection, wounding, UV-C exposure and treatment with chemicals. Stilbenes are formed via the phenylalanine/polymalonate-route, the last step of which is catalyzed by the enzyme stilbene synthase (STS, a type III polyketide synthase (PKS. Stilbene synthases are closely related to chalcone synthases (CHS, the key enzymes of the flavonoid pathway, as illustrated by the fact that both enzymes share the same substrates. To date, STSs have been cloned from peanut, pine, sorghum and grapevine, the only stilbene-producing fruiting-plant for which the entire genome has been sequenced. Apart from sorghum, STS genes appear to exist as a family of closely related genes in these other plant species. Results In this study a complete characterization of the STS multigenic family in grapevine has been performed, commencing with the identification, annotation and phylogenetic analysis of all members and integration of this information with a comprehensive set of gene expression analyses including healthy tissues at differential developmental stages and in leaves exposed to both biotic (downy mildew infection and abiotic (wounding and UV-C exposure stresses. At least thirty-three full length sequences encoding VvSTS genes were identified, which, based on predicted amino acid sequences, cluster in 3 principal groups designated A, B and C. The majority of VvSTS genes cluster in groups B and C and are located on chr16 whereas the few gene family members in group A are found on chr10. Microarray and mRNA-seq expression analyses revealed different patterns of transcript accumulation between the different groups of VvSTS family members and between VvSTSs and VvCHSs. Indeed, under certain conditions the transcriptional response of VvSTS and VvCHS genes appears to be

  10. XVIII Mendeleev congress on general and applied chemistry. Summaries of reports in five volumes. Volume 5. IV Russian-French symposium Supramolecular systems in chemistry and biology. II Russian-Indian symposium on organic chemistry. International symposium on present-day radiochemistry Radiochemistry: progress and prospects. International symposium Green chemistry, stable evolution and social responsibility of chemists. Symposium Nucleophilic hydrogen substitution in aromatic systems and related reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The 5 volume of the XVIII Mendeleev congress on general and applied chemistry includes summaries of reports on the subjects of sypramolecular systems in chemistry and biology, organic chemistry, modern radiochemistry, green chemistry - development and social responsibility of chemists, nucleophilic hydrogen substitution in aromatic systems and related chemical reactions [ru

  11. Lewis Acid-Base Chemistry of 7-Azaisoindigo-Based Organic Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randell, Nicholas M; Fransishyn, Kyle M; Kelly, Timothy L

    2017-07-26

    Low-band-gap organic semiconductors are important in a variety of organic electronics applications, such as organic photovoltaic devices, photodetectors, and field effect transistors. Building on our previous work, which introduced 7-azaisoindigo as an electron-deficient building block for the synthesis of donor-acceptor organic semiconductors, we demonstrate how Lewis acids can be used to further tune the energies of the frontier molecular orbitals. Coordination of a Lewis acid to the pyridinic nitrogen of 7-azaisoindigo greatly diminishes the electron density in the azaisoindigo π-system, resulting in a substantial reduction in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy. This results in a smaller highest occupied molecular orbital-LUMO gap and shifts the lowest-energy electronic transition well into the near-infrared region. Both H + and BF 3 are shown to coordinate to azaisoindigo and affect the energy of the S 0 → S 1 transition. A combination of time-dependent density functional theory and UV/vis and 1 H NMR spectroscopic titrations reveal that when two azaisoindigo groups are present and high concentrations of acid are used, both pyridinic nitrogens bind Lewis acids. Importantly, we demonstrate that this acid-base chemistry can be carried out at the solid-vapor interface by exposing thin films of aza-substituted organic semiconductors to vapor-phase BF 3 ·Et 2 O. This suggests the possibility of using the BF 3 -bound 7-azaisoindigo-based semiconductors as n-type materials in various organic electronic applications.

  12. Synthesis of Organic Matter of Prebiotic Chemistry at the Protoplanetary Disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snytnikov, Valeriy; Stoynovskaya, Olga; Rudina, Nina

    We have carried out scanning electron microscopic examination of CM carbonaceous chondrites meteorites Migey, Murchison, Staroe Boriskino aged more than 4.56 billion years (about 50 million years from the beginning of the formation of the Solar system). Our study confirmed the conclusion of Rozanov, Hoover and other researchers about the presence of microfossils of bacterial origin in the matrix of all these meteorites. Since the time of the Solar system formation is 60 - 100 million years, the primary biocenosis emerged in the protoplanetary disc of the Solar system before meteorites or simultaneously with them. It means that prebiological processes and RNA world appeared even earlier in the circumsolar protoplanetary disc. Most likely, this appearance of prebiotic chemistry takes place nowday in massive and medium-massive discs of the observed young stellar objects (YSO) class 0 and I. The timescale of the transition from chemical to biological evolution took less than 50 million years for the Solar system. Further evolution of individual biocenosis in a protoplanetary disc associated with varying physico-chemical conditions during the formation of the Solar system bodies. Biocenosis on these bodies could remove or develop under the influence of many cosmic factors and geological processes in the case of Earth. To complete the primary biosphere formation in short evolution time - millions of years - requires highly efficient chemical syntheses. In industrial chemistry for the efficient synthesis of ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, methanol and other organic species, that are the precursors to obtain prebiotic compounds, catalytic reactors of high pressure are used. Thus (1) necessary amount of the proper catalyst in (2) high pressure areas of the disc can trigger these intense syntheses. The disc contains the solids with the size from nanoparticle to pebble. Iron and magnesium is catalytically active ingredient for such solids. The puzzle is a way to provide hydrogen

  13. The chemistry of metal-organic frameworks for CO2 capture, regeneration and conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickett, Christopher A.; Helal, Aasif; Al-Maythalony, Bassem A.; Yamani, Zain H.; Cordova, Kyle E.; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2017-08-01

    The carbon dioxide challenge is one of the most pressing problems facing our planet. Each stage in the carbon cycle — capture, regeneration and conversion — has its own materials requirements. Recent work on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) demonstrated the potential and effectiveness of these materials in addressing this challenge. In this Review, we identify the specific structural and chemical properties of MOFs that have led to the highest capture capacities, the most efficient separations and regeneration processes, and the most effective catalytic conversions. The interior of MOFs can be designed to have coordinatively unsaturated metal sites, specific heteroatoms, covalent functionalization, other building unit interactions, hydrophobicity, porosity, defects and embedded nanoscale metal catalysts with a level of precision that is crucial for the development of higher-performance MOFs. To realize a total solution, it is necessary to use the precision of MOF chemistry to build more complex materials to address selectivity, capacity and conversion together in one material.

  14. Computational organic chemistry: bridging theory and experiment in establishing the mechanisms of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gui-Juan; Zhang, Xinhao; Chung, Lung Wa; Xu, Liping; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2015-02-11

    Understanding the mechanisms of chemical reactions, especially catalysis, has been an important and active area of computational organic chemistry, and close collaborations between experimentalists and theorists represent a growing trend. This Perspective provides examples of such productive collaborations. The understanding of various reaction mechanisms and the insight gained from these studies are emphasized. The applications of various experimental techniques in elucidation of reaction details as well as the development of various computational techniques to meet the demand of emerging synthetic methods, e.g., C-H activation, organocatalysis, and single electron transfer, are presented along with some conventional developments of mechanistic aspects. Examples of applications are selected to demonstrate the advantages and limitations of these techniques. Some challenges in the mechanistic studies and predictions of reactions are also analyzed.

  15. Chemistry of Metal-organic Frameworks Monitored by Advanced X-ray Diffraction and Scattering Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaj, Matjaž; Kaučič, Venčeslav; Zabukovec Logar, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    The research on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) experienced rapid progress in recent years due to their structure diversity and wide range of application opportunities. Continuous progress of X-ray and neutron diffraction methods enables more and more detailed insight into MOF's structural features and significantly contributes to the understanding of their chemistry. Improved instrumentation and data processing in high-resolution X-ray diffraction methods enables the determination of new complex MOF crystal structures in powdered form. By the use of neutron diffraction techniques, a lot of knowledge about the interaction of guest molecules with crystalline framework has been gained in the past few years. Moreover, in-situ time-resolved studies by various diffraction and scattering techniques provided comprehensive information about crystallization kinetics, crystal growth mechanism and structural dynamics triggered by external physical or chemical stimuli. The review emphasizes most relevant advanced structural studies of MOFs based on powder X-ray and neutron scattering.

  16. Active Learning and Cooperative Learning in the Organic Chemistry Lecture Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Donald R.

    1999-08-01

    Faculty in the physical sciences are one of the academic groups least receptive to the use of active learning strategies and cooperative learning in their classrooms. This is particularly so in traditional lecture classes. It is the objective of this paper to show how effective these techniques can be in improving student performance in classes. The use of active learning strategies and cooperative learning groups in my organic chemistry lecture classes has increased the overall pass rate in my classes by an astounding 20-30% over the traditional lecture mode. This has been accomplished without any reduction in "standards". The actual methods employed are presented as well as a discussion of how I came to radically change the way I teach my classes.

  17. The effect of soil mineral phases on the abiotic degradation of selected organic compounds. Progress report, June 31, 1990--May 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, S.S.

    1993-05-31

    Tetraphenylborate (TPB) is used to precipitate radioactive 137Cs from high-level nuclear waste water at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operated by the US DOE at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The process is part of the procedure for the glassification of high-level nuclear waste in preparation for its long-term geological disposal. The decontaminated waste water contains millimolar quantities of TPB that will be processed into salt concretions. The transporation and use of large amounts of TPB can potentially result in the release of TPB into soil or aquatic environments. Previous study has shown that TPB degrades in soils to initially form diphenylborinic acid (DPBA) and biphenyl. DPBA appears to degrade further into other unidentified compounds which subsequently degrade into inorganic boron. The factors which promote the abiotic degradation of TPB need to be investigated since this chemical is used in the processing of radioactive wastes. TPB and its intermediate product, DPBA, have been reported to be toxic to microorganisms and plants, dependent on soil or water environments for their survival and growth.

  18. A personal recollection of Ernest Roy Davidson's contributions to organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Joseph J.

    Ernest Davidson's contributions of potential energy surfaces for thermal reactions of organic compounds form an important body of scientific work. His pursuit, with Borden, of the methylenecyclopropane degenerate rearrangement involving the trimethylenemethane singlet biradical with planar and orthogonal species is a classic example that also touches on the Davidson-Borden characterization of open shell, pi conjugated biradicals as either disjoint or non-disjoint systems. In a related effort with vinylmethylenecyclopropane he not only calculated all reasonable stationary points for both the singlet and triplet species, but demonstrated the preference for a conrotatory-bevel closure of a cross-conjugated 1,5 singlet biradical. Further, he pursued the classic hydrocarbon 1,3 biradicals trimethylene and vinyltrimethylene, showing in the latter case that there are no intermediates on the potential energy surface. Thus the reaction appears to proceed from saddle point to saddle point by traversing coordinates perpendicular to the reaction coordinates. He became embroiled in the Cope rearrangement energy surface that pushed the limits of approximations to the solution of the Schroedinger equation. He provided evidence that the conservation of orbital symmetry 'forbidden' suprafacial-inversion 1,5 shift of carbon in the circumambulatory degenerate rearrangement of norcaradiene is comparable in energy with the 'allowed' suprafacial-retention pathway. And he provided important insights into the captodative effects of monoradicals. Ernest understands more organic chemistry than most organic chemists.

  19. Evaluating Student Motivation in Organic Chemistry Courses: Moving from a Lecture-Based to a Flipped Approach with Peer-Led Team Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yujuan; Raker, Jeffrey R.; Lewis, Jennifer E.

    2018-01-01

    Academic Motivation Scale-Chemistry (AMS-Chemistry), an instrument based on the self-determination theory, was used to evaluate students' motivation in two organic chemistry courses, where one course was primarily lecture-based and the other implemented flipped classroom and peer-led team learning (Flip-PLTL) pedagogies. Descriptive statistics…

  20. Ethers on Si(001): A prime example for the common ground between surface science and molecular organic chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Pecher, Lisa

    2017-09-15

    Using computational chemistry, we show that the adsorption of ether molecules on Si(001) under ultra-high vacuum conditions can be understood with textbook organic chemistry. The two-step reaction mechanism of (1) dative bond formation between the ether oxygen and a Lewis acidic surface atom and (2) a nucleophilic attack of a nearby Lewis basic surface atom is analysed in detail and found to mirror the acid-catalysed ether cleavage in solution. The O-Si dative bond is found to be the strongest of its kind and reactivity from this state defies the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle. Electron rearrangement during the C-O bond cleavage is visualized using a newly developed bonding analysis method, which shows that the mechanism of nucleophilic substitutions on semiconductor surfaces is identical to molecular chemistry SN2 reactions. Our findings thus illustrate how the fields of surface science and molecular chemistry can mutually benefit and unexpected insight can be gained.

  1. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-10-25

    Oct 25, 2017 ... thetic Organic Chemistry, Asymmetric Synthesis, Stereochemistry, Pericyclic Reactions, Advance. Spectroscopy, Organomettalic Chemistry, Material Chemistry and Nanotechnology, X-Ray Crys- tallography, Molecular Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemistry, Medicinal Chemistry, Bio-inorganic. Chemistry.

  2. Analytical chemistry of the persistent organic pollutants identified in the Stockholm Convention: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weiguang; Wang, Xian; Cai, Zongwei

    2013-08-06

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are major environmental concern due to their persistence, long-range transportability, bio-accumulation and potentially adverse effects on living organisms. Analytical chemistry plays an essential role in the measurement of POPs and provides important information on their distribution and environmental transformations. Much effort has been devoted during the last two decades to the development of faster, safer, more reliable and more sensitive analytical techniques for these pollutants. Since the Stockholm Convention (SC) on POPs was adopted 12 years ago, analytical methods have been extensively developed. This review article introduces recent analytical techniques and applications for the determination of POPs in environmental and biota samples, and summarizes the extraction, separation and instrumental analyses of the halogenated POPs. Also, this review covers important aspects for the analyses of SC POPs (e.g. lipid determination and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC)), and finally discusses future trends for improving the POPs analyses and for potential new POPs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantum Chemistry in Nanoscale Environments: Insights on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering and Organic Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Amaya, Roberto

    The understanding of molecular effects in nanoscale environments is becoming increasingly relevant for various emerging fields. These include spectroscopy for molecular identification as well as in finding molecules for energy harvesting. Theoretical quantum chemistry has been increasingly useful to address these phenomena to yield an understanding of these effects. In the first part of this dissertation, we study the chemical effect of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We use quantum chemistry simulations to study the metal-molecule interactions present in these systems. We find that the excitations that provide a chemical enhancement contain a mixed contribution from the metal and the molecule. Moreover, using atomistic studies we propose an additional source of enhancement, where a transition metal dopant surface could provide an additional enhancement. We also develop methods to study the electrostatic effects of molecules in metallic environments. We study the importance of image-charge effects, as well as field-bias to molecules interacting with perfect conductors. The atomistic modeling and the electrostatic approximation enable us to study the effects of the metal interacting with the molecule in a complementary fashion, which provides a better understanding of the complex effects present in SERS. In the second part of this dissertation, we present the Harvard Clean Energy Project, a high-throughput approach for a large-scale computational screening and design of organic photovoltaic materials. We create molecular libraries to search for candidates structures and use quantum chemistry, machine learning and cheminformatics methods to characterize these systems and find structure-property relations. The scale of this study requires an equally large computational resource. We rely on distributed volunteer computing to obtain these properties. In the third part of this dissertation we present our work related to the acceleration of electronic structure

  4. The Effect of Systemic Synthesis Questions [SSynQs] on Students' Performance and Meaningful Learning in Secondary Organic Chemistry Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrin, Tamara N.; Milenkovic, Dušica D.; Segedinac, Mirjana D.

    2016-01-01

    Many studies in the field of chemical education have emphasized the fact that students at secondary level have considerable difficulties in mastering organic chemistry contents. As a result, they choose to learn these contents in a "rote" way. Taking this fact into consideration, the first aim of our study was to help students in…

  5. ConfChem Conference on Flipped Classroom: Improving Student Engagement in Organic Chemistry Using the Inverted Classroom Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Improving student engagement in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) courses generally, and organic chemistry specifically, has long been a goal for educators. Recently educators at all academic levels have been exploring the "inverted classroom" or "flipped classroom" pedagogical model for improving student…

  6. Soil organic matter chemistry in allophanic soils: a pyrolysis-GC/MS study of a Costa Rican Andosol catena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurman, P.; Peterse, F.; Almendros Martin, G.

