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Sample records for zeeman slower based

  1. A Zeeman slower for diatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, M.; Kaebert, P.; Gersema, P.; Siercke, M.; Ospelkaus, S.

    2018-04-01

    We present a novel slowing scheme for beams of laser-coolable diatomic molecules reminiscent of Zeeman slowing of atomic beams. The scheme results in efficient compression of the one-dimensional velocity distribution to velocities trappable by magnetic or magneto-optical traps. We experimentally demonstrate our method in an atomic testbed and show an enhancement of flux below v = 35 m s‑1 by a factor of ≈20 compared to white light slowing. 3D Monte Carlo simulations performed to model the experiment show excellent agreement. We apply the same simulations to the prototype molecule 88Sr19F and expect 15% of the initial flux to be continuously compressed in a narrow velocity window at around 10 m s‑1. This is the first experimentally shown continuous and dissipative slowing technique in molecule-like level structures, promising to provide the missing link for the preparation of large ultracold molecular ensembles.

  2. Investigation of different magnetic field configurations using an electrical, modular Zeeman slower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohayon, Ben; Ron, Guy, E-mail: gron@racah.phys.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2015-10-15

    We present a method of constructing an automatically reconfigurable, modular, electronic Zeeman slower, which is remotely controlled. This setup is used to investigate the ability of different magnetic field profiles to slow thermal atoms to the capture velocity of a magneto-optical-trap. We show that a simple numerical optimization process yields better results than the commonly used approach for deciding on the appropriate field and comes close to the optimum field, found by utilizing a fast feedback loop which uses a genetic algorithm. Our new numerical method is easily adaptable to a variety of existing slower designs and may be beneficial where feedback is unavailable.

  3. Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos-Vollebregt, M.T.C. de.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of background correction in atomic absorption spectroscopy has recently been introduced, based on the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in a magnetic field. A theoretical analysis of the background correction capability observed in such instruments is presented. A Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer utilizing a 50 Hz sine wave modulated magnetic field is described. (Auth.)

  4. ZEEMAN ELLIPSOMETER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, K.; WIND, M.M.; Lepoole, R.; Habing, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9416310 (A1) Ellipsometer comprising at least a Zeeman laser (Z) to generate two beams (g1, g2) which are slightly shifted in frequency and (after transmission through a birefringent crystal (quarter-wave plate)) are both polarized linearly but perpendicular to one another, a

  5. ZEEMAN ELLIPSOMETER

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmes, K.; WIND, M.M.; Lepoole, R.; Habing, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9416310 (A1) Ellipsometer comprising at least a Zeeman laser (Z) to generate two beams (g1, g2) which are slightly shifted in frequency and (after transmission through a birefringent crystal (quarter-wave plate)) are both polarized linearly but perpendicular to one another, a non-polarizing beam splitter (N) downstream of which a working beam (g'm2) mofidied by a sample (S) interferes with a reference beam (g1), a unit (W) for separating two orthogonal (p- and s-) components of...

  6. Zeeman spectrum of scandium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lulu, B.A.

    1980-09-01

    The spectra of Sc I, Sc II, Sc III, and Sc IV are analyzed through the use of the Zeeman effect. A sliding spark of the author's design is used in conjunction with a 27 kilogauss electromagnet. The spectra have (reciprocal) dispersions of 0.2 to 0.5 A/mm. 10 Sc I levels, 16 Sc II levels and 5 Sc III levels show Zeeman splitting. No Sc IV Zeeman patterns were observed. 2 Sc I, 4 Sc II, and all of the Sc III level data are new

  7. Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadeishi, T.; McLaughlin, R.

    1978-08-01

    The design and development of a Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer for trace element analysis are described. An instruction manual is included which details the operation, adjustment, and maintenance. Specifications and circuit diagrams are given

  8. Fragmented perception: slower space-based but faster object-based attention in recent-onset psychosis with and without Schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henderikus G O M Smid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia is associated with impairments of the perception of objects, but how this affects higher cognitive functions, whether this impairment is already present after recent onset of psychosis, and whether it is specific for schizophrenia related psychosis, is not clear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that because schizophrenia is associated with impaired object perception, schizophrenia patients should differ in shifting attention between objects compared to healthy controls. To test this hypothesis, a task was used that allowed us to separately observe space-based and object-based covert orienting of attention. To examine whether impairment of object-based visual attention is related to higher order cognitive functions, standard neuropsychological tests were also administered. METHOD: Patients with recent onset psychosis and normal controls performed the attention task, in which space- and object-based attention shifts were induced by cue-target sequences that required reorienting of attention within an object, or reorienting attention between objects. RESULTS: Patients with and without schizophrenia showed slower than normal spatial attention shifts, but the object-based component of attention shifts in patients was smaller than normal. Schizophrenia was specifically associated with slowed right-to-left attention shifts. Reorienting speed was significantly correlated with verbal memory scores in controls, and with visual attention scores in patients, but not with speed-of-processing scores in either group. CONCLUSIONS: deficits of object-perception and spatial attention shifting are not only associated with schizophrenia, but are common to all psychosis patients. Schizophrenia patients only differed by having abnormally slow right-to-left visual field reorienting. Deficits of object-perception and spatial attention shifting are already present after recent onset of psychosis. Studies investigating visual spatial

  9. Zeeman en Einstein. Meeslepende metingen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ad Maas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Zeeman and EinsteinThis article discusses an early example of interferometric, experimental research related to Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity. This research concerned two series of experiments on the velocity of light in moving media, conducted between 1914 and 1921 by the Amsterdam physicist Pieter Zeeman. With the first of these series, on the velocity of light in moving water, Zeeman obtained an important result that validated the so called ‘dispersion term’ of the formula for the velocity of light in moving media. Less clear is the scientific objective of the second series, in which Zeeman measured the velocity of light in moving solid media. It seems that Zeeman’s interest in this second series was triggered mainly by the technical challenges posed by these experiments. In this way, they reveal the increasing tendency of Zeeman’s later research to be led by technical and experimental challenges, rather than by the actual scientific developments.

  10. Anisotropic spin transport affected by competition between spin orbit interaction and Zeeman effect in an InGaAs based wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitta, Junsaku; Moulis, Sylvain; Kohda, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Spin transport affected by competition between Zeeman effect and spin-orbit interaction (SOI) is investigated in order to check a proposed method to deduce the Rashba SOI α and Dresselhaus SOI β ratio. The experimentally obtained ratio α/β of the present sample is about 4 from angle dependence of magnetoconductance under in-plane magnetic field. The proposed method to detect the ratio by transport measurement is promising although further improvement of sample fabrication and measurement is required.

  11. Zeeman effect in NO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonilla, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    The gyromagnetic factors of the molecule NO 2 , in the Zeeman Effect, is measured under high resolution spectroscopy. The values 0.103 + - 0.007; 0.060 + - 0.005 and 0.045 + - 0.004 are found for the components α, β and γ respectively, by applying a magnetic field of 40 Gauss. For fields greater than 1 kilogauss decoupling of the electronic spin to the rotational angular momentum of the molecule is observed. Under this condition the value 1.86 + - 0.25 is obtained for the gyromagnetic factor. (Author) [pt

  12. Parity nonconservation in Zeeman atomic transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraftmakher, A.Ya.

    1990-01-01

    The abilities to observe the parity violation at the radiofrequency transitions between the hyperfine and Zeeman terms of the atomic levels are considered. The E-1 amplitudes fo the Zeeman transitions of heavy atoms in weak magnetic fields are larger, than for the light atoms hyperfine transitions at the same wavelength. 9 refs

  13. ZEEMAN DOPPLER MAPS: ALWAYS UNIQUE, NEVER SPURIOUS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stift, Martin J.; Leone, Francesco [Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-01

    Numerical models of atomic diffusion in magnetic atmospheres of ApBp stars predict abundance structures that differ from the empirical maps derived with (Zeeman) Doppler mapping (ZDM). An in-depth analysis of this apparent disagreement investigates the detectability by means of ZDM of a variety of abundance structures, including (warped) rings predicted by theory, but also complex spot-like structures. Even when spectra of high signal-to-noise ratio are available, it can prove difficult or altogether impossible to correctly recover shapes, positions, and abundances of a mere handful of spots, notwithstanding the use of all four Stokes parameters and an exactly known field geometry; the recovery of (warped) rings can be equally challenging. Inversions of complex abundance maps that are based on just one or two spectral lines usually permit multiple solutions. It turns out that it can by no means be guaranteed that any of the regularization functions in general use for ZDM (maximum entropy or Tikhonov) will lead to a true abundance map instead of some spurious one. Attention is drawn to the need for a study that would elucidate the relation between the stratified, field-dependent abundance structures predicted by diffusion theory on the one hand, and empirical maps obtained by means of “canonical” ZDM, i.e., with mean atmospheres and unstratified abundances, on the other hand. Finally, we point out difficulties arising from the three-dimensional nature of the atomic diffusion process in magnetic ApBp star atmospheres.

