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Sample records for zirconium niobium molybdenum

  1. Hardening of niobium alloys at precrystallization annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'eva, E.V.; Pustovalov, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Niobium base alloys were investigated. It is shown that precrystallization annealing of niobium-molybdenum, niobium-vanadium and niobium-zirconium alloys elevates much more sufficiently their resistance to microplastic strains, than to macroplastic strains. Hardening effect differs sufficiently for different alloys. The maximal hardening is observed for niobium-vanadium alloys, the minimal one - for niobium-zirconium alloys

  2. Electroplating and stripping copper on molybdenum and niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Molybdenum and niobium are often electroplated and subsequently stripped of copper. Since general standard plating techniques produce poor quality coatings, general procedures have been optimized and specified to give good results.

  3. Solid solutions of hydrogen in niobium, molybdenum and their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, T.T.

    1981-01-01

    The solubility of hydrogen in niobium, molybdenum and niobium-molybdenum alloys with varying atomic fraction of molybdenum from 0.15 to 0.75 was measured on the temperature range of 673 0 K to 1273 0 k for one atmosphere hydrogen pressure. The experimental technique involved the saturation of the solvent metal or alloy with hydrogen, followed by quenching and analysis of the solid solution. The results obtained of hydrogen solubility are consistent with the quasi-regular model for the dilute interstitial solid solutions. The partial molar enthalpy and partial molar entropy in excess of the dissolved hydrogen atoms were calculated from data of solubility versus reciprocal doping temperature. The variation of the relative partial molar enthalpy of hydrogen dissolved in niobium-molybdenum alloys, with the increase of molybdenum content of the alloy was analized. (Author) [pt

  4. Determination of hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium in niobium and niobium-based alloys by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Kunikazu; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Sudo, Emiko.

    1985-01-01

    The analytical procedure is as follows: Weigh 1 g of a sample and put it into a 100 cm 3 PTFE beaker. Add 5 ml of distilled water and 5 ml of hydrofluoric acid, and then heat the solution on a hot plate, adding 3 ml of nitric acid dropwise. Dilute the solution to 100 cm 3 with distilled water. When hafnium is determined, add 2 g of diammonium titanium hexafluoride ((NH 4 ) 2 TiF 6 )) before dilution. Working standard solutions are prepared by adding the stock standard solutions of hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium into niobium solutions. When hafnium is determined, add 2 g of (NH 4 ) 2 TiF 6 and the alloying elements in amounts corresponding to those in sample solutions into the working standard solutions. The tolerable amounts of hydrofluoric acid were 2.9 M, 2.1 M, and 3.1 M and those of nitric acid were 1.0 M, 1.6 M, and 1.6 M for hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium, respectively. It was found that (NH 4 ) 2 TiF 6 greatly increased the sensitivity for hafnium determination. Niobium showed minus effect for hafnium and plus effect for molybdenum and vanadium. The atomic absorption of molybdenum and vanadium were not influenced by the presence of 20 % of each alloying element, while the atomic absorption of hafnium was given plus effect by 20 % of zirconium, iron, cobalt, nickel, manganese, chromium or vanadium and minus effect by 20 % tungsten. The analytical values of hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium in niobium-based alloys by this method showed a good agreement with those by X-ray fluorescence analysis. The lower limits of determination (S/N=2) were 0.05, 0.001, and 0.002 % and the relative standard deviation were 3, 1, and 1.5 % for hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium, respectively. (author)

  5. Determination of impurities in uranium--niobium (7.5%)--zirconium (2.5%) alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arragon, Y

    1973-10-01

    The determination of 11 impurities in uranium--niobium-- zirconium alloys was studied. Elements of which the alloy is composed are considered and information is given on the determination of niobium by niobic acid precipitation. Selective elimination of the three components is discussed. Two liquid-liquid extractions are used. The nioblum is separated by methylisobutylketone in a hydrochloric --hydrofluoric medium and the zirconium and uranium by tributyl phosphate in a nitric medium. The determination of trace elements using electrochemical methods is discussed. Anodic re-dissolution polarography or square wave polarography enabled six elements (cadmium, copper, lead, zinc, bismuth, and thallium) to be determined in a carbonate medium together with aluminium in tetraethylammonium perchlorate, molybdenum in nitric acid, ammonium nitrate, and tungsten in hydrochloric acid with added double sodium and potassium tartrate. Fluorine was determined using ionometric techniques with a specific electrode and carbon was titrated by conductometry after combustion of the sample in an oxygen current. (auth)

  6. Damage production by fast electrons in dilute alloys of vanadium, niobium and molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, P.

    1975-01-01

    Vanadium, niobium and molybdenum samples containing about 300 ppm of zirconium were irradiated at helium temperature with electrons of energies between 0,6 and 3.1 MeV. The measured damage rates were analysed in terms of minimum threshold energy, damage function and resistivity per unit concentration of Frenkel pairs. For the minimum threshold energy T(Sub)d, values of 25+-2 eV (V) 28+-2 e V(Nb) and 34+-2 e V(Mo) were obtained. Pronounced differences between the displacement functions of molybdenum and that of niobium and vanadium are found which are explained by different stability of the defects during the irradiation at helium temperature

  7. Effect of high concentration of molybdenum on the structure and properties of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trekina, M.I.; Vasil'eva, E.V.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of alloying of 20,25 and 30 % Mo on the structure and mechanical properties of niobium is studied. It is shown that niobium alloying with molybdenum in the studied concentration leads to grain grinding, which increases with the molybdenum content growth in the alloy. The effective energy values of recrystallization activation of the studied niobium and molybdenum alloys are determined. The high hardness level at some plasticity and deformability of niobium alloy with 20 % Mo is established

  8. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis of zirconium and zirconium-niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashimova, F.A.; Sadikov, I.I.; Salimov, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Zirconium and zirconium-niobium alloys are used on nuclear technology, as fuel cladding of nuclear reactors. Their nuclear-physical, mechanical and thermophysical properties are influenced them matrix and impurity composition, therefore determination of matrix and impurity content of these materials is a very important task. Neutron activation analysis is one from multielemental and high sensible techniques that are widely applied in analysis of high purity materials. Investigation of nuclear-physical characteristics of zirconium has shown that instrumental variant NAA is unusable for analysis due to high radioactivity of a matrix. Therefore it is necessary carrying out radiochemical separation of impurity radionuclides from matrix. Study of the literature datum have shown, that zirconium and niobium are very well extracted from muriatic solution with 5% tributyl phosphineoxide (TBPO) solution in toluene and 0,75 M solution of di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in cyclohexanone. Investigation of these elements extraction in these systems has shown that more effective and selective separation of matrix radionuclides is achieved in HDEHP-3M HCI system. This system is also extracted and hafnium, witch is an accompanying element of zirconium and its high content prevented determination of other impurity elements in sample. Therefore we used extraction system HDEHP-3M HCl for analysis of zirconium and zirconium-niobium alloys in chromatographic variant. By measurement of distribution profile of a matrix and of elution curve of determined elements is established, that for effective separation of impurity and matrix radionuclides there is enough chromatographic column with diameter 1 cm and height of a sorbent layer 7 cm, thus volume of elute, necessary for complete elution of determinate elements is 35-40 ml. On the basis of the carried out researches the technique of radiochemical NAA of high purity zirconium and zirconium-niobium alloy, which allows to

  9. Technology of niobium and molybdenum refining by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, R.A.; Pinatti, D.G.; Sandim, H.R.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The uses of metals and alloys in superconductors (Nb46%Ti), aerospatial industry (Ti6Al4V), electroeletronic industry (Nb, Mo, W) and in surgical implants (Ti, Nb) are increasing nowadays. A refining process of niobium and molybdenum by electron beam technique, since the oxides reduction till the obtention of a high purity ingot is presented. (C.G.C.) [pt

  10. Rapid radiochemical separation of zirconium-95 and niobium-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downey, D.M.; McLaughlin, C.L.

    1983-01-01

    A rapid method for the quantitative separation of 95 Zr and 95 Nb has been developed. The method is based on the ion flotation of cationic zirconium complex ions with sodium lauryl sulfate (NaLS) from niobium which is masked with hydrogen peroxide. The separation was applied to mixtures of 95 Zr and 95 Nb initially in oxalic acid solution and quantitative recoveries of the radiochemically pure radioisotopes were obtained. (orig.)

  11. Rapid radiochemical separation of zirconium-95 and niobium-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downey, D.M.; McLaughlin, C.L.

    1983-01-01

    A rapid method for the quantitative separation of /sup 95/Zr and /sup 95/Nb has been developed. The method is based on the ion flotation of cationic zirconium complex ions with sodium lauryl sulfate (NaLS) from niobium which is masked with hydrogen peroxide. The separation was applied to mixtures of /sup 95/Zr and /sup 95/Nb initially in oxalic acid solution and quantitative recoveries of the radiochemically pure radioisotopes were obtained.

  12. On the stabilization of niobium(V) solutions by zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, E.; Bjerre, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    Niobium cannot be separated from zirconium or hafnium when these elements occur together in solution with common anions such as chloride and sulphate. This is ascribed to the co-polymerization of niobium(V) and the hydrolysed ionic species of zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV) to form colloidal...

  13. Passive behaviour of zirconium, hafnium and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornkjoel, S.

    1990-01-01

    The paper deals mainly with the results of stationary and transient polarization measurements together with capacitance measurements on passive electrodes of Zr, Hf and Nb over the entire pH-scale. The passive current densities are exstremely low, and essentially both pH and potential independent, exept for Nb at high pH. The extrapolated potential of zero inverse capacitance seems to be different from the extrapolated potential of zero film thickness for Zr and Hf, but not for Nb. The potential versus time curves at constant current show a downwards bending for Zr and Hf. It is shown that the pitting potentials of Zr and Hf are dependent of the concentration of halide ions and the type of halide ion, but not on pH. It is also shown that the pitting induction is second-order stimulated by chloride ions and first-order hindered by sulphate ions. Results from electron transfer reactions on passive niobium are reported. 9 refs

  14. Zirconium/niobium-95 determined in Hudson River water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsalata, P.; Cohen, N.

    1982-01-01

    Zirconium 95 and Niobium 95 are the fission products detected in greatest abundance in Hudson River water following the atmospheric testing of a nuclear device in N.W. China in 1980. Water samples, collected continuously and on a 'grab' basis, and processed monthly, have been studied to determine 95 Zr and 95 Nb concentrations, and plotted against collection time. Total precipitation values for each month, averaged over the whole Hudson River are also plotted. Airborne concentration data were obtained from sites in Lower Manhattan and Chester, N.J. A maximum value for 95 Zr in the Hudson River was found for February 1981. Half-time removal of 95 Zr from water was also calculated. (U.K.)

  15. Ternary cobalt-molybdenum-zirconium coatings for alternative energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yar-Mukhamedova, Gulmira; Ved', Maryna; Sakhnenko, Nikolay; Koziar, Maryna

    2017-11-01

    Consistent patterns for electrodeposition of Co-Mo-Zr coatings from polyligand citrate-pyrophosphate bath were investigated. The effect of both current density amplitude and pulse on/off time on the quality, composition and surface morphology of the galvanic alloys were determined. It was established the coating Co-Mo-Zr enrichment by molybdenum with current density increasing up to 8 A dm-2 as well as the rising of pulse time and pause duration promotes the content of molybdenum because of subsequent chemical reduction of its intermediate oxides by hydrogen ad-atoms. It was found that the content of the alloying metals in the coating Co-Mo-Zr depends on the current density and on/off times extremely and maximum Mo and Zr content corresponds to the current density interval 4-6 A dm-2, on-/off-time 2-10 ms. Chemical resistance of binary and ternary coatings based on cobalt is caused by the increased tendency to passivity and high resistance to pitting corrosion in the presence of molybdenum and zirconium, as well as the acid nature of their oxides. Binary coating with molybdenum content not less than 20 at.% and ternary ones with zirconium content in terms of corrosion deep index are in a group ;very proof;. It was shown that Co-Mo-Zr alloys exhibits the greatest level of catalytic properties as cathode material for hydrogen electrolytic production from acidic media which is not inferior a platinum electrode. The deposits Co-Mo-Zr with zirconium content 2-4 at.% demonstrate high catalytic properties in the carbon(II) oxide conversion. This confirms the efficiency of materials as catalysts for the gaseous wastes purification and gives the reason to recommend them as catalysts for red-ox processes activating by oxygen as well as electrode materials for red-ox batteries.

  16. Plastic flow and preferred orientation in molybdenum and zirconium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Window, B.

    1989-01-01

    X-ray diffraction measurements on samples of molybdenum and zirconium growth with ion assistance at low temperatures support the occurrence of plastic flow during growth, provided the level of bombardment is high enough. As the energy of the argon ions was increased, the lattice strain in the growth direction increased to a maximum before decreasing slowly. That this is a plastic flow transition is shown by the independence of the maximum strain on preparation conditions and by the changes in microstructure. In particular, the grain size in the growth direction decreased and the preferred orientation favored the usual wire drawing textures of these metals. For the zirconium films this involved a change in preferred orientation from a (00.2) to a (10.0) texture. A reduction in strain is observed at high bombardment levels

  17. Niobium and zirconium telluride thin films prepared by sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, M.; Pailharey, D.; Mathey, Y.

    2000-01-01

    A versatile procedure of sputter deposition, well adapted for getting a large of Te/M ratios (with M = Zr or Nb), has led to the synthesis of several highly anisotropic zirconium and niobium poly tellurides in thin film form. Upon tuning the two key parameters of the process, i.e., the Te percentage in the target and the substrate temperature during the deposition, preparation of systems ranging from ZrTe 0 .72 to ZrTe 6 .7, on the one hand, and from NbTe 1 .28 to NbTe 7 .84, on the other, has been achieved. Besides their amorphous or crystalline (with or without preferential orientations) behavior and their relationship to known structural types, the most striking feature of these films is their large departure from the stoichiometry of the bulk Mte x reference compounds. This peculiarity, together with the possible changes of composition under annealing, are described and interpreted in terms of variable of Te and M atoms trapped or intercalated within the parent structures. (author)

  18. Adhesive wear of iron chromium nickel silicon manganese molybdenum niobium alloys with duplex structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugscheider, E.; Deppe, E.; Ambroziak, A.; Melzer, A.

    1991-01-01

    Iron nickel chromium manganese silicon and iron chromium nickel manganese silicon molybdenum niobium alloys have a so-called duplex structure in a wide concentration range. This causes an excellent resistance to wear superior in the case of adhesive stress with optimized concentrations of manganese, silicon, molybdenum and niobium. The materials can be used for welded armouring structures wherever cobalt and boron-containing alloy systems are not permissible, e.g. in nuclear science. Within the framework of pre-investigations for manufacturing of filling wire electrodes, cast test pieces were set up with duplex structure, and their wear behavior was examined. (orig.) [de

  19. Strengthening and elongation mechanism of Lanthanum-doped Titanium-Zirconium-Molybdenum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Ping, E-mail: huping1985@126.com [School of Metallurgy Engineering, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an 710055 (China); Jinduicheng Molybdenum Co., Ltd., Xi’an 710068 (China); Hu, Bo-liang; Wang, Kuai-she; Song, Rui; Yang, Fan [School of Metallurgy Engineering, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an 710055 (China); Yu, Zhi-tao [Ruifulai Tungsten & Molybdenum Co., Ltd., Xi’an 721914 (China); Tan, Jiang-fei [School of Metallurgy Engineering, Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi’an 710055 (China); Cao, Wei-cheng; Liu, Dong-xin; An, Geng [Jinduicheng Molybdenum Co., Ltd., Xi’an 710068 (China); Guo, Lei [Ruifulai Tungsten & Molybdenum Co., Ltd., Xi’an 721914 (China); Yu, Hai-liang [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    The microstructural contributes to understand the strengthening and elongation mechanism in Lanthanum-doped Titanium-Zirconium-Molybdenum alloy. Lanthanum oxide particles not only act as heterogeneous nucleation core, but also act as the second phase to hinder the grain growth during sintering crystallization. The molybdenum substrate formed sub-grain under the effect of second phase when the alloy rolled to plate.

  20. Behaviour of solvent extraction of niobium in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Cansheng; Huang Meixin; Zhang Xianzi; Zhang Chonghai

    1988-01-01

    The behaviour of solvent extraction of niobium is discussed. The expractants, includding TBP, HDBP, H 2 MBP, TBP irradiated, HDEHP, TTA and Aliquat-7402, are used. The special influence of molybdenum and zirconium on solvent extraction of niobium and the extraction behaviur of niobium with TBP irradiated are described. The effect of fluorine and uranium in aqueous phase on extraction of niobium is mentioned. It is observed that the interfacial crud has not relevance to D Nb , but niobium-95 can be absorbed on it. The species of extractable niobium, extraction mechanism, and the reason brought niobum into organic phase are discussed. Finally, the idea of increasing decontamination factor for niobium is suggested

  1. Study of physicochemical processes and parameters of regime of diffusion brazing of niobium with titanium, zirconium and vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishin, V.L.; Lashko, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    Physicochemical processes at diffusion brazing of niobium with titanium, zirconium and vanadium, producing continious series of solid solutions with niobium are studied. Diffusion coefficients, time of isothermal crystallization of soldered welds, as well as the duration of homogenized thermal treatment of soldered welds necessary to provide the given temperature of weld unsoldering

  2. Estimation of niobium, tantalum and zirconium in a carbonate rich ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navale, A.S.; Venkatakrishnan, R.R.; Sreenivas, T.

    2013-01-01

    A simple method using ICP-OES for estimation of tantalum, niobium and zirconium in a carbonate rich matrix is described. The sample is boiled with 10% v/v hydrochloric acid for 15 min and filtered. The residue is fused with ammonium bifluoride-ammonium sulphate flux and the melt is leached with water. Nb, Ta and Zr are estimated in the water leach by ICP-OES. (author)

  3. Young's modulus of crystal bar zirconium and zirconium alloys (zircaloy-2, zircaloy-4, zirconium-2.5wt% niobium) to 1000 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinger, H.E.; Ritchie, I.G.; Shillinglaw, A.J.

    1975-09-01

    This report contains experimentally determined data on the dynamic elastic moduli of zircaloy-2, zircaloy-4, zirconium-2.5wt% niobium and Marz grade crystal bar zirconium. Data on both the dynamic Young's moduli and shear moduli of the alloys have been measured at room temperature and Young's modulus as a function of temperature has been determined over the temperature range 300 K to 1000 K. In every case, Young's modulus decreases linearly with increasing temperature and is expressed by an empirical equation fitted to the data. Differences in Young's modulus values determined from specimens with longitudinal axes parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction are small, as are the differences between Young's moduli determined from strip, bar stock and fuel sheathing. (author)

  4. Polarographic determination of the titanium and niobium content of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, R; Gabra, J.

    1978-03-01

    A method is described for the polarographic determination of titanium and niobium in zirconium alloys in the concentration range of 0.1% to 4% of each of the determined metals. To assure the complete dissolution of the sample a mixture of nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid is used. After evaporating these acids in the presence of sulphuric acid, the contents are determined polarographically with a supporting electrolyte solution of 0.1M EDTA, 0.33M potassium sulfate and 0.4M sodium acetate, buffered to pH 4 with acetic acid. The half-wave potential (Esub(1/2)) of titanium is -0.35V and that of niobium is -0.67 V. (author)

  5. Determination of hydrogen in uranium-niobium-zirconium alloy by inert-gas fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carden, W.F.

    1979-12-01

    An improved method has been developed using inert-gas fusion for determining the hydrogen content in uranium-niobium-zirconium (U-7.5Nb-2.5Zr) alloy. The method is applicable to concentrations of hydrogen ranging from 1 to 250 micrograms per gram and may be adjusted for analysis of greater hydrogen concentrations. Hydrogen is determined using a hydrogen determinator. The limit of error for a single determination at the 95%-confidence level (at the 3.7-μg/g-hydrogen level) is +-1.4 micrograms per gram hydrogen

  6. EDXRF analysis of Straits Chinese porcelains for zirconium and niobium using a cadmium-109 source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, C.T.

    1986-01-01

    An annular Cd-109 source was used to induce fluorescent X-rays from 37 pieces of Straits Chinese porcelain of which four were modern pieces and the rest were produced from the nineteenth century up to the Republic period (1912-1939). Experimental data show that for zirconium and niobium infinite thickness is reached for a thickness of about 1.5 mm. A plot of the intensity of the K/sub α/ 1 line of Zr against that of Nb shows that all Ch'ing and Republic pieces cluster together and are quite distinct from the modern pieces, allowing easy nondestructive identification of modern fakes

  7. Estimation of niobium, tantalum and zirconium in a carbonate rich ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navale, A.S.; Venkatakrishnan, R.R.; Sreenivas, T.

    2013-01-01

    Tantalum, niobium and zirconium form refractory compounds and therefore pose problems in estimation by methods like spectrophotometry, AAS etc. Their estimation is best carried out with ICP-OES as the plasma is capable of breaking the refractory compounds and releases these elements in the form of excited atoms. But another major problem is bringing these elements in solution as they require very strong reagents and tend to hydrolyze easily in solution. Complexing agents need to be added to maintain these elements in dissolved condition. The commonly employed dissolution techniques for these elements are fusion with potassium pyrosulfate (for Nb and Ta), sodium hydroxide or peroxide (for zirconium). Digestion with mineral acids in combination with hydrofluoric acid is also employed

  8. A process for electrodeposition of layers of niobium, vanadium, molybdenum or tungsten, or of their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diepers, H.; Schmidt, O.

    1977-01-01

    An improvement is proposed for the process for electrodeposition of layers of niobium, vanadium, molybdenum or tungsten or of their alloys from molten-salt electrolytes (fluorid melts) which is to increase the quality of layers in order to obtain regular thickness and smooth surfaces. According to the invention, a pre-separation is executed on an auxiliary cathode before the (preheated) cathode is immersed. The cathode is only charged for separation after the adjustment of a constant anode potential. It is an advantage that the auxiliary cathode is mechanically and electrically connected with the cathode. As an electrolyte, a mixture of niobium fluorides and a eustetic mixture of potassium fluorides, sodium fluorides and lithium fluorides are particularly suitable for the electrodeposition of miobium. (UWI) [de

  9. Kinetic parameters of nitridation of molybdenum and niobium alloys with various structure states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solodkin, G.A.; Bulgach, A.A.; Likhacheva, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    Effect of preliminary plastic strain under rolling on kinetic parameters of nitridation of VN-2AEh, VN-3 niobium alloys and molybdenum alloy with hafnium is investigated. Extreme character of dependence of kinetic parameters of nitridation on the degree of reduction under rolling is determined. Preliminary plastic strain at negligible reduction is shown to accelerate growth of the zone of internal nitridation and decelerates growth of the nitride zone. Nitrogen atom removal from the surface to the centre is retarded at the increase of the degree of reduction up to 50% and higher. The degree of deformations is the higher the lower nitridation temperature is

  10. Susceptibility of cold-worked zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium alloy to delayed hydrogen cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    Notched tensile specimens of cold-worked zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium alloy have been stressed at 350 K and 520 K. At 350 K, above a possible threshold stress of 200 MPa, specimens exhibited delayed failure which was attributed to hydride cracking. Metallography showed that hydrides accumulated at notches and tips of growing cracks. The time to failure appeared to be independent of hydrogen content over the range 7 to 100 ppm hydrogen. Crack growth rates of about 10 -10 m/s deduced from fractography were in the same range as those necessary to fracture pressure tubes. The asymptotic stress intensity for delayed failure, Ksub(1H), appeared to be about 5 MPa√m. With this low value of Ksub(1H) small surface flaws may propagate in pressure tubes which contain large residual stresses. Stress relieving and modified rolling procedures will reduce the residual stresses to such an extent that only flaws 12% of the wall thickness or greater will grow. At 520 K no failures were observed at times a factor of three greater than times to failure at 350 K. Zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium appears to be safe from delayed hydrogen cracking at the reactor operating temperature. (author)

  11. Reactor irradiation effect on the physical-mechanical properties of zirconium carbides and niobium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrievskij, R.A.; Vlasov, K.P.; Shevchenko, A.S.; Lanin, A.G.; Pritchin, S.A.; Klyushin, V.V.; Kurushin, S.P.; Maskaev, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    A study has been made of the effect of the reactor radiation by a flux of neutrons 1.5x10 20 n/cm 2 (E>=1 meV) at radiation temperatures of 150 and 1100 deg C on the physico-mechanical properties of carbides of zirconium and niobium and their equimolar hard solution. A difference has been discovered in the behaviour of the indicated carbides under the effect of radiation. Under the investigated conditions of radiation the density of zirconium carbide is being decreased, while in the niobium carbide no actual volumetric changes occur. The increase of the lattice period in ZrC is more significant than in NbC. The electric resistance of ZrC is also changed more significantly than in the case of NbC, while for the microhardness a reverse relationship is observed. Strength and elasticity modulus change insignificantly in both cases. Resistance to crack formation shows a higher reduction for ZrC than for NbC, while the thermal strength shows an approximately similar increase. The equimolar hard solution of ZrC and NbC behaves to great extent similar to ZrC, although the change in electric resistance reminds of NbC while thermal strength changes differently. The study of the microstructure of the specimens has shown that radiation causes a large number of etching patterns-dislocations in NbC which are almost absent in ZrC

  12. Static recrystallisation and precipitation after hot deformation of austenitic stainless steels containing molybdenum and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombry, R.; Rossard, C.; Thomas, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    In general the hot workability of austenite depends on the work hardening during deformation and the kinetics of the dynamic and static restoration processes. Static recrystallisation is a very important factor in the case of hot rolling. The present work was undertaken to determine the effect of additions of molybdenum or niobium on the kinetics of static recrystallisation. The results show that the rate of static recrystallisation of type 304, 316 and 347 stainless steels decreases in this order for a given amount of prior deformation (epsilon=0,44). The differences in the rates of recrystallisation increases as the temperature is lowered towards 900 deg C. The effect of molybdenum appears to be attribuable to a solute drag effect on the mobility of dislocations, subgrain boundaries or grain boundaries whereas niobium additions lead to the formation of NbC precipitates on the dislocation cell walls and sub boundaries. It is also shown that in the case of type 316 and type 347 steels the dynamic recrystallisation process (observed in type 304 steels at all temperatures above 900 deg C) is replaced by dynamic recovery at temperatures egal to or below about 1000 deg C [fr

  13. An experimental investigation of the rate of hydrogen absorption in zirconium-2.5 wt percent niobium from steam/hydrogen mixtures at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langman, V.J.

    1984-08-01

    The test specifications for an experimental program to study the rate of hydrogen absorption in zirconium-2.5 weight percent niobium pressure tube material from steam/hydrogen mixtures at elevated temperatures are discussed

  14. Removal of zirconium and niobium activities from plutonium nitrate during plutonium reconversion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajithlal, R.T.; Rakshe, P.R.; Kumaraguru, K.

    2010-01-01

    Present investigation deals with quality improvement of Pu solutions after ion exchange cycle of Purex process. In order to improve the decontamination factor of Pu with respect to fission products zirconium ( 95 Zr) and niobium ( 95 Nb), Pu-Product solution was precipitated as oxalate at different compositions of nitric acid with stoichiometric and hyper-stoichiometric amount of oxalic acid. The Pu-oxalate so precipitated was washed with respective feed solutions of oxalic and nitric acid mixture, similar to feed conditions. Fission product activities in the feed, supernatant and the washes were analysed for gross gamma activity and individual fission products by Multichannel analyzer using HPGe-detector. A solution comprising of 4M HNO 3 + 0.2M excess oxalic acid precipitation with excess amount of washing yielded effective decontamination of the Pu product. (author)

  15. Absorption of dissolved hydrogen from lithiated water during accelerated corrosion of zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolescu, A.V.; Mayer, P.; Rasile, E.M.; Mummenhoff, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    A series of laboratory experiments was carried out to determine the extent of dissolved hydrogen absorption from lithiated water by zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium alloy during corrosion. The material was exposed at 340 0 C to 1 M LiOH aqueous solution containing 0 to approximately 70 cm 3 /L of dissolved hydrogen. Results indicate that dissolved hydrogen has no effect on the corrosion rate or on the amount of hydrogen absorbed by the material

  16. Tunneling measurements in amorphous layers of superconducting transition metals: molybdenum, vanadium, and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roll, U.

    1981-01-01

    Tunneling experiments with amorphous Molybdenum and Vanadium layers are presented, showing no significant increase of the reduced energy gap 2δ(O)/kTsub(c)(δ) compared with the BCS-value, in contrast to all previous measurement on amorphous superconducting materials of simple s-p-metals, showing on enhanced electron-phonon-interaction. This fact may lead to the conclusion that the strong electron-phonon coupling is caused by the amorphous structure of the superconductor. The present results, however, indicate that the strong electron-phonon interaction cannot be explained only ba the amorphous structure of the superconductor. In the measurements of the second derivative d 2 U/dI 2 no phonon-induced structures have been observed for amorphous molybdenum, vanadium and niobium films. Apparently the phonon density of states F(#betta#) of amorphous transition metals has no structure, thus the longitudinal and transverse phonons cannot be identified in the measured (d 2 U/dI 2 )-curves. This particular behaviour of the amorphous transition metals in contrast to the simple s-p-metals may be interpreted by the strongly localized d-electrons. (orig./GG) [de

  17. The effects of adding molybdenum and niobium on the creep strength of 18Cr-10Ni-20Co austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomono, Yutaka

    1987-01-01

    The decrease in the creep strength of structural materials during service at elevated temperatures is a very important problem that affects the security of plants and machinery. The improvement in the creep strength of 18Cr-10Ni-20Co austenitic steel achieved through the addition of molybdenum and niobium was studied in tests carried out at 973K and 1,073K. The creep strengthening mechanism was examined using transmission electron micrographs, X-ray diffraction, etc. The results obtained are summarized as follows: (1) The creep strength of low C-18Cr-10Ni-20Co austenitic steel with molybdenum was greatly improved by the addition of niobium up to 1% by weight. In the case of long-term creep, no trend toward decreasing creep strength was observed. (2) The creep strength of austenitic steel possessing a matrix strengthened with molybdenum can be improved through the addition of niobium combined with precipitation hardening with fine carbides precipitated in the grains. (author)

  18. Impurity composition effect on work function in cylindrical specimens of niobium and low zirconium niobium base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobyakov, V.P.

    2000-01-01

    A study is made into poly- and single crystal cylindrical niobium specimens, prepared by various methods as well as into polycrystalline specimens of niobium base alloys doped with 1.2 and 1.6 % Zr. Thermionic work function is measured using a full current method. Several techniques are applied to determine the content of substitutional and interstitial impurities in specimens. The phase composition of polished section surface is also investigated. A work function increase is observed when a considerable amount of carbide phases occurs at the surface. This increase is comparable with the effect of going from a polycrystalline niobium specimen to a single crystal with (110) surface orientation [ru

  19. Development of rolled joints for zirconium-2.5 wt % niobium pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhusoodanan, K.; Sinha, R.K.; Samuel, K.A.; Joeman, V.

    1992-01-01

    Due to its higher strength and lower deuterium pick-up rate, as compared to the existing cold worked zircaloy-2 material, cold worked zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium (Zr-2.5%Nb) alloy is to be used as the pressure tube material in all forthcoming Indian PHWRs starting with KAPP-2. These pressure tubes, which carry the fuel bundles are to be joined to the S.S 403 end-fittings through rolled joints. Since the new pressure tubes have a lower wall thickness and higher room temperature yield stress, than zircaloy-2 tubes the design parameters of the rolled joint had to be developed afresh. Further, since Zr-2.5%Nb is susceptible to delayed hydride cracking, it is necessary to limit the residual stress near the rolled joint to a minimum. Since the high residual stress is due to the initial assembly clearance between the pressure tube and end-fitting, a modified rolled joint had to be developed, referred to as zero clearance rolled joint. This paper provides details of the work carried out at Reactor Engineering Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay towards the development of the design of the rolled joint as well as the tooling and procedures required for achieving zero-clearance fit-ups at site. The requirements to be met by the Zr-2.5% Nb pressure tubes for achieving acceptable rolled joints are highlighted. (author). 5 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  20. In-reactor creep of zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium at 570 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.E.; Causey, A.R.; Fidleris, V.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of fast neutron flux at 570 K on the creep rate of specimens of zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium alloy taken from tubes in various metallurgical conditions has been measured using both constant load tensile creep machines and bent-beam stress relaxation. Creep rates calculated from stress relaxation fit on the trend line for the constant load creep data. Between 114 MPa and 450 MPa the creep rate is proportional to neutron flux. The creep rate of specimens from the longitudinal direction is about twice that of specimens from the circumferential direction of a tube. This anisotropy in creep strength is attributed partly to crystallographic texture and partly to deformation substructure. Cold-work is detrimental to in-reactor creep strength; as-extruded material has higher creep strength. In cold-worked material at stresses below 100 MPa the stress exponent, n, is about 1; n gradually increases with stress being about 10 at 525 MPa and about 100 at 660 MPa. In laboratory tests, rupture ductility correlates inversely with n; the lower n the higher the ductility. In-reactor tests support this correlation thus pressure tubes in CANDU reactors, operating at 117 MPa where n approximately 1, should have good ductility. (Auth.)

  1. Deformation of zirconium - niobium alloy E635 in sub-microsecond shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, D. N.; Kozelkov, O. E.; Mayorova, A. S.; Malyugina, A. S.; Mokrushin, S. S.; Pavlenko, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    Strength characteristics of zirconium - niobium alloy E635 were measured under shock - wave loading conditions at normal and elevated temperatures and results of these measurements are presented. Measurements were taken in conditions when samples were impacted by plane shock waves with the pressure up to 13 GPa and duration from ˜0.05 μs up to 1 μs. Free-surface velocity profiles were recorded with the help of VISAR and PDV laser Doppler velocimeters having nanosecond time resolution. Evolution of elastic precursors with samples thickness varying from 0.5 up to 8 mm is also considered. Measured attenuation of the elastic precursor was used to determine plastic strain rate behind the precursor front. Temperature effect on the value of dynamic elastic limit and spall strength at normal and elevated temperatures is studied. This work is implemented with the support of the State Atomic Energy Corporation "Rosatom" under State Contract H.4x.44.90.13.1111.

  2. Deformation of zirconiumniobium alloy E635 in sub-microsecond shock waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazakov D.N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Strength characteristics of zirconium - niobium alloy E635 were measured under shock - wave loading conditions at normal and elevated temperatures and results of these measurements are presented. Measurements were taken in conditions when samples were impacted by plane shock waves with the pressure up to 13 GPa and duration from ∼0.05 μs up to 1 μs. Free-surface velocity profiles were recorded with the help of VISAR and PDV laser Doppler velocimeters having nanosecond time resolution. Evolution of elastic precursors with samples thickness varying from 0.5 up to 8 mm is also considered. Measured attenuation of the elastic precursor was used to determine plastic strain rate behind the precursor front. Temperature effect on the value of dynamic elastic limit and spall strength at normal and elevated temperatures is studied. This work is implemented with the support of the State Atomic Energy Corporation “Rosatom” under State Contract H.4x.44.90.13.1111.

  3. Evaluation of the effect of the partial substituttion of vanadium and molybdenum by niobium in a tool steel DIN W. NR. 1.2714

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isore, A.; Pereira, O.J.; Aleixo, C.

    1982-01-01

    A comparative study of the properties of a steel DIN W. Nr 1.2714 and those of two steels of the same type but with lower amounts of molybdenum and vanadium, higher amounts of silicon and chromium, and with the adition of niobium (0,08 and 0,17%), was carried out. In the three steels with niobium there are niobium carbides wich are aligned in the hot deformation direction, and do not dissolve at the normal austenitizing temperatures. In the steel with higher niobium content, these carbides affect the transverse toughness and its hot ductility (200 - 600 0 C), although sensibly improving the abrasion wear resistance. The results of the fracture toughness and Charpy test, suggest that the niobium carbides do not decrease the crack nucleation resistance. (Author) [pt

  4. Specific heat and electric conductivity of zirconium alloy with 2,5 mass% niobium in the range of phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshchupkin, V.V.; Pokrasin, M.A.; Chernov, A.I.; Semashko, N.A.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental investigation of specific heat and electric resistance of zirconium alloy with 2.5 mass% niobium in the range of phase transitions was conducted, using adiabatic calorimeter of original design, characterized by high sensitivity, efficiency and high accuracy. It was revealed that temperature dependence of specific heat was characterized by anomalous growth at 590 deg C, related with (α+β Nb )→(α+β Zr )-transition, and at 810 deg -related with (α+β Zr )→β Zr - transition. Temperature dependence of electric resistance was specific in the region of α+β Zr →β Zr phase transition. It was established that revealed anomalies were connected with high oxygen absorption at high temperatures. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  5. Determination of zirconium 93 and molybdenum 93 in reprocessing nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puech, P.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work is to find new determination methods of zirconium 93 and molybdenum 93 (two long-lived radioelements) contained in reprocessing nuclear waste. 93 Zr has a very long period: 1.5 * 10 6 years. The measurement of this isotope is more performing by the ICP-MS method than by the classical radiochemical measurement methods. 93 Mo disintegrates with a radioactive period of 4000 years and can be detected by radiochemical measurement in particular by X spectrometry. But these radioelements cannot be directly measured on the reprocessing nuclear waste; they require a preliminary chemical separation (removing the radioelements able to interfere and those responsible of the radioactivity of the nuclear waste). The separation is implemented with very potentially selective techniques, using Mo and Zr specific extracting molecules: solvent extraction, emulsified liquid membrane extraction and liquid chromatography extraction (on a resin impregnated by solvent). Studies carried out in CEA/Cadarache, on a synthetic solution simulating a reprocessing nuclear waste, have allowed to show the selective properties of the L'-benzoinoxime for extracting Mo and of TBP for extracting Zr for the three studied techniques. The optimal extraction and separation conditions have been reached with a methodology including experiment plans. At last, the methods have been tested on real reprocessing nuclear waste at Cogema/La Hague. 93 Zr and 93 Mo have been measured in a dissolution solution and in a fission product solution. The obtained values are 2 * 10 6 Bq/l and 10 7 Bq/l for 93 Zr and 500 Bq/l for 93 Mo in a dissolution solution. These methods have allowed to determine too the isotopic compositions for Mo and Zr elements contained in reprocessing nuclear waste. The results are in accordance with those obtained with the Cesar code. (O.M.)

  6. Fabrication and characterisation of uranium, molybdenum, chromium, niobium and aluminium; Dobijanje i karakterizacija legura uranijuma sa molibdenom, hromom, niobijumom i aluminijumom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofrenovic, R; Isailovic, M; Kotur, Z [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    This paper describes fabrication of binary uranium alloys by melting and casting. The following alloys with nominal composition were obtained by melting in the vacuum furnace: uranium with niobium contents from 0.5%- 4.0% and uranium with molybdenum contents from 0.4% - 1.2%. Uranium alloys with chromium content from 0.4% - 1.2% and uranium alloy with 0.12% of aluminium were obtained by vacuum induction furnace (electric arc melting)

  7. Catalytic applications of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, C.J.; England, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    This article examines the potential uses of niobium, and its compounds, as catalysts in chemical processing. The word potential is deliberately chosen because in 1978 none of the world's twenty-five major catalysts (1) contained niobium. On the other hand, catalysts containing molybdenum and vanadium, neighbors of niobium in the periodic table, realized over 80 x 10 6 of sales in that same year. At the same time many of the patents for niobium catalysts cover applications in which niobium improves the activity of, or substitutes for, molybdenum based compounds. With favorable cost differentials and improvements in understanding, niobium may be able to replace molybdenum in some its traditional uses

  8. High-temperature irradiation of niobium-1 w/o zirconium-clad UO/sub 2/. [Compatibility with lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kangilaski, M.; Fromm, E.O.; Lozier, D.H.; Storhok, V.W.; Gates, J.E.

    1965-06-28

    Twenty-four 0.225-in.-diameter and six 0.290-in.-diameter UO/sub 2/ specimens clad with 80 mils of niobium-1 w/o zirconium were irradiated to burnups of 1.4 to 6.0 at. % of uranium at surface temperatures of 900 to 1400/sup 0/C. UO/sub 2/ and lithium were found to be incompatible at these temperatures, and the thick cladding was used primarily to minimize the chances of contact of UO/sub 2/ and the lithium coolant. The thickly clad specimens did not undergo any dimensional changes as a result of irradiation, although it was found that movement of UO/sub 2/ took place in the axial direction by a vaporization-redeposition mechanism. It was found that 32 to 87% of the fission gases was released from the fuel, depending on the temperature of the specimen. Metallographic examination of longitudinal and transverse sections of the specimens indicated the usual UO/sub 2/ microstructure with columnar grains. Grain-boundary thickening was observed in the UO/sub 2/ at higher burnups. The oxygen/uranium ratio of UO/sub 2/ increased with increasing burnup.

  9. Physicochemical and mechanical properties of zirconium oxide and niobium oxide modified Portland cement-based experimental endodontic sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viapiana, R; Flumignan, D L; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, J M; Camilleri, J; Tanomaru-Filho, M

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the physicochemical and mechanical properties of Portland cement-based experimental sealers (ES) with different radiopacifying agents (zirconium oxide and niobium oxide micro- and nanoparticles) in comparison with the following conventional sealers: AH Plus, MTA Fillapex and Sealapex. The materials were tested for setting time, compressive strength, flow, film thickness, radiopacity, solubility, dimensional stability and formaldehyde release. Data were subjected to anova and Tukey tests (P 0.05) and lower solubility when compared with MTA Fillapex and Sealapex (P Portland cement-based experimental endodontic sealers presented physicochemical properties according to the specifications no 57 ANSI/ADA (ADA Professional Product Review, 2008) and ISO 6876 (Dentistry - Root Canal Sealing Materials, 2012, British Standards Institution, London, UK). The sealers had setting times and flow ability that was adequate for clinical use, satisfactory compressive strength and low solubility. Additional studies should be carried out with the purpose of decreasing the film thickness and to determine the ideal ratio of radiopacifying agents in Portland cement-based root canal sealers. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Initiation of delayed hydride cracking in zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalabi, A.F.; Meneley, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Delayed hydride cracking in zirconium alloys is caused by the repeated precipitation and cracking of brittle hydrides. The growth kinetic of the hydrides have been measured to evaluate the critical hydride length for crack initiation. Hydride growth leading to crack initiation follows an approximate (time) 1/3 law on the average; crack propagation proceeds in a stepwise fashion. The critical length of hydride for crack initiation increases with stress and temperature. The fracture criterion for crack initiation predicts the critical hydride length at a give stress level and temperature. The fracture initiation mechanism of the hydride confirms the temperature effects for heating and cooling cycles under services loads. (orig.)

  11. Rolling of molybdenum and niobium tubes on cold-rolling mill with high stiff stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potapov, I N; Shejkh-Ali, A D; Filimonov, G V; Lunev, A G

    1984-03-01

    To develop the technique of tube production the process of rolling is studied and comparative evaluation of the structure formed is carried out. It is shown that billets of rods deformed by screw rolling have the improved plastic properties and are deformed on cold-rolling mill (CRM) with a high degree of reduction without defect formation. High stiff stand of the CRM permits to produce high-quality molybdenum tubes.

  12. Features of soldering of molybdenum a lols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishin, V.L.; Rybkin, B.V.; Cherkasov, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Soldering features of complex-alloy molybdenum alloys were investigated in comparison with alloys based on solid solutions. Soldering features of heterogeneous molybdenum base alloys were investigated using samples of 0.5-1.O mm sheets with the strain of about 95% made of ingots which had been smelted in arc vacuum furnaces. The soldering of samples was carried out in 5x1O -5 mm Hg vacuum using different sources of heating: radiation, electron-ray and contact. It was shown that heat-resisting soldered joints of heterogeneous molybdenum alloys could be produced using zirconium and niobium base solders containing the most effective hardeners of the parent material (titanum, vanadium, tantalum, molybdenum, tungsten). To preserve high mechanical properties of heterogeneous alloys it was expedient to use for welding local heating sources which permitted to decrease considerably temperature- time conditions of the process

  13. Niobium 1 percent zirconium/potassium and titanium/potassium life-test heat pipe design and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, J. Tom; Merrigan, Michael A.

    Experimental lifetime performance studies currently in progress use Niobium 1 percent Zirconium (Nb-1Zr) and Titanium (Ti) heat pipes with potassium (K) as the working fluid. A heat pipe life test matrix was developed for testing the heat pipes. Because the corrosion rates in alkali metal heat pipes are affected by temperature and working fluid evaporation flux, the variable parameters of the experimental matrix are established as steady operating temperature and input heat flux density. Total impurity inventory is a factor in corrosion rate so impurity levels are being evaluated in the heat pipe materials before and after testing. Eight Nb-1Zr/K heat pipes were designed, fabricated, and tested. Two of the heat pipes have completed testing whereas the other six are currently in test. These are gravity assist heat pipes operating in a reflux mode. The heat pipes are tested by sets, one set of two and two sets of three heat pipes. Three Ti/K heat pipes are also in life test. These heat pipes are tested as a set in a horizontal position in a capillary pumped annular flow mode. Each of the heat pipes is encapsulated in a quartz vacuum container with a water calorimeter over the vacuum container for power throughput measurements. Thermocouples are attached to the heat pipes for measuring temperature. Heat input to the heat pipes is via an RF coil. The heat pipes are operating at between 800 and 900 K, with heat input fluxes of 13.8 to 30 W/sq cm. Of the Nb-1Zr/K heat pipes, two of the heat pipes have been in operation for 14,000 hours, three over 10,000 hours, and three over 7,000 hours. The Ti/K heat pipes have been in operation for 1,266 hours.

  14. Review of corrosion phenomena on zirconium alloys, niobium, titanium, inconel, stainless steel, and nickel plate under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The role of nuclear fluxes in corrosion processes was investigated in ATR, ETR, PRTR, and in Hanford production reactors. Major effort was directed to zirconium alloy corrosion parameter studies. Corrosion and hydriding results are reported as a function of oxygen concentration in the coolant, flux level, alloy composition, surface pretreatment, and metallurgical condition. Localized corrosion and hydriding at sites of bonding to dissimilar metals are described. Corrosion behavior on specimens transferred from oxygenated to low-oxygen coolants in ETR and ATR experiments is compared. Mechanism studies suggest that a depression in the corrosion of the Zr--2.5Nb alloy under irradiation is due to radiation-induced aging. The radiation-induced onset of transition on several alloys is in general a gradual process which nucleates locally, causing areas of oxide prosity which eventually encompass the surface. Examination of Zry-2 process tubes reveals that accelerated corrosion has occurred in low-oxygen coolants. Hydrogen contents are relatively low, but show some localized profiles. Gross hydriding has occurred on process tubes containing aluminum spacers, apparently by a galvanic charging mechanism. Titanium paralleled Zry-2 in corrosion behavior under irradiation. Niobium corrosion was variable, but did not appear to be strongly influenced by radiation. Corrosion rates on Inconel and stainless steel were only slightly higher in-flux than out-of-reactor. Corrosion rates on nickel-plated aluminum appeared to vary substantially with preexposure treatments, but the rates generally were accelerated compared to rates on unirradiated coupons. (59 references, 11 tables, 12 figs.)

  15. High temperature thermodynamics and vaporization of the zirconium--niobium--oxygen system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinehart, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    The vaporization behavior of the Zr--Nb--O system was studied by means of successive vaporization, Knudsen effusion-target collection experiments, and mass spectrometric analysis of the vapors effusing from a Knudsen crucible. The successive vaporization experiments were performed on two ternary samples in open crucibles. X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the residues and x-ray fluorescence analysis of the condensates and residues indicated the preferential vaporization of niobium-containing species with the composition of the residue subsequently becoming closer to that of congruently vaporizing ZrO/sub 2-x/. The Knudsen effusion-target collection experiments were employed on two samples, pure NbO 2 (s) and a two-phase ZrO 2 --NbO 2 mixture, in order to obtain information on the activity of NbO 2 in the two-phase mixture. Second law enthalpies and entropies of sublimation as well as third law enthalpies were obtained for both systems. The vaporization behaviors of five compositions in the Zr--Nb--O system, NbO 2 , NbO, a ZrO 2 --NbO 2 two-phase mixture, Nb 2 O 5 , and Zr 6 Nb 2 O 17 , were investigated. Above Nb 2 O 5 and the fully oxidized Zr 6 Nb 2 O 17 oxygen is preferentially lost; over NbO 2 , the two-phase ZrO 2 --NbO 2 system, and NbO the principal gaseous species is NbO 2

  16. L-shell X-ray production of molybdenum and niobium induced by 1500–3500 keV Xe26+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yipan; Yang, Zhihu; Song, Zhangyong; Xu, Qiumei; Chen, Jing; Yang, Bian

    2013-01-01

    L-shell X-ray production cross sections are measured for molybdenum and niobium target induced by Xe 26+ ions. The incident energy range varies from 1500 to 3500 keV. The experimental results are well reproduced by the binding-energy-modified binary encounter approximation model in the united-atom limit. In addition to target L-shell X-ray spectra, we also observe a weak spectrum which corresponds to the forbidden transition 3d → 2s from the projectiles

  17. Zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedinger, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium is the 20th most abundant element in the Earth’s crust. It occurs in a variety of rock types and geologic environments but most often in igneous rocks in the form of zircon (ZrSiO4). Zircon is recovered as a coproduct of the mining and processing of heavy mineral sands for the titanium minerals ilmenite and rutile. The sands are formed by the weathering and erosion of rock containing zircon and titanium heavy minerals and their subsequent concentration in sedimentary systems, particularly in coastal environments. A small quantity of zirconium, less than 10 kt/a (11,000 stpy), compared with total world production of 1.4 Mt (1.5 million st) in 2012, was derived from the mineral baddeleyite (ZrO2), produced from a single source in Kovdor, Russia.

