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Sample records for zirconium cladding degradation

  1. Separate-effect tests on zirconium cladding degradation in air ingress situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duriez, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, Direction de Prevention des Accidents Majeurs, Centre de Cadarache, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France)], E-mail: christian.duriez@irsn.fr; Steinbrueck, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, FZK, Institut fuer Materialforschung, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ohai, D.; Meleg, T. [Institute for Nuclear Research, INR, Nuclear Material and Corrosion Department, Pitesti, 115400 Mioveni Arges (Romania); Birchley, J.; Haste, T. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2009-02-15

    In the event of air ingress during a reactor or spent fuel pond low probability accident, the fuel rods will be exposed to air-containing atmospheres at high temperatures. In comparison with steam, the presence of air is expected to result in a more rapid escalation of the accident. A state-of-the-art review performed before SARNET started showed that the existing data on zirconium alloy oxidation in air were scarce. Moreover, the exact role of zirconium nitride on the cladding degradation process was poorly understood. Regarding the cladding behaviour in air + steam or nitrogen-enriched atmospheres (encountered in oxygen-starved conditions), almost no data were available. New experimental programmes comprising small-scale tests have therefore been launched at FZK, IRSN (MOZART programme in the frame of the International Source Term Program-ISTP) and INR. Zircaloy-4 cladding in PWR (FZK, IRSN) and in CANDU (INR) geometry are investigated. On-line kinetic data are obtained on centimetre size tube segments, by thermogravimetry (FZK, IRSN and INR) or by mass spectrometry (FZK). Plugged tubes 15 cm long (FZK) are also investigated. The samples are air-oxidised either in the 'as-received' state, or after pre-oxidation in steam. 'Analytical' tests at constant temperature and gas composition provide basic kinetic data, while more prototypical temperature transients and sequential gas compositions are also investigated. The temperature domains extend from 600 deg. C up to 1500 deg. C. Systematic post-test metallographic inspections are performed. The paper gives a synthesis of the results obtained, comparing them in terms of kinetics and oxide scale structure and composition. A comparative analysis is performed with results of the QUENCH-10 (Q-10) bundle test, which included an air ingress phase. It is shown how the data contribute to a better understanding of the cladding degradation process, especially regarding the role of nitrogen. For modelling of

  2. Separate-effect tests on zirconium cladding degradation in air ingress situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duriez, C.; Steinbrueck, M.; Ohai, D.; Meleg, T.; Birchley, J.; Haste, T.

    2009-01-01

    In the event of air ingress during a reactor or spent fuel pond low probability accident, the fuel rods will be exposed to air-containing atmospheres at high temperatures. In comparison with steam, the presence of air is expected to result in a more rapid escalation of the accident. A state-of-the-art review performed before SARNET started showed that the existing data on zirconium alloy oxidation in air were scarce. Moreover, the exact role of zirconium nitride on the cladding degradation process was poorly understood. Regarding the cladding behaviour in air + steam or nitrogen-enriched atmospheres (encountered in oxygen-starved conditions), almost no data were available. New experimental programmes comprising small-scale tests have therefore been launched at FZK, IRSN (MOZART programme in the frame of the International Source Term Program-ISTP) and INR. Zircaloy-4 cladding in PWR (FZK, IRSN) and in CANDU (INR) geometry are investigated. On-line kinetic data are obtained on centimetre size tube segments, by thermogravimetry (FZK, IRSN and INR) or by mass spectrometry (FZK). Plugged tubes 15 cm long (FZK) are also investigated. The samples are air-oxidised either in the 'as-received' state, or after pre-oxidation in steam. 'Analytical' tests at constant temperature and gas composition provide basic kinetic data, while more prototypical temperature transients and sequential gas compositions are also investigated. The temperature domains extend from 600 deg. C up to 1500 deg. C. Systematic post-test metallographic inspections are performed. The paper gives a synthesis of the results obtained, comparing them in terms of kinetics and oxide scale structure and composition. A comparative analysis is performed with results of the QUENCH-10 (Q-10) bundle test, which included an air ingress phase. It is shown how the data contribute to a better understanding of the cladding degradation process, especially regarding the role of nitrogen. For modelling of the oxide scale

  3. ZIRCONIUM-CLADDING OF THORIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, R.J.

    1961-11-21

    A method of cladding thorium with zirconium is described. The quality of the bond achieved between thorium and zirconium by hot-rolling is improved by inserting and melting a thorium-zirconium alloy foil between the two materials prior to rolling. (AEC)

  4. Zirconium-barrier cladding attributes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.; Rand, R.A.; Tucker, R.P.; Cheng, B.; Adamson, R.B.; Davies, J.H.; Armijo, J.S.; Wisner, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    This metallurgical study of Zr-barrier fuel cladding evaluates the importance of three salient attributes: (1) metallurgical bond between the zirconium liner and the Zircaloy substrate, (2) liner thickness (roughly 10% of the total cladding wall), and (3) softness (purity). The effect that each of these attributes has on the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) resistance of the Zr-barrier fuel was studied by a combination of analytical model calculations and laboratory experiments using an expanding mandrel technique. Each of the attributes is shown to contribute to PCI resistance. The effect of the zirconium liner on fuel behavior during off-normal events in which steam comes in contact with the zirconium surface was studied experimentally. Simulations of loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) showed that the behavior of Zr-barrier cladding is virtually indistinguishable from that of conventional Zircaloy cladding. If steam contacts the zirconium liner surface through a cladding perforation and the fuel rod is operated under normal power conditions, the zirconium liner is oxidized more rapidly than is Zircaloy, but the oxidation rate returns to the rate of Zircaloy oxidation when the oxide phase reaches the zirconium-Zircaloy metallurgical bond

  5. Degradation resistant fuel cladding materials and manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlowe, M.O. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Montes, J. [ENUSA, Madrid (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    GE has been producing the degradation resistant cladding (zirconium liner and zircaloy-2 surface larger) described here with the cooperation of its primary zirconium vendors since the beginning of 1994. Approximately 24 fuel reloads, or in excess of 250,000 fuel rods, have been produced using this material by GE. GE has also produced tubing for one reload of fuel that is currently being produced by its technology affiliate ENUSA. (orig./HP)

  6. Mechanism for iodine cracking of zirconium claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of iodine cracking of zirconium cladding is analyzed taking into account the effect of stresses on diffusion. A decisive effect of the stress gradiemt on crack propagation in an agressive medium is shown. The experimental data are compared with the proposed model

  7. Clad Degradation - FEPs Screening Arguments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E. Siegmann

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the screening of the cladding degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF). This report also addresses the effect of some FEPs on both the cladding and the CSNF, DSNF, and HLW waste forms where it was considered appropriate to address the effects on both materials together. This report summarizes the work of others to screen clad degradation FEPs in a manner consistent with, and used in, the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This document was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA'' (BSC 2004a [DIRS 167796])

  8. Automatic measuring system of zirconium thickness for zirconium liner cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, K.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hiroshima, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Murayama, R.

    1985-01-01

    An automatic system of pure zirconium liner thickness for zirconium-zircaloy cladding tubes has been successfully developed. The system consists of three parts. (1) An ultrasonic thickness measuring method for mother tubes before cold rolling. (2) An electromagnetic thickness measuring method for the manufactured tubes. (3) An image processing method for the cross sectional view of the manufactured cut tube samples. In Japanese nuclear industry, zirconium-zircaloy cladding tubes have been tested in order to realize load following operation in the atomic power plant. In order to provide for the practical use in the near future, Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd. has been studied and established the practical manufacturing process of the zirconium liner cladding tubes. The zirconium-liner cladding tube is a duplex tube comprising an inner layer of pure zirconium bonded to zircaloy metallurgically. The thickness of the pure zirconium is about 10 % of the total wall thickness. Several types of the automatic thickness measuring methods have been investigated instead of the usual microscopic viewing method in which the liner thickness is measured by the microscopic cross sectional view of the cut tube samples

  9. Zirconium alloy fuel cladding resistant to PCI crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, R.F.; Foster, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element is described cladding tube comprising: concentric tubular layers of zirconium base alloys; the concentric tubular layers including an inner layer and outer layer; the outer layer metallurgically bonded to the inner layer; the outer layer composed of a first zirconium base alloy characterized by excellent resistance to corrosion caused by exposure to high temperature and pressure aqueous environments; the inner layer composed of a second zirconium base alloy consisting of: about 0.2 to 0.6 wt.% tin, about 0.03 to 0.11 wt.% iron, less than about 0.02 wt.% chromium, up to about 350 ppm oxygen and the remainder being zirconium and incidental impurities, and the inner layer characterized by improved resistance to crack propagation under reactor operating conditions compared to the first zirconium alloy

  10. Development of advanced zirconium fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Young Hwan; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.

    2007-04-01

    This report includes the manufacturing technology developed for HANA TM claddings, a series of their characterization results as well as the results of their in-pile and out-of pile performances tests which were carried out to develop some fuel claddings for a high burn-up (70,000MWd/mtU) which are competitive in the world market. Some of the HANA TM claddings, which had been manufactured based on the results from the 1st and 2nd phases of the project, have been tested in a research reactor in Halden of Norway for an in-pile performance qualification. The results of the in-pile test showed that the performance of the HANA TM claddings for corrosion and creep was better than 50% compared to that of Zircaloy-4 or A cladding. It was also found that the out-of pile performance of the HANA TM claddings for such as LOCA and RIA in some accident conditions corrosion creep, tensile, burst and fatigue was superior or equivalent to that of the Zircaloy-4 or A cladding. The project also produced the other many data which were required to get a license for an in-pile test of HANA TM claddings in a commercial reactor. The data for the qualification or characterization were provided for KNFC to assist their activities to get the license for the in-pile test of HANA TM Lead Test Rods(LTR) in a commercial reactor

  11. CLAD DEGRADATION - FEPS SCREENING ARGUMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. Schreiner

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the screening of the clad degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This report also addresses the effect of certain FEPs on both the cladding and the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and defense high-level waste (DHLW) waste forms, as appropriate to address the effects on multiple materials and both components (FEPs 2.1.09.09.0A, 2.1.09.11.0A, 2.1.11.05.0A, 2.1.12.02.0A, and 2.1.12.03.0A). These FEPs are expected to affect the repository performance during the postclosure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. Table 1-1 provides the list of cladding FEPs, including their screening decisions (include or exclude). The primary purpose of this report is to identify and document the analysis, screening decision, and TSPA-LA disposition (for included FEPs) or screening argument (for excluded FEPs) for these FEPs related to clad degradation. In some cases, where a FEP covers multiple technical areas and is shared with other FEP reports, this report may provide only a partial technical basis for the screening of the FEP. The full technical basis for shared FEPs is addressed collectively by the sharing FEP reports. The screening decisions and associated TSPA-LA dispositions or screening arguments from all of the FEP reports are cataloged in a project-specific FEPs database

  12. Delayed hydride cracking of zirconium alloy fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-10-01

    This report describes the work performed in a coordinated research project on Hydrogen and Hydride Degradation of the Mechanical and Physical Properties of Zirconium Alloys. It is the second in the series. In 2005-2009 that work was extended within a new CRP called Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zirconium Alloy Fuel Cladding. The project consisted of adding hydrogen to samples of Zircaloy-4 claddings representing light water reactors (LWRs), CANDU and Atucha, and measuring the rates of delayed hydride cracking (DHC) under specified conditions. The project was overseen by a supervisory group of experts in the field who provided advice and assistance to participants as required. All of the research work undertaken as part of the CRP is described in this report, which includes details of the experimental procedures that led to a consistent set of data for LWR cladding. The participants and many of their co-workers in the laboratories involved in the CRP contributed results and material used in this report, which compiles the results, their analysis, discussions of their interpretation and conclusions and recommendations for future work. The research was coordinated by an advisor and by representatives in three laboratories in industrialized Member States. Besides the basic goal to transfer the technology of the testing technique from an experienced laboratory to those unfamiliar with the methods, the CRP was set up to harmonize the experimental procedures to produce consistent sets of data, both within a single laboratory and between different laboratories. From the first part of this project it was demonstrated that by following a standard set of experimental protocols, consistent results could be obtained. Thus, experimental vagaries were minimized by careful attention to detail of microstructure, temperature history and stress state in the samples. The underlying idea for the test programme was set out at the end of the first part of the project on pressure tubes. The

  13. Modeling of Zircaloy cladding degradation under repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santanam, L.; Raghavan, S.; Chin, B.A.

    1989-07-01

    Two potential degradation mechanisms, creep and stress corrosion cracking, of Zircaloy cladding during repository storage of spent nuclear fuel have been investigated. The deformation and fracture map methodology has been used to predict maximum allowable initial storage temperatures to achieve a thousand year life without rupture as a function of spent-fuel history. A stress analysis of fuel rods has been performed. Stresses in the outer zirconium oxide layer and the inner Zircaloy tube have been predicted for typical internal pressurization, oxide layer thickness, volume expansion from formation of the oxide layer and thermal expansion coefficients of the cladding and oxide. Stress relaxation occurring in-reactor has also been taken into account. The calculations indicate that for the anticipated storage conditions investigated, the outer zirconium oxide layer is in a state of compression thus making it unlikely that stress corrosion cracking of the exterior surface will occur. 20 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs

  14. Hydrogenation and high temperature oxidation of Zirconium claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, T.; Perez-Feró, E.; Horváth, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years a new series of experiments started for supporting the new LOCA criteria, considering the proposals of US NRC. The effects which can cause the embrittlement of VVER fuel claddings were reviewed and evaluated in the framework of the project. The purpose of the work was to determine how the fuel cladding’s hydrogen uptake under normal operating conditions, effect the behavior of the cladding under LOCA conditions. As a first step a gas system equipment with gas valves and pressure gauge was built, in which the zirconium alloy can absorb hydrogen under controlled conditions. In this apparatus E110 (produced by electrolytic method, currently used at Paks NPP) and E110G (produced by a new technology) alloys were hydrogenated to predetermined hydrogen contents. According the results of ring compression tests the E110G alloys lose their ductility above 3200 ppm hydrogen content. This limit can be applied to determine the ductile-brittle transition of the nuclear fuel claddings. After the hydrogenation, high temperature oxidation experiments were carried out on the E110G and E110 samples at 1000 °C and 1200 °C. 16 pieces of E110G and 8 samples of E110 with 300 ppm and 600 ppm hydrogen content were tested. The oxidation of the specimens was performed in steam, under isothermal conditions. Based on the ring compression tests load-displacement curves were recorded. The main objective of the compression tests was to determine the ductile-brittle transition. These results were compared to the results of our previous experiments where the samples did not contain hydrogen. The original claddings showed more ductile behavior than the samples with hydrogen content. The higher hydrogen content resulted in a more brittle mechanical behavior. However no significant difference was observed in the oxidation kinetics of the same cladding types with different hydrogen content. The experiments showed that the normal operating hydrogen uptake of the fuel claddings

  15. White Paper Summary of 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Louthan, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); PNNL, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-05-29

    This white paper recommends that ASTM International develop standards to address the potential impact of hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium alloys. The need for such standards was apparent during the 2nd ASTM International Workshop on Hydrides in Zirconium Alloy Cladding and Assembly Components, sponsored by ASTM International Committee C26.13 and held on June 10-12, 2014, in Jackson, Wyoming. The potentially adverse impacts of hydrogen and hydrides on the long term performance of irradiated zirconium-alloy cladding on used fuel were shown to depend on multiple factors such as alloy chemistry and processing, irradiation and post irradiation history, residual and applied stresses and stress states, and the service environment. These factors determine the hydrogen content and hydride morphology in the alloy, which, in turn, influence the response of the alloy to the thermo-mechanical conditions imposed (and anticipated) during storage, transport and disposal of used nuclear fuel. Workshop presentations and discussions showed that although hydrogen/hydride induced degradation of zirconium alloys may be of concern, the potential for occurrence and the extent of anticipated degradation vary throughout the nuclear industry because of the variations in hydrogen content, hydride morphology, alloy chemistry and irradiation conditions. The tools and techniques used to characterize hydrides and hydride morphologies and their impacts on material performance also vary. Such variations make site-to-site comparisons of test results and observations difficult. There is no consensus that a single material or system characteristic (e.g., reactor type, burnup, hydrogen content, end-of life stress, alloy type, drying temperature, etc.) is an effective predictor of material response during long term storage or of performance after long term storage. Multi-variable correlations made for one alloy may not represent the behavior of another alloy exposed to

  16. Thermal creep behavior of N36 zirconium alloy cladding tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P.; Zhao, W.; Dai, X.

    2015-01-01

    N36 is an alloy containing Zr, Sn, Nb and Fe that is developed by China as a superior cladding material to meet the performance of PWR fuel assembly at the maximum fuel rod burn-up. The creep characteristics of N36 zirconium alloy cladding tube were investigated at temperature from 593 K to 723 K with stress ranging from 20 MPa to 160 MPa. Transitions in creep mechanisms were noted, showing the distinct three rate-controlled creep mechanisms for the alloy at test conditions. In the region of low stresses with stress exponent n ∼ 1 and activation energy Q ∼ (104±4) kJ.mol -1 , Coble creep, based on diffusion of materials through grain boundaries, is the dominant rate-controlling mechanism, which contributes to the creep deformation. The formation of slip bands acts as an accommodation mechanism. In the region of middle stress with stress exponent n ∼ 3 and activation energy Q ∼ (195±7) kJ.mol -1 , micro-creep, caused by viscous gliding of dislocations due to the interaction of O atoms with dislocations, controls the deformation. In the high stress region with stress exponent n ∼ 5-6 and activation energy Q ∼ (210±10) kJ.mol -1 , two mechanisms of the climb of edge dislocations (EDC) and the motion of jogged screw dislocation (MJS) contribute to rate controlling process. In test conditions N36 alloy cladding tube behaves a type of creep similar to that noted in class-I (A) alloys

  17. Capture of Tritium Released from Cladding in the Zirconium Recycle Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Barry B [ORNL; Bruffey, Stephanie H [ORNL; DelCul, Guillermo Daniel [ORNL; Walker, Trenton Baird [ORNL

    2016-08-31

    Zirconium may be recovered from the Zircaloy® cladding of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for recycle or to reduce the quantities of high-level waste destined for a geologic repository. Recovery of zirconium using a chlorination process is currently under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The approach is to treat the cladding with chlorine gas to convert the zirconium in the alloy (~98 wt % of the alloy mass) to zirconium tetrachloride. A significant fraction of the tritium (0–96%) produced in nuclear fuel during irradiation may be found in zirconium-based cladding and could be released from the cladding when the solid matrix is destroyed by the chlorination reaction. To prevent uncontrolled release of radioactive tritium to other parts of the plant or to the environment, a method to recover the tritium may be required. The focus of this effort was to (1) identify potential methods for the recovery of tritium from the off-gas of the zirconium recycle process, (2) perform scoping tests on selected recovery methods using nonradioactive gas simulants, and (3) select a process design appropriate for testing on radioactive gas streams generated by the engineering-scale zirconium recycle demonstrations on radioactive used cladding.

  18. Capture of Tritium Released from Cladding in the Zirconium Recycle Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruffey, Stephanie H [ORNL; Spencer, Barry B [ORNL; DelCul, Guillermo Daniel [ORNL

    2016-08-31

    This report is issued as the first revision to FCRD-MRWFD-2016-000297. Zirconium may be recovered from the Zircaloy® cladding of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for recycle or to reduce the quantities of high-level waste destined for a geologic repository. Recovery of zirconium using a chlorination process is currently under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The approach is to treat the cladding with chlorine gas to convert the zirconium in the alloy (~98 wt % of the alloy mass) to zirconium tetrachloride. A significant fraction of the tritium (0–96%) produced in nuclear fuel during irradiation may be found in zirconium-based cladding and could be released from the cladding when the solid matrix is destroyed by the chlorination reaction. To prevent uncontrolled release of radioactive tritium to other parts of the plant or to the environment, a method to recover the tritium may be required. The focus of this effort was to (1) identify potential methods for the recovery of tritium from the off-gas of the zirconium recycle process, (2) perform scoping tests on selected recovery methods using non-radioactive gas simulants, and (3) select a process design appropriate for testing on radioactive gas streams generated by the engineering-scale zirconium recycle demonstrations on radioactive used cladding.

  19. Clad Degradation- Summary and Abstraction for LA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Stahl

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to develop the summary cladding degradation abstraction that will be used in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Most civilian commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. The model addressed in this report is intended to describe the postulated condition of commercial Zircaloy-clad fuel as a function of postclosure time after it is placed in the repository. Earlier total system performance assessments analyzed the waste form as exposed UO 2 , which was available for degradation at the intrinsic dissolution rate. Water in the waste package quickly became saturated with many of the radionuclides, limiting their release rate. In the total system performance assessments for the Viability Assessment and the Site Recommendation, cladding was analyzed as part of the waste form, limiting the amount of fuel available at any time for degradation. The current model is divided into two stages. The first considers predisposal rod failures (most of which occur during reactor operation and associated activities) and postdisposal mechanical failure (from static loading of rocks) as mechanisms for perforating the cladding. Other fuel failure mechanisms including those caused by handling or transportation have been screened out (excluded) or are treated elsewhere. All stainless-steel-clad fuel, which makes up a small percentage of the overall amount of fuel to be stored, is modeled as failed upon placement in the waste packages. The second stage of the degradation model is the splitting of the cladding from the reaction of water or moist air and UO 2 . The splitting has been observed to be rapid in comparison to the total system performance assessment time steps and is modeled to be instantaneous. After the cladding splits, the rind buildup inside the cladding widens the split, increasing the diffusion area from the fuel rind to the waste package interior. This model report summarizes the

  20. Out-of-pile test of zirconium cladding simulating reactivity initiated accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. H.; Lee, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Bang, J. K.; Jung, Y. H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Mechanical properties of zirconium cladding such as Zircaloy-4 and advanced cladding were evaluated by ring tension test to simulate Reactivity-Initiated Accident (RIA) as an out-pile test. Cladding was hydrided by means of charging hydrogen up to 1000ppm to simulate high-burnup situation, finally fabricated to circumferential tensile specimen. Ring tension test was carried out from 0.01 to 1/sec to keep pace with actual RIA event. The results showed that mechanical strength of zirconium cladding increased at the value of 7.8% but ductility decreased at the 34% as applied strain rate and absorbed hydrogen increased. Further activities regarding out-of-pile testing plans for simulated high-burnup cladding were discussed in this paper.

  1. Solid-phase zirconium and fluoride species in alkaline zircaloy cladding waste at Hanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Jacob G; Huber, Heinz J; Cooke, Gary A; Pestovich, John A

    2014-08-15

    The United States Department of Energy Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington, USA, processed plutonium between 1944 and 1987. Fifty-six million gallons of waste of various origins remain, including waste from removing zircaloy fuel cladding using the so-called Zirflex process. The speciation of zirconium and fluoride in this waste is important because of the corrosivity and reactivity of fluoride as well as the (potentially) high density of Zr-phases. This study evaluates the solid-phase speciation of zirconium and fluoride using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). Two waste samples were analyzed: one waste sample that is relatively pure zirconium cladding waste from tank 241-AW-105 and another that is a blend of zirconium cladding wastes and other high-level wastes from tank 241-C-104. Villiaumite (NaF) was found to be the dominant fluoride species in the cladding waste and natrophosphate (Na7F[PO4]2 · 19H2O) was the dominant species in the blended waste. Most zirconium was present as a sub-micron amorphous Na-Zr-O phase in the cladding waste and a Na-Al-Zr-O phase in the blended waste. Some zirconium was present in both tanks as either rounded or elongated crystalline needles of Na-bearing ZrO2 that are up to 200 μm in length. These results provide waste process planners the speciation data needed to develop disposal processes for this waste. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of plastic anisotropy of zirconium alloys cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamshchikov, N.V.; Prasolov, P.F.; Shestak, V.E.

    1991-01-01

    Method for determining plastic anisotropy of zurconium alloy cladding is described. It is based on consideration of material as a combination of transversal crystallites with known distribution over orientations. Such approach enables to describe cladding resistance to plastic deformation at arbitrary stressed state, using the results of texture investigations and uniaxial tests of samples, cut out of claddings along three directions. Plastic anisotropy of fuel element claddings 9.15 and 13.6 mm in diameter up to several percents of plastic deformation is shown

  3. Penetrate-leach dissolution of zirconium-clad uranium and uranium dioxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, H.D.

    1975-01-01

    A new decladding-dissolution process was developed for zirconium-clad uranium metal and UO 2 fuels. The proposed penetrate-leach process consists of penetrating the zirconium cladding with Alniflex solution (2M HF--1M HNO 3 --1M Al(NO 3 ) 3 --0.1M K 2 Cr 2 O 7 ) and of leaching the exposed core with 10M HNO 3 . Undissolved cladding pieces are discarded as solid waste. Periodic HF and HNO 3 additions, efficient agitation, and in-line zirconium analyses are required for successful control of ZrF 4 and/or AlF 3 precipitation during the cladding-penetration step. Preliminary solvent extraction studies indicated complete recovery of uranium with 30 vol. percent tributyl phosphate (TBP) from both Alniflex solution and blended Alniflex-HNO 3 leach solutions. With 7.5 vol. percent TBP, high extractant/feed flow ratios and low scrub flows are required for satisfactory uranium recovery from Alniflex solution. Modified waste-handling procedures may be required for Alniflex waste, because it cannot be evaporated before neutralization and large quantities of solids are generated on neutralization. The effect of unstable UZr 3 (epsilon phase of uranium-zirconium system) on the safety of penetrate-leach dissolution was investigated

  4. Zircaloy cladding degradation under repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santanam, L.; Raghavan, S.; Chin, B.A.

    1990-12-01

    Creep, a potential degradation mechanism of Zircaloy cladding after repository disposal of spent nuclear fuel, has been investigated. The deformation and fracture map methodology has been used to predict maximum allowable initial storage temperatures to achieve a thousand year life without rupture as a function of spent-fuel history. Maximum allowable temperatures are 340 degree C (613 K) for typically stressed rods (70--100 MPa) and 300 degree C (573 K) for highly stressed rods (140--160 MPa). 10 refs., 2 figs

  5. The degradation of zirconium alloys in nuclear reactors - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, D.; Graham, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents the findings of a survey of available non-Canadian literature on the oxidation and hydriding of zirconium alloys. Much of the literature was found to address the Zircaloys, particularly when used as fuel cladding subjected to a radioactive and oxidizing environment. Hydriding of Zircaloys is mainly attributed to oxidation. The survey revealed that Zr-Nb alloys have been included in some investigations; however, data on the long-term degradation of Zr-2.5 wt% Nb, in particular, were scarce. The reviewed literature did not lead to conclusions regarding the potential for accelerated hydriding due to corrosion at crevices and/or second-phase particles, nor did it lead to conclusions as to the potential for a 'breakaway' in oxidation and hydrogen acquisition in long service life of Zr-Nb alloys. Specific information on service experience in U.S.S.R. power reactors could not be obtained; however, most of the information surveyed leads to the conclusion that fuel channels having Zr-2.5 wt% Nb pressure tubes should perform satisfactorily with respect to degradation from corrosion and hydriding provided they are installed correctly and are not operated under conditions that are far removed from those anticipated in design. 91 refs

  6. Process for surface treatment of zirconium-containing cladding materials for fuel element or other components for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videm, K.G.; Lunde, L.R.; Kooyman, H.H.

    1975-01-01

    A process for the surface treatment of zirconium-base cladding materials for fuel elements or other components for nuclear reactors is described. The treatment includes pickling the cladding material in a fluoride-containing bath, and then applying a protective coating through oxidation to the pickled cladding material. The fluoride-containing contaminants which remain on the surface of the cladding material during pickling are removed or rendered harmless by anodic oxidation

  7. High-resolution characterization of oxidation mechanism of zirconium nuclear fuel cladding alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, J.; Lozano-Perez, S.; Grovenor, C.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Zirconium alloys are used extensively as cladding materials in modern light water reactors to separate the uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel rods and the coolant water in order to prevent the escape of radioactive fission products whilst maintaining heat transfer to the coolant. With increasing demand for high burn-up in modern nuclear reactors, environmental degradation of these alloys is now the life limiting factor for fuel assemblies. As part of the MUZIC-2 collaboration studying oxidation and hydrogen pickup in Zr alloys, several high resolution analysis techniques have been used to study the microstructure of a range of commercial and developmental Zr alloys. The sample used for this investigation was prepared from a Westinghouse TM developmental alloy with composition of Zr-0.9Nb-0.01Sn-0.08Fe (wt %) in the recrystallized condition. The sample was oxidised in an autoclave at EDF Energy under simulated PWR water conditions at 360 C. degrees for 360 days. Using Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), we have studied the development of the equiaxed-columnar-equiaxed grain structure, and observe that the columnar grains are both longer and show a stronger preferred texture in more corrosion-resistant alloys. Fresnel imaging revealed the existence of both parallel interconnected pores and some vertically interconnected pores along the columnar oxide grain boundaries, which become more disconnected near the metal-oxide interface. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) provided accurate quantitative analysis of the oxygen concentration across the interface, identifying the existence of local regions of stoichiometric ZrO and Zr 3 O 2 with varying thickness. These observations will be discussed in the context of current models for oxidation in zirconium alloys. (authors)

  8. Management of waste cladding hulls. Part II. An assessment of zirconium pyrophoricity and recommendations for handling waste hulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kullen, B.J.; Levitz, N.M.; Steindler, M.J.

    1977-11-01

    This report reviews experience and research related to the pyrophoricity of zirconium and zirconium alloys. The results of recent investigations of the behavior of Zircaloy and some observations of industrial handling and treatment of Zircaloy tubing and scrap are also discussed. A model for the management of waste Zircaloy cladding hulls from light water reactor fuel reprocessing is offered, based on an evaluation of the reviewed information. It is concluded that waste Zircaloy cladding hulls do not constitute a pyrophoric hazard if, following the model flow sheet, finely divided metal is oxidized during the management procedure. Steps alternative to the model are described which yield zirconium in deactivated form and also accomplish varying degrees of transuranic decontamination. Information collected into appendixes is (1) a collation of zirconium pyrophoricity data from the literature, (2) calculated radioactivity contents in Zircaloy cladding hulls from spent LWR fuels, and (3) results of a laboratory study on volatilization of zirconium from Zircaloy using HCl or Cl 2

  9. A comparative study on the fretting wear properties of advanced zirconium fuel cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Hyung Kyu; Park, Jeong Yong; Kim, Jun Hwan

    2005-06-01

    Fretting wear tests were carried out in room and high temperature water in order to evaluate the wear properties of new zirconium nuclear fuel claddings (K2∼K6) and the commercial claddings (M5, zirlo and zircaloy-4). The objective is to compare the wear resistance of K2∼K6 claddings with that of the commercial ones at the same test condition. After the wear tests, the average wear volume and the maximum wear depth were evaluated and compared at each test condition. As a result, it is difficult to select the most wear-resistant cladding between the K2∼K6 claddings and the commercial ones. This is because the average wear volume and maximum depth of each cladding included between the scattering range of measured results. However, wear resistance of the tested claddings based on the average wear volume and maximum wear depth could be summarized as follows: K5 > zircaloy-4 > (K2,K3) > (K4,M5) > K6 > zirlo at room temperature, zircaloy-4 > K5 > (K3,K4,zirlo) > (K2,K6) > M5 at high temperature and pressure. Therefore, it is concluded that K5 cladding among the tested new zirconium alloys has relatively higher wear-resistance in room and high temperature condition. In order to examine the wear mechanism, it is necessary to systematically study with the consideration of the alloying element effect and test environment. In this report, the wear test procedure and the wear evaluation method are described in detail

  10. HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, K.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation

  11. Zirconium cladding - the long way towards a mechanistic understanding of processing and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preuss, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are the material of choice to encapsulate nuclear fuel in light and heavy water-cooled reactors due to their low neutron absorption, excellent corrosion resistance and sufficient mechanical properties. Despite these advantageous physical and mechanical properties a more physically based understanding of microstructure and texture evolution during processing is highly desirable in order to improve our understanding of formability during thermomechanical processing and performance variability of cladding material. In addition, the purely empirical understanding of aqueous zirconium corrosion, hydrogen pick up, hydride precipitation as well as irradiation growth and creep limits the accuracy of life predictions and therefore the level of burnup that is obtained from current fuel assemblies. The presentation aims at giving examples of new research strategies that will enable the development of a new physical understanding of processing and performance aspects in zirconium cladding material, which is required to develop new predictive models. Particular emphasis will be placed on using novel research tools and large-scale research facilities such as neutron spallation and synchrotron radiation sources to undertake very detailed and often in-situ studies of deformation mechanisms and microstructure evolution as well as determining stress states in grain families, oxides and hydrides. The results will be presented in the view of how they might help us to improve our understanding and enable the development of better predictive models

  12. Development of new zirconium alloys for PWR fuel rod claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wenjin; Zhou Bangxin; Miao Zhi; Li Cong; Jiang Hongman; Yu Xiaowei; Jiang Yourong; Huang Qiang; Gou Yuan; Huang Decheng

    2001-01-01

    An advanced zirconium alloys containing Sn, Nb, Fe and Cr have been developed. The relationships between manufacturing, microstructure and corrosion performance for the new alloys have been studied. The effects of both heat treatment and chemistry on corrosion behavior were assessed by autoclave tests in lithia water at 633 K and high-temperature steam at 773 K. Analytical electron microscopy demonstrated that the best out-of-pile corrosion performance was obtained for microstructure containing a fine and uniform distribution of β-Nb and Zr(Fe, Nb) 2 particles. Autoclave testing in LiOH solution indicated that two kinds of alloys (N18, N36) showed the lower corrosion rate than the reference Zr-4 tested, and especially, the corrosion resistance in superheated steam at 773 K was much better. Moreover, the mechanical properties were superior to Zr-4. And the hydrogen absorption data for all of alloys from corrosion reactions under various corrosion conditions showed a linear increase with the oxide thickness

  13. Development of Self-Healing Zirconium-Silicide Coatings for Improved Performance Zirconium-Alloy Fuel Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Mariani, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, Xianming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Xu, Peng [Westinghouse Electric Company; Lahoda, Ed [Westinghouse Electric Company

    2018-03-31

    Given the long-term goal of developing such coatings for use with nuclear reactor fuel cladding, this work describes results of oxidation and corrosion behavior of bulk zirconium-silicide and fabrication of zirconium-silicide coatings on zirconium-alloy test flats, tube configurations, and SiC test flats. In addition, boiling heat transfer of these modified surfaces (including ZrSi2 coating) during clad quenching experiments is discussed in detail. Oxidation of bulk ZrSi2 was found to be negligible compared to Zircaloy-4 (a common Zr-alloy cladding material) and mechanical integrity of ZrSi2 was superior to that of bulk Zr2Si at high temperatures in ambient air. Very interesting and unique multi-nanolayered composite of ZrO2 and SiO2 were observed. Physical model for the oxidation has been proposed wherein Zr–Si–O mixture undergoes a spinodal phase decomposition into ZrO2 and SiO2, which is manifested as a nanoscale assembly of alternating layer of the two oxides. Steam corrosion at high pressure (10.3 MPa) led to weight loss of ZrSi2 and produced oxide scale with depletion of silicon, possibly attributed to volatile silicon hydroxide, gaseous silicon monoxide, and a solubility of silicon dioxide in water. Only Zircon phase (ZrSiO4) formed during oxidation of ZrSi2 at 1400°C in air, and allowed for immobilization silicon species in oxide scale in the aqueous environments. Zirconium-silicide coatings (on zirconium-alloy substrates) investigated in this study were deposited primarily using magnetron sputter deposition method and slurry method, although powder spray deposition processes cold spray and thermal spray methods were also investigated. The optimized ZrSi2 sputtered coating exhibited a highly protective nature at elevated temperatures in ambient air by mitigating oxygen permeation to the underlying zirconium alloy substrate. The high oxidation resistance of the coating has been shown to be due to nanocrystalline SiO2 and ZrSiO4 phases in the amorphous

  14. Cladding failure model III (CFM III). A simple model for iodine induced stress corrosion cracking of zirconium-lined barrier and standard zircaloy cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasooji, A.; Miller, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    A previously developed unified model (SCCIG*) for predicting iodine induced SCC in standard Zircaloy cladding was modified recently into the ''SCCIG-B'' model which predicts the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of zirconium lined barrier cladding. Several published papers have presented the capability of these models for predicting various observed behaviours related to SCC. A closed form equation, called Cladding Failure Model III (CMFIII), has been derived from the SCCIG-B model. CFMIII takes the form of an explicit equation for the radial crack growth rate dc/dt as a function of hoop strain, crack depth, temperature, and surface iodine concentration in irradiated cladding (both barrier and standard Zircaloy). CMFIII has approximately the same predictive capabilities as the physically based SCCIG and/or SCCIG-B models but is computationally faster and more convenient and can be easily utilized in fuel performance codes for predicting the behaviour of barrier and standard claddings in reactor operations. (author)

  15. Phase evolution and dendrite growth in laser cladding of aluminium on zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, T.M.; Xie, H.; Lin, X.; Yang, H.O.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Laser cladding of Al on pure Zr. → A series of phase evolutions occurred across the laser-clad coating. → Epitaxial crystal growth, backward dendrite growth and two-phase eutectic dendritic growth. → Phase and microstructure evolution is discussed. - Abstract: Aluminium was laser clad on a pure zirconium substrate using the blown powder method. The microstructure across the laser-clad coating was studied. Starting from the bottom to the top surface of the coating, a series of phase evolutions had occurred: (Zr) → (Zr) + AlZr 2 + AlZr 3 → Al 4 Zr 5 + Al 3 Zr 2 → Al 3 Zr 2 + AlZr 2 → Al 2 Zr → Al 2 Zr + Al 3 Zr. This resulted in an epitaxial columnar crystal growth at the re-melt substrate boundary, a band of backward growth Al 3 Zr 2 dendrites towards the lower half of the coating, and a two-phase eutectic dendritic growth of Al 2 Zr + Al 3 Zr towards the top of the coating. The evolution of the various phases and microstructures is discussed in conjunction with the Al-Zr phase diagram, the criteria for planar interface instability, and the theory of eutectic growth under rapid solidification conditions (the TMK model).

  16. Application of non-destructive liner thickness measurement technique for manufacturing and inspection process of zirconium lined cladding tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Norio; Fukuda, Akihiro; Fujii, Noritsugu; Inoue, Koichi

    1986-01-01

    Recently, in order to meet the difference of electric power demand owing to electric power situation, large scale load following operation has become necessary. Therefore, the development of the cladding tubes which withstand power variation has been carried out, as the result, zirconium-lined zircaloy 2 cladding tubes have been developed. In order to reduce the sensitivity to stress corrosion cracking, these zirconium-lined cladding tubes require uniform liner thickness over the whole surface and whole length. Kobe Steel Ltd. developed the nondestructive liner thickness measuring technique based on ultrasonic flaw detection technique and eddy current flaw detection technique. These equipments were applied to the manufacturing and inspection processes of the zirconium-lined cladding tubes, and have demonstrated superiority in the control and assurance of the liner thickness of products. Zirconium-lined cladding tubes, the development of the measuring technique for guaranteeing the uniform liner thickness and the liner thickness control in the manufacturing and inspection processes are described. (Kako, I.)

  17. The elastic properties of zirconium alloy fuel cladding and pressure tubing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinger, H.E.; Northwood, D.O.

    1979-01-01

    A knowledge of the elastic properties of zirconium alloys is required in the mathematical modelling of cladding and pressure tubing performance. Until recently, little of this type of data was available, particularly at elevated temperatures. The dynamic elastic moduli of zircaloy-2, zircaloy-4, the alloys Zr-1.0 wt%Nb, Zr-2.5 wt%Nb and Marz grade zirconium have therefore been determined over the temperature range 275 to 1000 K. Young's modulus and shear modulus for all the zirconium alloys decrease with temperature and are expressed by empirical relations fitted to the data. The elastic properties are texture dependent and a detailed study has been conducted on the effect of texture on the elastic properties of Zr-1.0 wt% Nb over the temperature range 275 to 775 K. The results are compared with polycrystalline elastic constants computed from single crystal elastic constants, and the effect of texture on the dynamic elastic moduli is discussed in detail. (Auth.)

  18. Creep behavior under internal pressure of zirconium alloy cladding oxidized in steam at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chosson, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    During hypothetical Loss-Of-Coolant-Accident (LOCA) scenarios, zirconium alloy fuel cladding tubes creep under internal pressure and are oxidized on their outer surface at high temperature (HT). Claddings become stratified materials: zirconia and oxygen-stabilized α phase, called α(O), are formed on the outer surface of the cladding whereas the inner part remains in the β domain. The strengthening effect of oxidation on the cladding creep behavior under internal pressure has been highlighted at HT. In order to model this effect, the creep behavior of each layer had to be determined. This study focused on the characterization of the creep behavior of the α(O) phase at HT, through axial creep tests performed under vacuum on model materials, containing from 2 to 7 wt.% of oxygen and representative of the α(O) phase. For the first time, two creep flow regimes have been observed in this phase. Underlying physical mechanisms and relevant microstructural parameters have been discussed for each regime. The strengthening effect due to oxygen on the α(O) phase creep behavior at HT has been quantified and creep flow equations have been identified. A ductile to brittle transition criterion has been also suggested as a function of temperature and oxygen content. Relevance of the creep flow equations for each layer, identified in this study or from the literature, has been discussed. Then, a finite element model, describing the oxidized cladding as a stratified material, has been built. Based on this model, a fraction of the experimental strengthening during creep is predicted. (author) [fr

  19. Nanoindentation measurements of the mechanical properties of zirconium matrix and hydrides in unirradiated pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rico, A.; Martin-Rengel, M.A.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Rodriguez, J.; Gomez-Sanchez, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the mechanical properties of the nuclear fuel cladding may be affected by the presence of hydrides. The average mechanical properties of hydrided cladding have been extensively investigated from a macroscopic point of view. In addition, the mechanical and fracture properties of bulk hydride samples fabricated from zirconium plates have also been reported. In this paper, Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress are measured for each phase, namely zirconium hydrides and matrix, of pre-hydrided nuclear fuel cladding. To this end, nanoindentation tests were performed on ZIRLO samples in as-received state, on a hydride blister and in samples with 150 and 1200 ppm of hydrogen homogeneously distributed along the hoop direction of the cladding. The results show that the measured mechanical properties of the zirconium hydrides and ZIRLO matrix (Young’s modulus, hardness and yield stress) are rather similar. From the experimental data, the hydride volume fraction in the cladding samples with 150 and 1200 ppm was estimated and the average mechanical properties were calculated by means of the rule of mixtures. These values were compared with those obtained from ring compression tests. Good agreement between the results obtained by both methods was found

  20. Effects of Cooling Rates on Hydride Reorientation and Mechanical Properties of Zirconium Alloy Claddings under Interim Dry Storage Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Su-Jeong; Kim, Myeong-Su; Won, Chu-chin; Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2013-01-01

    As-received Zr-Nb cladding tubes and 600 ppm hydrogen-charged tubes were employed to evaluate the effects of cladding cooling rates on the extent of hydride reorientation from circumferential hydrides to radial ones and mechanical property degradations with the use of cooling rates of 2, 4 and 15 °C/min from 400 °C to room temperature simulating cladding cooling under interim dry storage conditions. The as-received cladding tubes generated nearly the same ultimate tensile strengths and plastic elongations, regardless of the cooling rates, because of a negligible hydrogen content in the cladding. The 600 ppm-H cladding tubes indicate that the slower cooling rate generated the larger radial hydride fraction and the longer radial hydrides, which resulted in greater mechanical performance degradations. The cooling rate of 2 °C/min generates an ultimate tensile strength of 758 MPa and a plastic elongation of 1.0%, whereas the cooling rate of 15 °C/min generates an ultimate tensile strength of 825 MPa and a plastic elongation of 15.0%. These remarkable mechanical property degradations of the 600 ppm-H cladding tubes with the slowest cooling rate may be characterized by cleavage fracture surface appearance enhanced by longer radial hydrides and their higher fraction that have been precipitated through a relatively larger nucleation and growth rate.

  1. Incorporation of Integral Fuel Burnable Absorbers Boron and Gadolinium into Zirconium-Alloy Fuel Clad Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridharan, K.; Renk, T.J.; Lahoda, E.J.; Corradini, M.L

    2004-01-01

    Long-lived fuels require the use of higher enrichments of 235U or other fissile materials. Such high levels of fissile material lead to excessive fuel activity at the beginning of life. To counteract this excessive activity, integral fuel burnable absorbers (IFBA) are added to some rods in the fuel assembly. The two commonly used IFBA elements are gadolinium, which is added as gadolinium-oxide to the UO2 powder, and boron, which is applied as a zirconium-diboride coating on the UO2 pellets using plasma spraying or chemical vapor deposition techniques. The incorporation of IFBA into the fuel has to be performed in a nuclear-regulated facility that is physically separated from the main plant. These operations tend to be very costly because of their small volume and can add from 20 to 30% to the manufacturing cost of the fuel. Other manufacturing issues that impact cost and performance are maintaining the correct levels of dosing, the reduction in fuel melting point due to gadolinium-oxide additions, and parasitic neutron absorption at fuel's end-of-life. The goal of the proposed research is to develop an alternative approach that involves incorporation of boron or gadolinium into the outer surface of the fuel cladding material rather than as an additive to the fuel pellets. This paradigm shift will allow for the introduction of the IFBA in a non-nuclear regulated environment and will obviate the necessity of additional handling and processing of the fuel pellets. This could represent significant cost savings and potentially lead to greater reproducibility and control of the burnable fuel in the early stages of the reactor operation. The surface alloying is being performed using the IBEST (Ion Beam Surface Treatment) process developed at Sandia National Laboratories. IBEST involves the delivery of energetic ion beam pulses onto the surface of a material, near-surface melting, and rapid solidification. The non-equilibrium nature of such processing allows f or surface

  2. Evaluation of steam corrosion and water quenching behavior of zirconium-silicide coated LWR fuel claddings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Hwasung; Lockhart, Cody; Mariani, Robert; Xu, Peng; Corradini, Michael; Sridharan, Kumar

    2018-02-01

    This study investigates steam corrosion of bulk ZrSi2, pure Si, and zirconium-silicide coatings as well as water quenching behavior of ZrSi2 coatings to evaluate its feasibility as a potential accident-tolerant fuel cladding coating material in light water nuclear reactor. The ZrSi2 coating and Zr2Si-ZrSi2 coating were deposited on Zircaloy-4 flats, SiC flats, and cylindrical Zircaloy-4 rodlets using magnetron sputter deposition. Bulk ZrSi2 and pure Si samples showed weight loss after the corrosion test in pure steam at 400 °C and 10.3 MPa for 72 h. Silicon depletion on the ZrSi2 surface during the steam test was related to the surface recession observed in the silicon samples. ZrSi2 coating (∼3.9 μm) pre-oxidized in 700 °C air prevented substrate oxidation but thin porous ZrO2 formed on the coating. The only condition which achieved complete silicon immobilization in the oxide scale in aqueous environments was the formation of ZrSiO4 via ZrSi2 coating oxidation in 1400 °C air. In addition, ZrSi2 coatings were beneficial in enhancing quenching heat transfer - the minimum film boiling temperature increased by 6-8% in the three different environmental conditions tested. During repeated thermal cycles (water quenching from 700 °C to 85 °C for 20 s) performed as a part of quench tests, no spallation and cracking was observed and the coating prevented oxidation of the underlying Zircaloy-4 substrate.

  3. Sulphur mustard degradation on zirconium doped Ti-Fe oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stengl, Vaclav, E-mail: stengl@iic.cas.cz [Department of Solid State Chemistry, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry AS CR v.v.i 250 68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic); Grygar, Tomas Matys [Department of Solid State Chemistry, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry AS CR v.v.i 250 68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic); Oplustil, Frantisek; Nemec, Tomas [Military Technical Institute of Protection Brno Veslarska 230, 628 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} New stechiometric materials for sulphur mustard degradation. {yields} High degree of degradation, more then 95% h{sup -1}. {yields} One-pot synthesis procedure. - Abstract: Zirconium doped mixed nanodispersive oxides of Ti and Fe were prepared by homogeneous hydrolysis of sulphate salts with urea in aqueous solutions. Synthesized nanodispersive metal oxide hydroxides were characterised as the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joiner-Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis, and acid-base titration. These oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity with sulphur mustard (chemical warfare agent HD or bis(2-chloroethyl)sulphide). The presence of Zr{sup 4+} dopant tends to increase both the surface area and the surface hydroxylation of the resulting doped oxides in such a manner that it can contribute to enabling the substrate adsorption at the oxide surface and thus accelerate the rate of degradation of warfare agents. The addition of Zr{sup 4+} to the hydrolysis of ferric sulphate with urea shifts the reaction route and promotes formation of goethite at the expense of ferrihydrite. We discovered that Zr{sup 4+} doped oxo-hydroxides of Ti and Fe exhibit a higher degradation activity towards sulphur mustard than any other yet reported reactive sorbents. The reaction rate constant of the slower parallel reaction of the most efficient reactive sorbents is increased with the increasing amount of surface base sites.

  4. Modeling of mechanical behavior of quenched zirconium-based nuclear fuel claddings after a high temperature oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera-Salcedo, A.

    2012-01-01

    During the second stage of Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) zirconium-based fuel claddings undergo a high temperature oxidation (up to 1200 C), then a water quench. After a single-side steam oxidation followed by a direct quench, the cladding is composed of three layers: an oxide (Zirconia) outer layer (formed at HT), always brittle at Room Temperature (RT), an intermediate oxygen stabilized alpha layer, always brittle at RT, called alpha(O), and an inner 'prior-beta' layer, which is the only layer able to keep some significant Post Quench (PQ) ductility at RT. However, hydrogen absorbed because of service exposure or during the LOCA transient, concentrates in this layer and may leads to its embrittlement. To estimate the PQ mechanical properties of these materials, Ring Compression Tests (RCT) are widely used because of their simplicity. Small sample size makes RCTs advantageous when a comparison with irradiated samples is required. Despite their good reproducibility, these tests are difficult to interpret as they often present two or more load drops on the engineering load-displacement curve. Laboratories disagree about their interpretation. This study proposes an original fracture scenario for a stratified PQ cladding tested by RCT, and its associated FE model. Strong oxygen content gradient effect on layers mechanical properties is taken into account in the model. PQ thermal stresses resulting from water quench of HT oxidized cladding are investigated, as well as progressive damage of three layers during an RCT. The proposed scenario is based on interrupted RCT analysis, post- RCT sample's outer layers observation for damage evaluation, RCTs of prior-beta single-layer rings, and mechanical behavior of especially chemically adjusted samples. The force displacement curves appearance is correctly reproduced using the obtained FE model. The proposed fracture scenario elucidates RCTs of quenched zirconium-based nuclear fuel

  5. High-temperature irradiation of niobium-1 w/o zirconium-clad UO/sub 2/. [Compatibility with lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kangilaski, M.; Fromm, E.O.; Lozier, D.H.; Storhok, V.W.; Gates, J.E.

    1965-06-28

    Twenty-four 0.225-in.-diameter and six 0.290-in.-diameter UO/sub 2/ specimens clad with 80 mils of niobium-1 w/o zirconium were irradiated to burnups of 1.4 to 6.0 at. % of uranium at surface temperatures of 900 to 1400/sup 0/C. UO/sub 2/ and lithium were found to be incompatible at these temperatures, and the thick cladding was used primarily to minimize the chances of contact of UO/sub 2/ and the lithium coolant. The thickly clad specimens did not undergo any dimensional changes as a result of irradiation, although it was found that movement of UO/sub 2/ took place in the axial direction by a vaporization-redeposition mechanism. It was found that 32 to 87% of the fission gases was released from the fuel, depending on the temperature of the specimen. Metallographic examination of longitudinal and transverse sections of the specimens indicated the usual UO/sub 2/ microstructure with columnar grains. Grain-boundary thickening was observed in the UO/sub 2/ at higher burnups. The oxygen/uranium ratio of UO/sub 2/ increased with increasing burnup.

  6. Oxidation Behavior of FeCrAl -coated Zirconium Cladding prepared by Laser Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Choi, Byung-Kwan; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Seon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    From the recent research trends, the ATF cladding concepts for enhanced accident tolerance are divided as follows: Mo-Zr cladding to increase the high temperature strength, cladding coating to increase the high temperature oxidation resistance, FeCrAl alloy and SiC/SiCf material to increase the oxidation resistance and strength at high temperature. To commercialize the ATF cladding concepts, various factors are considered, such as safety under normal and accident conditions, economy for the fuel cycle, and developing development challenges, and schedule. From the proposed concepts, it is known that the cladding coating, FeCrAl alloy, and Zr-Mo claddings are considered as a near/mid-term application, whereas the SiC material is considered as a long-term application. Among them, the benefit of cladding coating on Zr-based alloys is the fuel cycle economy regarding the manufacturing, neutron cross section, and high tritium permeation characteristics. However, the challenge of cladding coating on Zr-based alloys is the lower oxidation resistance and mechanical strength at high-temperature than other concepts. Another important point is the adhesion property between the Zr-based alloy and coating materials. A laser coating method supplied with FeCrAl powders was developed to decrease the high-temperature oxidation rate in a steam environment through a systematic study for various coating parameters, and a FeCrAl-coated Zircaloy-4 cladding tube of 100 mm in length to the axial direction can be successfully manufactured.

  7. About criteria of inadmissible embrittlement of zirconium fuel cladding during LOCA in the PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmachkin, V.S.

    1999-01-01

    According the licensing procedures the designers of the PWRs reactor have to prove the meeting of special safety requirements. One criteria on effectiveness of the Emergency Core Cooling System is not to exceeding some limited conditions of the fuel cladding during LOCA accidents (typical example T m ax o C, ECR<0,17 and oth.). The damage of fuel element in the core during LOCA is caused by the oxidation of the cladding, its embrittlement and thermal shock stresses after initiation of the heat removal by a cold water from emergency core cooling system. In the paper the conservatism in criteria to avoid brittle ruptures of the fuel elements is discussed. Taking into account the influence of fuel burnup on the property of the cladding and a potential presence of air in the steam, it is believed that criteria of survivability of the zircaloy fuel cladding during LOCA may not be enough conservative.(author)

  8. On composition and thermal degradation of basic zirconium sulfates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grizik, A A; Nekhamkin, L G; Kondrashova, I A; Serebrennikov, E L; Kerina, V P

    1988-02-01

    Methods of potentiometric titration, conductometry and thermal gravimetric analysis are used to study composition and properties of basic zirconium sulfates (BZS) obtained under different conditions of precipitation from aqueous solutions. Three X-ray amorphous phases of BZR with mole ratio SO/sub 4//sup 2-/:Zr, being 0.60+-0.03; 0.37+-0.04 and 0.176+-0.005, are identified. Different character of thermal decomposition of these phases in the process of zirconium dioxide preparation from BZS is confirmed.

  9. On composition and thermal degradation of basic zirconium sulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grizik, A.A.; Nekhamkin, L.G.; Kondrashova, I.A.; Serebrennikov, E.L.; Kerina, V.P.

    1988-01-01

    Methods of potentiometric titration, conductometry and thermal gravimetric analysis are used to study composition and properties of basic zirconium sulfates (BZS) obtained under different conditions of precipitation from aqueous solutions. Three X-ray amorphous phases of BZR with mole ratio SO 4 2- :Zr, being 0.60±0.03; 0.37±0.04 and 0.176±0.005, are identified. Different character of thermal decomposition of these phases in the process of zirconium dioxide preparation from BZS is confirmed

  10. Effects of operating conditions on molten-salt electrorefining for zirconium recovery from irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding of pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jaeyeong, E-mail: d486916@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sungyeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Sungjune [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Rag [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Il Soon [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Computational simulation on electrorefining of irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding. • Composition of irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding of pressurized water reactor. • Redox behavior of elements in irradiated Zircaloy cladding during electrorefining. • Effect of electrorefining operating conditions on decontamination factor. - Abstract: To reduce the final waste volume from used nuclear fuel assembly, it is significant to decontaminate irradiated cladding. Electrorefining in high temperature molten salt could be one of volume decontamination processes for the cladding. This study examines the effect of operating conditions on decontamination factor in electrorefining of irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding of pressurized water reactor. One-dimensional time-dependent electrochemical reaction code, REFIN, was utilized for simulating irradiated cladding electrorefining. Composition of irradiated Zircaloy was estimated based on ORIGEN-2 and other literatures. Co and U were considered in electrorefining simulation with major elements of Zircaloy-4 to represent activation products and actinides penetrating into the cladding respectively. Total 240 cases of electrorefining are simulated including 8 diffusion boundary layer thicknesses, 10 concentrations of contaminated molten salt and 3 termination conditions. Decontamination factors for each case were evaluated and it is revealed that the radioactivity of Co-60 in recovered zirconium on cathode could decrease below the clearance level when initial concentration of chlorides except ZrCl{sub 4} is lower than 1 × 10{sup −11} weight fraction if electrorefining is finished before anode potential reaches −1.8 V (vs. Cl{sub 2}/Cl{sup −})

  11. Effect of high hydrogen content on metallurgical and mechanical properties of zirconium alloy claddings after heat-treatment at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turque, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Under hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident conditions, fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys can be exposed to steam at high temperature (HT, up 1200 C) before being cooled and then quenched in water. In some conditions, after burst occurrence the cladding can rapidly absorb a significant amount of hydrogen (secondary hydriding), up to 3000 wt.ppm locally, during steam exposition at HT. The study deals with the effect, poorly studied up to date, of high contents of hydrogen on the metallurgical and mechanical properties of two zirconium alloys, Zircaloy-4 and M5, during and after cooling from high temperatures, at which zirconium is in its β phase. A specific facility was developed to homogeneously charge in hydrogen up to ∼ 3000 wt.ppm cladding tube samples of several centimeters in length. Phase transformations, chemical element partitioning and hydrogen precipitation during cooling from the β temperature domain of zirconium were studied by using several techniques, for the materials containing up to ∼ 3000 wt.ppm of hydrogen in average: in-situ neutron diffraction upon cooling from 700 C, X-ray diffraction, μ-ERDA, EPMA and electron microscopy in particular. The results were compared to thermodynamic predictions. In order to study the effect of high hydrogen contents on the mechanical behavior of the (prior-)μ phase of zirconium, axial tensile tests were performed at various temperatures between 20 and 700 C upon cooling from the β temperature domain, on samples with mean hydrogen contents up to ∼ 3000 wt.ppm. The results show that metallurgical and mechanical properties of the (prior-)β phase of zirconium alloys strongly depend on temperature and hydrogen content. (author) [fr

  12. Zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedinger, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium is the 20th most abundant element in the Earth’s crust. It occurs in a variety of rock types and geologic environments but most often in igneous rocks in the form of zircon (ZrSiO4). Zircon is recovered as a coproduct of the mining and processing of heavy mineral sands for the titanium minerals ilmenite and rutile. The sands are formed by the weathering and erosion of rock containing zircon and titanium heavy minerals and their subsequent concentration in sedimentary systems, particularly in coastal environments. A small quantity of zirconium, less than 10 kt/a (11,000 stpy), compared with total world production of 1.4 Mt (1.5 million st) in 2012, was derived from the mineral baddeleyite (ZrO2), produced from a single source in Kovdor, Russia.

  13. Electrochemical Studies on Important Elements for Zirconium Recovery Form Irradiated Zircaloy-4 Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.; Sohn, S.; Hwang, I.S.

    2015-01-01

    Since Zircaloy cladding accounts for about 16 wt. % of used nuclear fuel assembly, decontamination process is required to reduce the final waste volume from spent nuclear fuel. To develop Zircaloy-4 electrorefining process as an irradiated Zircaloy cladding decontamination process, electrochemical studies on Sn, Cr, Fe and Co which are major or important elements in the irradiated cladding were conducted based on cyclic voltammetry in LiCl-KCl at 500 deg. C. Cyclic voltammetry for Sn, Fe, Cr and Co elements that should be eliminated was conducted and revealed that redox reactions of these ions are much simpler than Zr and more reductive than Zr. The reliability of cyclic voltammetry was verified by comparing diffusion coefficients and formal reduction potentials of these ions obtained in this study to previous studies. (authors)

  14. Experimental study and modeling of high-temperature oxidation and phase transformation of cladding-tubes made in zirconium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeres, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    One of the hypothetical accident studied in the field of the safety studies of Pressurized light Water Reactor (PWR) is the Loss-Of-Coolant-Accident (LOCA). In this scenario, zirconium alloy fuel claddings could undergo an important oxidation at high temperature (T≅ 1200 C) in a steam environment. Cladding tubes constitute the first confinement barrier of radioelements and then it is essential that they keep a certain level of ductility after quenching to ensure their integrity. These properties are directly related to the growth kinetics of both the oxide and the αZr(O) phase and also to the oxygen diffusion profile in the cladding tube after the transient. In this context, this work was dedicated to the understanding and the modeling of the both oxidation phenomenon and oxygen diffusion in zirconium based alloys at high temperature. The numerical tool (EKINOX-Zr) used in this thesis is based on a numerical resolution of a diffusion/reaction problem with equilibrium-conditions on three moving boundaries: gas/oxide, oxide/αZr(O), αZr(O)/βZr. EKINOX-Zr kinetics model is coupled with ThermoCalc software and the Zircobase database to take into account the influence of the alloying elements (Sn, Fe, Cr, Nb) but also the influence of hydrogen on the solubility of oxygen. This study focused on two parts of the LOCA scenario: the influence of a pre-oxide layer (formed in-service) and the effects of hydrogen. Thanks to the link between EKINOX-Zr and the thermodynamic database Zircobase, the hydrogen effects on oxygen solubility limit could be considered in the numerical simulations. Thus, simulations could reproduce the oxygen diffusion profiles measured in pre-hydrided samples. The existence of a thick pre-oxide layer on cladding tubes can induce a reduction of this pre-oxide layer before the growth of a high-temperature one during the high temperature dwell under steam. The first simulations performed using the numerical tool EKINOX-Zr showed that this particular

  15. Quantification of the distribution of hydrogen by nuclear microprobe at the Laboratory Pierre Sue in the width of zirconium alloy fuel clad of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raepsaet, C.; Bossis, Ph.; Hamon, D.; Bechade, J.L.; Brachet, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Among the analysis techniques by ions beams, the micro ERDA (Elastic Detection Analysis) is an interesting technique which allows the quantitative distribution of the hydrogen in materials. In particular, this analysis has been used for hydride zirconium alloys, with the nuclear microprobe of the Laboratory Pierre Sue. This probe allows the characterization of radioactive materials. The technique principles are recalled and then two examples are provided to illustrate the fuel clad behavior in PWR reactors. (A.L.B.)

