WorldWideScience

Sample records for http

  1. http Log Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøving, Kristian Billeskov; Simonsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    This article documents how log analysis can inform qualitative studies concerning the usage of web-based information systems (WIS). No prior research has used http log files as data to study collaboration between multiple users in organisational settings. We investigate how to perform http log...... analysis; what http log analysis says about the nature of collaborative WIS use; and how results from http log analysis may support other data collection methods such as surveys, interviews, and observation. The analysis of log files initially lends itself to research designs, which serve to test...... hypotheses using a quantitative methodology. We show that http log analysis can also be valuable in qualitative research such as case studies. The results from http log analysis can be triangulated with other data sources and for example serve as a means of supporting the interpretation of interview data...

  2. PROTOCOLO HTTP X PROTOCOLO HTTPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVA, Regina Célia Marques Freitas

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The Internet had a reputation in the business as a competitive differential and mayexpand its business worldwide. This huge market that is constantly evolving provides enormousexpectations of good business. On the other hand, there is a great threat to the company and users of theInternet. With the imminent risk of confidential information being intercepted, causes, users becomeunsafe to provide information via Web This paper aims to discuss the form of data transmission over theInternet, making a comparison of data transmission via http and https protocol.A Internet passou a ter notoriedade nas empresas como um diferencial competitivo,podendo expandir seus negócios mundialmente. Este mercado gigantesco que está em constante evoluçãoproporciona imensas expectativas de bons negócios. Por outro lado, existe uma grande ameaça asempresa e aos usuários da Internet. Com o risco eminente de uma informação sigilosa ser interceptada,faz com que, os usuários se tornem inseguros ao disponibilizar informações via Web. Este trabalho sepropõe a discutir a forma de transmissão de dados pela Internet, fazendo uma comparação entretransmissão de dados via protocolo http e https.:

  3. Developing Trend of HTTP Streaming%HTTP Streaming技术发展趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康亮

    2011-01-01

    HTTP Streaming已逐渐成为因特网上主流的媒体形式,占据着不可替代的位置.本文在介绍几种流媒体技术的基础上,阐述了HTTP Streaming技术的发展趋势,包括3GPP Adaptive HTTP Streaming,Microsoft IIS Smooth Streaming,Apple HTTP Live Streaming以及Adobe HTTP Dynamic Streaming.

  4. The covert channel over HTTP protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graniszewski, Waldemar; Krupski, Jacek; Szczypiorski, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents a new steganographic method - the covert channel is created over HTTP protocol header, i.e. trailer field. HTTP protocol is one of the most frequently used in the Internet. The popularity of the Web servers and network traffic from, and to them, is one of the requirements for undetectable message exchange. To study this kind of the information hiding technique an application in Javascript language based on the Node.js framework was written. The results of the experiment that was performed to send a message in the covert channel are also presented.

  5. The Analysis of HTTP/1.1%HTTP/1.1的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐健; 王涛

    2004-01-01

    HTTP是互联网中使用得最为广泛的传输协议之一,最新版HTTP/1.1是对HTTP/1.0的改进,提高了浏览速度,增强了安全性等.基于此,笔者对HTTP/1.1的信息进行了详细分析,并简单介绍了MIME编码.

  6. HttpClient 4.0

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    HTTP可能是目前互联网上使用的最多的协议了,尽管Java.net包提供了通过HTTP访问资源的基本功能,但是它并没有完整的HTTP协议的所有功能。HttpClient是Apache Jakarta Common下的子项目,为客户端提供了最新的、高效的HTTP功能实现,包含了HTTP协议最新的标准和建议。

  7. CERN moves to http://home.cern

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    A new top-level domain for CERN will be inaugurated next week, with the migration of the core website to http://home.cern.   The new home.cern webpage. The .cern top-level domain is intended for the exclusive use of CERN and its affiliates, and will soon be open for applications from within the community. Clear governance mechanisms for registration and management of .cern domains have been put in place. Applications for domains may be submitted by current members of the CERN personnel, and must be sponsored by a CERN entity such as a department, experiment, project or CERN-recognised experiment. For more information please refer to the registration policy. The acquisition of the .cern top-level domain was negotiated via ICANN’s new gTLD programme by a board comprising members of the CERN Legal Service, Communications group and IT department. .cern is one of over 1,300 new top-level domains that will launch over the coming months and years. The .cern domain nam...

  8. Creating A Model HTTP Server Program Using java

    CERN Document Server

    Veerasamy, Bala Dhandayuthapani

    2010-01-01

    HTTP Server is a computer programs that serves webpage content to clients. A webpage is a document or resource of information that is suitable for the World Wide Web and can be accessed through a web browser and displayed on a computer screen. This information is usually in HTML format, and may provide navigation to other webpage's via hypertext links. WebPages may be retrieved from a local computer or from a remote HTTP Server. WebPages are requested and served from HTTP Servers using Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP). WebPages may consist of files of static or dynamic text stored within the HTTP Server's file system. Client-side scripting can make WebPages more responsive to user input once in the client browser. This paper encompasses the creation of HTTP server program using java language, which is basically supporting for HTML and JavaScript.

  9. HTTP Flow Cobbling Method Based on DFI%基于 DFI 的 HTTP 流归并方法磁

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷红花; 桑静

    2016-01-01

    Currently ,the flow classification algorithm can only classify HTTP traffic with different application types , therefore it is unable to meet the emerging services such as reverse billing .A HTTP flow cobbling is proposed based on DFI , which can cobble all HTTP traffic generated by web service .This method is based on the application of the flow behavior recognition technology ,by analyzing the difference of HTTP streaming in different sessions or different states ,thus HTTP stream can be merged by web page as a unit .Experimental results show that the proposed method can solve the problem of HTTP flow cobbling in large scale traffic effectively .%目前的流量分类算法只能对不同类型的 HTTP 流量进行分类,无法将 HTTP 流量以各自所属的网页进行聚类,因此无法满足后向收费等新兴应用,论文提出一种基于 DFI 的 HTTP 流归并算法,能将一次网页访问所产生的所有HTTP 流进行归并。该方法是一种基于流量行为的应用识别技术,通过分析不同 HTTP 流在会话连接或数据流上状态的不同,从而对 HTTP 流以网页为单位进行归并。实验结果表明该方法可以有效地解决大规模网络流量的 HTTP 流归并问题。

  10. Mean Response Time Approximation for HTTP Transactions over Transport Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. J. Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses mean response time that end-users experience when using the Internet. HTTP (Hyper Text Transfer Protocol is a widely used transfer protocol to retrieve web objects in the Internet. Generally, HTTP uses TCP (Transmission Control Protocol in a transport layer. But it is known that HTTP interacts with TCP inefficiently. As an example of such inefficiencies, HTTP does not require TCP to deliver the rigid order, which may cause head-of-line blocking. As another transport layer protocol, SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol has attractive features such as multi-streaming and multi-homing unlike TCP. Within an SCTP association, multi-streaming allows for independent delivery among streams, thus can avoid the head-of-line blocking. In addition, SCTP provides very large number of streams; therefore, it can transfer multiple objects more efficiently than the typical HTTP/1.1 over TCP which limits the number of pipelines. Mean response time is one of the main measures that end users using Internet concern. This paper presents the simple analytical model and algorithm to find the mean response time for HTTP over SCTP including the previous HTTP over TCP. Some computational experiences show that the proposed model and algorithm are well approximated to the real environment. Also, it is shown that mean response time for HTTP over SCTP can be less than that for HTTP over TCP.

  11. 下一代HTTP协议%Next Generation HTTP Architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宏涛; 王慧

    2000-01-01

    为了克服当前HTTP协议的缺点,W3C(World Wide Web consortium)开始研究制定下一代HTTP协议桯TTP-NG.它分三个层次:应用层、消息层、传输层.现有WEB上应用将转换到HTTP-NG平台上,最后整个平台都会更新为HTTP-NG.

  12. Social Backup and Sharing of Video using HTTP Adaptive Streaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokking, H.M.; Klos, V.B.; Jiang, J.; Casetti, C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is on social backup, sharing and remote access of video using HTTP Adaptive Streaming. A social backup is a backup at the location, and thus on the equipment, of (close) friends and family. Backups are created at friends’ locations, matching the hosting user’s interest with the content an

  13. Comparison Of The Consumption Of Resources Between HTTP And SIP

    CERN Document Server

    Ravonimanantsoa, Ndaohialy Manda-Vy

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the development of research around VoIP experience a tremendous growth. In the community of open source Asterisk represents a reliable alternative for a lower cost solution. In this same community as the SIP protocol is a supplement to the more asterisk PBX. to share the benefits claimed by proponents of free software co-existence with other Asterisk server is not yet proven. In this context this paper we show a comparison of the use of simplified resource material for the apache server using the HTTP protocol and server that uses the asterisk SIP.

  14. Leveraging httpModules for Better ASPNET Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Love, Chris

    2008-01-01

    This Wrox Blox explains how to create different types of custom modules for ASP.NET web sites. Custom ASP.NET Modules are a great way to program advanced features to your web site. This Wrox blox discusses the difference between a custom httpModule and the Global.asax file. It also covers the steps in the ASP.NET pipeline. The examples include using a custom module to configure a site's initial settings, a background worker thread, and an IP blocker. Other examples show how to add content to the content being sent to the client, URL Rewriting, and a custom error handler. Table of Contents Intr

  15. An HTTP-Based Versioning Mechanism for Linked Data

    CERN Document Server

    Van de Sompel, Herbert; Nelson, Michael L; Balakireva, Lyudmila L; Shankar, Harihar; Ainsworth, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Dereferencing a URI returns a representation of the current state of the resource identified by that URI. But, on the Web representations of prior states of a resource are also available, for example, as resource versions in Content Management Systems or archival resources in Web Archives such as the Internet Archive. This paper introduces a resource versioning mechanism that is fully based on HTTP and uses datetime as a global version indicator. The approach allows "follow your nose" style navigation both from the current time-generic resource to associated time-specific version resources as well as among version resources. The proposed versioning mechanism is congruent with the Architecture of the World Wide Web, and is based on the Memento framework that extends HTTP with transparent content negotiation in the datetime dimension. The paper shows how the versioning approach applies to Linked Data, and by means of a demonstrator built for DBpedia, it also illustrates how it can be used to conduct a time-seri...

  16. ADAPTIVE STREAMING OVER HTTP (DASH UNTUK APLIKASI VIDEO STREAMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Oka Widyantara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyze Internet-based streaming video service in the communication media with variable bit rates. The proposed scheme on Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH using the internet network that adapts to the protocol Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP. DASH technology allows a video in the video segmentation into several packages that will distreamingkan. DASH initial stage is to compress the video source to lower the bit rate video codec uses H.26. Video compressed further in the segmentation using MP4Box generates streaming packets with the specified duration. These packages are assembled into packets in a streaming media format Presentation Description (MPD or known as MPEG-DASH. Streaming video format MPEG-DASH run on a platform with the player bitdash teritegrasi bitcoin. With this scheme, the video will have several variants of the bit rates that gave rise to the concept of scalability of streaming video services on the client side. The main target of the mechanism is smooth the MPEG-DASH streaming video display on the client. The simulation results show that the scheme based scalable video streaming MPEG-DASH able to improve the quality of image display on the client side, where the procedure bufering videos can be made constant and fine for the duration of video views

  17. PAKE-based mutual HTTP authentication for preventing phishing attacks

    CERN Document Server

    Oiwa, Yutaka; Takagi, Hiromitsu

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a new password-based mutual authentication protocol for Web systems which prevents various kinds of phishing attacks. This protocol provides a protection of user's passwords against any phishers even if dictionary attack is employed, and prevents phishers from imitating a false sense of successful authentication to users. The protocol is designed considering interoperability with many recent Web applications which requires many features which current HTTP authentication does not provide. The protocol is proposed as an Internet Draft submitted to IETF, and implemented in both server side (as an Apache extension) and client side (as a Mozilla-based browser and an IE-based one). The paper also proposes a new user-interface for this protocol which is always distinguishable from fake dialogs provided by phishers.

  18. HTTP Packet Inspection Policy for Improvising Internal Network Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Tomar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Past few years the use of Internet and its applications has increased to a great extent. There is also an enormous growth in the establishment of computer networks by large, medium and small organizations, for data transfer and information exchange. Due to this huge growth, incidents of cyber-attacks and security breaches have also increased. Data on a network is transferred using protocols such as Hyper Text Transfer Protocol, which is very vulnerable. Many types of malicious contents are hidden in packets that are transferred over a network or system, which may can to get it slow, crash or buffer overflow etc. Thus it is very important to secure networks from such types of attacks. There are lots of mechanisms available but still they are not good enough because of dynamic environment. Such kind of attacks can be countered by applying appropriate policies on network edge devices like Adaptive Security Appliance, firewalls, web servers, router etc. Also the packets which are transferred between networks, they should deeply inspect for malicious or any insecure contents. In this paper firstly we would study Network security issues and available mechanism to counter them our focus would be on inspecting the HTTP packets deeply by applying policies on ASA. Finally we would use Graphical Network Simulator (GNS3 to test such a policy.

  19. Analyses of Apach Commons HttpClient Programming in Chinese OS Platform%浅析中文环境下的Apach Commons HttpClient编程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪亮; 田支斌

    2008-01-01

    本文详尽的分析了在中文环境下运用Apach Commons HttpClient进行编程时出现的几个常见问题.针对每个问题,本文均给出较为完善的解决方案,对中文环境下的Apach Commons HttpClient编程具有极大的现实参考价值.

  20. Research on Direct Broadcast Technology Based on Http Live Streaming%基于Http Live Streaming的直播技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁耀

    2014-01-01

    The paper makes an introduction of the streaming media technology based on Http Live Streaming, including system architecture, file format, data structure and streaming-media segment tools supplied by Apple Company. Proposes two kinds of audio and video acquisition program according to different application scene, designs and builds a direct broadcast system that based on Http Live Streaming. At the end does analysis on the characteristic of Http Live Streaming based system and the system optimization direction.%本文介绍了基于Http Live Streaming的流媒体技术,包括系统架构、文件格式、数据结构和苹果提供的流媒体分割工具。结合应用场合提出了两种音视频采集方案,设计并搭建了一套基于Http Live Streaming的直播系统。分析了基于Http Live Streaming的直播系统的特点以及系统优化方向。

  1. Classification of HTTP traffic based on C5.0 Machine Learning Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bujlow, Tomasz; Riaz, Tahir; Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    2012-01-01

    Our previous work demonstrated the possibility of distinguishing several groups of traffic with accuracy of over 99%. Today, most of the traffic is generated by web browsers, which provide different kinds of services based on the HTTP protocol: web browsing, file downloads, audio and voice...... streaming through third-party plugins, etc. This paper suggests and evaluates two approaches to distinguish various types of HTTP traffic based on the content: distributed among volunteers' machines and centralized running in the core of the network. We also assess the accuracy of the centralized classifier...... for both the HTTP traffic and mixed HTTP/non-HTTP traffic. In the latter case, we achieved the accuracy of 94%. Finally, we provide graphical characteristics of different kinds of HTTP traffic....

  2. Threshold Based Kernel Level HTTP Filter (TBHF for DDoS Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ibrahim AK

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available HTTP flooding attack has a unique feature of interrupting application level services rather than depleting the network resources as in any other flooding attacks. Bombarding of HTTP GET requests to a target results in Denial of Service (DoS of the web server. Usage of shortened Uniform Resource Locator (URL is one of the best ways to unknowingly trap users for their participation in HTTP GET flooding attack. The existing solutions for HTTP attacks are based on browser level cache maintenance, CAPTCHA technique, and usage of Access Control Lists (ACL. Such techniques fail to prevent dynamic URL based HTTP attacks. To come up with a solution for the prevention of such kind of HTTP flooding attack, a real time HTTP GET flooding attack was generated using d0z-me, a malicious URL shortener tool. When user clicked the shortened URL, it was found that the user intended web page was displayed in the web browser. But simultaneously, an avalanche of HTTP GET requests were generated at the backdrop to the web server based on the scripts downloaded from the attacker. Since HTTP GET request traffic are part of any genuine internet traffic, it becomes difficult for the firewall to detect such kind of attacks. This motivated us to propose a Threshold Based Kernel Level HTTP Filter (TBHF, which would prevent internet users from taking part in such kind of Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS attacks unknowingly. Windows Filtering Platform (WFP, which is an Application Programming Interface (API, was used to develop TBHF. The proposed solution was tested by installing TBHF on a victim machine and generating the DDoS attack. It was observed that the TBHF completely prevented the user from participating in DDoS attack by filtering out the malicious HTTP GET requests while allowing other genuine HTTP GET requests generated from that system

  3. Improving throughput and user experience for information intensive websites by applying HTTP compression technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, Ratnakar

    2008-11-06

    HTTP compression is a technique specified as part of the W3C HTTP 1.0 standard. It allows HTTP servers to take advantage of GZIP compression technology that is built into latest browsers. A brief survey of medical informatics websites show that compression is not enabled. With compression enabled, downloaded files sizes are reduced by more than 50% and typical transaction time is also reduced from 20 to 8 minutes, thus providing a better user experience.

  4. Communication Behaviour-Based Big Data Application to Classify and Detect HTTP Automated Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manh Cong Tran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available HTTP is recognized as the most widely used protocol on the Internet when applications are being transferred more and more by developers onto the web. Due to increasingly complex computer systems, diversity HTTP automated software (autoware thrives. Unfortunately, besides normal autoware, HTTP malware and greyware are also spreading rapidly in web environment. Consequently, network communication is not just rigorously controlled by users intention. This raises the demand for analyzing HTTP autoware communication behaviour to detect and classify malicious and normal activities via HTTP traffic. Hence, in this paper, based on many studies and analysis of the autoware communication behaviour through access graph, a new method to detect and classify HTTP autoware communication at network level is presented. The proposal system includes combination of MapReduce of Hadoop and MarkLogic NoSQL database along with xQuery to deal with huge HTTP traffic generated each day in a large network. The method is examined with real outbound HTTP traffic data collected through a proxy server of a private network. Experimental results obtained for proposed method showed that promised outcomes are achieved since 95.1% of suspicious autoware are classified and detected. This finding may assist network and system administrator in inspecting early the internal threats caused by HTTP autoware.

  5. A Model for Evaluating Sharing Policies for Network-assisted HTTP Adaptive Streaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinrouweler, J.W.M.; Cabrero Barros, S.; Mei, R.D. van der; Cesar Garcia, P.S.

    2016-01-01

    HTTP adaptive streaming (HAS) has become the dominant technology for streaming video over the Internet. It gained popularity because of its ability to adapt the video quality to the current network conditions and other appealing properties such as usage of off-the-shelf HTTP servers and easy firewal

  6. Operational Mechanism and Realization Method of Http Proxy%Http Proxy的运行机制及实现方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪卫东

    2006-01-01

    以Jigsaw为例,描述了Http Proxy的运行机制和实现方法,其中包括Proxy服务器的配置、网络资源的封装、Http通讯协议的实现、Socket及SeverSocket的运用以及线程机制的管理与实现.

  7. Modeling Stability and Bitrate of Network-Assisted HTTP Adaptive Streaming Players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinrouweler, J.W.M.; Cabrero Barros, S.; Mei, R.D. van der; Cesar Garcia, P.S.

    2015-01-01

    Viewers using HTTP Adaptive Streaming (HAS) without sufficient bandwidth undergo frequent quality switches that hinder their watching experience. This situation, known as instability, is produced when HAS players are unable to accurately estimate the available bandwidth. Moreover, when several playe

  8. 浅析中文环境下的Apach Commons HttpClient编程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪亮; 田支斌

    2008-01-01

    本文详尽的分析了在中文环境下运用Apach Commons HttpClient进行编程时出现的几个常见问题。针对每个问题.本文均给出较为完善的解决方案,对中文环境下的Apach Commons HttpClient编程具有极大的现实参考价值。

  9. High-speed web attack detection through extracting exemplars from HTTP traffic

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we propose an effective method for high-speed web attack detection by extracting exemplars from HTTP traffic before the detection model is built. The smaller set of exemplars keeps valuable information of the original traffic while it significantly reduces the size of the traffic so that the detection remains effective and improves the detection efficiency. The Affinity Propagation (AP) is employed to extract the exemplars from the HTTP traffic. K-Nearest Neighbor(K-NN) and one class Support Vector Machine (SVM) are used for anomaly detection. To facilitate comparison, we also employ information gain to select key attributes (a.k.a. features) from the HTTP traffic for web attack detection. Two large real HTTP traffic are used to validate our methods. The extensive test results show that the AP based exemplar extraction significantly improves the real-time performance of the detection compared to using all the HTTP traffic and achieves a more robust detection performance than information gain based attribute selection for web attack detection. © 2011 ACM.

  10. New data access with HTTP/WebDAV in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Elmsheuser, Johannes; The ATLAS collaboration; Serfon, Cedric; Garonne, Vincent; Blunier, Sylvain; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Nilsson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    With the exponential growth of LHC (Large Hadron Collider) data in the years 2010-2012, distributed computing has become the established way to analyze collider data. The ATLAS experiment Grid infrastructure includes more than 130 sites worldwide, ranging from large national computing centres to smaller university clusters. So far the storage technologies and access protocols to the clusters that host this tremendous amount of data vary from site to site. HTTP/WebDAV offers the possibility to use a unified industry standard to access the storage. We present the deployment and testing of HTTP/WebDAV for local and remote data access in the ATLAS experiment for the new data management system Rucio and the PanDA workload management system. Deployment and large scale tests have been performed using the Grid testing system HammerCloud and the ROOT HTTP plugin Davix.

  11. New data access with HTTP/WebDAV in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Elmsheuser, Johannes; The ATLAS collaboration; Serfon, Cedric; Garonne, Vincent; Blunier, Sylvain; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Nilsson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    With the exponential growth of LHC (Large Hadron Collider) data in the years 2010-2012, distributed computing has become the established way to analyse collider data. The ATLAS experiment Grid infrastructure includes more than 130 sites worldwide, ranging from large national computing centres to smaller university clusters. So far the storage technologies and access protocols to the clusters that host this tremendous amount of data vary from site to site. HTTP/WebDAV offers the possibility to use a unified industry standard to access the storage. We present the deployment and testing of HTTP/WebDAV for local and remote data access in the ATLAS experiment for the new data management system Rucio and the PanDA workload management system. Deployment and large scale tests have been performed using the Grid testing system HammerCloud and the ROOT HTTP plugin Davix.

  12. Shaping HTTP Adaptive Streams using Receive Window Tuning Method in Home Gateway

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Ameur, Chiheb; Mory, Emmanuel; Cousin, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we describe a new method, called RWTM (Receive Window Tuning Method) that shapes HTTP adaptive streams. It employs the flow control in the gateway to improve the quality of experience (QoE) of users. Our use case is when two HTTP Adaptive streaming clients are competing for bandwidth in the same home network. Results show that our proposed method considerably improves the QoE; it improves the video stability, the fidelity to optimal video quality level s...

  13. An Internet Framework to Bring Coherence between WAP and HTTP Ensuring Better Mobile Internet Security

    OpenAIRE

    Pathan, Al-Mukaddim Khan; Mottalib, Md. Abdul; Zibran, Minhaz Fahim

    2006-01-01

    To bring coherence between Wireless Access Protocol (WAP) and Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP), in this paper, we have proposed an enhanced Internet framework, which incorporates a new markup language and a browser compatible with both of the access control protocols. This Markup Language and the browser enables co-existence of both Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) and Wireless Markup Language (WML) contents in a single source file, whereas the browser incorporates the ability to hold con...

  14. HTTP协议技术探析%Some viewpoints on HTTP protocol technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖戈林

    2001-01-01

    简单概述了WWW核心技术HTTP协议的地位,以及WEB协议族的工作机制和URL编码和解码,对HTTP协议的运行机制与特性进行了详细介绍,着重论述了协议的缺陷及HTTP1.1的新发展.

  15. RESEARCH AND IMPLEMENTATION OF HTTP CACHE%HTTP缓存的研究与实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘心松; 邱元杰

    2000-01-01

    本文研究了HTTP[1]缓存的特点和影响HTTP缓存效果的因素,分析了衡量HTTP缓存性能的指标,设计了HTTP缓存文件和缓存入口信息的结构,最后给出了收到用户请求和收到响应时的分类处理过程.

  16. Classification of HTTP Attacks: A Study on the ECML/PKDD 2007 Discovery Challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eliassi-Rad, Tina [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2009-07-08

    As the world becomes more reliant on Web applications for commercial, financial, and medical transactions, cyber attacks on the World Wide Web are increasing in frequency and severity. Web applications provide an attractive alternative to traditional desktop applications due to their accessibility and ease of deployment. However, the accessibility of Web applications also makes them extremely vulnerable to attack. This inherent vulnerability is intensified by the distributed nature ofWeb applications and the complexity of configuring application servers. These factors have led to a proliferation of Web-based attacks, in which attackers surreptitiously inject code into HTTP requests, allowing them to execute arbitrary commands on remote systems and perform malicious activities such as reading, altering, or destroying sensitive data. One approach for dealing with HTTP-based attacks is to identify malicious code in incoming HTTP requests and eliminate bad requests before they are processed. Using machine learning techniques, we can build a classifier to automatically label requests as “Valid” or “Attack.” For this study, we develop a simple, but effective HTTP attack classifier, based on the vector space model used commonly for Information Retrieval. Our classifier not only separates attacks from valid requests, but can also identify specific attack types (e.g., “SQL Injection” or “Path Traversal”). We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach through experiments on the ECML/PKDD 2007 Discovery Challenge data set. Specifically, we show that our approach achieves higher precision and recall than previous methods. In addition, our approach has a number of desirable characteristics, including robustness to missing contextual information, interpretability of models, and scalability.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP). III. (Sabbi+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbi, E.; Lennon, D. J.; Anderson, J.; Cignoni, M.; van der Marel, R. P.; Zaritsky, D.; de Marchi, G.; Panagia, N.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grebel, E. K.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Smith, L. J.; Sana, H.; Aloisi, A.; Tosi, M.; Evans, C. J.; Arab, H.; Boyer, M.; de Mink, S. E.; Gordon, K.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Larsen, S. S.; Ryon, J. E.; Zeidler, P.

    2016-02-01

    Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP; HST 12939, PI Elena Sabbi + HST 12499, PI Danny Lennon) was awarded 60 orbits of HST time in cycle 20 to survey the entire Tarantula Nebula (30 Doradus), using both the UVIS and the IR channels of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), and, in parallel, the Wide Field Channel (WFC) of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). See log of the observations (from 2011 Oct 03 to 2013 Sep 17) in table 1. (2 data files).

  18. [Learning from regional differences: online platform: http://www.versorgungsatlas.de].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiapane, S

    2014-02-01

    In 2011, the Central Research Institute of Ambulatory Health Care in Germany (ZI) published the website http://www.versorgungsatlas.de, a portal that presents research results from regional health services in Germany. The Web portal provides a publicly accessible source of information and a growing number of selected analyses focusing on regional variation in health care. Each topic is presented in terms of interactive maps, tables, and diagrams and is supplemented by a paper that examines the results in detail and provides an explanation of the findings. The portal has been designed to provide a forum on which health service researchers can publish their results derived from various data sources of different institutions in Germany and can comment on results already available on http://www.versorgungsatlas.de. For health policy actors, the discussion of regional differences offers a new, previously unavailable basis for determining the region-specific treatment needs and for providing health-care management with the goal of high-quality care for each resident.

  19. MEKANISME SEGMENTASI LAJU BIT PADA DYNAMIC ADAPTIVE STREAMING OVER HTTP (DASH UNTUK APLIKASI VIDEO STREAMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Audy Bazly

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyze Internet-based streaming video service in the communication media with variable bit rates. The proposed scheme on Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH using the internet network that adapts to the protocol Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP. DASH technology allows a video in the video segmentation into several packages that will distreamingkan. DASH initial stage is to compress the video source to lower the bit rate video codec uses H.26. Video compressed further in the segmentation using MP4Box generates streaming packets with the specified duration. These packages are assembled into packets in a streaming media format Presentation Description (MPD or known as MPEG-DASH. Streaming video format MPEG-DASH run on a platform with the player bitdash teritegrasi bitcoin. With this scheme, the video will have several variants of the bit rates that gave rise to the concept of scalability of streaming video services on the client side. The main target of the mechanism is smooth the MPEG-DASH streaming video display on the client. The simulation results show that the scheme based scalable video streaming MPEG- DASH able to improve the quality of image display on the client side, where the procedure bufering videos can be made constant and fine for the duration of video views

  20. A multi-pattern hash-binary hybrid algorithm for URL matching in the HTTP protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ping; Tan, Qingping; Meng, Xiankai; Shao, Zeming; Xie, Qinzheng; Yan, Ying; Cao, Wei; Xu, Jianjun

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, based on our previous multi-pattern uniform resource locator (URL) binary-matching algorithm called HEM, we propose an improved multi-pattern matching algorithm called MH that is based on hash tables and binary tables. The MH algorithm can be applied to the fields of network security, data analysis, load balancing, cloud robotic communications, and so on-all of which require string matching from a fixed starting position. Our approach effectively solves the performance problems of the classical multi-pattern matching algorithms. This paper explores ways to improve string matching performance under the HTTP protocol by using a hash method combined with a binary method that transforms the symbol-space matching problem into a digital-space numerical-size comparison and hashing problem. The MH approach has a fast matching speed, requires little memory, performs better than both the classical algorithms and HEM for matching fields in an HTTP stream, and it has great promise for use in real-world applications.

  1. RSS (http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/arthropods/rss.xml

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthropods (ISSN 2224-4255

    Full Text Available Arthropods ISSN 2224-4255 URL: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/arthropods/online-version.asp RSS: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/arthropods/rss.xml E-mail: arthropods@iaees.org Editor-in-Chief: WenJun Zhang Aims and Scope ARTHROPODS (ISSN 2224-4255 is an international journal devoted to the publication of articles on various aspects of arthropods, e.g., ecology, biogeography, systematics, biodiversity (species diversity, genetic diversity, et al., conservation, control, etc. The journal provides a forum for examining the importance of arthropods in biosphere (both terrestrial and marine ecosystems and human life in such fields as agriculture, forestry, fishery, environmental management and human health. The scope of Arthropods is wide and embraces all arthropods-insects, arachnids, crustaceans, centipedes, millipedes, and other arthropods. Articles/short communications on new taxa (species, genus, families, orders, etc. and new records of arthropods are particularly welcome. Authors can submit their works to the email box of this journal, arthropods@iaees.org. All manuscripts submitted to this journal must be previously unpublished and may not be considered for publication elsewhere at any time during review period of this journal. Authors are asked to read Author Guidelines before submitting manuscripts. In addition to free submissions from authors around the world, special issues are also accepted. The organizer of a special issue can collect submissions (yielded from a research project, a research group, etc. on a specific research topic, or submissions of a scientific conference for publication of special issue.

  2. Arthropods (http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/arthropods/online-version.asp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    arthropods@iaees.org

    Full Text Available Arthropods ISSN 2224-4255 URL: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/arthropods/online-version.asp RSS: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/arthropods/rss.xml E-mail: arthropods@iaees.org Editor-in-Chief: WenJun Zhang Aims and Scope ARTHROPODS (ISSN 2224-4255 is an international journal devoted to the publication of articles on various aspects of arthropods, e.g., ecology, biogeography, systematics, biodiversity (species diversity, genetic diversity, et al., conservation, control, etc. The journal provides a forum for examining the importance of arthropods in biosphere (both terrestrial and marine ecosystems and human life in such fields as agriculture, forestry, fishery, environmental management and human health. The scope of Arthropods is wide and embraces all arthropods-insects, arachnids, crustaceans, centipedes, millipedes, and other arthropods. Articles/short communications on new taxa (species, genus, families, orders, etc. and new records of arthropods are particularly welcome. Authors can submit their works to the email box of this journal, arthropods@iaees.org. All manuscripts submitted to this journal must be previously unpublished and may not be considered for publication elsewhere at any time during review period of this journal. Authors are asked to read Author Guidelines before submitting manuscripts. In addition to free submissions from authors around the world, special issues are also accepted. The organizer of a special issue can collect submissions (yielded from a research project, a research group, etc. on a specific research topic, or submissions of a scientific conference for publication of special issue.

  3. RSS (http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/environsc/rss.xml

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    Environmental Skeptics and Critics (ISSN 2224-4263

    Full Text Available Environmental Skeptics and Critics ISSN 2224-4263 URL: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/environsc/online-version.asp RSS: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/environsc/rss.xml E-mail: environsc@iaees.org Editor-in-Chief: WenJun Zhang Aims and Scope The more truth is debated, the clearer it becomes. Science will not proceed without debate and controversy. Wide and in-depth debate and controversy on human's knowledge, attitudes, policies and practices on the environment determines the future of our planet. There are numerous controversial and potentially controversial issues on environmental sciences and practices. ENVIRONMENTAL SKEPTICS and CRITICS (ISSN 2224-4263 is an international journal devoted to the publication of skeptical and critical articles/short communications/letters on theories, viewpoints, methodologies, practices, policies, etc., in ecological and environmental areas. The journal provides a forum for questioning, disputing, arguing, challenging, criticizing and judging known theories, methdologies, practices, and policies, etc., or presenting different ideas. The scope of Environmental Skeptics and Critics is wide and embraces all controversial, non-conclusive or unexplained issues in ecological and environmental areas. Authors can submit their works to the email box of this journal, environsc@iaees.org. All manuscripts submitted to this journal must be previously unpublished and may not be considered for publication elsewhere at any time during review period of this journal. Authors are asked to read Author Guidelines before submitting manuscripts. In addition to free submissions from authors around the world, special issues are also accepted. The organizer of a special issue can collect submissions (yielded from a research project, a research group, etc. on a specific research topic, or submissions of a scientific conference for publication of special issue.

  4. Environmental Skeptics and Critics (http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/environsc/online-version.asp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    environsc@iaees.org

    Full Text Available Environmental Skeptics and Critics ISSN 2224-4263 URL: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/environsc/online-version.asp RSS: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/environsc/rss.xml E-mail: environsc@iaees.org Editor-in-Chief: WenJun Zhang Aims and Scope The more truth is debated, the clearer it becomes. Science will not proceed without debate and controversy. Wide and in-depth debate and controversy on human's knowledge, attitudes, policies and practices on the environment determines the future of our planet. There are numerous controversial and potentially controversial issues on environmental sciences and practices. ENVIRONMENTAL SKEPTICS and CRITICS (ISSN 2224-4263 is an international journal devoted to the publication of skeptical and critical articles/short communications/letters on theories, viewpoints, methodologies, practices, policies, etc., in ecological and environmental areas. The journal provides a forum for questioning, disputing, arguing, challenging, criticizing and judging known theories, methdologies, practices, and policies, etc., or presenting different ideas. The scope of Environmental Skeptics and Critics is wide and embraces all controversial, non-conclusive or unexplained issues in ecological and environmental areas. Authors can submit their works to the email box of this journal, environsc@iaees.org. All manuscripts submitted to this journal must be previously unpublished and may not be considered for publication elsewhere at any time during review period of this journal. Authors are asked to read Author Guidelines before submitting manuscripts. In addition to free submissions from authors around the world, special issues are also accepted. The organizer of a special issue can collect submissions (yielded from a research project, a research group, etc. on a specific research topic, or submissions of a scientific conference for publication of special issue.

  5. RSS (http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/piaees/rss.xml

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    Proceedings of the International Academy of Ecology and Environmental Sciences (ISSN 2220-8860

    Full Text Available Proceedings of the International Academy of Ecology and Environmental Sciences ISSN 2220-8860 URL: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/piaees/online-version.asp RSS: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/piaees/rss.xml E-mail: piaees@iaees.org Editor-in-Chief: WenJun Zhang Aims and Scope PROCEEDINGS OF THE INTERNATIONAL ACADEMY OF ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (ISSN 2220-8860; CODEN PIAEBW is an open access, peer-reviewed international journal that considers scientific articles in all different areas of ecology and environmental sciences. It is the flagship journal of the International Academy of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. It dedicates to the latest advances in ecology and environmental sciences. The goal of this journal is to keep a record of the state-of-the-art research and promote the research work in these fast moving areas. The topics to be covered by this journal include, but are not limited to theory, methodology, technology, innovation, activity, and project in the following areas: •Animal ecology, plant/microbe ecology, wetland ecology, farmland ecology, forest/grassland ecology, marine ecology, pollution ecology, etc. •Biological conservation & preservation, ecosystem restoration, environmental policy, environmental toxicology, environmental pollution and control, natural resource, bioenergy research, environmental technology, waste management, environmental economics, environmental management & planning, environmental education, environmental engineering, global climate change, oceanography, etc. Authors can submit their works to the email box of this journal, piaees@iaees.org. All manuscripts submitted to this journal must be previously unpublished and may not be considered for publication elsewhere at any time during review period of this journal. Authors are asked to read Author Guidelines before submitting manuscripts. In addition to free submissions from authors around the world, special issues are

  6. RSS (http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/nb/rss.xml

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    Network Biology (ISSN 2220-8879

    Full Text Available Network Biology ISSN 2220-8879 URL: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/nb/online-version.asp RSS: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/nb/rss.xml E-mail: networkbiology@iaees.org Editor-in-Chief: WenJun Zhang Aims and Scope NETWORK BIOLOGY (ISSN 2220-8879; CODEN NBEICS is an open access, peer-reviewed international journal that considers scientific articles in all different areas of network biology. It is the transactions of the International Society of Network Biology. It dedicates to the latest advances in network biology. The goal of this journal is to keep a record of the state-of-the-art research and promote the research work in these fast moving areas. The topics to be covered by Network Biology include, but are not limited to: •Theories, algorithms and programs of network analysis •Innovations and applications of biological networks •Ecological networks, food webs and natural equilibrium •Co-evolution, co-extinction, biodiversity conservation •Metabolic networks, protein-protein interaction networks, biochemical reaction networks, gene networks, transcriptional regulatory networks, cell cycle networks, phylogenetic networks, network motifs •Physiological networks •Network regulation of metabolic processes, human diseases and ecological systems •Social networks, epidemiological networks •System complexity, self-organized systems, emergence of biological systems, agent-based modeling, individual-based modeling, neural network modeling, and other network-based modeling, etc. We are also interested in short communications that clearly address a specific issue or completely present a new ecological network, food web, or metabolic or gene network, etc. Authors can submit their works to the email box of this journal, networkbiology@iaees.org. All manuscripts submitted to this journal must be previously unpublished and may not be considered for publication elsewhere at any time during review period of this journal

  7. Computational Ecology and Software (http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/ces/online-version.asp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ces@iaees.org

    Full Text Available Computational Ecology and Software ISSN 2220-721X URL: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/ces/online-version.asp RSS: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/ces/rss.xml E-mail: ces@iaees.org Editor-in-Chief: WenJun Zhang Aims and Scope COMPUTATIONAL ECOLOGY AND SOFTWARE (ISSN 2220-721X is an open access, peer-reviewed online journal that considers scientific articles in all different areas of computational ecology. It is the transactions of the International Society of Computational Ecology. The journal is concerned with the ecological researches, constructions and applications of theories and methods of computational sciences including computational mathematics, computational statistics and computer science. It features the simulation, approximation, prediction, recognition, and classification of ecological issues. Intensive computation is one of the major stresses of the journal. The journal welcomes research articles, short communications, review articles, perspectives, and book reviews. The journal also supports the activities of the International Society of Computational Ecology. The topics to be covered by CES include, but are not limited to: •Computation intensive methods, numerical and optimization methods, differential and difference equation modeling and simulation, prediction, recognition, classification, statistical computation (Bayesian computing, randomization, bootstrapping, Monte Carlo techniques, stochastic process, etc., agent-based modeling, individual-based modeling, artificial neural networks, knowledge based systems, machine learning, genetic algorithms, data exploration, network analysis and computation, databases, ecological modeling and computation using Geographical Information Systems, satellite imagery, and other computation intensive theories and methods. •Artificial ecosystems, artificial life, complexity of ecosystems and virtual reality. •The development, evaluation and validation of software and

  8. RSS (http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/ces/rss.xml

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    Computational Ecology and Software (ISSN 2220-721X

    Full Text Available Computational Ecology and Software ISSN 2220-721X URL: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/ces/online-version.asp RSS: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/ces/rss.xml E-mail: ces@iaees.org Editor-in-Chief: WenJun Zhang Aims and Scope COMPUTATIONAL ECOLOGY AND SOFTWARE (ISSN 2220-721X is an open access, peer-reviewed online journal that considers scientific articles in all different areas of computational ecology. It is the transactions of the International Society of Computational Ecology. The journal is concerned with the ecological researches, constructions and applications of theories and methods of computational sciences including computational mathematics, computational statistics and computer science. It features the simulation, approximation, prediction, recognition, and classification of ecological issues. Intensive computation is one of the major stresses of the journal. The journal welcomes research articles, short communications, review articles, perspectives, and book reviews. The journal also supports the activities of the International Society of Computational Ecology. The topics to be covered by CES include, but are not limited to: •Computation intensive methods, numerical and optimization methods, differential and difference equation modeling and simulation, prediction, recognition, classification, statistical computation (Bayesian computing, randomization, bootstrapping, Monte Carlo techniques, stochastic process, etc., agent-based modeling, individual-based modeling, artificial neural networks, knowledge based systems, machine learning, genetic algorithms, data exploration, network analysis and computation, databases, ecological modeling and computation using Geographical Information Systems, satellite imagery, and other computation intensive theories and methods. •Artificial ecosystems, artificial life, complexity of ecosystems and virtual reality. •The development, evaluation and validation of software and

  9. Network Biology (http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/nb/online-version.asp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    networkbiology@iaees.org

    Full Text Available Network Biology ISSN 2220-8879 URL: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/nb/online-version.asp RSS: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/nb/rss.xml E-mail: networkbiology@iaees.org Editor-in-Chief: WenJun Zhang Aims and Scope NETWORK BIOLOGY (ISSN 2220-8879; CODEN NBEICS is an open access, peer-reviewed international journal that considers scientific articles in all different areas of network biology. It is the transactions of the International Society of Network Biology. It dedicates to the latest advances in network biology. The goal of this journal is to keep a record of the state-of-the-art research and promote the research work in these fast moving areas. The topics to be covered by Network Biology include, but are not limited to: •Theories, algorithms and programs of network analysis •Innovations and applications of biological networks •Ecological networks, food webs and natural equilibrium •Co-evolution, co-extinction, biodiversity conservation •Metabolic networks, protein-protein interaction networks, biochemical reaction networks, gene networks, transcriptional regulatory networks, cell cycle networks, phylogenetic networks, network motifs •Physiological networks •Network regulation of metabolic processes, human diseases and ecological systems •Social networks, epidemiological networks •System complexity, self-organized systems, emergence of biological systems, agent-based modeling, individual-based modeling, neural network modeling, and other network-based modeling, etc. We are also interested in short communications that clearly address a specific issue or completely present a new ecological network, food web, or metabolic or gene network, etc. Authors can submit their works to the email box of this journal, networkbiology@iaees.org. All manuscripts submitted to this journal must be previously unpublished and may not be considered for publication elsewhere at any time during review period of this journal

  10. 基于OPNET的HTTP性能仿真研究%Simulation Study of HTTP Performance Based on OPNET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜瑞娟; 薛晓瑾; 刘艺兰; 潘耘

    2015-01-01

    To study the HTTP performance,based on OPNET simulation platform,we do simulations with some HTTP network simulation models. In the simulation,we design different scenarios according to differ-ent performances of HTTP. By comparing the simulation results of each scenario,we analyze the influence of different performance of HTTP to Web applications.%本文以研究HTTP性能为目标,基于OPNET仿真平台创建HTTP网络仿真模型,并进行了仿真实验。仿真中,针对HTTP的不同性能设计了不同的场景,通过对比各场景的仿真结果,分析了HTTP的不同性能对Web应用产生的影响。

  11. Client-Driven Joint Cache Management and Rate Adaptation for Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenghao Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that proxy-driven proxy cache management and the client-driven streaming solution of Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH are two independent processes, some difficulties and challenges arise in media data management at the proxy cache and rate adaptation at the DASH client. This paper presents a novel client-driven joint proxy cache management and DASH rate adaptation method, named CLICRA, which moves prefetching intelligence from the proxy cache to the client. Based on the philosophy of CLICRA, this paper proposes a rate adaptation algorithm, which selects bitrates for the next media segments to be requested by using the predicted buffered media time in the client. CLICRA is realized by conveying information on the segments that are likely to be fetched subsequently to the proxy cache so that it can use the information for prefetching. Simulation results show that the proposed method outperforms the conventional segment-fetch-time-based rate adaptation and the proxy-driven proxy cache management significantly not only in streaming quality at the client but also in bandwidth and storage usage in proxy caches.