  18. Automation drying unit molybdenum-zirconium gel radioisotope production technetium-99M for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrova, Y.; Khromushin, I.; Medvedeva, Z.; Fettsov, I.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : Since 2001 the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Republic of Kazakhstan has began production of radiopharmaceutical based on technetium-99m from irradiated reactor WWR-K of natural molybdenum, which allows to obtain a solution of technetium-99m of the required quality and high volume activity. In 2013 an automated system is started, which is unique and urgent task is to develop algorithms and software in Python, as well as the manufacture of certain elements of technological systems for automated production

  19. Study of the microstructural and mechanical properties of titanium-niobium-zirconium based alloys processed with hydrogen and powder metallurgy for use in dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvaizem, Jose Helio

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen has been used as pulverization agent in alloys based on rare earth and transition metals due to its extremely high diffusion rate even on low temperatures. Such materials are used on hydrogen storage dispositives, generation of electricity or magnetic fields, and are produced by a process which the first step is the transformation of the alloy in fine powder by miling. Besides those, hydrogenium is also being used to obtain alloys based on titanium - niobium - zirconium in the pulverization. Powder metallurgy is utilized on the production of these alloys, making it possible to obtain structures with porous surface as result, requirement for its application as biomaterials. Other advantages of powder metallurgy usage include better surface finish and better microstructural homogeneity. In this work samples were prepared in the Ti-13Nb-13Zr composition. The hydrogenation was performed at 700 degree C, 600 degree C, and 500 degree C for titanium, niobium and zirconium respectively. After hydrogenation, the milling stage was carried out on high energy planetary ball milling with 200rpm during 90 minutes, and also in conventional ball milling for 30 hours. Samples were pressed in uniaxial press, followed by isostatic cold press, and then sintered at 1150 degree C for 7-13 hours. Microstructural properties of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray diffraction. Mechanical and structural properties determined were density, microhardness and moduli of elasticity. The sample sintered at 1150 degree C for 7h, hydrogenated using 10.000 mbar and produced by milling on high energy planetary ball milling presented the best mechanical properties and microstructural homogeneity. (author)

  20. Peroxo complexes of molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV) and thorium(IV) ions containing tridentate Schiff bases derived from salicylaldehyde and amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarafder, M.T.H.; Khan, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    The synthesis of peroxo complexes of molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV), thorium(IV) and their possible oxygen transfer reactions is presented. An attempt has also been made to study the size of the metal ions and the electronic effect derived from the tridentate Schiff bases on the v 1 (O-O) mode of the complexes in their IR spectra

  1. Study of the transformation of uranium-niobium alloys with low niobium concentrations, tempered from the gamma and beta + gamma 1 regions and then annealed at different temperatures. Comparison with uranium-molybdenum alloys (1963); Etude des transformations des alliages uranium-niobium a faible teneur en niobium trempes depuis les domaines gamma et beta + gamma 1 puis revenus a differentes temperatures. Comparaison avec les alliages uranium-molybdene (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collot, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-09-15

    The author shows that uranium-niobium alloys, like uranium-molybdenum alloys, tempered from the gamma region, give a martensitic phase with a structure deriving from that of alpha uranium by a slight contraction parallel to the axis [001], The critical cooling rate allowing the formation of this martensite is 80 deg. C/s at 750 deg. C. Retention of the beta phase of uranium-niobium alloys is particularly difficult, the critical retention rate being 700 deg. C/s at 668 deg. C for an alloy containing 2.5 at. per cent of Nb. This beta phase is completely converted to the alpha phase at room temperature in about 6 hours. The TTT curves of this beta alloy are effectively reduced to the lower branch of the lower 'C'. The beta phase conversion law is expressed as: 1-x = exp. (kt){sup n} x being the degree of progression of the conversion, t the time, n an exponent no-varying with temperature and having approximately the value 2 for the alloy considered, k an increasing function of temperature. The activation energy of conversion is of the order of 14,600 cal/mole. Niobium is much less active than molybdenum as a stabiliser of beta uranium. (author) [French] Dans ce travail l'auteur montre que les alliages uranium-niobium, comme d'ailleurs les alliages uranium-molybdene, trempes depuis le domaine gamma, donnent une phase martensitique dont la structure derive de celle de l'uranium alpha par une legere contraction parallele de l'axe [001]. La vitesse critique de refroidissement permettant la formation de cette martensite est de 80 deg. C/s a 750 deg. C. La retention de la phase beta des alliages uranium-niobium est particulierement delicate car la vitesse critique de retention est de 700 deg. C/s a 668 deg. C pour l'alliage a 2,5 at. pour cent de Nb. Cette phase beta se transforme completement en phase alpha a la temperature ordinaire en 6 heures environ. Les courbes TTT de cet alliage de structure beta se reduisent pratiquement a la branche inferieure du 'C' inferieur. La

  2. The surface oxidation kinetics of zirconium-niobium alloys and aα-Fe with prevailing cubical texture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhambetov, D.G.; Kargin, D.B.; Chalaya, O. V.; Berber, N.N.

    2002-01-01

    It is known, that the kinetics of oxidation of zirconium at formed heating is characterized by two consecutive stages. At the initial stage the thin protecting film will be derived. The relation of its depth from time h (t) is described predominantly by parabolic law. Some time later there can be a transition to the linear law of oxidation. The time moment divided these areas on the kinetic relation is called as a point of break. The film is formed at the second stage, has a developed grid of pores or cracks, can be flake away and be crumbled by losing its protective properties. At the oxidation of the surface shells of the heat generating elements and the technological channels of atomic boilers both stages are proceeded simultaneously. This phenomenon is called modular corrosion. Its consequences can be dangerous for the equipment. Its mechanism is not clear till now. Similar dependencies h(t), with the break point, beginning from which the thin film is transformed into the thick one were found by us at the oxidation α-Fe with prevailing cubical texture. The task of the work was to study the oxide film growth laws in order to clarify the mechanisms of transition of the thin film into the oxide layer on the α-Fe surface and Zr-Nb alloy modular corrosion emergence. Low-carbonate steel with contents 99.43 % of α-Fe was used as a model object of our research. In the texture of the steel surface planar direction [100] was prevalent. Its part accounted for about 40 %. The isothermal air oxidation was carried out in the interval of 450-500 deg. C . Phase composition of the film was determined with X-ray diffraction. The mathematical treatment of the dependencies h(t) obtained by experiment showed that the kinetics of the film growth can be conditionally divided into 4-stages. The initial stage is described by function logarithmic function, the other stages - by the power mode h n =A n ·t, namely, the second stage - is described by function close to cubical (n≅3

  3. Preconcentration of uranium, thorium, zirconium, titanium, molybdenum and vanadium with oxine supported on microcrystalline naphthalene and their determinations by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naveen Kumar, P.; Sanjay Kumar; Vijay Kumar; Nandakishore, S.S.; Bangroo, P.N.

    2013-01-01

    A sensitive and rapid method for the determination of uranium, thorium, zirconium, titanium, molybdenum and vanadium by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) after solid-liquid extraction with microcrystalline naphthalene is developed. Analytes were quantitatively adsorbed as their oxinate complexes on naphthalene and determined by ICP-AES after stripping with 2 M HCl. The effect of various experimental parameters such as pH, reagent amounts, naphthalene amount and stripping conditions on the determination of these elements was investigated in detail. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the detection limits of this method for U (VI), Th (IV), Zr (IV), Ti (IV), Mo (VI) and V (V) were 20.0 ng mL -1 and the relative standard deviations obtained for three replicate determinations at a concentration of 1.0 µg mL -1 were 1.5-3.0%. The proposed method has been applied in the analysis of SY-2, SY-3 and pre-analysed samples for U, Th, Zr, Ti, Mo and V the analytical results are in good agreement with recommended values. (author)

  4. Evaluation of methods for mathematical corrections in the determination of niobium and zirconium contents in U-Nb and U-Zr alloys by X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, V.L.R.; Sato, I.M.; Lordello, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    Methods for the determination of niobium and zirconium in U-Nb and U-Zr alloys with the X-ray fluorescence technique are described. The NbK sub(Ab) line, although not under the overlapping effect of the uranium lines as the NbK sub(β) line, although not under the overlapping effect of the uranium lines as the NbK sub(α) is, presents a more intensive absorption effect than this last one; on the other hand the ZrK sub(α) and ZrK sub(β) lines are under the overlapping effect of the uranium spectrum. Such interferences are mathematically corrected by means of relations between the intensities of the lines for the elements and those for the uranium. The technique for the preparation of the samples is the double layer pressed pellet. From the different corrections the best method has showed a precision of 5%. (Author) [pt

  5. Comparison of changes in irregularity and transverse width with nickel-titanium and niobium-titanium-tantalum-zirconium archwires during initial orthodontic alignment in adolescents: A double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, Barrett; Shoji, Toshihiro; Anderson, W Cameron; Fields, Henry W; Beck, F Michael; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Deguchi, Toru

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this prospective, double-blind, randomized clinical trial was to compare the clinical efficiency of nickel-titanium (NiTi) and niobium-titanium-tantalum-zirconium (TiNbTaZr) archwires during initial orthodontic alignment. All subjects (ages between 12 and 20 years) underwent nonextraction treatment using 0.022-inch brackets. All patients were randomized into two groups for initial alignment with 0.016-inch NiTi archwires (n = 14), or with 0.016-inch TiNbTaZr archwires (n = 14). Digital scans were taken during the course of treatment and were used to compare the improvement in Little's Irregularity Index and the changes in intercanine and intermolar widths. There was approximately a 27% reduction in crowding during the first month with the use of 0.016-inch TiNbTaZr (Gummetal) wire, and an additional 25% decrease in crowding was observed during the next month. There was no significant difference between the two treatment groups in the decrease in irregularity over time ( P = .29). There was no significant difference between the two groups in the changes in intercanine and intermolar width ( P = .80). It can be concluded that Gummetal wires and conventional NiTi wires possess a similar ability to align teeth, and Gummetal wires have additional advantages over conventional NiTi, such as formability and use in patients with nickel allergy.

  6. Corrosion resistance of the substrates for the cryogenic gyroscope and electrodeposition of the superconductive niobium coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskiy, A. R.; Okunev, M. A.; Makarova, O. V.; Kuznetsov, S. A.

    2017-05-01

    The interaction of different materials with the niobium containing melt was investigated. As substrate materials the ceramics, beryllium and carbopyroceram were chosen. Several spherical ceramic and beryllium samples were coated with protective molybdenum and niobium films by magnetron sputtering and PVD, respectively. After the experiment (exposition time 10 min) the exfoliation of molybdenum film from ceramic samples was observed due to interaction of the substrate with the melt. The niobium protective coatings reacted with the melt with niobium oxide formation. The beryllium samples regardless of the shape and the presence of the protective films were dissolved in the niobium containing melt due to more negative electrode potential comparing with niobium one. The carbopyroceram samples were exposed in the melt during 3 and 12 h. It was found that the carbopyroceram not corrodes in the niobium containing melt. The optimal regimes for electrodeposition of smooth uniform niobium coatings with the thickness up to 50 μm on carbopyroceram spheres were found.

  7. Study of molybdenum (VI) complexation and precipitation by zirconium (IV) in strongly acid medium. Application to nuclear spent fuel dissolution; Etude de la complexation et de la precipitation du molybdene (VI) par le zirconium (IV) en milieu tres acide. Application a la dissolution du combustible nucleaire irradie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esbelin, E

    1999-07-01

    These last years the formation of solid deposits has been observed in the dissolution workshops of the La Hague plant. A sample of the solid was withdrawn for expertise: molybdenum and zirconium are the two major components of the solid, identified as zirconium molybdate. This thesis consisted in the approach of the mechanisms in solution liable to induce precipitate formation. After a bibliographical overview on the chemistry of Mo(VI) in highly acidic solution, this system was studied by absorption spectrophotometry in perchloric medium. The implication of two major forms of Mo(VI) in a dimerization equilibrium was confirmed by this way and by {sup 95}Mo NMR. The principal parameters governing this equilibrium were identified. It is thus shown that the molybdenum dimerization reaction is exothermic. Disturbance of the Mo(VI) system in highly acidic solution by Zr(IV) was also studied. In a restricted experimental field, for which 'conventional' exploitation methodologies had to be adapted to the system, a main complex of stoichiometry 1:1 between Mo(VI) and Zr(IV) was found. The precipitation study of Mo(VI) by Zr(IV) under conditions close to those of the dissolution medium of nuclear spent fuel was undertaken. The main parameters which control precipitation kinetics were identified. The results obtained reveal that precipitation is controlled by a single macroscopic process and therefore can be described by a single equation. The solid obtained is composed of only one phase presenting a Mo:Zr non-stoichiometry when compared to the theoretical formula ZrMo{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2},2H{sub 2}O. At last, on the basis of the research results, a descriptive mechanism of the system is proposed in which intervenes a 1:1 intermediate complex, much more soluble than a probable 2:1 precipitation precursor. (author)

  8. X-ray target with substrate of molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    Rotary targets for x-ray tubes are provided comprising a molybdenum base body alloyed with a stabilizing proportion of iron, silicon, cobalt, tantalum, niobium, hafnium, stable metal oxide, or a mixture of the preceding

  9. Zirconium and cast zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krone, K

    1977-04-01

    A survey is given on the occurence of zirconium, production of Zr sponge and semi-finished products, on physical and mechanical properties, production of Zr cast, composition of the commercial grades and reactor grades qualities, metal cutting, welding, corrosion behavior and use.

  10. Mechanical properties of soldered joints of niobium base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishin, V.L.

    1980-01-01

    Mechanical properties of soldered joints of niobium alloys widely distributed in industry: VN3, VN4, VN5A, VN5AE, VN5AEP etc., 0.6-1.2 mm thick are investigated. It is found out that the usage of zirconium-vanadium, titanium-tantalum solders for welding niobium base alloys permits to obtain soldered joints with satisfactory mechanical properties at elevated temperatures

  11. Niobium technological alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinatti, D.G.; Dainesi, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    The process-product matrix of Niobium is presented, through which the technological alternatives for Niobium are identified. It is shown that the three axes of Niobium application, steels, superalloys and metallic Niobium have a tendency to be economical by equivalent. The critical points where technological development of Niobium is needed are analyzed and results are presented on the following products: Nb 2 O 5 by volatilization, metalic Niobium, Niobium powder, bars and sheets, NbTi alloy, corrosion resistent Niobium alloys and superconductor cable and wires. (Author) [pt

  12. Thermal transport properties of niobium and some niobium-based alloys from 80 to 1600 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J P; Graves, R S; Williams, R K [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)

    1980-01-01

    The electric resistivity, rho, and Seebeck coefficient, S, of 99.8 at% niobium, and Nb-4.8 at% W, Nb-5 at% Mo, Nb-10 at% Mo, and Nb-2.4 at% Mo-2.4 at% Zr alloys were measured from 80 to 1600 K, and the thermal conductivity, lambda, of the niobium and the Nb-5 at% W alloy was measured from 80 to 1300 K. A technique is described for measuring rho and S of a specimen during radial-heat-flow measurements of lambda. The transport property results, which had uncertainties of +-0.4% for rho and +-1.4% for lambda, showed the influence of tungsten and molybdenum solutes on the transport properties of niobium and were used to obtain the electronic Lorenz function of pure niobium, which was found to approach the Sommerfeld value at high temperatures.

  13. Thermal transport properties of niobium and some niobium base alloys from 80 to 16000K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.P.; Graves, R.S.; Williams, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    The electrical resistivities and absolute Seebeck coefficients of 99.8 at. % niobium with a RRR of 36, Nb-4.8 at. % W, Nb-5 at. % Mo, Nb-10 at. % Mo, and Nb-2.4 at. % Mo-2.4 at. % Zr were measured from 80 to 1600 0 K, and the thermal conductivities of the niobium and Nb-5 at. % W were measured from 80 to 1300 0 K. A technique is described for measuring the electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient of a specimen during radial heat flow measurements of the thermal conductivity. The transport property results, which had uncertainties of +-0.4%for electrical resistivity and +-1.4% for thermal conductivity, showed the influence of tungsten and molybdenum solutes on the transport properties of niobium and were used to obtain the electronic Lorenz function of pure niobium, which was found to approach the Sommerfeld value at high temperatures

  14. Study of the microstructural and mechanical properties of titanium-niobium-zirconium based alloys processed with hydrogen and powder metallurgy for use in dental implants; Estudo das propriedades mecanicas e microestruturais de ligas a base de titanio-niobiozirconio processados com hidrogenio e metalurgia do po para utilizacao em implantes dentarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvaizem, Jose Helio

    2009-07-01

    Hydrogen has been used as pulverization agent in alloys based on rare earth and transition metals due to its extremely high diffusion rate even on low temperatures. Such materials are used on hydrogen storage dispositives, generation of electricity or magnetic fields, and are produced by a process which the first step is the transformation of the alloy in fine powder by miling. Besides those, hydrogenium is also being used to obtain alloys based on titanium - niobium - zirconium in the pulverization. Powder metallurgy is utilized on the production of these alloys, making it possible to obtain structures with porous surface as result, requirement for its application as biomaterials. Other advantages of powder metallurgy usage include better surface finish and better microstructural homogeneity. In this work samples were prepared in the Ti-13Nb-13Zr composition. The hydrogenation was performed at 700 degree C, 600 degree C, and 500 degree C for titanium, niobium and zirconium respectively. After hydrogenation, the milling stage was carried out on high energy planetary ball milling with 200rpm during 90 minutes, and also in conventional ball milling for 30 hours. Samples were pressed in uniaxial press, followed by isostatic cold press, and then sintered at 1150 degree C for 7-13 hours. Microstructural properties of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray diffraction. Mechanical and structural properties determined were density, microhardness and moduli of elasticity. The sample sintered at 1150 degree C for 7h, hydrogenated using 10.000 mbar and produced by milling on high energy planetary ball milling presented the best mechanical properties and microstructural homogeneity. (author)

  15. Reduction of Al2O3 in niobium--lithium systems at 10000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, J.E.; DeVan, J.H.

    1977-07-01

    Various grades of aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) were sealed inside capsules of niobium and niobium-1% zirconium alloy which were then exposed to liquid lithium for 3000 hr at 1000 0 C. Similar unsealed capsules were exposed to a high vacuum. Reduction of the Al 2 O 3 occurred in the lithium-treated capsules, but no reaction occurred in the vacuum-treated capsules. Metallography and electron-microprobe analysis showed that reaction products in the form of compounds of niobium, aluminum, and zirconium were formed. Lithium acted as a sink for oxygen

  16. Niobium stainless steel for implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo, J.M.D.A.

    1983-01-01

    The materials that have often been used, during the last two or three decades, to carry out materials for implants are made according to the specifications: a)A.S.T.M. (F.55-76, F.56-76, F.138-76, F.139-76) stainless steel b)A.S.T.M. (F.75-76), cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys. c)A.S.T.M. (F.90-76), cobalt-chromium-tungsten-nickel alloys. d)A.S.T.M. (F.67-77), unalloyed titanium. e)A.S.T.M. (F.136-70), titanium alloys. It was the purpose of retaking them, toverify the niobium influence as alloy element in ANSI/ASTM F.55-76 classification stainless steels, usually for these materials elaboration. The problem by substituting molybdenum total or partially for niobium, by comparing the mechanical and corrosion properties, and biocompatibility is presented, by pointing out the variables of these substitutions, when we employ this new material to perform materials for implants. (Author) [pt

  17. Determination of niobium, tantalum, and uranium in tantalite-columbite ores by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry; Application de la spectrometrie de fluorescence de rayos X a la determination de niobium, tantale et uranium dans niobiotantalites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latorre, O; Bermudez Polonio, J

    1964-07-01

    A simple and quick procedure is carried out to determine niobium, tantalum and uranium employing the internal standard technique; zinc as internal standard for tantalum and molybdenum for niobium and uranium were selected. Some inter element effects were studied and the ratios. (Author)

  18. Corrosion of niobium and niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yau, T.L.; Webster, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    Niobium and niobium alloys are used in several corrosion-resistant applications, principally rocket and jet engines, nuclear reactors, sodium vapor highway lighting, and chemical-processing equipment. Niobium has many of the same properties of tantalum, its sister metal, but has one half the density of tantalum (see the article ''Corrosion of Tantalum'' in this Volume). A common property of niobium and tantalum is the interaction with the reactive elements hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon at temperatures above 300 0 C (570 0 F). These reactions will cause severe embrittlement. Consequently, at elevated temperatures, the metal must be protectively coated or used in vacuum or inert atmospheres. Niobium resists a wide variety of corrosive environments, including concentrated mineral acids, organic acids, liquid metals (particularly sodium and lithium), metal vapors, and molten salts

  19. Niobium and hafnium grown on porous membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morant, C.; Marquez, F.; Campo, T.; Sanz, J.M.; Elizalde, E.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we report on a method for fabricating highly ordered nanostructures of niobium and hafnium metals by physical vapour deposition using two different templates: anodized aluminum oxide membranes (AAO) and zirconium onto AAO membranes (Zr/AAO). The growth mechanism of these metal nanostructures is clearly different depending on the material used as a template. A different morphology was obtained by using AAO or Zr/AAO templates: when the metal is deposited onto AAO membranes, nanospheres with ordered hexagonal regularity are obtained; however, when the metal is deposited onto a Zr/AAO template, highly ordered nanocones are formed. The experimental approach described in this work is simple and suitable for synthesizing nanospheres or nanoholes of niobium and hafnium metals in a highly ordered structure.

  20. Niobium, catalyst repair kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that niobium oxides, when small amounts are added to known catalysts, enhance catalytic activity and selectivity and prolong catalyst life. Moreover, niobium oxides exhibit a pronounced effect as supports of metal or metal oxide catalysts. Recently we found that the surface acidity of hydrated niobium pentoxide, niobic acid (Nb 2 O 5 · nH 2 O), corresponds to the acidity of 70% sulfuric acid and exhibits high catalytic activity, selectivity, and stability for acid-catalyzed reactions in which water molecules participate. Although there are few differences in electronegativity and ionic radius between niobium and its neighbors in the periodic table, it is interesting that the promoter effect, support effect, and acidic nature of niobium compounds are quite different from those of compounds of the surrounding elements. Here we review what's known of niobium compounds from the viewpoint of their pronounced catalytic behavior

  1. Niobium-Matrix-Composite High-Temperature Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Richard B.; Tuffias, Robert H.; La Ferla, Raffaele; Heng, Sangvavann; Harding, John T.

    1995-01-01

    High-temperture composite-material turbine blades comprising mainly niobium matrices reinforced with refractory-material fibers being developed. Of refractory fibrous materials investigated, FP-AL(2)0(3), tungsten, and polymer-based SiC fibers most promising. Blade of this type hollow and formed in nearly net shape by wrapping mesh of reinforcing refractory fibers around molybdenum mandrel, then using thermal-gradient chemical-vapor infiltration (CVI) to fill interstices with niobium. CVI process controllable and repeatable, and kinetics of both deposition and infiltration well understood.

  2. Field determination of microgram quantities of niobium in rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, F.N.; Marranzino, A.P.

    1955-01-01

    A rapid, simple, and moderately accurate method was needed for the determination of traces of niobium in rocks. The method developed is based on the reaction of niobium(V) with thiocyanate ion in a 4M hydrochloric acid and 0.5M tartaric acid medium, after which the complex is extracted with ethyl ether. The proposed procedure is applicable to rocks containing from 50 to 2000 p.p.m. of niobium, and, with modifications, can be used on rocks containing larger amounts. Five determinations on two rocks containing 100 p.p.m. or less of niobium agree within 5 p.p.m. of the mean, and the confidence limits at the 95% level are, respectively, ??6 and ??4 p.p.m. The addition of acetone to the ether extract of the niobium thiocyanate inhibits the polymerization of the thiocyanate ion and stabilizes the solution for at least 20 hours. The proposed procedure permits the determination of 20 ?? of niobium in the presence of 1000 ?? of iron, titanium, or uranium; 500 ?? of vanadium; or 100 ?? of tungsten or molybdenum or both.

  3. Low cycle fatigue behaviour of zirconium alloys at 3000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosbons, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    The low cycle fatigue lives of two zirconium alloys, zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium and zirconium-1.1 wt% chronium-0.1 wt% iron, have been determined at 300 0 C. Both annealed material and cold-worked and stress-relieved material have similar fatigue lives to annealed Zircaloy-2 but β-quenched zirconium-niobium and zirconium-chromium-iron have lower fatigue lives than annealed Zircaloy-2. An atmosphere containing a concentration of iodine lower than that required for stress corrosion cracking still significantly lowers the fatigue life. A mathematical relationship between fatigue life and short-term tensile properties was used to estimate the fatigue life of zirconium alloy fuel sheaths and it was estimated that for a strain cycle of 0.1 per cent a cyclic frequency exceeding 0.116 Hz (10 000 cycles/day) would be required to cause fatigue failure of the sheath before its design life is realized. (author)

  4. Low cycle fatigue behaviour of zirconium alloys at 3000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosbons, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    The low cycle fatigue lives of two zirconium alloys, zirconium--2.5 wt percent niobium and zirconium--1.1 wt percent chromium--0.1 wt percent iron, have been determined at 300 0 C. Both annealed material and cold-worked and stress-relieved material have similar fatigue lives to annealed Zircaloy-2 but β-quenched zirconium--niobium and zirconium--chromium--iron have lower fatigue lives than annealed Zircaloy-2. An atmosphere containing a concentration of iodine lower than that required for stress corrosion cracking still significantly lowers the fatigue life. A mathematical relationship between fatigue life and short-term tensile properties was used to estimate the fatigue life of zirconium alloy fuel sheaths and it was estimated that for a strain cycle of 0.1 percent a cyclic frequency exceeding 0.116 Hz (10,000 cycles/ day) would be required to cause fatigue failure of the sheath before its design life is realized

  5. High temperature niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    Niobium alloys are currently being used in various high temperature applications such as rocket propulsion, turbine engines and lighting systems. This paper presents an overview of the various commercial niobium alloys, including basic manufacturing processes, properties and applications. Current activities for new applications include powder metallurgy, coating development and fabrication of advanced porous structures for lithium cooled heat pipes

  6. Niobium effects on the austenitic grain growth and hardenability of steels for mechanical construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, R.R.; Arruda Camargo, L.M. de; Oliveira Junior, G.G. de; Dias Filho, A.G.C.

    1983-01-01

    The austenitic grain growth and hardenability of SAE 86XX and 5120 steels modified with 0,001 to 0,20 per-cent niobium content were studied when submitted to case hardening and quenching heat treatments. The results show that niobium controlS the austenite grain size better than molybdenum up to 950 0 C austenitization temperature. The hardenability, evaluated by the Jominy test which the modified SAE 8640 steels, is more strongly inflencied by the grain refining resulting from niobium addition than by any other supposed effect. (Author) [pt

  7. Niobium ore OKA-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steger, H.F.; Bowman, W.S.

    1981-01-01

    A 287-kg sample of a niobium ore, OKA-1, from Oka, Quebec, was prepared as a compositional reference material. OKA-1 was ground to minus 74 μm, blended in one lot, tested for homogeneity by X-ray fluorescence and chemical methods and bottled in 200-g units. In a 'free-choice' round-robin analytical program, 22 laboratories contributed results for niobium in each of two bottles of OKA-1. A statistical analysis of the data gave a recommended value of 0.37 +- 0.01% for niobium

  8. Interlaboratory niobium dosimetry comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wille, P.

    1980-01-01

    For an interlaboratory comparison of neutron dosimetry using niobium the 93 sup(m)Nb activities of irradiated niobium monitors were measured. This work was performed to compare the applied techniques of dosimetry with Nb in different laboratories. The niobium monitors were irradiated in the fast breeder EBRII, USA and the BR2, Belgium. The monitors were dissolved and several samples were prepared. Their niobium contents were determined by the 94 Nb-count rates. since the original specific count rate was known. The KX radiations of the 93 sup(m)Nb of the samples and of a calibrated Nb-foil were compared. This foil was measured by PTB, Braunschweig and CBNM, Geel, which we additionally compared with the KX radiation of 88 Sr produced by a thin 88 Y source from a 88 Y-standard solution (PTB). (orig.) [de

  9. On niobium nitrilohalogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinitsyna, S.M.

    1977-01-01

    Niobium nitrilhalogenides of the general formula [MNH]sub(n) and [MNH 2 ]sub(n) have been synthesized and their properties investigated. The effect of the ligand nature on the properties, structure, and nature of the chemical bond in niobium nitrilhalogenides has been shown. With an increase of electron-donor properties of the ligands F 2 -800 cm -1 , NbNCl 2 -740 cm -1 , NbNBr 2 -720 cm -1 , NbNI-725 cm -1 )

  10. Corrosion of zirconium alloys in alternating pH environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, P.; Manolescu, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    Behaviour of two commercial alloys, Zircaloy-2 and zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium were investigated in an environment of alternating pH. Corrosion advancement and scale morphology of coupons exposed to aqueous solution of LiOH (pH 10.2 and 14) were followed as a function of temperature (300-360 degreesC) and time (up to 165 days). The test sequence consisted of short term exposure to high pH and re-exposure to low pH solutions for extended period of time followed by a short term test in high pH. The results of these tests and detailed post-corrosion analysis indicate a fundamental difference between the corrosion behaviour of these two materials. Both alloys corrode fast in high pH environments, but only zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium continues to form detectable new oxide in low pH solution

  11. Niobium in gray cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castello Branco, C.H.; Beckert, E.A.

    1984-03-01

    The potential for utilization of niobium in gray cast iron is appraised and reviewed. Experiments described in literature indicate that niobium provides structural refinement of the eutectic cells and also promotes pearlite formation. (Author) [pt

  12. Vitreous-enamel protective coatings for niobium and niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobyakov, V.P.; Sedmale, G.P.; Tsimdin', R.A.; Sedmalis, U.Ya.; Tsetskhladze, D.L.; Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol'zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Sukhumi. Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst.)

    1988-01-01

    Vitreous-enanel coatings to protect niobium and niobium alloys, used in oxidizing media at temperatures up to 1000degC, from embrittlement are developed on the basis of Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 -P 2 O 5 -Ba vetrificating system. By means of microhardness measurement and IR-spectroscopy it is found, that at coating formation the intermediate ∼20 mkm width zone which prevents oxygen penetration in niobium is formed. Test of niobium pieces with ERS-1000 vitreous-enamel coating have shown, that coating provides niobium reliable protection in the air at 800degC and atmospheric pressure

  13. Method of removing niobium from uranium-niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, E.N.; Schlier, D.S.; Shinopulos, G.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method of removing niobium from a uranium-niobium alloy. It comprises dissolving the uranium-niobium alloy metal pieces in a first aqueous solution containing an acid selected from the group consisting of hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid and fluoboric acid as a catalyst to provide a second aqueous solution, which includes uranium (U +4 ), acid radical ions, the acids insolubles including uranium oxides and niobium oxides; adding nitric acid to the insolubles to oxidize the niobium oxides to yield niobic acid and to complete the solubilization of any residual uranium; and separating the niobic acid from the nitric acid and solubilized uranium

  14. Development of Silicide Coating on Molybdenum Alloy Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Woojin; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    The molybdenum alloy is considered as one of the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding materials due to its high temperature mechanical properties. However, molybdenum has a weak oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. To modify the oxidation resistance of molybdenum cladding, silicide coating on the cladding is considered. Molybdenum silicide layers are oxidized to SiO 2 in an oxidation atmosphere. The SiO 2 protective layer isolates the substrate from the oxidizing atmosphere. Pack cementation deposition technique is widely adopted for silicide coating for molybdenum alloys due to its simple procedure, homogeneous coating quality and chemical compatibility. In this study, the pack cementation method was conducted to develop molybdenum silicide layers on molybdenum alloys. It was found that the Mo 3 Si layer was deposited on substrate instead of MoSi 2 because of short holding time. It means that through the extension of holding time, MoSi 2 layer can be formed on molybdenum substrate to enhance the oxidation resistance of molybdenum. The accident tolerant fuel (ATF) concept is to delay the process following an accident by reducing the oxidation rate at high temperatures and to delay swelling and rupture of fuel claddings. The current research for Atf can be categorized into three groups: First, modification of existing zirconium-based alloy cladding by improving the high temperature oxidation resistance and strength. Second, replacing Zirconium based alloys with alternative metallic materials such as refractory elements with high temperature oxidation resistance and strength. Third, designing alternative fuel structures using ceramic and composite systems

  15. Niobium and tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Klaus J.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Papp, John F.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Niobium and tantalum are transition metals that are almost always found together in nature because they have very similar physical and chemical properties. Their properties of hardness, conductivity, and resistance to corrosion largely determine their primary uses today. The leading use of niobium (about 75 percent) is in the production of high-strength steel alloys used in pipelines, transportation infrastructure, and structural applications. Electronic capacitors are the leading use of tantalum for high-end applications, including cell phones, computer hard drives, and such implantable medical devices as pacemakers. Niobium and tantalum are considered critical and strategic metals based on the potential risks to their supply (because current production is restricted to only a few countries) and the significant effects that a restriction in supply would have on the defense, energy, high-tech industrial, and medical sectors.The average abundance of niobium and tantalum in bulk continental crust is relatively low—8.0 parts per million (ppm) niobium and 0.7 ppm tantalum. Their chemical characteristics, such as small ionic size and high electronic field strength, significantly reduce the potential for these elements to substitute for more common elements in rock-forming minerals and make niobium and tantalum essentially immobile in most aqueous solutions. Niobium and tantalum do not occur naturally as pure metals but are concentrated in a variety of relatively rare oxide and hydroxide minerals, as well as in a few rare silicate minerals. Niobium is primarily derived from the complex oxide minerals of the pyrochlore group ((Na,Ca,Ce)2(Nb,Ti,Ta)2(O,OH,F)7), which are found in some alkaline granite-syenite complexes (that is, igneous rocks containing sodium- or potassium-rich minerals and little or no quartz) and carbonatites (that is, igneous rocks that are more than 50 percent composed of primary carbonate minerals, by volume). Tantalum is derived mostly from the

  16. Niobium in steels and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyakishev, N.P.; Tulin, N.A.; Pliner, Y.L.

    1984-01-01

    Data are presented on the reserves and processing of niobium raw materials followed by brief review of the current status and long-range trends in the commercial usage of niobium and its compounds. A survey is made of the physical properties of niobium and its chemical reactions with elements of direct concern in the manufacture of ferroalloys, quality steels and other products. Niobium minerals and ores, along with common ore processing practices are described briefly. Attention is paid to Brazilian niobium ores, and to the Araxa deposit specifically. Some emphasis has been given to methods of processing lean niobium ores not easily amenable to simple concentration. A systematic review is presented of the techniques used in the production of niobium ferroalloys. (E.G.) [pt

  17. A half-century of changes in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardon, J.P.; Barberis, P.; Hoffmann, P.B.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the history of zirconium alloys for PWR and BWR technologies. For more than 20 years zirconium alloys have evolved to cope with demands of the reactor operators concerning the burn-up extension and new safety margins. The poor properties of Zircaloy-1 concerning corrosion have led researchers to add elements like iron by developing Zircaloy-3A and Zircaloy-3C, and resulting in Zircaloy-4 with tin addition (from 1.30% to 1.50%). Zircaloy-4 is now outdated for PWR and new zirconium alloys with niobium are used (M5, ZIRLO...) they present a better resistance to corrosion, to hydridation, to creep and they are less prone to dimensional changes under irradiation. (A.C.)

  18. Behavior of molybdenum in mixed-oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacchetti, G.; Sari, C.

    1976-01-01

    Metallic molybdenum, Mo--Ru--Rh--Pd alloys, barium, zirconium, and tungsten were added to uranium and uranium--plutonium oxides by coprecipitation and mechanical mixture techniques. This material was treated in a thermal gradient similar to that existing in fuel during irradiation to study the behavior of molybdenum in an oxide matrix as a function of the O/(U + Pu) ratio and some added elements. Result of ceramographic and microprobe analysis shows that when the overall O/(U + Pu) ratio is less than 2, molybdenum and Mo--Ru--Rh--Pd alloy inclusions are present in the uranium--plutonium oxide matrix. If the O/(U + Pu) ratio is greater than 2, molybdenum oxidizes to MoO 2 , which is gaseous at a temperature approximately 1000 0 C. Molybdenum oxide vapor reacts with barium oxide and forms a compound that exists as a liquid phase in the columnar grain region. Molybdenum oxide also reacts with tungsten oxide (tungsten is often present as an impurity in the fuel) and forms a compound that contains approximately 40 wt percent of actinide metals. The apparent solubility of molybdenum in uranium and uranium--plutonium oxides, determined by electron microprobe, was found to be less than 250 ppM both for hypo- and hyperstoichiometric fuels

  19. Surface preparation of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneisel, P.

    1980-01-01

    Any discussion of surface preparation for superconducting rf-surfaces is certainly connected with the question what is the best recipe for achieving high Q-values and high break-down fields. Since the break-down in a cavity is not understood so far and because several mechanisms play a role, it also is not possible to give one recipe which always works. Nevertheless in the past certain preparation techniques for niobium surfaces have been developed and certain rules for preparation can be applied. In the following the to-days state of the art will be described and it is attempted to give a short description of the surface in conjunction with the methods of surface treatments, which generally can be applied to niobium cavities. (orig./WTR)

  20. White beam synchrotron fractography of molybdenum and niobium single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilello, J.C.; Hmelo, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that a White Beam Synchrotron reflection technique can be used to characterize the fracture surface of Mo and Nb single crystals. This technique when used in conjunction with Berg-Barrett (or in the future monochromatic synchrotron topography) gives detailed information which correlates the internal defect structure to the cleavage surface morphology. In particular, synchrotron fractography has revealed the full extent of the plastic zone associated with a precursor crack, has clearly identified the nature of the initial crack where more than one precursor could have existed, and give detailed information on the extent of twinning and microtwinning. In comparison with other fractography methods for such semi-brittle metals the White Beam Synchrotron method not only achieves rapid data collection, but also provides internal defect structure correlation non-destructively. (author)

  1. Molybdenum extraction from copper-molybdenum ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevaeva, L.M.

    1982-01-01

    Molybdenum extraction from copper-molybdenum ores as practised in different countries is reviewed. In world practice the production process including depression of copper and iron sulfides and flotation of molybdenite is widely spread. At two USA factories the process of a selective flotation with molybdenite depression by dextrin is used

  2. Method of reducing zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megy, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for making nuclear-grade zirconium from a zirconium compound, which ismore economical than previous methods since it uses aluminum as the reductant metal rather than the more expensive magnesium. A fused salt phase containing the zirconium compound to be reduced is first prepared. The fused salt phase is then contacted with a molten metal phase which contains aluminum and zinc. The reduction is effected by mutual displacment. Aluminum is transported from the molten metal phase to the fused salt phase, replacing zirconium in the salt. Zirconium is transported from the fused salt phase to the molten metal phase. The fused salt phase and the molten metal phase are then separated, and the solvent metal and zirconium are separated by distillation or other means. (DN)

  3. Zirconium molybdate gel as a generator for technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.V.; Shying, M.E.

    1984-12-01

    A new sup(99m)Tc generator based on zirconium molybdate gel is described. Essentially the gel is a cation ion exchanger which permits the elution of the pertechnetate ion. The high molybdenum content of this gel, its stability under self-irradiation, and the absence of organic materials during preparation provide a generator concept that eliminates high processing costs, active waste storage costs and stability problems in other types of generator

  4. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  5. Methods for determination of zirconium in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Two methods for determining zirconium content in titanium alloys are specified in this standard. One is the ion-exchange/mandelic acid gravimetry for Zr content below 20 % down to 1 % while the other is the mandelic acid gravimetry for Zr content below 20 % down to 0.5 %. In the former, a specimen is decomposed by hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid. After substances such as titanium are oxidized by adding nitric acid, the liquid is adjusted into a 4N hydrochloric acid - gN hydrofluoric acid solution, which is them passed through an ion-exchange column. The niobium and tantalum contents are absorbed while the titanium and zirconium contents flow out. Perchloric acid and sulfuric acid are poured in the solution to remove hydrofluoric acid. Aqueous ammonia is added to produce hydroxide of titanium and zirconium, which is then filtered out. The hydroxyde is dissolved in hydrochloric acid, and mandelic acid is poured to precipitate the zirconium content. The precipitate is ignited and the weight of the oxide formed is measured. The coprecipitated titanium content is determined by the absorptiometric method using hydrogen peroxide. Finally, the weight of the oxide is corrected. In the latter determination method, on the other hand, only several steps of the above procedure are used, namely, decomposition by hydrochloric acid, precipitation of zirconium, ignition of precipitate, measurement of oxide weight and weight correction. (Nogami, K.)

  6. Corrosion resistant zirconium alloys prepared by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojeik, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    Pure zirconium and zirconium 2.5% niobium were prepared by powder metallurgy. The powders were prepared directly from sponge and consolidated by cold isostatic pressing and sintering. Hot isostatic pressing was also used to obtain full density after sintering. For pure zirconium the effects of particle size, compaction pressure, sintering temperature and purity were investigated. Fully densified zirconium and Zr-2.5%Nb exhibited tensile properties comparable to cast material at room temperature and 300 0 F (149 0 C). Pressed and sintered material having density of 94-99% had slightly lower tensile properties. Corrosion tests were performed in boiling 65% H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 70% HNO/sub 3/, 20% HCl and 20% HCl + 500 ppm FeCl/sub 3/ (a known pitting solution). For fully dense material the observed corrosion behavior was nearly equivalent to cast material. A slightly higher rate of attack was observed for samples which were only 94-99% dense. Welding tests were also performed on zirconium and Zr-2.5%Nb alloy. Unlike P/M titanium alloys, these materials had good weldability due to the lower content of volatile impurities in the powder. A slight amount of weld porosity was observed but joint efficiencies were always not 100%, even for 94-99% density samples. Several practical applications of the P/M processed material will be briefly described

  7. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.; Iizuka, T.

    1983-04-01

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author) [pt

  8. Concept Feasibility Report for Electroplating Zirconium onto Uranium Foil - Year 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, Greg W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meinhardt, Kerry D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pederson, Larry R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burkes, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Fuel Fabrication Capability within the U.S. High Performance Research Reactor Conversion Program is funded through the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) NA-26 (Office of Material Management and Minimization). An investigation was commissioned to determine the feasibility of using electroplating techniques to apply a coating of zirconium onto depleted uranium/molybdenum alloy (U-10Mo). Electroplating would provide an alternative method to the existing process of hot roll-bonding zirconium foil onto the U-10Mo fuel foil during the fabrication of fuel elements for high-performance research reactors. The objective of this research was to develop a reproducible and scalable plating process that will produce a uniform, 25 μm thick zirconium metal coating on U-10Mo foil. In previous work, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) established a molten salt electroplating apparatus and protocol to plate zirconium metal onto molybdenum foil (Coffey 2015). During this second year of the research, PNNL furthered this work by moving to the U-10Mo alloy system (90 percent uranium:10 percent molybdenum). The original plating apparatus was disassembled and re-assembled in a laboratory capable of handling low-level radioactive materials. Initially, the work followed the previous year’s approach, and the salt bath composition was targeted at the eutectic composition (LiF:NaF:ZrF4 = 26:37:37 mol%). Early results indicated that the formation of uranium fluoride compounds would be problematic. Other salt bath compositions were investigated in order to eliminate the uranium fluoride production (LiF:NaF = 61:39 mol% and LiF:NaF:KF = 46.5:11.5:42 mol% ). Zirconium metal was used as the crucible for the molten salt. Three plating methods were used—isopotential, galvano static, and pulsed plating. The molten salt method for zirconium metal application provided high-quality plating on molybdenum in PNNL’s previous work. A key advantage of this approach is that

  9. Molybdenum, molybdenum oxides, and their electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saji, Viswanathan S; Lee, Chi-Woo

    2012-07-01

    The electrochemical behaviors of molybdenum and its oxides, both in bulk and thin film dimensions, are critical because of their widespread applications in steels, electrocatalysts, electrochromic materials, batteries, sensors, and solar cells. An important area of current interest is electrodeposited CIGS-based solar cells where a molybdenum/glass electrode forms the back contact. Surprisingly, the basic electrochemistry of molybdenum and its oxides has not been reviewed with due attention. In this Review, we assess the scattered information. The potential and pH dependent active, passive, and transpassive behaviors of molybdenum in aqueous media are explained. The major surface oxide species observed, reversible redox transitions of the surface oxides, pseudocapacitance and catalytic reduction are discussed along with carefully conducted experimental results on a typical molybdenum glass back contact employed in CIGS-based solar cells. The applications of molybdenum oxides and the electrodeposition of molybdenum are briefly reviewed. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Large grain cavities from pure niobium ingot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Yorktown, VA; Kneisel, Peter [Williamsburg, VA; Cameiro, Tadeu [McMurray, PA

    2012-03-06

    Niobium cavities are fabricated by the drawing and ironing of as cast niobium ingot slices rather than from cold rolled niobium sheet. This method results in the production of niobium cavities having a minimum of grain boundaries at a significantly reduced cost as compared to the production of such structures from cold rolled sheet.

  11. Thermofluency in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orozco M, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is presented about the theoretical and experimental results obtained at present in thermofluency under radiation in zirconium alloys. The phenomenon of thermofluency is presented in a general form, underlining the thermofluency at high temperature because this phenomenon is similar to the thermofluency under radiation, which ocurrs in zirconium alloys into the operating reactor. (author)

  12. Solute redistribution studies in oxidised zirconium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khera, S K; Kale, G B; Gadiyar, H S [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Metallurgy Div.

    1977-01-01

    Electron microprobe studies on solute distribution in oxide layers and in the regions near oxide metal interface have been carried out in the case of zircaloy-2 and zirconium binary alloys containing niobium, tin, iron, copper, chromium and nickel and oxidised in steam at 550 deg C. In the case of alloys having higher oxidation rates, the oxide of solute element was found to dissolve in ZrO/sub 2/ without any composition variation. However, for solute addition with limited solubility like Cr, Cu and Fe, solute enrichment at metal/oxide interface and depletion of the same matrix has been observed. The intensity profiles for nickel distribution were also found to be identical to Fe or Cr distribution. The mode of solute distribution has been discussed in relation to oxidation behaviour of these alloys.

  13. Niobium and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polupanova, L.I.; Volkova, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    General mineralogical-geochemical and analytical characteristics of niobium and tantalum are presented. Potentialities of any analytical methods for determining these elements in various geologic samples are estimated. The following specific techniques are described: neutron + activation determination of Ta, fluorescence X-radiometric determination of Nb and Ta, fluorescence X-ray spectral determination of Nb and Ta, spectrographic determination of Nb and Ta, gravimetric determination of Nb and Ta, their extraction-photometric determination with various reagents (crystal violet, rhodamine 6 Y, butylrhodamine B)

  14. Metallurgy of zirconium and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshnikov, N.V.; Geger, V.Eh.; Denisova, N.D.; Kazajn, A.A.; Kozhemyakin, V.A.; Nekhamkin, L.G.; Rodyakin, V.V.; Tsylov, Yu.A.

    1979-01-01

    Considered are those properties of zirconium and of hafnium, which are of practical interest for the manufacture of these elements. Systematized are the theoretical and the practical data on the procedures for thermal decomposition of zirconia and for obtaining zirconium dioxide and hafnium dioxide by a thermal decomposition of compounds and on the hydrometallurgical methods for extracting zirconium and hafnium. Zirconium and hafnium fluorides and chlorides production procedures are described. Considered are the iodide and the electrolytic methods of refining zirconium and hafnium

  15. Analytic chemistry of molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Electrochemical, colorimetric, gravimetric, spectroscopic, and radiochemical methods for the determination of molybdenum are summarized in this book. Some laboratory procedures are described in detail while literature citations are given for others. The reader is also referred to older comprehensive reviews of the analytical chemistry of molybdenum. Contents, abridged: Gravimetric methods. Titrimetric methods. Colorimetric methods. X-ray fluorescence. Voltammetry. Catalytic methods. Molybdenum in non-ferrous alloys. Molydbenum compounds

  16. Molybdenum from uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, H.E.

    1981-01-01

    A method of removing molybdenum from a uranium bearing solution is claimed. It comprises adding sufficient reactive lead compound to supply at least 90 percent of the stoichiometric quantity of lead ion required to fully react with the molybdenum present to form insoluble lead molybdate and continuing the reaction with agitation until the desired percentage of the molybdenum present has reacted with the lead ion

  17. Potentiometric determination of molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusina, O.N.; Gorbatkova, B.Kh.

    1977-01-01

    Potentiometric titration by lead acetate is used to determine molybdenum in the form of molybdate ions. The behaviour of bimetallic electrode couples, i.e. tungsten-lead, platinum-lead, lead-carbon electrode, molybdenum-carbon electrode platinum-molibdenum has been investigated. The greatest jump of the potential in the finite point is observed for platinum-molybdenum electrode couple (150 mV/ml at pH 4.0-5.5). The limiting concentration of molybdenum in potentiometric titration by lead acetate is 2.8x10 -4 M. The measurements are accurate to within +-0.1%

  18. Studies of rotational structures in the neutron-rich niobium isotopes 101-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paffrath, U.

    1989-08-01

    The aim of this thesis was to study rotational structures in the low-lying levels of the niobium isotopes 101, 102, and 103. This was performed at the recoil separator JOSEF of the Nuclear Research Facility Juelich by studies of the β-decays of the zirconium isotopes 101-103 into their niobium daughters. By γ-γ respectively X-γ coincidence measurements the already existing term schemes of the niobium isotopes should be verified respectively extended and by γ-γ angular-correlation measurements the rotational structures should be studied. The term schemes of the niobium isotopes 101 and 102 could be confirmed in the framework of the performed experiments while the level scheme of the 103 Nb could be essentially extended. From the X-γ coincidence measurement for a plurality of γ transitions the conversion coefficients and by this the dominant multipolarities could be determined. With these conversion coefficients then also the mixing parameters were calculated. These data together with the results from the γ-γ angular-correlation experiments led to a fixing concerning the spins and parities at a series of levels in all three niobium isotopes. (orig./HSI) [de

  19. Behaviour of hydrogen in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, Y.C.; Tang, C.H.; Chuang, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Polycrystalline niobium was charged electrolytically with hydrogen at room temperature. The behaviour of hydrogen in niobium has been investigated by optical microscopy, SEM, and ion microprobe analysis. It is shown that, when the hydrogen content in niobium is low, hydride tends to form at the grain boundary. As the hydrogen content is increased, precipitation of hydrides with domain structure takes place in the grain. The habit plane of the hydride formed in the vicinity of the grain boundary has been determined by Laue X-ray back reflection technique to be (130)c and (111)c. The structure of the hydride formed on the surface of niobium after 6 h hydrogen charging at room temperature (c.d. 0.2 A/cm 2 ) has been established to be identical to that of NbHsub(0.89). (orig.) [de

  20. Morphology study of niobium pentoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, R.P.P.; Panta, P.C.; Araujo, A.O. de; Bergmann, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, Niobium pentoxide (Nb 2 O 5 ) has been studied due to physical properties and their use in obtaining electronic ceramics, optical lenses, pH sensors, special filters for TV receivers, among other applications. This study investigated the morphology of the niobium pentoxide obtained by hydrothermal synthesis from the precursor pentachloride niobium (NbCl 5 ), where the synthesis was carried out at a temperature of 150 and 200 °C for 130 min and the product obtained was calcined at temperatures 600, 800 and 1000 °C for 60 min. The following characterizations were performed for analysis of the material, among them, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for analysis of the crystal structure, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) for detecting the existing functional groups and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology of material. As a result, different morphologies were obtained and consequently different niobium pentoxide properties studied. (author)

  1. Quenching experiments on niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwirtlich, I.A.; Schultz, H.; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart

    1980-01-01

    High-purity niobium wire specimens have been quenched in superfluid helium from near the melting point in order to obtain information on vacancies in this material. The quenched-in resistivity Δsub(pQ) for a quench from 2600 K was very small (approximately 0.3 x 10 -12 Ω m) and near the limit of detection. It is assumed that large quenching losses are responsible for the small quenched-in resistance. From the experimental cooling curve estimates have been made for the formation and migration enthalpies (Hsub(1V)sup(F), Hsub(1V)sup(M)), where Hsub(1V)sup(M)+Hsub(1V)sup(F)=Qsub(1V)sup(SD)=3.62 ev. For Ssub(1V)sup(F), the formation entropy, two different values were assumed. (author)

  2. Molybdenum market in transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutulov, A.

    1980-01-01

    Since the beginning of 1980 - after seven years of constant unbalance between supply and demand of molybdenum, characterized by a demand overhang and after two years of unprecedented spot market prices - clear signals for a consolidation of the molybdenum market can be recognized. (orig.) [de

  3. SEPARATING HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, B.A.J.; Duncan, J.F.

    1956-08-21

    A dilute aqueous solution of zirconyl chloride which is 1N to 2N in HCl is passed through a column of a cation exchange resin in acid form thereby absorbing both zirconium and associated hafnium impurity in the mesin. The cation exchange material with the absorbate is then eluted with aqueous sulfuric acid of a O.8N to 1.2N strength. The first portion of the eluate contains the zirconium substantially free of hafnium.