  16. Titanium(IV), zirconium, hafnium and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Paul L.; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Titanium can exist in solution in a number of oxidation states. The titanium(IV) exists in acidic solutions as the oxo-cation, TiO 2+ , rather than Ti 4+ . Zirconium is used in the ceramics industry and in nuclear industry as a cladding material in reactors where its reactivity towards hydrolysis reactions and precipitation of oxides may result in degradation of the cladding. In nature, hafnium is found together with zirconium and as a consequence of the contraction in ionic radii that occurs due to the 4f -electron shell, the ionic radius of hafnium is almost identical to that of zirconium. All isotopes of thorium are radioactive and, as a consequence of it being fertile, thorium is important in the nuclear fuel cycle. The polymeric hydrolysis species that have been reported for thorium are somewhat different to those identified for zirconium and hafnium, although thorium does form the Th 4 (OH) 8 8+ species.

  17. A study into the impact of interface roughness development on mechanical degradation of oxides formed on zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platt, P.; Wedge, S.; Frankel, P.; Gass, M.; Howells, R.; Preuss, M.

    2015-01-01

    As a cladding material used to encapsulate nuclear fuel pellets, zirconium alloys are the primary barrier separating the fuel and a pressurised steam or lithiated water environment. Degradation mechanisms such as oxidation can be the limiting factor in the life-time of the fuel assembly. Key to controlling oxidation, and therefore allowing increased burn-up of fuel, is the development of a mechanistic understanding of the corrosion process. In an autoclave, the oxidation kinetics for zirconium alloys are typically cyclical, with periods of accelerated kinetics being observed in steps of ∼2 μm oxide growth. These periods of accelerated oxidation are immediately preceded by the development of a layer of lateral cracks near the metal-oxide interface, which may be associated with the development of interface roughness. The present work uses scanning electron microscopy to carry out a statistical analysis of changes in the metal-oxide interface roughness between three different alloys at different stages of autoclave oxidation. The first two alloys are Zircaloy-4 and ZIRLO ™ for which analysis is carried out at stages before, during and after first transition. The third alloy is an experimental low tin alloy, which under the same oxidation conditions and during the same time period does not appear to go through transition. Assessment of the metal-oxide interface roughness is primarily carried out based on the root mean square of the interface slope known as the R dq parameter. Results show clear trends with relation to transition points in the corrosion kinetics. Discussion is given to how this relates to the existing mechanistic understanding of the corrosion process, and the components required for possible future modelling approaches

  18. The Effect of Peak Temperatures and Hoop Stresses on Hydride Reorientations of Zirconium Alloy Cladding Tubes under Interim Dry Storage Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Hyun Jin; Jang, Ki Nam; Kim, Kyu Tae

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of peak temperatures and hoop tensile stresses on hydride reorientation in cladding was investigated. It was shown that the 250ppm-H specimens generated larger radial hydride fractions and longer radial hydrides than the 500ppm-H ones. The precipitated hydride in radial direction severely degrades mechanical properties of spent fuel rod. Hydride reorientation is related to cladding material, cladding temperature, hydrogen contents, thermal cycling, hoop stress and cooling rate. US NRC established the regulation on cladding temperature during the dry storage, which is the maximum fuel cladding temperature should not exceed 400 .deg. C for all fuel burnups under normal conditions of storage. However, if it is proved that the best estimate cladding hoop stress is equal to or less than 90MPa for the temperature limit proposed, a higher short-term temperature limit is allowed for low burnup fuel. In this study, 250ppm and 500ppm hydrogen-charged Zr-Nb alloy cladding tubes were selected to evaluate the effect of peak temperatures and hoop tensile stresses on the hydride reorientation during the dry storage. In order to evaluate threshold stresses in relation to various peak temperatures, four peak temperatures of 250, 300, 350, and 400 .deg. C and three tensile hoop stresses of 80, 100, 120MPa were selected.

  19. Mechanical behaviour and failure of fuel cladding zirconium alloys in nuclear power plants under accidental RIA-type situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan, D.T.

    2009-01-01

    In French Nuclear Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs), most of structural parts of the fuel assembly consist of zirconium alloy tubes and plates. Optimizing the management of fuel in nuclear power plants led to the increase in the duration of fuel cycles and power. The use of high fuel burnups requires drastic changes in the rules for reactor design in the nuclear safety. The evaluation of nuclear reactors in accident situations is based on reference accident scenarios. One of these hypothetical accidents, examined in this study, is the 'Reactivity Initiated Accident'. In order to assess the structural integrity of these parts it is necessary to characterize both the plastic flow and fracture behaviour of the materials at various stages of the life cycle, (i.e. at increasing levels of hydriding, irradiation, oxidation or thermal mechanical loading). The purpose of this work is to provide experimental data and to develop a model of the thermo-mechanical behaviour and to propose a design analysis method in the case of non-irradiated clads, in RIA-type situations. Mechanical tests were conducted on Cold-Worked-Stress-Relieved and on Recrystallized Zircaloy-4 sheets using various kinds of samples including smooth and notched tensile specimens and small punch tests. Temperature was set to 25, 250 and 600 C with hydrogen contents between 0 and 1000 ppm. The model is based on a simplified description of a Zircaloy polycrystal in which scalar isotropic ductile damage including void nucleation and growth is added. The model is also physically based to easily transfer parameters determined for one material state to another (e.g. transfer between sheet and tube or between different levels of irradiation). The model was implemented in the Finite Element software Zebulon using either an explicit or an implicit time integration scheme. Uniaxial tension tests were used to tune the model parameters for both materials, considering various values of temperature and hydrogen levels

  20. Evaluation of Conditions for Hydrogen Induced Degradation of Zirconium Alloys during Fuel Operation and Storage. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2011-2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    This publication reports on the work carried out in 2011–2015 in the coordinated research project (CRP) on the evaluation of conditions for hydrogen induced degradation of zirconium alloys during fuel operation and storage. The CRP was carried out to evaluate the threshold condition for delayed hydride cracking (KIH) in pressurized water reactors and zircaloy-4 and E635M fuel claddings, with application to in-pile operation and spent fuel storage. The project consisted of adding hydrogen to samples of cladding and measuring K IH by one of four methods. The CRP was the third in the series, of which the results of the first two were published in IAEA-TECDOC-1410 and IAEA-TECDOC-1649, in 2004 and 2010, respectively. This publication includes all of the research work performed in the framework of the CRP, including details of the experimental procedures that led to a set of data for tested materials. The research was conducted by representatives from 13 laboratories from all over the world. In addition to the basic goal to transfer the technology of the testing techniques from experienced laboratories to those unfamiliar with the methods, the CRP was set up to develop experimental procedures to produce consistent sets of data, both within a single laboratory and among different laboratories. The material condition and temperature history were prescribed, and laboratories chose one or two of four methods of loading that were recommended in an attempt to develop standard sets of experimental protocols so that consistent results could be obtained. Experimental discrepancies were minimized through careful attention to details of microstructure, temperature history and stress state in the samples, with the main variation being the mode of loading

  1. Analytical functions used for description of the plastic deformation process in Zirconium alloys WWER type fuel rod cladding under designed accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedotov, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to improve the RAPTA-5 code as applied to the analysis of the thermomechanical behavior of the fuel rod cladding under designed accident conditions. The irreversible process thermodynamics methods were proposed to be used for the description of the plastic deformation process in zirconium alloys under accident conditions. Functions, which describe yielding stress dependence on plastic strain, strain rate and temperature may be successfully used in calculations. On the basis of the experiments made and the existent experimental data the dependence of yielding stress on plastic strain, strain rate, temperature and heating rate for E110 alloy was determined. In future the following research work shall be made: research of dynamic strain ageing in E635 alloy under different strain rates; research of strain rate influence on plastic strain in E635 alloy under test temperature higher than 873 K; research of deformation strengthening of E635 alloy under high temperatures; research of heating rate influence n phase transformation in E110 and E635 alloys

  2. Quantification of the distribution of hydrogen by nuclear microprobe at the Laboratory Pierre Sue in the width of zirconium alloy fuel clad of PWR reactors; Quantification de la repartition de l'hydrogene a la microsonde nucleaire du Laboratoire Pierre Sue dans l'epaisseur de tubes de gainage du combustible des REP en alliage de zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raepsaet, C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Recherche sur l' Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules (DSM/DRECAM/LPS-CNRS) UMR9956, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Bossis, Ph. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMULM2E), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hamon, D.; Bechade, J.L.; Brachet, J.C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMALA2M), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    Among the analysis techniques by ions beams, the micro ERDA (Elastic Detection Analysis) is an interesting technique which allows the quantitative distribution of the hydrogen in materials. In particular, this analysis has been used for hydride zirconium alloys, with the nuclear microprobe of the Laboratory Pierre Sue. This probe allows the characterization of radioactive materials. The technique principles are recalled and then two examples are provided to illustrate the fuel clad behavior in PWR reactors. (A.L.B.)

  3. Preparation, microstructural evolution and properties of Ni–Zr intermetallic/Zr–Si ceramic reinforced composite coatings on zirconium alloy by laser cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kun; Li, Yajiang, E-mail: yajli@sdu.edu.cn; Wang, Juan; Ma, Qunshuang; Li, Jishuai; Li, Xinyue

    2015-10-25

    NiZr{sub 2}–ZrSi–Zr{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}){sub 4}-ZrC intermetallic/ceramic reinforced composite coatings were in situ synthesized by laser cladding the pre-placed Ni–Cr–B–Si powder on zirconium substrate. Microstructure and phase constituents were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Microhardness tester and block-on-ring wear tester were employed to measure the hardness distribution and wear resistance of the intermetallic/ceramic reinforced composite coating. Results indicated that the multiphase of reinforcements includes Ni–Zr intermetallic compounds (e.g., NiZr and NiZr{sub 2}) and Zr–Si(C) ceramic phases (e.g., ZiSi, Zr{sub 5}Si{sub 4} and ZrC). Ni–Si clusters transforming to Zr–Si–Ni clusters at high temperature facilitated the forming of Zr{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}){sub 4} and during the growth of Zr{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}){sub 4}, the consumption of Zr atoms at the lateral interface of liquid/Zr{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}){sub 4} resulted into developing Zr-poor zone near Zr{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}){sub 4}. The microhardness and wear resistance of the coating were significantly improved by various reinforced phases in comparison to zirconium substrate. - Highlights: • NiZr{sub 2}–ZrSi–Zr{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}){sub 4}-ZrC compostie coating was in-situ synthesized. • Ni–Si clusters transforming resulted into developing Zr-poor zone near Zr{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x}){sub 4}. • Reinforced phases significantly improve wear resistance of the coating.

  4. Sensitivity analysis on the zirconium ignition in a postulated SFP loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sanggil; Lee, Jaeyoung; Kim, Sun-ki; Chun, Tae-hyun; Bang, Je-geon

    2016-01-01

    From both SFP complete LOCA experiments, it was observed that zirconium alloy cladding temperature was abruptly increased at a certain point and the cladding was almost fully oxidized. To capture this phenomenon, the concept of air oxidation breakaway model was adopted in MELCOR code. This paper examines this air oxidation breakaway model by comparing the SFP project test data and MELCOR code calculation results by using this model. The air oxidation model parameters are slightly altered to see their sensitivities on the occurrence of the zirconium ignition. Through such sensitivity analysis, limitations of the air oxidation breakaway model are revealed in comparison to the actual zirconium ignition phenomenon during air ingress scenarios. In addition, ways to overcome the identified limitations of the air oxidation model are recommended to estimate better the zirconium ignition phenomenon in SFP sequences. In this paper, the zirconium ignition phenomenon was reviewed and the model to capture this phenomenon was investigated. The model is the air oxidation breakaway model in MELCOR code, and its sensitivity of the model parameters on the time to ignition was studied. From the sensitivity analysis, the slight change of model parameters induce the large variation of the time to ignition. The model itself includes its weakness to fully represent both the air oxidation breakaway phenomenon and the followed zirconium ignition behavior. Furthermore, this model considers no effect of N2 on the cladding degradation and its promoted exothermic heat release

  5. Sensitivity analysis on the zirconium ignition in a postulated SFP loss of coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sanggil; Lee, Jaeyoung [Handong Global Univ., Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun-ki; Chun, Tae-hyun; Bang, Je-geon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    From both SFP complete LOCA experiments, it was observed that zirconium alloy cladding temperature was abruptly increased at a certain point and the cladding was almost fully oxidized. To capture this phenomenon, the concept of air oxidation breakaway model was adopted in MELCOR code. This paper examines this air oxidation breakaway model by comparing the SFP project test data and MELCOR code calculation results by using this model. The air oxidation model parameters are slightly altered to see their sensitivities on the occurrence of the zirconium ignition. Through such sensitivity analysis, limitations of the air oxidation breakaway model are revealed in comparison to the actual zirconium ignition phenomenon during air ingress scenarios. In addition, ways to overcome the identified limitations of the air oxidation model are recommended to estimate better the zirconium ignition phenomenon in SFP sequences. In this paper, the zirconium ignition phenomenon was reviewed and the model to capture this phenomenon was investigated. The model is the air oxidation breakaway model in MELCOR code, and its sensitivity of the model parameters on the time to ignition was studied. From the sensitivity analysis, the slight change of model parameters induce the large variation of the time to ignition. The model itself includes its weakness to fully represent both the air oxidation breakaway phenomenon and the followed zirconium ignition behavior. Furthermore, this model considers no effect of N2 on the cladding degradation and its promoted exothermic heat release.

  6. Clad Treatment in KARMA Code and Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong-yeup; Lee, Hae-chan; Woo, Hae-seuk [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Zirconium is the main components in clad materials. The subgroup parameters of zirconium were generated with effective cross section which obtained by using flux distribution in clad region. It decreases absorption reaction rate differences with reference MCNP results. Use of composite nuclide is acceptable to increase efficiency but should be limited to specific target composition. Therefore, the use of the composite nuclide of Zircaloy-2 should be limited when HANA clad material is used for clad. Either using explicit components or generating composite nuclide for HANA is suggested. This paper investigates the clad analysis model for KARMA whether current method is applicable to HANA clad material.

  7. Zirconium alloy barrier having improved corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, R.B.; Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor has a composite cladding container having a substrate and a dilute zirconium alloy liner bonded to the inside surface of the substrate. The dilute zirconium alloy liner forms about 1 to about 20 percent of the thickness of the cladding and is comprised of zirconium and a metal selected from the group consisting of iron, chromium, iron plus chromium, and copper. The dilute zirconium alloy liner shields the substrate from impurities or fission products from the nuclear fuel material and protects the substrate from stress corrosion and stress cracking. The dilute zirconium alloy liner displays greater corrosion resistance, especially to oxidation by hot water or steam than unalloyed zirconium. The substrate material is selected from conventional cladding materials, and preferably is a zirconium alloy. (author)

  8. Fracture properties of hydrided Zircaloy-4 cladding in recrystallization and stress-relief anneal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hung, E-mail: hhhsu@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), Lungtan Township, Taoyuan County 325, Taiwan (China); Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China); Tsay, Leu-Wen [Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-15

    In this work, the stress-relieved (SRA) and recrystallized (RXA) Zircaloy-4 cladding specimens were hydrogen-charged to the target concentration of 300 wppm and then manufactured into X-specimens for fracture toughness test. The hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 cladding specimens in both SRA and RXA conditions were investigated. At the hydrogen concentration level of 300 wppm, J-integral values for RXA cladding were higher than those for SRA cladding at both 25 Degree-Sign C and 300 Degree-Sign C. The formation of brittle zirconium hydrides had a significant impact on the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 cladding in both SRA and RXA states, especially at 25 Degree-Sign C. Among all the tests, SRA cladding tested at 25 Degree-Sign C exhibited a great loss of the fracture toughness. The micrographic and fractographic observations further demonstrated that the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 cladding would be improved by the coarse grains in RXA cladding, but degraded by zirconium hydrides precipitated along the grain boundary.

  9. The influence of hydride on fracture toughness of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hung, E-mail: 175877@mail.csc.com.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), Lungtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China); China Steel Corporation, Hsiao Kang District, Kaohsiung 81233, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chiang, Ming-Feng [China Steel Corporation, Hsiao Kang District, Kaohsiung 81233, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Yen-Chen [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), Lungtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-04-01

    In this work, RXA cladding tubes were hydrogen-charged to target hydrogen content levels between 150 and 800 wppm (part per million by weight). The strings of zirconium hydrides observed in the cross sections are mostly oriented in the circumferential direction. The fracture toughness of hydrided RXA Zircaloy-4 cladding was measured to evaluate its hydride embrittlement susceptibility. With increasing hydrogen content, the fracture toughness of hydrided RXA cladding decreases at both 25 °C and 300 °C. Moreover, highly localized hydrides (forming a hydride rim) aggravate the degradation of the fracture properties of RXA Zircaloy-4 cladding at both 25 °C and 300 °C. Brittle features in the form of quasi-cleavages and secondary cracks were observed on the fracture surface of the hydride rim, even for RXA cladding tested at 300 °C.

  10. Fuel assembly and fuel cladding tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsumi, Shinro; Ito, Ken-ichi; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Nakajima, Junjiro.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel cladding tube is a zirconium liner tube formed by lining a pure zirconium layer on the inner side of a zirconium alloy tube. The fuel cladding tube is formed by extrusion molding of a composite billet formed by inserting a pure zirconium billet into a zirconium alloy billet. Accordingly, the pure zirconium layer and the zirconium alloy tube are strongly joined by metal bond. The fuel cladding tube has an external oxide film on the outer surface of the zirconium alloy tube and an internal oxide film on the inner side of the pure zirconium layer. The external oxide film has a thickness preferably of about 1μm. The internal oxide film has a thickness of not more than 10μm, preferably, from 1 to 5μm. With such a constitution, flaws to be formed on both inner and outer surfaces of the cladding tube upon assembling a fuel assembly can be reduced thereby enabling to reduce the amount of hydrogen absorbed to the cladding tube. (I.N.)

  11. In situ Investigation of Oxide Films on Zirconium Alloy in PWR Primary Water Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taeho; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Zirconium alloys are used as fuel cladding materials in nuclear power reactors, because these materials have a very low thermal neutron capture cross section as well as desirable mechanical properties. However, the Fukushima accident shows that the oxidation behavior of zirconium alloy is an important issue because the zirconium alloy functions as a shield of nuclear material (i.e., uranium, fission gas), and the degradation on zirconium cladding directly causes severe accident on nuclear power plant. Therefore, to ensure the safety of nuclear power reactors, the performance and sustainability of nuclear fuel should be understood. Currently, the water-metal interface is regarded as the rate-controlling site governing the rapid oxidation transition in high-burn-up fuels. Zirconium oxide is formed at the water-metal interface, and its structure and phase play an important role in determining its mechanical properties. In the early stage of the oxidation process, zirconium oxide with both tetragonal and monoclinic phases is formed. With an increase in the oxidation time to 150 h, the unstable tetragonal phase disappears and the monoclinic phase is dominant and possibly because of the stress relaxation according to previous and present results.

  12. Zircaloy cladding corrosion degradation in a Tuff repository: initial experimental plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.

    1984-07-01

    The projected environmental history of a Tuff repository sited in an unsaturated hydrologic setting is evaluated to identify the potentially most severe corrosion conditions for Zircaloy spent fuel cladding. Three distinct corrosion periods are identified over the projected history. In two of those, liquid water may be present which is believed to produce the most severe corrosive environment for Zircaloy spent fuel cladding. In the time interval 100 to 1000 years after emplacement in the repository, the most severe condition is exposure to 170 0 C water at about 100 psi in an unbreached canister. This condition will be reproduced experimentally in an autoclave. For times after 1000 years, the most severe condition is exposure to 90 0 C water that is equilibrated with the tuff and invades breached canisters. This condition will be reproduced with a water bath system

  13. Nuclear fuel cladding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahigashi, Shigeo.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To largely improve the durability and the safety of fuel cladding material. Constitution: Diffusion preventive layers, e.g., aluminum or the like are covered on both sides of a zirconium alloy base layer of thin material, and corrosion resistant layers, e.g., copper or the like are covered thereon. This thin plate material is intimately wound in a circularly tubular shape in a plurality of layers to form a fuel cladding tube. With such construction, corrosion of the tube due to fuel and impurity can be prevented by the corrosion resistant layers, and the diffusion of the corrosion resistant material to the zirconium alloy can be prevented by the diffusion preventive layers. Since a plurality of layers are cladded, even if the corrosion resistant layers are damaged or cracked due to stress corrosion, only one layer is damaged or cracked, but the other layers are not affected. (Sekiya, K.)

  14. Formation and Role of Gel Fractions in the Corrosion Layer of Zirconium Cladding as the First-stage Protection of the Nuclear Power Plant Fuel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weishauptová, Zuzana; Vrtílková, V.; Bláhová, O.; Maixner, J.

    -, č. 16 (2007), s. 29-38 ISSN 1214-9691 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/04/0043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : zirconium alloys * corrosion layer * hydrated ZrO2 Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  15. Accident tolerant fuel cladding development: Promise, status, and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrani, Kurt A.

    2018-04-01

    The motivation for transitioning away from zirconium-based fuel cladding in light water reactors to significantly more oxidation-resistant materials, thereby enhancing safety margins during severe accidents, is laid out. A review of the development status for three accident tolerant fuel cladding technologies, namely coated zirconium-based cladding, ferritic alumina-forming alloy cladding, and silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite cladding, is offered. Technical challenges and data gaps for each of these cladding technologies are highlighted. Full development towards commercial deployment of these technologies is identified as a high priority for the nuclear industry.

  16. DISSOLUTION OF ZIRCONIUM AND ALLOYS THEREFOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, J.L.

    1961-07-11

    The dissolution of zirconium cladding in a water solution of ammonium fluoride and ammonium nitrate is described. The method finds particular utility in processing spent fuel elements for nuclear reactors. The zirconium cladding is first dissolved in a water solution of ammonium fluoride and ammonium nitrate; insoluble uranium and plutonium fiuorides formed by attack of the solvent on the fuel materiai of the fuel element are then separated from the solution, and the fuel materiai is dissolved in another solution.

  17. MODELLING OF NUCLEAR FUEL CLADDING TUBES CORROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Cech

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes materials made of zirconium-based alloys used for nuclear fuel cladding fabrication. It is focused on corrosion problems their theoretical description and modeling in nuclear engineering.

  18. Method of processing spent fuel cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Ouchi, Atsuhiro; Imahashi, Hiromichi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the residual activity of spent fuel cladding tubes in a short period of time and enable safety storage with simple storage equipments. Constitution: Spent fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys discharged from a nuclear fuel reprocessing step are exposed to a grain boundary embrittling atmosphere to cause grain boundary destruction. This causes grain boundary fractures to the zirconium crystal grains as the matrix of nuclear fuels and then precipitation products precipitated to the grain boundary fractures are removed. The zirconium constituting the nuclear fuel cladding tube and other ingredient elements contained in the precipitation products are separated in this removing step and they are separately stored respectively. As a result, zirconium constituting most part of the composition of the spent nuclear fuel cladding tubes can be stored safely at a low activity level. (Takahashi, M.)

  19. Degradation of the Mechanical Properties of Zirconium-base alloys due to Interaction with Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolino, Graciela

    2001-01-01

    Security aspects and the purpose to extend the nuclear power plants lifetime motivate the renovated interest on the influence of the environment and radiation on the mechanical properties of in-reactor materials.Zirconium based alloys are the family of alloys most extensively used in nuclear core components.A consequence of the interaction of the in-reactor environment with these alloys is the formation of brittle phase Zr hydride, a process that greatly affects the component integrity.In this work we present a experimental study of the hydrogen influence on the Z ry-4 mechanical properties at different temperatures.As a complement we also present results of a finite elements simulations of the fracture process.We performed standard metallurgical and mechanical characterization in commercial Z ry-4 samples to obtain their basic properties. Different hydrogen pickup techniques were applied to obtain H concentration of charged samples between 10 and 2000 ppm, homogeneous or mainly localized at the crack tip zone.To obtain the fracture toughness of the alloys specimens were tested using elastoplastic fracture mechanics techniques.Specifically we implement J-integral methodology with partial unloading compliance measurements.Tests were performed in a temperature range of 20 to 200 o C.The negative influence of the H content on material toughness probed to be important even at very small concentrations, with an effect that decreases when temperature increases.While there was observed no change in the fracture mechanism in homogeneous charged samples, specimens charged under a superimposed stress field fractured by brittle mode when were tested at 20 to 70 o C. SEM observations of the crack growth, the fracture surface morphology and precipitates content showed the influence of the precipitates on fracture at different H concentrations.At least three stages with different fracture behavior depending on H content were identified.Complementary to the experimental work we

  20. Analyses on Silicide Coating for LOCA Resistant Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweidan, Faris B.; Lee, You Ho; Ryu, Ho Jin [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A particular focus of accident-tolerant fuel has been cladding due to the rapid high-temperature oxidation of zirconium-based cladding with the evolution of H2 when steam is a reactant. Some key features of the coated cladding include high-temperature resistance to oxidation, lower processing temperatures, and a high melting point of the coating. Zirconium alloys exhibit a reasonably high melting temperature, so a coating for the cladding is appealing if the coating increases the high-temperature resistance to oxidation. In this case, the cladding is protected from complete oxidation. The cladding coating involves the application of zirconium silicide onto Zr-based cladding. Zirconium silicide coating is expected to produce a glassy layer that becomes more protective at elevated temperature. For this reason, silicide coatings on cladding offer the potential for improved reliability at normal operating temperatures and at the higher transient temperatures encountered during accidents. Although ceramic coatings are brittle and may have weak points to be used as coating materials, several ceramic coatings were successful and showed adherent behavior and high resistance to oxidation. In this study, the oxidation behavior of zirconium silicide and its oxidation kinetics are analyzed. Zirconium silicide is a new suggested material to be used as coatings on existing Zr-based cladding alloys, the aim of this study is to evaluate if zirconium silicide is applicable to be used, so they can be more rapidly developed using existing cladding technology with some modifications. These silicide coatings are an attractive alternative to the use of coatings on zirconium claddings or to the lengthy development of monolithic ceramic or ceramic composite claddings and coatings.

  1. Analyses on Silicide Coating for LOCA Resistant Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweidan, Faris B.; Lee, You Ho; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    A particular focus of accident-tolerant fuel has been cladding due to the rapid high-temperature oxidation of zirconium-based cladding with the evolution of H2 when steam is a reactant. Some key features of the coated cladding include high-temperature resistance to oxidation, lower processing temperatures, and a high melting point of the coating. Zirconium alloys exhibit a reasonably high melting temperature, so a coating for the cladding is appealing if the coating increases the high-temperature resistance to oxidation. In this case, the cladding is protected from complete oxidation. The cladding coating involves the application of zirconium silicide onto Zr-based cladding. Zirconium silicide coating is expected to produce a glassy layer that becomes more protective at elevated temperature. For this reason, silicide coatings on cladding offer the potential for improved reliability at normal operating temperatures and at the higher transient temperatures encountered during accidents. Although ceramic coatings are brittle and may have weak points to be used as coating materials, several ceramic coatings were successful and showed adherent behavior and high resistance to oxidation. In this study, the oxidation behavior of zirconium silicide and its oxidation kinetics are analyzed. Zirconium silicide is a new suggested material to be used as coatings on existing Zr-based cladding alloys, the aim of this study is to evaluate if zirconium silicide is applicable to be used, so they can be more rapidly developed using existing cladding technology with some modifications. These silicide coatings are an attractive alternative to the use of coatings on zirconium claddings or to the lengthy development of monolithic ceramic or ceramic composite claddings and coatings

  2. Hydride-induced degradation of hoop ductility in textured zirconium-alloy tubes: A theoretical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, W.; Szpunar, J.A.; Kozinski, J.

    2012-01-01

    Hydride-induced degradation of hoop ductility in Zr-alloy tubular components has been studied for many years because of its importance in the nuclear industry. In this paper the role of intergranular and intragranular δ-hydrides in the degradation of ductility of the textured Zr-alloy tubes is investigated. The correlation among hydride distribution, orientation and morphology in the tubes is formulated based on thermodynamic modeling, and then analyzed. The results show that the applied stress, the crystallographic texture of α-Zr matrix, the grain-boundary structure, and the morphology and size of Zr grains simultaneously govern the site preference and the orientation of hydrides. A criterion is proposed to determine the threshold stress of hydride reorientation. The hoop ductility of the hydrided Zr tubes is discussed using the concept of macroscopic fracture strain. It is shown that the intergranular hydrides may be more deleterious to ductility than the intragranular ones. This work defines a general framework for understanding the relation of the microstructure of hydride-forming materials to embrittlement.

  3. Zirconium - an imported mineral commodity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    This report examines Canada's position in regard to the principal zirconium materials: zircon; fusion-cast zirconium-bearing refractory products; zirconium-bearing chemicals; and zirconium metal, master alloys, and alloys. None of these is produced in Canada except fused alumina-zirconia and certain magnesium-zirconium alloys and zirconium-bearing steels. Most of the 3 000-4 000 tonnes of the various forms of zircon believed to be consumed in Canada each year is for foundry applications. Other minerals, notably chromite, olivine and silica sand are also used for these purposes and, if necessary, could be substituted for zircon. Zirconium's key role in Canada is in CANDU nuclear power reactors, where zirconium alloys are essential in the cladding for fuel bundles and in capital equipment such as pressure tubes, calandria tubes and reactivity control mechanisms. If zirconium alloys were to become unavailable, the Canadian nuclear power industry would collapse. As a contingency measure, Ontario Hydro maintains at least nine months' stocks of nuclear fuel bundles. Canada's vulnerability to short-term disruptions to supplies of nuclear fuel is diminished further by the availability of more expensive electricity from non-nuclear sources and, given time, from mothballed thermal plants. Zirconium minerals are present in many countries, notably Australia, the Republic of South Africa and the United States. Australia is Canada's principal source of zircon imports; South Africa is its sole source of baddeleyite. At this time, there are no shortages of either material. Canada has untapped zirconium resources in the Athabasca Oil Sands (zircon) and at Strange Lake along the ill-defined border between Quebec and Newfoundland (gittinsite). Adequate metal and alloy production facilities exist in France, Japan and the United States. No action by the federal government in regard to zirconium supplies is called for at this time

  4. Zirconium and cast zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krone, K

    1977-04-01

    A survey is given on the occurence of zirconium, production of Zr sponge and semi-finished products, on physical and mechanical properties, production of Zr cast, composition of the commercial grades and reactor grades qualities, metal cutting, welding, corrosion behavior and use.

  5. Modelling the gas transport and chemical processes related to clad oxidation and hydriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, R O; Rashid, Y R [ANATECH Research Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Models are developed for the gas transport and chemical processes associated with the ingress of steam into a LWR fuel rod through a small defect. These models are used to determine the cladding regions in a defective fuel rod which are susceptible to massive hydriding and the creation of sunburst hydrides. The brittle nature of zirconium hydrides (ZrH{sub 2}) in these susceptible regions produces weak spots in the cladding which can act as initiation sites for cladding cracks under certain cladding stress conditions caused by fuel cladding mechanical interaction. The modeling of the axial gas transport is based on gaseous bimolar diffusion coupled with convective mass transport using the mass continuity equation. Hydrogen production is considered from steam reaction with cladding inner surface, fission products and internal components. Eventually, the production of hydrogen and its diffusion along the length results in high hydrogen concentration in locations remote from the primary defect. Under these conditions, the hydrogen can attack the cladding inner surface and breakdown the protective ZrO{sub 2} layer locally, initiating massive localized hydriding leading to sunburst hydride. The developed hydrogen evolution model is combined with a general purpose fuel behavior program to integrate the effects of power and burnup into the hydriding kinetics. Only in this manner can the behavior of a defected fuel rod be modeled to determine the conditions the result in fuel rod degradation. (author). 14 refs, 6 figs.

  6. Allowable peak heat-up cladding temperature for spent fuel integrity during interim-dry storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Nam Jang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate allowable peak cladding temperature and hoop stress for maintenance of cladding integrity during interim-dry storage and subsequent transport, zirconium alloy cladding tubes were hydrogen-charged to generate 250 ppm and 500 ppm hydrogen contents, simulating spent nuclear fuel degradation. The hydrogen-charged specimens were heated to four peak temperatures of 250°C, 300°C, 350°C, and 400°C, and then cooled to room temperature at cooling rates of 0.3 °C/min under three tensile hoop stresses of 80 MPa, 100 MPa, and 120 MPa. The cool-down specimens showed that high peak heat-up temperature led to lower hydrogen content and that larger tensile hoop stress generated larger radial hydride fraction and consequently lower plastic elongation. Based on these out-of-pile cladding tube test results only, it may be said that peak cladding temperature should be limited to a level < 250°C, regardless of the cladding hoop stress, to ensure cladding integrity during interim-dry storage and subsequent transport.

  7. A state of the Art report on Manufacturing technology of high burn-up fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyeong Ho; Nam, Cheol; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Choi, Byung Kwon; Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Myung Ho; Jeong, Yong Hwan

    1999-09-01

    In order to manufacturing the prototype fuel cladding, overall manufacturing processes and technologies should be thoroughly understood on the manufacturing processes and technologies of foreign cladding tubes. Generally, the important technology related to fuel cladding tube manufacturing processes for PWRs/PHWRs is divided into three stages. The first stage is to produce the zirconium sponge from zirconium sand, the second stage is to produce the zircaloy shell or TREX from zirconium sponge ingot and finally, cladding is produced from TREX or zircaloy shell. Therefore, the manufacturing processes including the first and second stages are described in brief in this technology report in order to understand the whole fuel cladding manufacturing processes. (author)

  8. Iron-chrome-aluminum alloy cladding for increasing safety in nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2017-12-01

    After a tsunami caused plant black out at Fukushima, followed by hydrogen explosions, the US Department of Energy partnered with fuel vendors to study safer alternatives to the current UO2-zirconium alloy system. This accident tolerant fuel alternative should better tolerate loss of cooling in the core for a considerably longer time while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operation conditions. General electric, Oak ridge national laboratory, and their partners are proposing to replace zirconium alloy cladding in current commercial light water power reactors with an iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) cladding such as APMT or C26M. Extensive testing and evaluation is being conducted to determine the suitability of FeCrAl under normal operation conditions and under severe accident conditions. Results show that FeCrAl has excellent corrosion resistance under normal operation conditions and FeCrAl is several orders of magnitude more resistant than zirconium alloys to degradation by superheated steam under accident conditions, generating less heat of oxidation and lower amount of combustible hydrogen gas. Higher neutron absorption and tritium release effects can be minimized by design changes. The implementation of FeCrAl cladding is a near term solution to enhance the safety of the current fleet of commercial light water power reactors.

  9. Diffusion in cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, M.S.; Pande, B.M.; Agarwala, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminium has been used as a cladding material in most research reactors because its low neutron absorption cross section and ease of fabrication. However, it is not suitable for cladding in power reactors and as such zircaloy-2 is normally used as a clad because it can withstand high temperature. It has low neutron absorption cross section, good oxidation, corrosion, creep properties and possesses good mechanical strength. With the passage of time, further development in this branch of science took place and designers started looking for better neutron economy and less hydrogen pickup in PHW reactors. The motion of fission products in the cladding material could pose a problem after long operation. In order to understand their behaviour under reactor environment, it is essential to study first the diffusion under normal conditions. These studies will throw light on the interaction of defects with impurities which would in turn help in understanding the mechanism of diffusion. In this article, it is intended to discuss the diffusion behaviour of impurities in cladding materials.(i.e. aluminium, zircaloy-2, zirconium-niobium alloy etc.). (author). 94 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Structural cladding /clad structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Structural Cladding /Clad Structures: Studies in Tectonic Building Practice A. Beim CINARK – Centre for Industrialized Architecture, Institute of Architectural Technology, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark ABSTRACT: With point of departure in the pr......Structural Cladding /Clad Structures: Studies in Tectonic Building Practice A. Beim CINARK – Centre for Industrialized Architecture, Institute of Architectural Technology, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark ABSTRACT: With point of departure...... to analyze, compare, and discuss how these various construction solutions point out strategies for development based on fundamentally different mindsets. The research questions address the following issues: How to learn from traditional construction principles: When do we see limitations of tectonic maneuver......, to ask for more restrictive building codes. As an example, in Denmark there are series of increasing demands in the current building legislations that are focused at enhancing the energy performance of buildings, which consequently foster rigid insulation standards and ask for improvement of air...

  11. Initial Cladding Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegmann, E.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the condition of commercial Zircaloy clad fuel as it is received at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site. Most commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. This analysis is developed to describe cladding degradation from the expected failure modes. This includes reactor operation impacts including incipient failures, potential degradation after reactor operation during spent fuel storage in pool and dry storage and impacts due to transportation. Degradation modes include cladding creep, and delayed hydride cracking during dry storage and transportation. Mechanical stresses from fuel handling and transportation vibrations are also included. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) does not address any potential damage to assemblies that might occur at the YMP surface facilities. Ranges and uncertainties have been defined. This analysis will be the initial boundary condition for the analysis of cladding degradation inside the repository. In accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning'', a work plan (CRWMS M andO 2000c) was developed, issued, and utilized in the preparation of this document. There are constraints, caveats and limitations to this analysis. This cladding degradation analysis is based on commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel with Zircaloy cladding but is applicable to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel. Reactor operating experience for both PWRs and BWRs is used to establish fuel reliability from reactor operation. It is limited to fuel exposed to normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences (i.e. events which are anticipated to occur within a reactor lifetime), and not to fuel that has been exposed to severe accidents. Fuel burnup projections have been limited to the current commercial reactor licensing environment with restrictions on fuel enrichment, oxide coating thickness and rod plenum pressures. The information provided in this analysis will be used in

  12. High-temperature steam-oxidation behavior of Zr-1Nb-1Sn-0.1Fe cladding tube at temperatures of 800-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Cheol Min; Cho, Tae Won; Jeong, Gwan Yoon; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Hee Jae; Sohn, Dong Seong; Mok, Yong Kyoon

    2016-01-01

    To prevent cladding failure, NRC issued a regulation Title 10 § 50.46, which specifies cladding temperature of 1204 .deg. C and 17% ECR should not be exceeded. The fundamental reason of the mechanical degradation of cladding is the formation of the oxide which is brittle. Theoretically, the oxide layer is formed following parabolic rate. However, from many experiments, sub-parabolic rates are often observed. There have been many suggestions so far; chemical and stress gradient across the oxide layer could initiate the sub-parabolic rate, the phase transformation of Zirconium dioxide from tetragonal to monoclinic could be the reason, change of the grain size of Zirconium dioxide could cause the cubic oxidation rate, and there is a suggestion that if electron migration is the major mechanism of the oxide growth, then the subparabolic rate can show up. However, the reason why the sub-parabolic rate appears is still not certain. Another important degradation mechanism is breakaway oxidation. A clear explanation that why the breakaway oxidation appears is still not clear. Most of the people believe the phase transformation of Zirconium dioxide cause instability within the oxide, which causes breakaway oxidation to appear. However, how much effect is caused from the phase transformation is not so sure. In this study, detailed analysis about the oxidation kinetics and the breakaway oxidation of Zr-1Nb-1Sn- 0.1Fe were carried out at temperatures between 800 - 1000 .deg. C.

  13. Atomistic studies of cation transport in tetragonal ZrO2 during zirconium corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Yongfeng; Tonks, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are the major fuel cladding materials in current reactors. The water-side corrosion is a significant degradation mechanism of these alloys. During corrosion, the transport of oxidizing species in zirconium dioxide (ZrO 2 ) determines the corrosion kinetics. Previously, it has been argued that the outward diffusion of cations is important for forming protective oxides. In this work, the migration of Zr defects in tetragonal ZrO 2 is studied with temperature accelerated dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that Zr interstitials have anisotropic diffusion and migrate preferentially along the [001] or c direction in tetragonal ZrO 2 . The compressive stresses can increase the Zr interstitial migration barrier significantly. The migration of Zr interstitials at a grain boundary is much slower than in a bulk oxide. The implications of these atomistic simulation results in the Zr corrosion are discussed. (authors)

  14. Method for automatic filling of nuclear fuel rod cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezold, H.

    1979-01-01

    Prior to welding the zirconium alloy cladding tubes with end caps, they are automatically filled with nuclear fuel tablets and ceramic insulating tablets. The tablets are introduced into magazine drums and led through a drying oven to a discharging station. The empty cladding tubes are removed from this discharging station and filled with tablets. A filling stamp pushes out the columns of tablets in the magazine tubes of the magazine drum into the cladding tube. Weight and measurement of length determine the filled state of the cladding tube. The cladding tubes are then led to the welding station via a conveyor belt. (DG) [de

  15. Localized deformation of zirconium-liner tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Fumihisa; Uchida, Masaaki

    1988-03-01

    Zirconium-liner tube has come to be used in BWR. Zirconium liner mitigates the localized stress produced by the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). In this study, simulating the ridging, stresses were applied to the inner surfaces of zirconium-liner tubes and Zircaloy-2 tubes, and, to investigate the mechanism and the extent of the effect, the behavior of zirconium liner was examined. As the result of examination, stress was concentrated especially at the edge of the deformed region, where zirconium liner was highly deformed. Even after high stress was applied, the deformation of Zircaloy part was small, since almost the concentrated stress was mitigated by the deformation of zirconium liner. In addition, stress and strain distributions in the cross section of specimen were calculated with a computer code FEMAXI-III. The results also showed that zirconium liner mitigated the localized stress in Zircaloy, although the affected zone was restricted to the region near the boundary between zirconium liner and Zircaloy. (author)

  16. Effects of alpha-zirconium phosphate on thermal degradation and flame retardancy of transparent intumescent fire protective coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Weiyi [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Ping [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, 59 Qinglong Road, Mianyang 621010 (China); Song, Lei; Wang, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hu, Yuan, E-mail: yuanhu@ustc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzai Road, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A transparent intumescent fire protective coating was obtained by UV-cured technology. • OZrP could enhance the thermal stability and anti-oxidation of the coating. • OZrP could reduce the combustion properties of the coatings. - Abstract: Organophilic alpha-zirconium phosphate (OZrP) was used to improve the thermal and fire retardant behaviors of the phenyl di(acryloyloxyethyl)phosphate (PDHA)-triglycidyl isocyanurate acrylate (TGICA)-2-phenoxyethyl acrylate (PHEA) (PDHA-TGICA-PHEA) coating. The morphology of nanocomposite coating was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of OZrP on the flame retardancy, thermal stability, fireproofing time and char formation of the coatings was investigated by microscale combustion calorimeter (MCC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) and scanning electric microscope (SEM). The results showed that by adding OZrP, the peak heat release rate and total heat of combustion were significantly reduced. The highest improvement was achieved with 0.5 wt% OZrP. XPS analysis indicated that the performance of anti-oxidation of the coating was improved with the addition of OZrP, and SEM images showed that a good synergistic effect was obtained through a ceramic-like layer produced by OZrP covered on the surface of char.

  17. Effects of alpha-zirconium phosphate on thermal degradation and flame retardancy of transparent intumescent fire protective coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Weiyi; Zhang, Ping; Song, Lei; Wang, Xin; Hu, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A transparent intumescent fire protective coating was obtained by UV-cured technology. • OZrP could enhance the thermal stability and anti-oxidation of the coating. • OZrP could reduce the combustion properties of the coatings. - Abstract: Organophilic alpha-zirconium phosphate (OZrP) was used to improve the thermal and fire retardant behaviors of the phenyl di(acryloyloxyethyl)phosphate (PDHA)-triglycidyl isocyanurate acrylate (TGICA)-2-phenoxyethyl acrylate (PHEA) (PDHA-TGICA-PHEA) coating. The morphology of nanocomposite coating was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of OZrP on the flame retardancy, thermal stability, fireproofing time and char formation of the coatings was investigated by microscale combustion calorimeter (MCC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS) and scanning electric microscope (SEM). The results showed that by adding OZrP, the peak heat release rate and total heat of combustion were significantly reduced. The highest improvement was achieved with 0.5 wt% OZrP. XPS analysis indicated that the performance of anti-oxidation of the coating was improved with the addition of OZrP, and SEM images showed that a good synergistic effect was obtained through a ceramic-like layer produced by OZrP covered on the surface of char

  18. Structure and short time degradation studies of sodium zirconium phosphate ceramics loaded with simulated fast breeder (FBR) waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananthanarayanan, A., E-mail: arvinda@barc.gov.in [Process Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ambashta, R.D., E-mail: aritu@barc.gov.in [Process Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sudarsan, V. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ajithkumar, T. [Applied Catalysis Unit, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India); Sen, D.; Mazumder, S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Wattal, P.K. [Process Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2017-04-15

    Sodium zirconium phosphate (NZP) ceramics have been prepared using conventional sintering and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) routes. The structure of NZP ceramics, prepared using the HIP route, has been compared with conventionally sintered NZP using a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and ({sup 31}P and {sup 23}Na) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques. It is observed that NZP with no waste loading is aggressive toward the steel HIP-can during hot isostatic compaction and significant fraction of cations from the steel enter the ceramic material. Waste loaded NZP samples (10 wt% simulated FBR waste) show significantly low can-interaction and primary NZP phase is evident in this material. Upon exposure of can-interacted and waste loaded NZP to boiling water and steam, {sup 31}P NMR does not detect any major modifications in the network structure. However, the {sup 23}Na NMR spectra indicate migration of Na{sup +} ions from the surface and possible re-crystallization. This is corroborated by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) data and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) measurements carried out on these samples.

  19. Influence of processing variables and alloy chemistry on the corrosion behavior of ZIRLO nuclear fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comstock, R.J.; Sabol, G.P.; Schoenberger, G.

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the thermal heat treatments used during the fabrication of ZIRLO (Zr-1Nb-1Sn-0.1Fe) fuel clad tubing and in ZIRLO alloy chemistry were explored to develop a further understanding of the relationship between processing, microstructure, and cladding corrosion performance. Heat treatment variables included intermediate tube annealing temperatures as well as a beta-phase heat treatment during the latter stages of the tube reduction schedule. Chemistry variables included deviations in niobium and tin content from the nominal composition. The effects of both heat treatment and chemistry on corrosion behavior were assessed by autoclave tests in both pure and lithiated water and high-temperature steam. Analytical electron microscopy demonstrated that the best out-reactor corrosion performance is obtained for microstructures containing a fine distribution of beta-niobium and Zr-Nb-Fe particles. Deviations from this microstructure, such as the presence of beta-zirconium phase, tend to degrade corrosion resistance. ZIRLO fuel cladding was irradiated in four commercial reactors. In all cases, the microstructure in the cladding included beta-niobium and Zr-Nb-Fe particles. ZIRLO fuel cladding processed with a late-stage beta heat treatment to further refine the second-phase particle size exhibited in-reactor corrosion behavior that was similar to reference ZIRLO cladding. Variations of the in-reactor corrosion behavior of ZIRLO were correlated to tin content, with higher oxide thickness observed in the ZIRLO cladding containing higher tin. The results of these studies indicate that optimum corrosion performance of ZIRLO is achieved by maintaining a uniform distribution of fine second-phase particles and controlled levels of tin

  20. Production of nuclear grade zirconium: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, L., E-mail: L.Xu-2@tudelft.nl [School of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft 2628 CD (Netherlands); Xiao, Y. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan 243002 (China); Zr-Hf-Ti Metallurgie B.V., Den Haag 2582 SB (Netherlands); Sandwijk, A. van [Zr-Hf-Ti Metallurgie B.V., Den Haag 2582 SB (Netherlands); Xu, Q. [School of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Yang, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft 2628 CD (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    Zirconium is an ideal material for nuclear reactors due to its low absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons, whereas the typically contained hafnium with strong neutron-absorption is very harmful for zirconium as a fuel cladding material. This paper provides an overview of the processes for nuclear grade zirconium production with emphasis on the methods of Zr–Hf separation. The separation processes are roughly classified into hydro- and pyrometallurgical routes. The known pyrometallurgical Zr–Hf separation methods are discussed based on the following reaction features: redox characteristics, volatility, electrochemical properties and molten salt–metal equilibrium. In the present paper, the available Zr–Hf separation technologies are compared. The advantages and disadvantages as well as future directions of research and development for nuclear grade zirconium production are discussed.

  1. Zirconium phosphatidylcholine-based nanocapsules as an in vivo degradable drug delivery system of MAP30, a momordica anti-HIV protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caizhen, Guo; Yan, Gao; Ronron, Chang; Lirong, Yang; Panpan, Chu; Xuemei, Hu; Yuanbiao, Qiao; Qingshan, Li

    2015-04-10

    An essential in vivo drug delivery system of a momordica anti-HIV protein, MAP30, was developed through encapsulating in chemically synthesized matrices of zirconium egg- and soy-phosphatidylcholines, abbreviated to Zr/EPC and Zr/SPC, respectively. Matrices were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffractometry studies. Zr/EPC granule at an approximate diameter of 69.43±7.78 nm was a less efficient encapsulator than the granule of Zr/SPC. Interlayer spacing of the matrices encapsulating MAP30 increased from 8.8 and 9.7 Å to 7.4 and 7.9 nm, respectively. In vivo kinetics on degradation and protein release was performed by analyzing the serum sampling of intravenously injected SPF chickens. The first order and biphasic variations were obtained for in vivo kinetics using equilibrium dialysis. Antimicrobial and anti-HIV assays yielded greatly decreased MIC50 and EC50 values of nanoformulated MAP30. An acute toxicity of MAP30 encapsulated in Zr/EPC occurred at a single intravenous dose above 14.24 mg/kg bw in NIH/KM/ICR mice. The folding of MAP30 from Zr/EPC sustained in vivo chickens for more than 8 days in high performance liquid chromatography assays. These matrices could protect MAP30 efficiently with strong structure retention, lowered toxicity and prolonged in vivo life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Eddy-current testing of fatigue degradation upon contact fatigue loading of gas powder laser clad NiCrBSi-Cr3C2 composite coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savrai, R. A.; Makarov, A. V.; Gorkunov, E. S.; Soboleva, N. N.; Kogan, L. Kh.; Malygina, I. Yu.; Osintseva, A. L.; Davydova, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    The possibilities of the eddy-current method for testing the fatigue degradation under contact loading of gas powder laser clad NiCrBSi-Cr3C2 composite coating with 15 wt.% of Cr3C2 additive have been investigated. It is shown that the eddy-current testing of the fatigue degradation under contact loading of the NiCrBSi-15%Cr3C2 composite coating can be performed at high excitation frequencies 72-120 kHz of the eddy-current transducer. At that, the dependences of the eddy-current instrument readings on the number of loading cycles have both downward and upward branches, with the boundary between the branches being 3×105 cycles in the given loading conditions. This is caused, on the one hand, by cracking, and, on the other hand, by cohesive spalling and compaction of the composite coating, which affect oppositely the material resistivity and, correspondingly, the eddy-current instrument readings. The downward branch can be used to monitor the processes of crack formation and growth, the upward branch - to monitor the degree of cohesive spalling, while taking into account in the testing methodology an ambiguous character of the dependences of the eddy-current instrument readings on the number of loading cycles.

  3. Advances in zirconium technology for nuclear reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, C.

    2002-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are extensively used as a material for cladding nuclear fuels and for making core structurals of water-cooled nuclear power reactors all over the world for generation of nearly 16 percent of the worlds electricity. Only four countries in the world, namely France, USA, Russia and India, have large zirconium industry and capability to manufacture reactor grade zirconium sponge, a number of zirconium alloys and a wide variety of structural components for water cooled nuclear reactor. The present paper summarises the status of zirconium technology and highlights the achievement of Nuclear Fuel Complex during the last ten years in developing a wide variety of zirconium alloys and components for water-cooled nuclear power programme

  4. Experimental and thermodynamic study of the erbium-oxygen-zirconium and gadolinium-oxygen-zirconium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jourdan, J.

    2009-11-01

    This work is a contribution to the development of innovative concepts for fuel cladding in pressurized water nuclear reactors. This concept implies the insertion of rare earth (erbium and gadolinium) in the zirconium fuel cladding. The determination of phase equilibria in the systems is essential prior to the implementation of such a promising solution. This study consisted in an experimental determination of the erbium-zirconium phase diagram. For this, we used many different techniques in order to obtain diagram data such as solubility limits, solidus, liquidus or invariant temperatures. These data allowed us to present a new diagram, very different from the previous one available in the literature. We also assessed the diagram using the CALPHAD approach. In the gadolinium-zirconium system, we determined experimentally the solubility limits. Those limits had never been determined before, and the values we obtained showed a very good agreement with the experimental and assessed versions of the diagram. Because these alloys are subjected to oxygen diffusion throughout their life, we focused our attention on the erbium-oxygen-zirconium and gadolinium-oxygen-zirconium systems. The first system has been investigated experimentally. The alloys fabrication has been performed using powder metallurgy. In order to obtain pure raw materials, we fabricated powder from erbium and zirconium bulk metals using hydrogen absorption/desorption. The characterisation of the ternary pellets allowed the determination of two ternary isothermal sections at 800 and 1100 C. For the gadolinium-oxygen-zirconium system, we calculated the phase equilibria at temperatures ranging from 800 to 1100 C, using a homemade database compiled from literature assessments of the oxygen-zirconium, gadolinium-zirconium and gadolinia-zirconia systems. Finally, we determined the mechanical properties, in connexion with the microstructure, of industrial quality alloys in order to identify the influence of

  5. Effect of the pre-transient oxide on Zy-4 cladding degradation in air and air+steam atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duriez, C.; Guerain, M.; Lacote, P.; Mermoux, M.

    2015-01-01

    High temperature reactivity in air of Zr based alloys has been mostly investigated with initially bare cladding materials. In this study, attention is paid to the influence of a low temperature pre-oxidation scale aiming to simulate the corrosion scale existing on spent fuel. Different out of pile pre-oxidation methods, inducing significant variation in the pre-oxides microstructure, are compared. The reaction kinetics in air and in mixed air + steam atmospheres, investigated in the 700-950 C. degrees temperature range by thermogravimetry (TGA), shows that a pre-oxide scale formed at low temperature has a protective effect at high temperature by significantly delaying occurrence of the kinetic acceleration, which however still occurs. Efficiency of this protective effect appears to depend on the type of pre-oxide. To better understand the exact role of the pre-oxide, oxygen transport through the pre-oxide has been investigated using the 18 O tracer technique. 18 O distribution maps have been obtained by micro-Raman imaging, which has proved to offer interesting capabilities for that purpose. Results obtained with a 30 μm pre-oxide scale formed at 425 C. degrees in oxygen suggest that, at 850 C. degrees, only the inner part of the scale acts as a barrier against oxidation while the outermost part of the scale (5 to 15 μm in thickness) seems to be permeable to gaseous oxygen. The use of the 18 O isotope tracer technique associated with micro-Raman mapping of the scales is demonstrated to be a powerful method to investigate the transport properties of the scales and will help to gain understanding of the kinetic differences between the different pre-oxides

  6. Study of the uranium-zirconium diffusion; Etude de la diffusion uranium-zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adda, Y; Mairy, C; Bouchet, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-07-01

    The intermetallic diffusion of uranium fuel and zirconium used as cladding is studied. Intermetallic diffusion can occur during the cladding of uranium rods and uranium can penetrate the zirconium cladding. Different parameters are involved in this mechanism as structure and mechanical properties of the diffusion area as well as presence of impurities in the metal. The uses of different analysis techniques (micrography, Castaing electronic microprobe, microhardness and autoradiography) have permitted to determine with great accuracy the diffusion coefficient in gamma phase (body centered cubic system) and the results have given important information on the intermetallic diffusion mechanisms. The existence of the Kirkendall effect in the U-Zr diffusion is also an argument in favor of the generality of the diffusion mechanism by vacancies in body centered cubic system. (M.P.)

  7. Oxidation resistant chromium coating on Zircaloy-4 for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Eui-Jung; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The attributes of such a fuel are approved reaction kinetics with steam, a slower hydrogen generation rate, and good cladding thermo-mechanical properties. Many researchers have tried to modify zirconium alloys to improve their oxidation resistance in the early stages of the ATF development. Corrosion resistant coating on cladding is one of the candidate technologies to improve the oxidation resistance of zirconium cladding. By applying coating technology to zirconium cladding, it is easy to obtain corrosion resistance without a change in the base materials. Among the surface coating methods, arc ion plating (AIP) is a coating technology to improve the adhesion owing to good throwing power, and a dense deposit (Fig. 1). Owing to these advantages, AIP has been widely used to efficiently form protective coatings on cutting tools, dies, bearings, etc. In this study, The AIP technique for the protection of zirconium claddings from the oxidation in a high-temperature steam environment was studied. The homogeneous Cr film with a high adhesive ability to the cladding was deposited by AIP and acted as a protection layer to enhance the corrosion resistance of the zirconium cladding. It was concluded that the AIP technology is effective for coating a protective layer on claddings

  8. Oxidation resistant chromium coating on Zircaloy-4 for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Eui-Jung; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The attributes of such a fuel are approved reaction kinetics with steam, a slower hydrogen generation rate, and good cladding thermo-mechanical properties. Many researchers have tried to modify zirconium alloys to improve their oxidation resistance in the early stages of the ATF development. Corrosion resistant coating on cladding is one of the candidate technologies to improve the oxidation resistance of zirconium cladding. By applying coating technology to zirconium cladding, it is easy to obtain corrosion resistance without a change in the base materials. Among the surface coating methods, arc ion plating (AIP) is a coating technology to improve the adhesion owing to good throwing power, and a dense deposit (Fig. 1). Owing to these advantages, AIP has been widely used to efficiently form protective coatings on cutting tools, dies, bearings, etc. In this study, The AIP technique for the protection of zirconium claddings from the oxidation in a high-temperature steam environment was studied. The homogeneous Cr film with a high adhesive ability to the cladding was deposited by AIP and acted as a protection layer to enhance the corrosion resistance of the zirconium cladding. It was concluded that the AIP technology is effective for coating a protective layer on claddings.

  9. Some recent trends in the use of zirconium alloys for nuclear service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaramamoorthy, K.

    1992-01-01

    Without any exception nuclear power reactors particularly the water cooled ones, operating in the World use natural or slightly enriched uranium oxide fuel pellets with zirconium alloy cladding. While the zirconium alloys have proven to be successful in their designed usage, a desire for longer lifetimes of core components and increased duty cycle puts more demand on materials performance. This demand has led to more in depth studies of phenomena associated with zirconium alloy corrosion mechanism, fine tuning of the zirconium alloy composition, development of fabrication techniques and to the evaluation of newer zirconium alloys for critical applications. (author). 5 refs., 32 figs

  10. Determination of zirconium by fluoride ion selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahanty, B.N.; Sonar, V.R.; Gaikwad, R.; Raul, S.; Das, D.K.; Prakash, A.; Afzal, Md.; Panakkal, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Zirconium is used in a wide range of applications including nuclear clad, catalytic converters, surgical appliances, metallurgical furnaces, superconductors, ceramics, lamp filaments, anti corrosive alloys and photographical purposes. Irradiation testing of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr fuel pins has also demonstrated their feasibility as fuel in liquid metal reactors. Different methods that are employed for the determination of zirconium are spectrophotometry, potentiometry, neutron activation analysis and mass spectrometry. Ion-selective electrode (ISE), selective to zirconium ion has been studied for the direct potentiometric measurements of zirconium ions in various samples. In the present work, an indirect method has been employed for the determination of zirconium in zirconium nitrate sample using fluoride ion selective electrode. This method is based on the addition of known excess amount of fluoride ion to react with the zirconium ion to produce zirconium tetra fluoride at about pH 2-3, followed by determination of residual fluoride ion selective electrode. The residual fluoride ion concentrations were determined from the electrode potential data using calibration plot. Subsequently, zirconium ion concentrations were determined from the concentration of consumed fluoride ions. A precision of about 2% (RSD) with the mean recovery of more than 94% has been achieved for the determination of zirconium at the concentration of 4.40 X 10 -3 moles lit -1

  11. PCI resistant light water reactor fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, J.P.; Sabol, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    A tubular nuclear fuel element cladding tube is described, the fuel element cladding tube forming the entire fuel element cladding and consisting of: a single continuous wall, the single continuous wall consisting of a single alloy selected from the group consisting of zirconium base alloys, A, B, C, D, and E; the single continuous wall characterized by a cold worked and stress relieved microstructure throughout; wherein the zirconium base alloy A contains 0.2 - 0.6 w/o Sn, 0.03 - 0.11 w/o sum of Fe and Cr, section 600 ppm O and section 1500 ppm total impurities; the zirconium base alloy B contains 0.1 - 0.6 w/oo Sn, 0.04 - 0.24 w/o Fe, 0.05 - 0.15 w/o Cr, section 0.08 w/o Ni, section 600 ppm O and section 1500 ppm total impurities; the zirconium base alloy C contains 1.2 - 1.7 w/o Sn, 0.04 - 0.24 w/o Fe, 0.05 - 0.15 w/o Cr, section 0.08 w/o Ni, section 600 ppm O, and section 1500 ppm total impurities; the zirconium base alloy D contains 0.15 - 0.6 w/o Sn, 0.15 - 0.5 w/o Fe, section 600 ppm O, and section 1500 ppm total impurities; and the zirconium base alloy E contains 0.4 - 0.6 w/o Sn, 0.1 - 0.3 w/o Fe, 0.03 - 0.07 w/o Ni, section 600 ppm O, and section 1500 ppm total impurities

  12. Identification and characterization of a new Zirconium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Z.

    2007-01-01

    In order to control the integrity of the fuel clad, alloy of zirconium, it is necessary to predict the behavior of zirconium hydrides in the environment (temperature, stress...), at a microscopic scale. A characterization study by TEM of hydrides has been realized. It shows little hydrides about 500 nm, in hydride Zircaloy 4. Then a more detailed study identified a new hydride phase presented in this paper. (A.L.B.)

