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Sample records for zevalin ibritumomab tiuxetan

  1. EANM procedure guideline for radio-immunotherapy for B-cell lymphoma with 90Y-radiolabelled ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennvall, Jan; Fischer, Manfred; Brans, Boudewijn; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Bombardieri, Emilio; Bodei, Lisa; Giammarile, Francesco; Lassmann, Michael; Oyen, Wim

    2007-01-01

    In January 2004, EMEA approved 90 Y-radiolabelled ibritumomab tiuxetan, Zevalin, in Europe for the treatment of adult patients with rituximab-relapsed or -refractory CD20+ follicular B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The number of European nuclear medicine departments using Zevalin is continuously increasing, since the therapy is often considered successful. The Therapy, Oncology and Dosimetry Committees have worked together in order to define some EANM guidelines on the use of Zevalin, paying particular attention to the problems related to nuclear medicine. The purpose of this guideline is to assist the nuclear medicine physician in treating and managing patients who may be candidates for radio-immunotherapy. The guideline also stresses the need for close collaboration with the physician(s) treating the patient for the underlying disease. (orig.)

  2. New modalities (setting, fractionation) of radioimmunotherapy by 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (90Y zevalin) in first line treatment of follicular type non Hodgkin malignant lymphomas: efficiency, toxicity and personalized dosimetry approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morschhauser, F.

    2008-12-01

    Rationale: radioimmunotherapy (R.I.T.) with 90 Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan ([ 90 Y] Zevalin ) is a new treatment option for patients with relapsed/refractory non Hodgkin follicular lymphoma (F.L.). Efficacy increases when Zevalin is used earlier in the disease course. Currently, Zevalin dosage is based on weight and not dosimetry. This most likely results in a wide range of absorbed dose to critical organs and tumor, which in turn translates in unpredictable efficacy and toxicity. Optimizing R.I.T. with [ 90 Y] Zevalin will require its use as part of first-line therapy and implementation of patient-specific dosimetry methods in clinical trials. Objectives and methods: we have consecutively studied 2 new modalities of using Zevalin in first line therapy of F.L.. First, we conducted an international, randomized, phase 3 trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of consolidation with Zevalin(15 MBq/Kg) in patients with advanced-stage F.L. achieving at least a partial response after induction immuno chemotherapy. A second approach consisted of evaluating a fractionated schedule with 2 doses of Zevalin (11.1 MBq/kg each), 9 to 13 weeks apart, as front line therapy in F.L. patients with high tumor burden. As part of this second approach, we designed a refined imaging-based (planar and 3-dimensional) dosimetry protocol to improve prediction of dose efficacy and toxicity after each dose of zevalin. Data acquisition was performed in 3 centers (Lille, Nantes and Manchester) while data treatment and specific dose calculations for major organ, tumor masses and bone marrow were centralized. Conclusion: Consolidation of first remission with 90 Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan in advanced-stage follicular lymphoma is highly effective with no unexpected toxicities, prolonging P.F.S. by 2 years and resulting in high P.R.-to-C.R. conversion rates regardless of type of first-line induction treatment. Preliminary data show the feasibility of front line fractionated R.I.T. with Zevalin in patient

  3. Radiolabeling optimization and reduced staff radiation exposure for high-dose 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (HD-Zevalin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papi, Stefano; Martano, Luigi; Garaboldi, Lucia; Rossi, Annalisa; Cremonesi, Marta; Grana, Chiara Maria; Paolucci, Daniele; Sansovini, Maddalena; Paganelli, Giovanni; Chinol, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: 90 Y-Zevalin labeling may cause severe finger radiation exposure, especially in high-dose protocols (HD-Zevalin), where up to 7.4 GBq could be injected. In this work, we optimized the labeling of HD-Zevalin with special regard to simplicity, speed, safety and radiation protection. Methods: Factors influencing labeling outcome (activity, specific activity, time, final volume, stability) were studied separately. The critical steps of a standard radiolabeling procedure were optimized to reduce finger exposure, developing an alternative labeling procedure and including a different 90 Y supplier. Finger doses were monitored by thermoluminescent dosimeters at each fingertip under anti-X gloves, considering both absolute values and values after normalization to 1.48 GBq. Results: Labeling of 90 Y-Zevalin was safe and reproducible up to 7.4 GBq with a simple and single-step procedure offering good stability for several hours. Radiolabeling specific activity was found critical, being kept at 740 MBq.mg -1 . Radiochemical purity values ≥98% were routinely achieved. The alternative procedure allowed a sensible reduction of finger dose, due to both the different 90 Y vial and the handling. Finger exposure was reduced from 6.6±4.3 to 3.1±0.8 mSv/1.48 GBq in the case of the original 90 Y vial and from 1.5±0.9 to 0.3±0.1 mSv/1.48 GBq using a shielded 90 Y vial. Conclusions: HD-Zevalin can be prepared in a safe and reproducible way, giving high radiochemical purity values, good stability and low finger exposure. This study may improve the safety of nuclear medicine professionals involved in the preparation of Zevalin.

  4. Phase I/II 90Y-Zevalin (yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8) radioimmunotherapy dosimetry results in relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiseman, G.A.; Dunn, W.L.; White, C.A.; Berlfein, J.R.; Ding, E.; Grillo-Lopez, A.J.; Stabin, M.; Erwin, W.; Spies, S.; Dahlbom, M.; Silverman, D.H.S.; Raubitschek, A.; Karvelis, K.; Schultheiss, T.; Witzig, T.E.; Belanger, R.

    2000-01-01

    Dosimetry studies in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were performed to estimate the radiation absorbed dose to normal organs and bone marrow from 90 Y-Zevalin (yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8) treatment in this phase I/II, multicenter trial. The trial was designed to determine the dose of Rituximab (chimeric anti-CD20, Rituxan, IDEC-C2B8, MabThera), the unlabeled antibody given prior to the radioconjugate to clear peripheral blood B cells and optimize distribution, and to determine the maximum tolerated dose of 90 Y-Zevalin [7.4, 11, or 15 MBq/kg (0.2, 0.3, or 0.4 mCi/kg)]. Patients received 111 In-Zevalin (indium-111 ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-In2B8) on day 0 followed by a therapeutic dose of 90 Y-Zevalin on day 7. Both doses were preceded by an infusion of the chimeric, unlabeled antibody Rituximab. Following administration of 111 In-Zevalin, serial anterior/posterior whole-body scans were acquired. Major-organ radioactivity versus time estimates were calculated using regions of interest. Residence times were computed and entered into the MIRDOSE3 computer software program to calculate estimated radiation absorbed dose to each organ. Initial analyses of estimated radiation absorbed dose were completed at the clinical site. An additional, centralized dosimetry analysis was performed subsequently to provide a consistent analysis of data collected from the seven clinical sites. In all patients with dosimetry data (n=56), normal organ and red marrow radiation absorbed doses were estimated to be well under the protocol-defined upper limit of 20 Gy and 3 Gy, respectively. Median estimated radiation absorbed dose was 3.4 Gy to liver (range 1.2-7.8 Gy), 2.6 Gy to lungs (range 0.72-4.4 Gy), and 0.38 Gy to kidneys (range 0.07-0.61 Gy). Median estimated tumor radiation absorbed dose was 17 Gy (range 5.8-67 Gy). No correlation was noted between hematologic toxicity and the following variables: red marrow radiation absorbed dose, blood T 1/2 , blood AUC

  5. Travelers' Health: Immunocompromised Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TNF blocker Ibritumomab tiuxetan Zevalin CD20 with radioisotope Ibrutinib Imbruvica Tyrosine kinase inhibitor Imatinib mesylate Gleevec, STI ... of Health, and HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clin Infect Dis. 2014 ...