  4. Components made of corrosion-resistent zirconium alloy and method for its production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanneman, R.E.; Urquhart, A.W.; Vermilyea, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a method to increase the resistance of zirconium alloys to blister corrosion which mainly occurs in boiling-water nuclear reactors. According to the method described, the surface of the alloy body is coated with a thin film of a suitable electronically conducting material. Gold, silver, platinum, nickel, chromium, iron and niobium are suitable as coating materials. The invention is more closely explained by means of examples. (GSC) [de

  5. Effects of alloying elements on nodular and uniform corrosion resistance of zirconium-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Katsuhiro

    1992-01-01

    The effects of alloying and impurity elements (tin, iron, chromium, nickel, niobium, tantalum, oxygen, aluminum, carbon, nitrogen, silicon, and phosphorus) on the nodular and uniform corrosion resistance of zirconium-based alloys were studied. The improving effect of iron, nickel and niobium in nodular corrosion resistance were observed. The uniform corrosion resistance was also improved by nickel, niobium and tantalum. The effects of impurity elements, nitrogen, aluminum and phosphorus were negligibly small but increasing the silicon content seemed to improve slightly the uniform corrosion resistance. Hydrogen pick-up fraction were not changed by alloying and impurity elements except nickel. Nickel addition increased remarkably hydrogen pick-up fraction. Although the composition of secondary precipitates changed with contents of alloying elements, the correlation of composition of secondary precipitates to corrosion resistance was not observed. (author)

  6. Protection of zirconium and its alloys by metallic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loriers, H.; Lafon, A.; Darras, R.; Baque, P.

    1968-01-01

    At 600 deg. C in an atmosphere of carbon dioxide, zirconium and its alloys undergo corrosion which presents two aspects simultaneously: - formation of a surface layer of zirconia, - dissolution of oxygen in the alloy sub-layer leading to brittleness. The two phenomena greatly restrict the possibilities of using zirconium alloys as a canning material for fuel elements in CO 2 cooled nuclear reactors. An attempt has thus been made to limit, and perhaps to suppress, the corrosion effects in zirconium under these conditions by protecting it with metallic coatings. A first attempt to obtain a protection using copper-based coatings did not produce the result hoped for. Aluminium coatings produced by vacuum evaporation, followed by a consolidating thermal treatment make it possible to prevent the formation of the zirconia layer, but they do not eliminate the hardening effect produced by oxygen diffusion. On the other hand, electrolytically produced chromium deposits whose adherence is improved by a thermal vacuum treatment, counteract both these phenomena simultaneously. A similar result has been obtained with coatings of molybdenum produced by the technique of high-frequency inductive plasma sputtering. The particular effectiveness of the last two types of coatings is due to their structures characterized by the existence of an adherent film of chromium or molybdenum in the free state. (authors) [fr

  7. Direct Flotation of Niobium Oxide Minerals from Carbonatite Niobium Ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xiao

    Currently the recovery of niobium oxide minerals from carbonatite niobium ores relies on the use of non-selective cationic collectors. This leads to complicated process flowsheets involving multiple desliming and multiple reverse flotation stages, and low niobium recovery. In this research, anionic collectors that are capable of strong chemisorption on the niobium minerals were studied with the objective of directly floating the niobium oxide minerals from the carbonatite ores. In the flotation of both high purity minerals and Niobec ores, it was shown that the combination of hydroxamic acid and sodium metaphosphate was an effective reagent scheme for the direct flotation of niobium oxide from its ores. Batch flotation on the Niobec Mill Feed showed that over 95% of niobium oxide was recovered into a rougher concentrate that was less than 47% of the original feed mass. Preliminary cleaning tests showed that the reagent scheme could also be used to upgrade the rougher concentrate, although the depression of iron oxide minerals required further study. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) measurement results confirm that OHA (octyl hydroxamic acid) could chemisorb on pyrochlore surface while only physically adsorb on calcite, judging by the chemical shifts of electron binding energies in the elements in both OHA and the mineral surfaces. When hydroxamic acid was adsorbed on calcite surface, the binding energies of the N 1s electrons, at 400.3 eV, did not shift. However, after adsorption on pyrochlore, the N 1s binding energy peak split into two peaks, one at a binding energy of around 399 eV, representing chemically adsorbed OHA, the other at between 400 and 401 eV. The experimental data suggested a strong chemisorption of the OHA on pyrochlore surface in the form of a vertical head-on orientation of the OHA molecules so that the pyrochlore was strongly hydrophobized even at low OHA concentrations, followed by possibly randomly oriented physisorbed OHA molecules

  8. Climax-Type Porphyry Molybdenum Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludington, Steve; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Climax-type porphyry molybdenum deposits, as defined here, are extremely rare; thirteen deposits are known, all in western North America and ranging in age from Late Cretaceous to mainly Tertiary. They are consistently found in a postsubduction, extensional tectonic setting and are invariably associated with A-type granites that formed after peak activity of a magmatic cycle. The deposits consist of ore shells of quartz-molybdenite stockwork veins that lie above and surrounding the apices of cupola-like, highly evolved, calc-alkaline granite and subvolcanic rhyolite-porphyry bodies. These plutons are invariably enriched in fluorine (commonly >1 percent), rubidium (commonly >500 parts per million), and niobium-tantalum (Nb commonly >50 parts per million). The deposits are relatively high grade (typically 0.1-0.3 percent Mo) and may be very large (typically 100-1,000 million tons). Molybdenum, as MoS2, is the primary commodity in all known deposits. The effect on surface-water quality owing to natural influx of water or sediment from a Climax-type mineralized area can extend many kilometers downstream from the mineralized area. Waste piles composed of quartz-silica-pyrite altered rocks will likely produce acidic drainage waters. The potential exists for concentrations of fluorine or rare metals in surface water and groundwater to exceed recommended limits for human consumption near both mined and unmined Climax-type deposits.

  9. Synthesis of niobium nitride by pyrolysis of niobium pentachloride ammines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebtsova, O.M.; Shulga, Y.M.; Troitskii, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper investigates the conditions for the preparation of niobium nitride in the thermal decomposition of niobium nitride in the thermal decomposition of niobium pentachloride ammines. The synthesis of the ammines was accomplished by the reaction of powdered NbC1 5 with dry ammonia at 210 K. Thermography and x-ray diffraction, spectral, and chemical analyses were used to identify the ammonolysis products. It was established that the products of ammonolysis of NbC1 5 are a mixture of the x-ray-amorphous complex Nb (NH 2 ) /SUB 5-x/ - (NG 3 ) 3 CL 3 (x≅) and 2 moles of NH 4 C1. The steps in the thermal decomposition of this mixture were studied. The phase transition that is observed in the case of further vacuum heat treatment at 1100-1300 K is presented

  10. Niobium interaction with chloride-carbonate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, S.A.; Kuznetsova, S.V.

    1996-01-01

    Niobium interaction with chloride-carbonate melt NaCl-KCl-K 2 CO 3 (5 mass %) in the temperature range of 973-1123 K has been studied. The products and niobium corrosion rate have been ascertained, depending on the temperature of melt and time of allowance. Potentials of niobium corrosion have been measured. Refs. 11, figs. 3, tabs. 2

  11. Biocompatibility of Niobium Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Olivares-Navarrete

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Niobium coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering were evaluated as a possible surface modification for stainless steel (SS substrates in biomedical implants. The Nb coatings were deposited on 15 mm diameter stainless steel substrates having an average surface roughness of 2 mm. To evaluate the biocompatibility of the coatings three different in vitro tests, using human alveolar bone derived cells, were performed: cellular adhesion, proliferation and viability. Stainless steel substrates and tissue culture plastic were also studied, in order to give comparative information. No toxic response was observed for any of the surfaces, indicating that the Nb coatings act as a biocompatible, bioinert material. Cell morphology was also studied by immune-fluorescence and the results confirmed the healthy state of the cells on the Nb surface. X-ray diffraction analysis of the coating shows that the film is polycrystalline with a body centered cubic structure. The surface composition and corrosion resistance of both the substrate and the Nb coating were also studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and potentiodynamic tests. Water contact angle measurements showed that the Nb surface is more hydrophobic than the SS substrate.

  12. Zirconium isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.H.; Lahoda, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    A process is described for reducing the amount of zirconium 91 isotope in zirconium comprising: forming a first solution of (a) a first solvent, (b) a scavenger, and (c) a zirconium compound which is soluble in the first solvent and reacts with the scavenger when exposed to light of a wavelength of 220 to 600 nm; irradiating the first solution with light at the wavelength for a time sufficient to photoreact a disproportionate amount of the zirconium compound containing the zirconium 91 isotope with the scavenger to form a reaction product in the first solution; contacting the first solution, while effecting the irradiation, with a second solvent which is immiscible with the first solvent, which the second solvent is a preferential solvent for the reaction product relative to the first solvent, such that at least a portion of the reaction product is transferred to the second solvent to form a second solution; and separating the second solution from the first solution after the contacting

  13. ZIRCONIUM-CLADDING OF THORIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, R.J.

    1961-11-21

    A method of cladding thorium with zirconium is described. The quality of the bond achieved between thorium and zirconium by hot-rolling is improved by inserting and melting a thorium-zirconium alloy foil between the two materials prior to rolling. (AEC)

  14. Spectrographic determination of niobium in uranium - niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbel, M.Y.; Lordello, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method for the spectrographic determination of niobium in uranium-niobium alloys in the concentration range 1-10% has been developed. The metallic sample is converted to oxide by calcination in a muffle furnace at 800 0 C for two hours. The standards are prepared synthetically by dry-mixing. One part of the sample or standard is added to nineteen parts of graphite powder and the mixture is excited in a DC arc. Hafnium has been used as internal standard. The precision of the method is + - 4.8%. (Author) [pt

  15. Mechanical strenght and niobium and niobium-base alloys substructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, W.A.; Andrade, A.H.P. de

    1986-01-01

    Niobium and some of its alloys have been used in several fields of technological applications such as the aerospace, chemical and nuclear industries. This is due to its excelent mechanical stringth at high temperatures and reasonable ductility at low temperatures. In this work, we review the main features of the relationship mechanical strength - substructure in niobium and its alloys, taking into account the presence of impurities, the influence of initial thermal and thermo - mechanical treatments as well as the irradiation by energetic particles. (Author) [pt

  16. Process for purifying molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheresnowsky, J.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a process for purifying molybdenum containing arsenic and phosphorus. The process comprising: adding to an acidic slurry of molybdenum trioxide, a source of magnesium ions in a solid form, with the amount of magnesium and the magnesium ion concentration in the subsequently formed ammonium molybdate solution being sufficient to subsequently form insoluble compounds containing greater than about 80% by weight of the arsenic and greater than about 80% by weight of the phosphorus, and ammonia in an amount sufficient to subsequently dissolve the molybdenum and subsequently form the insoluble compounds, with the source of magnesium ions being added prior to the addition of the ammonia; digesting the resulting ammoniated slurry at a temperature sufficient to dissolve the molybdenum and form an ammonium molybdate solution while the pH is maintained at from bout 9 to about 10 to form a solid containing the insoluble compounds; and separating the solid from the ammonium molybdate solution

  17. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  18. Purification of zirconium concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, A.E.P.

    1976-01-01

    A commercial grade ZrO 2 and an ammonium uranate (yellow cake) are obtained from the caldasito ore processing. This ore is found in the Pocos de Caldas Plateau, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Caldasito is an uranigerous zirconium ore, a mixture of zircon and baddeleyite and contains 60% ZrO 2 and 0,3% U 3 O 8 . The chemical opening of the ore was made by alkaline fusion with NaOH at controlled temperature. The zirconium-uranium separation took place by a continuous liquid-liquid extraction in TBP-varsol-HNO 3 -H 2 O system. The raffinate containing zirconium + impurities (aluminium, iron and titanium) was purified by an ion exchange operation using a strong cationic resin [pt

  19. Zirconium and hafnium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James V.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Bedinger, George M.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Zirconium and hafnium are corrosion-resistant metals that are widely used in the chemical and nuclear industries. Most zirconium is consumed in the form of the main ore mineral zircon (ZrSiO4, or as zirconium oxide or other zirconium chemicals. Zirconium and hafnium are both refractory lithophile elements that have nearly identical charge, ionic radii, and ionic potentials. As a result, their geochemical behavior is generally similar. Both elements are classified as incompatible because they have physical and crystallochemical properties that exclude them from the crystal lattices of most rock-forming minerals. Zircon and another, less common, ore mineral, baddeleyite (ZrO2), form primarily as accessory minerals in igneous rocks. The presence and abundance of these ore minerals in igneous rocks are largely controlled by the element concentrations in the magma source and by the processes of melt generation and evolution. The world’s largest primary deposits of zirconium and hafnium are associated with alkaline igneous rocks, and, in one locality on the Kola Peninsula of Murmanskaya Oblast, Russia, baddeleyite is recovered as a byproduct of apatite and magnetite mining. Otherwise, there are few primary igneous deposits of zirconium- and hafnium-bearing minerals with economic value at present. The main ore deposits worldwide are heavy-mineral sands produced by the weathering and erosion of preexisting rocks and the concentration of zircon and other economically important heavy minerals, such as ilmenite and rutile (for titanium), chromite (for chromium), and monazite (for rare-earth elements) in sedimentary systems, particularly in coastal environments. In coastal deposits, heavy-mineral enrichment occurs where sediment is repeatedly reworked by wind, waves, currents, and tidal processes. The resulting heavy-mineral-sand deposits, called placers or paleoplacers, preferentially form at relatively low latitudes on passive continental margins and supply 100 percent of

  20. On niobium sputter coated cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnolds-Mayer, G.; Kaufmann, U.; Downar, H.

    1988-01-01

    To coat copper cavities with a thin film of niobium, facilities for electropolishing and sputter deposition have been installed at Dornier. Experiments have been performed on samples to optimize electropolishing and deposition parameters. In this paper, characteristics concerning surface properties, adhesion of the niobium film to the copper substrate, and film properties were studied on planar samples. A 1.5 GHz single cell cavity made from oxygen free high conductivity (OFHC) copper was sputter coated twice. First rf measurements were performed in the temperature range from 300 K to 2 K

  1. Niobium electrodeposition from molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, A.F.

    1987-01-01

    Niobium electrodeposition from molten alkali fluorides has been studied aiming the application of this technic to the processes of electrorefining and galvanotechnic of this metal. The effects of current density, temperature, niobium concentration in the bath, electrolysis time, substrate nature, ratio between anodic and cathodic areas, electrodes separation and the purity of anodes were investigated in relation to the cathodic current efficiency, electrorefining, electroplating and properties of the deposit and the electrolytic solution. The work also gives the results of the conctruction and operation of a pilot plant for refractory metals electrodeposition and shows the electrorefining and electroplating compared to those obtained at the laboratory scale. (author) [pt

  2. Plasma sprayed and electrospark deposited zirconium metal diffusion barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, Kendall J.; Pena, Maria I.

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium metal coatings applied by plasma spraying and electrospark deposition (ESD) have been investigated for use as diffusion barrier coatings on low enrichment uranium fuel for research nuclear reactors. The coatings have been applied to both stainless steel as a surrogate and to simulated nuclear fuel uranium-molybdenum alloy substrates. Deposition parameter development accompanied by coating characterization has been performed. The structure of the plasma sprayed coating was shown to vary with transferred arc current during deposition. The structure of ESD coatings was shown to vary with the capacitance of the deposition equipment.

  3. Solvent extraction of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.S.; Yoon, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The extraction of zirconium(VI) from an aqueous solution of constant ionic strength with versatic acid-10 dissolved in benzen was studied as a function of pH and the concentration of zirconium(VI) and organic acid. The effects of sulphate and chlorine ions on the extraction of the zirconium(VI) were briefly examined. It was revealed that (ZrOR 2 .2RH) is the predominant species of extracted zirconium(VI) in the versatic acid-10. The chemical equation and the apparent equilibrium constants thereof have been determined as follows. (ZrOsup(2+))aq+ 2(R 2 H 2 )sub(org) = (ZrOR 2 .2RH)sub(org)+2(H + )aq Ksub(Zr) = (ZrOR 2 .2RH)sub(org)(H + ) 2 /(ZrOsup(2+))sub(aq)(R 2 H 2 )sup(2)sub(org) = 3.3 x 10 -7 . The synergistic effects of TBP and D2EHPA were also studied. In the mixed solvent with 0.1M TBP, the synergistic effect was observed, while the mixed solvent with D2EHPA showed the antisynergistic effect. (Author)

  4. Titanium and zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium pure and base alloys are protected by an oxide film with anionic vacancies which gives a very good resistance to corrosion in oxidizing medium, in some ph ranges. Results of pitting and crevice corrosion are given for Cl - , Br - , I - ions concentration with temperature and ph dependence, also with oxygenated ions effect. (A.B.). 32 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Synthesis of niobium carbide by a high energy milling technique of powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonello, Rodrigo Tecchio; Gonzalez, Cezar Henrique; Urtiga Filho, Severino Leopoldino; Araujo Filho, Oscar Olimpio de; Ambrozio Filho, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to obtain and characterize the Niobium Carbide (NbC) by a suitable high energy milling technique using a SPEX Mill vibratory type and niobium and carbon (graphite) powders. Since this carbide is scarced in the national market and it's necessary to apply this NbC as a reinforcement in two molybdenum high speed steels (AISI M2 and AISI M3:2) object of another work motivated this research. The powders were submitted to a high energy milling procedure for suitable times and conditions and then were characterized by means of Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (DRX) techniques. The ball-to-powder weight ratio was 10:1. The analysed samples showed that the high-energy milling is an alternative route of the NbC synthesis. (author)

  6. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of Niobium modified cast AISI H 13 hot work tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noorian, A.; Kheirandish, Sh.; Saghafian, H.

    2010-01-01

    In this research, the effects of partially replacing of vanadium and molybdenum with niobium on the mechanical properties of AISIH 13 hot-work tool steel have been studied. Cast samples made of the modified new steel were homogenized and austenitized at different conditions, followed by tempering at the specified temperature ranges. Hardness, red hardness, three point bending test and Charpy impact test were carried out to evaluate the mechanical properties together with characterizing the microstructure of the modified steel using scanning electron microscope. The results show that niobium addition modifies the cast structure of Nb-alloyed steel, and increases its maximum hardness. It was found that bending strength; bending strain, impact strength, and red hardness of the modified cast steel are also higher than those of the cast H13 steel, and lower than those of the wrought H13 steel.

  7. Synthesis of niobium carbide (NbC) by powder metallurgy high energy milling technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonello, Rodrigo Tecchio; Urtiga Filho, Severino Leopoldino; Araujo Filho, Oscar Olimpio de; Ambrozio Filho, Francisco; Gonzalez, Cezar Henrique

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to obtain and characterize the Niobium Carbide (NbC) by a suitable high energy milling technique using a SPEX Mill vibratory type and niobium and carbon (graphite) powders. Since this carbide is scarce in the national market and it's necessary to apply this NbC as a reinforcement in two molybdenum high speed steels (AISI M2 and AISI M3:2) object of another work motivated this research. The powders were submitted to a high energy milling procedure for suitable times and conditions and then were characterized by means of Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (DRX) techniques. The ball-to-powder weight ratio was 10:1. The analysed samples showed that the high-energy milling is an alternative route of the NbC synthesis. (author)

  8. Electroless deposition process for zirconium and zirconium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Robert E.; Sherman, Anna H.

    1981-01-01

    A method is disclosed for preventing stress corrosion cracking or metal embrittlement of a zirconium or zirconium alloy container that is to be coated on the inside surface with a layer of a metal such as copper, a copper alloy, nickel, or iron and used for holding nuclear fuel material as a nuclear fuel element. The zirconium material is etched in an etchant solution, desmutted mechanically or ultrasonically, oxidized to form an oxide coating on the zirconium, cleaned in an aqueous alkaline cleaning solution, activated for electroless deposition of a metal layer and contacted with an electroless metal plating solution. This method provides a boundary layer of zirconium oxide between the zirconium container and the metal layer.

  9. Bibliographic study on molybdenum biokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erzberger, A.

    1988-05-01

    This bibliographical study compiles and analyzes findings about the metabolism and resorption of molybdenum. Besides including studies on the physiology of molybdenum 99, a general survey is given on molybdenum in the environment and on its physiological behaviour. In particular, information on the dependence of molybdenum resorption on various factors, such as the chemical form, antagonisms etc., are gathered from literature. These factors have to be considered for sensibly carrying out necessary experiments. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Molybdenum solar neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfsberg, K.; Cowan, G.A.; Bryant, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The goal of the molybdenum solar neutrino experiment is to deduce the 8 B solar neutrino flux, averaged over the past several million years, from the concentration of 98 Tc in a deeply buried molybdenum deposit. The experiment is important to an understanding of stellar processes because it will shed light on the reason for the discrepancy between theory and observation of the chlorine solar neutrino experiment. Possible reasons for the discrepancy may lie in the properties of neutrinos (neutrino oscillations or massive neutrinos) or in deficiencies of the standard solar model. The chlorine experiment only measures the 8 B neutrino flux in current times and does not address possible temporal variations in the interior of the sun, which are also not considered in the standard model. In the molybdenum experiment, we plan to measure 98 Tc (4.2 Myr), also produced by 8 B neutrinos, and possibly 97 Tc (2.6 Myr), produced by lower energy neutrinos

  11. Method of producing molybdenum-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Eric John

    2013-05-28

    Method of producing molybdenum-99, comprising accelerating ions by means of an accelerator; directing the ions onto a metal target so as to generate neutrons having an energy of greater than 10 MeV; directing the neutrons through a converter material comprising techentium-99 to produce a mixture comprising molybdenum-99; and, chemically extracting the molybdenum-99 from the mixture.

  12. Influence of irradiation and radiolysis on the corrosion rates and mechanisms of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verlet, Romain

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear fuel of pressurized water reactors (PWR) in the form of uranium oxide UO 2 pellets (or MOX) is confined in a zirconium alloy cladding. This cladding is very important because it represents the first containment barrier against the release of fission products generated by the nuclear reaction to the external environment. Corrosion by the primary medium of zirconium alloys, particularly the Zircaloy-4, is one of the factors limiting the reactor residence time of the fuel rods (UO 2 pellets + cladding). To optimize core management and to extend the lifetime of the fuel rods in reactor, new alloys based on zirconium-niobium (M5) have been developed. However, the corrosion mechanisms of these are not completely understood because of the complexity of these materials, corrosion environment and the presence of radiation from the nuclear fuel. Therefore, this thesis specifically addresses the effects of radiolysis and defects induced by irradiation with ions in the matrix metal and the oxide layer on the corrosion rate of Zircaloy-4 and M5. The goal is to separate the influence of radiation damage to the metal, that relating to defects created in the oxide and that linked to radiolysis of the primary medium on the oxidation rate of zirconium alloys in reactor. 1) Regarding effect of irradiation of the metal on the oxidation rate: type dislocation loops appear and increase the oxidation rate of the two alloys. For M5, in addition to the first effect, a precipitation of fines needles of niobium reduced the solid solution of niobium concentration in the metal and ultimately in the oxide, which strongly reduces the oxidation rate of the alloy. 2) Regarding the effect of irradiation of the oxide layer on the oxidation rate: defects generated by the nuclear cascades in the oxide increase the oxidation rate of the two materials. For M5, germination of niobium enriched zones in irradiated oxide also causes a decrease of the niobium concentration in solid solution

  13. Zirconium - an imported mineral commodity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    This report examines Canada's position in regard to the principal zirconium materials: zircon; fusion-cast zirconium-bearing refractory products; zirconium-bearing chemicals; and zirconium metal, master alloys, and alloys. None of these is produced in Canada except fused alumina-zirconia and certain magnesium-zirconium alloys and zirconium-bearing steels. Most of the 3 000-4 000 tonnes of the various forms of zircon believed to be consumed in Canada each year is for foundry applications. Other minerals, notably chromite, olivine and silica sand are also used for these purposes and, if necessary, could be substituted for zircon. Zirconium's key role in Canada is in CANDU nuclear power reactors, where zirconium alloys are essential in the cladding for fuel bundles and in capital equipment such as pressure tubes, calandria tubes and reactivity control mechanisms. If zirconium alloys were to become unavailable, the Canadian nuclear power industry would collapse. As a contingency measure, Ontario Hydro maintains at least nine months' stocks of nuclear fuel bundles. Canada's vulnerability to short-term disruptions to supplies of nuclear fuel is diminished further by the availability of more expensive electricity from non-nuclear sources and, given time, from mothballed thermal plants. Zirconium minerals are present in many countries, notably Australia, the Republic of South Africa and the United States. Australia is Canada's principal source of zircon imports; South Africa is its sole source of baddeleyite. At this time, there are no shortages of either material. Canada has untapped zirconium resources in the Athabasca Oil Sands (zircon) and at Strange Lake along the ill-defined border between Quebec and Newfoundland (gittinsite). Adequate metal and alloy production facilities exist in France, Japan and the United States. No action by the federal government in regard to zirconium supplies is called for at this time

  14. Niobium sputter deposition on quarter wave resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Viswanadham, C; Jayaprakash, D; Mishra, R L

    2003-01-01

    Niobium sputter deposition on quarter wave copper R.F resonators, have been taken up in our laboratory, An ultra high vacuum system was made for this purpose. Niobium exhibits superconducting properties at liquid Helium temperature. A uniform coating of about 1.5 mu m of niobium on the internal surfaces of the copper resonant cavities is desired. Power dissipation in the resonators can be greatly reduced by making the internal surfaces of the R.F cavity super conducting. (author)

  15. Plasma arc melting of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubesing, P.K.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Dunn, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Zirconium, like some other refractory metals, has an undesirable sensitivity to interstitials such as oxygen. Traditionally, zirconium is processed by electron beam melting to maintain minimum interstitial contamination. Electron beam melted zirconium, however, does not respond positively to mechanical processing due to its large grain size. The authors undertook a study to determine if plasma arc melting (PAM) technology could be utilized to maintain low interstitial concentrations and improve the response of zirconium to subsequent mechanical processing. The PAM process enabled them to control and maintain low interstitial levels of oxygen and carbon, produce a more favorable grain structure, and with supplementary off-gassing, improve the response to mechanical forming

  16. Zirconium microstructures: uncharted possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samajdar, I.; Kumar, Gulshan; Singh, Jaiveer; Lodh, Arijit; Srivastava, D.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G.K.; Saibaba, N.

    2015-01-01

    The 'conventional' Zirconium microstructures can be significantly extended with information on: (i) microtexture, (ii) residual stresses and (iii) local mechanical properties. Though these involve different tools, but a consolidated microstructure can be crated. This is the theme of this presentation. Examples of this consolidated picture will be made from deformation twinning, recovery-recrystallization, burst ductility and orientation versus solid solution hardening. (author)

  17. Zirconium elasticity modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavra, G.

    1978-01-01

    Considered are the limit and the intermediate values of the Young modulus E, modulus of shear G and of linear modulus of compression K obtainable at various temperatures (4.2 to 1133 K) for single crystals of α-zirconium. Determined and presented are the corrected isotropic elasticity characteristics of E, G, K over the above range of temperatures of textured and non-textured α-Zr

  18. History of the development of zirconium alloys for use in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rickover, H.G.; Geiger, L.D.; Lustman, B.

    1975-01-01

    The technical problems and the major decisions made during the early development of zirconium alloys for use in naval reactors are outlined. A summary is given of the development of commercial sources of supply for zirconium and hafnium metal over the period 1950 to 1965, and the problems encountered in obtaining zirconium needed for early naval prototype and shipboard reactors are identified. Steps taken in the Government procurement process are described and statistics on production amounts, prices, and inventory are included. Also included are the technical aspects associated with the development of zirconium for water-cooled nuclear reactors, beginning in early 1949 when the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory was established as a part of the Naval Reactors Program. While in the course of the next 25 years, small-scale investigations were performed on other potential core structural materials such as stainless steel, niobium, aluminum, and beryllium, the pressure for continual development, improvement, and application of zirconium was predominant and unrelenting. (U.S.)

  19. Beryllium and zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salesse, Marc

    1959-01-01

    Pure beryllium and zirconium, both isolated at about the same date but more than a century ago remained practically unused for eighty years. Fifteen years ago they were released from this state of inactivity by atomic energy, which made them into current metal a with an annual production which runs into tens of tons for the one and thousands for the other. The reasons for this promotion promise well for the future of the two metals, which moreover will probably find additional uses in other branches of industry. The attraction of beryllium and zirconium for atomic energy is easily explained. The curve of figure 1 gives the price per gram of uranium-235 as a function of enrichment: this price increases by about a factor of 3 on passing from natural uranium (0, 7 percent 235 U) to almost pure uranium-235. Because of their tow capture cross-section beryllium and zirconium make it possible, or at least easier, to use natural uranium and they thus enjoy an advantage the extent of which must be calculated for each reactor or fuel element project, but which is generally considerable. It will be seen later that this advantage should be based on figures which are even more favourable that would appear from the simple ratio 3 of the price of pure uranium- 235 contained in natural uranium. Reprint of a paper published in 'Industries Atomiques' - n. 1-2, 1959

  20. '99Mo/99mTc Generator Based on High Radionuclidic Pure Zirconium Molybdate Gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, M.; Mostafa, M.; El-Amir, M.A.; El-Absy, M.A.; Mohamed, O.I.; Farag, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    99 Mo / 99 mTc radioisotope generator was prepared using in-situ precipitated zirconium molybdate chromatographic column. Zirconium molybdate gel matrix was synthesized by precipitation of neutron activation molybdenum-99 from its solution after variety purification processes to prevent contamination of the 99m Tc eluate with cross-contaminants. Greeter than 82.7 ± 0.4 % of the generated 99m Tc was immediately and reproducible eluted by passing 10 ml 0.9 % NaCl solution through the 1 g zirconium molybdate- 99 Mo column matrix at a flow rate of 0.5 ml / min and room temperature with high chemical, radionuclide ( ≥ 99.9 % 99m Tc) and radiochemical purity ( ≥ 97.7 % % as 99 mTcO 4 - ) with ph value suitable for medical uses.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of new oxides and oxynitrides of niobium; Synthese und Charakterisierung neuer Oxide und Oxidnitride des Niobs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orthmann, Steven

    2017-11-02

    By different synthesis routes the first oxide nitrides in the series scandium-niobium-oxygen-nitrogen could be synthesized and characterized. ScNb{sub 4}O{sub 7}N{sub 3}, which crystallizes in the rutile-type structure, exhibit a band gap of 2.62 eV after a short oxidation. Furthermore anion-deficit NbSc{sub 2}(O,N,□){sub 6} with fluorite-type structure could be synthesized. UV-Vis measurements point to a band gap of 3.36 eV after a short oxidation of the product. In the series zirconium-niobium-oxygen-nitrogen new oxides and oxide nitrides could be synthesized. By replacing zirconium with hafnium isotopical compounds with comparable composition could be obtained. The crystal structure of these new compounds is discussed respecting magnetism and the results of electron microscopy and neutron diffraction. By partially substitution of niobium with magnesium or zinc three additional oxide nitrides with the compositions Mg{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 2}N{sub 5}, Zn{sub 2}NbO{sub 0,3}N{sub 2,8}, and ZnNb{sub 3}O{sub 0,1}N{sub 4,5}, showing a tetragonal Nb{sub 4}N{sub 5}-type structure, could be synthesized.

  2. Process for purifying zirconium sponge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abodishish, H.A.M.; Kimball, L.S.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a Kroll reduction process wherein a zirconium sponge contaminated with unreacted magnesium and by-product magnesium chloride is produced as a regulus, a process for purifying the zirconium sponge. It comprises: distilling magnesium and magnesium chloride from: a regulus containing a zirconium sponge and magnesium and magnesium chloride at a temperature above about 800 degrees C and at an absolute pressure less than about 10 mmHg in a distillation vessel to purify the zirconium sponge; condensing the magnesium and the magnesium chloride distilled from the zirconium sponge in a condenser; and then backfilling the vessel containing the zirconium sponge and the condenser containing the magnesium and the magnesium chloride with a gas; recirculating the gas between the vessel and the condenser to cool the zirconium sponge from above about 800 degrees C to below about 300 degrees C; and cooling the recirculating gas in the condenser containing the condensed magnesium and the condensed magnesium chloride as the gas cools the zirconium sponge to below about 300 degrees C

  3. Free energy of hydration of niobium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Some of the glasses being formulated by SRTC researchers contain niobium oxide. In this report, the free energy of hydration of the oxide is calculated from the free energies of formation of the oxide, the hydroxide, and water. This value can be used in calculations of the free energy of hydration of glasses containing niobium

  4. ZIRCONIUM PHOSPHATE ADSORPTION METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, E.R.; Adamson, A.S.; Schubert, J.; Boyd, G.E.

    1958-11-01

    A method is presented for separating plutonium values from fission product values in aqueous acidic solution. This is accomplished by flowing the solutlon containing such values through a bed of zirconium orthophosphate. Any fission products adsorbed can subsequently be eluted by washing the column with a solution of 2N HNO/sub 3/ and O.lN H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/. Plutonium values may subsequently be desorbed by contacting the column with a solution of 7N HNO/sub 3/ .

  5. Technological challenges in extractive metallurgy and refining of niobium, tantalum and preparation of their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirji, K.V.; Sheela; Saibaba, N.

    2016-01-01

    Manufacturing of refractory and reactive metals, their alloys and fabricated products has been always difficult due to their high affinity with atmospheric gases, stringent specifications and exhaustive quality requirements. In the field of development of these materials, Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), Hyderabad has been at the fore front in accepting the challenges for the advancement of technological growth. Extensive developments have been carried out during the last few decades in the field of niobium, tantalum, zirconium etc in the form of pure metal, their compounds and alloys. Over the period of time, efforts have been made for developing sophisticated facilities along with trained man power for manufacturing of critical items for which technical knowhow is not available either with private industries or any other organizations in the country. In the field of reactive metals, though general theory is well established, production is intriguing and requires expert handling on the field. At NFC, efforts were put towards industrial adoptability of the useful knowledge gained from lab scale to reliable production scale. Comprehensive study was conducted to systematically study the effects of various process parameters starting from ore to the metals and their alloys, equipment were modified for ease of operation with stress on recycling/reusing of the waste and handling of effluents. However scale of operation and therefore cost of production has been matter of concern in the field of tantalum and niobium. Electron beam refining is used for production of highly pure reactive and refractory metals like tantalum, niobium, zirconium etc. and their alloys under high vacuum. Special Materials Plant (SMP) at Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad has developed processes for production of niobium oxide, tantalum oxide, tantalum metal powder, tantalum anodes/capacitors, potassium tantalum fluoride, Nb thermit, Nb metal granules, RRR grade niobium, Nb base alloys such as Zr

  6. Effects of exposure to high-temperature helium containing oxygen on the mechanical properties of molybdenum and TZM-Mo alloy at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, T.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, R.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of exposure to helium containing oxygen of 0.1-115 vpm at 1000 0 C on the mechanical properties of molybdenum and TZM-Mo alloy at room temperature were studied. The stress-relieved molybdenum specimen which was not recrystallized at test temperature showed the ductility after exposure to helium containing oxygen. The recrystallized molybdenum and TZM lost ductility after exposure to helium containing oxygen of 0.1-13 vpm in a few hours. The embrittlement of molybdenum was considered to be due to the grain boundary weakening. Molybdenum to which carbon was added seemed to hinder the grain boundary weakening by the oxygen contamination. Both stress-relieved and recrystallized TZM specimens picked up oxygen linearly with time of exposure to helium. The increase in oxygen content of TZM, which was considered to be caused by the internal oxidation of titanium and zirconium, results in the embrittlement of TZM. (orig.)

  7. Molybdenum dioxide-molybdenite roasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabacky, B.J.; Hepworth, M.T.

    1984-01-01

    A process is disclosed for roasting molybdenite concentrates directly to molybdenum dioxide. The process comprises establishing a roasting zone having a temperature of about 700 0 C. to about 800 0 C., introducing into the roasting zone particulate molybdenum dioxide and molybdenite in a weight ratio of at least about 2:1 along with an oxygen-containing gas in amount sufficient to oxidize the sulfur content of the molybdenite to molybdenum dioxide

  8. Modification in band gap of zirconium complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Mayank, E-mail: mayank30134@gmail.com; Singh, J.; Chouhan, S. [Department of Physics, ISLE, IPS Academy, Indore (M.P.) (India); Mishra, A. [School of Physics, Devi Ahilya Vishwavidyalaya, Indore (M.P.) (India); Shrivastava, B. D. [Govt. P. G. College, Biora (M.P.) (India)

    2016-05-06

    The optical properties of zirconium complexes with amino acid based Schiff bases are reported here. The zirconium complexes show interesting stereo chemical features, which are applicable in organometallic and organic synthesis as well as in catalysis. The band gaps of both Schiff bases and zirconium complexes were obtained by UV-Visible spectroscopy. It was found that the band gap of zirconium complexes has been modified after adding zirconium compound to the Schiff bases.

  9. The Resonance Integral of Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellstrand, E; Lundgren, G

    1962-08-15

    The resonance integral of niobium has been studied by both pile oscillator and activation techniques. A value of 8.15b {+-} 0.65 b was obtained for the infinitely dilute integral. In addition, the variation of the resonance integral with foil thickness has been measured for thicknesses in the range 0.06 mm to 1.36 mm. A separate study of the half-life of the isomeric state in {sup 94}Nb yielded a value T{sub 1/2} = 6.30 - 0.03 m which is about 5 % lower than the value given in literature.

  10. Zirconium for nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yau, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    The excellent corrosion resistance of zirconium in nitric acid has been known for over 30 years. Recently, there is an increasing interest in using zirconium for nitric acid services. Therefore, an extensive research effort has been carried out to achieve a better understanding of the corrosion properties of zirconium in nitric acid. Particular attention is paid to the effect of concentration, temperature, structure, solution impurities, and stress. Immersion, autoclave, U-bend, and constant strain-rate tests were used in this study. Results of this study indicate that the corrosion resistance of zirconium in nitric acid is little affected by changes in temperature and concentration, and the presence of common impurities such as seawater, sodium chloride, ferric chloride, iron, and stainless steel. Moreover, the presence of seawater, sodium chloride, ferric chloride, and stainless steel has little effect on the stress corrosion craking (SCC) susceptibility of zirconium in 70% nitric acid at room temperatures. However, zirconium could be attacked by fluoride-containing nitric acid and the vapors of chloride-containing nitric acid. Also, high sustained tensile stresses should be avoided when zirconium is used to handle 70% nitric acid at elevated temperatures or > 70% nitric acid

  11. Niobium Nb and tantalum Ta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busev, A.I.; Tiptsova, V.G.; Ivanov, V.M.

    1978-01-01

    The basic methods for determining niobium and tantalum in various objects are described. Nb and Ta are separated with the aid of N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine by precipitating Nb(5) from a tartaric acid solution with subsequent precipitation of Ta from the filtrate. The gravimetric determination of Nb and Ta in steels is based on their quantitative separation from a diluted solution by way of hydrolysis with subsequent after-precipitation with phenylarsonic acid (in the absence of W). The gravimetric determination of Nb in the presence of W is carried out with the aid of Cupferron. To determine Nb in its carbide, Nb(5) reduced to Nb(3) is titrated with a solution of K 2 Cr 2 O 7 in the presence of phenyl-anthranilic acid. The photometric determination of Nb in tungsten-containing steels and in ores containing Ti, W, Mo and Cr is based on the rhodanide method. Nb is determined in alloys with Zr and Ti photometrically with the aid of 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcin and in alloyed steels with the aid of benzhydroxamic acid. The latter complex is extracted with chloroform. This method is used to determine Nb in rocks. The photometric determination of Ta in TiCl 4 is carried out with the aid of pyrogallol, in commercial niobium with the aid of methyl violet, and in steel with the aid of 4-(-pyridylazo)-resorcin. Also described is the polarographic determination of Nb in tantalum pentoxide

  12. Buffered Electrochemical Polishing of Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Tian, Hui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Corcoran, Sean [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The standard preparation of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of pure niobium include the removal of a 'damaged' surface layer, by buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP), after the cavities are formed. The performance of the cavities is characterized by a sharp degradation of the quality factor when the surface magnetic field exceeds about 90 mT, a phenomenon referred to as 'Q-drop.' In cavities made of polycrystalline fine grain (ASTM 5) niobium, the Q-drop can be significantly reduced by a low-temperature (? 120 °C) 'in-situ' baking of the cavity if the chemical treatment was EP rather than BCP. As part of the effort to understand this phenomenon, we investigated the effect of introducing a polarization potential during buffered chemical polishing, creating a process which is between the standard BCP and EP. While preliminary results on the application of this process to Nb cavities have been previously reported, in this contribution we focus on the characterization of this novel electrochemical process by measuring polarization curves, etching rates, surface finish, electrochemical impedance and the effects of temperature and electrolyte composition. In particular, it is shown that the anodic potential of Nb during BCP reduces the etching rate and improves the surface finish.

  13. SEPARATION OF HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholser, L.B.; Barton, C.J. Sr.; Ramsey, J.W.

    1960-05-31

    The separation of hafnium impurities from zirconium can be accomplished by means of organic solvent extraction. The hafnium-containing zirconium feed material is dissolved in an aqueous chloride solution and the resulting solution is contacted with an organic hexone phase, with at least one of the phases containing thiocyanate. The hafnium is extracted into the organic phase while zirconium remains in the aqueous phase. Further recovery of zirconium is effected by stripping the onganic phase with a hydrochloric acid solution and commingling the resulting strip solution with the aqueous feed solution. Hexone is recovered and recycled by means of scrubbing the onganic phase with a sulfuric acid solution to remove the hafnium, and thiocyanate is recovered and recycled by means of neutralizing the effluent streams to obtain ammonium thiocyanate.

  14. Zirconium nitride hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, Daiane; Amorim, Cintia Lugnani Gomes de; Soares, Gabriel Vieira; Figueroa, Carlos Alejandro; Baumvol, Israel Jacob Rabin; Basso, Rodrigo Leonardo de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) nanometric films were deposited onto different substrates, in order to study the surface crystalline microstructure and also to investigate the electrochemical behavior to obtain a better composition that minimizes corrosion reactions. The coatings were produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD). The influence of the nitrogen partial pressure, deposition time and temperature over the surface properties was studied. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and corrosion experiments were performed to characterize the ZrN hard coatings. The ZrN films properties and microstructure changes according to the deposition parameters. The corrosion resistance increases with temperature used in the films deposition. Corrosion tests show that ZrN coating deposited by PVD onto titanium substrate can improve the corrosion resistance. (author)

  15. Anomalous diffusion in niobium. Study of solute diffusion mechanism of iron in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablitzer, D.

    1977-01-01

    In order to explain anomalously high diffusion velocities observed for iron diffusion in niobium, the following parameters were measured: isotope effect, b factor (which expresses the effect of iron on niobium self-diffusion), self-diffusion coefficient of niobium, solute diffusion coefficient of iron in niobium. The results obtained show that neither pure vacancy models, nor diffusion in the lattice defects (dislocations, sub-boundaries, grain boundaries), nor pure interstitialy mechanisms, nor simple or cyclic exchange mechanisms agree with experiments. A mechanism is proposed which considers an equilibrium between substitution iron atoms and interstitial iron atoms. The diffusion of iron then occurs through interstitial vancancy pairs [fr

  16. Zirconium-barrier cladding attributes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.; Rand, R.A.; Tucker, R.P.; Cheng, B.; Adamson, R.B.; Davies, J.H.; Armijo, J.S.; Wisner, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    This metallurgical study of Zr-barrier fuel cladding evaluates the importance of three salient attributes: (1) metallurgical bond between the zirconium liner and the Zircaloy substrate, (2) liner thickness (roughly 10% of the total cladding wall), and (3) softness (purity). The effect that each of these attributes has on the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) resistance of the Zr-barrier fuel was studied by a combination of analytical model calculations and laboratory experiments using an expanding mandrel technique. Each of the attributes is shown to contribute to PCI resistance. The effect of the zirconium liner on fuel behavior during off-normal events in which steam comes in contact with the zirconium surface was studied experimentally. Simulations of loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) showed that the behavior of Zr-barrier cladding is virtually indistinguishable from that of conventional Zircaloy cladding. If steam contacts the zirconium liner surface through a cladding perforation and the fuel rod is operated under normal power conditions, the zirconium liner is oxidized more rapidly than is Zircaloy, but the oxidation rate returns to the rate of Zircaloy oxidation when the oxide phase reaches the zirconium-Zircaloy metallurgical bond

  17. The electrodeposition of niobium on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.

    1977-03-01

    The electrodeposition of niobium on a tungsten substrate has been demonstrated by electrolysis of an alkali metal fluoride melt. The deposit produced was non-porous, coherent and formed a good bond to the substrate. (author)

  18. Polarography of niobium in hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrion, G.; Adler, F.; Andreas, B.

    1978-01-01

    Dependence between the limiting current and the concentration of niobium and hydrochloric acid has been investigated. With the decrease of niobium concentration the hydrolysis and condensation reactions proceed slower. The time dependence of condensation is shown using ethylene glycol which delays the condensation because of complexation of Nb(5). Hydroxylamine hydrochloride increases the limiting current by a kinetic effect by one order of magnitude which was observed clearly by cyclic voltammetry. Even small amounts of ethylene glycol suppress the kinetic effect. Polarographic determination of niobium in HCl as a supporting electrolyte is possible in concentration above 10 M only. Addition of ethylene glycol and hydroxylamine hydrochloride enables determination of small amounts of niobium in 4 M HCl. (author)

  19. Hydride Olefin complexes of tantalum and niobium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klazinga, Aan Hendrik

    1979-01-01

    This thesis describes investigations on low-valent tantalum and niobium hydride and alkyl complexes, particularly the dicyclopentadienyl tantalum hydride olefin complexes Cp2Ta(H)L (L=olefin). ... Zie: Summary

  20. Effect of molybdenum on structure, microstructure and mechanical properties of biomedical Ti-20Zr-Mo alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Pedro Akira Bazaglia; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Grandini, Carlos Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Titanium has an allotropic transformation around 883°C. Below this temperature, the crystalline structure is hexagonal close-packed (α phase), changing to body-centered cubic (β phase). Zirconium has the same allotropic transformation around 862°C. Molybdenum has body-centered cubic structure, being a strong β-stabilizer for the formation of titanium alloys. In this paper, the effect of substitutional molybdenum was analyzed on the structure, microstructure and selected mechanical properties of Ti-20Zr-Mo (wt%) alloys to be used in biomedical applications. The samples were prepared by arc-melting and characterized by x-ray diffraction with subsequent refinement by the Rietveld method, optical and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties were analyzed by Vickers microhardness and dynamic elasticity modulus. X-ray measurements and Rietveld analysis revealed the presence of α' phase without molybdenum, α'+α″ phases with 2.5wt% of molybdenum, α″+β phases with 5 and 7.5wt% of molybdenum, and only β phase with 10wt% of molybdenum. These results were corroborated by microscopy results, with a microstructure composed of grains of β phase and lamellae and needles of α' and α″ phase in intra-grain the region. The hardness of the alloy was higher than the commercially pure titanium, due to the action of zirconium and molybdenum as hardening agents. The samples have a smaller elasticity modulus than the commercially pure titanium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of molybdenum on structure, microstructure and mechanical properties of biomedical Ti-20Zr-Mo alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Pedro Akira Bazaglia [UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, Laboratório de Anelasticidade e Biomateriais, 17.033-360, Bauru, SP (Brazil); IBTN/Br – Institute of Biomaterials, Tribocorrosion and Nanomedicine, Brazilian Branch, 17.033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil); Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo [USP – Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, 17.012-901, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Grandini, Carlos Roberto, E-mail: betog@fc.unesp.br [UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, Laboratório de Anelasticidade e Biomateriais, 17.033-360, Bauru, SP (Brazil); IBTN/Br – Institute of Biomaterials, Tribocorrosion and Nanomedicine, Brazilian Branch, 17.033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil)

    2016-10-01

    Titanium has an allotropic transformation around 883 °C. Below this temperature, the crystalline structure is hexagonal close-packed (α phase), changing to body-centered cubic (β phase). Zirconium has the same allotropic transformation around 862 °C. Molybdenum has body-centered cubic structure, being a strong β-stabilizer for the formation of titanium alloys. In this paper, the effect of substitutional molybdenum was analyzed on the structure, microstructure and selected mechanical properties of Ti-20 Zr-Mo (wt%) alloys to be used in biomedical applications. The samples were prepared by arc-melting and characterized by x-ray diffraction with subsequent refinement by the Rietveld method, optical and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties were analyzed by Vickers microhardness and dynamic elasticity modulus. X-ray measurements and Rietveld analysis revealed the presence of α′ phase without molybdenum, α′ + α″ phases with 2.5 wt% of molybdenum, α″ + β phases with 5 and 7.5 wt% of molybdenum, and only β phase with 10 wt% of molybdenum. These results were corroborated by microscopy results, with a microstructure composed of grains of β phase and lamellae and needles of α′ and α″ phase in intra-grain the region. The hardness of the alloy was higher than the commercially pure titanium, due to the action of zirconium and molybdenum as hardening agents. The samples have a smaller elasticity modulus than the commercially pure titanium. - Highlights: • Ti-20Zr-Mo system alloys were developed. • β-Stabilizer effect of Zr in the presence of another β-stabilizer element • Alloys with low elastic modulus.

  2. Mineral Resource of the Month: Niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Niobium, also called columbium, is a transition metal with a very high melting point. It is in greatest demand in industrialized countries, like the United States, because of its defense-related uses in the aerospace, energy and transportation industries. Niobium is used mostly to make high-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steel and stainless steel. HSLA steels are used in large-diameter pipes for oil and natural gas pipelines and automobile wheels.