  13. Accident tolerant clad material modeling by MELCOR: Benchmark for SURRY Short Term Station Black Out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jun; Mccabe, Mckinleigh; Wu, Lei; Dong, Xiaomeng; Wang, Xianmao; Haskin, Troy Christopher; Corradini, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermo-physical and oxidation kinetics properties calculation and analysis of FeCrAl. • Properties modelling of FeCrAl in MELCOR. • Benchmark calculation of Surry nuclear power plant. - Abstract: Accident tolerant fuel and cladding materials are being investigated to provide a greater resistance to fuel degradation, oxidation and melting if long-term cooling is lost in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) following an accident such as a Station Blackout (SBO) or Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). Researchers at UW-Madison are analyzing an SBO sequence and examining the effect of a loss of auxiliary feedwater (AFW) with the MELCOR systems code. Our research work considers accident tolerant cladding materials (e.g., FeCrAl alloy) and their effect on the accident behavior. We first gathered the physical properties of this alternative cladding material via literature review and compared it to the usual zirconium alloys used in LWRs. We then developed a model for the Surry reactor for a Short-term SBO sequence and examined the effect of replacing FeCrAl for Zircaloy cladding. The analysis uses MELCOR, Version 1.8.6 YR, which is developed by Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with MELCOR developers at Sandia National Laboratories. This version allows the user to alter the cladding material considered, and our study examines the behavior of the FeCrAl alloy as a substitute for Zircaloy. Our benchmark comparisons with the Sandia National Laboratory’s analysis of Surry using MELCOR 1.8.6 and the more recent MELCOR 2.1 indicate good overall agreement through the early phases of the accident progression. When FeCrAl is substituted for Zircaloy to examine its performance, we confirmed that FeCrAl slows the accident progression and reduce the amount of hydrogen generated. Our analyses also show that this special version of MELCOR can be used to evaluate other potential ATF cladding materials, e.g., SiC as well as innovative coatings on zirconium cladding

  14. Accident tolerant clad material modeling by MELCOR: Benchmark for SURRY Short Term Station Black Out

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun, E-mail: jwang564@wisc.edu [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706 (United States); Mccabe, Mckinleigh [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706 (United States); Wu, Lei [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Dong, Xiaomeng [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706 (United States); Wang, Xianmao [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Haskin, Troy Christopher [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706 (United States); Corradini, Michael L., E-mail: corradini@engr.wisc.edu [College of Engineering, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Thermo-physical and oxidation kinetics properties calculation and analysis of FeCrAl. • Properties modelling of FeCrAl in MELCOR. • Benchmark calculation of Surry nuclear power plant. - Abstract: Accident tolerant fuel and cladding materials are being investigated to provide a greater resistance to fuel degradation, oxidation and melting if long-term cooling is lost in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) following an accident such as a Station Blackout (SBO) or Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). Researchers at UW-Madison are analyzing an SBO sequence and examining the effect of a loss of auxiliary feedwater (AFW) with the MELCOR systems code. Our research work considers accident tolerant cladding materials (e.g., FeCrAl alloy) and their effect on the accident behavior. We first gathered the physical properties of this alternative cladding material via literature review and compared it to the usual zirconium alloys used in LWRs. We then developed a model for the Surry reactor for a Short-term SBO sequence and examined the effect of replacing FeCrAl for Zircaloy cladding. The analysis uses MELCOR, Version 1.8.6 YR, which is developed by Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with MELCOR developers at Sandia National Laboratories. This version allows the user to alter the cladding material considered, and our study examines the behavior of the FeCrAl alloy as a substitute for Zircaloy. Our benchmark comparisons with the Sandia National Laboratory’s analysis of Surry using MELCOR 1.8.6 and the more recent MELCOR 2.1 indicate good overall agreement through the early phases of the accident progression. When FeCrAl is substituted for Zircaloy to examine its performance, we confirmed that FeCrAl slows the accident progression and reduce the amount of hydrogen generated. Our analyses also show that this special version of MELCOR can be used to evaluate other potential ATF cladding materials, e.g., SiC as well as innovative coatings on zirconium cladding

  15. Improving Accident Tolerance of Nuclear Fuel with Coated Mo-alloy Cladding

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Cheng; Young-Jin Kim; Peter Chou

    2016-01-01

    In severe loss of coolant accidents (LOCA), similar to those experienced at Fukushima Daiichi and Three Mile Island Unit 1, the zirconium alloy fuel cladding materials are rapidly heated due to nuclear decay heating and rapid exothermic oxidation of zirconium with steam. This heating causes the cladding to rapidly react with steam, lose strength, burst or collapse, and generate large quantities of hydrogen gas. Although maintaining core cooling remains the highest priority in accident managem...

  16. Amine extraction of lead(II) and zirconium(IV) with succinate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahamuni, S.V.; Mane, C.P.; Sargar, B.M.; Rajmane, M.M.; Anuse, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Lead is an important constituent of various alloys, which are in increasing demand in manufacture of batteries and nuclear shielding while the use of zirconium in nuclear power plants as entirely cladding uranium fuel is most important. This study was carried out to optimize the extraction conditions for Pb(II) and zirconium(IV)

  17. Modeling of Some Physical Properties of Zirconium Alloys for Nuclear Applications in Support of UFD Campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael V. Glazoff

    2013-08-01

    Zirconium-based alloys Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 are widely used in the nuclear industry as cladding materials for light water reactor (LWR) fuels. These materials display a very good combination of properties such as low neutron absorption, creep behavior, stress-corrosion cracking resistance, reduced hydrogen uptake, corrosion and/or oxidation, especially in the case of Zircaloy-4. However, over the last couple of years, in the post-Fukushima Daiichi world, energetic efforts have been undertaken to improve fuel clad oxidation resistance during off-normal temperature excursions. Efforts have also been made to improve upon the already achieved levels of mechanical behavior and reduce hydrogen uptake. In order to facilitate the development of such novel materials, it is very important to achieve not only engineering control, but also a scientific understanding of the underlying material degradation mechanisms, both in working conditions and in storage of used nuclear fuel. This report strives to contribute to these efforts by constructing the thermodynamic models of both alloys; constructing of the respective phase diagrams, and oxidation mechanisms. A special emphasis was placed upon the role of zirconium suboxides in hydrogen uptake reduction and the atomic mechanisms of oxidation. To that end, computational thermodynamics calculations were conducted concurrently with first-principles atomistic modeling.

  18. Zirconium behaviour in purex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, J.

    1982-01-01

    The extraction behaviour of zirconium, as fission product, in TBP/diluent- HNO 3 -H 2 O systems, simulating Purex solutions, is studied. The main purpose is to attain an increasing in the zirconium decontamination factor by adjusting the extraction parameters. Equilibrium diagram, TBP concentration, aqueous:organic ratio, salting-out effects and, uranium loading in the organic phase were the main factors studied. All these experiments had been made with zirconium in the 10 - 2 - 10 - 3 concentration range. The extractant degradation products influence uppon the zirconium behaviour was also verified. With the obtained data it was possible to introduce some modification in the standard Purex flow-sheet in order to obtain the uranium product with higher zirconium decontamination. (Author) [pt

  19. Thermodynamic Database for Zirconium Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerlerud Perez, Rosa

    2003-05-01

    For many decades zirconium alloys have been commonly used in the nuclear power industry as fuel cladding material. Besides their good corrosion resistance and acceptable mechanical properties the main reason of using these alloys is the low neutron absorption. Zirconium alloys are exposed to a very severe environment during the nuclear fission process and there is a demand for better design of this material. To meet this requirement a thermodynamic database is developed to support material designers. In this thesis some aspects about the development of a thermodynamic database for zirconium alloys are presented. A thermodynamic database represents an important facility in applying thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for a given material providing: 1) relevant information about the thermodynamic properties of the alloys e.g. enthalpies, activities, heat capacity, and 2) significant information for the manufacturing process e.g. heat treatment temperature. The basic information in the database is first the unary data, i.e. pure elements; those are taken from the compilation of the Scientific Group Thermodata Europe (SGTE) and then the binary and ternary systems. All phases present in those binary and ternary systems are described by means of the Gibbs energy dependence on composition and temperature. Many of those binary systems have been taken from published or unpublished works and others have been assessed in the present work. All the calculations have been made using Thermo C alc software and the representation of the Gibbs energy obtained by applying Calphad technique

  20. Analysis of hafnium in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Isao; Sakai, Fumiaki; Ohuchi, Yoshifusa; Nakamura, Hisashi

    1977-01-01

    It is required to analyse alloying components and impurity elements in the acceptance analysis of zirconium alloys as the material for fuel cladding tubes and pressure tubes for advanced thermal reactors. Because of extreme similarity in chemical properties between zirconium and hafnium, about 100 ppm of hafnium is usually contained in zirconium alloys. Zircaloy-2 alloy and 2.5% Nb-zirconium with the addition of hafnium had been prepared as in-house standard samples for rapid analysis. Study was made on fluorescent X-ray analysis and emission spectral analysis to establish the analytical method. By using these in-house standard samples, acceptance analysis was successfully carried out for the fuel cladding tubes for advanced thermal reactors. Sulfuric acid solution was prepared from JAERI-Z 1, 2 and 3, the standard sample for zircaloy-2 prepared by the Analytical Committee on Nuclear Fuel and Reactor Materials, JAERI, and zirconium oxide (Hf 1 ppm/Zr). Standard Hf solution was added to the sulfuric acid solution step by step, to make up a series of the standard oxide samples by the precipitation process. By the use of these standard samples, the development of the analytical method and joint analysis were made by the three-member analytical technique research group including PNC. The analytical precision for the fluorescent X-ray analysis was improved by attaching a metallic yttrium filter to the window of an X-ray tube so as to suppress the effect due to zirconium matrix. The variation factor of the joint analysis was about 10% to show good agreement, and the indication value was determined. (Kobatake, H.)

  1. ;Study of secondary hydriding at high temperature in zirconium based nuclear fuel cladding tubes by coupling information from neutron radiography/tomography, electron probe micro analysis, micro elastic recoil detection analysis and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachet, Jean-Christophe; Hamon, Didier; Le Saux, Matthieu; Vandenberghe, Valérie; Toffolon-Masclet, Caroline; Rouesne, Elodie; Urvoy, Stéphane; Béchade, Jean-Luc; Raepsaet, Caroline; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Bayon, Guy; Ott, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    This paper gives an overview of a multi-scale experimental study of the secondary hydriding phenomena that can occur in nuclear fuel cladding materials exposed to steam at high temperature (HT) after having burst (loss-of-coolant accident conditions). By coupling information from several facilities, including neutron radiography/tomography, electron probe micro analysis, micro elastic recoil detection analysis and micro laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, it was possible to map quantitatively, at different scales, the distribution of oxygen and hydrogen within M5™ clad segments having experienced ballooning and burst at HT followed by steam oxidation at 1100 and 1200 °C and final direct water quenching down to room temperature. The results were very reproducible and it was confirmed that internal oxidation and secondary hydriding at HT of a cladding after burst can lead to strong axial and azimuthal gradients of hydrogen and oxygen concentrations, reaching 3000-4000 wt ppm and 1.0-1.2 wt% respectively within the β phase layer for the investigated conditions. Consistent with thermodynamic and kinetics considerations, oxygen diffusion into the prior-β layer was enhanced in the regions highly enriched in hydrogen, where the α(O) phase layer is thinner and the prior-β layer thicker. Finally the induced post-quenching hardening of the prior-β layer was mainly related to the local oxygen enrichment. Hardening directly induced by hydrogen was much less significant.

  2. Water chemistry regimes for VVER-440 units: water chemistry influence on fuel cladding behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmitko, M.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture next problems of water chemistry influence on fuel cladding behaviour for VVER-440 units are presented: primary coolant technologies; water chemistry specification and control; fuel integrity considerations; zirconium alloys cladding corrosion (corrosion versus burn-up; water chemistry effect; crud deposition; hydrogen absorption; axial offset anomaly); alternatives for the primary coolant regimes

  3. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis of zirconium and zirconium-niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashimova, F.A.; Sadikov, I.I.; Salimov, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Zirconium and zirconium-niobium alloys are used on nuclear technology, as fuel cladding of nuclear reactors. Their nuclear-physical, mechanical and thermophysical properties are influenced them matrix and impurity composition, therefore determination of matrix and impurity content of these materials is a very important task. Neutron activation analysis is one from multielemental and high sensible techniques that are widely applied in analysis of high purity materials. Investigation of nuclear-physical characteristics of zirconium has shown that instrumental variant NAA is unusable for analysis due to high radioactivity of a matrix. Therefore it is necessary carrying out radiochemical separation of impurity radionuclides from matrix. Study of the literature datum have shown, that zirconium and niobium are very well extracted from muriatic solution with 5% tributyl phosphineoxide (TBPO) solution in toluene and 0,75 M solution of di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in cyclohexanone. Investigation of these elements extraction in these systems has shown that more effective and selective separation of matrix radionuclides is achieved in HDEHP-3M HCI system. This system is also extracted and hafnium, witch is an accompanying element of zirconium and its high content prevented determination of other impurity elements in sample. Therefore we used extraction system HDEHP-3M HCl for analysis of zirconium and zirconium-niobium alloys in chromatographic variant. By measurement of distribution profile of a matrix and of elution curve of determined elements is established, that for effective separation of impurity and matrix radionuclides there is enough chromatographic column with diameter 1 cm and height of a sorbent layer 7 cm, thus volume of elute, necessary for complete elution of determinate elements is 35-40 ml. On the basis of the carried out researches the technique of radiochemical NAA of high purity zirconium and zirconium-niobium alloy, which allows to

  4. Influence of protecting gel film on oxidation of zirconium alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, H.; Weishauptová, Zuzana; Vrtílková, V.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 360, č. 3 (2007), s. 282-292 ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/04/0043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : fuel cladding * corrosion * Zirconium oxide Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2007

  5. Assessment of thin-walled cladding tube mechanical properties by segmented expanding Mandrel test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Karl-Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the principles of the segmented expanding mandrel test for thin-walled cladding tubes, which can be used as a basic material characterisation test to determine stress-strain curves and ductility or as a test to simulate mechanical pellet-cladding interaction. The paper discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the test method and it illustrates how the test can be used to simulate hydride reorientations in zirconium claddings and quantify how hydride reorientation affects ductility. (authors)

  6. Quantification of hydrogen distribution with the nuclear microprobe of the Pierre Sue Laboratory in the thickness of the PWR fuel cladding in zirconium alloy; Quantification de la repartition de l'hydrogene a la microsonde nucleaire du Laboratoire Pierre Sue dans l'epaisseur du tube de gainage du combustible des REP en alliage de zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raepsaet, C. [Laboratoire Pierre Sue (DSM/DRECAM/LPS) - CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bossis, Ph. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMI/LM2E), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Hamon, D.; Bechade, J.L.; Brachet, J.C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA/LA2M), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    In a first part of this study, are detailed the general principles of the specific technique ERDA (Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis) used in the Pierre Sue Laboratory. Then, the contribution of this technique is illustrated with two studies examples on the behaviour of PWR nuclear fuel cladding. (O.M.)

  7. WWER water chemistry related to fuel cladding behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kysela, J; Zmitko, M [Nuclear Research Inst. plc., Rez (Czech Republic); Vrtilkova, V [Nuclear Fuel Inst., Prague (Czech Republic)

    1997-02-01

    Operational experience in WWER primary water chemistry and corrosion related to the fuel cladding is reviewed. Insignificant corrosion of fuel cladding was found which is caused by good corrosion resistance of Zr1Nb material and relatively low coolant temperature at WWER-440 reactor units. The differences in water chemistry control is outlined and an attention to the question of compatibility of Zircaloys with WWER water chemistry is given. Some results of research and development in field of zirconium alloy corrosion behaviour are discussed. Experimental facility for in-pile and out-of-pile cladding material corrosion testing is shown. (author). 14 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs.

  8. “Study of secondary hydriding at high temperature in zirconium based nuclear fuel cladding tubes by coupling information from neutron radiography/tomography, electron probe micro analysis, micro elastic recoil detection analysis and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachet, Jean-Christophe, E-mail: jean-christophe.brachet@cea.fr [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées (SRMA), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hamon, Didier; Le Saux, Matthieu [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées (SRMA), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vandenberghe, Valérie [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées (SRMA), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); DEN-Service d’Etudes Mécaniques et Thermiques (SEMT), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Toffolon-Masclet, Caroline; Rouesne, Elodie; Urvoy, Stéphane [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées (SRMA), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Béchade, Jean-Luc [DEN-Service de Recherches Métallurgiques Appliquées (SRMA), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique (SRMP), CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Raepsaet, Caroline [LEEL, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); NIMBE, CEA, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); and others

    2017-05-15

    This paper gives an overview of a multi-scale experimental study of the secondary hydriding phenomena that can occur in nuclear fuel cladding materials exposed to steam at high temperature (HT) after having burst (loss-of-coolant accident conditions). By coupling information from several facilities, including neutron radiography/tomography, electron probe micro analysis, micro elastic recoil detection analysis and micro laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, it was possible to map quantitatively, at different scales, the distribution of oxygen and hydrogen within M5™ clad segments having experienced ballooning and burst at HT followed by steam oxidation at 1100 and 1200 °C and final direct water quenching down to room temperature. The results were very reproducible and it was confirmed that internal oxidation and secondary hydriding at HT of a cladding after burst can lead to strong axial and azimuthal gradients of hydrogen and oxygen concentrations, reaching 3000–4000 wt ppm and 1.0–1.2 wt% respectively within the β phase layer for the investigated conditions. Consistent with thermodynamic and kinetics considerations, oxygen diffusion into the prior-β layer was enhanced in the regions highly enriched in hydrogen, where the α(O) phase layer is thinner and the prior-β layer thicker. Finally the induced post-quenching hardening of the prior-β layer was mainly related to the local oxygen enrichment. Hardening directly induced by hydrogen was much less significant. - Highlights: •More than 50% of the gaseous hydrogen produced by the inner clad oxidation absorbed and trapped into prior-β layer. •High hydrogen and oxygen local concentrations, up to 3000–4000 wt. ppm and 1.0–1.2 wt.% respectively, within the β phase. •Enhanced oxygen diffusion into hydrogen enriched prior-β layer, with locally thinner α(O) and thicker prior-β layers. •Post-quenching hardening of the prior-β structure mainly related to the (local) oxygen concentration.

  9. Air oxidation of Zircaloy-4, M5 (registered) and ZIRLOTM cladding alloys at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrueck, M.; Boettcher, M.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results of isothermal and transient oxidation experiments of the advanced cladding alloys M5 (registered) and ZIRLO TM in comparison to Zircaloy-4 in air at temperatures from 973 to 1853 K. Generally, oxidation in air leads to a strong degradation of the cladding material. The main mechanism of this process is the formation of zirconium nitride and its re-oxidation. From the point of view of safety, the barrier effect of the fuel cladding is lost much earlier than during accident transients with a steam atmosphere only. Comparison of the three alloys investigated reveals a qualitatively similar, but quantitatively varying oxidation behavior in air. The mainly parabolic oxidation kinetics, where applicable, is comparable for the three alloys. Strong differences of up to 500% in oxidation rates were observed after transition to linear kinetics at temperatures below 1300 K. The paper presents kinetic rate constants as well as critical times and oxide scale thicknesses at the point of transition from parabolic to linear kinetics.

  10. Critical cladding radius for hybrid cladding modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyard, Romain; Leduc, Dominique; Lupi, Cyril; Lecieux, Yann

    2018-05-01

    In this article we explore some properties of the cladding modes guided by a step-index optical fiber. We show that the hybrid modes can be grouped by pairs and that it exists a critical cladding radius for which the modes of a pair share the same electromagnetic structure. We propose a robust method to determine the critical cladding radius and use it to perform a statistical study on the influence of the characteristics of the fiber on the critical cladding radius. Finally we show the importance of the critical cladding radius with respect to the coupling coefficient between the core mode and the cladding modes inside a long period grating.

  11. CEA studies on advanced nuclear fuel claddings for enhanced accident tolerant LWRs fuel (LOCA and beyond LOCA conditions)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachet, J.C.; Lorrette, C.; Michaux, A.; Sauder, C.; Idarraga-Trujillo, I.; Le Saux, M.; Le Flem, M.; Schuster, F.; Billard, A.; Monsifrot, E.; Torres, E.; Rebillat, F.; Bischoff, J.; Ambard, A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of CEA studies on advanced nuclear fuel claddings for enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuel in collaboration with industrial partners AREVA and EDF. Two potential solutions were investigated: chromium coated zirconium based claddings and SiC/SiC composite claddings with a metallic liner. Concerning the first solution, the optimization of chromium coatings on Zircaloy-4 substrate has been performed. Thus, it has been demonstrated that, due in particular to their slower oxidation rate, a significant additional 'grace period( can be obtained on high temperature oxidized coated claddings in comparison to the conventional uncoated ones, regarding their residual PQ (Post-Quench) ductility and their ability to survive to the final water quenching in LOCA and, to some extent, beyond LOCA conditions. Concerning the second solution, the innovative 'sandwich' SiC/SiC cladding concept is introduced. Initially designed for the next generation of nuclear reactors, it can be adapted to obtain high safety performance for LWRs in LOCA conditions. The key findings of this work highlight the low sensitivity of SiC/SiC composites under the explored steam oxidation conditions. No signification degradation of the mechanical properties of CVI-HNI SiC/SiC specimen is particularly acknowledged for relatively long duration (beyond 100 h at 1200 Celsius degrees). Despite these very positive preliminary results, significant studies and developments are still necessary to close the technology gap. Qualification for nuclear application requires substantial irradiation testing, additional characterization and the definition of design rules applicable to such a structure. The use of a SiC-based fuel cladding shows promise for the highest temperature accident conditions but remains a long term perspective

  12. Effect of CeO2 and Y2O3 on microstructure, bioactivity and degradability of laser cladding CaO-SiO2 coating on titanium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H C; Wang, D G; Chen, C Z; Weng, F

    2015-03-01

    To solve the lack of strength of bulk biomaterials for load-bearing applications and improve the bioactivity of titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), CaO-SiO2 coatings on titanium alloy were fabricated by laser cladding technique. The effect of CeO2 and Y2O3 on microstructure and properties of laser cladding coating was analyzed. The cross-section microstructure of ceramic layer from top to bottom gradually changes from cellular-dendrite structure to compact cellular crystal. The addition of CeO2 or Y2O3 refines the microstructure of the ceramic layer in the upper and middle regions. The refining effect on the grain is related to the kinds of additives and their content. The coating is mainly composed of CaTiO3, CaO, α-Ca2(SiO4), SiO2 and TiO2. Y2O3 inhibits the formation of CaO. After soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF), the calcium phosphate layer is formed on the coating surface, indicating the coating has bioactivity. After soaking in Tris-HCl solution, the samples doped with CeO2 or Y2O3 present a lower weight loss, indicating the addition of CeO2 or Y2O3 improves the degradability of laser cladding sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Manufacturing process for the metal ceramic hybrid fuel cladding tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Sun Han; Park, Jeong Yong

    2012-01-01

    For application in LWRs with suppressed hydrogen release, a metal-ceramic hybrid cladding tube has been proposed. The cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube and outer SiC fiber matrix SiC ceramic composite. The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. However, it is a challenging task to fabricate the metal-ceramic hybrid tube. Processes such as filament winding, matrix impregnation, and surface costing are additionally required for the existing Zr based fuel cladding tubes. In the current paper, the development of the manufacturing process will be introduced

  14. Manufacturing process for the metal ceramic hybrid fuel cladding tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yang Il; Kim, Sun Han; Park, Jeong Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    For application in LWRs with suppressed hydrogen release, a metal-ceramic hybrid cladding tube has been proposed. The cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube and outer SiC fiber matrix SiC ceramic composite. The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. However, it is a challenging task to fabricate the metal-ceramic hybrid tube. Processes such as filament winding, matrix impregnation, and surface costing are additionally required for the existing Zr based fuel cladding tubes. In the current paper, the development of the manufacturing process will be introduced.

  15. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction: Phase 2. Third semiannual report, January-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, H.S. (comp.)

    1980-09-01

    Two fuel concepts are being developed for possible demonstration within this program: (a) Cu-barrier fuel and (b) Zr-liner fuel. These advanced fuels (known collectively as barrier fuels) have special fuel cladding designed to avoid the harmful effects of localized stress and reactive fission products during reactor service. Within the work scope of this program one of these concepts is to be selected for demonstration in a commercial power reactor. It was decided to demonstrate Zr-liner in 132 bundles which have liners of either crystal-bar zirconium or of low-oxygen sponge zirconium in the reload for Quad Cities Unit 2, Cycle 6. Irradiation testing or barrier fuel was continued, and the superior PCI resistance of Zr-liner fuel was further substantiated in the current report period. Furthermore, an irradiation experiment in which Zr-liner fuel, having a deliberately fabricated cladding perforation, was operated at a linear heat generation rate of 35 kW/m to a burnup of approx. 3 MWd/kg U showed no unusual signs of degradation compared with a similarly defected reference fuel rod. Four lead test assemblies of barrier fuel (two of Zr-liner and two of Cu-barrier), presently under irradiation in Quad Cities Unit 1, have achieved a burnup of 11 MWd/kg U.

  16. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction: Phase 2. Third semiannual report, January-June 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1980-09-01

    Two fuel concepts are being developed for possible demonstration within this program: (a) Cu-barrier fuel and (b) Zr-liner fuel. These advanced fuels (known collectively as barrier fuels) have special fuel cladding designed to avoid the harmful effects of localized stress and reactive fission products during reactor service. Within the work scope of this program one of these concepts is to be selected for demonstration in a commercial power reactor. It was decided to demonstrate Zr-liner in 132 bundles which have liners of either crystal-bar zirconium or of low-oxygen sponge zirconium in the reload for Quad Cities Unit 2, Cycle 6. Irradiation testing or barrier fuel was continued, and the superior PCI resistance of Zr-liner fuel was further substantiated in the current report period. Furthermore, an irradiation experiment in which Zr-liner fuel, having a deliberately fabricated cladding perforation, was operated at a linear heat generation rate of 35 kW/m to a burnup of approx. 3 MWd/kg U showed no unusual signs of degradation compared with a similarly defected reference fuel rod. Four lead test assemblies of barrier fuel (two of Zr-liner and two of Cu-barrier), presently under irradiation in Quad Cities Unit 1, have achieved a burnup of 11 MWd/kg U

  17. Zirconium ignition in exposed fuel channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, E., E-mail: merezra@technion.ac.il; Hasan, D.; Nekhamkin, Y.

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • We demonstrate the idea of runaway zirconium–steam reactions in severe accidents in today's LWRs. • We predict the thermal-hydraulics conditions relevant to cladding oxidation in an exposed fuel channel of a partially uncovered core. • The Semenov theory of metal combustion is extended to define a criterion for runaway oxidation reaction in fuel cladding. - Abstract: A theoretical model based on simultaneous solution of the heat and mass transfer equations is developed for predicting the rate of thermo-chemical reaction between zirconium cladding and a hot steam environment. Ignition conditions relevant to cladding oxidation in an exposed fuel channel of a partially uncovered core are predicted based on the theory of metal combustion. A range of decay power, convective heat transfer coefficients, and initial temperatures leading to uncontrolled runaway cladding oxidation is identified. The model could be readily integrated as part of a fuel channel analysis code for predicting possible outcomes of different accident mitigation procedures in light water nuclear reactors under LOCA conditions.

  18. Modelling of zirconium alloys corrosion in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kritskij, V.G.; Berezina, I.G.; Kritskij, A.V.; Stjagkin, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical parameters, that exerted effect on Zr+1%Nb alloy corrosion and deserved consideration during reactor operation, were defined and a model was developed to describe the influence of physical and chemical parameters on zirconium alloys corrosion in nuclear power plants. The model is based on the correlation between the zirconium oxide solubility in high-temperature water under the influence of the chemical parameters and the measured values of fuel cladding corrosion under LWR conditions. The intensity of fuel cladding corrosion in the primary circuits depends on the coolant water quality, growth of iron oxide deposits and vaporization portion. Mathematically, the oxidation rate can be expressed as a sum of heat and radiation components. The temperature dependence on the oxidation rate can be described by the Arrenius equation. The radiation component of Zr uniform corrosion equation is a function of several factors such as neutron fluency, the temperature the metallurgical composition and et. We assume that the main factor is the changing of water chemistry and the H 2 O 2 concentration play the determinative role. Probably, the influence of H 2 O 2 is based on the formation of unstable compound ZrO 3 ·nH 2 O and Zr(OH) 4 with high solubility. The validity of the used formulae was confirmed by corrosion measurements on WWER and RBMK fuel cladding. The model can be applied for calculating the reliability of nuclear fuel operation. (author)

  19. Oxide thickness measurement technique for duplex-layer Zircaloy-4 cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClelland, R.G.; O'Leary, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation (SNP) is investigating the use of duplex-layer Zircaloy-4 tubing to improve the waterside corrosion resistance of cladding for high-burnup pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel designs. Standard SNP PWR cladding is typically 0.762-mm (0.030-in.)-thick Zircaloy-4. The SNP duplex cladding is nominally 0.660-mm (0.026-in.)-thick Zircalloy-4 with an ∼0.102-mm (0.004-in.) outer layer of another, more corrosion-resistant, zirconium-based alloy. It is common industry practice to monitor the in-reactor corrosion behavior of Zircaloy cladding by using an eddy-current 'lift-off' technique to measure the oxide thickness on the outer surface of the fuel cladding. The test program evaluated three different cladding samples, all with the same outer diameter and wall thickness: Zircaloy-4 and duplex clad types D2 and D4

  20. Evaluation of a Zirconium Recycle Scrubber System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bruffey, Stephanie H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    A hot-cell demonstration of the zirconium recycle process is planned as part of the Materials Recovery and Waste Forms Development (MRWFD) campaign. The process treats Zircaloy® cladding recovered from used nuclear fuel with chlorine gas to recover the zirconium as volatile ZrCl4. This releases radioactive tritium trapped in the alloy, converting it to volatile tritium chloride (TCl). To meet regulatory requirements governing radioactive emissions from nuclear fuel treatment operations, the capture and retention of a portion of this TCl may be required prior to discharge of the off-gas stream to the environment. In addition to demonstrating tritium removal from a synthetic zirconium recycle off-gas stream, the recovery and quantification of tritium may refine estimates of the amount of tritium present in the Zircaloy cladding of used nuclear fuel. To support these objectives, a bubbler-type scrubber was fabricated to remove the TCl from the zirconium recycle off-gas stream. The scrubber was fabricated from glass and polymer components that are resistant to chlorine and hydrochloric acid solutions. Because of concerns that the scrubber efficiency is not quantitative, tests were performed using DCl as a stand-in to experimentally measure the scrubbing efficiency of this unit. Scrubbing efficiency was ~108% ± 3% with water as the scrubber solution. Variations were noted when 1 M NaOH scrub solution was used, values ranged from 64% to 130%. The reason for the variations is not known. It is recommended that the equipment be operated with water as the scrubbing solution. Scrubbing efficiency is estimated at 100%.

  1. Irradiation effects on mechanical properties of fuel element cladding from thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, S.

    2005-01-01

    During reactor operation, UO 2 expands more than the cladding tube (Zirconium alloys for thermal reactors), is hotter, cracks and swells. The fuel therefore will interact with the cladding, resulting in straining of the later. To minimize the possibility of rupture of the cladding, ideally it should have good ductility as well as high strength. However, the ductility reduces with increase in fuel element burn-up. Increased burn-up also increases swelling of the fuel, leading to increased contact pressure between the fuel and the cladding tube. This would cause strains to be concentrated over localized regions of the cladding. For fuel elements burnup exceeding 40 GWd/T, the contribution of embrittlement due to hydriding, and the increased possibility of embrittlement due to stress corrosion cracking, also need to be considered. In addition to the tensile properties, the other mechanical properties of interest to the performance of cladding tube in an operating fuel element are creep rate and fatigue endurance. Irradiation is reported to have insignificant effect on high cycle endurance limit, and fatigue from fuel element vibration is most unlikely, to be life limiting. Even though creep rates due to irradiation are reported to increase by an order of magnitude, the cladding creep ductility would be so high that creep type failures in fuel element would be most improbable. Thus, the most important limiting aspect of mechanical performance of fuel element cladding has been recognized as the tensile ductility resulting from the stress conditions experienced by the cladding. Some specific fission products of threshold amount (if) deposited on the cladding, and hydride morphology (e.g. hydride lenses). The presentation will brief about irradiation damage in cladding materials and its significance, background of search for better Zirconium alloys as cladding materials, and elaborate on the types of mechanical tests need to be conducted for the evaluation of claddings

  2. In-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements of zirconium alloy oxide conductivity: Relationship to hydrogen pickup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couet, Adrien; Motta, Arthur T.; Ambard, Antoine; Livigni, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • In-situ electrochemistry on zirconium alloys in 360 °C pure water show oxide layer resistivity changes during corrosion. • A linear relationship is observed between oxide resistivity and instantaneous hydrogen pickup fraction. • The resistivity of the oxide layer formed on Zircaloy-4 (and thus its hydrogen pickup fraction) is higher than on Zr-2.5Nb. - Abstract: Hydrogen pickup during nuclear fuel cladding corrosion is a critical life-limiting degradation mechanism for nuclear fuel. Following a program dedicated to zirconium alloys, corrosion, it has been hypothesized that oxide electronic resistivity determines hydrogen pickup. In-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy experiments were performed on Zircaloy-4 and Zr-2.5Nb alloys in 360 °C water. The oxide resistivity was measured as function of time. The results show that as the oxide resistivity increases so does the hydrogen pickup fraction. The resistivity of the oxide layer formed on Zircaloy-4 is higher than on Zr-2.5Nb, resulting in a higher hydrogen pickup fraction of Zircaloy-4, compared to Zr-2.5Nb.

  3. Influence de l’irradiation et de la radiolyse sur la vitesse et les mécanismes de corrosion des alliages de zirconium

    OpenAIRE

    Verlet , Romain

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear fuel of pressurized water reactors (PWR) in the form of uranium oxide UO2 pellets (or MOX) is confined in a zirconium alloy cladding. This cladding is very important because it represents the first containment barrier against the release of fission products generated by the nuclear reaction to the external environment. Corrosion by the primary medium of zirconium alloys, particularly the Zircaloy-4, is one of the factors limiting the reactor residence time of the fuel rods (UO2 pe...

  4. Method of reducing zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megy, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for making nuclear-grade zirconium from a zirconium compound, which ismore economical than previous methods since it uses aluminum as the reductant metal rather than the more expensive magnesium. A fused salt phase containing the zirconium compound to be reduced is first prepared. The fused salt phase is then contacted with a molten metal phase which contains aluminum and zinc. The reduction is effected by mutual displacment. Aluminum is transported from the molten metal phase to the fused salt phase, replacing zirconium in the salt. Zirconium is transported from the fused salt phase to the molten metal phase. The fused salt phase and the molten metal phase are then separated, and the solvent metal and zirconium are separated by distillation or other means. (DN)

  5. Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Technically the study of corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear power reactors is a very active field and both experimental work and understanding of the mechanisms involved are going through rapid changes. As a result, the lifetime of any publication in this area is short. Because of this it has been decided to revise IAEA-TECDOC-684 - Corrosion of Zirconium Alloys in Nuclear Power Plants - published in 1993. This updated, revised and enlarged version includes major changes to incorporate some of the comments received about the first version. Since this review deals exclusively with the corrosion of zirconium and zirconium based alloys in water, and another separate publication is planned to deal with the fuel-side corrosion of zirconium based fuel cladding alloys, i.e. stress corrosion cracking, it was decided to change the original title to Waterside Corrosion of Zirconium Alloys in Nuclear Power Plants. The rapid changes in the field have again necessitated a cut-off date for incorporating new data. This edition incorporates data up to the end of 1995; including results presented at the 11 International Symposium on Zirconium in the Nuclear Industry held in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, in September 1995. The revised format of the review now includes: Introductory chapters on basic zirconium metallurgy and oxidation theory; A revised chapter discussing the present extent of our knowledge of the corrosion mechanism based on laboratory experiments; a separate and revised chapter discussing hydrogen uptake; a completely reorganized chapter summarizing the phenomenological observations of zirconium alloy corrosion in reactors; a new chapter on modelling in-reactor corrosion; a revised chapter devoted exclusively to the manner in which irradiation might influence the corrosion process; finally, a summary of our present understanding of the corrosion mechanisms operating in reactor

  6. Review of experimental data for modelling LWR fuel cladding behaviour under loss of coolant accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massih, Ali R. [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park (Sweden)

    2007-02-15

    Extensive range of experiments has been conducted in the past to quantitatively identify and understand the behaviour of fuel rod under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions in light water reactors (LWRs). The obtained experimental data provide the basis for the current emergency core cooling system acceptance criteria under LOCA conditions for LWRs. The results of recent experiments indicate that the cladding alloy composition and high burnup effects influence LOCA acceptance criteria margins. In this report, we review some past important and recent experimental results. We first discuss the background to acceptance criteria for LOCA, namely, clad embrittlement phenomenology, clad embrittlement criteria (limitations on maximum clad oxidation and peak clad temperature) and the experimental bases for the criteria. Two broad kinds of test have been carried out under LOCA conditions: (i) Separate effect tests to study clad oxidation, clad deformation and rupture, and zirconium alloy allotropic phase transition during LOCA. (ii) Integral LOCA tests, in which the entire LOCA sequence is simulated on a single rod or a multi-rod array in a fuel bundle, in laboratory or in a tests and results are discussed and empirical correlations deduced from these tests and quantitative models are conferred. In particular, the impact of niobium in zirconium base clad and hydrogen content of the clad on allotropic phase transformation during LOCA and also the burst stress are discussed. We review some recent LOCA integral test results with emphasis on thermal shock tests. Finally, suggestions for modelling and further evaluation of certain experimental results are made.

  7. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  8. Critical assessment of finite element analysis applied to metal–oxide interface roughness in oxidising zirconium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platt, P., E-mail: Philip.Platt@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, School of Materials, Materials Performance Centre, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Frankel, P. [University of Manchester, School of Materials, Materials Performance Centre, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gass, M. [AMEC, Walton House, Faraday Street, Birchwood Park, Risley, Warrington WA3 6GA (United Kingdom); Preuss, M. [University of Manchester, School of Materials, Materials Performance Centre, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    As a nuclear fuel cladding material, zirconium alloys act as a barrier between the fuel and pressurised steam or lithiated water environment. Controlling degradation mechanisms such as oxidation is essential to extending the in-service lifetime of the fuel. At temperatures of ∼360 °C zirconium alloys are known to exhibit cyclical, approximately cubic corrosion kinetics. With acceleration in the oxidation kinetics occurring every ∼2 μm of oxide growth, and being associated with the formation of a network of lateral cracks. Finite element analysis has been used previously to explain the lateral crack formation by the development of localised out-of-plane tensile stresses at the metal–oxide interface. This work uses the Abaqus finite element code to assess critically current approaches to representing the oxidation of zirconium alloys, with relation to undulations at the metal–oxide interface and localised stress generation. This includes comparison of axisymmetric and 3D quartered modelling approaches, and investigates the effect of interface geometry and plasticity in the metal substrate. Particular focus is placed on the application of the anisotropic strain tensor used to represent the oxidation mechanism, which is typically applied with a fixed coordinate system. Assessment of the impact of the tensor showed that 99% of the localised tensile stresses originated from the out-of-plane component of the strain tensor, rather than the in-plane expansion as was previously thought. Discussion is given to the difficulties associated with this modelling approach and the requirements for future simulations of the oxidation of zirconium alloys.

  9. The development of zirconium alloy and its manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Gaihuan; Yue Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear power which acts as one of low-carbon energy resources is the most realistic in large-scale application. It is also the preferred choice for many countries to develop energy resources and optimize its structure. Zirconium alloy is a key structural material for nuclear power plant fuel assemblies and cladding tubes of zirconium alloy are often referred as the first safeguard to nuclear power safety. With the development of nuclear power, three kinds of zirconium alloys Zr-Sn, Zr-Nb, Zr-Sn-Nb and with the representative products of Zr-4, M5, Zirlo respectively are developed and widely applied. Because of its severe operating environment and influence to nuclear safety, the requirements to zirconium alloys for physical and chemical properties, nuclear capability, tolerance and surface quality are very strict. The in-depth research and its manufacture capability become one of the main barriers for many countries who are developing the nuclear energy. In recent years, a stated-owned company, State Nuclear Bao Ti Zirconium Industry Company ('SNZ' for short) as well as National R and D Center for Nuclear Grade Zirconium material, is founded to meet the requirement of the rapid development of China's nuclear power industry. SNZ is dedicated for the fabrication and the research of nuclear grade zirconium products. After the successful completion of technology transfer of manufacturing for production chain and fully grasped of the manufacturing technology for the nuclear grade zirconium sponge through zirconium alloy tube, rod and strip products. National R and D Center for Nuclear Grade Zirconium material is cooperating with universities, nuclear energy research and design institutes and the owners of nuclear power plant to develop new zirconium alloy of self-owned brand. Through the selection of components, in-process testing and product inspection, four kinds of new zirconium alloys owns better performance than currently commercialized M5, Zirlo etc

  10. Status and task of the study on the hydrogen embrittlement of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Fumihisa; Furuta, Teruo; Seino, Shun; Komatsu, Kazushi.

    1995-08-01

    As the burnup of the LWR fuel is extended, waterside corrosion and hydrogen pickup increase in the Zircaloy cladding. Hydrogen embrittlement of Zircaloy is one of the main factors which may limit the life of the fuel rod. This report presents a review on the hydrogen embrittlement of zirconium and its alloys including the irradiated materials. Research tasks for the reduction of ductility in the high burnup fuel cladding are also discussed. Many fundamental investigations have been performed on the hydrogen embrittlement of zirconium alloys. However, the embrittlement mechanism of the high burnup fuel cladding is complicated. Especially, a coupled effect of hydrides and radiation defects are expected to be pronounced with neutron dose increase. In order to evaluate the reduction of ductility of the higher burnup fuel cladding properly, it is necessary to investigate the coupled effect of these two factors by systematic examinations. (author) 64 refs

  11. The quest for safe and reliable fuel cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pino, Eddy S.; Abe, Alfredo Y.; Giovedi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The tragic Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident of March, 2011, has brought great unrest and challenge to the nuclear industry, which, in collaboration with universities and nuclear research institutes, is making great efforts to improve the safety in nuclear reactors developing accident tolerant fuels (ATF). This involves the study of different materials to be applied as cladding and, also, the improvement in the fuel properties in order to enhance the fuel performance and safety, specifically under accident conditions. Related to the cladding, iron based alloys and silicon carbide (SiC) materials have been studied as a good alternative. In the case of austenitic stainless steel, there is the advantage that the austenitic stainless steel 304 was used as cladding material in the first PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) registering a good performance. Then, alternated cladding materials such as iron based alloys (304, 310, 316, 347) should be used to replace the zirconium-based alloys in order to improve safety. In this paper, these cladding materials are evaluated in terms of their physical and chemical properties; among them, strength and creep resistance, thermal conductivity, thermal stability and corrosion resistance. Additionally, these properties are compared with those of conventional zirconium-based alloys, the most used material in actual PWR, to assess the advantages and disadvantages of each material concerning to fuel performance and safety contribution. (author)

  12. The quest for safe and reliable fuel cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pino, Eddy S.; Abe, Alfredo Y., E-mail: eddypino132@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (POLI/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise, Avaliacao e Gerenciamento de Risco

    2015-07-01

    The tragic Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident of March, 2011, has brought great unrest and challenge to the nuclear industry, which, in collaboration with universities and nuclear research institutes, is making great efforts to improve the safety in nuclear reactors developing accident tolerant fuels (ATF). This involves the study of different materials to be applied as cladding and, also, the improvement in the fuel properties in order to enhance the fuel performance and safety, specifically under accident conditions. Related to the cladding, iron based alloys and silicon carbide (SiC) materials have been studied as a good alternative. In the case of austenitic stainless steel, there is the advantage that the austenitic stainless steel 304 was used as cladding material in the first PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) registering a good performance. Then, alternated cladding materials such as iron based alloys (304, 310, 316, 347) should be used to replace the zirconium-based alloys in order to improve safety. In this paper, these cladding materials are evaluated in terms of their physical and chemical properties; among them, strength and creep resistance, thermal conductivity, thermal stability and corrosion resistance. Additionally, these properties are compared with those of conventional zirconium-based alloys, the most used material in actual PWR, to assess the advantages and disadvantages of each material concerning to fuel performance and safety contribution. (author)

  13. Thermodynamics of pellet-cladding interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoh, Bunkei; Fuji, Kensho

    1987-01-01

    Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations are performed on the U-Zr-Cs-I-O system that is assumed to exist in the fuel-cladding gap of light water reactor (LWR) fuel under pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) failure condition. For this purpose a computer program called SOLGASMIX-PV for the calculation of complex multi-component equilibria is used, and the results of postirradiation examination are interpreted. The analysis of the thermodynamics of the system U-Zr-Cs-I-O indicates that cesium and iodine are assumed to be released from fuel pellet into the fuel-cladding gap as CsI, therefore, the Cs/I ratio in fuel-cladding bonding zone is one. The important condensed phases in this region are UO 2 , U 3 O 8 , Cs 2 U 2 O 7 , Cs 2 U 15 O 46 , ZrO 2 and CsI, and the major gaseous species are CsI, I 2 and I. Under this situation where Cs/I ratio is one, cesium-zirconate is not present. If, however, cesium rich phase is partially present then cesium will be associated with zirconium, possibly as Cs 2 ZrO 3 . (author)

  14. Thin polycrystalline diamond films protecting zirconium alloys surfaces: From technology to layer analysis and application in nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashcheulov, P. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences Czech Republic v.v.i, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21, Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Škoda, R.; Škarohlíd, J. [Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technická 4, Prague 6, CZ-160 07 (Czech Republic); Taylor, A.; Fekete, L.; Fendrych, F. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences Czech Republic v.v.i, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21, Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Vega, R.; Shao, L. [Texas A& M University, Department of Nuclear Engineering TAMU-3133, College Station, TX TX 77843 (United States); Kalvoda, L.; Vratislav, S. [Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Brehova 7, CZ-115 19, Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Cháb, V.; Horáková, K.; Kůsová, K.; Klimša, L.; Kopeček, J. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences Czech Republic v.v.i, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21, Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Sajdl, P.; Macák, J. [University of Chemistry and Technology, Power Engineering Department, Technická 3, Prague 6, CZ-166 28 (Czech Republic); Johnson, S. [Nuclear Fuel Division, Westinghouse Electric Company, 5801 Bluff Road, Hopkins, SC 29209 (United States); Kratochvílová, I., E-mail: krat@fzu.cz [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences Czech Republic v.v.i, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21, Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Brehova 7, CZ-115 19, Prague 1 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • In this work we showed that films prepared by MW-LA-PECVD technology can be used as anticorrosion protective layer for Zircaloy2 nuclear fuel claddings at elevated temperatures (950 °C) when α phase of zirconium changes to β phase (more opened for oxygen/hydrogen diffusion). Quality of PCD films was examined by Raman spectroscopy, XPS, SEM, AFM and SIMS analysis. • The polycrystalline diamond films were of high quality - without defects and contaminations. After hot steam oxidation (950 °C) a high level of structural integrity of PCD layer was observed. Both sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} C phases were present in the protective PCD layer. Higher resistance and a lower degree of impedance dispersion was found in the hot steam oxidized PCD coated Zircaloy2 samples, which may suggest better protection of the Zircaloy2 surface. The PCD layer blocks the hydrogen diffusion into the Zircaloy2 surface thus protecting the material from degradation. • Hot steam oxidation tests confirmed that PCD coated Zircaloy2 surfaces were effectively protected against corrosion. Presented results demonstrate that the PCD anticorrosion protection can significantly prolong service life of Zircaloy2 nuclear fuel claddings in nuclear reactors even at elevated temperatures. - Abstract: Zirconium alloys can be effectively protected against corrosion by polycrystalline diamond (PCD) layers grown in microwave plasma enhanced linear antenna chemical vapor deposition apparatus. Standard and hot steam oxidized PCD layers grown on Zircaloy2 surfaces were examined and the specific impact of polycrystalline Zr substrate surface on PCD layer properties was investigated. It was found that the presence of the PCD coating blocks hydrogen diffusion into the Zircaloy2 surface and protects Zircaloy2 material from degradation. PCD anticorrosion protection of Zircaloy2 can significantly prolong life of Zircaloy2 material in nuclear reactors even at temperatures above Zr

  15. Thermofluency in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orozco M, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is presented about the theoretical and experimental results obtained at present in thermofluency under radiation in zirconium alloys. The phenomenon of thermofluency is presented in a general form, underlining the thermofluency at high temperature because this phenomenon is similar to the thermofluency under radiation, which ocurrs in zirconium alloys into the operating reactor. (author)

  16. A microstuctural study on accelerated zirconium alloy oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Seung Bum; Oh, Seung Jun; Jang, Jung Nam; Kim, Yong Soo; Jung, Yong Hwan; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Park, Jung Yong

    2005-01-01

    It has been reported that the effect of thermal redistribution of hydrides across the zirconium metaloxide interface, coupled with thermal feedback on the metal-oxide interface, is a dominating factor in the accelerated oxidation in zirconium alloys cladding PWR fuel. Basically this influence determines characteristic of oxide layer. Influence estimation for corrosion oxide layer due to hydrogen / hydride carried out because of investigation on the kinetic on accelerated oxidation due to hydride precipitation was preceded. Generally, it is known that ZrO 2 tetragonal layer structures play an important role as a barrier layer. So analysing the ZrO 2 monoclinic and tetragonal structure distribution is our main aim. Especially, this study focused on the hydride effects. In other words, the difference of crystal structure distribution between pre-hydrided and without hydrided specimen is just expected results. Experimental results of microstructure at zirconium metal-oxide interface through TEM and EBSD analysis was confirmed

  17. Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-31

    The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

  18. Modelling of Zirconium and Hafnium separation using continuous annular chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moch-Setyadji; Endang Susiantini

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear degrees of zirconium in the form of a metal alloy is the main material for fuel cladding of NPP. Zirconium is also used as sheathing UO 2 kernel in the form of ZrC as a substitute of SiC in the fuel elements of High Temperature Reactor (HTR). Difficulty separating hafnium from zirconium because it has a lot of similarities in the chemical properties of Zr and Hf. Annular chromatography is a device that can be used for separating of zirconium and hafnium to obtain zirconium nuclear grade. Therefore, it is necessary to construct the mathematical modelling that can describe the separation of zirconium and hafnium in the annular chromatography containing anion resin dowex-1X8. The aim of research is to perform separation simulation by using the equilibrium model and mass transfer coefficient resulted from research. Zr and Hf feed used in this research were 26 and 1 g/l, respectively. Height of resin (L), angular velocity (ω) and the superficial flow rate (uz) was varied to determine the effect of each parameter on the separation of Zr and Hf. By using Kd and Dv values resulted previous research. Simulation results showed that zirconium and hafnium can be separated using a continuous annular chromatography with high resin (long bed) 50 cm, superficial flow rate of 0.001 cm/s, the rotation speed of 0.006 rad/min and 20 cm diameter annular. In these conditions the results obtained zirconium concentration of 10,303.226 g/m 3 and hafnium concentration of 12.324 g/m 3 (ppm). (author)

  19. Thermal-Hydraulic Aspects of Changing the Nuclear Fuel-Cladding Materials from Zircaloy to Silicon Carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niceno, Bojan; Pouchon, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The accident in Fukushima has drastically shown the drawbacks of Zircaloy claddings despite their beneficial properties in normal use. The effect of the lack of cooling and the production of hydrogen would not have been so strong if the fuel cladding had not consisted of a zirconium (or metal) alloy. International activities have been started to search for an alternative to Zircaloy, however, still on a limited basis. A project sponsored by Swissnuclear has been conducted at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) with the aim to close the gap in knowledge on application of silicon carbides (SiC) as potential replacement for Zircaloys as material for nuclear fuel cladding. The work was interdisciplinary, result of collaboration between different laboratories at PSI, and has focused on SiC cladding material properties, implication of its usage on neutronics and on thermal-hydraulics. This paper summarizes thermal-hydraulic aspects of changing Zircaloy for SiC as the cladding material. The change of cladding material inevitably changes the surface properties thus making a significant impact on boiling curve, and critical heat flux (CHF). Low chemical reactivity of SiC means fewer particles in the flow (less crud), which leads to fewer failures, but also decreases the CHF. Due to differences in physical properties between SiC and Zircaloys, higher brittleness of SiC in particular, might have impact on fuel-rod assembly design, which has direct influence on flow patterns and heat transfer in the fuel assembly. Higher melting (i.e. decomposition) point for SiC means that severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) should have to be re-assessed. Not only would the core degrade later than in the case of conventional fuels, but the production of hydrogen would be quite different as well. All these issues are explored in this work in two steps; first the SiC properties which may have influence on thermal-hydraulics are outlined, then each thermal-hydraulic issues is explained from

  20. Metallurgy of zirconium and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshnikov, N.V.; Geger, V.Eh.; Denisova, N.D.; Kazajn, A.A.; Kozhemyakin, V.A.; Nekhamkin, L.G.; Rodyakin, V.V.; Tsylov, Yu.A.

    1979-01-01

    Considered are those properties of zirconium and of hafnium, which are of practical interest for the manufacture of these elements. Systematized are the theoretical and the practical data on the procedures for thermal decomposition of zirconia and for obtaining zirconium dioxide and hafnium dioxide by a thermal decomposition of compounds and on the hydrometallurgical methods for extracting zirconium and hafnium. Zirconium and hafnium fluorides and chlorides production procedures are described. Considered are the iodide and the electrolytic methods of refining zirconium and hafnium

  1. Impact of reactor water chemistry on cladding performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.

    1997-01-01

    Water chemistry may have a major impact on fuel cladding performance in PWRs. If the saturation temperature on the surface of fuel cladding is exceeded, either because of the thermal hydraulics of the system, or because of crud deposition, then LiOH concentration can occur within thick porous oxide films on the cladding. This can degrade the protective film and accelerate the corrosion rate of the cladding. If sufficient boric acid is also present in the coolant then these effects may be mitigated. This is normally the case through most of any reactor fuel cycle. Extensive surface boiling may disrupt this equilibrium because of the volatility of boric acid in steam. Under such conditions severe cladding corrosion can ensue. The potential for such effects on high burnup cladding in CANDU reactors, where bone acid is not present in the primary coolant, is discussed. (author)

  2. Impact of reactor water chemistry on cladding performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, B. [University of Toronto, Centre for Nuclear Engineering, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    Water chemistry may have a major impact on fuel cladding performance in PWRs. If the saturation temperature on the surface of fuel cladding is exceeded, either because of the thermal hydraulics of the system, or because of crud deposition, then LiOH concentration can occur within thick porous oxide films on the cladding. This can degrade the protective film and accelerate the corrosion rate of the cladding. If sufficient boric acid is also present in the coolant then these effects may be mitigated. This is normally the case through most of any reactor fuel cycle. Extensive surface boiling may disrupt this equilibrium because of the volatility of boric acid in steam. Under such conditions severe cladding corrosion can ensue. The potential for such effects on high burnup cladding in CANDU reactors, where bone acid is not present in the primary coolant, is discussed. (author)

  3. Ceramic Coatings for Clad (The C3 Project): Advanced Accident-Tolerant Ceramic Coatings for Zr-Alloy Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickafus, Kurt E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Miller, Larry [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Weber, Bill [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Zhang, Yanwen [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Patel, Maulik [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Wolfe, Doug [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Fratoni, Max [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Raj, Rishi [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Plunkett, Kenneth [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hollis, Kendall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nelson, Andy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Chris [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Comstock, Robert [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Partezana, Jonna [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Whittle, Karl [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Preuss, Michael [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Withers, Philip [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Donnelly, Stephen [Univ. of Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Riley, Daniel [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Syndney (Australia)

    2017-02-14

    The goal of this NEUP-IRP project is to develop a fuel concept based on an advanced ceramic coating for Zr-alloy cladding. The coated cladding must exhibit demonstrably improved performance compared to conventional Zr-alloy clad in the following respects: During normal service, the ceramic coating should decrease cladding oxidation and hydrogen pickup (the latter leads to hydriding and embrittlement). During a reactor transient (e.g., a loss of coolant accident), the ceramic coating must minimize or at least significantly delay oxidation of the Zr-alloy cladding, thus reducing the amount of hydrogen generated and the oxygen ingress into the cladding. The specific objectives of this project are as follows: To produce durable ceramic coatings on Zr-alloy clad using two possible routes: (i) MAX phase ceramic coatings or similar nitride or carbide coatings; and (ii) graded interface architecture (multilayer) ceramic coatings, using, for instance, an oxide such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the outer protective layer. To characterize the structural and physical properties of the coated clad samples produced in 1. above, especially the corrosion properties under simulated normal and transient reactor operating conditions. To perform computational analyses to assess the effects of such coatings on fuel performance and reactor neutronics, and to perform fuel cycle analyses to assess the economic viability of modifying conventional Zr-alloy cladding with ceramic coatings. This project meets a number of the goals outlined in the NEUP-IRP call for proposals, including: Improve the fuel/cladding system through innovative designs (e.g. coatings/liners for zirconium-based cladding) Reduce or eliminate hydrogen generation Increase resistance to bulk steam oxidation Achievement of our goals and objectives, as defined above, will lead to safer light-water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel assemblies, due to improved cladding properties and built-in accident resistance, as well as

  4. SEPARATING HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, B.A.J.; Duncan, J.F.

    1956-08-21

    A dilute aqueous solution of zirconyl chloride which is 1N to 2N in HCl is passed through a column of a cation exchange resin in acid form thereby absorbing both zirconium and associated hafnium impurity in the mesin. The cation exchange material with the absorbate is then eluted with aqueous sulfuric acid of a O.8N to 1.2N strength. The first portion of the eluate contains the zirconium substantially free of hafnium.

  5. Evolutionary developments of advanced PWR nuclear fuels and cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are provided. • Evolution of PWR advanced fuel in U.S.A. and in Korea is described. • Cutting-edge design features against grid-to-rod fretting and debris are explained. • High performance data of advanced grids, debris filters and claddings are given. -- Abstract: The evolutionary developments of advanced PWR fuels and cladding materials are explained with outstanding design features of nuclear fuel assembly components and zirconium-base cladding materials. The advanced PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are also provided along with verification tests, which can be used as guidelines for newcomers planning to develop an advanced fuel for the first time. The up-to-date advanced fuels with the advanced cladding materials may provide a high level of economic utilization and reliable performance even under current and upcoming aggressive operating conditions. To be specific, nuclear fuel vendors may achieve high fuel burnup capability of between 45,000 and 65,000 MWD/MTU batch average, overpower thermal margin of as much as 15% and longer cycle length up to 24 months on the one hand and fuel failure rates of around 10 −6 on the other hand. However, there is still a need for better understanding of grid-to-rod fretting wear mechanisms leading to major PWR fuel defects in the world and subsequently a driving force for developing innovative spacer grid designs with zero fretting wear-induced fuel failure

  6. Gel structure of the corrosion layer on cladding pipes of nuclear fuels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medek, Jiří; Weishauptová, Zuzana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 393, č. 2 (2009), s. 306-310 ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/04/0043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : cladding pipes of nuclear fuels * corrosion layer * zirconium alloys Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics Impact factor: 1.933, year: 2009

  7. Laser cladding with powder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, M.F.; Schneider, Marcel Fredrik

    1998-01-01

    This thesis is directed to laser cladding with powder and a CO2 laser as heat source. The laser beam intensity profile turned out to be an important pa6 Summary rameter in laser cladding. A numerical model was developed that allows the prediction of the surface temperature distribution that is

  8. Adaptation of fuel code for light water reactor with austenitic steel rod cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira; Giovedi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Light water reactors were used with steel as nuclear fuel cladding from 1960 to 1980. The high performance proved that the use of low-carbon alloys could substitute the current zirconium alloys. Stainless steel is an alternative that can be used as cladding. The zirconium alloys replaced the steel. However, significant experiences in-pile occurred, in commercial units such as Haddam Neck, Indian Point, and Yankee experiences. Stainless Steel Types 347 and 348 can be used as cladding. An advantage of using Stainless Steel was evident in Fukushima when a large number of hydrogens was produced at high temperatures. The steel cladding does not eliminate the problem of accumulating free hydrogen, which can lead to a risk of explosion. In a boiling water reactor, environments easily exist for the attack of intergranular corrosion. The Stainless Steel alloys, Types 321, 347, and 348, are stabilized against attack by the addition of titanium, niobium, or tantalum. The steel Type 348 is composed of niobium, tantalum, and cobalt. Titanium preserves type 321, and niobium additions stabilize type 347. In recent years, research has increased on studying the effects of irradiation by fast neutrons. The impact of radiation includes changes in flow rate limits, deformation, and ductility. The irradiation can convert crystalline lattices into an amorphous structure. New proposals are emerging that suggest using a silicon carbide-based fuel rod cladding or iron-chromium-aluminum alloys. These materials can substitute the classic zirconium alloys. Once the steel Type 348 was chosen, the thermal and mechanical properties were coded in a library of functions. The fuel performance codes contain all features. A comparative analysis of the steel and zirconium alloys was made. The results demonstrate that the austenitic steel alloys are the viable candidates for substituting the zirconium alloys. (author)

  9. Adaptation of fuel code for light water reactor with austenitic steel rod cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (POLI/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise, Avaliacao e Gerenciamento de Risco

    2015-07-01

    Light water reactors were used with steel as nuclear fuel cladding from 1960 to 1980. The high performance proved that the use of low-carbon alloys could substitute the current zirconium alloys. Stainless steel is an alternative that can be used as cladding. The zirconium alloys replaced the steel. However, significant experiences in-pile occurred, in commercial units such as Haddam Neck, Indian Point, and Yankee experiences. Stainless Steel Types 347 and 348 can be used as cladding. An advantage of using Stainless Steel was evident in Fukushima when a large number of hydrogens was produced at high temperatures. The steel cladding does not eliminate the problem of accumulating free hydrogen, which can lead to a risk of explosion. In a boiling water reactor, environments easily exist for the attack of intergranular corrosion. The Stainless Steel alloys, Types 321, 347, and 348, are stabilized against attack by the addition of titanium, niobium, or tantalum. The steel Type 348 is composed of niobium, tantalum, and cobalt. Titanium preserves type 321, and niobium additions stabilize type 347. In recent years, research has increased on studying the effects of irradiation by fast neutrons. The impact of radiation includes changes in flow rate limits, deformation, and ductility. The irradiation can convert crystalline lattices into an amorphous structure. New proposals are emerging that suggest using a silicon carbide-based fuel rod cladding or iron-chromium-aluminum alloys. These materials can substitute the classic zirconium alloys. Once the steel Type 348 was chosen, the thermal and mechanical properties were coded in a library of functions. The fuel performance codes contain all features. A comparative analysis of the steel and zirconium alloys was made. The results demonstrate that the austenitic steel alloys are the viable candidates for substituting the zirconium alloys. (author)

  10. Chemical dissolution of spent fuel and cladding using complexed fluoride species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rance, P.J.W.; Freeman, G.A.; Mishin, V.; Issoupov, V.