  6. Radioimmunotherapy of indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with Yttrium-90 labeled anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy does not preclude subsequent chemotherapy or autologous hematologic stem cell transplantation therapy in most patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiseman, G.A.; Witzig, T.E.; Ansell, S.M.; Ristow, K.M.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Yttrium-90 (Y-90) labeled anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (ibritumomab tiuxetan or Zevalin TM ) is a novel therapy for patients with relapsed CD20+ B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Patients treated with Zevalin radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are limited from higher doses due to transient and reversible platelet and neutrophil suppression. Patients with indolent NHL who relapse or are refractory to chemotherapy have a 70-80% overall response rate and a 20-30% complete response rate when treated with Zevalin RIT. Therefore additional treatment is required in a minority of patients shortly after Zevalin therapy and in many others at relapse. Relapsed patients are generally treated with chemotherapy alone or high dose chemotherapy followed by autologous transplantation. We wanted to evaluate the ability of patients to tolerate subsequent therapy given at relapse following Zevalin RIT. Methods: We had 58 patients who relapsed after receiving Zevalin RIT and later received additional therapy. The clinical records and lab results were reviewed and compared with a matched control group of patients treated prior to Zevalin availability who received chemotherapy without prior Zevalin RIT. Results: The toxicity in 58 patients treated with Zevalin RIT and subsequent therapy was not significantly different from the control group who did not receive Zevalin RIT. Patients had a median of two subsequent therapies (range, 1-7) after Zevalin. Twenty eight percent required blood cell growth factor support with subsequent chemotherapy and 2 patients required reductions from the standard chemotherapy doses due to prolonged myelosuppression. Eight patients subsequently had successful autologous hematologic stem cell transplant with cells collected after Zevalin. Thirteen of the 58 patients (28%) treated with standard dose chemotherapy were hospitalized for neutropenic fever or thrombocytopenia. Conclusions: Chemotherapy or high dose chemotherapy with autologous transplantation

  7. 90Sr content in 90Y-labeled SIR-spheres and Zevalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metyko, John; Erwin, William; Poston, John; Jimenez, Sandra

    2014-11-01

    Three different 90Y internally administered radionuclide therapies are currently used in both standard-of-care and clinical trial procedures atMD Anderson Cancer Center. TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres therapies utilize 90Y-labeled microspheres, while Zevalin is an 90Y-labeled radioimmunotherapeutic agent. Several publications have indicated radionuclidic impurities resulting from 90Y production methods. The 90Y in SIR-Spheres and Zevalin are produced from a 90Sr/90Y generator, which leaves measurable quantities of 90Sr in the final product. TheraSphere 90Y is produced in a nuclear reactor which results in a large number of impurities, most notably 88Y and 91Y. Product information sheets reference these impurities with specific limits given. These limits represent a tiny fraction of the total product activity, and in the case of TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres gamma-emitting impurities, this has been verified in the literature. An analysis of 90Sr impurities in SIR-Spheres and Zevalin is presented in this paper. Impurity quantities were found to be within the vendors’ documented limits.

  8. 90y-Ibritumumab Tiuxetan (Zevalin®-BEAM/C with Autologous Stem Cell Support as Therapy for Advanced Mantle Cell Lymphoma. - Preliminary Results From the Third Nordic II Study (MCL3)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolstad, Arne; Laurell, Anna; Andersen, Niels S

    after 4 cycles of intensified CHOP (maxi-CHOP). The results were disappointing, as the majority of patients relapsed. 1 Being in CR pre-transplant was the most important factor for outcome. Hence, in the second trial (MCL2) 2000-2006 induction therapy was intensified by adding high-dose Ara...... to transplant was positive in 2% of CR patients, 20% of CRu patients and 54% of PR patients. Patients with a positive PET-scan pre-transplant had a 36% chance of achieving a molecular remission post-transplant, compared to 92% of cases with a negative PET-scan (p

  9. Hematological toxicity of Zevalin1-{sup 90}Y used in mono-therapy or in consolidation among 39 patients suffering of B non Hodgkin lymphomas (B-N.H.L.); Toxicite hematologique du Zevalin1-90Y utilise en monotherapie ou en consolidation chez 39 patients atteints de LNH B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boin, C.; Barre, E.; Gaillard, I.; Faure, P.; Moretti, J.L. [Hopital Saint-Louis, Service de pharmacie/medecine nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France); Sibon, D.; Brice, P.; Thieblemont, C. [Hopital Saint-Louis, Service d' hemato-oncologie, 75 - Paris (France); Bonnot-Lours, S.; Meignan, M. [Hopital Henri-Mondor, service de pharmacie/medecine nucleaire, 94 - Creteil (France)

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: an important heterogeneity of hematological toxicity of Zevalin -{sup 90}Y was observed in patients treated in mono-therapy or consolidation. In a context of ambulatory follow-up, it seems interesting to look for predicting this toxicity according to the clinico biological characteristics of patients. This would allow to select and follow in an optimum way the candidates to this treatment. A bi-centric retrospective study was lead for which objective was to enlighten the factors associated to this toxicity. Conclusions: a comprehensive study of clinico biological history and compliance with warnings of product characteristics summary will allow to select at the best the candidates to radioimmunotherapy by Zevalin-{sup 90}Y. this treatment represents an interesting option in some patients (particularly aged patients), stays efficient and well tolerated. (N.C.)

  10. Radioimmunotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; positioning, safety, and efficacy of 90Y-Ibritumomab. 10 years of experience and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, A; Martínez-Ramirez, M; Martínez-Caballero, D; Beneit, P; Clavel, J; Figueroa, G; Verdú, J

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is one of the therapies directed against molecular targets in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). To evaluate the positioning, safety, and effectiveness of RIT with 90Y-Ibritumomab in NHL patients. A retrospective study was conducted on patients with NHL who received RIT with 90Y-Ibritumomab. An evaluation was made of the concordance with clinical guidelines, toxicity as rated by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), and effectiveness was assessed based on response to treatment, overall survival (OS), and progression-free survival (PFS). RIT was requested in 26 patients, of whom 21 (11 women, mean age 56±10 years) were included in the study, with the following distribution: Follicular NHL, 67%, Mantle NHL, 14%, Diffuse large B-cell NHL, 9.5%, and Transformed NHL 9.5%. Twelve patients with refractory NHL, 7 for consolidation response, and 2 transplant conditioning, were treated. Adverse effects were observed in 71% of patients, which were usually manageable and transient, and with the most common being thrombocytopenia. At 3-4 months, overall response rate was 76.2% (71.4% complete and 4.8% partial response), and 19% had progression of disease. With a median follow up of 70 months, the OS was 96±8 months, and the PFS was 54±11 months. RIT showed a moderate correlation with clinical guidelines, and is probably underused. Adverse effects were common, mild, and manageable. The data show a high complete response rate and an increase in the OS and PFS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  11. Radio-immunotherapy; La radio-immunotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodet-Milin, C.; Oudoux, A.; Kraeber-Bodere, F. [Hopital Hotel-Dieu, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 44 - Nantes (France); Kraeber-Bodere, F. [Inserm U892, CRCNA, 44 - Nantes (France); Kraeber-Bodere, F. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 44 - Saint-Herblain (France)

    2009-02-15

    Radioimmunotherapy (R.I.T.) is a new modality of targeted therapy in which irradiation from radionuclides is delivered to tumor targets using monoclonal antibodies (MAb) directed to tumor-associated antigen. R.I.T. has been developed for more than 20 years. Today, R.I.T. can be used in clinical practice using non-ablative activity of murine anti-CD20 {sup 90}Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) for treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory follicular lymphomas (F.L.), with overall response rate of 70 to 80% and 20 to 30% of complete response. Different approaches are explored to improve efficacy of R.I.T. in N.H.L.: myelo-ablative R.I.T. or HD treatment, R.I.T. as consolidation after chemotherapy to target M.R.D., R.I.T. in first-line treatment, fractionated R.I.T., R.I.T. using other Ag targets. For solid tumors, interesting results have been obtained using anti-CEA R.I.T. delivered as consolidation treatment or using pre-targeting system. (authors)

  12. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirick, G R; Bradt, B M; Denardo, S J; Denardo, G L

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ((90)yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ((131)I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) anti-CD20 MAbs for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, assays were developed to determine HAGA (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to ''humanize'' MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  13. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirick, G. R.; Bradt, B. M.; Denardo, S. J.; Denardo, G. L.