    2007-01-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) in allophanic soils is supposed to accumulate due to protection caused by binding to allophane, aluminium and iron. We investigated a catena of allophanic and non-allophanic soils in Costa Rica to determine the effect of such binding mechanisms on SOM chemistry. These soils

  7. Bringing Research into a First Semester Organic Chemistry Laboratory with the Multistep Synthesis of Carbohydrate-Based HIV Inhibitor Mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontrello, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Benefits of incorporating research experiences into laboratory courses have been well documented, yet examples of research projects designed for the first semester introductory organic chemistry lab course are extremely rare. To address this deficiency, a Carbohydrate-Based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Inhibitor project consisting of a…

  8. Influence of pH on the redox chemistry of metal (hydr)oxides and organic matter in paddy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Y.; Koopmans, G.F.; Bonten, L.T.C.; Song, J.; Luo, Y.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Comans, R.N.J.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine how flooding and draining cycles affect the redox chemistry of metal (hydr)oxides and organic matter in paddy soils and how the pH influences these processes. Our secondary purpose was to determine to what extent a geochemical thermodynamic

  9. Two Methods of Determining Total Phenolic Content of Foods and Juices in a General, Organic, and Biological (GOB) Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Lee Alan; Leung, Sam H.; Puderbaugh, Amy; Angel, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    The determination of total phenolics in foods and fruit juices was used successfully as a laboratory experiment in our undergraduate general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry course. Two different colorimetric methods were used over three years and comparative student results indicate that a ferrous ammonium sulfate (FAS) indicator…

  10. The Effects of Online Homework on First Year Pre-Service Science Teachers' Learning Achievements of Introductory Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratniyom, Jadsada; Boonphadung, Suttipong; Unnanantn, Thassanant

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of the introductory organic chemistry online homework on first year pre-service science teachers' learning achievements. The online homework was created using a web-based Google form in order to enhance the pre-service science teachers' learning achievements. The steps for constructing online homework were…

  11. Development and Assessment of a Diagnostic Tool to Identify Organic Chemistry Students' Alternative Conceptions Related to Acid Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClary, LaKeisha M.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2012-01-01

    The central goal of this study was to create a new diagnostic tool to identify organic chemistry students' alternative conceptions related to acid strength. Twenty years of research on secondary and college students' conceptions about acids and bases has shown that these important concepts are difficult for students to apply to qualitative problem…

  12. This Mechanistic Step Is ''Productive'': Organic Chemistry Students' Backward-Oriented Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspari, I.; Weinrich, M. L.; Sevian, H.; Graulich, N.

    2018-01-01

    If an organic chemistry student explains that she represents a mechanistic step because ''it's a productive part of the mechanism,'' what meaning could the professor teaching the class attribute to this statement, what is actually communicated, and what does it mean for the student? The professor might think that the explanation is based on…

  13. Nickel-Catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling in a Green Alcohol Solvent for an Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hie, Liana; Chang, Jonah J.; Garg, Neil K.

    2015-01-01

    A modern undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment involving the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling is reported. Although Suzuki-Miyaura couplings typically employ palladium catalysts in environmentally harmful solvents, this experiment features the use of inexpensive nickel catalysis, in addition to a "green" alcohol solvent. The…

  14. Extraction of pigments from seeds of Bixa orellana L.: an alternative for experimental courses in organic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Charllyton Luis S. da; Chaves, Mariana H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes methodologies for the extraction and characterization by TLC, UV-VIS, IR and NMR of bixin from Bixa orellana L. (urucum) seeds. Based on the results, the extraction with NaOH 5% is the fastest, uses low cost materials, requires two to four laboratory hours and is a useful alternative for an experimental Organic Chemistry discipline. (author)

  15. The Cyclohexanol Cycle and Synthesis of Nylon 6,6: Green Chemistry in the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dintzner, Matthew R.; Kinzie, Charles R.; Pulkrabek, Kimberly; Arena, Anthony F.

    2012-01-01

    A one-term synthesis project that incorporates many of the principles of green chemistry is presented for the undergraduate organic laboratory. In this multistep scheme of reactions, students react, recycle, and ultimately convert cyclohexanol to nylon 6,6. The individual reactions in the project employ environmentally friendly methodologies, and…

  16. Using Undergraduate Facilitators for Active Learning in Organic Chemistry: A Preparation Course and Outcomes of the Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Hannah E.; Friedman, Lee A.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we describe a course to educate and prepare undergraduate "facilitators" for small group problem solving sessions in a large, first semester, introductory undergraduate organic chemistry course. We then explore the outcomes of the facilitator experience for one cohort of facilitators through qualitative analysis of written…

  17. Radicals and Transition-Metal Catalysis: An Alliance Par Excellence to Increase Reactivity and Selectivity in Organic Chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ford, Leigh Robert; Jahn, Ullrich

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 35 (2009), s. 6386-6389 ISSN 1433-7851 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : cross-coupling * elimination * homogeneous catalysis * hydrogen transfer * radicals Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 11.829, year: 2009

  18. Self-Regulated Learning Study Strategies and Academic Performance in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry: An Investigation Examining Ethnically Diverse Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Enrique J.; Nandagopal, Kiruthiga; Shavelson, Richard J.; Szu, Evan; Penn, John

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to identify ethnically diverse students' study strategies in organic chemistry and their relationships to course outcomes. Study diaries, concept maps, and problem sets were used to assess study outcomes. Findings show that students engage in four commonly used reviewing-type strategies, regardless of ethnic group affiliation.…

  19. Extraction and [superscript 1]H NMR Analysis of Fats from Convenience Foods: A Laboratory Experiment for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartel, Aaron M.; Moore, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    The extraction and analysis of fats from convenience foods (crackers, cookies, chips, candies) has been developed as an experiment for a second-year undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course. Students gravimetrically determine the fat content per serving and then perform a [superscript 1]H NMR analysis of the recovered fat to determine the…

  20. Associating Animations with Concrete Models to Enhance Students' Comprehension of Different Visual Representations in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.; Al-Hajri, Sheikha H.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to explore the impact of associating animations with concrete models on eleventh-grade students' comprehension of different visual representations in organic chemistry. The study used a post-test control group quasi-experimental design. The experimental group (N = 28) used concrete models, submicroscopic…

  1. Organic aerosol evaporation and formation in biomass-burning plumes: The competition between dilution and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, J. R.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Bian, Q.; Jathar, S.; Kodros, J.; Barsanti, K.; Hatch, L. E.; May, A.

    2017-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) has been shown to form in biomass-burning emissions in laboratory and field studies. However, there is significant variability among studies in mass enhancement, which could be due to differences in fuels, fire conditions, dilution, and/or limitations of laboratory experiments and observations. This study focuses on understanding processes affecting biomass-burning SOA formation in ambient plumes. The plume dilution rate impacts the organic partitioning between the gas and particle phases, which may impact the potential for SOA to form as well as the rate of SOA formation. We use an aerosol microphysics model that includes representations of volatility and oxidation chemistry to estimate SOA formation in the smoke emitted into the atmosphere. We add Gaussian dispersion to our aerosol microphysical model to estimate how SOA formation may vary under different ambient-plume conditions (e.g. fire size, emission mass flux, atmospheric stability). Smoke from small fires, such as typical prescribed burns, dilutes rapidly, which drives evaporation of organic vapor from the particle phase, leading to more effective SOA formation. Emissions from large fires, such as intense wildfires, dilute slowly, suppressing OA evaporation and subsequent SOA formation in the near field. We also demonstrate that different approaches to the calculation of OA enhancement in ambient plumes can lead to different conclusions regarding SOA formation. Normalized OA mass enhancement ratios of around 1 calculated using an inert tracer, such as black carbon or CO, have traditionally been interpreted as exhibiting little or no SOA formation; however, we show that SOA formation may have greatly contributed to the mass in these plumes.

  2. Designing Undergraduate-Level Organic Chemistry Instructional Problems: Seven Ideas from a Problem-Solving Study of Practicing Synthetic Organic Chemists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raker, Jeffrey R.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2012-01-01

    The development of curricular problems based on the practice of synthetic organic chemistry has not been explored in the literature. Such problems have broadly been hypothesized to promote student persistence and interest in STEM fields. This study reports seven ideas about how practice-based problems can be developed for sophomore-level organic…

  3. PHYS: Division of Physical Chemistry 258 - Properties and Origins of Cometary and Asteroidal Organic Matter Delivered to the Early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Nguyen, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Comets and asteroids may have contributed much of the Earth's water and organic matter. The Earth accretes approximately 4x10(exp 7) Kg of dust and meteorites from these sources every year. The least altered meteorites contain complex assemblages of organic compounds and abundant hydrated minerals. These carbonaceous chondrite meteorites probably derive from asteroids that underwent hydrothermal processing within the first few million years after their accretion. Meteorite organics show isotopic and chemical signatures of low-T ion-molecule and grain-surface chemistry and photolysis of icy grains that occurred in cold molecular clouds and the outer protoplanetary disk. These signatures have been overprinted by aqueously mediated chemistry in asteroid parent bodies, forming amino acids and other prebiotic molecules. Comets are much richer in organic matter but it is less well characterized. Comet dust collected in the stratosphere shows larger H and N isotopic anomalies than most meteorites, suggesting better preservation of primordial organics. Rosetta studies of comet 67P coma dust find complex organic matter that may be related to the macromolecular material that dominates the organic inventory of primitive meteorites. The exogenous organic material accreting on Earth throughout its history is made up of thousands of molecular species formed in diverse processes ranging from circumstellar outflows to chemistry at near absolute zero in dark cloud cores and the formative environment within minor planets. NASA and JAXA are currently flying sample return missions to primitive, potentially organic-rich asteroids. The OSIRIS-REx and Hayabusa2 missions will map their target asteroids, Bennu and Ryugu, in detail and return regolith samples to Earth. Laboratory analyses of these pristine asteroid samples will provide unprecedented views of asteroidal organic matter relatively free of terrestrial contamination within well determined geological context. Studies of

  4. Zirconocene and Si-tethered diynes: a happy match directed toward organometallic chemistry and organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Xiong; Zhang, Shaoguang; Xi, Zhenfeng

    2011-07-19

    Characterizing reactive organometallic intermediates is critical for understanding the mechanistic aspects of metal-mediated organic reactions. Moreover, the isolation of reactive organometallic intermediates can often result in the ability to design new synthetic methods. In this Account, we outline synthetic methods that we developed for a variety of diverse Zr/Si organo-bimetallic compounds and Si/N heteroatom-organic compounds through the detailed study of zirconacyclobutene-silacyclobutene fused compounds. Two basic components are involved in this chemistry. The first is the Si-tethered diyne, which owes its rich reactive palette to the combination of the Si-C bond and the C≡C triple bond. The second is the low-valent zirconocene species Cp(2)Zr(II), which has proven very useful in organic synthesis. The reaction of these two components affords the zirconacyclobutene-silacyclobutene fused compound, which is the key reactive Zr/Si organo-bimetallic intermediate discussed here. We discuss the three types of reactions that have been developed for the zirconacyclobutene-silacyclobutene fused intermediate. The reaction with nitriles (the C≡N triple bond) is introduced in the first section. In this one-pot reaction, up to four different components can be combined: the Si-tethered diyne can be reacted with three identical nitriles, with differing nitriles, or with a nitrile and other unsaturated organic substrates such as formamides, isocyanides, acid chlorides, aldehydes, carbodiimides, and azides. Several unexpected multiring, fused Zr/Si organo-bimetallic intermediates were isolated and characterized. A wide variety of N-heterocycles, such as 5-azaindole, pyrrole, and pyrroloazepine derivatives, were obtained. We then discuss the reaction with alkynes (the C≡C triple bond). A consecutive skeletal rearrangement, differing from that observed in the reactions with nitriles, takes place in this reaction. Finally, we discuss the reaction with the C═X substrates

  5. Improving Students' Understanding of Molecular Structure through Broad-Based Use of Computer Models in the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Several articles suggest how to incorporate computer models into the organic chemistry laboratory, but relatively few papers discuss how to incorporate these models broadly into the organic chemistry lecture. Previous research has suggested that "manipulating" physical or computer models enhances student understanding; this study…

  6. Determination of concentration of radon, volatile organic compounds (VOC) and water chemistry in springs near to Popocatepetl volcano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, P.; Segovia, N.; Lopez M, B.E.; Cisniega, G.; Valdes, C.; Armienta, M.A.; Mena, M.

    2004-01-01

    Popocatepetl volcano is a high-risk active volcano in Central Mexico where the highest population density in the country is settled. Radon in the soil and groundwater together with water chemistry from samples of nearby springs is analysed as a function of the 2002-2003 volcanic activity. Soil radon indicated fluctuations related both the meteorological parameters and sporadic explosive events. Groundwater radon showed essentially differences in concentration due to the specific characteristics of the studied springs. Water chemistry showed stability along the monitoring period indicating also differences between springs. No anthropogenic pollution from volatile organic compounds was observed. (Author)

  7. Adsorption and desorption of dissolved organic matter by carbon nanotubes: Effects of solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Maya; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-06-01

    Increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has led to their introduction into the environment where they can interact with dissolved organic matter (DOM). This study focuses on solution chemistry effects on DOM adsorption/desorption processes by single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Our data show that DOM adsorption is controlled by the attachment of DOM molecules to the SWCNTs, and that the initial adsorption rate is dependent on solution parameters. Adsorbed amount of DOM at high ionic strength was limited, possibly due to alterations in SWCNT bundling. Desorption of DOM performed at low pH resulted in additional DOM adsorption, whereas at high pH, adsorbed DOM amount decreased. The extent of desorption conducted at increased ionic strength was dependent on pre-adsorbed DOM concentration: low DOM loading stimulated additional adsorption of DOM, whereas high DOM loading facilitated release of adsorbed DOM. Elevated ionic strength and increased adsorbed amount of DOM reduced the oxidation temperature of the SWCNTs, suggesting that changes in the assembly of the SWCNTs had occurred. Moreover, DOM-coated SWCNTs at increased ionic strength provided fewer sites for atrazine adsorption. This study enhances our understanding of DOM-SWCNT interactions in aqueous systems influenced by rapid changes in salinity, and facilitates potential use of SWCNTs in water-purification technologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. New perspectives for organic chemistry and biochemistry in VUV: reaction kinetics, chirality and thermochemistry. Summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahon, Laurent; Field, David; Gerber, Thomas; Knopp, Gregor; Beaud, Paul; Radi, Peter; Tulej, Marek; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jung, J.M.; Laprevote, Olivier; Thissen, Roland; Le Barbu, K.; Lahmani, F.; Zehnacker, A.; Maurizot, Jean Claude; Barbier, Bernard; Kagan, Henri B.

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this workshop was to examine the conditions of use of VUV for the study of complex molecular systems, and notably bio-molecules, a domain which is greatly expanding. The conclusions of this one-day workshop should allow to define new fields of utilization of the synchrotron radiation in VUV, to precise certain performances that are needed for the transferred line, to establish the complementarities with other VUV sources (lasers, free electron lasers, lamps) and to determine the eventual need for a second low energy light line at SOLEIL. The titles of the various abstract papers presented are (two papers are in English, the rest is in French): SU5, a high resolution and variable polarization VUV line that should be transferred at SOLEIL; Interstellar organic chemistry (in English); Application of spectroscopic techniques in the VUV to combustion relevant molecules (in English); Gaseous phase reaction kinetics (bi-molecular reactions in collision and in aggregates); Liquids of biological interest (excitation and relaxation close to the ionization threshold); Successes and impediments in protein mass spectrometry (the potential contribution of VUV synchrotron radiation); Stereo-specific effects; Complexes between chiral molecules; circular dichroism of biomolecules; Exobiology; asymmetric synthesis (principles and recent results)

  9. BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY REPORT. March through05/1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    1963-07-23

    This report covers the following titles: (1) Fertility and litter size of normally ovulated and artificially ovulated mice; (2) Further studies on sterility produced in male mice by deuterium oxide; (3) Planarian disaggregation; (4) Uptake of organic compounds by planarians. II; (5) Effects of environmental complexity and training on acetylcholinesterase and cholinesterase activity in rat brain; (6) Effects of environmental complexity and training on brain chemistry and anatomy among mature rats; (7) Improvements in paper chromatographic techniques for labeled cell extracts; (8) measurement and adjustment of pH in small volumes of solutions; (9) Carbon-14 and Nitrogen-15 tracer studies of amino acid synthesis during photosynthesis by Chlorella Pyrenoidosa; (10) Photosynthesis of {sup 14}C-labeled protein from {sup 14}CO{sub 2} by Chlorella; (11) Further studies on carboxydismutase; (12) Electron microscopy of chlorophyll a crystals; (13) The possible role of chromanyl phosphates in oxidative and photosynthetic phosphorylation; (14) Oxidation-reductions of some coenzymes; (15) Preparation of some [{sup 14}C] labeled substances: glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, 6-phosphogluconic acid, pyruvic acid, and succinic acid; (16) attempt to synthesize high molecular weight polynucleotides using Schramm's purely chemical method; and (17) Optical properties of some dye-polyanion complexes.

  10. Designing cooperatively folded abiotic uni- and multimolecular helix bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Soumen; Chi, Bo; Granier, Thierry; Qi, Ting; Maurizot, Victor; Huc, Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Abiotic foldamers, that is foldamers that have backbones chemically remote from peptidic and nucleotidic skeletons, may give access to shapes and functions different to those of peptides and nucleotides. However, design methodologies towards abiotic tertiary and quaternary structures are yet to be developed. Here we report rationally designed interactional patterns to guide the folding and assembly of abiotic helix bundles. Computational design facilitated the introduction of hydrogen-bonding functionalities at defined locations on the aromatic amide backbones that promote cooperative folding into helix-turn-helix motifs in organic solvents. The hydrogen-bond-directed aggregation of helices not linked by a turn unit produced several thermodynamically and kinetically stable homochiral dimeric and trimeric bundles with structures that are distinct from the designed helix-turn-helix. Relative helix orientation within the bundles may be changed from parallel to tilted on subtle solvent variations. Altogether, these results prefigure the richness and uniqueness of abiotic tertiary structure behaviour.