  12. HTTP-based remote operational options for the Vacuum Tower Telescope, Tenerife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, J.

    2012-09-01

    We are currently developing network based tools for the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), Tenerife which will allow to operate the telescope together with the newly developed 2D-spectrometer HELLRIDE under remote control conditions. The computational configuration can be viewed as a distributed system linking hardware components of various functionality from different locations. We have developed a communication protocol which is basically an extension of the HTTP standard. It will serve as a carrier for command- and data-transfers. The server-client software is based on Berkley-Unix sockets in a C++ programming environment. A customized CMS will allow to create browser accessible information on-the-fly. Java-based applet pages have been tested as optional user access GUI's. An access tool has been implemented to download near-realtime, web-based target information from NASA/SDO. Latency tests have been carried out at the VTT and the Swedish STT at La Palma for concept verification. Short response times indicate that under favorable network conditions remote interactive telescope handling may be possible. The scientific focus of possible future remote operations will be set on the helioseismology of the solar atmosphere, the monitoring of flares and the footpoint analysis of coronal loops and chromospheric events.

  13. An online database for informing ecological network models: http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beas-Luna, Rodrigo; Novak, Mark; Carr, Mark H; Tinker, Martin T; Black, August; Caselle, Jennifer E; Hoban, Michael; Malone, Dan; Iles, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Ecological network models and analyses are recognized as valuable tools for understanding the dynamics and resiliency of ecosystems, and for informing ecosystem-based approaches to management. However, few databases exist that can provide the life history, demographic and species interaction information necessary to parameterize ecological network models. Faced with the difficulty of synthesizing the information required to construct models for kelp forest ecosystems along the West Coast of North America, we developed an online database (http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu/) to facilitate the collation and dissemination of such information. Many of the database's attributes are novel yet the structure is applicable and adaptable to other ecosystem modeling efforts. Information for each taxonomic unit includes stage-specific life history, demography, and body-size allometries. Species interactions include trophic, competitive, facilitative, and parasitic forms. Each data entry is temporally and spatially explicit. The online data entry interface allows researchers anywhere to contribute and access information. Quality control is facilitated by attributing each entry to unique contributor identities and source citations. The database has proven useful as an archive of species and ecosystem-specific information in the development of several ecological network models, for informing management actions, and for education purposes (e.g., undergraduate and graduate training). To facilitate adaptation of the database by other researches for other ecosystems, the code and technical details on how to customize this database and apply it to other ecosystems are freely available and located at the following link (https://github.com/kelpforest-cameo/databaseui).

  14. An online database for informing ecological network models: http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beas-Luna, Rodrigo; Tinker, M. Tim; Novak, Mark; Carr, Mark H.; Black, August; Caselle, Jennifer E.; Hoban, Michael; Malone, Dan; Iles, Alison C.

    2014-01-01

    Ecological network models and analyses are recognized as valuable tools for understanding the dynamics and resiliency of ecosystems, and for informing ecosystem-based approaches to management. However, few databases exist that can provide the life history, demographic and species interaction information necessary to parameterize ecological network models. Faced with the difficulty of synthesizing the information required to construct models for kelp forest ecosystems along the West Coast of North America, we developed an online database (http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu/) to facilitate the collation and dissemination of such information. Many of the database's attributes are novel yet the structure is applicable and adaptable to other ecosystem modeling efforts. Information for each taxonomic unit includes stage-specific life history, demography, and body-size allometries. Species interactions include trophic, competitive, facilitative, and parasitic forms. Each data entry is temporally and spatially explicit. The online data entry interface allows researchers anywhere to contribute and access information. Quality control is facilitated by attributing each entry to unique contributor identities and source citations. The database has proven useful as an archive of species and ecosystem-specific information in the development of several ecological network models, for informing management actions, and for education purposes (e.g., undergraduate and graduate training). To facilitate adaptation of the database by other researches for other ecosystems, the code and technical details on how to customize this database and apply it to other ecosystems are freely available and located at the following link (https://github.com/kelpforest-cameo/data​baseui).

  15. An online database for informing ecological network models: http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Beas-Luna

    Full Text Available Ecological network models and analyses are recognized as valuable tools for understanding the dynamics and resiliency of ecosystems, and for informing ecosystem-based approaches to management. However, few databases exist that can provide the life history, demographic and species interaction information necessary to parameterize ecological network models. Faced with the difficulty of synthesizing the information required to construct models for kelp forest ecosystems along the West Coast of North America, we developed an online database (http://kelpforest.ucsc.edu/ to facilitate the collation and dissemination of such information. Many of the database's attributes are novel yet the structure is applicable and adaptable to other ecosystem modeling efforts. Information for each taxonomic unit includes stage-specific life history, demography, and body-size allometries. Species interactions include trophic, competitive, facilitative, and parasitic forms. Each data entry is temporally and spatially explicit. The online data entry interface allows researchers anywhere to contribute and access information. Quality control is facilitated by attributing each entry to unique contributor identities and source citations. The database has proven useful as an archive of species and ecosystem-specific information in the development of several ecological network models, for informing management actions, and for education purposes (e.g., undergraduate and graduate training. To facilitate adaptation of the database by other researches for other ecosystems, the code and technical details on how to customize this database and apply it to other ecosystems are freely available and located at the following link (https://github.com/kelpforest-cameo/databaseui.

  16. Perancangan dan Realisasi Web-Based Data Logging System menggunakan ATmega16 melalui Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RATNA SUSANA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP merupakan protokol jaringan pada lapisan aplikasi TCP/IP yang menjadi dasar komunikasi pada World Wide Web (WWW. Penelitian ini merancang dan merealisasikan web-based data logging system yang bertujuan untuk memperkenalkan aturan HTTP, sehingga perangkat elektronik dapat berkomunikasi dengan website secara langsung. Sistem dirancang dengan dua sub sistem utama yaitu website data logger dan website. Data logger direalisasikan menggunakan ATMega16 yang diintegrasikan dengan sumber data analog dan digital, RTC serta modem GSM. Data logger berfungsi sebagai pengirim data, sedangkan website berfungsi sebagai pengatur, penerima, pengolah dan penyaji data. Sistem ini telah berhasil melakukan komunikasi antara data logger dengan website melalui HTTP, artinya protokol ini dapat diimplementasikan pada data logger yang menggunakan ATmega16. Perubahan data analog dan status logika 0 dan 1 dari data digital yang terjadi pada data logger dapat dilihat pada tampilan di website. Kata kunci:  basis data, data logger, Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP, website, protokol jaringan. Abstract Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP is an application layer network protocols in TCP/IP is the basis of communication on the World Wide Web (WWW. This research was to design and realize a web-based data logging system that aims to introduce the rules of HTTP, so that electronic devices could communicate with the website directly. The system was designed with two main sub-system, namely data logger and website. The data logger was realized using ATmega16 are integrated with analog and digital data sources, RTC and a GSM modem. Data logger function as the sender of data, while the website functions as regulator, receiver, processing and presenter data. This system had been successfully perform communication between the data logger to a website via HTTP, meaning that this protocol could be implemented on a data logger that uses ATmega16

  17. HLS-SHARE:A PLAYER MIDDLEWARE TIMELY SHARING HTTP LIVE STREAMING%HLS-Share:一种实时分享Http Live Streaming的播放器中间件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑博玮; 权恒星; 刘磊; 孙毅

    2014-01-01

    描述一种分享Http Live Streaming流媒体,同时对服务器和播放器透明的播放器中间件HLS-Share。HLS-Share通过手机节点间的协作计算,使手机共享3G网络带宽,减少3G网络流量,加速观看Http Live Streaming流。HLS-Share采用基于事件驱动的方法在本地P2P网络中挑选部分节点作为中继节点负责分享从Internet获取的Http Live Streaming流。通过实验验证了相比于每部手机独立使用3 G网络观看视频,HLS-Share在引入极小的CPU使用率的代价下,能够实现共享带宽、加快缓存速度的作用,并且消耗的电量小于前者。%This paper describes a player middleware named as HLS-Share,it shares streaming media of Http Live Streaming,and is transparent to both the server and the player simultaneously.HLS-Share enables mobile phones nodes share their 3G networks bandwidth and cut down 3G networks flow by cooperated computation between the mobile phones’nodes,which speeds up Http Live Streaming watching. HLS-Share selects part of the nodes from local P2P network by using event-driven based means and employs them as the relay nodes in charge of sharing the Http Live Streaming data obtained from Internet.In this paper we verify through the experiment that comparing with each mobile phone watching video in 3G network independently,HLS-Share is able to realise bandwidth sharing,accelerate the role of cache speed,and has less power consumption than the former at the cost of introducing slight CPU utilisation rate.

  18. Empirical evaluation of H.265/HEVC-based dynamic adaptive video streaming over HTTP (HEVC-DASH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irondi, Iheanyi; Wang, Qi; Grecos, Christos

    2014-05-01

    Real-time HTTP streaming has gained global popularity for delivering video content over Internet. In particular, the recent MPEG-DASH (Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP) standard enables on-demand, live, and adaptive Internet streaming in response to network bandwidth fluctuations. Meanwhile, emerging is the new-generation video coding standard, H.265/HEVC (High Efficiency Video Coding) promises to reduce the bandwidth requirement by 50% at the same video quality when compared with the current H.264/AVC standard. However, little existing work has addressed the integration of the DASH and HEVC standards, let alone empirical performance evaluation of such systems. This paper presents an experimental HEVC-DASH system, which is a pull-based adaptive streaming solution that delivers HEVC-coded video content through conventional HTTP servers where the client switches to its desired quality, resolution or bitrate based on the available network bandwidth. Previous studies in DASH have focused on H.264/AVC, whereas we present an empirical evaluation of the HEVC-DASH system by implementing a real-world test bed, which consists of an Apache HTTP Server with GPAC, an MP4Client (GPAC) with open HEVC-based DASH client and a NETEM box in the middle emulating different network conditions. We investigate and analyze the performance of HEVC-DASH by exploring the impact of various network conditions such as packet loss, bandwidth and delay on video quality. Furthermore, we compare the Intra and Random Access profiles of HEVC coding with the Intra profile of H.264/AVC when the correspondingly encoded video is streamed with DASH. Finally, we explore the correlation among the quality metrics and network conditions, and empirically establish under which conditions the different codecs can provide satisfactory performance.

  19. Service detection and analysis of HTTP at port 80 based on flow records%基于流记录的HTTP80端口服务检测和分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁伟; 洪沿; 夏震

    2016-01-01

    In order to locate web servers in a network and analyze their traffic behavior ,a HTTP serv‐er of port 80 locating algorithm was proposed with the help of IP flow information provided by the boundary routers of the same network .The algorithm was implemented on CERNET (China Educa‐tion and Research Network) Nanjing Node .The result shows that only about 3% IP space should be detected ,where over 98% of HTTP80 servers can be located .During the process ,some other infor‐mation can be used for locating potential safety hazards also ,such as the misuse of a web server′s de‐fault page and port 80 abuses .The idea of the algorithm can also be used for locating other kinds of server ,such as DNS server .%为了定位Web服务器并对其流量行为进行分析,提出了一个以网络边界路由器提供的流记录为分析数据源,定位网内HTTP80端口服务主机的算法。算法实现在了CERNET南京主节点所覆盖的网络。对算法的检测结果用传统的扫描定位方式进行了检验,结果表明:本算法只须探测全网3%左右的IP地址空间,便可成功定位超过98%的HTTP80服务器。根据算法执行过程中获得的信息,还可以检测分析网络中的一些安全隐患,包括定位使用Web服务器缺省首页的主机和存在80端口滥用情况的主机等。该算法还具有较好的通用性,调整有关检测条件后可以用于包括DNS在内的其他服务器的角色定位。

  20. A Novel Protective Framework for Defeating HTTP-Based Denial of Service and Distributed Denial of Service Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth of web technology has brought convenience to our life, since it has become the most important communication channel. However, now this merit is threatened by complicated network-based attacks, such as denial of service (DoS and distributed denial of service (DDoS attacks. Despite many researchers’ efforts, no optimal solution that addresses all sorts of HTTP DoS/DDoS attacks is on offer. Therefore, this research aims to fix this gap by designing an alternative solution called a flexible, collaborative, multilayer, DDoS prevention framework (FCMDPF. The innovative design of the FCMDPF framework handles all aspects of HTTP-based DoS/DDoS attacks through the following three subsequent framework’s schemes (layers. Firstly, an outer blocking (OB scheme blocks attacking IP source if it is listed on the black list table. Secondly, the service traceback oriented architecture (STBOA scheme is to validate whether the incoming request is launched by a human or by an automated tool. Then, it traces back the true attacking IP source. Thirdly, the flexible advanced entropy based (FAEB scheme is to eliminate high rate DDoS (HR-DDoS and flash crowd (FC attacks. Compared to the previous researches, our framework’s design provides an efficient protection for web applications against all sorts of DoS/DDoS attacks.

  1. On the Performance of the Current MANET Routing Protocols for VoIP, HTTP, and FTP Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waheb A. Jabbar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent advances of ensemble mobile environment of smart devices with embedded sensors have enabled the MANET to play a key role in the smart cities as well as WSN and WMN. However, these smart devices are still limited in terms of energy, processor, and memory. Moreover, the efficient routing for reliable network connectivity at anytime, anywhere, and about everything is still a challenge in multihop wireless networks. This paper evaluates the QoS and energy efficiency of three active routing protocols: (i OLSRv2, a successor to OLSR, (ii DYMO, a successor to both DSR and AODV, and (iii MP-OLSR multipath extension to OLSRv2. In contrast to the related previous works which focused only on CBR traffic without considering the influence of specific traffic types on the performance of routing protocols, this work focused on this area from a different perspective. It evaluates the performance of three internet-based traffic types that can be used in the smart city applications: VoIP, HTTP, and FTP using different simulation models. The impact of the network density, load traffic, and nodes mobility on the considered protocols was evaluated by considering particular performance metrics for each traffic application. Based on the results, the study concludes by presenting useful recommendations for future work.

  2. Using XML/HTTP to store, serve and annotate tactical scenarios for X3D operational visualization and anti-terrorist training

    OpenAIRE

    Mnif, Khaled

    2003-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution unlimited Adopting Extensible Markup Language (XML) and Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) are key steps to accommodate the evolution of Internet technologies. While HTTP is already a proven standard communication protocol responsible for the rapid expansion of the World Wide Web, XML provides general mechanisms for determining validatable documents and addresses several deficiencies of HTML regarding diverse document structure and content. XML and...

  3. Optimized adaptation algorithm for HEVC/H.265 dynamic adaptive streaming over HTTP using variable segment duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irondi, Iheanyi; Wang, Qi; Grecos, Christos

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive video streaming using HTTP has become popular in recent years for commercial video delivery. The recent MPEG-DASH standard allows interoperability and adaptability between servers and clients from different vendors. The delivery of the MPD (Media Presentation Description) files in DASH and the DASH client behaviours are beyond the scope of the DASH standard. However, the different adaptation algorithms employed by the clients do affect the overall performance of the system and users' QoE (Quality of Experience), hence the need for research in this field. Moreover, standard DASH delivery is based on fixed segments of the video. However, there is no standard segment duration for DASH where various fixed segment durations have been employed by different commercial solutions and researchers with their own individual merits. Most recently, the use of variable segment duration in DASH has emerged but only a few preliminary studies without practical implementation exist. In addition, such a technique requires a DASH client to be aware of segment duration variations, and this requirement and the corresponding implications on the DASH system design have not been investigated. This paper proposes a segment-duration-aware bandwidth estimation and next-segment selection adaptation strategy for DASH. Firstly, an MPD file extension scheme to support variable segment duration is proposed and implemented in a realistic hardware testbed. The scheme is tested on a DASH client, and the tests and analysis have led to an insight on the time to download next segment and the buffer behaviour when fetching and switching between segments of different playback durations. Issues like sustained buffering when switching between segments of different durations and slow response to changing network conditions are highlighted and investigated. An enhanced adaptation algorithm is then proposed to accurately estimate the bandwidth and precisely determine the time to download the next

  4. The Implementation of Http-Proxy Authentication in Firewall%防火墙Http代理用户认证的实现技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱树人; 李伟琴

    2001-01-01

    Firewall is a very important technique to protect the network. The http-proxy authentication is the key of firewall. This paper introduces the implementation of The http-proxy authentication.%防火墙技术是保护网络安全的一种重要手段,Http代理用户认证是防火墙技术的关键之一。文中叙述了http代理用户认证的实现技术。

  5. Application of open source standards and technologies in the http://climate4impact.eu/ portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plieger, Maarten; Som de Cerff, Wim; Pagé, Christian; Tatarinova, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    This presentation will demonstrate how to calculate and visualize the climate indice SU (number of summer days) on the climate4impact portal. The following topics will be covered during the demonstration: - Security: Login using OpenID for access to the Earth System Grid Fedeation (ESGF) data nodes. The ESGF works in conjunction with several external websites and systems. The climate4impact portal uses X509 based short lived credentials, generated on behalf of the user with a MyProxy service. Single Sign-on (SSO) is used to make these websites and systems work together. - Discovery: Facetted search based on e.g. variable name, model and institute using the ESGF search services. A catalog browser allows for browsing through CMIP5 and any other climate model data catalogues (e.g. ESSENCE, EOBS, UNIDATA). - Processing using Web Processing Services (WPS): Transform data, subset, export into other formats, and perform climate indices calculations using Web Processing Services implemented by PyWPS, based on NCAR NCPP OpenClimateGIS and IS-ENES2 ICCLIM. - Visualization using Web Map Services (WMS): Visualize data from ESGF data nodes using ADAGUC Web Map Services. The aim of climate4impact is to enhance the use of Climate Research Data and to enhance the interaction with climate effect/impact communities. The portal is based on 21 impact use cases from 5 different European countries, and is evaluated by a user panel consisting of use case owners. It has been developed within the European projects IS-ENES and IS-ENES2 for more than 5 years, and its development currently continues within IS-ENES2 and CLIPC. As the climate impact community is very broad, the focus is mainly on the scientific impact community. This work has resulted in the ENES portal interface for climate impact communities and can be visited at http://climate4impact.eu/ The current main objectives for climate4impact can be summarized in two objectives. The first one is to work on a web interface which

  6. Proactive Defense Against HTTP Flood Attacks Based on Watching Web Log%基于日志监视主动防御HTTP泛洪攻击

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁志

    2012-01-01

    HTTP flood attacks mimicking normal access behavior are difficult to discovered, it consumes web server's resources and brings hidden danger on information security, a method of proactive defense against HTTP floods is provided. Rewrite URL to record Cookield and Sessionld of HTTP requests into Web log; analysis Web log at regular time, identify user according Cookield and Sessionld, indentify puppet computers using request time characteristic; process HTTP requests in advance to keep out the requests from the puppet computers. This method is low cost and easy to implement, practice proved its validity.%模仿正常访问行为的HTTP泛洪攻击较为隐蔽,在消耗网站服务器资源的同时还带来信息安全隐患,提出了一种主动防御方法.用URL重写的方法使Web日志记录HTTP请求的CookieId和SessionId;定时分析Web日志,利用CookieId和SessionID识别用户,根据请求时间特征来识别傀儡主机;对HTTP请求进行预处理,拦截傀儡主机的请求.该方法成本低、便于实施,实践证明了其有效性.

  7. Portal authentication HTTP redirection using netfilter NFQUEUE%利用netfilter NFQUEUE实现网关认证的HTTP重定向

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张焕杰; 夏玉良

    2014-01-01

    利用netfilter的NFQUEUE机制,将未认证用户的TCP 80端口流量发送至用户态进程redir_http,redir_http使用原始套接字发送应答数据分组,在用户态实现HTTP重定向功能。这种实现方法既保证了重定向的高性能,又能避免Linux内核中的繁琐程序开发,降低程序开发复杂度,提高系统运行的稳定性。%When using portal for user authentication, unauthorized user's HTTP access should be redirected to portal login page to help user do authentication.Using netfilter NFQUEUE target send unauthorized user TCP port 80 packets to user-space program redir_http. Redir_http will send IP reply packets to user do HTTP redirection with the help of raw socket. Using NFQUEUE can ensures high performance redirection, avoid troublesome development in the Linux ker-nel,simplify application development and improve system stability.

  8. A Semantically Automated Protocol Adapter for Mapping SOAP Web Services to RESTful HTTP Format to Enable the Web Infrastructure, Enhance Web Service Interoperability and Ease Web Service Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Doheny; Paul Jacob; Maria Maleshkova; Owen Molloy; Robert Stewart; Sean Kennedy

    2012-01-01

    Semantic Web Services (SWS) are Web Service (WS) descriptions augmented with semantic information. SWS enable intelligent reasoning and automation in areas such as service discovery, composition, mediation, ranking and invocation. This paper applies SWS to a previous protocol adapter which, operating within clearly defined constraints, maps SOAP Web Services to RESTful HTTP format. However, in the previous adapter, the configuration element is manual and the latency implications are locally b...

  9. A Semantically Automated Protocol Adapter for Mapping SOAP Web Services to RESTful HTTP Format to Enable the Web Infrastructure, Enhance Web Service Interoperability and Ease Web Service Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Doheny

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Semantic Web Services (SWS are Web Service (WS descriptions augmented with semantic information. SWS enable intelligent reasoning and automation in areas such as service discovery, composition, mediation, ranking and invocation. This paper applies SWS to a previous protocol adapter which, operating within clearly defined constraints, maps SOAP Web Services to RESTful HTTP format. However, in the previous adapter, the configuration element is manual and the latency implications are locally based. This paper applies SWS technologies to automate the configuration element and the latency tests are conducted in a more realistic Internet based setting.

  10. setsApp: Set operations for Cytoscape Nodes and Edges [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3ml

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Morris

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available setsApp (http://apps.cytoscape.org/apps/setsapp is a relatively simple Cytoscape 3 app for users to handle groups of nodes and/or edges. It supports several important biological workflows and enables various set operations. setsApp provides basic tools to create sets of nodes or edges, import or export sets, and perform standard set operations (union, difference, intersection on those sets. The sets functionality is also exposed to users and app developers in the form of a set of commands that can be used for scripting purposes or integrated in other Cytoscape apps.

  11. setsApp for Cytoscape: Set operations for Cytoscape Nodes and Edges [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5lz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Morris

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available setsApp (http://apps.cytoscape.org/apps/setsapp is a relatively simple Cytoscape 3 app for users to handle groups of nodes and/or edges. It supports several important biological workflows and enables various set operations. setsApp provides basic tools to create sets of nodes or edges, import or export sets, and perform standard set operations (union, difference, intersection on those sets. Automatic set partitioning and layout functions are also provided. The sets functionality is also exposed to users and app developers in the form of a set of commands that can be used for scripting purposes or integrated in other Cytoscape apps.

  12. HTTP://WWW.WINDDATA.COM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, K.S. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Dept. of Energy Engineering, Lyngby (Denmark); Courtney, M.S. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    This paper describes the `Database on Wind Characteristics`, a world wide web hosted database of wind time series suitable for wind turbine designers. The paper marks the conclusion of the initialising Joule project and presents the database as a functioning and useful tool for the wind turbine community. An overview of the current contents of the database is given. The browser based search system is described and examples of potentially damaging wind time series found using the search system are presented. The paper concludes by placing the database in context, briefly mentioning associated projects and describing how the database will continue to function as an IEA annex. (au)

  13. Website: http://banglastories.org/

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalais, A.; Chatterji, J.; Alexander, C.A.; Runnymede Trust, U.K.

    2010-01-01

    This website is on stories of Bengali Muslim migration where through various life-stories, family trees and pictorial narratives, high-school students, especially British-Bangladeshi ones, can get a greater sense of the histories of their ancestors, explore different phases of migration and settleme

  14. http://www.winddata.com/

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Courtney, Michael

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the "Database on Wind Characteristics", a world wide web hosted database of wind time series suitable for wind turbine designers. The paper marks the conclusion of the initialising Joule project and presents the database as a functioning and useful tool for the wind turbine c...

  15. 基于Http Live Streaming的移动流媒体直播系统Android客户端的实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔嵘; 袁泉

    2013-01-01

    For the developing Mobile Internet, the streaming media application is one of the most important and market demand applications.This paper is based on the technology of Http Live Streaming,which detailedly introduces the Android platform architecture and the development of Android NDK. Meanwhile,in this paper there is a introduction and design about mobile streaming system,which realizes the wireless network video transmission.At last,through the performance test,the system realizes the function of client capture and coding.%对于日益发展的移动互联网来说,流媒体是其最重要最有需求和市场的应用之一。本论文以Http Live Streaming技术为背景,详细介绍了Android平台架构和Android NDK开发,并在此基础上介绍并设计了移动流媒体直播系统,实现了无线网络视频的传输。最后,通过性能测试,实现了客户端采集编码功能。

  16. taxize: taxonomic search and retrieval in R [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/24v

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Chamberlain

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available All species are hierarchically related to one another, and we use taxonomic names to label the nodes in this hierarchy. Taxonomic data is becoming increasingly available on the web, but scientists need a way to access it in a programmatic fashion that’s easy and reproducible. We have developed taxize, an open-source software package (freely available from http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/taxize/index.html for the R language. taxize provides simple, programmatic access to taxonomic data for 13 data sources around the web. We discuss the need for a taxonomic toolbelt in R, and outline a suite of use cases for which taxize is ideally suited (including a full workflow as an appendix. The taxize package facilitates open and reproducible science by allowing taxonomic data collection to be done in the open-source R platform.

  17. Viewing multiple sequence alignments with the JavaScript Sequence Alignment Viewer (JSAV [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4io

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. R. Martin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The JavaScript Sequence Alignment Viewer (JSAV is designed as a simple-to-use JavaScript component for displaying sequence alignments on web pages. The display of sequences is highly configurable with options to allow alternative coloring schemes, sorting of sequences and ’dotifying’ repeated amino acids. An option is also available to submit selected sequences to another web site, or to other JavaScript code. JSAV is implemented purely in JavaScript making use of the JQuery and JQuery-UI libraries. It does not use any HTML5-specific options to help with browser compatibility. The code is documented using JSDOC and is available from http://www.bioinf.org.uk/software/jsav/.

  18. SkateBase, an elasmobranch genome project and collection of molecular resources for chondrichthyan fishes [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/445

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Wyffels

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chondrichthyan fishes are a diverse class of gnathostomes that provide a valuable perspective on fundamental characteristics shared by all jawed and limbed vertebrates. Studies of phylogeny, species diversity, population structure, conservation, and physiology are accelerated by genomic, transcriptomic and protein sequence data. These data are widely available for many sarcopterygii (coelacanth, lungfish and tetrapods and actinoptergii (ray-finned fish including teleosts taxa, but limited for chondrichthyan fishes.  In this study, we summarize available data for chondrichthyes and describe resources for one of the largest projects to characterize one of these fish, Leucoraja erinacea, the little skate.  SkateBase (http://skatebase.org serves as the skate genome project portal linking data, research tools, and teaching resources.

  19. Proceedings of the International Academy of Ecology and Environmental Sciences (http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/piaees/online-version.asp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    piaees@iaees.org

    Full Text Available Proceedings of the International Academy of Ecology and Environmental Sciences ISSN 2220-8860 URL: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/piaees/online-version.asp RSS: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/piaees/rss.xml E-mail: piaees@iaees.org Editor-in-Chief: WenJun Zhang Aims and Scope PROCEEDINGS OF THE INTERNATIONAL ACADEMY OF ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (ISSN 2220-8860; CODEN PIAEBW is an open access, peer-reviewed international journal that considers scientific articles in all different areas of ecology and environmental sciences. It is the flagship journal of the International Academy of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. It dedicates to the latest advances in ecology and environmental sciences. The goal of this journal is to keep a record of the state-of-the-art research and promote the research work in these fast moving areas. The topics to be covered by this journal include, but are not limited to theory, methodology, technology, innovation, activity, and project in the following areas: •Animal ecology, plant/microbe ecology, wetland ecology, farmland ecology, forest/grassland ecology, marine ecology, pollution ecology, etc. •Biological conservation & preservation, ecosystem restoration, environmental policy, environmental toxicology, environmental pollution and control, natural resource, bioenergy research, environmental technology, waste management, environmental economics, environmental management & planning, environmental education, environmental engineering, global climate change, oceanography, etc. Authors can submit their works to the email box of this journal, piaees@iaees.org. All manuscripts submitted to this journal must be previously unpublished and may not be considered for publication elsewhere at any time during review period of this journal. Authors are asked to read Author Guidelines before submitting manuscripts. In addition to free submissions from authors around the world, special issues are

  20. Thousands of exon skipping events differentiate among splicing patterns in sixteen human tissues [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2dl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Florea

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is widely recognized for its roles in regulating genes and creating gene diversity. However, despite many efforts, the repertoire of gene splicing variation is still incompletely characterized, even in humans. Here we describe a new computational system, ASprofile, and its application to RNA-seq data from Illumina’s Human Body Map project (>2.5 billion reads.  Using the system, we identified putative alternative splicing events in 16 different human tissues, which provide a dynamic picture of splicing variation across the tissues. We detected 26,989 potential exon skipping events representing differences in splicing patterns among the tissues. A large proportion of the events (>60% were novel, involving new exons (~3000, new introns (~16000, or both. When tracing these events across the sixteen tissues, only a small number (4-7% appeared to be differentially expressed (‘switched’ between two tissues, while 30-45% showed little variation, and the remaining 50-65% were not present in one or both tissues compared.  Novel exon skipping events appeared to be slightly less variable than known events, but were more tissue-specific. Our study represents the first effort to build a comprehensive catalog of alternative splicing in normal human tissues from RNA-seq data, while providing insights into the role of alternative splicing in shaping tissue transcriptome differences. The catalog of events and the ASprofile software are freely available from the Zenodo repository (http://zenodo.org/record/7068; doi:10.5281/zenodo.7068 and from our web site http://ccb.jhu.edu/software/ASprofile.

  1. Research and implementation of fuzzing testing based on HTTP proxy%基于HTTP代理的模糊测试技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙歆; 姚一杨; 卢新岱; 刘雪娇; 吴永涵

    2016-01-01

    Most of the security testing tools lack of optimization of testing, configured strategy and intelligent analysis of testing results. These problems lead to the status that these tools can’t be used in Web application testing well. A fuzzing testing method towards Web application security based on HTTP proxy was proposed. The high-performance communication between HTTP proxy server and browser through the mechanism of asynchronous monitoring was realized. Configured strategy of testing cases based on pseudo code could help to do flexible and automatic tests. By using multi-dimensional ways to parse the packet, intelligent analysis of testing results was achieved. Experiments show that the tool supports mainstream Web application vulnerabilities detection and configured strategy of testing. It can detect the vulnerabilities such as directory traversal, SQL injection, cross-site scripting.%常用的Web应用测试工具普遍存在着测试功能欠优化、可配置程度较低、测试结果不够智能等问题,无法较好地辅助测试。进行了基于HTTP代理的模糊测试技术研究,设计了相应的测试工具。该工具应用模糊测试理论,异步监听实现了HTTP代理与服务器、浏览器间的高性能通信;采用基于伪码的可配置测试用例生成策略,灵活进行自动化测试;通过解析网络数据分组,为用户提供全面的测试分析结果。实验结果表明,该工具支持主流 Web 应用漏洞检测、测试策略配置,可检测出目录遍历、SQL 注入、跨站脚本等漏洞。

  2. Development of intelligent instruments with embedded HTTP servers for control and data acquisition in a cryogenic setup—The hardware, firmware, and software implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Joby; Mathuria, D. S.; Datta, T. S.; Maity, Tanmoy

    2015-12-01

    The power of Ethernet for control and automation technology is being largely understood by the automation industry in recent times. Ethernet with HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is one of the most widely accepted communication standards today. Ethernet is best known for being able to control through internet from anywhere in the globe. The Ethernet interface with built-in on-chip embedded servers ensures global connections for crate-less model of control and data acquisition systems which have several advantages over traditional crate-based control architectures for slow applications. This architecture will completely eliminate the use of any extra PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) or similar control hardware in any automation network as the control functions are firmware coded inside intelligent meters itself. Here, we describe the indigenously built project of a cryogenic control system built for linear accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, known as "CADS," which stands for "Complete Automation of Distribution System." CADS deals with complete hardware, firmware, and software implementation of the automated linac cryogenic distribution system using many Ethernet based embedded cryogenic instruments developed in-house. Each instrument works as an intelligent meter called device-server which has the control functions and control loops built inside the firmware itself. Dedicated meters with built-in servers were designed out of ARM (Acorn RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) Machine) and ATMEL processors and COTS (Commercially Off-the-Shelf) SMD (Surface Mount Devices) components, with analog sensor front-end and a digital back-end web server implementing remote procedure call over HTTP for digital control and readout functions. At present, 24 instruments which run 58 embedded servers inside, each specific to a particular type of sensor-actuator combination for closed loop operations, are now deployed and distributed across control LAN (Local

  3. Development of intelligent instruments with embedded HTTP servers for control and data acquisition in a cryogenic setup--The hardware, firmware, and software implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Joby; Mathuria, D S; Datta, T S; Maity, Tanmoy

    2015-12-01

    The power of Ethernet for control and automation technology is being largely understood by the automation industry in recent times. Ethernet with HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is one of the most widely accepted communication standards today. Ethernet is best known for being able to control through internet from anywhere in the globe. The Ethernet interface with built-in on-chip embedded servers ensures global connections for crate-less model of control and data acquisition systems which have several advantages over traditional crate-based control architectures for slow applications. This architecture will completely eliminate the use of any extra PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) or similar control hardware in any automation network as the control functions are firmware coded inside intelligent meters itself. Here, we describe the indigenously built project of a cryogenic control system built for linear accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, known as "CADS," which stands for "Complete Automation of Distribution System." CADS deals with complete hardware, firmware, and software implementation of the automated linac cryogenic distribution system using many Ethernet based embedded cryogenic instruments developed in-house. Each instrument works as an intelligent meter called device-server which has the control functions and control loops built inside the firmware itself. Dedicated meters with built-in servers were designed out of ARM (Acorn RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) Machine) and ATMEL processors and COTS (Commercially Off-the-Shelf) SMD (Surface Mount Devices) components, with analog sensor front-end and a digital back-end web server implementing remote procedure call over HTTP for digital control and readout functions. At present, 24 instruments which run 58 embedded servers inside, each specific to a particular type of sensor-actuator combination for closed loop operations, are now deployed and distributed across control LAN (Local

  4. Implementation and application of HTTP protocol and JSON format in ZStack%HTTP协议与JSON格式在ZStack中的实现与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢少军; 过丹婷; 刘守印

    2016-01-01

    TI ZStack ,a protocol stack up to ZigBee standard ,focused on building low power ,low rate wirelss sensor network(WSN) .Aiming at it’s not direct access to the Internet ,the application of HTTP protocal in ZStack is provided .Firstly ,With the aid of the network chip ENC28J60 ,uIP protocal is ported to the ZStack providing the ZigBee easy access to the internet .Secondly ,encapsulating the TCP client mode in the uIP protocol stack realizes the POST requirement in the HTTP protocal .JSON markup language widely used in the internet is adopted to transfer data to the PC datebase so the simple and effective communication is ensured .Finally ,with the use of this program collecting temperature and humility and transfer the related data to backstage ,and realize the real‐time data curve drawing of temperature and humidity and displaying of ZigBee network topology .%ZStack是TI公司推出的符合ZigBee标准的协议栈,专注于构建低功耗、低速率的无线传感器网络。针对该协议栈无法直接接入互联网,提出了HTTP协议在ZStack中的应用方案。首先通过以太网芯片ENC28J60将uIP协议栈移植到ZStack中,实现了ZigBee网络便捷接入互联网;其次对 uIP协议栈中的 TCP客户端模式进行封装,实现了HTTP协议的POST请求,采用互联网中通用的JSON标记语言传输数据到PC数据库,保证了通信的简单高效;最后采用此方案采集温湿度信息并传输到后台,在WEB端实现温湿度曲线的实时绘制与ZigBee网络的拓扑显示。

  5. Development of intelligent instruments with embedded HTTP servers for control and data acquisition in a cryogenic setup—The hardware, firmware, and software implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antony, Joby; Mathuria, D. S.; Datta, T. S. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Maity, Tanmoy [Department of MME, Indian School of Mines (ISM), Dhanbad 826004 (India)

    2015-12-15

    The power of Ethernet for control and automation technology is being largely understood by the automation industry in recent times. Ethernet with HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is one of the most widely accepted communication standards today. Ethernet is best known for being able to control through internet from anywhere in the globe. The Ethernet interface with built-in on-chip embedded servers ensures global connections for crate-less model of control and data acquisition systems which have several advantages over traditional crate-based control architectures for slow applications. This architecture will completely eliminate the use of any extra PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) or similar control hardware in any automation network as the control functions are firmware coded inside intelligent meters itself. Here, we describe the indigenously built project of a cryogenic control system built for linear accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, known as “CADS,” which stands for “Complete Automation of Distribution System.” CADS deals with complete hardware, firmware, and software implementation of the automated linac cryogenic distribution system using many Ethernet based embedded cryogenic instruments developed in-house. Each instrument works as an intelligent meter called device-server which has the control functions and control loops built inside the firmware itself. Dedicated meters with built-in servers were designed out of ARM (Acorn RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) Machine) and ATMEL processors and COTS (Commercially Off-the-Shelf) SMD (Surface Mount Devices) components, with analog sensor front-end and a digital back-end web server implementing remote procedure call over HTTP for digital control and readout functions. At present, 24 instruments which run 58 embedded servers inside, each specific to a particular type of sensor-actuator combination for closed loop operations, are now deployed and distributed across control LAN

  6. 基于HTTP请求行为的组合式隐蔽信道的构造研究%ON STRUCTURE OF COMBINED COVERT CHANNEL BASED ON HTTP REQUEST BEHAVIOUR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑威; 兰少华; 树雅倩; 朱书宏

    2016-01-01

    To achieve a proper balance in capacity,reliability and undetectability of the covert channel better,we proposed an HTTP request behaviour-based covert channel.We dynamically assigned the HTTP requests onto multiple HTTP flows and transmitted the hidden information using a way of mathematics combination.Furthermore,by simulating normal HTTP flows we made the undetectability performance of the channel be greatly enhanced.At the same time,the reliable transmission of TCP protocol ensures the transmission process not to be affected by the influence of network status,which guarantees the robustness of the channel.At last we proved through experimental result that the new covert channel has high availability,and is superior to the traditional HTTP-based covert channels on the aspects of transmission rate, transmission accuracy and undetectability.%为了更好地使隐蔽信道在容量、可靠性、抗检测性方面取得一个合适的平衡,提出一种基于 HTTP 请求行为的隐蔽信道HRCC(Combined Covert Channel Based on HTTP Requests)。将 HTTP 请求动态分配在多个 HTTP 流上,利用数学组合的方式传输隐蔽信息,且通过模拟正常的 HTTP 流使得信道的抗检测性大大增强。同时 TCP 协议的可靠传输使得传输过程不会受到网络状况的影响,从而保证了信道的鲁棒性。最后通过实验结果证明了该新型隐蔽信道具有很强的实用性,而且在传输速率、传输正确率和抗检测性方面均优于传统基于 HTTP 的隐蔽信道。

  7. shRNA-seq data analysis with edgeR [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/38s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyin Dai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pooled short hairpin RNA sequencing (shRNA-seq screens are becoming increasingly popular in functional genomics research, and there is a need to establish optimal analysis tools to handle such data. Our open-source shRNA processing pipeline in edgeR provides a complete analysis solution for shRNA-seq screen data, that begins with the raw sequence reads and ends with a ranked lists of candidate shRNAs for downstream biological validation. We first summarize the raw data contained in a fastq file into a matrix of counts (samples in the columns, hairpins in the rows with options for allowing mismatches and small shifts in hairpin position. Diagnostic plots, normalization and differential representation analysis can then be performed using established methods to prioritize results in a statistically rigorous way, with the choice of either the classic exact testing methodology or a generalized linear modelling that can handle complex experimental designs. A detailed users’ guide that demonstrates how to analyze screen data in edgeR along with a point-and-click implementation of this workflow in Galaxy are also provided. The edgeR package is freely available from http://www.bioconductor.org.