    2001-01-01

    The dissolution of LWR fuel cladding using two fluoride ion donors, HBF 4 and K 2 ZrF 6 , in combination with nitric acid has been investigated as a potential reprocessing head-end process suitable for chemical decladding and fuel dissolution in a single process step. Maximum zirconium concentrations in the order of 0,75 to 1 molar have been achieved and dissolution found to continue to low F:Zr ratios albeit at ever decreasing rates. Dissolution rates of un-oxidised zirconium based fuel claddings are fast, whereas oxidised materials exhibit an induction period prior to dissolution. Data is presented relating to the rates of dissolution of cladding and UO 2 fuels under various conditions. (author)

  11. DECONTAMINATION OF ZIRCALOY SPENT FUEL CLADDING HULLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudisill, T; John Mickalonis, J

    2006-01-01

    The reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) generates a Zircaloy cladding hull waste which requires disposal as a high level waste in the geologic repository. The hulls are primarily contaminated with fission products and actinides from the fuel. During fuel irradiation, these contaminants are deposited in a thin layer of zirconium oxide (ZrO 2 ) which forms on the cladding surface at the elevated temperatures present in a nuclear reactor. Therefore, if the hulls are treated to remove the ZrO 2 layer, a majority of the contamination will be removed and the hulls could potentially meet acceptance criteria for disposal as a low level waste (LLW). Discard of the hulls as a LLW would result in significant savings due to the high costs associated with geologic disposal. To assess the feasibility of decontaminating spent fuel cladding hulls, two treatment processes developed for dissolving fuels containing zirconium (Zr) metal or alloys were evaluated. Small-scale dissolution experiments were performed using the ZIRFLEX process which employs a boiling ammonium fluoride (NH 4 F)/ammonium nitrate (NH 4 NO 3 ) solution to dissolve Zr or Zircaloy cladding and a hydrofluoric acid (HF) process developed for complete dissolution of Zr-containing fuels. The feasibility experiments were performed using Zircaloy-4 metal coupons which were electrochemically oxidized to produce a thin ZrO 2 layer on the surface. Once the oxide layer was in place, the ease of removing the layer using methods based on the two processes was evaluated. The ZIRFLEX and HF dissolution processes were both successful in removing a 0.2 mm (thick) oxide layer from Zircaloy-4 coupons. Although the ZIRFLEX process was effective in removing the oxide layer, two potential shortcomings were identified. The formation of ammonium hexafluorozirconate ((NH 4 ) 2 ZrF 6 ) on the metal surface prior to dissolution in the bulk solution could hinder the decontamination process by obstructing the removal of

  12. Zirconium isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.H.; Lahoda, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    A process is described for reducing the amount of zirconium 91 isotope in zirconium comprising: forming a first solution of (a) a first solvent, (b) a scavenger, and (c) a zirconium compound which is soluble in the first solvent and reacts with the scavenger when exposed to light of a wavelength of 220 to 600 nm; irradiating the first solution with light at the wavelength for a time sufficient to photoreact a disproportionate amount of the zirconium compound containing the zirconium 91 isotope with the scavenger to form a reaction product in the first solution; contacting the first solution, while effecting the irradiation, with a second solvent which is immiscible with the first solvent, which the second solvent is a preferential solvent for the reaction product relative to the first solvent, such that at least a portion of the reaction product is transferred to the second solvent to form a second solution; and separating the second solution from the first solution after the contacting

  13. Secondary degradation mechanisms - A theoretical approach to remedial actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudling, P.

    2001-04-01

    A failed BWR fuel rod may degrade either by developing long axial cracks and/or transversal breaks. The tendency of failed BWR rods to degrade depends on the fuel design and reactor operation of the failed rod. The knowledge of the degradation mechanisms may be used to develop secondary degradation resistant fuel and/or to mitigate the degradation tendencies during operation of failed fuel. Literature data from three different categories has been analysed: Open literature data on failed BWR rods that have and have not degraded; Data generated in experimental reactors where primary failures have been simulated either by drilling a hole in the intact cladding before the test or by letting water/steam into the rod from a capsule connected to the otherwise intact rod. In addition data related to hydrogen production in the pellet-cladding gap in a failed rod and the subsequent hydrogen ingress and finally the hydride formation in zirconium alloys; Open literature data out-of-pile material tests to improve the knowledge of the secondary degradation mechanisms. To get an idea of the degradation mechanisms one may first characterise the failed fuel rods in commercial BWRs that form axial splits, transversal breaks and also failed rods that do not degrade at all. Considering axial splits in BWRs, they seem to occur mostly for failed fuel rods with intermediate and high burnups, i.e., in rods with small pellet-cladding gaps, that have been subjected to a power ramp. Such data indicate that the axial crack propagation rate is larger than 0.16 mm/h. It is also clear that the axial cracks formed in commercial reactors show mostly brittle cleavage features at reactor operating temperature even though the hydrogen content in the fuel cladding is low, 150-300 wtppm. Macroscopically the brittle cleavage fractures are characterised by: a fracture surface that is perpendicular to the main tensile stress direction i.e., in the cladding circumferential direction, no or very little clad

  14. Design of an integrated system to recycle Zircaloy cladding using a hydride–milling–dehydride process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, Randy, E-mail: rkelley@pitt.edu [Mechanical Engineering Department, 236 Engineering and Science Building, University of Pittsburgh – Johnstown, Johnstown, PA 15904 (United States); McDeavitt, Sean [Texas A and M University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, 327 Zachry Engineering Center, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Dehydriding zirconium hydride was studied at relatively low temperatures (<800 °C). • High vacuum pressures decrease dehydriding temperatures. • Specialized equipment was designed, built and demonstrated to process zirconium. • The process hydrided–milled–dehydrided zirconium metal to a fine metal powder. • Two powder samples were analyzed and proved the operation of the machine. -- Abstract: A hydride–dehydride process was evaluated to recover a portion of spent nuclear fuel cladding; a zirconium alloy (Zircaloy), as a metal powder that may be used for advanced nuclear fuel applications. The investigation was part of a broader study that sought to determine the viability of recovering components of used nuclear fuel to for a metal matrix cermet for transuranic burning. The zirconium powder process begins with the conversion of Zircaloy cladding hulls into a brittle zirconium hydride, which is easily pulverized into a powder. The dehydriding process removes hydrogen by heating the powder in a vacuum, resulting in a zirconium metal powder. In support of this, a specialized piece of equipment was designed to demonstrate the entire zirconium conversion process to transform Zircaloy tubes into metal powder without intermediate handling. This was accomplished by building a milling system that rotates inside of controlled atmosphere chamber with an internal heater. The hydriding process was accomplished using an argon–5% hydrogen atmosphere at 500 °C. The process variables for the dehydriding process were determined using a thermogavimetric analysis (TGA) method. It was determined that a rough vacuum (∼0.001 bar) and 800 °C were sufficient to decompose the zirconium hydride. Zirconium metal powder was created using different milling times: 45 min (coarse powder) and 12 h (fine powder). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that the process produced a zirconium metal. Additionally, visual observations of the samples silvery

  15. All fiber cladding mode stripper with uniform heat distribution and high cladding light loss manufactured by CO2 laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebali, M. A.; Basso, E. T.

    2018-02-01

    Cladding mode strippers are primarily used at the end of a fiber laser cavity to remove high-power excess cladding light without inducing core loss and beam quality degradation. Conventional manufacturing methods of cladding mode strippers include acid etching, abrasive blasting or laser ablation. Manufacturing of cladding mode strippers using laser ablation consist of removing parts of the cladding by fused silica ablation with a controlled penetration and shape. We present and characterize an optimized cladding mode stripper design that increases the cladding light loss with a minimal device length and manufacturing time. This design reduces the localized heat generation by improving the heat distribution along the device. We demonstrate a cladding mode stripper written on a 400um fiber with cladding light loss of 20dB, with less than 0.02dB loss in the core and minimal heating of the fiber and coating. The manufacturing process of the designed component is fully automated and takes less than 3 minutes with a very high throughput yield.

  16. Purification of zirconium concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, A.E.P.

    1976-01-01

    A commercial grade ZrO 2 and an ammonium uranate (yellow cake) are obtained from the caldasito ore processing. This ore is found in the Pocos de Caldas Plateau, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Caldasito is an uranigerous zirconium ore, a mixture of zircon and baddeleyite and contains 60% ZrO 2 and 0,3% U 3 O 8 . The chemical opening of the ore was made by alkaline fusion with NaOH at controlled temperature. The zirconium-uranium separation took place by a continuous liquid-liquid extraction in TBP-varsol-HNO 3 -H 2 O system. The raffinate containing zirconium + impurities (aluminium, iron and titanium) was purified by an ion exchange operation using a strong cationic resin [pt

  17. Fuel cladding behavior under rapid loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, K.; Karlsson, J.; Stjärnsäter, J.; Schrire, D.; Ledergerber, G.; Munoz-Reja, C.; Hallstadius, L.

    2016-02-01

    A modified burst test (MBT) was used in an extensive test program to characterize fuel cladding failure behavior under rapid loading conditions. The MBT differs from a normal burst test with the use of a driver tube to simulate the expansion of a fuel pellet, thereby producing a partial strain driven deformation condition similar to that of a fuel pellet expansion in a reactivity insertion accident (RIA). A piston/cylinder assembly was used to pressurize the driver tube. By controlling the speed and distance the piston travels the loading rate and degree of sample deformation could be controlled. The use of a driver tube with a machined gauge section localizes deformation and allows for continuous monitoring of the test sample diameter change at the location of maximum hoop strain, during each test. Cladding samples from five irradiated fuel rods were tested between 296 and 553 K and loading rates from 1.5 to 3.5/s. The test rods included variations of Zircaloy-2 with different liners and ZIRLO, ranging in burn-up from 41 to 74 GWd/MTU. The test results show cladding ductility is strongly temperature and loading rate dependent. Zircaloy-2 cladding ductility degradation due to operational hydrogen pickup started to recover at approximately 358 K for test condition used in the study. This recovery temperature is strongly loading rate dependent. At 373 K, ductility recovery was small for loading rates less than 8 ms equivalent RIA pulse width, but longer than 8 ms the ductility recovery increased exponentially with increasing pulse width, consistent with literature observations of loading rate dependent brittle-to-ductile (BTD) transition temperature. The cladding ductility was also observed to be strongly loading rate/pulse width dependent for BWR cladding below the BTD temperature and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) cladding at both 296 and 553 K.

  18. Zirconium - ab initio modelling of point defects diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasca, Petrica

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium is the main element of the cladding found in pressurized water reactors, under an alloy form. Under irradiation, the cladding elongate significantly, phenomena attributed to the vacancy dislocation loops growth in the basal planes of the hexagonal compact structure. The understanding of the atomic scale mechanisms originating this process motivated this work. Using the ab initio atomic modeling technique we studied the structure and mobility of point defects in Zirconium. This led us to find four interstitial point defects with formation energies in an interval of 0.11 eV. The migration paths study allowed the discovery of activation energies, used as entry parameters for a kinetic Monte Carlo code. This code was developed for calculating the diffusion coefficient of the interstitial point defect. Our results suggest a migration parallel to the basal plane twice as fast as one parallel to the c direction, with an activation energy of 0.08 eV, independent of the direction. The vacancy diffusion coefficient, estimated with a two-jump model, is also anisotropic, with a faster process in the basal planes than perpendicular to them. Hydrogen influence on the vacancy dislocation loops nucleation was also studied, due to recent experimental observations of cladding growth acceleration in the presence of this element [fr

  19. Zirconium and hafnium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James V.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Bedinger, George M.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Zirconium and hafnium are corrosion-resistant metals that are widely used in the chemical and nuclear industries. Most zirconium is consumed in the form of the main ore mineral zircon (ZrSiO4, or as zirconium oxide or other zirconium chemicals. Zirconium and hafnium are both refractory lithophile elements that have nearly identical charge, ionic radii, and ionic potentials. As a result, their geochemical behavior is generally similar. Both elements are classified as incompatible because they have physical and crystallochemical properties that exclude them from the crystal lattices of most rock-forming minerals. Zircon and another, less common, ore mineral, baddeleyite (ZrO2), form primarily as accessory minerals in igneous rocks. The presence and abundance of these ore minerals in igneous rocks are largely controlled by the element concentrations in the magma source and by the processes of melt generation and evolution. The world’s largest primary deposits of zirconium and hafnium are associated with alkaline igneous rocks, and, in one locality on the Kola Peninsula of Murmanskaya Oblast, Russia, baddeleyite is recovered as a byproduct of apatite and magnetite mining. Otherwise, there are few primary igneous deposits of zirconium- and hafnium-bearing minerals with economic value at present. The main ore deposits worldwide are heavy-mineral sands produced by the weathering and erosion of preexisting rocks and the concentration of zircon and other economically important heavy minerals, such as ilmenite and rutile (for titanium), chromite (for chromium), and monazite (for rare-earth elements) in sedimentary systems, particularly in coastal environments. In coastal deposits, heavy-mineral enrichment occurs where sediment is repeatedly reworked by wind, waves, currents, and tidal processes. The resulting heavy-mineral-sand deposits, called placers or paleoplacers, preferentially form at relatively low latitudes on passive continental margins and supply 100 percent of

  20. Development of Silicide Coating on Molybdenum Alloy Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Woojin; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    The molybdenum alloy is considered as one of the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding materials due to its high temperature mechanical properties. However, molybdenum has a weak oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. To modify the oxidation resistance of molybdenum cladding, silicide coating on the cladding is considered. Molybdenum silicide layers are oxidized to SiO 2 in an oxidation atmosphere. The SiO 2 protective layer isolates the substrate from the oxidizing atmosphere. Pack cementation deposition technique is widely adopted for silicide coating for molybdenum alloys due to its simple procedure, homogeneous coating quality and chemical compatibility. In this study, the pack cementation method was conducted to develop molybdenum silicide layers on molybdenum alloys. It was found that the Mo 3 Si layer was deposited on substrate instead of MoSi 2 because of short holding time. It means that through the extension of holding time, MoSi 2 layer can be formed on molybdenum substrate to enhance the oxidation resistance of molybdenum. The accident tolerant fuel (ATF) concept is to delay the process following an accident by reducing the oxidation rate at high temperatures and to delay swelling and rupture of fuel claddings. The current research for Atf can be categorized into three groups: First, modification of existing zirconium-based alloy cladding by improving the high temperature oxidation resistance and strength. Second, replacing Zirconium based alloys with alternative metallic materials such as refractory elements with high temperature oxidation resistance and strength. Third, designing alternative fuel structures using ceramic and composite systems

  1. Stone cladding engineering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Camposinhos, Rui de Sousa

    2014-01-01

    .... Straightforward formulae are provided for computing action on cladding, with special emphasis on the effect of seismic forces, including an extensive general methodology applied to non-structural elements...

  2. Cladding creepdown under compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, D.O.

    1977-01-01

    Light-water power reactors use Zircaloy tubing as cladding to contain the UO 2 fuel pellets. In-service operating conditions impose an external hydrostatic force on the cladding, causing it to creep down into eventual contact with the fuel. Knowledge of the rate of such creepdown is of great importance to modelers of fuel element performance. An experimental system was devised for studying creepdown that meets several severe requirements by providing (1) correct stress state, (2) multiple positions for measuring radial displacement of the cladding surface, (3) high-precision data, and (4) an experimental configuration compact enough to fit in-reactor. A microcomputer-controlled, eddy-current monitoring system was developed for this study and has proven highly successful in measuring cladding deformation with time at temperatures of 371 0 C (700 0 F) and higher, and at pressures as high as 21 MPa

  3. Highly corrosion resistant zirconium based alloy for reactor structural material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yoichi.

    1996-01-01

    The alloy of the present invention is a zirconium based alloy comprising tin (Sn), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and iron (Fe) in zirconium (Zr). The amount of silicon (Si) as an impurity is not more than 60ppm. It is preferred that Sn is from 0.9 to 1.5wt%, that of Cr is from 0.05 to 0.15wt%, and (Fe + Ni) is from 0.17 to 0.5wt%. If not less than 0.12wt% of Fe is added, resistance against nodular corrosion is improved. The upper limit of Fe is preferably 0.40wt% from a view point of uniform suppression for the corrosion. The nodular corrosion can be suppressed by reducing the amount of Si-rich deposition product in the zirconium based alloy. Accordingly, a highly corrosion resistant zirconium based alloy improved for the corrosion resistance of zircaloy-2 and usable for a fuel cladding tube of a BWR type reactor can be obtained. (I.N.)

  4. Solvent extraction of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.S.; Yoon, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The extraction of zirconium(VI) from an aqueous solution of constant ionic strength with versatic acid-10 dissolved in benzen was studied as a function of pH and the concentration of zirconium(VI) and organic acid. The effects of sulphate and chlorine ions on the extraction of the zirconium(VI) were briefly examined. It was revealed that (ZrOR 2 .2RH) is the predominant species of extracted zirconium(VI) in the versatic acid-10. The chemical equation and the apparent equilibrium constants thereof have been determined as follows. (ZrOsup(2+))aq+ 2(R 2 H 2 )sub(org) = (ZrOR 2 .2RH)sub(org)+2(H + )aq Ksub(Zr) = (ZrOR 2 .2RH)sub(org)(H + ) 2 /(ZrOsup(2+))sub(aq)(R 2 H 2 )sup(2)sub(org) = 3.3 x 10 -7 . The synergistic effects of TBP and D2EHPA were also studied. In the mixed solvent with 0.1M TBP, the synergistic effect was observed, while the mixed solvent with D2EHPA showed the antisynergistic effect. (Author)

  5. Titanium and zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium pure and base alloys are protected by an oxide film with anionic vacancies which gives a very good resistance to corrosion in oxidizing medium, in some ph ranges. Results of pitting and crevice corrosion are given for Cl - , Br - , I - ions concentration with temperature and ph dependence, also with oxygenated ions effect. (A.B.). 32 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Modelling zirconium hydrides using the special quasirandom structure approach

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao; Chroneos, Alexander I.; Jiang, Chao; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    The study of the structure and properties of zirconium hydrides is important for understanding the embrittlement of zirconium alloys used as cladding in light water nuclear reactors. Simulation of the defect processes is complicated due to the random distribution of the hydrogen atoms. We propose the use of the special quasirandom structure approach as a computationally efficient way to describe this random distribution. We have generated six special quasirandom structure cells based on face centered cubic and face centered tetragonal unit cells to describe ZrH2-x (x = 0.25-0.5). Using density functional theory calculations we investigate the mechanical properties, stability, and electronic structure of the alloys. © the Owner Societies 2013.

  7. MAX Phase Modified SiC Composites for Ceramic-Metal Hybrid Cladding Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yang-Il; Kim, Sun-Han; Park, Dong-Jun; Park, Jeong-Hwan; Park, Jeong-Yong; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Koo, Yang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    A metal-ceramic hybrid cladding consists of an inner zirconium tube, and an outer SiC fiber-matrix SiC ceramic composite with surface coating as shown in Fig. 1 (left-hand side). The inner zirconium allows the matrix to remain fully sealed even if the ceramic matrix cracks through. The outer SiC composite can increase the safety margin by taking the merits of the SiC itself. In addition, the outermost layer prevents the dissolution of SiC during normal operation. On the other hand, a ceramic-metal hybrid cladding consists of an outer zirconium tube, and an inner SiC ceramic composite as shown in Fig. 1 (right-hand side). The outer zirconium protects the fuel rod from a corrosion during reactor operation, as in the present fuel claddings. The inner SiC composite, additionally, is designed to resist the severe oxidation under a postulated accident condition of a high-temperature steam environment. Reaction-bonded SiC was fabricated by modifying the matrix as the MAX phase. The formation of Ti 3 SiC 2 was investigated depending on the compositions of the preform and melt. In most cases, TiSi 2 was the preferential phase because of its lowest melting point in the Ti-Si-C system. The evidence of Ti 3 SiC 2 was the connection with the pressurizing

  8. Laser cladding of turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepeleva, L.; Medres, B.; Kaplan, W.D.; Bamberger, M.

    2000-01-01

    A comparative study of two different techniques for the application of wear-resistant coatings for contact surfaces of shroud shelves of gas turbine engine blades (GTE) has been conducted. Wear-resistant coatings were applied on In713 by laser cladding with direct injection of the cladding powder into the melt pool. Laser cladding was conducted with a TRUMPF-2500, CW-CO 2 laser. The laser cladding was compared with commercially available plasma cladding with wire. Both plasma and laser cladded zones were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the laser cladded zone has a higher microhardness value (650-820 HV) compared with that of the plasma treated material (420-440 HV). This is a result of the significant reduction in grain size in the case of laser cladding. Unlike the plasma cladded zones, the laser treated material is free of micropores and microcracks. (orig.)

  9. Hydrogen permeation in FeCrAl alloys for LWR cladding application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Terrani, Kurt A.; Wirth, Brian D.; Snead, Lance L.

    2015-06-01

    FeCrAl, an advanced oxidation-resistant iron-based alloy class, is a highly prevalent candidate as an accident-tolerant fuel cladding material. Compared with traditional zirconium alloy fuel cladding, increased tritium permeation through FeCrAl fuel cladding to the primary coolant is expected, raising potential safety concerns. In this study, the hydrogen permeability of several FeCrAl alloys was obtained using a static permeation test station, which was calibrated and validated using 304 stainless steel. The high hydrogen permeability of FeCrAl alloys leads to concerns with respect to potentially significant tritium release when used for fuel cladding in LWRs. The total tritium inventory inside the primary coolant of a light water reactor was quantified by applying a 1-dimensional steady state tritium diffusion model to demonstrate the dependence of tritium inventory on fuel cladding type. Furthermore, potential mitigation strategies for tritium release from FeCrAl fuel cladding were discussed and indicate the potential for application of an alumina layer on the inner clad surface to serve as a tritium barrier. More effort is required to develop a robust, economical mitigation strategy for tritium permeation in reactors using FeCrAl clad fuel assemblies.

  10. Electroless deposition process for zirconium and zirconium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Robert E.; Sherman, Anna H.

    1981-01-01

    A method is disclosed for preventing stress corrosion cracking or metal embrittlement of a zirconium or zirconium alloy container that is to be coated on the inside surface with a layer of a metal such as copper, a copper alloy, nickel, or iron and used for holding nuclear fuel material as a nuclear fuel element. The zirconium material is etched in an etchant solution, desmutted mechanically or ultrasonically, oxidized to form an oxide coating on the zirconium, cleaned in an aqueous alkaline cleaning solution, activated for electroless deposition of a metal layer and contacted with an electroless metal plating solution. This method provides a boundary layer of zirconium oxide between the zirconium container and the metal layer.

  11. Prospects for zirconium structural alloys at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, W.R.

    1969-05-01

    Improved station efficiencies and lower capital costs provide incentives for the development of zirconium alloys for pressure tubes which can operate at temperatures above 450 o C. The experience of the Ti industry indicates that a complex alloy containing solution hardeners of Sn or Al and precipitation hardeners of Mo and Nb and perhaps Si will be required. The thermal neutron cross-section of the alloy will be about 10% higher than Zircaloy-2 and because of its poor corrosion resistance will require cladding with a corrosion resistant alloy such as Zr-Cr. Results to date indicate that such a pressure tube is feasible. (author)

  12. Modelling of stress corrosion cracking in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fandeur, O.; Rouillon, L.; Pilvin, P.; Jacques, P.; Rebeyrolle, V.

    2001-01-01

    During normal and incidental operating conditions, PWR power plants must comply with the first safety requirement, which is to ensure that the cladding wall is sound. Indeed some severe power transients potentially induce Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) of the zirconium alloy clad, due to strong Pellet Cladding Interaction (PCI). Since, at present, the prevention of this risk has some consequences on the French reactors manoeuvrability, a better understanding and forecast of the clad damage related to SCC/PCI is needed. With this aim, power ramp tests are performed in experimental reactors to assess the fuel rod behaviour and evaluate PCI failure risks. To study in detail SCC mechanisms, additional laboratory experiments are carried out on non-irradiated and irradiated cladding tubes. Numerical simulations of these tests have been developed aiming, on the one hand, to evaluate mechanical state variables and, on the other hand, to study consistent mechanical parameters for describing stress corrosion clad failure. The main result of this simulation is the determination of the validity ranges of the stress intensity factor, which is frequently used to model SCC. This parameter appears to be valid only at the onset of crack growth, when crack length remains short. In addition, the role of plastic strain rate and plastic strain as controlling parameters of the SCC process has been analysed in detail using the above mechanical description of the crack tip mechanical fields. Finally, the numerical determination of the first-order parameter(s) in the crack propagation rate law is completed by the development of laboratory tests focused on these parameters. These tests aim to support experimentally the results of the FE simulation. (author)

  13. Fabrication of a tantalum-clad tungsten target for KENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Kikuchi, Kenji; Kurishita, Hiroaki; Li, J.-F.; Furusaka, Michihiro

    2001-01-01

    Since the cold neutron source intensity of KENS (the spallation neutron source at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) was decreased into about a third of the designed value because a cadmium liner at the cold neutron source deformed and obstructed the neutron beam line, the target-moderator-and-reflector assembly (TMRA) has been replaced by a new one aimed at improving the neutron performance and recovering the cold neutron source. The tantalum target has also been replaced by a tantalum-clad tungsten one. In order to bond the tantalum-clad with the tungsten block, a hot isostatic press (HIP) process was applied and optimized. It was found that gaseous interstitial impurity elements severely attacked tantalum and embrittled, and that the getter materials such as zirconium and tantalum were effective to reduce the embrittlement

  14. Plasma arc melting of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubesing, P.K.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Dunn, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    Zirconium, like some other refractory metals, has an undesirable sensitivity to interstitials such as oxygen. Traditionally, zirconium is processed by electron beam melting to maintain minimum interstitial contamination. Electron beam melted zirconium, however, does not respond positively to mechanical processing due to its large grain size. The authors undertook a study to determine if plasma arc melting (PAM) technology could be utilized to maintain low interstitial concentrations and improve the response of zirconium to subsequent mechanical processing. The PAM process enabled them to control and maintain low interstitial levels of oxygen and carbon, produce a more favorable grain structure, and with supplementary off-gassing, improve the response to mechanical forming

  15. Zirconium microstructures: uncharted possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samajdar, I.; Kumar, Gulshan; Singh, Jaiveer; Lodh, Arijit; Srivastava, D.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G.K.; Saibaba, N.

    2015-01-01

    The 'conventional' Zirconium microstructures can be significantly extended with information on: (i) microtexture, (ii) residual stresses and (iii) local mechanical properties. Though these involve different tools, but a consolidated microstructure can be crated. This is the theme of this presentation. Examples of this consolidated picture will be made from deformation twinning, recovery-recrystallization, burst ductility and orientation versus solid solution hardening. (author)

  16. Zirconium elasticity modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavra, G.

    1978-01-01

    Considered are the limit and the intermediate values of the Young modulus E, modulus of shear G and of linear modulus of compression K obtainable at various temperatures (4.2 to 1133 K) for single crystals of α-zirconium. Determined and presented are the corrected isotropic elasticity characteristics of E, G, K over the above range of temperatures of textured and non-textured α-Zr

  17. An allowable cladding peak temperature for spent nuclear fuels in interim dry storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyun-Jin; Jang, Ki-Nam; Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2018-01-01

    Allowable cladding peak temperatures for spent fuel cladding integrity in interim dry storage were investigated, considering hydride reorientation and mechanical property degradation behaviors of unirradiated and neutron irradiated Zr-Nb cladding tubes. Cladding tube specimens were heated up to various temperatures and then cooled down under tensile hoop stresses. Cool-down specimens indicate that higher heat-up temperature and larger tensile hoop stress generated larger radial hydride precipitation and smaller tensile strength and plastic hoop strain. Unirradiated specimens generated relatively larger radial hydride precipitation and plastic strain than did neutron irradiated specimens. Assuming a minimum plastic strain requirement of 5% for cladding integrity maintenance in interim dry storage, it is proposed that a cladding peak temperature during the interim dry storage is to keep below 250 °C if cladding tubes are cooled down to room temperature.

  18. Electra-Clad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-05-04

    The study relates to the use of building-integrated photovoltaics. The Electra-Clad project sought to use steel-based cladding as a substrate for direct fabrication of a fully integrated solar panel of a design similar to the ICP standard glass-based panel. The five interrelated phases of the project are described. The study successfully demonstrated that the principles of the panel design are achievable and sound. But, despite intensive trials, a commercially realistic solar performance has not been achieved: the main failing was the poor solar conversion efficiency as the active area of the panel was increased in size. The problem lies with the coating used on the steel cladding substrates and it was concluded that a new type of coating will be required. ICP Solar Technologies UK carried out the work under contract to the DTI.

  19. Beryllium and zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salesse, Marc

    1959-01-01

    Pure beryllium and zirconium, both isolated at about the same date but more than a century ago remained practically unused for eighty years. Fifteen years ago they were released from this state of inactivity by atomic energy, which made them into current metal a with an annual production which runs into tens of tons for the one and thousands for the other. The reasons for this promotion promise well for the future of the two metals, which moreover will probably find additional uses in other branches of industry. The attraction of beryllium and zirconium for atomic energy is easily explained. The curve of figure 1 gives the price per gram of uranium-235 as a function of enrichment: this price increases by about a factor of 3 on passing from natural uranium (0, 7 percent 235 U) to almost pure uranium-235. Because of their tow capture cross-section beryllium and zirconium make it possible, or at least easier, to use natural uranium and they thus enjoy an advantage the extent of which must be calculated for each reactor or fuel element project, but which is generally considerable. It will be seen later that this advantage should be based on figures which are even more favourable that would appear from the simple ratio 3 of the price of pure uranium- 235 contained in natural uranium. Reprint of a paper published in 'Industries Atomiques' - n. 1-2, 1959

  20. Recovery of zirconium from pickling solution, regeneration and its reuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, D. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad 500062 (India); Mandal, D., E-mail: dmandal10@gmail.com [Alkali Material & Metal Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Visweswara Rao, R.V.R.L.; Sairam, S.; Thakur, S. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad 500062 (India)

    2017-05-15

    Graphical abstract: The following compares the performance of fresh pickling solution (PS) and regenerated and used pickling solution (UPS). - Highlights: • Pickling of zircaloy tubes and appendages is carried out to remove oxide layer. • The pickling solution become saturated with zirconium due to reuse. • As NaNO{sub 3} concentration increases, conc. of Zr in pickling solution decreases. • Experimental results shows that, used pickling solution can be regenerated. • Regenerated solution may be reused by adding makeup quantities of HF-HNO{sub 3}. - Abstract: The pressurized heavy water reactors use natural uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) as fuel and uses cladding material made up of zircaloy, an alloy of zirconium. Pickling of zircaloy tubes and appendages viz., spacer and bearing pads is carried out to remove the oxide layer and surface contaminants, if present. Pickling solution, after use for many cycles i.e., used pickling solution (UPS) is sold out to vendors, basically for its zirconium value. UPS, containing a relatively small concentration of hydrofluoric acid. After repeated use, pickling solution become saturated with zirconium fluoride complex and is treated by adding sodium nitrate to precipitate sodium hexafluro-zirconate. The remaining solution can be recycled after suitable makeup for further pickling use. The revenue lost by selling UPS is very high compared to its zirconium value, which causes monetary loss to the processing unit. Experiments were conducted to regenerate and reuse UPS which will save a good amount of revenue and also protect the environment. Experimental details and results are discussed in this paper.

  1. Prevention of nuclear fuel cladding materials corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, K.R.; Yang, J.C.; Lee, I.C.; Kang, H.D.; Cho, S.W.; Whang, C.K.

    1983-01-01

    The only way which could be performed by the operator of nuclear power plant to minimizing the degradation of nuclear fuel cladding material is to control the water quality of primary coolant as specified standard conditions which dose not attack the cladding material. If the water quality of reactor coolant does not meet far from the specification, the failure will occure not only cladding material itself but construction material of primary system which contact with the coolant. The corrosion product of system material are circulate through the whole primary system with the coolant and activated by the neutron near the reactor core. The activated corrosion products and fission products which released from fuel rod to the coolant, so called crud, will repeate deposition and redeposition continuously on the fuel rod and construction material surface. As a result we should consider heat transfer problem. In this study following activities were performed; 1. The crud sample was taken from the spent fuel rod surface of Kori unit one and analized for radioactive element and non radioactive chemical species. 2. The failure mode of nuclear fuel cladding material was estimated by the investigation of releasing type of fission products from the fuel rod to the reactor coolant using the iodine isotopes concentration of reactor coolants. 3. A study was carried out on the sipping test results of spent fuel and a discussion was made on the water quality control records through the past three cycle operation period of Kori unit one plant. (Author)

  2. Crack resistance curves determination of tube cladding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)]. E-mail: johannes.bertsch@psi.ch; Hoffelner, W. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2006-06-30

    Zirconium based alloys have been in use as fuel cladding material in light water reactors since many years. As claddings change their mechanical properties during service, it is essential for the assessment of mechanical integrity to provide parameters for potential rupture behaviour. Usually, fracture mechanics parameters like the fracture toughness K {sub IC} or, for high plastic strains, the J-integral based elastic-plastic fracture toughness J {sub IC} are employed. In claddings with a very small wall thickness the determination of toughness needs the extension of the J-concept beyond limits of standards. In the paper a new method based on the traditional J approach is presented. Crack resistance curves (J-R curves) were created for unirradiated thin walled Zircaloy-4 and aluminium cladding tube pieces at room temperature using the single sample method. The procedure of creating sharp fatigue starter cracks with respect to optical recording was optimized. It is shown that the chosen test method is appropriate for the determination of complete J-R curves including the values J {sub 0.2} (J at 0.2 mm crack length), J {sub m} (J corresponding to the maximum load) and the slope of the curve.

  3. Experimental creep behaviour determination of cladding tube materials under multi-axial loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosjean, Catherine; Poquillon, Dominique; Salabura, Jean-Claude; Cloue, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    Cladding tubes are structural parts of nuclear plants, submitted to complex thermomechanical loadings. Thus, it is necessary to know and predict their behaviour to preserve their integrity and to enhance their lifetime. Therefore, a new experimental device has been developed to control the load path under multi-axial load conditions. The apparatus is designed to determine the thermomechanical behaviour of zirconium alloys used for cladding tubes. First results are presented. Creep tests with different biaxial loadings were performed. Results are analysed in terms of thermal expansion and of creep strain. The anisotropy of the material is revealed and iso-creep strain curves are given.

  4. Recent irradiation tests of uranium-plutonium-zirconium metal fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Villarreal, R.; Hofman, G.L.; Beck, W.N.

    1986-09-01

    Uranium-Plutonium-Zirconium metal fuel irradiation tests to support the ANL Integral Fast Reactor concept are discussed. Satisfactory performance has been demonstrated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup in three alloys having 0, 8, and 19 wt % plutonium. Fuel swelling measurements at low burnup in alloys to 26 wt % plutonium show that fuel deformation is primarily radial in direction. Increasing the plutonium content in the fuel diminishes the rate of fuel-cladding gap closure and axial fuel column growth. Chemical redistribution occurs by 2.1 at.% peak burnup and generally involves the inward migration of zirconium and outward migration of uranium. Fission gas release to the plenum ranges from 46% to 56% in the alloys irradiated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup. No evidence of deleterious fuel-cladding chemical or mechanical interaction was observed

  5. Zirconium distribution in the system HNO3-H2O-TBP-diluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, J.; Araujo, B.F. de.

    1984-01-01

    The extraction behaviour of zirconium in TBP/diluent-HNO 3 -H 2 O systems is studied in order to increase the uranium decontamination factor by adjusting the extraction conditions so that zirconium extraction is kept at a minimum. Equilibrium diagram, TBP concentration, aqueous: organic phases ratio, salting-out effects and uranium loading in the organic phase were the main factors studied. All the experiments have been carried out with zirconium in the 10 -2 - 10 -3 M concentration range. The extractant degradation products influence upon zirconium behaviour was also verified. With the data obtained it was possible to introduce some modifications in the standard Purex flowsheet with the increase of the decontamination of uranium product from zirconium. (Author) [pt

  6. Process for purifying zirconium sponge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abodishish, H.A.M.; Kimball, L.S.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a Kroll reduction process wherein a zirconium sponge contaminated with unreacted magnesium and by-product magnesium chloride is produced as a regulus, a process for purifying the zirconium sponge. It comprises: distilling magnesium and magnesium chloride from: a regulus containing a zirconium sponge and magnesium and magnesium chloride at a temperature above about 800 degrees C and at an absolute pressure less than about 10 mmHg in a distillation vessel to purify the zirconium sponge; condensing the magnesium and the magnesium chloride distilled from the zirconium sponge in a condenser; and then backfilling the vessel containing the zirconium sponge and the condenser containing the magnesium and the magnesium chloride with a gas; recirculating the gas between the vessel and the condenser to cool the zirconium sponge from above about 800 degrees C to below about 300 degrees C; and cooling the recirculating gas in the condenser containing the condensed magnesium and the condensed magnesium chloride as the gas cools the zirconium sponge to below about 300 degrees C

  7. Composite polymer: Glass edge cladding for laser disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, H.T.; Wolfe, C.A.; Campbell, J.H.; Murray, J.E.; Riley, M.O.; Lyon, R.E.; Jessop, E.S.

    1987-11-02

    Large neodymium glass laser disks for disk amplifiers such as those used in the Nova laser require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 micrometer. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise deplete the gain. Nova now utilizes volume-absorbing monolithic-glass claddings which are fused at high temperature to the disks. These perform quite well but are expensive to produce. Absorbing glass strips are adhesively bonded to the edges of polygonal disks using a bonding agent whose index of refraction matches that of both the laser and absorbing glass. Optical finishing occurs after the strips are attached. Laser disks constructed with such claddings have shown identical gain performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without significant degradation. 18 figs.

  8. Composite polymer-glass edge cladding for laser disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Howard T.; Riley, Michael O.; Wolfe, Charles R.; Lyon, Richard E.; Campbell, John H.; Jessop, Edward S.; Murray, James E.

    1989-01-01

    Large neodymium glass laser disks for disk amplifiers such as those used in the Nova laser require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 micrometer. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise deplete the gain. Nova now utilizes volume-absorbing monolithic-glass claddings which are fused at high temperature to the disks. These perform quite well but are expensive to produce. Absorbing glass strips are adhesively bonded to the edges of polygonal disks using a bonding agent whose index of refraction matches that of both the laser and absorbing glass. Optical finishing occurs after the strips are attached. Laser disks constructed with such claddings have shown identical gain performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without significant degradation.

  9. Technical basis for storage of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel in inert gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1983-09-01

    The technical bases to establish safe conditions for dry storage of Zircaloy-clad fuel are summarized. Dry storage of fuel with zirconium alloy cladding has been licensed in Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, and Switzerland. Dry storage demonstrations, hot cell tests, and modeling have been conducted using Zircaloy-clad fuel. The demonstrations have included irradiated boiling water reactor, pressurized heavy-water reactor, and pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies. Irradiated fuel has been emplaced in and retrieved from metal casks, dry wells, silos, and a vault. Dry storage tests and demonstrations have involved about 15,000 fuel rods, and about 5600 rods have been monitored during dry storage in inert gases with maximum cladding temperatures ranging from 50 to 570 0 C. Although some tests and demonstrations are still in progress, there is currently no evidence that any rods exposed to inert gases have failed (one PWR rod exposed to an air cover gas failed at about 270 0 C). Based on this favorable experience, it is concluded that there is sufficient information on fuel rod behavior, storage conditions, and potential cladding failure mechanisms to support licensing of dry storage in the US. This licensing position includes a requirement for inert cover gases and a maximum cladding temperature guideline of 380 0 C for Zircaloy-clad fuel. Using an inert cover gas assures that even if fuel with cladding defects were placed in dry storage, or if defects develop during storage, the defects would not propagate. Tests and demonstrations involving Zircaloy-clad rods and assemblies with maximum cladding temperatures above 400 0 C are in progress. When the results from these tests have been evaluated, the viability of higher temperature limits should be examined. Acceptable conditions for storage in air and dry storage of consolidated fuel are issues yet to be resolved

  10. Zircaloy oxidation and cladding deformation in PWR-specific CORA experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, K.; Hering, W.; Hagen, S.

    1991-07-01

    Out-of-pile bundle experiments (zircaloy 4) are performed in the CORA facility to investigate the behavior of PWR fuel elements during severe fuel damage (SFD) accidents. Within the international cooperation the most significant phenomena such as cladding deformation, oxidation (especially the zirconium/steam reaction), melt formation, melt release, and relocation which were found in all tests have been analyzed. (orig./MM) [de

  11. ZIRCONIUM PHOSPHATE ADSORPTION METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, E.R.; Adamson, A.S.; Schubert, J.; Boyd, G.E.

    1958-11-01

    A method is presented for separating plutonium values from fission product values in aqueous acidic solution. This is accomplished by flowing the solutlon containing such values through a bed of zirconium orthophosphate. Any fission products adsorbed can subsequently be eluted by washing the column with a solution of 2N HNO/sub 3/ and O.lN H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/. Plutonium values may subsequently be desorbed by contacting the column with a solution of 7N HNO/sub 3/ .

  12. Laves intermetallics in stainless steel-zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, D.P.; McDeavitt, S.M.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Laves intermetallics have a significant effect on properties of metal waste forms being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. These waste forms are stainless steel-zirconium alloys that will contain radioactive metal isotopes isolated from spent nuclear fuel by electrometallurgical treatment. The baseline waste form composition for stainless steel-clad fuels is stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr). This article presents results of neutron diffraction measurements, heat-treatment studies and mechanical testing on SS-15Zr alloys. The Laves intermetallics in these alloys, labeled Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni) 2+x , have both C36 and C15 crystal structures. A fraction of these intermetallics transform into (Fe,Cr,Ni) 23 Zr 6 during high-temperature annealing; the authors have proposed a mechanism for this transformation. The SS-15Zr alloys show virtually no elongation in uniaxial tension, but exhibit good strength and ductility in compression tests. This article also presents neutron diffraction and microstructural data for a stainless steel-42 wt.% zirconium (SS-42Zr) alloy

  13. Evaluation of a Ductility after High Temperature Oxidation with the Three-Point Bend Test in Zirconium Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yang Il; Park, Sang Yoon; Park, Jeong Yong; Jeong, Yong Hwan

    2010-01-01

    In a light water reactor, the fuel cladding play an important role of preventing leakage of radioactive materials into the coolant, and thus the mechanical integrity of the cladding should be guaranteed under the conditions of normal and transient operation. In the case of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA), the cladding is subjected to a high temperature oxidation which is finally quenched because of an emergency coolant reflooding into the core. In this situation, the current LOCA criteria consist of five separate requirements: i) peak cladding temperature, ii) maximum cladding oxidation, iii) maximum hydrogen generation, iv) coolable geometry, and v) long-term cooling. The claddings lose their ductility due to the microstructural phase transformation from beta to martensite alpha-prime. and hydrogen up-take after LOCA. Since the reduction in ductility can induce embrittlement of claddings, post-quench ductility is one of the major concerns in transient operation circumstances. For the analysis, usually ring compression test are performed on ring samples cut from the tube to examine the oxidized cladding ductility. However, the test would not be applicable to the platelet samples which are general form of a specimen for developing alloys. As a high burn-up fuel cladding materials, Zircaloys are being replaced by modern zirconium alloys such as ZIRLO, and M5. Korea has also developed a new fuel cladding material HANA (high performance alloy for nuclear application) by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Because of the different composition of the newer claddings in comparison with the conventional Zircaloy-4, the high temperature oxidation behavior and the ductility after the oxidation would be different, and the properties should be evaluated how much the newer claddings were improved

  14. Development of Cold Spray Coatings for Accident-Tolerant Fuel Cladding in Light Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Benjamin; Yeom, Hwasung; Johnson, Greg; Dabney, Tyler; Walters, Jorie; Romero, Javier; Shah, Hemant; Xu, Peng; Sridharan, Kumar

    2018-02-01

    The cold spray coating process has been developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for the deposition of oxidation-resistant coatings on zirconium alloy light water reactor fuel cladding with the goal of improving accident tolerance during loss of coolant scenarios. Coatings of metallic (Cr), alloy (FeCrAl), and ceramic (Ti2AlC) materials were successfully deposited on zirconium alloy flats and cladding tube sections by optimizing the powder size, gas preheat temperature, pressure and composition, and other process parameters. The coatings were dense and exhibited excellent adhesion to the substrate. Evaluation of the samples after high-temperature oxidation tests at temperatures up to 1300°C showed that the cold spray coatings significantly mitigate oxidation kinetics because of the formation of thin passive oxide layers on the surface. The results of the study indicate that the cold spray coating process is a viable near-term option for developing accident-tolerant zirconium alloy fuel cladding.

  15. Stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDeavitt, S.M.; Abraham, D.P.; Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Park, J.Y.

    1996-01-01

    An electrometallurgical treatment process has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory to convert various types of spent nuclear fuels into stable storage forms and waste forms for repository disposal. The first application of this process will be to treat spent fuel alloys from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. Three distinct product streams emanate from the electrorefining process: (1) refined uranium; (2) fission products and actinides extracted from the electrolyte salt that are processed into a mineral waste form; and (3) metallic wastes left behind at the completion of the electrorefining step. The third product stream (i.e., the metal waste stream) is the subject of this paper. The metal waste stream contains components of the chopped spent fuel that are unaffected by the electrorefining process because of their electrochemically ''noble'' nature; this includes the cladding hulls, noble metal fission products (NMFP), and, in specific cases, zirconium from metal fuel alloys. The selected method for the consolidation and stabilization of the metal waste stream is melting and casting into a uniform, corrosion-resistant alloy. The waste form casting process will be carried out in a controlled-atmosphere furnace at high temperatures with a molten salt flux. Spent fuels with both stainless steel and Zircaloy cladding are being evaluated for treatment; thus, stainless steel-rich and Zircaloy-rich waste forms are being developed. Although the primary disposition option for the actinides is the mineral waste form, the concept of incorporating the TRU-bearing product into the metal waste form has enough potential to warrant investigation

  16. Modification in band gap of zirconium complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Mayank, E-mail: mayank30134@gmail.com; Singh, J.; Chouhan, S. [Department of Physics, ISLE, IPS Academy, Indore (M.P.) (India); Mishra, A. [School of Physics, Devi Ahilya Vishwavidyalaya, Indore (M.P.) (India); Shrivastava, B. D. [Govt. P. G. College, Biora (M.P.) (India)

    2016-05-06

    The optical properties of zirconium complexes with amino acid based Schiff bases are reported here. The zirconium complexes show interesting stereo chemical features, which are applicable in organometallic and organic synthesis as well as in catalysis. The band gaps of both Schiff bases and zirconium complexes were obtained by UV-Visible spectroscopy. It was found that the band gap of zirconium complexes has been modified after adding zirconium compound to the Schiff bases.

  17. Zirconium for nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yau, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    The excellent corrosion resistance of zirconium in nitric acid has been known for over 30 years. Recently, there is an increasing interest in using zirconium for nitric acid services. Therefore, an extensive research effort has been carried out to achieve a better understanding of the corrosion properties of zirconium in nitric acid. Particular attention is paid to the effect of concentration, temperature, structure, solution impurities, and stress. Immersion, autoclave, U-bend, and constant strain-rate tests were used in this study. Results of this study indicate that the corrosion resistance of zirconium in nitric acid is little affected by changes in temperature and concentration, and the presence of common impurities such as seawater, sodium chloride, ferric chloride, iron, and stainless steel. Moreover, the presence of seawater, sodium chloride, ferric chloride, and stainless steel has little effect on the stress corrosion craking (SCC) susceptibility of zirconium in 70% nitric acid at room temperatures. However, zirconium could be attacked by fluoride-containing nitric acid and the vapors of chloride-containing nitric acid. Also, high sustained tensile stresses should be avoided when zirconium is used to handle 70% nitric acid at elevated temperatures or > 70% nitric acid

  18. Scientific basis for storage criteria for interim dry storage of aluminum-clad fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, R.L.; Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Lam, P.S.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Murphy, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    An engineered system for dry storage of aluminum-clad foreign and domestic research reactor spent fuel owned by the US Department of Energy is being considered to store the fuel up to a nominal period of 40 years prior to ultimate disposition. Scientifically-based criteria for environmental limits to drying and storing the fuels for this system are being developed to avoid excessive degradation in sealed and non-sealed (open to air) dry storage systems. These limits are based on consideration of degradation modes that can cause loss of net section of the cladding, embrittlement of the cladding, distortion of the fuel, or release of fuel and fission products from the fuel/clad system. Potential degradation mechanisms include corrosion mechanisms from exposure to air and/or sources of humidity, hydrogen blistering of the aluminum cladding, distortion of the fuel due to creep, and interdiffusion of the fuel and fission products with the cladding. The aluminum-clad research reactor fuels are predominantly highly-enriched aluminum uranium alloy fuel which is clad with aluminum alloys similar to 1100, 5052, and 6061 aluminum. In the absence of corrodant species, degradation due to creep and diffusion mechanisms limit the maximum fuel storage temperature to 200 C. The results of laboratory scale corrosion tests indicate that this fuel could be stored under air up to 200 C at low relative humidity levels (< 20%) to limit corrosion of the cladding and fuel (exposed to the storage environment through assumed pre-existing pits in the cladding). Excessive degradation of fuels with uranium metal up to 200 C can be avoided if the fuel is sufficiently dried and contained in a sealed system; open storage can be achieved if the temperature is controlled to avoid excessive corrosion even in dry air

  19. Secondary degradation mechanisms - A theoretical approach to remedial actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudling, P. [Advanced Nuclear Technology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2001-04-01

    A failed BWR fuel rod may degrade either by developing long axial cracks and/or transversal breaks. The tendency of failed BWR rods to degrade depends on the fuel design and reactor operation of the failed rod. The knowledge of the degradation mechanisms may be used to develop secondary degradation resistant fuel and/or to mitigate the degradation tendencies during operation of failed fuel. Literature data from three different categories has been analysed: Open literature data on failed BWR rods that have and have not degraded; Data generated in experimental reactors where primary failures have been simulated either by drilling a hole in the intact cladding before the test or by letting water/steam into the rod from a capsule connected to the otherwise intact rod. In addition data related to hydrogen production in the pellet-cladding gap in a failed rod and the subsequent hydrogen ingress and finally the hydride formation in zirconium alloys; Open literature data out-of-pile material tests to improve the knowledge of the secondary degradation mechanisms. To get an idea of the degradation mechanisms one may first characterise the failed fuel rods in commercial BWRs that form axial splits, transversal breaks and also failed rods that do not degrade at all. Considering axial splits in BWRs, they seem to occur mostly for failed fuel rods with intermediate and high burnups, i.e., in rods with small pellet-cladding gaps, that have been subjected to a power ramp. Such data indicate that the axial crack propagation rate is larger than 0.16 mm/h. It is also clear that the axial cracks formed in commercial reactors show mostly brittle cleavage features at reactor operating temperature even though the hydrogen content in the fuel cladding is low, 150-300 wtppm. Macroscopically the brittle cleavage fractures are characterised by: a fracture surface that is perpendicular to the main tensile stress direction i.e., in the cladding circumferential direction, no or very little clad

  20. Development of Diffusion barrier coatings and Deposition Technologies for Mitigating Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions (FCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Cole, James

    2013-02-27

    The goal of this project is to develop diffusion barrier coatings on the inner cladding surface to mitigate fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). FCCI occurs due to thermal and radiation enhanced inter-diffusion between the cladding and fuel materials, and can have the detrimental effects of reducing the effective cladding wall thickness and lowering the melting points of the fuel and cladding. The research is aimed at the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), a sodium-cooled fast reactor, in which higher burn-ups will exacerbate the FCCI problem. This project will study both diffusion barrier coating materials and deposition technologies. Researchers will investigate pure vanadium, zirconium, and titanium metals, along with their respective oxides, on substrates of HT-9, T91, and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels; these materials are leading candidates for ABR fuel cladding. To test the efficacy of the coating materials, the research team will perform high-temperature diffusion couple studies using both a prototypic metallic uranium fuel and a surrogate the rare-earth element lanthanum. Ion irradiation experiments will test the stability of the coating and the coating-cladding interface. A critical technological challenge is the ability to deposit uniform coatings on the inner surface of cladding. The team will develop a promising non-line-of-sight approach that uses nanofluids . Recent research has shown the feasibility of this simple yet novel approach to deposit coatings on test flats and inside small sections of claddings. Two approaches will be investigated: 1) modified electrophoretic deposition (MEPD) and 2) boiling nanofluids. The coatings will be evaluated in the as-deposited condition and after sintering.

  1. Water chemistry and corrosion control of cladding and primary circuit components. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    Corrosion is the principal life limiting degradation mechanism in nuclear steam supply systems, especially taking into account the trends to increase fuel burnup, thermal rate and cycle length. Primary circuit components of water cooled power reactors have an impact on Zr-based alloys behaviour due to crud (primary circuit corrosion products) formation, transport and deposition on heat transfer surfaces. Crud deposits influence water chemistry, radiation and thermal hydraulic conditions near cladding surface, and by this way-Zr-based alloy corrosion. During the last decade, significant improvements were achieved in the reduction of the corrosion and dose rates by changing the cladding material for one more resistant to corrosion or by the improvement of water chemistry conditions. However, taking into account the above mentioned tendency for heavier fuel duties, corrosion and water chemistry, control will remain a serious task to work with for nuclear power plant operators and scientists, as well as development of generally accepted corrosion model of Zr-based alloys in a water environment in a new millennium. Upon the recommendation of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology, water chemistry and corrosion of cladding and primary circuit components are in the focus of the IAEA activities in the area of fuel technology and performance. At present the IAEA performs two co-ordinated research projects (CRPs): on On-line High Temperature Monitoring of Water Chemistry and Corrosion (WACOL) and on Activity Transport in Primary Circuits. Two CRPs deal with hydrogen and hydride degradation of the Zr-based alloys. A state-of-the-art review entitled: 'Waterside Corrosion of Zirconium Alloys in Nuclear Power Plants' was published in 1998. Technical Committee meetings on the subject were held in 1985 (Cadarache, France), 1989 (Portland, USA), 1993 (Rez, Czech Republic). During the last few years extensive exchange of experience in

  2. YAG laser cladding to heat exchanger flange in actual plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshio, Kojima

    2001-01-01

    This paper is a sequel to ''Development of YAG Laser Cladding Technology to Heat Exchanger Flange'' presented in ICONE-8. A YAG Laser cladding technology is a permanent repairing and preventive maintenance method for heat exchanger's flange (channel side) seating surface which is degraded by the corrosion in long term operation. The material of this flange is carbon steel, and that of cladding wire is type 316 stainless steel so as to have high corrosion resistance. In former paper above, the soundness of cladding layers were presented to be verified. This channel side flange is bolted with tube sheet (shell side) through metal gasket. As the tube sheet side is already cladded a corrosion resistant material, it needs to apply the repairing and preventive maintenance method to only channel side. In 2000 this technology had been performed to the actual heat exchanger (Residual Heat Removal Heat Exchanger; RHR Hx) flange in domestic nuclear power plant. This paper described the outline, special equipment, and our total evaluation for this actual laser cladding work. And also several technical subjects which we should solve and/or improve for the next project was presented. (author)

  3. Corrosion behaviour of E110- and E635- type zirconium alloys under PWR irradiation simulating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markelov, V.A.; Novikov, V.V.; Kon'kov, V.F.; Tselishchev, A.V.; Dologov, A.B.; Zmitko, M.; Maserik, V.; Kocik, J.

    2008-01-01

    As structural materials for VVER 1000 fuel rod claddings and FA components use is made of zirconium alloys E110 (Zr 1Nb) and E635 (Zr 1.2Sn 1Nb 0.35Fe) that meet the design parameters of operation. Nonetheless, the work is in progress to perfect those alloys to reach higher corrosion and shape change resistance. At VNIINM updated E110M and E635M alloys have been developed on E110 and E635 bases. To assess the corrosion behaviour of the updated alloys in comparison to the base alloys their cladding samples were tested in RVS 3 loop of LWR 15 reactor (NRI, Rez) in PWR water chemistry with coolant surface and volume boiling. The data are presented on the influence effected by in pile irradiation for up to 324 days on oxide coat thickness and microstructure of fuel claddings produced from the four tested alloys. It has been revealed that E110 alloy its updated version E110M and E635M alloy compared to E635 have higher corrosion resistances. The paper discusses th+e results on the in pile corrosion of cladding samples from the alloys under study in comparison to the results acquired for similar samples tested in LWR 15 inactive channel and under autoclave conditions. Using methods of TEM, EDX analyses of extraction replicas dislocation structure and phase composition changes were studied in samples of all four alloy claddings LWR 15 reactor irradiated to the material damage dose of 1.5 dpa. The interrelation is discussed between irradiation effected strengthening and corrosion of fuel claddings made of E110 and E635 type zirconium alloys and the evolution of their structure and phase states

  4. SEPARATION OF HAFNIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overholser, L.B.; Barton, C.J. Sr.; Ramsey, J.W.

    1960-05-31

    The separation of hafnium impurities from zirconium can be accomplished by means of organic solvent extraction. The hafnium-containing zirconium feed material is dissolved in an aqueous chloride solution and the resulting solution is contacted with an organic hexone phase, with at least one of the phases containing thiocyanate. The hafnium is extracted into the organic phase while zirconium remains in the aqueous phase. Further recovery of zirconium is effected by stripping the onganic phase with a hydrochloric acid solution and commingling the resulting strip solution with the aqueous feed solution. Hexone is recovered and recycled by means of scrubbing the onganic phase with a sulfuric acid solution to remove the hafnium, and thiocyanate is recovered and recycled by means of neutralizing the effluent streams to obtain ammonium thiocyanate.

  5. Zirconium nitride hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, Daiane; Amorim, Cintia Lugnani Gomes de; Soares, Gabriel Vieira; Figueroa, Carlos Alejandro; Baumvol, Israel Jacob Rabin; Basso, Rodrigo Leonardo de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) nanometric films were deposited onto different substrates, in order to study the surface crystalline microstructure and also to investigate the electrochemical behavior to obtain a better composition that minimizes corrosion reactions. The coatings were produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD). The influence of the nitrogen partial pressure, deposition time and temperature over the surface properties was studied. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and corrosion experiments were performed to characterize the ZrN hard coatings. The ZrN films properties and microstructure changes according to the deposition parameters. The corrosion resistance increases with temperature used in the films deposition. Corrosion tests show that ZrN coating deposited by PVD onto titanium substrate can improve the corrosion resistance. (author)

  6. Zirconium-based alloys, nuclear fuel rods and nuclear reactors including such alloys, and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Robert Dominick

    2014-09-09

    Zirconium-based metal alloy compositions comprise zirconium, a first additive in which the permeability of hydrogen decreases with increasing temperatures at least over a temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C., and a second additive having a solubility in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. At least one of a solubility of the first additive in the second additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. and a solubility of the second additive in the first additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. is higher than the solubility of the second additive in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. Nuclear fuel rods include a cladding material comprising such metal alloy compositions, and nuclear reactors include such fuel rods. Methods are used to fabricate such zirconium-based metal alloy compositions.

  7. Corrosion performance of optimised and advanced fuel rod cladding in PWRs at high burnups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jourdain, P.; Hallstadius, L.; Pati, S.R.; Smith, G.P.; Garde, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour both in-pile and out-of-pile for a number of cladding alloys developed by ABB to meet the current and future needs for fuel rod cladding with improved corrosion resistance is presented. The cladding materials include: 1) Zircaloy-4 (OPTIN) with optimised composition and processing and Zircaloy-2 optimised for Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR), (Zircaloy-2P), and 2) several alternative zirconium-based alloys with compositions outside the composition range for Zircaloys. The data presented originate from fuel rods irradiated in six PWRs to burnups up to about 66 MWd/kgU and from tests conducted in 360 o water autoclave. Also included are in-pile fuel rod growth measurements on some of the alloys. (UK)

  8. FY 2014 Status Report: of Vibration Testing of Clad Fuel (M4FT-14OR0805033)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL

    2014-03-28

    The DOE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) tasked Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to investigate the behavior of light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel cladding material performance related to extended storage and transportation of UNF. ORNL has been tasked to perform a systematic study on UNF integrity under simulated normal conditions of transportation (NCT) by using the recently developed hot-cell testing equipment, Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT). To support the testing on actual high-burnup UNF, fast-neutron irradiation of pre-hydrided zirconium-alloy cladding in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at elevated temperatures will be used to simulate the effects of high-burnup on fuel cladding for help in understanding the cladding materials properties relevant to extended storage and subsequent transportation. The irradiated pre-hydrided metallic materials testing will generate baseline data to benchmark hot-cell testing of the actual high-burnup UNF cladding. More importantly, the HFIR-irradiated samples will be free of alpha contamination and can be provided to researchers who do not have hot cell facilities to handle highly contaminated high-burnup UNF cladding to support their research projects for the UFDC.

  9. Eutectic reaction analysis between TRU-50%Zr alloy fuel and HT-9 cladding, and temperature prediction of eutectic reaction under steady-state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Bong Sang; Park, Won Seok

    2001-02-01

    Blanket fuel assembly for HYPER contains a bundle of pins arrayed in triangular pitch, which has hexagonal bundle structure. The reference blanket fuel pin consists of the fuel slug of TRU-50wt%Zr alloy and the cladding material of ferritic martensite steel, HT-9. Chemical interaction between fuel slug and cladding is one of the major concerns in metallic fuel rod design. The contact of metallic fuel slug and stainless steel cladding in a fuel rod forms a complex multi-component diffusion couple at elevated temperatures. The potential problem of inter-diffusion of fuel and cladding components is essentially two-fold weakening of cladding mechanical strength due to the formation of diffusion zones in the cladding, and the formation of comparatively low melting point phases in the fuel/cladding interface to develop eutectic reaction. The main components of fuel slug are composed of zirconium alloying element in plutonium matrix, including neptunium, americium and uranium additionally. Therefore basic eutectic reaction change of Pu-Fe binary system can be assessed, while it is estimated how much other elements zirconium, uranium, americium and neptunium influence on plutonium phase stability. Afterwards it is needed that eutectic reaction is verified through experimental necessarily.