  11. Creating a Discovery Platform for Confined-Space Chemistry and Materials: Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Simmons, Blake

    2008-09-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOF) are a recently discovered class of nanoporous, defect-free crystalline materials that enable rational design and exploration of porous materials at the molecular level. MOFs have tunable monolithic pore sizes and cavity environments due to their crystalline nature, yielding properties exceeding those of most other porous materials. These include: the lowest known density (91% free space); highest surface area; tunable photoluminescence; selective molecular adsorption; and methane sorption rivaling gas cylinders. These properties are achieved by coupling inorganic metal complexes such as ZnO4 with tunable organic ligands that serve as struts, allowing facile manipulation of pore size and surface area through reactant selection. MOFs thus provide a discovery platform for generating both new understanding of chemistry in confined spaces and novel sensors and devices based on their unique properties. At the outset of this project in FY06, virtually nothing was known about how to couple MOFs to substrates and the science of MOF properties and how to tune them was in its infancy. An integrated approach was needed to establish the required knowledge base for nanoscale design and develop methodologies integrate MOFs with other materials. This report summarizes the key accomplishments of this project, which include creation of a new class of radiation detection materials based on MOFs, luminescent MOFs for chemical detection, use of MOFs as templates to create nanoparticles of hydrogen storage materials, MOF coatings for stress-based chemical detection using microcantilevers, and "flexible" force fields that account for structural changes in MOFs that occur upon molecular adsorption/desorption. Eight journal articles, twenty presentations at scientific conferences, and two patent applications resulted from the work. The project created a basis for continuing development of MOFs for many Sandia applications and succeeded in securing $2.75 M in

  12. Chairs!: A Mobile Game for Organic Chemistry Students to Learn the Ring Flip of Cyclohexane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Julia; Wentzel, Michael; Ahluwalia, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    The hallmark of game-based learning is that students discover concepts through trial and error as they play. With the digital landscape in higher education shifting to mobile-first, new tools for learning chemistry are both possible and needed. Interactive games for chemistry bring intuitive content directly to students through their devices. The…

  13. Comparing Amide-Forming Reactions Using Green Chemistry Metrics in an Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennie, Michael W.; Roth, Jessica M.

    2016-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, upper-division undergraduate chemistry and biochemistry majors investigate amide-bond-forming reactions from a green chemistry perspective. Using hydrocinnamic acid and benzylamine as reactants, students perform three types of amide-forming reactions: an acid chloride derivative route; a coupling reagent promoted…

  14. Role of Organic Solutes in the Chemistry Of Acid-Impacted Bog Waters of the Western Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    HrušKa, Jakub; Johnson, Chris E.; KráM, Pavel

    1996-04-01

    In many regions, naturally occurring organic acid anions can effectively buffer mineral acid inputs from atmospheric deposition, moderating their effect on surface water pH. We studied the effect of chronically high inputs of acid rain on the chemistry of three brown-water streams in the western Czech Republic. The dissolved organic acids in the streams were similar in character to those of other systems in Europe and North America. The site densities (the carboxyl group content per mass of C) were similar to values reported from Fenno-Scandia, and the relationship between the apparent pKa and pH conformed to those from two North American studies. Sulfate and organic acid anions (OA-) were the dominant anions in all three streams, yet despite high dissolved organic carbon and total organic acid concentrations, OA - comprised only 21-32% of total anion charge. This pattern was due to very high sulfate concentrations and, in two of the streams, a low degree of dissociation of the organic acids, probably the results of high long-term inputs of strong acids. Stream water pH was highly correlated to sulfate concentration, but uncorrelated with OA-, suggesting that free acidity is controlled by strong mineral acids rather than organic acids. Thus future reductions in strong acid inputs should result in increased pH and a return to organic control over acid-base chemistry.

  15. Metal-organic frameworks for analytical chemistry: from sample collection to chromatographic separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhi-Yuan; Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Chang, Na; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2012-05-15

    In modern analytical chemistry researchers pursue novel materials to meet analytical challenges such as improvements in sensitivity, selectivity, and detection limit. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are an emerging class of microporous materials, and their unusual properties such as high surface area, good thermal stability, uniform structured nanoscale cavities, and the availability of in-pore functionality and outer-surface modification are attractive for diverse analytical applications. This Account summarizes our research on the analytical applications of MOFs ranging from sampling to chromatographic separation. MOFs have been either directly used or engineered to meet the demands of various analytical applications. Bulk MOFs with microsized crystals are convenient sorbents for direct application to in-field sampling and solid-phase extraction. Quartz tubes packed with MOF-5 have shown excellent stability, adsorption efficiency, and reproducibility for in-field sampling and trapping of atmospheric formaldehyde. The 2D copper(II) isonicotinate packed microcolumn has demonstrated large enhancement factors and good shape- and size-selectivity when applied to on-line solid-phase extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water samples. We have explored the molecular sieving effect of MOFs for the efficient enrichment of peptides with simultaneous exclusion of proteins from biological fluids. These results show promise for the future of MOFs in peptidomics research. Moreover, nanosized MOFs and engineered thin films of MOFs are promising materials as novel coatings for solid-phase microextraction. We have developed an in situ hydrothermal growth approach to fabricate thin films of MOF-199 on etched stainless steel wire for solid-phase microextraction of volatile benzene homologues with large enhancement factors and wide linearity. Their high thermal stability and easy-to-engineer nanocrystals make MOFs attractive as new stationary phases to fabricate MOF

  16. Role of aldehyde chemistry and NOx concentrations in secondary organic aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Wennberg

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Aldehydes are an important class of products from atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons. Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene, the most abundantly emitted atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbon, produces a significant amount of secondary organic aerosol (SOA via methacrolein (a C4-unsaturated aldehyde under urban high-NOx conditions. Previously, we have identified peroxy methacryloyl nitrate (MPAN as the important intermediate to isoprene and methacrolein SOA in this NOx regime. Here we show that as a result of this chemistry, NO2 enhances SOA formation from methacrolein and two other α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, specifically acrolein and crotonaldehyde, a NOx effect on SOA formation previously unrecognized. Oligoesters of dihydroxycarboxylic acids and hydroxynitrooxycarboxylic acids are observed to increase with increasing NO2/NO ratio, and previous characterizations are confirmed by both online and offline high-resolution mass spectrometry techniques. Molecular structure also determines the amount of SOA formation, as the SOA mass yields are the highest for aldehydes that are α, β-unsaturated and contain an additional methyl group on the α-carbon. Aerosol formation from 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO232 is insignificant, even under high-NO2 conditions, as PAN (peroxy acyl nitrate, RC(OOONO2 formation is structurally unfavorable. At atmospherically relevant NO2/NO ratios (3–8, the SOA yields from isoprene high-NOx photooxidation are 3 times greater than previously measured at lower NO2/NO ratios. At sufficiently high NO2 concentrations, in systems of α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, SOA formation from subsequent oxidation of products from acyl peroxyl radicals+NO2 can exceed that from RO2+HO2 reactions under the same inorganic seed conditions, making RO2+NO2 an important channel for SOA formation.

  17. Role of aldehyde chemistry and NOx concentrations in secondary organic aerosol formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, A. W. H.; Chan, M. N.; Surratt, J. D.; Chhabra, P. S.; Loza, C. L.; Crounse, J. D.; Yee, L. D.; Flagan, R. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-08-01

    Aldehydes are an important class of products from atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons. Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene), the most abundantly emitted atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbon, produces a significant amount of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via methacrolein (a C4-unsaturated aldehyde) under urban high-NOx conditions. Previously, we have identified peroxy methacryloyl nitrate (MPAN) as the important intermediate to isoprene and methacrolein SOA in this NOx regime. Here we show that as a result of this chemistry, NO2 enhances SOA formation from methacrolein and two other α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, specifically acrolein and crotonaldehyde, a NOx effect on SOA formation previously unrecognized. Oligoesters of dihydroxycarboxylic acids and hydroxynitrooxycarboxylic acids are observed to increase with increasing NO2/NO ratio, and previous characterizations are confirmed by both online and offline high-resolution mass spectrometry techniques. Molecular structure also determines the amount of SOA formation, as the SOA mass yields are the highest for aldehydes that are α, β-unsaturated and contain an additional methyl group on the α-carbon. Aerosol formation from 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO232) is insignificant, even under high-NO2 conditions, as PAN (peroxy acyl nitrate, RC(O)OONO2) formation is structurally unfavorable. At atmospherically relevant NO2/NO ratios (3-8), the SOA yields from isoprene high-NOx photooxidation are 3 times greater than previously measured at lower NO2/NO ratios. At sufficiently high NO2 concentrations, in systems of α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, SOA formation from subsequent oxidation of products from acyl peroxyl radicals+NO2 can exceed that from RO2+HO2 reactions under the same inorganic seed conditions, making RO2+NO2 an important channel for SOA formation.

  18. Teaching a Modified Hendrickson, Cram, and Hammond Curriculum in Organic Chemistry. Curriculum Redesign To Turn Around Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karty, Joel M.; Gooch, Gene; Gray Bowman, B.

    2007-07-01

    Prior to the 2004 2005 academic year, a variety of indicators suggested a severe problem with the two-semester organic chemistry series at Elon University, a private, liberal arts institution with an enrollment averaging about 4500 undergraduate students. Student evaluations of teaching for organic chemistry were below the university average, the student attrition rate was near 50%, students exhibited poor competency with mechanisms, and scores on the ACS final exam were quite low. In the fall of 2004, we introduced a new curriculum, reminiscent of the approach by Hendrickson, Cram, and Hammond. In this new curriculum, fundamental concepts are introduced before mechanisms, and mechanisms are introduced before reactions. Reactions are introduced according to similarities among mechanisms rather than the functional group involved. After the implementation of that curriculum, substantially positive changes were observed for all of the above indicators. This report examines which factors may be the specific causes of these positive changes.

  19. Nickel-Catalyzed Suzuki–Miyaura Cross-Coupling in a Green Alcohol Solvent for an Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Hie, Liana; Chang, Jonah J.; Garg, Neil K.

    2014-01-01

    A modern undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment involving the Suzuki–Miyaura coupling is reported. Although Suzuki–Miyaura couplings typically employ palladium catalysts in environmentally harmful solvents, this experiment features the use of inexpensive nickel catalysis, in addition to a “green” alcohol solvent. The experiment employs heterocyclic substrates, which are important pharmaceutical building blocks. Thus, this laboratory procedure exposes students to a variety of co...

  20. Organic Iodine(I, III, and V Chemistry: 10 Years of Development at the Medical University of Warsaw, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Skulski

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This review reports some novel (or considerably improved methods for the synthesis of aromatic iodides, (dichloroiodoarenes, (diacetoxyiodoarenes, iodylarenes and diaryliodonium salts, as well as some facile, oxidative anion metatheses in crude diaryliodonium halides and, for comparison, potassium halides. All these new results were obtained in our laboratory over the past decade (1990-2000. A full list of our papers dealing with the organic iodine(I, III and V chemistry, covering exlusively the aromatic derivatives, is also provided.

  1. Abiotic stress signaling and responses in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Summary As sessile organisms, plants must cope with abiotic stress such as soil salinity, drought, and extreme temperatures. Core stress signaling pathways involve protein kinases related to the yeast SNF1 and mammalian AMPK, suggesting that stress signaling in plants evolved from energy sensing. Stress signaling regulates proteins critical for ion and water transport and for metabolic and gene-expression reprogramming to bring about ionic and water homeostasis and cellular stability under stress conditions. Understanding stress signaling and responses will increase our ability to improve stress resistance in crops to achieve agricultural sustainability and food security for a growing world population. PMID:27716505

  2. Sterilization affects soil organic matter chemistry and bioaccumulation of spiked p,p'-DDE and anthracene by earthworms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, Jason W., E-mail: kelsey@muhlenberg.ed [Program in Environmental Science and Department of Chemistry, Muhlenberg College, 2400 Chew Street, Allentown, PA 18104 (United States); Slizovskiy, Ilya B.; Peters, Richard D.; Melnick, Adam M. [Program in Environmental Science and Department of Chemistry, Muhlenberg College, 2400 Chew Street, Allentown, PA 18104 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to assess the effects of soil sterilization on the bioavailability of spiked p,p'-DDE and anthracene to the earthworms Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus terrestris. Physical and chemical changes to soil organic matter (SOM) induced by sterilization were also studied. Uptake of both compounds added after soil was autoclaved or gamma irradiated increased for E. fetida. Sterilization had no effect on bioaccumulation of p,p'-DDE by L. terrestris, and anthracene uptake increased only in gamma-irradiated soils. Analyses by FT-IR and DSC indicate sterilization alters SOM chemistry and may reduce pollutant sorption. Chemical changes to SOM were tentatively linked to changes in bioaccumulation, although the effects were compound and species specific. Artifacts produced by sterilization could lead to inaccurate risk assessments of contaminated sites if assumptions derived from studies carried out in sterilized soil are used. Ultimately, knowledge of SOM chemistry could aid predictions of bioaccumulation of organic pollutants. - Soil sterilization affects soil organic matter chemistry and pollutant bioaccumulation.

  3. Dust evolution, a global view: III. Core/mantle grains, organic nano-globules, comets and surface chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A P

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of The Heterogeneous dust Evolution Model for Interstellar Solids (THEMIS), this work explores the surface processes and chemistry relating to core/mantle interstellar and cometary grain structures and their influence on the nature of these fascinating particles. It appears that a realistic consideration of the nature and chemical reactivity of interstellar grain surfaces could self-consistently and within a coherent framework explain: the anomalous oxygen depletion, the nature of the CO dark gas, the formation of 'polar ice' mantles, the red wing on the 3 μm water ice band, the basis for the O-rich chemistry observed in hot cores, the origin of organic nano-globules and the 3.2 μm 'carbonyl' absorption band observed in comet reflectance spectra. It is proposed that the reaction of gas phase species with carbonaceous a-C(:H) grain surfaces in the interstellar medium, in particular the incorporation of atomic oxygen into grain surfaces in epoxide functional groups, is the key to explaining these observations. Thus, the chemistry of cosmic dust is much more intimately related with that of the interstellar gas than has previously been considered. The current models for interstellar gas and dust chemistry will therefore most likely need to be fundamentally modified to include these new grain surface processes.

  4. Design of Organic Transformations at Ambient Conditions: Our Sincere Efforts to the Cause of Green Chemistry Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmachari, Goutam

    2016-02-01

    This account summarizes our recent efforts in designing a good number of important organic transformations leading to the synthesis of biologically relevant compounds at room temperature and pressure. Currently, the concept of green chemistry is globally acclaimed and has already advanced quite significantly to emerge as a distinct branch of chemical sciences. Among the principles of green chemistry, one principle is dedicated to the "design of energy efficiency" - that is, to develop synthetic strategies that require less or the minimum amount of energy to carry out a specific reaction with optimum productivity - and the most effective way to save energy is to develop strategies/protocols that are capable enough to carry out the transformations at ambient temperature! As part of on-going developments in green synthetic strategies, the design of reactions under ambient conditions coupled with other green aspects is, thus, an area of current interest. The concept of developing reaction strategies at room temperature and pressure is now an emerging field of research in organic chemistry and is progressing steadily. This account is aimed to offer an overview of our recent research works directly related to this particular field of interest, and highlights the green chemistry practice leading to carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bond-forming reactions of topical significance. Green synthetic routes to a variety of biologically relevant organic molecules (heterocyclic, heteroaromatic, alicyclic, acyclic, etc.) at room temperature and pressure are discussed. © 2015 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Testing the Vibrational Theory of Olfaction: A Bio-Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Using Hooke's Law and Chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthyala, Rajeev S.; Butani, Deepali; Nelson, Michelle; Tran, Kiet

    2017-01-01

    Sense of smell is one of the important senses that enables us to interact with our environment. The molecular basis of olfactory signal transduction is a fascinating area for organic chemistry educators to explore in terms of developing undergraduate laboratory activities at the interface of chemistry and biology. In this paper, a guided-inquiry…

  6. Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation Using a Copper(I)/TEMPO Catalyst System: A Green, Catalytic Oxidation Reaction for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nicholas J.; Hoover, Jessica M.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2013-01-01

    Modern undergraduate organic chemistry textbooks provide detailed discussion of stoichiometric Cr- and Mn-based reagents for the oxidation of alcohols, yet the use of such oxidants in instructional and research laboratories, as well as industrial chemistry, is increasingly avoided. This work describes a laboratory exercise that uses ambient air as…

  7. Oxylipins and plant abiotic stress resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, T V; Zastrijnaja, O M; Klimov, V V

    2014-04-01

    Oxylipins are signaling molecules formed enzymatically or spontaneously from unsaturated fatty acids in all aerobic organisms. Oxylipins regulate growth, development, and responses to environmental stimuli of organisms. The oxylipin biosynthesis pathway in plants includes a few parallel branches named after first enzyme of the corresponding branch as allene oxide synthase, hydroperoxide lyase, divinyl ether synthase, peroxygenase, epoxy alcohol synthase, and others in which various biologically active metabolites are produced. Oxylipins can be formed non-enzymatically as a result of oxygenation of fatty acids by free radicals and reactive oxygen species. Spontaneously formed oxylipins are called phytoprostanes. The role of oxylipins in biotic stress responses has been described in many published works. The role of oxylipins in plant adaptation to abiotic stress conditions is less studied; there is also obvious lack of available data compilation and analysis in this area of research. In this work we analyze data on oxylipins functions in plant adaptation to abiotic stress conditions, such as wounding, suboptimal light and temperature, dehydration and osmotic stress, and effects of ozone and heavy metals. Modern research articles elucidating the molecular mechanisms of oxylipins action by the methods of biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics are reviewed here. Data on the role of oxylipins in stress signal transduction, stress-inducible gene expression regulation, and interaction of these metabolites with other signal transduction pathways in cells are described. In this review the general oxylipin-mediated mechanisms that help plants to adjust to a broad spectrum of stress factors are considered, followed by analysis of more specific responses regulated by oxylipins only under certain stress conditions. New approaches to improvement of plant resistance to abiotic stresses based on the induction of oxylipin-mediated processes are discussed.