    2004-01-01

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ( 9 0yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ( 1 31I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades

  14. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirick, G. R.; Bradt, B. M.; Denardo, S. J.; Denardo, G. L. [Calfornia Univ., Sacramento (United States). Davis Medical Center

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ({sup 9}0yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ({sup 1}31I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  15. Radioimmunotherapy of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eBodet-Milin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript reviews current advances in the use of radioimmunotherapy (RIT for the treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. RIT has been in use for more than 20 years and has progressed significantly with the discovery of new molecular targets, the development of new stable chelates, the humanization of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs, and the use of pretargeting techniques. Today, two products targeting the CD20 antigen are approved: 131I-tositumomab, (Bexxar® and 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan, (Zevalin®. 131I-tositumomab is available in the United States, and 90Y-ibritumumab tiuxetan in Europe, the United States, Asia, and Africa. RIT can be integrated in clinical practice using non-ablative activities for treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma (FL or as consolidation after induction chemotherapy in front-line treatment in FL patients. Despite the lack of phase III studies to clearly define the efficacy of RIT in the management of B lymphoma in the era of rituximab-based therapy, RIT efficacy in NHL has been demonstrated. In relapsing refractory FL and transformed NHL, RIT as a monotherapy induces around 30% complete response with a possibility of durable remissions. RIT consolidation after induction therapy significantly improves the quality of the response. Dose-limiting toxicity of RIT is hematological, depending on bone marrow involvement and prior treatment. Non-hematological toxicity is generally low. Different studies have been published assessing innovative protocols of RIT or new indications, in particular treatment in patients with aggressive lymphomas. High-dose treatment, RIT as consolidation after different therapeutic induction modalities, RIT in first-line treatment or fractionated RIT showed promising results. New MAbs, in particular humanized MAbs, or combinations of naked and radiolabeled MAbs, also appear promising. Personalized dosimetry protocols should be developed to determine

  16. Pharmacotechnical development of a radioimmunoconjugate for non-Hodgkin Lymphoma therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massicano, Adriana Vidal Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    The radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has proven to be a promising therapeutic modality, especially for therapy of hematological malignancies, which has stimulated the development of this type of radiopharmaceutical. Currently, there is one radioimmunoconjugate approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for refractory or relapsed non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) therapy, 90 Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin®), and it has higher overall response and complete remission rates compared to conventional treatments. However, Zevalin® is not commercially available in Brazil. In this context, the goal of this work was to study the steps involved in the process of conjugation and radiolabeling with Lu-177 of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, in order to consolidate the in house methodology for development of this radioimmunoconjugate, contributing for the treatment of patients with NHL and also contributing for the future development of other radioimmunoconjugates. In the studies performed to determine the best antibody: chelator (DOTA) molar ratio, the molar ratio 1:50, showed high radiochemical purity (greater than 95% after purification) and the immunoreactivity was higher than many published studies. Additionally, the immunoconjugate was stable for, at least, 3 months under refrigeration when conjugated by two different methods. The study of radiolabeling parameters, produced a radioimmunoconjugate with specific activity of 740 MBq/mg, with adequate stability that allowed the transportation of the radiopharmaceutical to nuclear medicine centers. The biodistribution and pharmacokinetic profiles were consistent with other radioimmunoconjugates in the literature. The radioimmunoconjugate showed tumor uptake and in vivo stability appreciable, the latter evidenced by low bone uptake. The lyophilization studies were performed for the optimized formulation of immunoconjugate that allowed the lyophilization without structural damage, evidenced by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and with

  17. A pioneer experience in Malaysia on In-house Radio-labelling of (131)I-rituximab in the treatment of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma and a case report of high dose (131)I-rituximab-BEAM conditioning autologous transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Jew Win; Law, Chiong Soon; Wong, Xiang Qi; Ko, Ching Tiong; Awang, Zool Hilmi; Chew, Lee Ping; Chang, Kian Meng

    2016-10-01

    Radioimmunotherapy is an established treatment modality in Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The only two commercially available radioimmunotherapies - (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan is expensive and (131)I-tositumomab has been discontinued from commercial production. In resource limited environment, self-labelling (131)I-rituximab might be the only viable practical option. We reported our pioneer experience in Malaysia on self-labelling (131)I-rituximab, substituting autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and a patient, the first reported case, received high dose (131)I-rituximab (6000MBq/163mCi) combined with BEAM conditioning for autologous HSCT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Smart bomb for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karagiannis, Tom

    2006-01-01

    recognise cell-surface receptors on cancer cells that are either not found on healthy cells or that are found on healthy cells but are expressed at much lower levels. The main focus of our research in the Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre is to develop a type of monoclonal antibody-based cancer therapy referred to as radio-immunotherapy. In its simplest form, radio-immunotherapy involves the use of a monoclonal antibody to deliver a radioactive atom specifically to cancer cells. The idea is that targeting the radiation specifically to cancer cells using a monoclonal antibody will deliver a sufficient radiation dose to kill diseased cells, while minimising the damage to healthy surrounding tissue. To date, the monoclonal antibodies ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) and tositumomab (Bexxar), which are labelled with a radioactive atom, have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for radio-immunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Our strategy is a more complex multi-step approach. It involves targeting the radioactive atom not only to cancer cells but also to the DNA of those cells. Our smart molecular bombs that consist of three different parts. The first part is a special type of radioactive atom known as an Auger electron-emitting isotope, which is used to destroy the cancer cell. The radioactive atom is then linked to a small drug molecule that binds very tightly to DNA. This DNA-binding drug delivers the radiation in close proximity to the DNA so that the radioactive atom can kill the cancer cell by breaking the genetic material. To make our potential therapy specific for cancer cells we then chemically link the radiation-containing DNA-binding drug to an anti-cancer monoclonal antibody

  19. Cloning and molecular characterization of the cDNAs encoding the variable regions of an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanehbandi, Dariush; Majidi, Jafar; Kazemi, Tohid; Baradaran, Behzad; Aghebati-Maleki, Leili

    2017-01-01

    CD20-based targeting of B-cells in hematologic malignancies and autoimmune disorders is associated with outstanding clinical outcomes. Isolation and characterization of VH and VL cDNAs encoding the variable regions of the heavy and light chains of monoclonal antibodies (MAb) is necessary to produce next generation MAbs and their derivatives such as bispecific antibodies (bsAb) and single-chain variable fragments (scFv). This study was aimed at cloning and characterization of the VH and VL cDNAs from a hybridoma cell line producing an anti-CD20 MAb. VH and VL fragments were amplified, cloned and characterized. Furthermore, amino acid sequences of VH, VL and corresponding complementarity-determining regions (CDR) were determined and compared with those of four approved MAbs including Rituximab (RTX), Ibritumomab tiuxetan, Ofatumumab and GA101. The cloned VH and VL cDNAs were found to be functional and follow a consensus pattern. Amino acid sequences corresponding to the VH and VL fragments also indicated noticeable homologies to those of RTX and Ibritumomab. Furthermore, amino acid sequences of the relating CDRs had remarkable similarities to their counterparts in RTX and Ibritumomab. Successful recovery of VH and VL fragments encourages the development of novel CD20 targeting bsAbs, scFvs, antibody conjugates and T-cells armed with chimeric antigen receptors.