  10. Eutectic reaction analysis between TRU-50%Zr alloy fuel and HT-9 cladding, and temperature prediction of eutectic reaction under steady-state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Bong Sang; Park, Won Seok

    2001-02-01

    Blanket fuel assembly for HYPER contains a bundle of pins arrayed in triangular pitch, which has hexagonal bundle structure. The reference blanket fuel pin consists of the fuel slug of TRU-50wt%Zr alloy and the cladding material of ferritic martensite steel, HT-9. Chemical interaction between fuel slug and cladding is one of the major concerns in metallic fuel rod design. The contact of metallic fuel slug and stainless steel cladding in a fuel rod forms a complex multi-component diffusion couple at elevated temperatures. The potential problem of inter-diffusion of fuel and cladding components is essentially two-fold weakening of cladding mechanical strength due to the formation of diffusion zones in the cladding, and the formation of comparatively low melting point phases in the fuel/cladding interface to develop eutectic reaction. The main components of fuel slug are composed of zirconium alloying element in plutonium matrix, including neptunium, americium and uranium additionally. Therefore basic eutectic reaction change of Pu-Fe binary system can be assessed, while it is estimated how much other elements zirconium, uranium, americium and neptunium influence on plutonium phase stability. Afterwards it is needed that eutectic reaction is verified through experimental necessarily

  11. Irradiation effects of the zirconium oxidation and the uranium diffusion in zirconia; Effets d'irradiation sur l'oxydation du zirconium et la diffusion de l'uranium dans la zircone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bererd, N

    2003-07-01

    The context of this study is the direct storage of spent fuel assemblies after operation in reactor. In order to obtain data on the capacities of the can as the uranium diffusion barrier, a fundamental study has been carried out for modelling the internal cladding surface under and without irradiation. The behaviour of zirconium in reactor conditions has at first been studied. A thin uranium target enriched with fissile isotope has been put on a zirconium sample, the set being irradiated by a thermal neutrons flux leading to the fission of the deposited uranium. The energetic history of the formed fission products has revealed two steps: 1)the zirconium oxidation and 2)the diffusion of uranium in the zirconia formed at 480 degrees C. A diffusion coefficient under irradiation has been measured. Its value is 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}.s{sup -1}. In order to be able to reveal clearly the effect of the irradiation by the fission products on the zirconium oxidation, measurements of thermal oxidation and under {sup 129}Xe irradiation have been carried out. They have shown that the oxidation is strongly accelerated by the irradiation and that the temperature is negligible until 480 degrees C. On the other hand, the thermal diffusion of the uranium in zirconium and in zirconia has been studied by coupling ion implantation and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. This study shows that the uranium diffuses in zirconium and is trapped in zirconia in a UO{sub 3} shape. (O.M.)

  12. Cladding tube manufacturing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, R.; Jeong, Y. H.; Baek, B. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, S. J.; Choi, B. K.; Kim, J. M.

    1999-04-01

    This report gives an overview of the manufacturing routine of PWR cladding tubes. The routine essentially consists of a series of deformation and annealing processes which are necessary to transform the ingot geometry to tube dimensions. By changing shape, microstructure and structure-related properties are altered simultaneously. First, a short overview of the basics of that part of deformation geometry is given which is related to tube reducing operations. Then those processes of the manufacturing routine which change the microstructure are depicted, and the influence of certain process parameters on microstructure and material properties are shown. The influence of the resulting microstructure on material properties is not discussed in detail, since it is described in my previous report A lloy Development for High Burnup Cladding . Because of their paramount importance still up to now, and because manufacturing data and their influence on properties for other alloys are not so well established or published, the descriptions are mostly related to Zry4 tube manufacturing, and are only in short for other alloys. (author). 9 refs., 46 figs

  13. Cladding tube manufacturing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. [Kraftwerk Union AG, Mulheim (Germany); Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, B.J.; Kim, K.H.; Kim, S.J.; Choi, B.K.; Kim, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    This report gives an overview of the manufacturing routine of PWR cladding tubes. The routine essentially consists of a series of deformation and annealing processes which are necessary to transform the ingot geometry to tube dimensions. By changing shape, microstructure and structure-related properties are altered simultaneously. First, a short overview of the basics of that part of deformation geometry is given which is related to tube reducing operations. Then those processes of the manufacturing routine which change the microstructure are depicted, and the influence of certain process parameters on microstructure and material properties are shown. The influence of the resulting microstructure on material properties is not discussed in detail, since it is described in my previous report 'Alloy Development for High Burnup Cladding.' Because of their paramount importance still up to now, and because manufacturing data and their influence on properties for other alloys are not so well established or published, the descriptions are mostly related to Zry4 tube manufacturing, and are only in short for other alloys. (author). 9 refs., 46 figs.

  14. Precipitation of γ-zirconium hydride in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, G.J.C.

    1978-01-01

    A mechanism for the precipitation of γ-zirconium hydride in zirconium is presented which does not require the diffusion of zirconium. The transformation is completed by shears caused by 1/3 (10 anti 10) Shockley partial dislocations on alternate zirconium basal planes, either by homogeneous nucleation or at lattice imperfections. Homogeneous nucleation is considered least likely in view of the large nucleation barrier involved. Hydrides may form at dislocations by the generation of partials by means of either a pole or ratchet mechanism. The former requires dislocations with a component of Burgers vector along the c-axis, but contrast experiments show that these are not normally observed in annealed zirconium. It is therefore most likely that intragranular hydrides form at the regular 1/3 (11 anti 20) dislocations, possibly by means of a ratchet mechanism. Contrast experiments in the electron microscope show that the precipitates have a shear character consistent with the mechanism suggested. The possibility that the shear dislocations associated with the hydrides are emissary dislocations is considered and a model suggested in which this function is satisfied together with the partial relief of misfit stresses. The large shear strains associated with the precipitation mechanism may play an important role in the preferential orientation of hydrides under stress

  15. Effect of ultra high temperature ceramics as fuel cladding materials on the nuclear reactor performance by SERPENT Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkut, Turgay; Kara, Ayhan; Korkut, Hatun [Sinop Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Energy Engineering

    2016-12-15

    Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) have low density and high melting point. So they are useful materials in the nuclear industry especially reactor core design. Three UHTCs (silicon carbide, vanadium carbide, and zirconium carbide) were evaluated as the nuclear fuel cladding materials. The SERPENT Monte Carlo code was used to model CANDU, PWR, and VVER type reactor core and to calculate burnup parameters. Some changes were observed at the same burnup and neutronic parameters (keff, neutron flux, absorption rate, and fission rate, depletion of U-238, U-238, Xe-135, Sm-149) with the use of these UHTCs. Results were compared to conventional cladding material zircalloy.

  16. Fine-grained zirconium-base material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houten, G.R.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for making zirconium with inhibited grain growth characteristics, by the process of vacuum melting the zirconium, adding 0.3 to 0.5% carbon, stirring, homogenizing, and cooling. (Official Gazette)

  17. CASTI handbook of cladding technology. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.; Celant, M.

    2000-01-01

    This updated (2000) CASTI handbook covers all aspects of clad products - the different means of manufacture, properties and applications in various industries. Topics include: an introduction to cladding technology, clad plate, clad pipes, bends, clad fittings, specification requirements of clad products, welding clad products, clad product application and case histories from around the world. Unique to this book is the documentation of case histories of major cladding projects from around the world and how the technology of that day has withstood the demands of time. Filled with over 100 photos and graphics illustrating the various cladding technology examples and products, this book truly documents the most recent technologies in the field of cladding technology used worldwide

  18. Experimental study of the zirconium alloy oxidation under high pressure of steam and modelling of the mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dali, Yacoub

    2007-01-01

    The corrosion of the cladding materials used for the fuel rods is one of the limiting factor of their lifetime in light water reactors. In this field, the aim of the nuclear industry is today to increase the time and the number of cycles and to submit the claddings in zirconium alloys to higher corrosive conditions. In this way, new alloys devoted to replace the standard Zircaloy-4, for instance Nb containing alloys, have been recently developed and licensed and show better corrosion resistance. A better understanding of the corrosion mechanisms of the zirconium alloys is necessary to predict the corrosion behaviour of these materials. In this work, the oxidation rate of model alloys of two metallurgic families has been studied in steam in a pressure range between 100 milli-bars and 100 bars. The Zircaloy type alloys contain as alloying elements oxygen and/or tin and/or iron and chromium. For the Zr-Nb family, three niobium contents have been studied, respectively 0.2, 0.4 and 1 weight percent of niobium. Our objectives were to understand the variations of the reactivity between the low pressure and the high pressure range, in quantifying the dependency of the corrosion rate with the steam pressure and the alloying element concentrations. The segregation process of the niobium at the surface has also been studied on the Zr-Nb alloys. During this work, a magnetic suspension thermo-balance has been developed and used to follow in-situ the corrosion rate at high pressure of water vapour. The oxide layers have been characterized by many techniques, macro and micro-photo-electrochemistry, XRD, FEG-SEM, XPS, HR-TEM and SIMS. For the Zircaloy type alloys, we have confirmed the major role of the intermetallic precipitates Zr(Fe,Cr) 2 on the corrosion resistance. Unlike the standard Zircaloy-4, for which the oxidation rate does not depend on the pressure of the water vapour and is thus limited by the vacancy diffusion in the oxide layer, we have shown that the rate of the

  19. Distribution of zirconium in the nitric acid-water-TPB-diluent system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, J.; Floh de Araujo, B.

    1984-10-01

    This paper deals with the extraction behaviour of zirconium in TBP/diluent-HNO 3 -H 2 O systems. The main purpose is to increase the uranium decontamination factor by adjusting the extraction conditions so that zirconium extraction is kept at a mininum. Equilibrium diagram, TBP concentration, aqueous: organic phases ratio, salting-out effects and uranium loading in the organic phase were the main factors studied. All the experiments have been carried out with zirconium in the 10 -2 - 10 -3 M concentration range. The extractant degradation products influence upon ziconium behaviour was also verified. With the data obtained it was possible to introduce some modification in the standard Purex flow-sheet with the increase of the decontamination of uranium from zirconium. 5 refs., 9 figs

  20. Problems of zirconium metal production in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vareka, J.; Vaclavik, E.

    1975-01-01

    The problems are summed up of the production and quality control of zirconium sponge. A survey is given of industrial applications of zirconium in form of pure metal or alloys in nuclear power production, ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgy, chemical engineering and electrical engineering. A survey is also presented of the manufacture of zirconium metal in advanced capitalist countries. (J.B.)

  1. Atomistic modeling of zirconium hydride precipitation: methodology for deriving a tight-binding potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, Alice

    2014-01-01

    The zirconium-hydrogen system is of nuclear safety interest, as the hydride precipitation leads to the cladding embrittlement, which is made of zirconium-based alloys. The cladding is the first safety barrier confining the radioactive products: its integrity shall be kept during the entire fuel-assemblies life, in reactor, including accidental situation, and post-operation (transport and storage). Many uncertainties remain regarding the hydrides precipitation kinetics and the local stress impact on their precipitation. The atomic scale modeling of this system would bring clarifications on the relevant mechanisms. The usual atomistic modeling methods are based on thermo-statistic approaches, whose precision and reliability depend on the interatomic potential used. However, there was no potential allowing a rigorous study of the Zr-H system. The present work has indeed addressed this issue: a new tight-binding potential for zirconium hydrides modeling is now available. Moreover, this thesis provides a detailed manual for deriving such potentials accounting for spd hybridization, and fitted here on DFT results. This guidebook has be written in light of modeling a pure transition metal followed by a metal-covalent coupling (metallic carbides, nitrides and silicides). (author)

  2. Anisotropy of mechanical properties of zirconium and zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medrano, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    In studies of technological applications of zirconium to fuel elements of nuclear reactor, it was found that the use of plasticity equations for isotropic materials is not in agreement with experimental results, because of the strong anisotropy of zirconium. The present review describes recent progress on the knowledge of the influence of anisotropy on mechanical properties, after Douglass' review in 1971. The review was written to be selfconsistent, changing drastically the presentation of some of the referenced papers. It is also suggested some particular experiments to improve developments in this area

  3. Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yong Hwan; Baek, B. J.; Park, S. Y. and others

    1999-08-01

    The overview of corrosion and hydriding behaviors of Zr-based alloy under the conditions of the in-reactor service and in the absence of irradiation is introduced in this report. The metallurgical characteristics of Zr-based alloys and the thermo-mechanical treatments on the microstructures and the textures in the manufacturing process for fuel cladding are also introduced. The factors affecting the corrosion of Zr alloy in reactor are summarized. And the corrosion mechanism and hydrogen up-take are discussed based on the laboratory and in-reactor results. The phenomenological observations of zirconium alloy corrosion in reactors are summarized and the models of in-reactor corrosion are exclusively discussed. Finally, the effects of irradiation on the corrosion process in Zr alloy were investigated mainly based on the literature data. (author). 538 refs., 26 tabs., 105 figs

  4. Stone cladding engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sousa Camposinhos, Rui de

    2014-01-01

    This volume presents new methodologies for the design of dimension stone based on the concepts of structural design while preserving the excellence of stonemasonry practice in façade engineering. Straightforward formulae are provided for computing action on cladding, with special emphasis on the effect of seismic forces, including an extensive general methodology applied to non-structural elements. Based on the Load and Resistance Factor Design Format (LRDF), minimum slab thickness formulae are presented that take into consideration stress concentrations analysis based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) for the most commonly used modern anchorage systems. Calculation examples allow designers to solve several anchorage engineering problems in a detailed and objective manner, underlining the key parameters. The design of the anchorage metal parts, either in stainless steel or aluminum, is also presented.

  5. Reactor fuel cladding tube with excellent corrosion resistance and method of manufacturing the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Takanari; Kanehara, Mitsuo; Abe, Katsuhiro; Nishimura, Takashi.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a fuel cladding tube having an excellent corrosion resistance and thus a long life, and a suitable manufacturing method therefor. Namely, in the fuel cladding tube, the outer circumference of an inner layer made of a zirconium base alloy is coated with an outer layer made of a metal more corrosion resistant than the zirconium base alloy. Ti or a titanium alloy is suitable for the corrosion resistant metal. In addition, the outer layer can be coated by a method such as vapor deposition or plating, not limited to joining of the inner layer material and the outer layer material. Specifically, a composite material having an inner layer made of a zirconium alloy coated by the outer material made of a titanium alloy is applied with hot fabrication at a temperature within a range of from 500 to 850degC and at a fabrication rate of not less than 5%. The fabrication method includes any of extrusion, rolling, drawing, and casting. As the titanium-base alloy, a Ti-Al alloy or a Ti-Nb alloy containing Al of not more than 20wt%, or Nb of not more than 20wt% is preferred. (I.S.)

  6. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, R.S.; Vogler, S.

    1958-01-21

    A process is described for dissolving binary zirconium-uranium alloys where the uranium content is about 2%. In prior dissolution procedures for these alloys, an oxidizing agent was added to prevent the precipitation of uranium tetrafluoride. In the present method complete dissolution is accomplished without the use of the oxidizing agent by using only the stoichiometric amount or slight excess of HF required by the zirconium. The concentration of the acid may range from 2M to 10M and the dissolution is advatageously carried out at a temperature of 80 deg C.

  7. Technology readiness level (TRL) assessment of cladding alloys for advanced nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Reliable fuel claddings are essential for the safe, sustainable and economic operation of nuclear stations. This paper presents a worldwide TRL assessment of advanced claddings for Gen III and IV reactors following an extensive literature review. Claddings include austenitic, ferritic/martensitic (F/M), reduced activation (RA) and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels as well as advanced iron-based alloys (Kanthal alloys). Also assessed are alloys of zirconium, nickel (including Hastelloy R ), titanium, chromium, vanadium and refractory metals (Nb, Mo, Ta and W). Comparison is made with Cf/C and SiCf/SiC composites, MAX phase ceramics, cermets and TRISO fuel particle coatings. The results show in general that the higher the maximum operating temperature of the cladding, the lower the TRL. Advanced claddings were found to have lower TRLs than the corresponding fuel materials, and therefore may be the limiting factor in the deployment of advanced fuels and even possibly the entire reactor in the case of Gen IV. (authors)

  8. Investigation and basic evaluation for ultra-high burnup fuel cladding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, Ikuo; Nagase, Fumihisa; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    2001-03-01

    In ultra-high burnup of the power reactor, it is an essential problem to develop the cladding with excellent durability. First, development history and approach of the safety assessment of Zircaloy for the high burnup fuel were summarized in the report. Second, the basic evaluation and investigation were carried out on the material with high practicability in order to select the candidate materials for the ultra-high burnup fuel. In addition, the basic research on modification technology of the cladding surface was carried out from the viewpoint of the addition of safety margin as a cladding. From the development history of the zirconium alloy including the Zircaloy, it is hard to estimate the results of in-pile test from those of the conventional corrosion test (out-pile test). Therefore, the development of the new testing technology that can simulate the actual environment and the elucidation of the corrosion-controlling factor of the cladding are desired. In cases of RIA (Reactivity Initiated Accident) and LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident), it seems that the loss of ductility in zirconium alloys under heavy irradiation and boiling of high temperature water restricts the extension of fuel burnup. From preliminary evaluation on the high corrosion-resistance materials (austenitic stainless steel, iron or nickel base superalloys, titanium alloy, niobium alloy, vanadium alloy and ferritic stainless steel), stabilized austenitic stainless steels with a capability of future improvement and high-purity niobium alloys with a expectation of the good corrosion resistance were selected as candidate materials of ultra-high burnup cladding. (author)

  9. Environmentally-induced cracking of zirconium alloys - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.

    1990-01-01

    The general field of environmentally-induced cracking of zirconium alloys has been reviewed and the phenomena that are observed and the progress in understanding the mechanisms are summarized. The details of the industrially important pellet-clad interaction failures of nuclear reactor fuel have been left for a companion review, and only observations on the mechanism are summarized briefly here. It is concluded that in the zirconium alloy system, by virtue of the physical peculiarities of the system, it is easier to reach unambiguous conclusions about the environmental cracking mechanisms that are operating than with other systems. Thus, chemical dissolution in either liquid or vapour phase is thought to be the principal mechanism for intergranular cracking, while adsorption-induced embrittlement is thought to be the most common transgranular quasi-cleavage process. Hydrogen embrittlement in this system can be identified because it requires precipitated hydride that gives characteristic fractography when cracked. Only in a few instances does stress-corrosion cracking appear to proceed by a hydride cracking mechanism. (orig.)

  10. Process for etching zirconium metallic objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panson, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    In a process for etching of zirconium metallic articles formed from zirconium or a zirconium alloy, wherein the zirconium metallic article is contacted with an aqueous hydrofluoric acid-nitric acid etching bath having an initial ratio of hydrofluoric acid to nitric acid and an initial concentration of hydrofluoric and nitric acids, the improvement, is described comprising: after etching of zirconium metallic articles in the bath for a period of time such that the etching rate has diminished from an initial rate to a lesser rate, adding hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid to the exhausted bath to adjust the concentration and ratio of hydrofluoric acid to nitric acid therein to a value substantially that of the initial concentration and ratio and thereby regenerate the etching solution without removal of dissolved zirconium therefrom; and etching further zirconium metallic articles in the regenerated etching bath

  11. Influence of Zircaloy cladding composition on hydride formation during aqueous hydrogen charging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekhara, S. [Intel Corporation, 2501 NW 229th Av., Hillsboro, OR 97124 (United States); Kotula, P.G.; Enos, D.G.; Doyle, B.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185 (United States); Clark, B.G., E-mail: blyclar@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Although hydrogen uptake in Zirconium (Zr) based claddings has been a topic of many studies, hydrogen uptake as a function of alloy composition has received little attention. In this work, commercial Zr-based cladding alloys (Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4 and ZIRLO™), differing in composition but with similar initial textures, grain sizes, and surface roughness, were aqueously charged with hydrogen for 100, 300, and 1000 s at nominally 90 °C to produce hydride layers of varying thicknesses. Transmission electron microscope characterization following aqueous charging showed hydride phase and orientation relationship were identical in all three alloys. However, elastic recoil detection measurements confirmed that surface hydride layers in Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 were an order of magnitude thicker relative to ZIRLO™. - Highlights: •Aqueous charging was performed to produce a layer of zirconium hydride for three different Zr-alloy claddings. •Hydride thicknesses were analyzed by elastic recoil detection and transmission electron microscopy. •Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 formed thicker hydride layers than ZIRLO™ for the same charging durations.

  12. BISON Fuel Performance Analysis of FeCrAl cladding with updated properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-30

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys due to much slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and allow the cladding to remain integral longer in the presence of high temperature steam, making accident mitigation more likely. As a continuation of the development for these alloys, suitability for normal operation must also be demonstrated. This research is focused on modeling the integral thermo-mechanical performance of FeCrAl-cladded fuel during normal reactor operation. Preliminary analysis has been performed to assess FeCrAl alloys (namely Alkrothal 720 and APMT) as a suitable fuel cladding replacement for Zr-alloys, using the MOOSE-based, finite-element fuel performance code BISON and the best available thermal-mechanical and irradiation-induced constitutive properties. These simulations identify the effects of the mechanical-stress and irradiation response of FeCrAl, and provide a comparison with Zr-alloys. In comparing these clad materials, fuel rods have been simulated for normal reactor operation and simple steady-state operation. Normal reactor operating conditions target the cladding performance over the rod lifetime (~4 cycles) for the highest-power rod in the highest-power fuel assembly under reactor power maneuvering. The power histories and axial temperature profiles input into BISON were generated from a neutronics study on full-core reactivity equivalence for FeCrAl using the 3D full core simulator NESTLE. Evolution of the FeCrAl cladding behavior over time is evaluated by using steady-state operating conditions such as a simple axial power profile, a constant cladding surface temperature, and a constant fuel power history. The fuel rod designs and

  13. ICP-AES determination of rare earths in zirconium with prior chemical separation of the matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajeswari, B.; Dhawale, B.A.; Page, A.G.; Sastry, M.D.

    2002-01-01

    Zirconium being one of the most important material in nuclear industry used as a fuel cladding in reactors and an additive in advanced fuels necessitates its characterization for trace metallic contents. Zirconium, as refractory in nature as the rare earth elements, has a complex spectrum comprising of several emission lines. Rare earths, which are high neutron absorbers have to be analysed at very low limits. Hence, to achieve the desired limits, the major matrix has to be separated prior to rare earth determination. The present paper describes the method developed for the separation of rare earths from zirconium by solvent extraction using Trioctyl Phosphine Oxide (TOPO) as the extractant followed by their determination using Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrometric (ICP-AES) method. Initially, radiochemical studies were carried out using known amounts of gamma active tracers of 141 Ce, 152-154 Eu, 153 Gd and 95 Zr for optimisation of extraction conditions using Tl- activated NaI detector. The optimum conditions at 0.5 M TOPO/xylene in 6 M HCl so as to achieve a quantitative recovery of rare earth analytes alongwith a near total extraction of zirconium in the organic phase, was further extended to carry out the studies using ICP-AES method. The recovery of rare earths was found to be quantitative within experimental error with a precision better than 10% RSD. (author)

  14. High Temperature Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions Between TRIGA Fuels and 304 Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Emmanuel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Keiser, Jr., Dennis D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Forsmann, Bryan [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Janney, Dawn E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Henley, Jody [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Woolstenhulme, Eric C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    High-temperature fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) between TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) fuel elements and the 304 stainless steel (304SS) are of interest to develop an understanding of the fuel behavior during transient reactor scenarios. TRIGA fuels are composed of uranium (U) particles dispersed in a zirconium-hydride (Zr-H) matrix. In reactor, the fuel is encased in 304-stainless-steel (304SS) or Incoloy 800 clad tubes. At high temperatures, the fuel can readily interact with the cladding, resulting in FCCI. A number of FCCI can take place in this system. Interactions can be expected between the cladding and the Zr-H matrix, and/or between the cladding and the U-particles. Other interactions may be expected between the Zr-H matrix and the U-particles. Furthermore, the fuel contains erbium-oxide (Er-O) additions. Interactions can also be expected between the Er-O, the cladding, the Zr-H and the U-particles. The overall result is that very complex interactions may take place as a result of fuel and cladding exposures to high temperatures. This report discusses the characterization of the baseline fuel microstructure in the as-received state (prior to exposure to high temperature), characterization of the fuel after annealing at 950C for 24 hours and the results from diffusion couple experiments carries out at 1000C for 5 and 24 hours. Characterization was carried out via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with sample preparation via focused ion beam in situ-liftout-technique.

  15. The influence of cladding on fission gas release from irradiated U-Mo monolithic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas E., E-mail: Douglas.Burkes@pnnl.gov; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2017-04-01

    The monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy has been proposed as a fuel design capable of converting the world's highest power research reactors from use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. However, a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier must be used to eliminate interactions that form between the U-Mo monolith and aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061) cladding during fabrication and are enhanced during irradiation. One aspect of fuel development and qualification is to demonstrate an appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An exothermic reaction has previously been observed between the AA6061 cladding and Zr diffusion layer. In this paper, two fuel segments with different irradiation history were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Samples from each segment were tested with cladding and without cladding to investigate the effect, if any, that the exothermic reaction has on fission gas release mechanisms. Measurements revealed there is an instantaneous effect of the cladding/Zr exothermic reaction, but not necessarily a cumulative effect above approximately 973 K (700 °C). The mechanisms responsible for fission gas release events are discussed. - Highlights: •Complementary fission gas release events are reported for U-Mo fuel with and without cladding. •Exothermic reaction between Zr diffusion layer and cladding influences fission gas release. •Mechanisms responsible for fission gas release are similar, but with varying timing and magnitude. •Behavior of samples is similar after 800 °C signaling the onset of superlattice destabilization.

  16. High Temperature Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions Between TRIGA Fuels and 304 Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Emmanuel; Keiser Jr, Dennis D.; Forsmann, Bryan; Janney, Dawn E.; Henley, Jody; Woolstenhulme, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) between TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) fuel elements and the 304 stainless steel (304SS) are of interest to develop an understanding of the fuel behavior during transient reactor scenarios. TRIGA fuels are composed of uranium (U) particles dispersed in a zirconium-hydride (Zr-H) matrix. In reactor, the fuel is encased in 304-stainless-steel (304SS) or Incoloy 800 clad tubes. At high temperatures, the fuel can readily interact with the cladding, resulting in FCCI. A number of FCCI can take place in this system. Interactions can be expected between the cladding and the Zr-H matrix, and/or between the cladding and the U-particles. Other interactions may be expected between the Zr-H matrix and the U-particles. Furthermore, the fuel contains erbium-oxide (Er-O) additions. Interactions can also be expected between the Er-O, the cladding, the Zr-H and the U-particles. The overall result is that very complex interactions may take place as a result of fuel and cladding exposures to high temperatures. This report discusses the characterization of the baseline fuel microstructure in the as-received state (prior to exposure to high temperature), characterization of the fuel after annealing at 950C for 24 hours and the results from diffusion couple experiments carries out at 1000C for 5 and 24 hours. Characterization was carried out via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with sample preparation via focused ion beam in situ-liftout-technique.

  17. Performance of U-Pu-Zr fuel cast into zirconium molds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, D.C.; Lahm, C.E.; Tsai, H.

    1992-01-01

    Current fabrication techniques for the integral fast reactor (IFR) fuel utilize injection casting into quartz molds after reprocessing in the IFR fuel cycle facility. The quartz molds are destroyed during the fuel demolding process, and the quartz residue must therefore be treated as contaminated waste. Alternatively, if the fuel can be cast into molds that remain as part of the fuel slugs (i.e., if the fuel can be left inside the molds for irradiation), then the quartz mold contribution to the waste stream can be eliminated. This possibility is being addresssed in an ongoing effort to evaluate the irradiation performance of fuel cast into zirconium sheaths rather than quartz molds. Zirconium was chosen as the sheath material because it is the component of the U-Pu-Zr fuel alloy that raises the alloy solidus temperatures and provides resistance to fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI)

  18. New zirconium alloys for nuclear application; Novas ligas de zirconio para aplicacao nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, R.M.; Andrade, A.H.P., E-mail: rmlobo@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Zirconium alloys are widely used in the nuclear industry, mainly in fuel cladding tubes and structural components for PWR plants. The service life of these components, which operate under high temperatures conditions ({approx} 300 deg C), has led to developing new alloys with the aim to improve the mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and irradiation damage. The variation in the composition of the alloy produces second phase particles which alter the materials properties according to their size and distribution, is essential therefore, knowledge their characteristics. Analysis of second phase particles in zirconium alloys are carried out by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and image analysis. This study used the zircaloy-4 to illustrate the characterization of these alloys through the study of second phase particles. (author)

  19. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Y., E-mail: yano.yasuhide@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Ukai, S.; Oono, N. [Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8628 (Japan); Kimura, A. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hayashi, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Torimaru, T. [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1313 (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900–1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  20. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Y.; Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T.; Ukai, S.; Oono, N.; Kimura, A.; Hayashi, S.; Torimaru, T.

    2017-04-01

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900-1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  1. Technique Comparison of the Fracture Toughness Tests for Irradiated Fuel Claddings in a Hot Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sangbok; Kim, Dosik; Jung, Yanghong; Choo, Yongsun; Ryu, Wooseog

    2007-01-01

    The degradation of a fracture toughness in a fuel cladding is a important factor to restrict the operation safety in nuclear power plants. The fracture properties of claddings were traditionally measured through a rubber bung test, a burst test, etc. Those results were the qualitative fracture characteristics, and could not be used as design or operation safety evaluation data. We need to evaluate the quantitative characteristics of claddings under normal operation and in accidents. The application of a fracture mechanics concept in testing a fuel cladding is restricted by the cladding geometry and creating the correct stress-state conditions. The geometry of claddings does not meet the requirement of the ASTM Standards for a specimen configuration and an applied load. The specimen may be produced from previously flattened claddings, but the flattening causes some uncertainties in the results due to changes in the microstructure of the material and a new distribution of the internal stresses. Therefore many efforts have been devoted to developing new test techniques, to quantify the fracture characteristics of claddings. Researchers from JAEA and NFI in Japan, Studsvik Company Ltd in Sweden, IAEA in Australia, and KAERI in Korea have independently developed fracture test techniques. This study is designed to review the independently developed techniques and to compare of their merits. Finally we shall apply the other techniques to upgrade our developing techniques

  2. Hygrothermal performance of ventilated wooden cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nore, Kristine

    2009-10-15

    This project contributes to more accurate design guidelines for high-performance building envelopes by analysis of hygrothermal performance of ventilated wooden cladding. Hygrothermal performance is defined by cladding temperature and moisture conditions, and subsequently by risk of degradation. Wood cladding is the most common facade material used in rural and residential areas in Norway. Historically, wooden cladding design varied in different regions in Norway. This was due to both climatic variations and the logistical distance to materials and craftspeople. The rebuilding of Norwegian houses in the 1950s followed central guidelines where local climate adaptation was often not evaluated. Nowadays we find some technical solutions that do not withstand all climate exposures. The demand for thermal comfort and also energy savings has changed hygrothermal condition of the building envelopes. In well-insulated wall assemblies, the cladding temperature is lower compared to traditional walls. Thus the drying out potential is smaller, and the risk of decay may be higher. The climate change scenario indicates a warmer and wetter future in Norway. Future buildings should be designed to endure harsher climate exposure than at present. Is there a need for refined climate differentiated design guidelines for building enclosures? As part of the Norwegian research programme 'Climate 2000', varieties of wooden claddings have been investigated on a test house in Trondheim. The aim of this investigation was to increase our understanding of the relation between microclimatic conditions and the responding hygrothermal performance of wooden cladding, according to orientation, design of ventilation gap, wood material quality and surface treatment. The two test facades, facing east and west have different climate exposure. Hourly measurements of in total 250 sensors provide meteorological data; temperature, radiation, wind properties, relative humidity, and test house data

  3. Corrosion issues in the long term storage of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Sindelar, R.L.; Iyer, N.C.

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 8% of the spent nuclear fuel owned by the US Department of Energy is clad with aluminum alloys. The spent fuel must be either reprocessed or temporarily stored in wet or dry storage systems until a decision is made on final disposition in a repository. There are corrosion issues associated with the aluminum cladding regardless of the disposition pathway selected. This paper discusses those issues and provides data and analysis to demonstrate that control of corrosion induced degradation in aluminum clad spent fuels can be achieved through relatively simple engineering practices

  4. Oxide properties of autoclaved zircaloy cladding tubes investigated by the photoelectric polarization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystrand, A.C.

    2000-06-01

    Corrosion of zirconium alloys is an important lifetime limiting factor for the nuclear reactor fuel. The corrosion resistance of a metal is highly dependent on the ability of the surface metal oxide to transport electrons and ions, which is related to the stoichiometry of the oxide and the oxide defect concentration. The Photoelectric Polarization Method (PEP) is a structure sensitive method which earlier has been investigated as a possible method to study the defect structure in zirconium oxides. The purpose of the following work is, by using more optimized experimental equipment, to verify if the PEP method is a suitable method to study the defect structure in zirconium oxides and to predict the corrosion resistance for different zirconium alloys. The conclusions from the experiments are as follows: - The modifications of the experimental setup by means of a new source of light (deuterium lamp) and a new oscilloscope with an amplifier gave distinct Vpep signals. - The photoresponse is negative for all types of cladding and under all kind of oxidation regimes and hence the oxide is a n-type semiconductor with deficiency of oxygen. - The method needs to be verified by testing semiconductors with a known defect concentration

  5. Effect of water chemistry and fuel operation parameters on Zr + 1% Nb cladding corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritsky, V G; Petrik, N G; Berezina, I G; Doilnitsina, V V [VNIPIET, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-02-01

    In-pile corrosion of Zr + 1%Nb fuel cladding has been studied. Zr-oxide and hydroxide solubilities at various temperatures and pH values have been calculated and correlations obtained between post-transition corrosion and the solubilities nodular corrosion and fuel operation parameters, as well as between the rate of fuel cladding degradation and water chemistry. Extrapolations of fuel assemblies behaviour to higher burnups have also performed. (author). 12 refs, 11 figs.

  6. Reuse of spent fuel cladding Zr by molten salt toward advanced recycle society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Osamu; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Kazunori; Yasuike, Y.; Sato, Nobuaki

    2003-01-01

    Cladding tubes of zircaloy 95% generated from reprocessing process for spent nuclear fuels are to be chopped in about 3 cm length, compacted and solidified with cements. This paper reports the summary of investigation of the present possible techniques for zirconium recovery: (1) electrolysis of molten salts (Zr-chlorides and/or fluorides) and (2) separation as volatile zirconium chlorides (ZrCl 4 ) (chloride volatility process) followed by reaction with metallic magnesium at 900degC to produce sponged Zr (Kroll method). The feasibility are discussed from the point of view of reduction of secondary radioactive wastes, accumulation of such nuclides as Co-60 and Ni-63 in electrolytic basin, radioactivity estimation in the products, and also problems of cleaning and reducing chemicals. (S. Ohno)

  7. Radiation hardness of new Kuraray double cladded optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedeschi, F.; Menzione, A.; Budagov, Yu.; Chirikov-Zorin, I.; Solov'ev, A.; Turchanovich, L.; Vasil'chenko, V.

    1996-01-01

    The radiation hardness of the new plastic scintillating and clear fibers irradiated by 137 Cs γ-flux and by pulsed reactor fast neutrons were investigated. All the studied fibers were of S-type (with S=70) and had a double cladding. Optical fibers degradation study after irradiation shows that the level of radiation hardness lower that what is expected from results of previous studies. 9 refs., 6 figs

  8. Axial distribution of deformation in the cladding of pressurized water reactor fuel rods in a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, K.M.; Mann, C.A.; Hindle, E.D.

    1979-01-01

    In the event of a loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor, the cladding of the fuel rods would undergo a temperature excursion while being subject to tensile hoop stress. The deformation behavior of 470-mm lengths of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding has been studied experimentally; under a range of stress levels in the high-alpha range of zirconium (600 to 850 0 C), diametral strains of up to 70% were observed over the greater part of their length. A negative-feedback mechanism is suggested, based on the reduction of secondary creep rate following cooling by enhanced heat loss at swelling areas. An approximate analysis based on this mechanism was found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. A computer modeling code is being developed to predict cladding deformation under realistic conditions

  9. Axial distribution of deformation in the cladding of pressurized water reactor fuel rods in a loss-of-coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.M.; Mann, C.A.; Hindle, E.D.

    1979-12-01

    In the event of a loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor, the cladding of the fuel rods would undergo a temperature excursion while being subject to tensile hoop stress. The deformation behavior of 470-mm lengths of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding has been studied experimentally; under a range of stress levels in the high-alpha range of zirconium (600 to 850/sup 0/C), diametral strains of up to 70% were observed over the greater part of their length. A negative-feedback mechanism is suggested, based on the reduction of secondary creep rate following cooling by enhanced heat loss at swelling areas. An approximate analysis based on this mechanism was found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. A computer modeling code is being developed to predict cladding deformation under realistic conditions.

  10. Interfacing VPSC with finite element codes. Demonstration of irradiation growth simulation in a cladding tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patra, Anirban [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tome, Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-23

    This Milestone report shows good progress in interfacing VPSC with the FE codes ABAQUS and MOOSE, to perform component-level simulations of irradiation-induced deformation in Zirconium alloys. In this preliminary application, we have performed an irradiation growth simulation in the quarter geometry of a cladding tube. We have benchmarked VPSC-ABAQUS and VPSC-MOOSE predictions with VPSC-SA predictions to verify the accuracy of the VPSCFE interface. Predictions from the FE simulations are in general agreement with VPSC-SA simulations and also with experimental trends.

  11. Neutron activation of chlorine in zirconium and zirconium alloys use of the matrix as comparator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, I.M.; Gomez, C.D.; Mila, M.I.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for neutron activation analysis of chlorine in zirconium and zirconium alloys. Calculation of chlorine concentration is performed relative to zirconium concentration in the matrix in order to minimize effects of differences in irradiation and counting geometry. Principles of the method and the results obtained are discussed. (author)

  12. Improving Accident Tolerance of Nuclear Fuel with Coated Mo-alloy Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In severe loss of coolant accidents (LOCA, similar to those experienced at Fukushima Daiichi and Three Mile Island Unit 1, the zirconium alloy fuel cladding materials are rapidly heated due to nuclear decay heating and rapid exothermic oxidation of zirconium with steam. This heating causes the cladding to rapidly react with steam, lose strength, burst or collapse, and generate large quantities of hydrogen gas. Although maintaining core cooling remains the highest priority in accident management, an accident tolerant fuel (ATF design may extend coping and recovery time for operators to restore emergency power, and cooling, and achieve safe shutdown. An ATF is required to possess high resistance to steam oxidation to reduce hydrogen generation and sufficient mechanical strength to maintain fuel rod integrity and core coolability. The initiative undertaken by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI is to demonstrate the feasibility of developing an ATF cladding with capability to maintain its integrity in 1,200–1,500°C steam for at least 24 hours. This ATF cladding utilizes thin-walled Mo-alloys coated with oxidation-resistant surface layers. The basic design consists of a thin-walled Mo alloy structural tube with a metallurgically bonded, oxidation-resistant outer layer. Two options are being investigated: a commercially available iron, chromium, and aluminum alloy with excellent high temperature oxidation resistance, and a Zr alloy with demonstrated corrosion resistance. As these composite claddings will incorporate either no Zr, or thin Zr outer layers, hydrogen generation under severe LOCA conditions will be greatly reduced. Key technical challenges and uncertainties specific to Mo alloy fuel cladding include: economic core design, industrial scale fabricability, radiation embrittlement, and corrosion and oxidation resistance during normal operation, transients, and severe accidents. Progress in each aspect has been made and key results are

  13. Study on dynamic measurement of fuel pellet length during loading into cladding tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Kai

    1993-09-01

    Various methods are presented for measuring the pellet length in the cladding tube (zirconium tube) during the loading process of the preparation of single rod of nuclear fuel assembly. These methods are used in former Soviet Union, west European countries and China in the manufacturing of nuclear power plant element. Different methods of dynamic measurement by using mechanics, optics and electricity and their special features are analysed and discussed. The structure and measuring principle of a developed measuring device,and its measuring precision and system deviation are also introduced. Finally, the length of loaded pellets is checked with analog pellets. The results are as expected and show that the method and principle used in the measuring device are feasible. It is an ideal and advanced method for the pellet loading of single cladding tube. The principle mentioned above can also be used in other industries

  14. Spectrophotometric titration of zirconium in siliceous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, K.F.; Su, Y.-S.; Strzegowski, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    An accurate and selective complexometric titration procedure based upon a spectrophotometrically detected end-point has been developed for the determination of zirconium in glasses, glass-ceramics and refractories. A p-bromomandelic acid separation step for zirconium imparts excellent selectivity to the procedure. The method is particularly important for the 1 to 5% concentration range where a simple, accurate and selective method for the determination of zirconium has been lacking. (author)

  15. Voltammetric determination of zirconium using azo compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orshulyak, O.O.; Levitskaya, G.D.

    2008-01-01

    The optimum conditions for zirconium complexation with azo compounds are found. The applicability of Eriochrome Red B, Calcon, and Calcion to the voltammetric determination of zirconium, total Zr(IV) and Hf(IV), and Zr(IV) in the presence of Zn(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Ni(II), or Ti(IV) is demonstrated. The developed procedures are used to determine zirconium in a terbium alloy and in an alloy for airplane wheel drums [ru

  16. Applications for zirconium and columbium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condliff, A.F.

    1986-01-01

    Currently, zirconium and columbium are used in a wide range of applications, overlapping only in the field of corrosion control. As a construction material, zirconium is primarily used by the nuclear power industry. The use of zirconium in the chemical processing industry (CPI) is, however, increasing steadily. Columbian alloys are primarily applied as superconducting alloys for research particle accelerators and fusion generators as well as in magnetic resonance imaging for medical diagnosis

  17. Zirconium Phosphate Supported MOF Nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Yuwei; Clearfield, Abraham

    2016-06-06

    We report a rare example of the preparation of HKUST-1 metal-organic framework nanoplatelets through a step-by-step seeding procedure. Sodium ion exchanged zirconium phosphate, NaZrP, nanoplatelets were judiciously selected as support for layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly of Cu(II) and benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (H3BTC) linkers. The first layer of Cu(II) is attached to the surface of zirconium phosphate through covalent interaction. The successive LBL growth of HKUST-1 film is then realized by soaking the NaZrP nanoplatelets in ethanolic solutions of cupric acetate and H3BTC, respectively. The amount of assembled HKUST-1 can be readily controlled by varying the number of growth cycles, which was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and gas adsorption analyses. The successful construction of HKUST-1 on NaZrP was also supported by its catalytic performance for the oxidation of cyclohexene.

  18. Pin clad strains in Phenix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Languille, A.

    1979-07-01

    The Phenix reactor has operated for 4 years in a satisfactory manner. The first 2 sub-assembly loadings contained pins clad in solution treated 316. The principal pin strains are: diametral strain (swelling and irradiation creep), ovality and spiral bending of the pin (interaction of wire and pin cluster and wrapper). A pin cluster irradiated to a dose of 80 dpa F reached a pin diameter strain of 5%. This strain is principally due to swelling (low fission gas pressure). The principal parameters governing the swelling are instantaneous dose, time and temperature for a given type of pin cladding. Other types of steel are or will be irradiated in Phenix. In particular, cold-worked titanium stabilised 316 steel should contribute towards a reduction in the pin clad strains and increase the target burn-up in this reactor. (author)

  19. Fuel-cladding chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueneau, C.; Piron, J.P.; Dumas, J.C.; Bouineau, V.; Iglesias, F.C.; Lewis, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    The chemistry of the nuclear fuel is very complex. Its chemical composition changes with time due to the formation of fission products and depends on the temperature level history within the fuel pellet and the clad during operation. Firstly, in thermal reactors, zircaloy oxidation from reaction with UO 2 fuel under high-temperature conditions will be addressed. Then other fuel-cladding interaction phenomena occurring in fast reactors will be described. Large thermal gradients existing between the centre and the periphery of the pellet induce the radial redistribution of the fuel constituents. The fuel pellet can react with the clad by different corrosion processes which can involve actinide and/or fission product transport via gas, liquid or/and solid phases. All these phenomena are briefly described in the case of different kinds of fuels (oxide, carbide, nitride, metallic) to be used in fast reactors. The way these phenomena are taken into account in fuel performance codes is presented. (authors)

  20. Method of separating hafnium from zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megy, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    English. A new anhydrous method was developed for separating zirconium and hafnium, which gives higher separation factors and is more economical than previous methods. A molten phase, comprising a solution of unseparated zirconium and hafnium and a solvent metal, is first prepared. The molten metal phase is contacted with a fused salt phase which includes a zirconium salt. Zirconium and hafnium separation is effected by mutual displacement with hafnium being transported from the molten metal phase to the fused salt phase, while zirconium is transported from the fused salt phase to the molten metal phase. The solvent metal is less electropositive than zirconium. Zinc was chosen as the solvent metal, from a group which also included cadmium, lead, bismuth, copper, and tin. The fused salt phase cations are more electropositive than zirconium and were selected from a group comprising the alkali elements, the alkaline earth elements, the rare earth elements, and aluminum. A portion of the zirconium in the molten metal phase was oxidized by injecting an oxidizing agent, chlorine, to form zirconium tetrachlorid

  1. Microhardness and microplasticity of zirconium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshpor, V.S.; Eron'yan, M.A.; Petrov, A.N.; Kravchik, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    To experimentally check the concentration dependence of microhardness of 4 group nitrides, microhardness of zirconium nitride compact samples was measured. The samples were obtained either by bulk saturation of zirconium iodide plates or by chemical precipitation from gas. As nitrogen content decreased within the limits of homogeneity of zirconium nitride samples where the concentration of admixed oxygen was low, the microhardness grew from 1500+-100 kg/mm 2 for ZrNsub(1.0) to 27000+-100 kg/mm 2 for ZrNsub(0.78). Microplasticity of zirconium nitride (resistance to fracture) decreased, as the concentration of nitrogen vacancies was growing

  2. Production kinetics of zirconium tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudjoko, D.; Masduki, B.; Sunardjo; Sulistyo, B.

    1996-01-01

    This research was intended to study the kinetics of zirconium tetrachloride production. The process was carried out in semi continuous reactor, equipped with heater, temperature controller, sublimator and scrubber. The variables investigated were time, temperature and the pellet forming pressure. Within the range of variables studied, the expression of the process in the chemical reaction controller region and diffusion controller region were both presented. (author)

  3. Characteristics and properties of cladding tubes for VVER-1000 higher Uranium content fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregud, M.; Markelov, A.; Novikov, V.; Gusev, A.; Konkov, V.; Pimenov, Y.; Agapitov, V.; Shtutsa, M.

    2009-01-01

    To improve the fuel cycle economics and to further increase the VVER fuel usability the work programme is under way to design novel improved fuel, fuel rods and fuel assemblies. Longer FA operation time that is needed to increase the fuel burnup and the related design developments of novel fuel assemblies resulted not only in changing types and sizes of Zirconium items and fuel assembly components but also altered the requirements placed on their technical characteristics. To use fuel rods having a larger charge of fuel, to improve their behaviour in LOCA, to reduce fuel rod damage ability during assembling the work was carried out to perfect the characteristics of both the cladding (reduced wall thickness and more rigid tolerances for geometry) and its material. To meet the more rigid requirements for the geometry dimensions of cladding tubes an improved process flow sheet has been designed and employed for their fabrication and also the finishing treatment of tube surfaces has been improved. The higher and stable properties of the cladding materials were managed through using the special purity in terms of Hafnium Zirconium (not higher than 100 ppm Hf) as a base of the E110 alloy and maintaining within the valid specifications for the alloy the optimized contents of Oxygen and Iron at the levels of (600 - 990) ppm and (250 - 700) ppm, respectively. The work was under way in 2004 - 2008 years; during this period the technology and materials science solutions were mastered that were phased-in introduced into the production of the cladding tubes for the fuels loaded into the of the Kalinin NPP Unit 1

  4. Prediction of cladding life in waste package environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, J.K.; Doering, T.W.

    1994-01-01

    Fuel cladding can potentially provide longer containment or slower release of radionuclides from spent fuel after geologic disposal. To predict the amount of benefit that cladding can provide, we surveyed degradation modes and developed a model for creep rupture by diffusion-controlled cavity growth, the mechanism that several authors have concluded is the most important. In this mechanism, voids nucleate on the grain boundaries and grow by diffusion of vacancies along the grain boundaries to the voids. When a certain fraction of the grain boundary area is covered with voids, the material fails. An analytic expression for cladding lifetime is developed. Besides materials constants, the predicted lifetime depends on the temperature history, the hoop stress in the cladding, the spacing between void nuclei, and the micro-structure. The inclusion of microstructure is a significant new feature of the model; this feature is used to help avoid excessive conservatism. The model is applied in a sample calculation for disposal of spent fuel, and the practice of using temperature limits to evaluate repository designs is examined

  5. Oxidation of zirconium alloys in steam: influence of tetragonal zirconia on oxide growth mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godlewski, J.

    1990-07-01

    The oxidation of zirconium alloys in presence of steam, presents after a 'parabolic' growth law, an acceleration of the oxidation velocity. This phenomenon limits the use of zirconium alloys as nuclear fuel cladding element. In order to determine the physico-chemical process leading to this kinetic transition, two approaches have been carried out: the first one has consisted to determine the composition of the oxide layer and its evolution with the oxidation time; and the second one to determine the oxygen diffusion coefficients in the oxide layers of pre- and post-transition as well as their evolution with the oxidation time. The composition of the oxide layers has been determined by two analyses techniques: the X-ray diffraction and the laser Raman spectroscopy. This last method has allowed to confirm the presence of tetragonal zirconium oxide in the oxide layers. Analyses carried out by laser Raman spectroscopy on oxides oblique cuttings have revealed that the tetragonal zirconium oxide is transformed in monoclinic phase during the kinetic transition. A quantitative approach has allowed to corroborate the results obtained by these two techniques. In order to determine the oxygen diffusion coefficients in the oxides layers, two diffusion treatments have been carried out: 1)under low pressure with D 2 18 O 2 ) under high pressure in an autoclave with H 2 18 O. The oxygen 18 concentration profiles have been obtained by two analyses techniques: the nuclear microprobe and the secondary ions emission spectroscopy. The obtained profiles show that the mass transport is made by the volume and particularly by the grain boundaries. The corresponding diffusion coefficients have been calculated with the WHIPPLE and LE CLAIRE solution. The presence of tetragonal zirconium oxide, its relation with the kinetic transition, and the evolution of the diffusion coefficients with the oxidation time, are discussed in terms of internal stresses in the oxide layer and of the oxide layer

  6. Methods for the preparation of ultra-pure anhydrous zirconium tetrafluoride from zirconium tetraborohydride, researches in connection with halide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortevois, R.

    1990-01-01

    The synthesis of ultrapure zirconium tetrafluoride, the main component of fluorozirconate based optical fibers, was successfully attempted from zirconium tetraborohydride. Of the fluorinating agents used, nitrogen trifluoride doesn't react with zirconium tetraborohydride while xenon difluoride reacts too violently and leads to phases which contain boron. The fluorination in a compatible solvent enabled us to minimize the degradation. The best results were obtained with the fluorination of Zr(BH 4 ) 4 dissolved in CFCl 3 at -40 deg C by anhydrous HF. Using several analytical methods such as graphite furnace atomic absorption and proton activation, we analyzed the purity. The degree of transition element impurities is less than the ppm level for ZrF 4 . The dehydration of ZrF 4 ,H 2 O and ZrF 4 ,3H 2 O at room temperature by CIF 3 in gaseous and liquid state was also investigated. At exceptionally low temperature, this process allows oxide and oxyfluoride components to be reduced

  7. Investigation and recovery of unrecovered fuel pellets and cladding tube pieces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Keiji

    1980-01-01

    The total weight of the fuel pellets lost due to break was about 1206 g, and cladding tube pieces were about 217 g. Among these, the pellets of about 527 g and the cladding tube pieces of about 152 g were recovered when broken fuel rods were discovered. It is not desirable to leave these broken pieces as unrecovered in view of safety and the management of nuclear fuel materials. Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., investigated the position and the amount of these pellets and cladding tube pieces for about a year, and recovered a part of them. The results were written in two reports. The objects of the investigation and recovery, and the method of recovery are explained. The UO 2 and zirconium recovered were 58.52 g and 369.58 g, respectively. The solid pellets were recovered from the reactor, fuel assemblies, a spent fuel pit and canals, and the content in sludge was recovered from other installations. The amounts of unrecovered pellets and cladding tube pieces in primary cooling water, coolant filters, sealing water filters, primary cooling pipes, waste resins and fuel assemblies were estimated. The problems concerning the recovery and estimation are pointed out. The results of estimating the amount of uranium in coolant filters and sealing water filters are useful to know the time of the occurrence of accident. (Kako, I.)

  8. Current status of materials development of nuclear fuel cladding tubes for light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Zhengang, E-mail: duan_zg@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Yang, Huilong [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Satoh, Yuhki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Murakami, Kenta; Kano, Sho; Zhao, Zishou; Shen, Jingjie [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Abe, Hiroaki, E-mail: abe.hiroaki@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    Zirconium-based (Zr-based) alloys have been widely used as materials for the key components in light water reactors (LWRs), such as fuel claddings which suffer from waterside corrosion, hydrogen uptakes and strength loss at elevated temperature, especially during accident scenarios like the lost-of-coolant accident (LOCA). For the purpose of providing a safer, nuclear leakage resistant and economically viable LWRs, three general approaches have been proposed so far to develop the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) claddings: optimization of metallurgical composition and processing of Zr-based alloys, coatings on existing Zr-based alloys and replacement of current Zr-based alloys. In this manuscript, an attempt has been made to systematically present the historic development of Zr-based cladding, including the impacts of alloying elements on the material properties. Subsequently, the research investigations on coating layer on the surface of Zr-based claddings, mainly referring coating materials and fabrication methods, have been broadly reviewed. The last section of this review provides the introduction to alternative materials (Non-Zr) to Zr-based alloys for LWRs, such as advanced steels, Mo-based, and SiC-based materials.

  9. A deformation and thermodynamic model for hydride precipitation kinetics in spent fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.

    1989-10-01

    Hydrogen is contained in the Zircaloy cladding of spent fuel rods from nuclear reactors. All the spent fuel rods placed in a nuclear waste repository will have a temperature history that decreases toward ambient; and as a result, most all of the hydrogen in the Zircaloy will eventually precipitate as zirconium hydride platelets. A model for the density of hydride platelets is a necessary sub-part for predicting Zircaloy cladding failure rate in a nuclear waste repository. A model is developed to describe statistically the hydride platelet density, and the density function includes the orientation as a physical attribute. The model applies concepts from statistical mechanics to derive probable deformation and thermodynamic functionals for cladding material response that depend explicitly on the hydride platelet density function. From this model, hydride precipitation kinetics depend on a thermodynamic potential for hydride density change and on the inner product of a stress tensor and a tensor measure for the incremental volume change due to hydride platelets. The development of a failure response model for Zircaloy cladding exposed to the expected conditions in a nuclear waste repository is supported by the US DOE Yucca Mountain Project. 19 refs., 3 figs

  10. Current status of materials development of nuclear fuel cladding tubes for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Zhengang; Yang, Huilong; Satoh, Yuhki; Murakami, Kenta; Kano, Sho; Zhao, Zishou; Shen, Jingjie; Abe, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Zirconium-based (Zr-based) alloys have been widely used as materials for the key components in light water reactors (LWRs), such as fuel claddings which suffer from waterside corrosion, hydrogen uptakes and strength loss at elevated temperature, especially during accident scenarios like the lost-of-coolant accident (LOCA). For the purpose of providing a safer, nuclear leakage resistant and economically viable LWRs, three general approaches have been proposed so far to develop the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) claddings: optimization of metallurgical composition and processing of Zr-based alloys, coatings on existing Zr-based alloys and replacement of current Zr-based alloys. In this manuscript, an attempt has been made to systematically present the historic development of Zr-based cladding, including the impacts of alloying elements on the material properties. Subsequently, the research investigations on coating layer on the surface of Zr-based claddings, mainly referring coating materials and fabrication methods, have been broadly reviewed. The last section of this review provides the introduction to alternative materials (Non-Zr) to Zr-based alloys for LWRs, such as advanced steels, Mo-based, and SiC-based materials.

  11. Interaction between thorium and potential clad materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kale, G.B.; Gawde, P.S.; Sengupta, Pranesh

    2005-01-01

    Thorium based fuels are being used for nuclear reactors. The structural stability of fuel-clad assemblies in reactor systems depend upon the nature of interdiffusion reaction between fuel-cladding materials. Interdiffusion reaction thorium and various cladding materials is presented in this paper. (author)

  12. Examination of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel after extended pool storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, E.R.; Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Lowry, L.M.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results from metallurgical examinations of Zircaloy-clad fuel rods from two bundles (0551 and 0074) of Shippingport PWR Core 1 blanket fuel after extended water storage. Both bundles were exposed to water in the reactor from late 1957 until discharge. The estimated average burnups were 346 GJ/kgU (4000 MWd/MTU) for bundle 0551 and 1550 GJ/kgU (18,000 MWd/MTU) for bundle 0074. Fuel rods from bundle 0551 were stored in deionized water for nearly 21 yr prior to examination in 1980, representing the world's oldest pool-stored Zircaloy-clad fuel. Bundle 0074 has been stored in deionized water since reactor discharge in 1964. Data from the current metallurgical examinations enable a direct assessment of extended pool storage effects because the metallurgical condition of similar fuel rods was investigated and documented soon after reactor discharge. Data from current and past examinations were compared, and no significant degradation of the Zircaloy cladding was indicated after almost 21 yr in water storage. The cladding dimensions and mechanical properties, fission gas release, hydrogen contents of the cladding, and external oxide film thicknesses that were measured during the current examinations were all within the range of measurements made on fuel bundles soon after reactor discharge. The appearance of the external surfaces and the microstructures of the fuel and cladding were also similar to those reported previously. In addition, no evidence of accelerated corrosion or hydride redistribution in the cladding was observed

  13. Clad-coolant chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, F.C.; Lewis, B.J.; Desgranges, C.; Toffolon, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the kinetics for zircaloy clad oxidation behaviour in steam and air during reactor accident conditions. The generation of chemical heat from metal/water reaction is considered. Low-temperature oxidation of zircaloy due to water-side corrosion is further described. (authors)

  14. Development of high performance cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    2003-01-01

    The developments of superior next-generation light water reactor are requested on the basis of general view points, such as improvement of safety, economics, reduction of radiation waste and effective utilization of plutonium, until 2030 year in which conventional reactor plants should be renovate. Improvements of stainless steel cladding for conventional high burn-up reactor to more than 100 GWd/t, developments of manufacturing technology for reduced moderation-light water reactor (RMWR) of breeding ratio beyond 1.0 and researches of water-materials interaction on super critical pressure-water cooled reactor are carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Stable austenite stainless steel has been selected for fuel element cladding of advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR). The austenite stain less has the superiority for anti-irradiation properties, corrosion resistance and mechanical strength. A hard spectrum of neutron energy up above 0.1 MeV takes place in core of the reduced moderation-light water reactor, as liquid metal-fast breeding reactor (LMFBR). High performance cladding for the RMWR fuel elements is required to get anti-irradiation properties, corrosion resistance and mechanical strength also. Slow strain rate test (SSRT) of SUS 304 and SUS 316 are carried out for studying stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Irradiation tests in LMFBR are intended to obtain irradiation data for damaged quantity of the cladding materials. (M. Suetake)

  15. Analysis of hydrogen in zirconium metallic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, A.N.; Vega Bustillos, J.O.W.

    1991-02-01

    Determination of hydrogen in zirconium metallic have been performed using the hot vacuum extraction system and the gas chromatographic technique. The zirconium metallic samples were hydrieded by electrolitic technique at difference temperatures and times, then the samples were annealing at vacuum and eatching by fluoridric acid solution. The details of the hydrieded process, analytical technique and the data obtained are discussed. (author)

  16. Expanded heat treatment to form residual compressive hoop stress on inner surface of zirconium alloy tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megata, Masao

    1997-01-01

    A specific heat treatment process that introduces hoop stress has been developed. This technique can produce zirconium alloy tubing with a residual compressive hoop stress near the inner surface by taking advantage of the mechanical anisotropy in hexagonal close-packed zirconium crystal. Since a crystal having its basal pole parallel to the tangential direction of the tubing is easier to exhibit plastic elongation under the hoop stress than that having its basal pole parallel to the radial direction, the plastic and elastic elongation can coexist under a certain set of temperature and hoop stress conditions. The mechanical anisotropy plays a role to extend the coexistent stress range. Thus, residual compressive hoop stress is formed at the inner surface where more plastic elongation occurs during the heat treatment. This process is referred to as expanded heat treatment. Since this is a fundamental crystallographic principle, it has various applications. The application to improve PCI/SCC (pellet cladding interaction/stress corrosion cracking) properties of water reactor fuel cladding is promising. Excellent results were obtained with laboratory-scale heat treatment and an out-reactor iodine SCC test. These results included an extension of the time to SCC failure. (author)

  17. Autoclave Testing on Zirconium Alloy Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Petra-Britt; Sell, Hans-Juergen; Garzarolli, Friedrich

    2012-09-01

    The corrosion of Zirconium components like fuel rod claddings and spacer grids is limiting lifetime and duty of these components. In Pressurized and Boiling Water Reactors (PWR and BWR), different corrosion phenomena are of interest. Although in-pile experience is the final proof for a material development, significant experience was gained by autoclave tests, trying to simulate in-pile conditions but reducing time for return of experience by increased temperatures. For PWR application, the uniform corrosion is studied in water at up to 370 deg. C and in high pressure steam at 400 deg. C, and for BWR, the nodular corrosion is studied in high pressure steam at 500-520 deg. C. Particular attention has to be given to the corrosion media, because oxidative traces in the water can significantly affect the corrosion response. An extensive air removal is thus important for all corrosion tests. This links to the different water chemistry conditions that have been investigated as separate effects otherwise difficult to separate under in-pile conditions. Uniform corrosion in 350 deg. C water is usually a cyclic process with repeated rate transitions. In addition, at high exposure times an acceleration of corrosion can occur, e.g. for Zr-Sn alloys with a high Sn content. In 400 deg. C steam, corrosion rate decreases somewhat with increasing time. Uniform corrosion rate of Zr alloys depends on their Sn- and Fe+Cr contents as well as on their annealing parameters with a similar trend as in PWR and on their yield strength, however with an opposite trend compared to BWR conditions. Nodular corrosion of BWR alloys depends on the annealing parameter with a similar trend as in PWR and out-of-reactor also significantly on the Fe+Cr content. The hydrogen pickup fraction (HPUF) depends largely on details of the water chemistry and can particularly depend on autoclave degassing and probably also on autoclave contaminations. Thus any HPUF value from out-of- pile corrosion tests is only

  18. Mechanical behavior of fast reactor fuel pin cladding subjected to simulated overpower transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.; Hunter, C.W.