  8. [JSPS Asian core program on cutting-edge organic chemistry in Asia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Minoru; Nishikawa, Toshio

    2009-04-01

    The vision to establish this program was to establish and extend cooperative research efforts beyond the intraregional boundaries. The Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) has taken an initiative to support an Asian Core Program, which aims to create world-class research hubs within the Asian region and foster the development of the next generation of leading researchers by establishing sustainable collaborative relations among research and educational institutions in Asian countries. Nagoya University strongly supports and is the Core University of this program with Minoru Isobe and Toshio Nishikawa serving as the coordinator. Representing their respective countries/regions, Guo-Qiang Lin and Zhu-Jun Yao (China, Shanghai), Sunggak Kim and Kwan-Soo Kim (Korea), Somsak Ruchirawat (Thailand), and Chun-Chen Liao and Biing-Jiun Uang (China, Taipei) share in the vision to enhance collaborative efforts. As coordinators they have invited many cooperative universities/institutes in their home countries/regions to start the network since 2005. Singapore (Tech-Peng Loh) has joined lately, and Hong Kong is represented by Henry Wong. All cooperating regions also agreed to support this program by acquiring matching funds for the duration of the program, that is, until March 2010. This program is jointly supported by the JSPS (Japan), the NNSFC (China, Beijing), the NSCT (China, Taipei), the KOSEF/CMDS (Korea), the NRCT/CRI (Thailand), and the IUPAC for an East Asian Network Task group project. Pauline Chiu takes the general secretary work. The initiation of the Asian Core Program and the Inauguration Conference (The 0th International Conference on Cutting-Edge Organic Chemistry in Asia; ICCEOCA-0) was held in Nagoya (2006. 3), which was followed by ICCEOCA-1 in Okinawa, Japan (2006. 10), ICCEOCA-2 in Busan, Korea (2007. 9), ICCEOCA-3 in Hangzhou, China (2008. 10). A post symposium of ICCEOCA-1 was held in Hsinchu, Taiwan (2006. 10), and a satellite symposium of

  9. BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY REPORT. December 1961, January and February 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various,

    1962-04-03

    Progress is reported in investigations on the polymerization of formaldehyde, ultraviolet irradiation of aqueous HC/sup 14/N, radiation chemistry of nucleic acid constituents, oxidation of free sugars and aldonic acid derivatives by Acetobacter suboxydans, preparation and isolation of C/sup 14/O/ sub 2/~ enzyme, metabolism of C/sup 14/-ribulose diphosphate by Nitrobacter agilis, C/sup 14/O/sub 2/ metabolism of Hordeum valgare seedlings during the development of the photosynthetic apparatus, location and chemical characterization of RNA in the chloroplasts of Spinacea oleracea, inhibition of dark bleaching by stroma extracts and by inert gases, ESR studies on chromatophores from Rhodospirillium rubrum and on quantasomes from spinach chloroplasts, and phthalocyanine manganese and etioporphyrin manganese complexes. (J.R.D.) It has been known for a hundred years that formaldehyde polymerizes to carbohydrate substances in alkaline media. Although the reaction has long attracted much attention, only recently has a detailed qualitative analysis of the products been carried out by chromatographic methods. We have started to re-examine this reaction by combining chromatography with radioactive tracer techniques in the hope of refining the quantitative aspects of the analysis. Our particular interest has been to develop methods for determining the relative proportions of ribose and ribulose in the mixtures of sugars formed in basic media, as well as under other polymerizing conditions. The finding of large amounts of these sugars might help to explain the occurrence of ribose as the only basic sugar in the fundamental replicating molecules--the nucleic acids. Formaldehyde is thought to have been present in the primitive reducing atmosphere which existed before life first appeared. The ribonucleic acids must have appeared in the constitution of reproducing systems at a very early stage in the development of living organisms. In this study, the polymerizations of formaldehyde

  10. Volatile organic compounds in the New England troposphere: Atmospheric chemistry and measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Jesse L.

    Atmospheric measurements made at Appledore Island, Maine were used to investigate nighttime nitrate radical (NO3) chemistry and its significance for the nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) budget in the Gulf of Maine region during the summer of 2004 International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation field campaign. Removal of NOx was strongly dependent on reactions of NO3 with biogenic volatile organic compounds and the fate of dinitrogen pentoxide (N 2O5). For three case studies, temporal profiles of NO 3 were calculated from measured parameters. Comparisons between measured and calculated NO3 mixing ratios highlighted significant uncertainties in the kinetic parameters governing gas-phase and heterogeneous N2O 5 hydrolysis. Removal of NOx was estimated to be ˜11 ppbv day-1, with nighttime chemical pathways contributing ˜50%. Atmospheric measurements made at the AIRMAP atmospheric monitoring station Thompson Farm (THF) during summer, 2004 were used to test the specificity of a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTA-MS) for atmospheric toluene measurements under conditions often dominated by biogenic emissions. Quantitative estimates were made of potential interferences in the PTR-MS toluene measurements related to sampling and analysis of monoterpenes, including fragmentation of the monoterpenes and some of their primary carbonyl oxidation products in the PTR-MS drift tube. The analysis supported only minor interferences from the investigated fragmentation sources, suggesting that toluene can be reliably quantified by PTR-MS with the operating parameters used, under the ambient compositions probed. This work extends the range of field conditions under which PTR-MS validation studies have been conducted. A GC instrument was developed for measurement of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in the lower atmosphere. Its major features include a cold temperature analyte enrichment system, a robust porous polymer stationary phase capillary

  11. Organization of a cognitive activity of students when teaching analytical chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. Tapalova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative analysis allows using basic knowledge of general and inorganic chemistry for the solution of practical problems, disclosure the chemism of the processes that are fundamental for  the methods of analysis. Systematic qualitative analysis develops analytical thinking, establishes a scientific style of thinking of students.Сhemical analysis requires certain skills and abilities and develops the general chemical culture of the future teachers оn chemistry. The result can be evaluated in the course of self-control, peer review, and solving creative problems. Mastering the techniques of critical thinking (comparison, abstraction, generalization and their use in a particular chemical material - are necessary element in the formation of professional thinking of the future chemistry teacher.

  12. Environmental chemistry. Seventh edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manahan, S.E. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1999-11-01

    This book presents a basic understanding of environmental chemistry and its applications. In addition to providing updated materials in this field, the book emphasizes the major concepts essential to the practice of environmental chemistry. Topics of discussion include the following: toxicological chemistry; toxicological chemistry of chemical substances; chemical analysis of water and wastewater; chemical analysis of wastes and solids; air and gas analysis; chemical analysis of biological materials and xenobiotics; fundamentals of chemistry; and fundamentals of organic chemistry.

  13. The effects of organic matter-mineral interactions and organic matter chemistry on diuron sorption across a diverse range of soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smernik, Ronald J; Kookana, Rai S

    2015-01-01

    Sorption of non-ionic organic compounds to soil is usually expressed as the carbon-normalized partition coefficient (KOC), because it is assumed that the main factor that influences the amount sorbed is the organic carbon content of the soil. However, KOC can vary by a factor of at least ten across a range of soils. We investigated two potential causes of variation in diuron KOC - organic matter-mineral interactions and organic matter chemistry - for a diverse set of 34 soils from Sri Lanka, representing a wide range of soil types. Treatment with hydrofluoric acid (HF-treatment) was used to concentrate soil organic matter. HF-treatment increased KOC for the majority of soils (average factor 2.4). We attribute this increase to the blocking of organic matter sorption sites in the whole soils by minerals. There was no significant correlation between KOC for the whole soils and KOC for the HF-treated soils, indicating that the importance of organic matter-mineral interactions varied greatly amongst these soils. There was as much variation in KOC across the HF-treated soils as there was across the whole soils, indicating that the nature of soil organic matter is also an important contributor to KOC variability. Organic matter chemistry, determined by solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was correlated with KOC for the HF-treated soils. In particular, KOC increased with the aromatic C content (R=0.64, p=1×10(-6)), and decreased with O-alkyl C (R=-0.32, p=0.03) and alkyl C (R=-0.41, p=0.004) content. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dragonfly: In Situ Exploration of Titan's Prebiotic Organic Chemistry and Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, E. P.; Barnes, J. W.; Trainer, M. G.; Lorenz, R. D.; Hibbard, K. E.; Adams, D. S.; Bedini, P.; Langelaan, J. W.; Zacny, K.

    2017-09-01

    Titan's abundant complex carbon-rich chemistry, interior ocean, and past presence of liquid water on the surface, make it an ideal destination to study prebiotic chemical processes and to document the habitability of an extraterrestrial environment. Moreover, Titan's dense atmosphere and low gravity provide the means to access different geologic settings over 10s - 100s of kilometers apart, via exploration by an aerial vehicle. Dragonfly is a rotorcraft lander mission proposed to New Frontiers to use Titan's unique natural laboratory to understand how far chemistry can progress in environments that provide key ingredients for life.

  15. Transport of oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes through silica based porous media: influences of aquatic chemistry, surface chemistry, and natural organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Bitter, Julie L; Smith, Billy A; Fairbrother, D Howard; Ball, William P

    2013-12-17

    This paper provides results from studies of the transport of oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (O-MWCNTs) of varying surface oxygen concentrations under a range of aquatic conditions and through uniform silica glass bead media. In the presence of Na(+), the required ionic strength (IS) for maximum particle attachment efficiency (i.e., the critical deposition concentration, or CDC) increased as the surface oxygen concentration of the O-MWCNTs or pH increased, following qualitative tenets of theories based on electrostatic interactions. In the presence of Ca(2+), CDC values were lower than those with Na(+) present, but were no longer sensitive to surface oxygen content, suggesting that Ca(2+) impacts the interactions between O-MWCNTs and glass beads by mechanisms other than electrostatic alone. The presence of Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) decreased the attachment efficiency of O-MWCNTs in the presence of either Na(+) or Ca(2+), but with more pronounced effects when Na(+) was present. Nevertheless, low concentrations of SRNOM (organic carbon) were sufficient to mobilize all O-MWCNTs studied at CaCl2 concentrations as high as 10 mM. Overall, this study reveals that NOM content, pH, and cation type show more importance than surface chemistry in affecting O-MWCNTs deposition during transport through silica-based porous media.

  16. Green, Enzymatic Syntheses of Divanillin and Diapocynin for the Organic, Biochemistry, or Advanced General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Rachel T.; Giammanco, Chiara H.; Vosburg, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Environmentally benign chemistry is an increasingly important topic both in the classroom and the laboratory. In this experiment, students synthesize divanillin from vanillin or diapocynin from apocynin, using horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide in water. The dimerized products form rapidly at ambient temperature and are isolated by…

  17. Organic Chemistry YouTube Writing Assignment for Large Lecture Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Annaliese K.

    2012-01-01

    This work describes efforts to incorporate and evaluate the use of a YouTube writing assignment in large lecture classes to personalize learning and improve conceptual understanding of chemistry through peer- and self-explanation strategies. Although writing assignments can be a method to incorporate peer- and self-explanation strategies, this…

  18. Regional Impacts of extending inorganic and organic cloud chemistry with AQCHEM-KMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starting with CMAQ version 5.1, AQCHEM-KMT has been offered as a readily expandable option for cloud chemistry via application of the Kinetic PreProcessor (KPP). AQCHEM-KMT treats kinetic mass transfer between the gas and aqueous phases, ionization, chemical kinetics, droplet sc...

  19. Greener "Solutions" for the Organic Chemistry Teaching Lab: Exploring the Advantages of Alternative Reaction Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Lallie C.; Huffman, Lauren M.; Hutchison, James E.; Rogers, Courtney E.; Goodwin, Thomas E.; Spessard, Gary O.

    2009-01-01

    A major approach for implementing green chemistry is the discovery and development of synthetic strategies that reduce the quantity of solvent needed, eliminate it altogether, or rely on new reaction media. An increasing number of examples have demonstrated that greener reaction solvents or media can enhance performance as well as reduce hazard.…

  20. A Continuum of Learning: From Rote Memorization to Meaningful Learning in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Nathaniel P.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2012-01-01

    The Assimilation Theory of Ausubel and Novak has typically been used in the research literature to describe two extremes to learning chemistry: meaningful learning "versus" rote memorization. It is unlikely, however, that such discrete categories of learning exist. Rote and meaningful learning, rather, are endpoints along a continuum of…

  1. Connecting Biology and Organic Chemistry Introductory Laboratory Courses through a Collaborative Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltax, Ariana L.; Armanious, Stephanie; Kosinski-Collins, Melissa S.; Pontrello, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Modern research often requires collaboration of experts in fields, such as math, chemistry, biology, physics, and computer science to develop unique solutions to common problems. Traditional introductory undergraduate laboratory curricula in the sciences often do not emphasize connections possible between the various disciplines. We designed an…

  2. Some aspects of the organic, biological and inorganic chemistry of astatine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, G.W.M.

    1982-01-01

    Astatine has no stable isotopes and the radioactive isotopes with half-lives sufficiently long for chemical experiments ( 209 At, 210 At, 211 At) must be produced artificially with a cyclotron or with a high energy accelerator by spallation of Th. This thesis deals with the synthesis and chemistry of At-compounds and the determination of some of their properties. (C.F.)

  3. Surface organization of aqueous MgCl2 and application to atmospheric marine aerosol chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Casillas-Ituarte, N. N.; Callahan, K. M.; Tang, CH. Y.; Chen, X.; Roeselová, Martina; Tobias, D. J.; Allen, H. C.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 15 (2010), s. 6616-6621 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA MŠk ME09064 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : magnesium chloride * fatty acid * air/aqueous interface Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 9.771, year: 2010

  4. Annual report 1984 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funck, J.; Larsen, E.; Nielsen, O.J.

    1985-03-01

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1984 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry , environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, geochemistry and waste disposal, radical chemistry, positron annihilation, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  5. Annual report 1985 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funck, J.; Larsen, E.; Nielsen, O.J.

    1986-03-01

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All particles and reports published and lectures given in 1985 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, geochemistry and waste disposal, radical chemistry, positron annihilation, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  6. Materials Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Fahlman, Bradley D

    2011-01-01

    The 2nd edition of Materials Chemistry builds on the strengths that were recognized by a 2008 Textbook Excellence Award from the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA). Materials Chemistry addresses inorganic-, organic-, and nano-based materials from a structure vs. property treatment, providing a suitable breadth and depth coverage of the rapidly evolving materials field. The 2nd edition continues to offer innovative coverage and practical perspective throughout. After briefly defining materials chemistry and its history, seven chapters discuss solid-state chemistry, metals, semiconducting materials, organic "soft" materials, nanomaterials, and materials characterization. All chapters have been thoroughly updated and expanded with, for example, new sections on ‘soft lithographic’ patterning, ‘click chemistry’ polymerization, nanotoxicity, graphene, as well as many biomaterials applications. The polymer and ‘soft’ materials chapter represents the largest expansion for the 2nd edition. Each ch...

  7. Organic chemistry and biology: chemical biology through the eyes of collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, Victor J

    2009-12-18

    From a scientific perspective, efforts to understand biology including what constitutes health and disease has become a chemical problem. However, chemists and biologists "see" the problems of understanding biology from different perspectives, and this has retarded progress in solving the problems especially as they relate to health and disease. This suggests that close collaboration between chemists and biologists is not only necessary but essential for progress in both the biology and chemistry that will provide solutions to the global questions of biology. This perspective has directed my scientific efforts for the past 45 years, and in this overview I provide my perspective of how the applications of synthetic chemistry, structural design, and numerous other chemical principles have intersected in my collaborations with biologists to provide new tools, new science, and new insights that were only made possible and fruitful by these collaborations.

  8. Organic Chemistry of Southern Sources: Microwave Spectroscopy of Cha-MMS1 and IRAS 15194-5115

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, Martin; Charnley, Steven

    2011-01-01

    We report new spectra of molecule-rich sources in the southern hemisphere obtained using the 22-meter Mopra telescope. Spectra and maps are presented of organic molecules detected between 30 and 50 GHz in the young Class 0 protostar Chamaeleon MMS-1. The large abundances of polyynes, cyanopolyynes and methanol may be indicative of a warm carbon chemistry in the dense gas surrounding this protostar. Spectra are also presented from a 78-96 GHz scan of the carbon-rich AGB star IRAS 15194-5115, including new detections of HC5N, CCS and C13CH.