  20. Endoradiotherapy in cancer treatment--basic concepts and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoller, Frederic; Eisenhut, Michael; Haberkorn, Uwe; Mier, Walter

    2009-12-25

    Endoradiotherapy represents an alternative therapeutic method in cancer treatment with advantageous features compared to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Intelligent dose delivery concepts using small drugs, peptides or antibodies as radionuclide carriers enable the verification of a selective accumulation in the tumour lesion and to reduce radiation toxicity for the peripheral organs. The development of endoradiotherapeutic agents, especially chelator-conjugated biomolecules, for example ibritumomab tiuxetan or DOTATOC, gains importance due to the stable complexation of versatile radiometals, such as (90)Y or (177)Lu. The rational design of novel target binding sides and their grafting into a drug scaffold is a highly promising strategy, which may promote further implication in endoradiotherapy. This review highlights the basic concepts of endoradiotherapy and discusses the potential of targeted therapy and the properties of energy-rich particles emitted by radionuclides for tumour therapy.

  1. [Bendamustine-rituximab therapy is effective for transformed follicular lymphoma with significant expression of p53].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Jomen, Wataru; Miura, Shogo; Arihara, Yohei; Yamada, Michiko; Hirako, Tasuku; Abe, Tomoyuki; Sakurai, Tamaki; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Fujita, Miri; Nagashima, Kazuo; Okagawa, Yutaka; Hoki, Toshifumi; Kato, Junji

    2013-08-01

    We describe a patient with transformed follicular lymphoma(FL), expressing p53 but remaining in complete remission(CR) due to bendamustine-rituximab(BR)therapy. She was a 64-year-old female diagnosed with stage IV FL(grade 3A)in July 2007 when she was admitted with right lower abdominal pain and body weight loss. Colonoscopy revealed Bauhin' valve lymphoma of the terminal ileum, and computed tomography(CT)scan showed lymphadenopathy, involving the cervical, mediastinal para-aortic lymph nodes and right tonsil. She received chemotherapy with eight courses of CHOP therapy with rituximab and achieved CR. Two and a half years later, mediastinal lymph node swelling relapsed, and ibritumomab tiuxetan therapy induced the second CR. After ten months, however, a third relapse occurred as a submucosal tumor(SMT)of the stomach. Gastric SMT biopsy showed diffuse large B cell lymphoma(DLBCL)transformation with immunohistochemical expression of p53. Although gastric SMT disappeared after radiotherapy, which achieved the third CR, lymph node swelling was detected again in the para-aortic and-iliac artery lymph nodes in September 2011. Subsequently, she was treated with five courses of BR therapy, because bendamustine had been reported to be effective for p53 gene-deficient B cell neoplasms. The therapy was successful and achieved the fourth CR, demonstrating that BR therapy was effective for p53-expressing DLBCL.

  2. A pioneer experience in Malaysia on In-house Radio-labelling of "1"3"1I-rituximab in the treatment of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma and a case report of high dose "1"3"1I-rituximab-BEAM conditioning autologous transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuan, Jew Win; Law, Chiong Soon; Wong, Xiang Qi; Ko, Ching Tiong; Awang, Zool Hilmi; Chew, Lee Ping; Chang, Kian Meng

    2016-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy is an established treatment modality in Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The only two commercially available radioimmunotherapies – "9"0Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan is expensive and "1"3"1I-tositumomab has been discontinued from commercial production. In resource limited environment, self-labelling "1"3"1I-rituximab might be the only viable practical option. We reported our pioneer experience in Malaysia on self-labelling "1"3"1I-rituximab, substituting autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and a patient, the first reported case, received high dose "1"3"1I-rituximab (6000 MBq/163 mCi) combined with BEAM conditioning for autologous HSCT. - Highlights: • Usual dose: Day 0 (dosimetry) – 5 mCi, Day 7 (therapeutic) 0.75 Gy to whole body. • High dose: 6000 MBq (163 mCi) on Day − 18, BEAM conditioning starts on Day − 8. • Self-labelled "1"3"1I-rituximab is a viable treatment in resource limited environment. • "1"3"1I-rituximab may substitute autologous transplant. • High dose "1"3"1I-rituximab-BEAM is a feasible conditioning regime.

  3. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for indolent lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izutsu, Koji

    2008-01-01

    Described are the review of the transplantation in the title (SCT), and the possible impact on its application and outcome of radio-immunotherapy (RIT) by new antibody drugs like ibritumomab tiuxetan (Ibr) and tositumomab (Tos), and of chemotherapy by purine analogs. Various regimens for the combination of auto-SCT, allo-SCT, chemotherapy and total body irradiation (TBI) have been used to treat the recurrent and progressive indolent lymphoma including follicular lymphoma (FL); however, their outcomes are still controversial. Introduction of new drugs like rituximab (Rit), Ibr and Tos has made it possible to extend the options of the regimen. For instance, in auto-SCT in FL, a high dose Rit therapy is used for in vivo purging to reduce tumor cell contamination of the graft instead of the exhausting, high-cost pretreatment for the in vitro purging with cyclophosphamide (CY)/TBI hitherto. In addition, RIT by Tos at the absorbed dose of 20-27 Gy in the critical organs with CY/VP16 combination is reportedly superior to CY/VP16/TBI. In allo-SCT where recurrence frequency is known low despite high mortality due to various complications, many regimens involving fludarabine/TBI have been also reported. Thus there has been neither clear standard for SCT in the lymphoma nor yet its prognosis after the therapy with new drugs described and the accumulation of their findings hereafter is important for future SCT application. (R.T.)

  4. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2009-05-01

    (-)-Gossypol; Abacavir sulfate/lamivudine, ACAM-1000, ACE-011, Agomelatine, AGS-004, Alemtuzumab, Alvocidib hydrochloride, AMG-317, Amlodipine, Aripiprazole, Atazanavir sulfate, Azacitidine; Becatecarin, Belinostat, Bevacizumab, BMS-387032, BMS-690514, Bortezomib; Casopitant mesylate, Cetuximab, Choline fenofibrate, CK-1827452, Clofarabine, Conivaptan hydrochloride; Dabigatran etexilate, DADMe-Immucillin-H, Darbepoetin alfa, Darunavir, Dasatinib, DC-WT1, Decitabine, Deferasirox, Degarelix acetate, Denenicokin, Denosumab, Dienogest, Duloxetine hydrochloride; Ecogramostim, Eculizumab, Edoxaban tosilate, Elacytarabine, Elesclomol, Eltrombopag olamine, Enfuvirtide, Enzastaurin hydrochloride, Eribulin mesilate, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Eszopiclone, Etravirine; Flibanserin, Fludarabine, Fondaparinux sodium, Fosamprenavir calcium; Gefitinib, Genistein; I-131-L19-SIP, Idrabiotaparinux sodium, Imatinib mesylate, IMGN-901, Ipilimumab; Laromustine, Lenalidomide, Liposomal cisplatin, Liraglutide, Lisdexamfetamine mesilate, Lopinavir, Lopinavir/ritonavir; Maraviroc, MDV-3100, Mecasermin rinfabate, MP-470, Mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Naproxcinod, NB-002, Nesiritide, Nilotinib hydrochloride monohydrate, NK-012; Palonosetron hydrochloride, Panobinostat, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Pitavastatin calcium, PL-3994, Plerixafor hydrochloride, Plitidepsin, PM-10450; Raltegravir potassium, Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin, ReoT3D, RHAMM R3 peptide, Rivaroxaban, Romiplostim, Rosuvastatin calcium, Rozrolimupab; Sabarubicin hydrochloride, Salinosporamide A, Sirolimus-eluting stent, Smallpox (Vaccinia) Vaccine, Live, Sorafenib; Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, Teriparatide, Tipifarnib, Tipranavir, Trabectedin, Trifluridine/TPI; Vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, Vinflunine, Volociximab, Vorinostat; Ximelagatran; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Ziprasidone hydrochloride, Zoledronic acid monohydrate

  5. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanale, Michelle A; Younes, Anas