  3. Precipitation of γ-zirconium hydride in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, G.J.C.

    1978-01-01

    A mechanism for the precipitation of γ-zirconium hydride in zirconium is presented which does not require the diffusion of zirconium. The transformation is completed by shears caused by 1/3 (10 anti 10) Shockley partial dislocations on alternate zirconium basal planes, either by homogeneous nucleation or at lattice imperfections. Homogeneous nucleation is considered least likely in view of the large nucleation barrier involved. Hydrides may form at dislocations by the generation of partials by means of either a pole or ratchet mechanism. The former requires dislocations with a component of Burgers vector along the c-axis, but contrast experiments show that these are not normally observed in annealed zirconium. It is therefore most likely that intragranular hydrides form at the regular 1/3 (11 anti 20) dislocations, possibly by means of a ratchet mechanism. Contrast experiments in the electron microscope show that the precipitates have a shear character consistent with the mechanism suggested. The possibility that the shear dislocations associated with the hydrides are emissary dislocations is considered and a model suggested in which this function is satisfied together with the partial relief of misfit stresses. The large shear strains associated with the precipitation mechanism may play an important role in the preferential orientation of hydrides under stress

  4. Fine-grained zirconium-base material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houten, G.R.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for making zirconium with inhibited grain growth characteristics, by the process of vacuum melting the zirconium, adding 0.3 to 0.5% carbon, stirring, homogenizing, and cooling. (Official Gazette)

  5. On molybdenum (6) alcoholates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turova, N.Ya.; Kessler, V.G.

    1990-01-01

    Synthesis techniques for molybdenum (6) alcoholates of MoO(OR) 4 (1) and MoO 2 (OR) 2 (2) series by means of exchange interaction of corresponding oxychloride with MOR (M=Li, Na) are obtained. These techniques have allowed to prepare 1(R=Me, Et, i-Pr) and 2(R=Me, Et) with 70-98 % yield. Methylates are also prepared at ether interchange of ethylates by methyl alcohol. Metal anode oxidation in corresponding alcohol may be used for 1 synthesis. Physicochemical properties of both series alcoholates, solubility in alcohols in particular, depend on their formation conditions coordination polymerism. Alcoholates of 1 are rather unstable and tend to decomposition up to 2 and ether. It is suggested to introduce NaOR microquantities to stabilize those alcoholates

  6. Molybdenum Tube Characterization report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaux II, Miles Frank [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Usov, Igor Olegovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-07

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have been utilized to produce free-standing molybdenum tubes with the end goal of nuclear fuel clad applications. In order to produce tubes with properties desirable for this application, deposition rates were lowered requiring long deposition durations on the order of 50 hours. Standard CVD methods as well as fluidized-bed CVD (FBCVD) methods were applied towards these objectives. Characterization of the tubes produced in this manner revealed material suitable for fuel clad applications, but lacking necessary uniformity across the length of the tubes. The production of freestanding Mo tubes that possess the desired properties across their entire length represents an engineering challenge that can be overcome in a next iteration of the deposition system.

  7. Diffusion in molybdenum disilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamon, M.; Mehrer, H.

    2005-01-01

    The diffusion behaviour of the high-temperature material molybdenum disilicide (MoSi 2 ) was completely unknown until recently. In this paper we present studies of Mo self-diffusion and compare our present results with our already published studies of Si and Ge diffusion in MoSi 2 . Self-diffusion of molybdenum in monocrystalline MoSi 2 was studied by the radiotracer technique using the radioisotope 99 Mo. Deposition of the radiotracer and serial sectioning after the diffusion anneals to determine the concentration-depth profiles was performed using a sputtering device. Diffusion of Mo is a very slow process. In the entire temperature region investigated (1437 to 2173 K), the 99 Mo diffusivities in both principal directions of the tetragonal MoSi 2 crystals obey Arrhenius laws, where the diffusion perpendicular to the tetragonal axis is faster by two to three orders of magnitude than parallel to it. The activation enthalpies for diffusion perpendicular and parallel to the tetragonal axis are Q perpendicular to = 468 kJ mol -1 (4.85 eV) and Q parallel = 586 kJ mol -1 (6.07 eV), respectively. Diffusion of Si and its homologous element Ge is fast and is mediated by thermal vacancies of the Si sublattice of MoSi 2 . The diffusion of Mo is by several orders of magnitude slower than the diffusion of Si and Ge. This large difference suggests that Si and Mo diffusion are decoupled and that the diffusion of Mo likely takes place via vacancies on the Mo sublattice. (orig.)

  8. Problems of zirconium metal production in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vareka, J.; Vaclavik, E.

    1975-01-01

    The problems are summed up of the production and quality control of zirconium sponge. A survey is given of industrial applications of zirconium in form of pure metal or alloys in nuclear power production, ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgy, chemical engineering and electrical engineering. A survey is also presented of the manufacture of zirconium metal in advanced capitalist countries. (J.B.)

  9. Anisotropy of mechanical properties of zirconium and zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medrano, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    In studies of technological applications of zirconium to fuel elements of nuclear reactor, it was found that the use of plasticity equations for isotropic materials is not in agreement with experimental results, because of the strong anisotropy of zirconium. The present review describes recent progress on the knowledge of the influence of anisotropy on mechanical properties, after Douglass' review in 1971. The review was written to be selfconsistent, changing drastically the presentation of some of the referenced papers. It is also suggested some particular experiments to improve developments in this area

  10. Kinetics and oxidation mechanisms of polycrystaline niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1979-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of annealed niobium was determined by thermogravimetric analysis between 450 and 800 0 C and for oxygen pressures varying from 20 to 700 mmHg. The oxidation kinetics of cold worked and/or irradiated niobium for temperatures between 500 and 700 0 C, with oxygen pressures varying from 100 to 300 mmHg. Was also determined. Using X-ray diffraction it was found that the oxide formed in the range of temperature and oxygen pressure considered in this research is γ-Nb 2 O 5 . Optical and scanning eletronic microscopy showed that for annealed niobium oxidized under 600 0 C there was formation of non-uniform oxide layers, containing cracks and pores, presenting very irregular metal/pentoxide interface. The presence of sub-oxide NbOsub(z) platelets was observed in this interface. This sub-oxide platelets where not observed in annealed oxidized niobium samples over 600 0 C; the oxide layers formed were compact. At 800 0 C and the beginning at 700 0 C the interfaces were quite regular. Through microhardness measurements for the metal near the metal/pentoxide interface, the formation of oxygen solid solution was found and the oxygen diffusion coefficient was calculated. The results showed that at 600 0 C the oxygen diffusion coefficient in cold worked niobium is three times larger than the value obtained for annealed niobium. The results suggest that the reaction between annealed niobium and oxygen undaer 600 0 C is controlled by reaction in interface where the oxide layers are not compacted, parcially due to Nb sub(z) platelets formation.(Author) [pt

  11. The determination of molybdenum and tungsten in resin by x-ray-fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, B.T.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes a method using X-ray-fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of molybdenum and tungsten in ion-exchange resins. The dried resin is milled with sand, binder, and an internal-standard mixture before being briquetted. Niobium and zinc are used as the internal standards for molybdenum and tungsten respectively. Intensity measurements are made with the gold anode tube. Corrections are made for the interference of the Mo Kα analytical line on the background intensities used for the Mo Kα and Nb Kα lines. The precision of the analysis for molybdenum ranges from a relative standard deviation 0,02 at 5 mg/g to 0.045 at 55μg/g; for tungsten, the relative standard deviation ranges from 0,04 at 5 mg/g to 0,055 at 55μg/g. The limits of determination in the original resin sample were found to be 40μg/g for molybdenum and 80μg/g for tungsten. The laboratory method is given in an appendix

  12. Hydrogen Contamination of Niobium Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viet Nguyen-Tuong; Lawrence Doolittle

    1993-01-01

    The presence of hydrogen is blamed for dramatic reductions in cavity Q's. Hydrogen concentration is difficult to measure, so there is a great deal of Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt (FUD) associated with the problem. This paper presents measurements of hydrogen concentration depth profiles, commenting on the pitfalls of the methods used and exploring how material handling can change the amount of hydrogen in pieces of niobium. Hydrogen analysis was performed by a forward scattering experiment with Helium used as the primary beam. This technique is variously known as FRES (Forward Recoil Elastic Scattering), FRS, HFS (Hydrogen Forward Scattering), and HRA (Hydrogen Recoil Analysis). Some measurements were also made using SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry). Both HFS and SIMS are capable of measuring a depth profile of Hydrogen. The primary difficulty in interpreting the results from these techniques is the presence of a surface peak which is due (at least in part) to contamination with either water or hydrocarbons. With HFS, the depth resolution is about 30 nm, and the maximum depth profiled is about 300 nm. (This 10-1 ratio is unusually low for ion beam techniques, and is a consequence of the compromises that must be made in the geometry of the experiment, surface roughness, and energy straggling in the absorber foil that must be used to filter out the forward scattered helium.) All the observed HFS spectra include a surface peak which includes both surface contamination and any real hydrogen uptake by the niobium surface. Some contamination occurs during the analysis. The vacuum in the analysis chamber is typically a few times 10(sup -6) torr, and some of the contamination is in the form of hydrocarbons from the pumping system. Hydrocarbons normally form a very thin (less than a monolayer) film which is in equilibrium between arrival rate and the evaporation rate. In the presence of the incoming ion beam, however, these hydrocarbons crack on the surface into non

  13. Preparation of zirconium molybdate gel for 99mTc gel generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliludin, Z.; Ohkubo, Masatake; Kushita, Kouhei

    1988-09-01

    Zirconium molybdate gel has excellent characteristics for use as column matrix material of 99m Tc generators. In this work, zirconium molybdate gels were prepared under different conditions; pH's of molybdate solutions from 2.5 to 7.0, Mo:Zr molar ratios from 0.7:1.0 to 1.3:1.0, drying temperatures from an ambient temperature to 200 deg C, and drying times from 1 h to 25 h. Contents of water, nitrate, molybdenum and zirconium were measured to examine the fundamental conditions in gel preparation. The Mo:Zr molar ratio was 1.0:1.0 for the most of gels obtained. A 99m Tc generator was prepared with an amorphous zirconium molybdate containing a tracer level of 99 Mo as column matrix material. Elution of 99m Tc was rapid and the average elution efficiency was 90 % for 6 ml elutions. Contents of radionuclidic impurities, Zr and Mo in the eluates, were low enough to meet the pharmacopoeia requirements for human use. (author)

  14. Influence of temperature and rate of deformation on mechanical properties of a low alloyed niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, V.A.; Krashchenko, V.P.; Statsenko, V.E.; Kharchenko, V.K.

    1979-01-01

    The technique for indirect temperature measurements of wire samples is suggested and justified. Temperature dependences are investigated of strength and plasticity characteristics of niobium alloy alloyed with zirconium in the range of 20-1100 deg C at two deformation rates: 1.1x10 -3 and 5.3x10 -3 sec -1 . Deformation aging at both deformation rates in the temperature range of 0.25-0.42 Tsub(m) takes place in the form of the increase of σsub(B) and σsub(0.2) strength characteristics and discontinuous yield. The σsub(B) and σsub(0.2) level in this interval is higher for a lesser deformation rate, than for a higher one. Maxima on temperature strength dependence curves move to the side of high temperatures. In the 20-900 deg C temperature range rate alterations slightly affect plasticity characteristics

  15. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, R.S.; Vogler, S.

    1958-01-21

    A process is described for dissolving binary zirconium-uranium alloys where the uranium content is about 2%. In prior dissolution procedures for these alloys, an oxidizing agent was added to prevent the precipitation of uranium tetrafluoride. In the present method complete dissolution is accomplished without the use of the oxidizing agent by using only the stoichiometric amount or slight excess of HF required by the zirconium. The concentration of the acid may range from 2M to 10M and the dissolution is advatageously carried out at a temperature of 80 deg C.

  16. Niobium based coatings for dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, G.; Rodil, S.E.; Arzate, H.; Muhl, S.; Olaya, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Niobium based thin films were deposited on stainless steel (SS) substrates to evaluate them as possible biocompatible surfaces that might improve the biocompatibility and extend the life time of stainless steel dental implants. Niobium nitride and niobium oxide thin films were deposited by reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering under standard deposition conditions without substrate bias or heating. The biocompatibility of the surfaces was evaluated by testing the cellular adhesion and viability/proliferation of human cementoblasts during different culture times, up to 7 days. The response of the films was compared to the bare substrate and pieces of Ti6Al4V; the most commonly used implant material for orthopedics and osteo-synthesis applications. The physicochemical properties of the films were evaluated by different means; X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results suggested that the niobium oxide films were amorphous and of stoichiometric Nb 2 O 5 (a-Nb 2 O 5 ), while the niobium nitride films were crystalline in the FCC phase (c-NbN) and were also stoichiometric with an Nb to N ratio of one. The biological evaluation showed that the biocompatibility of the SS could be improved by any of the two films, but neither was better than the Ti6Al4V alloy. On the other hand, comparing the two films, the c-NbN seemed to be a better surface than the oxide in terms of the adhesion and proliferation of human cemetoblasts.

  17. Superconductors made of niobium germanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newkirk, L.R.; Valencia, F.A.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns the superconductors and particularly the mass coatings of niobium germanide (Nb 3 Ge) exhibiting superconductor properties, as well as the compositions enabling them to be obtained, having transition temperatures of around 20 0 K or more. The invention proposes a composition of a material of the general formula Nb 3 Ge, containing from around 1 to around 10 at. % oxygen. Preferably, the material contains around 5 at. % of oxygen. The invention also proposes fabricated articles in which the compositions described above are associated with and joined to a metallic substrate. Hence, for instance, the present studies involving a superconducting power transmission line for direct current make it possible to envisage the use of conductors placed in a double envelope, enabling the superconducting element transmitting the current to be carried, whilst containing the cryogenic coolant. In this type of design, the coat of superconducting material surrounds a tube containing liquid helium or possibly liquid hydrogen if a sufficiently high superconduction transition temperature can be reached. The tube must be a good heat and electricity conductor in order to achieve good stability of the superconducting coating [fr

  18. Zirconium alloy barrier having improved corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, R.B.; Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor has a composite cladding container having a substrate and a dilute zirconium alloy liner bonded to the inside surface of the substrate. The dilute zirconium alloy liner forms about 1 to about 20 percent of the thickness of the cladding and is comprised of zirconium and a metal selected from the group consisting of iron, chromium, iron plus chromium, and copper. The dilute zirconium alloy liner shields the substrate from impurities or fission products from the nuclear fuel material and protects the substrate from stress corrosion and stress cracking. The dilute zirconium alloy liner displays greater corrosion resistance, especially to oxidation by hot water or steam than unalloyed zirconium. The substrate material is selected from conventional cladding materials, and preferably is a zirconium alloy. (author)

  19. Process for etching zirconium metallic objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panson, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    In a process for etching of zirconium metallic articles formed from zirconium or a zirconium alloy, wherein the zirconium metallic article is contacted with an aqueous hydrofluoric acid-nitric acid etching bath having an initial ratio of hydrofluoric acid to nitric acid and an initial concentration of hydrofluoric and nitric acids, the improvement, is described comprising: after etching of zirconium metallic articles in the bath for a period of time such that the etching rate has diminished from an initial rate to a lesser rate, adding hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid to the exhausted bath to adjust the concentration and ratio of hydrofluoric acid to nitric acid therein to a value substantially that of the initial concentration and ratio and thereby regenerate the etching solution without removal of dissolved zirconium therefrom; and etching further zirconium metallic articles in the regenerated etching bath

  20. Study of niobium corrosion in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, S.H. de.

    1987-01-01

    A comparative study of niobium electrochemical behaviour in NaOH and KOH solution, with concentrations between 0,5 and 6,1M is presented. The studies were done through electrochemicals assays, consisting in the corrosion potential and anodic and cathodic polarization curves, complemented by loss of mass experiments. The niobium anodic behaviour in alkaline medium is characterized by passivation occurrence, with a stable film formation. The Na oH solution in alkaline medium are more corrosible to niobium than the KOH solution. The loss of mass assays showed that the corrosion velocit is more dependente of hydroxide concentration in KOH medium than the NaOH medium. (C.G.C.) [pt

  1. Josephson tunnel junctions in niobium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiik, Tapio.

    1976-12-01

    A method of fabricating stable Josephson tunnel junctions with reproducible characteristics is described. The junctions have a sandwich structure consisting of a vacuum evaporated niobium film, a niobium oxide layer produced by the glow discharge method and a lead film deposited by vacuum evaporation. Difficulties in producing thin-film Josephson junctions are discussed. Experimental results suggest that the lower critical field of the niobium film is the most essential parameter when evaluating the quality of these junctions. The dependence of the lower critical field on the film thickness and on the Ginzburg-Landau parameter of the film is studied analytically. Comparison with the properties of the evaporated films and with the previous calculations for bulk specimens shows that the presented model is applicable for most of the prepared samples. (author)

  2. Radioactivity analysis in niobium activation foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, G.E.

    1995-06-01

    The motivation for this study was to measure and analyze the activity of six (6) niobium (Nb) foils (the x-rays from an internal transition in Nb-93m) and apply this information with previously obtained activation foil data. The niobium data was used to determine the epithermal to MeV range for the neutron spectrum and fluence. The foil activation data was re-evaluated in a spectrum analysis code (STAY`SL) to provide new estimates of the exposure at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effect Facility (LASREF). The activity of the niobium foils was measured and analyzed at the University of Missouri-Columbia (UMC) under the direction of Professor William Miller. The spectrum analysis was performed at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) by Professor Gary Mueller.

  3. Molding of L band niobium superconductor cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yoshisato; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Koizumi, Susumu [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    A cavity to produce high accelerating electron field was developed. The L-band (1.3 GHz) niobium superconductor unit cell cavity was ellipsoid with {phi}217.3 mm outer diameter and 2.5 mm thickness and consisted of two pieces of half cell, two beam pipes and flange. A deep drawing process was adapted. In spite of the first trial manufacture, each good cavity was obtained. Characteristic properties of niobium materials, molding method of cavity, extension of sheet after molding, production of beam pipe, accuracy and the cost were explained. Niobium materials. showed tensile strength 15.6 kg/mm{sup 2}, load-carrying capacity 4.1 kg/mm{sup 2}, density 8.57, extension 42.5% and RRR (resistance residual ratio){>=}200. (S.Y.)

  4. Purification of molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheresnowsky, M.J.; Brunelli, T.A.; Kim, T.K.

    1987-01-01

    A method for purifying molybdenum is described comprising: (a) adding to an ammoniacal ammonium molybdate solution which is at a pH of from about 8.5 to about 11 and which contains the impurities of phosphorus and arsenic with the phosphorus concentration being from about 0.01 to about 0.12 g/l, a soluble magnesium salt to form a precipitate comprising magnesium ammonium salts of the phosphorus and the arsenic, and to form a purified ammonium molybdate solution, with the amount of the magnesium salt being added in an amount sufficient to result in a concentration of from about 0.005 to about 0.04 moles Mg/l in the ammoniacal ammonium molybdate solution, and the purified solution containing no greater than about 0.01 g P/l; (b) separating the precipitate from the purified ammonium molybdate solution; and (c) contacting the purified ammonium molybdate solution with a chelating cation exchange resin supplying a sufficient amount of ammonium as the cation to remove the major portion of the magnesium ions from the purified solution and form a further purified ammonium molybdate solution

  5. Development of Molybdenum Adsorbent for 99Mo/99mTc Radioisotope Generator Based on Irradiated Natural Molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohadi Awaludin; Hotman Lubis; Sriyono; Abidin; Herlina; Endang Sarmini; Indra Saptiama; Hambali

    2011-01-01

    Preparation of 99 Mo/ 99m Tc radioisotope generator using irradiated natural molybdenum requires an adsorbent with high absorption capacity. Zirconium-based materials (ZBM), adsorbent with adsorption capacity of about 183 mg(Mo) / g(adsorbent), has been successfully synthesized. However, the adsorbent was easily broken in the Mo adsorption process due to many fractures in the grain. To increase the hardness, the material was immersed in tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and coated by TEOS flow in a column. The hardness test results showed that the ZBM with TEOS treatment was not broken when immersed into the Mo solution. Observations using SEM showed that the fractures formed on the ZBM were successfully removed by TEOS treatment. Measurements using EDS showed that after TEOS treatment, the silicon was detected and the oxygen content increased in the material surface. Adsorption test results showed that the TEOS immersion decreased the adsorption capacity of molybdenum from 183 to 79.8 mg of Mo per gram of adsorbent. The TEOS flow-in a column gave material with relatively high adsorption capacity, 140 mgMo per gram adsorbent. The content of Silicon in the surface was lower than that of adsorbent immersed in TEOS. (author)

  6. Liquid-film assisted formation of alumina/niobium interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Sugar, Joshua D.; McKeown, Joseph T.; Marks, Robert A.; Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2002-01-01

    Alumina has been joined at 1400 degrees C using niobium-based interlayers. Two different joining approaches were compared: solid-state diffusion bonding using a niobium foil as an interlayer, and liquid-film assisted bonding using a multilayer copper/niobium/copper interlayer. In both cases, a 127-(mu)m thick niobium foil was used; =1.4-(mu)m or =3-(mu)m thick copper films flanked the niobium. Room-temperature four-point bend tests showed that the introduction of a copper film had a significa...

  7. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K W; Kennedy, W L; Sagalovsky, L [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-11-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling costs for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed. (Author) fig., 7 refs.

  8. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling cost for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed

  9. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling costs for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed. (Author) fig., 7 refs

  10. Niobium-base grain refiner for aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Pontes, P. da; Robert, M.H.; Cupini, N.L.

    1980-01-01

    A new chemical grain refiner for aluminium has been developed, using inoculation of a niobium-base compound. When a bath of molten aluminium is inoculated whith this refiner, an intermetallic aluminium-niobium compound is formed which acts as a powerful nucleant, producing extremely fine structure comparable to those obtained by means of the traditional grain refiner based on titanium and boron. It was found that the refinement of the structure depends upon the weight percentage of the new refiner inoculated as well as the time of holding the bath after inoculation and before pouring, but mainly on the inoculating temperature. (Author) [pt

  11. Investigation of superconducting niobium 1170 MHz cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anashin, V.V.; Bibko, S.I.; Fadeyev, E.I.

    1988-01-01

    The design, fabrication and experiments with superconducting L-band single cell cavities are described. These cavities model a cell of an accelerating RF structure. The cavities have been fabricated from technical grade and higher purity grade sheet niobium using deep-drawing, electron beam welding and chemical polishing. They have spherical geometry and are excited in the TM 010 mode. A computerized set-up was used for cavity tests. Qo=1.5 x 10 9 and E acc = 4.3 MV/m were obtained in the cavity made of higher purity grade niobium. 6 references, 8 figures, 3 tables

  12. Tool steel for cold worck niobium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldenstein, H.

    1984-01-01

    A tool steel was designed so as to have a microstructure with the matrix similar a cold work tool steel of D series, containing a dispersion of Niobium carbides, with no intention of putting Niobium in solution on the matrix. The alloy was cast, forged and heat treated. The alloy was easily forged; the primary carbide morfology, after forging, was faceted, tending to equiaxed. The hardness obtained was equivalent to the maximum hardness of a D-3 sttel when quenched from any temperature between 950 0 C, and 1200 0 , showing a very small sensitivy to the quenching temperature. (Author) [pt

  13. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling cost for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed.

  14. Design for a superconducting niobium RFQ structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W.; Kennedy, W.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1992-09-01

    This paper reports a design for a niobium superconducting RFQ operating at 192 Mhz. The structure is of the rod and post type, novel in that each of four rods is supported by two posts oriented radially with respect to the beam axis. Although the geometry has four-fold rotation symmetry, the dipole-quadrupole mode splitting is large, giving good mechanical tolerances. The simplicity of the geometry enables designing for good mechanical stability while minimizing tooling cost for fabrication with niobium. Results of MAFIA numerical modeling, measurements on a copper model, and plans for a beam test are discussed.

  15. Molybdenum Disilicide Oxidation Kinetics in High Temperature Steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Elizabeth Sooby [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parker, Stephen Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nelson, Andrew Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-07

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program’s Advanced Fuels Campaign is currently supporting a range of experimental efforts aimed at the development and qualification of ‘accident tolerant’ nuclear fuel forms. One route to enhance the accident tolerance of nuclear fuel is to replace the zirconium alloy cladding, which is prone to rapid oxidation in steam at elevated temperatures, with a more oxidation-resistant cladding. Several cladding replacement solutions have been envisaged. The cladding can be completely replaced with a more oxidation resistant alloy, a layered approach can be used to optimize the strength, creep resistance, and oxidation tolerance of various materials, or the existing zirconium alloy cladding can be coated with a more oxidation-resistant material. Molybdenum is one candidate cladding material favored due to its high temperature creep resistance. However, it performs poorly under autoclave testing and suffers degradation under high temperature steam oxidation exposure. Development of composite cladding architectures consisting of a molybdenum core shielded by a molybdenum disilicide (MoSi2) coating is hypothesized to improve the performance of a Mo-based cladding system. MoSi2 was identified based on its high temperature oxidation resistance in O2 atmospheres (e.g. air and “wet air”). However, its behavior in H2O is less known. This report presents thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) results for MoSi2 exposed to 670-1498 K water vapor. Synthetic air (80-20%, Ar-O2) exposures were also performed, and those results are presented here for a comparative analysis. It was determined that MoSi2 displays drastically different oxidation behavior in water vapor than in dry air. In the 670-1498 K temperature range, four distinct behaviors are observed. Parabolic oxidation is exhibited in only 670

  16. Nitrogen reduction: Molybdenum does it again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, Richard R.

    2011-02-01

    Nature reduces dinitrogen under mild conditions using nitrogenases, the most active of which contains molybdenum and iron. The only abiological dinitrogen reduction catalyst that avoids the harsh conditions of the Haber-Bosch process contains just molybdenum.

  17. HIP bonding between niobium/copper/stainless steel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Fujino, Takeo; Hitomi, Nobuteru; Saito, Kenji; Yamada, Masahiro; Shibuya, Junichi; Ota, Tomoko

    2000-01-01

    We have used niobium flanges for the niobium bulk superconducting RF cavities, however, they are expensive. Stainless steel flanges instead of the niobium flanges will be used in the future large scale production of sc cavities like the KEK/JAERI joint project. For a future R and D of the vacuum sealing related to the clean horizontal assembly method or development of cavities welded a helium vessel in the KEK/JAERI joint project, a converter section of niobium material to stainless steel is required. From these requirements we need to develop the converter. We have tried a HIP bonding method between niobium materials and stainless steel or copper material. It was made clear that the technology could offer an enough bonding strength even higher than niobium tensile strength in the joined surface between niobium and stainless steel or copper. (author)

  18. Deposition of niobium plate on niobium-titanium from molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matychenko, Eh.S.; Shevyrev, A.A.; Stolyarova, L.A.; Sukhorzhevskaya, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    A possibility of using Nb-Ti alloys (50 and 34 mas.% of Ti) as substrates for deposition of niobium coating of chloride-fluoride and fluoride molten salts is studied. Corrosion behaviour of alloys indicates in the electrolytic bath within 970-1070 K interval, coating structure and state of coating-substrate boundary are investigated. Chloride-fluoride molten salt usefullness for making products with niobium coatings is shown

  19. Method of molybdenum kinetic determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejngol'd, S.U.; Dzotsenidze, N.E.; Ruseishviyai, T.G.; Nelen', I.M.

    1980-01-01

    The method molybdenum kinetic determination according to oxidation of pyrogallol with bromate in the medium of 0.05-0.15 M perchloric or sulphuric acids is presented. 1 mg of Ni, Co, Mn, Mg, Zn, Cr(3); 100 μg of Ca, Al, Cu, 10 μg of Cr(4), W; 10 μg of Fe in the presence of 22x10 - 4 M solution of EDTA, as well as 10 - 4 M solutions of chlorides and fluorides, 10 - 5 M solutions of bromides do not interfere with molybdenum determination using the given method. The method is rather simple, it takes 30 min to carry out the analysis. Determination limit of molybdenum constitutes 0.01 μg/ml

  20. Isotope analysis of molybdenum in selected minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, S.; Dietze, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical method is described for the mass spectrometric determination of molybdenum abundance values. The results of analyses of three molybdenum mineral samples are presented and compared with the results of other authors. It is shown that the fine variations of molybdenum in natural minerals cannot be analysed with currently available mass spectrometers

  1. Dislocation morphology in deformed and irradiated niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.P.

    1977-06-01

    Niobium foils of moderate purity were examined for the morphology of dislocations or defect clusters in the deformed or neutron-irradiated state by transmission electron microscopy. New evidence has been found for the dissociation of screw dislocations into partials on the (211) slip plane according to the Crussard mechanism: (a/2) [111] → (a/3) [111] + (a/6) [111

  2. Growth of anodic films on niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, M.A.B.; Bulhoes, L.O.S.

    1988-01-01

    The analysis of the response of the galvanostatic growth of anodic films on niobium metal in aqueous solutions is shown. The first spark voltage showed a dependence upon value of current density that could be explained as the incorporation of anions into the film. (M.J.C.) [pt

  3. Review of tantalum and niobium alloy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the current state of niobium- and tantalum-base alloy production. The materials requirements, alloy compositions of interest, and production status are discussed. Finally, a list of developments needed to support the SP-100 program will be identified. A bibliography is included

  4. Intercalated compounds of niobium and tantalum dicalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wypych, F.

    1988-01-01

    The synthesis of niobium and tantalum lamellar compounds and its intercalated derivatives is described. The intercalated compounds with lithium, with alkaline metal and with metals of the first-row transition are studied, characterized by X-ray diffraction. (C.G.C.) [pt

  5. Voltage breakdown on niobium and copper surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, G.R.; Padamsee, H.; Betzwieser, J.C.; Liu, Y.G.; Rubin, K.H.R.; Shipman, J.E.; Ying, L.T.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments have shown that voltage breakdown in superconducting niobium RF cavities is in many ways similar to voltage breakdown on niobium cathodes in DC voltage gaps; most striking are the distinctive starburst patterns and craters that mark the site of voltage breakdown in both superconducting cavities and DC vacuum gaps. Therefore, we can learn much about RF breakdown from simpler, faster DC experiments. We have direct evidence, in the form of before'' and ''after'' pictures, that breakdown events caused by high surface electric fields occur with high probability at contaminant particles on surfaces. Although the pre-breakdown behavior (field emission) seems to depend mostly on the contaminant particles present and little on the substrate, the breakdown event itself is greatly affected by the substrate-niobium, heavily oxidized niobium, electropolished copper, and diamond-machined copper cathodes lead to different kinds of breakdown events. By studying DC voltage breakdown we hope to learn more details about the processes involved in the transition from field emission to catastrophic arcing and the cratering of the surface; as well as learning how to prevent breakdown, we would like to learn how to cause breakdown, which could be important when ''processing'' cavities to reduce field emission. (author)

  6. Spectral lines and coincidence tables for the determination of zirconium, niobium and tantalum with the ICP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuensch, G.; Wennemer, A.

    1987-01-01

    Coincidence tables for ICP-AES are given for 20 Zr lines, 9 Nb lines and 7 Ta lines. They include 582 interferent lines of 49 elements. The specified interference data (IEC and CCR) hold for a bandwidth FWHM = 16 pm and an interferent concentration of 1,000 mg/l. For trace determinations of Zr, Nb, Ta in a matrix of Fe, Z, Zr, Nb, Ta the dependence of the interference on the matrix concentration is specified up to 10,000 mg/l. Interference data CCR calculated for the ICP from the NBS tables often differ from the measured data by several orders of magnitude. The spectrum of Zr measured at a high concentration shows many weak lines most of which are not even listed in the MIT tables. They give rise to a quasi-continuous background the intensity of which increases nearly linearly with the matrix concentration. Therefore, an increase of sample concentration will not lead to an improved detection limit. The line intensities found in our investigations match well with those listed in the Wohlers tables. (orig.)

  7. Spectrographic determination of zirconium, niobium, rhodium, ruthenium, tantalum, and tungsten in uranium and its compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alduan, F.A.; Capdevila, C.

    1976-01-01

    The determination of Nb, Rh, Ru, Ta, W and Zr in uranium and its compounds has been studied, using the carrier distillation method with either AgCl or AgCl-SrF 2 (4:3) as carrier. In order to get the best sensitivity, the influence of the carrier concentration, the dc arc intensity and several controlled atmospheres on the variation of the line to background ratio of intensities has been considered. With the most suitable conditions, the sensitivities achieved for the considered elements are in the range 1-10 ppm. (author)

  8. Analytical electron microscope study of the omega phase transformation in a zirconium--niobium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1979-06-01

    An in-situ study of the as-quenched omega phase transformation in Zr--15% Nb was conducted between the temperatures of 77 and 300/sup 0/K using analytical electron microscopy. The domain size of the omega regions observed in this investigation was on the order of 30 A, consistent with previous observations in this system. No alignment of omega domains along <222> directions of the bcc lattice was observed and in-situ thermal cycling experiments failed to produce a long period structure of alternating ..beta.. and ..omega.. phase regions as predicted by one theory of this transformation. Several techniques of microstructural analysis were developed, refined, and standardized. Grouped under the general classification of Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) they provide the experimentalist with a unique tool for the microcharacterization of solids, allowing semiquantitative to quantitative analysis of the morphology, crystallography, elemental composition, and electronic structure of regions as small as 20 A in diameter. These techniques have complications, and it was necessary to study the AEM system used in this work so that instrumental artifacts which invalidate the information produced in the microscope environment might be eliminated. Once these factors had been corrected, it was possible to obtain a wealth of information about the microvolume of material under investigation. The microanalytical techniques employed during this research include: energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) using both conventional and scanning transmission electron microscopy (CTEM, STEM), transmission scanning electron diffraction (TSED), the stationary diffraction pattern technique, and electron energy loss spectroscopy (ELS) using a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope (DSTEM).

  9. Corrosion resistance of the niobium-zirconium-oxygen alloys in the molten lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakelov, A.G.; Vavilova, V.V.; Gekov, A.F.; Zel'tser, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    Phase behaviour of Nb-Zr-O system alloys after thermal treatment at 1500 deg and 500 deg C has been studied in the concentration range up to 6 at.% Zr and 6 at.% O. Alloys annealed at 1500 deg C, so that the ratio Zr:O was 1:2, displayed intercrystalline corrosion in lithium environment, whereas after annealing at 500 deg C the corrosion was largely transcrystalline. Lithium penetration into these alloys which is much slower than that into Nb-O alloys, results, as in the binary system, in lower microhardness and higher specific electrical resistance

  10. Probabilistic aspects of fatigue crack propagation data for zirconium-2.5 % niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, B.J.S.; Reich, A.R.

    1976-11-01

    Fatigue crack propagation data for Zr-2.5 % Nb pressure tube material at 20 and 400 deg C are presented. The practical application of these data in terms of error analysis and extrapolation errors is discussed. (author)

  11. Effect of fast neutron irradiation upon the omega transformation process in zirconium--niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremer, B.W.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of fast neutrons (E greater than 1 MeV) upon the beta-omega transformation was investigated. Irradiation-produced vacancies promoted the omega transformation by migrating to the regions of high compressive stress associated with the one-dimensional omega embryos, thereby allowing rearrangement of the strain fields. This rearrangement allows the omega embryos to attain large sizes. Growth of these embryos is diffusion controlled. However, irradiation produced no increase in growth rate. It is concluded the vacancies are effectively trapped by these strain fields even at the aging temperature, 400 0 C. The omega hardening mechanism is shown to be related solely to lattice misfit, independent of irradiation, and to saturate when the magnitude of the strain causes a breakdown of the coherent interface, thereby creating one or two interfacial dislocations. Aging at 400 0 C results in alpha growth into the interomega beta phase, producing an additional hardness increase additive to that resulting from the omega phase. At higher aging temperatures 500 0 C, the omega is rapidly replaced by alpha. The alpha microstructure consists of ultra-fine grains, 1000 A, each composed of one 12 interrelated crystallographic variants. Fast neutron irradiation has no effect upon the omega metastable equilibrium phase diagram

  12. Evolution of interphase and intergranular strain in zirconium-niobium alloys during deformation at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Song

    Zr-2.5Nb is currently used for pressure tubes in the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactor. A complete understanding of the deformation mechanism of Zr-2.5Nb is important if we are to accurately predict the in-reactor performance of pressure tubes and guarantee normal operation of the reactors. This thesis is a first step in gaining such an understanding; the deformation mechanism of ZrNb alloys at room temperature has been evaluated through studying the effect of texture and microstructure on deformation. In-situ neutron diffraction was used to monitor the evolution of the lattice strain of individual grain families along both the loading and Poisson's directions and to track the development of interphase and intergranular strains during deformation. The following experiments were carried out with data interpreted using elasto-plastic modeling techniques: (1) Compression tests of a 100%betaZr material at room temperature. (2) Tension and compression tests of hot rolled Zr-2.5Nb plate material. (3) Compression of annealed Zr-2.5Nb. (4) Cyclic loading of the hot rolled Zr-2.5Nb. (5) Compression tests of ZrNb alloys with different Nb and oxygen contents. The experimental results were interpreted using a combination of finite element (FE) and elasto-plastic self-consistent (EPSC) models. The phase properties and phase interactions well represented by the FE model, the EPSC model successfully captured the evolution of intergranular constraint during deformation and provided reasonable estimates of the critical resolved shear stress and hardening parameters of different slip systems under different conditions. The consistency of the material parameters obtained by the EPSC model allows the deformation mechanism at room temperature and the effect of textures and microstructures of ZrNb alloys to be understood. This work provides useful information towards manufacturing of Zr-2.5Nb components and helps in producing ideal microstructures and material properties for pressure tubes. Also it is helpful in guiding the development of new materials for the next generation of nuclear reactors. Furthermore, the large data set obtained from this study can be used in evaluation and improving current and future polycrystalline deformation models.

  13. Analytical electron microscope study of the omega phase transformation in a zirconium--niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1979-06-01

    An in-situ study of the as-quenched omega phase transformation in Zr--15% Nb was conducted between the temperatures of 77 and 300 0 K using analytical electron microscopy. The domain size of the omega regions observed in this investigation was on the order of 30 A, consistent with previous observations in this system. No alignment of omega domains along directions of the bcc lattice was observed and in-situ thermal cycling experiments failed to produce a long period structure of alternating β and ω phase regions as predicted by one theory of this transformation. Several techniques of microstructural analysis were developed, refined, and standardized. Grouped under the general classification of Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) they provide the experimentalist with a unique tool for the microcharacterization of solids, allowing semiquantitative to quantitative analysis of the morphology, crystallography, elemental composition, and electronic structure of regions as small as 20 A in diameter. These techniques have complications, and it was necessary to study the AEM system used in this work so that instrumental artifacts which invalidate the information produced in the microscope environment might be eliminated. Once these factors had been corrected, it was possible to obtain a wealth of information about the microvolume of material under investigation. The microanalytical techniques employed during this research include: energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) using both conventional and scanning transmission electron microscopy (CTEM, STEM), transmission scanning electron diffraction (TSED), the stationary diffraction pattern technique, and electron energy loss spectroscopy (ELS) using a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope

  14. INTERMEDIATE STAGES OF REACTIONS FORMING CARBIDES OF TITANIUM, ZIRCONIUM, VANADIUM, NIOBIUM, AND TANTALIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    intermediate and final products, and also during the calculation of approximate heat values of their formation, the passage of the reaction is confirmed...for obtaining TiC, and ZrC through the stage of intermediate oxides Ti2O3, Ti3O5, TiO and Zr2O3, ZrO, respectively and also for the reaction of...forming carbides of V (from V2O3 + 5C), of Nb and Ta (from Nb2O5 + 7C and Ta205 + 7C) through the stage of intermediate oxides VO, V4O and TaO2, Ta4O. The

  15. Analytical electron microscope study of the omega phase transformation in a zirconium-niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1979-01-01

    The study of the as-quenched omega phase morphology shows that the domain size of Zr-15% Nb is on the order of 30 A. No alignment of omega domains along β directions was observed and samples having undergone thermal cycling in thin foil form, did not develop a long-period structure of alternating β and ω phases below the omega transformation temperature

  16. Niobium based coatings for dental implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, G., E-mail: enggiova@hotmail.com [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Facultad de Quimica, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Rodil, S.E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Arzate, H. [Laboratorio de Biologia Celular y Molecular, Facultad de Odontologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Muhl, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, CU, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Olaya, J.J. [Unidad de Materiales, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica y Mecatronica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Cra. 30 45-03 Bogota (Colombia)

    2011-01-15

    Niobium based thin films were deposited on stainless steel (SS) substrates to evaluate them as possible biocompatible surfaces that might improve the biocompatibility and extend the life time of stainless steel dental implants. Niobium nitride and niobium oxide thin films were deposited by reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering under standard deposition conditions without substrate bias or heating. The biocompatibility of the surfaces was evaluated by testing the cellular adhesion and viability/proliferation of human cementoblasts during different culture times, up to 7 days. The response of the films was compared to the bare substrate and pieces of Ti6Al4V; the most commonly used implant material for orthopedics and osteo-synthesis applications. The physicochemical properties of the films were evaluated by different means; X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results suggested that the niobium oxide films were amorphous and of stoichiometric Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} (a-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}), while the niobium nitride films were crystalline in the FCC phase (c-NbN) and were also stoichiometric with an Nb to N ratio of one. The biological evaluation showed that the biocompatibility of the SS could be improved by any of the two films, but neither was better than the Ti6Al4V alloy. On the other hand, comparing the two films, the c-NbN seemed to be a better surface than the oxide in terms of the adhesion and proliferation of human cemetoblasts.

  17. Neutron activation of chlorine in zirconium and zirconium alloys use of the matrix as comparator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, I.M.; Gomez, C.D.; Mila, M.I.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for neutron activation analysis of chlorine in zirconium and zirconium alloys. Calculation of chlorine concentration is performed relative to zirconium concentration in the matrix in order to minimize effects of differences in irradiation and counting geometry. Principles of the method and the results obtained are discussed. (author)

  18. Spectrophotometric titration of zirconium in siliceous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, K.F.; Su, Y.-S.; Strzegowski, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    An accurate and selective complexometric titration procedure based upon a spectrophotometrically detected end-point has been developed for the determination of zirconium in glasses, glass-ceramics and refractories. A p-bromomandelic acid separation step for zirconium imparts excellent selectivity to the procedure. The method is particularly important for the 1 to 5% concentration range where a simple, accurate and selective method for the determination of zirconium has been lacking. (author)

  19. Voltammetric determination of zirconium using azo compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orshulyak, O.O.; Levitskaya, G.D.

    2008-01-01

    The optimum conditions for zirconium complexation with azo compounds are found. The applicability of Eriochrome Red B, Calcon, and Calcion to the voltammetric determination of zirconium, total Zr(IV) and Hf(IV), and Zr(IV) in the presence of Zn(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Ni(II), or Ti(IV) is demonstrated. The developed procedures are used to determine zirconium in a terbium alloy and in an alloy for airplane wheel drums [ru

  20. Applications for zirconium and columbium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condliff, A.F.

    1986-01-01

    Currently, zirconium and columbium are used in a wide range of applications, overlapping only in the field of corrosion control. As a construction material, zirconium is primarily used by the nuclear power industry. The use of zirconium in the chemical processing industry (CPI) is, however, increasing steadily. Columbian alloys are primarily applied as superconducting alloys for research particle accelerators and fusion generators as well as in magnetic resonance imaging for medical diagnosis

  1. Evaluation of molybdenum and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.

    1981-01-01

    The choice of pure molybdenum as the prime candidate material for space reactor core heat pipes is critically examined. Pure molybdenum's high ductile-brittle transition temperature appears to be its major disadvantage. The candidate materials examined in detail for this application include low carbon arc-cast molybdenum, TZM-molybdenum alloy, and molybdenum-rhenium alloys. Published engineering properties are collected and compared, and it appears that Mo-Re alloys with 10 to 15% rhenium offer the best combination. Hardware is presently being made from electron beam melted Mo-13Re to test this conclusion

  2. Zirconium Phosphate Supported MOF Nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Yuwei; Clearfield, Abraham

    2016-06-06

    We report a rare example of the preparation of HKUST-1 metal-organic framework nanoplatelets through a step-by-step seeding procedure. Sodium ion exchanged zirconium phosphate, NaZrP, nanoplatelets were judiciously selected as support for layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of Cu(II) and benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (H3BTC) linkers. The first layer of Cu(II) is attached to the surface of zirconium phosphate through covalent interaction. The successive LBL growth of HKUST-1 film is then realized by soaking the NaZrP nanoplatelets in ethanolic solutions of cupric acetate and H3BTC, respectively. The amount of assembled HKUST-1 can be readily controlled by varying the number of growth cycles, which was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and gas adsorption analyses. The successful construction of HKUST-1 on NaZrP was also supported by its catalytic performance for the oxidation of cyclohexene.

  3. Method of separating hafnium from zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megy, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    English. A new anhydrous method was developed for separating zirconium and hafnium, which gives higher separation factors and is more economical than previous methods. A molten phase, comprising a solution of unseparated zirconium and hafnium and a solvent metal, is first prepared. The molten metal phase is contacted with a fused salt phase which includes a zirconium salt. Zirconium and hafnium separation is effected by mutual displacement with hafnium being transported from the molten metal phase to the fused salt phase, while zirconium is transported from the fused salt phase to the molten metal phase. The solvent metal is less electropositive than zirconium. Zinc was chosen as the solvent metal, from a group which also included cadmium, lead, bismuth, copper, and tin. The fused salt phase cations are more electropositive than zirconium and were selected from a group comprising the alkali elements, the alkaline earth elements, the rare earth elements, and aluminum. A portion of the zirconium in the molten metal phase was oxidized by injecting an oxidizing agent, chlorine, to form zirconium tetrachlorid

  4. Microhardness and microplasticity of zirconium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshpor, V.S.; Eron'yan, M.A.; Petrov, A.N.; Kravchik, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    To experimentally check the concentration dependence of microhardness of 4 group nitrides, microhardness of zirconium nitride compact samples was measured. The samples were obtained either by bulk saturation of zirconium iodide plates or by chemical precipitation from gas. As nitrogen content decreased within the limits of homogeneity of zirconium nitride samples where the concentration of admixed oxygen was low, the microhardness grew from 1500+-100 kg/mm 2 for ZrNsub(1.0) to 27000+-100 kg/mm 2 for ZrNsub(0.78). Microplasticity of zirconium nitride (resistance to fracture) decreased, as the concentration of nitrogen vacancies was growing

  5. Production kinetics of zirconium tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudjoko, D.; Masduki, B.; Sunardjo; Sulistyo, B.

    1996-01-01

    This research was intended to study the kinetics of zirconium tetrachloride production. The process was carried out in semi continuous reactor, equipped with heater, temperature controller, sublimator and scrubber. The variables investigated were time, temperature and the pellet forming pressure. Within the range of variables studied, the expression of the process in the chemical reaction controller region and diffusion controller region were both presented. (author)

  6. Thermodynamic Database for Zirconium Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerlerud Perez, Rosa

    2003-05-01

    For many decades zirconium alloys have been commonly used in the nuclear power industry as fuel cladding material. Besides their good corrosion resistance and acceptable mechanical properties the main reason of using these alloys is the low neutron absorption. Zirconium alloys are exposed to a very severe environment during the nuclear fission process and there is a demand for better design of this material. To meet this requirement a thermodynamic database is developed to support material designers. In this thesis some aspects about the development of a thermodynamic database for zirconium alloys are presented. A thermodynamic database represents an important facility in applying thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for a given material providing: 1) relevant information about the thermodynamic properties of the alloys e.g. enthalpies, activities, heat capacity, and 2) significant information for the manufacturing process e.g. heat treatment temperature. The basic information in the database is first the unary data, i.e. pure elements; those are taken from the compilation of the Scientific Group Thermodata Europe (SGTE) and then the binary and ternary systems. All phases present in those binary and ternary systems are described by means of the Gibbs energy dependence on composition and temperature. Many of those binary systems have been taken from published or unpublished works and others have been assessed in the present work. All the calculations have been made using Thermo C alc software and the representation of the Gibbs energy obtained by applying Calphad technique

  7. Gel Fabrication of Molybdenum “Beads”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowden, Richard Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Armstrong, Beth L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Cooley, Kevin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division

    2016-11-01

    Spherical molybdenum particles or “beads” of various diameters are of interest as feedstock materials for the additive manufacture of targets and assemblies used in the production of 99Mo medical isotopes using accelerator technology. Small metallic beads or ball bearings are typically fabricated from wire; however, small molybdenum spheres cannot readily be produced in this manner. Sol-gel processes are often employed to produce small dense microspheres of metal oxides across a broad diameter range that in the case of molybdenum could be reduced and sintered to produce metallic spheres. These Sol-gel type processes were examined for forming molybdenum oxide beads; however, the molybdenum trioxide was chemically incompatible with commonly used gelation materials. As an alternative, an aqueous alginate process being assessed for the fabrication of oxide spheres for catalyst applications was employed to form molybdenum trioxide beads that were successfully reduced and sintered to produce small molybdenum spheres.

  8. Vapor pressure and evaporation rate of certain heat-resistant compounds in a vacuum at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolgar, A. S.; Verkhoglyadova, T. S.; Samsonov, G. V.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor pressure and evaporation rate of borides of titanium, zirconium, and chrome; and of strontium and carbides of titanium, zirconium, and chrome, molybdenum silicide; and nitrides of titanium, niobium, and tantalum in a vacuum were studied. It is concluded that all subject compounds evaporate by molecular structures except AlB sub 12' which dissociates, losing the aluminum.

  9. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN MOLYBDENUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abd El Keriem, M.S.; van der Werf, D.P.; Pleiter, F

    1993-01-01

    Vacancy-hydrogen interaction in molybdenum was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. The complex InV2 turned out to trap up to two hydrogen atoms: trapping of a single hydrogen atom gives rise to a decrease of the quadrupole

  10. Trapping of hydrogen isotopes in molybdenum and niobium predamaged by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottiger, J.; Picraux, S.T.; Rud, N.; Laursen, T.

    1977-01-01

    The trapping of hydrogen isotopes at defects in Mo and Nb have been studied. Ion beams of 11- and 18-keV He + , 55-keV O + and Ne + , and 500-keV Bi + were used to create defects. Subsequently H or D was injected at room temperature by use of molecular beams of 16-keV H + 2 and D + 2 . Appreciable enhancements were observed in the amount of H and D retained within the near-surface region of predamaged samples compared to samples with no prior damage. The total amount of D retained within the near-surface region was measured by means of the nuclear reaction D( 3 He,p) 4 He, and H depth profiles were measured via a resonance in the nuclear reaction 1 H( 19 F,αγ) 16 O. The H profiles correlate with the predicted predamaging ion profiles; however, appreciable tails to deeper depths for the hydrogen profiles are observed for the heavier predamaging ions. For a given predamage ion fluence, the amount of trapped deuterium increases linearly with incident deuterium fluence until a saturation in the enhancement is reached. The amount of deuterium trapped when saturation occurs increases with increasing predamage fluence. The experiments indicate that lighter ions, which create fewer primary displacements, are more effective per displacement in trapping hydrogen. An appreciable release of hydrogen is obtained upon annealing at 200 and 300 degreeC, and a preannealing experiment indicates this is due to detrapping rather than to any loss of traps. These temperatures suggest a much higher binding energy for the trapped hydrogen isotopes (approx.1.5 eV) than the available evidence gives for simple H-defect binding energies (approximately-less-than0.3 eV). The detailed trapping mechanism is not known. However, it is suggested on the basis of the high binding energies and the high concentrations of hydrogen which can be trapped that clusters of hydrogen may be formed

  11. X-ray topographic fractography of single crystals of molybdenum and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hmelo, A.B.