  9. Chemistry of Small Organic Molecules on Snow Grains: The Applicability of Artificial Snow for Environmental Studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kurková, R.; Ray, D.; Nachtigallová, Dana; Klán, P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 8 (2011), s. 3430-3436 ISSN 0013-936X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/10/0947 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : water-ice * photochemical decomposition * dibenzyl- ketones Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.228, year: 2011

  10. Sunscreen synthesis and their immobilisation on polymethylmethacrylate: an integrated project in organic chemistry, polymer chemistry and photochemistry; Sintese de fotoprotetores e sua imobilizacao em poli(metacrilato de metilo): um projeto integrado de quimica organica, quimica de polimeros e fotoquimica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murtinho, Dina Maria B.; Serra, Maria Elisa S.; Pineiro, Marta, E-mail: dmurtinho@ci.uc.p [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia. Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    Dibenzalacetone and other aldol condensation products are known sunscreens commonly used in cosmetics. This type of compounds can easily be prepared in an Organic Chemistry Lab by reaction of aldehydes with ketones in basic medium. These compounds can be incorporated in poly(methyl methacrylate) and used as UV light absorbers, for example in sunglasses. This project has the advantage of using inexpensive reagents which are readily available in Chemistry Laboratories. This experiment can also be a base starting point for discussions of organic, polymer and photochemistry topics. (author)

  11. A lead user of instruments in science: John D. Roberts and the adaptation of nuclear magnetic resonance to organic chemistry, 1955-1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Carsten

    2006-06-01

    During the 1960s organic chemistry underwent a spectacular transformation as a result of the introduction of high-tech instruments. In this process, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) became an important analytical technique in organic chemistry. The theme of this essay is the relationship of Varian Associates of Palo Alto, California, the major manufacturer of NMR spectrometers up to the 1970s, with one early and crucial user, the organic chemist John D. Roberts, who was based at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Roberts's research and teaching contributed to the fast and smooth acceptance of NMR in organic chemistry. He embraced the role of mediator between the instrument manufacturer, which had expertise mainly in physics and electrical engineering, and the customers, who were mostly organic chemists. This essay focuses on the tactics used by Roberts and James N. Shoolery at Varian Associates to implement novel types of instrumentation and on the modes of cooperation between instrument manufacturer and academic scientist.

  12. Abiotic ozone and oxygen in atmospheres similar to prebiotic Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D. [Planetary Environments Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Segura, Antígona; Claire, Mark W.; Robinson, Tyler D.; Meadows, Victoria S., E-mail: shawn.goldman@nasa.gov [NASA Astrobiology Institute—Virtual Planetary Laboratory (United States)

    2014-09-10

    The search for life on planets outside our solar system will use spectroscopic identification of atmospheric biosignatures. The most robust remotely detectable potential biosignature is considered to be the detection of oxygen (O{sub 2}) or ozone (O{sub 3}) simultaneous to methane (CH{sub 4}) at levels indicating fluxes from the planetary surface in excess of those that could be produced abiotically. Here we use an altitude-dependent photochemical model with the enhanced lower boundary conditions necessary to carefully explore abiotic O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} production on lifeless planets with a wide variety of volcanic gas fluxes and stellar energy distributions. On some of these worlds, we predict limited O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} buildup, caused by fast chemical production of these gases. This results in detectable abiotic O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} features in the UV-visible, but no detectable abiotic O{sub 2} features. Thus, simultaneous detection of O{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} by a UV-visible mission is not a strong biosignature without proper contextual information. Discrimination between biological and abiotic sources of O{sub 2} and O{sub 3} is possible through analysis of the stellar and atmospheric context—particularly redox state and O atom inventory—of the planet in question. Specifically, understanding the spectral characteristics of the star and obtaining a broad wavelength range for planetary spectra should allow more robust identification of false positives for life. This highlights the importance of wide spectral coverage for future exoplanet characterization missions. Specifically, discrimination between true and false positives may require spectral observations that extend into infrared wavelengths and provide contextual information on the planet's atmospheric chemistry.

  13. Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Kroll, Jesse H.; Donahue, Neil M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Altieri, Katye E.; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Wozniak, Andrew S.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Mysak, Erin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2010-11-05

    A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations, and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that organics play in human health, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. However, such an understanding is hindered by the immense chemical complexity of environmental mixtures of organics; for example, atmospheric organic aerosol consists of at least thousands of individual compounds, all of which likely evolve chemically over their atmospheric lifetimes. Here we demonstrate the utility of describing organic aerosol (and other complex organic mixtures) in terms of average carbon oxidation state (OSC), a quantity that always increases with oxidation, and is readily measured using state-of-the-art analytical techniques. Field and laboratory measurements of OSC , using several such techniques, constrain the chemical properties of the organics and demonstrate that the formation and evolution of organic aerosol involves simultaneous changes to both carbon oxidation state and carbon number (nC).

  14. Inserção do conceito de economia atômica no programa de uma disciplina de química orgânica experimental Inclusion of atom economy concept in an experimental organic chemistry undergraduate course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Maria Oliveira Coelho Merat

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the atom economy concepts are applied in a series of experiments during an experimental organic chemistry class, to implement "green chemistry" in an undergraduate course.

  15. The 1953 Stanley L. Miller Experiment: Fifty Years of Prebiotic Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazcano, Antonio; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The field of prebiotic chemistry effectively began with a publication in Science 50 years ago by Stanley L. Miller on the spark discharge synthesis of amino acids and other compounds using a mixture of reduced gases that were thought to represent the components of the atmosphere on the primitive Earth. On the anniversary of this landmark publication, we provide here an accounting of the events leading to the publication of the paper. We also discuss the historical aspects that lead up to the landmark Miller experiment.

  16. Clean graphene electrodes on organic thin-film devices via orthogonal fluorinated chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jonathan H; Barton, Robert A; Cox, Marshall P; Alexandrou, Konstantinos; Petrone, Nicholas; Olivieri, Giorgia; Yang, Shyuan; Hone, James; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2015-04-08

    Graphene is a promising flexible, highly transparent, and elementally abundant electrode for organic electronics. Typical methods utilized to transfer large-area films of graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition on metal catalysts are not compatible with organic thin-films, limiting the integration of graphene into organic optoelectronic devices. This article describes a graphene transfer process onto chemically sensitive organic semiconductor thin-films. The process incorporates an elastomeric stamp with a fluorinated polymer release layer that can be removed, post-transfer, via a fluorinated solvent; neither fluorinated material adversely affects the organic semiconductor materials. We used Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy to show that chemical vapor deposition graphene can be successfully transferred without inducing defects in the graphene film. To demonstrate our transfer method's compatibility with organic semiconductors, we fabricate three classes of organic thin-film devices: graphene field effect transistors without additional cleaning processes, transparent organic light-emitting diodes, and transparent small-molecule organic photovoltaic devices. These experiments demonstrate the potential of hybrid graphene/organic devices in which graphene is deposited directly onto underlying organic thin-film structures.

  17. The fate or organic matter during planetary accretion - Preliminary studies of the organic chemistry of experimentally shocked Murchison meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingle, Tracy N.; Tyburczy, James A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.; Becker, Christopher H.

    1992-01-01

    The fate of organic matter in carbonaceous meteorites during hypervelocity (1-2 km/sec) impacts is investigated using results of experiments in which three samples of the Murchison (CM2) carbonaceous chondrite were shocked to 19, 20, and 36 GPa and analyzed by highly sensitive thermal-desorption photoionization mass spectrometry (SALI). The thermal-desorptive SALI mass spectra of unshocked CM2 material revealed presence of indigenous aliphatic, aromatic, sulfur, and organosulfur compounds, and samples shocked to about 20 GPa showed little or no loss of organic matter. On the other hand, samples shocked to 36 GPa exhibited about 70 percent loss of organic material and a lower alkene/alkane ratio than did the starting material. The results suggest that it is unlikely that the indigenous organic matter in carbonaceous chondritelike planetesimals could have survived the impact on the earth in the later stages of earth's accretion.

  18. Laboratory Studies of the Reactive Chemistry and Changing CCN Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosol, Including Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scot Martin

    2013-01-31

    The chemical evolution of secondary-organic-aerosol (SOA) particles and how this evolution alters their cloud-nucleating properties were studied. Simplified forms of full Koehler theory were targeted, specifically forms that contain only those aspects essential to describing the laboratory observations, because of the requirement to minimize computational burden for use in integrated climate and chemistry models. The associated data analysis and interpretation have therefore focused on model development in the framework of modified kappa-Koehler theory. Kappa is a single parameter describing effective hygroscopicity, grouping together several separate physicochemical parameters (e.g., molar volume, surface tension, and van't Hoff factor) that otherwise must be tracked and evaluated in an iterative full-Koehler equation in a large-scale model. A major finding of the project was that secondary organic materials produced by the oxidation of a range of biogenic volatile organic compounds for diverse conditions have kappa values bracketed in the range of 0.10 +/- 0.05. In these same experiments, somewhat incongruently there was significant chemical variation in the secondary organic material, especially oxidation state, as was indicated by changes in the particle mass spectra. Taken together, these findings then support the use of kappa as a simplified yet accurate general parameter to represent the CCN activation of secondary organic material in large-scale atmospheric and climate models, thereby greatly reducing the computational burden while simultaneously including the most recent mechanistic findings of laboratory studies.

  19. Abiotic and Biotic Formation of Amino Acids in the Enceladus Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Elliot L; Davila, Alfonso; McKay, Christopher P

    2017-09-01

    The active plume at Enceladus' south pole makes the indirect sampling of its global ocean possible. The partially resolved chemistry of the plume, which points to conditions that are seemingly compatible with life, has made orbital sampling missions a priority. We present a conceptual model of energy flux, hydrothermal H 2 production, and both abiotic and biotic production of amino acids. Based on the energy flux observed at the south pole and the inferred internal hydrothermal activity, we estimate an H 2 production of 0.6-34 mol/s from serpentinization, sufficient to sustain abiotic and biotic amino acid synthesis of 1.6-87 and 1-44 g/s, respectively. Two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulations of the hydrothermal vent suggest that the vent fluids could reach the ice-water boundary in less than 11-55 days for a 50 km deep ocean diluted by ambient ocean water 10 to 1. Concentrations of glycine, alanine, α-amino isobutyric acid, and glutamic acid in the plume and in the ambient ocean could all be above 0.01 μM just due to abiotic production. Biological synthesis, if occurring, could produce a maximum of 90 μM concentrations of amino acids based on a methanogenic ecosystem consuming H 2 and CO 2 . Racemization timescales in the ocean are short compared with production timescales. Thus, no enantiomeric excess is expected in the ambient ocean, and if biology is present, enantiomeric excess at the vent fluids is expected to be less than 10% in the plume. From vent H 2 concentrations of 7.8 mM (e.g., Lost City) and assuming complete H 2 use and conversion to chemical energy by methanogens, cell production is estimated. Annual biomass production in the methanogenic-based biology model is 4 × 10 4 -2 × 10 6 kg/year. This corresponds to cell concentrations ∼10 9 cells/cm 3 in the vents and ∼10 8 cells/cm 3 in the plume, and when diluted into the ambient ocean, we predict cell concentrations of 80-4250 cells/cm 3 . Key Words: Abiotic organic

  20. Synthesis of a Parkinson's Disease Treatment Drug, the "R,R"-Tartrate Salt "of R"-Rasagiline: A Three Week Introductory Organic Chemistry Lab Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Noberto; Garcia, Billy; Cunningham, Mark; David, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    A synthesis of the "R,R"-tartrate salt of the popular anti-Parkinson's drug "R"-rasagiline (Azilect) was adapted to introduce the organic laboratory student to a medically relevant synthesis. It makes use of concepts found in the undergraduate organic chemistry curriculum, appropriately fits into three approximately 4 h lab…

  1. A Green Multicomponent Reaction for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory: The Aqueous Passerini Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Matthew M.; DeBoef, Brenton

    2009-01-01

    Water is the ideal green solvent for organic reactions. However, most organic molecules are insoluble in it. Herein, we report a laboratory module that takes advantage of this property. The Passerini reaction, a three-component coupling involving an isocyanide, aldehyde, and carboxylic acid, typically requires [similar to] 24 h reaction times in…

  2. Organic chemistry of basal ice - presence of labile, low molecular weight compounds available for microbial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Grzegorz P.; Wadham, Jemma L.; Lawson, Emily; Stibal, Marek; Telling, Jon

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies show that subglacial environments previously thought to be devoid of life contain a host of active microbial organisms. Presence of liquid water due to overburden pressure, the release of nutrients from chemical erosion of bedrock, and the potential carbon sources in overridden sediments facilitate life in this extreme environment. However, little is still known of concentrations and diversity of labile organic compounds essential for sustaining microbial metabolism in subglacial environments. Three subglacial ecosystems that considerably differ in range and amount of available organic compounds were selected for this study 1-Engabreen, northern Norway, overlying high-grade metamorphic rocks with low organic carbon content; 2-Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard, overriding ancient black shales with a relatively high carbon content yet recalcitrant to microbiological consumption; and 3-Russell Glacier in western Greenland with recently overridden quaternary organic rich paleosols. Basal and pressure ridge ice samples were collected and subsequently analysed for low molecular weight organic compounds, with the emphasis on volatile fatty acids, carbohydrates and amino acids. The highest concentration of labile organic compounds in Greenland basal ice suggest that recently overridden paleosols have the greatest potential for sustaining microbial populations present within and underneath basal ice. The high concentration of "ancient" organic carbon in basal ice from Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard, doesn't correlate with the presence of labile organic compounds. This indicates the inability of microbes to digest recalcitrant kerogen carbon in cold temperatures. In all three investigated environments, concentrations of labile organic compounds are elevated in basal ice with a high debris content. Until recently, most models of the global carbon cycle tend to neglect the pool of subglacial organic carbon as little is known about the range and concentrations of

  3. Modeling the acid-base chemistry of organic solutes in Adirondack, New York, lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Charles T.; Lehtinen, Michael D.; Sullivan, Timothy J.

    1994-02-01

    Data from the large and diverse Adirondack Lake Survey were used to calibrate four simple organic acid analog models in an effort to quantify the influence of naturally occurring organic acids on lake water pH and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). The organic acid analog models were calibrated to observations of pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and organic anion (An-) concentrations from a reduced data set representing 1128 individual lake samples, expressed as 41 observations of mean pH, in intervals of 0.1 pH units from pH 3.9 to 7.0. Of the four organic analog approaches examined, including the Oliver et al. (1983) model, as well as monoprotic, diprotic, and triprotic representations, the triprotic analog model yielded the best fit (r2 = 0.92) to the observed data. Moreover, the triprotic model was qualitatively consistent with observed patterns of change in organic solute charge density as a function of pH. A low calibrated value for the first H+ dissociation constant (pKal = 2.62) and the observation that organic anion concentrations were significant even at very low pH (acidic functional groups. Inclusion of organic acidity in model calculations resulted in good agreement between measured and predicted values of lake water pH and ANC. Assessments to project the response of surface waters to future changes in atmospheric deposition, through the use of acidification models, will need to include representations of organic acids in model structure to make accurate predictions of pH and ANC.

  4. Purchase of Microwave Reactors for Implementation of Small-scale Microwave-accelerated Organic Chemistry Laboratory Program in Undergraduate Curriculum and Synthetic Chemistry Research at HU

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-16

    Yadav, Hemant Mande, and Prasanna Ghalsasi, Nitration of Phenols Using Cu(NO3)2: Green Chemistry Laboratory Experiment, Journal of Chemical...A Microwave-Assisted Friedel–Crafts Acylation of Toluene with Anhydrides Fehmi Damkaci, Michelle Dallas, and Megan Wagner Journal of Chemical...and Robert Kobelja Journal of Chemical Education 2008 85 (2), 261 30. Nitration of Phenols Using Cu(NO3)2: Green Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

  5. The effect of fertilization levels and genetic deployment on soil organic matter chemistry and turnover in managed loblolly pine forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, J. G.; Jokela, E. J.; He, D.; Hockaday, W. C.; Schuur, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics were examined for two managed loblolly pine forests (Pinus taeda L.) located in north-central Florida on sandy Spodosols. The study designs were split-plots with the whole plots designated as fertilization levels, and the split-plots full-sib families of loblolly pine. The forests were aged 9 and 10 years at sampling. Roots, wood, and charcoal were hand-picked from SOM and density fractionation (1.6 g/ml) used to further separate SOM into a light (LF) and heavy fraction (HF). LF turnover rates were estimated using radiocarbon and LF chemistry determined with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Family or fertilization level effects on the mass of SOM components were not significant at both sites. The largest proportions of SOM were in the LF (83% and 85%) and wood (6% and 9%). Varying in relative contributions were charcoal (2% and 3%) and the HF (4% and 1%) while fine dead roots were between 1-2% of total SOM. Higher fertilization levels generally depressed fine root (family and soil horizon. The turnover rate for one family under low fertilization was significantly slower (14 yrs) than the other treatments. This treatment also had a greater proportion of lignin, and given the slow turnover, the results suggest this lignin derived from the previous stand. At the other site lignin and lipids differed significantly (pfamilies. These results suggest that tree genetics in forests can influence SOM chemistry, but that family and the degree of fertilization have little net effect on SOM chemistry and turnover.

  6. Annual report 1988 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funck, J.; Neve Larsen, Aa.; Larsen, E.; Nielsen, O.J.

    1989-05-01

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. The names and abstracts of all articles and reports published and lectures given in 1988 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, chemical reactivity, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  7. Annual report 1989 Chemistry Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funck, J.; Neve Larsen, Aa.; Larsen, E.; Nielsen, O.J.

    1990-03-01

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. The names and abstracts of all articles and reports published and lectures given in 1989 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, chemical reactivity, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  8. Annual report 1986 chemistry department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funck, J.; Larsen, E.; Nielsen, O.J.