    1978-06-01

    Cladding mechanical property data for analysis and prediction of fuel pin transient behavior were obtained under experimental conditions in which the temperature ramps of reactor transients were simulated. All cladding specimens were 20% CW Type 316 stainless steel and were cut from EBR-II irradiated fuel pins. It was determined that irradiation degraded the cladding ductility and failure strength. Specimens that had been adjacent to the fuel exhibited the poorest properties. Correlations were developed to describe the effect of neutron fluence on the mechanical behavior of the cladding. Metallographic examinations were conducted to characterize the failure mode and to establish the nature of internal and external surface corrosion. Various mechanisms for the fuel adjacency effect were examined and results for helium concentration profiles were presented. Results from the simulated transient tests were compared with TREAT test results

  19. Deformation mechanisms and irradiation effects in zirconium alloys. A multi-scale study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onimus, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    Zirconium alloys have been used for more than 30 years in the nuclear industry as structural materials for the fuel assemblies of pressurized water reactors. In particular, the cladding tube, made of zirconium alloys, constitutes the first barrier against the dissemination of radioactive elements. It is therefore essential to have a good understanding and prediction of the mechanical behavior of these materials in various conditions. The work presented in this dissertation deals with an experimental study and numerical simulations, at several length scales, of the deformation mechanisms and the mechanical behavior of zirconium alloys before irradiation, but also after irradiation and under irradiation. The mechanical behavior of zirconium single crystal has been determined, during an original study, using tensile test specimens containing large grains. Based on this study, crystal plasticity constitutive laws have been proposed. A polycrystalline model has also been developed to simulate the behavior of unirradiated zirconium alloys. A thorough Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) study has been able to clarify the deformation mechanisms of zirconium alloys occurring after irradiation. The clearing of loops by gliding dislocations leading to the dislocation channeling mechanism has been studied in details. This phenomenon has also been simulated using a dislocation dynamics code. The macroscopic consequences of this process have also been analyzed. A polycrystalline model taking into account the specificity of this mechanism has eventually been proposed. This approach has then been extended to the post-irradiation creep behavior. The recovery of radiation defects during creep tests has been characterized by TEM and modeled using cluster dynamics method. Deformation modes during creep have also been studied and a simple model for the creep behavior has eventually been proposed. Finally, the mechanism responsible for the acceleration of irradiation growth that

  20. Development of high performance cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Yong; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.

    2010-04-01

    The irradiation test for HANA claddings conducted and a series of evaluation for next-HANA claddings as well as their in-pile and out-of pile performances tests were also carried out at Halden research reactor. The 6th irradiation test have been completed successfully in Halden research reactor. As a result, HANA claddings showed high performance, such as corrosion resistance increased by 40% compared to Zircaloy-4. The high performance of HANA claddings in Halden test has enabled lead test rod program as the first step of the commercialization of HANA claddings. DB has been established for thermal and LOCA-related properties. It was confirmed from the thermal shock test that the integrity of HANA claddings was maintained in more expanded region than the criteria regulated by NRC. The manufacturing process of strips was established in order to apply HANA alloys, which were originally developed for the claddings, to the spacer grids. 250 kinds of model alloys for the next-generation claddings were designed and manufactured over 4 times and used to select the preliminary candidate alloys for the next-generation claddings. The selected candidate alloys showed 50% better corrosion resistance and 20% improved high temperature oxidation resistance compared to the foreign advanced claddings. We established the manufacturing condition controlling the performance of the dual-cooled claddings by changing the reduction rate in the cold working steps

  1. Study of laser cladding nuclear valve parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Shihong; Wang Xinlin; Huang Guodong

    1998-12-01

    The mechanism of laser cladding is discussed by using heat transfer model of laser cladding, heat conduction model of laser cladding and convective transfer mass model of laser melt-pool. Subsequently the laser cladding speed limit and the influence of laser cladding parameters on cladding layer structure is analyzed. A 5 kW with CO 2 transverse flow is used in the research for cladding treatment of sealing surface of stop valve parts of nuclear power stations. The laser cladding layer is found to be 3.0 mm thick. The cladding surface is smooth and has no such defects as crack, gas pore, etc. A series of comparisons with plasma spurt welding and arc bead welding has been performed. The results show that there are higher grain grade and hardness, lower dilution and better performances of resistance to abrasion, wear and of anti-erosion in the laser cladding layer. The new technology of laser cladding can obviously improve the quality of nuclear valve parts. Consequently it is possible to lengthen the service life of nuclear valve and to raise the safety and reliability of the production system

  2. Influence of irradiation and radiolysis on the corrosion rates and mechanisms of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verlet, Romain

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear fuel of pressurized water reactors (PWR) in the form of uranium oxide UO 2 pellets (or MOX) is confined in a zirconium alloy cladding. This cladding is very important because it represents the first containment barrier against the release of fission products generated by the nuclear reaction to the external environment. Corrosion by the primary medium of zirconium alloys, particularly the Zircaloy-4, is one of the factors limiting the reactor residence time of the fuel rods (UO 2 pellets + cladding). To optimize core management and to extend the lifetime of the fuel rods in reactor, new alloys based on zirconium-niobium (M5) have been developed. However, the corrosion mechanisms of these are not completely understood because of the complexity of these materials, corrosion environment and the presence of radiation from the nuclear fuel. Therefore, this thesis specifically addresses the effects of radiolysis and defects induced by irradiation with ions in the matrix metal and the oxide layer on the corrosion rate of Zircaloy-4 and M5. The goal is to separate the influence of radiation damage to the metal, that relating to defects created in the oxide and that linked to radiolysis of the primary medium on the oxidation rate of zirconium alloys in reactor. 1) Regarding effect of irradiation of the metal on the oxidation rate: type dislocation loops appear and increase the oxidation rate of the two alloys. For M5, in addition to the first effect, a precipitation of fines needles of niobium reduced the solid solution of niobium concentration in the metal and ultimately in the oxide, which strongly reduces the oxidation rate of the alloy. 2) Regarding the effect of irradiation of the oxide layer on the oxidation rate: defects generated by the nuclear cascades in the oxide increase the oxidation rate of the two materials. For M5, germination of niobium enriched zones in irradiated oxide also causes a decrease of the niobium concentration in solid solution

  3. Influence of radiolytic degradation products from organic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, H.L.P. de.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of primary and secondary degradation products from TBP - dodecane on zirconium extraction is studied. The presence of radiolytical degradation at organic phase, in systems of initial concentration of HNO 3 1 and 4M, and absorbed γ radiation doses from 0,5 to 4,5 Wh/l, lead to an increase of zirconium extraction, being the HDBP the main product of degradation responsable by this effect. The influence of secondary degradation products is significative in systems of HNO 3 1M initial concentration. The formation of precipitator in extractions of Zr in HNO 3 1M with irradiated TBP-dodecane was observed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  4. Effect of zinc injection on BWR fuel cladding corrosion. Pt. 1. Study on an accelerated corrosion condition to evaluate corrosion resistance of zircaloy-2 fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka; Kanbe, Hiromu; Furuya, Masahiro

    2002-01-01

    Japanese BWR utilities have a plan to apply zinc injection to the primary coolant in order to reduce radioactivity accumulation on the structure. Prior to applying the zinc injection to BWR plants, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of zinc injection on corrosion resistance of fuel cladding. The objective of this report was to examine the accelerated corrosion condition for evaluation of BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance under non-irradiated conditions, as the first step of a zinc injection evaluation study. A heat transfer corrosion test facility, in which a two phase flow condition could be achieved, was designed and constructed. The effects of heat flux, void fraction and solution temperature on BWR fuel cladding corrosion resistance were quantitatively investigated. The main findings were as follows. (1) In situ measurements using high speed camera and a void sensor together with one dimensional two phase flow analysis results showed that a two phase flow simulated BWR core condition can be obtained in the corrosion test facility. (2) The heat transfer corrosion test results showed that the thickness of the zirconium oxide layer increased with increasing solution temperature and was independent of heat flux and void fraction. The corrosion accelerating factor was about 2.5 times in the case of a temperature increase from 288degC to 350degC. (author)

  5. Thermodynamical, kinetic and structural properties of simple and mixed complexes of zirconium (IV) with the hydroxyl and carbonate ions. Study by potentiometry, Raman spectroscopy and NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veyland, A.

    1999-01-01

    Most of zirconium production is used by the nuclear industry for the cladding of nuclear fuels and for the storage of radioactive wastes. The aim of this work is the qualitative and quantitative study of the complexes made by zirconium with the hydroxyl and carbonate ions in order to evaluate the long-term pollution risks linked with the corrosion of confinement containers. The zirconium(IV)/hydroxyl system is studied by proto-metry and follows a protocol which reduces the local over-concentrations of reagent and the precipitation of zirconium hydroxide. In potassium nitrate environment and in a pH range of 1.5 to 3.5, three soluble species are evidenced: Zr(OH) 3 + , Zr 2 (OH) 7 + and Zr(OH) 4 . Their apparent constant of formation and the solubility product of zirconium hydroxide are determined with 4 ionic forces. Using these results, the corresponding thermodynamic constants are calculated by applying the theory of specific interactions. The formation of zirconium (IV) hydroxo-carbonate complexes is evidenced by proto-metry and 17 O and 13 C NMR. The number of carbonates fixed by zirconium varies from 0 to 4. The dialysis indicates that the degree of poly-condensation of species is an inverse function of the number of complex carbonates. The Raman polarized spectra and the 13 C NMR results demonstrate for all complexes the bidentate character of the complexation mode of the carbonates. The dynamical study made by 13 C NMR of the exchange between complexed carbonates of the tetra-carbonate-zirconate ion and free carbonates in solution allows to determine the kinetic constants and the corresponding velocity law. An associative mechanism is proposed, in agreement with the results obtained by mass spectroscopy with electro-spray ionization. These new thermodynamical and kinetic data allow to model the speciation of zirconium in natural waters. (J.S.)

  6. FUNDAMENTAL MECHANISMS OF CORROSION OF ADVANCED LIGHT WATER REACTOR FUEL CLADDING ALLOYS AT HIGH BURNUP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lott, Randy G.

    2003-01-01

    OAK (B204) The corrosion behavior of nuclear fuel cladding is a key factor limiting the performance of nuclear fuel elements, improved cladding alloys, which resist corrosion and radiation damage, will facilitate higher burnup core designs. The objective of this project is to understand the mechanisms by which alloy composition, heat treatment and microstructure affect corrosion rate. This knowledge can be used to predict the behavior of existing alloys outside the current experience base (for example, at high burn-up) and predict the effects of changes in operation conditions on zirconium alloy behavior. Zirconium alloys corrode by the formation f a highly adherent protective oxide layer. The working hypothesis of this project is that alloy composition, microstructure and heat treatment affect corrosion rates through their effect on the protective oxide structure and ion transport properties. The experimental task in this project is to identify these differences and understand how they affect corrosion behavior. To do this, several microstructural examination techniques including transmission electron microscope (TEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and a selection of fluorescence and diffraction techniques using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) were employed

  7. Hydride precipitation crack propagation in zircaloy cladding during a decreasing temperature history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    An assessment of safety, design, and cost tradeoff issues for short (ten to fifty years) and longer (fifty to hundreds of years) interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel in Zircaloy rods shall address potential failures of the Zircaloy cladding caused by the precipitation response of zirconium hydride platelets. To perform such assessment analyses rigorously and conservatively will be necessarily complex and difficult. For Zircaloy cladding, a model for zirconium hydride induced crack propagation velocity was developed for a decreasing temperature field and for hydrogen, temperature, and stress dependent diffusive transport of hydrogen to a generic hydride platelet at a crack tip. The development of the quasi-steady model is based on extensions of existing models for hydride precipitation kinetics for an isolated hydride platelet at a crack tip. An instability analysis model of hydride-crack growth was developed using existing concepts in a kinematic equation for crack propagation at a constant thermodynamic crack potential subject to brittle fracture conditions. At the time an instability is initiated, the crack propagation is no longer limited by hydride growth rate kinetics, but is then limited by stress rates. The model for slow hydride-crack growth will be further evaluated using existing available data. (authors)

  8. Hydride precipitation crack propagation in zircaloy cladding during a decreasing temperature history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, R.B. [California Univ., Livermore, CA (United States). Lawrence Livermore National Lab

    2001-07-01

    An assessment of safety, design, and cost tradeoff issues for short (ten to fifty years) and longer (fifty to hundreds of years) interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel in Zircaloy rods shall address potential failures of the Zircaloy cladding caused by the precipitation response of zirconium hydride platelets. To perform such assessment analyses rigorously and conservatively will be necessarily complex and difficult. For Zircaloy cladding, a model for zirconium hydride induced crack propagation velocity was developed for a decreasing temperature field and for hydrogen, temperature, and stress dependent diffusive transport of hydrogen to a generic hydride platelet at a crack tip. The development of the quasi-steady model is based on extensions of existing models for hydride precipitation kinetics for an isolated hydride platelet at a crack tip. An instability analysis model of hydride-crack growth was developed using existing concepts in a kinematic equation for crack propagation at a constant thermodynamic crack potential subject to brittle fracture conditions. At the time an instability is initiated, the crack propagation is no longer limited by hydride growth rate kinetics, but is then limited by stress rates. The model for slow hydride-crack growth will be further evaluated using existing available data. (authors)

  9. Hydrides blister formation and induced embrittlement on zircaloy-4 cladding tubes in reactivity initiated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellouin-De-Menibus, A.

    2012-01-01

    Our aim is to study the cladding fracture with mechanical tests more representative of RIA conditions, taking into account the hydrides blisters, representative strain rates and stress states. To obtain hydride blisters, we developed a thermodiffusion setup that reproduces blister growth in reactor conditions. By metallography, nano-hardness, XRD and ERDA, we showed that they are constituted by 80% to 100% of δ hydrides in a Zircaloy-4 matrix, and that the zirconium beneath has some radially oriented hydrides. We modeled the blister growth kinetics taking into account the hysteresis of the hydrogen solubility limit and defined the thermal gradient threshold for blister growth. The modeling of the dilatometric behavior of hydrided zirconium indicates the important role of the material crystallographic texture, which could explain differences in the blister shape. Mechanical tests monitored with an infrared camera showed that significant local heating occurred at strain rates higher than 0.1/s. In parallel, the Expansion Due to Compression test was optimized to increase the bi-axiality level from uniaxial stress to plane strain (HB-EDC and VHB-EDC tests). This increase in loading bi-axiality lowers greatly the fracture strain at 25 C and 350 C only in homogeneous material without blister. Eventually, the ductility decrease of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding tube in function of the blister depth was quantified. (author) [fr

  10. Composite polymer/glass edge claddings for new Nova laser disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, H.T.; Campbell, J.H.; Edwards, G.

    1987-01-01

    Large Nd:glass laser disks like those used in Nova require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 μm. This cladding prevents Fresnel reflections from the edges from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise reduce the gain. The original Nova disks had a Cu/sup 2+/-doped phosphate glass cladding which was cast at high temperature around the circumference of the disk. Although the performance of this cladding is excellent, it was expensive to produce. Consequently, in parallel with their efforts to develop Pt inclusion-free laser glass, the authors developed a composite polymer/glass edge cladding that can be applied at greatly reduced cost. Laser disks constructed with the new cladding design show identical performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without degradation. The new cladding consists of absorbing glass strips which are bonded to the edges of polygonal-rather that elliptical-shaped disks. The bond is made by an --25-μm thick clear epoxy adhesive whose index of refraction matches both the laser and absorbing glass. By blending aromatic and aliphatic epoxy constituents, they achieved an index-of-refraction match within approximately +-0.003 between the epoxy and glass. The epoxy was also chosen based on its damage resistance to flashlamp light and its adhesive strength to glass. The present cladding is a major improvement over a previous experimental cladding utilizing silicone rubber as a coupling agent. Early prototypes constructed without using the presented techniques exhibited failures from both mechanisms. Delamination failures occurred which clearly showed both surface and bulk-mode parasitic oscillation. Requirements on the polymer, disk size, and Nd doping to prevent these problems are presented

  11. Hydrogen desorption kinetics from zirconium hydride and zirconium metal in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Terrani, Kurt A.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride is important in many nuclear design and safety applications. In this paper, a coordinated experimental and modeling study has been used to explicitly demonstrate the applicability of existing kinetic theories for hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride and α-zirconium. A static synthesis method was used to produce δ-zirconium hydride, and the crystallographic phases of the zirconium hydride were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Three obvious stages, involving δ-zirconium hydride, a two-phase region, and α-zirconium, were observed in the hydrogen desorption spectra of two zirconium hydride specimens with H/Zr ratios of 1.62 and 1.64, respectively, which were obtained using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). A continuous, one-dimensional, two-phase moving boundary model, coupled with the zero- and second-order kinetics of hydrogen desorption from δ-zirconium hydride and α-zirconium, respectively, has been developed to reproduce the TDS experimental results. A comparison of the modeling predictions with the experimental results indicates that a zero-order kinetic model is valid for description of hydrogen flux away from the δ-hydride phase, and that a second-order kinetic model works well for hydrogen desorption from α-Zr if the activation energy of desorption is optimized to be 70% of the value reported in the literature

  12. Use of multiscale zirconium alloy deformation models in nuclear fuel behavior analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, Robert, E-mail: robert.montgomery@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (United States); Tomé, Carlos, E-mail: tome@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Liu, Wenfeng, E-mail: wenfeng.liu@anatech.com [ANATECH Corporation (United States); Alankar, Alankar, E-mail: alankar.alankar@iitb.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (India); Subramanian, Gopinath, E-mail: gopinath.subramanian@usm.edu [University of Southern Mississippi (United States); Stanek, Christopher, E-mail: stanek@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Accurate prediction of cladding mechanical behavior is a key aspect of modeling nuclear fuel behavior, especially for conditions of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), and loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Current approaches to fuel performance modeling rely on empirical constitutive models for cladding creep, growth and plastic deformation, which are limited to the materials and conditions for which the models were developed. To improve upon this approach, a microstructurally-based zirconium alloy mechanical deformation analysis capability is being developed within the United States Department of Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). Specifically, the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) polycrystal plasticity modeling approach, developed by Lebensohn and Tomé [1], has been coupled with the BISON engineering scale fuel performance code to represent the mechanistic material processes controlling the deformation behavior of light water reactor (LWR) cladding. A critical component of VPSC is the representation of the crystallographic nature (defect and dislocation movement) and orientation of the grains within the matrix material and the ability to account for the role of texture on deformation. A future goal is for VPSC to obtain information on reaction rate kinetics from atomistic calculations to inform the defect and dislocation behavior models described in VPSC. The multiscale modeling of cladding deformation mechanisms allowed by VPSC far exceed the functionality of typical semi-empirical constitutive models employed in nuclear fuel behavior codes to model irradiation growth and creep, thermal creep, or plasticity. This paper describes the implementation of an interface between VPSC and BISON and provides initial results utilizing the coupled functionality.

  13. Analysis and Experimental Qualification of an Irradiation Capsule Design for Testing Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Cladding in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kurt R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Daily, Charles R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is currently investigating a number of advanced nuclear fuel cladding concepts to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactors. Alumina-forming ferritic alloys (e.g., FeCrAl) are some of the leading candidates to replace traditional zirconium alloys due to their superior oxidation resistance, provided no prohibitive irradiation-induced embrittlement occurs. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed experimental designs to irradiate thin-walled cladding tubes with representative pressurized water reactor geometry in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) under relevant temperatures. These designs allow for post-irradiation examination (PIE) of cladding that closely resembles expected commercially viable geometries and microstructures. The experiments were designed using relatively inexpensive rabbit capsules for the irradiation vehicle. The simplistic designs combined with the extremely high neutron flux in the HFIR allow for rapid testing of a large test matrix, thus reducing the time and cost needed to advanced cladding materials closer to commercialization. The designs are flexible in that they allow for testing FeCrAl alloys, stainless steels, Inconel alloys, and zirconium alloys (as a reference material) both with and without hydrides. This will allow a direct comparison of the irradiation performance of advanced cladding materials with traditional zirconium alloys. PIE will include studies of dimensional change, microstructure variation, mechanical performance, etc. This work describes the capsule design, neutronic and thermal analyses, and flow testing that were performed to support the qualification of this new irradiation vehicle.

  14. Laser cladding of quasicrystalline alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audebert, F.; Sirkin, H.; Colaco, R.; Vilar, R.

    1998-01-01

    Quasicrystals are a new class of ordinated structures with metastable characteristics room temperature. Quasicrystalline phases can be obtained by rapid quenching from the melt of some alloys. In general, quasicrystals present properties which make these alloys promising for wear and corrosion resistant coatings applications. During the last years, the development of quasicrystalline coatings by means of thermal spray techniques has been impulsed. However, no references have been found of their application by means of laser techniques. In this work four claddings of quasicrystalline compositions formed over aluminium substrate, produced by a continuous CO 2 laser using simultaneous powders mixture injection are presented. The claddings were characterized by X ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers microhardness. (Author) 18 refs

  15. High-temperature air oxidation of E110 and Zr-1%Nb alloys claddings with coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuprin, A.S.; Belous, V.A.; Voyevodin, V.N.; Bryk, V.V.; Vasilenko, R.L.; Ovcharenko, V.D.; Tolmachova, G.N.; V'yugov, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    Results of experimental study of the influence of protective vacuum-arc claddings on the base of compounds zirconium-chromium and of its nitrides on air oxidation resistance at temperatures 660, 770, 900, 1020, 1100 deg C during 3600 s. of tubes produced of zirconium alloys E110 and Zr-1%Nb (calcium-thermal alloy of Ukrainian production) are presented. Change of hardness, the width of oxide layer and depth of oxygen penetration into alloys from the side of coating and without coating are investigated by the methods of nanoindentation and by scanning electron microscopy. It is shown that the thickness of oxide layer in zirconium alloys at temperatures 1020 and 1100 deg C from the side of the coating doesn't exceed 5 μm, and from the unprotected side reaches the value of ≥ 120 μm with porous and rough structure. Tubes with coatings save their shape completely independently of the type of alloy; tubes without coatings deform with the production of through cracks

  16. Review and evaluation of cladding attack of LMFBR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, M.; Nagai, S.; Furuya, H.; Muto, T.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of cladding inner wall corrosion during irradiation was evaluated in terms of fuel density, fuel form, O/M ratio, plutonium concentration, cladding composition, cladding pretreatment, cladding inner diameter, burnup and cladding inner wall temperature. Factors which influence the corrosion are O/M ratio (oxygen to metal ratio), burn up, cladding inner diameter and cladding inner wall temperature. Maximum cladding inner wall corrosion depth was formulated as a function of O/M ratio, burn up and cladding inner wall temperature

  17. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION WITH RESPECT TO ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, S.; Beederman, M.

    1961-05-01

    A process is given for separating uranium values from a nitric acid aqueous solution containing uranyl values, zirconium values and tetravalent plutonium values. The process comprises contacting said solution with a substantially water-immiscible liquid organic solvent containing alkyl phosphate, separating an organic extract phase containing the uranium, zirconium, and tetravalent plutonium values from an aqueous raffinate, contacting said organic extract phase with an aqueous solution 2M to 7M in nitric acid and also containing an oxalate ion-containing substance, and separating a uranium- containing organic raffinate from aqueous zirconium- and plutonium-containing extract phase.

  18. Chemistry of titanium, zirconium and thorium picramates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, R.S.; Agrawal, S.P.; Bhargava, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    Picramates of titanium, zirconium and thorium are prepared by treating the aqueous sulphate, chloride and nitrate solutions with sodium picramate. Micro-analysis, colorimetry and spectrophotometry are used to establish the compositions (metal : ligand ratio) of these picramates as 1 : 2 (for titanium and zirconium) and 1 : 4 (for thorium). IR studies indicate H 2 N → Me coordination (where Me denotes the metal). A number of explosive properties of these picramates point to the fact that the zirconium picramate is thermally more stable than the picramates of titanium and thorium. (orig.) [de

  19. Fundamentals and industrial applications of high power laser beam cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruck, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    Laser beam cladding has been refined such that clad characteristics are precisely determined through routine process control. This paper reviews the state of the art of laser cladding optical equipment, as well as the fundamental process/clad relationships that have been developed for high power processing. Major categories of industrial laser cladding are described with examples chose to highlight particular process attributes

  20. Unirradiated cladding rip-propagation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.; Hunter, C.W.

    1981-04-01

    The size of cladding rips which develop when a fuel pin fails can affect the subassembly cooling and determine how rapidly fuel escapes from the pin. The object of the Cladding Rip Propagation Test (CRPT) was to quantify the failure development of cladding so that a more realistic fuel pin failure modeling may be performed. The test results for unirradiated 20% CS 316 stainless steel cladding show significantly different rip propagation behavior at different temperatures. At room temperature, the rip growth is stable as the rip extension increases monotonically with the applied deformation. At 500 0 C, the rip propagation becomes unstable after a short period of stable rip propagation. The rapid propagation rate is approximately 200 m/s, and the critical rip length is 9 mm. At test temperatures above 850 0 C, the cladding exhibits very high failure resistances, and failure occurs by multiple cracking at high cladding deformation. 13 figures

  1. Effect of laser power on clad metal in laser-TIG combined metal cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Akihiro; Hino, Takanori; Matsuda, Jun; Tasoda, Takashi; Yoneda, Masafumi; Katsumura, Munehide; Yano, Tetsuo; Araki, Takao

    2003-03-01

    TIG arc welding has been used to date as a method for clad welding of white metal as bearing material. We propose a new clad welding process that combines a CO2 laser and a TIG arc, as a method for cladding at high speed. We hypothesized that this method would permit appropriate control of the melted quantity of base metal by varying the laser power. We carried out cladding while varying the laser power, and investigated the structure near the boundary between the clad layer and the base metal. Using the laser-TIG combined cladding, we found we were able to control appropriately the degree of dilution with the base metal. By applying this result to subsequent cladding, we were able to obtain a clad layer of high quality, which was slightly diluted with the base metal.

  2. LASER SURFACE CLADDING FOR STRUCTURAL REPAIR

    OpenAIRE

    SANTANU PAUL

    2018-01-01

    Laser cladding is a powder deposition technique, which is used to deposit layers of clad material on a substrate to improve its surface properties. It has widespread application in the repair of dies and molds used in the automobile industry. These molds and dies are subjected to cyclic thermo-mechanical loading and therefore undergo localized damage and wear. The final clad quality and integrity is influenced by various physical phenomena, namely, melt pool morphology, microst...

  3. Electrochemical profiling of multi-clad aluminium sheets used in automotive heat exchangers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordo, Kirill; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Peguet, Lionel

    2018-01-01

    potentiodynamic polarization, galvanic corrosion behaviour by ZRA, microstructure and composition by SEM and TEM were investigated and compared to those obtained for sheet without the interlayer. Inward diffusion of Si from clad, and outward diffusion of Cu from core are found to degrade the corrosion properties...

  4. Development of composite polymer-glass edge claddings for Nova Laser Disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.H.; Edwards, G.; Frick, F.A.; Gemmell, D.S.; Gim, B.M.; Jancaitis, K.S.; Jessop, E.S.; Kong, M.K.; Lyon, R.E.; Murray, J.E.; Patton, H.G.; Pitts, J.H.; Powell, H.T.; Riley, M.O.; Wallerstein, E.P.; Wolfe, C.R.; Woods, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    Large Nd:glass laser disks for disk amplifiers require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 μ m. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations that would otherwise deplete the gain. The authors have developed a composite polymer-glass edge cladding that consists of absorbing glass strips bonded to the edges of laser glass disks using an epoxy adhesive. The edge cladding must survive a fluence of approximately 20 J/cm 2 in a 0.5-ms pulse. Failure can occur either by decomposition of the polymer or by mechanical failure from thermal stresses which leads to bond delamination. An epoxy has been developed that gives the required damage resistance, refractive index match and processing characteristics. A slight tilt of the disk edges greatly reduces the threat from parasitic oscillations and a glass surface treatment is used to promote bond adhesion. Laser disks fabricated with this new cladding show identical gain performance to disks using conventional fused-glass cladding and have been tested for over 2000 shots (equivalent to about a 4-year lifetime on Nova) with out degradation

  5. Nuclear-powered pacemaker fuel cladding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoup, R.L.

    1976-07-01

    The fabrication of fuel capsules with refractory metal and alloy clads used in nuclear-powered cardiac pacemakers precludes the expedient dissolution of the clad in inorganic acid solutions. An experiment to measure penetration rates of acids on commonly used fuel pellet clads indicated that it is not impossible, but that it would be very difficult to dissolve the multiple cladding. This work was performed because of a suggestion that a 238 PuO 2 -powered pacemaker could be transformed into a terrorism weapon

  6. Laser surface cladding:a literature survey

    OpenAIRE

    Gedda, Hans

    2000-01-01

    This work consists of a literature survey of a laser surface cladding in order to investigate techniques to improve the cladding rate for the process. The high local heat input caused by the high power density of the laser generates stresses and the process is consider as slow when large areas are processed. To avoid these disadvantages the laser cladding process velocity can be increased three or four times by use of preheated wire instead of the powder delivery system. If laser cladding is ...

  7. Modelling cladding response to changing conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tulkki, Ville; Ikonen, Timo [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland ltd (Finland)

    2016-11-15

    The cladding of the nuclear fuel is subjected to varying conditions during fuel reactor life. Load drops and reversals can be modelled by taking cladding viscoelastic behaviour into account. Viscoelastic contribution to the deformation of metals is usually considered small enough to be ignored, and in many applications it merely contributes to the primary part of the creep curve. With nuclear fuel cladding the high temperature and irradiation as well as the need to analyse the variable load all emphasise the need to also inspect the viscoelasticity of the cladding.

  8. Pulsed Laser Cladding of Ni Based Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascu, A.; Stanciu, E. M.; Croitoru, C.; Roata, I. C.; Tierean, M. H.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize the operational parameters and quality of one step Metco Inconel 718 atomized powder laser cladded tracks, deposited on AISI 316 stainless steel substrate by means of a 1064 nm high power pulsed laser, together with a Precitec cladding head manipulated by a CLOOS 7 axes robot. The optimization of parameters and cladding quality has been assessed through Taguchi interaction matrix and graphical output. The study demonstrates that very good cladded layers with low dilution and increased mechanical proprieties could be fabricated using low laser energy density by involving a pulsed laser.

  9. Cladding creepdown model for FRAPCON-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Tolli, J.E.

    1985-02-01

    This report presents a cladding deformation model developed to analyze cladding creepdown during steady state operation in both a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and a boiling water reactor (BWR). This model accounts for variations in zircaloy cladding heat treatment; cold worked and stress relieved material, typically used in a PWR, and fully recrystallized material, typically used in a BWR. The model calculates cladding creepdown as a function of hoop stress, fast neutron flux, exposure time, and temperature. This report also presents a comparison between cladding creep calculations by this model and corresponding measurements from the KWU/CE program, ORNL HOBBIE experiments, and EPRI/Westinghouse Engineering cooperative project. The comparisons show that the model calculates cladding creep strains well. The analyses of non-fueled rods by FRAPCON-2 show that the cladding creepdown model was correctly incorporated. Also, analysis of a PWR rod test case shows that the FRAPCON-2 code can analyze pellet-cladding mechanical interaction caused by cladding creepdown and fuel swelling

  10. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  11. Anticorrosion ion implantation of fragments of zirconium fuel can specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, B.A.; Osipov, V.V.; Volkov, N.V.; Khernov, V.Yu.

    2001-01-01

    Aimed at the study of specific features of oxide film formation in the initial stage of Eh110 and Eh635 alloy fuel can oxidation the modification of tubular specimen surfaces is performed using an ion mixing technique, and the structure of oxide films produced in a steam-water environment is investigated. Using the method of vacuum vapor deposition the outer surface of specimens is coated with alloying element films irradiated by a polyenergetic Ar + ion beam with a 10 keV mean energy up to radiation doses of (7-10) x 10 17 ion/cm 2 . Monatomic (Al, Fe, Cu, Cr, Mo, Sn) or diatomic (Al-Fe, Al-Mo, Al-Sn, Fe-Cu, Fe-Mo, Fe-Sn, Cr-Mo, Cr-Sn) implantation into a zirconium cladding occurs under irradiation effect. The positive influence of combined intrusion of Al and other elements is revealed. The presence of Al atoms enhances the oxide film structure. The least ZeO 2 film thickness is observed when alloying with molybdenum, Al-Fe, Al-Mo and Al-Sn [ru

  12. Unirradiated UO2 in irradiated zirconium alloy sheathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, R.D.; Hardy, D.G.; Hunt, C.E.L.; Scoberg, J.A.

    1979-07-01

    Zircaloy-clad UO 2 fuel elements have defected in power reactors when element power outputs were raised significantly after a long irradiation at low power. We have irradiated fuel elements fabricated from fresh UO 2 pellets and zirconium alloy sheaths previously irradiated without fuel. This gave a fuel element with radiation-damaged low-ductility sheathing but with no fission products in the fuel. The elements were power boosted in-reactor to linear power outputs up to 84 kW/m for two five-day periods. No elements defected despite sheath strains of 0.82 percent at circumferential ridge postions. Half of these elements were subsequently soaked at low power to build up the fission product inventory in the fuel and then power boosted to 63 kW/m for a third time. Two elements defected on this final boost. We conclude that these defects were caused by fission product induced stress-corrosion cracking and that this mechanism plays an importent role in power reactor fuel defects. (auth)

  13. Multiscale modelling of hydrogen embrittlement in zirconium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majevadia, Jassel; Wenman, Mark; Balint, Daniel; Sutton, Adrian [Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Nazarov, Roman [MPIE, Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) is a commonly occurring embrittlement phenomenon in zirconium alloy fuel cladding within Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). DHC is caused by the accumulation of hydrogen atoms taken up by the metal, and the formation of brittle hydrides in the vicinity of crack tips. The rate of crack growth is limited by the rate of hydrogen diffusion to the crack, which can be modelled by solving a stress driven diffusion equation that incorporates the elastic interaction between defects. This of interest in the present work. The elastic interaction is calculated by combining defect forces determined through Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulations, and an exact solution for the anisotropic elastic field of an edge dislocation in Zr. making it possible to determine the interaction energy without the need to simulate directly a hydrogen atom in the presence of a crack or dislocation, which is computationally prohibitive with DFT. The result of the elastic interaction energy calculations can be utilised to determine the segregation of hydrogen to a crack tip for varying crack tip geometries, and in the presence of other crystal defects. This is done by implementing a diffusion equation for hydrogen within a discrete dislocation dynamics simulation. In the present work a model has been developed to demonstrate the effect of a single dislocation on hydrogen diffusion to create a Cottrell atmosphere.

  14. Oxidized zirconium on ceramic; Catastrophic coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, V E; Saglam, N; Dikmen, G; Tozun, I R

    2017-02-01

    Oxidized zirconium (Oxinium™; Smith & Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA) articulated with polyethylene in total hip arthroplasty (THA) appeared to have the potential to reduce wear dramatically. The thermally oxidized metal zirconium surface is transformed into ceramic-like hard surface that is resistant to abrasion. The exposure of soft zirconium metal under hard coverage surface after the damage of oxidized zirconium femoral head has been described. It occurred following joint dislocation or in situ succeeding disengagement of polyethylene liner. We reported three cases of misuse of Oxinium™ (Smith & Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA) heads. These three cases resulted in catastrophic in situ wear and inevitable failure although there was no advice, indication or recommendation for this use from the manufacturer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Study for the chlorination of zirconium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, E.S.M.; Takiishi, H.; Paschoal, J.O.A.; Andreoli, M.

    1990-12-01

    In the development of new ceramic and metallic materials the chlorination process constitutes step in the formation of several intermediate compounds, such as metallic chlorides, used for the production of high, purity raw materials. Chlorination studies with the aim of fabrication special zirconium-base alloys have been carried out at IPEN. Within this program the chlorination technique has been used for zirconium tetrachloride production from zirconium oxide. In this paper some relevant parameters such as: time and temperature of reaction, flow rate of chloride gas and percentage of the reducing agent which influence the efficiency of chlorination of zirconium oxide are evaluated. Thermodynamical aspects about the reactions involved in the process are also presented. (author)

  16. Towards an understanding of zirconium alloy corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.

    1976-08-01

    A brief historical summary is given of the development of a programme for understanding the corrosion mechanisms operating for zirconium alloys. A general summary is given of the progress made, so far, in carrying through this programme. (author)

  17. Zirconium determination in refractories (gravimetric method)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capiotto, N.; Narahashi, Y.; Perish, C.G.; Souza, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    The zirconium determination in refractories is described, consisting in two separation methods for eliminating the interferences. The formatted product is calcined at 1100 0 C and determined gravimetrically as Zr P z 07. (author)

  18. Joint titrimetric determination of zirconium and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Cristina; Botbol, Moises; Bianco de Salas, G.N.; Cornell de Casas, M.I.

    1980-01-01

    A method for the joint titrimetric determination of zirconium and hafnium, which are elements of similar chemical behaviour, is described. The disodic salt of the ethylendiaminetetracetic acid (EDTA) is used for titration, while xilenol orange serves as final point indicator. Prior to titration it is important to evaporate with sulfuric acid, the solution resulting from the zirconium depolymerization process, to adjust the acidity and to eliminate any interferences. The method, that allows the quick and precise determination of zirconium and hafnium in quantities comprised between 0.01 and mg, was applied to the analysis of raw materials and of intermediate and final products in the fabrication of zirconium sponge and zircaloy. (M.E.L.) [es

  19. Zirconium determination in refractories (gravimetric method)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capiotto, N.; Narahashi, Y.; Perish, P.G.; Souza, J.R. de

    1991-01-01

    A gravimetric method for zirconium determination in refractories is described. X-ray fluorescence analysis is also employed in this experiment and considerations about interfering elements are presented. (M.V.M.)

  20. Examination of stainless steel-clad Connecticut Yankee fuel assembly S004 after storage in borated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langstaff, D.C.; Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Landow, M.P.; Pasupathi, V.; Klingensmith, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    A Connecticut Yankee fuel assembly (S004) was tested nondestructively and destructively. It was concluded that no obvious degradation of the 304L stainless steel-clad spent fuel from assembly S004 occurred during 5 y of storage in borated water. Furthermore, no obvious degradation due to the pool environment occurred on 304 stainless steel-clad rods in assemblies H07 and G11, which were stored for shorter periods but contained operationally induced cladding defects. The seam welds in the cladding on fuel rods from assembly S004, H07, and G11 were similar in that they showed a wrought microstructure with grains noticeably smaller than those in the cladding base metal. The end cap welds showed a dendritically cored structure, typical of rapidly quenched austenitic weld metal. Some intergranular melting may have occurred in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in the cladding adjacent to the end cap welds in rods from assemblies S004 and H07. However, the weld areas did not show evidence of corrosion-induced degradation

  1. Synthesis of Zirconium Lower Chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaviria, Juan P.

    2002-01-01

    This research is accurately related to the Halox concept of research reactor spent fuel element treatment.The aim of this project is to work the conditioning through selected chlorination of the element that make the spent fuel element. This research studied the physical chemistry conditions which produce formation of the lower zirconium chlorides through the reaction between metallic Zr and gaseous ZrCl 4 in a silica reactor.This work focused special attention in the analysis and confrontation of the published results among the different authors in order to reveal coincidences and contradictions.Experimental section consisted in a set of synthesis with different reaction conditions and reactor design. After reaction were analyzed the products on Zr shavings and the deposit growth on wall reactor.The products were strongly dependent of reactor design. It was observed that as the distance between Zr and wall reactor increased greater was tendency to lower chlorides formation.In reactors with small distance the reaction follows other way without formation of lower chlorides.Analysis on deposit growth on reactor showed that may be formed to a mixture of Si x Zr y intermetallics and zirconium oxides.Presence of oxygen in Zr and Zr-Si compounds on wall reactor reveals that there is an interaction between quartz and reactants.This interaction is in gaseous phase because contamination is observed in experiences where Zr was not in contact with reactor.Finally, it was made a global analysis of all experiences and a possible mechanism that interprets reaction ways is proposed

  2. METHOD OF IMPROVING CORROSION RESISTANCE OF ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, D.W.

    1961-03-28

    An improved intermediate rinse for zirconium counteracts an anomalous deposit that often results in crevices and outof-the-way places when ordinary water is used to rinse away a strong fluoride etching solution designed to promote passivation of the metal. The intermediate rinse, which is used after the etching solution and before the water, is characterized by a complexing agent for fluoride ions such as aluminum or zirconium nitrates or chlorides.

  3. Microstructures and properties of ceramic particle-reinforced metal matrix composite layers produced by laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingmao; He, Jingjiang; Liu, Wenjin; Zhong, Minlin

    2005-01-01

    Different weight ratio of titanium, zirconium, WC and Fe-based alloy powders were mixed, and cladded onto a medium carbon steel substrate using a 3kW continuous wave CO2 laser, aiming at producing Ceramic particles- reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) layers. The microstructures of the layers are typical hypoeutectic, and the major phases are Ni3Si2, TiSi2, Fe3C, FeNi, MC, Fe7Mo3, Fe3B, γ(residual austenite) and M(martensite). The microstructure morphologies of MMCs layers are dendrites/cells. The MC-type reinforcements are in situ synthesis Carbides which main compositions consist of transition elements Zr, Ti, W. The MC-type particles distributed within dendrite and interdendritic regions with different volume fractions for single and overlapping clad layers. The MMCs layers are dense and free of cracks with a good metallurgical bonding between the layer and substrate. The addition ratio of WC in the mixtures has the remarkable effect on the microhardness of clad layers.

  4. Cladding temperature measurement by thermocouples at preirradiated LWR fuel rod samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiling, W.

    1981-12-01

    This report describes the technique to measure cladding temperatures of test fuel rod samples, applied during the in-pile tests on fuel rod failure in the steam loop of the FR2 reactor. NiCr/Ni thermocouples with stainless steel and Inconel sheaths, respectively,of 1 mm diameter were resistance spot weld to the outside of the fuel rod cladding. For the pre-irradiated test specimens, welding had to be done under hot-cell conditions, i.e. under remote handling. In order to prevent the formation of eutectics between zirconium and the chemical elements of the thermocouple sheath at elevated temperatures, the thermocouples were covered with a platinum jacket of 1.4 mm outside diameter swaged onto the sheath in the area of the measuring junction. This thermocouple design has worked satisfactorily in the in-pile experiments performed in a steam atmosphere. Even in the heatup phase, in which cladding temperatures up to 1050 0 C were reached, only very few failures occured. This good performance is to a great part due to a careful control and a thorough inspection of the thermocouples. (orig.) [de

  5. Influence of water chemistry on fuel cladding behaviour. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    For the purpose of the meeting water chemistry included the actual practice, the water chemistry monitoring and the on-going research. Corrosion included also hydriding, recent observations made in reactors, modelling and the recent research carried out. Fifty seven participants representing twenty countries attended the thirty formal presentations and the subsequent discussions. The thirty papers presented were split into five sessions covering, Reactor experience, Mechanism and Modelling, Oxidation and hydriding, On-line monitoring of water chemistry and the review of existing and advanced water chemistries. Four panel discussions including ''Corrosion mechanism and Modelling'', ''Corrosion and Hydriding'', ''Plant Experience and Loop Experiments'', Water Chemistry, Current Practice and Emerging Solutions'' and ''On-line Monitoring of Water Chemistry and Corrosion'' were organized. The main points of discussion focussed on the optimization of water chemistry, the compatibility of potassium water chemistry with the utilization of Zircaloy 4 or the utilization of zirconium niobium cladding with lithium water chemistry. The effect of the fabrication route and of the cladding composition (Sn content) on the corrosion kinetics, the state of the art and the correlative gaps in cladding corrosion modelling and the recent developments of on-line monitoring of water chemistry together with examination of suitable developments, were also discussed. Refs, figs, tabs

  6. Influence of water chemistry on fuel cladding behaviour. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    For the purpose of the meeting water chemistry included the actual practice, the water chemistry monitoring and the on-going research. Corrosion included also hydriding, recent observations made in reactors, modelling and the recent research carried out. Fifty seven participants representing twenty countries attended the thirty formal presentations and the subsequent discussions. The thirty papers presented were split into five sessions covering, Reactor experience, Mechanism and Modelling, Oxidation and hydriding, On-line monitoring of water chemistry and the review of existing and advanced water chemistries. Four panel discussions including ``Corrosion mechanism and Modelling``, ``Corrosion and Hydriding``, ``Plant Experience and Loop Experiments``, Water Chemistry, Current Practice and Emerging Solutions`` and ``On-line Monitoring of Water Chemistry and Corrosion`` were organized. The main points of discussion focussed on the optimization of water chemistry, the compatibility of potassium water chemistry with the utilization of Zircaloy 4 or the utilization of zirconium niobium cladding with lithium water chemistry. The effect of the fabrication route and of the cladding composition (Sn content) on the corrosion kinetics, the state of the art and the correlative gaps in cladding corrosion modelling and the recent developments of on-line monitoring of water chemistry together with examination of suitable developments, were also discussed. Refs, figs, tabs.

  7. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-12-01

    A large variety of research reactor spent fuel with different fuel meats, different geometries and different enrichments in 235 U are presently stored underwater in basins located around the world. More than 90% of these fuels are clad in aluminium or aluminium based alloys that are notoriously susceptible to corrosion in water of less than optimum quality. Some fuel is stored in the reactor pools themselves, some in auxiliary pools (or basins) close to the reactor and some stored at away-from-reactor pools. Since the early 1990s, when corrosion induced degradation of the fuel cladding was observed in many of the pools, corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel stored in light water filled basins has become a major concern, and programmes were implemented at the sites to improve fuel storage conditions. The IAEA has since then established a number of programmatic activities to address corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. Of special relevance was the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase I) initiated in 1996, whose results were published in IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 418. At the end of this CRP it was considered necessary that a continuation of the CRP should concentrate on fuel storage basins that had demonstrated significant corrosion problems and would therefore provide additional insight into the fundamentals of localized corrosion of aluminium. As a consequence, the IAEA started a new CRP entitled Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase II), to carry out more comprehensive research in some specific areas of corrosion of aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. In addition to this CRP, one of the activities under IAEA's Technical Cooperation Regional Project for Latin America Management of Spent Fuel from Research Reactors (2001-2006) was corrosion monitoring and surveillance of research

  8. Experimental approach and micro-mechanical modeling of the mechanical behavior of irradiated zirconium alloys; Approche experimentale et modelisation micromecanique du comportement des alliages de zirconium irradies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onimus, F

    2003-12-01

    Zirconium alloys cladding tubes containing nuclear fuel of the Pressurized Water Reactors constitute the first safety barrier against the dissemination of radioactive elements. Thus, it is essential to predict the mechanical behavior of the material in-reactor conditions. This study aims, on the one hand, to identify and characterize the mechanisms of the plastic deformation of irradiated zirconium alloys and, on the other hand, to propose a micro-mechanical modeling based on these mechanisms. The experimental analysis shows that, for the irradiated material, the plastic deformation occurs by dislocation channeling. For transverse tensile test and internal pressure test this channeling occurs in the basal planes. However, for axial tensile test, the study revealed that the plastic deformation also occurs by channeling but in the prismatic and pyramidal planes. In addition, the study of the macroscopic mechanical behavior, compared to the deformation mechanisms observed by TEM, suggested that the internal stress is higher in the case of irradiated material than in the case of non-irradiated material, because of the very heterogeneous character of the plastic deformation. This analysis led to a coherent interpretation of the mechanical behavior of irradiated materials, in terms of deformation mechanisms. The mechanical behavior of irradiated materials was finally modeled by applying homogenization methods for heterogeneous materials. This model is able to reproduce adequately the mechanical behavior of the irradiated material, in agreement with the TEM observations. (author)

  9. Sulphur mustard degradation on zirconium doped Ti-Fe oxides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štengl, Václav; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Opluštil, F.; Němec, T.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 192, č. 3 (2011), s. 1491-1504 ISSN 0304-3894 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : warfare agents * nanodispersive oxides * homogeneous hydrolysis * urea Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.173, year: 2011

  10. BWR fuel clad behaviour following LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, S.M.; Vyas, K.N.; Dinesh Babu, R.

    1996-01-01

    Flow and pressure through the fuel coolant channel reduce rapidly following a loss of coolant accident. Due to stored energy and decay heat, fuel and cladding temperatures rise rapidly. Increase in clad temperature causes deterioration of mechanical properties of clad material. This coupled with increase of pressure inside the cladding due to accumulation of fission gases and de-pressurization of coolant causes the cladding to balloon. This phenomenon is important as it can reduce or completely block the flow passages in a fuel assembly causing reduction of emergency coolant flow. Behaviour of a BWR clad is analyzed in a design basis LOCA. Fuel and clad temperatures following a LOCA are calculated. Fission gas release and pressure is estimated using well established models. An elasto-plastic analysis of clad tube is carried out to determine plastic strains and corresponding deformations using finite-element technique. Analysis of neighbouring pins gives an estimate of flow areas available for emergency coolant flow. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  11. Cladding properties under simulated fuel pin transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, C.W.; Johnson, G.D.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the HEDL fuel pin testing program utilizing a recently developed Fuel Cladding Transient Tester (FCTT) to generate the requisite mechanical property information on irradiated and unirradiated fast reactor fuel cladding under temperature ramp conditions. The test procedure is described, and data are presented

  12. Analysis of corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Kim, Ki Hang; Seo, Keum Seok; Chung, Jin Gon

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding was analyzed using the oxide measurement data of KOFA fuel irradiated up to the fuel rod burnup of 35,000 MWD/MTU for two cycles in Kori-2. Even though KOFA cladding is a standard Zircaloy-4 manufactured by Westinghouse according to the Siemens/KWU's HCW (Highly Cold Worked) standard Zircaloy-4 specification, it was expected that in-pile corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding would not be equivalent to that of Siemens/KWU's cladding due to the differences in such manufacturing processes as cold work and heat treatment. The analysis of measured KOFA cladding oxidation showed that oxidation of KOFA cladding is at least 19 % lower than the design analysis based upon Siemens/KWU's HCW standard Zircaloy-4 cladding. Lower corrosion of KOFA cladding seems to result from the differences in the manufacturing processes and chemical composition although the burnup and oxide layer thickness of the measured fuel rods is relatively low and the amount of the oxidation data base is small

  13. Corrosion characteristics of K-claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. Y.; Choi, B. K.; Jung, Y. H.; Jung, Y. H.

    2004-01-01

    The Improvement of the corrosion resistance of nuclear fuel claddings is the critical issue for the successful development of the high burn-up fuel. KAERI have developed the K-claddings having a superior corrosion resistance by controlling the alloying element addition and optimizing the manufacturing process. The comparative evaluation of the corrosion resistance for K-claddings and the foreign claddings was performed and the effect of the heat treatment on the corrosion behavior of K-claddings was also examined. Corrosion tests were carried out in the conditions of 360 .deg. C pure water, PWR-simulating loop and 400 .deg. C steam, From the results of the corrosion tests, it was found that the corrosion resistance of K-claddings is superior to those of Zry4 and A claddings and K6 showed a better corrosion resistance than K3. The corrosion behavior of K-cladding was strongly influenced by the final annealing rather than the intermediate annealing, and the corrosion resistance increased with decreasing the final annealing temperature

  14. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    This report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for cladding large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high-power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for cladding inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. An initial evaluation for performed on the quality of nickel claddings processed using the two selected cladding techniques.

  15. Zirconium doped nano-dispersed oxides of Fe, Al and Zn for destruction of warfare agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stengl, Vaclav; Houskova, Vendula; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Murafa, Nataliya; Marikova, Monika; Oplustil, Frantisek; Nemec, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium doped nano dispersive oxides of Fe, Al and Zn were prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of the respective sulfate salts with urea in aqueous solutions. Synthesized metal oxide hydroxides were characterized using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joiner-Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). These oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity with sulfur mustard (HD or bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide), soman (GD or (3,3'-Dimethylbutan-2-yl)-methylphosphonofluoridate) and VX agent (S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl]-O-ethyl-methylphosphonothionate). The presence of Zr 4+ dopant can increase both the surface area and the surface hydroxylation of the resulting doped oxides, decreases their crystallites' sizes thereby it may contribute in enabling the substrate adsorption at the oxide surface thus it can accelerate the rate of degradation of warfare agents. Addition of Zr 4+ converts the product of the reaction of ferric sulphate with urea from ferrihydrite to goethite. We found out that doped oxo-hydroxides Zr-FeO(OH) - being prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of ferric and zirconium oxo-sulfates mixture in aqueous solutions - exhibit a comparatively higher degradation activity towards chemical warfare agents (CWAs). Degradation of soman or VX agent on Zr-doped FeO(OH) containing ca. 8.3 wt.% of zirconium proceeded to completion within 30 min.

  16. Zirconium doped nano-dispersed oxides of Fe, Al and Zn for destruction of warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stengl, Vaclav, E-mail: stengl@uach.cz [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry AS CR v.v.i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Houskova, Vendula; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Murafa, Nataliya; Marikova, Monika [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry AS CR v.v.i., 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Oplustil, Frantisek; Nemec, Tomas [Military Technical Institute of Protection Brno, Veslarska 230, 628 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2010-11-15

    Zirconium doped nano dispersive oxides of Fe, Al and Zn were prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of the respective sulfate salts with urea in aqueous solutions. Synthesized metal oxide hydroxides were characterized using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joiner-Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). These oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity with sulfur mustard (HD or bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide), soman (GD or (3,3'-Dimethylbutan-2-yl)-methylphosphonofluoridate) and VX agent (S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl]-O-ethyl-methylphosphonothionate). The presence of Zr{sup 4+} dopant can increase both the surface area and the surface hydroxylation of the resulting doped oxides, decreases their crystallites' sizes thereby it may contribute in enabling the substrate adsorption at the oxide surface thus it can accelerate the rate of degradation of warfare agents. Addition of Zr{sup 4+} converts the product of the reaction of ferric sulphate with urea from ferrihydrite to goethite. We found out that doped oxo-hydroxides Zr-FeO(OH) - being prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of ferric and zirconium oxo-sulfates mixture in aqueous solutions - exhibit a comparatively higher degradation activity towards chemical warfare agents (CWAs). Degradation of soman or VX agent on Zr-doped FeO(OH) containing ca. 8.3 wt.% of zirconium proceeded to completion within 30 min.

  17. Effect of known clad and pellet reactions on the GEC ESL design of dry vault store

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, D.

    1984-01-01

    The more important clad and pellet reactions and their temperature dependence are briefly reviewed, followed by an outline of the economical GEC ESL interim spent fuel storage concept that highlights: The ability of the concept to reduce the temperature of the fuel to values where the clad and pellet reactions are minimal. The containment philosophy that enables any consequences of the reactions to be safely retained to ALARA principles. The maintenance of an air storage environment that can never be lost. The utilisation of passive, naturally induced cooling regimes. The ability to continuously monitor for long-term degradation, together with ease of inspection at any time during storage

  18. Evolution of processing of GE fuel clad tubing for corrosion resistance in boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C.D. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Adamson, R.B. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Marlowe, M.O. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Plaza-Meyer, E. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); Proebstle, R.A. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States); White, D.W. [GE Nuclear Energy, Wilmington, NC (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The current modification of the primary GE in-process solution-quench heat treatment, an (alpha+beta) solution-quench carried out at a tube diameter requiring only two subsequent reduction and anneal cycles, is applicable to Zr barrier fuel clad tubing, to non-barrier fuel clad tubing, and to the TRICLAD tubing product. A combination of good in-reactor corrosion performance and degradation resistance is anticipated for these products, based on knowledge of metallurgical characteristics and supported by the demonstrated performance capability of the Zircaloy-2 materials used. (orig.)

  19. Flaw behavior in mechanically loaded clad plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Robinson, G.C.; Oland, C.B.

    1989-01-01

    A small crack near the inner surface of clad nuclear reactor pressure vessels is an important consideration in the safety assessment of the structural integrity of the vessel. Four-point bend tests on large plate specimens, conforming to ASTM specification for pressure vessel plates, alloy steels, quenched and tempered, Mn-Mo and Mn-Mo-Ni (A533) grade B six clad and two unclad with stainless steels 308, 309 and 312 weld wires, were performed to determine the effect of cladding upon the propagation of small surface cracks subjected to stress states. Results indicated that the tough surface layer composed of cladding and/or heat-affected zone has enhanced the load-bearing capacity of plates under conditions where unclad plates have ruptured. The results are interpreted in terms of fracture mechanics. The behavior of flaws in clad reactor pressure vessels is examined in the light of the test results. 11 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Some proposed mechanisms for internal cladding corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Pickering, S.; Whitlow, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    In spite of extensive research during recent years, a comprehensive model for internal cladding corrosion in fast reactor oxide fuel pins has not yet been established. In this paper, a model is proposed which accounts for many of the features normally associated with this type of corrosion. The model is composed of a number of parts which describe the chronological sequence of events at the fuel/cladding interface. The corrosion reaction is visualised as being primarily chemical in character, involving the cladding steel, the fuel and the more aggressive fission products, notably caesium in the presence of oxygen. The model attempts to explain how corrosion starts, how it depends on the oxygen potential, why it occurs non-uniformly; also covered are phase changes within the cladding steel and morphological features such as the intergranular form of attack and the distribution of corrosion products in the fuel/cladding gap. (author)

  1. Some proposed mechanisms for internal cladding corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M H; Pickering, S; Whitlow, W H [EURATOM (United Kingdom)

    1977-04-01

    In spite of extensive research during recent years, a comprehensive model for internal cladding corrosion in fast reactor oxide fuel pins has not yet been established. In this paper, a model is proposed which accounts for many of the features normally associated with this type of corrosion. The model is composed of a number of parts which describe the chronological sequence of events at the fuel/cladding interface. The corrosion reaction is visualised as being primarily chemical in character, involving the cladding steel, the fuel and the more aggressive fission products, notably caesium in the presence of oxygen. The model attempts to explain how corrosion starts, how it depends on the oxygen potential, why it occurs non-uniformly; also covered are phase changes within the cladding steel and morphological features such as the intergranular form of attack and the distribution of corrosion products in the fuel/cladding gap. (author)

  2. Texture and hydride orientation relationship of Zircaloy-4 fuel clad tube during its fabrication for pressurized heavy water reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaibhaw, Kumar; Rao, S. V. R.; Jha, S. K.; Saibaba, N.; Jayaraj, R. N.

    2008-12-01

    Zircaloy-4 material is used for cladding tube in pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) of 220 MWe and 540 MWe capacity in India. These tubes are fabricated by using various combinations of thermo-mechanical processes to achieve desired mechanical and corrosion properties. Cladding tube develops crystallographic texture during its fabrication, which has significant influence on its in-reactor performance. Due to radiolytic decomposition of water Zircaloy-4 picks-up hydrogen. This hydrogen in excess of its maximum solubility in reactor operating condition (˜300 °C), precipitates as zirconium hydrides causing embrittlement of cladding tube. Hydride orientation in the radial direction of the tube limits the service life and lowers the fuel burn-up in reactor. The orientation of the hydride primarily depends on texture developed during fabrication. A correlation between hydride orientation ( F n) with the texture in the tube during its fabrication has been developed using a second order polynomial. The present work is aimed at quantification and correlation of texture evolved in Zircaloy-4 cladding tube using Kearn's f-parameter during its fabrication process.

  3. Texture and hydride orientation relationship of Zircaloy-4 fuel clad tube during its fabrication for pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaibhaw, Kumar; Rao, S.V.R.; Jha, S.K.; Saibaba, N.; Jayaraj, R.N.

    2008-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 material is used for cladding tube in pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) of 220 MWe and 540 MWe capacity in India. These tubes are fabricated by using various combinations of thermo-mechanical processes to achieve desired mechanical and corrosion properties. Cladding tube develops crystallographic texture during its fabrication, which has significant influence on its in-reactor performance. Due to radiolytic decomposition of water Zircaloy-4 picks-up hydrogen. This hydrogen in excess of its maximum solubility in reactor operating condition (∼300 deg. C), precipitates as zirconium hydrides causing embrittlement of cladding tube. Hydride orientation in the radial direction of the tube limits the service life and lowers the fuel burn-up in reactor. The orientation of the hydride primarily depends on texture developed during fabrication. A correlation between hydride orientation (F n ) with the texture in the tube during its fabrication has been developed using a second order polynomial. The present work is aimed at quantification and correlation of texture evolved in Zircaloy-4 cladding tube using Kearn's f-parameter during its fabrication process

  4. Behavior of zirconium in nitric medium in the extraction with TBP 30% V/V in dodecane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, H.L.P. de.

    1979-10-01

    The extraction of 10 -2 M zirconium by TBP 30% V/V in dodecane from nitric acid solutions is studied as a function of the following parameters : nitric acid concentration, temperature and the presence of radiolytic degradation products of the organic phase. For this study natural zirconium is irradiated in order to obtain Zr-95, used as a tracer. The experimental results are discussed considering the displacement of the equilibrium in the systems studied as a function of different experimental variables. (Author) [pt

  5. Artefacts in multimodal imaging of titanium, zirconium and binary titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Ralf; Schöllchen, Maximilian; Gauer, Tobias; Aarabi, Ghazal; Assaf, Alexandre T; Rendenbach, Carsten; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Semmusch, Jan; Sedlacik, Jan; Heiland, Max; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-02-01

    To analyze and evaluate imaging artefacts induced by zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants. Zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants were embedded in gelatin and MRI, CT and CBCT were performed. Standard protocols were used for each modality. For MRI, line-distance profiles were plotted to quantify the accuracy of size determination. For CT and CBCT, six shells surrounding the implant were defined every 0.5 cm from the implant surface and histogram parameters were determined for each shell. While titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy induced extensive signal voids in MRI owing to strong susceptibility, zirconium implants were clearly definable with only minor distortion artefacts. For titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy, the MR signal was attenuated up to 14.1 mm from the implant. In CT, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy resulted in less streak artefacts in comparison with zirconium. In CBCT, titanium-zirconium alloy induced more severe artefacts than zirconium and titanium. MRI allows for an excellent image contrast and limited artefacts in patients with zirconium implants. CT and CBCT examinations are less affected by artefacts from titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants compared with MRI. The knowledge about differences of artefacts through different implant materials and image modalities might help support clinical decisions for the choice of implant material or imaging device in the clinical setting.