  8. Porting and using PanGIA for Cytoscape 3: challenges and solutions [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3r3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Welker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Much of the biologically significant functionality in Cytoscape is contained within third-party add-ons, called plugins in Cytoscape 2 and apps in Cytoscape 3. In the transition from Cytoscape 2 to Cystoscape 3, some of the underlying assumptions upon which plugins relied changed, requiring a significant porting effort for plugins to work as Cytoscape 3 apps. PanGIA is a Cytoscape add-on (http://apps.cytoscape.org/apps/pangia designed to analyze and visualize genetic interaction data in light of physical interaction data. In order to convert the PanGIA plugin to an app, various challenges, including those related to a transformed data model, concurrency, and randomization had to be overcome. In the process, the ability to control randomization was added to the GUI, a feature which was not only integral to the porting process, but which also ensures more easily reproducible scientific analysis for PanGIA users. Most authors of Cytoscape 2 plugins will face similar challenges porting their software to work with Cytoscape 3, and this paper gives details of how the PanGIA port addressed them.

  9. CyREST: Turbocharging Cytoscape Access for External Tools via a RESTful API [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5ly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichiro Ono

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available As bioinformatic workflows become increasingly complex and involve multiple specialized tools, so does the difficulty of reliably reproducing those workflows. Cytoscape is a critical workflow component for executing network visualization, analysis, and publishing tasks, but it can be operated only manually via a point-and-click user interface. Consequently, Cytoscape-oriented tasks are laborious and often error prone, especially with multistep protocols involving many networks. In this paper, we present the new cyREST Cytoscape app and accompanying harmonization libraries. Together, they improve workflow reproducibility and researcher productivity by enabling popular languages (e.g., Python and R, JavaScript, and C# and tools (e.g., IPython/Jupyter Notebook and RStudio to directly define and query networks, and perform network analysis, layouts and renderings. We describe cyREST’s API and overall construction, and present Python- and R-based examples that illustrate how Cytoscape can be integrated into large scale data analysis pipelines. cyREST is available in the Cytoscape app store (http://apps.cytoscape.org where it has been downloaded over 1900 times since its release in late 2014.

  10. JSim, an open-source modeling system for data analysis [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/39h

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Butterworth

    2014-05-01

    open source; it and about 400 human readable open source physiological/biophysical models are available at http://www.physiome.org/jsim/.

  11. JSim, an open-source modeling system for data analysis [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3n0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Butterworth

    2014-07-01

    open source; it and about 400 human readable open source physiological/biophysical models are available at http://www.physiome.org/jsim/.

  12. JSim, an open-source modeling system for data analysis [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2fk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Butterworth

    2013-12-01

    open source; it and about 400 human readable open source physiological/biophysical models are available at http://www.physiome.org/jsim/.

  13. 在基于J2EE架构的网站中集成HTTP代理的设计与实现%Design and implementation of integrating HTTP proxy into website based on J2EE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史承毅

    2011-01-01

    A new approach, that the HTTP proxy service was integrated into the website when J2EE-based website exist the server, was proposed. Compared with the traditional HTTP proxy service, the HTTP proxy using the design method need not set the client and open more ports. Also the user experience is improved and the risk of server security is reduced.%提出了一种在服务器上存在基于J2EE网站的情况下,将HTTP代理服务集成于网站的方案.相对于传统的HTTP代理服务,用该设计方法实现的HTTP代理,无需在浏览器客户端进行设置且不另外多开端口,提高了用户体验,同时降低了服务器安全风险.

  14. BioJS DAGViewer: A reusable JavaScript component for displaying directed graphs [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2ut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Kalderimis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The DAGViewer BioJS component is a reusable JavaScript component made available as part of the BioJS project and intended to be used to display graphs of structured data, with a particular emphasis on Directed Acyclic Graphs (DAGs. It enables users to embed representations of graphs of data, such as ontologies or phylogenetic trees, in hyper-text documents (HTML. This component is generic, since it is capable (given the appropriate configuration of displaying any kind of data that is organised as a graph. The features of this component which are useful for examining and filtering large and complex graphs are described. Availability: http://github.com/alexkalderimis/dag-viewer-biojs; http://github.com/biojs/biojs; http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.8303.

  15. PsicquicGraph, a BioJS component to visualize molecular interactions from PSICQUIC servers [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Villaveces

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Protein interaction networks have become an essential tool in large-scale data analysis, integration, and the visualization of high-throughput data in the context of complex cellular networks. Many individual databases are available that provide information on binary interactions of proteins and small molecules. Community efforts such as PSICQUIC aim to unify and standardize information emanating from these public databases. Here we introduce PsicquicGraph, an open-source, web-based visualization component for molecular interactions from PSIQUIC services. Availability: PsicquicGraph is freely available at the BioJS Registry for download and enhancement. Instructions on how to use the tool are available here http://goo.gl/kDaIgZ and the source code can be found at http://github.com/biojs/biojs and DOI:10.5281/zenodo.7709.

  16. C-Sibelia: an easy-to-use and highly accurate tool for bacterial genome comparison [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/27n

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Minkin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present C-Sibelia, a highly accurate and easy-to-use software tool for comparing two closely related bacterial genomes, which can be presented as either finished sequences or fragmented assemblies. C-Sibelia takes as input two FASTA files and produces: (1 a VCF file containing all identified single nucleotide variations and indels; (2 an XMFA file containing alignment information. The software also produces Circos diagrams visualizing high level genomic architecture for rearrangement analyses. C-Sibelia is a part of the Sibelia comparative genomics suite, which is freely available under the GNU GPL v.2 license at http://sourceforge.net/projects/sibelia-bio. C-Sibelia is compatible with Unix-like operating systems. A web-based version of the software is available at http://etool.me/software/csibelia.

  17. IoT 環境における REST 通信のためのCoAPと HTTP の選択指標に関する検討

    OpenAIRE

    久保田, 真一郎; 溝上, 紘史; 山場, 久昭; 岡崎, 直宣

    2015-01-01

    The IoT(Internet of Things), which means to connect all of the things around us to the Internet, enables us monitor and control status of things. A huge number of clients communicate with a server using various band-width in IoT environment. The Constrained application protocol(CoAP) has been proposed by IETF so as to use in IoT. However, the difference between the performance of CoAP and HTTP in various communication environment is not shown. This paper shows some indicators in a case where ...

  18. Musik for folket! http://www.aabenraa-lokal-tv.dk/wp/2010/11/22/22-november-%E2%80%93-29-november-musik-for-folket/

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.; Araghipour, Janus Høgfeldt; Bonne, Jane

    2010-01-01

    The TV-documentary "Musik for folket!" (in Danish) was filmed during the November 11 lunchtime concert and through a series of interviews with Carsten Sjødahl, Jane Bonne, Leif Jensen, Søren R. Frimodt-Møller, Janus Høgfeldt Araghipour and Cynthia M. Grund, it recounts the story behind the luncht...... the lunchtime concert series at SDU. The program aired November 22-29, 2010 on ALTV and is permanently available from November 22, 2010 onwards at http://www.aabenraa-lokal-tv.dk/wp/2010/11/22/22-november-%E2%80%93-29-november-musik-for-folket/...

  19. http://programminghistorian.org/lessons/normalizing-data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Turkel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The list that we created in the From HTML to a List of Words (2 needs some normalizing before it can be used further. We are going to do this by applying additional string methods, as well as by using regular expressions. Once normalized, we will be able to more easily analyze our data.

  20. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multikulti

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo, Lourdes; Cotta, Carlos; de Vega, Francisco Fernandez

    2008-01-01

    Migration policies in distributed evolutionary algorithms has not been an active research area until recently. However, in the same way as operators have an impact on performance, the choice of migrants is due to have an impact too. In this paper we propose a new policy (named multikulti) for choosing the individuals that are going to be sent to other nodes, based on multiculturality: the individual sent should be as different as possible to the receiving population. We have checked this policy on different discrete optimization problems, and found that, in average or in median, this policy outperforms classical ones like sending the best or a random individual.

  1. Design and Implementation of An Online Searching Function for VoIP Phone Based on HTTP Protocol%基于HTTP协议的VoIP终端在线查询功能的设计与实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田文武

    2012-01-01

    According to the actual need of the VoIP Phone users, design and implement a slim but high-performance HTTP Client on ARM-LINUX platform. And two kinds of extended functions: Online Phone book, Online Weather-Info, are developed out based on the client. Function tests show that this HTTP Client module is less resources consumption, high real-time and easy to extend.%针对VoIP终端用户的实际功能需要,基于ARM-LINUX嵌入式平台,实现了一种轻型高效的HTTP客户端,并基于该客户端开发了两种扩展功能:在线电话簿、实时天气预报.经过测试验证,该功能模块具有系统资源消耗少、实时性高、易于扩展等特点.

  2. BioJS: an open source standard for biological visualisation – its status in 2014 [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2yy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Corpas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available BioJS is a community-based standard and repository of functional components to represent biological information on the web. The development of BioJS has been prompted by the growing need for bioinformatics visualisation tools to be easily shared, reused and discovered. Its modular architecture makes it easy for users to find a specific functionality without needing to know how it has been built, while components can be extended or created for implementing new functionality. The BioJS community of developers currently provides a range of functionality that is open access and freely available. A registry has been set up that categorises and provides installation instructions and testing facilities at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/tools/biojs/. The source code for all components is available for ready use at https://github.com/biojs/biojs.

  3. FeatureViewer, a BioJS component for visualization of position-based annotations in protein sequences [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2u2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Garcia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: FeatureViewer is a BioJS component that lays out, maps, orients, and renders position-based annotations for protein sequences. This component is highly flexible and customizable, allowing the presentation of annotations by rows, all centered, or distributed in non-overlapping tracks. It uses either lines or shapes for sites and rectangles for regions. The result is a powerful visualization tool that can be easily integrated into web applications as well as documents as it provides an export-to-image functionality. Availability: https://github.com/biojs/biojs/blob/master/src/main/javascript/Biojs.FeatureViewer.js; http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7719

  4. Construction and accessibility of a cross-species phenotype ontology along with gene annotations for biomedical research [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/p5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Köhler

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenotype analyses, e.g. investigating metabolic processes, tissue formation, or organism behavior, are an important element of most biological and medical research activities. Biomedical researchers are making increased use of ontological standards and methods to capture the results of such analyses, with one focus being the comparison and analysis of phenotype information between species. We have generated a cross-species phenotype ontology for human, mouse and zebra fish that contains zebrafish phenotypes. We also provide up-to-date annotation data connecting human genes to phenotype classes from the generated ontology. We have included the data generation pipeline into our continuous integration system ensuring stable and up-to-date releases. This article describes the data generation process and is intended to help interested researchers access both the phenotype annotation data and the associated cross-species phenotype ontology. The resource described here can be used in sophisticated semantic similarity and gene set enrichment analyses for phenotype data across species. The stable releases of this resource can be obtained from http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/hp/uberpheno/.

  5. Characterizing alpha helical properties of Ebola viral proteins as potential targets for inhibition of alpha-helix mediated protein-protein interactions [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/50u

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chakraborty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola, considered till recently as a rare and endemic disease, has dramatically transformed into a potentially global humanitarian crisis. The genome of Ebola, a member of the Filoviridae family, encodes seven proteins. Based on the recently implemented software (PAGAL for analyzing the hydrophobicity and amphipathicity properties of alpha helices (AH in proteins, we characterize the helices in the Ebola proteome. We demonstrate that AHs with characteristically unique features are involved in critical interactions with the host proteins. For example, the Ebola virus membrane fusion subunit, GP2, from the envelope glycoprotein ectodomain has an AH with a large hydrophobic moment. The neutralizing antibody (KZ52 derived from a human survivor of the 1995 Kikwit outbreak recognizes a protein epitope on this AH, emphasizing the critical nature of this secondary structure in the virulence of the Ebola virus. Our method ensures a comprehensive list of such `hotspots'. These helices probably are or can be the target of molecules designed to inhibit AH mediated protein-protein interactions. Further, by comparing the AHs in proteins of the related Marburg viruses, we are able to elicit subtle changes in the proteins that might render them ineffective to previously successful drugs. Such differences are difficult to identify by a simple sequence or structural alignment. Thus, analyzing AHs in the small Ebola proteome can aid rational design aimed at countering the `largest Ebola epidemic, affecting multiple countries in West Africa' (http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/outbreaks/2014-west-africa/index.html.

  6. Nigerian secondary school adolescents’ perspective on abstinence-only sexual education as an effective tool for promotion of sexual health [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2fe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mfrekemfon P Inyang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The success of any type of sexual education programme depends on the knowledge and preparedness for practice by adolescents. A recent study has found that an ‘abstinence-only’ sexual education programme is effective in reducing sexual activity among adolescents. Knowledge of abstinence-only sexual education and preparedness for practice as an effective tool for promotion of sexual health among Nigerian secondary school adolescents was studied. An analytic descriptive survey design was used for the study. The research population comprised of all public secondary schools in three southern geopolitical zones of the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. A multistage sampling technique was used to select 2020 senior secondary school (SS1-SS3 students as sample for the study. A partially self-designed and partially adapted questionnaire from an 'abstinence-only versus comprehensive sex education' debate, from debatepedia (http://wiki.idebate.org/, entitled 'Questionnaire on Nigerian Secondary School Adolescents’ Perspective on Abstinence-Only Sexual Education (QNSSAPAOSE' was used in eliciting information from respondents. Hypotheses were formulated and tested. Frequency counts, percentage and Pearson Product Moment Correlation were used in analysing data. A greater proportion of secondary school adolescents in this study lacked knowledge of sexual education. About 80% of the respondents could not define sexual education. The general perspective on abstinence-only sexual education was negative, as revealed by the larger number of respondents who demonstrated unwillingness to practice abstinence-only sexual education. Specifically, of those who responded in favour of abstinence-only sexual education, the youngest group of adolescents (11-13 years and the male respondents were more likely to accept this type of education than the other groups. Poor knowledge of sexual education could be responsible for unwillingness to practice abstinence-only sexual

  7. IsoCleft Finder – a web-based tool for the detection and analysis of protein binding-site geometric and chemical similarities [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/13y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalja Kurbatova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available IsoCleft Finder is a web-based tool for the detection of local geometric and chemical similarities between potential small-molecule binding cavities and a non-redundant dataset of ligand-bound known small-molecule binding-sites. The non-redundant dataset developed as part of this study is composed of 7339 entries representing unique Pfam/PDB-ligand (hetero group code combinations with known levels of cognate ligand similarity. The query cavity can be uploaded by the user or detected automatically by the system using existing PDB entries as well as user-provided structures in PDB format. In all cases, the user can refine the definition of the cavity interactively via a browser-based Jmol 3D molecular visualization interface. Furthermore, users can restrict the search to a subset of the dataset using a cognate-similarity threshold. Local structural similarities are detected using the IsoCleft software and ranked according to two criteria (number of atoms in common and Tanimoto score of local structural similarity and the associated Z-score and p-value measures of statistical significance. The results, including predicted ligands, target proteins, similarity scores, number of atoms in common, etc., are shown in a powerful interactive graphical interface. This interface permits the visualization of target ligands superimposed on the query cavity and additionally provides a table of pairwise ligand topological similarities. Similarities between top scoring ligands serve as an additional tool to judge the quality of the results obtained. We present several examples where IsoCleft Finder provides useful functional information. IsoCleft Finder results are complementary to existing approaches for the prediction of protein function from structure, rational drug design and x-ray crystallography. IsoCleft Finder can be found at: http://bcb.med.usherbrooke.ca/isocleftfinder.

  8. Norwegian long-term care: Legacies, trends, and controversies - See more at: http://www.gigapp.org/index.php/component/jresearch/?view=publication&task=show&id=1807#sthash.eCzEqbqK.dpuf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daatland, SveinOlav

    2015-02-01

    ? Have the policy tools (services, transfers, funding or models of provision changed? To what extent have these policies been successful in coping with social and economic problems? To what extent a social demand in favour of these changes exist? What are the main political and social actors intervening as stakeholders in these policies? Finally, what are the major similarities and differences existing between the two countries? To what extent are there policy proposals that might easily travel between them? Could they foster mutually enriching exchanges of information? - See more at: http://www.gigapp.org/index.php/component/jresearch/?view=publication&task=show&id=1807#sthash.GBgfdaqa.dpuf

  9. Proton Collision Event with 4 Muons(Actual Event) An animation created of an actual ATLAS proton collision event in 2011. The four muons are picked out as long blue tracks.Source: http://www.atlas.ch/multimedia/4-muon-event.html

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2011-01-01

    Proton Collision Event with 4 Muons(Actual Event) An animation created of an actual ATLAS proton collision event in 2011. The four muons are picked out as long blue tracks.Source: http://www.atlas.ch/multimedia/4-muon-event.html

  10. Proton Collision Event with 2 Photons (Actual Event) An animation of an actual ATLAS proton collision event in 2011. Photons are indicated by the clusters of energy shown in green. Source: http://www.atlas.ch/multimedia/2-photon-event.html

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2011-01-01

    Proton Collision Event with 2 Photons (Actual Event) An animation of an actual ATLAS proton collision event in 2011. Photons are indicated by the clusters of energy shown in green. Source: http://www.atlas.ch/multimedia/2-photon-event.html

  11. Application Transparent HTTP Over a Disruption Tolerant Smartnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    to action by a third party. For example, a microwave connection could be disconnected when a low flying aircraft passes through the two nodes. The...duration of a disconnection can be as short as a second, as in the microwave example, or could last hours or more, such as when a planetary satellite...mul- tiple tests. Each configuration was tested using a pseudo-random disruption pattern. The seeds to the pseudo-random number generator were saved

  12. Capturing of HTTP Protocol Packets in a Wireless Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Soni

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The word wide revolution in wireless technology is changing our lives in term of the way we learn and use. Wireless Networks fit into this because the technology has been around long enough and can provide various benefits for development in this area.The main objective of this paper is to create a fake access point in a wireless network and transfer the fake ARP (Address Resolution Protocol Packets on the same Wi-Fi Network in which users are connected and the name of fake access point also known as ESSID (Extended Service Set Identification is same as the name of the wireless network. So when a fake access point is created with same wireless network name then the user gets disconnected to original network and connects with the fake access point, so all the traffic goes through out your network and you can hijack the details, important information, and secret credentials of that user which is connected to your fake access point network

  13. http://www.revista-apunts.com/es/hemeroteca?article=1435

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lapresa Ajamil

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available El propósito último de nuestro trabajo se centra en la adaptación del deporte al niño. En concreto, el presente artículo trata de arrojar luz sobre como ha de ser la introducción del niño en la competición, en la iniciación al fútbol. En el seno de la metodología observacional, utilizando estadística descriptiva –como marco general– y la detección de patrones temporales –como ejemplificación concreta–, se compara el desempeño técnico-táctico del prebenjamín en la modalidad vigente –el fútbol 5–, con el desarrollado en la propuesta alternativa de fútbol 3. El artículo, a partir del estudio de la utilización del espacio de juego y del desempeño de habilidades técnicas, concluye que la propuesta alternativa de fútbol 3 resulta más acorde con las posibilidades reales del prebenjamín.

  14. http://www.aulamedica.es/fh/pdf/8547.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Damas Fuentes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetive: To analyze the latex content of drugs in hospital formulary and establish possible therapeutic alternatives. Methods: All drugs susceptible of having latex were selected and written information was obtained from manufacturers. A therapeutic alternative was found for each of them, if possible. Results: Written information from manufacturer was obtained for 605 (97.9% and from label information for 8 of 632 selected drugs. For 43.9% of not safe drugs (total 57 on patients with latex allergy, a therapeutic alternative was found in hospital formulary. Conclusions: Knowing drugs having latex improve the prescription security, while the therapeutic alternatives chart eases the validation. The published data updates the scarce and variable information for patients and healthcare professionals.

  15. http://www.aulamedica.es/fh/pdf/10518.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta García-Queiruga

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the level of adherence to treatment with imatinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia and its association with therapeutic response. Materials and methods: Study conducted on October, 2013 – March, 2014, including patients diagnosed with Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia on treatment with imatinib in the hospital. Therapeutic adherence was assessed through the standard Morisky-Green Questionnaire and the medication dispensing record. Those patients who did not complete 6 months of treatment and/or did not complete the questionnaire were excluded. Therapeutic response was assessed following clinical guidelines. The descriptive analysis of variables and correlation was conducted through Pearsons’s Chi-Square Test. Results: The study included 31 patients. When assessing the level of association between response variables and therapeutic adherence: 1. The highest molecular response was reached by 68.4% of those patients with high adherence, and by 75% of those patients with intermediate adherence. 2. Complete molecular response was achieved by 57.9% of patients with high adherence, and by 58.3% of patients with intermediate adherence. No statistically significant differences were found in response variables between patients with high and intermediate therapeutic adherence. No association was observed between level of adherence and therapeutic response. Conclusions: We cannot confirm that a different level of therapeutic adherence might have an impact on response to imatinib, though this should be taken into account in cases of therapeutic failure or sub-optimal response

  16. http://ntv.ifmo.ru/file/article/10373.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Zhukov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Comparative analysis of spectral and luminescent properties for glasses SiO2-Al2O3-MgO-K2O-TiO2 doped with chromium ions and forsterite nano-glass ceramic have been done. Initial glasses were obtained by using a conventional melt quenching method. Glass ceramics were produced by the two-stage secondary heat treatment of initial glasses. At the first step of the heat treatment nucleation centers were formed at 700º C. At the second step there was an increase of Mg2SiO4: Cr crystalline phase. Crystalline phase composition and the crystals size were determined by X-ray diffractometer. It is shown that the crystalline phase of Mg2SiO4 (forsterite is precipitated during the heat treatment. Valency state and the chromium ion position in a forsterite or a glassy matrix are determined according to luminescence and absorption spectra. Identification of absorption and luminescence bands in initial and heat-treated samples is carried out. The dependence between spectral and luminescent properties of chromium and heat treatment modes is examined. The results demonstrate that ions of the trivalent and tetravalent chromium are transforming to the forsterite crystalline phase during the heat treatment, and a part of them remains in the glassy phase. Presented research results can be used for the development of glasses and nanoscale glassceramic for fiber tunable lasers and broadband optical amplifiers of a near infrared range which are used in information and telecommunication technologies.

  17. weblog: http://www.kommunikationsforum.dk/Niels-Ole-Finnemann

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnemann, Niels Ole

    2007-01-01

    ...men det er også et område, som mange mennesker ikke rigtig tør forholde sig til og nærmest fortrænger, både fordi de ligger under for IT profeternes demagogi, og fordi de selv føler sig fremmedgjorte overfor ny teknologi og nye medier. ...og IT-fremmedgørelsen Fremmedgørelsen over teknologi og...

  18. http://www.aulamedica.es/fh/pdf/7860.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Haro Márquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess adherence and beliefs about long-term medicines for other chronic conditions among HIV-infected patients as well as to evaluate their relationship. Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted from may to july 2014 in HIV-infected patients treated with antiretroviral treatment (ART and ≥1 long-term medicines for other chronic diseases. The variables analysed in the study were demographics: sex, age, education, employment status, living situation; clinical: mode of transmission, HIV plasma viral load ,T-CD4+, CDC classification; and pharmacotherapeutics: type of ART, adherence to long-term medicines for other chronic conditions using the 4-item Morisky Medication Adherence (MMAS Scale. MMAS scores were dichotomised into adherent/non-adherent. The Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaires (BMQ was used to assess patients’ beliefs about the long-term medicines. The BMQ-Specific has two scales (necessity and concern with five questions each that uses a 5-point Likert scale. Internal consistency within BMQ scales was measured with Cronbach’s and their association with adherence was assessed with t-Student tests, using SPSS 20.0. Results: We included 126 patients (80.4% male, mean age 49.0}8.3. The mean of long-term medicines was 2.9}2.0. The percentage of non-adherent patients was 54.0%. 63.5% of patients had AIDS, that showed statistically significant relationship with non-adherence. Concerns were negatively related to self-reported adherence (14.6}5.7 vs. 12.1}6.1; p=0.019. No relationship between adherence and necessity was found (17.3}5.6 vs. 18.8}4.4; p=0.188. Internal consistency for BMQ-Specific was high (Cronbach’s =0.724. Conclusion: Higher concerns are associated with higher self-reported adherence to long-term medicines in HIV infected-patients

  19. Proton Collision Event with 2 Electrons & 2 Muons (Actual Event) An animation of an actual ATLAS proton collision event in 2011. The two muons are detailed as long blue tracks, the two electrons as short blue tracks matching green clusters of energy in the calorimeters which lie outside the inner tracking detector. source: http://www.atlas.ch/multimedia/2-electron-2-muon-event.html

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2011-01-01

    Proton Collision Event with 2 Electrons & 2 Muons (Actual Event) An animation of an actual ATLAS proton collision event in 2011. The two muons are detailed as long blue tracks, the two electrons as short blue tracks matching green clusters of energy in the calorimeters which lie outside the inner tracking detector. source: http://www.atlas.ch/multimedia/2-electron-2-muon-event.html

  20. Active and Passive Supplier Assessment Program (ASAP & PSAP) WWW Sites http://nepp.nasa.gov/imd/asap http://nepp.nasa.gov/imd/psap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusse, Jay

    2000-01-01

    The Active and Passive Supplier Assessment Programs (ASAP and PSAP) WWW Sites provide general information to the electronic parts community regarding the availability of electronic parts. They also provide information to NASA regarding modifications to commonly used procurement specifications and test methods. The ASAP and PSAP www sites are ongoing resources produced by Code 562 in support of the NASA HQ funded NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program. These WWW sites do not provide information pertaining to patented or proprietary information. All of the information contained in these www sites is available through various other public domain resources such as US Military Qualified Producers Listings (QPLs) and Qualified Manufacturer Listings (QMLs) and industry working groups such as the Electronics Industry Alliance (EIA) and the Space Parts Working Group (SPWG).

  1. http://www.e-journall.org/2376905x-2-29/

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Abolfazli Khonbi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The present research contributes to an increased understanding of the potential relationships between multiple intelligences and the choice and frequency of use of language learning strategies. Forty-one EFL students from Urmia University (Iran completed Oxford’s (1990a Strategy Inventory for Language Learning and the McKenzie (1999 Multiple Intelligences Inventory. Data analyses revealed a moderately positive relationship between the participants’ multiple intelligences and language learning strategy use (r = .58. Pearson Product-Moment correlation also showed medium-to-large positive relationships within and among the categories of multiple intelligences and the types of language learning strategies. Implications of this study for EFL education are discussed, and suggestions to improve students’ performance are provided.

  2. Supporting Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP in Wireless Meshed Networks using Random Linear Network Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundebøll, Martin; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2014-01-01

    , including CUBIC, Reno, Veno, Vegas, and Westwood+, under different packet loss rates in wireless systems using a real testbed with Raspberry Pi devices. Our goal was to choose the most promising TCP version in terms of delay performance, in this case TCP Reno, and make a fair comparison between TCP running...... alone and using FRANC underneath for reliability. Our demonstrator with DASH in Raspberry Pi devices using the DASH benchmark, shows that the video rate delivered is 4x higher when using FRANC. Even in harsh packet loss conditions, FRANC is able to deliver higher data rates (increase 4x), while...

  3. Simulation of the Prokaryotic Cell Cycle at http://simon.bio.uva.nl/cellcycle/

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arieh Zaritsky

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial Cell Cycle is presented using the Simulation program CCSim, which employs four parameters related to time (inter-division τ, replication C, division D and size (mass at replication initiation Mi, sufficient to describe and compare bacterial cells under various conditions. The parameter values can be altered and the effects of the alterations can be seen. CCSim is easy to use and presents the kinetics of cell growth in a digestible format. Replicating chromosomes and growing bacillary cells are coupled to parameters that affect the cell cycle and animated. It serves as an educational tool to teach bacteriology and to compare experimental observations with the model best describing cell growth thus improve our understanding of regulatory mechanisms. Examples are displayed of transitions between known physiological states that are consistent with experimental results, including one that explains strange observations. The program predicts enhanced division frequencies after a period of slow replication under thymine limitation if a minimal distance (Eclipse exists between successive replisomes, as observed. Missing features and ways to improve, extend and refine CCSim are proposed, for both single cells and random populations under steady-states of exponential growth and during well-defined transitions. Future improvements and extensions are proposed for single cells and populations.

  4. http://www.veterinaria.org7revistas7redvet/n050505/050501.pdf

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    El diagnóstico clínico en pacientes con patologías crónicos suele ser un reto para el médico veterinario de campo. El uso de herramientas diagnosticas que le sirvan de apoyo y permitan tener mayor informaci��n de juicio para concretar un diagnóstico es definitivo. El manejo del laboratorio clínico y métodos diagnósticos como la electrocardiografía cada vez son más populares en la práctica por lo tanto es necesario familiarizarnos con sus procesos e interpretación.La falta de planes profilácti...

  5. http://www.ajer.org/papers/v4(10/A04100107.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. U. Agber

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Control of reactive power and voltage constitute part of the major challenge in the power system industry. Adequate absorption or injection of reactive power into electric power transmission systems solves power quality problems like voltage profile maintenance at all power transmission levels, transmission efficiency and system stability. Globally, there is increasing demand for electricity to feed the technology-driven economy, while the commensurate expansion of power generation and transmission to meet up with such demand has been severely limited due to inadequate resources and environmental factors. Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS controllers, such as the Static VAr Compensator (SVC, employ latest technology in the design of power electronic switching devices for electric power transmission systems to control voltage and power flow, and improve voltage regulation without the need to expand the power generation and transmission facilities. In this work, the capability of SVC in stabilizing power system’s voltage through reactive power compensation was investigated. Power flow equations involving voltage drop with/without SVC were developed. Modeling equations for SVC were also developed and used to determine its parameters. The Nigeria 330kV network, 28-bus power system used for the study was modeled using MATLAB/SIMULINK software. From the simulations, the compensated and uncompensated voltages at each of the 28 buses were evaluated. It was observed from the analysis that some buses in the network had very weak voltage profile consequent to either excessive generation or absorption of the reactive power at such buses. It is therefore pertinent to note that not all the buses within the network need voltage compensation and as such, only buses with very weak voltage profile require the incorporation of SVC. Hence it can be concluded that in order to enhance the transmission system performance of the Nigerian 330kV power system, the control of the voltages at certain buses through the application of SVC is required.

  6. Cloud-Based DDoS HTTP Attack Detection Using Covariance Matrix Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz Aborujilah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this era of technology, cloud computing technology has become essential part of the IT services used the daily life. In this regard, website hosting services are gradually moving to the cloud. This adds new valued feature to the cloud-based websites and at the same time introduces new threats for such services. DDoS attack is one such serious threat. Covariance matrix approach is used in this article to detect such attacks. The results were encouraging, according to confusion matrix and ROC descriptors.

  7. http://bulletin.mfd.org.mk/volumes/Volume%2051/51_005.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Kadifkova Panovska

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the ability of different extracts of H. plicatum obtained from flowers, stems and leaves, to act as natural antioxidants in different in vitro experimental models in which free radical reactions are involved: inhibition of DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2- picrylhydrazyl radical, inhibition of hydroxyl radicals and protection of β-carotene-linoleic acid model system. Investigate extracts showed radical scavenging activity with IC50 from 6 to 11 mg/ml. The extracts are capable to reacting with OH• radical with inhibition of its production ranged between 33-58%. The high preventive activity against the bleaching of beta-carotene (15-49% of initial value after 120 minutes was also observed. The antioxidative activity of the extracts in the experimental systems was compared with that of reference substances: luteolin, quercetin, BHA, BHT and sylimarin (the main agent of the well-known milk thistle – Silybum marianum L.. Results of this study suggest that Helichrysum plicatum represent a natural source with antioxidant potential.

  8. HTTP-based Search and Ordering Using ECHO's REST-based and OpenSearch APIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, K.; Newman, D. J.; Pilone, D.

    2012-12-01

    Metadata is an important entity in the process of cataloging, discovering, and describing Earth science data. NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) ClearingHOuse (ECHO) acts as the core metadata repository for EOSDIS data centers, providing a centralized mechanism for metadata and data discovery and retrieval. By supporting both the ESIP's Federated Search API and its own search and ordering interfaces, ECHO provides multiple capabilities that facilitate ease of discovery and access to its ever-increasing holdings. Users are able to search and export metadata in a variety of formats including ISO 19115, json, and ECHO10. This presentation aims to inform technically savvy clients interested in automating search and ordering of ECHO's metadata catalog. The audience will be introduced to practical and applicable examples of end-to-end workflows that demonstrate finding, sub-setting and ordering data that is bound by keyword, temporal and spatial constraints. Interaction with the ESIP OpenSearch Interface will be highlighted, as will ECHO's own REST-based API.

  9. 4 http://dx.doi.org/10.4322/cto.2014.006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Sfair Kinker

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to make a reflection on the contradictions and the alleged rehabilitative potential of labor-therapeutic practices, starting from the experience developed by the Work Center of the Mental Health Program of the Municipality of Santos from 1989 to 1996, from the beginning of the intervention in the psychiatric hospital to the implementation of territorial and community services. The labor-therapeutic practice is characterized here as a disciplinary technology of deviation control, operating in line with the psychiatric paradigm. On the other hand, work projects that combine mental health and solidarity economy are considered devices that multiply opportunities, expand social networks and transform the concrete conditions of life, contributing to deconstruct the psychiatric paradigm and the sociability of merchandise. The ideas herein presented are part of a doctoral thesis that used the experience report of the Work Center implementation as a method, articulating the theoretical perspective of deinstitutionalization and the discussion of complexity, presenting new emancipatory possibilities of dealing with the issue of labor in the mental health field.

  10. http://www.diclemedj.org/upload/sayi/32/Dicle%20Med%20J-02117.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Yazmalar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI is a rare heritable condition characterized by bone fragility and reduced bone mass. This pathology is characterized by disruption of biosynthesis of Type I collagen, and production of limited amount of defective and imperfect collagens. This causes decrease in bone mass of human body, bones become fragile and brittle, resulting in unreasonable multiple fractures. Other manifestations include hyperextensibility of the joints, blue sclera, hearing loss, short stature and dentinogenesis imperfecta. Bisphosphonates are now the most widely used for the treatment of OI. In conclusion, along with the literature, we present a case of zoledronic acid treatment in adult patient with OI.

  11. Percipitopia (http://slurl.com/secondlife/Bifrost/89/128/33)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.; Pilegaard, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    Percipitopia takes as its point of departure a "virtual Whitehall" in which visitors will be introduced to the Irish philosopher George Berkeley's thoughts, and from which further examination of philosophical issues and the history of philosophy is facilitated. The actual Whitehall was George...... Berkeley's American home 1729-1731, and now functions as a museum for his life and work. Berkeley (1685-1753) is an important figure in the history of philosophy who is best known for his doctrine of immaterialism, the view that the objects of perception have no extra-mental existence. Even though Berkeley...

  12. http://www.esa.int/esaSC/Pr_21_2004_s_en.html

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    X-ray brightness map hi-res Size hi-res: 38 Kb Credits: ESA/ XMM-Newton/ Patrick Henry et al. X-ray brightness map This map shows "surface brightness" or how luminous the region is. The larger of the two galaxy clusters is brighter, shown here as a white and red spot. A second cluster resides about "2 o'clock" from this, shown by a batch of yellow surrounded by green. Luminosity is related to density, so the densest regions (cluster cores) are the brightest regions. The white color corresponds to regions of the highest surface brightness, followed by red, orange, yellow, green, blue and purple. High resolution version (JPG format) 38 Kb High resolution version (TIFF format) 525 Kb Temperature map Credits: NASA Artist’s impression of cosmic head on collision The event details what the scientists are calling the perfect cosmic storm: galaxy clusters that collided like two high-pressure weather fronts and created hurricane-like conditions, tossing galaxies far from their paths and churning shock waves of 100-million-degree gas through intergalactic space. The tiny dots in this artist's concept are galaxies containing thousand million of stars. Animated GIF version Temperature map hi-res Size hi-res: 57 Kb Credits: ESA/ XMM-Newton/ Patrick Henry et al. Temperature map This image shows the temperature of gas in and around the two merging galaxy clusters, based directly on X-ray data. The galaxies themselves are difficult to identify; the image highlights the hot ‘invisible’ gas between the clusters heated by shock waves. The white colour corresponds to regions of the highest temperature - million of degrees, hotter than the surface of the Sun - followed by red, orange, yellow and blue. High resolution version (JPG format) 57 Kb High resolution version (TIFF format) 819 Kb The event details what the scientists are calling the ‘perfect cosmic storm’: galaxy clusters that collided like two high-pressure weather fronts and created hurricane-like conditions, tossing galaxies far from their paths and churning shock waves of 100-million-degree gas through intergalactic space. This unprecedented view of a merger in action crystallises the theory that the Universe built its magnificent hierarchal structure from the ‘bottom up’ - essentially through mergers of smaller galaxies and galaxy clusters into bigger ones. "Here before our eyes we see the making of one of the biggest objects in the Universe," said Dr Patrick Henry of the University of Hawaii, who led the study. "What was once two distinct but smaller galaxy clusters 300 million years ago is now one massive cluster in turmoil.” Henry and his colleagues, Alexis Finoguenov and Ulrich Briel of the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany, present these results in an upcoming issue of the Astrophysical Journal. The forecast for the new super-cluster, they said, is 'clear and calm' now that the worst of the storm has passed. Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in Universe, containing hundreds to thousands of galaxies. Our Milky Way galaxy is part of a small group of galaxies but is not gravitationally bound to the closest cluster, the Virgo Cluster. We are destined for a collision in a few thousand million years, though. The cluster named Abell 754 in the constellation Hydra has been known for decades. However, to the scientists' surprise, the new observation reveals that the merger may have occurred from the opposite direction than what was thought. They found evidence for this by tracing the wreckage today left in the merger's wake, spanning a distance of millions of light years. While other large mergers are known, none has been measured in such detail as Abell 754. For the first time, the scientists could create a complete ‘weather map’ of Abell 754 and thus determine a forecast. This map contains information about the temperature, pressure and density of the new cluster. As in all clusters, most the ordinary matter is in the form of gas between the galaxies and not locked up i

  13. http://www.dieweltdertuerken.org/index.php/ZfWT/article/view/804/804

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazım Özkan ERTÜRK

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In time, the progress recorded in communication technology and the change of sociocultural and economic conditions have transformed the social perception in the field of communication. By courtesy of the expansion in access to information and inspection facilities, directing and persuading the masses with rising knowledge and awareness have become more difficult, and that has resulted in the emergence of different aspects in communication-based persuasion activities and approaches. Thanks to the ease of obtaining information from different sources on a topic, it has been difficult to manage both complex social relationships and communication process in the institutional sense. The development of public relations, which aimed at providing a bilateral information sharing between the institutions/organizations and their target audience within the framework of tolerance and goodwill, cannot be separated from the improvement in communication technologies and the transformation of the social perception pertaining to communication. In line with the changing social and institutional perception in communications, communication approach in public relations practices has shown seasonal differences. In this study, an analysis will be made regarding the transformation of the understanding of communication in public relations in the light of changes in the shape and perception of communication.

  14. http://www.tkea.com.ua/tkea/2008/6_2008/pdf/12.zip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavetskyy T. S.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available It is established radiation-induced decreasing in fragility of structural network takes place for γ-irradiated sample of Ge15,8As21S63,2 chalcogenide glass. It is concluded on the basis of the results obtained that radiation modification of chalcogenide glass leads to the rigidity of its matrix, and the vibrational (boson contribution in the low-frequency spectral region is dominatе on the relaxation quasi-elastic scattering.

  15. http://journal.eng.unila.ac.id/index.php/mech/article/view/328

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mirmanto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As the fossil energy has been getting depletion, it is important to utilize alternative energies such as solar energy. An equipment that can be used for capturing and converting solar energy is solar collector. Two identical collectors used in this study were placed facing to the North with an inclination angle of 15°. The collector dimension was 0.8 m x 1 m x 0.05 m. One collector contained 5 parallel pipes and the other contained 7 parallel pipes. The water used in the test was flowed naturally due to the gravity force from a higher tank and was adjusted using a valve fitted at the end of the collector. The water flow rates employed were 200, 250 and 300 cc/minutes and measured using a volume meter and a stop watch. The results showed that the energy coming into the collector, energy absorbed by the absorber and water, increased with an increase in the observation time and reached the peak value at about 2.30 pm. After that, they decreased. The effect of the pipe number is insignificant.

  16. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF ROUTING PROTOCOLS AND TCP VARIANTS UNDER HTTP AND FTP TRAFFIC IN MANETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan A. QasMarrogy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available MANET stands for mobile ad-hoc network that has multi-hop and dynamic nature, where each station changes its location frequently and automatically configures itself. In this paper, four routing protocols that are OLSR, GRP, DSR, and AODV are discussed along with three TCP variants that are SACK, New Reno and Reno. The main focus of this paper is to study the impact scalability, mobility and traffic loads on routing protocols and TCP variants. The paper results shows that the proactive protocols OLSR and GRP outperform the reactive protocols AODV and DSR with the same nodes size, nodes speed, and traffic load. On the other hand, the TCP variants research reveal the superiority of the TCP SACK variant over the other two variants in case of adapting to varying network size, while the TCP Reno variant acts more robustly in varying mobility speeds and traffic loads

  17. http://www.ijana.in/papers/Paper-2.5.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Chaba

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A MANET is an autonomous collection of mobile users (nodes that communicate over relatively bandwidth-constrained wireless links. The infrastructure less and the dynamic nature of these networks demands new set of networking strategies to be implemented in order to provide efficient end-to-end communication. MANETs employ the traditional TCP/IP structure to provide end-to-end communication between nodes. However, due to their mobility and the limited resource in wireless networks, each layer in the TCP/IP model require redefinition or modifications to function efficiently in MANETs. Routing in the MANETs is a challenging task and has received a tremendous amount of attention from researches. This has led to development of many different routing protocols for MANETs, which are classified in two basic categories: reactive routing and proactive routing protocols. This paper compares and analyze reactive routing protocols on the basis of various properties.