    1987-03-01

    This report contains a brief survey of the main activities in the Chemistry Department. All articles and reports published and lectures given in 1986 are presented. The facilities and equipment are mentioned briefly. The activities are divided into the following groups: radioisotope chemistry, analytical- and organic chemistry, environmental chemistry, polymer chemistry, radical chemistral, mineral processing, and general. (author)

  9. Cannabis sativa (Marijuana) alters blood chemistry and the cytoarchitecture of some organs in Sprague Dawley rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abey, Nosarieme Omoregie

    2018-04-19

    There is evidence that Cannabis whose active ingredient is tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the most commonly abused neuroactive substance, among young adults. This work investigated the effects of Cannabis sativa on the cytoarchitecture of some key organs and the blood chemistry of rat models. Twenty-one (21) male Sprague Dawley rats were fed different percentage of cannabis chow (0%, 5% and 10%) for a period of seven (7) weeks. Rats were subjected to intermittent cognitive function test and sacrificed after the seventh week, collecting the blood, brain and other important tissues for analysis which include; brain total protein and nitric oxide concentration, blood chemistry and histopathology. Results revealed a dose-dependent decline in the cognitive function, statistically significant decrease in the brain total protein and nitric oxide. Histopathology revealed significant hypertrophy in the heart, hypercellularity in neuronal cells, prominent sinusoids cytoarchitecture of the hepatocytes and vascular congestion in the seminiferous tubules of testes. There was a statistically significant difference in the plasma ALP, ALT, AST level between controls and the cannabis test groups. Cannabis use caused cellular damage through mediation of imbalance and altered cytoarchitecture which may affects the overall health of dependent user. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Secondary organic aerosol formation from cyclohexene ozonolysis: effect of OH scavenger and the role of radical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keywood, M D; Kroll, J H; Varutbangkul, V; Bahreini, R; Flagan, R C; Seinfeld, J H

    2004-06-15

    To isolate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in ozone-alkene systems from the additional influence of hydroxyl (OH) radicals formed in the gas-phase ozone-alkene reaction, OH scavengers are employed. The detailed chemistry associated with three different scavengers (cyclohexane, 2-butanol, and CO) is studied in relation to the effects of the scavengers on observed SOA yields in the ozone-cyclohexene system. Our results confirm those of Docherty and Ziemann that the OH scavenger plays a role in SOA formation in alkene ozonolysis. The extent and direction of this influence are shown to be dependent on the specific alkene. The main influence of the scavenger arises from its independent production of HO2 radicals, with CO producing the most HO2, 2-butanol an intermediate amount, and cyclohexane the least. This work provides evidence for the central role of acylperoxy radicals in SOA formation from the ozonolysis of alkenes and generally underscores the importance of gas-phase radical chemistry beyond the initial ozone-alkene reaction.

  11. Distinct optical chemistry of dissolved organic matter in urban pond ecosystems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    McEnroe, N. A.; Williams, C. J.; Xenopoulos, M. A.; Porcal, Petr; Frost, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 11 (2013), e80334 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : dissolved organic matter * photodegradation * fluorescence * PARAFAC Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  12. Applications of the Conceptual Density Functional Theory Indices to Organic Chemistry Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Luis R; Ríos-Gutiérrez, Mar; Pérez, Patricia

    2016-06-09

    Theoretical reactivity indices based on the conceptual Density Functional Theory (DFT) have become a powerful tool for the semiquantitative study of organic reactivity. A large number of reactivity indices have been proposed in the literature. Herein, global quantities like the electronic chemical potential μ, the electrophilicity ω and the nucleophilicity N indices, and local condensed indices like the electrophilic P k + and nucleophilic P k - Parr functions, as the most relevant indices for the study of organic reactivity, are discussed.

  13. Influence of surface chemistry on the structural organization of monomolecular protein layers adsorbed to functionalized aqueous interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lösche, M.; Piepenstock, M.; Diederich, A.

    1993-01-01

    The molecular organization of streptavidin (SA) bound to aqueous surface monolayers of biotin-functionalized lipids and binary lipid mixtures has been investigated with neutron reflectivity and electron and fluorescence microscopy. The substitution of deuterons (2H) for protons (1H), both...... in subphase water molecules and in the alkyl chains of the lipid surface monolayer, was utilized to determine the interface structure on the molecular length scale. In all cases studied, the protein forms monomolecular layers underneath the interface with thickness values of apprx 40 ANG . A systematic...... dependence of the structural properties of such self-assembled SA monolayers on the surface chemistry was observed: the lateral protein density depends on the length of the spacer connecting the biotin moiety and its hydrophobic anchor. The hydration of the lipid head groups in the protein-bound state...

  14. Extraterrestrial Organic Chemistry: From the Interstellar Medium to the Origins of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Extraterrestrially delivered organics in the origin of cellular life. Various processes leading to the emergence of cellular life from organics delivered from space to earth or other planetary bodies in the solar system will be reviewed. The focus will be on: (1) self-assembly of amphiphilic material to vesicles and other structures, such as micelles and multilayers, and its role in creating environments suitable for chemical catalysis, (2) a possible role of extraterrestrial delivery of organics in the formation of the simplest bioenergetics (3) mechanisms leading from amino acids or their precursors to simple peptides and, subsequently, to the evolution of metabolism. These issues will be discussed from two opposite points of view: (1) Which molecules could have been particularly useful in the protobiological evolution; this may provide focus for searching for these molecules in interstellar media. (2) Assuming that a considerable part of the inventory of organic matter on the early earth was delivered extraterrestrially, what does relative abundance of different organics in space tell us about the scenario leading to the origin of life.

  15. Chemistry of organic carbon in soil with relationship to the global carbon cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, W.M. III.

    1988-01-01

    Various ecosystem disturbances alter the balances between production of organic matter and its decomposition and therefore change the amount of carbon in soil. The most severe perturbation is conversion of natural vegetation to cultivated crops. Conversion of natural vegetation to cultivated crops results in a lowered input of slowly decomposing material which causes a reduction in overall carbon levels. Disruption of soil matrix structure by cultivation leads to lowered physical protection of organic matter resulting in an increased net mineralization rate of soil carbon. Climate change is another perturbation that affects the amount and composition of plant production, litter inputs, and decomposition regimes but does not affect soil structure directly. Nevertheless, large changes in soil carbon storage are probable with anticipated CO 2 induced climate change, particularly in northern latitudes where anticipated climate change will be greatest (MacCracken and Luther 1985) and large amounts of soil organic matter are found. It is impossible, given the current state of knowledge of soil organic matter processes and transformations to develop detailed process models of soil carbon dynamics. Largely phenomenological models appear to be developing into predictive tools for understanding the role of soil organic matter in the global carbon cycle. In particular, these models will be useful in quantifying soil carbon changes due to human land-use and to anticipated global climate and vegetation changes. 47 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Organic chemistry of natural products in Indonesia: Opportunity, achievement and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achmad, Sjamsul Arifin; Hakim, Euis Holisotan; Juliawaty, Lia Dewi; Makmur, Lukman; Syah, Yana Maolana; Mujahidin, Didin

    2015-09-01

    Of the 250.000 species of higher plants known to exist on earth, 30.000 species are to be found in the tropical region of Indonesia. Many of these tropical plants have been employed as medicines by the indigeneous people in both rural and urban areas. However, only a relatively small amount of them have been thoroughly studied for all aspects of their potential therapeutic value in medicine. The search for plant chemicals with potential activity for treatment of deseases and industrial utilization have been initiated successfully in our laboratories. in combination with biological evaluation. Many members of the genus Artocarpus and Morus (Moraceae) are used in tradirional folk medicine in the tropical and subtropical regions of south and southeast Asia. In this paper, our recent works on the chemistry of Artocarpus lanceifolius and Morus macroura the endemic and endangered species to Indonesia, which led to the isolation of many new, unique and novel phenolic compounds and their bioactivities will be presented.

  17. Carborane acids. New "strong yet gentle" acids for organic and inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Christopher A

    2005-04-07

    Icosahedral carborane anions such as CHB11Cl11- are amongst the least coordinating, most chemically inert anions known. They are also amongst the least basic, so their conjugate acids, H(carborane), are superacids (i.e. stronger than 100% H2SO4). Acidity scale measurements indicate that H(CHB11Cl11) is the strongest pure Brønsted acid presently known, surpassing triflic and fluorosulfuric acid. Nevertheless, it is also an extremely gentle acid--because its conjugate base engages in so little chemistry. Carborane acids separate protic acidity from anion nucleophilicity and destructive oxidative capacity in the conjugate base, to a degree not previously achieved. As a result, many long-sought, highly acidic, reactive cations such as protonated benzene (C6H7+), protonated C60(HC60+), tertiary carbocations (R3C+), vinyl cations (R2C=C(+)-R), silylium ions (R3Si+) and discrete hydronium ions (H3O+, H5O2+ etc.) can be readily isolated as carborane salts and characterized at room temperature by X-ray crystallography.

  18. Model analysis of secondary organic aerosol formation by glyoxal in laboratory studies: the case for photoenhanced chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Andrew J; Woo, Joseph L; McNeill, V Faye

    2014-10-21

    The reactive uptake of glyoxal by atmospheric aerosols is believed to be a significant source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Several recent laboratory studies have been performed with the goal of characterizing this process, but questions remain regarding the effects of photochemistry on SOA growth. We applied GAMMA (McNeill et al. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2012, 46, 8075-8081), a photochemical box model with coupled gas-phase and detailed aqueous aerosol-phase chemistry, to simulate aerosol chamber studies of SOA formation by the uptake of glyoxal by wet aerosol under dark and irradiated conditions (Kroll et al. J. Geophys. Res. 2005, 110 (D23), 1-10; Volkamer et al. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2009, 9, 1907-1928; Galloway et al. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2009, 9, 3331- 306 3345 and Geophys. Res. Lett. 2011, 38, L17811). We find close agreement between simulated SOA growth and the results of experiments conducted under dark conditions using values of the effective Henry's Law constant of 1.3-5.5 × 10(7) M atm(-1). While irradiated conditions led to the production of some organic acids, organosulfates, and other oxidation products via well-established photochemical mechanisms, these additional product species contribute negligible aerosol mass compared to the dark uptake of glyoxal. Simulated results for irradiated experiments therefore fell short of the reported SOA mass yield by up to 92%. This suggests a significant light-dependent SOA formation mechanism that is not currently accounted for by known bulk photochemistry, consistent with recent laboratory observations of SOA production via photosensitizer chemistry.

  19. A modeling study of secondary organic aerosol formation from sesquiterpenes using the STOCHEM global chemistry and transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. A. H.; Jenkin, M. E.; Foulds, A.; Derwent, R. G.; Percival, C. J.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2017-04-01

    Sesquiterpenes are one of the precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) which can be an important global sources of organic aerosol (OA). Updating the chemistry scheme in the global chemistry transport model by incorporating an oxidation mechanism for β-caryophyllene (representing all sesquiterpenes), adding global sesquiterpene emissions of 29 Tg/yr, and revising global monoterpene emissions up to 162 Tg/yr [Guenther et al., 2012] led to an increase of SOA burden by 95% and SOA production rate by 106% relative to the base case described in Utembe et al. [2011]. Including the emissions of sesquiterpenes resulted in increase of SOA burden of 0.11 Tg and SOA production rate of 12.9 Tg/yr relative to the base case. The highest concentrations of sesquiterpene-derived SOA (by up to 1.2 μg/m3) were found over central Africa and South America, the regions having high levels of biogenic emissions with significant biomass burning. In the updated model simulation, the multigeneration oxidation products from sesquiterpenes and monoterpenes transported above the boundary layer and condensed to the aerosol phase at higher altitude led to an increase of OA by up to 30% over the tropics and northern midlatitude to higher altitude. The model evaluation showed an underestimation of model OA mostly for the campaigns dominated by regional anthropogenic pollution. The increase of SOA production from sesquiterpenes reduced the discrepancies between modeled and observed OA concentrations over the remote and rural areas. The increase of SOA concentrations by up to 200% from preindustrial to present scenarios was found over the tropical oceans.

  20. Organic Chemistry in Interstellar Ices: Connection to the Comet Halley Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, W. A.; Agarwal, V. K.; deGroot, M. S.; Greenberg, J. M.; McCain, P.; Ferris, J. P.; Briggs, R.

    1997-01-01

    Mass spectroscopic measurements on the gas and dust in the coma of Comet Halley revealed the presence of considerable amounts of organic species. Greenberg (1973) proposed that prior to the formation of the comet UV processing of the ice mantles on grains in dense clouds could lead to the formation of complex organic molecules. Theoretical predictions of the internal UV field in dense clouds as well as the discovery in interstellar ices of species like OCS and OCN- which have been formed in simulation experiments by photoprocessing of interstellar ice analogues point to the importance of such processing. We undertook a laboratory simulation study of the formation of organic molecules in interstellar ices and their possible relevance to the Comet Halley results.

  1. Bringing research into a first semester organic chemistry laboratory with the multistep synthesis of carbohydrate-based HIV inhibitor mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontrello, Jason K

    2015-01-01

    Benefits of incorporating research experiences into laboratory courses have been well documented, yet examples of research projects designed for the first semester introductory organic chemistry lab course are extremely rare. To address this deficiency, a Carbohydrate-Based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Inhibitor project consisting of a synthetic scheme of four reactions was developed for and implemented in the first semester organic lab. Students carried out the synthetic reactions during the last 6 of 10 total labs in the course, generating carbohydrate-based dimeric target molecules modeled after published dimers with application in HIV therapy. The project was designed to provide a research experience through use of literature procedures for reactions performed, exploration of variation in linker length in the target structure, and synthesis of compounds not previously reported in the scientific literature. Project assessment revealed strong student support, indicating enhanced engagement and interest in the course as a direct result of the use of scientific literature and the applications of the synthesized carbohydrate-based molecules. Regardless of discussed challenges in designing a research project for the first semester lab course, the finding from data analysis that a project implemented in the first semester lab had significantly greater student impact than a second semester project should provide motivation for development of additional research projects for a first semester organic course. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  2. Meteor wake in high frame-rate images--implications for the chemistry of ablated organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans C

    2004-01-01

    Extraterrestrial organic matter may have been chemically altered into forms more ameanable for prebiotic chemistry in the wake of a meteor after ablation. We measured the rate of cooling of the plasma in the meteor wake from the intensity decay just behind a meteoroid by freezing its motion in high frame-rate 1000 frames/s video images, with an intensified camera that has a short phosphor decay time. Though the resulting cooling rate was found to be lower than theoretically predicted, our calculations indicated that there would have been insufficient collisions to break apart large organic compounds before most reactive radicals and electrons were lost from the air plasma. Organic molecules delivered from space to the early Earth via meteors might therefore have survived in a chemically altered form. In addition, we discovered that relatively small meteoroids generated far-ultraviolet emission that is absorbed in the immediate environment of the meteoroid, which may chemically alter the atmosphere over a much larger region than previously recognized.

  3. BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY REPORT. December 1962 throughFebruary 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Various

    1963-03-29

    This report covers the following titles: (1) A versatile solvent to replace phenol for the paper chromatography of radioactive intermediary metabolites; (2) Chromatography of plant lipids on alumina paper; (3) Quinone and pigment composition of chloroplasts and quantasomes from Spinacea oleracea; (4) The lipid composition of chloroplast lamellae from Spinacea oleracea; (5) Metal chelates and photochemistry of flavins; (6) Photoinduced ESR in some solutions of organic electron donors and acceptors; (7) Fluorescence of oriented dye-macromolecule complexes--Theoretical study; (8) Formation of adenine by electron irradiation of methane, ammonia, and water; (9) Uptake of organic compounds by planarians; (10) The planaria: Absorption spectrum, cell disaggregation, and studies on homogenates.

  4. Influence of soil γ-irradiation and spiking on sorption of p,p'-DDE and soil organic matter chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škulcová, Lucia; Scherr, Kerstin E; Chrást, Lukáš; Hofman, Jakub; Bielská, Lucie

    2018-07-15

    The fate of organic chemicals and their metabolites in soils is often investigated in model matrices having undergone various pre-treatment steps that may qualitatively or quantitatively interfere with the results. Presently, effects associated with soil sterilization by γ-irradiation and soil spiking using an organic solvent were studied in one freshly spiked soil (sterilization prior to contamination) and its field-contaminated (sterilization after contamination) counterpart for the model organic compound 1,1-Dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethene (p,p'-DDE). Changes in the sorption and potential bioavailability of spiked and native p,p'-DDE were measured by supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), XAD-assisted extraction (XAD), and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and linked to qualitative changes in soil organic matter (SOM) chemistry measured by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier-transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Reduced sorption of p,p´-DDE detected with XAD and SPME was associated more clearly with spiking than with sterilization, but SFE showed a negligible impact. Spiking resulted in an increase of the DRIFT-derived hydrophobicity index, but irradiation did not. Spectral peak height ratio descriptors indicated increasing hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity in pristine soil following sterilization, and a greater reduction of hydrophobic over hydrophilic groups as a consequence of spiking. In parallel, reduced sorption of p,p´-DDE upon spiking was observed. Based on the present samples, γ-irradiation appears to alter soil sorptive properties to a lesser extent when compared to common laboratory processes such as spiking with organic solvents. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Revisiting the concept of recalcitrance and organic matter persistence in soils and aquatic systems: Does environment trump chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Spiotta, E.