    2007-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutic approaches have had a significant impact in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab's development as an anti-CD20 antibody heralded a new era in treatment approaches for NHL. While rituximab was first shown to be effective in the treatment of relapsed follicular lymphoma, it is now standard monotherapy for front-line treatment of follicular lymphoma, and is also used in conjunction with chemotherapy for other indolent, intermediate and aggressive B-cell lymphomas. The development of rituximab has led to intense interest in this type of therapeutic approach and to development and approval of the radioimmunoconjugates of rituximab, (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan and (131)I-tositumomab, which have added to the repertoire of treatments for relapsed follicular lymphoma and increased interest in developing other conjugated antibodies. Since rituximab is a chimeric antibody, there is a need to develop fully humanised antibodies, such as IMMU-106 (hA20), in order to minimise infusion reactions and eliminate the development of human antibodies against the drug. Further clinical evaluation of antibodies has been based largely on our knowledge of antigen expression on the surface of lymphoma cells and has led to the development of antibodies against CD22 (unconjugated epratuzumab and calicheamicin conjugated CMC-544 [inotuzumab ozogamicin]), CD80 (galiximab), CD52 (alemtuzumab), CD2 (MEDI-507 [siplizumab]), CD30 (SGN-30 and MDX-060 [iratumumab]), and CD40 (SGN-40). Furthermore, the VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) inhibitor bevacizumab, which was first approved for the treatment of colon cancer is currently under investigation in NHL, and agonists rather than antibodies to TRAIL (tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) [rApo2L/TRAIL, HGS-ETR1{mapatumumab}, HGS-ETR2] are currently being investigated as treatments for both advanced solid tumours and NHL. Knowledge of the ability of cancer cells to become

  6. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-01-01

    , Tiotropium bromide, TIV, Trabectedin, Tremelimumab, TRU-016; Vadimezan, Val8-GLP-1(7-37)OH, Vandetanib, Vernakalant hydrochloride, Voreloxin, Voriconazole, Vorinostat, Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zeaxanthin, Ziprasidone hydrochloride, Zosuquidar trihydrochloride. Copyright 2010 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of conventional, model-based quantitative planar, and quantitative SPECT image processing methods for organ activity estimation using In-111 agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Bin; Frey, Eric C

    2006-01-01

    Accurate quantification of organ radionuclide uptake is important for patient-specific dosimetry. The quantitative accuracy from conventional conjugate view methods is limited by overlap of projections from different organs and background activity, and attenuation and scatter. In this work, we propose and validate a quantitative planar (QPlanar) processing method based on maximum likelihood (ML) estimation of organ activities using 3D organ VOIs and a projector that models the image degrading effects. Both a physical phantom experiment and Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) studies were used to evaluate the new method. In these studies, the accuracies and precisions of organ activity estimates for the QPlanar method were compared with those from conventional planar (CPlanar) processing methods with various corrections for scatter, attenuation and organ overlap, and a quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) processing method. Experimental planar and SPECT projections and registered CT data from an RSD Torso phantom were obtained using a GE Millenium VH/Hawkeye system. The MCS data were obtained from the 3D NCAT phantom with organ activity distributions that modelled the uptake of 111 In ibritumomab tiuxetan. The simulations were performed using parameters appropriate for the same system used in the RSD torso phantom experiment. The organ activity estimates obtained from the CPlanar, QPlanar and QSPECT methods from both experiments were compared. From the results of the MCS experiment, even with ideal organ overlap correction and background subtraction, CPlanar methods provided limited quantitative accuracy. The QPlanar method with accurate modelling of the physical factors increased the quantitative accuracy at the cost of requiring estimates of the organ VOIs in 3D. The accuracy of QPlanar approached that of QSPECT, but required much less acquisition and computation time. Similar results were obtained from the physical phantom experiment. We conclude that the QPlanar method, based

  8. A possible coincidence of cytomegalovirus retinitis and intraocular lymphoma in a patient with systemic non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svozílková Petra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To present a possible coincidence of cytomegalovirus retinitis and intraocular lymphoma in a patient with systemic non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Case presentation A 47-year-old woman presented with decreased visual acuity associated with white retinal lesions in both eyes. A history of pneumonia of unknown aetiology closely preceded the deterioration of vision. Five years previously the patient was diagnosed with follicular non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. She was treated with a chemotherapy regimen comprised of cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristin, and prednisone with later addition of the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab. She experienced a relapse 19 months later with involvement of the retroperitoneal lymph nodes, and commenced treatment with rituximab and 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan. A second relapse occurred 22 months after radioimmunotherapy and was treated with a combination of fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and mitoxantrone followed by rituximab. The patient experienced no further relapses until the current presentation (April, 2010. Pars plana vitrectomy with vitreous fluid analysis was performed in the right eye. PCR testing confirmed the presence of cytomegalovirus in the vitreous. Atypical lymphoid elements, highly suspicious of malignancy were also found on cytologic examination. Intravenous foscarnet was administered continually for three weeks, followed by oral valganciclovir given in a dose of 900 mg twice per day. In addition, the rituximab therapy continued at three monthly intervals. Nevertheless, cessation of foscarnet therapy was followed by a recurrence of retinitis on three separate occasions during a 3-month period instigating its reinduction to the treatment regime after each recurrence. Conclusions Cytomegalovirus retinitis is an opportunistic infection found in AIDS patients as well as in bone marrow and solid organ transplant recipients being treated with systemic immunosuppressive drugs. This case presents a less

  9. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-10-01

    -globulin, ivabradine hydrochloride, ixabepilone; LA-419, lacosamide, landiolol, lanthanum carbonate, lidocaine/prilocaine, liposomal cisplatin, lutropin alfa; Matuzumab, MBP(82-98), mecasermin, MGCD-0103, MMR-V, morphine hydrochloride, mycophenolic acid sodium salt; Natalizumab, NCX-4016, neridronic acid, nesiritide, nilotinib, NSC-330507; O6-benzylguanine, olanzapine/fluoxetine hydrochloride, omalizumab; Panitumumab, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PEG-filgrastim, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, pegvisomant, pemetrexed disodium, perospirone hydrochloride, pexelizumab, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine, posaconazole, pramiconazole, prasugrel, pregabalin, prilocaine; rAAV-GAD65, raclopride, rasagiline mesilate, retapamulin, rosuvastatin calcium, rotigotine, rufinamide; SarCNU, SB-743921, SHL-749, sirolimus-eluting stent, sitaxsentan sodium, sorafenib; TachoSil, tadalafil, talampanel, Taxus, tegaserod maleate, telithromycin, telmisartan/hydrochlorothiazide, temsirolimus, tenatoprazole, teriflunomide, tetrathiomolybdate, ticilimumab, timcodar dimesilate, tipifarnib, tirapazamine, TPI, tramiprosate, trifluridine/TPI, trimethoprim; Ularitide, Urocortin 2; Valdecoxib, valganciclovir hydrochloride, valproate magnesium, valspodar, vardenafil hydrochloride hydrate, vitespen, vofopitant hydrochloride, volociximab, vorinostat; Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Ziprasidone hydrochloride, zotarolimus, zotarolimus-eluting stent.

  10. Dgroup: DG02629 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ritumomab tiuxetan (genetical recombination) (JAN) ... ATC code: V10XX02 Antineoplastic, Radioactive agent, Anti-CD20 antibody... Monoclonal antibody CD20 [HSA:931] [KO:K06466] ... Genomic biomarker: CD20 [HSA:931

  11. Evaluation of quantitative imaging methods for organ activity and residence time estimation using a population of phantoms having realistic variations in anatomy and uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Bin; Du Yong; Segars, W. Paul; Wahl, Richard L.; Sgouros, George; Jacene, Heather; Frey, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    Estimating organ residence times is an essential part of patient-specific dosimetry for radioimmunotherapy (RIT). Quantitative imaging methods for RIT are often evaluated using a single physical or simulated phantom but are intended to be applied clinically where there is variability in patient anatomy, biodistribution, and biokinetics. To provide a more relevant evaluation, the authors have thus developed a population of phantoms with realistic variations in these factors and applied it to the evaluation of quantitative imaging methods both to find the best method and to demonstrate the effects of these variations. Using whole body scans and SPECT/CT images, organ shapes and time-activity curves of 111In ibritumomab tiuxetan were measured in dosimetrically important organs in seven patients undergoing a high dose therapy regimen. Based on these measurements, we created a 3D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT)-based phantom population. SPECT and planar data at realistic count levels were then simulated using previously validated Monte Carlo simulation tools. The projections from the population were used to evaluate the accuracy and variation in accuracy of residence time estimation methods that used a time series of SPECT and planar scans. Quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) reconstruction methods were used that compensated for attenuation, scatter, and the collimator-detector response. Planar images were processed with a conventional (CPlanar) method that used geometric mean attenuation and triple-energy window scatter compensation and a quantitative planar (QPlanar) processing method that used model-based compensation for image degrading effects. Residence times were estimated from activity estimates made at each of five time points. The authors also evaluated hybrid methods that used CPlanar or QPlanar time-activity curves rescaled to the activity estimated from a single QSPECT image. The methods were evaluated in terms of mean relative error and standard deviation of the

  12. The impact of 3D volume of interest definition on accuracy and precision of activity estimation in quantitative SPECT and planar processing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Frey, Eric C.