  18. http://seer.fclar.unesp.br/alfa/article/view/5510/5018

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Pereira ROMANO

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available • RESUMO: Este trabalho utiliza como corpus de análise os dados coletados pela equipe do Projeto Atlas Linguístico do Brasil em três regiões: Centro-Oeste, Sudeste e Sul. Os dados referem-se às cidades do interior e às capitais de cada estado, coletados junto a informantes selecionados segundo o perfil estabelecido. Nesta oportunidade, objetiva-se discutir a distribuição diatópica das variantes lexicais para a questão 132 – “Criança pequenininha, a gente diz que é bebê. E quando ela tem de 5 a 10 anos, do sexo masculino?” – do Questionário Semântico-Lexical (COMITÊ NACIONAL DO PROJETO ALIB, 2001. A metodologia utilizada envolveu análises descritivas e inferenciais pertinentes ao estudo. Para tanto, oito hipóteses foram testadas no sentido de averiguar o comportamento e a distribuição diatópica das cinco variantes mais produtivas no conjunto de respostas. Os principais resultados observados indicam que as variantes apresentam comportamento distinto nas três regiões: (i a variante “menino” apresenta distribuição homogênea nos dez estados; (ii as formas lexicais “guri” e “piá” possuem distribuição heterogênea na região Sul; (iii as variantes de etimologia indígena (“guri” e “piá” são mais representativas nas regiões Sul e Centro-Oeste; (iv há uma maior representatividade da variante “moleque” (étimo africano na região Sudeste, principalmente em São Paulo e Minas Gerais. • PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Projeto ALiB. Dialetologia. Variantes lexicais.

  19. http://journals.continental.edu.pe/index.php/apuntes/article/view/29/28

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Perales Munguía

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Identificar evidencias que prueben la asociación cronológica entre el asentamiento prehispánico de Tunanmarca (Jauja - Junín y el sistema hidráulico cercano a éste; y evaluar el papel de dicha asociación y del manejo del agua en la constitución del poder en la jefatura con sede en dicho asentamiento. Métodos: Se desarrolló esta investigación básica, con un alcance descriptivo y diseño transversal. Los procedimientos de recolección de datos estuvieron basados en: reconocimiento pedestre a nivel de superficie, en transectos; para la ubicación y registro de las evidencias se empleó un GPS, brújula, cintas métricas, nivel y cámara fotográfica, en tanto que los datos espaciales fueron procesados en el software ArcGIS y otros. Resultados: Se identificaron los restos de tres caminos prehispánicos, además de dos estructuras arqueológicas asociadas al sistema hidráulico de Tunanmarca, una de las cuales parece haber sido un reservorio de agua. El camino más largo une el probable reservorio y el tramo final del canal con el asentamiento de Tunanmarca. Conclusiones: El asentamiento prehispánico de Tunanmarca se asocia cronológicamente con el sistema hidráulico cercano, principalmente con el tramo final del canal principal, que parece terminar en un probable reservorio de agua, al que se accede desde el asentamiento mediante un camino prehispánico. Asimismo, la escasa sofisticación de la tecnología hidráulica observada y la presencia del camino que une la infraestructura asociada al canal con la parte central del sitio de Tunanmarca, sugieren alguna importancia del manejo del agua en los procesos de constitución del poder político y el ejercicio de autoridad en la jefatura prehispánica de Tunanmarca.

  20. Overview of “Splendid Speaking” Website (http://splendid-speaking.com

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Travis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is natural for adult learners preparing for upper-intermediate and advanced speaking examinations like the Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English (CAE, the Business English Certificate (BEC or International English Language Teaching System (IELTS to feel daunted by the Speaking examination. Having their spoken English assessed ‘live’ in a high stakes situation can be quite stressful. To perform at their best in the exam learners need to be able to contribute fully to the various task formats within their spoken exam.Students preparing for these exams need to have regular practice in responding fully to questions, working cooperatively with a partner, and generally taking the opportunity to showcase their use of English. In our experience there was little in the way of freely-available structured materials for advanced speaking skills online. We decided we would like to help learners preparing for their respective exams as well as general upper intermediate to advanced students wishing to develop their speaking skills. We launched splendid-speaking.com in 2006.

  1. http://www.derecho.uba.ar/publicaciones/lye/revistas/90/abreut.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreut de Begher, Liliana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El reconocimiento de los derechos de las comunidades indígenas y su tratamiento en la legislación argentina ha sufrido, a principios del siglo XX, un cambio rotundo. El presente trabajo se propondrá analizar dicho cambio, retomando la normativa del siglo XIX y comparándola con la actual. Al tocarse el tema desde una visión histórica, la autora realiza un recorrido por las distintas etapas de la historia argentina, cuyos cambios en mentalidad se encuentran plasmados en el derecho constitucional. Se analizarán, entonces, las Constituciones del siglo XIX, destacándose su modelo jurídico monocultural, para llegar, luego, a la Constitución de 1994, que implicará un cambio en dicho modelo, un pasaje a uno pluricultural. Por otro lado, se discutirá si el derecho de la propiedad indígena, puede ser colocado dentro de la órbita del derecho privado, y se analizarán las características propias y distintivas de este nuevo derecho real.

  2. Software-Defined Networking-based Crypto Ransomware Detection Using HTTP Traffic Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Cabaj, Krzysztof; Gregorczyk, Marcin; Mazurczyk, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Ransomware is currently the key threat for individual as well as corporate Internet users. Especially dangerous is crypto ransomware that encrypts important user data and it is only possible to recover it once a ransom has been paid. Therefore devising efficient and effective countermeasures is a rising necessity. In this paper we present a novel Software-Defined Networking (SDN) based detection approach that utilizes characteristics of ransomware communication. Based on the observation of ne...

  3. http://journals.univ-danubius.ro/index.php/oeconomica/article/view/2278/2080

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Ullah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Globalization is a buzz word that catches significant importance as a reform agenda post 1980. The current study is an attempt to analyze the impact of globalization on economic growth of Pakistan. The sample period for this study ranges from 1980-2009. For empirical analysis of the study, Autoregressive Distributive Lag model is employed while for data analysis Augmented Dicky Fuller test is applied. It is found that all the variables are stationary at first difference. The empirical findings of the study suggest that economic globalization in long phase of time increase growth in case of Pakistan economy, social globalization has negative impacts on growth and political globalization is insignificant which mean that it will not increase or decrease the growth of Pakistan economy. While in short run economic globalization at lag 1 and social globalization decrease the pace of growth. It is suggested to the government that as overall globalization helps in increasing the growth of economy therefore government should formulate such a policy that helps the economy to be globalized.

  4. http://journals.univ-danubius.ro/index.php/oeconomica/article/view/2278/2080

    OpenAIRE

    Farid Ullah; Abdur Rauf; Nasir Rasool

    2014-01-01

    Globalization is a buzz word that catches significant importance as a reform agenda post 1980. The current study is an attempt to analyze the impact of globalization on economic growth of Pakistan. The sample period for this study ranges from 1980-2009. For empirical analysis of the study, Autoregressive Distributive Lag model is employed while for data analysis Augmented Dicky Fuller test is applied. It is found that all the variables are stationary at first difference. The empir...

  5. http://englishkyoto-seas.org/2014/02/vol-1-no-3-takahiro-kojima/

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Kojima

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper will explore the religious practices of Theravada Buddhists in Dehong Dai and Jingpo Autonomous Prefecture, Yunnan Province. The data presented were gathered by the author during a year of fieldwork in a village outside the city of Ruili. Dehong Prefecture is located on the China-Myanmar border. One of the main groups in this area is the Dai (Tăi, who follow Theravada Buddhism. Buddhism was brought into Dehong mainly from Myanmar. Local religious practices have much in common with Buddhist practices in Southeast Asia, sharing the same Pali canon. However, this area differs from other Theravada Buddhist societies in that it has a relatively low number of monks and novices. Although all the villages in Dehong have a monastery, just as in the rest of Southeast Asia, most of the monas- teries are uninhabited. One reason for this is the oppression of religion during the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution. But more important, the custom of ordaining is significantly less widespread in Dehong than in other Theravada Buddhist societies. Therefore, without resident monks, Buddhist rituals in Dehong are performed by virtue of the direct relationship between the lay community and their Buddhist texts, Buddha images, and pagodas. In particular, holu (experts in reciting Buddhist texts and xiŋ lai (elderly people who go to the monastery during the rainy season retreat to keep eight precepts on special holy days play important roles as mediators in this relationship.1 It is laypeople, not monks, who play the central role in the practice of Buddhism in Dehong. In this situation, knowledge of Buddhism is transmitted mainly from laypeople to laypeople. Furthermore, a diver- sity of practices has been produced and reproduced by local Buddhists. These features of Buddhist practices in Dehong are in striking contrast to practices in other Theravada Buddhist societies, and suggest that there is a need to re-examine the models to understand the Theravada Buddhist societies that were developed upon the case of Central Thailand.

  6. Instructions to use and maintain the Sharepoint site http://cern.ch/research-board

    CERN Document Server

    Mage-Granados, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The minutes of the Research Board are the official reference for decisions taken at the board. This facility has been set up to allow for easier searching of those minutes. It provides access to the individual paragraphs of the minutes, each labelled with the following information: · The Research Board meeting that it belongs to; · The experiment (or experiments) that are concerned; · The type of information in the paragraph (e.g. just informative text, or a decision on approval, etc.); · A short title describing the paragraph’s content (if appropriate).

  7. http://revista.ismm.edu.cu/index.php/revistamg/article/view/812/Uboho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Manuel Díaz-Cedré

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la conversión de un aporte oxiacetilénico R-FeCr en un aporte por arco eléctrico E-FeCr, para el relleno manual de piezas sometidas a desgaste erosivo (tornillos extrusores de arcilla, con la finalidad de incrementar la productividad de los procesos de relleno superficial y disminuir deformaciones sin reducir las propiedades de los depósitos. Se partió de la formulación de un revestimiento bajo hidrógeno, ensayado en trabajos previos, el cual fue aplicado por inmersión. Se realizaron depósitos mediante un simulador que permite realizar ensayos de soldadura manual sin la interferencia directa del soldador, variando la corriente de soldadura. Se determinaron las características técnico–operativas (tasa de fusión, tasa de deposición, rendimiento real, estabilidad de funcionamiento, metalografía y dureza del depósito de los consumibles en estudio. El análisis de estas características permitió demostrar la factibilidad técnica de esta conversión.

  8. TASK FORCE ON AMPHIBIAN DECLINES AND DEFORMITIES (TADD WEB PAGE AT HTTP://FROGWEB.GOV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This record consists of three inventory descriptions: 1) Evaluating a metapopulation framework for biotic inventory and monitoring in patchy habitats (Principal Investigator Peter Trenham), 2) Effects of ultraviolet radiation (PI Gary Ankley), and 3) Evaluation of the effects...

  9. http://www.revistas.unal.edu.co/index.php/biotecnologia/article/view/54277

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Lorena García Lozano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aspidosperma polyneuron is a species native to the Neotropics, in countries like Colombia, Venezuela, Peru, Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay, typical of semi-deciduous forests, catalogued since 1998 by the IUCN as "Endangered (EN", because its natural populations were subjected to an intense exploitation for timber and its habitat was seriously degraded by agricultural and silvopastoral activities. The difficulties for its natural regeneration and the rooting of cuttings, make the in vitro culture an efficient tool to counteract the reproductive difficulties that it presents. However, the presence of pollutants that affect the viability of the explants needs the development of protocols that allow the in vitro establishment of this species. The objective of this research was to achieve aseptic establishment and the induction of callogenesis in explants of A. polyneuron, by evaluating different disinfection treatments. The expants were obtained from individuals of natural regeneration, in the Municipality of Armero in the Department of Tolima, which were immersed in distilled water with a drop of Tween® 80 for each 100 ml, for 10 minutes and then rinsed with sterile distilled water. There were used as disinfectant agents, sodium hypochlorite and mercury dichloride in different concentrations and times of immersion. Among the used explants: buds, nodal segments and leaf blades, the last one was selected for its capacity of producing friable and green callosity, for which a disinfection with mercury dichloride (HgCl2 0.125% for 10 minutes was enough for contamination control and low indexes of oxidation.

  10. http://www.esa.int/esaSC/Pr_11_2004_s_en.html

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Phoebe hi-res Size hi-res: 2280 kb Credits: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute Peering at Phoebe Shown here is a mosaic of seven of the sharpest, highest resolution images taken of Phoebe during the Cassini-Huygens close fly-by of the tiny moon. The image scales range from 27 to 13 metres per pixel. Smaller and smaller craters can be detected as resolution increases from left to right. The number of blocks, or bumps on the surface also increases to the right. The Sun is coming from the right, so the bright-dark pattern is reversed between blocks and small craters. Grooves or chains of pits are seen on the left portion of the mosaic, which may mark fractures or faults induced by large impact events. Many of the small craters have bright rays, similar to recent craters on the Moon. There are also bright streaks on steep slopes, perhaps where loose material slid downhill during the seismic shaking of impact events. There are also places where especially dark materials are present, perhaps rich in carbon compounds. Phoebe hi-res Size hi-res: 265 kb Credits: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute Dark desolation On 11 June 2004, during its closest approach to Phoebe, Cassini-Huygens obtained this extremely high-resolution view of a dark, desolate landscape. Regions of different reflectivity are clearly visible on what appears to be a gently rolling surface. Notable are several bright-rayed impact craters, lots of small craters with bright-coloured floors and light-coloured streaks across the landscape. Note also the several sharply defined craters, probably fairly young features, near the upper left corner. This high-resolution image was obtained with an angle of 30.7 degrees between the Sun, Phoebe and spacecraft and from a distance of approximately 2365 kilometres. The image scale is approximately 14 metres per pixel. The image was high-pass filtered to bring out small-scale features and then enhanced in contrast. Phoebe hi-res Size hi-res: 311 kb Credits: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute A view to the south A mosaic of two images of Saturn's moon Phoebe taken shortly after Cassini's fly-by on 11 June 2004, gives a close-up view of a region near its South Pole. The view, taken about 13 000 kilometres from Phoebe, is about 120 kilometres across and shows a region battered by crater impacts. Brighter material, likely to be ice, is exposed by small craters and streams down the slopes of large craters. The skyline is a combination of Phoebe's roundish shape and the formation of impact craters. Walls of some of the larger craters are more than four kilometres high. The image scale is 80 metres per pixel. Phoebe hi-res Size hi-res: 136 kb Credits: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute A skyline view Images like this one, showing bright 'wispy' streaks thought to be ice revealed by subsidence of crater walls, are leading to the view that Phoebe is an icy-rich body overlain with a thin layer of dark material. Obvious downslope motion of material occurring along the walls of the major craters in this image is the cause for the bright streaks, which are over-exposed here. Significant slumping has occurred along the crater wall at top left. The slumping of material might have been caused by a small projectile punching into the steep slope of the wall of a pre-existing larger crater. Another possibility is that the material collapsed when triggered by another impact elsewhere on Phoebe. Note that the bright, exposed areas of ice are not very uniform along the wall. Small craters are exposing bright material on the ‘hummocky’ floor of the larger crater. Elsewhere on this image, there are local areas of outcropping along the larger crater wall where denser, more resistant material is located. Whether these outcrops are large blocks being exhumed by landslides or actual 'bedrock' is not currently understood. The crater on the left, with most of the bright streamers, is about 45 kilometres in diameter, front to back as viewed. The larger depression in which the crater sits is on the order of 100 kilometres across. The slopes from the rim down to th

  11. http://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/ijdl/article/view/3151

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A. Tawfik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available With the growing emphasis being placed upon situated learning theory, designs increasingly implement problem-based learning (PBL in various educational contexts. However, some of the difficulties instructional designers face include interweaving elements such as breadth, depth, and situated knowledge in a contextualized learning task. This design case details how the 3C3R method was systematically employed to design a PBL learning environment that highlights the effects of environmental toxins on human fertility. We also discuss how a case library learning environment (CLLE was implemented and designed to support the decision-making process. This design case examines the challenges involved, such as misunderstandings between the SMEs and instructional designer as we contextualized complex issues related to human biology. A discussion of how we designed for multiple solution paths is also included. Lastly, we discuss the challenges of interweaving the ill-structured problem with multiple narratives found in a case library.

  12. http://www.omjournal.org/fultext_PDF.aspx?DetailsID=544&type=fultext

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Mandhari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To illustrate the patient safety culture in Oman as gleaned via 12 indices of patient safety culture derived from the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSPSC and to compare the average positive response rates in patient safety culture between Oman and the USA, Taiwan, and Lebanon. Methods: This was a cross-sectional research study employed to gauge the performance of HSPSC safety indices among health workers representing five secondary and tertiary care hospitals in the northern region of Oman. The participants (n=398 represented different professional designations of hospital staff. Analyses were performed using univariate statistics. Results: The overall average positive response rate for the 12 patient safety culture dimensions of the HSPSC survey in Oman was 58%. The indices from HSPSC that were endorsed the highest included ‘organizational learning and continuous improvement’ while conversely, ‘non-punitive response to errors’ was ranked the least. There were no significant differences in average positive response rates between Oman and the United States (58% vs. 61%; p=0.666, Taiwan (58% vs. 64%; p=0.386, and Lebanon (58% vs. 61%; p=0.666. Conclusion: This study provides the first empirical study on patient safety culture in Oman which is similar to those rates reported elsewhere. It highlights the specific strengths and weaknesses which may stem from the specific milieu prevailing in Oman.

  13. http://janusonline.pt/2003/2003_2_4_9.html

    OpenAIRE

    Safaneta, Marisa Abreu

    2003-01-01

    Muita controvérsia gira em torno da ideia de criação de um Estado Palestiniano, nomeadamente no que respeita à ausência de soberania sobre um território definido por parte dos palestinianos. A ideia da formação de um Estado Palestiniano sofreu alterações para ambos os intervenientes: os palestinianos substituiram as reivindicações sobre a Palestina histórica pelas actuais reivindicações de estabelecimento na Faixa de Gaza, Cisjordânia e Jerusalém Oriental; entre os israelitas, as opiniões ext...

  14. CATIE: Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center. http://www.catie.ac.cr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applied Environmental Education and Communication, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This article features CATIE (Centro Agronomico Tropical de Investigacion y Ensenanza), a tropical agricultural research and higher education center. CATIE's mission is to be instrumental in poverty reduction and rural development in the American tropics, by promoting diversified and competitive agriculture and sustainable management of natural…

  15. AphID (Lucid key) http://AphID.AphidNet.org

    Science.gov (United States)

    This peer-reviewed web site concentrates on the 66 adult alate and apterous aphids that are the world's most cosmopolitan and polyphagous species. The site includes fact sheets about the various aphids species, a glossary of terms helpful to the student, hundreds of photographs and illustrations, a...

  16. A website for all angiosperm families – http://www.mobot.org/mobot/research/apweb/

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, P.F.

    2002-01-01

    Currently both those teaching and those learning about phylogenies face a variety of problems. There are several systems to chose from, yet there is no explicitly phylogenetic system (in the sense of recognizing only strictly monophyletic groups) where all those groups are described. Conventional fa

  17. http://annales.univ-mosta.dz/images/articles/07/annales_07ar_habbacha.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    د. عبد القادر فيدوح

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available يقوم جوهر إشكالية هذه الدراسة على إمكانية فهم معضلة تصور البنية الذهنية العربية منذ بداية منشئها الفكري من الأثر الملموس في النص الإبداعي. ولا أتصور أنني سأضيف شيئا ذا أهمية بالنسبة إلى ما قاله من سبقني بالدراسة والتمحيص، ولكن حسبي أن أجيب عن أسئلة كانت تراودني منذ مدة. وقد حاولت أن أتطرق إلى بعضها، وهي الآن مبثوثة في ثنايا بعض دراساتي غير أنها كانت نظرة اختزالية. ومن هنا أحاول في هذه الدراسة أن أعمق هذا الانطباع بقدر ما يتيسر لنا، وهو ما دفعني دفعا لتقريب بعض الظنون التي كانت تراودني مما ترسخ في ذهني منذ فترة، ومن هنا يشكل التأويل حجر الزاوية في إعادة قراءاتي لكشف سيولة دلالات النص، وإبراز ظلاله وإيحاءاته بخاصة اللامتناهية منها، وسواء ما يظهره النص مجسدا في إنتاجه مكتوبا، أو ما كان ضمنا ولم يكشف عن هويته إلا من قبيل الاستنتاج من النصوص.

  18. http://www.veterinaria.org7revistas7redvet/n050505/050501.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcila-Quiceno Víctor H.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available El diagnóstico clínico en pacientes con patologías crónicos suele ser un reto para el médico veterinario de campo. El uso de herramientas diagnosticas que le sirvan de apoyo y permitan tener mayor informaci��n de juicio para concretar un diagnóstico es definitivo. El manejo del laboratorio clínico y métodos diagnósticos como la electrocardiografía cada vez son más populares en la práctica por lo tanto es necesario familiarizarnos con sus procesos e interpretación.La falta de planes profilácticos permite el desarrollo de procesos morbosos que se tornan crónicos como en los pacientes infestados por nemátodos (dirofilarias quienes causan deterioro continuo de un individuo que en muchos de los casos se caracteriza por la progresiva perdida de peso, disminución del apetito, pelo en mal estado (opaco que se desprende con facilidad y un cambio en el comportamiento que es evidente (indiferente al medio al que el dueño denomina animal perezoso.

  19. Instance-optimality in probability with an http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.e

    KAUST Repository

    DeVore, Ronald

    2009-11-01

    Let Φ (ω), ω ∈ Ω, be a family of n × N random matrices whose entries φ{symbol}i, j are independent realizations of a symmetric, real random variable η with expectation E η = 0 and variance E η2 = 1 / n. Such matrices are used in compressed sensing to encode a vector x ∈ RN by y = Φ x. The information y holds about x is extracted by using a decoder Δ : Rn → RN. The most prominent decoder is the ℓ1-minimization decoder Δ which gives for a given y ∈ Rn the element Δ (y) ∈ RN which has minimal ℓ1-norm among all z ∈ RN with Φ z = y. This paper is interested in properties of the random family Φ (ω) which guarantee that the vector over(x, ̄) : = Δ (Φ x) will with high probability approximate x in ℓ2 N to an accuracy comparable with the best k-term error of approximation in ℓ2 N for the range k ≤ a n / log2 (N / n). This means that for the above range of k, for each signal x ∈ RN, the vector over(x, ̄) : = Δ (Φ x) satisfies{norm of matrix} x - over(x, ̄) {norm of matrix}ℓ2N ≤ C under(inf, z ∈ Σk) {norm of matrix} x - z {norm of matrix}ℓ2N with high probability on the draw of Φ. Here, Σk consists of all vectors with at most k nonzero coordinates. The first result of this type was proved by Wojtaszczyk [P. Wojtaszczyk, Stability and instance optimality for Gaussian measurements in compressed sensing, Found. Comput. Math., in press] who showed this property when η is a normalized Gaussian random variable. We extend this property to more general random variables, including the particular case where η is the Bernoulli random variable which takes the values ± 1 / sqrt(n) with equal probability. The proofs of our results use geometric mapping properties of such random matrices some of which were recently obtained in [A. Litvak, A. Pajor, M. Rudelson, N. Tomczak-Jaegermann, Smallest singular value of random matrices and geometry of random polytopes, Adv. Math. 195 (2005) 491-523]. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tests of PROOF-on-Demand with ATLAS Prodsys2 and first experience with HTTP federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nardo, R.; Ganis, G.; Vilucchi, E.; Albicocco, P.; Antonelli, M.

    2015-12-01

    During the LHC Run-1, Grid resources in ATLAS have been managed by the PanDA and DQ2 systems. In order to meet the needs for the LHC Run-2, Prodsys2 and Rucio are used as the new ATLAS Workload and Data Management systems. The data are stored under various formats in ROOT files and end-user physicists have the choice to use either the ATHENA framework or directly ROOT. Within the ROOT data analysis framework it is possible to perform analysis of huge sets of ROOT files in parallel with PROOF on clusters of computers (usually organised in analysis facilities) or multi-core machines. In addition, PROOF-on-Demand (PoD) can be used to enable PROOF on top of an existing resource management system. In this work, we present the first performance obtained enabling PROOF-based analysis at CERN and in some of the Italian ATLAS Tier-2 sites within the new ATLAS workload system. Benchmark tests of data access with the httpd protocol, using also the httpd redirector, will be shown. We also present results on the startup latency tests using the new PROOF functionality of dynamic workers addition, which improves the performance of PoD using Grid resources. These new results will be compared with the expected improvements discussed in a previous work.

  1. Tests of PoD with ATLAS Prodsys2 and first experience with HTTP Federation

    CERN Document Server

    Di Nardo, Roberto; The ATLAS collaboration; Ganis, Gerardo; Antonelli, Mario

    2015-01-01

    During the LHC Run-1, Grid resources in ATLAS have been managed by the PanDA and DQ2 systems. In order to meet the needs for the LHC Run-2, Prodsys2 and Rucio are used as the new ATLAS Workload and Data Management systems. The data are stored under various formats in ROOT files and end-user physicists have the choice to use either the ATHENA framework or directly ROOT. Within the ROOT data analysis framework it is possible to perform analysis of huge sets of ROOT files in parallel with PROOF on clusters of computers (usually organised in analysis facilities) or multi-core machines. In addition, PROOF-on-Demand (PoD) can be used to enable PROOF on top of an existing resource management system. In this work, we present the first performances obtained enabling PROOF-based analysis in the Italian ATLAS Tier-1/Tier-2 sites within the new ATLAS workload system. Benchmark tests of data access with the httpd protocol, using also the httpd redirector, will be shown. We also present results on the startup latency tests...

  2. Tests of PROOF-on-Demand with ATLAS Prodsys2 and first experience with HTTP federation

    CERN Document Server

    Di Nardo, Roberto; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Antonelli, Mario

    2015-01-01

    During the LHC Run-1, Grid resources in ATLAS have been managed by the PanDA and DQ2 systems. In order to meet the needs for the LHC Run-2, Prodsys2 and Rucio are used as the new ATLAS Workload and Data Management systems. The data are stored under various formats in ROOT files and end-user physicists have the choice to use either the ATHENA framework or directly ROOT. Within the ROOT data analysis framework it is possible to perform analysis of huge sets of ROOT files in parallel with PROOF on clusters of computers (usually organised in analysis facilities) or multi-core machines. In addition, PROOF-on-Demand (PoD) can be used to enable PROOF on top of an existing resource management system. In this work, we present the first performances obtained enabling PROOF-based analysis at CERN and in some of the Italian ATLAS Tier-2 sites within the new ATLAS workload system. Benchmark tests of data access with the httpd protocol, using also the httpd redirector, will be shown. We also present results on the startup ...

  3. http://revistas.unc.edu.ar/index.php/anuariohistoria/article/view/8394/9265

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdés, Estela Graciela

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Este trabajo surge de relacionar los resultados de dos líneas de investigación llevadas a cabo por equipos pertenecientes a la Facultad de Derecho y Ciencias Sociales y a la de Filosofía y Humanidades, ambas pertenecientes a la Universidad Nacional de Córdoba. La indagación supone al contemplar no sólo miradas interdisciplinarias sino también el rol del territorio en la conformación de problemáticas sociales. Los efectos del lugar cobran fuerza en el caso que nos ocupa al poner en escena el pleno ejercicio de la ciudadanía frente a las políticas públicas orientadas a la prevención del delito. Abstract This work arises on the relationship between the results of two different research lines conducted by teams from the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences and Philosophy and Humanities, both belonging to the National University of Córdoba. The inquiry involves not only interdisciplinary looks but also the role of the territory in shaping social problems. The effects of the place gain strength in this case staging the full exercise of citizenship against public policies aimed at crime prevention.

  4. SciDAC - The Scientific Data Management Center (http://sdmcenter.lbl.gov)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling Liu Calton Pu

    2005-06-20

    In SciDAC SDM project, the main assignment to the Georgia Institute of Technology team (according to the proposed work) is to develop advanced information extraction and information integration technologies on top of the XWRAP technology originated from Georgia Tech [LPH01]. We have developed XWRAPComposer technology to enable the XWRAP code generator to generate Java information wrappers that are capable of extraction of data from multiple linked pages. These information wrappers are used as gateways or adaptors for scientific information mediators to access and fuse interesting data and answering complex queries over a large collection of heterogeneous scientific information sources. Our accomplishments over the SciDAC sponsored years (July 2001 to July 2004) can be summarized along two dimensions. Technically, we have produced a number of major software releases and published over 30 research papers in both international conferences and international journals. The planned software releases include 1. Five Java wrappers and five WDSL-enabled wrappers for SDM Pilot scenarios, which were released in early 2003, 2. The XWRAPComposer toolkit (command line version) which was first released in late 2003 and then released in Summer 2004, 3. Five Ptolemy wrapper actors which were released first in Summer 2003, and then released again in Fall 2005. 4. The decomposable XWRAPComposer actor in Ptolemy, which we have made it available as open source in end of 2004 and tested it in early 2005.

  5. NASA GSFC Tin Whisker Homepage http://nepp.nasa.gov/whisker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Harry

    2000-01-01

    The NASA GSFC Tin Whisker Homepage provides general information and GSFC Code 562 experimentation results regarding the well known phenomenon of tin whisker formation from pure tin plated substrates. The objective of this www site is to provide a central repository for information pertaining to this phenomenon and to provide status of the GSFC experiments to understand the behavior of tin whiskers in space environments. The Tin Whisker www site is produced by Code 562. This www site does not provide information pertaining to patented or proprietary information. All of the information contained in this www site is at the level of that produced by industry and university researchers and is published at international conferences.

  6. http://openjournals.net/files/pics/CEU.gif"/> A competence executive coaching model

    OpenAIRE

    Pieter Koortzen; Rudolf M. Oosthuizen

    2010-01-01

    Orientation: Psychologists in industry are increasingly required to provide executive coaching services in their organisations or as part of their consulting services. An evaluation of coaching models as well as the development needs of individuals being trained as coaches, both locally and internationally, has led the authors to believe that there is a need for a competence executive coaching model.Research purpose: The purpose of this article is to address the training and development needs...

  7. http://www.atala.org/IMG/pdf/TAL-2006-47-1-05-Venant.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Venant

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an exploration of a lexical graph, within the framework of lexical semantics. The aim of the exploration is reveal the structure of the lexicon modelled by the graph so an automatic system can reach the information it contains. We developed geometric tools to build a semantic space associated with the graph. The topology of this space can account for the topology of the graph. These tools were developed using a graph of adjectival synonymy and its scale-free small-world structure. We now want now to use them to explore any lexical graph, and more generally any graph related to human activities.

  8. http://tse.go.cr/revista/art/19/jimenez_jurado.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Jiménez Jurado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Los delitos electorales federales en México han evolucionado poco en los últimos años, no han ido a la par de la legislación electoral, por lo que el artículo presenta un análisis con la finalidad de reflexionar sobre ese desfase que ha llevado a los delitos electorales a una falta de efectividad, evidenciando la necesidad de su actualización a la realidad nacional, con el propósito de que el sufragio ciudadano sea respetado. Estructurado en siete apartados el artículo expone el derecho penal y la definición de delito electoral; los antecedentes del derecho penal electoral y los delitos electorales contenidos en el Código Penal Federal de México; así como también realiza un estudio comparativo de los delitos electorales y las penas en materia electoral en cinco países de América Latina.

  9. http://journal.iaingorontalo.ac.id/index.php/au/article/view/302

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duriana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the economic principles of Ibn Taymiyyah with moral analysis. The purpose of this paper is to reveal the position of morality in economic principles of Ibn Taymiyyah. There are two issues to be answered in this paper are: how is the economic principles of Ibn Taymiyyah, and how is the moral position in the economic principles of Ibn Taymiyyah. This research was found: principles of Ibn Taymiyyah's economy include: the principle of balance, fairness, sharia, cooperation, consultation and the prohibition of usury. Moral position in the economic principles of Ibn Taymiyyah is the basis and foundation of the economy which is essentially based on justice as a moral parent intended to protect the public from a variety of exploitative actions.

  10. http://www.periodicos.letras.ufmg.br/index.php/textolivre/article/view/10912/9820

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siane Paula de Araújo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work seeks to reflect on how the Cognitive Linguistics – about the conceptual metaphor theory and embodiment – assiste the production processes and assessment of a virtual learning material for the course Anatomy for the Movement in the Degree Course of Dance from Escola de Belas Artes, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. This material comprises three learning objects (a digital game and two players of animated videos with the possibility of interaction and emphasizes contents on human anatomical systems: skeletal, muscular or joint. The methodology of this study is critical-analytical about the development of this objects and its testing. In this context, the theory of conceptual metaphor (LAKOFF; JOHNSON, 2002 contributed to the design and planning processes of the first evaluation of the objects produced, since each is constituted by similar models to human anatomical structures and its evaluation process highlights the represented anatomical content. The concept of embodiment (GIBBS, 2005 influenced the production process, highlighting by which means metaphors would be represented, and especially for guiding the second evaluation of the objects that were applied during one semester in the classroom. This assessment brings inferences about the possible impact of learning objects in that subject. From the results obtained, it is expected to contribute to the process of production of learning objects in society, and in developing appropriate methodologies to the goals purposes.

  11. http://www.ijer.in/ijer/publication/v4s6/IJER_2015_608.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Now a days the use of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV is getting common, as its size varies from small to large, which has good parameters like, light weight and good stability and can be used for surveillance, agriculture, and in defense as it can be controlled from ground or from other aircraft. In an UAV wing is blended with fuselage which gives lift to the UAV and the tail is also used for take-off and landing which is also gives higher stability to aircraft. It is important to design an empennage structure at lower drag and for good stability characteristics. In this present project airfoil coordinates has been generated by using JAVAFOIL, in this project NACA0010 airfoil is created, which is imported to CATIA V5 to design different empennage configurations of same wetted area and UAV empennage has been finally designed in a modeling tool CATIA V5 R19.The model is imported to Ansys through IGES file to simulate CFD analysis, where for analyzing fine meshing is taken for the whole structure of UAV and further CFD flow analysis is done through Ansys CFX software. The results for CL, CD and L/D are obtained by varying AOA with different velocity as shown in graphs (fig 13 to 18. A comparison is made for these empennages to check the aerodynamic efficiency and stability created by the different SUAV tails

  12. Measurement of D*±, D± and http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">Ds± meson production cross sections in pp collisions at http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D' Auria, S.; D' Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell' Acqua, A.; Dell' Asta, L.; Dell' Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. 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    2016-06-01

    The production of D, D± and D $±\\atop{s}$charmed mesons has been measured with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV at the LHC, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 280 nb-1. The charmed mesons have been reconstructed in the range of transverse momentum 3.5T(D)<100 GeV and pseudorapidity |η(D)|<2.1. The differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and pseudorapidity were measured for D and D± production. The next-to-leading-order QCD predictions are consistent with the data in the visible kinematic region within the large theoretical uncertainties. Using the visible D cross sections and an extrapolation to the full kinematic phase space, the strangeness-suppression factor in charm fragmentation, the fraction of charged non-strange D mesons produced in a vector state, and the total cross section of charm production at √s = 7 TeV were derived.

  13. Measurement of the http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">tt¯ production cross-section using eμ events with b-tagged jets in pp collisions at http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">s=13TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

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J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooberman, B. H.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn' ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S. -C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Huo, P.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ito, F.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jain, V.; Jakobi, K. B.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanneau, F.; Jeanty, L.; Jeng, G. -Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, H.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, S.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Juste Rozas, A.; Köhler, M. K.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kaluza, A.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneti, S.; Kanjir, L.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. 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A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. 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A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-08-16

    This paper describes a measurement of the inclusive top quark pair production cross-section (σt$\\bar{t}$) with a data sample of 3.2 fb-1 of proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 13 TeV, collected in 2015 by the ATLAS detector at the LHC.

  14. Search for a new bottomonium state decaying to http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">Υ(1S)π+π- in pp collisions at http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">s=8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-11-01

    The results of a search for the bottomonium counterpart, denoted as $X_b$, of the exotic charmonium state X(3872) is presented. The analysis is based on a sample of pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.7 inverse femtobarns. The search looks for the exclusive decay channel $X_b \\to \\Upsilon(1S) \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ followed by $\\Upsilon(1S) \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$. No evidence for an $X_b$ signal is observed. Upper limits are set at the 95% confidence level on the ratio of the inclusive production cross sections times the branching fractions to $\\Upsilon(1S) \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ of the $X_b$ and the $\\Upsilon$(2S). The upper limits on the ratio are in the range 0.9-5.4% for $X_b$ masses between 10 and 11 GeV. These are the first upper limits on the production of a possible $X_b$ at a hadron collider.

  15. Measurement of the top quark mass in the http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">tt¯dilepton channel from http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">s=8 TeV ATLAS data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. 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G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. 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M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. 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C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-10-01

    The top quark mass is measured in the t¯t→dileptonchannel (lepton=e, μ) using ATLAS data recorded in the year 2012 at the LHC. The data were taken at a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s=8TeVand correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 20.2fb-1. Exploiting the template method, and using the distribution of invariant masses of lepton–b-jetpairs, the top quark mass is measured to be mtop=172.99 ±0.41(stat)±0.74(syst)GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.84GeV. Finally, acombination with previous ATLAS mtopmeasurements from √s=7TeVdata in the t¯t→dileptonand t¯t→lepton+jetschannels results in mtop=172.84 ±0.34(stat)±0.61(syst)GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.70GeV.

  16. On genomics, kin, and privacy [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/35l

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalio Telenti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The storage of greater numbers of exomes or genomes raises the question of loss of privacy for the individual and for families if genomic data are not properly protected. Access to genome data may result from a personal decision to disclose, or from gaps in protection. In either case, revealing genome data has consequences beyond the individual, as it compromises the privacy of family members. Increasing availability of genome data linked or linkable to metadata through online social networks and services adds one additional layer of complexity to the protection of genome privacy.  The field of computer science and information technology offers solutions to secure genomic data so that individuals, medical personnel or researchers can access only the subset of genomic information required for healthcare or dedicated studies.

  17. http://www.ijecse.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Volume-1Number-2PP-196-197.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Er. Kailash Aseri

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A properly configured firewall is a good starting point in securing a computer network. However, complex network environments that involve higher number of participants and endpoints require better security infrastructure. Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS, proposed as a solution to perimeter defense, have many open problems and it is clear that better solutions must be found. Due to many unsolved problems associated with IDS, Intrusion Prevention Systems (IPS is introduced. The main idea in IPS is to be proactive. Network intrusion prevention system (NIPS becomes more complex due to the rapid growth of network bandwidth and requirement of network security. However existing solutions, either hardware-based or software-based cannot obtain a good tradeoff between performance and flexibility. In this paper, intrusion prevention can be used to and block malicious activity upon detection. To be specific intrusion prevention may involve dropping packets that can be considered malicious, blocking any traffic from an IP address that may be offending, sending alarms, resetting of connections, correcting cyclic redundancy errors etc.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Lupus [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5eh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Sarbu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric lupus is a major diagnostic challenge, and a main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is, by far, the main tool for assessing the brain in this disease. Conventional and advanced MRI techniques are used to help establishing the diagnosis, to rule out alternative diagnoses, and recently, to monitor the evolution of the disease. This review explores the neuroimaging findings in SLE, including the recent advances in new MRI methods.

  19. Nanotechnology-supported THz medical imaging [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/ws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Stylianou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, the achievements and progress in the field of medical imaging have dramatically enhanced the early detection and treatment of many pathological conditions. The development of new imaging modalities, especially non-ionising ones, which will improve prognosis, is of crucial importance. A number of novel imaging modalities have been developed but they are still in the initial stages of development and serious drawbacks obstruct them from offering their benefits to the medical field. In the 21st century, it is believed that nanotechnology will highly influence our everyday life and dramatically change the world of medicine, including medical imaging. Here we discuss how nanotechnology, which is still in its infancy, can improve Terahertz (THz imaging, an emerging imaging modality, and how it may find its way into real clinical applications. THz imaging is characterised by the use of non-ionising radiation and although it has the potential to be used in many biomedical fields, it remains in the field of basic research. An extensive review of the recent available literature shows how the current state of this emerging imaging modality can be transformed by nanotechnology. Innovative scientific concepts that use nanotechnology-based techniques to overcome some of the limitations of the use of THz imaging are discussed. We review a number of drawbacks, such as a low contrast mechanism, poor source performance and bulky THz systems, which characterise present THz medical imaging and suggest how they can be overcome through nanotechnology. Better resolution and higher detection sensitivity can also be achieved using nanotechnology techniques.

  20. http://www.journalagent.com/z4/download_fulltext.asp?pdir=tjh&plng=eng&un=TJH-16056

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Han Lim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Febrile neutropenia (FN is a major toxic responseto chemotherapy requiring prompt medical attention. There are a limited number of reports on clinical outcome in patients with FN that present to emergency departments.Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated clinical manifestations, therapeutic outcomes, and risk factors for FN in 102 adult patients that presented to the emergency department between 1 January 2006 and 31 March 2009. FN was defined as a body temperature>38°C and a neutrophil count >0.5×109/L on the day of fever onset or the day after.Results: Mean age of the patients was 57 years. Mean absolute neutrophil count (ANC was 436.8/mm3 (range: 0-1000/mm3. In all, 23 of the patients (22.5% died due to complications related to FN. There were not a statistical difference in therapeutic outcome among tumor types, performance status, sex, depth of neutropenia, or time from emergency department presentationto initiation of antibiotic therapy.Age was an important prognostic factor for therapeutic outcome. Mean age of fatal cases was 65 years versus 56 years for non-fatal cases (p=0.016. Bacteremia was noted in 19 patients, 10 (53% of which died. The mortality rate was significantly higher in thepatients with blood culture-proven bacteria than in those whose blood culture yielded no organism (p=0.013.Conclusion: FN patients that presented to the emergency department had a high mortality rate thatincreased with age. Given the increasing age of patients diagnosed with cancer as well as therapeuticinterventions, the high mortality rate associated withchemotherapy-induced FN in elderly patientsrequires further study in order to reduce the risk of death.