    2014-12-01

    Most ecological models of decomposition rely on plant litter chemistry. However, growing evidence suggests that the chemical composition of organic matter (OM) is not a good predictor of its eventual fate in terrestrial or aquatic environments. New data on variable decomposition rates of select organic compounds challenge concepts of chemical recalcitrance, i.e. the inherent ability of certain molecular structures to resist biodegradation. The role of environmental or "ecosystem" properties on influencing decomposition dates back to some of the earliest research on soil OM. Despite early recognition that the physical and aqueous matrices are critical in determining the fate of organic compounds, the prevailing paradigm hinges on intrinsic chemical properties as principal predictors of decay rate. Here I build upon recent reviews and discuss new findings that contribute to three major transformations in our understanding of OM persistence: (1) a shift away from an emphasis on chemical recalcitrance as a primary predictor of turnover, (2) new interpretations of radiocarbon ages which challenge predictions of reactivity, and (3) the recognition that most detrital OM accumulating in soils and in water has been microbially processed. Predictions of OM persistence due to aromaticity are challenged by high variability in lignin and black C turnover observed in terrestrial and aquatic environments. Contradictions in the behavior of lignin are, in part, influenced by inconsistent methodologies among research communities. Even black C, long considered to be one of the most recalcitrant components of OM, is susceptible to biodegradation, challenging predictions of the stability of aromatic structures. At the same time, revised interpretations of radiocarbon data suggest that organic compounds can acquire long mean residence times by various mechanisms independent of their molecular structure. Understanding interactions between environmental conditions and biological

  6. Proceedings of the 17. Annual Meeting of the Brazilian Chemistry Society; 7. National Symposium on Inorganic Chemistry. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    These 17. Annual Meeting of the Brazilian Chemistry Society and 7. National Symposium on Inorganic Chemistry present several subjects of different interests for the participants, including sections about inorganic chemistry; organic chemistry; environmental chemistry; technological chemistry; electrochemistry; physical chemistry; photochemistry; chemical education; natural products; analytical chemistry and biological chemistry. (C.G.C.)

  7. Green Chemistry Decision-Making in an Upper-Level Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Landon J. G.; Koroluk, Katherine J.; Golmakani, Mehrnaz; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    A self-directed independent synthesis experiment was developed for a third-year undergraduate organic laboratory. Students were provided with the CAS numbers of starting and target compounds and devised a synthetic plan to be executed over two 4.5 h laboratory periods. They consulted the primary literature in order to develop and carry out an…

  8. Study of photochemical transformations of organic azides by matrix isolation techniques and quantum chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsan, N. P.

    2007-12-01

    Results of investigations of organic azide photochemistry in inert gas matrices and the most important spectroscopic studies of the last decade, which formed the basis for the modern views on the photochemistry of azides, are analysed. The unique potential of the matrix isolation technique for the reliable identification of reaction intermediates is demonstrated.

  9. Experiments probing the influence of air exchange rates on secondary organic aerosols derived from indoor chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Shields, H.C.

    2003-01-01

    Reactions between ozone and terpenes have been shown to increase the concentrations of submicron particles in indoor settings. The present study was designed to examine the influence of air exchange rates on the concentrations of these secondary organic aerosols as well as on the evolution...

  10. An Epistemological Inquiry into Organic Chemistry Education: Exploration of Undergraduate Students' Conceptual Understanding of Functional Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkuzu, Nalan; Uyulgan, Melis Arzu

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine the levels of conceptual understanding of undergraduate students regarding organic compounds within different functional groups. A total of 60 students who were enrolled in the Department of Secondary Science and Mathematics Education of a Faculty of Education at a state university in Turkey and who had followed an…

  11. Incorporation of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry into the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarikos, Dimitrios G.; Patel, Sagir; Lister, Andrew; Razeghifard, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical tool for detection, identification, and quantification of many volatile organic compounds. However, many colleges and universities have not fully incorporated this technique into undergraduate teaching laboratories despite its wide application and ease of use in organic…

  12. Blood chemistry and relative organ weights of rabbits fed neem leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) based diets on blood and relative organ weight characteristics of rabbits. In the first experiment, 36 rabbit bucks aged 7 to 8 months were distributed into four dietary groups, T1 , T2 T3 and T4 of 9 rabbits using completely randomized design.

  13. Proto-Planetary Disk Chemistry Recorded by D-Rich Organic Radicals in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remusat, Laurent; Robert, François; Meibom, Anders; Mostefaoui, Smail; Delpoux, Olivier; Binet, Laurent; Gourier, Didier; Derenne, Sylvie

    2009-06-01

    Insoluble organic matter (IOM) in primitive carbonaceous meteorites has preserved its chemical composition and isotopic heterogeneity since the solar system formed ~4.567 billion years ago. We have identified the carrier moieties of isotopically anomalous hydrogen in IOM isolated from the Orgueil carbonaceous chondrite. Data from high spatial resolution, quantitative isotopic NanoSIMS mapping of Orgueil IOM combined with data from electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals that organic radicals hold all the deuterium excess (relative to the bulk IOM) in distinct, micrometer-sized, D-rich hotspots. Taken together with previous work, the results indicate that an isotopic exchange reaction took place between pre-existing organic compounds characterized by low D/H ratios and D-rich gaseous molecules, such as H2D+ or HD2 +. This exchange reaction most likely took place in the diffuse outer regions of the proto-planetary disk around the young Sun, offering a model that reconciles meteoritic and cometary isotopic compositions of organic molecules.

  14. DC-electrochemiluminescence (ECL with a coreactant)—principle and applications in organic chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ludvík, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 10 (2011), s. 2065-2081 ISSN 1432-8488 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400813 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : organic compounds * reaction mechanisms * radical intermediates Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.131, year: 2011

  15. Synthesis and Hydrogenation of Disubstituted Chalcones: A Guided-Inquiry Organic Chemistry Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrig, Jerry R.; Hammond, Christina Noring; Schatz, Paul F.; Davidson, Tammy A.

    2009-01-01

    Guided-inquiry experiments offer the same opportunities to participate in the process of science as classical organic qualitative analysis used to do. This three-week guided-inquiry project involves an aldol-dehydration synthesis of a chalcone chosen from a set of nine, followed by a catalytic transfer hydrogenation reaction using ammonium formate…

  16. What Happens when Representations Fail to Represent? Graduate Students' Mental Models of Organic Chemistry Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Amanda M.; Kraft, Adam; Bhattacharyya, Gautam

    2010-01-01

    As part of our investigations into the development of representational competence, we report results from a study in which we elicited sixteen graduate students' expressed mental models of commonly-used terms for describing organic reactions--functional group, nucleophile/electrophile, acid/base--and for diagrams of transformations and their…

  17. The redox chemistry of neptunium in gamma-irradiated aqueous nitric acid in the presence of an organic phase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mincher, B.J.; Přeček, Martin; Paulenova, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 308, č. 3 (2016), s. 1005-1009 ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant - others:OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : neptunium * redox chemistry * radiation chemistry * solvent extraction Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  18. Effect of soil organic matter chemistry on sorption of trinitrotoluene and 2,4-dinitrotoluene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Neera, E-mail: drneerasingh@yahoo.com [Division of Agricultural Chemicals, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi-110012 (India); Berns, Anne E. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institute of Chemistry and Dynamics of the Geosphere, Institute 4: Agrosphere, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Hennecke, Dieter; Hoerner, Jennifer; Koerdel, Werner [Fraunhofer Institute of Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology, 27392 Schmallenberg (Germany); Schaeffer, Andreas [RWTH University, Chair of Environmental Biology and Chemodynamics, Worringerweg 152074, Aachen (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    The sorption of organic contaminants in soil is mainly attributed to the soil organic matter (SOM) content. However, recent studies have highlighted the fact that it is not the total carbon content of the organic matter, but its chemical structure which have a profound effect on the sorption of organic contaminants. In the present study sorption of two nitroaromatic contaminants viz. trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) was studied in different SOM fractions viz. a commercial humic acid, commercial lignin and humic acid and humin extracted from a compost. {sup 13}C-DP/MAS NMR studies indicated that the structural composition of the organic carbon in different SOM fractions was different. The order of sorption of the nitroaromatics in the different sorbents was: humic acid-commercial > humic acid-compost > humin {approx} lignin. Among the aliphatic and aromatic carbon fractions (representing bulk of SOM matrix), adsorption parameter K{sub f}(1/n) for nitroaromatics sorption correlated well with the aliphatic carbon (r = 0.791 for TNT and 0.829 for 2,4-DNT) than the aromatic carbon (r = 0.634 for TNT and r = 0.616 for 2,4-DNT). However, among carbon containing functional groups, carbonyl carbon showed strong positive correlation with sorption of TNT (r = 0.991) and 2,4-DNT (r = 0.967) while O-alkyl carbon showed negative correlation (r = 0.832 for TNT and r = 0.828 for 2,4-DNT). The study indicates that aliphatic domains in the SOM significantly affect the non-specific sorption of both the nitroaromatic contaminants.

  19. Effect of soil organic matter chemistry on sorption of trinitrotoluene and 2,4-dinitrotoluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neera; Berns, Anne E; Hennecke, Dieter; Hoerner, Jennifer; Koerdel, Werner; Schaeffer, Andreas

    2010-01-15

    The sorption of organic contaminants in soil is mainly attributed to the soil organic matter (SOM) content. However, recent studies have highlighted the fact that it is not the total carbon content of the organic matter, but its chemical structure which have a profound effect on the sorption of organic contaminants. In the present study sorption of two nitroaromatic contaminants viz. trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) was studied in different SOM fractions viz. a commercial humic acid, commercial lignin and humic acid and humin extracted from a compost. (13)C-DP/MAS NMR studies indicated that the structural composition of the organic carbon in different SOM fractions was different. The order of sorption of the nitroaromatics in the different sorbents was: humic acid-commercial>humic acid-compost>humin approximately lignin. Among the aliphatic and aromatic carbon fractions (representing bulk of SOM matrix), adsorption parameter K(f)(1/n) for nitroaromatics sorption correlated well with the aliphatic carbon (r=0.791 for TNT and 0.829 for 2,4-DNT) than the aromatic carbon (r=0.634 for TNT and r=0.616 for 2,4-DNT). However, among carbon containing functional groups, carbonyl carbon showed strong positive correlation with sorption of TNT (r=0.991) and 2,4-DNT (r=0.967) while O-alkyl carbon showed negative correlation (r=0.832 for TNT and r=0.828 for 2,4-DNT). The study indicates that aliphatic domains in the SOM significantly affect the non-specific sorption of both the nitroaromatic contaminants.

  20. Electronic properties and chemistry of metal / organic semiconductor/ S-GaAs(100) heterosructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrila, G.N.

    2005-10-21

    in the framework of this thesis three perylene derivates are applied as interlayers in metal/organic layer/S-GaAs(100) heterostructures. The aim of this thesis is to prove the influence of different chemical end-groups on the electronic and chemical properties of the interfaces, as well as the molecular orientation in the organic layers. The molecules 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarbonic acid dianhydride (PTCDA), 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarbonic acid diimide (PTCDI), and dimethyl-3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarbonic acid diimide (DiMe-PTCDI) were evaporated by organic molecular beam deposition (OMBD) in the ultrahigh vacuum on sulfur-passivated GaAs(001):2 x 1 substrates. Surface-sensitive characterization procedures as photoemission spectroscopy (PES), inverse photoemission spectroscopy (IPES), and near-edge X-ray fine-structure measurements (NEXAFS) were applied for the characterization. Theoretical calculations by means of the density-functional methods were performed, in order to allow an assignment of different components in core-level spectra. The NEXAFS spectra allow a precise determination of the molecule orientation in relation to the substrate. So it can be proved that a small change of chemical end-groups for instance in DiMe-PTCDI compared with PTCDI causes a dramatic change of the molecule orientation. The valence-band spectra of DiMe-PTCDI show an energetic dispersion of 0.2 eV, which can be assigned to a {pi}-orbital overlap and covers the formation of valence bands. The energy-level fitting to the organic-layer/S-GaAs interface as well as the transport band gap of PTCDI, DiMe-PTCDI, and PTCDA were deteminde by means of PES and IPES. The electronic, chemical, and structural properties of metal/organic-layer interfaces were studied by means of core-level spectroscopy and NEXAFS. Mg reacts strongly with the end-groups of PTCDA AND ptcdi, while the In atoms contribute to a charge-transfer process with the perylene cores of all three molecules, whereby the

  1. Effects of abiotic stress on plants: a systems biology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Grant R; Urano, Kaoru; Delrot, Serge; Pezzotti, Mario; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2011-11-17

    The natural environment for plants is composed of a complex set of abiotic stresses and biotic stresses. Plant responses to these stresses are equally complex. Systems biology approaches facilitate a multi-targeted approach by allowing one to identify regulatory hubs in complex networks. Systems biology takes the molecular parts (transcripts, proteins and metabolites) of an organism and attempts to fit them into functional networks or models designed to describe and predict the dynamic activities of that organism in different environments. In this review, research progress in plant responses to abiotic stresses is summarized from the physiological level to the molecular level. New insights obtained from the integration of omics datasets are highlighted. Gaps in our knowledge are identified, providing additional focus areas for crop improvement research in the future.

  2. Abiotic racemization kinetics of amino acids in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Andrew; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Lomstein, Bente Aagaard

    2013-01-01

    Enantiomeric ratios of amino acids can be used to infer the sources and composition of sedimentary organic matter. Such inferences, however, rely on knowing the rates at which amino acids in sedimentary organic racemize abiotically. Based on a heating experiment, we report Arrhenius parameters...... for aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine in bulk sediment from Aarhus Bay, Denmark, taken from the surface, 30 cm, and 340 cm depth. Extrapolation to a typical cold deep sea sediment temperature of 3 °C suggests racemization rate constants of on the order of 10-5 yr-1 without evident differences...... between different amino acids or depths. These results can be used in conjunction with measurements of sediment age to predict the ratio of D:L amino acids due solely to abiotic racemization of the source material, deviations from which can indicate the abundance and turnover of active microbial...

  3. A química orgânica na consolidação dos conceitos de átomo e molécula Organic chemistry in the consolidation of the concepts of atom and molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia de Oliveira Camel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work discusses the appearance of the concepts of valence and molecular structure, and describes the appropriation and evolution of the concept of molecule in the period following the publication of Avogadro's Hypothesis. The point of reference is the development of what became known as Organic Chemistry, which encompassed Pharmacy, Physiological Chemistry, Animal and Plant Chemistry, Chemistry of Dyestuffs, Agricultural Chemistry, and the fledgling Organic Synthesis industry in the early 19th century. The theories formulated in these areas and the quest for accurate atomic weights led to those concepts of valence and molecular structure and to a precise differentiation between atom and molecule.

  4. Organic chemistry. A data-intensive approach to mechanistic elucidation applied to chiral anion catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, Anat; Neel, Andrew J; Toste, F Dean; Sigman, Matthew S

    2015-02-13

    Knowledge of chemical reaction mechanisms can facilitate catalyst optimization, but extracting that knowledge from a complex system is often challenging. Here, we present a data-intensive method for deriving and then predictively applying a mechanistic model of an enantioselective organic reaction. As a validating case study, we selected an intramolecular dehydrogenative C-N coupling reaction, catalyzed by chiral phosphoric acid derivatives, in which catalyst-substrate association involves weak, noncovalent interactions. Little was previously understood regarding the structural origin of enantioselectivity in this system. Catalyst and substrate substituent effects were probed by means of systematic physical organic trend analysis. Plausible interactions between the substrate and catalyst that govern enantioselectivity were identified and supported experimentally, indicating that such an approach can afford an efficient means of leveraging mechanistic insight so as to optimize catalyst design. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Diffusion coefficients of gaseous scavengers in organic liquids used in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luthjens, L.H.; De Leng, H.C.; Warman, J.M.; Hummel, A.

    1990-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients have been measured of some gaseous scavengers commonly used in radiation chemical studies: CO 2 , NH 3 , SF 6 and O 2 in trans-decalin, cyclohexane, isooctane and n-hexane, and CO 2 in cis-decalin, at 25 0 C. A modified diaphragm cell method has been used in order to limit the time needed for a measurement to about 6 h. Analysis of the results yields a simple semi-empirical predictive relation for the diffusion coefficient of a (gaseous) solute A in an organic solvent B. Diffusion coefficients calculated using the simple relation appear to give results in fair agreement with published values, over a range of organic solvents including alcohols, and over a range of temperatures. Some measured and predicted values are discussed with reference to results from the literature. (author)

  6. Chemistry in Confinement: Copper and Palladium Catalyzed Ecofriendly Organic Transformations within Porous Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Basuvaraj Suresh; Pitchumani, Kasi

    2017-11-24

    A concise account on the use of transition metals copper (Cu) and palladium (Pd), as their cations as well as nanoparticles exchanged/immobilized onto porous frameworks such as zeolites, metal organic frameworks (MOFs), covalent organic polymers (COPs) and hollow nanostructures, functioning as catalysts in organic synthesis is presented. This biomimetic account, "focusing on catalytic systems in confinement" within zero-dimensional microenvironments and second sphere coordination covers primarily results from our group on N-sulfonylketenimine mediated cycloaddition, hydrogenation and C-C bond forming reactions, thus providing an interesting insight into the versatility and utility of these Cu and Pd catalysts. Other significant advantages and green credentials of confinement such as stability, selectivity, reusability, promotion of multicomponent reactions, use of green solvents, atom economy, and use of ambient conditions are highlighted at appropriate places. In the final section, our views on the current achievements and the future prospects in this area are summarized. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Removal of triazine-based pollutants from water by carbon nanotubes: Impact of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Maya; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-12-01

    Adsorption of organic pollutants by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the environment or removal of pollutants during water purification require deep understanding of the impacts of the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM). DOM is an integral part of environmental systems and plays a key role affecting the behavior of organic pollutants. In this study, the effects of solution chemistry (pH and ionic strength) and the presence of DOM on the removal of atrazine and lamotrigine by single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) was investigated. The solubility of atrazine slightly decreased (∼5%) in the presence of DOM, whereas that of lamotrigine was significantly enhanced (by up to ∼70%). Simultaneous introduction of DOM and pollutant resulted in suppression of removal of both atrazine and lamotrigine, which was attributed to DOM-pollutant competition or blockage of adsorption sites by DOM. However the decrease in removal of lamotrigine was also a result of its complexation with DOM. Pre-introduction of DOM significantly reduced pollutant adsorption by the SWCNTs, whereas introduction of DOM after the pollutant resulted in the release of adsorbed atrazine and lamotrigine from the SWCNTs. These data imply that DOM exhibits higher affinity for the adsorption sites than the triazine-based pollutants. In the absence of DOM atrazine was a more effective competitor than lamotrigine for adsorption sites in SWCNTs. However, competition between pollutants in the presence of DOM revealed lamotrigine as the better competitor. Our findings help unravel the complex DOM-organic pollutant-CNT system and will aid in CNT-implementation in water-purification technologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Atmospherically-Relevant Organic Coatings, Humidity, and Aerosol Acidity on Multiphase Chemistry of Isoprene Epoxydiols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyuk, A.; Riva, M.; Bell, D.; Hansen, A. M. K.; Drozd, G.; Zhang, Z.; Gold, A.; Imre, D. G.; Surratt, J. D.; Glasius, M.; Shrivastava, M. B.