    1982-12-01

    The semi-brittle (001) cleavage fracture at 77 0 K of Mo and outgassed Nb single crystals was related to their fracture toughness. Berg-Barrett x-ray reflection topography and White Beam Synchrotron Fractography were used. Calibrated electropolishing in layers followed by Synchrotron Fractography revealed that under the conditions which existed at the tip of the running crack, Mo underwent general yielding which resulted in a plastically curved lattice. This result correlates with the substantial fracture toughness for Mo measured previously. On the other hand, double [112] slip was observed for Nb. The plastic zone associated with the crack-tip is shown to have a structure typicla of shock-loaded materials, consisting of arrays of screw dislocations, micro- and macrotwins. This result correlates with the low fracture toughness of Nb at 77 0 K. It is proposed that these extremes in cleavage behavior for Mo vs Nb can be rationalized in terms of the capacity of a bcc structure to undergo a slip to twinning transition at high strain rates. 32 figures, 5 tables

  12. Study of niobium isotopes having excess neutrons and a short half-life; Etude des isotopes du niobium excedentaires en neutrons et de courte periode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebenthal, K [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-02-01

    By irradiating Mo with 14 MeV neutrons isomers have been found for {sup 98}Nb (2.8 s half-life) {sup 99}Nb (9 s) and {sup 100}Nb (2.4 s). No isomer of this type seems to exist for {sup 96}Nb. Rapid separation methods are developed for isolating {sup 98}Zr from fission products, and for separating Zr and Nb. The half-life of {sup 98}Zr is measured (31 s) and the formation of {sup 98}Nb (2.8 s) from {sup 98}Zr (31 s) is shown by milking. Rough {beta} and {gamma} measurements of these nuclei are described. The {gamma} spectrum of {sup 98}Nb (51 mn) is studied with a high-resolution Ge/Li - detector. (authors) [French] Des irradiations des isotopes de molybdene avec des neutrons de 14 MeV ont mis en evidence l'existence des isomeres de {sup 98}Nb (periode 2.8 s) {sup 99}Nb (9 s) et {sup 100}Nb (2.4 s). Pour le {sup 96}Nb un isomere de ce type ne semble pas exister. Des methodes rapides de separation sont mises au point pour isoler le zirconium 98 des produits de fission, et pour separer ensuite le niobium du zirconium. La periode du {sup 98}Zr est de 3l s, et on demontre la formation du {sup 98}Nb (2.8 s) a partir du Zr (31 s). Ces corps sont etudies sommairement en spectroscopie {beta} et {gamma}. Le spectre gamma de {sup 98}Nb (periode 51 mn) est etudie avec un detecteur Ge/Li de haute resolution. (auteurs)

  13. Analysis of hydrogen in zirconium metallic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, A.N.; Vega Bustillos, J.O.W.

    1991-02-01

    Determination of hydrogen in zirconium metallic have been performed using the hot vacuum extraction system and the gas chromatographic technique. The zirconium metallic samples were hydrieded by electrolitic technique at difference temperatures and times, then the samples were annealing at vacuum and eatching by fluoridric acid solution. The details of the hydrieded process, analytical technique and the data obtained are discussed. (author)

  14. Localized deformation of zirconium-liner tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Fumihisa; Uchida, Masaaki

    1988-03-01

    Zirconium-liner tube has come to be used in BWR. Zirconium liner mitigates the localized stress produced by the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). In this study, simulating the ridging, stresses were applied to the inner surfaces of zirconium-liner tubes and Zircaloy-2 tubes, and, to investigate the mechanism and the extent of the effect, the behavior of zirconium liner was examined. As the result of examination, stress was concentrated especially at the edge of the deformed region, where zirconium liner was highly deformed. Even after high stress was applied, the deformation of Zircaloy part was small, since almost the concentrated stress was mitigated by the deformation of zirconium liner. In addition, stress and strain distributions in the cross section of specimen were calculated with a computer code FEMAXI-III. The results also showed that zirconium liner mitigated the localized stress in Zircaloy, although the affected zone was restricted to the region near the boundary between zirconium liner and Zircaloy. (author)

  15. Study of niobium V compounds in nitric medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gue, J.-P.; Kikindai, Tivadar; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92

    1976-01-01

    Nitric solutions of niobium V were studied in the range of concentrations of 5.10 -6 M to 0,5.10 -3 M in niobium and 0,4 to 10N in nitric acid. Methods used were light scattering, electron microscopy, electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. It is shown that niobium was in a colloidal hydroxide form. Solvent extraction studies were performed with dibutyl phosphoric acid diluted in dodecane. It appears that floculation of the sol occurs for weak organic acid concentrations. But if the concentration increases, the precipitated niobium compound is redissolved in the organic phase [fr

  16. RF Characterization of Niobium Films for Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aull† , S; Doebert, S; Junginger, T; Ehiasarian, AP; Knobloch, J; Terenziani, G

    2013-01-01

    The surface resistance RS of superconductors shows a complex dependence on the external parameters such as temperature, frequency or radio-frequency (RF) field. The Quadrupole Resonator modes of 400, 800 and 1200 MHz allow measurements at actual operating frequencies of superconducting cavities. Niobium films on copper substrates have several advantages over bulk niobium cavities. HIPIMS (High-power impulse magnetron sputtering) is a promising technique to increase the quality and therefore the performance of niobium films. This contribution will introduce CERNs recently developed HIPIMS coating apparatus. Moreover, first results of niobium coated copper samples will be presented, revealing the dominant loss mechanisms.

  17. Degradation of ethyl alcohol on niobium hydraxide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artem'eva, M.A.; Maslova, E.S.; Artem'ev, Yu.M.

    1992-01-01

    Samples of niobium hydroxide were prepared from niobium(5) chloride solutions in anhydrous ethanol. Niobium hydroxide groups were applied on the surface of dispersed silica-airsilogel. Pulse microcatalytic method was used to reveal, that synthesized hydroxide catalysed ethanol decomposition at 573 K only along the direction of dehydration with formation of ethylene. Ethylene was also the main product of alcohol degradation on applied samples, and procedure of dehydration reactions was noticeable. Spectra of temperature programmed surface reactions demonstrate the similarity of acidic surface properties of these two types of samples. Hydroxide compounds of niobium and bismuth were tested for correlation. They were active during ethyl alcohol dehydrogenation

  18. Proposal of a new biokinetic model for niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Roges

    2006-01-01

    There are two niobium isotopes generated in nuclear power plants: 95 Nb and 94 Nb. Workers and members of the public are subjects to intake these radionuclides in accident situation. For dose calculation purpose, it is very important to develop a model that describes in a more realistic way the kinetics of niobium inside of the human body. Presently the model adopted by ICRP (ICRP, 1989) is based on animal studies and describes the behavior of niobium in human being in a simple manner. The new model proposal describes the kinetics of the niobium from the intake into the blood until the excretion, doing this in a more realistic form and considering not only data from animals but data from human beings as well. For this objective, a workers group of a niobium extraction and processing industry exposed to stable niobium (93 Nb) in oxide insoluble form with associated uranium, was monitored for uranium and niobium determination in urinary and fecal excretion, by mass spectrometry. Based in the ratios of the niobium concentration in urinary and faecal excretion of this workers and animal data study, a new biokinetic model for niobium was proposed, with the followings modifications relative to ICRP model: a new compartment that represents muscular tissue; the fractions which are deposited into the compartment are modified; a third component in the retention equation of the bone tissue; introduction of recirculation between organs and blood. The new model was applied for a case of accidental intake and described adequately the experimental data

  19. Development of high purity niobium material for superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Koichi; Sakita, Kohei; Suzuki, Takafusa; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi.

    1993-01-01

    For the superconducting niobium cavities, issues of thermal quench and field emission have to be solved to achieve a high field gradient (>25MV/m) for TESLA (TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator). In order to overcome the quench, upgrading of thermal conductivity of niobium material at the low temperature is very important. On the reduction of the field emission not only dust particles but also defect, impurity and inhomogeneity should be considered. Therefore development of high purity niobium material is very important to solve these issues. This paper describes the our latest R and D for high purity niobium material. (author)

  20. Impurity dependence of superconductivity in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laa, C.

    1984-04-01

    Jump temperatures, the critical fields Hsubc and Hsubc 2 and specific heats were measured on niobium samples where the impurity content was systematically varied by loading with nitrogen. Quantities could thus be extrapolated to lattice perfection and absolute purity. Comparisons with theories were made and some parameters extracted. Agreement was found with Gorkov theory for small impurities. A new value of the Ginsburg-Landau parameter Ko was determined to be just above 1/sqrt2 which proves that niobium is an elementary Type II semiconductor. By comparisons with the BCS and the CLAC theory the values of the mean Fermi velocity, the London penetration depth, the BCS coherence length and the impurity parameter were extracted. (G.Q.)

  1. Defect studies of H+ implanted niobium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prochazka, I.; Čížek, J.; Havránek, Vladimír; Anwand, W.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 645, SI1 (2015), s. 69-71 ISSN 0925-8388. [14th International Symposium on Metal-Hydrogen Systems (MH). Salford, 20.07.2014-25.07.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Niobium * Hydrogen * defects * Positron annihilation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.014, year: 2015

  2. Hydrogen solubility in polycrystalline - and nonocrystalline niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, T.T.; Silva, J.R.G. da

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen solubility in polycrystalline and monocrystalline niobium was measured in the range 400 0 C to 1000 0 C at one atmosphere hydrogen partial pressure. The experimental technique consists of saturation of the solvent metal with hydrogen, followed by quenching and analysis of the solid solution. It is presented solubility curves versus reciprocal of the absolute doping temperature, associated with their thermodynamical equation. (Author) [pt

  3. Superconducting parameters of polycrystalline niobium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandyba, P.E.; Kolesnikov, D.P.; Tkachev, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    The niobium semi-crystalline films, having a thickness of 200-5,050 A have been studied. The films have been produced by the electron-beam evaporation in the oilless vacuum and by the ionic plasma spraying with diode and triode methods. Determined have been the coherence length, the magnetic field penetration depth and the Ginsburg-andau parameter. An attempt is made to determine the electron states density of the Fermi surface

  4. Zirconium behaviour in purex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, J.

    1982-01-01

    The extraction behaviour of zirconium, as fission product, in TBP/diluent- HNO 3 -H 2 O systems, simulating Purex solutions, is studied. The main purpose is to attain an increasing in the zirconium decontamination factor by adjusting the extraction parameters. Equilibrium diagram, TBP concentration, aqueous:organic ratio, salting-out effects and, uranium loading in the organic phase were the main factors studied. All these experiments had been made with zirconium in the 10 - 2 - 10 - 3 concentration range. The extractant degradation products influence uppon the zirconium behaviour was also verified. With the obtained data it was possible to introduce some modification in the standard Purex flow-sheet in order to obtain the uranium product with higher zirconium decontamination. (Author) [pt

  5. ROUGHNESS ANALYSIS OF VARIOUSLY POLISHED NIOBIUM SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeill, G.; Reece, C.

    2008-01-01

    Niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities have gained widespread use in accelerator systems. It has been shown that surface roughness is a determining factor in the cavities’ effi ciency and maximum accelerating potential achievable through this technology. Irregularities in the surface can lead to spot heating, undesirable local electrical fi eld enhancement and electron multipacting. Surface quality is typically ensured through the use of acid etching in a Buffered Chemical Polish (BCP) bath and electropolishing (EP). In this study, the effects of these techniques on surface morphology have been investigated in depth. The surface of niobium samples polished using different combinations of these techniques has been characterized through atomic force microscopy (AFM) and stylus profi lometry across a range of length scales. The surface morphology was analyzed using spectral techniques to determine roughness and characteristic dimensions. Experimentation has shown that this method is a valuable tool that provides quantitative information about surface roughness at different length scales. It has demonstrated that light BCP pretreatment and lower electrolyte temperature favors a smoother electropolish. These results will allow for the design of a superior polishing process for niobium SRF cavities and therefore increased accelerator operating effi ciency and power.

  6. Structural phase transitions in niobium oxide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvakkumar, R.; Hong, Sun Ig

    2015-09-01

    Niobium oxide nanocrystals were successfully synthesized employing the green synthesis method. Phase formation, microstructure and compositional properties of 1, 4 and 7 days incubation treated samples after calcinations at 450 °C were examined using X-ray diffraction, Raman, photoluminescence (PL), infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectra and transmission electron microscopic characterizations. It was observed that phase formation of Nb2O5 nanocrystals was dependent upon the incubation period required to form stable metal oxides. The characteristic results clearly revealed that with increasing incubation and aging, the transformation of cubic, orthorhombic and monoclinic phases were observed. The uniform heating at room temperature (32 °C) and the ligation of niobium atoms due to higher phenolic constituents of utilized rambutan during aging processing plays a vital role in structural phase transitions in niobium oxide nanocrystals. The defects over a period of incubation and the intensities of the PL spectra changing over a period of aging were related to the amount of the defects induced by the phase transition.

  7. Fatigue behavior of niobium--hydrogen alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, D.W.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on room temperature fatigue behavior of niobium were investigated under both high frequency stress control and low frequency strain control conditions, in air. Hydrogen markedly improved the fatigue life in high frequency tests, while low frequency tests resulted in decreased fatigue life with increasing hydrogen content. Notches in hydrogen-charged alloys reduced high cycle life significantly but had little effect on low cycle tests. Fracture surfaces of annealed niobium mainly exhibited striations, with numerous cracks originating at troughs of striated bands in both stress and strain control tests. The fracture mode for alloys with hydrogen in solution was mixed, with striations interspersed with cleavage facets at high frequencies but generally cleavage steps at low frequencies. For the hydrided alloys, distinctive steps of mixed ductile-brittle appearance were revealed under high frequency conditions, but large cleavage facets only were observed for low frequency tests. The results are discussed in terms of the effects of hydrogen on the cyclic strain hardening rate, as well as on fatigue strength and ductility of niobium

  8. Electrical and electrochemical properties of niobium disulphide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molenda, J.; Bak, T.; Marzec, J. [Academy of Min. and Metall., Cracow (Poland). Dept. of Chem. of Solids

    1996-07-16

    The electrical conductivity and thermoelectric power measurements of NbS{sub 2} pure and electrochemically doped with lithium, Li{sub x}NbS{sub 2}, were done as a function of temperature (77 to 300 K). The high absolute values of conductivity and their dependence on temperature together with low absolute values of thermoelectric power and their linear increase with temperature indicate metallic properties of niobium disulphide. In case of Li{sub x}NbS{sub 2} the obtained values of electrical conductivity are significantly lower as compared with the starting NbS{sub 2}. The temperature dependence of the thermo-electric power of intercalated niobium disulphide also indicates that metallic properties get worse as the concentration of lithium increases. The modification of the electronic structure of NbS{sub 2} due to lithium intercalation was proposed. The character of the discharge curves in the electrochemical Li/Li{sup +}/Li{sub x}NbS{sub 2} systems was correlated with the electronic properties of niobium disulphide. (orig.) 11 refs.

  9. Neutron scattering and models: molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive interpretation of the fast-neutron interaction with elemental and isotopic molybdenum at energies of le 30 MeV is given. New experimental elemental-scattering information over the incident energy range 4.5 r a rrow 10 MeV is presented. Spherical, vibrational and dispersive models are deduced and discussed, including isospin, energy-dependent and mass effects. The vibrational models are consistent with the ''Lane potential''. The importance of dispersion effects is noted. Dichotomies that exist in the literature are removed. The models are vehicles for fundamental physical investigations and for the provision of data for applied purposes. A ''regional'' molybdenum model is proposed. Finally, recommendations for future work are made

  10. CVD molybdenum films of high infrared reflectance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carver, G. E.

    1979-01-01

    Molybdenum thin films of high infrared reflectance have been deposited by pyrolytic decomposition of molybdenum carbonyl (Mo(CO)/sub 6/), and by hydrogen reduction of molybdenum pentachloride (MoCl/sub 5/). Reflectance values within 0.7% of the reflectance of supersmooth bulk molybdenum have been attained by annealing films of lower reflectance in both reducing and non-reducing atmospheres. All depositions and anneals proceed at atmospheric pressure, facilitating a continuous, flow-through fabrication. These reflectors combine the high temperature stability of molybdenum thin films with the infrared reflectance of a material such as aluminum. Deposition from Mo(CO)/sub 6/ under oxidizing conditions, and subsequent anneal in a reducing atmosphere, results in films that combine high solar absorptance with low thermal emittance. If anti-reflected, black molybdenum films can serve as highly selective single layer photothermal converters. Structural, compositional, and crystallographic properties have been measured after both deposition and anneal.

  11. Hydrogen desorption kinetics from zirconium hydride and zirconium metal in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Terrani, Kurt A.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride is important in many nuclear design and safety applications. In this paper, a coordinated experimental and modeling study has been used to explicitly demonstrate the applicability of existing kinetic theories for hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride and α-zirconium. A static synthesis method was used to produce δ-zirconium hydride, and the crystallographic phases of the zirconium hydride were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Three obvious stages, involving δ-zirconium hydride, a two-phase region, and α-zirconium, were observed in the hydrogen desorption spectra of two zirconium hydride specimens with H/Zr ratios of 1.62 and 1.64, respectively, which were obtained using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). A continuous, one-dimensional, two-phase moving boundary model, coupled with the zero- and second-order kinetics of hydrogen desorption from δ-zirconium hydride and α-zirconium, respectively, has been developed to reproduce the TDS experimental results. A comparison of the modeling predictions with the experimental results indicates that a zero-order kinetic model is valid for description of hydrogen flux away from the δ-hydride phase, and that a second-order kinetic model works well for hydrogen desorption from α-Zr if the activation energy of desorption is optimized to be 70% of the value reported in the literature

  12. Carbon, chromium and molybdenum contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinatora, A; Goldenstein, H.; Mei, P.R.; Albertin, E.; Fuoco, R.; Mariotto, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    This work describes solidification experiments on white cast iron, with 15 and 20% of chromium, 2.3, 3.0 and 3.6 % of carbon and 0.0, 1.5 and 2.5 % of molybdenum in test de samples with 30 mm diameter. Measurements were performed on the austenite and eutectic formation arrests, the number of the eutectic carbide particles relative to the total and the eutectic volumes, and the volume fraction of the primary austenite

  13. Study of the performance of gels of molybdenum containing several cations for the preparation of 99Mo and 99mTc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Vanessa

    2005-01-01

    99m Tc is the most employed radioisotope in Nuclear Medicine, due to its nuclear characteristics: short half-life (6.04 h); emission of low energy gamma ray (140 keV); no emission of β - ; generated by the radioactive decay of 99 Mo (radioisotope generator system). 99 Mo can be produced in cyclotron or nuclear reactor by the irradiation of 235 U (n, f) 99 Mo or by the 98 Mo (n, γ) 90 Mo reaction. Four different kinds of generators of 99m Tc can be employed, based on the separation techniques: column chromatographic using alumina, with fission 99 Mo; solvent extraction using methylethylketone; sublimation of technetium heptoxide; gel type chromatographic generator, that contains molybdenum. IPEN, aiming the nationalization of the 99m Tc generators production, developed a gel type generator that uses zirconium molybdate. Three types of gels are studied in the work: molybdenum gel with titanium, molybdenum gel with cerium and molybdenum gel with hafnium, that were compared with the molybdenum gel with zirconium. The variables studied in the gel preparation are: mass relation between Mo and the cation, NaOH concentration, temperature and final pH of the product. After the preparation, the gels are analysed in relation to the amount of Mo and the cation, structure and gel particle size. The gel is irradiated and later a generator system is prepared, and the elutions are analysed in order to measure the 99m Tc elution efficiency. The results showed that the molybdenum gel with titanium had the best performance in all analysis. (author)

  14. Oxidation kinetics of some zirconium alloys in flowing carbon dioxide at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohli, R.

    1980-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of three zirconium alloys (Zr-2.2 wt% Hf, Zr-2.5 wt% Nb, and Zr-3 wt% Nb-1 wt% Sn) have been measured in flowing carbon dioxide in the temperature range from 873 to 1173 K to 120 ks (2000 min). At all oxidation temperatures, Zr-2.5 Nb and Zr-3 Nb-1 Sn showed a transition to rapid linear kinetics after initial parabolic oxidation. The Zr-2.2 Hf showed this transition at temperatures in the range from 973 to 1173 K; at 873 K, no transition was observed within the oxidation times reported. The Zr-2.2 Hf showed the smallest weight gains, followed in order by Zr-2.5 Nb and Zr-3 Nb-1 Sn. Increased oxidation rates and shorter times-to-rate-transition of Zr-2.2 Nb and Zr-1 Sn as compared with Zr-2.2 Hf can be attributed to the presence of niobium, tin, and hafnium in the alloys. This is considered in terms of the Nomura-Akutsu model, according to which hafnium should delay the rate transition, while niobium and tin lead to shorter times-to-rate-transition. The scale on Zr-2.2 Hf was identified as monoclinic zirconia, while the tetragonal phase, 6ZrO 2 .Nb 2 O 5 , was contained in the monoclinic zirconia scales on both other alloys

  15. Liquid phase sintering of carbides using a nickel-molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, J.M.; Warenchak, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Liquid phase vacuum sintering was used to densify four carbide groups. These were titanium carbide, tungsten carbide, vanadium carbide, and zirconium carbide. The liquid phase consisted of nickel with additions of molybdenum of from 6.25 to 50.0 weight percent at doubling increments. The liquid phase or binder comprised 10, 20, and 40 percent by weight of the pressed powders. The specimens were tested using 3 point bending. Tungsten carbide showed the greatest improvement in bend rupture strength, flexural modulus, fracture energy and hardness using 20 percent binder with lesser amounts of molybdenum (6.25 or 12.5 wt %) added to nickel compared to pure nickel. A refinement in the carbide microstructure and/or a reduction in porosity was seen for both the titanium and tungsten carbides when the alloy binder was used compared to using the nickel alone. Curves depicting the above properties are shown for increasing amounts of molybdenum in nickel for each carbide examined. Loss of binder phase due to evaporation was experienced during heating in vacuum at sintering temperatures. In an effort to reduce porosity, identical specimens were HIP processed at 15 ksi and temperatures averaging 110 C below the sintering g temperature. The tungsten carbide and titanium carbide series containing 80 and 90 weight percent carbide phase respectively showed improvement properties after HIP while properties decreased for most other compositions

  16. Effect of low-temperature thermomechanical treatment on mechanical properties of low-alloying molybdenum alloys with carbide hardening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernshtejn, L.M.; Zakharov, A.M.; Veller, M.V.

    1978-01-01

    Presented are results of testing low-temperature thermomechanical treatment of low-alloying molybdenum alloys, including quenching from 2100 deg C, 40% deformation by hydroextrusion and aging at the temperature of 1200-1400 deg C. Tensile tests at room temperature with the following processing of results have shown that low-temperature thermomechanical treatment of low-alloying molybdenum alloys of Mo-Zr-C and Mo-Zr-Nb-C systems leads to a significant increase in low-temperature mechanical properties (strength properties - by 30-35%, ductility - by 30-40%) as compared with conventional heat treatment (aging after quenching). The treatment proposed increases resistance to small, as well as large plastic deformations, and leads to a simultaneous rise of strength and plastic properties at all stages of tensile test. Alloying of the Mo-Zr-C system with niobium increases both strength and plastic characteristics as compared with alloys without niobium when testing samples, subjected to low temperature thermomechanical treatment and conventional heat treatment at room temperature

  17. Mining, ore preparation and niobium alloys production at Araxa, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraiso, O.S.; Fuccio Junior, R. de; Betz, E.W.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed description of the worlds major niobium producer is presented covering mining, concentration by froth flotation, leaching, and production of ferro-alloys. The present exploration of the Araxa deposit, its ore preparation and production of ferro-niobium is described. (E.G.) [pt

  18. Diffusion of oxygen in niobium during bake-out

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, Sergio; Ruzinov, V

    2001-01-01

    Bake-outs at temperatures between 100 C and 150 C for a duration up to two days have become customary for optimising the performance of bulk niobium cavities. This treatment results in the diffusion of oxygen, originating from the surface oxide, into the niobium. The theoretical oxygen profile has been simulated using the diffusion equations, and compared with some experimental results.

  19. Processing of Niobium-Lined M240 Machine Gun Barrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Fig. 5 Finished niobium-lined M240 machine gun barrel with flash suppressor attached ..........11 Fig. 6 End of barrel 1 showing small amount of...the finished barrel is shown in Fig. 5. 11 Fig. 5 Finished niobium-lined M240 machine gun barrel with flash suppressor attached Firing tests

  20. Anticorrosion ion implantation of fragments of zirconium fuel can specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, B.A.; Osipov, V.V.; Volkov, N.V.; Khernov, V.Yu.

    2001-01-01

    Aimed at the study of specific features of oxide film formation in the initial stage of Eh110 and Eh635 alloy fuel can oxidation the modification of tubular specimen surfaces is performed using an ion mixing technique, and the structure of oxide films produced in a steam-water environment is investigated. Using the method of vacuum vapor deposition the outer surface of specimens is coated with alloying element films irradiated by a polyenergetic Ar + ion beam with a 10 keV mean energy up to radiation doses of (7-10) x 10 17 ion/cm 2 . Monatomic (Al, Fe, Cu, Cr, Mo, Sn) or diatomic (Al-Fe, Al-Mo, Al-Sn, Fe-Cu, Fe-Mo, Fe-Sn, Cr-Mo, Cr-Sn) implantation into a zirconium cladding occurs under irradiation effect. The positive influence of combined intrusion of Al and other elements is revealed. The presence of Al atoms enhances the oxide film structure. The least ZeO 2 film thickness is observed when alloying with molybdenum, Al-Fe, Al-Mo and Al-Sn [ru

  1. Studies of niobium and development of niobium resonant RF cavities for accelerator driven system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, Jayanta

    2013-01-01

    The present approach for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is to roll and deep draw sheets of polycrystalline high-purity niobium. Jefferson Laboratory pioneered the use of large-grain/single-crystal Nb directly sliced from an ingot for the fabrication of single-crystal high-purity Nb SRF cavities. The large grain/single crystal niobium has several potential advantages over the polycrystalline niobium and has become a viable alternative to the standard fine grain (ASTM grain size>6 μm), high purity (RRR ≥ 250 ) niobium for the fabrication of high-performance SRF cavities for particle accelerators. The present study includes the prototype single cell low beta cavity design, fabrication, EB welding and low temperature RF test at 2K. In this study also the medium field Q-Slope has been analyzed with the help of an added non linear term in Heabel's analytical model and a linear increase of surface resistance Rs with the magnetic field

  2. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION WITH RESPECT TO ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, S.; Beederman, M.

    1961-05-01

    A process is given for separating uranium values from a nitric acid aqueous solution containing uranyl values, zirconium values and tetravalent plutonium values. The process comprises contacting said solution with a substantially water-immiscible liquid organic solvent containing alkyl phosphate, separating an organic extract phase containing the uranium, zirconium, and tetravalent plutonium values from an aqueous raffinate, contacting said organic extract phase with an aqueous solution 2M to 7M in nitric acid and also containing an oxalate ion-containing substance, and separating a uranium- containing organic raffinate from aqueous zirconium- and plutonium-containing extract phase.

  3. Chemistry of titanium, zirconium and thorium picramates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, R.S.; Agrawal, S.P.; Bhargava, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    Picramates of titanium, zirconium and thorium are prepared by treating the aqueous sulphate, chloride and nitrate solutions with sodium picramate. Micro-analysis, colorimetry and spectrophotometry are used to establish the compositions (metal : ligand ratio) of these picramates as 1 : 2 (for titanium and zirconium) and 1 : 4 (for thorium). IR studies indicate H 2 N → Me coordination (where Me denotes the metal). A number of explosive properties of these picramates point to the fact that the zirconium picramate is thermally more stable than the picramates of titanium and thorium. (orig.) [de

  4. Direct atomic absorption determination of silicon in metallic niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinova, Eh.S.; Guzeev, I.D.; Nedler, V.V.; Khokhrin, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Consideration is being given to realization of the basic advantage of non-flame atomizer-analysis of directly solid samples-for silicon determination in niobium for the content of the first one of less than 1x10 -3 mass %. Analysis technique is described. Diagrams of the dependences of atomic silicon absorption in graphite cells of usual type as well as lined by tungsten carbide and atomic silicon absorption on the value of niobium weighed amount are presented. It is shown that Si determination in metallic niobium according to aqueous reference solutions results in understatement of results 2.4 times. The optimal conditions for Si determination in niobium are the following: 2400 deg C temperature, absence of carbon and oxygen. Different niobium specimens with the known silicon content were used as reference samples

  5. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs

  6. Fast fluence measurement for JOYO irradiation field using niobium dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikara

    2004-03-01

    Neutron fluence and spectrum are key parameters in various irradiation tests and material surveillance tests so they need to be evaluated accurately. The reactor dosimetry test has been conducted by the multiple foil activation method, and a niobium dosimeter has been developed for measurement of fast neutron fluence in the experimental fast reactor JOYO. The inelastic scattering reaction of 93 Nb has a low threshold energy, about 30 keV, and the energy distribution of reaction cross section is similar to the displacement cross section for iron. Therefore, a niobium dosimeter is suitable for evaluation of the fast neutron fluence and the displacement per atom for iron. Moreover, a niobium dosimeter is suited to measure neutron fluence in long-term irradiation test because 93 Nb, which is produced by the reaction, has a long half-life (16.4 years). This study established a high precision measurement technique using the niobium reaction rate. The effect of self-absorption was decreased by the solution and evaporation to dryness of niobium dosimeter. The dosimeter weight was precisely measured using the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. This technique was applied to JOYO dosimetry. The fast neutron fluences (E > 0.1 MeV) found by measuring the reaction rate in the niobium dosimeter were compared with the values evaluated using the multiple foil activation method. The ratio of measured fast neutron fluences by means of niobium dosimeter and multiple foil activation method range from 0.97 to 1.03 and agree within the experimental uncertainty. The measurement errors of fast neutron fluence by niobium dosimeter range from 4.5% (fuel region) to 10.1% (in-vessel storage rack). As a result of this study, the high precision measurement of fast neutron fluence by niobium dosimeters was confirmed. The accuracy of fast reactor dosimetry will be improved by application of niobium dosimeters to the irradiation tests in the JOYO MK-III core. (author)

  7. Electron heating by photon-assisted tunneling in niobium terahertz mixers with integrated niobium titanium nitride striplines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leone, B; Gao, [No Value; Klapwijk, TM; Jackson, BD; Laauwen, WM; de Lange, G

    2001-01-01

    We describe the gap voltage depression and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics in pumped niobium superconductor-insulator-superconductor junction with niobium titanium nitride tuning stripline by introducing an electron heating power contribution resulting from the photon-assisted tunneling

  8. Evaluation of 99Mo/99mTc generator experiment using PZC material and irradiated natural molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khongpetch, P.; Chingjit, S.; Dangprasert, M.; Rangsawai, W.; Virawat, N.

    2006-01-01

    Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc) is the most widely used radioisotope in nuclear medicine, accounting for more than 80% of all diagnostic nuclear medicine procedure. 99m Tc is almost exclusively produced from the decay of its parent molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo). The present sources of 99 Mo are research reactors by using the (n, γ) nuclear reaction with natural molybdenum, resulting in inexpensive but low specific activity 99 Mo, or by neutron-induced fission of uranium-235, which result in expensive but high specific activity 99 Mo. The technology requirement for processing of 99 Mo from the (n, γ) 'activation method' is rather simple, and is within the reach of most developing countries operating research reactors. In the fission method' the technological and infrastructure requirements are some complex, and possibly can be sustained only by countries with advanced nuclear technology. To overcome these difficulties, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and KAKEN company have developed alternative technology for 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generator by using a molybdenum absorbent called Poly Zirconium compound (PZC) and irradiated natural molybdenum. The paper describes experiments for evaluation the performance of PZC as a column packing material for 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generator from (n, γ) 99 Mo. (author)

  9. Evaluated nuclear-data file for niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.; Smith, D.L.; Howerton, R.J.

    1985-03-01

    A comprehensive evaluated nuclear-data file for elemental niobium is provided in the ENDF/B format. This file, extending over the energy range 10 -11 -20 MeV, is suitable for comprehensive neutronic calculations, particulary those dealing with fusion-energy systems. It also provides dosimetry information. Attention is given to the internal consistancy of the file, energy balance, and the quantitative specification of uncertainties. Comparisons are made with experimental data and previous evaluated files. The results of integral tests are described and remaining outstanding problem areas are cited. 107 refs

  10. Critical unpairing currents in narrow niobium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershenzon, M.E.; Gubankov, V.N.

    1979-01-01

    Investigated are the dependences of critical currents of narrow ( with the width of W=0.5-15 μm) superconducting niobium films on temperature and a magnetic field. The proposed method of film production with the width of the 1μm order and with small edge inhomogeneities ((<=500 A) permitted to realize the Ginsburg-Landau unpairing currents in the wide range of temperatures. The correct comparison with the theory showed that the unpairing currents are observed if W(< or approximately) 2delta, where delta is the effective depth of the penetration of the perpendicular magnetic field

  11. Germanium-overcoated niobium Dayem bridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holdeman, L.B.; Peters, P.N.

    1976-01-01

    Overcoating constriction microbridges with semiconducting germanium provides additional thermal conductivity at liquid-helium temperatures to reduce the effects of self-heating in these Josephson junctions. Microwave-induced steps were observed in the I-V characteristics of an overcoated Dayem bridge fabricated in a 15-nm-thick niobium film; at 4.2 K (T/sub c/-T=2.6 K), at least 20 steps could be counted. No steps were observed in the I-V characteristics of the bridge prior to overcoating. In addition, the germanium overcoat can protect against electrical disturbances at room temperature

  12. Hydrogen in niobium-titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.R.G. da; Cabral, F.A.O.; Florencio, O.

    1985-01-01

    High purity Nb-Ti polycrystalline alloys were doped with hydrogen in equilibrium with the gaseous atmosphere at a pressure of 80 torr. at different temperatures. The partial molar enthalpy and entropy of the hydrogen solution at high dilution, ΔH sup(-) 0 and ΔS sup(-) 0 , were calculated from the equilibrium solubility data. The ΔH sup(-) 0 values are compared with the electron screened proton model of metal-hydrogen solutions. The addition of titanium to niobium has the effect to increase the hydrogen solubility at a given equilibrium temperature. (Author) [pt

  13. Molybdenum: the element and aqueous solution chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter on the chemistry of the coordination compounds of molybdenum concentrates on the element itself, its recovery from ores and its use in the manufacture of steels. Most of the chapter is devoted to the aqueous solution chemistry of molybdenum in oxidation states II, III and IV. (UK)

  14. Investigation of pressing of molybdenum powder compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mymrin, S.A.; Kuznetsov, V.Eh.; Yampol'skij, M.L.; Leonov, S.A.; Mikhridinov, R.M.; Korzukhin, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation into pressing of compacts of MCh type molybdenum powders using the industrial equipment are presented. To measure the density of powder molybdenum billets a radioisotopic density meter with cesium-137 is used as radioactive gamma radiation source. The dependence of the produced billet density on the specific compacting pressure at different values of the powder bulk density is ascertained

  15. Extraction of molybdenum VI by alpha benzoinoxime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achache, M.; Meklati, M.

    1990-06-01

    The concentration of molybdenum, was studied using alpha benzoinoxime dissolved in chloroform. Several acids and salt at different levels of concentration were investigated as well as other parameters such as (mixing time, extractant to metal ratio, temperature etc.) The molybdenum stippling was also studied in alkaline medium with the subsequent recovery of the extractant and solvent

  16. Molybdenum sealing glass-ceramic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagan, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    A glass-ceramic composition is described having low hydrogen and helium permeability properties, along with high fracture strength, and a thermal coefficient of expansion similar to that of molybdenum. The composition is adaptable for hermetically sealing to molybdenum at temperatures between 900 and about 950 0 C to form a hermetically sealed insulator body

  17. Oxidized zirconium on ceramic; Catastrophic coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, V E; Saglam, N; Dikmen, G; Tozun, I R

    2017-02-01

    Oxidized zirconium (Oxinium™; Smith & Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA) articulated with polyethylene in total hip arthroplasty (THA) appeared to have the potential to reduce wear dramatically. The thermally oxidized metal zirconium surface is transformed into ceramic-like hard surface that is resistant to abrasion. The exposure of soft zirconium metal under hard coverage surface after the damage of oxidized zirconium femoral head has been described. It occurred following joint dislocation or in situ succeeding disengagement of polyethylene liner. We reported three cases of misuse of Oxinium™ (Smith & Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA) heads. These three cases resulted in catastrophic in situ wear and inevitable failure although there was no advice, indication or recommendation for this use from the manufacturer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Production of nuclear grade zirconium: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, L., E-mail: L.Xu-2@tudelft.nl [School of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft 2628 CD (Netherlands); Xiao, Y. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan 243002 (China); Zr-Hf-Ti Metallurgie B.V., Den Haag 2582 SB (Netherlands); Sandwijk, A. van [Zr-Hf-Ti Metallurgie B.V., Den Haag 2582 SB (Netherlands); Xu, Q. [School of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Yang, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft 2628 CD (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    Zirconium is an ideal material for nuclear reactors due to its low absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons, whereas the typically contained hafnium with strong neutron-absorption is very harmful for zirconium as a fuel cladding material. This paper provides an overview of the processes for nuclear grade zirconium production with emphasis on the methods of Zr–Hf separation. The separation processes are roughly classified into hydro- and pyrometallurgical routes. The known pyrometallurgical Zr–Hf separation methods are discussed based on the following reaction features: redox characteristics, volatility, electrochemical properties and molten salt–metal equilibrium. In the present paper, the available Zr–Hf separation technologies are compared. The advantages and disadvantages as well as future directions of research and development for nuclear grade zirconium production are discussed.

  19. Study for the chlorination of zirconium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, E.S.M.; Takiishi, H.; Paschoal, J.O.A.; Andreoli, M.

    1990-12-01

    In the development of new ceramic and metallic materials the chlorination process constitutes step in the formation of several intermediate compounds, such as metallic chlorides, used for the production of high, purity raw materials. Chlorination studies with the aim of fabrication special zirconium-base alloys have been carried out at IPEN. Within this program the chlorination technique has been used for zirconium tetrachloride production from zirconium oxide. In this paper some relevant parameters such as: time and temperature of reaction, flow rate of chloride gas and percentage of the reducing agent which influence the efficiency of chlorination of zirconium oxide are evaluated. Thermodynamical aspects about the reactions involved in the process are also presented. (author)

  20. Towards an understanding of zirconium alloy corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.

    1976-08-01

    A brief historical summary is given of the development of a programme for understanding the corrosion mechanisms operating for zirconium alloys. A general summary is given of the progress made, so far, in carrying through this programme. (author)

  1. Titanium(IV), zirconium, hafnium and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Paul L.; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Titanium can exist in solution in a number of oxidation states. The titanium(IV) exists in acidic solutions as the oxo-cation, TiO 2+ , rather than Ti 4+ . Zirconium is used in the ceramics industry and in nuclear industry as a cladding material in reactors where its reactivity towards hydrolysis reactions and precipitation of oxides may result in degradation of the cladding. In nature, hafnium is found together with zirconium and as a consequence of the contraction in ionic radii that occurs due to the 4f -electron shell, the ionic radius of hafnium is almost identical to that of zirconium. All isotopes of thorium are radioactive and, as a consequence of it being fertile, thorium is important in the nuclear fuel cycle. The polymeric hydrolysis species that have been reported for thorium are somewhat different to those identified for zirconium and hafnium, although thorium does form the Th 4 (OH) 8 8+ species.

  2. Zirconium determination in refractories (gravimetric method)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capiotto, N.; Narahashi, Y.; Perish, C.G.; Souza, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    The zirconium determination in refractories is described, consisting in two separation methods for eliminating the interferences. The formatted product is calcined at 1100 0 C and determined gravimetrically as Zr P z 07. (author)

  3. Joint titrimetric determination of zirconium and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Cristina; Botbol, Moises; Bianco de Salas, G.N.; Cornell de Casas, M.I.

    1980-01-01

    A method for the joint titrimetric determination of zirconium and hafnium, which are elements of similar chemical behaviour, is described. The disodic salt of the ethylendiaminetetracetic acid (EDTA) is used for titration, while xilenol orange serves as final point indicator. Prior to titration it is important to evaporate with sulfuric acid, the solution resulting from the zirconium depolymerization process, to adjust the acidity and to eliminate any interferences. The method, that allows the quick and precise determination of zirconium and hafnium in quantities comprised between 0.01 and mg, was applied to the analysis of raw materials and of intermediate and final products in the fabrication of zirconium sponge and zircaloy. (M.E.L.) [es

  4. Zirconium determination in refractories (gravimetric method)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capiotto, N.; Narahashi, Y.; Perish, P.G.; Souza, J.R. de

    1991-01-01

    A gravimetric method for zirconium determination in refractories is described. X-ray fluorescence analysis is also employed in this experiment and considerations about interfering elements are presented. (M.V.M.)

  5. Materials for Molybdenum 99 purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, M. Victoria; Mondino, Angel V.; Manzini, Alberto C.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) produces fission Mo 99, an isotope of wide use in nuclear medicine. In order to simplify the current Mo 99 production process, to shorten its duration and reduce impurities in the final product, alternative methods for purification steps were looked for. In this work a variety of new materials for the purification columns were designed, all of them with carbon. These materials were studied and a material which contribute with the best results for molybdenum retention, was selected. The preparation procedure and the working conditions were determined. (author)

  6. Molybdenum Oxides - From Fundamentals to Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Isabela Alves; Datta, Robi Shankar; Ou, Jian Zhen; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Sriram, Sharath; Daeneke, Torben; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2017-10-01

    The properties and applications of molybdenum oxides are reviewed in depth. Molybdenum is found in various oxide stoichiometries, which have been employed for different high-value research and commercial applications. The great chemical and physical characteristics of molybdenum oxides make them versatile and highly tunable for incorporation in optical, electronic, catalytic, bio, and energy systems. Variations in the oxidation states allow manipulation of the crystal structure, morphology, oxygen vacancies, and dopants, to control and engineer electronic states. Despite this overwhelming functionality and potential, a definitive resource on molybdenum oxide is still unavailable. The aim here is to provide such a resource, while presenting an insightful outlook into future prospective applications for molybdenum oxides. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Synthesis of Zirconium Lower Chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaviria, Juan P.

    2002-01-01

    This research is accurately related to the Halox concept of research reactor spent fuel element treatment.The aim of this project is to work the conditioning through selected chlorination of the element that make the spent fuel element. This research studied the physical chemistry conditions which produce formation of the lower zirconium chlorides through the reaction between metallic Zr and gaseous ZrCl 4 in a silica reactor.This work focused special attention in the analysis and confrontation of the published results among the different authors in order to reveal coincidences and contradictions.Experimental section consisted in a set of synthesis with different reaction conditions and reactor design. After reaction were analyzed the products on Zr shavings and the deposit growth on wall reactor.The products were strongly dependent of reactor design. It was observed that as the distance between Zr and wall reactor increased greater was tendency to lower chlorides formation.In reactors with small distance the reaction follows other way without formation of lower chlorides.Analysis on deposit growth on reactor showed that may be formed to a mixture of Si x Zr y intermetallics and zirconium oxides.Presence of oxygen in Zr and Zr-Si compounds on wall reactor reveals that there is an interaction between quartz and reactants.This interaction is in gaseous phase because contamination is observed in experiences where Zr was not in contact with reactor.Finally, it was made a global analysis of all experiences and a possible mechanism that interprets reaction ways is proposed

  8. DISSOLUTION OF ZIRCONIUM AND ALLOYS THEREFOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, J.L.

    1961-07-11

    The dissolution of zirconium cladding in a water solution of ammonium fluoride and ammonium nitrate is described. The method finds particular utility in processing spent fuel elements for nuclear reactors. The zirconium cladding is first dissolved in a water solution of ammonium fluoride and ammonium nitrate; insoluble uranium and plutonium fiuorides formed by attack of the solvent on the fuel materiai of the fuel element are then separated from the solution, and the fuel materiai is dissolved in another solution.

  9. METHOD OF IMPROVING CORROSION RESISTANCE OF ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, D.W.

    1961-03-28

    An improved intermediate rinse for zirconium counteracts an anomalous deposit that often results in crevices and outof-the-way places when ordinary water is used to rinse away a strong fluoride etching solution designed to promote passivation of the metal. The intermediate rinse, which is used after the etching solution and before the water, is characterized by a complexing agent for fluoride ions such as aluminum or zirconium nitrates or chlorides.

  10. Low carbon manganese-nickel-niobium steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisterkamp, F.; Hulka, K.

    1983-11-01

    Experimental heats of a low carbon-manganese-0.5% nickel-0.15% niobium steel have been rolled to plates between 13.5 and 50 mm thickness and to a 16 mm hot strip. Various combinations of soaking temperatures form 1100 0 C to 1300 0 C and of finish rolling temperatures between 710 0 C and 930 0 C have been investigated. From mechanical properties obtained, one can conclude that the investigated steel composition provides very good properties e.g. for pipe steels X65 to X75. In particular, the toughness at low temperature is outstanding despite relaxed rolling conditions. Metalographic and special investigations such as electron microscopy, texture evaluation and chemical extraction, correlated with applied rolling schedules and the mechanical properties obtained resulted in a comprehensive understanding about the benefits of high niobium metallurgy combined with nickel addition. All practically applied welding processes generated mechanical properties, in particular toughness of the weldment, that meet arctic specifications.(Author) [pt

  11. Vapor deposition of molybdenum oxide using bis(ethylbenzene) molybdenum and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, Tasha L.; Stair, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Three molybdenum precursors—bis(acetylacetonate) dioxomolybdenum, molybdenum isopropoxide, and bis(ethylbenzene) molybdenum—were tested for molybdenum oxide vapor deposition. Quartz crystal microbalance studies were performed to monitor growth. Molybdenum isopropoxide and bis(ethylbenzene) molybdenum achieved linear growth rates 0.01 and 0.08 Å/cycle, respectively, using atomic layer deposition techniques. Negligible MoO_x growth was observed on alumina powder using molybdenum isopropoxide, as determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. Bis(ethylbenzene) molybdenum achieved loadings of 0.5, 1.1, and 1.9 Mo/nm"2 on alumina powder after one, two, and five cycles, respectively, using atomic layer deposition techniques. The growth window for bis(ethylbenzene) molybdenum is 135–150 °C. An alternative pulsing strategy was also developed for bis(ethylbenzene) molybdenum that results in higher growth rates in less time compared to atomic layer deposition techniques. The outlined process serves as a methodology for depositing molybdenum oxide for catalytic applications. All as-deposited materials undergo further calcination prior to characterization and testing.

  12. Studying titanium-molybdenum-zirconium alloys of increased corrosion resistance in acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomashov, N.D.; Kazarin, V.I.; Mikheev, V.S.; Goncharenko, B.A.; Sigalovskaya, T.M.; Kalyanova, M.P.

    1977-01-01

    New promising Ti-Mo-Nb-Zr system alloys, possessing good workability and a high corrosion resistance in non-oxidizing solutions of acids, have been developed. The alloys may be recommended as structural materials for equipment operating in severely agressive acid media, such as hydrochloric, sulphuric and phosphoric acids. The corrosion resistance of alloys of the above system in solutions of H 2 SO 4 , HCl and H 3 PO 4 acids may be maximized by increasing the overall alloying to 42% (keeping the ratio of the alloying components Mo/Nb/Zr=4/1/1 unchanged), while retaining sufficiently good plasticity and workability

  13. Sub-Coulomb proton absorption for isotopes of zirconium and molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, D.S.; Hershberger, R.L.; Gabbard, F.

    1979-01-01

    Total (p,n) cross sections were measured with enriched targets of /sup 92,94/Zr and /sup 94,95,96,98/Mo, from each threshold energy to approx.6.7 MeV. Proton strength functions were deduced and compared with those of neighboring nuclei. The strength functions were characterized by a minimum which was interpreted as a valley between the 3s and 3p single-particle resonances. Optical-model calculations were performed to fit the deduced strength functions. Systematic variations in the depths of the absorptive potentials were found as a function of mass in the manner suggested by Johnson et al

  14. The analysis of simple configurations in the capture state of zirconium and molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, V.G.; Voronov, V.V.

    1975-01-01

    In sup(91,93,95,97)Zr and in sup(93,95,97,99)Mo the energies of one-quasiparticle and three-quasiparticle states with Isup(π)=1/2 + , 1/2 - and 3/2 - near the neutron binding energy Bn are calculated. The investigations of the E1 and M1 transitions from these states to one-quasiparticle components of the low-lying states are performed. The analysis of neutron and partial radiation widths is given. It is shown that the valence neutron model should work well in sup(91,93,95,97)Zr, in 99 Mo and somewhat worse - in sup(95,97)Mo. The values of one-quasiparticle components 3psub(1/2) and 3psub(3/2) in the wave function of P-wave resonance are estimated from the neutron and radiation widths, these are equal to anti b 2 approximately 10 -3 - 10 -4 . Large partial widths for the M1-transitions from the s-wave resonances in 93 Zr, sup(93,99)Mo give evidence of a rather large contribution to their wave functions, corresponding to the three-quasiparticle configurations

  15. Aspects of chlorination and its potential to produce niobium pentoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocchi, E.A.; Jeffes, J.H.E.

    1984-01-01

    Reduction chlorination of niobium pentoxide were carried out under different experimental conditions in order to study the effects of some variables of the process. In order to evaluate the efficiency of the recovery of niobium pentoxide which could be obtained as condensed material a group of experiments were also carried out with pyrochlore concentrate. The results showed that a balance of factors such as temperature, percentage of carbon in the initial charge and porosity cause the progress of the reaction to be controlled by different mechanisms and indicate that chlorination can be used to produce niobium pentoxide-especially if applied on rich starting material. (Author) [pt

  16. Effect of plastic deformation on the niobium thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitskij, E.M.; Bychkova, M.I.; Kanikovskij, V.B.

    1978-01-01

    Using dilatometric method the effect of plastic deformation on change of thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of niobium of different purity was studied. It was shown that deformation affected the TEC in different ways. At first the deformation degree rising causes linear decrease of the TEC and then linear increase. Carbon intensifies the TEC decrease of deformed niobium. The linear correlation was established between the TEC and the value of macroscopic stresses in plastic deformed niobium. The expression indicating the metal TEC change under loading was defined for case of strain hardening

  17. Thermodynamic Calculation of Carbide Precipitate in Niobium Microalloyed Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yun-bo; YU Yong-mei; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of regular solution sublattice model, thermodynamic equilibrium of austenite/carbide in Fe-Nb-C ternary system was investigated. The equilibrium volume fraction, chemical driving force of carbide precipitates and molar fraction of niobium and carbon in solution at different temperatures were evaluated respectively. The volume fraction of precipitates increases, molar fraction of niobium dissolved in austenite decreases and molar fraction of carbon increases with decreasing the niobium content. The driving force increases with the decrease of temperature, and then comes to be stable at relatively low temperatures. The predicted ratio of carbon in precipitates is in good agreement with the measured one.