  1. Paging Doctor Google! Heuristics vs. technology [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/113

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    Kenar D Jhaveri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The most dramatic development in medical decision-making technology has been the advent of the Internet. This has had an impact not only on clinicians, but has also become an important resource for patients who often approach their doctors with medical information they have obtained from the Internet.  Increasingly, medical students, residents and attending physicians have been using the Internet as a tool for diagnosing and treating disease. Internet-based resources that are available take various forms, including informational websites, online journals and textbooks, and social media.  Search engines such as Google have been increasingly used to help in making diagnoses of disease entities. Do these search methods fare better than experienced heuristic methods? In a small study, we examined the comparative role of heuristics versus the 'Google' mode of thinking. Internal medicine residents were asked to “google” key words to come up with a diagnosis. Their results were compared to experienced nephrology faculty and fellows in training using heuristics and no additional help of internet. Overall, with the aid of Google, the novices (internal medicine residents correctly diagnosed renal diseases less often than the experts (the attendings but with the same frequency as the intermediates (nephrology fellows.  However, in a subgroup analysis of both common diseases and rare diseases, the novices correctly diagnosed renal diseases less often than the experts but more often than the intermediates in each analysis.  The novices correctly diagnosed renal diseases with the same frequency as nephrology fellows in training.

  2. http://www.goums.ac.ir/mljgoums/browse.php?a_id=342&slc_lang=en&sid=1&ftxt=1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gharibi, Z. (MSc

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Microsporidia is an obligatory intracellular parasite known as an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients. Its laboratory diagnosis is relatively difficult and modified trichrome staining is a standard diagnostic method for detection of Microsporidia. The aim of present study was to identify intestinal Microsporidia in kidney- transplanted patients, using modified Trichrome Staining and Calcofluor White Methods. Material and Methods: In 2012, 180 stool specimens were taken from kidney transplanted- patients given immunosuppressive drugs in Hamadan, Iran. To identify Microsporidia, we use modified Trichrome Staining and Calcofluor White Methods. Results: The mean duration of kidney transplant and immunosuppressive drug using was 5.5 Years. Only one female patient was positive for Microsporidia. Conclusions: Owing to low frequency of this opportunistic infection among kidney transplanted patients, we can conclude that their hygienic conditions are good enough and they are not exposed with the parasites. Keywords: Microsporidia; Modified Trichrome Staining; Kidney Transplant; Calcofluor White; Hamadan

  3. http://www.goums.ac.ir/mljgoums/browse.php?a_id=342&slc_lang=en&sid=1&ftxt=1

    OpenAIRE

    Gharibi, Z. (MSc); Daadras, F. (MD); Maghsood, A. (PhD); Fallah, M

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Microsporidia is an obligatory intracellular parasite known as an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients. Its laboratory diagnosis is relatively difficult and modified trichrome staining is a standard diagnostic method for detection of Microsporidia. The aim of present study was to identify intestinal Microsporidia in kidney- transplanted patients, using modified Trichrome Staining and Calcofluor White Methods. Material and Methods: In 2012, 180 s...

  4. Using Machine Learning for Behavior-Based Access Control: Scalable Anomaly Detection on TCP Connections and HTTP Requests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    KMeans clustering and SVM SMO classifiers available in the Weka API [15]). The novelty stems from the exploration of how these classifiers perform...initializa- tion using the Weka API to cluster the host TCP data. The goal of the clustering is not to blindly create clusters – rather we want to...classifiers should be able to pick up behavior changes that a single classifier could not. For example, an attack vector might communicate using Twitter

  5. Rice (Oryza hemoglobins [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4vp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Arredondo-Peter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobins (Hbs corresponding to non-symbiotic (nsHb and truncated (tHb Hbs have been identified in rice (Oryza. This review discusses the major findings from the current studies on rice Hbs. At the molecular level, a family of the nshb genes, consisting of hb1, hb2, hb3, hb4 and hb5, and a single copy of the thb gene exist in Oryza sativa var. indica and O. sativa var. japonica, Hb transcripts coexist in rice organs and Hb polypeptides exist in rice embryonic and vegetative organs and in the cytoplasm of differentiating cells. At the structural level, the crystal structure of rice Hb1 has been elucidated, and the structures of the other rice Hbs have been modeled. Kinetic analysis indicated that rice Hb1 and 2, and possibly rice Hb3 and 4, exhibit a very high affinity for O2, whereas rice Hb5 and tHb possibly exhibit a low to moderate affinity for O2. Based on the accumulated information on the properties of rice Hbs and data from the analysis of other plant and non-plant Hbs, it is likely that Hbs play a variety of roles in rice organs, including O2-transport, O2-sensing, NO-scavenging and redox-signaling. From an evolutionary perspective, an outline for the evolution of rice Hbs is available. Rice nshb and thb genes vertically evolved through different lineages, rice nsHbs evolved into clade I and clade II lineages and rice nshbs and thbs evolved under the effect of neutral selection. This review also reveals lacunae in our ability to completely understand rice Hbs. Primary lacunae are the absence of experimental information about the precise functions of rice Hbs, the properties of modeled rice Hbs and the cis-elements and trans-acting factors that regulate the expression of rice hb genes, and the partial understanding of the evolution of rice Hbs.

  6. Self-organization of signal transduction [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/zg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Scheler

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a model of parameter learning for signal transduction, where the objective function is defined by signal transmission efficiency. We apply this to learn kinetic rates as a form of evolutionary learning, and look for parameters which satisfy the objective. This is a novel approach compared to the usual technique of adjusting parameters only on the basis of experimental data. The resulting model is self-organizing, i.e. perturbations in protein concentrations or changes in extracellular signaling will automatically lead to adaptation. We systematically perturb protein concentrations and observe the response of the system. We find compensatory or co-regulation of protein expression levels. In a novel experiment, we alter the distribution of extracellular signaling, and observe adaptation based on optimizing signal transmission. We also discuss the relationship between signaling with and without transients. Signaling by transients may involve maximization of signal transmission efficiency for the peak response, but a minimization in steady-state responses. With an appropriate objective function, this can also be achieved by concentration adjustment. Self-organizing systems may be predictive of unwanted drug interference effects, since they aim to mimic complex cellular adaptation in a unified way.

  7. A brief grief over bowel relief [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/wq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalpreet S Parmar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral sodium phosphate (OSP solution is commonly used as bowel purgative before colonoscopy. Its safety has recently been questioned with several reports of acute renal failure and chronic kidney disease following its use. All of the cases reported are following bowel preparation for colonoscopy. I present a case of acute renal failure following OSP solution given to relieve constipation. This report further highlights the dangers of OSP and the importance of caution and careful monitoring when OSP solution is used as a cathartic, or for bowel preparation before colonoscopy.

  8. Immunofluorescent visualization of mouse interneuron subtypes [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5hn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Molgaard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The activity of excitatory neurons is controlled by a highly diverse population of inhibitory interneurons. These cells show a high level of physiological, morphological and neurochemical heterogeneity, and play highly specific roles in neuronal circuits. In the mammalian hippocampus, these are divided into 21 different subtypes of GABAergic interneurons based on their expression of different markers, morphology and their electrophysiological properties. Ideally, all can be marked using an antibody directed against the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, but parvalbumin, calbindin, somatostatin, and calretinin are also commonly used as markers to narrow down the specific interneuron subtype. Here, we describe a journey to find the necessary immunological reagents for studying GABAergic interneurons of the mouse hippocampus. Based on web searches there are several hundreds of different antibodies on the market directed against these four markers. Searches in the literature databases allowed us to narrow it down to a subset of antibodies most commonly used in publications. However, in our hands the most cited ones did not work for immunofluorescence stainings of formaldehyde fixed tissue sections and cultured hippocampal neurons, and we had to immunostain our way through thirteen different commercial antibodies before finally finding a suitable antibody for each of the four markers. The antibodies were evaluated based on signal-to-noise ratios as well as if positive cells were found in layers of the hippocampus where they have previously been described. Additionally, the antibodies were also tested on sections from mouse spinal cord with similar criteria for specificity of the antibodies. Using the antibodies with a high rating on pAbmAbs, an antibody review database, stainings with high signal-to-noise ratios and location of the immunostained cells in accordance with the literature could be obtained, making these antibodies suitable choices for studying the GABAergic system.

  9. Immunofluorescent visualization of mouse interneuron subtypes [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4qq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Molgaard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The activity of excitatory neurons is controlled by a highly diverse population of inhibitory interneurons. These cells show a high level of physiological, morphological and neurochemical heterogeneity, and play highly specific roles in neuronal circuits. In the mammalian hippocampus, these are divided into 21 different subtypes of GABAergic interneurons based on their expression of different markers, morphology and their electrophysiological properties. Ideally, all can be marked using an antibody directed against the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, but parvalbumin, calbindin, somatostatin, and calretinin are also commonly used as markers to narrow down the specific interneuron subtype. Here, we describe a journey to find the necessary immunological reagents for studying GABAergic interneurons of the mouse hippocampus. Based on web searches there are several hundreds of different antibodies on the market directed against these four markers. Searches in the literature databases allowed us to narrow it down to a subset of antibodies most commonly used in publications. However, in our hands the most cited ones did not work for immunofluorescence stainings of formaldehyde fixed tissue sections and cultured hippocampal neurons, and we had to immunostain our way through thirteen different commercial antibodies before finally finding a suitable antibody for each of the four markers. The antibodies were evaluated based on signal-to-noise ratios as well as if positive cells were found in layers of the hippocampus where they have previously been described. Additionally, the antibodies were also tested on sections from mouse spinal cord with similar criteria for specificity of the antibodies. Using the antibodies with a high rating on pAbmAbs, an antibody review database, stainings with high signal-to-noise ratios and location of the immunostained cells in accordance with the literature could be obtained, making these antibodies suitable choices for studying the GABAergic system.

  10. Interactive lectures: Clickers or personal devices? [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/54w

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley J. Morrell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Audience response systems (‘clickers’ are frequently used to promote participation in large lecture classes, and evidence suggests that they convey a number of benefits to students, including improved academic performance and student satisfaction. The limitations of these systems (such as limited access and cost can be overcome using students’ personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops together with text message, web- or app-based polling systems. Using questionnaires, we compare student perceptions of clicker and smartphone based polling systems. We find that students prefer interactive lectures generally, but those that used their own device preferred those lectures over lectures using clickers. However, device users were more likely to report using their devices for other purposes (checking email, social media etc. when they were available to answer polling questions. These students did not feel that this distracted them from the lecture, instead, concerns over the use of smartphones centred around increased battery usage and inclusivity for students without access to suitable technology. Our results suggest that students generally preferred to use their own devices over clickers, and that this may be a sensible way to overcome some of the limitations associated with clickers, although issues surrounding levels of distraction and the implications for retention and recall of information need further investigation.

  11. http://rcps-cr.org/articulos/vol33-2/5-RCP-Vol.33-No2.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Melissa Quant-Quintero

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available La Psicología clínica basada en la evidencia (PsClBE es el estándar actual de práctica profesional que se basa en la integración de los resultados de investigaciones científicas, la experiencia en la práctica clínica, y las características culturales y sociales de las personas beneficiarias de los servicios de salud mental. Actualmente, la práctica de la Psicología clínica requiere lineamientos claros que garanticen una atención idónea y con altos estándares de calidad por lo que, desde hace varios años, la práctica basada en la evidencia se ha establecido como criterio para el desarrollo de protocolos de evaluación e intervención en diferentes disciplinas. El objetivo de este artículo es describir la PsClBE y sus fundamentos. En la primera parte del escrito se encuentra una conceptualización de la PsClBE y del modelo científico profesional. Posteriormente, se propone una perspectiva del impacto que tiene la PsClBE en la formación profesional, la investigación y la práctica clínica y finalmente se presentan algunas limitaciones identificadas para la utilización de los lineamientos ofrecidos por la PsClBE.

  12. "Music and Meaning: Duets and Dialogues." http://www.aabenraa-lokal-tv.dk/wp/2010/02/15/3285/

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.; Westney, William; Olsen, Poul

    2010-01-01

    During the week of February 1 - February 22, 2010, ALT-Aabenraa Lokal TV aired "Music and Meaning: Duets and Dialogues" with H.C. Andersen Guest Professorial Fellow William Westney and Cynthia M. Grund, Research Director for The Aesthetics of Music and Sound (AMS). This program includes interviews......, 2009: Art and/or Entertainment? The Fifth Anniversary Conference on Philosophy and Popular Culture....

  13. 892 Available at: http://ijph.tums.ac.ir Genetic of Alzheimer's Disease: A Narrative Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad KHANAHMADI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alzheimer's disease (AD is one of the most common problems for old peoples. Etiology of AD is notclear, but genetic factors play a major role in determining a person's risk to develop AD. Twin and family studies con-firm that AD has a genetic basis.AD genetics has been split into two broad categories: early-onset and late-onset. EO-AD cases are inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. In this form, dominant mutations in genes like APP, PSEN-1 and PSEN-2 associated with AD. This study aimed to consider the role of genetic in AD.Method: At the first, most of the references in relation with genetic basis of AD searched from the following web-sites: PubMed, Science direct, Wiley & Sons (1995-2014. Then, the most common genes and their affects described briefly.Results: Aging is the most obvious risk factor for developing AD. There is a genetic basis for AD, of course this rela-tion is not complete but it is significant.Conclusion: More than thousand genes studied in relation with Alzheimer's disease. Against the improvements in understanding different aspects of AD, the accurate genetic foundation of AD remain unclear.

  14. Immunohistochemical visualization of mouse interneuron subtypes [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4em

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Molgaard

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The activity of excitatory neurons is controlled by a small, but highly diverse population of inhibitory interneurons. These cells show a high level of physiological, morphological and neurochemical heterogeneity, and play highly specific roles in neuronal circuits. In the mammalian hippocampus, these are divided into 21 different subtypes of GABAergic interneurons based on their expression of different markers, morphology and their electrophysiological properties. Ideally, all can be marked using an antibody directed against the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, but parvalbumin, calbindin, somatostatin, and calretinin are also commonly used as markers to narrow down the specific interneuron subtype. Here, we describe a journey to find the necessary immunological reagents for studying GABAergic interneurons of the mouse hippocampus. Based on web searches there are several hundreds of different antibodies on the market directed against these four markers. Searches in the literature databases allowed us to narrow it down to a subset of antibodies most commonly used in publications. However, in our hands the most cited ones did not work for immunofluorescence stainings of formaldehyde fixed tissue sections and cultured hippocampal neurons, and we had to immunostain our way through thirteen different commercial antibodies before finally finding a suitable antibody for each of the four markers. The antibodies were evaluated based on signal-to-noise ratios as well as if positive cells were found in layers of the hippocampus where they have previously been described. Additionally, the antibodies were also tested on sections from mouse spinal cord with similar criteria for specificity of the antibodies. Using the antibodies with a high rating on pAbmAbs, stainings with high signal-to-noise ratios and location of the immunostained cells in accordance with the literature could be obtained, making these antibodies suitable choices for studying the GABAergic system.

  15. Advancing the activity cliff concept [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1wf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Hu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The activity cliff concept has experienced increasing interest in medicinal chemistry and chemoinformatics. Activity cliffs have originally been defined as pairs of structurally similar compounds that are active against the same target but have a large difference in potency. Activity cliffs are relevant for structure-activity relationship (SAR analysis and compound optimization because small chemical modifications can be deduced from cliffs that result in large-magnitude changes in potency. In addition to studying activity cliffs on the basis of individual compounds series, they can be systematically identified through mining of compound activity data. This commentary aims to provide a concise yet detailed picture of our current understanding of activity cliffs. It is also meant to introduce the further refined activity cliff concept to a general audience in drug development.

  16. Monitoring drug promiscuity over time [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4oa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Hu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Drug promiscuity and polypharmacology are much discussed topics in pharmaceutical research. Experimentally, promiscuity can be studied by profiling of compounds on arrays of targets. Computationally, promiscuity rates can be estimated by mining of compound activity data. In this study, we have assessed drug promiscuity over time by systematically collecting activity records for approved drugs. For 518 diverse drugs, promiscuity rates were determined over different time intervals. Significant differences between the number of reported drug targets and the promiscuity rates derived from activity records were frequently observed. On the basis of high-confidence activity data, an increase in average promiscuity rates from 1.5 to 3.2 targets per drug was detected between 2000 and 2014. These promiscuity rates are lower than often assumed. When the stringency of data selection criteria was reduced in subsequent steps, non-realistic increases in promiscuity rates from ~6 targets per drug in 2000 to more than 28 targets were obtained. Hence, estimates of drug promiscuity significantly differ depending on the stringency with which target annotations and activity data are considered.

  17. Monitoring drug promiscuity over time [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4bh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Hu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug promiscuity and polypharmacology are much discussed topics in pharmaceutical research. Experimentally, promiscuity can be studied by profiling of compounds on arrays of targets. Computationally, promiscuity rates can be estimated by mining of compound activity data. In this study, we have assessed drug promiscuity over time by systematically collecting activity records for approved drugs. For 518 diverse drugs, promiscuity rates were determined over different time intervals. Significant differences between the number of reported drug targets and the promiscuity rates derived from activity records were frequently observed. On the basis of high-confidence activity data, an increase in average promiscuity rates from 1.5 to 3.2 targets per drug was detected between 2000 and 2014. These promiscuity rates are lower than often assumed. When the stringency of data selection criteria was reduced in subsequent steps, non-realistic increases in promiscuity rates from ~6 targets per drug in 2000 to more than 28 targets were obtained. Hence, estimates of drug promiscuity significantly differ depending on the stringency with which target annotations and activity data are considered.

  18. 基于SOM算法的HTTP隧道攻击检测%Detecting HTTP Tunnelling Attacks Using SOM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨照芳

    2006-01-01

    基于自组织映射网络聚类算法,提出HTTP隧道攻击异常检测模型,讨论HTTP连接样本特征、SOM网络分步优化训练、漏报与误报率的平衡等问题,实现模型并对检测结果进行验证,结果表明系统较好地识别了正常HTTP连接和HTTP隧道连接,漏报/误报率达到最佳平衡.

  19. http://www.orientjchem.org/vol32no1/synthesis-and-study-of-composite-organic-silica-sorption-materials/

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Menglin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the experiment, the crystallization process was compared with the chemical precipitate process for phosphorus removal efficiency. Calcites were used as seeds to remove and recover phosphorus from synthetic phosphorite wastewater. The results indicated that under the same wastewater compositions, the crystallization process showed better phosphorus removal performance. At the initial stage, the corresponding removed Ca/P ratio (DCa/DP was 1.43:1. When the phosphorus concentration was low, phosphorus could be removed further in the crystallization system, whereas the chemical precipitation stopped. During the reaction, calcium concentration firstly decreased because of precipitation or crystallization. Then it slightly increased, which possibly resulted from the transformation of HAP precursor or the dissolution of calcite seeds. The effects of pH, initial phosphorus concentration and Ca/P ratio were investigated. Phosphorus removal and recovery efficiency increased with the increment of the above three factors. In addition, the Response Surface Methodology was used to optimize the related factors. A significant quadratic model was obtained. From the optimization results, it could be found that when pH value was 9.0, molar ratio was 1.07 and reaction time was 36 h, the phosphorus removal rate could reach 96.1%.

  20. Inpatients’ opinions on a hospital in Portugal [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/xb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina C Silva

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Little is known about the relationship between the opinions of inpatients and the degree to which hospitals are improving in performance over time. The aim of this study was to determine the personal assessment level of inpatients or their representatives regarding aspects of health care in an internal medicine ward. Methods: We carried out a questionnaire in September 2011 with 284 discharged patients and patient representatives, focusing on their opinions about the department, health professionals and amenities, with response options ranging from 1 (very bad to 5 (very good. The relationships between domains from the questionnaire and socio-demographic factors were examined using a t-test and one-way ANOVA. Results: The response rate was 78%. The patients showed a slightly higher mean score (m for factors in the medical care domain than did the patient representatives (m = 4.51 vs. m = 4.27; p = 0.014. The mean score of all the items in all domains was 4.24; this allowed us to determine the difference from the overall mean (DIFM for medical care (DIFM = 0.18; p = 0.000, foods (DIFM = –0.31; p = 0.000, diagnostic tests (DIFM = –0.15; p = 0.036 and transport (DIFM = –0.41; p = 0.000. Respondents with a medium or higher educational level gave lower scores to the domains food (m = 3.74; p = 0.004, diagnostic tests (m = 3.72; p = 0.04 and transport (m = 3.62; p = 0.025 than those with lower educational levels. The domains facilities (m = 2.4; p = 0.04 and diagnostic tests (m = 3.63; p = 0.009 were given lower scores by those aged <50 years compared with older respondents. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the evaluation of the responders will allow the hospital management to make improvements in the quality of care.

  1. The prion dilemma confounding science educators [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/ku

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V Zaitsev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the issue of the prion hypothesis, a simmering controversy within the scientific community, is addressed. We inquire into the appropriateness of the use of certain augmentations and rhetoric approaches used during scientific debates, as well as the aptness of unequivocal statements in textbooks that indicate “abnormal prions” as a primary cause of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies.

  2. Data publication consensus and controversies [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4ja

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kratz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The movement to bring datasets into the scholarly record as first class research products (validated, preserved, cited, and credited has been inching forward for some time, but now the pace is quickening. As data publication venues proliferate, significant debate continues over formats, processes, and terminology. Here, we present an overview of data publication initiatives underway and the current conversation, highlighting points of consensus and issues still in contention. Data publication implementations differ in a variety of factors, including the kind of documentation, the location of the documentation relative to the data, and how the data is validated. Publishers may present data as supplemental material to a journal article, with a descriptive “data paper,” or independently. Complicating the situation, different initiatives and communities use the same terms to refer to distinct but overlapping concepts. For instance, the term published means that the data is publicly available and citable to virtually everyone, but it may or may not imply that the data has been peer-reviewed. In turn, what is meant by data peer review is far from defined; standards and processes encompass the full range employed in reviewing the literature, plus some novel variations. Basic data citation is a point of consensus, but the general agreement on the core elements of a dataset citation frays if the data is dynamic or part of a larger set. Even as data publication is being defined, some are looking past publication to other metaphors, notably “data as software,” for solutions to the more stubborn problems.

  3. http://www.scientificpapers.org/knowledge-management/using-information-technology-for-the-efficiency-activities-in-the-educational-field/

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Myftaraj (Tomori

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Poverty is a very widespread phenomenon directly related to consumption (or income and other important problems of everyday life, such as the lack of appropriate infrastructure, security, quality of health and education, etc. Poverty is traditionally measured in monetary terms. After an aggregate income, expenditure is defined to measure poverty; the next step is the definition of one or more poverty lines. Based on a monetary concept, all individuals who fall under a certain line called poverty line are considered poor people. This paper provides a definition of the monetary and non-monetary poverty concept. It focuses in statistical estimations for the relation between status of individual (poor-non poor and family composite and education level of the head. We examine whether the changes in poverty level are reflected in the area (rural/urban and regional levels by conducting stochastic dominance analysis for different areas and regions. The data for the analyses are from Albania LSMS 2012. The paper ends with results of statistical testing and conclusions that emerge from the analysis used.

  4. FDA approved drugs as potential Ebola treatments [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/554

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the search for treatments for the Ebola Virus, multiple screens of FDA drugs have led to the identification of several with promising in vitro activity. These compounds were not originally developed as antivirals and some have been further tested in mouse in vivo models. We put forward the opinion that some of these drugs could be evaluated further and move into the clinic as they are already FDA approved and in many cases readily available. This may be important if there is a further outbreak in future and no other therapeutic is available.

  5. The STRESA (storage of reactor safety) database (Web page: http://asa2.jrc.it/stresa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annunziato, A.; Addabbo, C.; Brewka, W. [Joint Research Centre, Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    A considerable amount of resources has been devoted at the international level during the last few decades, to the generation of experimental databases in order to provide reference information for the understanding of reactor safety relevant phenomenologies and for the development and/or assessment of related computational methodologies. The extent to which these databases are preserved and can be accessed and retrieved is an issue of major concern. This paper provides an outline of the JRC databases preservation initiative and a description of the supporting web-based computer platform STRESA. (author)

  6. http://www.revistadestatistica.ro/index.php/effective-management-of-resources-for-environmental-protection-using-taxes-in-the-environmental-policy/

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia CĂPĂŢÎNĂ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Establishment of environmental taxes, called green taxes or eco-taxes, are ways to internalize the environmental costs in the prices of goods or services, causing producers and consumers to use resources more efficiently and sustainably. Green taxes or Pigovian taxes, named after their inventor, Arthur Pigou are known as sin taxes and when are applied to the “sin” of pollution they may be called environmental taxes or eco-taxes. Sustainable development can not be sustained without the existence of adequate measures and effective for protection of the environment. The polluter pays principle is a principle embraced by all countries from the desire do not deplete environmental resources, some of which being non-renewable resources, to be used by future generations. Polluters are both individuals and legal entities who must to respond in one way or another for their irresponsible actions, compensating damages, protecting the environment and paying damages for any casualties. Green taxes can generate a tax reform. Any responsible person will try to manage in another way the resources when has to bear consequences. In this regard, the environment can be protected more effectively and more cost effective for citizens. The effects of irresponsible actions of some of us not only affect the environment but also all animals and vegetable bodies inclusive people.

  7. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Japanese Encephalitis [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5uq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabonita Sengupta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis (JE is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia. Acute encephalitis syndrome (AES is a group of central nervous system (CNS disorders caused by a wide range of viruses, bacteria, fungi, chemicals and toxins. It is important to distinguish between various forms of infectious encephalitis with similar clinical manifestations in order to ensure specific and accurate diagnosis and development of subsequent therapeutic strategies. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is in direct contact with the CNS and hence it is considered to be an excellent source for identifying biomarkers for various neurological disorders. With the recent advancement in proteomic methodologies, the field of biomarker research has received a remarkable boost.  The present study identifies potential biomarkers for JE using a proteomics based approach. The CSF proteomes from ten patients each with JE and Non-JE acute encephalitis were analyzed by 2D gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry. Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP, fibrinogen gamma chain, fibrinogen beta chain, complement C4-B, complement C3 and cytoplasmic actin were found to be significantly elevated in case of JE indicating severe disruption of the blood brain barrier and DBP can be suggested to be an important diagnostic marker.

  8. Planetary Science Research Discoveries (PSRD): Effective Education and Outreach Website at http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/PSRdiscoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.; Martel, L. M. V.

    2000-01-01

    Planetary Science Research Discoveries (PSRD) website reports the latest research about planets, meteorites, and other solar system bodies being made by NASA-sponsored scientists. In-depth articles explain research results and give insights to contemporary questions in planetary science.

  9. Targeting metastatic breast cancer: problems and potential [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/534

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Deasy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality of women in the United States. Since the majority of cancer deaths are due to metastases rather than the primary tumor, a better understanding of the biological mechanisms that lead to metastatic disease is critical to reduce breast cancer associated mortality. Current adjuvant therapies use the same broadly cytotoxic and targeted strategies against metastases as are used against the primary tumor. However, resistance to chemotherapy due to the cellular dormancy, high genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity between primary tumor and metastases as well as among individual metastases, and the limitations in detection of disseminated tumor cells and micrometastases significantly hinder the efficiency of currently available therapies. While it is crucial to directly address the issue of metastatic dormancy and evaluate for anti-metastatic therapy the relevance of molecular targets chosen based on primary tumor profiling, it is also imperative to address metastasis-specific mechanisms of growth and survival that are likely to be distinct from those of the primary tumor. We believe that a three-pronged approach to therapy will be necessary to deal with progressive disease: blocking of further dissemination after diagnosis; eradication of disseminated tumor cells and prevention of the dormant-to-proliferative switch of those remaining; and elimination of established metastatic tumors. The implementation of this strategy requires a greater depth of knowledge of metastasis driver and maintenance genes and suggests the need for a “Metastasis Genome Atlas” project to complement the current investigations into cancer genomic landscapes.

  10. Low-energy http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">(<10keV) electron ionization and recombination model for a liquid argon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxe, M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hagmann, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jovanovic, I. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kazkaz, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mozin, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pereverzev, S. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sangiorgio, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sorensen, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Detailed understanding of the ionization process in dual-phase noble element detectors is important for their use in applications such as the search for Dark Matter and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. The response of dual-phase noble element detectors to low-energy ionization events is poorly understood at this time. We describe a new simulation tool which predicts the ionization yield from electronic energy deposits (E < 10 keV) in liquid Ar, including the dependence of the yield on the applied electric drift eld. The ionization signal produced in a dual-phase argon detector from 37Ar beta decay and 55Fe X-rays has been calculated using the new model.

  11. Isolation of flow and nonflow correlations by two- and four-particle cumulant measurements of azimuthal harmonics in http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">sNN=200 GeV Au+Au collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahab, N. M.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-05-01

    A data-driven method was applied to Au+Au collisions at root S-NN = 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance Delta eta-dependent and Delta eta-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a Delta eta-independent component of the correlation, which is dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of. within the measured range of pseudorapidity vertical bar eta vertical bar < 1. In 20-30% central Au+Au collisions, the relative flow fluctuation was found to be 34% +/- 2%(stat.) +/- 3%(sys.) for particles with transverse momentum p(T) less than 2 GeV/c. The Delta eta-dependent part, attributed to nonflow correlations, is found to be 5% +/- 2%(sys.) relative to the flow of the measured second harmonic cumulant at vertical bar Delta eta vertical bar > 0.7. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Ultraviolet light emitting diodes by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy on metamorphic (http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/

    KAUST Repository

    Young, Erin C.

    2015-09-01

    © 2015. In this paper we demonstrate ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on metamorphic AlGaN buffers on freestanding GaN (202-1) substrates by ammonia assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Misfit and related threading dislocations were confined to the stress relaxed, compositionally graded buffer layers, and single quantum well devices emitting at 355, 310 and 274. nm were grown on top of the graded buffers. The devices showed excellent structural and electrical (I-. V) characteristics.

  13. Measuring the oxygen profile and permeation flux across an ion transport http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSch

    KAUST Repository

    Hunt, Anton

    2014-10-01

    A novel ion transport membrane laboratory reactor is introduced which can sample gases at the La0.9Ca0.1FeO3 -δ membrane surface at high temperature flux conditions. Experimental data (spatial profiles and operating condition sensitivity) is presented and used to validate detailed 1D and 2D numerical models under inert (CO2 sweep) operating conditions; the numerical models account for mass transfer resistances to the membrane surface. Bypassing the mass transfer resistances experimentally allows for direct parameterization of a three resistance oxygen flux model; a unique solution method based on bespoke experimental datasets to find surface exchange reaction rate constants is demonstrated. Membrane operating regimes and oxygen off-stoichiometric coefficients can thus be determined highlighting the importance of surface exchange studies and the obvious requirement to reduce sweep surface P O2 through oxyfuel reaction integration and/or flow field adjustments. A more complex first-order flux model is also proposed and tested incorporating the surface oxygen ion concentrations in the surface exchange reactions; this is found to give similar material parameters to the simpler zero-order model studied in the literature for this particular case. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Measurement of the total cross section from elastic scattering in pp collisions at http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">s=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M-S; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabras, G.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D' amen, G.; D' Auria, S.; D' Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Dell' Acqua, A.; Dell' Asta, L.; Dell' Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Díez Cornell, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudder, A. Chr.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dumancic, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Ezzi, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gasnikova, K.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisen, M.; Geisler, M. P.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; Gentsos, C.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghneimat, M.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuli, F.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, G.; Gonella, L.; Gongadze, A.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goudet, C. R.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gravila, P. M.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grevtsov, K.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Groh, S.; Grohs, J. P.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guan, W.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Hadef, A.; Hageböck, S.; Hagihara, M.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hartmann, N. M.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hayakawa, D.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J. J.; Heinrich, L.; Heinz, C.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Henkelmann, S.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Herde, H.; Herget, V.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Honda, T.; Hong, T. M.; Hooberman, B. H.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howarth, J.; Hoya, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn' ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S. -C.; Hu, Q.; Hu, S.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Huo, P.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Ishijima, N.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ito, F.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, P.; Jain, V.; Jakobi, K. B.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanneau, F.; Jeanty, L.; Jeng, G. -Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, H.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Jivan, H.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, S.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Juste Rozas, A.; Köhler, M. K.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kaji, T.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kaluza, A.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneti, S.; Kanjir, L.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. 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M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shirabe, S.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shope, D. R.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, I. M.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. 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M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-10-01

    A measurement of the total ppcross section at the LHC at √s=8TeV is presented. An integrated luminosity of 500 μb-1 was accumulated in a special run with high-β beam optics to measure the differential elastic cross section as a function of the Mandelstam momentum transfer variable t. The measurement is performed with the ALFA sub-detector of ATLAS. Using a fit to the differential elastic cross section in the -t range from 0.014GeV2 to 0.1GeV2 to extrapolate t→0, the total cross section, σtot(pp →X), is measured via the optical theorem to be σtot(pp→ X) = 96.07±0.18 (stat.)±0.85 (exp.)± 0.31 (extr.) mb, where the first error is statistical, the second accounts for all experimental systematic uncertainties and the last is related to uncertainties in the extrapolation t→0. In addition, the slope of the exponential function describing the elastic cross section at small t is determined to be B =19.74 ±0.05 (stat.) ±0.23 (syst.) GeV-2.

  15. Search for high-mass new phenomena in the dilepton final state using proton–proton collisions at http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">s=13TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

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V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D' amen, G.; D' Auria, S.; D' Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. 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A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. 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A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. 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    2016-10-01

    A search is conducted for both resonant and non-resonant high-mass new phenomena in dielectron and dimuon final states. The search uses 3.2 fb-1of proton–proton collision data, collected at √s = 13 TeV by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2015. The dilepton invariant mass is used as the discriminating variable. No significant deviation from the Standard Model prediction is observed; therefore limits are set on the signal model parameters of interest at 95% credibility level. Upper limits are set on the cross-section times branching ratio for resonances decaying to dileptons, and the limits are converted into lower limits on the resonance mass, ranging between 2.74 TeV and 3.36 TeV, depending on the model. Lower limits on the ℓℓqq contact interaction scale are set between 16.7 TeV and 25.2 TeV, also depending on the model.

  16. Search for supersymmetry in events with a photon, a lepton, and missing transverse momentum in pp collisions at http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">s=8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D' Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Dobur, D.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. 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T.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Carpinteyro, S.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. 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V.; Vinogradov, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras De Saa, J. R.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Berruti, G. 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C.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Taroni, S.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Ferro, C.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartek, R.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W. -S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R. -S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. F.; Tzeng, Y. 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F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Mareskas-palcek, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O' Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny III, R. 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W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. -J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Primavera, F.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Demortier, L.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Christian, A.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Gomber, B.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-03-19

    The results of a search for new physics in final states with photons and missing transverse energy are reported. The study is based on a sample of proton-proton collisions collected at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV with the CMS detector in 2015, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.3 inverse femtobarns. Final states with two photons and significant missing transverse energy are used to search for supersymmetric particles in models of supersymmetry (SUSY) with general gauge-mediated (GGM) supersymmetry breaking. No excess is observed with respect to the standard model expectation, and the results are used to set limits on gluino pair production and squark pair production in the GGM SUSY framework. Gluino masses below 1.65 TeV and squark masses below 1.37 TeV are excluded at a 95% confidence level.

  17. Search for R-parity violating decays of a top squark in proton–proton collisions at http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">s=8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatryan, Vardan [et al.

    2016-06-21

    The results of a search for a supersymmetric partner of the top quark (top squark), pair-produced in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV, are presented. The search, which focuses on R-parity violating, chargino-mediated decays of the top squark, is performed in final states with low missing transverse momentum, two oppositely charged electrons or muons, and at least five jets. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector at the LHC in 2012. The data are found to be in agreement with the standard model expectation, and upper limits are placed on the top squark pair production cross section at 95% confidence level. Assuming a 100% branching fraction for the top squark decay chain, $ \\mathrm{ \\tilde{t} \\to t \\tilde{\\chi}^{\\pm}_1,\\, \\tilde{\\chi}^{\\pm}_1 \\to \\ell^\\pm+jj } $, top squark masses less than 890 (1000) GeV for the electron (muon) channel are excluded for the first time in models with a single nonzero R-parity violating coupling $\\lambda^{\\prime}_{ijk}$ $(i,j,k \\leq 2)$, where $i,j,k$ correspond to the three generations.

  18. Measurement of the jet radius and transverse momentum dependence of inclusive jet suppression in lead–lead collisions at http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">sNN=2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J. -F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. 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O.; Holy, T.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Horn, C.; Horner, S.; Hostachy, J. -Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hrynʼova, T.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S. -C.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huettmann, A.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibbotson, M.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Inigo-Golfin, J.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ivashin, A. V.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, J. N.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansen, H.; Jantsch, A.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Jeanty, L.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Jenni, P.; Jeremie, A.; Jež, P.; Jézéquel, S.; Jha, M. K.; Ji, H.; Ji, W.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Belenguer, M.; Jin, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Joffe, D.; Johansen, M.; Johansson, K. E.; Johansson, P.; Johnert, S.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Joram, C.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Jovin, T.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jungst, R. M.; Juranek, V.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kabana, S.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kadlecik, P.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalinin, S.; Kalinovskaya, L. V.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kanno, T.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kaplon, J.; Kar, D.; Karagounis, M.; Karakostas, K.; Karnevskiy, M.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R. 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I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, M.; Schneider, B.; Schnoor, U.; Schöning, A.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. 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W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Young, C. J.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-02-01

    Measurements of inclusive jet suppression in heavy ion collisions at the LHC provide direct sensitivity to the physics of jet quenching. In a sample of lead–lead collisions at √sNN corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 7 μb-1, ATLAS has measured jets with a calorimeter system over the pseudorapidity interval |η|<2.1 and over the transverse momentum range 38T<210 GeV. Jets were reconstructed using the anti-kt algorithm with values for the distance parameter that determines the nominal jet radius of R=0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5. The centrality dependence of the jet yield is characterized by the jet “central-to-peripheral ratio,” RCP. Jet production is found to be suppressed by approximately a factor of two in the 10% most central collisions relative to peripheral collisions. RCP varies smoothly with centrality as characterized by the number of participating nucleons. The observed suppression is only weakly dependent on jet radius and transverse momentum. These results provide the first direct measurement of inclusive jet suppression in heavy ion collisions and complement previous measurements of dijet transverse energy imbalance at the LHC.

  19. Search for direct slepton and gaugino production in final states with two leptons and missing transverse momentum with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">s=7 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

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A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colas, J.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crescioli, F.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cuciuc, C. -M.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cuthbert, C.; Cwetanski, P.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; DʼAuria, S.; DʼOnofrio, M.; DʼOrazio, A.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dameri, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. 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    2013-01-28

    A search for the electroweak pair production of charged sleptons and weak gauginos decaying into final states with two leptons is performed using 4.7 fb-1 of proton–proton collision data at √s = 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excesses are observed with respect to the prediction from Standard Model processes. In the scenario of direct slepton production, if the sleptons decay directly into the lightest neutralino, left-handed slepton masses between 85 and 195 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level for a 20 GeV neutralino. Chargino masses between 110 and 340 GeV are excluded in the scenario of direct production of wino-like chargino pairs decaying into the lightest neutralino via an intermediate on-shell charged slepton for a 10 GeV neutralino. The results are also interpreted in the framework of the phenomenological minimal supersymmetric Standard Model.

  20. Searches for heavy long-lived sleptons and R-hadrons with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd">s=7 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

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G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Sauvan, J. B.; Savard, P.; Savinov, V.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schäfer, U.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, M.; Schneider, B.; Schnoor, U.; Schoening, A.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Sellers, G.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Soni, N.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strang, M.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Stupak, J.; Sturm, P.; Styles, N. A.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Subramania, HS.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tani, K.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teinturier, M.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trboush, S.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J. -W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tua, A.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turala, M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Tzanakos, G.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valenta, J.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Vulpen, I.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Viti, M.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, W.; Wagner, P.; Wahlen, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walch, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Weydert, C.; Whalen, K.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkelmann, S.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, W. C.; Wooden, G.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wraight, K.; Wright, M.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xie, S.; Xu, C.; Xu, D.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ybeles Smit, G. V.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Young, C. J.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zinonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zieminska, D.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Živković, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2013-03-01

    A search for long-lived particles is performed using a data sample of 4.7 fb-1 from proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy √s=7 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No excess is observed above the estimated background and lower limits, at 95% confidence level, are set on the mass of the long-lived particles in different scenarios, based on their possible interactions in the inner detector, the calorimeters and the muon spectrometer. Long-lived staus in gauge-mediated SUSY-breaking models are excluded up to a mass of 300 GeV for tan β= 5-20. Directly produced long-lived sleptons are excluded up to a mass of 278 GeV. R-hadrons, composites of gluino (stop, sbottom) and light quarks, are excluded up to a mass of 985 GeV (683 GeV, 612 GeV) when using a generic interaction model. Additionally two sets of limits on R-hadrons are obtained that are less sensitive to the interaction model for R-hadrons. One set of limits is obtained using only the inner detector and calorimeter observables, and a second set of limits is obtained based on the inner detector alone.

  1. Evidence for http://www.elsevier.com/xml/xocs/dtd" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:ja="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/ja/dtd" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:tb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/table/dtd" xmlns:sb="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-bib/dtd" xmlns:ce="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/dtd" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:cals="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/cals/dtd" xmlns:sa="http://www.elsevier.com/xml/common/struct-aff/dtd">B¯s0Λc+Λ¯π-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solovieva, E.; Chistov, R.; Adachi, I.; Asner, David M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, Anu; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, Bipul; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, Deepanwita; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Gaur, Vipin; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W. S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Huschle, Matthias J.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, T.; Julius, T.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Klucar, Jure; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, Thomas; Kumar, R.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S. H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, Mikihiko; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, Shohei; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, Stephen L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, Galina; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Prothmann, K.; Ritter, M.; Rohrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, Himansu B.; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santel, Daniel; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, ME; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, TA; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Singh, J. B.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y. S.; Sokolov, A.; Stanic, S.; Staric, M.; Sumihama, M.; Tamponi, Umberto; Tanaka, Satoru; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, Gocha; Teramoto, Y.; Tikhomirov, I.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varner, Gary; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, Eun Il; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Youngmin; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2013-10-01

    Using 121.4 fb-1 of data collected with the Belle detector at the Υ(5S) resonance at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider, we report evidence for the $\\bar{B}$0s → Λ$+\\atop{c}$$\\bar{Λ}$π- source decay mode with a measured branching fraction (3.6±1.1[stat] $+0.3\\atop{-0.5}$± 0.9 [Λ$+\\atop{c}$] ±0.7[N$\\bar{B}$0s]) x 10-4 and a significance of 4.4 standard deviations. This is the first evidence for a baryonic $\\bar{B}$0s decay.