    2016-12-01

    Multiphase chemistry of isomeric isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) has been shown to be the dominant source of isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Recent studies have reported particles composed of ammonium bisulfate (ABS) mixed with model organics exhibit slower rates of IEPOX uptake compared to pure ABS particles. We will present the results of a study, in which we investigated, for the first time, the effect of atmospherically-relevant organic coatings of α-pinene SOA on the reactive uptake of trans-β-IEPOX onto ABS particles under different conditions and coating thicknesses. Single particle mass spectrometry was used to characterize in real-time particle size, shape, density, and quantitative composition before and after reaction with IEPOX. We demonstrate that IEPOX uptake by pure ABS and deliquesced ammonium sulfate particles is a volume-controlled process, which results in particles with uniform concentration of IEPOX-derived SOA across a wide range of sizes. Aerosol acidity was shown to enhance IEPOX-derived SOA formation, consistent with recent studies. We find that the weight fraction of IEPOX-derived SOA for ABS particles is 41% as compared to 31% for ammonium sulfate particles. The presence of water has a weaker impact on IEPOX-derived SOA yield for ABS particles, but significantly enhanced formation of 2-methyltetrols, consistent with offline filter analysis. In contrast, we show that presence of α-pinene SOA coatings greatly impact IEPOX heterogeneous chemistry. IEPOX uptake by ABS particles coated with α-pinene SOA is lower compared to that of pure ABS particles, and strongly dependent on particle composition, and therefore on particle size. For example, in the experiment with thinly ( 18 nm) coated ABS particles, the weight fraction of IEPOX-derived SOA increases rapidly from 0 to 30% with respect to ABS seed, as the seed aerosol diameter increases from 60 to 100 nm, and then remains nearly constant at 30% for diameters > 100 nm. In

  9. The latest general chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Geun Bae; Choi, Se Yeong; Kim, Chin Yeong; Yoon, Gil Jung; Lee, Eun Seok; Seo, Moon Gyu

    1995-02-01

    This book deals with the latest general chemistry, which is comprised of twenty-three chapters, the contents of this book are introduction, theory of atoms and molecule, chemical formula and a chemical reaction formula, structure of atoms, nature of atoms and the periodic table, structure of molecule and spectrum, gas, solution, solid, chemical combination, chemical reaction speed, chemical equilibrium, thermal chemistry, oxidation-reduction, electrochemistry, acid-base, complex, aquatic chemistry, air chemistry, nuclear chemistry, metal and nonmetal, organic chemistry and biochemistry. It has exercise in the end of each chapter.

  10. Secondary organic aerosol in the global aerosol - chemistry transport model Oslo CTM2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Berntsen, T.; Myhre, G.; Isaksen, I. S. A.

    2007-06-01

    The global chemical transport model Oslo CTM2 has been extended to include the formation, transport and deposition of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Precursor hydrocarbons which are oxidised to form condensible species include both biogenic species such as terpenes and isoprene, as well as species emitted predominantly by anthropogenic activities (toluene, m-xylene, methylbenzene and other aromatics). A model simulation for 2004 gives an annual global SOA production of approximately 55 Tg. Of this total, 2.5 Tg is found to consist of the oxidation products of anthropogenically emitted hydrocarbons, and about 15 Tg is formed by the oxidation products of isoprene. The global production of SOA is increased to about 76 Tg yr-1 by allowing semi-volatile species to condense on ammonium sulphate aerosol. This brings modelled organic aerosol values closer to those observed, however observations in Europe remain significantly underestimated, raising the possibility of an unaccounted for SOA source. Allowing SOA to form on ammonium sulphate aerosol increases the contribution of anthropogenic SOA from about 4.5% to almost 9% of the total production. The importance of NO3 as an oxidant of SOA precursors is found to vary regionally, causing up to 50%-60% of the total amount of SOA near the surface in polluted regions and less than 25% in more remote areas. This study underscores the need for SOA to be represented in a more realistic way in global aerosol models in order to better reproduce observations of organic aerosol burdens in industrialised and biomass burning regions.

  11. Resolution of ibuprofen: a project for an experimental organic chemistry course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Adriano L.; Baptistella, Lucia H.B.; Coelho, Fernando; Imamura, Paulo M.

    2012-01-01

    A practical and didactic sequence of experiments was proposed to illustrate the stereochemistry concept, optically active compounds, resolution of racemates, and use of the NMR technique, including 2D-COSY for identification of organic compounds, on a laboratory course for undergraduate students. The sequence was: extractions of racemic ibuprofen and chiral naproxen from commercial tablets; syntheses of diastereoisomeric amides reacting chiral (S)-(-)-α-methylbenzylamine with (+-)-ibuprofen; separation and determination of absolute configuration of amides by 1 H NMR spectroscopy and GC analysis, and hydrolysis of amides to obtain (+)- and (-)-ibuprofen. (author)

  12. Fabrication of cross-linked hydrazone covalent organic frameworks by click chemistry and application to solid phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingxue; Chen, Gang; Ma, Jiutong; Liu, Ping; Jia, Qiong

    2016-12-01

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are an emerging class of porous organic frameworks with diverse promising applications. Herein, we presented the first example of cross-linked hydrazone COFs (cross-linked COFs) coating via thiol-ene click chemistry for solid phase microextraction (SPME). Strong covalent bonds and interlayer of the prepared networks ensured the adsorption capacity and durability of the novel SPME fiber. π-π conjugated structure existed because of abundant phenyl rings and -C=N groups in the cross-lined COFs. A series of characterizations indicated that the cross-linked COFs possessed large surface areas, high porosities and stabilities as well as hydrophobicities. The fiber was applied to SPME of pesticide residues coupled with gas chromatography with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD). Under the optimum experimental conditions, enhancement factors in the range of 2190-10,998 were obtained, illustrating that the cross-linked COFs possessed remarkable preconcentration ability. The low detection limits of 0.0003-0.0023ngkg -1 were achieved with relative standard deviations (RSDs) in the range of 3.4-7.6% (intra-batch) and 5.7-11.6% (inter-batch), respectively. Recovery values in the range of 78.2-107.0% were obtained when the SPME-GC method was applied to the analysis of pesticides in cucumber samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The SOA formation model combined with semiempirical quantum chemistry for predicting UV-Vis absorption of secondary organic aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Min; Jang, Myoseon; Oliferenko, Alexander; Pillai, Girinath G; Katritzky, Alan R

    2012-07-07

    A new model for predicting the UV-visible absorption spectra of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been developed. The model consists of two primary parts: a SOA formation model and a semiempirical quantum chemistry method. The mass of SOA is predicted using the PHRCSOA (Partitioning Heterogeneous Reaction Consortium Secondary Organic Aerosol) model developed by Cao and Jang [Environ. Sci. Technol., 2010, 44, 727]. The chemical composition is estimated using a combination of the kinetic model (MCM) and the PHRCSOA model. The absorption spectrum is obtained by taking the sum of the spectrum of each SOA product calculated using a semiempirical NDDO (Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap)-based method. SOA was generated from the photochemical reaction of toluene or α-pinene at different NO(x) levels (low NO(x): 24-26 ppm, middle NO(x): 49 ppb, high NO(x): 104-105 ppb) using a 2 m(3) indoor Teflon film chamber. The model simulation reasonably agrees with the measured absorption spectra of α-pinene SOA but underestimates toluene SOA under high and middle NO(x) conditions. The absorption spectrum of toluene SOA is moderately enhanced with increasing NO(x) concentrations, while that of α-pinene SOA is not affected. Both measured and calculated UV-visible spectra show that the light absorption of toluene SOA is much stronger than that of α-pinene SOA.

  14. Bridging the gap between cell biology and organic chemistry: chemical synthesis and biological application of lipidated peptides and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Carsten; Wagner, Melanie; Völkert, Martin; Waldmann, Herbert

    2002-09-01

    We have developed a basic concept for studying cell biological phenomena using an interdisciplinary approach starting from organic chemistry. Based on structural information available for a given biological phenomenon, unsolved chemical problems are identified. For their solution, new synthetic pathways and methods are developed, which reflect the state of the art in synthesising lipidated peptide conjugates. These compounds are used as molecular probes for the investigation of biological phenomena that involve both the determination of biophysical properties and cell biological studies. The interplay between organic synthesis, biophysics and cell biology in the study of protein lipidation may open up new and alternative opportunities to gain knowledge about the biological phenomenon that could not be obtained by employing biological techniques alone. This fruitful combination is highlighted using the Ras protein as an outstanding example. Included herein is: the development of methods for the synthesis of Ras-derived peptides and fully functional Ras proteins, the determination of the biophysical properties, in particular the ability to bind to model membranes, and finally the use of synthetic Ras peptides and proteins in cell biological experiments.

  15. Free-radicals and advanced chemistries involved in cell membrane organization influence oxygen diffusion and pathology treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard C

    2017-01-01

    A breakthrough has been discovered in pathology chemistry related to increasing molecular structure that can interfere with oxygen diffusion through cell membranes. Free radicals can crosslink unsaturated low-viscosity fatty acid oils by chain-growth polymerization into more viscous liquids and even solids. Free radicals are released by mitochondria in response to intermittent hypoxia that can increase membrane molecular organization to reduce fluidity and oxygen diffusion in a possible continuing vicious cycle toward pathological disease. Alternate computational chemistry demonstrates molecular bond dynamics in free energy for cell membrane physiologic movements. Paired electrons in oxygen and nitrogen atoms require that oxygen bonds rotate and nitrogen bonds invert to seek polar nano-environments and hide from nonpolar nano-environments thus creating fluctuating instability at a nonpolar membrane and polar biologic fluid interface. Subsequent mechanomolecular movements provide free energy to increase diffusion by membrane transport of molecules and oxygen into the cell, cell-membrane signaling/recognition/defense in addition to protein movements for enzyme mixing. In other chemistry calcium bonds to membrane phosphates primarily on the outer plasma cell membrane surface to influence the membrane firing threshold for excitability and better seal out water permeation. Because calcium is an excellent metal conductor and membrane phosphate headgroups form a semiconductor at the biologic fluid interface, excess electrons released by mitochondria may have more broad dissipation potential by safe conduction through calcium atomic-sized circuits on the outer membrane surface. Regarding medical conditions, free radicals are known to produce pathology especially in age-related disease in addition to aging. Because cancer cell membranes develop extreme polymorphism that has been extensively followed in research, accentuated easily-visualized free-radical models are

  16. Adhesion of bacterial pathogens to soil colloidal particles: influences of cell type, natural organic matter, and solution chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenqiang; Walker, Sharon L; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng

    2014-04-15

    Bacterial adhesion to granular soil particles is well studied; however, pathogen interactions with naturally occurring colloidal particles (colloids as a function of cell type, natural organic matter (NOM), and solution chemistry. Specifically, batch adhesion experiments were conducted using NOM-present, NOM-stripped soil colloids, Streptococcus suis SC05 and Escherichia coli WH09 over a wide range of solution pH (4.0-9.0) and ionic strength (IS, 1-100 mM KCl). Cell characterization techniques, Freundlich isotherm, and Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory (sphere-sphere model) were utilized to quantitatively determine the interactions between cells and colloids. The adhesion coefficients (Kf) of S. suis SC05 to NOM-present and NOM-stripped soil colloids were significantly higher than E. coli WH09, respectively. Similarly, Kf values of S. suis SC05 and E. coli WH09 adhesion to NOM-stripped soil colloids were greater than those colloids with NOM-present, respectively, suggesting NOM inhibits bacterial adhesion. Cell adhesion to soil colloids declined with increasing pH and enhanced with rising IS (1-50 mM). Interaction energy calculations indicate these adhesion trends can be explained by DLVO-type forces, with S. suis SC05 and E. coli WH09 being weakly adhered in shallow secondary energy minima via polymer bridging and charge heterogeneity. S. suis SC05 adhesion decreased at higher IS 100 mM, which is attributed to the change of hydrophobic effect and steric repulsion resulted from the greater presence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on S. suis SC05 surface as compared to E. coli WH09. Hence, pathogen adhesion to the colloidal material is determined by a combination of DLVO, charge heterogeneity, hydrophobic and polymer interactions as a function of solution chemistry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemistry of the organic-rich hot core G327.3-0.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, E.; Nummelin, A.; Irvine, W. M.; Whittet, D. C.; Bergman, P.; Ferris, J. P. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    We present gas-phase abundances of species found in the organic-rich hot core G327.3-0.6. The data were taken with the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST). The 1-3 mm spectrum of this source is dominated by emission features of nitrile species and saturated organics, with abundances greater than those found in many other hot cores, including Sgr B2 and OMC-1. Population diagram analysis indicates that many species (CH3CN, C2H3CN, C2H5CN, CH3OH, etc.) have hot components that originate in a compact (2") region. Gas-phase chemical models cannot reproduce the high abundances of these molecules found in hot cores, and we suggest that they originate from processing and evaporation of icy grain mantle material. In addition, we report the first detection of vibrationally excited ethyl cyanide and the first detection of methyl mercaptan (CH3SH) outside the Galactic center.

  18. Characteristics of the surface chemistry of linden pyrochar after removal of labile organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeeva, A. A.; Smirnova, E. V.; Giniyatullin, K. G.; Vorobev, V. V.; Biktasheva, L. R.; Grachev, A. N.

    2018-01-01

    The changes of chemical properties of the pyrochar surface were studied in the laboratory experiment that simulated pedogenic transformation of pyrochar under the influence of soil biota. The native pyrochar samples were obtained by pyrolysis of linden wood residues at the temperature of 250°C, 450°C and 650°C. Their modified samples were obtained by removing an easily degradable pool of organic substances that can be used by microorganisms during the first months after application to the soil. In low-temperature linden pyrochar (250°C and 450°C) dominated carboxylic and phenolic surface groups, in high-temperature (650°C) - lactonic groups. After removal of readily decomposable organic substances the acidity of the phenolic and lactonic groups in pyrochar of low-temperature pyrolysis sharply decreased. Characteristic feature of all studied samples is the presence in IR spectra of absorption bands of gyroxyl, carbonyl, methylene groups and organosilicon polymers. The feature of IR spectra of linden pyrochar (250°C and 450°C) is the presence of absorption bands of the stretching vibrations of the tertiary alcohols and phenols C-O group.

  19. Organic chemistry of embalming agents in Pharaonic and Graeco-Roman mummies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, S A; Evershed, R P

    2001-10-25

    Chemical treatments were an essential element of ancient Egyptian mummification. Although the inorganic salt natron is recognized as having a central role as a desiccant, without the application of organic preservatives the bodies would have decomposed in the humid environment of the tombs. The nature of the organic treatments remains obscure, because the ancient Egyptians left no written record of the process. Secondary textual evidence for mummification is provided by Herodotus, Diodorus Siculus, Strabo and Pliny. The most important account is that of Herodotus (about 450 yr bc), although archaeological evidence shows that by this time the process had declined significantly and the best results had been achieved centuries before. His account mentions myrrh, cassia, palm wine, 'cedar oil' (still widely disputed) and 'gum'; however, it is vague with respect to the specific natural products used. Here we report the results of chemical investigations of a substantial collection of samples of tissues, wrappings and 'resinous/bituminous' materials from provenanced and dated Egyptian mummies. We focused on examples of the 'classic' mummy-making culture of the Pharaonic or dynastic period, from which we can begin to track the development of mummification chronologically.

  20. NMR Kinetics of the S[subscript N]2 Reaction between BuBr and I[superscript -]: An Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, T. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    A simple organic chemistry experiment is described that investigates the kinetics of the reaction between 1-bromobutane (BuBr) and iodide (I[superscript -]) as followed by observing the disappearance of BuBr and the appearance of 1-iodobutane (BuI) using [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopy. In small groups of three to four, students acquire data to…