  6. Artefacts in multimodal imaging of titanium, zirconium and binary titanium–zirconium alloy dental implants: an in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöllchen, Maximilian; Aarabi, Ghazal; Assaf, Alexandre T; Rendenbach, Carsten; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Semmusch, Jan; Sedlacik, Jan; Heiland, Max; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze and evaluate imaging artefacts induced by zirconium, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy dental implants. Methods: Zirconium, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy implants were embedded in gelatin and MRI, CT and CBCT were performed. Standard protocols were used for each modality. For MRI, line–distance profiles were plotted to quantify the accuracy of size determination. For CT and CBCT, six shells surrounding the implant were defined every 0.5 cm from the implant surface and histogram parameters were determined for each shell. Results: While titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy induced extensive signal voids in MRI owing to strong susceptibility, zirconium implants were clearly definable with only minor distortion artefacts. For titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy, the MR signal was attenuated up to 14.1 mm from the implant. In CT, titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy resulted in less streak artefacts in comparison with zirconium. In CBCT, titanium–zirconium alloy induced more severe artefacts than zirconium and titanium. Conclusions: MRI allows for an excellent image contrast and limited artefacts in patients with zirconium implants. CT and CBCT examinations are less affected by artefacts from titanium and titanium–zirconium alloy implants compared with MRI. The knowledge about differences of artefacts through different implant materials and image modalities might help support clinical decisions for the choice of implant material or imaging device in the clinical setting. PMID:27910719

  7. Electrochemical-metallothermic reduction of zirconium in molten salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Talko, F.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a method for separating hafnium from zirconium of the type wherein a feed containing zirconium and hafnium chlorides is prepared from zirconium-hafnium chloride and the feed is introduced into a distillation column, which distillation column has a reboiler connected at the bottom and a reflux condenser connected at the top and wherein a hafnium chloride enriched stream is taken from the top of the column and a zirconium enriched chloride stream is taken from the bottom of the column. It comprises: reducing the zirconium enriched chloride stream taken from the distillation column to metal by electrochemically reducing an alkaline earth metal in a molten salt bath with the molten salt in the molten salt bath consisting essentially of a mixture of at least one alkali metal chloride and at least one alkaline earth metal chloride and zirconium chloride, with the reduced alkaline earth metal reacting with the zirconium chloride to produce zirconium metal and alkaline earth metal chloride

  8. A review of the inorganic and organometallic chemistry of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalvins, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a literature review of the inorganic and organometallic chemistry of zirconium are presented. Compounds with physical and chemical properties compatible with the requirements of an ir laser zirconium isotope separation process have been identified

  9. Advanced in-situ characterisation of corrosion properties of LWR fuel cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arilahti, E.; Bojinov, M.; Beverskog, B.

    1999-01-01

    The trend towards higher fuel burnups imposes a demand for better corrosion and hydriding resistance of cladding materials. Development of new and improved cladding materials is a long process. There is a lack of fast and reliable in-situ techniques to investigate zirconium alloys in simulated or in-core LWR coolant conditions. This paper describes a Thin Layer Electrode (TLE) arrangement suitable for in-situ characterization of oxide films formed on fuel cladding materials. This arrangement enables us to carry out: Versatile Thin Layer Electrochemical measurements, including: (i) Thin Layer Electrochemical impedance Spectroscopic (TLEIS) measurements to characterize the oxidation kinetics and mechanisms of metals and the properties of their oxide films in aqueous environments. These measurements can also be performed in low conductivity electrolytes. (ii) Thin-Layer Wall-Jet (TLWJ) measurements, which give the possibility to detect soluble reaction products and to evaluate the influence of novel water chemistry additions on their release. Solid Contact measurements: (i) Contact Electric Resistance (CER) measurements to investigate the electronic properties of surface films on the basis of d.c. resistance measurements. (i) Contact Electric impedance (CEI) measurements to study the electronic properties of surface films using a.c. perturbation. All the above listed measurements can be performed using one single measurement device developed at VTT. This device can be conveniently inserted into an autoclave. Its geometry is currently being optimized in cooperation with the OECD Halden Reactor Project. In addition, the applicability of the device for in-core measurements has been investigated in a joint feasibility study performed by VTT and JRC Petten. Results of some autoclave studies of the effect of LiOH concentration on the stability of fuel cladding oxide films are presented in this paper. (author)

  10. Duplex-cladding: Siemens answer to the requirements of extended burnup in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Swam, L.F.; Sell, H.J.; Eberle, R.; Seibold, A.

    1994-01-01

    One important goal of nuclear fuel development is to increase the cost-effectiveness of the nuclear fuel cycle by burnup extension. A prerequisite for this goal is a cladding tube with high resistance to corrosion under the operating conditions of modern PWRs. Therefore, in the early eighties Siemens started to investigate the material behaviour of Zirconium based alloys also outside the composition range of Zry-4. The examination included out-of-pile corrosion testing in water and steam, with and without chemical addition, such as LiOH, in-pile testing of path finder fuel rods in a hot PWR up to 80 MWd/kgU and the investigation of mechanical behaviour, growth and creep under normal and the postulated conditions of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The evaluation of in-pile and out-of-pile experiments on alternative Zr-alloys revealed that improvements in corrosion resistance are frequently accompanied by undesirable changes in material properties which affect mechanical design and LOCA behaviour. To fulfill all requirements - the mechanical and corrosion related ones - and to retain the large experience base with Zry-4, a DUPLEX cladding was selected. The selected ELS DUPLEX cladding consists of a Zircaloy-4 tubing with a thin outer layer of an Extra Low tin (Sn) Zr-alloy. The ELS layer improves the stability against LiOH and allows operation with voided coolant. This advanced product has been engineered for use in highly enriched fuel assemblies in high efficiency plants operating with low neutron leakage core management and high coolant temperatures. It has become the accepted fuel rod cladding for many plants in Germany, Spain and Switzerland. (authors). 6 figs., 2 refs

  11. Impacts of transient heat transfer modeling on prediction of advanced cladding fracture during LWR LBLOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youho, E-mail: euo@kaist.ac.kr; Lee, Jeong Ik, E-mail: jeongiklee@kaist.ac.kr; NO, Hee Cheon, E-mail: hcno@kaist.ac.kr

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Use of constant heat transfer coefficient for fracture analysis is not sound. • On-time heat transfer coefficient should be used for thermal fracture prediction. • ∼90% of the actual fracture stresses were predicted with the on-time transient h. • Thermal-hydraulic codes can be used to better predict brittle cladding fracture. • Effects of surface oxides on thermal shock fracture should be accounted by h. - Abstract: This study presents the importance of coherency in modeling thermal-hydraulics and mechanical behavior of a solid for an advanced prediction of cladding thermal shock fracture. In water quenching, a solid experiences dynamic heat transfer rate evolutions with phase changes of the fluid over a short quenching period. Yet, such a dynamic change of heat transfer rates has been overlooked in the analysis of thermal shock fracture. In this study, we are presenting quantitative evidence against the prevailing use of a constant heat transfer coefficient for thermal shock fracture analysis in water. We conclude that no single constant heat transfer could suffice to depict the actual stress evolution subject to dynamic fluid phase changes. Use of the surface temperature dependent heat transfer coefficient will remarkably increase predictability of thermal shock fracture of brittle materials. The presented results show a remarkable stress prediction improvement up to 80–90% of the actual stress with the use of the surface temperature dependent heat transfer coefficient. For thermal shock fracture analysis of brittle fuel cladding such as oxidized zirconium-based alloy or silicon carbide during LWR reflood, transient subchannel heat transfer coefficients obtained from a thermal-hydraulics code should be used as input for stress analysis. Such efforts will lead to a fundamental improvement in thermal shock fracture predictability over the current experimental empiricism for cladding fracture analysis during reflood.

  12. ELABORATION OF AN EPOXY COATING REINFORCED WITH ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE NANOSTRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia G. Díaz-Barriga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the preparation of a transparent epoxy coating reinforced with 200 PPM of zirconium carbide nanostructures. The nanostructures of ZrC were prepared by mechanosynthesis. The additive characteristics analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were presented. Epoxy coating adhesion on a steel plate was analyzed using MEB. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA was performed to the reinforced paints between 20-700 °C. The reinforced enamel was compared with an enamel without nanostructures. There is not vaporization of reinforced enamel at a 95 y 100 °C with ZrC particles size of 10 µm y 120 nm respectively. The final enamel degradation is slower when there is a 14% by weight of the residue and 426 °C with 120nm diameter particles.

  13. Minimization of zirconium chlorinator residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, G.K.; Harbuck, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    Zirconium chlorinator residues contain an array of rare earths, scandium, unreacted coke, and radioactive thorium and radium. Because of the radioactivity, the residues must be disposed in special waste containment facilities. As these sites become more congested, and with stricter environmental regulations, disposal of large volumes of wastes may become more difficult. To reduce the mass of disposed material, the US Bureau of Mines (USBM) developed technology to recover rare earths, thorium and radium, and unreacted coke from these residues. This technology employs an HCl leach to solubilize over 99% of the scandium and thorium, and over 90% of the rare earths. The leach liquor is processed through several solvent extraction stages to selectively recover scandium, thorium, and rare earths. The leach residue is further leached with an organic acid to solubilize radium, thus allowing unreacted coke to be recycled to the chlorinator. The thorium and radium waste products, which comprise only 2.1% of the original residue mass, can then be sent to the radioactive waste facility

  14. The chemical vapor deposition of zirconium carbide onto ceramic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass A, John Jr.; Palmisiano, Nick Jr.; Welsh R, Edward

    1999-01-01

    Zirconium carbide is an attractive ceramic material due to its unique properties such as high melting point, good thermal conductivity, and chemical resistance. The controlled preparation of zirconium carbide films of superstoichiometric, stoichiometric, and substoichiometric compositions has been achieved utilizing zirconium tetrachloride and methane precursor gases in an atmospheric pressure high temperature chemical vapor deposition system

  15. Processing fissile material mixtures containing zirconium and/or carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael Ernest; Maloney, Martin David

    2013-07-02

    A method of processing spent TRIZO-coated nuclear fuel may include adding fluoride to complex zirconium present in a dissolved TRIZO-coated fuel. Complexing the zirconium with fluoride may reduce or eliminate the potential for zirconium to interfere with the extraction of uranium and/or transuranics from fission materials in the spent nuclear fuel.

  16. 40 CFR 721.9973 - Zirconium dichlorides (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Zirconium dichlorides (generic). 721... Substances § 721.9973 Zirconium dichlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as zirconium dichlorides (PMNs P...

  17. Removal of iron contaminant from zirconium chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voit, D.O.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for eliminating iron contaminant from an aqueous zirconium chloride solution that has been contaminated with FeCl 3 in a plant in which zirconium and hafnium chloride solutions are separated by a main MINK solvent extraction system and the FeCl 3 is normally removed from the zirconium chloride solution by a secondary MINK solvent extraction system

  18. Investigation of in-pile grown corrosion films on zirconium-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhardt, O.; Hermann, A.; Bart, G.; Blank, H.; Ray, I.L.F.

    1996-01-01

    In-pile grown corrosion films on different fuel rod claddings (standard Zircaloy-4, extra low tin Zircaloy (ELS), and Zr2.5Nb) have been studied using a variety of experimental techniques. The aim of the investigations was to find out common features and differences between the corrosion layers grown on zirconium alloys having different composition. Methods applied were scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and electrochemical anodization. The morphological differences have been observed between the specimens that could explain the irradiation enhancement of corrosion of Zircaloy-4. The features of the compact oxide close to the oxide/metal interface have been characterized by electrochemical methods. The relationship between the thickness of this protective oxide and the overall oxide thickness has been investigated by EIS. It was found that this relation is dependent on the location of the oxide along the fuel rod and on the corrosion rate

  19. Metal-clad waveguide sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skivesen, Nina

    This work concerns planar optical waveguide sensors for biosensing applications, with the focus on deep-probe sensing for micron-scale biological objects like bacteria and whole cells. In the last two decades planar metal-clad waveguides have been brieflyintroduced in the literature applied...... for various biosensing applications, however a thorough study of the sensor configurations has not been presented, but is the main subject of this thesis. Optical sensors are generally well suited for bio-sensing asthey show high sensitivity and give an immediate response for minute changes in the refractive...... index of a sample, due to the high sensitivity of optical bio-sensors detection of non-labeled biological objects can be performed. The majority of opticalsensors presented in the literature and commercially available optical sensors are based on evanescent wave sensing, however most of these sensors...

  20. Review of zirconium-zircaloy pyrophoricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, T.D.

    1984-11-01

    Massive zirconium metal scrap can be handled, shipped, and stored with no evidence of combustion or pyrophoricity hazards. Mechanically produced fine scrap such as shavings, turnings, or powders can burn but are not pyrophoric unless the particle diameter is less than 54 μm. Powders with particle diameters less than 54 μm can be both pyrophoric and explosive. Pyrophoric powders should be collected and stored underwater or under inert gas cover to reduce the flammability hazard. Opening sealed containers of zirconium stored underwater should be attempted with caution since hydrogen may be present. The factors that influence the ignition temperature have been explored in depth and recommendations are included for the safe handling, shipping, and storage of pyrophoric or flammable zirconium. 29 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  1. Laser-Based Additive Manufacturing of Zirconium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Sahasrabudhe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing of zirconium is attempted using commercial Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENSTM technique. A LENSTM-based approach towards processing coatings and bulk parts of zirconium, a reactive metal, aims to minimize the inconvenience of traditional metallurgical practices of handling and processing zirconium-based parts that are particularly suited to small volumes and one-of-a-kind parts. This is a single-step manufacturing approach for obtaining near net shape fabrication of components. In the current research, Zr metal powder was processed in the form of coating on Ti6Al4V alloy substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS as well as phase analysis via X-ray diffraction (XRD were studied on these coatings. In addition to coatings, bulk parts were also fabricated using LENS™ from Zr metal powders, and measured part accuracy.

  2. Fuel cladding mechanical interaction during power ramps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerin, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical interaction between fuel and cladding may occur as a consequence of two types of phenomenon: i) fuel swelling especially at levels of caesium accumulation, and ii) thermal differential expansion during power changes. Slow overpower ramps which may occur during incidental events are of course one of the circumstances responsible for this second type of fuel cladding mechanical interaction (FCMI). Experiments and analysis of this problem that have been done at C.E.A. allow to determine the main parameters which will fix the level of stress and the risk of damage induced by the fuel in the cladding during overpower transients

  3. Demonstration of fuel resistant to pellet-cladding interaction: Phase 2. Fourth semiannual report, July-December 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1981-03-01

    This program has as its ultimate objective the demonstration of an advanced fuel design that is resistant to the failure mechanism known as fuel pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). Two fuel concepts have been developed for possible demonstration: (a) Cu-barrier fuel and (b) Zr-liner fuel. These advanced fuels (known collectively as barrier fuels) have special fuel cladding designed to avoid the harmful effects of localized stress and reactive fission products during reactor service. Within the scope of this program one of these concepts had to be selected for a large-scale demonstration in a commercial power reactor. The selection was made to demonstrate Zr-liner fuel and to include bundles which have liners prepared from either low oxygen sponge zirconium or of crystal bar zirconium. The demonstration is intended to include a total of 132 barrier bundles in the reload for Quad Cities Unit 2, Cycle 6. In the current report period changes in the nuclear design were made to respond to changes in the Energy Utilization Plan for Quad Cities Unit 2. Bundle designs were completed, and were licensed for use in a BWR/3. The core specific licensing will be done as part of the reload license for Quad Cities Unit 2, Cycle 6

  4. Chemical compatibility between cladding alloys and advanced fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fee, D.C.; Johnson, C.E.

    1975-05-01

    The National Advanced Fuels Program requires chemical, mechanical, and thermophysical properties data for cladding alloys. The compatibility behavior of cladding alloys with advanced fuels is critically reviewed. in carbide fuel pins, the principal compatibility problem is cladding carburization, diffusion of carbon into the cladding matrix accompanied by carbide precipitation. Carburization changes the mechanical properties of the cladding alloy. The extent of carburization increases in sodium (versus gas) bonded fuels. The depth of carburization increases with increasing sesquicarbide (M 2 C 3 ) content of the fuel. In nitride fuel pins, the principal compatibility problem is cladding nitriding, diffusion of nitrogen into the cladding matrix accompanied by nitride precipitation. Nitriding changes the mechanical properties of the cladding alloy. In both carbide and nitride fuel pins, fission products do not migrate appreciably to the cladding and do not appear to contribute to cladding attack. 77 references. (U.S.)

  5. Zirconium diselenite microstructures, formation and mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Chandan C.; Salker, A. V.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a series of microstructures of zirconium diselenite (Zr(SeO3)2) has been prepared via a simple precipitation method at room temperature without adding any organic surfactants. Phase purity of the sample has been checked by X-ray Diffraction. From the SEM, FESEM, and TEM images spheroid nanoparticles to the starfish-like structure of zirconium diselenite are detected. The morphological evolution processes were investigated carefully following time-dependent experiments and a growth mechanism has been proposed. Two different crystal growth processes, the oriented attachment process accompanying the Ostwald ripening process were held responsible for the formation of a structure resembling starfish having four arms.

  6. Cathodic behavior of zirconium in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hine, F.; Yasuda, M.; Sato, H.

    1977-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of Zr was studied by polarization measurements. The surface oxide and zirconium hydride formed by cathodic polarization of Zr have been examined by X-ray, SEM, and a hardness tester. Zirconium hydride would form on Zr cathode after the surface oxide is reduced at the potential, which is several hundred mV more noble than the predicted value shown by the Pourbaix diagram. The parameters for the hydrogen evolution reaction on the hydride formed Zr cathode differs from that on the oxide covered surface, which means that hydrogen evolution takes place on both surfaces under a different mechanism, while details are still veiled at present

  7. Hydrogen outbreak of Zirconium Molybdate Hihydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Yasuhiko; Fukuda, Kazuhiro; Ochi, Eiji

    2008-01-01

    JNFL is planning to construct a facility for enclosing the hull and end pieces produced due to reprocessing of spent fuel into stainless canisters after compressing, while those hull and end pieces enclosed into the stainless canisters are called 'compressed hulls'. Since the compressed hulls contain moisture absorbent Zirconium Molybdate Hihydrate accompanying hull and end pieces, there is a risk of outbreak of radiolysisradiolysis gas such as hydrogen, etc. by radiolysisradiolysis. This report intends to state the result of radiation irradiation experiment with the purpose of examining the volume of hydrogen outbreak from Zirconium Molybdate Hihydrate of the compressed hulls. (author)

  8. Electron microscopy of nuclear zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versaci, R.A.; Ipohorski, Miguel

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy observations of the microstructure of zirconium alloys used in fuel sheaths of nuclear power reactors are reported. Specimens were observed after different thermal and mechanical treatment, similar to those actually used during fabrication of the sheaths. Electron micrographs and electron diffraction patterns of second phase particles present in zircaloy-2 and zircaloy-4 were also obtained, as well as some characteristic parameters. Images of oxides and hydrides most commonly present in zirconium alloys are also shown. Finally, the structure of a Zr-2,5Nb alloy used in CANDU reactors pressure tubes, is observed by electron microscopy. (Author) [es

  9. The fluorimetric titration of zirconium in the ppm-range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, W.E. von der; Boef, G. den; Ozinga, W.

    1976-01-01

    A fluorimetric titration of zirconium(IV) with EDTA is proposed. The fluorescence intensity of the zirconium-morin complex is used to indicate the end-point. More than twenty other cations were investigated and it was found that they did not interfere, neither did common anions. Mercury(II) can only be tolerated in amount not exceeding that of zirconium. Bismuth(III) interferes and hafnium(IV0 is titrated together with zirconium. The relative standard deviation of the titration of 10ml of a solution containing 1 ppm of zirconium does not exceed 1.5%

  10. Friction Surface Cladding of AA1050 on AA2024-T351; influence of clad layer thickness and tool rotation rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Shaojie; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Akkerman, Remko

    2015-01-01

    Friction Surfacing Cladding (FSC) is a recently developed solid state process to deposit thin metallic clad layers on a substrate. The process employs a rotating tool with a central opening to supply clad material and support the distribution and bonding of the clad material to the substrate. The

  11. Methods of studying oxide scales grown on zirconium alloys in autoclaves and in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blank, H.; Bart, G.; Thiele, H.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis of water-side corrosion of zirconium alloys has been a field of research for more than 25 years, but the details of the mechanisms involved still cannot be put into a coherent picture. Improved methods are required to establish the details of the microstructure of the oxide scales. A new approach has been made for a general analysis of oxide specimens from scales grown on the zirconium-based cladding alloys of PWR rods in order to analyse the morphology of these scales, the topography of the oxide/metal interface and the crystal structures close to this interface: a) Instead of using the conventional pickling solutions, the Zr-alloys are dissolved using a 'softer' solution (Br 2 in an organic solvent) in order to avoid damage to the oxide at the oxide/metal interface to be analysed by SEM (scanning electron microscopy). A second advantage of this method is easy etching of the grain structure of Zr-alloys for SEM analysis; b) By using the particular properties of the oxide scales, the corrosion-rate-determining innermost part of the oxide layer at the oxide/metal interface can be separated from the rest of the oxide scale and then analysed by SEM, STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy), TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and electron diffraction after dissolution of the alloy. Examples are given from oxides grown on Zr-alloys in a pressurized water reactor and in autoclaves. (author) 8 figs., 3 tabs., 9 refs

  12. Tube in zirconium base alloy for nuclear fuel assembly and manufacturing process of such a tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardon, J.P.; Senevat, J.; Charquet, D.

    1996-01-01

    This patent concerns the description and manufacturing guidelines of a zirconium alloy tube for fuel cladding or fuel assembly guiding. The alloy contains (in weight) 0.4 to 0.6% of tin, 0.5 to 0.8% of iron, 0.35 to 0.50% of vanadium and 0.1 to 0.18% of oxygen. The carbon and silicon tenors range from 100 to 180 ppm and from 80 to 120 ppm, respectively. The alloy contains only zirconium, plus inevitable impurities, and is completely recrystallized. Corrosion resistance tests were performed on tubes made of this alloy and compared to corrosion tests performed on zircaloy 4 tubes. These tests show a better corrosion resistance and a lower corrosion kinetics for the new alloy, even in presence of lithium and iodine, and a lower hydridation rate. The mechanical resistance of this alloy is slightly lower than the one of zircaloy 4 but becomes equivalent or slightly better after two irradiation cycles. The ductility remains always equal or better than for zircaloy 4. (J.S.)

  13. Study of the processes for of remelting zirconium alloys in an electric arc furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Luiz A.T.; Rossi, Jesualdo L.; Costa, Guilherme R.; Martinez, Luis G.; Sato, Ivone M., E-mail: luiz.atp@uol.com.br, E-mail: jelrossi@ipen.br, E-mail: guilhermeramoscosta@gmail.com, E-mail: lgallego@ipen.br, E-mail: imsato@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Zirconium alloy tubes are used as cladding for fuel elements of PWR nuclear reactors, which contains the UO{sub 2} pellets. In the manufacture of these fuel element parts, machining chips from the nuclear grade zirconium alloys are generated. Hence, these machining chips cannot be discarded, as ordinary metallic waste. Thus, the recycling of this material is a strategic aspect for the nuclear technology, both for economic and environmental issues. The main reason is that nuclear grade alloys have very high cost, are not commercially produced in Brazil and has to be imported for the manufacture of the nuclear fuels. This work discusses a method to melt and recycle Zircaloy chips, using an electric-arc furnace to obtain small laboratory ingots. The chemical composition of the ingots was determined using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and was compared to the specifications of nuclear grade Zircaloy and to the chemical composition of the received machining chips. The ingots were annealed in high vacuum, as well as were hot rolled in a mill. The microstructures were characterized by optical microscopy. The hardness was evaluated using the Rockwell B scale hardness. The results showed that the compositions of the recycled Zircaloy comply with the chemical specifications and a suitable microstructure has been obtained for nuclear use. (author)

  14. The behaviour of zirconium alloys in Santowax OM organic coolant at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawatzky, A.

    1964-10-01

    Zirconium alloys have been exposed to Santowax OM at temperatures of 320 to 400 o C for times as long as 5000 hours. Short-term experiments (less than 2 weeks) were done in stainless-steel bombs and small out-of-pile loops. The X-7 organic loop in the NRX reactor was used to study long-term oxidation and hydriding both in-flux and out-of-flux. The results obtained lead to several tentative conclusions: Aluminum cladding serves as an effective hydrogen barrier; Considerable protection against hydriding is given by zirconium oxide, provided impurities in the organic are carefully controlled; Hydriding is greatly enhanced by the presence of chlorine in the coolant; and, Hydriding is somewhat enhanced by neutron irradiation. Of considerable significance is the fact that a Zircaloy-4 in-reactor test section of the X-7 loop was exposed to Santowax OM at 320 to 400 o C for more than 5000 hours without excessive hydriding. (author)

  15. Experimental approach and micro-mechanical modeling of the mechanical behavior of irradiated zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onimus, F.

    2003-12-01

    Zirconium alloys cladding tubes containing nuclear fuel of the Pressurized Water Reactors constitute the first safety barrier against the dissemination of radioactive elements. Thus, it is essential to predict the mechanical behavior of the material in-reactor conditions. This study aims, on the one hand, to identify and characterize the mechanisms of the plastic deformation of irradiated zirconium alloys and, on the other hand, to propose a micro-mechanical modeling based on these mechanisms. The experimental analysis shows that, for the irradiated material, the plastic deformation occurs by dislocation channeling. For transverse tensile test and internal pressure test this channeling occurs in the basal planes. However, for axial tensile test, the study revealed that the plastic deformation also occurs by channeling but in the prismatic and pyramidal planes. In addition, the study of the macroscopic mechanical behavior, compared to the deformation mechanisms observed by TEM, suggested that the internal stress is higher in the case of irradiated material than in the case of non-irradiated material, because of the very heterogeneous character of the plastic deformation. This analysis led to a coherent interpretation of the mechanical behavior of irradiated materials, in terms of deformation mechanisms. The mechanical behavior of irradiated materials was finally modeled by applying homogenization methods for heterogeneous materials. This model is able to reproduce adequately the mechanical behavior of the irradiated material, in agreement with the TEM observations. (author)

  16. Optimized manufacture of nuclear fuel cladding tubes by FEA of hot extrusion and cold pilgering processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillac, Alexis; Ly, Céline

    2018-05-01

    Within the forming route of Zirconium alloy cladding tubes, hot extrusion is used to deform the forged billets into tube hollows, which are then cold rolled to produce the final tubes with the suitable properties for in-reactor use. The hot extrusion goals are to give the appropriate geometry for cold pilgering, without creating surface defects and microstructural heterogeneities which are detrimental for subsequent rolling. In order to ensure a good quality of the tube hollows, hot extrusion parameters have to be carefully chosen. For this purpose, finite element models are used in addition to experimental tests. These models can take into account the thermo-mechanical coupling conditions obtained in the tube and the tools during extrusion, and provide a good prediction of the extrusion load and the thermo-mechanical history of the extruded product. This last result can be used to calculate the fragmentation of the microstructure in the die and the meta-dynamic recrystallization after extrusion. To further optimize the manufacturing route, a numerical model of the cold pilgering process is also applied, taking into account the complex geometry of the tools and the pseudo-steady state rolling sequence of this incremental forming process. The strain and stress history of the tube during rolling can then be used to assess the damage risk thanks to the use of ductile damage models. Once validated vs. experimental data, both numerical models were used to optimize the manufacturing route and the quality of zirconium cladding tubes. This goal was achieved by selecting hot extrusion parameters giving better recrystallized microstructure that improves the subsequent formability. Cold pilgering parameters were also optimized in order to reduce the potential ductile damage in the cold rolled tubes.

  17. GSGG edge cladding development: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumitani, T.; Meissner, H.E.; Toratani, H.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of this project have been: (1) Investigate the possibility of chemical etching of GSGG crystal slabs to obtain increased strength. (2) Design and construct a simplified mold assembly for casting cladding glass to the edges of crystal slabs of different dimensions. (3) Conduct casting experiments to evaluate the redesigned mold assembly and to determine stresses as function of thermal expansion coefficient of cladding glass. (4) Clad larger sizes of GGG slabs as they become available. These tasks have been achieved. Chemical etching of GSGG slabs does not appear possible with any other acid than H 3 PO 4 at temperatures above 300 0 C. A mold assembly has been constructed which allowed casting cladding glass around the edges of the largest GGG slabs available (10 x 20 x 160 mm) without causing breakage through the annealing step

  18. Duplex stainless steel surface bay laser cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amigo, V.; Pineda, Y.; Segovia, F.; Vicente, A.

    2004-01-01

    Laser cladding is one of the most promising techniques to restore damaged surfaces and achieve properties similar to those of the base metal. In this work, duplex stainless steels have been cladded by a nickel alloy under different processing conditions. The influence of the beam speed and defocusing variables ha been evaluated in the microstructure both of the cladding and heat affected zone, HAZ. These results have been correlated to mechanical properties by means of microhardness measurements from cladding area to base metal through the interface. This technique has shown to be very appropriate to obtain controlled mechanical properties as they are determined by the solidification microstructure, originated by the transfer of mass and heat in the system. (Author) 21 refs

  19. Corrosion behaviour of cladded nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandl, W.; Ruczinski, D.; Nolde, M.; Blum, J.

    1995-01-01

    As a consequence of the high cost of nickel base alloys their use as surface layers is convenient. In this paper the properties of SA-as well as RES-cladded NiMo 16Cr16Ti and NiCr21Mo14W being produced in single and multi-layer technique are compared and discussed with respect to their corrosion behaviour. Decisive criteria describing the qualities of the claddings are the mass loss, the susceptibility against intergranular corrosion and the pitting corrosion resistance. The results prove that RES cladding is the most suitable technique to produce corrosion resistant nickel base coatings. The corrosion behaviour of a two-layer RES deposition shows a better resistance against pitting than a three layer SAW cladding. 7 refs

  20. CREEP STRAIN CORRELATION FOR IRRADIATED CLADDING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Macheret

    2001-01-01

    In an attempt to predict the creep deformation of spent nuclear fuel cladding under the repository conditions, different correlations have been developed. One of them, which will be referred to as Murty's correlation in the following, and whose expression is given in Henningson (1998), was developed on the basis of experimental points related to unirradiated Zircaloy cladding (Henningson 1998, p. 56). The objective of this calculation is to adapt Murty's correlation to experimental points pertaining to irradiated Zircaloy cladding. The scope of the calculation is provided by the range of experimental parameters characterized by Zircaloy cladding temperature between 292 C and 420 C, hoop stress between 50 and 630 MPa, and test time extending to 8000 h. As for the burnup of the experimental samples, it ranges between 0.478 and 64 MWd/kgU (i.e., megawatt day per kilogram of uranium), but this is not a parameter of the adapted correlation

  1. In-pile creep behaviour of Zry-4 and ZrNb3Sn1 cladding under uniaxial and biaxial stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehner, G.; Wildhagen, B.; Wilhelm, H.

    1987-01-01

    An irradiation programme - started in 1977 - was performed at the research reactor FRG-2 at Geesthacht, Germany, as a joint project of GKSS and KWU in order to study the in-pile creep behaviour of zirconium alloy cladding tubes of PWR fuel rods. The test objective was to establish a data base which allows refined modelling of the in-pile creep phenomenon. A wide test matrix was realized in which each of the precisely monitored test conditions (hoop stress, temperature, fast neutron flux) was varied separately. Different cladding materials (Zircaloy-4 and Zirconium-Niob-Tin alloy ZrNb3Sn1) were subjected to those varying test conditions. Cladding tube specimens of 10.75 mm outer diameter were irradiated in test capsules under various stress conditions and levels up to approx. 6000 h, at temperatures ranging from 300 0 C to 400 0 C and fast neutron flux (E > 1 MeV) of approx. 3x10 13 cm -2 .s -1 . Diametrical and/or axial creep deformation of all tubes were measured in the Hot Cells several times in the course of the tests. In order to extract the irradiation induced creep strain some out-pile experiments were carried out under the very same test conditions as the in-pile tests concerned. (orig./GL)

  2. Contribution to the study of zirconium self-diffusion in zirconium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Chul

    1972-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to determine experimental conditions allowing the measurement of the self-diffusion coefficient of zirconium in zirconium carbide. The author reports the development of a method of preparation of zirconium carbide samples. He reports the use of ion implantation as technique to obtain a radio-tracer coating. The obtained results give evidence of the impossibility to use sintered samples with small grains because of the demonstrated importance of intergranular diffusion. The self-diffusion coefficient is obtained in the case of zirconium carbide with grains having a diameter of few millimetres. The presence of 95 Nb from the disintegration of 95 Zr indicates that these both metallic elements have very close diffusion coefficients at 2.600 C [fr

  3. Air Oxidation Behaviors of Zircaloy-4 Cladding During a LOCA In Spent Fuel Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Je Geon; Chun, Tae Hyun; Kim, Sun Ki; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that air oxidation induces a serious degradation of the Zircaloy cladding material, compared with steam oxidation. From the oxidant point of view, in comparison with steam, chemical heat release during oxidation in air is higher by 80%, which may lead to a more rapid degradation of the Zircaloy cladding, and further evolution of the accident.. Additionally, the oxidation kinetics in air is much faster than in steam due to the formation of non-protective oxide layer. From the safety point of view, the barrier effect of the cladding against release of fission products is lost much earlier in air compared to steam. The objective of this study is to investigate the oxidation behaviors of fuel cladding in two different conditions such as isothermal and transient condition and to generate its kinetic data under an accident condition in the spent fuel pool. In this study, the oxidation behaviors and its kinetics of the Zircaloy-4 were investigated in air environment for various air ingress scenarios in the temperature range 600 .deg. C-1,400 .deg. C by thermo-gravimetric analysis. In this study, the oxidation behaviors of the Zircaloy-4 for both isothermal condition and transient condition were investigated in air environment. In comparison with isothermal condition, the retardation of oxidation rate in transient condition was observed at both 1,200 .deg. C and 1,400 .deg. C. This seems to be ascribed to the effect of thin oxide formed during a heating

  4. High purity zirconium obtainment through the iodine compounds transport method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolcich, J.C.; Zuzek, E.; Dutrus, S.M.; Corso, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental method and the equipment designed, constructed and actually applied for the high purity zirconium obtainment from a zirconium sponge of the nuclear type. The mechanism of purification is based on the impure metal attack with gaseous iodine (at 200 deg C) to obtain zirconium tetra iodine as main product which is then transformed into a pure zirconium base (at 1000-1300 deg C), precipitating the metallic zirconium and releasing the gaseous iodine. From the first experiences carried out, pure zirconium has been obtained from an initial filament of 0.5 mm of diameter as well as wires up to 2.5 mm of diameter. This work presents the results from the studies and analysis made to characterize the material obtained. Finally, the refining methods to which the zirconium produced may be submitted so as to optimize the final purity are discussed. (Author)

  5. Extractive metallurgy of zirconium--1945 to the present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, D.G.; Adamson, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Although the history of the reduction of zirconium dates from 1824 and the first ductile zirconium metal was produced in the laboratory in 1914, modern reduction practice was pioneered by the U.S. Bureau of Mines starting in 1945. This paper reviews the history of the extractive metallurgy of zirconium from the early work of W. J. Kroll and co-workers at the Bureau of Mines in Albany, Ore., through the commercial development of the production of reactor-grade zirconium metal which was spurred by the requirements of the Naval Reactor Program and the development of commercial nuclear power. Technical subjects covered include processes for opening the ore, zirconium-hafnium separation, chlorination of zirconium oxide, reduction processes, and electrowinning of zirconium metal. Proposed new processes and process modifications are reviewed

  6. Optimization of metal-clad waveguide sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skivesen, N.; Horvath, R.; Pedersen, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    The present paper deals with the optimization of metal-clad waveguides for sensor applications to achieve high sensitivity for adlayer and refractive index measurements. By using the Fresnel reflection coefficients both the angular shift and the width of the resonances in the sensorgrams are taken...... into account. Our optimization shows that it is possible for metal-clad waveguides to achieve a sensitivity improvement of 600% compared to surface-plasmon-resonance sensors....

  7. Trap state passivation improved hot-carrier instability by zirconium-doping in hafnium oxide in a nanoscale n-metal-oxide semiconductor-field effect transistors with high-k/metal gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hsi-Wen; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Liu, Kuan-Ju; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Ching-En; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen; Lin, Chien-Yu; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Ye, Yi-Han

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the effect on hot carrier degradation (HCD) of doping zirconium into the hafnium oxide high-k layer in the nanoscale high-k/metal gate n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors. Previous n-metal-oxide semiconductor-field effect transistor studies demonstrated that zirconium-doped hafnium oxide reduces charge trapping and improves positive bias temperature instability. In this work, a clear reduction in HCD is observed with zirconium-doped hafnium oxide because channel hot electron (CHE) trapping in pre-existing high-k bulk defects is the main degradation mechanism. However, this reduced HCD became ineffective at ultra-low temperature, since CHE traps in the deeper bulk defects at ultra-low temperature, while zirconium-doping only passivates shallow bulk defects.

  8. Synthesis of zirconium by zirconium tetrachloride reduction by magnesio-thermia. Experimental study and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basin, N.

    2001-01-01

    This work deals with the synthesis of zirconium. The ore is carbo-chlorinated to obtain the tetrachloride which is then purified by selective condensation and extractive distillation. Zirconium tetrachloride is then reduced by magnesium and the pseudo-alloy is obtained according to the global following reaction (Kroll process): ZrCl 4 + 2 Mg = 2 MgCl 2 . By thermodynamics, it has been shown that the volatilization of magnesium chloride and the formation of zirconium sub-chlorides are minimized when the combined effects of temperature and of dilution with argon are limited. With these conditions, the products, essentially zirconium and magnesium chloride, are obtained in equivalence ratio in the magnesio-thermia reaction. The global kinetics of the reduction process has been studied by a thermal gravimetric method. A thermo-balance device has been developed specially for this kinetics study. It runs under a controlled atmosphere and is coupled to a vapor tetrachloride feed unit. The transformation is modelled supposing that the zirconium and magnesium chloride formation result: 1)of the evaporation of magnesium from its liquid phase 2)of the transfer of magnesium and zirconium tetrachloride vapors towards the front of the reaction located in the gaseous phase 3)of the chemical reaction. In the studied conditions, the diffusion is supposed to be the limiting process. The influence of the following parameters: geometry of the reactive zone, temperature, scanning rate of the argon-zirconium tetrachloride mixture, composition of the argon-zirconium tetrachloride mixture has been experimentally studied and confronted with success to the model. (O.M.)

  9. Experimental studies of relevance on zirconium nitrate raffinate sludge for its disposal as well as zirconium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahmananda Reddy, G.; Narasimha Murty, B.; Ravindra, H.R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the many routes of production of nuclear grade zirconium dioxide involve separation of zirconium and hafnium by solvent extraction of zirconium nitrate using tri-n-butyl phosphate followed by precipitation of zirconium with ammonia and finally calcination of the so obtained hydrated zirconia at elevated temperature. The zirconium feed solution as is generated from digestion of zirconium washed dried frit (produced by the caustic fusion of zircon sand which is one of the beach sand heavy minerals) in nitric acid contain considerable amount of sludge material and after solvent extraction this whole sludge material rests with raffinate. This sludge material has a scope to contain considerable amounts of zirconium along with other metal ions such as hafnium, aluminium, iron, etc. besides nitric acid and it constitutes one of the important solid wastes that needs to be disposed suitably. One of the disposal means of this sludge material is to use it as a land fill for which two important criteria are to be viz the pH of 10% solid waste solution should be near to neutral pH and the loss on ignition at 550℃ on dry basis of the sludge to be below 20%. In order to study the implications of presence of varying amounts of zirconium nitrate in the sludge on the pH of 10% solution of the sludge various synthetic zirconium nitrate solid waste were prepared using the sludge material generated at the laboratory during the analysis of zirconium washed dried frit. Presence of zirconium in the sludge is expected to decrease the overall pH of the 10% solution of the sludge because zirconium is prone to hydrolyze especially locally when zirconium ion comes into contact with water according to the chemical equation Zr 4+ H 2 O → ZrO 2+ + 2H + . From this equation, it is clear that for every one mole of zirconium ions two moles of hydrogen ions are produced. This is verified experimentally using the synthetically prepared sludge materials with varying amounts of zirconium

  10. Laser cladding technology to small diameter pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimagari, H.; Hagiwara, M.; Kojima, T.

    2000-01-01

    A laser cladding method which produces a highly corrosion-resistant material coating layers (cladding) on the austenitic stainless steel (type 304 SS) pipe inner surface was developed to prevent SCC (stress corrosion cracking) occurrence. This technology is applicable to a narrow and long distance area from operators, because of the good accessibility of the YAG (yttrium-aluminum-garnet) laser beam that can be transmitted through an optical fiber. In this method a mixed paste metallic powder and heating-resistive organic solvent are firstly placed on the inner surface of a small pipe, and then a YAG laser beam transmitted through an optical fiber irradiates to the pasted area. A mixed paste will be melted and form a cladding layer subsequently. A cladding layer shows as excellent corrosion resistance property. This laser cladding (LC) method had already applied to several domestic nuclear power plants and had obtained a good reputation. This report introduces the outline of laser cladding technology, the developed equipment for practical application in the field, and the circumstance in actual plant application. (orig.)

  11. Reaction of hydrogen peroxide with uranium zirconium oxide solid solution - Zirconium hinders oxidative uranium dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yuta; Takano, Masahide; Watanabe, Masayuki

    2017-12-01

    We studied oxidative dissolution of uranium and zirconium oxide [(U,Zr)O2] in aqueous H2O2 solution to estimate (U,Zr)O2 stability to interfacial reactions with H2O2. Studies on the interfacial reactions are essential for anticipating how a (U,Zr)O2-based molten fuel may chemically degrade after a severe accident. The fuel's high radioactivity induces water radiolysis and continuous H2O2 generation. Subsequent reaction of the fuel with H2O2 may oxidize the fuel surface and facilitate U dissolution. We conducted our experiments with (U,Zr)O2 powder (comprising Zr:U mole ratios of 25:75, 40:60, and 50:50) and quantitated the H2O2 reaction via dissolved U and H2O2 concentrations. Although (U,Zr)O2 reacted more quickly than UO2, the dissolution yield relative to H2O2 consumption was far less for (U,Zr)O2 compared to that of UO2. The reaction kinetics indicates that most of the H2O2 catalytically decomposed to O2 at the surface of (U,Zr)O2. We confirmed the H2O2 catalytic decomposition via O2 production (quantitative stoichiometric agreement). In addition, post-reaction Raman scattering spectra of the undissolved (U,Zr)O2 showed no additional peaks (indicating a lack of secondary phase formation). The (U,Zr)O2 matrix is much more stable than UO2 against H2O2-induced oxidative dissolution. Our findings will improve understanding on the molten fuels and provide an insight into decommissioning activities after a severe accident.

  12. Thermo-mechanical treatment of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, I.S.

    1975-01-01

    A zirconium alloy comprising at least 95 percent Zr (Zircaloy), which has been thoroughly annealed, is greatly increased in strength without substantial loss in ductility by subjecting it to tensile creep deformation in a temperature range in which creep will occur, yet which is below the temperature for significant recovery. (U.S.)

  13. METHOD AND ALLOY FOR BONDING TO ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCuaig, F.D.; Misch, R.D.

    1960-04-19

    A brazing alloy can be used for bonding zirconium and its alloys to other metals, ceramics, and cermets, and consists of 6 to 9 wt.% Ni, 6 to 9 wn~.% Cr, Mo, or W, 0 to 7.5 wt.% Fe, and the balance Zr.

  14. Structuring of gels of zirconium oxohydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukharev, Yu.I.; Skuratovich, L.P.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic relationship between formation of mesophase states of zirconium oxohydrate gel, coprecipitated with dimethylamine, and ordered macrocrystallites of sorption material after cryogranulation or decryptation granulating is shown. This phenomenon is followed on example of formation of flattened crystallites when preparing granules in the presence of appl. The successive polymerization growth of crystallites leads to the frame ordered aggregation or aggregation of another type

  15. Accelerated irradiation growth of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, M.; Gilbert, R.W.; Fidleris, V.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses how sponge zirconium and Zr-2.5 wt% Nb, Zircaloy, or Excel alloys all exhibit accelerated irradiation growth compared with high-purity crystal-bar zirconium for irradiation temperatures between 550 to 710 K and fluences between 0.1 to 10 x 10 25 n · m -2 (E > 1 MeV). There is generally an incubation period or fluence before the onset of accelerated or breakaway growth, which is dependent on the particular material being irradiated, its metallurgical condition before irradiation, and the irradiation temperature. Transmission electron microscopy has shown that there is a correlation between accelerated irradiation growth and the appearance of c-component vacancy loops on basal planes. Measurements in some specimens indicate that a significant fraction of the strain can be directly attributed to the loops themselves. There is considerable evidence to show that their formation is dependent both on the specimen purity and on the irradiation temperature. Materials that have a high interstitial-solute content contain c-component loops and exhibit high growth rates even at low fluences ( 2 :5 n · m -2 , E > 1 MeV). For sponge zirconium and the Zircaloys, c-component loop formation and the associated acceleration of growth (breakaway) during irradiation occurs because the intrinsic interstitial solute (mainly, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen) in the zirconium matrix is supplemented by interstitial iron, chromium, and nickel from the radiation-induced dissolution of precipitates. (author)

  16. Zirconium (IV) complexes with some polymethylenediimines | Na ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The syntheses of zirconium (IV) complexes have been carried out by the reaction of oxozirconium (IV) chloride with the appropriate diimines (Schiff bases). The complexes were isolated as yellow solids which are stable to heat. The complexes were found to be insoluble in most solvents. The infrared spectra, elemental ...

  17. Manufacture of titanium and zirconium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mares, F.; Hanslik, T.

    1973-01-01

    A method is described of manufacturing titanium and zirconium hydrides by hydrogenation of said metals characterized by the reaction temperature ranging between 250 to 500 degC, hydrogen pressure of 20 to 300 atm and possibly by the presence of a hydride of the respective metal. (V.V.)

  18. Intercalation chemistry of zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, Jan; Zima, Vítězslav; Melánová, Klára; Beneš, Ludvík; Trchová, Miroslava

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate is a layered material which can be employed as a host for the intercalation reactions with basic molecules. A wide range of organic compounds were chosen to represent intercalation ability of zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate. These were a series of alkylamines from methylamine to dodecylamine, 1,4-phenylenediamine, p-toluidine, 1,8-diaminonaphthalene, 1-aminopyrene, imidazole, pyridine, 4,4′-bipyridine, poly(ethylene imine), and a series of amino acids from glycine to 6-aminocaproic acid. The prepared compounds were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis and IR spectroscopy and probable arrangement of the guest molecules in the interlayer space of the host is proposed based on the interlayer distance of the prepared intercalates and amount of the intercalated guest molecules. - Graphical abstract: Nitrogen-containing organic compounds can be intercalated into the interlayer space of zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate. - Highlights: • Zirconium 4-sulfophenylphosphonate was examined as a host material in intercalation chemistry. • A wide range of nitrogen-containing organic compounds were intercalated. • Possible arrangement of the intercalated species is described

  19. Studies on inorganic exchanger: zirconium antimonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dash, A.; Balasubramanian, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    The inorganic exchanger zirconium antimonate has been prepared and its characteristics evaluated. A method has been developed for the separation of 90 Sr and 144 Ce from fission products solution using this exchanger. (author). 23 refs., 18 f igs., 9 tabs

  20. Superconductivity in zirconium-rhodium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegler, S. T.

    1969-01-01

    Metallographic studies and transition temperature measurements were made with isothermally annealed and water-quenched zirconium-rhodium alloys. The results clarify both the solid-state phase relations at the Zr-rich end of the Zr-Rh alloy system and the influence upon the superconducting transition temperature of structure and composition.

  1. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic study of passive zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai Jiahe; Chen Yingzi [Center for Electrochemical Science and Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Macdonald, Digby D. [Center for Electrochemical Science and Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)], E-mail: ddm2@psu.edu

    2008-09-30

    Spent, unreproccessed nuclear fuel is generally contained within the operational fuel sheathing fabricated from a zirconium alloy (Zircaloy 2, Zircaloy 4, or Zirlo) and is then stored in a swimming pool and/or dry storage facilities until permanent disposal in a licensed repository. During this period, which begins with irradiation of the fuel in the reactor during operation, the fuel sheathing is exposed to various, aggressive environments. The objective of the present study was to characterize the nature of the passive film that forms on pure zirconium in contact with an aqueous phase [0.1 M B(OH){sub 3} + 0.001 M LiOH, pH 6.94] at elevated temperatures (in this case, 250 deg. C), prior to storage, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with the data being interpreted in terms of the point defect model (PDM). The results show that the corrosion resistance of zirconium in high temperature, de-aerated aqueous solutions is dominated by the outer layer. The extracted model parameter values can be used in deterministic models for predicting the accumulation of general corrosion damage to zirconium under a wide range of conditions that might exist in some repositories.

  2. Corrosion resistance of zirconium in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajimura, H.; Morikawa, H.; Nagano, H.

    1987-01-01

    Slow strain rate tests are effected on zirconium in boiling nitric acid to study the influence of nitric acid concentration, of oxidizing ions (Cr and Ce) and of electric potential. Corrosion resistance is excellent and stress corrosion cracking occurs only for severe conditions: 350 mV over electric potential for corrosion with nitric acid concentration of 40 % [fr

  3. Obtention of titanium and zirconium metallic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, P.R.G.; Rover, C.F.S.; Amaral, F.L.L.

    1988-01-01

    The development works of techniques and equipments for titanium and zirconium sponges obtention are mentioned. The Kroll Process used for the sponges production is described, consisting in the reduction of the metal tetracloride with magnesium in an inert atmosphere of helium or argon. (C.G.C.) [pt

  4. Oxidation of Zircaloy Fuel Cladding in Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, Digby; Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna; Chen, Yingzi; Ai, Jiahe; Park, Pilyeon; Kim, Han-Sang

    2006-12-12

    Our work involved the continued development of the theory of passivity and passivity breakdown, in the form of the Point Defect Model, with emphasis on zirconium and zirconium alloys in reactor coolant environments, the measurement of critically-important parameters, and the development of a code that can be used by reactor operators to actively manage the accumulation of corrosion damage to the fuel cladding and other components in the heat transport circuits in both BWRs and PWRs. In addition, the modified boiling crevice model has been further developed to describe the accumulation of solutes in porous deposits (CRUD) on fuel under boiling (BWRs) and nucleate boiling (PWRs) conditions, in order to accurately describe the environment that is contact with the Zircaloy cladding. In the current report, we have derived expressions for the total steady-state current density and the partial anodic and cathodic current densities to establish a deterministic basis for describing Zircaloy oxidation. The models are “deterministic” because the relevant natural laws are satisfied explicitly, most importantly the conversation of mass and charge and the equivalence of mass and charge (Faraday’s law). Cathodic reactions (oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution) are also included in the models, because there is evidence that they control the rate of the overall passive film formation process. Under open circuit conditions, the cathodic reactions, which must occur at the same rate as the zirconium oxidation reaction, are instrumental in determining the corrosion potential and hence the thickness of the barrier and outer layers of the passive film. Controlled hydrodynamic methods have been used to measure important parameters in the modified Point Defect Model (PDM), which is now being used to describe the growth and breakdown of the passive film on zirconium and on Zircaloy fuel sheathing in BWRs and PWRs coolant environments. The modified PDMs recognize the existence of a

  5. Modification of structural phase state in superficial layers of fuel tubes made of Zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, N.; Kalin, B.; Pimenov, Y.; Timoshin, S.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained in developing the method for introduction of the required changes into states and properties of outer surface on fuel rod cladding made of zirconium alloys E110 and E635 through irradiation by radial Ar + ion beam with a broad energy spectrum. In particular, the paper demonstrates that ion beam treatment of the claddings surface, at the final stage of their fabrication, can upgrade substantially quality of outer tubular surface after mechanical polishing (the cleaner surface, the lower roughness, removal of technological transversal scratches). In addition, the ion beam irradiation results in higher micro-hardness of the modified layer and in better tribological parameters. Kinetic effects in growth of oxide films were studied for the tubular samples of zirconium alloys after ion-beam treatment (cleaning and polishing by radial Ar + ion beam). Also, corrosion tests of the tubular samples were carried out in water (at 350 0 C) and steam (at 350, 375 and 400 0 C) with duration up to 3000 hours. It was revealed that oxide layer consisting mainly of zirconium dioxide in monoclinic modification was formed on tubular surface after oxidation at 3500 0 C in water or steam. The oxidizing process in the pressurized steam created thicker oxide layer on tubular surface than that in the pressurized water. Experimental data were used to determine optimal conditions for ion-beam treatment of outer fuel tube surface. The tubular samples with the following geometrical parameters were investigated: length - up to 500 mm, diameter - 9,15 mm. Optimal regimes for ion-beam cleaning and polishing of the tubular samples were studied up to the process rate of 1 meter per minute. Within the frames of linear approximation, analytical relationships were derived for time dependent growth of oxide films and used to evaluate thickness of oxide film under test conditions (duration . up to 10000 hours). Thickness of oxide films can cover the range from 6

  6. The Effect of Boron and Zirconium on the Structure and Tensile Properties of the Cast Nickel-Based Superalloy ATI 718Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Abbasi, Seyed Mehdi; Madar, Karim Zangeneh

    2018-04-01

    The effects of boron and zirconium on cast structure, hardness, and tensile properties of the nickel-based superalloy 718Plus were investigated. For this purpose, five alloys with different contents of boron and zirconium were cast via vacuum induction melting and then purified via vacuum arc remelting. Microstructural analysis by light-optical microscope and scanning electron microscope equipped with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and phase studies by x-ray diffraction analysis were performed. The results showed that boron and zirconium tend to significantly reduce dendritic arm spacing and increase the amount of Laves, Laves/gamma eutectic, and carbide phases. It was also found that boron led to the formation of B4C and (Cr, Fe, Mo, Ni, Ti)3B2 phases and zirconium led to the formation of intermetallic phases and ZrC carbide. In the presence of boron and zirconium, the hardness and its difference between dendritic branches and inter-dendritic spaces increased by concentrating such phases as Laves in the inter-dendritic spaces. These elements had a negative effect on tensile properties of the alloy, including ductility and strength, mainly because of the increase in the Laves phase. It should be noted that the largest degradation of the tensile properties occurred in the alloys containing the maximum amount of zirconium.

  7. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Zircon, a zirconium silicate, is currently the most important commercial zirconium-bearing mineral. Baddeleyite, a natural form of zirconia, is less important but has some specific end uses. Both zircon and baddeleyite occur in hard-rock and placer deposits, but at present all zircon production is from placer deposits. Most baddeleyite production is from hard-rock deposits, principally as a byproduct of copper and phosphate-rock mining. World zirconium resources in identified, economically exploitable deposits are about 46 times current production rates. Of these resources, some 71 percent are in South Africa, Australia, and the United States. The principal end uses of zirconium minerals are in ceramic applications and as refractories, abrasives, and mold linings in foundries. A minor amount, mainly of zircon, is used for the production of hafnium-free zirconium metal, which is used principally for sheathing fuel elements in nuclear reactors and in the chemical-processing industry, aerospace engineering, and electronics. Australia and South Africa are the largest zircon producers and account for more than 70 percent of world output; the United States and the Soviet Union account for another 20 percent. South Africa accounts for almost all the world's production of baddeleyite, which is about 2 percent of world production of contained zirconia. Australia and South Africa are the largest exporters of zircon. Unless major new deposits are developed in countries that have not traditionally produced zircon, the pattern of world production is unlikely to change by 2020. The proportions, however, of production that come from existing producing countries may change somewhat.

  8. Evaluation of Aerogel Clad Optical Fibers Final Report CRADA No. TSB-1448-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitland, Duncan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Droege, M. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    Fiber-optic based sensors will be needed for in situ monitoring of degradation products in various components of nuclear weapons. These sensors typically consist of a transducer located at the measurement site whose optical properties are modulated by interaction with the targeted degradation product. The interrogating light source and the detector for determining sensor response are located remotely. These two subsystems are connected by fiber optic cables. LLNL has developed a new technology, aerogel clad optical fibers, that have the advantage of accepting incident rays over a much wider angular range than normal glass clad fibers. These fibers are also capable of transmitting light more efficiently. These advantages can lead to a factor of 2-4 improvement in sensitivity and detection limit.

  9. Removal of methylene blue and rhodamine B from water by zirconium oxide/graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumita Rani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Methylene blue (MB and rhodamine B dyes (RB were degraded from water using zirconium oxide (ZrO2 and zirconium oxide/graphene composites (ZrO2/GR as photocatalyst. The photocatalytic efficiency was calculated from absorption spectra obtained using UV–visible spectroscopy. It has been observed that photodegradation time as well as photocatalytic efficiency increase with the concentration of catalyst up to a certain limit after which effect was reversed. The degradation was studied as a function of pH also. It was found that photocatalytic efficiency was more in alkaline medium than acidic medium. Degradation of RB takes place at higher value of pH as compared to MB. The degradation time for MB was 1 h using ZrO2 which get reduced to 32 min using ZrO2/GR composite and for RB it reduced to 40 min (using ZrO2/GR from 80 min (ZrO2.

  10. Experimental approach and micro-mechanical modeling of the creep behavior of irradiated zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribis, J.

    2007-12-01

    The fuel rod cladding, strongly affected by microstructural changes due to irradiation such as high density of dislocation loops, is strained by the end-of-life fuel rod internal pressure and the potential release of fission gases and helium during dry storage. Within the temperature range that is expected during dry interim storage, cladding undergoes long term creep under over-pressure. So, in order to have a predictive approach of the behavior of zirconium alloys cladding in dry storage conditions it is essential to take into account: initial dislocation loops, thermal annealing of loops and creep straining due to over pressure. Specific experiments and modelling for irradiated samples have been developed to improve our knowledge in that field. A Zr-1%Nb-O alloy was studied using fine microstructural investigations and mechanical testing. The observations conducted by transmission electron microscopy show that the high density of loops disappears during a heat treatment. The loop size becomes higher and higher while their density falls. The microhardness tests reveal that the fall of loop density leads to the softening of the irradiated material. During a creep test, both temperature and applied stress are responsible of the disappearance of loops. The loops could be swept by the activation of the basal slip system while the prism slip system is inhibited. Once deprived of loops, the creep properties of the irradiated materials are closed to the non irradiated state, a result whose consequence is a sudden acceleration of the creep rate. Finally, a micro-mechanical modeling based on microscopic deformation mechanisms taking into account experimental dislocation loop analyses and creep test, was used for a predictive approach by constructing a deformation mechanism map of the creep behavior of the irradiated material. (author)

  11. Investigation of Zirconium Oxide Films in Different Dissolved Hydrogen Concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taeho; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that in pre-transition zirconium oxide, the volume fraction of tetragonal zirconium oxide increased near the oxide/metal (O/M) interface, and the sub-stoichiometric zirconium oxide layer was observed. The diffusion of oxygen ion through the oxide layer is the rate-limiting process during the pre-transition oxidation process, and this diffusion mainly occurs in the grain boundaries. The two layered oxide structure is formed in pre-transition oxide for the zirconium alloy in high-temperature water environment. It is known that the corrosion rate is related to the volume fraction of zirconium oxide and the pores in the oxides; therefore, the aim of this paper is to investigate the oxidation behavior in the pre-transition zirconium oxide in high-temperature water chemistry. In this study, in situ Raman and TEM analysis were conducted for investigating the phase transformation of zirconium alloy in primary water. From this study, the following conclusions are drawn: 1. The zirconium alloy was oxidized in primary water chemistry for 100 d, and Raman and TEM were measured after 30, 50, 80, and 100 d from start-up. 2. TEM and FFT analysis showed that the zirconium oxide mostly consisted of the monoclinic phase. The tetragonal zirconium oxide was just found near the O/M interface

  12. In-reactor fuel cladding external corrosion measurement process and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomazet, J.; Musante, Y.; Pigelet, J.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the zirconium alloy cladding behaviour calls for an on-site corrosion measurement device. In the 80's, a FISCHER probe was used and allowed oxide layer measurements to be taken along the outer generating lines of the peripheral fuel rods. In order to allow measurements on inner rods, a thin Eddy current probe called SABRE was developed by FRAMATOME. The SABRE is a blade equipped with two E.C coils is moved through the assembly rows. A spring allows the measurement coil to be clamped on each of the generating lines of the scanned rods. By inserting this blade on all four assembly faces, measurements can also be performed along several generating lines of the same rod. Standard rings are fitted on the device and allow on-line calibration for each measured row. Signal acquisition and processing are performed by LAGOS, a dedicated software program developed by FRAMATOME. The measurements are generally taken at the cycle outage, in the spent fuel pool. On average, data acquisition calls for one shift per assembly (eight hours): this corresponds to more than 2500 measurement points. These measurements are processed statistically by the utility program SAN REMO. All the results are collected in a database for subsequent behaviour analysis: examples of investigated parameters are the thermal/hydraulic conditions of the reactors, the irradiation history, the cladding material, the water chemistry This analysis can be made easier by comparing the behaviour measurement and prediction by means of the COROS-2 corrosion code. (author)

  13. Evaluation of long-term creep behaviour on K-cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, J. G.; Jeong, Y. H.; Jeong, Y. H.