    2010-06-01

    Accurate and precise estimation of organ activities is essential for treatment planning in targeted radionuclide therapy. We have previously evaluated the impact of processing methodology, statistical noise and variability in activity distribution and anatomy on the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates obtained with quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) and planar (QPlanar) processing. Another important factor impacting the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates is accuracy of and variability in the definition of organ regions of interest (ROI) or volumes of interest (VOI). The goal of this work was thus to systematically study the effects of VOI definition on the reliability of activity estimates. To this end, we performed Monte Carlo simulation studies using randomly perturbed and shifted VOIs to assess the impact on organ activity estimates. The 3D NCAT phantom was used with activities that modeled clinically observed 111In ibritumomab tiuxetan distributions. In order to study the errors resulting from misdefinitions due to manual segmentation errors, VOIs of the liver and left kidney were first manually defined. Each control point was then randomly perturbed to one of the nearest or next-nearest voxels in three ways: with no, inward or outward directional bias, resulting in random perturbation, erosion or dilation, respectively, of the VOIs. In order to study the errors resulting from the misregistration of VOIs, as would happen, e.g. in the case where the VOIs were defined using a misregistered anatomical image, the reconstructed SPECT images or projections were shifted by amounts ranging from -1 to 1 voxels in increments of with 0.1 voxels in both the transaxial and axial directions. The activity estimates from the shifted reconstructions or projections were compared to those from the originals, and average errors were computed for the QSPECT and QPlanar methods, respectively. For misregistration, errors in organ activity estimations were

  13. The impact of 3D volume of interest definition on accuracy and precision of activity estimation in quantitative SPECT and planar processing methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Bin [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Frey, Eric C, E-mail: bih2006@med.cornell.ed, E-mail: efrey1@jhmi.ed [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21287-0859 (United States)

    2010-06-21

    Accurate and precise estimation of organ activities is essential for treatment planning in targeted radionuclide therapy. We have previously evaluated the impact of processing methodology, statistical noise and variability in activity distribution and anatomy on the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates obtained with quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) and planar (QPlanar) processing. Another important factor impacting the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates is accuracy of and variability in the definition of organ regions of interest (ROI) or volumes of interest (VOI). The goal of this work was thus to systematically study the effects of VOI definition on the reliability of activity estimates. To this end, we performed Monte Carlo simulation studies using randomly perturbed and shifted VOIs to assess the impact on organ activity estimates. The 3D NCAT phantom was used with activities that modeled clinically observed {sup 111}In ibritumomab tiuxetan distributions. In order to study the errors resulting from misdefinitions due to manual segmentation errors, VOIs of the liver and left kidney were first manually defined. Each control point was then randomly perturbed to one of the nearest or next-nearest voxels in three ways: with no, inward or outward directional bias, resulting in random perturbation, erosion or dilation, respectively, of the VOIs. In order to study the errors resulting from the misregistration of VOIs, as would happen, e.g. in the case where the VOIs were defined using a misregistered anatomical image, the reconstructed SPECT images or projections were shifted by amounts ranging from -1 to 1 voxels in increments of with 0.1 voxels in both the transaxial and axial directions. The activity estimates from the shifted reconstructions or projections were compared to those from the originals, and average errors were computed for the QSPECT and QPlanar methods, respectively. For misregistration, errors in organ activity estimations

  14. Beta emitters and radiation protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars

    2009-01-01

    preparing 90Y-Zevalin were measured. CONCLUSIONS. Good laboratory practice is important to keep radiation doses low. To reduce bremsstrahlung, 90Y should not be shielded by lead but instead perspex (10 mm) or aluminium (5 mm). Bremsstrahlung radiation can be further reduced by adding a millimetre of lead...

  15. Nuclear medical approaches to clinical research; Nuklearmedizinische Ansaetze in der klinischen Forschung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otte, Andreas; Nguyen, Tristan (eds.)

    2009-11-15

    In the frame of the master course Clinical research management at the scientific college Lahr in cooperation with the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg three contributions are presented: Functional imaging - supported clinical studies in the sleep research. A comparison of NMR imaging versus SPECT and PET (advantages and disadvantages). Clinical studies with ionizing radiation and the radiation fear of the public. The new radioimmunotherapeutic agent Zevalin and the challenges at the market.

  16. Nuclear medical approaches to clinical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otte, Andreas; Nguyen, Tristan

    2009-01-01

    In the frame of the master course Clinical research management at the scientific college Lahr in cooperation with the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg three contributions are presented: Functional imaging - supported clinical studies in the sleep research. A comparison of NMR imaging versus SPECT and PET (advantages and disadvantages). Clinical studies with ionizing radiation and the radiation fear of the public. The new radioimmunotherapeutic agent Zevalin and the challenges at the market.

  17. Recommendations to reduce hand exposure for standard nuclear medicine procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sans-Merce, M.; Ruiz, N.; Barth, I.; Carnicer, A.; Donadille, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fulop, M.; Ginjaume, M.; Gualdrini, G.; Krim, S.; Mariotti, F.; Ortega, X.; Rimpler, A.; Vanhavere, F.; Baechler, S.

    2011-01-01

    The optimization of the extremity dosimetry of medical staff in nuclear medicine was the aim of the Work Package 4 (WP4) of the ORAMED project, a Collaborative Project (2008–2011) supported by the European Commission within its 7th Framework Programme. Hand doses and dose distributions across the hands of medical staff working in nuclear medicine departments were evaluated through an extensive measurement program involving 32 hospitals in Europe and 139 monitored workers. The study included the most frequently used radionuclides, 99m Tc- and 18 F-labelled radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic and 90 Y-labelled Zevalin ® and DOTATOC for therapy. Furthermore, Monte Carlo simulations were performed in different predefined scenarios to evaluate separately the efficacy of different radiation protection measures by comparing hand dose distributions according to various parameters. The present work gives recommendations based on results obtained with both measurements and simulations. This results in nine practical recommendations regarding the positioning of the dosemeters for an appropriate skin dose monitoring and the best protection means to reduce the personnel exposure.