  2. Poderemos viver juntos? http://dx.doi.org/10.15601/1983-7631/rt.v3n5p183-188

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Schultz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available O sociólogo Alain Touraine abre uma instigante pergunta ao tratar da constituição do sujeito na sociedade contemporânea: Poderemos viver juntos? O título do livro é uma pergunta retórica à qual só pode ser dada uma resposta condicionada: poderemos sim, desde que... Ou então: não há outra saída – temos que viver juntos.  Tomado nesses termos, a pergunta de Touraine denuncia uma crise geral do sujeito na sociedade contemporânea, para além da crise ambiental, moral, trabalhista, econômica, etc, ou que qualquer uma de “nossas crises prediletas”, como diz Ignacy Sachs. Sua perspectiva mais bem se enquadra numa crise geral civilizacional, transcendendo condições socioculturais específicas. A pergunta Poderemos viver juntos? é global, e a resposta só pode ser geral

  3. A novel pseudoderivative-based mutation operator for real-coded adaptive genetic algorithms [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1td

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxinder S Kanwal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent development of large databases, especially those in genetics and proteomics, is pushing the development of novel computational algorithms that implement rapid and accurate search strategies. One successful approach has been to use artificial intelligence and methods, including pattern recognition (e.g. neural networks and optimization techniques (e.g. genetic algorithms. The focus of this paper is on optimizing the design of genetic algorithms by using an adaptive mutation rate that is derived from comparing the fitness values of successive generations. We propose a novel pseudoderivative-based mutation rate operator designed to allow a genetic algorithm to escape local optima and successfully continue to the global optimum. Once proven successful, this algorithm can be implemented to solve real problems in neurology and bioinformatics. As a first step towards this goal, we tested our algorithm on two 3-dimensional surfaces with multiple local optima, but only one global optimum, as well as on the N-queens problem, an applied problem in which the function that maps the curve is implicit. For all tests, the adaptive mutation rate allowed the genetic algorithm to find the global optimal solution, performing significantly better than other search methods, including genetic algorithms that implement fixed mutation rates.

  4. Does excitatory fronto-extracephalic tDCS lead to improved working memory performance? [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/216

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Níall Lally

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that excitatory transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS may improve performance on a wide variety of cognitive tasks. Due to the non-invasive and inexpensive nature of the method, harnessing its potential could be particularly useful for the treatment of neuropsychiatric illnesses involving cognitive dysfunction. However, questions remain regarding the efficacious stimulation parameters. Here, using a double-blind between-subjects design, we explored whether 1 mA excitatory (anodal left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex stimulation with a contralateral extracephalic reference electrode, leads to enhanced working memory performance across two days, relative to sham stimulation. Participants performed the 3-back, a test of working memory, at baseline, and during and immediately following stimulation on two days, separated by 24-48 hours. Active stimulation did not significantly enhance performance versus sham over the course of the experiment. However, exploratory comparisons did reveal a significant effect of stimulation group on performance during the first stimulation phase only, with active stimulation recipients performing better than sham. While these results do not support the hypothesis that dorsolateral prefrontal cortex tDCS boosts working memory, they raise the possibility that its effects may be greatest during early learning stages.

  5. CO2 elevation improves photosynthetic performance in progressive warming environment in white birch seedlings [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouren Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available White birch (Betula paperifera Mash seedlings were exposed to progressively warming in greenhouses under ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations for 5 months to explore boreal tree species’ potential capacity to acclimate to global climate warming and CO2 elevation. In situ foliar gas exchange, in vivo carboxylation characteristics and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured at temperatures of 26oC and 37oC. Elevated CO2 significantly increased net photosynthetic rate (Pn at both measurement temperatures, and Pn at 37oC was higher than that at 26oC under elevated CO2. Stomatal conductance (gs was lower at 37oC than at 26oC, while transpiration rate (E was higher at 37oC than that at 26oC. Elevated CO2 significantly increased instantaneous water-use efficiency (WUE at both 26oC and 37oC, but WUE was markedly enhanced at 37oC under elevated CO2. The effect of temperature on maximal carboxylation rate (Vcmax, PAR-saturated electron transport rate (Jmax and triose phosphate utilization (TPU varied with CO2, and the Vcmax and Jmax were significantly higher at 37oC than at 26oC under elevated CO2. However, there were no significant interactive effects of CO2 and temperature on TPU. The actual photochemical efficiency of PSII (DF/ Fm’, total photosynthetic linear electron transport rate through PSII (JT and the partitioning of JT to carboxylation (Jc were higher at 37oC than at 26oC under elevated CO2. Elevated CO2 significantly suppressed the partitioning of JT to oxygenation (Jo/JT. The data suggest that the CO2 elevation and progressive warming greatly enhanced photosynthesis in white birch seedlings in an interactive fashion.

  6. Effect of storage levels of nitric oxide derivatives in blood components [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/WDkFtz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Qazi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Potential deleterious effects of red blood cell (RBC transfusions, especially from blood kept at length, have been ascribed to biochemical changes during storage, including those of nitric oxide (NO metabolism. Study methods and design: In this study, NO metabolites, nitrite and nitrate, were quantified in RBCs and whole blood with time of storage. Whole blood (WB, leukoreduced (LR, and non-leukoreduced (NLR components were obtained from healthy volunteer donors and stored in polyvinyl chloride bags for 42 days. Nitrite and nitrate were measured using reductive gas-phase chemiluminescence. Results: Nitrite concentrations initially decreased rapidly from about 150nmol/L, but stabilized at about 44nmol/L in room air for up to 42 days. Nitrate concentrations remained stable during storage at about 35µmol/L. Cells from bags maintained in an argon chamber showed decreased nitrite levels compared to those maintained in room air. Inhibition of enzymes implicated in the NO cycle did not alter nitrite levels. Conclusion: As erythrocytes may contribute to the control of blood flow and oxygen delivery through reduction of nitrite to NO under hypoxic conditions, the present findings provide insight into possible effects of blood transfusion. These measurements may explain some adverse effects of RBC transfusion and suggest ways of optimizing the preservation of stored blood.

  7. Modulation of gene expression in guinea pig paraflocculus after induction of hearing loss [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2yw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelmina H. A. M. Mulders

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss often results in plastic changes in the central auditory pathways, which may be involved in the generation of tinnitus, a phantom auditory sensation. However, although animal studies have consistently shown increased neural activity in auditory structures after hearing loss, tinnitus does not always develop. It has therefore been suggested that non-auditory structures perform a gating or regulatory role that determines whether the increased activity in auditory structures leads to conscious perception. Recent evidence points to the paraflocculus of the cerebellum as having such a role. Therefore, we investigated the early effects of hearing loss on gene expression in guinea pig paraflocculus. Gene expression was investigated after two weeks recovery from either acoustic or mechanical cochlear trauma. The genes investigated in our study were associated with inhibitory neurotransmission (GABA-A receptor subunit alpha 1; glutamate decarboxylase 1, excitatory neurotransmission (glutamate receptor NMDA subunit 1, and regulation of transmitter release (member of RAB family of small GTPase. Our results show increased mRNA levels of glutamate decarboxylase 1 in ipsilateral paraflocculus with no difference between the different methods of cochlear trauma. Early modulation of gene expression in the paraflocculus suggests that an early effect of hearing loss may affect the influence of this structure on auditory processing.

  8. Modulation of gene expression in guinea pig paraflocculus after induction of hearing loss [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3c5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelmina H. A. M. Mulders

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss often results in plastic changes in the central auditory pathways, which may be involved in the generation of tinnitus, a phantom auditory sensation. However, although animal studies have consistently shown increased neural activity in auditory structures after hearing loss, tinnitus does not always develop. It has therefore been suggested that non-auditory structures perform a gating or regulatory role that determines whether the increased activity in auditory structures leads to conscious perception. Recent evidence points to the paraflocculus of the cerebellum as having such a role. Therefore, we investigated the early effects of hearing loss on gene expression in guinea pig paraflocculus. Gene expression was investigated after two weeks recovery from either acoustic or mechanical cochlear trauma. The genes investigated in our study were associated with inhibitory neurotransmission (GABA-A receptor subunit alpha 1; glutamate decarboxylase 1, excitatory neurotransmission (glutamate receptor NMDA subunit 1, and regulation of transmitter release (member of RAB family of small GTPase. Our results show increased mRNA levels of glutamate decarboxylase 1 in ipsilateral paraflocculus with no difference between the different methods of cochlear trauma. Early modulation of gene expression in the paraflocculus suggests that an early effect of hearing loss may affect the influence of this structure on auditory processing.

  9. Historical stand age of vegetation for the state of Alaska. Dataset generated in 2010. NAD83, Alaska Albers projection, http://spatialreference.org/ref/epsg/3338/

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — These raster datasets represent historical stand age. The last four digits of the file name specifies the year represented by the raster. For example a file named...

  10. Guiding Ebola patients to suitable health facilities: an SMS-based approach [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/51l

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad-Ali Trad

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Access to appropriate health services is a fundamental problem in developing countries, where patients do not have access to information and to the nearest health service facility. We propose building a recommendation system based on simple SMS text messaging to help Ebola patients readily find the closest health service with available and appropriate resources. The system will map people’s reported symptoms to likely Ebola case definitions and suitable health service locations. In addition to providing a valuable individual service to people with curable diseases, the proposed system will also predict population-level disease spread risk for infectious diseases using crowd-sourced symptoms from the population. Health workers will be able to better plan and anticipate responses to the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Patients will have improved access to appropriate health care. This system could also be applied in other resource poor or rich settings.

  11. Aging and energetics’ ‘Top 40’ future research opportunities 2010-2013 [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4ae

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    David B. Allison

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: As part of a coordinated effort to expand our research activity at the interface of Aging and Energetics a team of investigators at The University of Alabama at Birmingham systematically assayed and catalogued the top research priorities identified in leading publications in that domain, believing the result would be useful to the scientific community at large. Objective: To identify research priorities and opportunities in the domain of aging and energetics as advocated in the 40 most cited papers related to aging and energetics in the last 4 years. Design: The investigators conducted a search for papers on aging and energetics in Scopus, ranked the resulting papers by number of times they were cited, and selected the ten most-cited papers in each of the four years that include 2010 to 2013, inclusive. Results:   Ten research categories were identified from the 40 papers.  These included: (1 Calorie restriction (CR longevity response, (2 role of mTOR (mechanistic target of Rapamycin and related factors in lifespan extension, (3 nutrient effects beyond energy (especially resveratrol, omega-3 fatty acids, and selected amino acids, 4 autophagy and increased longevity and health, (5 aging-associated predictors of chronic disease, (6 use and effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, (7 telomeres relative to aging and energetics, (8 accretion and effects of body fat, (9 the aging heart,  and (10 mitochondria, reactive oxygen species, and cellular energetics. Conclusion: The field is rich with exciting opportunities to build upon our existing knowledge about the relations among aspects of aging and aspects of energetics and to better understand the mechanisms which connect them.

  12. Active transmembrane drug transport in microgravity: a validation study using an ABC transporter model [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/41n

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    Sergi Vaquer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microgravity has been shown to influence the expression of ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette transporters in bacteria, fungi and mammals, but also to modify the activity of certain cellular components with structural and functional similarities to ABC transporters. Changes in activity of ABC transporters could lead to important metabolic disorders and undesired pharmacological effects during spaceflights. However, no current means exist to study the functionality of these transporters in microgravity. To this end, a Vesicular Transport Assay® (Solvo Biotechnology, Hungary was adapted to evaluate multi-drug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2 trans-membrane estradiol-17-β-glucuronide (E17βG transport activity, when activated by adenosine-tri-phosphate (ATP during parabolic flights. Simple diffusion, ATP-independent transport and benzbromarone inhibition were also evaluated. A high accuracy engineering system was designed to perform, monitor and synchronize all procedures. Samples were analysed using a validated high sensitivity drug detection protocol. Experiments were performed in microgravity during parabolic flights, and compared to 1g on ground results using identical equipment and procedures in all cases. Our results revealed that sufficient equipment accuracy and analytical sensitivity were reached to detect transport activity in both gravitational conditions. Additionally, transport activity levels of on ground samples were within commercial transport standards, proving the validity of the methods and equipment used. MRP2 net transport activity was significantly reduced in microgravity, so was signal detected in simple diffusion samples. Ultra-structural changes induced by gravitational stress upon vesicle membranes or transporters could explain the current results, although alternative explanations are possible. Further research is needed to provide a conclusive answer in this regard. Nevertheless, the present validated technology opens new and interesting research lines in biology and human physiology with the potential for significant benefits for both space and terrestrial medicine.

  13. Case Report: A case report of acromegaly associated with primary aldosteronism [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2ny

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    Joanna Matrozova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with a rare combination of acromegaly and primary aldosteronism. A 37 year-old female patient was diagnosed with acromegaly on the basis of typical clinical, hormonal and image characteristics. She presented also with one of the most common co-morbidities – arterial hypertension. The patient has been regularly followed-up and after three surgical interventions, irradiation and adjuvant treatment with a dopamine agonist, acromegaly was finally controlled in 2008 (20 years after diagnosis. Arterial hypertension however, remained a therapeutic problem even after prescription of four antihypertensive drugs. She had normal biochemical parameters, except for low potassium levels 3.2 (3.5-5.6 mmol/l. This raised the suspicion of primary hyperaldosteronism, confirmed by a high aldosterone to plasma rennin activity ratio, high aldosterone level after a Captopril challenge test and visualization of a 35 mm left adrenal nodule on a CT scan. After an operation, the patient recovered from hypokalemia and antihypertensive therapy was reduced to a small dose of a Ca blocker. Co-morbid arterial hypertension is common in acromegaly, though it is rare for this to be caused by Conn’s adenoma. The association of Conn’s adenoma with acromegaly has been interpreted in two lines: as a component of multiple endocrine neoplasia type (MEN1 syndrome or as a direct mitogenic effect of hyperactivated GH-IGF1 axis.

  14. Finding small molecules for the ‘next Ebola’ [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/542

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    Sean Ekins

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The current Ebola virus epidemic may provide some suggestions of how we can better prepare for the next pathogen outbreak. We propose several cost effective steps that could be taken that would impact the discovery and use of small molecule therapeutics including: 1. text mine the literature, 2. patent assignees and/or inventors should openly declare their relevant filings, 3. reagents and assays could be commoditized, 4. using manual curation to enhance database links, 5. engage database and curation teams, 6. consider open science approaches, 7. adapt the “box” model for shareable reference compounds, and 8. involve the physician’s perspective.

  15. Case Report: Urgent endovascular treatment of subclavian artery injury after blunt trauma [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4x8

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    Taka-aki Nakada

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Subclavian arterial injury is rare and potentially life-threatening, particularly when it leads to arterial occlusion, causing limb ischemia, retrograde thromboembolization and cerebral infarction within hours after injury. Here we report a blunt trauma case with subclavian arterial injury, upper extremity ischemia, and the need for urgent treatment to salvage the limb and prevent cerebral infarction. A 41-year-old man had a left, open, mid-shaft clavicle fracture and left subclavian artery injury accompanied by a weak pulse in the left radial artery, decreased blood pressure of the left arm compared to the right, and left hand numbness. Urgent debridement and irrigation of the open clavicle fracture was followed by angiography for the subclavian artery injury. The left distal subclavian artery had a segmental dissection with a thrombus. Urgent endovascular treatment using a self-expanding nitinol stent successfully restored the blood flow and blood pressure to the left upper extremity. Endovascular treatment is a viable option for cases of subclavian artery injury where there is a risk of extremity ischemia and cerebral infarction.

  16. Student feedback about the use of literature excerpts in Sparshanam, a Medical Humanities module [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/WalKZT

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    P Ravi Shankar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Medical humanities (MH modules have been conducted for first year students at KIST Medical College, Lalitpur, Nepal for the last four years. Literature excerpts are widely used in MH programs in developed nations. In Nepal English language literature excerpts had been used previously in two modules. Problems noted were difficulty in comprehending the excerpts and relating them to the Nepalese scenario. The MH module for the 2011 intake was conducted from December 2011 to March 2012. The present study was conducted in the third week of March to obtain student perceptions about use of literature excerpts and suggestions for further improvement using a questionnaire. Literature excerpts used in the module dealt with Nepal and health-related topics. Sixty-eight of the 80 students (85% participated in the study. The majority were male, self-financing and from urban areas. Respondents felt the excerpts introduced them to different aspects of the medical profession, prepared them for future practice, and underscored the importance of understanding the patients’ feelings. The literature excerpts with which they could identify the most and the least were noted. There were no differences in median enjoyment and effectiveness scores of the literature excerpts according to subgroups of respondents. The suggested benefits of using literature in medical education were similar to those reported previously. Most respondents were able to appreciate the English language excerpts. They felt that Nepali language excerpts and those by Nepali writers could also be included. The findings would be of interest to educators in other developing nations introducing MH modules.

  17. UV-independent induction of beta defensin 3 in neonatal human skin explants [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/53b

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    Erin Wolf Horrell

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the effect of UV radiation on β-defensin 3 (BD3 expression in human skin, freshly-isolated UV-naïve skin was obtained from newborn male infants undergoing planned circumcision.  Skin explants sustained ex vivo dermis side down on RPMI media were exposed to 0.5 kJ/m2 UVB, and biopsies were taken from the explant through 72 hours after radiation.  mRNA expression was measured by qRTPCR and normalized to TATA-binding protein.  BD3 expression at each time point was compared with an untreated control taken at time 0 within each skin sample.  Extensive variability in both the timing and magnitude of BD3 induction across individuals was noted and was not predicted by skin pigment phenotype, suggesting that BD3 induction was not influenced by epidermal melanization.  However, a mock-irradiated time course demonstrated UV-independent BD3 mRNA increases across multiple donors which was not further augmented by treatment with UV radiation, suggesting that factors other than UV damage promoted increased BD3 expression in the skin explants.  We conclude that BD3 expression is induced in a UV-independent manner in human skin explants processed and maintained in standard culture conditions, and that neonatal skin explants are an inappropriate model with which to study the effects of UV on BD3 induction in whole human skin.

  18. UV-independent induction of beta defensin 3 in neonatal human skin explants [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4s2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Wolf Horrell

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the effect of UV radiation on β-defensin 3 (BD3 expression in human skin, freshly-isolated UV-naïve skin was obtained from newborn male infants undergoing planned circumcision.  Skin explants sustained ex vivo dermis side down on RPMI media were exposed to 0.5 kJ/m2 UVB, and biopsies were taken from the explant through 72 hours after radiation.  mRNA expression was measured by qRTPCR and normalized to TATA-binding protein.  BD3 expression at each time point was compared with an untreated control taken at time 0 within each skin sample.  Extensive variability in both the timing and magnitude of BD3 induction across individuals was noted and was not predicted by skin pigment phenotype, suggesting that BD3 induction was not influenced by epidermal melanization.  However, a mock-irradiated time course demonstrated UV-independent BD3 mRNA increases across multiple donors which was not further augmented by treatment with UV radiation, suggesting that factors other than UV damage promoted increased BD3 expression in the skin explants.  We conclude that BD3 expression is induced in a UV-independent manner in human skin explants processed and maintained in standard culture conditions, and that neonatal skin explants are an inappropriate model with which to study the effects of UV on BD3 induction in whole human skin.

  19. Longhorned beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae diversity in a fragmented temperate forest landscape [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/yz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Pavuk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae are an important component of temperate forest ecosystems.  We trapped longhorned beetles in forests in northwest Ohio during 2008 to test the hypothesis that larger forests have greater species diversity than smaller forests.  Large forests had a significantly greater cerambycid species richness than small forests (t = 3.16. P = 0.02, and there was a significant relationship between forest size and cerambycid species richness.

  20. Christian ethics: on the difficult dialectics between faith and ethics. http://dlibrary.acu.edu.au/research/theology/ejournal/aejt_2/Jan_Jans.htm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jans, J.M.N.E.

    2004-01-01

    The thesis of this paper is that Christian theological ethics or moral theology is only possible for those who conceive such a conflict as an opportunity for a fruitful dialectics between faith and ethics. Furthermore, it would be my thesis that experience and practical reflection in the area of eth

  1. L’édition électronique du cartulaire de la seigneurie de Nesle - http://www.cn-telma.fr/nesle/

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    Xavier Hélary

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available L’édition du cartulaire de la seigneurie de Nesle vient d’être mise en ligne sur la plate-forme TELMA (Traitement En Ligne des Manuscrits et des Archives, commune à l’École nationale des chartes et à l’Institut de recherche et d’histoire des textes (IRHT, CNRS. L’objectif de cette plate-forme est de présenter des exemples d’édition électronique en proposant les outils nécessaires.Jean, seigneur de Nesle (Côte-d’Or, arr. Montbard, cant. Laigne, a fait compiler ce cartulaire en plusieurs éta...

  2. Implementation of a worksite educational program focused on promoting healthy eating habits [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/32x

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Tanagra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To estimate the effectiveness of a short-term educational-counseling worksite program focused on lipid intake, by monitoring the possible change on nutrition knowledge and eating habits. Methods: an 8-week educational program based on the Health Belief Model was implemented in a honey packaging and sales company in Greece. 20 out of the 29 employees initially enrolled completed the program. Knowledge level and eating habits were evaluated prior and after the intervention by the “Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire” and the “Food Habits Questionnaire”. ANOVA, Spearman rho test and paired Wilcoxon test were employed in statistical analysis. Results: Non smokers and those with higher educational level had healthier eating habits. Knowledge following the intervention was significantly improved concerning recommendations and basic food ingredients but as far as eating habits were concerned, scores were not improved significantly, while intake of fried food was increased. Conclusions and Implications: Short-term interventions may produce substantial improvement in knowledge but not necessarily modifications in unhealthy eating habits.

  3. Nasal decongestant and chronic headache: a case of naphazoline overuse headache? [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1t2

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    Cherubino Di Lorenzo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic headache is an incapacitating condition afflicting patients at least for 15 days per month. In the most cases it is developed as a consequence of an excessive use of symptomatic drugs. Case: Here we report the case of a 34 year-old man suffering from chronic headache possibly related to the overuse of naphazoline nitrate nasal decongestant, used to treat a supposed chronic sinusitis. However, the patient did not suffer from sinusitis, but from a medication overuse headache (ICHD-II 8.3; ICD-10 44.41 that appeared to be due to excessive use of naphazoline. Conclusion: The use of naphazoline nitrate may result in an analgesic effect upon first use, through activation of adrenergic and opioidergic systems, followed by a pro-migraine effect via a late induction of an inflammatory cascade, modulated by nitric oxide and arachidonic acid. The observation that naphazoline detoxification relieved the patient’s headache, indicates that prolonged use of naphazoline may cause chronic headaches. Therefore, physicians should ask for details on the use of nasal decongestants in patients complaining of chronic headache, as they could potentially be suffering from a medication-overuse headache.

  4. An object oriented implementation of the Yeadon human inertia model [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4cr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Dembia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an open source software implementation of a popular mathematical method developed by M.R. Yeadon for calculating the body and segment inertia parameters of a human body. The software is written in a high level open source language and provides three interfaces for manipulating the data and the model: a Python API, a command-line user interface, and a graphical user interface. Thus the software can fit into various data processing pipelines and requires only simple geometrical measures as input.

  5. Case Report: Persistent erectile dysfunction in a man with prolactinoma [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4qj

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    Justin Badal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction has been explored as a condition secondary to elevated prolactin; however, the mechanisms by which elevated prolactin levels cause erectile dysfunction have not yet been clearly established. We here present a patient with a history of prolactinoma who suffered from persistent erectile dysfunction despite testosterone supplementation and pharmacological and surgical treatment for the prolactinoma.  Patients who have had both prolactinemia and erectile dysfunction have been reported in the literature, but we find no report of a patient with persistent erectile dysfunction in the setting of testosterone supplementation and persistent hyperprolactinemia refractory to treatment. This case provides evidence supporting the idea that suppression of erectile function occurs in both the central and peripheral nervous systems independent of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  6. Kairomonal communication in mice is concentration-dependent with a proportional discrimination threshold [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2h5

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    Anand Vasudevan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Odors of predators are often co-opted by prey species to serve as warning signals. Perceptual properties of such kairomonal communication are under studied despite their common use in many mammals. We demonstrate that the kairomonal response in mice to rat odors varies monotonically with the volume of rat odor. Moreover, the ability of mice to differentiate between two strengths of rat odors is dependent on the ratio of the two concentrations. These results show that mice can compare kairomonal strength over a large range of values, and that kairomonal communication follows Weber’s law.

  7. Prism adaptation does not alter configural processing of faces [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1wk

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    Janet H. Bultitude

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with hemispatial neglect (‘neglect’ following a brain lesion show difficulty responding or orienting to objects and events on the left side of space. Substantial evidence supports the use of a sensorimotor training technique called prism adaptation as a treatment for neglect. Reaching for visual targets viewed through prismatic lenses that induce a rightward shift in the visual image results in a leftward recalibration of reaching movements that is accompanied by a reduction of symptoms in patients with neglect. The understanding of prism adaptation has also been advanced through studies of healthy participants, in whom adaptation to leftward prismatic shifts results in temporary neglect-like performance. Interestingly, prism adaptation can also alter aspects of non-lateralised spatial attention. We previously demonstrated that prism adaptation alters the extent to which neglect patients and healthy participants process local features versus global configurations of visual stimuli. Since deficits in non-lateralised spatial attention are thought to contribute to the severity of neglect symptoms, it is possible that the effect of prism adaptation on these deficits contributes to its efficacy. This study examines the pervasiveness of the effects of prism adaptation on perception by examining the effect of prism adaptation on configural face processing using a composite face task. The composite face task is a persuasive demonstration of the automatic global-level processing of faces: the top and bottom halves of two familiar faces form a seemingly new, unknown face when viewed together. Participants identified the top or bottom halves of composite faces before and after prism adaptation. Sensorimotor adaptation was confirmed by significant pointing aftereffect, however there was no significant change in the extent to which the irrelevant face half interfered with processing. The results support the proposal that the therapeutic effects of prism adaptation are limited to dorsal stream processing.

  8. Ultimate drivers of native biodiversity change in agricultural systems [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/21m

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Norton

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability to address land degradation and biodiversity loss while maintaining the production of plant and animal products is a key global challenge. Biodiversity decline as a result of vegetation clearance, cultivation, grazing, pesticide and herbicide application, and plantation establishment, amongst other factors, has been widely documented in agricultural ecosystems. In this paper we identify six ultimate drivers that underlie these proximate factors and hence determine what native biodiversity occurs in modern agricultural landscapes; (1 historical legacies; (2 environmental change; (3 economy; (4 social values and awareness; (5 technology and knowledge; and (6 policy and regulation. While historical legacies and environmental change affect native biodiversity directly, all six indirectly affect biodiversity by influencing the decisions that land managers make about the way they use their land and water resources. Understanding these drivers is essential in developing strategies for sustaining native biodiversity in agricultural landscapes into the future.

  9. http://jestec.taylors.edu.my/Vol%2011%20issue%2012%20December%202016/11_12_2.pdf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. AHMAD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX or the IEEE 802.16 standard for broadband Internet access as well as metro-wide wireless sensor network (WSN communication, continues to gain popularity as a technology with a significant market potential. This development makes wireless security a very serious concern. Advanced encryption standard (AES has been widely used for protection in WiMAX applications. This study focuses on the performance comparison of AES algorithms with 128-bit cipher key using field programmable gate array (FPGA in terms of architectural, throughput differences, and power consumption rates. Different AES-128 designs, including the proposed improved power-throughput AES-128 design, are introduced and evaluated. Xilinx Virtex2 and Virtex5 FPGAs are utilized for implementation and verification purposes. Results show that with Virtex2 and Virtex5 FPGAs, the design core of the proposed AES-128 is the smallest with reduced slices up to 47%, and the throughput is increased by 90% compared with the reference designs. The proposed design also reduces total power consumption by 6% through Virtex5 FPGA.

  10. The stabilizing effects of genetic diversity on predator-prey dynamics [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/9u

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    Christopher F Steiner

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity among prey in their susceptibility to predation is a potentially important stabilizer of predator-prey interactions, reducing the magnitude of population oscillations and enhancing total prey population abundance. When microevolutionary responses of prey populations occur at time scales comparable to population dynamics, adaptive responses in prey defense can, in theory, stabilize predator-prey dynamics and reduce top-down effects on prey abundance. While experiments have tested these predictions, less explored are the consequences of the evolution of prey phenotypes that can persist in both vulnerable and invulnerable classes. We tested this experimentally using a laboratory aquatic system composed of the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus as a predator and the prey Synura petersenii, a colony-forming alga that exhibits genetic variation in its propensity to form colonies and colony size (larger colonies are a defense against predators. Prey populations of either low initial genetic diversity and low adaptive capacity or high initial genetic diversity and high adaptive capacity were crossed with predator presence and absence. Dynamics measured over the last 127 days of the 167-day experiment revealed no effects of initial prey genetic diversity on the average abundance or temporal variability of predator populations. However, genetic diversity and predator presence/absence interactively affected prey population abundance and stability; diversity of prey had no effects in the absence of predators but stabilized dynamics and increased total prey abundance in the presence of predators. The size structure of the genetically diverse prey populations diverged from single strain populations in the presence of predators, showing increases in colony size and in the relative abundance of cells found in colonies. Our work sheds light on the adaptive value of colony formation and supports the general view that genetic diversity and intraspecific trait variation of prey can play a vital role in the short-term dynamics and stability of planktonic predator-prey systems.

  11. Does vitamin D deficiency contribute to post-burn bone loss? [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/QLDkCs

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    Gordon L Klein

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury results in the acute loss of bone as well as the development of progressive vitamin D deficiency. Bone loss occurs acutely due to resorption, which is then followed by apoptosis of osteoblasts preventing repair of the bone loss. The acute resorption is due to a combination of the inflammatory response and the stress response to the burn injury. The resultant production of inflammatory cytokines and endogenous glucocorticoids initially stimulate the osteoblasts to produce RANK ligand, which stimulates marrow stem cell differentiation into osteoclasts. As the stress response persists for approximately one year post-burn the glucocorticoids produced by the body will cause osteoblast apoptosis and adynamic bone, impairing the ability of bone to recover its resorptive losses. The vitamin D deficiency is due to the failure to supplement the diet of burn patients with vitamin D on discharge from hospital and to failure of the skin to make normal quantities of vitamin D on sunlight exposure. Because the bone resorption can be prevented by the acute administration of bisphosphonates it is unlikely that vitamin D deficiency is responsible for the early-onset bone loss following burns. However, because a deficit in trabecular bone remains for at least two years post-burn, it is possible that vitamin D deficiency prevents the recovery of trabecular bone density over the long term.

  12. Functional characterization of Candida albicans Hos2 histone deacetylase [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3xh

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    G Karthikeyan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a mucosal commensal organism capable of causing superficial (oral and vaginal thrush infections in immune normal hosts, but is a major pathogen causing systemic and mucosal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Azoles have been very effective anti-fungal agents and the mainstay in treating opportunistic mold and yeast infections. Azole resistant strains have emerged compromising the utility of this class of drugs. It has been shown that azole resistance can be reversed by the co-administration of a histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor, suggesting that resistance is mediated by epigenetic mechanisms possibly involving Hos2, a fungal deacetylase. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of HOS2 (HighOsmolarity Sensitive, a gene coding for fungal histone deacetylase from C. albicans. Inhibition studies showed that Hos2 is susceptible to pan inhibitors such as trichostatin A (TSA and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, but is not inhibited by class I inhibitors such as MS-275. This in vitro enzymatic assay, which is amenable to high throughput could be used for screening potent fungal Hos2 inhibitors that could be a potential anti-fungal adjuvant. Purified Hos2 protein consistently deacetylated tubulins, rather than histones from TSA-treated cells. Hos2 has been reported to be a putative NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, a feature of sirtuins. We assayed for sirtuin activation with resveratrol and purified Hos2 protein and did not find any sirtuin activity.

  13. Demonstration of natriuretic activity in urine of neurosurgical patients with renal salt wasting [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/nu

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    Steven J Youmans

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We have utilized the persistent elevation of fractional excretion (FE of urate, > 10%, to differentiate cerebral/renal salt wasting (RSW from the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH, in which a normalization of FEurate occurs after correction of hyponatremia.  Previous studies suggest as well  that an elevated FEurate with normonatremia, without pre-existing hyponatremia, is also consistent with RSW, including studies demonstrating induction of RSW in rats infused with plasma from normonatremic neurosurgical and Alzheimer’s disease patients.  The present studies were designed to test whether precipitates from the urine of normonatremic neurosurgical patients, with either normal or elevated FEurate, and patients with SIADH, display natriuretic activity.   Methods: Ammonium sulfate precipitates from the urine of 6 RSW and 5 non-RSW Control patients were dialyzed (10 kDa cutoff to remove the ammonium sulfate, lyophilized, and the reconstituted precipitate was tested for its effect on transcellular transport of 22Na across LLC-PK1 cells grown to confluency in transwells. Results: Precipitates from 5 of the 6 patients with elevated FEurate and normonatremia significantly inhibited the in vitro transcellular transport of 22Na above a concentration of 3 μg protein/ml, by 10-25%, versus to vehicle alone, and by 15-40% at concentrations of 5-20 μg/ml as compared to precipitates from 4 of the 5 non-RSW patients with either normal FEurate and normonatremia (2 patients or with SIADH (2 patients. Conclusion: These studies provide further evidence that an elevated FEurate with normonatremia is highly consistent with RSW.  Evidence in the urine of natriuretic activity suggests significant renal excretion of the natriuretic factor. The potentially large source of the natriuretic factor that this could afford, coupled with small analytical sample sizes required by the in-vitro bioassay used here, should facilitate future experimental analysis and allow the natriuretic factor to be investigated as a potential biomarker for RSW.

  14. Demonstration of natriuretic activity in urine of neurosurgical patients with renal salt wasting [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1ax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Youmans

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We have utilized the persistent elevation of fractional excretion (FE of urate, > 10%, to differentiate cerebral/renal salt wasting (RSW from the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH, in which a normalization of FEurate occurs after correction of hyponatremia.  Previous studies suggest as well  that an elevated FEurate with normonatremia, without pre-existing hyponatremia, is also consistent with RSW, including studies demonstrating induction of RSW in rats infused with plasma from normonatremic neurosurgical and Alzheimer’s disease patients.  The present studies were designed to test whether precipitates from the urine of normonatremic neurosurgical patients, with either normal or elevated FEurate, and patients with SIADH, display natriuretic activity.   Methods: Ammonium sulfate precipitates from the urine of 6 RSW and 5 non-RSW Control patients were dialyzed (10 kDa cutoff to remove the ammonium sulfate, lyophilized, and the reconstituted precipitate was tested for its effect on transcellular transport of 22Na across LLC-PK1 cells grown to confluency in transwells. Results: Precipitates from 5 of the 6 patients with elevated FEurate and normonatremia significantly inhibited the in vitro transcellular transport of 22Na above a concentration of 3 μg protein/ml, by 10-25%, versus to vehicle alone, and by 15-40% at concentrations of 5-20 μg/ml as compared to precipitates from 4 of the 5 non-RSW patients with either normal FEurate and normonatremia (2 patients or with SIADH (2 patients. Conclusion: These studies provide further evidence that an elevated FEurate with normonatremia is highly consistent with RSW.  Evidence in the urine of natriuretic activity suggests significant renal excretion of the natriuretic factor. The potentially large source of the natriuretic factor that this could afford, coupled with small analytical sample sizes required by the in-vitro bioassay used here, should facilitate future experimental analysis and allow the natriuretic factor to be investigated as a potential biomarker for RSW.

  15. Internet-delivered eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (iEMDR: an open trial [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/zr

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    Jay Spence

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent research indicates internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT can reduce symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. This study examined the efficacy of an internet-delivered treatment protocol that combined iCBT and internet-delivered eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (iEMDR, in an uncontrolled trial. Eleven of the 15 participants completed post-treatment questionnaires. Large effect sizes were found from pre-treatment to 3-month follow-up (d = 1.03 – 1.61 on clinician-assessed and self-reported measures of PTSD, anxiety and distress, with moderate effect sizes (d = 0.59 – 0.70 found on measures of depression and disability. At post-treatment, 55% of the participants no longer met criteria for PTSD and this was sustained at follow-up. Symptom worsening occurred in 3 of 15 (20% of the sample from pre- to post-treatment; however, these participants reported overall symptom improvement by follow-up. Future research directions for iEMDR are discussed.

  16. Collaboration for rare disease drug discovery research [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4l6

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    Nadia K. Litterman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Rare disease research has reached a tipping point, with the confluence of scientific and technologic developments that if appropriately harnessed, could lead to key breakthroughs and treatments for this set of devastating disorders. Industry-wide trends have revealed that the traditional drug discovery research and development (R&D model is no longer viable, and drug companies are evolving their approach. Rather than only pursue blockbuster therapeutics for heterogeneous, common diseases, drug companies have increasingly begun to shift their focus to rare diseases. In academia, advances in genetics analyses and disease mechanisms have allowed scientific understanding to mature, but the lack of funding and translational capability severely limits the rare disease research that leads to clinical trials. Simultaneously, there is a movement towards increased research collaboration, more data sharing, and heightened engagement and active involvement by patients, advocates, and foundations. The growth in networks and social networking tools presents an opportunity to help reach other patients but also find researchers and build collaborations. The growth of collaborative software that can enable researchers to share their data could also enable rare disease patients and foundations to manage their portfolio of funded projects for developing new therapeutics and suggest drug repurposing opportunities. Still there are many thousands of diseases without treatments and with only fragmented research efforts. We will describe some recent progress in several rare diseases used as examples and propose how collaborations could be facilitated. We propose that the development of a center of excellence that integrates and shares informatics resources for rare diseases sponsored by all of the stakeholders would help foster these initiatives.

  17. Drosophila's contribution to stem cell research [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5h7

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    Gyanesh Singh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of Drosophila stem cells with striking similarities to mammalian stem cells has brought new hope for stem cell research. A recent development in Drosophila stem cell research is bringing wider opportunities for contemporary stem cell biologists. In this regard, Drosophila germ cells are becoming a popular model of stem cell research. In several cases, genes that controlled Drosophila stem cells were later discovered to have functional homologs in mammalian stem cells. Like mammals, Drosophila germline stem cells (GSCs are controlled by both intrinsic as well as external signals. Inside the Drosophila testes, germline and somatic stem cells form a cluster of cells (the hub. Hub cells depend on JAK-STAT signaling, and, in absence of this signal, they do not self-renew. In Drosophila, significant changes occur within the stem cell niche that contributes to a decline in stem cell number over time. In case of aging Drosophila, somatic niche cells show reduced DE-cadherin and unpaired (Upd proteins. Unpaired proteins are known to directly decrease stem cell number within the niches, and, overexpression of upd within niche cells restored GSCs in older males also . Stem cells in the midgut of Drosophila are also very promising. Reduced Notch signaling was found to increase the number of midgut progenitor cells. On the other hand, activation of the Notch pathway decreased proliferation of these cells. Further research in this area should lead to the discovery of additional factors that regulate stem and progenitor cells in Drosophila.

  18. Factors that contribute to social media influence within an Internal Medicine Twitter learning community [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3jd

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    Tejas Desai

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Medical societies, faculty, and trainees use Twitter to learn from and educate other social media users. These social media communities bring together individuals with various levels of experience. It is not known if experienced individuals are also the most influential members. We hypothesize that participants with the greatest experience would be the most influential members of a Twitter community. We analyzed the 2013 Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine Twitter community. We measured the number of tweets authored by each participant and the number of amplified tweets (re-tweets. We developed a multivariate linear regression model to identify any relationship to social media influence, measured by the PageRank. Faculty (from academic institutions comprised 19% of the 132 participants in the learning community (p < 0.0001. Faculty authored 49% of all 867 tweets (p < 0.0001. Their tweets were the most likely to be amplified (52%, p < 0.01. Faculty had the greatest influence amongst all participants (mean 1.99, p < 0.0001. Being a faculty member had no predictive effect on influence (β = 0.068, p = 0.6. The only factors that predicted influence (higher PageRank were the number of tweets authored (p < 0.0001 and number of tweets amplified (p < 0.0001 The status of “faculty member” did not confer a greater influence. Any participant who was able to author the greatest number of tweets or have more of his/her tweets amplified could wield a greater influence on the participants, regardless of his/her authority.

  19. Selection and validation of reference genes for quantitative gene expression studies in Erythroxylum coca [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/y1

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    Teresa Docimo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Real-time quantitative PCR is a powerful technique for the investigation of comparative gene expression, but its accuracy and reliability depend on the reference genes used as internal standards. Only genes that show a high level of expression stability are suitable for use as reference genes, and these must be identified on a case-by-case basis. Erythroxylum coca produces and accumulates high amounts of the pharmacologically active tropane alkaloid cocaine (especially in the leaves, and is an emerging model for the investigation of tropane alkaloid biosynthesis. The identification of stable internal reference genes for this species is important for its development as a model species, and would enable comparative analysis of candidate biosynthetic genes in the different tissues of the coca plant. In this study, we evaluated the expression stability of nine candidate reference genes in E. coca (Ec6409, Ec10131, Ec11142, Actin, APT2, EF1α, TPB1, Pex4, Pp2aa3. The expression of these genes was measured in seven tissues (flowers, stems, roots and four developmental leaf stages and the stability of expression was assessed using three algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. From our results we conclude that Ec10131 and TPB1 are the most appropriate internal reference genes in leaves (where the majority of cocaine is produced, while Ec10131 and Ec6409 are the most suitable internal reference genes across all of the tissues tested.