  14. Slower saccadic reading in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehangir, Naz; Yu, Caroline Yizhu; Song, Jeehey; Shariati, Mohammad Ali; Binder, Steven; Beyer, Jill; Santini, Veronica; Poston, Kathleen; Liao, Yaping Joyce

    2018-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease (PD) is characterized by degeneration of dopaminergic and other neurons, leading to motor and non-motor deficits. Abnormal eye movements in PD, including fixations, saccades, and convergence, are well described. However, saccadic reading, which requires serial and alternating saccades and fixations, is not well studied, despite its obvious impact on the quality of life. In this study, we assessed saccadic reading using variations of the King-Devick (KD) test, a rapid single digit number naming test, as a way to assess the ability to make serial left-to-right ocular motor movements necessary for reading. We recruited 42 treated PD patients and 80 age-matched controls and compared their reading times with a variety of measures, including age, duration of disease, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the National Eye Institute 25-Item Visual Functioning Questionnaire 25 (VFQ-25), and Montreal Cognitive assessment (MoCA) test. The subjects performed 4 trials of reading 120 single digit numbers aloud as fast as possible without making errors. In each trial, they read 3 pages (KD1, KD2, and KD3), and each page contained 40 numbers per page in 8 lines with 5 numbers/line. We found that PD patients read about 20% slower than controls on all tests (KD1, 2, and 3 tests) (p < 0.02), and both groups read irregularly spaced numbers slower than regularly spaced numbers. Having lines between numbers to guide reading (KD1 tests) did not impact reading time in both PD and controls, but increased visual crowding as a result of decreased spacing between numbers (KD3 tests) was associated with significantly slower reading times in both PD and control groups. Our study revealed that saccadic reading is slower in PD, but controls and PD patients are both impacted by visuospatial planning challenges posed by increased visual crowding and irregularity of number spacing. Reading time did not correlate with UPDRS or MoCA scores in PD patients but

  15. Zeeman splitting of surface-scattered neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felcher, G.P.; Adenwalla, S.; De Haan, V.O.; Van Well, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    If a beam of slow neutrons impinges on a solid at grazing incidence, the neutrons reflected can be used to probe the composition and magnetization of the solid near its surface. In this process, the incident and reflected neutrons generally have identical kinetic energies. Here we report the results of an experiment in which subtle inelastic scattering processes are revealed as relatively large deviations in scattering angle. The neutrons are scattered from a ferromagnetic surface in the presence of a strong ambient magnetic field, and exhibit a small but significant variation in kinetic energy as a function of the reflection angle. This effect is attributable to the Zeeman splitting of the energies of the neutron spin states due to the ambient magnetic field: some neutrons flip their spins upon reflection from the magnetized surface, thereby exchanging kinetic energy for magnetic potential energy. The subtle effects of Zeeman splitting are amplified by the extreme sensitivity of grazing-angle neutron scattering, and might also provide a useful spectroscopic tool if significant practical obstacles (such as low interaction cross-sections) can be overcome. (author)

  16. Human faces are slower than chimpanzee faces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Burrows

    Full Text Available While humans (like other primates communicate with facial expressions, the evolution of speech added a new function to the facial muscles (facial expression muscles. The evolution of speech required the development of a coordinated action between visual (movement of the lips and auditory signals in a rhythmic fashion to produce "visemes" (visual movements of the lips that correspond to specific sounds. Visemes depend upon facial muscles to regulate shape of the lips, which themselves act as speech articulators. This movement necessitates a more controlled, sustained muscle contraction than that produced during spontaneous facial expressions which occur rapidly and last only a short period of time. Recently, it was found that human tongue musculature contains a higher proportion of slow-twitch myosin fibers than in rhesus macaques, which is related to the slower, more controlled movements of the human tongue in the production of speech. Are there similar unique, evolutionary physiologic biases found in human facial musculature related to the evolution of speech?Using myosin immunohistochemistry, we tested the hypothesis that human facial musculature has a higher percentage of slow-twitch myosin fibers relative to chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. We sampled the orbicularis oris and zygomaticus major muscles from three cadavers of each species and compared proportions of fiber-types. Results confirmed our hypothesis: humans had the highest proportion of slow-twitch myosin fibers while chimpanzees had the highest proportion of fast-twitch fibers.These findings demonstrate that the human face is slower than that of rhesus macaques and our closest living relative, the chimpanzee. They also support the assertion that human facial musculature and speech co-evolved. Further, these results suggest a unique set of evolutionary selective pressures on human facial musculature to slow down while the function of this muscle

  17. Slower gait, slower information processing and smaller prefrontal area in older adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosano, C.; Studenski, S.A.; Aizenstein, H.J.; Boudreau, R.M.; Longstreth Jr, W.T.; Newman, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Slower gait in older adults is related to smaller volume of the prefrontal area (PFAv). The pathways underlying this association have not yet been explored. Understanding slowing gait could help improve function in older age. We examine whether the association between smaller PFAv and

  18. Zeeman catastrophe machines as a toolkit for teaching chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Péter; Tasnádi, Péter

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of chaotic motions and cooperative systems offers a magnificent opportunity to involve modern physics in the basic course of mechanics taught to engineering students. In this paper, it will be demonstrated that the Zeeman machine can be a versatile and motivating tool for students to acquire introductory knowledge about chaotic motion via interactive simulations. The Zeeman catastrophe machine is a typical example of a quasi-static system with hysteresis. It works in a relatively simple way and its properties can be understood very easily. Since the machine can be built easily and the simulation of its movement is also simple, the experimental investigation and the theoretical description can be connected intuitively. Although the Zeeman machine is known mainly for its quasi-static and catastrophic behaviour, its dynamic properties are also of interest with its typical chaotic features. By means of a periodically driven Zeeman machine, a wide range of chaotic properties of the simple systems can be demonstrated, such as bifurcation diagrams, chaotic attractors, transient chaos, Lyapunov exponents and so on. This paper is organically linked to our website (http://csodafizika.hu/zeeman) where the discussed simulation programs can be downloaded. In a second paper, the novel construction of a network of Zeeman machines will be presented to study the properties of cooperative systems. (paper)

  19. Studies on atom deceleration process by using the Zeeman-tuned technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnato, V.S.

    1990-01-01

    The Zeeman-tuned technique to slow an atomic beam of sodium atoms was detailed studied. A new technique to study the deceleration which consists in monitoring the fluorescence along the deceleration path is used. This allows a direct observation of the process and open possibilities to investigate the adiabatic following of atoms in the magnetic field, and others very important aspects of the process. With a single laser and some modification of the magnetic field profile it is possible stop atoms outside the slower solenoid, which make a lot of experiments much simpler. A systematic study of the optical pumping effects and adiabatic following conditions allow to produce a very strong slow motion atomic beam. (author)

  20. Threshold nonlinear absorption in Zeeman transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, Andal; Hazra, Abheera; Sandhya, S N

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally study the absorption spectroscopy from a collection of gaseous 87 Rb atoms at room temperature irradiated with three fields. Two of these fields are in a pump-probe saturation absorption configuration. The third field co-propagates with the pump field. The three fields address Zeeman degenerate transitions between hyperfine levels 5S 1/2 , F = 1 and 5P 3/2 , F = 0, F = 1 around the D2 line. We find a sub-natural absorption resonance in the counter-propagating probe field for equal detunings of all three fields. This absorption arises in conjunction with the appearance of increased transmission due to electro-magnetically induced transparency in the co-propagating fields. The novel feature of this absorption is its onset only for the blue of 5P 3/2 , F = 0, as the laser frequency is scanned through the excited states 5P 3/2 , F = 0, F = 1 and F = 2. The absorption rapidly rises to near maximum values within a narrow band of frequency near 5P 3/2 , F = 0. Our experimental results are compared with a dressed atom model. We find the threshold absorption to be a result of coherent interaction between the dressed states of our system.