  18. Extremity exposure in nuclear medicine: Preliminary results of a European study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merce, M. S.; Ruiz, N.; Barth, I.; Carnicer, A.; Donadille, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fulop, M.; Ginjaume, M.; Gualdrini, G.; Krim, S.; Mariotti, F.; Ortega, X.; Rimpler, A.; Vanhavere, F.; Baechler, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Work Package 4 of the ORAMED project, a collaborative project (2008-11) supported by the European Commission within its seventh Framework Programme, is concerned with the optimisation of the extremity dosimetry of medical staff in nuclear medicine. To evaluate the extremity doses and dose distributions across the hands of medical staff working in nuclear medicine departments, an extensive measurement programme has been started in 32 nuclear medicine departments in Europe. This was done using a standard protocol recording all relevant information for radiation exposure, i.e. radiation protection devices and tools. This study shows the preliminary results obtained for this measurement campaign. For diagnostic purposes, the two most-used radionuclides were considered: 99m Tc) and 18 F. For therapeutic treatments, Zevalin R and DOTATOC (both labelled with 90 Y) were chosen. Large variations of doses were observed across the hands depending on different parameters. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of the positioning of the extremity dosemeter for a correct estimate of the maximum skin doses. (authors)

  19. Understanding the molecular target therapy and it's approved synchronous use with radiation therapy in current Indian oncology practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Puneet; Dohhen, Umesh Kumar; Romana; Srivastava, Priyanka

    2012-01-01

    The molecular targeted drugs (MTD) are of two types; large and small. The large molecular targeted drugs (LMTD) cannot cross the cancer cell membrane whereas those that cross the cancer cell membrane are nicknamed small molecular target drugs (SMTD). India has availability of almost all MTD originals approved by USA Food and Drug administration. However a few LMTD like inj vectibix, inj Zevalin, Inj Bexar etc.; and SMTD like cap Tipifarnib approved for AML, are not available in India currently although approved and available in USA. The MTD may he used alone as singlet; along with chemotherapy as doublet or triplet; or along with radiation and chemotherapy combo (nicknamed chemo-radiation-bio therapy). The molecular target therapy approved by USA and/or European FDA and currently available in India and used along with radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy, indication wise are; Brain Tumor Inj Nimotuzumab (LMTD) and Inj bevacizumab (LMTD) in Glioblasoma Multiforme; for Carcinoma Head and neck Inj Cetuximab and Inj Nimotuzumab (LMTT), Tab Geftinib (SMTD). (author)

  20. Cutaneous Adverse Events of Targeted Therapies for Hematolymphoid Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransohoff, Julia D; Kwong, Bernice Y

    2017-12-01

    The identification of oncogenic drivers of liquid tumors has led to the rapid development of targeted agents with distinct cutaneous adverse event (AE) profiles. The diagnosis and management of these skin toxicities has motivated a novel partnership between dermatologists and oncologists in developing supportive oncodermatology clinics. In this article we review the current state of knowledge of clinical presentation, mechanisms, and management of the most common and significant cutaneous AEs observed during treatment with targeted therapies for hematologic and lymphoid malignancies. We systematically review according to drug-targeting pathway the cutaneous AE profiles of these drugs, and offer insight when possible into whether pharmacologic target versus immunologic modulation primarily underlie presentation. We include discussion of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, bosutinib, ponatinib), blinatumomab, ibrutinib, idelalisib, anti-B cell antibodies (rituximab, ibritumomab, obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, tositumomab), immune checkpoint inhibitors (nivolumab, pembrolizumab), alemtuzumab, brentuximab, and proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib, carfilzomib, ixazomib). We highlight skin reactions seen with antiliquid but not solid tumor agents, draw attention to serious cutaneous AEs that might require therapy modification or cessation, and offer management strategies to permit treatment tolerability. We emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and treatment to minimize disruptions to care, optimize prognosis and quality of life, and promptly address life-threatening skin or infectious events. This evolving partnership between oncologists and dermatologists in the iterative characterization and management of skin toxicities will contribute to a better understanding of these drugs' cutaneous targets and improved patient care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of anti-CD20 labelled with 188Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrio, Graciela; Osso Junior, Joao A.

    2011-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy has the potential to deliver lethal radiation energy directly to malignant cells via targeting of radioisotope-conjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to specific antigens. B-cell lymphoma is a particularly good candidate for radioimmunotherapy because the disease is inherently radiosensitive, malignant cells in the blood, bone marrow, spleen and lymphonodes are accessible, and MAbs have been developed to B-cell surface antigens that do not shed or modulate. Rituximab (RTX), the human IgG1-type chimeric form of the parent murine antibody ibritumomab, is specifically targeted against CD20, a surface antigen expressed by pre-B and mature human B lymphocytes. The use of rhenium-188 from a 188 W/ 188 Re generator system represents an attractive alternative radionuclide for therapy. 188 Re is produced from beta decay of the 188 W parent. In addition to the emission of high-energy electrons (Eβ= 2118 keV), 188 Re also decays with emission of a gamma photon with an energy of 155 keV in 15% abundance. Besides the therapeutic usefulness of 188 Re, the emission of gamma photon is an added advantage since the biodistribution of 188 Re-labeled antibodies can be evaluated in vivo with a gamma camera. Also, rhenium has chemical properties similar to technetium. Thus, both can be conjugated to antibodies using similar chemistry methods. The objective of this work is to prove the usefulness of this radiopharmaceutical based on dosimetric studies, that are also required by the Brazilian Regulatory Agency (ANVISA). (author)

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of anti-CD20 labelled with {sup 188}Re

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, Graciela; Osso Junior, Joao A., E-mail: gracielabarrio@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Radioimmunotherapy has the potential to deliver lethal radiation energy directly to malignant cells via targeting of radioisotope-conjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to specific antigens. B-cell lymphoma is a particularly good candidate for radioimmunotherapy because the disease is inherently radiosensitive, malignant cells in the blood, bone marrow, spleen and lymphonodes are accessible, and MAbs have been developed to B-cell surface antigens that do not shed or modulate. Rituximab (RTX), the human IgG1-type chimeric form of the parent murine antibody ibritumomab, is specifically targeted against CD20, a surface antigen expressed by pre-B and mature human B lymphocytes. The use of rhenium-188 from a {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator system represents an attractive alternative radionuclide for therapy. {sup 188}Re is produced from beta decay of the {sup 188}W parent. In addition to the emission of high-energy electrons (E{beta}= 2118 keV), {sup 188}Re also decays with emission of a gamma photon with an energy of 155 keV in 15% abundance. Besides the therapeutic usefulness of {sup 188}Re, the emission of gamma photon is an added advantage since the biodistribution of {sup 188}Re-labeled antibodies can be evaluated in vivo with a gamma camera. Also, rhenium has chemical properties similar to technetium. Thus, both can be conjugated to antibodies using similar chemistry methods. The objective of this work is to prove the usefulness of this radiopharmaceutical based on dosimetric studies, that are also required by the Brazilian Regulatory Agency (ANVISA). (author)

  3. Dosimetric studies of anti-CD20 labeled with therapeutic radionuclides at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, G.; Dias, C.R.B.R.; Osso Junior, J.A., E-mail: gracielabarrio@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) makes use of monoclonal antibodies (MAb) labeled with alpha/beta radionuclides for therapeutical purposes, leading to tumor irradiation and destruction, preserving the normal organs on the radiation excess. The therapeutic activity to be injected in a specific patient is based on information obtained in dosimetric studies. Beta emitting radionuclides such as {sup 131}I, {sup 188}Re, {sup 90}Y, {sup 177}Lu and {sup 166}Ho are useful for the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Anti-CD20 (Rituximab) is a chimeric MAb directed against antigen surface CD20 on B-lymphocytes, used in non-Hodgkin lymphoma treatment (NHL). The association with beta radionuclides have shown greater therapeutic efficacy. Currently, two radiopharmaceuticals with Anti-CD20 for radioimmunotherapy have FDA approval for NHL treatment: {sup 131}I-AntiCD20 (Bexar) and {sup 90}Y-AntiCD20 (Zevalin). Techniques for the radiolabeling of {sup 188}Re-antiCD20 have been recently developed by IPEN-CNEN/SP in order to evaluate the clinical use of this radionuclide in particular. The use of {sup 188}Re (T{sub 1/2} 17h) produced by the decay of {sup 188}W (T{sub 1/2} 69d), from an {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator system, has represented an alternative to RIT. Beyond high energy beta emission for therapy, {sup 188}Re also emits gamma rays (155keV) suitable for image. The aim of this new project is to compare the labeling of anti-CD20 with {sup 188}Re with the same MAb labeled with {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 90}Y and even {sup 99m}Tc. The first step in this project is the review of the published data available concerning the labeling of this MAb with different radionuclides, along with data obtained at IPEN, taking into account labeling procedures, labeling yields, reaction time, level and kind of impurities and biodistribution studies. The pharmacokinetic code will be developed in Visual Studio.NET platform through VB.NET and C{sup ++} for biodistribution and dosimetric