  20. Late cardiac sodium current can be assessed using automated patch-clamp [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4kj

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    Morgan Chevalier

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac late Na+ current is generated by a small fraction of voltage-dependent Na+ channels that undergo a conformational change to a burst-gating mode, with repeated openings and closures during the action potential (AP plateau. Its magnitude can be augmented by inactivation-defective mutations, myocardial ischemia, or prolonged exposure to chemical compounds leading to drug-induced (di-long QT syndrome, and results in an increased susceptibility to cardiac arrhythmias. Using CytoPatch™ 2 automated patch-clamp equipment, we performed whole-cell recordings in HEK293 cells stably expressing human Nav1.5, and measured the late Na+ component as average current over the last 100 ms of 300 ms depolarizing pulses to -10 mV from a holding potential of -100 mV, with a repetition frequency of 0.33 Hz. Averaged values in different steady-state experimental conditions were further corrected by the subtraction of current average during the application of tetrodotoxin (TTX 30 μM. We show that ranolazine at 10 and 30 μM in 3 min applications reduced the late Na+ current to 75.0 ± 2.7% (mean ± SEM, n = 17 and 58.4 ± 3.5% (n = 18 of initial levels, respectively, while a 5 min application of veratridine 1 μM resulted in a reversible current increase to 269.1 ± 16.1% (n = 28 of initial values. Using fluctuation analysis, we observed that ranolazine 30 μM decreased mean open probability p from 0.6 to 0.38 without modifying the number of active channels n, while veratridine 1 μM increased n 2.5-fold without changing p. In human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, veratridine 1 μM reversibly increased APD90 2.12 ± 0.41-fold (mean ± SEM, n = 6. This effect is attributable to inactivation removal in Nav1.5 channels, since significant inhibitory effects on hERG current were detected at higher concentrations in hERG-expressing HEK293 cells, with a 28.9 ± 6.0% inhibition (mean ± SD, n = 10 with 50 μM veratridine.      

  1. Use of botulinum toxin in musculoskeletal pain [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/16j

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    Jasvinder A Singh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a common cause of chronic pain, which is associated with a total cost of $635 billion per year in the U.S. Emerging evidence suggests an anti-nociceptive action of botulinum toxin, independent of its muscle paralyzing action. This review provides a summary of data from both non-randomized and randomized clinical studies of botulinum toxin in back pain and various osteoarticular conditions, including osteoarthritis, tennis elbow, low back pain and hand pain. Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs of small sizes provide evidence of short-term efficacy of a single intra-articular injection of 100 units of botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A for the relief of pain and the improvement of both function and quality of life in patients with chronic joint pain due to arthritis. Three RCTs studied intramuscular BoNT/A for tennis elbow with one showing a significant improvement in pain relief compared with placebo, another one showing no difference from placebo, and the third finding that pain and function improvement with BoNT/A injection were similar to those obtained with surgical release. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/A for low back pain found improvement in pain and function compared to placebo. Single RCTs using local injections of BoNT in patients with either temporomandibular joint (TMJ pain or plantar fasciitis found superior efficacy compared to placebo. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/B in patients with hand pain and carpal tunnel syndrome found improvement in pain in both BoNT/B and placebo groups, but no significant difference between groups. Most evidence is based on small studies, but the use of BoNT is supported by a single, and sometimes up to three, RCTs for several chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. This indicates that botulinum toxin may be a promising potential new treatment for chronic refractory musculoskeletal pain. Well-designed large clinical trials are needed.

  2. A novel mouse model of creatine transporter deficiency [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4zb

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    Laura Baroncelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the creatine (Cr transporter (CrT gene lead to cerebral creatine deficiency syndrome-1 (CCDS1, an X-linked metabolic disorder characterized by cerebral Cr deficiency causing intellectual disability, seizures, movement  and behavioral disturbances, language and speech impairment ( OMIM #300352. CCDS1 is still an untreatable pathology that can be very invalidating for patients and caregivers. Only two murine models of CCDS1, one of which is an ubiquitous knockout mouse, are currently available to study the possible mechanisms underlying the pathologic phenotype of CCDS1 and to develop therapeutic strategies. Given the importance of validating phenotypes and efficacy of promising treatments in more than one mouse model we have generated a new murine model of CCDS1 obtained by ubiquitous deletion of 5-7 exons in the Slc6a8 gene. We showed a remarkable Cr depletion in the murine brain tissues and cognitive defects, thus resembling the key features of human CCDS1. These results confirm that CCDS1 can be well modeled in mice. This CrT−/y murine model will provide a new tool for increasing the relevance of preclinical studies to the human disease.

  3. A brief review of recent Charcot-Marie-Tooth research and priorities [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/53g

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    Sean Ekins

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This brief review of current research progress on Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT disease is a summary of discussions initiated at the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF scientific advisory board meeting on November 7, 2014. It covers recent published and unpublished in vitro and in vivo research. We discuss recent promising preclinical work for CMT1A, the development of new biomarkers, the characterization of different animal models, and the analysis of the frequency of gene mutations in patients with CMT. We also describe how progress in related fields may benefit CMT therapeutic development, including the potential of gene therapy and stem cell research. We also discuss the potential to assess and improve the quality of life of CMT patients. This summary of CMT research identifies some of the gaps which may have an impact on upcoming clinical trials. We provide some priorities for CMT research and areas which HNF can support. The goal of this review is to inform the scientific community about ongoing research and to avoid unnecessary overlap, while also highlighting areas ripe for further investigation. The general collaborative approach we have taken may be useful for other rare neurological diseases.

  4. 1135 Available at: http://ijph.tums.ac.ir Acceptance of Cancer in Patients Diagnosed with Lung, Breast, Colorectal and Prostate Carcinoma

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    Urszula RELIGIONI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ability to accept illness is a major issue in the life of a person with cancer. Acceptance of disease is simultaneously conducted at two levels: the emotional and cognitive-behavioral one. It is consequential to cancer af-fecting numerous aspects of patient's life, i.e. the physical, mental, social and the spiritual area. The aim of the study was to verify the influence of socioeconomic factors on acceptance of illness in patients suffering from breast, lung, colorectal and prostate carcinoma.Methods: The study included 902 patients treated on an outpatient basis at the Center of Oncology, the Maria Skłodowska-Curie Institute in Warsaw, in the year 2013. The Paper and Pencil Interview (PAPI technique was ap-plied. The questionnaire comprised basic demographic questions (socioeconomic factors and Acceptance of Illness Scale (AIS test estimating the level of disease acceptance in patients.Results: Prostate carcinoma patients scored highest (30, 39, whereas lung carcinoma patients scored lowest (23, 17 concerning illness acceptance according to the AIS scale. In all cases, linear dependence between the net income-per-household-member and the AIS score could be observed. Another diversification factor in the case of prostate carci-noma patients was the level of education. Yet one more dependence could be observed between the level of illness acceptance and chemotherapy over the course of past twelve months.Conclusion: The degree of disease acceptance is subject to a type of carcinoma. Patient income is an economic factor significantly affecting the acceptance of illness score.

  5. Traditional medicine: a rare cause of lead poisoning in Western countries [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2c6

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    Halima Muller

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old man from Bhutan was admitted to the emergency department with a 5-day history of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Enhanced abdominal CT scan was found negative, however laboratory tests showed hemolytic anemia and basophilic stippling which are often seen in lead and heavy metal poisoning. Additional tests revealed a high level of lead in blood and urine. The patient was administered a chelator treatment with rapid improvement of the symptoms. A detailed interview revealed that the patient had been taking daily Bhutanese traditional medicines to treat a Bell’s palsy from which he had been suffering for a few months. The analysis of these medicines confirmed the presence of a high level of lead.

  6. A case series discussing the anaesthetic management of pregnant patients with brain tumours [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2hn

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    Alaa A Abd-Elsayed

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy may aggravate the natural history of an intracranial tumour, and may even unmask a previously unknown diagnosis. Here we present a series of seven patients who had brain tumours during pregnancy. The aim of this case series is to characterize the current perioperative management and to suggest evidence based guidelines for the anaesthetic management of pregnant females with brain tumours. This is a retrospective study. Information on pregnant patients diagnosed with brain tumours that underwent caesarean section (CS and/or brain tumour resection from May 2003 through June 2008 was obtained from the Department of General Anaesthesia and the Rose Ella Burkhardt Brain Tumour & Neuro-Oncology Centre (BBTC at the Cleveland Clinic, OH, USA. The mean age was 34.5 years (range 29-40 years old. Six patients had glioma, two of whom had concomitant craniotomy and CS. Six cases had the tumour in the frontal lobe. Four cases were operated on under general anaesthesia and three underwent awake craniotomy. The neonatal outcomes of the six patients with elective or emergent delivery were six viable infants with normal Apgar scores. Pregnancy was terminated in the 7th patient. In conclusion, good knowledge of the variable anesthetic agents and their effects on the fetus is very important in managing those patients.

  7. Case Report: Pregnancy in a patient with recurrent glioblastoma [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/27s

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    Birgit Flechl

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a woman with relapsed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM who recently gave birth. She announced her pregnancy shortly after the sixth cycle of a dense regimen of temozolomide, prescribed for treating the first recurrence of glioblastoma. Three years ago, in April 2008, she had undergone gross total resection of a glioblastoma multiforme in the postcentral region of the right hemisphere and had subsequently received treatment according to the actual standard therapy consisting of radiotherapy up to 60 Gy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide. The complete amount of temozolomide given before this pregnancy was 20.9 mg/m2. Nevertheless, she delivered a 1890 g child by caesarean section in the 32/6 week of pregnancy. The child showed no anomalies and is developing normally under close surveillance by paediatricians.

  8. Journal subscription expenditure of UK higher education institutions [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5lj

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    Stuart Lawson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The academic libraries of higher education institutions (HEIs pay significant amounts of money each year for access to academic journals. The amounts paid are often not transparent especially when it comes to knowing how much is paid to specific publishers. Therefore data on journal subscription expenditure were obtained for UK HEIs using a series of Freedom of Information requests. Data were obtained for 153 HEIs’ expenditure with ten publishers over a five-year period. The majority of institutions have provided figures but some are still outstanding. The data will be of interest to those who wish to understand the economics of scholarly communication and see the scale of payments flowing within the system. Further research could replicate the data collection in other jurisdictions.

  9. A case of severe psychosis induced by novel recreational drugs [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2o2

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    Filippo Dragogna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:  The use of novel recreational drugs is becoming of public interest, especially after recent international alerts about their cardiovascular and neurological toxicity. Additionally, little is known about the psychiatric consequences of the long-term use of these compounds. Case presentation: We describe a case of severe psychotic episode likely induced by chronic use of a combination of new recreational drugs (methylenedioxypyrovalerone, mephedrone, butylone and alpha-pyrrolidinopentiophenone. The patient had no psychiatric history and showed poor response to conventional antipsychotic treatment (haloperidol. Conclusions: This case illustrates the potential negative effects of recreational drugs that cannot be limited to an acute psychotic episode but might determine a condition of prolonged paranoid psychosis. Although the use of these compounds is currently increasing, such molecules might often pass undetected in patients accessing the emergency room, leading to misdiagnosis (e.g. schizophrenic episode and lack of appropriate treatment.

  10. Authors are also reviewers: problems in assigning cause for missing negative studies [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/uo

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    Stephen Senn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available I compare two possible extreme hypotheses regarding submission of papers to journals: the Q hypothesis, whereby the decision to submit is based on quality of research; and the P hypothesis, whereby it is based on probability of acceptance. I give five reasons as to why the P hypothesis is more plausible and suggest that problems of missing data may previously have caused researchers to misinterpret the evidence on editorial bias.

  11. Metabolomics in psoriatic disease: pilot study reveals metabolite differences in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3vr

    OpenAIRE

    April W. Armstrong; Julie Wu; Mary Ann Johnson; Dmitry Grapov; Baktazh Azizi; Jaskaran Dhillon; Oliver Fiehn

    2014-01-01

    Importance: While “omics” studies have advanced our understanding of inflammatory skin diseases, metabolomics is mostly an unexplored field in dermatology. Objective: We sought to elucidate the pathogenesis of psoriatic diseases by determining the differences in metabolomic profiles among psoriasis patients with or without psoriatic arthritis and healthy controls. Design: We employed a global metabolomics approach to compare circulating metabolites from patients with psoriasis, psoriasis and ...

  12. Absence of kdr resistance alleles in the Union of the Comoros, East Africa [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5fw

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    Yoosook Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Knockdown resistance (kdr and CYP9K1 genotypes were detected by a MOLDI-TOF based SNP genotyping assay (Sequenom iPLEX in samples of Anopheles gambiae collected at 13 sites throughout the Union of the Comoros and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania during February and March 2011. All A. gambiae specimens collected in the Comoros were homozygous for the susceptible kdr alleles (+/+ while 96% of A. gambiae from Dar es Salaam were homozygous for the East African kdr resistant genotype (E/E. In contrast, all specimens from Dar es Salaam and the Comoros were homozygous for the cyp3 allele (c3/c3 at the CYP9K1 locus; the locus has been implicated in metabolic resistance against pyrethroid insecticides in West Africa. All specimens had typical A. gambiae genotypes for SNPs within the divergence Islands on all three chromosomes. Although further spatial and temporal studies are needed, the distribution of kdr genotypes between the Comoros and Tanzania further supports isolation of the Comoros populations from A. gambiae populations on mainland Africa.

  13. Management of acute and post-operative pain in chronic kidney disease [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/10f

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    Malvinder S Parmar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease is common and patients with many co-morbid conditions frequently have to undergo surgical procedures and, therefore, require effective pain management. The pharmacokinetics of various analgesic agents are not well studied in patients with chronic kidney disease and the risk of accumulation of the main drug or their metabolites, resulting in serious adverse events, is a common scenario on medical and surgical wards. It is common for these patients to be cared for by 'non-nephrologists' who often prescribe the standard dose of the commonly used analgesics, without taking into consideration the patient's kidney function. It is important to recognize the problems and complications associated with the use of standard doses of analgesics, and highlight the importance of adjusting analgesic dosage based on kidney function to avoid complications while still providing adequate pain relief.

  14. Verbal and novel multisensory associative learning in adults [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/p4

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    Joanne M Fifer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To date, few studies have focused on the behavioural differences between the learning of multisensory auditory-visual and intra-modal associations. More specifically, the relative benefits of novel auditory-visual and verbal-visual associations for learning have not been directly compared. In Experiment 1, 20 adult volunteers completed three paired associate learning tasks: non-verbal novel auditory-visual (novel-AV, verbal-visual (verbal-AV; using pseudowords, and visual-visual (shape-VV. Participants were directed to make a motor response to matching novel and arbitrarily related stimulus pairs. Feedback was provided to facilitate trial and error learning. The results of Signal Detection Theory analyses suggested a multisensory enhancement of learning, with significantly higher discriminability measures (d-prime in both the novel-AV and verbal-AV tasks than the shape-VV task. Motor reaction times were also significantly faster during the verbal-AV task than during the non-verbal learning tasks.  Experiment 2 (n = 12 used a forced-choice discrimination paradigm to assess whether a difference in unisensory stimulus discriminability could account for the learning trends in Experiment 1. Participants were significantly slower at discriminating unisensory pseudowords than the novel sounds and visual shapes, which was notable given that these stimuli produced superior learning. Together the findings suggest that verbal information has an added enhancing effect on multisensory associative learning in adults

  15. Verbal and novel multisensory associative learning in adults [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/12s

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    Joanne M Fifer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To date, few studies have focused on the behavioural differences between the learning of multisensory auditory-visual and intra-modal associations. More specifically, the relative benefits of novel auditory-visual and verbal-visual associations for learning have not been directly compared. In Experiment 1, 20 adult volunteers completed three paired associate learning tasks: non-verbal novel auditory-visual (novel-AV, verbal-visual (verbal-AV; using pseudowords, and visual-visual (shape-VV. Participants were directed to make a motor response to matching novel and arbitrarily related stimulus pairs. Feedback was provided to facilitate trial and error learning. The results of Signal Detection Theory analyses suggested a multisensory enhancement of learning, with significantly higher discriminability measures (d-prime in both the novel-AV and verbal-AV tasks than the shape-VV task. Motor reaction times were also significantly faster during the verbal-AV task than during the non-verbal learning tasks.  Experiment 2 (n = 12 used a forced-choice discrimination paradigm to assess whether a difference in unisensory stimulus discriminability could account for the learning trends in Experiment 1. Participants were significantly slower at discriminating unisensory pseudowords than the novel sounds and visual shapes, which was notable given that these stimuli produced superior learning. Together the findings suggest that verbal information has an added enhancing effect on multisensory associative learning in adults

  16. Case Report: A case report of acromegaly associated with primary aldosteronism [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3ke

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    Joanna Matrozova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with a rare combination of acromegaly and primary aldosteronism. A 37 year-old female patient was diagnosed with acromegaly on the basis of typical clinical, hormonal and image characteristics. She presented also with one of the most common co-morbidities – arterial hypertension. The patient has been regularly followed-up and after three surgical interventions, irradiation and adjuvant treatment with a dopamine agonist, acromegaly was finally controlled in 2008 (20 years after diagnosis. Arterial hypertension however, remained a therapeutic problem even after prescription of four antihypertensive drugs. She had normal biochemical parameters, except for low potassium levels 3.2 (3.5-5.6 mmol/l. This raised the suspicion of primary hyperaldosteronism, confirmed by a high aldosterone to plasma rennin activity ratio, high aldosterone level after a Captopril challenge test and visualization of a 35 mm left adrenal nodule on a CT scan. After an operation, the patient recovered from hypokalemia and antihypertensive therapy was reduced to a small dose of a Ca blocker. Co-morbid arterial hypertension is common in acromegaly, though it is rare for this to be caused by Conn’s adenoma. The association of Conn’s adenoma with acromegaly has been interpreted in two lines: as a component of multiple endocrine neoplasia type (MEN1 syndrome or as a direct mitogenic effect of hyperactivated GH-IGF1 axis.

  17. The effects of anaesthesia on the developing brain: a summary of the clinical evidence [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1mv

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    Clara KY Yu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is data amassing in the literature regarding the potentially adverse effects of anaesthesia exposure on the developing human brain. The purpose of this article is to summarise current relevant data from clinical studies in this area. Methods: Articles from journals written in English were searched for using PubMed, Ovid and Medline. Keywords used included: brain (newborn, infant, child and neonate, neurodegeneration, apoptosis, toxicity, neurocognitive impairment (developmental impairment and learning disorders and anaesthesia (intravenous, inhalational and sedation. Results: From the initial search, 23 articles were identified as potentially relevant, with publication dates spanning from 1978 to 2012.  Twelve studies were deemed irrelevant to the research questions. The results of neurocognitive assessment from eight of the remaining eleven studies had showed some differences in the performances of children exposed to anaesthesia. The control population in these studies was highly variable. The age at which the subjects were exposed to anaesthesia ranged from prenatal to 4 years in the majority of studies with one including children aged up to 12 years when exposed. Discussion: Although there is clinical data suggesting a possible detrimental effect, the evidence is best considered preliminary and inconclusive at this stage. Many of the outcome measures were lacking in specificity and standardization in most cases. Parents should be counselled to not avoid necessary invasive procedures for fear of a currently ill-defined risk.  However, deferral of elective procedures beyond the first few years of life should be contemplated.

  18. Secretomes of apoptotic mononuclear cells ameliorate neurological damage in rats with focal ischemia [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4kv

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    Patrick Altmann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The pursuit of targeting multiple pathways in the ischemic cascade of cerebral stroke is a promising treatment option. We examined the regenerative potential of conditioned medium derived from rat and human apoptotic mononuclear cells (MNC, rMNCapo sec and hMNCapo sec, in experimental stroke. We performed middle cerebral artery occlusion on Wistar rats and administered apoptotic MNC-secretomes intraperitoneally in two experimental settings. Ischemic lesion volumes were determined 48 hours after cerebral ischemia. Neurological evaluations were performed after 6, 24 and 48 hours. Immunoblots were conducted to analyze neuroprotective signal-transduction in human primary glia cells and neurons. Neuronal sprouting assays were performed and neurotrophic factors in both hMNCapo sec and rat plasma were quantified using ELISA. Administration of rat as well as human apoptotic MNC-secretomes significantly reduced ischemic lesion volumes by 36% and 37%, respectively. Neurological examinations revealed improvement after stroke in both treatment groups. Co-incubation of human astrocytes, Schwann cells and neurons with hMNCapo sec resulted in activation of several signaling cascades associated with the regulation of cytoprotective gene products and enhanced neuronal sprouting in vitro. Analysis of neurotrophic factors in hMNCapo sec and rat plasma revealed high levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Our data indicate that apoptotic MNC-secretomes elicit neuroprotective effects on rats that have undergone ischemic stroke.

  19. Case Report: Testicular failure possibly associated with chronic use of methylphenidate [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/48z

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    Ranjith Ramasamy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Methylphenidate is a commonly prescribed treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. However, little is known about its adverse effects on the male reproductive system. We report a 20-year-old male patient whose chief complaint was of delayed puberty. He spoke in a high-pitched voice and complained of lack of body hair, impaired libido, inadequate erectile function, chronic fatigue, and low energy. He had been treated with methylphenidate as an infant and had continued treatment for 17 years. On examination, the patient was lean and visibly lacked facial or body hair. He further explained that he had never been able to grow underarm or facial hair and that he was often mistakenly considered a young teenager rather than a 20-year-old. The patient’s genitalia were categorized as Tanner Stage 2. Laboratory studies confirmed low serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, and testosterone levels. The patient was given exogenous testosterone supplementation with pellets and human chorionic gonadotropin to maintain testicular size. After 4 months his symptoms improved and he demonstrated signs of puberty. Our goal is to further elucidate the possible impact of methylphenidate on the male reproductive system.

  20. Environmental enrichment does not impact on tumor growth in mice [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/18c

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    Jennifer A Westwood

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of environmental enrichment (EE on a variety of physiologic and disease processes has been studied in laboratory mice. During EE, a large group of mice are housed in larger cages than the standard cage and are given toys and equipment, enabling more social contact, and providing a greater surface area per mouse, and a more stimulating environment. Studies have been performed into the effect of EE on neurogenesis, brain injury, cognitive capacity, memory, learning, neuronal pathways, diseases such as Alzheimer’s, anxiety, social defeat, emotionality, depression, drug addiction, alopecia, and stereotypies. In the cancer field, three papers have reported effects on mice injected with tumors and housed in enriched environments compared with those housed in standard conditions. One paper reported a significant decrease in tumor growth in mice in EE housing. We attempted to replicate this finding in our animal facility, because the implications of repeating this finding would have profound implications for how we house all our mice in our studies on cancer. We were unable to reproduce the results in the paper in which B16F10 subcutaneous tumors of mice housed in EE conditions were smaller than those of mice housed in standard conditions. The differences in results could have been due to the different growth rate of the B16F10 cultures from the different laboratories, the microbiota of the mice housed in the two animal facilities, variations in noise and handling between the two facilities, food composition, the chemical composition of the cages or the detergents used for cleaning, or a variety of other reasons. EE alone does not appear to consistently result in decreased tumor growth, but other factors would appear to be able to counteract or inhibit the effects of EE on cancer progression.

  1. A literatura e a teologia http://dx.doi.org/10.15601/1983-7631/rt.v3n5p164-167

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    Genilma Boehler

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma reflexão sobre literatura e teologia, pontualmente sobre poesia e teologia. Como afirmou Edgar Morin “a literatura tem a vantagem de refletir sobre a complexidade do ser humano e sobre a quantidade incrível de seus sonhos” (MORIN, 2009:6. Já a teologia, como definida por Rubem Alves, é “um jeito de falar sobre tais coisas dando-lhes um nome e apenas distinguindo-se da poesia porque a teologia é sempre feita como prece...” (ALVES, 2005:21. O encontro das duas é a ocasião para que seja feita uma reflexão acerca de Deus, a partir do espaço da poesia, recorrendo a outra linguagem, outro conhecimento, outras bibliotecas, considerando o corpo, o desejo, a vida, o mundo na medida em que apresenta a pessoa, a sociedade e a cultura.Palavras-chave: Teologia; Literatura

  2. An a posteriori measure of network modularity [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2ju

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    Timothée Poisot

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the modularity of networks, and how it deviates from random expectations, important to understand their structure and emerging properties. Several measures exist to assess modularity, which when applied to the same network, can return both different modularity values (i.e. different estimates of how modular the network is and different module compositions (i.e. different groups of species forming said modules. More importantly, as each optimization method uses a different optimization criterion, there is a need to have an a posteriori measure serving as an equivalent of a goodness-of-fit. In this article, I propose such a measure of modularity, which is simply defined as the ratio of interactions established between members of the same modules vs. members of different modules. I apply this measure to a large dataset of 290 ecological networks representing host–parasite (bipartite and predator–prey (unipartite interactions, to show how the results are easy to interpret and present especially to a broad audience not familiar with modularity analyses, but still can reveal new features about modularity and the ways to measure it.

  3. Research on Agent of Protocol Conversion of HTTP and CoAP%HTTP与CoAP的协议转换代理的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宗娜; 魏更宇

    2015-01-01

    当受限网络连接到互联网之后,为了实现在互联网浏览器上访问受限资源,需要进行HTTP到CoAP和CoAP到HTTP的转换.本文基于CoRE工作组当前的草案,讨论了协议转换的流程和转换中的关键问题.参照CoRE工作组的标准进行研究、开发和部署,成为今后重要的课题.因此在总结工作组的主要进展的基础上,本文对相关代理功能的开发和部署提出了建议.

  4. A computational analysis of the long-term regulation of arterial pressure [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2hm

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    Daniel A. Beard

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The asserted dominant role of the kidneys in the chronic regulation of blood pressure and in the etiology of hypertension has been debated since the 1970s. At the center of the theory is the observation that the acute relationships between arterial pressure and urine production—the acute pressure-diuresis and pressure-natriuresis curves—physiologically adapt to perturbations in pressure and/or changes in the rate of salt and volume intake. These adaptations, modulated by various interacting neurohumoral mechanisms, result in chronic relationships between water and salt excretion and pressure that are much steeper than the acute relationships. While the view that renal function is the dominant controller of arterial pressure has been supported by computer models of the cardiovascular system known as the “Guyton-Coleman model”, no unambiguous description of a computer model capturing chronic adaptation of acute renal function in blood pressure control has been presented. Here, such a model is developed with the goals of: 1. representing the relevant mechanisms in an identifiable mathematical model; 2. identifying model parameters using appropriate data; 3. validating model predictions in comparison to data; and 4. probing hypotheses regarding the long-term control of arterial pressure and the etiology of primary hypertension. The developed model reveals: long-term control of arterial blood pressure is primarily through the baroreflex arc and the renin-angiotensin system; and arterial stiffening provides a sufficient explanation for the etiology of primary hypertension associated with ageing. Furthermore, the model provides the first consistent explanation of the physiological response to chronic stimulation of the baroreflex.

  5. A computational analysis of the long-term regulation of arterial pressure [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1xq

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    Daniel A. Beard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The asserted dominant role of the kidneys in the chronic regulation of blood pressure and in the etiology of hypertension has been debated since the 1970s. At the center of the theory is the observation that the acute relationships between arterial pressure and urine production—the acute pressure-diuresis and pressure-natriuresis curves—physiologically adapt to perturbations in pressure and/or changes in the rate of salt and volume intake. These adaptations, modulated by various interacting neurohumoral mechanisms, result in chronic relationships between water and salt excretion and pressure that are much steeper than the acute relationships. While the view that renal function is the dominant controller of arterial pressure has been supported by computer models of the cardiovascular system known as the “Guyton-Coleman model”, no unambiguous description of a computer model capturing chronic adaptation of acute renal function in blood pressure control has been presented. Here, such a model is developed with the goals of: 1. capturing the relevant mechanisms in an identifiable mathematical model; 2. identifying model parameters using appropriate data; 3. validating model predictions in comparison to data; and 4. probing hypotheses regarding the long-term control of arterial pressure and the etiology of primary hypertension. The developed model reveals: long-term control of arterial blood pressure is primarily through the baroreflex arc and the renin-angiotensin system; and arterial stiffening provides a sufficient explanation for the etiology of primary hypertension associated with ageing. Furthermore, the model provides the first consistent explanation of the physiological response to chronic stimulation of the baroreflex.

  6. Characterization of M-laurdan, a versatile probe to explore order in lipid membranes [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4on

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    Serge Mazeres

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Microdomains corresponding to localized partition of lipids between ordered and less ordered environments are the subject of intensive investigations, because of their putative participation in modulating cellular responses. One popular approach in the field consists in labelling membranes with solvatochromic fluorescent probes such as laurdan and C-laurdan. In this report, we describe a high-yield procedure for the synthesis of laurdan, C-laurdan and two new fluorophores, called MoC-laurdan and M-laurdan, as well as their extensive photophysical characterization. We find that the latter probe, M-laurdan, is particularly suited to discriminate lipid phases independently of the chemical nature of the lipids, as measured by both fluorescence Generalized Polarization (GP and anisotropy in large unilamellar vesicles made of various lipid compositions. In addition, staining of live cells with M-laurdan shows a good stability over time without any apparent toxicity, as well as a wider distribution in the various cell compartments than the other probes.

  7. The Resource Identification Initiative: A cultural shift in publishing [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5fj

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    Anita Bandrowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A central tenet in support of research reproducibility is the ability to uniquely identify research resources, i.e., reagents, tools, and materials that are used to perform experiments. However, current reporting practices for research resources are insufficient to allow humans and algorithms to identify the exact resources that are reported or answer basic questions such as “What other studies used resource X?” To address this issue, the Resource Identification Initiative was launched as a pilot project to improve the reporting standards for research resources in the methods sections of papers and thereby improve identifiability and reproducibility. The pilot engaged over 25 biomedical journal editors from most major publishers, as well as scientists and funding officials. Authors were asked to include Research Resource Identifiers (RRIDs in their manuscripts prior to publication for three resource types: antibodies, model organisms, and tools (including software and databases. RRIDs represent accession numbers assigned by an authoritative database, e.g., the model organism databases, for each type of resource. To make it easier for authors to obtain RRIDs, resources were aggregated from the appropriate databases and their RRIDs made available in a central web portal (www.scicrunch.org/resources. RRIDs meet three key criteria: they are machine readable, free to generate and access, and are consistent across publishers and journals. The pilot was launched in February of 2014 and over 300 papers have appeared that report RRIDs. The number of journals participating has expanded from the original 25 to more than 40. Here, we present an overview of the pilot project and its outcomes to date. We show that authors are generally accurate in performing the task of identifying resources and supportive of the goals of the project. We also show that identifiability of the resources pre- and post-pilot showed a dramatic improvement for all three resource types, suggesting that the project has had a significant impact on reproducibility relating to research resources.

  8. Colonoscopic polyp detection rate is stable throughout the workday including evening colonoscopy sessions [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3cf

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    David Thurtle

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Polyp detection rate (PDR is an accepted measure of colonoscopy quality. Several factors may influence PDR including time of procedure and order of colonoscopy within a session. Our unit provides evening colonoscopy lists (6-9 pm. We examined whether colonoscopy performance declines in the evening. Design: Data for all National Health Service (NHS outpatient colonoscopies performed at Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital in 2011 were examined. Timing, demographics, indication and colonoscopy findings were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using multivariate regression. Results: Data from 2576 colonoscopies were included: 1163 (45.1% in the morning, 1123 (43.6% in the afternoon and 290 (11.3% in the evening.  Overall PDR was 40.80%. Males, increasing age and successful caecal intubation were all significantly associated with higher polyp detection. The indications ‘faecal occult blood screening’ (p<0.001 and ‘polyp surveillance’ (p<0.001 were strongly positively associated and ‘anaemia’ (p=0.01 was negatively associated with PDR. Following adjustment for  covariates, there was no significant difference in PDR between sessions. With the morning as the reference value, the odds ratio for polyp detection in the afternoon and evening were 0.93 (95% CI = 0.72-1.18 and 1.15 (95%CI = 0.82-1.61 respectively. PDR was not affected by rank of colonoscopy within a list, sedation dose or trainee-involvement. Conclusions: Time of day did not affect polyp detection rate in clinical practice. Evening colonoscopy had equivalent efficacy and is an effective tool in meeting increasing demands for endoscopy. Standardisation was shown to have a considerable effect as demographics, indication and endoscopist varied substantially between sessions. Evening sessions were popular with a younger population

  9. Case Report: Reversible cabergoline-associated cardiac valvulopathy post drug discontinuation [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2jm

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    Chris G. Yedinak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 21 year old male patient diagnosed with a 2.2 cm prolactin-secreting adenoma in contact with the optic chiasm. The patient was treated with up to 6mg/week of cabergoline (total cumulative dose 814 mg and developed mild valvulopathy. Valvulopathy was subsequently reversed after discontinuation of cabergoline therapy.

  10. Minoxidil induced hypertrichosis in a 2 year-old child [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1vw

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    Ingrid Herskovitz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 2 year-old male patient who developed generalized hypertrichosis after 2 months of treatment with 5% minoxidil foam for alopecia areata. This report highlights the danger of prescribing  topical minoxidil to young children and the need to correctly instruct caretakers about its administration.

  11. Is the pan-genome also a pan-selectome? [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/Vl9wKI

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    Francisco Rodriguez-Valera

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The comparative genomics of prokaryotes has shown the presence of conserved regions containing highly similar genes (the 'core genome' and other regions that vary in gene content (the ‘flexible’ regions. A significant part of the latter is involved in surface structures that are phage recognition targets. Another sizeable part provides for differences in niche exploitation. Metagenomic data indicates that natural populations of prokaryotes are composed of assemblages of clonal lineages or "meta-clones" that share a core of genes but contain a high diversity by varying the flexible component. This meta-clonal diversity is maintained by a collection of phages that equalize the populations by preventing any individual clonal lineage from hoarding common resources. Thus, this polyclonal assemblage and the phages preying upon them constitute natural selection units.

  12. Architecture of the superintegron in Vibrio cholerae: identification of core and unique genes [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/w6

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    Michel A Marin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vibrio cholerae, the etiologic agent of cholera, is indigenous to aquatic environments. The V. cholerae genome consists of two chromosomes; the smallest of these harbors a large gene capture and excision system called the superintegron (SI, of ~120 kbp. The flexible nature of the SI that results from gene cassette capture, deletion and rearrangement is thought to make it a hotspot of V. cholerae diversity, but beyond the basic structure it is not clear if there is a core genome in the SI and if so how it is structured. The aim of this study was to explore the core genome structure and the differences in gene content among strains of V. cholerae. Methods: From the complete genomes of seven V. cholerae and one Vibrio mimicus representative strains, we recovered the SI sequences based on the locations of the structural gene IntI4 and the V. cholerae repeats. Analysis of the pangenome, including cluster analysis of functional genes, pangenome profile analysis, genetic variation analysis of functional genes, strain evolution analysis and function enrichment analysis of gene clusters, was performed using a pangenome analysis pipeline in addition to the R scripts, splitsTree4 and genoPlotR. Results and conclusions: Here, we reveal the genetic architecture of the V. cholerae SI. It contains eight core genes when V. mimicus is included and 21 core genes when only V. cholerae strains are considered; many of them are present in several copies. The V. cholerae SI has an open pangenome, which means that V. cholerae may be able to import new gene cassettes to SI. The set of dispensable SI genes is influenced by the niche and type species. The core genes are distributed along the SI, apparently without a position effect.

  13. DataUp: A tool to help researchers describe and share tabular data [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/48u

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    Carly Strasser

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific datasets have immeasurable value, but they lose their value over time without proper documentation, long-term storage, and easy discovery and access. Across disciplines as diverse as astronomy, demography, archeology, and ecology, large numbers of small heterogeneous datasets (i.e., the long tail of data are especially at risk unless they are properly documented, saved, and shared. One unifying factor for many of these at-risk datasets is that they reside in spreadsheets. In response to this need, the California Digital Library (CDL partnered with Microsoft Research Connections and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to create the DataUp data management tool for Microsoft Excel. Many researchers creating these small, heterogeneous datasets use Excel at some point in their data collection and analysis workflow, so we were interested in developing a data management tool that fits easily into those work flows and minimizes the learning curve for researchers. The DataUp project began in August 2011. We first formally assessed the needs of researchers by conducting surveys and interviews of our target research groups: earth, environmental, and ecological scientists. We found that, on average, researchers had very poor data management practices, were not aware of data centers or metadata standards, and did not understand the benefits of data management or sharing. Based on our survey results, we composed a list of desirable components and requirements and solicited feedback from the community to prioritize potential features of the DataUp tool. These requirements were then relayed to the software developers, and DataUp was successfully launched in October 2012.

  14. Case Report: Neuropathic pain in a patient with congenital insensitivity to pain [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5iu

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    Daniel W. Wheeler

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a unique case of a woman with Channelopathy-associated Insensitivity to Pain (CIP Syndrome, who developed features of neuropathic pain after sustaining pelvic fractures and an epidural hematoma that impinged on the right fifth lumbar (L5 nerve root. Her pelvic injuries were sustained during painless labor, which culminated in a Cesarean section. She had been diagnosed with CIP as child, which was later confirmed when she was found to have null mutations of the SCN9A gene that encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. She now complains of troubling continuous buzzing in both legs and a vice-like squeezing in the pelvis on walking. Quantitative sensory testing showed that sensory thresholds to mechanical stimulation of the dorsum of both feet had increased more than 10-fold on both sides compared with tests performed before her pregnancy. These findings fulfill the diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pain. Notably, she mostly only experiences the negative symptoms (such as numbness and tingling, but also electric shocks, and she has not reported sharp or burning sensations, although the value of verbal descriptors is somewhat limited in a person who has never felt pain before. However, her case strongly suggests that at least some of the symptoms of neuropathic pain can persist despite the absence of the Nav1.7 channel. Pain is a subjective experience and this case sheds light on the transmission of neuropathic pain in humans that cannot be learned from knockout mice.

  15. Prmt7 is dispensable in tissue culture models for adipogenic differentiation [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2im

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    Yu-Jie Hu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein arginine methylation is a common posttranslational modification that has been implicated in numerous biological processes including gene expression. The mammalian genome encodes nine protein arginine methyltransferases (Prmts that catalyze monomethylation, asymmetric dimethylation, and symmetric dimethylation on arginine residues. Protein arginine methyltransferase 7 (Prmt7 is categorized as a type II and type III enzyme that produces symmetric dimethylated arginine and monomethylated arginine, respectively. However, the biological role of Prmt7 is not well characterized. We previously showed that Prmt5, a type II Prmt that associates with Brg1-based SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, is required for adipocyte differentiation. Since Prmt7 also associates with Brg1-based SWI/SNF complex and modifies core histones, we hypothesized that Prmt7 might play a role in transcriptional regulation of adipogenesis. In the present study, we determined that the expression of Prmt7 did not change throughout adipogenic differentiation of C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells. Knockdown or over-expression of Prmt7 had no effect on lipid accumulation or adipogenic gene expression in differentiating C3H10T1/2 cells or in C/EBPα-reprogrammed NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Based on these results, we conclude that Prmt7, unlike Prmt5, is dispensable for adipogenic differentiation in tissue culture models.

  16. Glycine-extended gastrin enhances somatostatin release from cultured rabbit fundic D-cells [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/8n

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    Ian LP Beales

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of the peptide hormone gastrin in stimulating gastric acid secretion is well established. Mature amidated gastrin is processed from larger peptide precursor forms. Increasingly these processing intermediates, such as glycine-extended gastrin (G-Gly and progastrin, have been shown to have biological activities of their own, often separate and complementary to gastrin. Although G-Gly is synthesized and secreted by gastric antral G-cells, the physiological functions of this putative mediator are unclear. Gastrin and cholecystokinin (CCK stimulate the secretion of somatostatin from gastric D-cells as part of the feedback control of gastric acid. In this study the effect of G-Gly and gastrin on the release of somatostatin from rabbit fundic D-cells was examined. D-cells were obtained by collagenase-EDTA digestion and elutriation and cultured for 48 hours. With a 2 hour exposure to the peptides, gastrin but not G-Gly stimulated somatostatin release. Treatment of D-cells for 24 hours with gastrin or G-Gly individually, significantly enhanced subsequent basal as well as CCK- and GLP-1-stimulated somatostatin release. Twenty four hours exposure to gastrin combined with G-Gly synergistically enhanced basal and agonist-stimulated somatostatin release and cellular somatostatin content. Gastrin and G-Gly may be important in the longer term regulation of D-cell function.

  17. An evolutionarily significant unicellular strategy in response to starvation in Dictyostelium social amoebae [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4kb

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    Darja Dubravcic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is widely studied for its multicellular development program as a response to starvation. Aggregates of up to 106 cells form fruiting bodies containing (i dormant spores (~80% that can persist for months in the absence of nutrients, and (ii dead stalk cells (~20% that promote the dispersion of the spores towards nutrient-rich areas. It is often overlooked that not all cells aggregate upon starvation. Using a new quantitative approach based on time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and a low ratio of reporting cells, we have quantified this fraction of non-aggregating cells. In realistic starvation conditions, up to 15% of cells do not aggregate, which makes this third cell fate a significant component of the population-level response of social amoebae to starvation. Non-aggregating cells have an advantage over cells in aggregates since they resume growth earlier upon arrival of new nutrients, but have a shorter lifespan under prolonged starvation. We find that phenotypic heterogeneities linked to cell nutritional state bias the representation of cells in the aggregating vs. non-aggregating fractions, and thus affect population partitioning. Next, we report that the fraction of non-aggregating cells depends on genetic factors that regulate the timing of starvation, signal sensing efficiency and aggregation efficiency. In addition, interactions between clones in mixtures of non-isogenic cells affect the partitioning of each clone into both fractions. We further build a numerical model to test the evolutionary significance of the non-aggregating cell fraction. The partitioning of cells into aggregating and non-aggregating fractions is optimal in fluctuating environments with an unpredictable duration of starvation periods. Our study highlights the unicellular component of the response of social amoebae to starvation, and thus extends its evolutionary and ecological framework.

  18. Non-invasive imaging to monitor lupus nephritis and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5gh

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    Joshua Thurman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease that can affect multiple different organs, including the kidneys and central nervous system (CNS. Conventional radiological examinations in SLE patients include volumetric/ anatomical computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and ultrasound (US. The utility of these modalities is limited, however, due to the complexity of the disease. Furthermore, CT and MRI contrast agents are contraindicated in patients with renal impairment. Various radiologic methods are currently being developed to improve disease characterization in patients with SLE beyond simple anatomical endpoints. Physiological non-contrast MRI protocols have been developed to assess tissue oxygenation, glomerular filtration, renal perfusion, interstitial diffusion, and inflammation-driven fibrosis in lupus nephritis (LN patients. For neurological symptoms, vessel size imaging (VSI, an MRI approach utilizing T2-relaxing iron oxide nanoparticles has shown promise as a diagnostic tool. Molecular imaging probes (mostly for MRI and nuclear medicine imaging have also been developed for diagnosing SLE with high sensitivity, and for monitoring disease activity. This paper reviews the challenges in evaluating disease activity in patients with LN and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE. We describe novel MRI and positron-emission tomography (PET molecular imaging protocols using targeted iron oxide nanoparticles and radioactive ligands, respectively, for detection of SLE-associated inflammation.