  1. Isotope separation utilizing Zeeman compensated magnetic extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsen, H.K.

    1978-01-01

    A vapor flow of elemental uranium is directed into a region where narrow band, tuned laser radiation is repeatedly applied to provide at least two energy step selective ionization of the U 235 isotope in the vapor flow. A magnetic field is applied in the region of the ionized U 235 which creates a Lorentz force on the moving ions directing them toward one of a plurality of collection plates placed generally parallel to the vapor flow to permit collection of the U 235 particles in substantially enriched proportions as compared to the concentration in the vapor flow generally. To prevent a broadening of the absorption lines for both the U 235 and U 238 isotopes in the vapor flow from the applied magnetic field and thus prevent substantial reduction in the selectivity of the excitation and ionization, the magnetic field is preferably applied in a time varying magnitude which is phased with respect to the repetitive application of laser radiation to provide a relatively low field strength and corresponding small Zeeman splitting during selective excitation and ionization of the U 235 particles

  2. ZEST: A Fast Code for Simulating Zeeman-Stark Line-Shape Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Gilleron

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the ZEST code, dedicated to the calculation of line shapes broadened by Zeeman and Stark effects. As concerns the Stark effect, the model is based on the Standard Lineshape Theory in which ions are treated in the quasi-static approximation, whereas the effects of electrons are represented by weak collisions in the framework of a binary collision relaxation theory. A static magnetic field may be taken into account in the radiator Hamiltonian in the dipole approximation, which leads to additional Zeeman splitting patterns. Ion dynamics effects are implemented using the fast Frequency-Fluctuation Model. For fast calculations, the static ion microfield distribution in the plasma is evaluated using analytic fits of Monte-Carlo simulations, which depend only on the ion-ion coupling parameter and the electron-ion screening factor.

  3. Suppression of Zeeman relaxation in cold collisions of 2P1/2 atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscherbul, T. V.; Dalgarno, A.; Buchachenko, A. A.; Lu, M.-J.; Weinstein, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of angular momentum depolarization in cold collisions of 2 P atoms in the presence of an external magnetic field. We show that collision-induced Zeeman relaxation of Ga( 2 P 1/2 ) and In( 2 P 1/2 ) atoms in cold 4 He gas is dramatically suppressed compared to atoms in 2 P 3/2 states. Using rigorous quantum-scattering calculations based on ab initio interaction potentials, we demonstrate that Zeeman transitions in collisions of atoms in 2 P 1/2 electronic states occur via couplings to the 2 P 3/2 state induced by the anisotropy of the interaction potential. Our results suggest the feasibility of sympathetic cooling and magnetic trapping of 2 P 1/2 -state atoms, such as halogens, thereby opening up exciting areas of research in precision spectroscopy and cold-controlled chemistry.

  4. Pathways linking regional hyperintensities in the brain and slower gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolandzadeh, Niousha; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Aizenstein, Howard; Harris, Tamara; Launer, Lenore; Yaffe, Kristine; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Newman, Anne; Rosano, Caterina

    2014-10-01

    Cerebral white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are involved in the evolution of impaired mobility and executive functions. Executive functions and mobility are also associated. Thus, WMHs may impair mobility directly, by disrupting mobility-related circuits, or indirectly, by disrupting circuits responsible for executive functions. Understanding the mechanisms underlying impaired mobility in late life will increase our capacity to develop effective interventions. To identify regional WMHs most related to slower gait and to examine whether these regional WMHs directly impact mobility, or indirectly by executive functions. Cross-sectional study. Twenty-one WMH variables (i.e., total WMH volume and WMHs in 20 tracts), gait speed, global cognition (Modified Mini-Mental State Examination; 3MS), and executive functions and processing speed (Digit-Symbol Substitution Test; DSST) were assessed. An L1-L2 regularized regression (i.e., Elastic Net model) identified the WMH variables most related to slower gait. Multivariable linear regression models quantified the association between these WMH variables and gait speed. Formal tests of mediation were also conducted. Community-based sample. Two hundred fifty-three adults (mean age: 83years, 58% women, 41% black). Gait speed. In older adults with an average gait speed of 0.91m/sec, total WMH volume, WMHs located in the right anterior thalamic radiation (ATRR) and frontal corpuscallosum (CCF) were most associated with slower gait. There was a >10% slower gait for each standard deviation of WMH in CCF, ATRR or total brain (standardized beta in m/sec [p value]: -0.11 [p=0.046], -0.15 [p=0.007] and -0.14 [p=0.010], respectively). These associations were substantially and significantly attenuated after adjustment for DSST. This effect was stronger for WMH in CCF than for ATRR or total WMH (standardized beta in m/sec [p value]: -0.07 [p=0.190], -0.12 [p=0.024] and -0.10 [p=0.049], respectively). Adjustment for 3MS did not change these

  5. Entanglement and Zeeman interaction in diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hichri, A.; Jaziri, S.

    2004-01-01

    We present theoretically the Zeeman coupling and exchange-induced swap action in spin-based quantum dot quantum computer models in the presence of magnetic field. We study the valence and conduction band states in a double quantum dots made in diluted magnetic semiconductor. The latter have been proven to be very useful in building an all-semiconductor platform for spintronics. Due to a strong p-d exchange interaction in diluted magnetic semiconductor (Cd 0.57 Mn 0.43 Te), the relative contribution of this component is strongly affected by an external magnetic field, a feature that is absent in nonmagnetic double quantum dots. We determine the energy spectrum as a function of magnetic field within the Hund-Mulliken molecular-orbit approach and by including the Coulomb interaction. Since we show that the ground state of the two carriers confined in a vertically coupled quantum dots provide a possible realization for a gate of a quantum computer, the crossing between the lowest states, caused by the giant spin splitting, can be observed as a pronounced jump in the magnetization of small magnetic field amplitude. Finally, we determine the swap time as a function of magnetic field and the inter dot distance. We estimate quantitatively swap errors caused by the field, establishing that error correction would, in principle, be possible in the presence of nonuniform magnetic field in realistic structures

  6. Mapping the absolute magnetic field and evaluating the quadratic Zeeman-effect-induced systematic error in an atom interferometer gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing-Qing; Freier, Christian; Leykauf, Bastian; Schkolnik, Vladimir; Yang, Jun; Krutzik, Markus; Peters, Achim

    2017-09-01

    Precisely evaluating the systematic error induced by the quadratic Zeeman effect is important for developing atom interferometer gravimeters aiming at an accuracy in the μ Gal regime (1 μ Gal =10-8m /s2 ≈10-9g ). This paper reports on the experimental investigation of Raman spectroscopy-based magnetic field measurements and the evaluation of the systematic error in the gravimetric atom interferometer (GAIN) due to quadratic Zeeman effect. We discuss Raman duration and frequency step-size-dependent magnetic field measurement uncertainty, present vector light shift and tensor light shift induced magnetic field measurement offset, and map the absolute magnetic field inside the interferometer chamber of GAIN with an uncertainty of 0.72 nT and a spatial resolution of 12.8 mm. We evaluate the quadratic Zeeman-effect-induced gravity measurement error in GAIN as 2.04 μ Gal . The methods shown in this paper are important for precisely mapping the absolute magnetic field in vacuum and reducing the quadratic Zeeman-effect-induced systematic error in Raman transition-based precision measurements, such as atomic interferometer gravimeters.