    2003-01-01

    KAERI has developed new zirconium alloys for high burnup fuel cladding. To evaluate the performance of these alloys, various out-pile tests are conducting. At high burnup, the creep resistance as well as corrosion resistance is one of the major factors determining nuclear fuel performance. Long-term creep test was performed at 350 .deg. C and 400 .deg. C and 100, 120, 135, and 150 MPa of applied hoop stress to evaluate the creep properties. The creep resistance was strongly affected by the final heat treatment conditions, while there was no effect of intermediate heat treatment. The creep strain of the recrystallized alloys is higher than that of the stress-relieved alloys by a factor of 3. The alloying elements also influenced the creep behaviour. Increase of Sn content enhanced the creep resistance, while Nb decreased the creep resistance. As a result of texture analysis, basal pole was directed to normal direction, while prism pole was to rolling direction. The development of the deformation texture and the ammealing texture showed almost similar process to Zircaloy cladding

  14. Cladding oxidation during air ingress. Part II: Synthesis of modelling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuzet, E.; Haurais, F.; Bals, C.; Coindreau, O.; Fernandez-Moguel, L.; Vasiliev, A.; Park, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A state-of-the-art for air oxidation modelling in the frame of severe accident is done. • Air oxidation models from main severe accident codes are detailed. • Simulations from main severe accident codes are compared against experimental results. • Perspectives in terms of need for further model development and experiments are given. - Abstract: Air ingress is a potential risk in some low probable situations of severe accidents in a nuclear power plant. Air is a highly oxidizing atmosphere that can lead to an enhanced Zr-based cladding oxidation and core degradation affecting the release of fission products. This is particularly true speaking about ruthenium release, due to its high radiotoxicity and its ability to form highly volatile oxides in a significant manner in presence of air. The oxygen affinity is decreasing from the Zircaloy cladding, fuel and ruthenium inclusions. It is consequently of great need to understand the phenomena governing cladding oxidation by air as a prerequisite for the source term issues in such scenarios. In the past years, many works have been done on cladding oxidation by air under severe accident conditions. This paper with in addition the paper “Cladding oxidation during air ingress – Part I: Synthesis of experimental results” of this journal issue aim at assessing the state of the art on this phenomenon. In this paper, the modelling of air ingress phenomena in the main severe accident codes (ASTEC, ATHLET-CD, MAAP, MELCOR, RELAP/SCDAPSIM, SOCRAT) is described in details, as well as the validation against the integral experiments QUENCH-10, QUENCH-16 and PARAMETER-SF4. A full review of cladding oxidation by air is thus established.

  15. Modification of MELCOR for severe accident analysis of candidate accident tolerant cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, Brad J., E-mail: brad.merrill@inl.gov; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M., E-mail: shannon.bragg-sitton@inl.gov; Humrickhouse, Paul W., E-mail: paul.humrickhouse@inl.gov

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Accident tolerant fuels (ATF) systems are currently under development for LWRs. • Many performance analysis tools are specifically developed for UO{sub 2}–Zr alloy fuel. • Modifications were made to the MELCOR code for candidate ATF cladding. • Preliminary analysis results for SiC and FeCrAl cladding concepts are presented. - Abstract: A number of materials are currently under development as candidate accident tolerant fuel and cladding for application in the current fleet of commercial light water reactors (LWRs). The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the nuclear industry. Continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to the industry’s success. Enhancing the accident tolerance of light water reactors became a topic of serious discussion following the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex. The overall goal for the development of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) systems for LWRs is to identify alternative fuel system technologies to further enhance the safety, competitiveness, and economics of commercial nuclear power. Designed for use in the current fleet of commercial LWRs, or in reactor concepts with design certifications (GEN-III+), to achieve their goal enhanced ATF must endure loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer period of time than the current fuel system, while maintaining or improving performance during normal operation. Many available nuclear fuel performance analysis tools are specifically developed for the current UO{sub 2}–Zirconium alloy fuel system. The MELCOR severe-accident analysis code, under development at the Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico (SNL-NM) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is one of these tools. This paper describes modifications

  16. A pellet-clad interaction failure criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howl, D.A.; Coucill, D.N.; Marechal, A.J.C.

    1983-01-01

    A Pellet-Clad Interaction (PCI) failure criterion, enabling the number of fuel rod failures in a reactor core to be determined for a variety of normal and fault conditions, is required for safety analysis. The criterion currently being used for the safety analysis of the Pressurized Water Reactor planned for Sizewell in the UK is defined and justified in this paper. The criterion is based upon a threshold clad stress which diminishes with increasing fast neutron dose. This concept is consistent with the mechanism of clad failure being stress corrosion cracking (SCC); providing excess corrodant is always present, the dominant parameter determining the propagation of SCC defects is stress. In applying the criterion, the SLEUTH-SEER 77 fuel performance computer code is used to calculate the peak clad stress, allowing for concentrations due to pellet hourglassing and the effect of radial cracks in the fuel. The method has been validated by analysis of PCI failures in various in-reactor experiments, particularly in the well-characterised power ramp tests in the Steam Generating Heavy Water Reactor (SGHWR) at Winfrith. It is also in accord with out-of-reactor tests with iodine and irradiated Zircaloy clad, such as those carried out at Kjeller in Norway. (author)

  17. Clad buffer rod sensors for liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, C.-K.; Ihara, I.

    1999-01-01

    Clad buffer rods, consisting of a core and a cladding, have been developed for ultrasonic monitoring of liquid metal processing. The cores of these rods are made of low ultrasonic-loss materials and the claddings are fabricated by thermal spray techniques. The clad geometry ensures proper ultrasonic guidance. The lengths of these rods ranges from tens of centimeters to 1m. On-line ultrasonic level measurements in liquid metals such as magnesium at 700 deg C and aluminum at 960 deg C are presented to demonstrate their operation at high temperature and their high ultrasonic performance. A spherical concave lens is machined at the rod end for improving the spatial resolution. High quality ultrasonic images have been obtained in the liquid zinc at 600 deg C. High spatial resolution is needed for the detection of inclusions in liquid metals during processing. We also show that the elastic properties such as density, longitudinal and shear wave velocities of liquid metals can be measured using a transducer which generates and receives both longitudinal and shear waves and is mounted at the end of a clad buffer rod. (author)

  18. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the GE project is to demonstrate that advanced steels such as iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys could be used as accident tolerant fuel cladding material in commercial light water reactors. The GE project does not include fuel development. Current findings support the concept that a FeCrAl alloy could be used for the cladding of commercial nuclear fuel. The use of this alloy will benefit the public since it is going to make the power generating light water reactors safer. In the Phase 1A of this cost shared project, GE (GRC + GNF) teamed with the University of Michigan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the environmental and mechanical behavior of more than eight candidate cladding materials both under normal operation conditions of commercial nuclear reactors and under accident conditions in superheated steam (loss of coolant condition). The main findings are as follows: (1) Under normal operation conditions the candidate alloys (e.g. APMT, Alloy 33) showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, shadow corrosion and to environmentally assisted cracking. APMT also showed resistance to proton irradiation up to 5 dpa. (2) Under accident conditions the selected candidate materials showed several orders of magnitude improvement in the reaction with superheated steam as compared with the current zirconium based alloys. (3) Tube fabrication feasibility studies of FeCrAl alloys are underway. The aim is to obtain a wall thickness that is below 400 µm. (4) A strategy is outlined for the regulatory path approval and for the insertion of a lead fuel assembly in a commercial reactor by 2022. (5) The GE team worked closely with INL to have four rodlets tested in the ATR. GE provided the raw stock for the alloys, the fuel for the rodlets and the cost for fabrication/welding of the rodlets. INL fabricated the rodlets and the caps and welded them to

  19. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, Raul B. [General Electric Global Research, Schnectady, NY (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The objective of the GE project is to demonstrate that advanced steels such as iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys could be used as accident tolerant fuel cladding material in commercial light water reactors. The GE project does not include fuel development. Current findings support the concept that a FeCrAl alloy could be used for the cladding of commercial nuclear fuel. The use of this alloy will benefit the public since it is going to make the power generating light water reactors safer. In the Phase 1A of this cost shared project, GE (GRC + GNF) teamed with the University of Michigan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the environmental and mechanical behavior of more than eight candidate cladding materials both under normal operation conditions of commercial nuclear reactors and under accident conditions in superheated steam (loss of coolant condition). The main findings are as follows: (1) Under normal operation conditions the candidate alloys (e.g. APMT, Alloy 33) showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, shadow corrosion and to environmentally assisted cracking. APMT also showed resistance to proton irradiation up to 5 dpa. (2) Under accident conditions the selected candidate materials showed several orders of magnitude improvement in the reaction with superheated steam as compared with the current zirconium based alloys. (3) Tube fabrication feasibility studies of FeCrAl alloys are underway. The aim is to obtain a wall thickness that is below 400 µm. (4) A strategy is outlined for the regulatory path approval and for the insertion of a lead fuel assembly in a commercial reactor by 2022. (5) The GE team worked closely with INL to have four rodlets tested in the ATR. GE provided the raw stock for the alloys, the fuel for the rodlets and the cost for fabrication/welding of the rodlets. INL fabricated the rodlets and the caps and welded them to

  20. Chemical aspects of hydrogen ingress in zirconium and zircaloy pressure tubes: ageing management of Indian PHWR coolant channels - determination of hydrogen and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayi, Y.S.; Shankaran, P.S.; Yadav, C.S.; Ramanjaneyulu, P.S.; Venugopal, V.; Ramakumar, K.L.; Chhapru, G.C.; Prasad, R.; Jain, H.C.; Sood, D.D.

    2009-02-01

    Pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs) use zirconium and zirconium based alloys as clad and coolant tubes since its beginning. The first ever zircaloy-2 pressure tube failure occurred in 1983 at Ontario Hydro's Pickering Unit 2 in Canada which necessitated a thorough examination of causes of such failure. The failure was attributed to massive hydriding at the failed spot of pressure tube. Continuous usage of zirconium alloys could result in their hydrogen and deuterium pick-up leading to hydrogen/ deuterium embrittlement. The life of the zircaloy coolant channels is dictated by hydrogen/deuterium content and hence ageing management of the pressure tubes is essential for ensuring their trouble-free usage. It is desirable to have a sound knowledge on the chemical aspects of zirconium and zirconium based alloys metallurgy, the mechanistic principles of hydrogen ingress into the pressure tubes during in reactor service, and identifying suitable analytical methodologies for precise and accurate determination of hydrogen in wafer thin sliver samples carved out from insides of pressure tubes without causing any structural damage so that it can continue to remain in service. This is desirable so that the ageing management does not result in cost-escalation. This report is divided in to three main parts. The first part deals with the chemical aspects of zirconium and zirconium based alloy metallurgy, the mechanism of hydrogen pick-up and hydride formation in zirconium matrix. The second part describes various methodologies and their limitations, available for hydrogen/deuterium determination. The third part deals in detail, about the extensive investigations carried out at Radioanalytical Chemistry Division (RACD) in Radiochemistry and Isotope Group for establishing an indigenously developed hot vacuum extraction system in combination with quadrupole mass spectrometry for precise determination of hydrogen and deuterium in wafer thin sliver sample of zircaloy. The

  1. Molten salt extractive distillation process for zirconium-hafnium separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Stoltz, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for zirconium-hafnium separation. It utilizes an extractive distillation column with a mixture of zirconium and hafnium tetrachlorides introduced into a distillation column having a top and bottom with hafnium enriched overheads taken from the top of the column and a molten salt solvent circulated through the column to provide a liquid phase, and with molten salt solvent containing zirconium chloride being taken from the bottom of the distillation column. The improvements comprising: utilizing a molten salt solvent consisting principally of lithium chloride and at least one of sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium chlorides; stripping of the zirconium chloride taken from the bottom of the distillation column by electrochemically reducing zirconium from the molten salt solvent; and utilizing a pressurized reflux condenser on the top of the column to add the hafnium chloride enriched overheads to the molten salt solvent previously stripped of zirconium chloride

  2. Investigation of anodic oxide coatings on zirconium after heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, Maciej; Dercz, Grzegorz; Suchanek, Katarzyna; Simka, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxide layers prepared via PEO of zirconium were subjected to heat treatment. • Surface characteristics were determined for the obtained oxide coatings. • Heat treatment led to the partial destruction of the anodic oxide layer. • Pitting corrosion resistance of zirconium was improved after the modification. - Abstract: Herein, results of heat treatment of zirconium anodised under plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) conditions at 500–800 °C are presented. The obtained oxide films were investigated by means of SEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The corrosion resistance of the zirconium specimens was evaluated in Ringer's solution. A bilayer oxide coatings generated in the course of PEO of zirconium were not observed after the heat treatment. The resulting oxide layers contained a new sublayer located at the metal/oxide interface is suggested to originate from the thermal oxidation of zirconium. The corrosion resistance of the anodised metal was improved after the heat treatment

  3. Extending FEAST-METAL for analysis of low content minor actinide bearing and zirconium rich metallic fuels for sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karahan, Aydin, E-mail: karahan@mit.edu [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge MA 24-204 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Computational models in FEAST-METAL fuel behaviour code have been upgraded to simulate minor actinide bearing zirconium rich metallic fuels for use in sodium fast reactors. Increasing the zirconium content to 20-40 wt.% causes significant changes in fuel slug microstructure affecting thermal, mechanical, chemical, and fission gas behaviour. Inclusion of zirconium rich phase reduces the fission gas swelling rate significantly in early irradiation. Above the threshold fission gas swelling, formation of micro-cracks, and open pores increase material compliancy enhance diffusivity, leading to rapid fuel gas swelling, interconnected porosity development and release of the fission gases and helium. Production and release of helium was modelled empirically as a function of americium content and fission gas production, consistent with previous Idaho National Laboratory studies. Predicted fuel constituent redistribution is much smaller compared to typical U-Pu-10Zr fuel operated at EBR-II. Material properties such as fuel thermal conductivity, modulus of elasticity, and thermal expansion coefficient have been approximated using the available database. Creep rate and fission gas diffusivity of high zirconium fuel is lowered by an order of magnitude with respect to the reference low zirconium fuel based on limited database and in order to match experimental observations. The new code is benchmarked against the AFC-1F fuel assembly post irradiation examination results. Satisfactory match was obtained for fission gas release and swelling behaviour. Finally, the study considers a comparison of fuel behaviour between high zirconium content minor actinide bearing fuel and typical U-15Pu-6Zr fuel pins with 75% smear density. The new fuel has much higher fissile content, allowing for operating at lower neutron flux level compared to fuel with lower fissile density. This feature allows the designer to reach a much higher burnup before reaching the cladding dose limit. On the other

  4. Extending FEAST-METAL for analysis of low content minor actinide bearing and zirconium rich metallic fuels for sodium fast reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Aydın

    2011-07-01

    Computational models in FEAST-METAL fuel behaviour code have been upgraded to simulate minor actinide bearing zirconium rich metallic fuels for use in sodium fast reactors. Increasing the zirconium content to 20-40 wt.% causes significant changes in fuel slug microstructure affecting thermal, mechanical, chemical, and fission gas behaviour. Inclusion of zirconium rich phase reduces the fission gas swelling rate significantly in early irradiation. Above the threshold fission gas swelling, formation of micro-cracks, and open pores increase material compliancy enhance diffusivity, leading to rapid fuel gas swelling, interconnected porosity development and release of the fission gases and helium. Production and release of helium was modelled empirically as a function of americium content and fission gas production, consistent with previous Idaho National Laboratory studies. Predicted fuel constituent redistribution is much smaller compared to typical U-Pu-10Zr fuel operated at EBR-II. Material properties such as fuel thermal conductivity, modulus of elasticity, and thermal expansion coefficient have been approximated using the available database. Creep rate and fission gas diffusivity of high zirconium fuel is lowered by an order of magnitude with respect to the reference low zirconium fuel based on limited database and in order to match experimental observations. The new code is benchmarked against the AFC-1F fuel assembly post irradiation examination results. Satisfactory match was obtained for fission gas release and swelling behaviour. Finally, the study considers a comparison of fuel behaviour between high zirconium content minor actinide bearing fuel and typical U-15Pu-6Zr fuel pins with 75% smear density. The new fuel has much higher fissile content, allowing for operating at lower neutron flux level compared to fuel with lower fissile density. This feature allows the designer to reach a much higher burnup before reaching the cladding dose limit. On the other

  5. Extending FEAST-METAL for analysis of low content minor actinide bearing and zirconium rich metallic fuels for sodium fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karahan, Aydin

    2011-01-01

    Computational models in FEAST-METAL fuel behaviour code have been upgraded to simulate minor actinide bearing zirconium rich metallic fuels for use in sodium fast reactors. Increasing the zirconium content to 20-40 wt.% causes significant changes in fuel slug microstructure affecting thermal, mechanical, chemical, and fission gas behaviour. Inclusion of zirconium rich phase reduces the fission gas swelling rate significantly in early irradiation. Above the threshold fission gas swelling, formation of micro-cracks, and open pores increase material compliancy enhance diffusivity, leading to rapid fuel gas swelling, interconnected porosity development and release of the fission gases and helium. Production and release of helium was modelled empirically as a function of americium content and fission gas production, consistent with previous Idaho National Laboratory studies. Predicted fuel constituent redistribution is much smaller compared to typical U-Pu-10Zr fuel operated at EBR-II. Material properties such as fuel thermal conductivity, modulus of elasticity, and thermal expansion coefficient have been approximated using the available database. Creep rate and fission gas diffusivity of high zirconium fuel is lowered by an order of magnitude with respect to the reference low zirconium fuel based on limited database and in order to match experimental observations. The new code is benchmarked against the AFC-1F fuel assembly post irradiation examination results. Satisfactory match was obtained for fission gas release and swelling behaviour. Finally, the study considers a comparison of fuel behaviour between high zirconium content minor actinide bearing fuel and typical U-15Pu-6Zr fuel pins with 75% smear density. The new fuel has much higher fissile content, allowing for operating at lower neutron flux level compared to fuel with lower fissile density. This feature allows the designer to reach a much higher burnup before reaching the cladding dose limit. On the other

  6. Investigating mechanical behavior and radiation resistant of fuel rods clad in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedgh Kerdar, A.

    1999-01-01

    interstitials in metal lattice under irradiation causes increased strength and hardness but decreases ductility in metals.The increase in strength and hardness depends on obstacles that prevent the motion of dislocations. The clustering of point defects are responsible for these changes. Irradiation also induces instabilities in phases due to enhancement of diffusion, solute segregation, precipitate formation, order- disorder transformation and resolution of small precipitates. From the microscopic point of view accumulation of vacancies accompanied by formation of He and H 2 gases under irradiation cause an increase in volume which results in swelling and eventually ends up with embrittlement of metals. This subject was described in chapter three Zirconium and its alloys are the best structural materials for fuel cladding of BWR and PWR reactors core. The working condition in the core of nuclear reactor are very serve, respect temperature and radiation dose. It should be realized that, if fuel cladding receive damage and get cracked, the first cooling cycle and the maine equipment will be contaminated with active materials which cause additional environmental problems. Furthermore, replacement of fuel rods are very costly. Therefore, for increasing life time of fuel cladding and minimizing damage, the effect of radiation and heat on Zirconium and its alloys must be investigated. This subject was described in chapter four.The mechanical behavior and radiation resistant of fuel cladding in PWR reactor (specifically WWER ) have been investigated which is described in chapter five. Result, discussion and final conclusion are summarized in last chapter and also several points for improvement have been offered

  7. Translucency and Strength of High Translucency Monolithic Zirconium Oxide Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-17

    Zirconium -Oxide Materials presented at/published to the Journal of General Dentistry with MDWI 41-108, and has been assigned local file #16208. 2...Zirconia-Oxide Materials 6. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide...OBSOLETE 48. DATE Page 3 of 3 Pages Translucency and Strength of High-Translucency Monolithic Zirconium -Oxide Materials Abstract Dental materials

  8. Immobilization of transition metal ions on zirconium phosphate monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melezhik, A.V.; Brej, V.V.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that ions of transition metals (copper, iron, vanadyl, titanium) are adsorbed on zirconium phosphate monolayers. The zirconium phosphate threshold capacity corresponds to substitution of all protons of hydroxyphosphate groups by equivalent amounts of copper, iron or vanadyl. Adsorption of polynuclear ions is possible in case of titanium. The layered substance with specific surface up to 300 m 2 /g, wherein ultradispersed titanium dioxide particles are intercalirated between zirconium-phosphate layers, is synthesized

  9. Titanium zirconium and hafnium coordination compounds with vanillin thiosemicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konunova, Ts.B.; Kudritskaya, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Coordination compounds of titanium zirconium and hafnium tetrachlorides with vanillin thiosemicarbazone of MCl 4 x nLig composition, where n=1.5, 4 for titanium and 1, 2, 4 for zirconium and hafnium, are synthesized. Molar conductivity of ethanol solutions is measured; IR spectroscopic and thermochemical investigation are carried out. The supposition about ligand coordination via sulfur and azomethine nitrogen atoms is made. In all cases hafnium forms stable compounds than zirconium

  10. Manufacturing process to reduce large grain growth in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosecrans, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described of treating cold worked zirconium alloys to reduce large grain growth during thermal treatment above its recrystallization temperature. The method comprises heating the zirconium alloy at a temperature of about 1300 0 F. to 1350 0 F. for about 1 to 3 hours subsequent to cold working the zirconium alloy and prior to the thermal treatment at a temperature of between 1450 0 -1550 0 F., the thermal treatment temperature being above the recrystallization temperature

  11. New method to calculate the mechanical properties of unirradiated fuel cladding from ring tensile tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Rengel, M.A. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), Justo Dorado 11, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Gomez, F.J.; Ruiz-Hervias, J.; Caballero, L.; Valiente, A. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, UPM, E.T.S.I. Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Profesor Aranguren s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Nuclear fuel cladding is the first barrier used to confine the fuel and the fission products produced during irradiation. Zirconium alloys are used for this purpose due to their remarkable neutron transparency, together with their good mechanical properties at operational temperatures. Consequently, it is very important to be able to characterize the mechanical response of the irradiated cladding. The mechanical behaviour of the material can be modelled as elastoplastic with different stress-strain curves depending on the direction: radial, hoop or longitudinal direction. The ring tensile test has been proposed to determine the mechanical properties of the cladding along the hoop direction. The initial test consisted of applying a force inside the tube, by means of two half cylinders. Later Arsene and Bai [1,2] modified the experimental device to avoid tube bending at the beginning of the test. The same authors proposed a numerical method to obtain the stress-strain curve in the hoop direction from the experimental load versus displacement results and a given friction coefficient between the loading pieces and the sample [3]. This method has been used by different authors [4] with slight modifications. It is based on the existence of two universal curves under small strain hypothesis: the first correlating the hoop strain and the displacement of the loading piece and the second one correlating the hoop stress and the applied load. In this work, a new method to determine the mechanical properties of the cladding from the ring tensile test results is proposed. Non-linear geometry is considered and an iterative procedure is proposed so universal curves are not needed. A stress-strain curve is determined by combining numerical calculations with experimental results in a convergent loop. The two universal curves proposed by Arsene and Bai [3] are substituted by two relationships, one between the equivalent plastic strain in the centre of the specimen ligament and the

  12. Capturing reflected cladding modes from a fiber Bragg grating with a double-clad fiber coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiad, Mohamad Diaa; Gagné, Mathieu; Lemire-Renaud, Simon; De Montigny, Etienne; Madore, Wendy-Julie; Godbout, Nicolas; Boudoux, Caroline; Kashyap, Raman

    2013-03-25

    We present a novel measurement scheme using a double-clad fiber coupler (DCFC) and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) to resolve cladding modes. Direct measurement of the optical spectra and power in the cladding modes is obtained through the use of a specially designed DCFC spliced to a highly reflective FBG written into slightly etched standard photosensitive single mode fiber to match the inner cladding diameter of the DCFC. The DCFC is made by tapering and fusing two double-clad fibers (DCF) together. The device is capable of capturing backward propagating low and high order cladding modes simply and efficiently. Also, we demonstrate the capability of such a device to measure the surrounding refractive index (SRI) with an extremely high sensitivity of 69.769 ± 0.035 μW/RIU and a resolution of 1.433 × 10(-5) ± 8 × 10(-9) RIU between 1.37 and 1.45 RIU. The device provides a large SRI operating range from 1.30 to 1.45 RIU with sufficient discrimination for all individual captured cladding modes. The proposed scheme can be adapted to many different types of bend, temperature, refractive index and other evanescent wave based sensors.

  13. Inspection system for Zircaloy clad fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yancey, M.E.; Porter, E.H.; Hansen, H.R.

    1975-10-01

    A description is presented of the design, development, and performance of a remote scanning system for nondestructive examination of fuel rods. Characteristics that are examined include microcracking of fuel rod cladding, fuel-cladding interaction, cladding thickness, fuel rod diameter variation, and fuel rod bowing. Microcracking of both the inner and outer fuel rod surfaces and variations in wall thickness are detected by using a pulsed eddy current technique developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Fuel rod diameter variation and fuel rod bowing are detected by using two linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs) and a signal conditioning system. The system's mechanical features include variable scanning speeds, a precision indexing system, and a servomechanism to maintain proper probe alignment. Initial results indicate that the system is a very useful mechanism for characterizing irradiated fuel rods

  14. Fuel cladding mechanical properties for transient analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.; Hunter, C.W.; Hanson, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Out-of-pile simulated transient tests have been conducted on irradiated fast-reactor fuel pin cladding specimens at heating rates of 10 0 F/s (5.6 0 K/s) and 200 0 F/s (111 0 K/s) to generate mechanical property information for use in describing cladding behavior during off-normal events. Mechanical property data were then analyzed, applying the Larson-Miller Parameter to the effects of heating rate and neutron fluence. Data from simulated transient tests on TREAT-tested fuel pins demonstrate that Plant Protective System termination of 3$/s transients prevents significant damage to cladding. The breach opening produced during simulated transient testing is shown to decrease in size with increasing neutron fluence

  15. Laser cladding to select new glassy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medrano, L.L.O.; Afonso, C.R.M.; Kiminami, C.S.; Gargarella, P.; Ramasco, B.

    2016-01-01

    A new experimental technique used to analyze the effect of compositional variation and cooling rate in the phase formation in a multicomponent system is the laser cladding. This work have evaluated the use of laser cladding to discover a new bulk metallic glass (BMG) in the Al-Co-Zr system. Coatings with composition variation have made by laser cladding using Al-Co-Zr alloys powders and the samples produced have been characterized by X ray diffraction, microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results did not show the composition variation as expected, because of incomplete melting during laser process. It was measured a composition variation tendency that allowed the glass forming investigation by the glass formation criterion λ+Δh 1/2 . The results have showed no glass formation in the coating samples, which prove a limited capacity of Zr-Co-Al system to form glass (author)

  16. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented

  17. Stress corrosion testing of irradiated cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunde, L.; Olshausen, K.D.

    1980-01-01

    Samples from two fuel rods with different cladding have been stress corrosion tested by closed-end argon-iodine pressurization at 320 0 C. The fuel rods with stress relieved and recrystallized Zircaloy-2 had received burnups of 10.000 and 20.000 MWd/ton UO 2 , respectively. It was found that the SCC failure stress was unchanged or slightly higher for the irradiated than for the unirradiated control tubes. The tubes failed consistently in the end with the lowest irradiation dose. The diameter increase of the irradiated cladding during the test was 1.1% for the stress-relieved samples and 0.24% for the recrystallized samples. SEM examination revealed no major differences between irradiated and unirradiated cladding. A ''semi-ductile'' fracture zone in recrystallized material is described in some detail. (author)

  18. Preparation of zirconium molybdate gel generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charoen, S.; Aungurarat, G.; Laohawilai, S.; Sukontpradit, W.; Jingjit, S.

    1994-01-01

    A procedure for preparation of 99mTc generator based on conversion to zirconium molybdate gel of 99Mo produced by neutron activation was reported. The gel was prepared from zirconium oxychloride solution pH 1.6, ammonium molybdate solution pH 3-5 and mole ratio of Zr:Mo 1:1 which had water content about 7-8%. Small generators containing 1-1.5 g of gel were eluted with average efficiencies of 77% and the activity peak in the first 3 ml of 10 ml of saline solution. The amount of Mo and Zr in eluates were below the acceptance limit. The gel generators of activity about 100 mCi were prepared and had the good performance in elutability and stability

  19. Study of some properties of zirconium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prospert, J.

    1963-05-01

    Zirconium phosphate has been studied with a view to using it as an ion exchanger: the first objective was to develop a method of preparation easy to apply and also reproducible. To this end, several tests were carried out varying the molar ratios of phosphorus and of zirconium. Some physical properties such as the diffraction of X-rays were examined. The work then involved certain chemical properties, particularly the percentages of free water and structural water given by the loss on calcination, the Karl-Fisher method and the weight losses by thermogravimetry. Finally an attempts was made to apply the exchanger to the separation of alkaline ions. The static tests showed that the order of fixation of these ions was Cs + > Rb + >> K + > Na + . Tests with columns showed that Na + and K + were easily separable, as was the Rb + -Cs + mixture, this last pair being fairly difficult to dissociate. (author) [fr

  20. Separation process of zirconium and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hure, J.; Saint-James, R.

    1955-01-01

    About the separation different processes of zirconium-hafnium, the extraction by solvent in cross-current is the most easily the process usable on an industrial scale. It uses tributyl phosphate as solvent, diluted with white spirit to facilitate the decanting. Some exploratory tests showed that nitric environment seemed the most favorable for extraction; but a lot of other factors intervene in the separation process. We studied the influence of the acidity successively, the NO 3 - ions concentration, the role of the cation coming with NO 3 - , as well as the influence of the concentration of zirconium in the solution on the separation coefficient β = α Zr / α Hf . (M.B.) [fr

  1. Sorption of Europium in zirconium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia R, G.

    2004-01-01

    Some minerals have the property of sipping radioactive metals in solution, that it takes advantage to manufacture contention barriers that are placed in the repositories of nuclear wastes. The more recent investigations are focused in the development of new technologies guided to the sorption of alpha emissors on minerals which avoid their dispersion in the environment. In an effort to contribute to the understanding of this type of properties, some studies of sorption of Europium III are presented like homologous of the americium, on the surface of zirconium silicate (ZrSiO 4 ). In this work the results of sorption experiences are presented as well as the interpretation of the phenomena of the formation of species in the surface of the zirconium silicate. (Author)

  2. Comparison of corrosion behavior between fusion cladded and explosive cladded Inconel 625/plain carbon steel bimetal plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zareie Rajani, H.R.; Akbari Mousavi, S.A.A.; Madani Sani, F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Both explosive and fusion cladding aggravate the corrosion resistance of Inconel 625. ► Fusion cladding is more detrimental to nonuniform corrosion resistance. ► Single-layered fusion coat does not show any repassivation ability. ► Adding more layers enhance the corrosion resistance of fusion cladding Inconel 625. ► High impact energy spoils the corrosion resistance of explosive cladding Inconel 625. -- Abstract: One of the main concerns in cladding Inconel 625 superalloy on desired substrates is deterioration of corrosion resistance due to cladding process. The present study aims to compare the effect of fusion cladding and explosive cladding procedures on corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 cladding on plain carbon steel as substrate. Also, an attempt has been made to investigate the role of load ratio and numbers of fusion layers in corrosion behavior of explosive and fusion cladding Inconel 625 respectively. In all cases, the cyclic polarization as an electrochemical method has been applied to assess the corrosion behavior. According to the obtained results, both cladding methods aggravate the corrosion resistance of Inconel 625. However, the fusion cladding process is more detrimental to nonuniform corrosion resistance, where the chemical nonuniformity of fusion cladding superalloy issuing from microsegregation, development of secondary phases and contamination of clad through dilution hinders formation of a stable passive layer. Moreover, it is observed that adding more fusion layers can enhance the nonuniform corrosion resistance of fusion cladding Inconel 625, though this resistance still remains weaker than explosive cladding superalloy. Also, the results indicate that raising the impact energy in explosive cladding procedure drops the corrosion resistance of Inconel 625.

  3. Modelling of pellet-clad interaction during power ramps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, G.; Lindback, J.E.; Schutte, H.C.; Jernkvist, L.O.; Massih, A.R.; Massih, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    A computational method to describe the pellet-clad interaction phenomenon is presented. The method accounts for the mechanical contact between fragmented pellets and the zircaloy clad, as well as for chemical reaction of fission products with zircaloy during power ramps. Possible pellet-clad contact states, soft, hard and friction, are taken into account in the computational algorithm. The clad is treated as an elastic-plastic-viscoplastic material with irradiation hardening. Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking is described by using a fracture mechanics-based model for crack propagation. This integrated approach is used to evaluate two power ramp experiments made on boiling water reactor fuel rods in test reactors. The influence of the pellet-clad coefficient of friction on clad deformation is evaluated and discussed. Also, clad deformations, pellet-clad gap size and fission product gas release for one of the ramped rods are calculated and compared with measured data. (authors)

  4. Multilayer cladding with hyperbolic dispersion for plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Shalaginov, Mikhail Y.; Ishii, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We study the properties of plasmonic waveguides with a dielectric core and multilayer metal-dielectric claddings that possess hyperbolic dispersion. The waveguides hyperbolic multilayer claddings show better performance in comparison to conventional plasmonic waveguides. © OSA 2015....

  5. Cladding using a 15 kW CO2 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, E.J.; Verma, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    Laser alloying or cladding differs little in principle from the traditional forms of weld overlays, but lasers as a heat source offer some distinct advantages. With the selective heating attainable using high power lasers, good metallurgical bond of the clad layer, minimal dilution and typically, a very fine homogeneous microstructure can be obtained in the clad layer. This is a review of work in laser cladding using the 15 kW CO 2 laser. The authors discuss the ability of the laser clad surface to increase the high temperature oxidation resistance of a low-alloy carbon steel (4140). Examples of clads subjected to high- temperature thermal cycling of nickel-20% aluminum and TaC + 4140 clad low-alloy steel and straight high-temperature oxidation of Stellite 6-304L cladding on a 4140 substrate are given

  6. New solvent extraction process for zirconium and hafnium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Katoh, Y.; Miyazaki, H.

    1984-01-01

    The authors' company developed a new solvent extraction process for zirconium and hafnium separation, and started production of zirconium sponge by this new process in September 1979. The process utilizes selective extraction of zirconium oxysulfate using high-molecular alkyl amine, and has the following advantages: 1. This extraction system has a separation factor as high as 10 to 20 for zirconium and hafnium in the range of suitable acid concentration. 2. In the scrubbing section, removal of all the hafnium that coexists with zirconium in the organic solvent can be effectively accomplished by using scrubbing solution containing hafnium-free zirconium sulfate. Consequently, hafnium in the zirconium sponge obtained is reduced to less than 50 ppm. 3. The extractant undergoes no chemical changes but is very stable for a long period. In particular, its solubility in water is small, about 20 ppm maximum, posing no environmental pollution problems such as are often caused by other process raffinates. At the present time, the zirconium and hafnium separation operation is very stable, and zirconium sponge made by this process can be applied satisfactorily to nuclear reactors

  7. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulac, B.L.; Edwards, G.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Welding, Joining, and Coatings Research; Burt, R.P. [Alumax Technical Center, Golden, CO (United States); David, S.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-01

    When gas-tungsten arc welded, iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure which is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Titanium inoculation effectively refined the fusion zone microstructure in iron aluminide weldments, but the inoculated weldments had a reduced fracture strength despite the presence of a finer microstructure. The weldments fractured by transgranular cleavage which nucleated at cracked second phase particles. With titanium inoculation, second phase particles in the fusion zone changed shape and also became more concentrated at the grain boundaries, which increased the particle spacing in the fusion zone. The observed decrease in fracture strength with titanium inoculation was attributed to increased spacing of second phase particles in the fusion zone. Current research has focused on the weldability of zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides. Preliminary work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has shown that zirconium and carbon additions affect the weldability of the alloy as well as the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of the weldments. A sigmajig hot cracking test apparatus has been constructed and tested at Colorado School of Mines. Preliminary characterization of hot cracking of three zirconium- and carbon-alloyed iron aluminides, each containing a different total concentration of zirconium at a constant zirconium/carbon ratio of ten, is in progress. Future testing will include low zirconium alloys at zirconium/carbon ratios of five and one, as well as high zirconium alloys (1.5 to 2.0 atomic percent) at zirconium/carbon ratios of ten to forty.

  8. Advanced LMFBR fuel cladding susceptability to stress corrosion due to reprocessing impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henslee, S.P.

    1987-03-01

    The potential degradation of LMFBR fuel cladding alloys by chlorides, when used in metallic fuel systems, was evaluated. The alloys tested were D-9 and HT-9 stainless steels, austenitic and ferritic alloys respectively. These two alloys were tested in parallel with and their performance compared to the austenitic stainless steel Type 316. All alloys were tested for 7400 hours in a stress rupture environment with chloride exposure at either 550/degree/C 650/degree/C. None of the alloys tested were found to exhibit any degradation in time-to-rupture by the presence of chlorides under the conditions imposed during testing. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Traps in Zirconium Alloys Oxide Layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmar Frank

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxide films long-time grown on tubes of three types of zirconium alloys in water and in steam were investigated, by analysing I-V characteristic measured at constant voltages with various temperatures. Using theoretical concepts of Rose [3] and Gould [5], ZryNbSn(Fe proved to have an exponential distribution of trapping centers below the conduction band edge, wheras Zr1Nb and IMP Zry-4 proved to have single energy trap levels.

  10. Structure of zirconium dioxide based porous glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gubanova, N. N.; Kopitsa, G. P.; Ezdakova, K. V.; Baranchikov, A. Y.; Angelov, Borislav; Feoktystov, A.; Pipich, V.; Ryukhtin, Vasyl; Ivanov, V. K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 5 (2014), s. 967-975 ISSN 1027-4510 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/1600; GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019; GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : zirconium dioxide * porous glasse * nanoparticles Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry; BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders (UJF-V) Impact factor: 0.359, year: 2012

  11. Zirconium oxide obtainment from brazilian zircon concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, S.; Martins, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    This work presents the experimental results of studies about alkaline melting, acid leaching and sulfation steps for obtention of zirconium oxide and partially stabilized zirconia by yttrium and rare-earth coprecipitation in chlorine medium, starting from the brazilian zircon concentrate. Using statistical methods of factorial design and the Packett-Burman approach, the results are discussed and the optimal conditions of the production steps were determined. (author)

  12. Evaluation of fast experimental reactor claddings, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Makoto; Nagaki, Hiroshi; Koyama, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yasumasa

    1974-01-01

    Thin-walled fine tubes of Type 316 austenitic stainless steel are used for fuel cladding in Joyo (experimental FBR). The material exhibits the change of the mechanical properties in long-time annealing at high temperature, resulting from the precipitation of carbide in structure. In this connection, the experiment and the results on the changes of the microstructure and mechanical properties (proof stress and hardness) are described. The test specimens are the fuel cladding tubes produced for trial for Joyo core and those for FFTF core made in the U.S.A. They were heated between 400 0 and 850 0 C for 1000 hr in vacuum. (Mori, K.)

  13. Management of cladding hulls and fuel hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent fuel from power reactors based on chop-leach technology produces a solid waste product of cladding hulls and other metallic residues. This report describes the current situation in the management of fuel cladding hulls and hardware. Information is presented on the material composition of such waste together with the heating effects due to neutron-induced activation products and fuel contamination. As no country has established a final disposal route and the corresponding repository, this report also discusses possible disposal routes and various disposal options under consideration at present

  14. Inpile (in PWR) testing of cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, R.; Jeong, Y. H.; Baek, B. J.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, S. J.; Choi, B. K.; Kim, J. M.

    1999-04-01

    As an introduction, the reasons to perform inpile tests are depicted. An overview over general inpile test procedure is given, and test details which are necessary for the development of new alloys for high burnup claddings, like sample geometries and measuring techniques for inpile corrosion testing, are described in detail. Tests for the creep and length change behavior of cladding tubes are described briefly. Finally, conclusions are drawn and literature citations for further test details are given. (author). 9 refs., 2 tabs., 17 figs

  15. Microstructure of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available and martensite with 10% ferrite for Material B. Table 7 - Proposed martensitic stainless steel alloys for laser cladding Material C* Cr Ni Mn Si Mo Co Ms (ºC)* Cr eq Ni eq Material A 0.4 13 - 1 0.5 2.5 5.5 120 16.5 12.5 Material B 0.2 15 2 1 0.7 2.5 5.5 117... dilution, low heat input, less distortion, increased mechanical and corrosion properties excellent repeatability and control of process parameters. Solidification of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel is primarily austenitic. Microstructures...

  16. Phosphate-core silica-clad Er/Yb-doped optical fiber and cladding pumped laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, O N; Semjonov, S L; Velmiskin, V V; Yatsenko, Yu P; Sverchkov, S E; Galagan, B I; Denker, B I; Dianov, E M

    2014-04-07

    We present a composite optical fiber with a Er/Yb co-doped phosphate-glass core in a silica glass cladding as well as cladding pumped laser. The fabrication process, optical properties, and lasing parameters are described. The slope efficiency under 980 nm cladding pumping reached 39% with respect to the absorbed pump power and 28% with respect to the coupled pump power. Due to high doping level of the phosphate core optimal length was several times shorter than that of silica core fibers.

  17. In-reactor performance of methods to control fuel-cladding chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, E.T.; Gibby, R.L.; Wilson, C.N.; Lawrence, L.A.; Adamson, M.G.

    1979-01-01

    Inner surface corrosion of austenitic stainless steel cladding by oxygen and reactive fission product elements requires a 50 μm wastage allowance in current FBR reference oxide fuel pin design. Elimination or reduction of this wastage allowance could result in better reactor efficiency and economics through improvements in fuel pin performance and reliability. Reduction in cladding thickness and replacement of equivalent volume with fuel result in improved breeding capability. Of the factors affecting fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI), oxygen activity within the fuel pin can be most readily controlled and/or manipulated without degrading fuel pin performance or significantly increasing fuel fabrication costs. There are two major approaches to control oxygen activity within an oxide fuel pin: (1) control of total oxygen inventory and chemical activity (Δ anti GO 2 ) by use of low oxygen-to-metal ratio (O/M) fuel; and (2) incorporation of a material within the fuel pin to provide in-situ control of oxygen activity (Δ anti GO 2 ) and fixation of excess oxygen prior to, or in preference to reaction with the cladding. The paper describes irradiation tests which were conducted in EBR-II and GETR incorporating oxygen buffer/getter materials and very low O/M fuel to control oxygen activity in sealed fuel pins

  18. Effect of the oxidation front penetration on in-clad hydrogen migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria, F.; Herranz, L. E.

    2018-03-01

    In LWR fuel claddings the embrittlement due to hydrogen precipitates (i.e., hydrides) is a degrading mechanism that concerns in nuclear safety, particularly in dry storage. A relevant factor is the radial distribution of the hydrogen absorbed, especially the hydride rim formed. Thus, a reliable assessment of fuel performance should account for hydrogen migration. Based on the current state of modelling of hydrogen dynamics in the cladding, a 1D radial model has been derived and coupled with the FRAPCON code. The model includes the effect of the oxidation front progression on in-clad hydrogen migration, based on experimental observations found (i.e., dissolution/diffusion/re-precipitation of the hydrogen in the matrix ahead of the oxidation front). A remarkable quantitative impact of this new contribution has been shown by analyzing the hydrogen profile across the cladding of several high burnup fuel scenarios (>60 GW d/tU); other potential contributions like thermodiffusion and diffusion in the hydride phase hardly make any difference. Comparisons against PIE measurements allow concluding that the model accuracy notably increases when the effect of the oxidation front is accounted for in the hydride rim formation. In spite of the promising results, further validation would be needed.

  19. Study of the uniform corrosion of an aluminium alloy used for the fuel cladding of the Jules Horowitz experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintergerst, M.

    2008-01-01

    For the Jules Horowitz new material testing reactor, an aluminium base alloy, AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. Taking into account the thermal properties of the alloy and of its oxide, the corrosion of the fuel cans presents many problems. The aim of this thesis is to provide a growing kinetic of the oxide layer at the surface of the AlFeNi fuel can in order to predict the life time of fuel element. Thus the mechanism of degradation of the cladding will be describe in order to integrate the different parameters of the operating reactor. (A.L.B.)

  20. Fluorometric determination of zirconium in minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, W.C.; Shapiro, L.; White, C.E.

    1951-01-01

    The increasing use of zirconium in alloys and in the ceramics industry has created renewed interest in methods for its determination. It is a common constituent of many minerals, but is usually present in very small amounts. Published methods tend to be tedious, time-consuming, and uncertain as to accuracy. A new fluorometric procedure, which overcomes these objections to a large extent, is based on the blue fluorescence given by zirconium and flavonol in sulfuric acid solution. Hafnium is the only element that interferes. The sample is fused with borax glass and sodium carbonate and extracted with water. The residue is dissolved in sulfuric acid, made alkaline with sodium hydroxide to separate aluminum, and filtered. The precipitate is dissolved in sulfuric acid and electrolysed in a Melaven cell to remove iron. Flavonol is then added and the fluorescence intensity is measured with a photo-fluorometer. Analysis of seven standard mineral samples shows excellent results. The method is especially useful for minerals containing less than 0.25% zirconium oxide.

  1. Study of zirconium-addition binary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wozniakova, B.; Kuchar, L.

    1975-01-01

    The curves are given of the solid and the liquid of binary zirconium-addition systems. Most additions reduce the melting temperature of zirconium. The only known additions to increase the melting temperature are nitrogen, oxygen and hafnium. Also given are the transformation curves of the systems and the elements are given which reduce or raise the temperature of α-β transformation. From the Mendeleev table into which are plotted the curves of the solid and the liquid of binary systems it is possible to predict the properties of unknown binary systems. For the calculations of the curves of the solid and the liquid, 1860 degC was taken as the temperature of zirconium melting. For the calculations of transformation curves, 865 degC was taken as the temperature of α-β transformation. The equations are given of the curves of the solid and the liquid and of the transformation curves of some Zr-addition systems. Also given are the calculated equilibrium distribution coefficients and the equilibrium distribution coefficients of the transformation of additions in Zr and their limit values for temperatures approximating the melting point or the temperature of the transformation of pure Zr, and the values pertaining to eutectic and peritectic or eutectoid and peritectoid temperatures. (J.B.)

  2. Development of zirconium alloy tube manufacturing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Kyu; Park, Chan Hyun; Lee, Seung Hwan; Chung, Sun Kyo

    2009-01-01

    In late 2004, Korea Nuclear Fuel Company (KNF) launched a government funded joint development program with Westinghouse Electric Co. (WEC) to establish zirconium alloy tube manufacturing technology in Korea. Through this program, KNF and WEC have developed a state of the art facility to manufacture high quality nuclear tubes. KNF performed equipment qualification tests for each manufacturing machine with the support of WEC, and independently carried out product qualification tests for each tube product to be commercially produced. Apart from those tests, characterization test program consisting of specification test and characterization test was developed by KNF and WEC to demonstrate to customers of KNF the quality equivalency of products manufactured by KNF and WEC plants respectively. As part of establishment of performance evaluation technology for zirconium alloy tube in Korea, KNF carried out analyses of materials produced for the characterization test program using the most advanced techniques. Thanks to the accomplishment of the development of zirconium alloy tube manufacturing technology, KNF is expected to acquire positive spin off benefits in terms of technology and economy in the near future

  3. Neutronographic Texture Analysis of Zirconium Based Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruz'elová, M; Vratislav, S; Kalvoda, L; Dlouhá, M

    2012-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is a very powerful tool in texture analysis of zirconium based alloys used in nuclear technique. Textures of five samples (two rolled sheets and three tubes) were investigated by using basal pole figures, inversion pole figures, and ODF distribution function. The texture measurement was performed at diffractometer KSN2 on the Laboratory of Neutron Diffraction, Department of Solid State Engineering, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, CTU in Prague. Procedures for studying textures with thermal neutrons and procedures for obtaining texture parameters (direct and inverse pole figures, three dimensional orientation distribution function) are also described. Observed data were processed by software packages HEXAL and GSAS. Our results can be summarized as follows: i) All samples of zirconium alloys show the distribution of middle area into two maxima in basal pole figures. This is caused by alloying elements. A characteristic split of the basal pole maxima tilted from the normal direction toward the transverse direction can be observed for all samples, ii) Sheet samples prefer orientation of planes (100) and (110) perpendicular to rolling direction and orientation of planes (002) perpendicular to normal direction, iii) Basal planes of tubes are oriented parallel to tube axis, meanwhile (100) planes are oriented perpendicular to tube axis. Level of resulting texture and maxima position is different for tubes and for sheets. The obtained results are characteristic for zirconium based alloys.

  4. low dose irradiation growth in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortis, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Low dose neutron irradiation growth in textured and recrystallized zirconium, is studied, at the Candu Reactors Calandria temperature (340 K) and at 77 K. It was necessary to design and build 1: A facility to irradiate at high temperatures, which was installed in the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission's RA1 Reactor; 2: Devices to carry out thermal recoveries, and 3: Devices for 'in situ' measurements of dimensional changes. The first growth kinetics curves were obtained at 365 K and at 77 K in a cryostat under neutron fluxes of similar spectra. Irradiation growth experiments were made in zirconium doped with fissionable material (0,1 at % 235 U). In this way an equivalent dose two orders of magnitude greater than the reactor's fast neutrons dose was obtained, significantly reducing the irradiation time. The specimens used were bimetallic couples, thus obtaining a great accuracy in the measurements. The results allow to determine that the dislocation loops are the main cause of irradiation growth in recrystallized zirconium. Furthermore, it is shown the importance of 'in situ' measurements as a way to avoid the effect that temperature changes have in the final growth measurement; since they can modify the residual stresses and the overconcentrations of defects. (M.E.L.) [es

  5. Development of Zirconium alloys (for pressure tubes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kwon, Sang Chul; Choo, Ki Nam; Jung, Chung Hwan; Yim, Kyong Soo; Kim, Sung Soo; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Jeong, Yong Hwan; Kim, Kyong Ho; Cho, Hae Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, S. K.; Kim, M. H. [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, S. I [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, I. S. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    The objective of this research is to set up the basic technologies for the evaluation of pressure tube integrity and to develop improved zirconium alloys to prevent pressure tube failures due to DHC and hydride blister caused by excessive creep-down of pressure tubes. The experimental procedure and facilities for characterization of pressure tubes were developed. The basic research related to a better understanding of the in-reactor performances of pressure tubes leads to noticeable findings for the first time : the microstructural effect on corrosion and hydrogen pick-up behavior of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes, texture effect on strength and DHC resistance and enhanced recrystallization by Fe in zirconium alloys and etc. Analytical methodology for the assessment of pressure tubes with surface flaws was set up. A joint research is being under way with AECL to determine the fracture toughness of O-8 at the EOL (End of Life) that had been quadruple melted and was taken out of the Wolsung Unit-1 after 10 year operation. In addition, pressure tube with texture controlled is being made along with VNINM in Russia as a joint project between KAERI and Russia. Finally, we succeeded in developing 4 different kinds of zirconium alloys with better corrosion resistance, low hydrogen pickup fraction and higher creep strength. (author). 121 refs., 65 tabs., 260 figs

  6. Low stress creep behaviour of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, N.

    1989-01-01

    Creep behaviour of alpha zirconium of grain size varying between 16 and 55 μm has been investigated in the temperature range 813 to 1003K at stresses upto 5.5 MNm -2 using high sensitive spring specimen geometry. Creep experiments on specimens of 50 μm grain size revealed a transition from lattice diffusion controlled viscous creep at temperatures greater than 940K to grain boundary diffusion controlled viscous creep at lower temperatures. Tests conducted on either side of the transition suggest the dominance of Nabarro-Herring and Coble creep processes respectively. Evidence for power-law creep has been observed in practically all the creep tests. Based on the experimental data obtained in the present study and those recently reported by Novotny et al (1985), Langdon creep mechanism maps have bee n constructed at 873 and 973K. With the help of these maps for zirconium and those published for titanium the low stress creep behaviour of zirconium and titanium are compared. (author). 22 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Mechanical modelling of transient- to- failure SFR fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feria, F.; Herranz, L. E.

    2014-07-01

    The response of Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) fuel rods to transient accident conditions is an important safety concern. During transients the cladding strain caused by the stress due to pellet cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) can lead to failure. Due to the fact that SFR fuel rods are commonly clad with strengthened material made of stainless steel (SS), cladding is usually treated as an elastic-perfectly-plastic material. However, viscoplastic behaviour can contribute to mechanical strain at high temperature (> 1000 K). (Author)

  8. Analysis of coaxial laser micro cladding processing conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Tarasova, Tatiana Vasilievna; Gvozdeva, Galina Olegovna; Nowotny, Steffen; Ableyeva, Riana R.; Dolzhikova, Evgenia Yu

    2018-01-01

    The laser build-up cladding is a well-known technique for repair, coatings and additive manufacturing tasks. Modern equipment for the laser cladding enables material to be deposited with the lateral resolution of about 100 μm and to manufacture miniature precise parts. However, the micro cladding regimes are unknown. Determination of these regimes is an expensive task as a well-known relation between laser cladding parameters and melt pool dimensions are changing by technology micro-miniaturi...

  9. Electron beam cladding of titanium on stainless steel plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomie, Michio; Abe, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Masanori; Noguchi, Shuichi.

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental characteristics of electron beam cladding was investigated. Titanium foil of 0.2mm thickness was cladded on stainless steel plate of 3mm thickness by scanning electron beam. Surface roughness and cladded layer were analyzed by surface roughness tester, microscope, scanning electron microscope and electron probe micro analyzer. Electron beam conditions were discussed for these fundamental characteristics. It is found that the energy density of the electron beam is one of the most important factor for cladding. (author)

  10. Finite element analysis of the tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation during oxidation of zirconium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, P.; Frankel, P.; Gass, M.; Howells, R.; Preuss, M.

    2014-11-01

    Corrosion is a key limiting factor in the degradation of zirconium alloys in light water reactors. Developing a mechanistic understanding of the corrosion process offers a route towards improving safety and efficiency as demand increases for higher burn-up of fuel. Oxides formed on zirconium alloys are composed of both monoclinic and meta-stable tetragonal phases, and are subject to a number of potential mechanical degradation mechanisms. The work presented investigates the link between the tetragonal to monoclinic oxide phase transformation and degradation of the protective character of the oxide layer. To achieve this, Abaqus finite element analysis of the oxide phase transformation has been carried out. Study of the change in transformation strain energy shows how relaxation of oxidation induced stress and fast fracture at the metal-oxide interface could destabilise the tetragonal phase. Central to this is the identification of the transformation variant most likely to form, and understanding why twinning of the transformed grain is likely to occur. Development of transformation strain tensors and analysis of the strain components allows some separation of dilatation and shear effects. Maximum principal stress is used as an indication of fracture in the surrounding oxide layer. Study of the stress distributions shows the way oxide fracture is likely to occur and the differing effects of dilatation and shape change. Comparison with literature provides qualitative validation of the finite element simulations.

  11. Finite element analysis of the tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation during oxidation of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platt, P.; Frankel, P.; Gass, M.; Howells, R.; Preuss, M.

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion is a key limiting factor in the degradation of zirconium alloys in light water reactors. Developing a mechanistic understanding of the corrosion process offers a route towards improving safety and efficiency as demand increases for higher burn-up of fuel. Oxides formed on zirconium alloys are composed of both monoclinic and meta-stable tetragonal phases, and are subject to a number of potential mechanical degradation mechanisms. The work presented investigates the link between the tetragonal to monoclinic oxide phase transformation and degradation of the protective character of the oxide layer. To achieve this, Abaqus finite element analysis of the oxide phase transformation has been carried out. Study of the change in transformation strain energy shows how relaxation of oxidation induced stress and fast fracture at the metal–oxide interface could destabilise the tetragonal phase. Central to this is the identification of the transformation variant most likely to form, and understanding why twinning of the transformed grain is likely to occur. Development of transformation strain tensors and analysis of the strain components allows some separation of dilatation and shear effects. Maximum principal stress is used as an indication of fracture in the surrounding oxide layer. Study of the stress distributions shows the way oxide fracture is likely to occur and the differing effects of dilatation and shape change. Comparison with literature provides qualitative validation of the finite element simulations

  12. Finite element analysis of the tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation during oxidation of zirconium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platt, P., E-mail: Philip.Platt@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, School of Materials, Materials Performance Centre, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Frankel, P. [University of Manchester, School of Materials, Materials Performance Centre, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gass, M.; Howells, R. [AMEC, Walton House, Faraday Street, Birchwood Park, Risley, Warrington WA3 6GA (United Kingdom); Preuss, M. [University of Manchester, School of Materials, Materials Performance Centre, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Corrosion is a key limiting factor in the degradation of zirconium alloys in light water reactors. Developing a mechanistic understanding of the corrosion process offers a route towards improving safety and efficiency as demand increases for higher burn-up of fuel. Oxides formed on zirconium alloys are composed of both monoclinic and meta-stable tetragonal phases, and are subject to a number of potential mechanical degradation mechanisms. The work presented investigates the link between the tetragonal to monoclinic oxide phase transformation and degradation of the protective character of the oxide layer. To achieve this, Abaqus finite element analysis of the oxide phase transformation has been carried out. Study of the change in transformation strain energy shows how relaxation of oxidation induced stress and fast fracture at the metal–oxide interface could destabilise the tetragonal phase. Central to this is the identification of the transformation variant most likely to form, and understanding why twinning of the transformed grain is likely to occur. Development of transformation strain tensors and analysis of the strain components allows some separation of dilatation and shear effects. Maximum principal stress is used as an indication of fracture in the surrounding oxide layer. Study of the stress distributions shows the way oxide fracture is likely to occur and the differing effects of dilatation and shape change. Comparison with literature provides qualitative validation of the finite element simulations.

  13. Polarization effects in silicon-clad optical waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, R. F.; Batchman, T. E.

    1984-01-01

    By changing the thickness of a semiconductor cladding layer deposited on a planar dielectric waveguide, the TE or TM propagating modes may be selectively attenuated. This polarization effect is due to the periodic coupling between the lossless propagating modes of the dielectric slab waveguide and the lossy modes of the cladding layer. Experimental tests involving silicon claddings show high selectivity for either polarization.

  14. Tutorial review of spent-fuel degradation mechanisms under dry-storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R.E.

    1983-02-01

    This tutorial reviews our present understanding of fuel-rod degradation over a range of possible dry-storage environments. Three areas are covered: (1) why study fuel-rod degradation; (2) cladding-degradation mechanisms; and (3) the status of fuel-oxidation studies

  15. Quantitative analysis of nickel in zirconium and zircaloy; Dosage du nickel dans le zirconium et dans le zircaloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastoix, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-07-01

    A rapid spectrophotometric has been developed for determination of 10 to 1000 ppm of Ni in zirconium and zircaloy using dimethylglyoxime. Iron, copper, tin and chromium, do not interfere at the concentration usually present in zirconium and its alloys. (author) [French] On determine colorimetriquenent 10 a 1000 ppm de Ni dans le zirconium et le zircaloy par photo colorimetrie a 440 m{mu} de la dimethylglyoxime nickelique. Le dosage est rapide. Le fer, le cuivre, l'etain, le chrome ne genent pas aux concentrations habituellement rencontrees dans le zirconium et ses alliages. (auteur)

  16. Experimental assessment of fuel-cladding interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Elizabeth Sooby [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-29

    A range of fuel concepts designed to better tolerate accident scenarios and reactor transients are currently undergoing fundamental development at national laboratories as well as university and industrial partners. Pellet-clad mechanical and chemical interaction can be expected to affect fuel failure rates experienced during steady state operation, as well as dramatically impact the response of the fuel form under loss of coolant and other accident scenarios. The importance of this aspect of fuel design prompted research initiated by AFC in FY14 to begin exploratory efforts to characterize this phenomenon for candidate fuelcladding systems of immediate interest. Continued efforts in FY15 and FY17 aimed to better understand and simulate initial pellet-clad interaction with little-to-no pressure on the pellet-clad interface. Reported here are the results from 1000 h heat treatments at 400, 500, and 600°C of diffusion couples pairing UN with a FeCrAl alloy, SiC, and Zr-based cladding candidate sealed in evacuated quartz ampoules. No gross reactions were observed, though trace elemental contaminants were identified.

  17. The measurement of residual stresses in claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, G.; Bender, N.

    1978-01-01

    The ring core method, a variation of the hole drilling method for the measurement of biaxial residual stresses, has been extended to measure stresses from depths of about 5 to 25mm. It is now possible to measure the stress profiles of clad material. Examples of measured stress profiles are shown and compared with those obtained with a sectioning technique. (author)

  18. Cladding For Transversely-Pumped Laser Rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, Robert L.; Fan, Tso Yee

    1989-01-01

    Combination of suitable dimensioning and cladding of neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet of similar solid-state laser provides for more efficient utilization of transversely-incident pump light from diode lasers. New design overcomes some of limitations of longitudinal- and older transverse-pumping concepts and promotes operation at higher output powers in TEM00 mode.

  19. Study and Behaviour of Prefabricated Composite Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Avinash, P.; Thiagarajan, N.; Santhi, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    The incessant population rise entailed for an expeditious construction at competitive prices that steered the customary path to the light weight structural components. This lead to construction of structural components using ferrocement. The load bearing structural cladding, sizing 3200x900x100 mm, is chosen for the study, which, is analyzed using the software ABAQUS 6.14 in accordance with the IS:875-87 Part1, IS:875-87 Part2, ACI 549R-97, ACI 318R-08 and NZS:3101-06 Part1 standards. The Ferrocement claddings (FCs) are fabricated to a scaled dimension of 400x115x38 mm. The light weight-high strength phenomena are corroborated by incorporating Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer Laminates (GFRPL) of thickness 6mm, engineered with the aid of hand layup (wet layup) technique wielding epoxy resin, followed by curing under room temperature. The epoxy resin is employed for fastening ferrocement cladding with the Glass fiber reinforced polymer laminate, with the contemporary methodology. The compressive load carrying capacity of the amalgamated assembly, both in presence and absence of Glass Fibre Reinforced polymer laminates (GFRPL) on either side of Ferrocement cladding, has been experimented.

  20. Method for decontaminating stainless cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Fumiaki.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To form an oxide film over the surface of stainless cladding tubes and to efficiently remove radioactive materials from the steel surface together with the oxide layer by the use of an acid water solution. Method: After the removal of water from cladding tubes that have passed through the re-processing process, an oxide film is formed on the surface of the cladding tubes by heating over 400 deg C in an oxidizing atmosphere and thereafter washed again in an acid water solution. When the cladding tubes are thus oxidized once, the stainless base metal itself is oxidized, an oxide layer of several 10 μm or more being formed thereon. In consequence, since the oxide layer is far inferior in corrosion resistance to stainless metals, a pickling liquid easily penetrates into the stainless metal through the oxide layer, thereby remarkably promoting the peeling of the layer from the base metal surface and also improving the residual radioactive material removing efficiency together. (Takahashi, M.)