  18. Critical fields of niobium nitride films of various granularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonova, E.A.; Sukhov, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    The behaviour of lattice parameter, specific electrical resistivity, critical temperature, and temperature dependence of upper critical field near Tsub(cr) of sputtered niobium nitride films is investigated versus the substrate temperature and gas mixture composition in the process of reactive cathode sputtering. The relation between extrapolated value of the upper critical field and granularity of niobium nitride films, close as to composition to the stoichiometric one, has been found. Values of the kappa parameter of the Ginsburg-Landau theory and of the coherence length for niobium nitride films of various granularity are estimated in an approximation of uniform distribution of impurities in a sample

  19. Crystallography and Morphology of Niobium Carbide in As-Cast HP-Niobium Reformer Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Karl G.; Kral, Milo V.

    2012-06-01

    The microstructures of two as-cast heats of niobium-modified HP stainless steels were characterized. Particular attention was paid to the interdendritic niobium-rich carbides formed during solidification of these alloys. At low magnifications, these precipitates are grouped in colonies of similar lamellae. Higher magnifications revealed that the lamellae actually obtain two distinct morphologies. The type I morphology exhibits broad planar interfaces with a smooth platelike shape. Type II lamellae have undulating interfaces and an overall reticulated shape. To provide further insight into the origin of these two different morphologies, the microstructure and crystallography of each have been studied in detail using high resolution scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, various electron diffraction methods (electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), selected area diffraction (SAD), and convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED)), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  20. Microstructural evaluation of alumina-niobium and alumina- niobium-zircon ceramics for ballistic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, Juliana Machado da; Lopes, Cristina Moniz Araujo; Melo, Francisco Lourenco Cristovao de

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the microstructural of Alumina- Niobium and Alumina- Niobium-Zircon ceramics. Samples with 3.5 x 4.5 x 34 mm dimensions were prepared by uniaxial pressure (50 MPa) followed by isostatic pressure (300 MPa). The samples were sintered at 1500 ° C for 1 hour. The ceramics obtained were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction, to evaluate the phases and microstructures. In order to analyze the microstructure, by SEM the samples were prepared using two techniques: heat treatment (1350 ° C for 5 minutes) and thermochemical treatment (500 ° C for 8 minutes in a solution of NaOH and KOH) on polished and fractured surfaces. The results showed that despite differences between the two etchings, both were effective to analyze the microstructure. (author)

  1. molybdenum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A [13]). However, the larger size leads to an enhanced Si-C bond length (1.868 A [13]) relative to that of the C-C bond (1.527 Á [13]). This leads to a net cancellation of effects. Consequently the data suggest that the SiMe, and 'Bu appear of similar size when viewed from the centroid of the substituted cyclopentadienyl ligand ...

  2. A SRF niobium cylindrical cavity with a large silicon nitride niobium-coated membrane as one end-wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis; Castelli, Alessandro; Pate, Jacob; Thompson, Johnathon; Delmas, William; Sharping, Jay; Chiao, Raymond; Chiao Team; Sharping Team

    The development of large silicon nitride membranes and niobium film deposition techniques motivate new architectures in opto-mechanics and microwave devices that can exploit the extremely high Q's obtainable with superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities. We present a X-band SRF cylindrical cavity-membrane system in which one end-wall of the cavity is replaced by a niobium coated centimeter-sized silicon nitride membrane. We report moderately high Q factors above 10 million. Experimental results characterizing the system and potential future applications for such schemes in microwave devices and optomechanics are discussed.

  3. Artefacts in multimodal imaging of titanium, zirconium and binary titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Ralf; Schöllchen, Maximilian; Gauer, Tobias; Aarabi, Ghazal; Assaf, Alexandre T; Rendenbach, Carsten; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Semmusch, Jan; Sedlacik, Jan; Heiland, Max; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-02-01

    To analyze and evaluate imaging artefacts induced by zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants. Zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants were embedded in gelatin and MRI, CT and CBCT were performed. Standard protocols were used for each modality. For MRI, line-distance profiles were plotted to quantify the accuracy of size determination. For CT and CBCT, six shells surrounding the implant were defined every 0.5 cm from the implant surface and histogram parameters were determined for each shell. While titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy induced extensive signal voids in MRI owing to strong susceptibility, zirconium implants were clearly definable with only minor distortion artefacts. For titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy, the MR signal was attenuated up to 14.1 mm from the implant. In CT, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy resulted in less streak artefacts in comparison with zirconium. In CBCT, titanium-zirconium alloy induced more severe artefacts than zirconium and titanium. MRI allows for an excellent image contrast and limited artefacts in patients with zirconium implants. CT and CBCT examinations are less affected by artefacts from titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants compared with MRI. The knowledge about differences of artefacts through different implant materials and image modalities might help support clinical decisions for the choice of implant material or imaging device in the clinical setting.

  4. Artefacts in multimodal imaging of titanium, zirconium and binary titanium–zirconium alloy dental implants: an in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöllchen, Maximilian; Aarabi, Ghazal; Assaf, Alexandre T; Rendenbach, Carsten; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Semmusch, Jan; Sedlacik, Jan; Heiland, Max; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze and evaluate imaging artefacts induced by zirconium, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy dental implants. Methods: Zirconium, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy implants were embedded in gelatin and MRI, CT and CBCT were performed. Standard protocols were used for each modality. For MRI, line–distance profiles were plotted to quantify the accuracy of size determination. For CT and CBCT, six shells surrounding the implant were defined every 0.5 cm from the implant surface and histogram parameters were determined for each shell. Results: While titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy induced extensive signal voids in MRI owing to strong susceptibility, zirconium implants were clearly definable with only minor distortion artefacts. For titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy, the MR signal was attenuated up to 14.1 mm from the implant. In CT, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy resulted in less streak artefacts in comparison with zirconium. In CBCT, titanium–zirconium alloy induced more severe artefacts than zirconium and titanium. Conclusions: MRI allows for an excellent image contrast and limited artefacts in patients with zirconium implants. CT and CBCT examinations are less affected by artefacts from titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy implants compared with MRI. The knowledge about differences of artefacts through different implant materials and image modalities might help support clinical decisions for the choice of implant material or imaging device in the clinical setting. PMID:27910719

  5. {sup 99m}Tc generator preparation using (n, {gamma}){sup 99}Mo produced ex-natural molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, So Van [Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam)

    2003-03-01

    Theoretical assessment on the chromatographic {sup 99m}Tc generator preparation using (n, {gamma}) {sup 99}Mo produced ex-natural molybdenum was carried out. The relationship between the neutron flux for MoO{sub 3} target activation, Mo-content or Mo adsorption capacity of column packing material, {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate concentration and/or {sup 99m}Tc radioactivity of eluate was established. The reasonably lower limit of neutron flux of reactor and Molybdenum content of column packing material were found out to estimate the production of portable chromatographic generators available for nuclear medicine application. The concentration of {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate eluate of low {sup 99m}Tc concentration using the column elution technique was also evaluate theoretically and conducted successfully in practice. Three options of {sup 99m}Tc generator using Titanium-Molybdate, Zirconium-Molybdate and Zirconium Oxide as generator column-packing materials were prepared and successfully put into use in nuclear medicine application. (author)

  6. Electrochemical-metallothermic reduction of zirconium in molten salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Talko, F.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a method for separating hafnium from zirconium of the type wherein a feed containing zirconium and hafnium chlorides is prepared from zirconium-hafnium chloride and the feed is introduced into a distillation column, which distillation column has a reboiler connected at the bottom and a reflux condenser connected at the top and wherein a hafnium chloride enriched stream is taken from the top of the column and a zirconium enriched chloride stream is taken from the bottom of the column. It comprises: reducing the zirconium enriched chloride stream taken from the distillation column to metal by electrochemically reducing an alkaline earth metal in a molten salt bath with the molten salt in the molten salt bath consisting essentially of a mixture of at least one alkali metal chloride and at least one alkaline earth metal chloride and zirconium chloride, with the reduced alkaline earth metal reacting with the zirconium chloride to produce zirconium metal and alkaline earth metal chloride

  7. A review of the inorganic and organometallic chemistry of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalvins, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a literature review of the inorganic and organometallic chemistry of zirconium are presented. Compounds with physical and chemical properties compatible with the requirements of an ir laser zirconium isotope separation process have been identified

  8. Study of N-cinnamoylphenylhydroxylaminate solubility in water and organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipenko, A.T.; Shpak, Eh.A.; Samchuk, A.I.

    1975-01-01

    The composition of complexes of N-cinnamoylphenylhydroxylamine with copper, cadmium, lead, indium, iron, gallium, titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten, molybdenum and vanadium was determined. The solubility products of the N-cinnamoylphenylhydroxylaminates of copper, cadmium, indium, gallium and iron were determined by the method of measuring the solubility of precipitates in acid. The solubility of N-cinnamoylphenylhydroxalaminates of cadmium, indium, iron, titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, vanadium, molybdenum and tungsten in organic solvents was studied. Two-phase constants for the stability of the complexes were calculated. (author)

  9. Plane strain forging of a niobium micro-alloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balancin, O.; Ferran L, G.; Rio de Janeiro Univ.

    1984-01-01

    Various termomechanical treatments were carried out on a niobium micro-alloyed steel and a low carbon steel as reference material, using an apparatus for hot phane strain forging. Control of processing variables and the presence of niobium strongly modify the austenite microstructure, which upon decomposition produces various phases such as polygonal and acicular ferrite and martensite, alone or together in variable proportions. Corresponding to this diversity of structures there is a wide variation in mechanical properties at room temperature: the initial yield point varies from 310 to 650 MPa and the reduction of area in uniaxial tension from 82 to 57% for the niobium steel. These results show that hot forging a niobium micro-alloyed steel may be a suitable manufacturing process for satisfying a wide range of specifications in a final product with low equivalent carbon. (Author) [pt

  10. An investigation of tantalum and niobium contents by nuclear technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patmasiriwat, N.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this experimental study was to find suitable nuclear techniques to determine the quantities of niobium and tantalum in columbite. The study has been performed by using radioisotope X-ray fluorescent technique (X RF) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). The results showed a good agreement between these two techniques. Nevertheless, with NAA, if there is uranium in the sample, the spectrum of niobium will be interfered. So practically, on the basis of accuracy and speed of determination, X-ray fluorescence is more suitable than NAA to determine the quantity of niobium while tantalum is preferable to use NAA. The detection limit of niobium and tantalum using the above techniques are 0.661% and 0.1 mg respectively

  11. Functionalization of niobium electrodes for the construction of impedimetric biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helali, S.; Abdelghani, A.; Hafaiedh, I.; Martelet, C.; Prodromidis, M.I.; Albanis, T.; Jaffrezic-Renault, N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an impedimetric immunosensor, based on niobium/niobium oxide (Nb/NbOxHy) electrodes, for the detection of atrazine. Niobium oxide was anodically formed onto niobium electrodes at 25 V in 1 M H 2 SO 4 . Hydrous oxide layers were then silanized with APTES, and using glutaraldehyde as a cross linker, Fab fragment k47 antibody was covalently immobilized onto the surface of the electrodes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to characterize the building-up of the immunosensors as well as the binding of atrazine to its specific antibody. In presence of ferricyanide redox species and under a cathodic polarization voltage (- 1.2 V versus SCE), the relationship between the concentration of atrazine and the change of the electron transfer resistance value was studied

  12. Reactivity of niobium cluster anions with nitrogen and carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwakapumba, Joseph; Ervin, Kent M.

    1997-02-01

    Reactions of small niobium cluster anions, Nbn-(n = 2-7), with CO and N2 are investigated using a flow tube reactor (flowing afterglow) apparatus. Carbon monoxide chemisorption on niobium cluster anions occurs with faster reaction rates than nitrogen chemisorption on corresponding cluster sizes. N2 addition to niobium cluster anions is much more size-selective than is CO addition. These general trends follow those reported in the literature for reactions of neutral and cationic niobium clusters with CO and N2. Extensive fragmentation of the clusters is observed upon chemisorption. A small fraction of the larger clusters survive and sequentially add multiple CO or N2 units without fragmentation. However, chemisorption saturation is not reached at the experimentally accessible pressure and reagent concentration ranges. The thermochemistry of the adsorption processes and the nature of the adsorbed species, molecular or dissociated, are discussed.

  13. Diffusion of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matusiewicz, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    The diffusion of hydrogen in niobium was investigated over the temperature range 148 to 500 degrees Kelvin, using measurements of the elastic after effect caused by long range diffusion (the Gorsky Effect). Relaxation curves for pure annealed niobium were generally not of the single exponential form expected from the Gorsky Effect theory, but were described well by a sum of two exponential curves with different amplitudes and relaxation times. The effects of oxygen and nitrogen interstitials on the diffusion were studied and were not in agreement with conventional trapping models. Deuterium and tritium diffusion in niobium were also studied, and a non-classical isotope effect was observed. Hydrogen diffusion coefficients in several Nb-Ta alloys were measured, and the diffusivity in all these alloys exhibited a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence. Experimental results were compared to several models for diffusion and trapping. A model is presented which can account for the form of the relaxation curves observed in pure, annealed niobium

  14. Alternative dissolution methods for analysis of niobium containing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    2The South African Nuclear Energy Corporation Ltd. (Necsa), P.O. Box 582, Pretoria 0001, South Africa. ... Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry was applied for ..... Validation of the methods for niobium determination was.

  15. Fabrication of ultrashort niobium variable-thickness bridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, T.

    1982-01-01

    A simple technique for the fabrication of niobium variable-thickness bridges of length approx.0.1 μm is described. The bridges are found to operate as ideal Josephson junctions over a wide temperature range

  16. Progress in the development of niobium alloyed high speed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, J.R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of economy-grades of niobium alloyed high speed steel is described. Both the metallurgical concepts behind the steel design and the results of performance tests are presented. (Author) [pt

  17. TERNARY ALLOYS OF URANIUM, COLUMBIUM, AND ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, F.G.

    1960-08-01

    Ternary alloys of uranium are described which are useful as neutron- reflecting materials in a fast neutron reactor. They are especially resistant to corrosion caused by oxidative processes of gascous or aqueous origin and comprise uranium as the predominant metal with zirconiunn and niobium wherein the total content of the minor alloying elements is between 2 and 8% by weight.

  18. Minimization of zirconium chlorinator residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, G.K.; Harbuck, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    Zirconium chlorinator residues contain an array of rare earths, scandium, unreacted coke, and radioactive thorium and radium. Because of the radioactivity, the residues must be disposed in special waste containment facilities. As these sites become more congested, and with stricter environmental regulations, disposal of large volumes of wastes may become more difficult. To reduce the mass of disposed material, the US Bureau of Mines (USBM) developed technology to recover rare earths, thorium and radium, and unreacted coke from these residues. This technology employs an HCl leach to solubilize over 99% of the scandium and thorium, and over 90% of the rare earths. The leach liquor is processed through several solvent extraction stages to selectively recover scandium, thorium, and rare earths. The leach residue is further leached with an organic acid to solubilize radium, thus allowing unreacted coke to be recycled to the chlorinator. The thorium and radium waste products, which comprise only 2.1% of the original residue mass, can then be sent to the radioactive waste facility

  19. Neutron data evaluation for natural niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Gonggui; Zou Yiming; Wang Shiming

    1992-01-01

    The complete neutron nuclear data for natural niobium were evaluated based on both experimental data measured up to 1989 and calculated data with program MUP2 and AUJP. The present work was done for CENDL-2 and supersedes the CENDL-1 (MAT = 1411) evaluation. The following neutron data are given for Nb in the energy range 10 -5 eV to 20 MeV (MAT = 2411): total, elastic, nonelastic, total inelastic, inelastic cross sections to 13 discrete levels, inelastic continuum, (n,2n), (n,3n), (n,n'α) + (n,αn'), (n,n'p) + (n,pn'),(n,n'd) + (n,dn'), (n,p), (n,d), (n,t), (n,α) and capture cross sections. Derived data for MT = 251, 252 and 253 are also included. Angular distributions and energy spectra of secondary neutron are also given inelastic continuum,

  20. Bragg projection ptychography on niobium phase domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdet, Nicolas; Shi, Xiaowen; Clark, Jesse N.; Huang, Xiaojing; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian

    2017-07-01

    Bragg projection ptychography (BPP) is a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging technique which combines the strengths of scanning microscopy with the phase contrast of x-ray ptychography. Here we apply it for high resolution imaging of the phase-shifted crystalline domains associated with epitaxial growth. The advantages of BPP are that the spatial extent of the sample is arbitrary, it is nondestructive, and it gives potentially diffraction limited spatial resolution. Here we demonstrate the application of BPP for revealing the domain structure caused by epitaxial misfit in a nanostructured metallic thin film. Experimental coherent diffraction data were collected from a niobium thin film, epitaxially grown on a sapphire substrate as the beam was scanned across the sample. The data were analyzed by BPP using a carefully selected combination of refinement procedures. The resulting image shows a close packed array of epitaxial domains, shifted with respect to each other due to misfit between the film and its substrate.

  1. Developments in niobium steels for linepipe applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisterkamp, F.; Bergmann, B.; Chaussy, L.

    1982-11-01

    Current niobium containing steels being produced for line pipe applications, developed over the last ten years, demonstrate an excellent respoNse to heavy deformation at low temperatures, which results in an optimum balance of yield strength and toughness. However, it has long been recognized that excessive use of controlled rolling involves production penalties and contributes to the characteristic anisotropy present in rolled products. Thus, changes in rolling procedures would be desirable if they minimized delays or reduced directionality thereby resulting in further improvement of secondary properties, such as through thickness ductility and hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) tendency in sour gas environments. Present steel development is focused on transformation strengthening or increased precipitation hardening. Coupled with the trend to even lower carbon ( [pt

  2. Study on niobium carbide dispersed superconducting tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, H; Tachikawa, K [National Research Inst. for Metals, Tokyo (Japan); Oh' asa, M [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    1977-11-01

    Niobium carbide (NbC) dispersed superconducting tapes have been fabricated by two metallurgical processes. In the first process, Ni-Nb-C alloys are directly arc melted and hot worked in air and the NbC phase is distributed in the form of fine discrete particles. In the second process, Ni-Nb and Ni-Nb-Cu alloys are arc melted, hot worked and subjected to solid-state carburization. NbC then precipitates along the grain boundaries, forming a network. The highest superconducting transition temperature attained is about 11 K. Taken together with the lattice parameter measurement, this indicates that NbC with a nearly perfect NaCl structure is formed in both processes. Measured values of the upper critical field, the critical current density and the volume fraction of the NbC phase are also discussed.

  3. Superconducting niobium cavities with high gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneisel, P.; Saito, K.

    1992-01-01

    Present accelerator projects making use of superconducting cavity technology are constructed with design accelerating gradients E acc ranging between 5 MV/m and 8 MV/m and Q-values of several 10 9 . Future plans for upgrades of existing accelerators or for linear colliders call for gradients greater than 15 MV/m corresponding to peak surface electric fields above 30 MV/m. These demands challenge state-of-the-art production technology and require improvements in processing and handling of these cavities to overcome the major performance limitation of field emission loading. This paper reports on efforts to improve the performance of cavities made from niobium from different suppliers by using improved cleaning techniques after processing and ultrahigh vacuum annealing at temperatures of 1400 C. In single cell L-band cavities peak surface electric fields as high as 50 MV/m have been measured without significant field emission loading. (Author) 8 refs., fig

  4. Thorium exposure in a niobium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Adelaide M. Gondin da

    1995-01-01

    The workers involved in the mineral process to obtain Nb-Fe alloy are exposure to thorium. Internal contamination with radioactive materials is a common problem. This is caused by presence of U and Th and their natural decay series associated with the mine ore. The examples are the workers at the niobium mine located in the state of Goias. Twenty mine workers were evaluated using in vitro bioassay techniques. Samples of urine and feces from occupationally exposed mine workers were analyzed for thorium isotopes. The fecal samples corresponding to one complete excretion and urine sample corresponding to a 24 hours collection were analyzed using alpha spectrometry. The results of thorium excretion (feces) have shown that in all the samples the 228 Th excretions in high than 232 Th. Thorium concentration in all the urine samples were below limit of detection that is approximately 1 mBq/l. (author). 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  5. Study of niobium oxidation by photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, C.

    1985-01-01

    The chemical composition of thin oxide layers, grown on clean niobium, in low oxygen pressure, was studied by a surface analysis method: X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. The purpose of this study was to find the best conditions for the building of Nb/Nb oxide/Pb Josephson junctions, and particularly to minimise the interface thickness during the formation of the insulator film (Nb 2 O 5 ) on the metal (Nb). This interface is essentially formed by the monoxide (NbO) and dioxide (NbO 2 ). Nb 3d XPS core level peak positions and area ratios (obtained by the signal decomposition) of the components of the total peak, were used to determine the presence of the different oxidation states II, IV and V, their relative abundance, oxide thicknesses and their depth distribution. All this information was extracted by a special numerical procedure [fr

  6. Diffusion of oxygen in niobium during bake-out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenuti, C.; Calatroni, S.; Ruzinov, V.

    2003-01-01

    Bake-outs at temperatures between 100 degC and 150 degC for duration up to two days have become customary for optimising the performance of bulk niobium cavities. This treatment results in the diffusion of oxygen, originating from the surface oxide, into the niobium. The theoretical oxygen profile has been simulated using the diffusion equations, and compared with some experimental results. (author)

  7. Electrodeposition of niobium and titanium in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, A.F.; Chagas, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    The electrodeposition of niobium and titanium in molten fluorides from the additions of fluorine niobates and fluorine titanates of potassium is described in laboratory and pilot scale. The temperature influence, the current density and the time deposition over the current efficiency, the deposits structure and the deposits purity are studied. The conditions for niobium coating over copper and carbon steel and for titanium coating over carbon steel are also presented. (C.G.C.) [pt

  8. Electrochemical studies on the redox behavior of zirconium in the LiF-NaF eutectic melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Liang [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Xiao, Yanping [School of Metallurgical Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan 243002 (China); Zr-Hf-Ti Metallurgie B.V., Den Haag 2582 SB (Netherlands); Xu, Qian, E-mail: qianxu@shu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steel, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Sandwijk, Anthonie van [Zr-Hf-Ti Metallurgie B.V., Den Haag 2582 SB (Netherlands); Zhao, Zhuo [School of Metallurgical Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan 243002 (China); Song, Qiushi; Cai, Yanqing [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Yang, Yongxiang [School of Metallurgical Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan 243002 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2017-05-15

    In the present paper, a detailed study of the redox behavior of zirconium in the eutectic LiF-NaF system was carried out on an inert molybdenum electrode at 750 °C. Several transient electrochemical methods were used such as cyclic voltammetry, square wave voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, and open circuit voltammetry. The reduction of Zr (IV) was found to follow a two-step mechanism of Zr (IV)/Zr (II) and Zr (II)/Zr at the potentials of about −1.10 and −1.50 V versus Pt, respectively. The theoretical evaluations of the number of transferred electrons according to both cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry further confirmed the Zr reduction mechanism. The estimations of Zr (IV) diffusion coefficient in the LiF-NaF eutectic melt at 750 °C through cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry are in fair agreement, as to be approximately 1.13E-5 and 2.42E-5 cm{sup 2}/s, respectively. - Highlights: •The redox mechanism of zirconium in a fluoride salt system was investigated. •A multi-step redox process of Zr was found with various electrochemical methods. •Perspectives on zirconium electro-refining process were proposed.

  9. The chemical vapor deposition of zirconium carbide onto ceramic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass A, John Jr.; Palmisiano, Nick Jr.; Welsh R, Edward

    1999-01-01

    Zirconium carbide is an attractive ceramic material due to its unique properties such as high melting point, good thermal conductivity, and chemical resistance. The controlled preparation of zirconium carbide films of superstoichiometric, stoichiometric, and substoichiometric compositions has been achieved utilizing zirconium tetrachloride and methane precursor gases in an atmospheric pressure high temperature chemical vapor deposition system

  10. Processing fissile material mixtures containing zirconium and/or carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael Ernest; Maloney, Martin David

    2013-07-02

    A method of processing spent TRIZO-coated nuclear fuel may include adding fluoride to complex zirconium present in a dissolved TRIZO-coated fuel. Complexing the zirconium with fluoride may reduce or eliminate the potential for zirconium to interfere with the extraction of uranium and/or transuranics from fission materials in the spent nuclear fuel.

  11. 40 CFR 721.9973 - Zirconium dichlorides (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Zirconium dichlorides (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9973 Zirconium dichlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as zirconium dichlorides (PMNs P...

  12. Removal of iron contaminant from zirconium chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voit, D.O.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for eliminating iron contaminant from an aqueous zirconium chloride solution that has been contaminated with FeCl 3 in a plant in which zirconium and hafnium chloride solutions are separated by a main MINK solvent extraction system and the FeCl 3 is normally removed from the zirconium chloride solution by a secondary MINK solvent extraction system

  13. Automatic measuring system of zirconium thickness for zirconium liner cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, K.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hiroshima, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Murayama, R.

    1985-01-01

    An automatic system of pure zirconium liner thickness for zirconium-zircaloy cladding tubes has been successfully developed. The system consists of three parts. (1) An ultrasonic thickness measuring method for mother tubes before cold rolling. (2) An electromagnetic thickness measuring method for the manufactured tubes. (3) An image processing method for the cross sectional view of the manufactured cut tube samples. In Japanese nuclear industry, zirconium-zircaloy cladding tubes have been tested in order to realize load following operation in the atomic power plant. In order to provide for the practical use in the near future, Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd. has been studied and established the practical manufacturing process of the zirconium liner cladding tubes. The zirconium-liner cladding tube is a duplex tube comprising an inner layer of pure zirconium bonded to zircaloy metallurgically. The thickness of the pure zirconium is about 10 % of the total wall thickness. Several types of the automatic thickness measuring methods have been investigated instead of the usual microscopic viewing method in which the liner thickness is measured by the microscopic cross sectional view of the cut tube samples

  14. Recovery of molybdenum in froth flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parlman, R.M.; Bresson, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    Beta-mercaptoethanol has been found to be an effective suppressant for such minerals as copper, iron and lead in a molybdenum sulfide ore froth flotation operation. The recovery process and a suppressant utilizing said compound are claimed

  15. Large-Batch Reduction of Molybdenum Trioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiggans, Jr, James O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lowden, Richard Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Menchhofer, Paul A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nunn, Stephen D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bryan, Chris [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Unconverted, isotopically-enriched molybdenum metal must be recovered from the spent radiopharmaceutical solution used in NorthStar’s Technetium-99m generator and reused. The recycle process begins by recovering the metal from the aqueous potassium molybdate (K2MoO4) solutions as molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) employing a process developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The MoO3 powder is subsequently reduced to molybdenum metal powder which can be blended with new powder and further processed into a flowable form to be used to produce target disks for irradiation. The molybdenum oxide reduction process has been examined and scaled to produce kilogram quantities of metal powder suitable for processing into a useable form employing spray drying or similar technique and ultimately used for target fabrication.

  16. Surface processing for bulk niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M. P.; Reid, T.

    2017-04-01

    The majority of niobium cavities for superconducting particle accelerators continue to be fabricated from thin-walled (2-4 mm) polycrystalline niobium sheet and, as a final step, require material removal from the radio frequency (RF) surface in order to achieve performance needed for use as practical accelerator devices. More recently bulk niobium in the form of, single- or large-grain slices cut from an ingot has become a viable alternative for some cavity types. In both cases the so-called damaged layer must be chemically etched or electrochemically polished away. The methods for doing this date back at least four decades, however, vigorous empirical studies on real cavities and more fundamental studies on niobium samples at laboratories worldwide have led to seemingly modest improvements that, when taken together, constitute a substantial advance in the reproducibility for surface processing techniques and overall cavity performance. This article reviews the development of niobium cavity surface processing, and summarizes results of recent studies. We place some emphasis on practical details for real cavity processing systems which are difficult to find in the literature but are, nonetheless, crucial for achieving the good and reproducible cavity performance. New approaches for bulk niobium surface treatment which aim to reduce cost or increase performance, including alternate chemical recipes, barrel polishing and ‘nitrogen doping’ of the RF surface, continue to be pursued and are closely linked to the requirements for surface processing.

  17. Recent developments in high purity niobium metal production at CBMM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, Gustavo Giovanni Ribeiro; Sousa, Clovis Antonio de Faria; Guimarães, Rogério Contato; Ribas, Rogério Marques; Vieira, Alaércio Salvador Martins; Menezes, Andréia Duarte; Fridman, Daniel Pallos; Cruz, Edmundo Burgos

    2015-01-01

    CBMM is a global supplier of high quality niobium products including pure niobium, the focus of this paper. CBMM’s position has been consolidated over three decades of producing high purity niobium metal ingots. The company supplies, among other products, commercial and reactor grade niobium ingots. One of the main uses of CBMM’s ingots is for the manufacture of particle accelerators (superconducting radio frequency – SRF – cavities), where the purity and homogeneity of niobium metal is essentially important for good performance. CBMM constantly strives to improve process controls and product quality, and is currently implementing innovations in production, research and development to further improve ingot quality. The main aim is to reduce the content of interstitial elements, such as nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), carbon (C), and hydrogen (H), starting with the raw materials through the final step of ingot production. CBMM held the first trial to produce the world’s largest-diameter niobium ingot (as cast 535 mm). The results of this initial trial presented very low levels of interstitial impurities (N, O, C, H), allowing the achievement of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values very close to 300 in a six-melt process in an electron beam furnace. These values were reached with 850 ppm of tantalum. SRF cavities will be produced with this material in order to study the effect of low impurities and high RRR on the Q factor and accelerating gradient

  18. Experimental study of the zirconium alloy oxidation under high pressure of steam and modelling of the mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dali, Yacoub

    2007-01-01

    The corrosion of the cladding materials used for the fuel rods is one of the limiting factor of their lifetime in light water reactors. In this field, the aim of the nuclear industry is today to increase the time and the number of cycles and to submit the claddings in zirconium alloys to higher corrosive conditions. In this way, new alloys devoted to replace the standard Zircaloy-4, for instance Nb containing alloys, have been recently developed and licensed and show better corrosion resistance. A better understanding of the corrosion mechanisms of the zirconium alloys is necessary to predict the corrosion behaviour of these materials. In this work, the oxidation rate of model alloys of two metallurgic families has been studied in steam in a pressure range between 100 milli-bars and 100 bars. The Zircaloy type alloys contain as alloying elements oxygen and/or tin and/or iron and chromium. For the Zr-Nb family, three niobium contents have been studied, respectively 0.2, 0.4 and 1 weight percent of niobium. Our objectives were to understand the variations of the reactivity between the low pressure and the high pressure range, in quantifying the dependency of the corrosion rate with the steam pressure and the alloying element concentrations. The segregation process of the niobium at the surface has also been studied on the Zr-Nb alloys. During this work, a magnetic suspension thermo-balance has been developed and used to follow in-situ the corrosion rate at high pressure of water vapour. The oxide layers have been characterized by many techniques, macro and micro-photo-electrochemistry, XRD, FEG-SEM, XPS, HR-TEM and SIMS. For the Zircaloy type alloys, we have confirmed the major role of the intermetallic precipitates Zr(Fe,Cr) 2 on the corrosion resistance. Unlike the standard Zircaloy-4, for which the oxidation rate does not depend on the pressure of the water vapour and is thus limited by the vacancy diffusion in the oxide layer, we have shown that the rate of the

  19. Experimental and thermodynamic study of the erbium-oxygen-zirconium and gadolinium-oxygen-zirconium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jourdan, J.

    2009-11-01

    This work is a contribution to the development of innovative concepts for fuel cladding in pressurized water nuclear reactors. This concept implies the insertion of rare earth (erbium and gadolinium) in the zirconium fuel cladding. The determination of phase equilibria in the systems is essential prior to the implementation of such a promising solution. This study consisted in an experimental determination of the erbium-zirconium phase diagram. For this, we used many different techniques in order to obtain diagram data such as solubility limits, solidus, liquidus or invariant temperatures. These data allowed us to present a new diagram, very different from the previous one available in the literature. We also assessed the diagram using the CALPHAD approach. In the gadolinium-zirconium system, we determined experimentally the solubility limits. Those limits had never been determined before, and the values we obtained showed a very good agreement with the experimental and assessed versions of the diagram. Because these alloys are subjected to oxygen diffusion throughout their life, we focused our attention on the erbium-oxygen-zirconium and gadolinium-oxygen-zirconium systems. The first system has been investigated experimentally. The alloys fabrication has been performed using powder metallurgy. In order to obtain pure raw materials, we fabricated powder from erbium and zirconium bulk metals using hydrogen absorption/desorption. The characterisation of the ternary pellets allowed the determination of two ternary isothermal sections at 800 and 1100 C. For the gadolinium-oxygen-zirconium system, we calculated the phase equilibria at temperatures ranging from 800 to 1100 C, using a homemade database compiled from literature assessments of the oxygen-zirconium, gadolinium-zirconium and gadolinia-zirconia systems. Finally, we determined the mechanical properties, in connexion with the microstructure, of industrial quality alloys in order to identify the influence of

  20. Process for the production of a tantalum and niobium bearing concentrate from a tantalum and niobium bearing ferro-alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deweck, J.; Van, H.

    1980-01-01

    In a process for the production of a tantalum and niobium bearing concentrate from a tantalum and niobium bearing ferro-alloy containing tantalum and niobium as carbide, by treating the ferro-alloy in molten state with a controlled amount of an oxidizing agent in order to slag at least most of the tantalum and at least part of the niobium and by separting the so obtained slag phase from the metal phase, the improvement which comprises using air, oxygen enriched air or oxygen as oxidizing agent and adjusting the iron content to the ferro-alloy by adding at least 70% by weight of iron prior to the step of forming the slag so that at least most of the tantalum carbide is dissolved in the molten ferro-alloy

  1. Molybdenum solubility in aluminium nitrate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heres, X.; Sans, D.; Bertrand, M.; Eysseric, C. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, DRCP, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Brackx, E.; Domenger, R.; Excoffier, E. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, DTEC, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Valery, J.F. [AREVA-NC, DOR/RDP, Paris - La Defense (France)

    2016-07-01

    For over 60 years, research reactors (RR or RTR for research testing reactors) have been used as neutron sources for research, radioisotope production ({sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc), nuclear medicine, materials characterization, etc... Currently, over 240 of these reactors are in operation in 56 countries. They are simpler than power reactors and operate at lower temperature (cooled to below 100 C. degrees). The fuel assemblies are typically plates or cylinders of uranium alloy and aluminium (U-Al) coated with pure aluminium. These fuels can be processed in AREVA La Hague plant after batch dissolution in concentrated nitric acid and mixing with UOX fuel streams. The aim of this study is to accurately measure the solubility of molybdenum in nitric acid solution containing high concentrations of aluminium. The higher the molybdenum solubility is, the more flexible reprocessing operations are, especially when the spent fuels contain high amounts of molybdenum. To be most representative of the dissolution process, uranium-molybdenum alloy and molybdenum metal powder were dissolved in solutions of aluminium nitrate at the nominal dissolution temperature. The experiments showed complete dissolution of metallic elements after 30 minutes long stirring, even if molybdenum metal was added in excess. After an induction period, a slow precipitation of molybdic acid occurs for about 15 hours. The data obtained show the molybdenum solubility decreases with increasing aluminium concentration. The solubility law follows an exponential relation around 40 g/L of aluminium with a high determination coefficient. Molybdenum solubility is not impacted by the presence of gadolinium, or by an increasing concentration of uranium. (authors)

  2. Elimination of excess molybdenum by cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toelgyesi, G.; Elmoty, I.A.

    1967-01-01

    It was found that cattle would ingest spontaneously 5-15 g of molybdenum on one occasion. The uptake of this quantity caused but moderate loss of appetite and mild enteritis, both normalizing in one week. The occurrence of a severe acute molybdenum poisoning can be practically excluded, owing to refusal of the poisoned feed. Spontaneously ingested molybdenum caused on the first day a 30-100 fold rise of ruminal Mo-level, decreasing to the order of the normal value in about one week. But in the urine and faeces, Mo-level was at least 10 fold, in the blood and milk about 4 fold of the normal one, even one or two weeks after ingestion. During this period at least 90% of ingested Mo was eliminated with the faeces, urine and milk. One week after the ingestion of molybdenum, the rumen content showed no evidence on poisoning and no trace of molybdenum. Oral administration of ammonium molybdenate in an amount equivalent to 40 g molybdenum caused no fatality. In fact, cattle would never ingest spontaneously such a large dose.

  3. Review of zirconium-zircaloy pyrophoricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, T.D.

    1984-11-01

    Massive zirconium metal scrap can be handled, shipped, and stored with no evidence of combustion or pyrophoricity hazards. Mechanically produced fine scrap such as shavings, turnings, or powders can burn but are not pyrophoric unless the particle diameter is less than 54 μm. Powders with particle diameters less than 54 μm can be both pyrophoric and explosive. Pyrophoric powders should be collected and stored underwater or under inert gas cover to reduce the flammability hazard. Opening sealed containers of zirconium stored underwater should be attempted with caution since hydrogen may be present. The factors that influence the ignition temperature have been explored in depth and recommendations are included for the safe handling, shipping, and storage of pyrophoric or flammable zirconium. 29 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Laser-Based Additive Manufacturing of Zirconium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Sahasrabudhe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing of zirconium is attempted using commercial Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENSTM technique. A LENSTM-based approach towards processing coatings and bulk parts of zirconium, a reactive metal, aims to minimize the inconvenience of traditional metallurgical practices of handling and processing zirconium-based parts that are particularly suited to small volumes and one-of-a-kind parts. This is a single-step manufacturing approach for obtaining near net shape fabrication of components. In the current research, Zr metal powder was processed in the form of coating on Ti6Al4V alloy substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS as well as phase analysis via X-ray diffraction (XRD were studied on these coatings. In addition to coatings, bulk parts were also fabricated using LENS™ from Zr metal powders, and measured part accuracy.

  5. Method of producing oxidation resistant coatings for molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmons, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    A method is described for producing a molybdenum element having adherently bonded thereto a thermally self-healing plasma-sprayed coating consisting essentially of a composite of molybdenum and a refactory oxide material capable of reacting with molybdenum oxide under oxidizing conditions to form a substantially thermally stable refractory compound of molybdenum, the method comprising plasma-spraying a coating formed by the step-wise application of a plurality of interbonded plasma-sprayed layers of a composite of molybdenum/refractory oxide material produced from a particulate mixture thereof. The coating comprises a first layer of molybdenum plasma-sprayed bonded to the substrate of the molybdenum element, a second layer of plasma-sprayed mixture of particulate molybdenum/refactory oxide consisting essentially of predominantly molybdenum bonded to the first layer, and succeeding layers of this mixture. The next step is heating the coated molybdenum element under oxidizing conditions to an elevated temperature sufficient to cause oxygen to diffuse into the surface of the multi-layered coating to react with dispersed molybdenum therein to form molybdenum oxide and effect healing of the coating by reaction of the molybdenum oxide with the contained refractory oxide and thereby protect the substrate of the molybdenum element against oxidation

  6. Analysis of hafnium in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Isao; Sakai, Fumiaki; Ohuchi, Yoshifusa; Nakamura, Hisashi

    1977-01-01

    It is required to analyse alloying components and impurity elements in the acceptance analysis of zirconium alloys as the material for fuel cladding tubes and pressure tubes for advanced thermal reactors. Because of extreme similarity in chemical properties between zirconium and hafnium, about 100 ppm of hafnium is usually contained in zirconium alloys. Zircaloy-2 alloy and 2.5% Nb-zirconium with the addition of hafnium had been prepared as in-house standard samples for rapid analysis. Study was made on fluorescent X-ray analysis and emission spectral analysis to establish the analytical method. By using these in-house standard samples, acceptance analysis was successfully carried out for the fuel cladding tubes for advanced thermal reactors. Sulfuric acid solution was prepared from JAERI-Z 1, 2 and 3, the standard sample for zircaloy-2 prepared by the Analytical Committee on Nuclear Fuel and Reactor Materials, JAERI, and zirconium oxide (Hf 1 ppm/Zr). Standard Hf solution was added to the sulfuric acid solution step by step, to make up a series of the standard oxide samples by the precipitation process. By the use of these standard samples, the development of the analytical method and joint analysis were made by the three-member analytical technique research group including PNC. The analytical precision for the fluorescent X-ray analysis was improved by attaching a metallic yttrium filter to the window of an X-ray tube so as to suppress the effect due to zirconium matrix. The variation factor of the joint analysis was about 10% to show good agreement, and the indication value was determined. (Kobatake, H.)

  7. Zirconium diselenite microstructures, formation and mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Chandan C.; Salker, A. V.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a series of microstructures of zirconium diselenite (Zr(SeO3)2) has been prepared via a simple precipitation method at room temperature without adding any organic surfactants. Phase purity of the sample has been checked by X-ray Diffraction. From the SEM, FESEM, and TEM images spheroid nanoparticles to the starfish-like structure of zirconium diselenite are detected. The morphological evolution processes were investigated carefully following time-dependent experiments and a growth mechanism has been proposed. Two different crystal growth processes, the oriented attachment process accompanying the Ostwald ripening process were held responsible for the formation of a structure resembling starfish having four arms.

  8. Cathodic behavior of zirconium in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hine, F.; Yasuda, M.; Sato, H.

    1977-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of Zr was studied by polarization measurements. The surface oxide and zirconium hydride formed by cathodic polarization of Zr have been examined by X-ray, SEM, and a hardness tester. Zirconium hydride would form on Zr cathode after the surface oxide is reduced at the potential, which is several hundred mV more noble than the predicted value shown by the Pourbaix diagram. The parameters for the hydrogen evolution reaction on the hydride formed Zr cathode differs from that on the oxide covered surface, which means that hydrogen evolution takes place on both surfaces under a different mechanism, while details are still veiled at present

  9. Hydrogen outbreak of Zirconium Molybdate Hihydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Yasuhiko; Fukuda, Kazuhiro; Ochi, Eiji

    2008-01-01

    JNFL is planning to construct a facility for enclosing the hull and end pieces produced due to reprocessing of spent fuel into stainless canisters after compressing, while those hull and end pieces enclosed into the stainless canisters are called 'compressed hulls'. Since the compressed hulls contain moisture absorbent Zirconium Molybdate Hihydrate accompanying hull and end pieces, there is a risk of outbreak of radiolysisradiolysis gas such as hydrogen, etc. by radiolysisradiolysis. This report intends to state the result of radiation irradiation experiment with the purpose of examining the volume of hydrogen outbreak from Zirconium Molybdate Hihydrate of the compressed hulls. (author)

  10. Electron microscopy of nuclear zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versaci, R.A.; Ipohorski, Miguel

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy observations of the microstructure of zirconium alloys used in fuel sheaths of nuclear power reactors are reported. Specimens were observed after different thermal and mechanical treatment, similar to those actually used during fabrication of the sheaths. Electron micrographs and electron diffraction patterns of second phase particles present in zircaloy-2 and zircaloy-4 were also obtained, as well as some characteristic parameters. Images of oxides and hydrides most commonly present in zirconium alloys are also shown. Finally, the structure of a Zr-2,5Nb alloy used in CANDU reactors pressure tubes, is observed by electron microscopy. (Author) [es

  11. The fluorimetric titration of zirconium in the ppm-range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, W.E. von der; Boef, G. den; Ozinga, W.

    1976-01-01

    A fluorimetric titration of zirconium(IV) with EDTA is proposed. The fluorescence intensity of the zirconium-morin complex is used to indicate the end-point. More than twenty other cations were investigated and it was found that they did not interfere, neither did common anions. Mercury(II) can only be tolerated in amount not exceeding that of zirconium. Bismuth(III) interferes and hafnium(IV0 is titrated together with zirconium. The relative standard deviation of the titration of 10ml of a solution containing 1 ppm of zirconium does not exceed 1.5%

  12. Determination of molybdenum by the gravimetric plumbate method (with the molybdenum content from 50 % and above)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepin, V.V.; Kurbatova, V.I.; Fedorova, N.D.

    1980-01-01

    A gravimetric method of molybdenum determination in ferromolybdenum (Mo content from 50% and higher) after its dissolving in HNO 3 is developed. The method is based on Mo deposition in acetic acid solution in the form of molybdenum oxide lead after separation of Fe and other interfering elements with sodium hydroxide [ru

  13. Contribution to the study of zirconium self-diffusion in zirconium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Chul

    1972-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to determine experimental conditions allowing the measurement of the self-diffusion coefficient of zirconium in zirconium carbide. The author reports the development of a method of preparation of zirconium carbide samples. He reports the use of ion implantation as technique to obtain a radio-tracer coating. The obtained results give evidence of the impossibility to use sintered samples with small grains because of the demonstrated importance of intergranular diffusion. The self-diffusion coefficient is obtained in the case of zirconium carbide with grains having a diameter of few millimetres. The presence of 95 Nb from the disintegration of 95 Zr indicates that these both metallic elements have very close diffusion coefficients at 2.600 C [fr

  14. Rapid analysis of molybdenum contents in molybdenum master alloys by X-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tongkong, P.

    1985-01-01

    Determination of molybdenum contents in molybdenum master alloy had been performed using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDX) technique where analysis were made via standard additions and calibration curves. Comparison of EDX technique with other analyzing techniques, i.e., wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence, neutron activation analysis and inductive coupled plasma spectrometry, showed consistency in the results. This technique was found to yield reliable results when molybdenum contents in master alloys were in the range of 13 to 50 percent using HPGe detector or proportional counter. When the required error was set at 1%, the minimum analyzing time was found to be 30 and 60 seconds for Fe-Mo master alloys with molybdenum content of 13.54 and 49.09 percent respectively. For Al-Mo master alloys, the minimum times required were 120 and 300 seconds with molybdenum content of 15.22 and 47.26 percent respectively

  15. High purity zirconium obtainment through the iodine compounds transport method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolcich, J.C.; Zuzek, E.; Dutrus, S.M.; Corso, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental method and the equipment designed, constructed and actually applied for the high purity zirconium obtainment from a zirconium sponge of the nuclear type. The mechanism of purification is based on the impure metal attack with gaseous iodine (at 200 deg C) to obtain zirconium tetra iodine as main product which is then transformed into a pure zirconium base (at 1000-1300 deg C), precipitating the metallic zirconium and releasing the gaseous iodine. From the first experiences carried out, pure zirconium has been obtained from an initial filament of 0.5 mm of diameter as well as wires up to 2.5 mm of diameter. This work presents the results from the studies and analysis made to characterize the material obtained. Finally, the refining methods to which the zirconium produced may be submitted so as to optimize the final purity are discussed. (Author)

  16. Extractive metallurgy of zirconium--1945 to the present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, D.G.; Adamson, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Although the history of the reduction of zirconium dates from 1824 and the first ductile zirconium metal was produced in the laboratory in 1914, modern reduction practice was pioneered by the U.S. Bureau of Mines starting in 1945. This paper reviews the history of the extractive metallurgy of zirconium from the early work of W. J. Kroll and co-workers at the Bureau of Mines in Albany, Ore., through the commercial development of the production of reactor-grade zirconium metal which was spurred by the requirements of the Naval Reactor Program and the development of commercial nuclear power. Technical subjects covered include processes for opening the ore, zirconium-hafnium separation, chlorination of zirconium oxide, reduction processes, and electrowinning of zirconium metal. Proposed new processes and process modifications are reviewed

  17. Study of gels of molybdenum with cerium in the preparation of generators of 99Mo-99mTc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Vanessa; Marczewski, Barbara; Dias, Carla Roberta; Osso Junior, Joao Alberto

    2005-01-01

    99m Tc has ideal nuclear properties for organ imaging in nuclear medicine, and it is obtained from the 99 Mo- 99m Tc generator. Four different types of generators are available: chromatographic that uses 99 Mo from fission of uranium; MEK solvent extraction; Tc 2 O 7 sublimation; gel chromatographic. This work presents the preparation of gel generators of molybdenum with cerium and characterization of the gels: mass ratio between molybdenum and cerium, structure, size of particles and elution percentage of 99m Tc after irradiating the gels. Eight gels were prepared at the same temperature of 50 deg C with concentrations of NaOH of 2 and 4 mol/L, mass ratio of 0.31 and 0.38 and final pH of 3.5 and 4.5. The analysis of the results proved that these gels are not adequate for preparation of the generators of 99 Mo- 99m Tc, since the elution percentages are low, when compared with the gel of molybdenum with zirconium.(author)

  18. Evaluation of niobium dimethylamino-ethoxide for chemical vapour deposition of niobium oxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabirian, Ali; Kuzminykh, Yury; Wagner, Estelle; Benvenuti, Giacomo; Rushworth, Simon; Hoffmann, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) processes depend on the availability of suitable precursors. Precursors that deliver a stable vapour pressure are favourable in classical CVD processes, as they ensure process reproducibility. In high vacuum CVD (HV-CVD) process vapour pressure stability of the precursor is of particular importance, since no carrier gas assisted transport can be used. The dimeric Nb 2 (OEt) 10 does not fulfil this requirement since it partially dissociates upon heating. Dimethylamino functionalization of an ethoxy ligand of Nb(OEt) 5 acts as an octahedral field completing entity and leads to Nb(OEt) 4 (dmae). We show that Nb(OEt) 4 (dmae) evaporates as monomeric molecule and ensures a stable vapour pressure and, consequently, stable flow. A set of HV-CVD experiments were conducted using this precursor by projecting a graded molecular beam of the precursor onto the substrate at deposition temperatures from 320 °C to 650 °C. Film growth rates ranging from 8 nm·h −1 to values larger than 400 nm·h −1 can be obtained in this system illustrating the high level of control available over the film growth process. Classical CVD limiting conditions along with the recently reported adsorption–reaction limited conditions are observed and the chemical composition, and microstructural and optical properties of the films are related to the corresponding growth regime. Nb(OEt) 4 (dmae) provides a large process window of deposition temperatures and precursor fluxes over which carbon-free and polycrystalline niobium oxide films with growth rates proportional to precursor flux are obtained. This feature makes Nb(OEt) 4 (dmae) an attractive precursor for combinatorial CVD of niobium containing complex oxide films that are finding an increasing interest in photonics and photoelectrochemical water splitting applications. The adsorption–reaction limited conditions provide extremely small growth rates comparable to an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process

  19. Synthesis of zirconium by zirconium tetrachloride reduction by magnesio-thermia. Experimental study and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basin, N.