  7. Chaotic behaviour of Zeeman machines at introductory course of mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Péter; Tasnádi, Péter

    2016-05-01

    Investigation of chaotic motions and cooperative systems offers a magnificent opportunity to involve modern physics into the basic course of mechanics taught to engineering students. In the present paper it will be demonstrated that Zeeman Machine can be a versatile and motivating tool for students to get introductory knowledge about chaotic motion via interactive simulations. It works in a relatively simple way and its properties can be understood very easily. Since the machine can be built easily and the simulation of its movement is also simple the experimental investigation and the theoretical description can be connected intuitively. Although Zeeman Machine is known mainly for its quasi-static and catastrophic behaviour, its dynamic properties are also of interest with its typical chaotic features. By means of a periodically driven Zeeman Machine a wide range of chaotic properties of the simple systems can be demonstrated such as bifurcation diagrams, chaotic attractors, transient chaos and so on. The main goal of this paper is the presentation of an interactive learning material for teaching the basic features of the chaotic systems through the investigation of the Zeeman Machine.

  8. Chaotic behaviour of Zeeman machines at introductory course of mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, P.; Tasnádi, P.

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of chaotic motions and cooperative systems offers a magnificent opportunity to involve modern physics into the basic course of mechanics taught to engineering students. In the present paper it will be demonstrated that Zeeman Machine can be a versatile and motivating tool for students to get introductory knowledge about chaotic motion via interactive simulations. It works in a relatively simple way and its properties can be understood very easily. Since the machine can be built easily and the simulation of its movement is also simple the experimental investigation and the theoretical description can be connected intuitively. Although Zeeman Machine is known mainly for its quasi-static and catastrophic behaviour, its dynamic properties are also of interest with its typical chaotic features. By means of a periodically driven Zeeman Machine a wide range of chaotic properties of the simple systems can be demonstrated such as bifurcation diagrams, chaotic attractors, transient chaos and so on. The main goal of this paper is the presentation of an interactive learning material for teaching the basic features of the chaotic systems through the investigation of the Zeeman Machine. 1. –

  9. Characterization of a magnetic trap by polarization dependent Zeeman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Vandel; Lyngsøe, Jens Kristian; Thorseth, Anders

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a detailed experimental study of our cloverleaf magnetic trap for sodium atoms. By using polarization dependent Zeeman spectroscopy of our atomic beam, passing the magnetic trap region, we have determined important trap parameters such as gradients, their curvatures...

  10. Long lifetime and high-fidelity quantum memory of photonic polarization qubit by lifting zeeman degeneracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhongxiao; Wu, Yuelong; Tian, Long; Chen, Lirong; Zhang, Zhiying; Yan, Zhihui; Li, Shujing; Wang, Hai; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2013-12-13

    Long-lived and high-fidelity memory for a photonic polarization qubit (PPQ) is crucial for constructing quantum networks. We present a millisecond storage system based on electromagnetically induced transparency, in which a moderate magnetic field is applied on a cold-atom cloud to lift Zeeman degeneracy and, thus, the PPQ states are stored as two magnetic-field-insensitive spin waves. Especially, the influence of magnetic-field-sensitive spin waves on the storage performances is almost totally avoided. The measured average fidelities of the polarization states are 98.6% at 200  μs and 78.4% at 4.5 ms, respectively.

  11. Detection of the OH Zeeman effect toward Orion A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troland, T.H.; Crutcher, R.M.; Kazes, I.; Paris Observatoire, Meudon, France; Kentucky Univ., Lexington)

    1986-01-01

    The Zeeman effect in the 18 cm OH absorption spectrum of Orion A is detected. From this effect, a line-of-sight magnetic field strength of - 125 + or - 20 is derived. At the same position, an H I Zeeman effect equivalent to a magnetic field of - 49 + or - 4 micro-G is found. Thus, the magnetic field in the molecular gas toward Orion A is significantly stronger than that in the atomic gas, contrary to the recent determination for the Cas A line of sight. Densities in the atomic and molecular regions toward Orion A are estimated and it is found that for this region the data are consistent with B proportional to n exp kappa, kappa = 0.3. 23 references

  12. Magnetic Field Measurements In Magnetized Plasmas Using Zeeman Broadening Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Showera; Wallace, Matthew; Presura, Radu; Neill, Paul

    2017-10-01

    The Zeeman effect has been used to measure the magnetic field in high energy density plasmas. This method is limited when plasma conditions are such that the line broadening due to the high plasma density and temperature surpasses the Zeeman splitting. We have measured magnetic fields in magnetized laser plasmas under conditions where the Zeeman splitting was not spectrally resolved. The magnetic field strength was determined from the difference in widths of two doublet components, using an idea proposed by Tessarin et al. (2011). Time-gated spectra with one-dimensional space-resolution were obtained at the Nevada Terawatt Facility for laser plasmas created by 20 J, 1 ns Leopard laser pulses, and expanding in the azimuthal magnetic field produced by the 0.6 MA Zebra pulsed power generator. We explore the response of the Al III 4s 2S1/2 - 4p 2P1 / 2 , 3 / 2 doublet components to the external magnetic field spatially along the plasma. Radial magnetic field and electron density profiles were measured within the plasma plume. This work was supported by the DOE/OFES Grant DE-SC0008829 and DOE/NNSA contract DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  13. Simple analysis of off-axis solenoid fields using the scalar magnetostatic potential: application to a Zeeman-slower for cold atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Muniz, Sérgio R.; Bhattacharya, M.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2010-01-01

    In a region free of currents, magnetostatics can be described by the Laplace equation of a scalar magnetic potential, and one can apply the same methods commonly used in electrostatics. Here we show how to calculate the general vector field inside a real (finite) solenoid, using only the magnitude of the field along the symmetry axis. Our method does not require integration or knowledge of the current distribution, and is presented through practical examples, including a non-uniform finite so...

  14. Analysis of off-axis solenoid fields using the magnetic scalar potential: An application to a Zeeman-slower for cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Sérgio R.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Bhattacharya, M.

    2015-06-01

    In a region free of currents, magnetostatics can be described by the Laplace equation of a scalar magnetic potential, and one can apply the same methods commonly used in electrostatics. Here, we show how to calculate the general vector field inside a real (finite) solenoid, using only the magnitude of the field along the symmetry axis. Our method does not require integration or knowledge of the current distribution and is presented through practical examples, including a nonuniform finite solenoid used to produce cold atomic beams via laser cooling. These examples allow educators to discuss the nontrivial calculation of fields off-axis using concepts familiar to most students, while offering the opportunity to introduce themes of current modern research.

  15. Faster Increases in Human Life Expectancy Could Lead to Slower Population Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Counterintuitively, faster increases in human life expectancy could lead to slower population aging. The conventional view that faster increases in human life expectancy would lead to faster population aging is based on the assumption that people become old at a fixed chronological age. A preferable alternative is to base measures of aging on people’s time left to death, because this is more closely related to the characteristics that are associated with old age. Using this alternative interpretation, we show that faster increases in life expectancy would lead to slower population aging. Among other things, this finding affects the assessment of the speed at which countries will age. PMID:25876033

  16. Ordinary matter, dark matter, and dark energy on normal Zeeman space-times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imre Szabó, Zoltán

    2017-01-01

    Zeeman space-times are new, relativistic, and operator based Hamiltonian models representing multi-particle systems. They are established on Lorentzian pseudo Riemannian manifolds whose Laplacian immediately appears in the form of original quantum physical wave operators. In classical quantum theory they emerge, differently, from the Hamilton formalism and the correspondence principle. Nonetheless, this new model does not just reiterate the well known conceptions but holds the key to solving open problems of quantum theory. Most remarkably, it represents the dark matter, dark energy, and ordinary matter by the same ratios how they show up in experiments. Another remarkable agreement with reality is that the ordinary matter appears to be non-expanding and is described in consent with observations. The theory also explains gravitation, moreover, the Hamilton operators of all energy and matter formations, together with their physical properties, are solely derived from the Laplacian of the Zeeman space-time. By this reason, it is called Monistic Wave Laplacian which symbolizes an all-comprehensive unification of all matter and energy formations. This paper only outlines the normal case where the particles do not have proper spin but just angular momentum. The complete anomalous theory is detailed in [Sz2, Sz3, Sz4, Sz5, Sz6, Sz7].

  17. Collision assisted Zeeman cooling with multiple types of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Mathew S.; Wilson, Rebekah F.; Roberts, Jacob L.