  19. A review of the biologic and pharmacologic role of docosapentaenoic acid n-3 [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/41a

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    Puya G Yazdi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fish oil contains a complex mixture of omega-3 fatty acids, of which eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA are the three predominant forms. There has been a plethora of previous research on the effects and associations of fish oil supplementation with various clinical manifestations. While the majority of this work was focused on EPA and DHA as the active compounds, emerging research has begun to elucidate the specific role that DPA plays in these physiological processes and its differences with the other omega-3 fatty acids. The purpose of this review is to focus on the new studies undertaken with DPA. This review summarizes the biochemical mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of DPA before focusing on its effects in cardiovascular disease, immune function, and psychiatric and cognitive health. The limited studies point toward a positive role that DPA supplementation can play in these processes and that is separate and distinct from traditional supplementation with DHA and EPA.

  20. A developmental biologist’s journey to rediscover the Zen of plant physiology [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/53n

    OpenAIRE

    José R Dinneny

    2015-01-01

    Physiology, which is often viewed as a field of study distinct from development, is technically defined as the branch of biology that explores the normal function of living organisms and their parts. Because plants normally develop continuously throughout their life, plant physiology actually encompasses all developmental processes. Viewing plant biology from a physiologist’s perspective is an attempt to understand the interconnectedness of development, form, and function in the context of mu...

  1. Cladonia lichens on extensive green roofs: evapotranspiration, substrate temperature, and albedo [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2ha

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    Amy Heim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Green roofs are constructed ecosystems that provide ecosystem services in urban environments. Shallow substrate green roofs subject the vegetation layer to desiccation and other environmental extremes, so researchers have evaluated a variety of stress-tolerant vegetation types for green roof applications. Lichens can be found in most terrestrial habitats.  They are able to survive extremely harsh conditions, including frequent cycles of desiccation and rehydration, nutrient-poor soil, fluctuating temperatures, and high UV intensities. Extensive green roofs (substrate depth <20cm exhibit these harsh conditions, making lichens possible candidates for incorporation into the vegetation layer on extensive green roofs.  In a modular green roof system, we tested the effect of Cladonia lichens on substrate temperature, water loss, and albedo compared to a substrate-only control. Overall, the Cladonia modules had significantly cooler substrate temperatures during the summer and significantly warmer temperatures during the fall.  Additionally, the Cladonia modules lost significantly less water than the substrate-only control. This implies that they may be able to benefit neighboring vascular plant species by reducing water loss and maintaining favorable substrate temperatures.

  2. Cladonia lichens on extensive green roofs: evapotranspiration, substrate temperature, and albedo [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2v4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Heim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Green roofs are constructed ecosystems that provide ecosystem services in urban environments. Shallow substrate green roofs subject the vegetation layer to desiccation and other environmental extremes, so researchers have evaluated a variety of stress-tolerant vegetation types for green roof applications. Lichens can be found in most terrestrial habitats.  They are able to survive extremely harsh conditions, including frequent cycles of desiccation and rehydration, nutrient-poor soil, fluctuating temperatures, and high UV intensities. Extensive green roofs (substrate depth <20cm exhibit these harsh conditions, making lichens possible candidates for incorporation into the vegetation layer on extensive green roofs.  In a modular green roof system, we tested the effect of Cladonia lichens on substrate temperature, water loss, and albedo compared to a substrate-only control. Overall, the Cladonia modules had significantly cooler substrate temperatures during the summer and significantly warmer temperatures during the fall.  Additionally, the Cladonia modules lost significantly less water than the substrate-only control. This implies that they may be able to benefit neighboring vascular plant species by reducing water loss and maintaining favorable substrate temperatures.

  3. Levodopa effects on [11C]raclopride binding in the resting human brain [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4oe

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    Kevin J. Black

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Synaptic dopamine (DA release induced by amphetamine or other experimental manipulations can displace [11C]raclopride (RAC* from dopamine D2-like receptors. We hypothesized that exogenous levodopa might increase dopamine release at striatal synapses under some conditions but not others, allowing a more naturalistic assessment of presynaptic dopaminergic function. Presynaptic dopaminergic abnormalities have been reported in Tourette syndrome (TS. Objective: Test whether levodopa induces measurable synaptic DA release in healthy people at rest, and gather pilot data in TS. Methods: This double-blind crossover study used RAC* and positron emission tomography (PET to measure synaptic dopamine release 4 times in each of 10 carbidopa-pretreated, neuroleptic-naïve adults: before and during an infusion of levodopa on one day and placebo on another (in random order. Five subjects had TS and 5 were matched controls. RAC* binding potential (BPND was quantified in predefined anatomical volumes of interest (VOIs. A separate analysis compared BPND voxel by voxel over the entire brain. Results: DA release declined between the first and second scan of each day (p=0.012, including on the placebo day. Levodopa did not significantly reduce striatal RAC* binding and striatal binding did not differ significantly between TS and control groups. However, levodopa’s effect on DA release differed significantly in a right midbrain region (p=0.002, corrected, where levodopa displaced RAC* by 59% in control subjects but increased BPND by 74% in TS subjects. Discussion: Decreased DA release on the second scan of the day is consistent with the few previous studies with a similar design, and may indicate habituation to study procedures. We hypothesize that mesostriatal DA neurons fire relatively little while subjects rest, possibly explaining the non-significant effect of levodopa on striatal RAC* binding. The modest sample size argues for caution in interpreting the group difference in midbrain DA release with levodopa.

  4. Enhancement of COPD biological networks using a web-based collaboration interface [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5ew

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    The sbv IMPROVER project team (in alphabetical order

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The construction and application of biological network models is an approach that offers a holistic way to understand biological processes involved in disease. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a progressive inflammatory disease of the airways for which therapeutic options currently are limited after diagnosis, even in its earliest stage. COPD network models are important tools to better understand the biological components and processes underlying initial disease development. With the increasing amounts of literature that are now available, crowdsourcing approaches offer new forms of collaboration for researchers to review biological findings, which can be applied to the construction and verification of complex biological networks. We report the construction of 50 biological network models relevant to lung biology and early COPD using an integrative systems biology and collaborative crowd-verification approach. By combining traditional literature curation with a data-driven approach that predicts molecular activities from transcriptomics data, we constructed an initial COPD network model set based on a previously published non-diseased lung-relevant model set. The crowd was given the opportunity to enhance and refine the networks on a website (https://bionet.sbvimprover.com/ and to add mechanistic detail, as well as critically review existing evidence and evidence added by other users, so as to enhance the accuracy of the biological representation of the processes captured in the networks. Finally, scientists and experts in the field discussed and refined the networks during an in-person jamboree meeting. Here, we describe examples of the changes made to three of these networks: Neutrophil Signaling, Macrophage Signaling, and Th1-Th2 Signaling. We describe an innovative approach to biological network construction that combines literature and data mining and a crowdsourcing approach to generate a comprehensive set of COPD-relevant models that can be used to help understand the mechanisms related to lung pathobiology. Registered users of the website can freely browse and download the networks.

  5. Understanding carbon regulation in aquatic systems - Bacteriophages as a model [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4zd

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    Swapnil Sanmukh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The bacteria and their phages are the most abundant constituents of the aquatic environment, and so represent an ideal model for studying carbon regulation in an aquatic system. The microbe-mediated interconversion of bioavailable organic carbon (OC into dissolved organic carbon (DOC by the microbial carbon pump (MCP has been suggested to have the potential to revolutionize our view of carbon sequestration. It is estimated that DOC is the largest pool of organic matter in the ocean and, though a major component of the global carbon cycle, its source is not yet well understood. A key element of the carbon cycle is the microbial conversion of DOC into inedible forms. The primary aim of this study is to understand the phage conversion from organic to inorganic carbon during phage-host interactions. Time studies of phage-host interactions under controlled conditions reveal their impact on the total carbon content of the samples and their interconversion of organic and inorganic carbon compared to control samples. A total organic carbon (TOC analysis showed an increase in inorganic carbon content by 15-25 percent in samples with bacteria and phage compared to samples with bacteria alone. Compared to control samples, the increase in inorganic carbon content was 60-70-fold in samples with bacteria and phage, and 50-55-fold for samples with bacteria alone. This study indicates the potential impact of phages in regulating the carbon cycle of aquatic systems.

  6. Food sovereignty: an alternative paradigm for poverty reduction and biodiversity conservation in Latin America [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/23s

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    M Jahi Chappell

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Strong feedback between global biodiversity loss and persistent, extreme rural poverty are major challenges in the face of concurrent food, energy, and environmental crises. This paper examines the role of industrial agricultural intensification and market integration as exogenous socio-ecological drivers of biodiversity loss and poverty traps in Latin America. We then analyze the potential of a food sovereignty framework, based on protecting the viability of a diverse agroecological matrix while supporting rural livelihoods and global food production. We review several successful examples of this approach, including ecological land reform in Brazil, agroforestry, milpa, and the uses of wild varieties in smallholder systems in Mexico and Central America. We highlight emergent research directions that will be necessary to assess the potential of the food sovereignty model to promote both biodiversity conservation and poverty reduction.

  7. The Binding Ring Illusion: assimilation affects the perceived size of a circular array [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/12q

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    J Daniel McCarthy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Our perception of an object’s size arises from the integration of multiple sources of visual information including retinal size, perceived distance and its size relative to other objects in the visual field. This constructive process is revealed through a number of classic size illusions such as the Delboeuf Illusion, the Ebbinghaus Illusion and others illustrating size constancy. Here we present a novel variant of the Delbouef and Ebbinghaus size illusions that we have named the Binding Ring Illusion. The illusion is such that the perceived size of a circular array of elements is underestimated when superimposed by a circular contour – a binding ring – and overestimated when the binding ring slightly exceeds the overall size of the array. Here we characterize the stimulus conditions that lead to the illusion, and the perceptual principles that underlie it. Our findings indicate that the perceived size of an array is susceptible to the assimilation of an explicitly defined superimposed contour. Our results also indicate that the assimilation process takes place at a relatively high level in the visual processing stream, after different spatial frequencies have been integrated and global shape has been constructed. We hypothesize that the Binding Ring Illusion arises due to the fact that the size of an array of elements is not explicitly defined and therefore can be influenced (through a process of assimilation by the presence of a superimposed object that does have an explicit size.

  8. Structure and dynamics of the membrane attaching nitric oxide transporter nitrophorin 7 [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/508

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    Markus Knipp

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitrophorins represent a unique class of heme proteins that are able to perform the delicate transportation and release of the free-radical gaseous messenger nitric oxide (NO in a pH-triggered manner. Besides its ability to bind to phospholipid membranes, the N-terminus contains an additional Leu-Pro-Gly stretch, which is a unique sequence trait, and the heme cavity is significantly altered with respect to other nitrophorins. These distinctive features encouraged us to solve the X-ray crystallographic structures of NP7 at low and high pH and bound with different heme ligands (nitric oxide, histamine, imidazole. The overall fold of the lipocalin motif is well preserved in the different X-ray structures and resembles the fold of other nitrophorins. However, a chain-like arrangement in the crystal lattice due to a number of head-to-tail electrostatic stabilizing interactions is found in NP7. Furthermore, the X-ray structures also reveal ligand-dependent changes in the orientation of the heme, as well as in specific interactions between the A-B and G-H loops, which are considered to be relevant for the biological function of nitrophorins. Fast and ultrafast laser triggered ligand rebinding experiments demonstrate the pH-dependent ligand migration within the cavities and the exit route. Finally, the topological distribution of pockets located around the heme as well as from inner cavities present at the rear of the protein provides a distinctive feature in NP7, so that while a loop gated exit mechanism to the solvent has been proposed for most nitrophorins, a more complex mechanism that involves several interconnected gas hosting cavities is proposed for NP7.

  9. Structure and dynamics of the membrane attaching nitric oxide transporter nitrophorin 7 [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5p1

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    Markus Knipp

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrophorins represent a unique class of heme proteins that are able to perform the delicate transportation and release of the free-radical gaseous messenger nitric oxide (NO in a pH-triggered manner. Besides its ability to bind to phospholipid membranes, the N-terminus of NP7, a member of the NO transporter nitrophorin family, contains an additional Leu-Pro-Gly stretch, which is a unique sequence trait, and the heme cavity is significantly altered with respect to other nitrophorins. These distinctive features encouraged us to solve the X-ray crystallographic structures of NP7 at low and high pH and bound with different heme ligands (nitric oxide, histamine, imidazole. The overall fold of the lipocalin motif is well preserved in the different X-ray structures and resembles the fold of other nitrophorins. However, a chain-like arrangement in the crystal lattice due to a number of head-to-tail electrostatic stabilizing interactions is found in NP7. Furthermore, the X-ray structures also reveal ligand-dependent changes in the orientation of the heme, as well as in specific interactions between the A-B and G-H loops, which are considered to be relevant for the biological function of nitrophorins. Fast and ultrafast laser triggered ligand rebinding experiments demonstrate the pH-dependent ligand migration within the cavities and the exit route. Finally, the topological distribution of pockets located around the heme as well as from inner cavities present at the rear of the protein provides a distinctive feature in NP7, so that while a loop gated exit mechanism to the solvent has been proposed for most nitrophorins, a more complex mechanism that involves several interconnected gas hosting cavities is proposed for NP7.

  10. Seeing and believing: recent advances in imaging cell-cell interactions [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5br

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    Alpha S. Yap

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in cell and developmental biology have often been closely linked to advances in our ability to visualize structure and function at many length and time scales. In this review, we discuss how new imaging technologies and new reagents have provided novel insights into the biology of cadherin-based cell-cell junctions. We focus on three developments: the application of super-resolution optical technologies to characterize the nanoscale organization of cadherins at cell-cell contacts, new approaches to interrogate the mechanical forces that act upon junctions, and advances in electron microscopy which have the potential to transform our understanding of cell-cell junctions.

  11. Questioned validity of Gene Expression Dysregulated Domains in Down's Syndrome [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5ky

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    Long H. Do

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, in studies examining fibroblasts obtained from the tissues of one set of monozygotic twins (i.e. fetuses derived from the same egg discordant for trisomy 21 (Down syndrome; DS, Letourneau et al., reported the presence of a defined pattern of dysregulation within specific genomic domains they referred to as Gene Expression Dysregulated Domains (GEDDs. GEDDs were described as alternating segments of increased or decreased gene expression affecting all chromosomes. Strikingly, GEDDs in fibroblasts were largely conserved in induced pluripotent cells (iPSCs generated from the twin’s fibroblasts as well as in fibroblasts from the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. Our recent analysis failed to find GEDDs. We reexamined the human iPSCs RNAseq data from Letourneau et al., and data from this same research group published earlier examining iPSCs from the same monozygotic twins. An independent analysis of RNAseq data from Ts65Dn fibroblasts also failed to confirm presence of GEDDs. Our analysis questions the validity of GEDDs in DS.

  12. http://www.bio.uaic.ro/publicatii/anale_biochimie/data/archive/papers/2007/2/2007_Anale_GBM_VIII_f2_l23.pdf

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    Lucian Hritcu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of lesioning the ventral tegmental area or substantia nigra pars reticulata by means of bilateral microinjections of two doses of kainic acid (50 ng/250 nl and 100 ng/500 nl were investigated to clarify the role of the mesotelencephalic dopamine system in learning and memory processes. Our findings suggest that ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons play an important role in retention of both short-term memory, tested in the Ymaze task and long-term memory evaluated with the multi-trial passive avoidance test, without affecting memory acquisition. As compared to short-term memory, long-term memory is more susceptible to the decreased dopamine level in nervous structures involved in processing and storage of information

  13. A novel mouse model of creatine transporter deficiency [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4f8

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    Laura Baroncelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the creatine (Cr transporter (CrT gene lead to cerebral creatine deficiency syndrome-1 (CCDS1, an X-linked metabolic disorder characterized by cerebral Cr deficiency causing intellectual disability, seizures, movement  and behavioral disturbances, language and speech impairment ( OMIM #300352. CCDS1 is still an untreatable pathology that can be very invalidating for patients and caregivers. Only two murine models of CCDS1, one of which is an ubiquitous knockout mouse, are currently available to study the possible mechanisms underlying the pathologic phenotype of CCDS1 and to develop therapeutic strategies. Given the importance of validating phenotypes and efficacy of promising treatments in more than one mouse model we have generated a new murine model of CCDS1 obtained by ubiquitous deletion of 5-7 exons in the Slc6a8 gene. We showed a remarkable Cr depletion in the murine brain tissues and cognitive defects, thus resembling the key features of human CCDS1. These results confirm that CCDS1 can be well modeled in mice. This CrT−/y murine model will provide a new tool for increasing the relevance of preclinical studies to the human disease.

  14. Bispectral index detects intraoperative cerebral ischaemia during balloon assisted cerebral aneurysm coiling [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2xs

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    Zoe Harclerode

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bispectral index (BIS is a monitoring modality designed and used for monitoring depth of anaesthesia. We wish to report a case where BIS monitoring may have alerted us to a potential adverse neurological event during angiographic coiling of a cerebral aneurysm.

  15. EpiCollect+: linking smartphones to web applications for complex data collection projects [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3vk

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    David M. Aanensen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we have described the development of the generic mobile phone data gathering tool, EpiCollect, and an associated web application, providing two-way communication between multiple data gatherers and a project database. This software only allows data collection on the phone using a single questionnaire form that is tailored to the needs of the user (including a single GPS point and photo per entry, whereas many applications require a more complex structure, allowing users to link a series of forms in a linear or branching hierarchy, along with the addition of any number of media types accessible from smartphones and/or tablet devices (e.g., GPS, photos, videos, sound clips and barcode scanning. A much enhanced version of EpiCollect has been developed (EpiCollect+. The individual data collection forms in EpiCollect+ provide more design complexity than the single form used in EpiCollect, and the software allows the generation of complex data collection projects through the ability to link many forms together in a linear (or branching hierarchy. Furthermore, EpiCollect+ allows the collection of multiple media types as well as standard text fields, increased data validation and form logic. The entire process of setting up a complex mobile phone data collection project to the specification of a user (project and form definitions can be undertaken at the EpiCollect+ website using a simple ‘drag and drop’ procedure, with visualisation of the data gathered using Google Maps and charts at the project website. EpiCollect+ is suitable for situations where multiple users transmit complex data by mobile phone (or other Android devices to a single project web database and is already being used for a range of field projects, particularly public health projects in sub-Saharan Africa. However, many uses can be envisaged from education, ecology and epidemiology to citizen science.

  16. Delayed ejaculation and alexithymia: what is the relationship? [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/15x

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    Paolo Maria Michetti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Delayed Ejaculation (DE is probably the least studied and understood of the male sexual dysfunctions (MSD. There is still little unanimity concerning its psychological/interpersonal aetiology. Previous studies found that MSD are strongly related with alexithymia, a multifaceted personality construct that describes a disturbance in the regulation of emotions.The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of alexithymia in men with DE and correlate alexithymia levels with DE severity. According to specific features of the symptoms, we hypothesized that alexithymia would not be correlated with this specific sexual disorder. 54 outpatients with a diagnosis of DE assessed at the Institute of Clinical Sexology and the Urology Department of Sapienza, University in Rome were enrolled in the study. DE was diagnosed after a specialist examination and according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders -IV-TR criteria. Participants were provided with the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (20 items; TAS-20, a self-measure of the Intravaginal Ejaculation Latency Time and an ad hoc questionnaire to collect anamnestic data. 9.3% of patients could be categorized as alexithymics, 9.3% of them as borderline, while 81.4% of the sample was found to be non-alexithymic. The overall average TAS-20 score was 45.46. Results show that alexithymia is correlated neither with the presence of DE nor with its severity, in contrast to other MSDs, where this condition was found in about 30% of patients. The data presented suggest that DE, although not correlated to alexithymia, is probably related to other psychogenic features such as hypercontrol configuration. This paper can contribute to the understanding of DE, by excluding one of the possible etiological factors, previously found to be important in the onset and the maintenance of the other MSDs. More studies are needed in order to better understand DE and provide recommendations about treatment.

  17. Case Report: Group B Streptococcus meningitis in an adolescent  [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3u4

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    Roselle Vittorino

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS usually colonizes the gastrointestinal and lower genital tracts of asymptomatic hosts, yet the incidence of invasive disease is on the rise. We describe a case of an 18 year old woman, recently diagnosed with lupus, who reported a spontaneous abortion six weeks prior to her hospitalization.  She presented with fever, altered mental status, and meningeal signs, paired with a positive blood culture for GBS. Magnetic resonance imaging of her brain demonstrated an extra-axial fluid collection, and she was diagnosed with meningitis.  She received prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy and aggressive treatment for lupus, leading to clinical recovery. This case illustrates the importance of recognizing GBS as a potential pathogen in all patients presenting with CNS infection.  

  18. An object oriented implementation of the Yeadon human inertia model [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/558

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    Christopher Dembia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We present an open source software implementation of a popular mathematical method developed by M.R. Yeadon for calculating the body and segment inertia parameters of a human body. The software is written in a high level open source language and provides three interfaces for manipulating the data and the model: a Python API, a command-line user interface, and a graphical user interface. Thus the software can fit into various data processing pipelines and requires only simple geometrical measures as input.

  19. Pericardial synovial sarcoma: challenges in diagnosis and management [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/329

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    Prajakta Phatak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pericardial synovial sarcoma is an extremely rare tumor with poor prognosis. Timely diagnosis and aggressive multimodal management improves patient outcome. We present our experience of diagnosis and management of a young patient with monophasic synovial sarcoma arising from pericardium. Case: A 27-year-old man presented with dyspnea and cough of three weeks duration. Examination revealed sinus tachycardia, distant heart sounds and elevated jugular venous pressure. Chest X-ray showed widened mediastinum. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE noted large pericardial effusion with tamponade physiology. Therapeutic pericardiocentesis yielded hemorrhagic fluid. Computed tomography (CT of the chest showed persistent pericardial effusion and a left anterior mediastinal mass. Left anterior thoracotomy, pericardial window and left anterior mediastinotomy were done, revealing a well-encapsulated gelatinous tumor originating from the pericardium. Histology and immunohistochemical profile showed the tumor to be a monophasic synovial sarcoma. Fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH was positive for SS18 (SYT gene rearrangement on chromosome 18q11, substantiating the diagnosis. Work-up for metastases was negative. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy with high dose ifosfamide led to substantial reduction in the size of the tumor. The patient underwent surgical resection and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT post surgery. He had symptom-free survival for 8 months prior to local recurrence. This was managed with left lung upper lobectomy and follow-up chemotherapy with docetaxel. The patient is currently stable with an acceptable functional status. Conclusion: In patients with pericardial effusions of unknown etiology, multiple modalities of cardiac imaging must be employed if there is suspicion of a pericardial mass. CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI are useful to evaluate for pericardial thickening or masses in addition to TTE. Treatment of synovial sarcoma is not well established. Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment. In non-resectable tumors, aggressive neo-adjuvant chemotherapy with ifosfamide followed by surgical resection and EBRT may lead to improved outcome.

  20. No psychological effect of color context in a low level vision task [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/202

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    Adam Pedley

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: A remarkable series of recent papers have shown that colour can influence performance in cognitive tasks. In particular, they suggest that viewing a participant number printed in red ink or other red ancillary stimulus elements improves performance in tasks requiring local processing and impedes performance in tasks requiring global processing whilst the reverse is true for the colour blue. The tasks in these experiments require high level cognitive processing such as analogy solving or remote association tests and the chromatic effect on local vs. global processing is presumed to involve widespread activation of the autonomic nervous system. If this is the case, we might expect to see similar effects on all local vs. global task comparisons. To test this hypothesis, we asked whether chromatic cues also influence performance in tasks involving low level visual feature integration. Methods: Subjects performed either local (contrast detection or global (form detection tasks on achromatic dynamic Glass pattern stimuli. Coloured instructions, target frames and fixation points were used to attempt to bias performance to different task types. Based on previous literature, we hypothesised that red cues would improve performance in the (local contrast detection task but would impede performance in the (global form detection task.  Results: A two-way, repeated measures, analysis of covariance (2×2 ANCOVA with gender as a covariate, revealed no influence of colour on either task, F(1,29 = 0.289, p = 0.595, partial η2 = 0.002. Additional analysis revealed no significant differences in only the first attempts of the tasks or in the improvement in performance between trials. Discussion: We conclude that motivational processes elicited by colour perception do not influence neuronal signal processing in the early visual system, in stark contrast to their putative effects on processing in higher areas.

  1. Resources, challenges and way forward in rare mitochondrial diseases research [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/54x

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    Anshu Bhardwaj

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Over 300 million people are affected by about 7000 rare diseases globally. There are tremendous resource limitations and challenges in driving research and drug development for rare diseases. Hence, innovative approaches are needed to identify potential solutions. This review focuses on the resources developed over the past years for analysis of genome data towards understanding disease biology especially in the context of mitochondrial diseases, given that mitochondria are central to major cellular pathways and their dysfunction leads to a broad spectrum of diseases. Platforms for collaboration of research groups, clinicians and patients and the advantages of community collaborative efforts in addressing rare diseases are also discussed. The review also describes crowdsourcing and crowdfunding efforts in rare diseases research and how the upcoming initiatives for understanding disease biology including analyses of large number of genomes are also applicable to rare diseases.

  2. Murine Tim-1 is excluded from the immunological synapse [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/QSgUx0

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    Jean Lin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between T cells and APCs bearing cognate antigen results in the formation of an immunological synapse (IS. During this process, many receptors and signaling proteins segregate to regions proximal to the synapse. This protein movement is thought to influence T cell function. However, some proteins are transported away from the IS, which is controlled in part by ERM family proteins. Tim-1 is a transmembrane protein with co-stimulatory functions that is found on many immune cells, including T cells. However, the expression pattern of Tim-1 on T cells upon activation by APCs has not been explored. Interestingly, in this study we demonstrate that the majority of Tim-1 on activated T cells is excluded from the IS. Tim-1 predominantly resides outside of the IS, and structure/function studies indicate that the cytoplasmic tail influences Tim-1 polarization. Specifically, a putative ERM binding motif (KRK 244-246 in the Tim-1 cytoplasmic tail appears necessary for proper Tim-1 localization. Furthermore, mutation of the KRK motif results in enhanced early tyrosine phosphorylation downstream of TCR/CD28 stimulation upon ectopic expression of Tim-1. Paradoxically however, the KRK motif is necessary for Tim-1 co-stimulation of NFAT/AP-1 activation and co-stimulation of cytokine production. This work reveals unexpected complexity underlying Tim-1 localization and suggests potentially novel mechanisms by which Tim-1 modulates T cell activity.

  3. Digital collaborative learning: identifying what students value [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/55h

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    Claire Hemingway

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Digital technologies are changing the learning landscape and connecting classrooms to learning environments beyond the school walls.  Online collaborations among students, teachers, and scientists are new opportunities for authentic science experiences.  Here we present findings generated on PlantingScience (www.plantingscience.org, an online community where scientists from more than 14 scientific societies have mentored over 14,000 secondary school students as they design and think through their own team investigations on plant biology.  The core intervention is online discourse between student teams and scientist mentors to enhance classroom-based plant investigations.  We asked: (1 what attitudes about engaging in authentic science do students reveal, and (2 how do student attitudes relate to design principles of the program? Lexical analysis of open-ended survey questions revealed that students most highly value working with plants and scientists.  By examining student responses to this cognitive apprenticeship model, we provide new perspectives on the importance of the personal relationships students form with scientists and plants when working as members of a research community. These perspectives have implications for plant science instruction and e-mentoring programs.

  4. Chile’s dilemma: how to reinsert scientists trained abroad [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4cm

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    Alexia Nunez-Parra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chile is recognized worldwide as an emergent economy, with a great power in natural resource exploitation. Nonetheless, despite being one of the most developed countries in Latin America, Chile imports most of the knowledge and technology necessary to drive innovation in the country. The tight budget that the Chilean government assigned to research and development and the absence of a long-term scientific agenda contributed to a limited supply of scientists over the years. In an effort to reverse this scenario, Chile has created several fellowships, such as the Becas Chile Program (BCP to encourage new generations to pursue graduate studies to ultimately advance research and development in situ. More than 6000 fellows are now being trained abroad, accumulating an incredible potential to transform the Chilean scientific environment as we know it.  Chile now faces a greater challenge: it has to offer infrastructure and job openings to the highly skilled professionals in whom it invested. Unfortunately no clear public policies to address this situation have been developed, partially due to the lack of a dedicated institution, such as a Ministry for Science and Technology which could focalize the necessary efforts to promote such policies. Therefore, in the meantime, Chilean scientist have been motivated to create different organizations, such as, Mas Ciencia para Chile and Nexos Chile-USA, to promote constructive discussion of the policies that could be implemented to improve the Chilean scientific situation. We hope that these and other organizations have a real impact on the generation of scientific guidelines that will finally contribute to the development of the country.

  5. The reproductive season of scleractinian corals in Socotra, Yemen [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/36f

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    Andrew H. Baird

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Determining when corals reproduce has clear management and economic implications. Here we document the reproductive condition of corals in the genus Acropora on the island of Socotra in Yemen during February 2014. Twenty percent of colonies (n = 143 contained mature gametes and 28% had immature gametes indicating that spawning will occur in both February and March in 2014, confirming previous anecdotal reports of coral spawning at this time in Socotra. Acropora typically reproduce in synchrony with many other broadcast spawning scleractinian corals, and we therefore predict that many other species are reproductively active at this time of year.

  6. agINFRA: a research data hub for agriculture, food and the environment [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5hk

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    Andreas Drakos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The agINFRA project (www.aginfra.eu was a European Commission funded project under the 7th Framework Programme that aimed to introduce agricultural scientific communities to the vision of open and participatory data-intensive science. agINFRA has now evolved into the European hub for data-powered research on agriculture, food and the environment, serving the research community through multiple roles. Working on enhancing the interoperability between heterogeneous data sources, the agINFRA project has left a set of grid- and cloud- based services that can be reused by future initiatives and adopted by existing ones, in order to facilitate the dissemination of agricultural research, educational and other types of data. On top of that, agINFRA provided a set of domain-specific recommendations for the publication of agri-food research outcomes. This paper discusses the concept of the agINFRA project and presents its major outcomes, as adopted by existing initiatives activated in the context of agricultural research and education.

  7. Plasmodium falciparum infection rates for some Anopheles spp. from Guinea-Bissau, West Africa [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4in

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    Michelle R. Sanford

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Presence of Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP was detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in a sample of Anopheles gambiae s.s., A. melas and A. pharoensis collected in Guinea-Bissau during October and November 2009. The percentage of P. falciparum infected samples (10.2% overall was comparable to earlier studies from other sites in Guinea-Bissau (9.6-12.4%. The majority of the specimens collected were identified as A. gambiae which had an individual infection rate of 12.6 % across collection sites. A small number of specimens of A. coluzzii, A. coluzzii x A. gambiae hybrids, A. melas and A. pharoensis were collected and had infection rates of 4.3%, 4.1%, 11.1% and 33.3% respectively. Despite being present in low numbers in indoor collections, the exophilic feeding behaviors of A. melas (N=18 and A. pharoensis (N=6 and high infection rates observed in this survey suggest falciparum-malaria transmission potential outside of the protection of bed nets.

  8. Countries’ Biomedical Publications and Attraction Scores. A PubMed-based assessment [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5q4

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    Qinyi Xu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Studying publication volumes at the country level is key to understanding and improving a country’s research system. PubMed is a public search engine of publications in all life sciences areas. Here, we show how this search engine can be used to assess the outputs of life science-related research by country. We have measured the numbers of publications during different time periods based on the country of affiliation of the first authors. Moreover, we have designed scores, which we have named Attraction Scores, to appraise the relative focus either toward particular types of studies, such as clinical trials or reviews, or toward specific research areas, such as public health and pharmacogenomics, or toward specific topics, for instance embryonic stem cells; we have also investigated a possible use of these Attraction Scores in connection with regulatory policies. We have weighed the statistics against general indicators such as country populations and gross domestic products (GDP. During the 5-year period 2008-2012, the United States was the country with the highest number of publications and Denmark the one with the highest number of publications per capita. Among the 40 countries with the highest GDPs, Israel had the highest publications-to-GDP ratio. Among the 20 countries with the most publications, Japan had the highest Attraction Score for induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells and Italy the highest proportion of review publications. More than 50% of publications in English were from countries in which English is not the primary language. We show an assorted and extensive collection of rankings and charts that will inform scholars and policymakers in studying and improving the research systems both at the national and international level.

  9. http://www.scientificpapers.org/knowledge-management/the-importance-of-data-bases-in-the-process-of-knowledge-sharing-inside-of-an-eco-bio-economic-cluster/

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    Ramona Maria Chivu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The attitude of companies on the environment fits into a broader sector such as that of social responsibility. Social responsibility includes topics such as child labor exploitation, safety and quality or environmental impact of companies. They now receive more attention from the media, because they lead to the development of new legislation, causing some of the responses consumers through demand and are considered by investors for setting up the portfolio. The debate services that companies must provide society that forms at a time the market and how society influences the behavior of companies imposing them or punishing certain behaviors remain open and highly complex. As a conclusion we can highlight that in the growing social concern to strive towards development models based on sustainability, the company is trying to redefine its role to adapt to these environmental changes. In this regard, there is a concern increasingly more important role it has to play in the overall strategy of sustainable development as the basic unit of production and thus generating considerable impacts for both economic and social and environmental.

  10. Bayesian prediction of microbial oxygen requirement [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1m6

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    Dan B. Jensen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prediction of the optimal habitat conditions for a given bacterium, based on genome sequence alone would be of value for scientific as well as industrial purposes. One example of such a habitat adaptation is the requirement for oxygen. In spite of good genome data availability, there have been only a few prediction attempts of bacterial oxygen requirements, using genome sequences. Here, we describe a method for distinguishing aerobic, anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria, based on genome sequence-derived input, using naive Bayesian inference. In contrast, other studies found in literature only demonstrate the ability to distinguish two classes at a time. Results: The results shown in the present study are as good as or better than comparable methods previously described in the scientific literature, with an arguably simpler method, when results are directly compared. This method further compares the performance of a single-step naive Bayesian prediction of the three included classifications, compared to a simple Bayesian network with two steps. A two-step network, distinguishing first respiring from non-respiring organisms, followed by the distinction of aerobe and facultative anaerobe organisms within the respiring group, is found to perform best. Conclusions: A simple naive Bayesian network based on the presence or absence of specific protein domains within a genome is an effective and easy way to predict bacterial habitat preferences, such as oxygen requirement.

  11. Expectant fathers’ knowledge of maternal morbidity: a Sri Lankan experience [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/zj

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    Amaya Weekrakkody

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Male partners play an important and vital role in the decision-making process regarding pregnant women’s health. The purpose of the present study was to assess the knowledge and awareness of expectant fathers about Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM, Pregnancy Induced Hypertension (PIH, and anaemia during pregnancy. Methods: A cross sectional descriptive study was carried out among expectant fathers whose partners were attending antenatal clinics at the Anuradhapura Teaching Hospital, Sri Lanka. All consenting participants were interviewed by investigators using an interviewer administered questionnaire to collect data on knowledge of risk factors, symptoms, complications and their control. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal Wallis test.  Results: Of the 246 expectant fathers studied, 192 (78% were aware of GDM, 183 (74.4% and 154 (62.6% were aware of PIH and anaemia during pregnancy, respectively. The total number of answers provided by expectant fathers ranged from 0 to 33 (of 41 questions. There were 44 fathers who could not answer even a single question. For GDM, anaemia, and PIH, the percentages of expectant fathers who failed to provide at least a single correct answer were 24.8%, 40.2%, and 31.3%, respectively. The median number of total correct answers provided increased steadily along with the average income (chi-square 31.24, p<0.001 and educational level (chi-square 33.57, p<0.001. Expectant fathers in the 25-34 age group had significantly higher scores, compared to younger and older fathers (chi-square 15.11, p=0.001. Fathers experiencing the second pregnancy of their spouses also had higher scores. Conclusions: Expectant father’s knowledge of the selected morbidities was limited. To improve maternal health, any health promotional programmes should include expectant fathers.

  12. Learning intrinsic excitability in medium spiny neurons [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/30b

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    Gabriele Scheler

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We present an unsupervised, local activation-dependent learning rule for intrinsic plasticity (IP which affects the composition of ion channel conductances for single neurons in a use-dependent way. We use a single-compartment conductance-based model for medium spiny striatal neurons in order to show the effects of parameterization of individual ion channels on the neuronal membrane potential-curent relationship (activation function. We show that parameter changes within the physiological ranges are sufficient to create an ensemble of neurons with significantly different activation functions. We emphasize that the effects of intrinsic neuronal modulation on spiking behavior require a distributed mode of synaptic input and can be eliminated by strongly correlated input. We show how modulation and adaptivity in ion channel conductances can be utilized to store patterns without an additional contribution by synaptic plasticity (SP. The adaptation of the spike response may result in either "positive" or "negative" pattern learning. However, read-out of stored information depends on a distributed pattern of synaptic activity to let intrinsic modulation determine spike response. We briefly discuss the implications of this conditional memory on learning and addiction.

  13. AGRIS: providing access to agricultural research data exploiting open data on the web [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/599

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    Fabrizio Celli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available AGRIS is the International System for Agricultural Science and Technology. It is supported by a large community of data providers, partners and users. AGRIS is a database that aggregates bibliographic data, and through this core data, related content across online information systems is retrieved by taking advantage of Semantic Web capabilities. AGRIS is a global public good and its vision is to be a responsive service to its user needs by facilitating contributions and feedback regarding the AGRIS core knowledgebase, AGRIS’s future and its continuous development. Periodic AGRIS e-consultations, partner meetings and user feedback are assimilated to the development of the AGRIS application and content coverage. This paper outlines the current AGRIS technical set-up, its network of partners, data providers and users as well as how AGRIS’s responsiveness to clients’ needs inspires the continuous technical development of the application. The paper concludes by providing a use case of how the AGRIS stakeholder input and the subsequent AGRIS e-consultation results influence the development of the AGRIS application, knowledgebase and service delivery.

  14. Cancer quasispecies and stem-like adaptive aneuploidy [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/29s

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    Domenico Napoletani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop a theoretical frame to understand self-regulation of aneuploidy rate in cancer and stem cells. This is accomplished building upon quasispecies theory, by leaving its formal mathematical structure intact, but by drastically changing the meaning of its objects. In particular, we propose a novel definition of chromosomal master sequence, as a sequence of physically distinct whole or fragmented chromosomes, whose length is taken to be the sum of the copy numbers of each whole or fragmented chromosome. This fundamental change in the functional objects of quasispecies theory allows us to show that previously measured aneuploidy rates in cancer populations are already close to a formally derived aneuploid error threshold, and that any value of aneuploidy rate larger than the aneuploid error threshold would lead to a loss of fitness of a tumor population. Finally, we make a phenomenological analysis of existing experimental evidence to argue that single clone cancer cells, derived from an aneuploid cancer subpopulation, are capable of self-regulating their aneuploidy rate and of adapting it to distinct environments, namely primary and metastatic microenvironments. We also discuss the potential origin of this self-regulatory ability in the wider context of developmental and comparative biology and we hypothesize the existence of a diversification factor, i.e. a cellular mechanism that regulates adaptation of aneuploidy rates, active in all embryo, adult and cancer stem cells.

  15. Diversion at the ER: How Plasmodium falciparum exports proteins into host erythrocytes [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/VOUzka

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    Karin Römisch

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is caused by parasites which live in host erythrocytes and remodel these cells to provide optimally for the parasites’ needs by exporting effector proteins into the host cells. Eight years ago the discovery of a host cell targeting sequence present in both soluble and transmembrane P. falciparum exported proteins generated a starting point for investigating the mechanism of parasite protein transport into infected erythrocytes. Since then many confusing facts about this targeting signal have emerged. In this paper, I try to make sense of them.

  16. I drink for my liver, Doc: emerging evidence that coffee prevents cirrhosis [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/59o

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    Jordan J. Feld

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Evidence demonstrating that regular ingestion of coffee has salutary effects on patients with chronic liver disease is accumulating rapidly. Specifically, it appears that coffee ingestion can slow the progression of liver fibrosis, preventing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. This should excite clinicians and scientists alike, since these observations, if true, would create effective, testable hypotheses that should lead to improved understanding on fibrosis pathogenesis and thus may generate novel pharmacologic treatments of patients with chronic liver disease. This review is designed to examine the relevant clinical and epidemiological data in critical fashion and to examine the putative pharmacological effects of coffee relevant to the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. We hope that this will inspire relevant critical analyses, especially among “coffee skeptics”. Of note, one major assumption made by this review is that the bulk of the effects of coffee consumption are mediated by caffeine, rather than by other chemical constituents of coffee. Our rationales for this assumption are threefold: first, caffeine’s effects on adenosinergic signaling provide testable hypotheses; second, although there are  myriad chemical constituents of coffee, they are present in very low concentrations, and perhaps more importantly, vary greatly between coffee products and production methods (it is important to note that we do not dismiss the “botanical” hypothesis here; rather, we do not emphasize it at present due to the limitations of the studies examined; lastly, some (but not all observational studies have examined both coffee and non-coffee caffeine consumption and found consistent effects, and when examined, no benefit to decaffeinated coffee has been observed. Further, in the interval since we examined this phenomenon last, further evidence has accumulated supporting caffeine as the effector molecule for coffee’s salutary effects.

  17. Nigrostriatal dynein changes in A53T alpha-synuclein transgenic mice [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2wb

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    Yan Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of misfolded a-synuclein is mechanistically linked to neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease (PD and other alpha-synucleinopathies. However, how alpha-synuclein causes neurodegeneration is unresolved. Several studies have supported the involvement of dynein, the major motor for retrograde axonal transport in alpha-synuclein-dependent neurodegeneration, es