  4. Internal Dosimetry in therapy with 90Y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Leonel; Vergara, Alex; García, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: 90 Y has shown satisfactory results in the therapy of multiple oncological diseases. This radionuclide has been widely used in therapy of diseases such as NHL (Zevalin), TNE ( 90 Y-DOTATOC), liver cancer, etc. Its safe and effective use presupposes the availability of accurate dosimetry methods and reproducible.El objective of this work is to standardize and optimize images use procedures that allow for dosimetric estimates braking during therapy of malignant diseases 90 Y. Materials and Methods: To quantify the activity in absolute units from scans correction methods that consider the peculiarities of the bremsstrahlung of 90 Y were proposed. acquisition parameters such as the selection of the collimator and the definition of energy windows as well as methods of scatter correction, attenuation, interactions of radiation with the collimator (septal penetration and degradation of information with distance) were considered and sensitivity or calibration factor was estimated. They were evaluated and calibrated parameters for dosimetry at the level of organ and estimates of distributions 3D dose, using experimental measurements with SPECT Mediso Nucline ™ Spirit DH-V system and simulations were performed using the Monte Carlo method, using the SIMIND v5 software .0. Results: The optimum position-energy window width and collimator to be used is determined from the relationship between total photons and primary photons (T / P), calculated with SIMIND. The results were favorable to employ HEGP collimator and energy window between 90-170kev. the sensitivity of the system for the selected collimator (HEGP for 90 Y) was estimated. He was evaluated and determined the MTF order to correct dispersive plane images, the source-detector and interactions of radiation with the collimator distance, using filtering methods (Wiener filter), including empirical estimates of the SNR component. Similarly the procedure for the use of transmission maps obtained from

  5. Radiation protection in radionuclide therapies with (90)Y-conjugates: risks and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonesi, Marta; Ferrari, Mahila; Paganelli, Giovanni; Rossi, Annalisa; Chinol, Marco; Bartolomei, Mirco; Prisco, Gennaro; Tosi, Giampiero

    2006-11-01

    The widespread interest in (90)Y internal radionuclide treatments has drawn attention to the issue of radiation protection for staff. Our aim in this study was to identify personnel at risk and to validate the protection devices used. (90)Y-MoAb (Zevalin, 15 cases, 1.1 GBq/patient) and (90)Y-peptide ((90)Y-DOTATOC) systemic (i.v., 50 cases, 3.0 GBq/patient) and locoregional (l.r., 50 cases, 0.4 GBq/patient) treatments were considered. Radiolabelling was carried out in a dedicated hot cell. Tele-tongs, shielded (PMMA: polymethylmethacrylate) syringes/vials and an automatic dose fractionating system were used. Operators wore anti-X-ray and anti-contamination gloves, with TLD dosimeters placed over the fingertips. For i.v. administration, activity was administered by a dedicated system; for l.r. administration, during activity infusion in the brain cavity, tongs were used and TLDs were placed over the fingertips. The air kerma-rate was measured around the patients. The use of devices provided a 75% dose reduction, with mean fingertip doses of 2.9 mGy (i.v. MoAbs), 0.6 mGy (i.v. peptides)/radiolabelling procedure and 0.5 mGy/l.r. administration. The mean effective dose to personnel was 5 microSv/patient. The air kerma-rate around the patients administered i.v. (90)Y-peptides were 3.5 (1 h) and 1.0 (48 h) microGy/h at 1 m. Patient hospitalisation of 6 h (l.r.)/48 h (i.v.) guaranteed that the recommended limits of 3 mSv/year to family members and 0.3 mSv/year to the general population (Council Directive 97/43/Euratom) were respected. When specific procedures are adopted, a substantial improvement in (90)Y manipulation is attainable, reducing doses and increasing safety. For the widespread clinical use of (90)Y-conjugates, a completely automatic labelling procedure is desirable.

  6. Preparation and radiolabeling of a lyophilized (kit) formulation of DOTA-rituximab with ⁹⁰Y and ¹¹¹In for domestic radioimmunotherapy and radioscintigraphy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipour, Nazila; Jalilian, Amir Reza; Khalaj, Ali; Johari-Daha, Fariba; Yavari, Kamal; Sabzevari, Omid; Khanchi, Ali Reza; Akhlaghi, Mehdi

    2014-07-29

    On the basis of results of our previous investigations on 90Y-DTPA-rituximab and in order to fulfil national demands to radioimmunoconjugates for radioscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL), preparation and radiolabeling of a lyophilized formulation (kit) of DOTA-rituximab with 111In and 90Y was investigated. 111In and 90Y with high radiochemical and radionuclide purity were prepared by 112Cd (p,2n)111In nuclear reaction and a locally developed 90Sr/90Y generator, respectively. DOTA-rituximab immunoconjugates were prepared by the reaction of solutions of p-SCN-Bz-DOTA and rituximab in carbonate buffer (pH = 9.5) and the number of DOTA per molecule of conjugates were determined by transchelation reaction between DOTA and arsenaso yttrium(III) complex. DOTA-rituximab immunoconjugates were labeled with 111In and 90Y and radioimmunoconjugates were checked for radiochemical purity by chromatography methods and for immunoreactivity by cell-binding assay using Raji cell line. The stability of radiolabeled conjugate with the approximate number of 7 DOTA molecules per one rituximab molecule which was prepared in moderate yield and showed moderate immunoreactivity, compared to two other prepared radioimmunoconjugates, was determined at different time intervals and against EDTA and human serum by chromatography methods and reducing SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, respectively. The biodistribution of the selected radioimmunoconjugate in rats was determined by measurement of the radioactivity of different organs after sacrificing the animals by ether asphyxiation. The radioimmunoconjugate with approximate DOTA/rituximab molar ratio of 7 showed stability after 24 h at room temperature, after 96 h at 4°C, as the lyophilized formulation after six months storage and against EDTA and human serum. This radioimmunoconjugate had a biodistribution profile similar to that of 90Y-ibritumomab, which is approved by FDA for radioimmunotherapy of NHL

  7. From academy to industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatal, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Clinical efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has been clearly documented in the consolidation situation, such as first line treatment of indolent Non Hodgkin Lymphoma after induction chemotherapy [1] or after salvage resection of liver metastases from colon carcinoma [2], when tumor targets have a small, preferably microscopic, size. In this favorable situation RIT, which is a targeted therapy with toxicity limited to hematological toxicity, has a great potential and could be competitive with chemotherapy in particular for solid tumors. Such potential has been recently demonstrated in prostate cancer [3]. A lot of academic preclinical studies have been performed using multiple antibodies and antibody formats labeled with varied beta-emitting and more recently alpha particle-emitting radionuclides. With regard to other targeted therapies, the efficacy of RIT has been fully recognized and academic preclinical studies have been extended to a lot of clinical phase I/II studies but a limited number of phase II studies. Paradoxically, despite quite encouraging results, the number of industrially implemented phase III studies has been limited to the fingers of one hand illustrating a gap between academy and industry. For the last ten years only 2 ARCs (Antibody Radio Conjugates) (Zevalin and Bexxar) have been approved. The reasons for such a gap are complex and multiple but they could be summarized in one word: Money. The cost for a phase III study, enrolling hundreds of patients, exceeds the financial capabilities of most radiopharmaceutical companies and, up to now, Big Pharmas did not dare to invest in this field of RIT in part because they are not familiar with the use of radionuclides and prefer to develop ADCs (Antibody Drug Conjugates) even if they are generally more toxic and no more efficient than ARCs. For the future of RIT it is crucial to succeed in convincing Big Pharmas to invest in this field of ARCs. For this purpose it