    2014-01-01

    Through a combination of spin-exchange collisions in a magnetic field and optical pumping, it is possible to cool a gas of atoms without requiring the loss of atoms from the gas. This technique, collision assisted Zeeman cooling (CAZ), was developed theoretically assuming a single atomic species [G. Ferrari, Eur. Phys. J. D 13, 67 (2001)]. We have extended this cooling technique to a system of two atomic species rather than just one and have developed a simple analytic model describing the cooling rate. We find that the two-isotope CAZ cooling scheme has a clear theoretical advantage in systems that are reabsorption limited.

  18. Are classical tachyons slower-than-light quantum particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recami, E.; Maccarrone, G.D.

    1983-01-01

    After having studied the shape that a tachyon T (e.g., intrinsecally spherical) would take up, it is shown in an explicit example that the characteristic of classical tachyons are similar to those of the ordinary (slower-than-light) quantum particles. In particular, a realistic tachyon is associated with a 'phase-speed' V [V 2 >Cσ2], but with a 'group speed' v=c 2 /V [v 2 2

  19. The Zeeman-split superconductivity with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingxiang; Yan, Xu; Gu, Qiang

    2017-10-01

    The superconductivity with Rashba and Dressehlaus spin-orbit coupling and Zeeman effect is investigated. The energy gaps of quasi-particles are carefully calculated. It is shown that the coexistence of two spin-orbit coupling might suppress superconductivity. Moreover, the Zeeman effect favors spin-triplet Cooper pairs.

  20. Application of Zeeman spatial beam-splitting in polarized neutron reflectometry

    OpenAIRE

    Kozhevnikov, S. V.; Ignatovich, V. K.; Radu, F.

    2017-01-01

    Neutron Zeeman spatial beam-splitting is considered at reflection from magnetically noncollinear films. Two applications of Zeeman beam-splitting phenomenon in polarized neutron reflectometry are discussed. One is the construction of polarizing devices with high polarizing efficiency. Another one is the investigations of magnetically noncollinear films with low spin-flip probability. Experimental results are presented for illustration.

  1. Networks of Zeeman catastrophe machines for the investigation of complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Péter; Tasnádi, Péter

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of chaotic motion and cooperative systems presents a great opportunity to involve modern physics into the basic course of mechanics taught to BSc-level students. In our previous paper (2014 Eur. J. Phys. 35 015018), it was demonstrated that a Zeeman machine can be a versatile and motivating tool for students to gain introductory knowledge about chaotic motion via interactive simulations. Although the Zeeman machine is known mainly for its quasi-static and catastrophic behaviour, its dynamic properties are also very interesting and show typical chaotic features. In this paper, we present a novel construction consisting of Zeeman machines linked into a network. Although Zeeman networks can be built with almost arbitrary topology, our discussion is restricted to a system where Zeeman machines are arranged in a two-dimensional periodical lattice and the angular variables of the machines are limited to discrete values only. It will be shown that the Zeeman-crystal is appropriate for studying the properties of a broad range of complex systems. Using NetLogo simulations (second- and first-order) phase transitions, its ferromagnetic- and anti-ferromagnetic-type behaviour is demonstrated. A limiting case of the theoretical model of Zeeman-crystal leads to a model that is analogous to the Potts clock model used frequently in statistical physics. The present paper is organically linked to our website (http://csodafizika.hu/zeeman) where downloadable simulations, which are discussed in the paper, can be found. (paper)

  2. Zeeman effect in sulfur monoxide: a tool to probe magnetic fields in star forming regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Coriani, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Context. Magnetic fields play a fundamental role in star formation processes and the best method to evaluate their intensity is to measure the Zeeman effect of atomic and molecular lines. However, a direct measurement of the Zeeman spectral pattern from interstellar molecular species is challengi...

  3. AN ARECIBO SURVEY FOR ZEEMAN SPLITTING IN OH MEGAMASER GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, James; Heiles, Carl

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a comprehensive survey using the Arecibo Observatory for Zeeman splitting of OH lines in OH megamasers (OHMs). A total of 77 sources were observed with the Arecibo telescope. Of these, maser emission could not be detected for eight sources, and two sources were only ambiguously detected. Another 27 sources were detected at low signal-to-noise ratios or with interference that prevented placing any useful limits on the presence of magnetic fields. In 26 sources, it was possible to place upper limits on the magnitude of magnetic fields, typically between 10 and 30 mG. For 14 sources, the Stokes V spectra exhibit features consistent with Zeeman splitting. Eleven of these 14 are new detections, and the remaining three are re-detections of Stokes V detections in Robishaw et al. Among confident new detections, we derive magnetic fields associated with maser regions with magnitudes ranging from 6.1 to 27.6 mG. The distribution of magnetic field strengths suggests the magnetic fields in OH masing clouds in OHMs are larger than those in Galactic OH masers. The results are consistent with magnetic fields playing a dynamically important role in OH masing clouds in OHMs.

  4. Slower saccadic reading in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehangir, Naz; Yu, Caroline Yizhu; Song, Jeehey; Shariati, Mohammad Ali; Binder, Steven; Beyer, Jill; Santini, Veronica; Poston, Kathleen

    2018-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is characterized by degeneration of dopaminergic and other neurons, leading to motor and non-motor deficits. Abnormal eye movements in PD, including fixations, saccades, and convergence, are well described. However, saccadic reading, which requires serial and alternating saccades and fixations, is not well studied, despite its obvious impact on the quality of life. In this study, we assessed saccadic reading using variations of the King-Devick (KD) test, a rapid single digit number naming test, as a way to assess the ability to make serial left-to-right ocular motor movements necessary for reading. We recruited 42 treated PD patients and 80 age-matched controls and compared their reading times with a variety of measures, including age, duration of disease, Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the National Eye Institute 25-Item Visual Functioning Questionnaire 25 (VFQ-25), and Montreal Cognitive assessment (MoCA) test. The subjects performed 4 trials of reading 120 single digit numbers aloud as fast as possible without making errors. In each trial, they read 3 pages (KD1, KD2, and KD3), and each page contained 40 numbers per page in 8 lines with 5 numbers/line. We found that PD patients read about 20% slower than controls on all tests (KD1, 2, and 3 tests) (p read irregularly spaced numbers slower than regularly spaced numbers. Having lines between numbers to guide reading (KD1 tests) did not impact reading time in both PD and controls, but increased visual crowding as a result of decreased spacing between numbers (KD3 tests) was associated with significantly slower reading times in both PD and control groups. Our study revealed that saccadic reading is slower in PD, but controls and PD patients are both impacted by visuospatial planning challenges posed by increased visual crowding and irregularity of number spacing. Reading time did not correlate with UPDRS or MoCA scores in PD patients but significantly

  5. Valley Zeeman splitting of monolayer MoS2 probed by low-field magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y. J.; Shen, C.; Tan, Q. H.; Shi, J.; Liu, X. F.; Wu, Z. H.; Zhang, J.; Tan, P. H.; Zheng, H. Z.

    2018-04-01

    The valley Zeeman splitting of monolayer two-dimensional (2D) materials in the magnetic field plays an important role in the valley and spin manipulations. In general, a high magnetic field (6-65 T) and low temperature (2-30 K) were two key measurement conditions to observe the resolvable valley Zeeman splitting of monolayer 2D materials in current reported experiments. In this study, we experimentally demonstrate an effective measurement scheme by employing magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy, which enables us to distinguish the valley Zeeman splitting under a relatively low magnetic field of 1 T at room temperature. MCD peaks related to both A and B excitonic transitions in monolayer MoS2 can be clearly observed. Based on the MCD spectra under different magnetic fields (-3 to 3 T), we obtained the valley Zeeman splitting energy and the g-factors of A and B excitons, respectively. Our results show that MCD spectroscopy is a high-sensitive magneto-optical technique to explore the valley and spin manipulation in 2D materials.

  6. Mercury pollution surveys in Riga by Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavare, Z.; Bogans, E.; Svagere, A.