    2001-01-01

    This work deals with the synthesis of zirconium. The ore is carbo-chlorinated to obtain the tetrachloride which is then purified by selective condensation and extractive distillation. Zirconium tetrachloride is then reduced by magnesium and the pseudo-alloy is obtained according to the global following reaction (Kroll process): ZrCl 4 + 2 Mg = 2 MgCl 2 . By thermodynamics, it has been shown that the volatilization of magnesium chloride and the formation of zirconium sub-chlorides are minimized when the combined effects of temperature and of dilution with argon are limited. With these conditions, the products, essentially zirconium and magnesium chloride, are obtained in equivalence ratio in the magnesio-thermia reaction. The global kinetics of the reduction process has been studied by a thermal gravimetric method. A thermo-balance device has been developed specially for this kinetics study. It runs under a controlled atmosphere and is coupled to a vapor tetrachloride feed unit. The transformation is modelled supposing that the zirconium and magnesium chloride formation result: 1)of the evaporation of magnesium from its liquid phase 2)of the transfer of magnesium and zirconium tetrachloride vapors towards the front of the reaction located in the gaseous phase 3)of the chemical reaction. In the studied conditions, the diffusion is supposed to be the limiting process. The influence of the following parameters: geometry of the reactive zone, temperature, scanning rate of the argon-zirconium tetrachloride mixture, composition of the argon-zirconium tetrachloride mixture has been experimentally studied and confronted with success to the model. (O.M.)

  20. Experimental studies of relevance on zirconium nitrate raffinate sludge for its disposal as well as zirconium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahmananda Reddy, G.; Narasimha Murty, B.; Ravindra, H.R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the many routes of production of nuclear grade zirconium dioxide involve separation of zirconium and hafnium by solvent extraction of zirconium nitrate using tri-n-butyl phosphate followed by precipitation of zirconium with ammonia and finally calcination of the so obtained hydrated zirconia at elevated temperature. The zirconium feed solution as is generated from digestion of zirconium washed dried frit (produced by the caustic fusion of zircon sand which is one of the beach sand heavy minerals) in nitric acid contain considerable amount of sludge material and after solvent extraction this whole sludge material rests with raffinate. This sludge material has a scope to contain considerable amounts of zirconium along with other metal ions such as hafnium, aluminium, iron, etc. besides nitric acid and it constitutes one of the important solid wastes that needs to be disposed suitably. One of the disposal means of this sludge material is to use it as a land fill for which two important criteria are to be viz the pH of 10% solid waste solution should be near to neutral pH and the loss on ignition at 550℃ on dry basis of the sludge to be below 20%. In order to study the implications of presence of varying amounts of zirconium nitrate in the sludge on the pH of 10% solution of the sludge various synthetic zirconium nitrate solid waste were prepared using the sludge material generated at the laboratory during the analysis of zirconium washed dried frit. Presence of zirconium in the sludge is expected to decrease the overall pH of the 10% solution of the sludge because zirconium is prone to hydrolyze especially locally when zirconium ion comes into contact with water according to the chemical equation Zr 4+ H 2 O → ZrO 2+ + 2H + . From this equation, it is clear that for every one mole of zirconium ions two moles of hydrogen ions are produced. This is verified experimentally using the synthetically prepared sludge materials with varying amounts of zirconium

  1. Molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue in Serratia sp. Strain DRY5 is catalyzed by a novel molybdenum-reducing enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukor, M Y; Halmi, M I E; Rahman, M F A; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A

    2014-01-01

    The first purification of the Mo-reducing enzyme from Serratia sp. strain DRY5 that is responsible for molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue in the bacterium is reported. The monomeric enzyme has an apparent molecular weight of 105 kDalton. The isoelectric point of this enzyme was 7.55. The enzyme has an optimum pH of 6.0 and maximum activity between 25 and 35°C. The Mo-reducing enzyme was extremely sensitive to temperatures above 50°C (between 54 and 70°C). A plot of initial rates against substrate concentrations at 15 mM 12-MP registered a V max for NADH at 12.0 nmole Mo blue/min/mg protein. The apparent K m for NADH was 0.79 mM. At 5 mM NADH, the apparent V max and apparent K m values for 12-MP of 12.05 nmole/min/mg protein and 3.87 mM, respectively, were obtained. The catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m ) of the Mo-reducing enzyme was 5.47 M(-1) s(-1). The purification of this enzyme could probably help to solve the phenomenon of molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue first reported in 1896 and would be useful for the understanding of the underlying mechanism in molybdenum bioremediation involving bioreduction.

  2. Molybdenum Reduction to Molybdenum Blue in Serratia sp. Strain DRY5 Is Catalyzed by a Novel Molybdenum-Reducing Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Shukor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The first purification of the Mo-reducing enzyme from Serratia sp. strain DRY5 that is responsible for molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue in the bacterium is reported. The monomeric enzyme has an apparent molecular weight of 105 kDalton. The isoelectric point of this enzyme was 7.55. The enzyme has an optimum pH of 6.0 and maximum activity between 25 and 35°C. The Mo-reducing enzyme was extremely sensitive to temperatures above 50°C (between 54 and 70°C. A plot of initial rates against substrate concentrations at 15 mM 12-MP registered a Vmax for NADH at 12.0 nmole Mo blue/min/mg protein. The apparent Km for NADH was 0.79 mM. At 5 mM NADH, the apparent Vmax and apparent Km values for 12-MP of 12.05 nmole/min/mg protein and 3.87 mM, respectively, were obtained. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km of the Mo-reducing enzyme was 5.47 M-1 s-1. The purification of this enzyme could probably help to solve the phenomenon of molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue first reported in 1896 and would be useful for the understanding of the underlying mechanism in molybdenum bioremediation involving bioreduction.

  3. Chromatographic purification of neutron capture molybdenum-99 from cross-contaminant radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafa, M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Technetium-99m is called the work horse, for many reasons, in nuclear medicine diagnostic purposes. It is produced as the β - decay of 99 Mo radionuclide. Molybdenum-99 gel type generators are considered as a suitable alternative of the conventional chromatographic alumina columns loaded with fission molybdenum-99. 99 Mo neutron-capture is cross-contaminated with radionuclides originated from activation of chemical impurities in the Mo target such 60 C0, 65 Zn, 95 Zr, 175 Hf, 181 Hf, 86 Rb, 134 Cs, 141 Ce, 152 Eu, 140 La, 51 Cr, 124 Sb, 46 Sc, 54 Mn, 59 Fe and / or fast neutrons interactions with the stable isotopes of molybdenum such as 92m Nb, 95 Nb and 95 Zr. To prevent contamination of the eluted 99m Tc, successive purification methods were made. After complete dissolution of the irradiated target wrapped with thin Al foil in 5 M NaOH solution, hydrogen peroxide was added to start precipitation of Fe(OH) 3 . The formed Fe (III) minerals allow complete elimination of some radio contaminants from the molybdate solute such as 152 Eu, 140 La, 141 Ce, 45 Mn and 92m Nb in addition to partial elimination of 46 Sc, 60 Co and 59 Fe radionuclides. The remaining supernatant was acidified by concentrated nitric acid to ph 9.5 for precipitation of Al(OH) 3 with complete elimination of radio contaminants such as 95 Zr 175 Hf, 181 Hf, 65 Zn, 124 Sb, 51 Cr, 46 Sc, 60 Co and 59 Fe. 134 Cs and 86 Rb radionuclides were not affected by precipitation of Fe(OH) 3 or Al(OH) 3 . Chromatographic column of potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate (II) (KNHCF) has high affinity towards elimination of 134 Cs and 86 Rb radionuclides. Highly pure molybdate- 99 Mo solution was processed for preparation of zirconium molybdate gel generator with 99m Tc eluate of high radionuclidic, radiochemical and chemical purity suitable for use in medical purposes.

  4. Thermo-mechanical treatment of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, I.S.

    1975-01-01

    A zirconium alloy comprising at least 95 percent Zr (Zircaloy), which has been thoroughly annealed, is greatly increased in strength without substantial loss in ductility by subjecting it to tensile creep deformation in a temperature range in which creep will occur, yet which is below the temperature for significant recovery. (U.S.)

  5. METHOD AND ALLOY FOR BONDING TO ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCuaig, F.D.; Misch, R.D.

    1960-04-19

    A brazing alloy can be used for bonding zirconium and its alloys to other metals, ceramics, and cermets, and consists of 6 to 9 wt.% Ni, 6 to 9 wn~.% Cr, Mo, or W, 0 to 7.5 wt.% Fe, and the balance Zr.

  6. Structuring of gels of zirconium oxohydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukharev, Yu.I.; Skuratovich, L.P.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic relationship between formation of mesophase states of zirconium oxohydrate gel, coprecipitated with dimethylamine, and ordered macrocrystallites of sorption material after cryogranulation or decryptation granulating is shown. This phenomenon is followed on example of formation of flattened crystallites when preparing granules in the presence of appl. The successive polymerization growth of crystallites leads to the frame ordered aggregation or aggregation of another type

  7. Accelerated irradiation growth of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, M.; Gilbert, R.W.; Fidleris, V.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses how sponge zirconium and Zr-2.5 wt% Nb, Zircaloy, or Excel alloys all exhibit accelerated irradiation growth compared with high-purity crystal-bar zirconium for irradiation temperatures between 550 to 710 K and fluences between 0.1 to 10 x 10 25 n · m -2 (E > 1 MeV). There is generally an incubation period or fluence before the onset of accelerated or breakaway growth, which is dependent on the particular material being irradiated, its metallurgical condition before irradiation, and the irradiation temperature. Transmission electron microscopy has shown that there is a correlation between accelerated irradiation growth and the appearance of c-component vacancy loops on basal planes. Measurements in some specimens indicate that a significant fraction of the strain can be directly attributed to the loops themselves. There is considerable evidence to show that their formation is dependent both on the specimen purity and on the irradiation temperature. Materials that have a high interstitial-solute content contain c-component loops and exhibit high growth rates even at low fluences ( 2 :5 n · m -2 , E > 1 MeV). For sponge zirconium and the Zircaloys, c-component loop formation and the associated acceleration of growth (breakaway) during irradiation occurs because the intrinsic interstitial solute (mainly, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen) in the zirconium matrix is supplemented by interstitial iron, chromium, and nickel from the radiation-induced dissolution of precipitates. (author)

  8. Zirconium (IV) complexes with some polymethylenediimines | Na ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The syntheses of zirconium (IV) complexes have been carried out by the reaction of oxozirconium (IV) chloride with the appropriate diimines (Schiff bases). The complexes were isolated as yellow solids which are stable to heat. The complexes were found to be insoluble in most solvents. The infrared spectra, elemental ...

  9. Manufacture of titanium and zirconium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mares, F.; Hanslik, T.

    1973-01-01

    A method is described of manufacturing titanium and zirconium hydrides by hydrogenation of said metals characterized by the reaction temperature ranging between 250 to 500 degC, hydrogen pressure of 20 to 300 atm and possibly by the presence of a hydride of the respective metal. (V.V.)

  10. Intercalation chemistry of zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, Jan; Zima, Vítězslav; Melánová, Klára; Beneš, Ludvík; Trchová, Miroslava

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate is a layered material which can be employed as a host for the intercalation reactions with basic molecules. A wide range of organic compounds were chosen to represent intercalation ability of zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate. These were a series of alkylamines from methylamine to dodecylamine, 1,4-phenylenediamine, p-toluidine, 1,8-diaminonaphthalene, 1-aminopyrene, imidazole, pyridine, 4,4′-bipyridine, poly(ethylene imine), and a series of amino acids from glycine to 6-aminocaproic acid. The prepared compounds were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis and IR spectroscopy and probable arrangement of the guest molecules in the interlayer space of the host is proposed based on the interlayer distance of the prepared intercalates and amount of the intercalated guest molecules. - Graphical abstract: Nitrogen-containing organic compounds can be intercalated into the interlayer space of zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate. - Highlights: • Zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate was examined as a host material in intercalation chemistry. • A wide range of nitrogen-containing organic compounds were intercalated. • Possible arrangement of the intercalated species is described

  11. Studies on inorganic exchanger: zirconium antimonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dash, A.; Balasubramanian, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    The inorganic exchanger zirconium antimonate has been prepared and its characteristics evaluated. A method has been developed for the separation of 90 Sr and 144 Ce from fission products solution using this exchanger. (author). 23 refs., 18 f igs., 9 tabs

  12. Mechanism for iodine cracking of zirconium claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of iodine cracking of zirconium cladding is analyzed taking into account the effect of stresses on diffusion. A decisive effect of the stress gradiemt on crack propagation in an agressive medium is shown. The experimental data are compared with the proposed model

  13. Superconductivity in zirconium-rhodium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegler, S. T.

    1969-01-01

    Metallographic studies and transition temperature measurements were made with isothermally annealed and water-quenched zirconium-rhodium alloys. The results clarify both the solid-state phase relations at the Zr-rich end of the Zr-Rh alloy system and the influence upon the superconducting transition temperature of structure and composition.

  14. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic study of passive zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai Jiahe; Chen Yingzi [Center for Electrochemical Science and Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Macdonald, Digby D. [Center for Electrochemical Science and Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)], E-mail: ddm2@psu.edu

    2008-09-30

    Spent, unreproccessed nuclear fuel is generally contained within the operational fuel sheathing fabricated from a zirconium alloy (Zircaloy 2, Zircaloy 4, or Zirlo) and is then stored in a swimming pool and/or dry storage facilities until permanent disposal in a licensed repository. During this period, which begins with irradiation of the fuel in the reactor during operation, the fuel sheathing is exposed to various, aggressive environments. The objective of the present study was to characterize the nature of the passive film that forms on pure zirconium in contact with an aqueous phase [0.1 M B(OH){sub 3} + 0.001 M LiOH, pH 6.94] at elevated temperatures (in this case, 250 deg. C), prior to storage, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with the data being interpreted in terms of the point defect model (PDM). The results show that the corrosion resistance of zirconium in high temperature, de-aerated aqueous solutions is dominated by the outer layer. The extracted model parameter values can be used in deterministic models for predicting the accumulation of general corrosion damage to zirconium under a wide range of conditions that might exist in some repositories.

  15. Corrosion resistance of zirconium in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajimura, H.; Morikawa, H.; Nagano, H.

    1987-01-01

    Slow strain rate tests are effected on zirconium in boiling nitric acid to study the influence of nitric acid concentration, of oxidizing ions (Cr and Ce) and of electric potential. Corrosion resistance is excellent and stress corrosion cracking occurs only for severe conditions: 350 mV over electric potential for corrosion with nitric acid concentration of 40 % [fr

  16. Obtention of titanium and zirconium metallic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, P.R.G.; Rover, C.F.S.; Amaral, F.L.L.

    1988-01-01

    The development works of techniques and equipments for titanium and zirconium sponges obtention are mentioned. The Kroll Process used for the sponges production is described, consisting in the reduction of the metal tetracloride with magnesium in an inert atmosphere of helium or argon. (C.G.C.) [pt

  17. Change in mechanical properties of low-alloyed molybdenum alloys at two-stage strengthening during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernshtejn, L.M.; Zakharov, A.M.; Arbuzov, V.K.

    1977-01-01

    Change in mechanical properties of hardened low-alloyed molybdenum alloys (Mo-Zr-C and Mo-Zr-Nb-C) at two-stage strengthening during ageing at 1400 deg C is studied. The initial strengthening maximum following ageing for 5 hr is caused by separation of dispersed ZrC particles and is accompanied by worsened plasticity, a development characteristic of precipitation hardening processes. The second increase in strength after a 10-hr ageing is not accompanied by reduced plasticity, this being characteristic of strengthening as a result of reconstruction of the dislocation structure. Niobium (0.16 wt.%) added to Mo-Zr-C alloys simultaneously increases their plastic and strength properties. The said effect is caused by prevention of premature decomposition of alloys on account of increased low-temperature plasticity, which permits to obtain high resistance to plastic deformation

  18. Metabolic and environmental aspects of fusion reactor activation products: niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easterly, C.E.; Shank, K.E.

    1977-11-01

    A summary of the metabolic and environmental aspects of niobium is presented. The toxicological symptoms from exposure to niobium are given, along with lethal concentration values for acute and chronic exposures. Existing human data are presented; animal uptake and retention data are analyzed for various routes of administration. Recommended metabolic values are also presented along with comments concerning their use and appropriateness. The natural distribution of niobium is given for freshwater, seawater, and the biosphere. Concentration factors and retention of 95 Nb in the environment are discussed with reference to: plant retention via leaf absorption; plant retention via root uptake; uptake in terrestrial animals from plants; uptake in freshwater organisms; uptake in marine organisms; and movement in soil. Conclusions are drawn regarding needs for future work in these areas. This review was undertaken because niobium is expected to be a key metal in the development of commercial fusion reactors. It is recognized that niobium will likely not be used in the first generation reactors as a structural material but will appear as an alloy in such materials as superconducting wire

  19. Metabolic and environmental aspects of fusion reactor activation products: niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easterly, C.E.; Shank, K.E.

    1977-11-01

    A summary of the metabolic and environmental aspects of niobium is presented. The toxicological symptoms from exposure to niobium are given, along with lethal concentration values for acute and chronic exposures. Existing human data are presented; animal uptake and retention data are analyzed for various routes of administration. Recommended metabolic values are also presented along with comments concerning their use and appropriateness. The natural distribution of niobium is given for freshwater, seawater, and the biosphere. Concentration factors and retention of /sup 95/Nb in the environment are discussed with reference to: plant retention via leaf absorption; plant retention via root uptake; uptake in terrestrial animals from plants; uptake in freshwater organisms; uptake in marine organisms; and movement in soil. Conclusions are drawn regarding needs for future work in these areas. This review was undertaken because niobium is expected to be a key metal in the development of commercial fusion reactors. It is recognized that niobium will likely not be used in the first generation reactors as a structural material but will appear as an alloy in such materials as superconducting wire.

  20. Development of technology of high-purity compounds of tantalum and niobium with octanol use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majorov, V.G.; Nikolaev, A.I.; Kopkov, V.K.; Baklanova, I.V.; Safonova, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    Effect of composition of solutions and extractant expenditure on tantalum and niobium distribution during extraction by octanol and purification of tantalum and niobium extracts from impurities was studied. Scheme was developed according to which samples of high-pure tantalum and niobium pentaoxides were prepared [ru

  1. Preparation of selective molybdenum concentrate from collective coppermolybdenum concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Tusupbaev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers possibilities of selective separation of the concentrate of copper and molybdenum from a collective copper-molybdenum concentrate of Aktogay deposit using regrinding and conventional flotation reagents. In the case of conventional flotoreagents, the content of molybdenum in a molybdenum concentrate was 8.0% at extraction effectiveness 83.12%. At 27.96% extraction degree of copper, it’s content in the concentrate equaled to 21.3%. After regrinding, molybdenum content in the concentrate was 24.0% at the extraction effectiveness 59.63%, and copper content in the concentrate was 21.9% at the recovery of 61.23%. Thus, the regrinding of a collective copper-molybdenum concentrate resulted in an increase in the content of molybdenum in molybdenum concentrate by 16%, and the copper concentration increased by 0.6%.

  2. Mechanical niobium doping in barium titanate electroceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco-Davalos, I.A., E-mail: ivan.velascodavalos@gmail.com [Departmento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Zacatenco, 07338 México D.F. (Mexico); INRS-EMT, 1650 Boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes J3X 1S2 (Canada); Ruediger, A. [INRS-EMT, 1650 Boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes J3X 1S2 (Canada); Cruz-Rivera, J.J. [Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Sierra Leona 550, Lomas, 78210 S.L.P. (Mexico); Gomez-Yanez, C. [Departmento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Zacatenco, 07338 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-12-25

    Highlights: •We demonstrate a new doping procedure by Mechanical Alloying (MA). •For small dopant concentrations, charge compensation of Nb is primarily attributed to free electrons. •At higher Nb concentrations cation vacancies prevail as compensation mechanism. -- Abstract: Niobium is a well-established donor dopant for semi-conducting BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics. The conventional procedure to dissolve Nb into BaTiO{sub 3} relies on thermal activation at high temperatures (up to 1500 °C) and even then, large dwell times are necessary due to the small diffusion coefficients of Nb{sup 5+}. In this work, we demonstrate a new doping procedure by Mechanical Alloying (MA), which has already proven its potential for the fabrication of conductive electroceramics. In a planetary mill, powders of BaTiO{sub 3} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} were mixed for up to 540 min. The BaTiO{sub 3} unit cell volume increases with increasing Nb concentration. The electrical properties of conventional and mechanical alloyed samples as a function of Nb concentration are similar, however the mechanically alloyed samples shows a large conductivity that we attribute to a better homogeneity in the structure of MA-processed samples. For small dopant concentrations, charge compensation of the pentavalent Nb is primarily attributed to free electrons. At higher Nb concentrations cation vacancies prevail as compensation mechanism.

  3. Niobium Titanium and Copper wire samples

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Two wire samples, both for carrying 13'000Amperes. I sample is copper. The other is the Niobium Titanium wiring used in the LHC magnets. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. Magnet coils are made of copper-clad niobium–titanium cables — each wire in the cable consists of 9’000 niobium–titanium filaments ten times finer than a hair. The cables carry up to 12’500 amps and must withstand enormous electromagnetic forces. At full field, the force on one metre of magnet is comparable ...

  4. Carbochlorination kinetics of tantalum and niobium pentoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allain, E.; Gaballah, I.; Garcia, F.; Ferreira, S.; Ayala, J. N.; Hernandez, A.

    1999-01-01

    The carbochlorination kinetics of pure Nb 2 O 5 and Ta 2 O 5 by gas mixture (CL 2 +CO+N 2 ) between 380 and 1,000 degree centigree is studied. A calculation of the standard free energy of the carbochlorination reactions is made. A diagram of the phases stability is drawn. The influence of the gas flow, temperature and the partial pressure of Cl 2 and Co at temperatures below 650 degree centigree on the reaction rate is studied. The apparent activation energy is approximately 75 and 110 kJ/mol for Nb 2 O 5 and Ta 2 O 5 , respectively. At temperatures above 650 degree centigree the Arrhenius diagram presents and anomaly which may be attributed to the decomposition of the COCL 2 formed in situ. The apparent reaction order of the carbochlorination of these oxides against Cl 2 +CO is approximately 2. The carbochlorination rates of these oxides are much greater than those of chlorination by Cl 2 +N 2 . The carbochlorination kinetics of tin furnace slag leaching concentrates containing tantalum and niobium compounds are also studied and compared with the carbochlorination kinetics of the pure oxides. (Author) 14 refs

  5. Radiation effects in uranium-niobium titanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, J.; Wang, S.X.; Wang, L.M.; Ewing, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Pyrochlore is an important actinide host phase proposed for the immobilization of high level nuclear wastes and excess weapon plutonium.[1] Synthetic pyrochlore has a great variety of chemical compositions due to the possibility of extensive substitutions in the pyrochlore structure.[2] During the synthesis of pyrochlore, additional complex titanate phases may form in small quantities. The response of these phases to radiation damage must be evaluated because volume expansion of minor phases may cause micro-fracturing. In this work, two complex uranium-niobium titanates, U 3 NbO 9.8 (U-rich titanate) and Nb 3 UO 10 (Nb-rich titanate) were synthesized by the alkoxide/nitrate route at 1300 deg. C under an argon atmosphere. The phase composition and structure were analyzed by EDS, BSE, XRD, EMPA and TEM techniques. An 800 KeVKr 2+ irradiation was performed using the IVEM-Tandem Facility at Argonne National Laboratory in a temperature range from 30 K to 973 K. The radiation effects were observed by in situ TEM

  6. Sample of superconducting wiring (Niobium Titanium)

    CERN Multimedia

    About NbTi cable: The cable consists of 36 strands of superconducting wire, each strand has a diameter of 0.825 mm and houses 6300 superconducting filaments of niobium-titanium (Nb-Ti, a superconducting alloy). Each filament has a diameter of about 0.006 mm, i.e. 10 times smaller than a typical human hair. The filaments are embedded in a high-purity copper matrix. Copper is a normal conducting material. The filaments are in the superconductive state when the temperature is below about -263ºC (10.15 K). When the filaments leave the superconductive state, the copper acts as conductor transports the electrical current. Each strand of The NbTi cable (at superconducting state) has a current density of up to above 2000 A/mm2 at 9 T and -271ºC (2.15 K). A cable transport a current of about 13000 A at 10 T and -271ºC (2.15 K). About LHC superconducting wiring: The high magnetic fields needed for the LHC can only be reached using superconductors. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistan...

  7. Sample of superconducting wiring (Niobium Titanium)

    CERN Multimedia

    About NbTi cable: The cable consists of 36 strands of superconducting wire, each strand has a diameter of 0.825 mm and houses 6300 superconducting filaments of niobium-titanium (Nb-Ti, a superconducting alloy). Each filament has a diameter of about 0.006 mm, i.e. 10 times smaller than a typical human hair. The filaments are embedded in a high-purity copper matrix. Copper is a normal conducting material. The filaments are in the superconductive state when the temperature is below about -263ºC (10.15 K). When the filaments leave the superconductive state, the copper acts as conductor transports the electrical current. Each strand of The NbTi cable (at superconducting state) has a current density of up to above 2000 A/mm2 at 9 T and -271ºC (2.15 K). A cable transport a current of about 13000 A at 10 T and -271ºC (2.15 K). About LHC superconducting wiring: The high magnetic fields needed for the LHC can only be reached using superconductors. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resista...

  8. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Zircon, a zirconium silicate, is currently the most important commercial zirconium-bearing mineral. Baddeleyite, a natural form of zirconia, is less important but has some specific end uses. Both zircon and baddeleyite occur in hard-rock and placer deposits, but at present all zircon production is from placer deposits. Most baddeleyite production is from hard-rock deposits, principally as a byproduct of copper and phosphate-rock mining. World zirconium resources in identified, economically exploitable deposits are about 46 times current production rates. Of these resources, some 71 percent are in South Africa, Australia, and the United States. The principal end uses of zirconium minerals are in ceramic applications and as refractories, abrasives, and mold linings in foundries. A minor amount, mainly of zircon, is used for the production of hafnium-free zirconium metal, which is used principally for sheathing fuel elements in nuclear reactors and in the chemical-processing industry, aerospace engineering, and electronics. Australia and South Africa are the largest zircon producers and account for more than 70 percent of world output; the United States and the Soviet Union account for another 20 percent. South Africa accounts for almost all the world's production of baddeleyite, which is about 2 percent of world production of contained zirconia. Australia and South Africa are the largest exporters of zircon. Unless major new deposits are developed in countries that have not traditionally produced zircon, the pattern of world production is unlikely to change by 2020. The proportions, however, of production that come from existing producing countries may change somewhat.

  9. Detection of MM.-radiation with high current density submicron niobium-niobium Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daalmans, G.M.; Graauw, T. de; Lidholm, S.; Vliet, F. v.

    1980-01-01

    The rf-induced step heights in submicron niobium-niobium Josephson junctions are in good agreement with Russer theory at 230 and 240 GHz. At 115 and 460 GHz the agreement is less but still reasonably good. The junction noise without rf-bias is within a factor of two equal to the theoretical limit. With rf-bias applied it can be equal to the theoretical limit within a factor of two. The maximum conversion efficiency measured at 230 GHz was 0.18 and the lowest single side band mixer noise temperature at the same frequency was 380 K. Saturation effects are limiting the performance of the mixer. Improvements in eta and Tsub(M) of a factor of two can be expected by eliminating these saturation effects. The mixer which has been studied most extensively starting at 12-3-80 is still alive at 5-6-80 after many cooling cycles, storage at room temperature and soldering in and out of the dewar. The reliability of this type of junction cannot be questionable anymore. (orig.)

  10. Bibliographic study on molybdenum biokinetics. Literaturstudie zur Biokinetik von Molybdaen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erzberger, A.

    1988-05-01

    This bibliographical study compiles and analyzes findings about the metabolism and resorption of molybdenum. Besides including studies on the physiology of molybdenum 99, a general survey is given on molybdenum in the environment and on its physiological behaviour. In particular, information on the dependence of molybdenum resorption on various factors, such as the chemical form, antagonisms etc., are gathered from literature. These factors have to be considered for sensibly carrying out necessary experiments.

  11. Investigation of Zirconium Oxide Films in Different Dissolved Hydrogen Concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taeho; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that in pre-transition zirconium oxide, the volume fraction of tetragonal zirconium oxide increased near the oxide/metal (O/M) interface, and the sub-stoichiometric zirconium oxide layer was observed. The diffusion of oxygen ion through the oxide layer is the rate-limiting process during the pre-transition oxidation process, and this diffusion mainly occurs in the grain boundaries. The two layered oxide structure is formed in pre-transition oxide for the zirconium alloy in high-temperature water environment. It is known that the corrosion rate is related to the volume fraction of zirconium oxide and the pores in the oxides; therefore, the aim of this paper is to investigate the oxidation behavior in the pre-transition zirconium oxide in high-temperature water chemistry. In this study, in situ Raman and TEM analysis were conducted for investigating the phase transformation of zirconium alloy in primary water. From this study, the following conclusions are drawn: 1. The zirconium alloy was oxidized in primary water chemistry for 100 d, and Raman and TEM were measured after 30, 50, 80, and 100 d from start-up. 2. TEM and FFT analysis showed that the zirconium oxide mostly consisted of the monoclinic phase. The tetragonal zirconium oxide was just found near the O/M interface

  12. Determination of zirconium by fluoride ion selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahanty, B.N.; Sonar, V.R.; Gaikwad, R.; Raul, S.; Das, D.K.; Prakash, A.; Afzal, Md.; Panakkal, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Zirconium is used in a wide range of applications including nuclear clad, catalytic converters, surgical appliances, metallurgical furnaces, superconductors, ceramics, lamp filaments, anti corrosive alloys and photographical purposes. Irradiation testing of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr fuel pins has also demonstrated their feasibility as fuel in liquid metal reactors. Different methods that are employed for the determination of zirconium are spectrophotometry, potentiometry, neutron activation analysis and mass spectrometry. Ion-selective electrode (ISE), selective to zirconium ion has been studied for the direct potentiometric measurements of zirconium ions in various samples. In the present work, an indirect method has been employed for the determination of zirconium in zirconium nitrate sample using fluoride ion selective electrode. This method is based on the addition of known excess amount of fluoride ion to react with the zirconium ion to produce zirconium tetra fluoride at about pH 2-3, followed by determination of residual fluoride ion selective electrode. The residual fluoride ion concentrations were determined from the electrode potential data using calibration plot. Subsequently, zirconium ion concentrations were determined from the concentration of consumed fluoride ions. A precision of about 2% (RSD) with the mean recovery of more than 94% has been achieved for the determination of zirconium at the concentration of 4.40 X 10 -3 moles lit -1

  13. The XUV spectra of highly ionised molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, M.W.D.; Peacock, N.J.; Smith, C.C.; Hobby, M.G.; Cowan, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    The spectra of molybdenum ions produced in Tokamaks in the wavelength range 10-200 A have been reproduced in a plasma formed by laser beam irradiation of solid molybdenum targets. Lines from highly ionised stages of molybdenum (Mo XXX to Mo XXXII) have been distinguished by varying the laser beam intensity. Detailed analyses of the simpler ions, Mo XV (Ni-like), Mo XVI (Co-like), Mo XXXII (Na-like), and to a lesser extent Mo XXXI (Mg-like) and Mo XVII (Fe-like), have been achieved by comparison with ab initio calculations. A general interpretation of intermediate ion stages is also given but it is shown that most of these spectra are so complex, as a result of inner-subshell excitation, that detailed term-scheme analyses are nearly impossible. (author)

  14. XUV spectra of highly ionised molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansfield, M W.D.; Peacock, N J; Smith, C C; Hobby, M G [UKAEA, Abingdon. Culham Lab.; Cowan, R D

    1978-05-14

    The spectra of molybdenum ions produced in Tokamaks in the wavelength range 10-200 A have been reproduced in a plasma formed by laser beam irradiation of solid molybdenum targets. Lines from highly ionised stages of molybdenum (Mo XXX to Mo XXXII) have been distinguished by varying the laser beam intensity. Detailed analyses of the simpler ions, Mo XV (Ni-like), Mo XVI (Co-like), Mo XXXII (Na-like), and to a lesser extent Mo XXXI (Mg-like) and Mo XVII (Fe-like), have been achieved by comparison with ab initio calculations. A general interpretation of intermediate ion stages is also given but it is shown that most of these spectra are so complex, as a result of inner-subshell excitation, that detailed term-scheme analyses are nearly impossible.

  15. Molybdenum peroxo complex. Structure and thermal behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segawa, Koichi; Ooga, Katsumi; Kurusu, Yasuhiko

    1984-10-01

    The molybdenum peroxide (Mo-y) prepared by oxidation of molybdenum metal with hydrogen peroxide has been studied to determine its structure and thermal behavior. Temperature programmed decomposition has been used to study the thermal stability of Mo-y. Two distinct peaks, I and II, of decomposition processes are discernible in Mo-y. Peak I corresponds to the elimination of water of crystallization and peak II to the decomposition of a peroxide ion of Mo-y. IR and UV examinations support the results of the thermal analysis. The IR band at 931 cm/sup -1/ and the UV band at 381 nm show the same thermal behavior. Both bands are attributable to the peroxide ion of Mo-y. Spectroscopic studies show that Mo-y has the tetrahedral coordination derived from the single molybdenum complex, which has double bond oxygens attached to Mo atom and has a symmetric type of peroxide ion with one water of crystallization.

  16. Separation and selective determination of molybdenum with sodiumthiosulfate and ethylacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainberger, L.; de Oliveira Andrade, W.

    1982-01-01

    A sensitive and selective method of spectrophotometric determination of molybdenum is described. Molybdenum is extracted to more than 97%. Lambert-Beer's law is obeyed between 0.35 and 30μg/10ml of the used aqueous solution. 43 ions concerning their interference are studied. The method was used to determine the content of molybdenum in black beans. (Author)

  17. Parametrisation of the niobium thermal conductivity in the superconducting state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koechlin, F.; Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal conductivity measurements of niobium sheets manufactured for deep-drawing of superconducting cavities have been gathered. Due to various histories of the niobium samples and a wide range of metal purities (35< RRR<1750) the data offer a large scatter of thermal conductivities. An attempt is made to obtain an analytical expression with realistic parameters for the thermal conductivity between 1.8 K and 9.25 K. The set of parameters deduced from a least square fit of experimental data is not very different from those yielded by the theory of superconducting metals, taken as a starting point. This should make possible to obtain a reasonable guess of the thermal conductivity of niobium in this temperature range, once the RRR and the past history of the metal samples have been determined. (author)

  18. Compatibility of niobium, titanium, and vanadium metals with LMFBR cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1975-10-01

    A series of laboratory capsule annealing experiments were conducted to assess the compatibility of niobium, vanadium, and titanium with 316 stainless steel cladding in the temperature range of 700 to 800 0 C. Niobium, vanadium, and titanium are cantidate oxygen absorber materials for control of oxygen chemistry in LMFBR fuel pins. Capsule examination indicated good compatibility between niobium and 316 stainless steel at 800 0 C. Potential compatibility problems between cladding and vanadium or titanium were indicated at 800 0 C under reducing conditions. In the presence of Pu/sub 0.25/U/sub 0.75/O/sub 1.98/ fuel (Δanti G 02 congruent to -160 kcal/mole) no reaction was observed between vanadium or titanium and cladding at 800 0 C

  19. Characterization and sintering of niobium-ATR alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibuya, N.H.; Iwasaki, H.; Suzuki, C.K.; Pinatti, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    In the niobium aluminothermy a slag is produced, composed mostly of alumina and other compounds such as niobium oxide and silica. The phase composition of this ATR alumina was characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry, and afterwards this alumina was subjected to leaching processes. It was noticed that the original content of 70% α-alumina in slag rose to 95% after the calcination. ATR alumina (leached and calcined, and without any treatment) was used to make pressed bodies which were fired in air at 1200 to 1400 0 C for 1 to 10,5 hours; and in vacuum at 1550 to 1800$0C for 2 hours. Characterization was done by density measurements, X-ray diffractometry and ultrasonic analysis. Ultrasonic analysis of some vacuum fired bodies showed londitudinal velocities close to the value found in literature. Correlation of several techniques measurements disclosed the niobium oxide interference in sintering. (Author) [pt

  20. Growth of anodic oxide films on oxygen-containing niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habazaki, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)]. E-mail: habazaki@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Ogasawara, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Konno, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Shimizu, K. [University Chemical Laboratory, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Asami, K. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Saito, K. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Nagata, S. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Skeldon, P. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Thompson, G.E. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-20

    The present study is directed at understanding of the influence of oxygen in the metal on anodic film growth on niobium, using sputter-deposited niobium containing from about 0-52 at.% oxygen, with anodizing carried out at high efficiency in phosphoric acid electrolyte. The findings reveal amorphous anodic niobia films, with no significant effect of oxygen on the field strength, transport numbers, mobility of impurity species and capacitance. However, since niobium is partially oxidized due to presence of oxygen in the substrate, less charge is required to form the films, hence reducing the time to reach a particular film thickness and anodizing voltage. Further, the relative thickness of film material formed at the metal/film interface is increased by the incorporation of oxygen species into the films from the substrate, with an associated altered depth of incorporation of phosphorus species into the films.

  1. Precipitation of hydrides in high purity niobium after different treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkov, F.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Grassellino, A.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation of lossy non-superconducting niobium hydrides represents a known problem for high purity niobium in superconducting applications. Using cryogenic optical and laser confocal scanning microscopy we have directly observed surface precipitation and evolution of niobium hydrides in samples after different treatments used for superconducting RF cavities for particle acceleration. Precipitation is shown to occur throughout the sample volume, and the growth of hydrides is well described by the fast diffusion-controlled process in which almost all hydrogen is precipitated at $T=140$~K within $\\sim30$~min. 120$^{\\circ}$C baking and mechanical deformation are found to affect hydride precipitation through their influence on the number of nucleation and trapping centers.

  2. Recovery of uranium and molybdenum from a carbonate type uranium-molybdenum ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Genmao; Zeng Yijun; Tang Baobin; Meng Shu; Xu Guolong

    2014-01-01

    Based on the results of process mineralogical research of a carbonate type uranium-molybdenum ore, leaching behaviors of the uranium-molybdenum ore were studied by alkali agitation leaching, conventional alkali column leaching and alkali curing column leaching processes. The results showed that using the alkali curing column leaching process, the leaching rate of molybdenum increased to more than 90%, and the leaching rate of uranium was about 85%, Compared with the conventional alkali column leaching process, the leaching time of the alkali curing column leaching process decreased by 60 days. (authors)

  3. Spectrographic analysis of uranium-molybdenum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.

    1967-01-01

    A spectrographic method of analysis has been developed for uranium-molybdenum alloys containing up to 10 % Mo. The carrier distillation technique, with gallium oxide and graphite as carriers, is used for the semiquantitative determination of Al, Cr, Fe, Ni and Si, involving the conversion of the samples into oxides. As a consequence of the study of the influence of the molybdenum on the line intensities, it is useful to prepare only one set of standards with 0,6 % MoO 3 . Total burning excitation is used for calcium, employing two sets of standards with 0,6 and 7.5 MoO 3 . (Author) 5 refs

  4. Low noise niobium dc SQUID with a planar input coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, V. J.; van den Hamer, P.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    1983-02-01

    A practical all-niobium dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with a niobium spiral input coil has been developed. The SQUID utilizes submicron Josephson junctions. The best intrinsic energy resolution obtained with a 1-nH SQUID is 4×10-32 J/Hz. A 20-turn 1.2-μH input coil is coupled to a 2.3-nH SQUID with an efficiency of 0.5. The energy resolution with respect to the coil is 1×10-30 J/Hz.

  5. Low noise niobium dc SQUID with a planar input coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Waal, V.J.; van den Hamer, P.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    1983-02-15

    A practical all-niobium dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with a niobium spiral input coil has been developed. The SQUID utilizes submicron Josephson junctions. The best intrinsic energy resolution obtained with a 1-nH SQUID is 4 x 10/sup -32/ J/Hz. A 20-turn 1.2-..mu..H input coil is coupled to a 2.3-nH SQUID with an efficiency of 0.5. The energy resolution with respect to the coil is 1 x 10/sup -30/ J/Hz.

  6. Electromigration of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium, niobium, and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, C.L.

    1977-10-01

    The electric mobility and effective valence of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium, niobium, tantalum and three niobium-tantalum alloys were measured. A resistance technique was used to directly determine the electric mobility of hydrogen and deuterium at 30 0 C while a steady-state method was used to measure the effective valence. The use of mass spectrographic techniques on a single specimen which contained both hydrogen and deuterium greatly increased the precision with which the isotope effect in the effective valence could be measured

  7. Thermal diffusivity of alumina-zirconia sintered with niobium additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, W.N. dos; Paulin Filho, P.I.; Taylor, R.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of niobium oxide addition on the alumina-zirconia thermal diffusivity was investigated from 100 0 C to 1000 0 C by the laser flash method. It was observed that 4 to 6% addition of niobium oxide increases the thermal diffusivity when samples were sintered at 1450 0 C. This effect was due to elimination of porosity by formation of liquid please above 1420 0 C in the Al 2 O 3 - Nb 2 O 5 system. (author). 7 refs., 3 figs

  8. Sorption of niobium on boreal forest soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederlund, Mervi; Hakanen, Martti; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry

    2015-07-01

    The sorption of niobium (Nb) was investigated on humus and mineral soil samples taken from various depths of a four-metre deep forest soil pit on Olkiluoto Island, southwestern Finland. Mass distribution coefficients, K{sub d}, were determined in batch sorption tests. The steady state of Nb sorption was observed in the mineral soil samples already after one week of equilibration, and sorption decreased with depth from a very high value of 185000 mL/g at 0.7 m to 54000 mL/g at 3.4 m. The reason behind this decrease is probably the tenfold reduction in the specific surface area of the soil at the same depth range. Distribution coefficients were clearly lower in the humus layer (1000 mL/g). The K{sub d} values determined in pure water at a pH range of 4.7-6.5 were at a high level (above 55000 mL/g), but decreased dramatically above pH 6.5, corresponding to the change in the major Nb species from the neutral Nb(OH){sub 5} to the low-sorbing anionic Nb(OH){sub 6}{sup -} and Nb(OH){sub 7}{sup 2-}. However, the K{sub d} values in the model soil solution were in the slightly alkaline range an order of magnitude higher than in pure water, which is probably caused by the formation of calcium niobate surface precipitate or electrostatic interaction between surface-sorbed calcium and solute Nb. Among nine soil constituent minerals kaolinite performed best in retaining Nb in both pure water and model soil solution at pH 8, whereas potassium feldspar showed the poorest sorption. The K{sub d} value for kaolinite was above 500000 mL/g in both solutions, while the respective potassium feldspar values were in the range of 120-220 mL/g.

  9. Molten salt extractive distillation process for zirconium-hafnium separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Stoltz, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for zirconium-hafnium separation. It utilizes an extractive distillation column with a mixture of zirconium and hafnium tetrachlorides introduced into a distillation column having a top and bottom with hafnium enriched overheads taken from the top of the column and a molten salt solvent circulated through the column to provide a liquid phase, and with molten salt solvent containing zirconium chloride being taken from the bottom of the distillation column. The improvements comprising: utilizing a molten salt solvent consisting principally of lithium chloride and at least one of sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium chlorides; stripping of the zirconium chloride taken from the bottom of the distillation column by electrochemically reducing zirconium from the molten salt solvent; and utilizing a pressurized reflux condenser on the top of the column to add the hafnium chloride enriched overheads to the molten salt solvent previously stripped of zirconium chloride

  10. Advances in zirconium technology for nuclear reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, C.

    2002-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are extensively used as a material for cladding nuclear fuels and for making core structurals of water-cooled nuclear power reactors all over the world for generation of nearly 16 percent of the worlds electricity. Only four countries in the world, namely France, USA, Russia and India, have large zirconium industry and capability to manufacture reactor grade zirconium sponge, a number of zirconium alloys and a wide variety of structural components for water cooled nuclear reactor. The present paper summarises the status of zirconium technology and highlights the achievement of Nuclear Fuel Complex during the last ten years in developing a wide variety of zirconium alloys and components for water-cooled nuclear power programme

  11. Investigation of anodic oxide coatings on zirconium after heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, Maciej; Dercz, Grzegorz; Suchanek, Katarzyna; Simka, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxide layers prepared via PEO of zirconium were subjected to heat treatment. • Surface characteristics were determined for the obtained oxide coatings. • Heat treatment led to the partial destruction of the anodic oxide layer. • Pitting corrosion resistance of zirconium was improved after the modification. - Abstract: Herein, results of heat treatment of zirconium anodised under plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) conditions at 500–800 °C are presented. The obtained oxide films were investigated by means of SEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The corrosion resistance of the zirconium specimens was evaluated in Ringer's solution. A bilayer oxide coatings generated in the course of PEO of zirconium were not observed after the heat treatment. The resulting oxide layers contained a new sublayer located at the metal/oxide interface is suggested to originate from the thermal oxidation of zirconium. The corrosion resistance of the anodised metal was improved after the heat treatment

  12. Variation of Mechanical Properties of High RRR And Reactor Grade Niobium With Heat Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapati Myneni; H. Umezawa

    2003-06-01

    Superconducting rf cavities used as accelerating structures in particle accelerators are made from high purity niobium with residual resistance ratios greater than 250. Reactor grade niobium is also used to make wave-guide and/or end group components for these accelerating structures. The major impurities in this type of niobium are interstitially dissolved gases such as hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen in addition to carbon. After fabricating the niobium accelerating structures, they are subjected to heat treatments for several hours in vacuum at temperatures of up to 900 C for degassing hydrogen or up to 1400 C for improving the thermal conductivity of niobium considerably. These heat treatments are affecting the mechanical properties of niobium drastically. In this paper the variation of the mechanical properties of high purity and reactor grade niobium with heat treatments in a vacuum of {approx} 10{sup -6} Torr and temperatures from 600 C to 1250 C for periods of 10 to 6 hours are presented.

  13. Translucency and Strength of High Translucency Monolithic Zirconium Oxide Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-17

    Zirconium -Oxide Materials presented at/published to the Journal of General Dentistry with MDWI 41-108, and has been assigned local file #16208. 2...Zirconia-Oxide Materials 6. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide...OBSOLETE 48. DATE Page 3 of 3 Pages Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide Materials Abstract Dental materials

  14. Immobilization of transition metal ions on zirconium phosphate monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melezhik, A.V.; Brej, V.V.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that ions of transition metals (copper, iron, vanadyl, titanium) are adsorbed on zirconium phosphate monolayers. The zirconium phosphate threshold capacity corresponds to substitution of all protons of hydroxyphosphate groups by equivalent amounts of copper, iron or vanadyl. Adsorption of polynuclear ions is possible in case of titanium. The layered substance with specific surface up to 300 m 2 /g, wherein ultradispersed titanium dioxide particles are intercalirated between zirconium-phosphate layers, is synthesized

  15. Titanium zirconium and hafnium coordination compounds with vanillin thiosemicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konunova, Ts.B.; Kudritskaya, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Coordination compounds of titanium zirconium and hafnium tetrachlorides with vanillin thiosemicarbazone of MCl 4 x nLig composition, where n=1.5, 4 for titanium and 1, 2, 4 for zirconium and hafnium, are synthesized. Molar conductivity of ethanol solutions is measured; IR spectroscopic and thermochemical investigation are carried out. The supposition about ligand coordination via sulfur and azomethine nitrogen atoms is made. In all cases hafnium forms stable compounds than zirconium

  16. Manufacturing process to reduce large grain growth in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosecrans, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described of treating cold worked zirconium alloys to reduce large grain growth during thermal treatment above its recrystallization temperature. The method comprises heating the zirconium alloy at a temperature of about 1300 0 F. to 1350 0 F. for about 1 to 3 hours subsequent to cold working the zirconium alloy and prior to the thermal treatment at a temperature of between 1450 0 -1550 0 F., the thermal treatment temperature being above the recrystallization temperature

  17. Preparation of zirconium molybdate gel generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charoen, S.; Aungurarat, G.; Laohawilai, S.; Sukontpradit, W.; Jingjit, S.

    1994-01-01

    A procedure for preparation of 99mTc generator based on conversion to zirconium molybdate gel of 99Mo produced by neutron activation was reported. The gel was prepared from zirconium oxychloride solution pH 1.6, ammonium molybdate solution pH 3-5 and mole ratio of Zr:Mo 1:1 which had water content about 7-8%. Small generators containing 1-1.5 g of gel were eluted with average efficiencies of 77% and the activity peak in the first 3 ml of 10 ml of saline solution. The amount of Mo and Zr in eluates were below the acceptance limit. The gel generators of activity about 100 mCi were prepared and had the good performance in elutability and stability

  18. Study of some properties of zirconium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prospert, J.

    1963-05-01

    Zirconium phosphate has been studied with a view to using it as an ion exchanger: the first objective was to develop a method of preparation easy to apply and also reproducible. To this end, several tests were carried out varying the molar ratios of phosphorus and of zirconium. Some physical properties such as the diffraction of X-rays were examined. The work then involved certain chemical properties, particularly the percentages of free water and structural water given by the loss on calcination, the Karl-Fisher method and the weight losses by thermogravimetry. Finally an attempts was made to apply the exchanger to the separation of alkaline ions. The static tests showed that the order of fixation of these ions was Cs + > Rb + >> K + > Na + . Tests with columns showed that Na + and K + were easily separable, as was the Rb + -Cs + mixture, this last pair being fairly difficult to dissociate. (author) [fr

  19. Separation process of zirconium and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hure, J.; Saint-James, R.

    1955-01-01

    About the separation different processes of zirconium-hafnium, the extraction by solvent in cross-current is the most easily the process usable on an industrial scale. It uses tributyl phosphate as solvent, diluted with white spirit to facilitate the decanting. Some exploratory tests showed that nitric environment seemed the most favorable for extraction; but a lot of other factors intervene in the separation process. We studied the influence of the acidity successively, the NO 3 - ions concentration, the role of the cation coming with NO 3 - , as well as the influence of the concentration of zirconium in the solution on the separation coefficient β = α Zr / α Hf . (M.B.) [fr

  20. Sorption of Europium in zirconium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia R, G.

    2004-01-01

    Some minerals have the property of sipping radioactive metals in solution, that it takes advantage to manufacture contention barriers that are placed in the repositories of nuclear wastes. The more recent investigations are focused in the development of new technologies guided to the sorption of alpha emissors on minerals which avoid their dispersion in the environment. In an effort to contribute to the understanding of this type of properties, some studies of sorption of Europium III are presented like homologous of the americium, on the surface of zirconium silicate (ZrSiO 4 ). In this work the results of sorption experiences are presented as well as the interpretation of the phenomena of the formation of species in the surface of the zirconium silicate. (Author)

  1. New solvent extraction process for zirconium and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Katoh, Y.; Miyazaki, H.