    2008-01-01

    Practical sessions of mercury pollution measurements in Riga (Latvia) have been performed in several districts using an RA-915+ Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer coupled with a global positioning system (GPS). The measurements were taken from a driving car and in different days at one particular location (the Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy) for monitoring the changes in atmospheric mercury concentration. GPS was used to relate the measurement results to particular places, which made it possible to create a digitalized database of pollution for different geographic coordinates in different time spans. The measurements have shown that the background level of mercury concentration in Riga does not exceed 5 ng/m 3 , although there are several areas of elevated mercury pollution that need particular attention. (Authors)

  7. Parametric optimization designs of a thermoelectric refrigeration device existing Zeeman and Coulomb effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Guangping; Lin, Bihong; Wu, Guocan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new model of the quantum dot refrigeration devices is established. • The effects of the Zeeman and Coulomb effects on performance are discussed. • Maximum cooling rate and coefficient of performance are calculated. • Upper boundary of the optimal region of the device is discussed. • Optimum choice criteria of some important parameters are provided. - Abstract: A general class of quantum dot refrigeration devices, which is consisting of a single orbital interacting quantum dot and two metal leads with different temperatures and chemical potentials, is established. In the model, not only the Zeeman splitting of energy levels resulting from an external magnetic field but also the effect of a linear fade of the Coulomb energy caused by the splitting are taken into account simultaneously. Based on the quantum master equation, the occupation probabilities of quantum states for the electron are determined under the steady state condition. The general expressions of the particle fluxes, heat flows, power input, cooling rate and the coefficient of performance (COP) are derived. The influences of the energy level and external magnetic field on the performance of the refrigerator are discussed in detail. By applying numerical simulations, three-dimensional diagrams of the cooling rate and COP varying with the magnetic field and energy level are given. The maximum COP and the optimal values of corresponding parameters as well as the maximum cooling rate are obtained. The optimal regions of the magnetic field and the energy level are determined. The optimized scopes of the COP and cooling rate are provided. Some important conclusions in the previous literatures can be directly deduced from the current model under the different extreme conditions.

  8. Hydroxide diffuses slower than hydronium in water because its solvated structure inhibits correlated proton transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mohan; Zheng, Lixin; Santra, Biswajit; Ko, Hsin-Yu; DiStasio, Robert A., Jr.; Klein, Michael L.; Car, Roberto; Wu, Xifan

    2018-03-01

    Proton transfer via hydronium and hydroxide ions in water is ubiquitous. It underlies acid-base chemistry, certain enzyme reactions, and even infection by the flu. Despite two centuries of investigation, the mechanism underlying why hydroxide diffuses slower than hydronium in water is still not well understood. Herein, we employ state-of-the-art density-functional-theory-based molecular dynamics—with corrections for non-local van der Waals interactions, and self-interaction in the electronic ground state—to model water and hydrated water ions. At this level of theory, we show that structural diffusion of hydronium preserves the previously recognized concerted behaviour. However, by contrast, proton transfer via hydroxide is less temporally correlated, due to a stabilized hypercoordination solvation structure that discourages proton transfer. Specifically, the latter exhibits non-planar geometry, which agrees with neutron-scattering results. Asymmetry in the temporal correlation of proton transfer leads to hydroxide diffusing slower than hydronium.

  9. Interface-Induced Zeeman-Protected Superconductivity in Ultrathin Crystalline Lead Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D superconducting systems are of great importance for exploring exotic quantum physics. The recent development of fabrication techniques has stimulated studies of high-quality single-crystalline 2D superconductors, where intrinsic properties give rise to unprecedented physical phenomena. Here, we report the observation of Zeeman-type spin-orbit interaction protected superconductivity (Zeeman-protected superconductivity in 4-monolayer (ML to 6-ML crystalline Pb films grown on striped incommensurate Pb layers on Si(111 substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. An anomalously large in-plane critical field far beyond the Pauli limit is detected, which can be attributed to the Zeeman-protected superconductivity due to the in-plane inversion symmetry breaking at the interface. Our work demonstrates that, in superconducting heterostructures, the interface can induce Zeeman-type spin-orbit interactions and modulate the superconductivity.

  10. Ground state magnetization of conduction electrons in graphene with Zeeman effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escudero, F., E-mail: federico.escudero@uns.edu.ar [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Sur (IFISUR, UNS-CONICET), Av. Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Ardenghi, J.S., E-mail: jsardenhi@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Sur (IFISUR, UNS-CONICET), Av. Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Sourrouille, L., E-mail: lsourrouille@yahoo.es [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Sur (IFISUR, UNS-CONICET), Av. Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Jasen, P., E-mail: pvjasen@uns.edu.ar [Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Sur (IFISUR, UNS-CONICET), Av. Alem 1253, B8000CPB Bahía Blanca (Argentina)

    2017-05-01

    In this work we address the ground state magnetization in graphene, considering the Zeeman effect and taking into account the conduction electrons in the long wavelength approximation. We obtain analytical expressions for the magnetization at T=0 K, where the oscillations given by the de Haas van Alphen (dHvA) effect are present. We find that the Zeeman effect modifies the magnetization by introducing new peaks associated with the spin splitting of the Landau levels. These peaks are very small for typical carrier densities in graphene, but become more important for higher densities. The obtained results provide insight of the way in which the Zeeman effect modifies the magnetization, which can be useful to control and manipulate the spin degrees of freedom. - Highlights: • The magnetization has peaks whenever the last energy level changes discontinuously. • The peaks amplitude depends on the electron density. • The Zeeman effect introduces new peaks in the magnetization.

  11. Interface-Induced Zeeman-Protected Superconductivity in Ultrathin Crystalline Lead Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Ziqiao; Zhang, Xuefeng; Liu, Chaofei; Liu, Yongjie; Zhou, Zhimou; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Qingyan; Liu, Yanzhao; Xi, Chuanying; Tian, Mingliang; Liu, Haiwen; Feng, Ji; Xie, X. C.; Wang, Jian

    2018-04-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) superconducting systems are of great importance for exploring exotic quantum physics. The recent development of fabrication techniques has stimulated studies of high-quality single-crystalline 2D superconductors, where intrinsic properties give rise to unprecedented physical phenomena. Here, we report the observation of Zeeman-type spin-orbit interaction protected superconductivity (Zeeman-protected superconductivity) in 4-monolayer (ML) to 6-ML crystalline Pb films grown on striped incommensurate Pb layers on Si(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy. An anomalously large in-plane critical field far beyond the Pauli limit is detected, which can be attributed to the Zeeman-protected superconductivity due to the in-plane inversion symmetry breaking at the interface. Our work demonstrates that, in superconducting heterostructures, the interface can induce Zeeman-type spin-orbit interactions and modulate the superconductivity.

  12. A quantum mechanical approach to establishing the magnetic field orientation from a maser Zeeman profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J. A.; Gray, M. D.; Robishaw, T.; Caswell, J. L.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2014-06-01

    Recent comparisons of magnetic field directions derived from maser Zeeman splitting with those derived from continuum source rotation measures have prompted new analysis of the propagation of the Zeeman split components, and the inferred field orientation. In order to do this, we first review differing electric field polarization conventions used in past studies. With these clearly and consistently defined, we then show that for a given Zeeman splitting spectrum, the magnetic field direction is fully determined and predictable on theoretical grounds: when a magnetic field is oriented away from the observer, the left-hand circular polarization is observed at higher frequency and the right-hand polarization at lower frequency. This is consistent with classical Lorentzian derivations. The consequent interpretation of recent measurements then raises the possibility of a reversal between the large-scale field (traced by rotation measures) and the small-scale field (traced by maser Zeeman splitting).

  13. Fatter, older and slower (and with a trigger)

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    The picture of the Universe has changed since the publication of the Planck results last March. One year earlier, the discovery of the Higgs boson had proved the existence of fundamental “scalar fields” – the most likely reason for why the Universe evolved from the Big Bang to what we observe today. At a workshop organized by the CERN Theory Unit, cosmologists and particle physicists discussed common issues and explored new avenues for better collaboration.   Planck enhanced anomalies. Photo: ESA and the Planck collaboration. “Planck has not been kind to the Universe,” says Daniela Paoletti, a member of the Planck collaboration and a researcher at the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics in Bologna. “We know now that it is fatter because it contains more dark matter than what we had previously calculated; it is also a few hundred thousand years older and is expanding at a slower pace.” What is the Universe ...

  14. Slower Dynamics and Aged Mitochondria in Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargini, Ricardo; García, Esther; Perry, George

    2017-01-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease corresponds to 95% of cases whose origin is multifactorial and elusive. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a major feature of Alzheimer's pathology, which might be one of the early events that trigger downstream principal events. Here, we show that multiple genes that control mitochondrial homeostasis, including fission and fusion, are downregulated in Alzheimer's patients. Additionally, we demonstrate that some of these dysregulations, such as diminished DLP1 levels and its mitochondrial localization, as well as reduced STOML2 and MFN2 fusion protein levels, take place in fibroblasts from sporadic Alzheimer's disease patients. The analysis of mitochondrial network disruption using CCCP indicates that the patients' fibroblasts exhibit slower dynamics and mitochondrial membrane potential recovery. These defects lead to strong accumulation of aged mitochondria in Alzheimer's fibroblasts. Accordingly, the analysis of autophagy and mitophagy involved genes in the patients demonstrates a downregulation indicating that the recycling mechanism of these aged mitochondria might be impaired. Our data reinforce the idea that mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the key early events of the disease intimately related with aging. PMID:29201274

  15. Anisotropic semivortices in dipolar spinor condensates controlled by Zeeman splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Bingjin; Li, Shoubo; Huang, Chunqing; Luo, Zhihuan; Pang, Wei; Tan, Haishu; Malomed, Boris A.; Li, Yongyao

    2017-10-01

    Spatially anisotropic solitary vortices, i.e., bright anisotropic vortex solitons (AVSs), supported by anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions, were recently predicted in spin-orbit-coupled binary Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), in the form of two-dimensional semivortices (complexes built of zero-vorticity and vortical components). We demonstrate that the shape of the AVSs—horizontal or vertical, with respect to the in-plane polarization of the atomic dipole moments in the underlying BEC—may be effectively controlled by the strength Ω of the Zeeman splitting (ZS). A transition from the horizontal to vertical shape with the increase of Ω is found numerically and explained analytically. At the transition point, the AVS assumes the shape of an elliptical ring. The mobility of horizontal AVSs is studied, too, with the conclusion that, with the increase of Ω , their negative effective mass changes the sign to positive via a point at which the effective mass diverges. Lastly, we report a new species of inverted AVSs, with the zero-vorticity and vortex component placed in lower- and higher-energy components, as defined by the ZS. They are excited states, with respect to the ground states provided by the usual AVSs. Quite surprisingly, inverted AVSs are stable in a large parameter region.

  16. Zeeman spectroscopy of Zn-H complex in germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabakar, J.P.C.; Vickers, R.E.M.; Fisher, P.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: A divalent substitutional zinc atom in germanium complexed with an interstitial hydrogen atom gives rise to a monovalent acceptor of trigonal symmetry. The axial nature of this complex splits the four-fold degenerate states associated with substitutional point defects into two two-fold degenerate states. Zeeman spectra of the Zn-H complex have been observed for B along and crystallographic directions in the Voigt configuration using linearly polarised radiation. Spectra of the C and D lines for B ≤ 2 Tesla are essentially identical to those of these lines of group III impurities; here B is the field strength. At all fields, splitting of the excited state of the D lines is identical to that for group III acceptors in germanium. The magnetic field dependence of the D components for both E parallel B and E perpendicular B and the selection rules demand that only one of the two two-fold 1s-like energy levels is occupied at the temperatures used instead of both. The results confirm piezospectroscopic studies which demonstrated that the axes of the complexes are along the four covalent bond directions of the host

  17. Preliminary study for the determination of heavy metal in ground samples by GF-ASS Zeeman; Studio preliminare per la determinazione di metalli pesanti in campioni di suolo mediante analisi GF-AAS Zeeman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casabianca, T.; Bitonte, R.; Epifani, M.; Ubaldi, C. [ENEA, Divisione Tecnologie Ingegneria e Servizi Ambientali, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, MT (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    In the framework of SIMOA project have been investigated methods to evaluate the level of soil contamination due to heavy metals. In this wok, it is discussed a procedure to measure topsoil bioavailable fraction of seven heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, Cr, Hg). The adopted procedure is based on acid digestion followed by instrumental detection by means of graphite furnace atomic-absorption spectrophotometry (GFAAS) using Zeeman effect to reduce background contribution. Details of samples preparation and analysis, experimental setup optimization and statistical data analysis are presented, together with a discussion on method accuracy and data interpretation. [Italian] Nell'ambito del progetto SIMOA (Sistema Integrato di Monitoraggio Ambientale) per il monitoraggio ambientale nel bacino del Basento (Regione Basilicata, Italia), vengono investigati i metodi per il controllo dei livelli di inquinamento del suolo da parte di metalli pesanti. Nel presente lavoro viene proposta una procedura per determinare il livello di concentrazione della frazione biodisponibile di sette metalli pesanti (Cadmio, Rame, Piombo, Nickel, Cromo, Mercurio) in campion di suolo superficiale. Il metodo e' basato su di un trattamento di digestione acida in forno a microonde cui segue la rivelazione strumentale mediante spettrofotometria di assorbimento atomico in fornetto di grafite (GFAAS) con effetto Zeeman per la correzione del fondo. Si descrivono in dettaglio le fasi di preparazione dei campioni, la metodologia di misura e l'analisi statistica dei dati, oltre ad una discussione sull'attendibilita' del metodo e sui futuri sviluppi.

  18. Half-marathoners are younger and slower than marathoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Nikolaidis, Pantelis T; Zingg, Matthias A; Rosemann, Thomas; Rüst, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Age and performance trends of elite and recreational marathoners are well investigated, but not for half-marathoners. We analysed age and performance trends in 508,108 age group runners (125,894 female and 328,430 male half-marathoners and 10,205 female and 43,489 male marathoners) competing between 1999 and 2014 in all flat half-marathons and marathons held in Switzerland using single linear regression analyses, mixed-effects regression analyses and analyses of variance. The number of women and men increased across years in both half-marathons and marathons. There were 12.3 times more female half-marathoners than female marathoners and 7.5 times more male half-marathoners than male marathoners. For both half-marathons and marathons, most of the female and male finishers were recorded in age group 40-44 years. In half-marathons, women (10.29 ± 3.03 km/h) were running 0.07 ± 0.06 km/h faster (p marathon, women (14.77 ± 4.13 km/h) were running 0.28 ± 0.16 km/h faster (p marathon, women (42.18 ± 10.63 years) were at the same age than men (42.06 ± 10.45 years) (p > 0.05). Also in half-marathon, women (41.40 ± 10.63 years) were at the same age than men (41.31 ± 10.30 years) (p > 0.05). However, women and men marathon runners were older than their counterpart half-marathon runners (p marathons than in marathons, (2) women were running faster than men, (3) half-marathoners were running slower than marathoners, and (4) half-marathoners were younger than marathoners.

  19. Stark--Zeeman effect of metastable hydrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagann, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    The Stark effect of the N = 1 rotational level of orthohydrogen and the N = 2 rotational level of parahydrogen in the metastable c 3 PI/sub u/ electronic state has been measured using the molecular beam magnetic resonance method. The Stark effect of the metastable state is 10,000 times larger than that of the ground electronic state. The Stark effect of parahydrogen was found to be weakly dependent on static magnetic field strength, whereas the Stark effect of orthohydrogen was found to be more strongly dependent on the magnetic field strength. The Stark effect of orthohydrogen has been calculated using second-order perturbation theory with a pure Stark effect perturbation. The magnetic field dependence of the Stark effect was calculated using third-order perturbation theory with a mixed Stark--Zeeman effect double perturbation. A comparison of the experimental and theoretical values of α/sub perpendicular/ provides information on the electronic transition moment connecting the c 3 PI/sub u/ state to the a 3 Σ + /sub g/ state. The transition moment is needed to calculate the radiative lifetimes of the various vibrational levels of the c 3 PI/sub u/ state. The transition moment also enters the calculation of the quenching of this metastable state by an external electric field. There is a disagreement between theoretical predictions and the results of an experiment on the electric field quenching of the metastables. A test of the electronic transition moment may help shed light on this question. The experimental determination of the values of the transition moments allows one to test theory by comparing these values to those obtained by calculations employing ab initio wavefunctions

  20. Suppression of the Nonlinear Zeeman Effect and Heading Error in Earth-Field-Range Alkali-Vapor Magnetometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Guzhi; Wickenbrock, Arne; Rochester, Simon; Zhang, Weiping; Budker, Dmitry

    2018-01-19

    The nonlinear Zeeman effect can induce splitting and asymmetries of magnetic-resonance lines in the geophysical magnetic-field range. This is a major source of "heading error" for scalar atomic magnetometers. We demonstrate a method to suppress the nonlinear Zeeman effect and heading error based on spin locking. In an all-optical synchronously pumped magnetometer with separate pump and probe beams, we apply a radio-frequency field which is in phase with the precessing magnetization. This results in the collapse of the multicomponent asymmetric magnetic-resonance line with ∼100  Hz width in the Earth-field range into a single peak with a width of 22 Hz, whose position is largely independent of the orientation of the sensor within a range of orientation angles. The technique is expected to be broadly applicable in practical magnetometry, potentially boosting the sensitivity and accuracy of Earth-surveying magnetometers by increasing the magnetic-resonance amplitude, decreasing its width, and removing the important and limiting heading-error systematic.