    1984-01-01

    The authors' company developed a new solvent extraction process for zirconium and hafnium separation, and started production of zirconium sponge by this new process in September 1979. The process utilizes selective extraction of zirconium oxysulfate using high-molecular alkyl amine, and has the following advantages: 1. This extraction system has a separation factor as high as 10 to 20 for zirconium and hafnium in the range of suitable acid concentration. 2. In the scrubbing section, removal of all the hafnium that coexists with zirconium in the organic solvent can be effectively accomplished by using scrubbing solution containing hafnium-free zirconium sulfate. Consequently, hafnium in the zirconium sponge obtained is reduced to less than 50 ppm. 3. The extractant undergoes no chemical changes but is very stable for a long period. In particular, its solubility in water is small, about 20 ppm maximum, posing no environmental pollution problems such as are often caused by other process raffinates. At the present time, the zirconium and hafnium separation operation is very stable, and zirconium sponge made by this process can be applied satisfactorily to nuclear reactors

  2. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulac, B.L.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Welding, Joining, and Coatings Research; Burt, R.P. [Alumax Technical Center, Golden, CO (United States); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-01

    When gas-tungsten arc welded, iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure which is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Titanium inoculation effectively refined the fusion zone microstructure in iron aluminide weldments, but the inoculated weldments had a reduced fracture strength despite the presence of a finer microstructure. The weldments fractured by transgranular cleavage which nucleated at cracked second phase particles. With titanium inoculation, second phase particles in the fusion zone changed shape and also became more concentrated at the grain boundaries, which increased the particle spacing in the fusion zone. The observed decrease in fracture strength with titanium inoculation was attributed to increased spacing of second phase particles in the fusion zone. Current research has focused on the weldability of zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides. Preliminary work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has shown that zirconium and carbon additions affect the weldability of the alloy as well as the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of the weldments. A sigmajig hot cracking test apparatus has been constructed and tested at Colorado School of Mines. Preliminary characterization of hot cracking of three zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides, each containing a different total concentration of zirconium at a constant zirconium/carbon ratio of ten, is in progress. Future testing will include low zirconium alloys at zirconium/carbon ratios of five and one, as well as high zirconium alloys (1.5 to 2.0 atomic percent) at zirconium/carbon ratios of ten to forty.

  3. Loading rate and test temperature effects on fracture of in situ niobium silicide-niobium composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigney, J.D.; Lewandowski, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Arc cast, extruded, and heat-treated in situ composites of niobium silicide (Nb 5 Si 3 ) intermetallic with niobium phases (primary--Nb p and secondary--Nb s ) exhibited high fracture resistance in comparison to monolithic Nb 5 Si 3 . In toughness tests conducted at 298 K and slow applied loading rates, the fracture process proceeded by the microcracking of the Nb 5 Si 3 and plastic deformation of the Nb p and Nb s phases, producing resistance-curve behavior and toughnesses of 28 MPa√m with damage zone lengths less than 500 microm. The effects of changes in the Nb p yield strength and fracture behavior on the measured toughnesses were investigated by varying the loading rates during fracture tests at both 77 and 298 K. Quantitative fractography was utilized to completely characterize each fracture surface created at 298 K in order to determine the type of fracture mode (i.e., dimpled, cleavage) exhibited by the Nb p . Specimens tested at either higher loading rates or lower test temperatures consistently exhibited a greater amount of cleavage fracture in the Nb p , while the Nb s always remained ductile. However, the fracture toughness values determined from experiments spanning six orders of magnitude in loading rate at 298 and 77 K exhibited little variation, even under conditions when the majority of Nb p phases failed by cleavage at 77 K. The changes in fracture mode with increasing loading rate and/or decreasing test temperature and their effects on fracture toughness are rationalized by comparison to existing theoretical models

  4. Traps in Zirconium Alloys Oxide Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmar Frank

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxide films long-time grown on tubes of three types of zirconium alloys in water and in steam were investigated, by analysing I-V characteristic measured at constant voltages with various temperatures. Using theoretical concepts of Rose [3] and Gould [5], ZryNbSn(Fe proved to have an exponential distribution of trapping centers below the conduction band edge, wheras Zr1Nb and IMP Zry-4 proved to have single energy trap levels.

  5. Structure of zirconium dioxide based porous glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gubanova, N. N.; Kopitsa, G. P.; Ezdakova, K. V.; Baranchikov, A. Y.; Angelov, Borislav; Feoktystov, A.; Pipich, V.; Ryukhtin, Vasyl; Ivanov, V. K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 5 (2014), s. 967-975 ISSN 1027-4510 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/1600; GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019; GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : zirconium dioxide * porous glasse * nanoparticles Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders (UJF-V) Impact factor: 0.359, year: 2012

  6. Evaluation of a Zirconium Recycle Scrubber System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bruffey, Stephanie H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    A hot-cell demonstration of the zirconium recycle process is planned as part of the Materials Recovery and Waste Forms Development (MRWFD) campaign. The process treats Zircaloy® cladding recovered from used nuclear fuel with chlorine gas to recover the zirconium as volatile ZrCl4. This releases radioactive tritium trapped in the alloy, converting it to volatile tritium chloride (TCl). To meet regulatory requirements governing radioactive emissions from nuclear fuel treatment operations, the capture and retention of a portion of this TCl may be required prior to discharge of the off-gas stream to the environment. In addition to demonstrating tritium removal from a synthetic zirconium recycle off-gas stream, the recovery and quantification of tritium may refine estimates of the amount of tritium present in the Zircaloy cladding of used nuclear fuel. To support these objectives, a bubbler-type scrubber was fabricated to remove the TCl from the zirconium recycle off-gas stream. The scrubber was fabricated from glass and polymer components that are resistant to chlorine and hydrochloric acid solutions. Because of concerns that the scrubber efficiency is not quantitative, tests were performed using DCl as a stand-in to experimentally measure the scrubbing efficiency of this unit. Scrubbing efficiency was ~108% ± 3% with water as the scrubber solution. Variations were noted when 1 M NaOH scrub solution was used, values ranged from 64% to 130%. The reason for the variations is not known. It is recommended that the equipment be operated with water as the scrubbing solution. Scrubbing efficiency is estimated at 100%.

  7. Zirconium oxide obtainment from brazilian zircon concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, S.; Martins, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    This work presents the experimental results of studies about alkaline melting, acid leaching and sulfation steps for obtention of zirconium oxide and partially stabilized zirconia by yttrium and rare-earth coprecipitation in chlorine medium, starting from the brazilian zircon concentrate. Using statistical methods of factorial design and the Packett-Burman approach, the results are discussed and the optimal conditions of the production steps were determined. (author)

  8. Process for separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelikman, A.N.; Voldman, G.M.; Rumyantsev, V.K.; Ziberov, G.N.; Kagermanian, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    A process for the separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction involves the addition of HCl or HNO 3 to an aqueous solution containing tungsten and molybdenum to obtain a pH from 0.5 to 4.3, and introduction of a stabilizer comprising water-soluble phosphorus salts and a complexing agent, hydrogen peroxide, in an amount from 1.5 to 2 mole per 1 g-atom of the total content of tungsten and molybdenum. Then molybdenum is selectively extracted from the resulting aqueous solution with tri-n-butylphosphate with equal volumetric proportioning of the aqueous and organic solutions. Re-extraction of molybdenum and partially tungsten is carried out from the organic extracting agent with an alkali or soda solution. The process makes possible the preparation of tungsten solution containing no more than 0.001 g/l of molybdenum, and an increase in the degree of extraction of tungsten and molybdenum

  9. Recent situation and future of molybdenum mineral resources; Molybdenum shigen no genjo to shorai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, K.; Nishiyama, T. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1997-05-05

    Molybdenum is produced mainly from molybdenite, and the majority of this ore is exploited from the porphyry deposit. The reserve is estimated at 5.5-million ton. A total of 118-thousand ton was produced across the world in 1995, in the U.S., China, Chile, and Canada, the countries named in the order of quantities they exploited. Molybdenite is first refined by flotation for the production of a sulphide. It is subjected to oxidizing roasting for conversion into crude molybdenum trioxide, which is next subjected to extraction in warmed-up aqueous ammonia and then to evaporation for the crystallization of ammonium paramolybdate. The crystals are baked for conversion into molybdenum trioxide of the ordinary purity, to be further processed into ferromolybdenum, molybdenum compounds, molybdenum powder, etc. In view of the magnitude of demand, the metal is used mostly for the manufacture of special steels and special alloys. The demand for this metal, though small in size, involves important articles, such as line materials for semiconductors in the power industry, catalysts in the chemical industry, and lubricants. Japan`s stockpile includes molybdenum, but the U.S. has been stockpiling none since 1977. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. A comparative evaluation of metallurgical properties of stainless steel and TMA archwires with timolium and titanium niobium archwires - An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalakshmi R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aims to evaluate and compare the mechanical and metallurgical properties of stainless steel and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA archwires, with recently introduced timolium and titanium niobium arch wires. Materials and Methods: Archwires were categorized into four groups (group I to IV with 10 samples in each group. They were evaluated for tensile strength, yield strength, modulus of elasticity, load deflection, frictional properties and weld characteristics. Results: The results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA test and it indicated that stainless steel has high strength, high stiffness and low friction compared to other arch wires, thereby proving that it is the best choice for both sliding as well as frictionless retraction mechanics. TMA with its high formability, low stiffness and low load deflection property is suited to apply consistent force in malaligned teeth but, high friction limits its use in retraction only with loop mechanics. Conclusion: Timolium possesses comparatively low stiffness, better strength and behaves as an intermediate between stainless steel and TMA and hence can be tried for almost all clinical situations. Low springback and high formability of titanium-niobium archwire allows creation of finishing bends and thus it can be used as finishing archwire.

  11. Thermodynamic Properties of Manganese and Molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    This work reviews and discusses the data on the various thermodynamic properties of manganese and molybdenum available through March 1985. These include heat capacity, enthalpy, enthalpy of transitions and melting, vapor pressure, and enthalpy of vaporization. The existing data have been critically evaluated and analyzed. The recommended values for the heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy function from 0.5 to 2400 K for manganese and from 0.4 to 5000 K for molybdenum have been generated, as have heat capacity values for supercooled β-Mn and for γ-Mn below 298.15 K. The recommended values for vapor pressure cover the temperature range from 298.15 to 2400 K for manganese and from 298.15 to 5000 K for molybdenum. These values are referred to temperatures based on IPTS-1968. The uncertainties in the recommended values of the heat capacity range from +-3% to +-5% for manganese and from +-1.5% to +-3% for molybdenum

  12. Paraelasticity in electron-irradiated molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuneu, Brigitte; Quere, Yves.

    1981-11-01

    The relaxation of a radiation-induced point defect-most probably the rotation of a dumbell-is observed during isothermal anneals of irradiated molybdenum by resistivity measurements. The recovery of close pairs is not affected, in first analysis, by the presence of a uniaxial stress

  13. Exploring atomic defects in molybdenum disulphide monolayers

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jinhua; Hu, Zhixin; Probert, Matt; Li, Kun; Lv, Danhui; Yang, Xinan; Gu, Lin; Mao, Nannan; Feng, Qingliang; Xie, Liming; Zhang, Jin; Wu, Dianzhong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Jin, Chuanhong; Ji, Wei; Zhang, Xixiang; Yuan, Jun; Zhang, Ze

    2015-01-01

    Defects usually play an important role in tailoring various properties of two-dimensional materials. Defects in two-dimensional monolayer molybdenum disulphide may be responsible for large variation of electric and optical properties. Here we present a comprehensive joint experiment-theory investigation of point defects in monolayer molybdenum disulphide prepared by mechanical exfoliation, physical and chemical vapour deposition. Defect species are systematically identified and their concentrations determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, and also studied by ab-initio calculation. Defect density up to 3.5 × 10 13 cm '2 is found and the dominant category of defects changes from sulphur vacancy in mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition samples to molybdenum antisite in physical vapour deposition samples. Influence of defects on electronic structure and charge-carrier mobility are predicted by calculation and observed by electric transport measurement. In light of these results, the growth of ultra-high-quality monolayer molybdenum disulphide appears a primary task for the community pursuing high-performance electronic devices.

  14. Exploring atomic defects in molybdenum disulphide monolayers

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jinhua

    2015-02-19

    Defects usually play an important role in tailoring various properties of two-dimensional materials. Defects in two-dimensional monolayer molybdenum disulphide may be responsible for large variation of electric and optical properties. Here we present a comprehensive joint experiment-theory investigation of point defects in monolayer molybdenum disulphide prepared by mechanical exfoliation, physical and chemical vapour deposition. Defect species are systematically identified and their concentrations determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, and also studied by ab-initio calculation. Defect density up to 3.5 × 10 13 cm \\'2 is found and the dominant category of defects changes from sulphur vacancy in mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition samples to molybdenum antisite in physical vapour deposition samples. Influence of defects on electronic structure and charge-carrier mobility are predicted by calculation and observed by electric transport measurement. In light of these results, the growth of ultra-high-quality monolayer molybdenum disulphide appears a primary task for the community pursuing high-performance electronic devices.

  15. Reaction of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, A.V.; Melekhin, V.F.; Pegov, V.S.

    1989-01-01

    The investigation results of interaction in the B 4 C-MoSi 2 system during sintering in vacuum are presented. Sintering of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide is shown to lead to the formation of MoB 2 , SiC, Mo 5 Si 3 compounds, the presence of carbon-containing covering plays an important role in sintering

  16. Molybdenum silicide based materials and their properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Z.; Stiglich, J.; Sudarshan, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi 2 ) is a promising candidate material for high temperature structural applications. It is a high melting point (2030 C) material with excellent oxidation resistance and a moderate density (6.24 g/cm 3 ). However, low toughness at low temperatures and high creep rates at elevated temperatures have hindered its commercialization in structural applications. Much effort has been invested in MoSi 2 composites as alternatives to pure molybdenum disilicide for oxidizing and aggressive environments. Molybdenum disilicide-based heating elements have been used extensively in high-temperature furnaces. The low electrical resistance of silicides in combination with high thermal stability, electron-migration resistance, and excellent diffusion-barrier characteristics is important for microelectronic applications. Projected applications of MoSi 2 -based materials include turbine airfoils, combustion chamber components in oxidizing environments, missile nozzles, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing. On this paper, synthesis, fabrication, and properties of the monolithic and composite molybdenum silicides are reviewed

  17. The utilization and performance of poly zirconium chloride (PZC) as chromatographic column for 99mTc generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Anuar Wan Awang; Zulkifli Mohd Hashim; Saaban Kassim

    2004-01-01

    We report on the performance test of column 99m Tc generator utilizing poly zirconium chloride as an adsorbent. Natural molybdenum trioxide was irradiated for 2 hrs at a neutron flux of about 1.5 x 10 12 n/cm 2 /s. A total fourteen generators have been prepared from the experiments. Yield of 99m Tc has been 60-93% and measured 99 Mo content in eluates is 0.20-0.44 %. The adsorption efficiency of 99 Mo on PZC column is between 85 - 92 %. The flow rates from the elution are relatively very poor and take about 5 minutes to finish the elution of 1 ml saline. (author)

  18. Fluorometric determination of zirconium in minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, W.C.; Shapiro, L.; White, C.E.

    1951-01-01

    The increasing use of zirconium in alloys and in the ceramics industry has created renewed interest in methods for its determination. It is a common constituent of many minerals, but is usually present in very small amounts. Published methods tend to be tedious, time-consuming, and uncertain as to accuracy. A new fluorometric procedure, which overcomes these objections to a large extent, is based on the blue fluorescence given by zirconium and flavonol in sulfuric acid solution. Hafnium is the only element that interferes. The sample is fused with borax glass and sodium carbonate and extracted with water. The residue is dissolved in sulfuric acid, made alkaline with sodium hydroxide to separate aluminum, and filtered. The precipitate is dissolved in sulfuric acid and electrolysed in a Melaven cell to remove iron. Flavonol is then added and the fluorescence intensity is measured with a photo-fluorometer. Analysis of seven standard mineral samples shows excellent results. The method is especially useful for minerals containing less than 0.25% zirconium oxide.

  19. Study of zirconium-addition binary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wozniakova, B.; Kuchar, L.

    1975-01-01

    The curves are given of the solid and the liquid of binary zirconium-addition systems. Most additions reduce the melting temperature of zirconium. The only known additions to increase the melting temperature are nitrogen, oxygen and hafnium. Also given are the transformation curves of the systems and the elements are given which reduce or raise the temperature of α-β transformation. From the Mendeleev table into which are plotted the curves of the solid and the liquid of binary systems it is possible to predict the properties of unknown binary systems. For the calculations of the curves of the solid and the liquid, 1860 degC was taken as the temperature of zirconium melting. For the calculations of transformation curves, 865 degC was taken as the temperature of α-β transformation. The equations are given of the curves of the solid and the liquid and of the transformation curves of some Zr-addition systems. Also given are the calculated equilibrium distribution coefficients and the equilibrium distribution coefficients of the transformation of additions in Zr and their limit values for temperatures approximating the melting point or the temperature of the transformation of pure Zr, and the values pertaining to eutectic and peritectic or eutectoid and peritectoid temperatures. (J.B.)

  20. Development of zirconium alloy tube manufacturing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Kyu; Park, Chan Hyun; Lee, Seung Hwan; Chung, Sun Kyo

    2009-01-01

    In late 2004, Korea Nuclear Fuel Company (KNF) launched a government funded joint development program with Westinghouse Electric Co. (WEC) to establish zirconium alloy tube manufacturing technology in Korea. Through this program, KNF and WEC have developed a state of the art facility to manufacture high quality nuclear tubes. KNF performed equipment qualification tests for each manufacturing machine with the support of WEC, and independently carried out product qualification tests for each tube product to be commercially produced. Apart from those tests, characterization test program consisting of specification test and characterization test was developed by KNF and WEC to demonstrate to customers of KNF the quality equivalency of products manufactured by KNF and WEC plants respectively. As part of establishment of performance evaluation technology for zirconium alloy tube in Korea, KNF carried out analyses of materials produced for the characterization test program using the most advanced techniques. Thanks to the accomplishment of the development of zirconium alloy tube manufacturing technology, KNF is expected to acquire positive spin off benefits in terms of technology and economy in the near future

  1. Neutronographic Texture Analysis of Zirconium Based Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruz'elová, M; Vratislav, S; Kalvoda, L; Dlouhá, M

    2012-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is a very powerful tool in texture analysis of zirconium based alloys used in nuclear technique. Textures of five samples (two rolled sheets and three tubes) were investigated by using basal pole figures, inversion pole figures, and ODF distribution function. The texture measurement was performed at diffractometer KSN2 on the Laboratory of Neutron Diffraction, Department of Solid State Engineering, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, CTU in Prague. Procedures for studying textures with thermal neutrons and procedures for obtaining texture parameters (direct and inverse pole figures, three dimensional orientation distribution function) are also described. Observed data were processed by software packages HEXAL and GSAS. Our results can be summarized as follows: i) All samples of zirconium alloys show the distribution of middle area into two maxima in basal pole figures. This is caused by alloying elements. A characteristic split of the basal pole maxima tilted from the normal direction toward the transverse direction can be observed for all samples, ii) Sheet samples prefer orientation of planes (100) and (110) perpendicular to rolling direction and orientation of planes (002) perpendicular to normal direction, iii) Basal planes of tubes are oriented parallel to tube axis, meanwhile (100) planes are oriented perpendicular to tube axis. Level of resulting texture and maxima position is different for tubes and for sheets. The obtained results are characteristic for zirconium based alloys.

  2. low dose irradiation growth in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortis, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Low dose neutron irradiation growth in textured and recrystallized zirconium, is studied, at the Candu Reactors Calandria temperature (340 K) and at 77 K. It was necessary to design and build 1: A facility to irradiate at high temperatures, which was installed in the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission's RA1 Reactor; 2: Devices to carry out thermal recoveries, and 3: Devices for 'in situ' measurements of dimensional changes. The first growth kinetics curves were obtained at 365 K and at 77 K in a cryostat under neutron fluxes of similar spectra. Irradiation growth experiments were made in zirconium doped with fissionable material (0,1 at % 235 U). In this way an equivalent dose two orders of magnitude greater than the reactor's fast neutrons dose was obtained, significantly reducing the irradiation time. The specimens used were bimetallic couples, thus obtaining a great accuracy in the measurements. The results allow to determine that the dislocation loops are the main cause of irradiation growth in recrystallized zirconium. Furthermore, it is shown the importance of 'in situ' measurements as a way to avoid the effect that temperature changes have in the final growth measurement; since they can modify the residual stresses and the overconcentrations of defects. (M.E.L.) [es

  3. Development of Zirconium alloys (for pressure tubes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kwon, Sang Chul; Choo, Ki Nam; Jung, Chung Hwan; Yim, Kyong Soo; Kim, Sung Soo; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Jeong, Yong Hwan; Kim, Kyong Ho; Cho, Hae Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, S. K.; Kim, M. H. [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, S. I [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, I. S. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    The objective of this research is to set up the basic technologies for the evaluation of pressure tube integrity and to develop improved zirconium alloys to prevent pressure tube failures due to DHC and hydride blister caused by excessive creep-down of pressure tubes. The experimental procedure and facilities for characterization of pressure tubes were developed. The basic research related to a better understanding of the in-reactor performances of pressure tubes leads to noticeable findings for the first time : the microstructural effect on corrosion and hydrogen pick-up behavior of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes, texture effect on strength and DHC resistance and enhanced recrystallization by Fe in zirconium alloys and etc. Analytical methodology for the assessment of pressure tubes with surface flaws was set up. A joint research is being under way with AECL to determine the fracture toughness of O-8 at the EOL (End of Life) that had been quadruple melted and was taken out of the Wolsung Unit-1 after 10 year operation. In addition, pressure tube with texture controlled is being made along with VNINM in Russia as a joint project between KAERI and Russia. Finally, we succeeded in developing 4 different kinds of zirconium alloys with better corrosion resistance, low hydrogen pickup fraction and higher creep strength. (author). 121 refs., 65 tabs., 260 figs

  4. Low stress creep behaviour of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, N.

    1989-01-01

    Creep behaviour of alpha zirconium of grain size varying between 16 and 55 μm has been investigated in the temperature range 813 to 1003K at stresses upto 5.5 MNm -2 using high sensitive spring specimen geometry. Creep experiments on specimens of 50 μm grain size revealed a transition from lattice diffusion controlled viscous creep at temperatures greater than 940K to grain boundary diffusion controlled viscous creep at lower temperatures. Tests conducted on either side of the transition suggest the dominance of Nabarro-Herring and Coble creep processes respectively. Evidence for power-law creep has been observed in practically all the creep tests. Based on the experimental data obtained in the present study and those recently reported by Novotny et al (1985), Langdon creep mechanism maps have bee n constructed at 873 and 973K. With the help of these maps for zirconium and those published for titanium the low stress creep behaviour of zirconium and titanium are compared. (author). 22 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  5. A model for growth of beta-phase particles in zirconium-2.5 wt percent niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, C.K.; Liner, Y.; Rigby, G.L.

    1984-08-01

    The kinetics of the α → β phase change in Zr-2.5 percent Nb pressure-tube material at constant temperature have been studied. The volume-fraction change of the β phase due to diffusion in an infinite α-phase matrix was considered, and a mathematical model with a numerical solution was developed to predict the transient spherical growth of the β-phase region. This model has been applied to Zr-2.5 wt percent Nb, and the calculated results compared to experiment

  6. Catalytic activity of metall-like carbides in carbon oxide oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharlamov, A.I.; Kosolapova, T.Ya.; Rafal, A.N.; Kirillova, N.V.

    1980-01-01

    Kinetics of carbon oxide oxidation upon carbides of hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, zirconium and chromium is studied. Probable mechanism of the catalysts action is suggested. The established character of the change of the carbide catalytic activity is explained by the change of d-electron contribution to the metal-metal interaction

  7. The Development of Molybdenum Speciation as a Paleoredox Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodley, J.; Peacock, C.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Poulton, S.

    2017-12-01

    The redox state of the oceans has changed throughout geological time and an understanding of these changes is essential to elucidate links between ocean chemistry, climate and life. Due to its abundance in seawater and redox-sensitive nature, molybdenum has enormous potential as a paleoredox proxy. Although a significant amount of research has been done on molybdenum in ancient and modern sediments in terms of its concentrations and isotopic ratios there remains a limited understanding of the drawdown mechanisms of molybdenum under different redox conditions restricting its use in identifying a range of redox states. In order to address these uncertainties, we have developed a novel sequential extraction technique to examine molybdenum concentrations in six sediment fractions from modern samples that represent oxic, nitrogenous, ferruginous and euxinic environments. In addition we use µ-XRF and µ-XANES synchrotron spectroscopy to examine the molybdenum speciation within these fractions and environments. To interpret our µ-XANES data we have developed an extensive library of molybdenum XANES standards that represent molybdenum sequestration by the sediment fractions identified from the sequential extraction. To further verify our synchrotron results we developed a series of µ-XANES micro-column experiments to examine preferential uptake pathways of molybdenum to different sediment phases under a euxinic water column. The initial data from both the sequential extraction and µ-XANES methods indicate that molybdenum is not limited to a single burial pathway in any of the redox environments. We find that each of the redox environments can be characterised by a limited set of molybdenum phase associations, with molybdenum adsorption to pyrite likely the dominant burial pathway. These findings agree with existing research for molybdenum speciation in euxinic environments suggesting that both pyrite and sulphidised organic matter act as important molybdenum sinks. Our

  8. Solubility of nitrogen in iron alloys with vanadium and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomarin, Yu.M.; Grigorenko, G.M.; Lakomskij, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    The solubility of nitrogen in the concentration range under study in Fe-N-V and Fe-N-Nb systems is in compliance with Syverts' law. An equation has been set up so as to estimate the nitrogen solubility in the iron alloys containing up to 10 per cent of vanadium and niobium in the wide temperature range

  9. Preferred orientations in niobium determined by neutrons diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, S.I.N.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been utilized to study textures developed in polycrystalline niobium, cold rolled to 60%, 80% and 95% in tickness and cold rolled to 95% in thickness and annealed at 800 0 C for 15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes in a vacuum of 10 -4 TORR [pt

  10. Process of forming niobium and boron containing titanium aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method of forming a composition of titanium, aluminum, niobium, and boron of higher ductility comprising casting the following approximate composition: Ti 34-50.5 Al 43-48 Nb 6-16 B 0.5-2.0 and thermomechanically working the cast composition

  11. Mechanical behaviour of copper 15% volume niobium microcomposite wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Filgueira

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Cu-Nb microcomposites are attractive in magnet pulsed field technology applications due to their anomalous mechanism of mechanical strength and high electrical conductivity. In this sense, recently it was conceived the use of Cu 15% vol. Nb wires to operate as a high tensile strength cable for a diamond cutting tool (diamond wires for marble and granite slabbing. The multifilamentary Cu 15% vol. Nb composite was obtained using a new processing route, starting with niobium bars bundled into copper tubes, without arc melting. Cold working techniques, such as swaging and wire drawing, combined with heat treatments such as sintering and annealing, and tube restacking were employed. The tensile property of the composite was measured as a function of the niobium filaments dimensions and morphology into the copper matrix, in the several processing steps. An ultimate tensile strength (UTS of 960 MPa was obtained for an areal reduction (R = Ao/A, with Ao-initial cross section area, and A-final cross section area of 4x10(8 X, in which the niobium filaments reached thickness less than 20 nm. The anomalous mechanical strength increase is attributed to the fact that the niobium filaments acts as a barrier to copper dislocations.

  12. High-Q superconducting niobium cavities for gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Paula, L A N; Furtado, S R; Aguiar, O D; N F Oliveira Jr, N F Oliveira Jr; Castro, P J; Barroso, J J

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to optimize the electric Q-factor of superconducting niobium klystron cavities to be used in parametric transducers of the Mario Schenberg gravitational wave detector. Many cavities were manufactured from niobium with relatively high tantalum impurities (1420 ppm) and they were cryogenically tested to determine their resonance frequencies, unloaded electrical quality factors (Q 0 ) and electromagnetic couplings. These cavities were closed with a flat niobium plate with tantalum impurities below 1000 ppm and an unloaded electrical quality factors of the order of 10 5 have been obtained. AC conductivity of the order of 10 12 S/m has been found for niobium cavities when matching experimental results with computational simulations. These values for the Q-factor would allow the detector to reach the quantum limit of sensitivity of ∼ 10 −22 Hz −1/2 in the near future, making it possible to search for gravitational waves around 3.2 kHz. The experimental tests were performed at the laboratories of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and at the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv - CTA)

  13. Effect of substitution of titanium by magnesium and niobium on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Effect of substitution of titanium by magnesium and niobium on structure and piezoelectric properties in (Bi1/2. Na1/2. )TiO3 ceramics. ZHOU CHANG-RONG*, LIU XIN-YU, LI WEI-ZHOU. † and YUAN CHANG-LAI. Department of Information Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology,. Guilin ...

  14. Quantitative analysis method for niobium in lead zirconate titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Hideo; Hashimoto, Toshio

    1986-01-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is a strong dielectric ceramic having piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties, and is used most as a piezoelectric material. Also it is a main component of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT), which is a typical electrical-optical conversion element. Since these have been developed, the various electronic parts utilizing the piezoelectric characteristics have been put in practical use. The characteristics can be set up by changing the composition of PZT and the kinds and amount of additives. Among the additives, niobium has the action to make metallic ion vacancy in crystals, and by the formation of this vacancy, to ease the movement of domain walls in crystal grains, and to increase resistivity. Accordingly, it is necessary to accurately determine the niobium content for the research and development, quality control and process control. The quantitative analysis methods for niobium used so far have respective demerits, therefore, the authors examined the quantitative analysis of niobium in PZT by using an inductively coupled plasma emission spectro-analysis apparatus which has remarkably developed recently. As the result, the method of dissolving a specimen with hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid, and masking unstable lead with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid 2 sodium and fluoride ions with boric acid was established. The apparatus, reagents, the experiment and the results are reported. (Kako, I.)

  15. Fatigue crack growth behavior in niobium-hydrogen alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M.C.C.; Salama, K.

    1997-01-01

    Near-threshold fatigue crack growth behavior has been investigated in niobium-hydrogen alloys. Compact tension specimens (CTS) with three hydrogen conditions are used: hydrogen-free, hydrogen in solid solution, and hydride alloy. The specimens are fatigued at a temperature of 296 K and load ratios of 0.05, 0.4, and 0.75. The results at load ratios of 0.05 and 0.4 show that the threshold stress intensity range (ΔK th ) decreases as hydrogen is added to niobium. It reaches a minimum at the critical hydrogen concentration (C cr ), where maximum embrittlement occurs. The critical hydrogen concentration is approximately equal to the solubility limit of hydrogen in niobium. As the hydrogen concentration exceeds C cr , ΔK th increases slowly as more hydrogen is added to the specimen. At load ratio 0.75, ΔK th decreases continuously as the hydrogen concentration is increased. The results provide evidence that two mechanisms are responsible for fatigue crack growth behavior in niobium-hydrogen alloys. First, embrittlement is retarded by hydride transformation--induced and plasticity-induced crack closures. Second, embrittlement is enhanced by the presence of hydrogen and hydride

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of reduction reactions of niobium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, C.

    1981-01-01

    Reduction processes of niobium oxides by hydrogen, carbon and aluminium are analysed thermodinamically. It is shown that reduction by hydrogen is not technically feasible. High purity of raw materials is required. In the carbothermic process impurities which react to form high stability carbides should be avoided. (Author) [pt

  17. Manufacturing of the L band 9-cell niobium cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Masanori; Ohkubo, Kohichi; Yamanaka, Toshiyuki; Kako, Eiji; Saito, Kenji; Shishido, Toshio; Ono, Masaaki; Noguchi, Shuichi.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1990, L-band niobium superconducting cavities have been developed with collaboration between our company and National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK). The manufacturing procedure and the performance of 9-cell superconducting cavity are presented. The maximum accelerating gradient of 12 MV/m was attained in a cold test. (author)

  18. Quantitative analysis of nickel in zirconium and zircaloy; Dosage du nickel dans le zirconium et dans le zircaloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastoix, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-07-01

    A rapid spectrophotometric has been developed for determination of 10 to 1000 ppm of Ni in zirconium and zircaloy using dimethylglyoxime. Iron, copper, tin and chromium, do not interfere at the concentration usually present in zirconium and its alloys. (author) [French] On determine colorimetriquenent 10 a 1000 ppm de Ni dans le zirconium et le zircaloy par photo colorimetrie a 440 m{mu} de la dimethylglyoxime nickelique. Le dosage est rapide. Le fer, le cuivre, l'etain, le chrome ne genent pas aux concentrations habituellement rencontrees dans le zirconium et ses alliages. (auteur)

  19. Computational Design of a Novel Medium-Carbon, Low-Alloy Steel Microalloyed with Niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaheri, Vahid; Nyyssönen, Tuomo; Grande, Bjørnar; Porter, David

    2018-04-01

    The design of a new steel with specific properties is always challenging owing to the complex interactions of many variables. In this work, this challenge is dealt with by combining metallurgical principles with computational thermodynamics and kinetics to design a novel steel composition suitable for thermomechanical processing and induction heat treatment to achieve a hardness level in excess of 600 HV with the potential for good fracture toughness. CALPHAD-based packages for the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformations and diffusion, namely Thermo-Calc® and JMatPro®, have been combined with an interdendritic segregation tool (IDS) to optimize the contents of chromium, molybdenum and niobium in a proposed medium-carbon low-manganese steel composition. Important factors taken into account in the modeling and optimization were hardenability and as-quenched hardness, grain refinement and alloying cost. For further investigations and verification, the designed composition, i.e., in wt.% 0.40C, 0.20Si, 0.25Mn, 0.90Cr, 0.50Mo, was cast with two nominal levels of Nb: 0 and 0.012 wt.%. The results showed that an addition of Nb decreases the austenite grain size during casting and after slab reheating prior to hot rolling. Validation experiments showed that the predicted properties, i.e., hardness, hardenability and level of segregation, for the designed composition were realistic. It is also demonstrated that the applied procedure could be useful in reducing the number of experiments required for developing compositions for other new steels.

  20. Noburnium: Systems design of niobium superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Abhijeet

    2005-11-01

    A systems-based approach, integrating quantum mechanical calculations with efficient experimentation, was employed to design niobium-based superalloys. The microstructural concept of gamma-gamma' nickel-based superalloys was adopted, where, the coherent gamma ' aluminides act both as the strengthening phase and a source of aluminum for Al2O3 passivation. Building on previous research, the selected bcc-type ordered aluminide was L2 1 structured Pd2HfAl phase. Comprehensive phase relations were measured on Nb-Pd-Hf-Al prototype alloys, and key tie-tetrahedra were identified. Aluminide precipitation in a bcc matrix was demonstrated in designed Nb+Pd2HfAl alloys. Thermodynamic databases were developed by integrating first-principles calculations with measured phase relations. Atomic volume models were developed for the bcc matrix and the Pd2HfAl phase and matrix elements which would reduce lattice misfit were identified. An experimental 2-phase alloy demonstrated a misfit of 3%. A modified Wagner's model was used to predict the required transient properties to form external Al2O3. The principal oxidation design goal was to decrease the oxygen permeability ( NSOx DO ) divided by the aluminum diffusivity (DAl) by 5 orders of magnitude. A multicomponent mobility database was developed to predict the diffusivities. Guided by first-principles calculations the effect of alloying elements on the oxygen diffusivity in Nb was measured, and the mobility database was experimentally validated. Based on the mobility database, it was found that increasing Al solubility in the bcc matrix greatly increased Al diffusivity. Alloying elements were identified that would increase Al solubility in the bcc matrix. Prototype alloys were prepared and the best oxidation performance was exhibited by a bcc+Nb2Al Nb-Hf-Al alloy, which exhibited parabolic oxidation behavior at 1300°C. The alloy was shown to have achieved the required 5 orders of magnitude reduction in the design parameter. The

  1. Influence of hydrostatic pressure on BCC-lattice parameter in molybdenum, niobium and vanadium with rhenium solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smol'yaninova, Eh.A.; Stribuk, E.K.; Tyavlovskij, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    Data on the effect of 1.8GPa hydrostatic pressure on bcc lattice parameters of solid solutions in Mo-Re, Nb-Re, V-re systems are presented. It is shown that after the application hydrostatic pressure a decrease in bcc lattice parameter is observed and the greatest change in the lattice parameter takes place in bcc of solid solutions in the Nb-Re system (DELTA A ∼ 0.0035 nm). Analysis of the experimental data obtained on the basis of calculations made for packing density change in the above-mentioned solid solutions under the pressure is carried out

  2. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  3. Molybdenum distribution and sensitivity in tomatoes, sunflowers and beans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht-Buchholz, C

    1973-01-01

    The influence of increasing levels of molybdenum on the growth, molybdenum uptake and distribution in individual plant organs was investigated in tomatoes, beans and sunflowers in a 9 day trial. With tomatoes, which showed marked damage with high molybdenum levels, the molybdenum content of dry matter was highest in the leaf and lowest in the stem. On the other hand, beans, insensitive towards the high molybdenum level, dry matter molybdenum content was appreciably higher in the stem than in the leaf. It is supposed that in plant species, insensitive to high molybdenum levels, molybdenum is held less firmly in this tissue and can attain damaging levels in the cytoplasm of the youngest leaf tissue cells. It is supposed, on the basis of the reactions which were carried out with expressed root juice and on the basis of the yellow coloration attainable in vitro in the tissue caused by the addition of molybdate solution, that the yellow coloration appearing in the cells and plant organs of various plant species, here tomatoes and sunflowers, with high molybdenum levels is due to a reaction between molybdenum and polyvalent phenols in cellsap.

  4. Research into zirconium alloys resistant to carbon dioxide under pressure at temperatures of up to 600 deg C (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baque, P.; Dominget, R.; Bossard, J.

    1963-01-01

    Zirconium is a metal having a relatively low neutron capture cross-section and a high melting point; it is thus possible to consider its use in particular as a canning material for fuel elements in CO 2 -cooled nuclear reactors. A preliminary study of several types of zirconium showed that the metal is already strongly oxidised in this gas at 500 deg C. The 'breakaway' phenomenon is generalised; the oxidation rate is then linear and depends on the carbon dioxide pressure. An attempt was therefore made to find binary and tertiary alloys in order to improve the metal behaviour. Several interesting compositions were found: 1, 1.6 and 2.5 per cent of copper, 2 per cent of vanadium, and 0.05 and 0.5 per cent of calcium. Tertiary copper-molybdenum and copper-phosphorus alloys are also less liable to oxidation and in particular do not exhibit the 'breakaway' phenomenon even after a prolonged treatment at 600 deg C. (authors) [fr

  5. [The clinical application of zirconium-dioxide-ceramics. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somfai, Dóra; Zsigmond, Ágnes; Károlyházy, Katalin; Kispély, Barbara; Hermann, Péter

    2015-12-01

    Due to its outstanding physical, mechanical and esthetic properties, zirconium-dioxide is one of the most popular non-metal denture, capable of surpassing PFM in most cases. The recent advances of CAD/CAM technology makes it a good alternitve. Here we show the usefulness of zirconium-dioxide in everyday dental practice through three case reports.

  6. Thermotransport of nitrogen and oxygen in β-zirconium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, D.L.; Rieck, G.D.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation of thermotransport of nitrogen in ß-zirconium is reported. Using a method previously described, the heat of transport turned out to be 25.1 kcal/mole with a standard deviation of 2.5 kcal/mole. The formerly published value of the heat of transport of oxygen in ß-zirconium, viz. 20

  7. Quantitative analysis of nickel in zirconium and zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastoix, M.

    1957-01-01

    A rapid spectrophotometric has been developed for determination of 10 to 1000 ppm of Ni in zirconium and zircaloy using dimethylglyoxime. Iron, copper, tin and chromium, do not interfere at the concentration usually present in zirconium and its alloys. (author) [fr

  8. Effect of zirconium addition on the recrystallization behaviour of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present work, zirconium was added to a commercial Al–Cu–Mg alloy and by heat treatment Al3Zr particles were precipitated and after forging, the grain size was an order of magnitude lower than the alloy without zirconium. Transmission electron microscopy was employed to characterize the second phase particles, ...

  9. Molten salt scrubbing of zirconium or hafnium tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.D.; McLaughlin, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a continuous process for removing impurities of iron or aluminum chloride or both from vaporous zirconium or hafnium chloride or both. It comprises: introducing impure zirconium or hafnium chloride vapor or both into a middle portion of an absorbing column containing a molten salt phase, the molten salt phase absorbing the impurities of iron or aluminum chloride or both to produce chloride vapor stripped of zirconium or hafnium chloride; introducing sodium or potassium chloride or both into a top portion of the column; controlling the top portion of the column to between 300--375 degrees C.; heating a bottom portion of the column to 450--550 degrees C. To vaporize zirconium chloride or hafnium chloride or hafnium and zirconium chloride from the molten salt; withdrawing molten salt substantially free of zirconium and hafnium chloride from the bottom portion of the column; and withdrawing zirconium chloride or hafnium chloride or hafnium and zirconium chloride vapor substantially free of impurities of iron and aluminum chloride from the top of the column

  10. Formation of zirconium dioxide layers on microelectrode of zirconium. Inhibition of the hydrogen evolution reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšil, Lubomír; Fanelli, N.; Hromadová, Magdaléna

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 49, C (2017), s. 128-133 ISSN 0324-1130 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03085S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : zirconium * ZrO2 * corrosion Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 0.238, year: 2016

  11. PROCESS FOR DISSOLVING BINARY URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM OR ZIRCONIUM-BASE ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonke, A.A.; Barghusen, J.J.; Levitz, N.M.

    1962-08-14

    A process of dissolving uranium-- zirconium and zircaloy alloys, e.g. jackets of fuel elements, with an anhydrous hydrogen fluoride containing from 10 to 32% by weight of hydrogen chloride at between 400 and 450 deg C., preferably while in contact with a fluidized inert powder, such as calcium fluoride is described. (AEC)

  12. Phase Transformations in a Uranium-Zirconium Alloy containing 2 weight per cent Zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerberg, G

    1961-04-15

    The phase transformations in a uranium-zirconium alloy containing 2 weight percent zirconium have been examined metallographically after heat treatments involving isothermal transformation of y and cooling from the -y-range at different rates. Transformations on heating and cooling have also been studied in uranium-zirconium alloys with 0.5, 2 and 5 weight per cent zirconium by means of differential thermal analysis. The results are compatible with the phase diagram given by Howlett and Knapton. On quenching from the {gamma}-range the {gamma} phase transforms martensitically to supersaturated a the M{sub S} temperature being about 490 C. During isothermal transformation of {gamma} in the temperature range 735 to 700 C {beta}-phase is precipitated as Widmanstaetten plates and the equilibrium structure consists of {beta} and {gamma}{sub 1}. Below 700 C {gamma} transforms completely to Widmanstaetten plates which consist of {beta} above 660 C and of a at lower temperatures. Secondary phases, {gamma}{sub 2} above 610 C and {delta} below this temperature, are precipitated from the initially supersaturated Widmanstaetten plates during the isothermal treatments. At and slightly below 700 C the cooperative growth of |3 and {gamma}{sub 2} is observed. The results of isothermal transformation are summarized in a TTTdiagram.

  13. Techniques for chemical characterization of zirconium and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, K.V.; Bassan, M.K.T.; Sudersanan, M.

    2002-01-01

    Chemical characterization of zirconium and its alloys such as zircaloy, Zr-Nb, etc for minor and trace constituents like Nb, Ti, Fe, Cr, Ni, Sn, Al etc has been carried out. Zirconium, being a major constituent, has been determined by gravimetry as zirconium oxide while other constituents like Nb, Ti, Fe have been determined by spectrophotometric methods. Other metals of importance at trace level have been estimated by AAS or ICPAES. The judicious use of both conventional and modern instrumental methods of analysis helps in the characterization of zirconium and its alloys for various major and minor constituents. The role of matrix effect in the determination was also investigated and methods have been worked out based on a preliminary separation of zirconium by a hydroxide precipitation. (author)

  14. Determination of microquantities of zirconium and thorium in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber de D'Alessio, Ana; Zucal, Raquel.

    1975-07-01

    A method for the determination of 10 to 50 ppm of zirconium and thorium in uranium IV oxide of nuclear purity is established. Zirconium and thorium are retained in a strong cation-exchange resin Dowex 50 WX8 in 1 M HCl. Zirconium is eluted with 0,5% oxalic acid solution and thorium with 4% ammonium oxalate. The colorimetric determination of zirconium with xilenol orange is done in perchloric acid after destructtion of oxalic acid and thorium is determined with arsenazo III in 5 M HCl. 10 μg of each element were determined with a standard deviation of 2,1% for thorium and 3,4% for zirconium. (author) [es

  15. Zirconium alloy fuel cladding resistant to PCI crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, R.F.; Foster, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element is described cladding tube comprising: concentric tubular layers of zirconium base alloys; the concentric tubular layers including an inner layer and outer layer; the outer layer metallurgically bonded to the inner layer; the outer layer composed of a first zirconium base alloy characterized by excellent resistance to corrosion caused by exposure to high temperature and pressure aqueous environments; the inner layer composed of a second zirconium base alloy consisting of: about 0.2 to 0.6 wt.% tin, about 0.03 to 0.11 wt.% iron, less than about 0.02 wt.% chromium, up to about 350 ppm oxygen and the remainder being zirconium and incidental impurities, and the inner layer characterized by improved resistance to crack propagation under reactor operating conditions compared to the first zirconium alloy

  16. Antimony removal from aqueous solutions using Zirconium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrescu, D.; Velciu, L.; Bucur, C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper it is presented an experimental test for non-radioactive antimony removal from aqueous solutions using zirconium hydroxide powder. Also, it was studied how the temperature and pH influences antimony adsorption onto zirconium hydroxide surface. After the adsorption, solutions were filtered on Cellulose Mixed Ester Membrane with 0.2 μm pore size to remove the zirconium powder and then the aqueous solutions were sent to Inductively Coupled Plasma Optic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) for quantitative analysis of Sb. Zirconium hydroxide powders were examined by optical microscopy. For the solutions that were tested at pH 4.5 and 10.2 the antimony concentration dropped below the detection limit of ICP-OES device, proof of antimony adsorption on zirconium hydroxide. Also, for the other tested solutions which had pH=12 the antimony concentration reduced with 77% and 80%. The temperature had no influence upon adsorption mechanism. (authors)

  17. Kinetics of molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue by Bacillus sp. strain A.rzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, A R; Bakar, N A; Halmi, M I E; Johari, W L W; Ahmad, S A; Jirangon, H; Syed, M A; Shukor, M Y

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum is very toxic to agricultural animals. Mo-reducing bacterium can be used to immobilize soluble molybdenum to insoluble forms, reducing its toxicity in the process. In this work the isolation of a novel molybdate-reducing Gram positive bacterium tentatively identified as Bacillus sp. strain A.rzi from a metal-contaminated soil is reported. The cellular reduction of molybdate to molybdenum blue occurred optimally at 4 mM phosphate, using 1% (w/v) glucose, 50 mM molybdate, between 28 and 30 °C and at pH 7.3. The spectrum of the Mo-blue product showed a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. Inhibitors of bacterial electron transport system (ETS) such as rotenone, sodium azide, antimycin A, and potassium cyanide could not inhibit the molybdenum-reducing activity. At 0.1 mM, mercury, copper, cadmium, arsenic, lead, chromium, cobalt, and zinc showed strong inhibition on molybdate reduction by crude enzyme. The best model that fitted the experimental data well was Luong followed by Haldane and Monod. The calculated value for Luong's constants p max, K(s), S(m), and n was 5.88 μmole Mo-blue hr(-1), 70.36 mM, 108.22 mM, and 0.74, respectively. The characteristics of this bacterium make it an ideal tool for bioremediation of molybdenum pollution.

  18. Evaluation of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum and molybdenum-rhenium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.J.; Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys being developed for high temperature applications possess excellent high temperature strength and creep resistance. In addition they exhibit a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBIT) in the worked and stress-relieved condition under longitudinal tensile load well below room temperature. However, in the recrystallized condition, the DBTT maybe near or above room temperature, depending on the volume fraction of oxide dispersion and the amount of prior work. Dilute rhenium additions (7 and 14 wt.%) to ODS molybdenum were evaluated to determine their effect on low temperature ductility. The addition of 7 wt.% rhenium to the ODS molybdenum did not significantly enhance the mechanical properties. However, the addition of 14 wt.% rhenium to the ODS molybdenum resulted in a DBTT well below room temperature in both the stress-relieved and recrystallized condition. Additionally, the tensile strength of ODS Mo-14Re is greater than the base ODS molybdenum at 1,000 to 1,250 C

  19. Carbochlorination kinetics of tantalum and niobium pentoxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allain, E.

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available The carbochlorination kinetics of pure Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 by gas mixture (C12 + CO + N2 between 380 and 1,000 °C is studied. A calculation of the standard free energy of the carbochlorination reactions is made. A diagram of the phases stability is drawn. The influence of the gas flow, temperature and the pardal pressure of Cl2 and CO at temperatures below 650 °C on the reaction rate is studied. The apparent activation energy is approximately 75 and 110 kJ/mol for Nb2Os and Ta2O5, respectively. At temperatures above 650°C the Arrhenius diagram presents an anomaly which may be attributed to the decomposition of the COCl2 formed in situ. The apparent reaction order of the carbochlorination of these oxides against Cl2+CO is approximately 2. The carbochlorination rates of these oxides are much greater than those of chlorination by Cl2 + N2. The carbochlorination kinetics of tin furnace slag leaching concentrates containing tantalum and niobium compounds are also studied and compared with the carbochlorination kinetics of the pure oxides.

    En este trabajo se estudia la cinética de carbocloruración del Nb2O5 y del Ta2O5 por la mezcla de gases (Cl2 + CO + N2 entre 380 y 1000°C. Se hace un cálculo de la energía libre estándar de carbocloruración y se dibujan los diagramas de equilibrio de fases. Se estudia la influencia del flujo de gas, la temperatura y la presión parcial de Cl2 y CO a temperaturas por debajo de 650°C sobre la velocidad de reacción. La energía de activación es aproximadamente 75 y 110 kJ/mol para el Nb2O5 y el Ta2O5, respectivamente. A temperaturas por encima de 650°C, el diagrama de Arrhenius presenta una anomalía que puede ser atribuida a la

  20. Study of the molybdenum retention in alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, Maria V.; Mondino, Angel V.; Manzini, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    The Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission routinely produces 99 Mo by fission of highly enriched uranium contained in targets irradiated in RA-3 reactor. The current process begins with the dissolution of the irradiated target in a basic media, considering the possibility of changing the targets, it could be convenient to dissolve them in acid media. The use of alumina as a first separation step in acid dissolution processes is already known although it is necessary to determine both the type of alumina to be used and the separation conditions. The study of molybdenum retention in alumina was performed at laboratory scale, using Mo-99 as radiotracer. Different kinds of alumina were tried, varying charge solution acidity. Influence of uranium concentration in the loading solution on molybdenum retention was also studied. (author)