  1. Suppression of the Nonlinear Zeeman Effect and Heading Error in Earth-Field-Range Alkali-Vapor Magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Guzhi; Wickenbrock, Arne; Rochester, Simon; Zhang, Weiping; Budker, Dmitry

    2018-01-01

    The nonlinear Zeeman effect can induce splitting and asymmetries of magnetic-resonance lines in the geophysical magnetic-field range. This is a major source of "heading error" for scalar atomic magnetometers. We demonstrate a method to suppress the nonlinear Zeeman effect and heading error based on spin locking. In an all-optical synchronously pumped magnetometer with separate pump and probe beams, we apply a radio-frequency field which is in phase with the precessing magnetization. This results in the collapse of the multicomponent asymmetric magnetic-resonance line with ˜100 Hz width in the Earth-field range into a single peak with a width of 22 Hz, whose position is largely independent of the orientation of the sensor within a range of orientation angles. The technique is expected to be broadly applicable in practical magnetometry, potentially boosting the sensitivity and accuracy of Earth-surveying magnetometers by increasing the magnetic-resonance amplitude, decreasing its width, and removing the important and limiting heading-error systematic.

  2. Zeeman effect in sulfur monoxide. A tool to probe magnetic fields in star forming regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Coriani, Sonia; Gauss, Jürgen; Codella, Claudio; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; Cernicharo, José; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Context. Magnetic fields play a fundamental role in star formation processes and the best method to evaluate their intensity is to measure the Zeeman effect of atomic and molecular lines. However, a direct measurement of the Zeeman spectral pattern from interstellar molecular species is challenging due to the high sensitivity and high spectral resolution required. So far, the Zeeman effect has been detected unambiguously in star forming regions for very few non-masing species, such as OH and CN. Aims: We decided to investigate the suitability of sulfur monoxide (SO), which is one of the most abundant species in star forming regions, for probing the intensity of magnetic fields via the Zeeman effect. Methods: We investigated the Zeeman effect for several rotational transitions of SO in the (sub-)mm spectral regions by using a frequency-modulated, computer-controlled spectrometer, and by applying a magnetic field parallel to the radiation propagation (I.e., perpendicular to the oscillating magnetic field of the radiation). To support the experimental determination of the g factors of SO, a systematic quantum-chemical investigation of these parameters for both SO and O2 has been carried out. Results: An effective experimental-computational strategy for providing accurate g factors as well as for identifying the rotational transitions showing the strongest Zeeman effect has been presented. Revised g factors have been obtained from a large number of SO rotational transitions between 86 and 389 GHz. In particular, the rotational transitions showing the largest Zeeman shifts are: N,J = 2, 2 ← 1, 1 (86.1 GHz), N,J = 4, 3 ← 3, 2 (159.0 GHz), N,J = 1, 1 ← 0, 1 (286.3 GHz), N,J = 2, 2 ← 1, 2 (309.5 GHz), and N,J = 2, 1 ← 1, 0 (329.4 GHz). Our investigation supports SO as a good candidate for probing magnetic fields in high-density star forming regions. The complete list of measured Zeeman components is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  3. Slower Reacquisition after Partial Extinction in Human Contingency Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morís, Joaquín; Barberia, Itxaso; Vadillo, Miguel A.; Andrades, Ainhoa; López, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    Extinction is a very relevant learning phenomenon from a theoretical and applied point of view. One of its most relevant features is that relapse phenomena often take place once the extinction training has been completed. Accordingly, as extinction-based therapies constitute the most widespread empirically validated treatment of anxiety disorders,…

  4. On the Zeeman Effect in highly excited atoms: 2. Three-dimensional case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baseia, B.; Medeiros e Silva Filho, J.

    1984-01-01

    A previous result, found in two-dimensional hydrogen-atoms, is extended to the three-dimensional case. A mapping of a four-dimensional space R 4 onto R 3 , that establishes an equivalence between Coulomb and harmonic potentials, is used to show that the exact solution of the Zeeman effect in highly excited atoms, cannot be reached. (Author) [pt

  5. Influence of the nuclear Zeeman effect on mode locking in pulsed semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beugeling, Wouter; Uhrig, Götz S.; Anders, Frithjof B.

    2017-09-01

    The coherence of the electron spin in a semiconductor quantum dot is strongly enhanced by mode locking through nuclear focusing, where the synchronization of the electron spin to periodic pulsing is slowly transferred to the nuclear spins of the semiconductor material, mediated by the hyperfine interaction between these. The external magnetic field that drives the Larmor oscillations of the electron spin also subjects the nuclear spins to a Zeeman-like coupling, albeit a much weaker one. For typical magnetic fields used in experiments, the energy scale of the nuclear Zeeman effect is comparable to that of the hyperfine interaction, so that it is not negligible. In this work, we analyze the influence of the nuclear Zeeman effect on mode locking quantitatively. Within a perturbative framework, we calculate the Overhauser-field distribution after a prolonged period of pulsing. We find that the nuclear Zeeman effect can exchange resonant and nonresonant frequencies. We distinguish between models with a single type and with multiple types of nuclei. For the latter case, the positions of the resonances depend on the individual g factors, rather than on the average value.

  6. New diagnostic technique for Zeeman-compensated atomic beam slowing: technique and results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, P.A.; Straten, P. van der; Heideman, H.G.M.; Metcalf, H.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a new diagnostic tool for the study of Zeeman-compensated slowing of an alkali atomic beam. Our time-of-flight technique measures the longitudinal veloc- ity distribution of the slowed atoms with a resolution below the Doppler limit of 30 cm/s. Furthermore, it can map

  7. A treatment of the Zeeman effect using Stokes formalism and its implementation in the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Richard; Buehler, Stefan A.; Eriksson, Patrick; Mendrok, Jana

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the practical theory that was used to implement the Zeeman effect using Stokes formalism in the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS). ARTS now treats the Zeeman effect in a general manner for several gas species for all polarizations and takes into account variations in both magnetic and atmospheric fields along a full 3D geometry. We present how Zeeman splitting affects polarization in radiative transfer simulations and find that the effect may be large in Earth settings for polarized receivers in limb observing geometry. We find that not taking a spatially varying magnetic field into account can result in absolute errors in the measurement vector of at least 10 K in Earth magnetic field settings. The paper also presents qualitative tests for O 2 lines against previous models (61.15 GHz line) and satellite data from Odin-SMR (487.25 GHz line), and the overall consistency between previous models, satellite data, and the new ARTS Zeeman module seems encouraging. -- Highlights: • We implement the Zeeman effect with Stokes formalism in ARTS. • We give a practical theory for the implementation. • Examples of how the Zeeman effect change RT are presented. • Qualitative Odin-SMR O 2 limb sounding model indicates the Zeeman effect is necessary

  8. Surface regions of illusory images are detected with a slower processing speed than those of luminance-defined images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaylova, Milena; Manahilov, Velitchko

    2010-11-24

    Research has shown that the processing time for discriminating illusory contours is longer than for real contours. We know, however, little whether the visual processes, associated with detecting regions of illusory surfaces, are also slower as those responsible for detecting luminance-defined images. Using a speed-accuracy trade-off (SAT) procedure, we measured accuracy as a function of processing time for detecting illusory Kanizsa-type and luminance-defined squares embedded in 2D static luminance noise. The data revealed that the illusory images were detected at slower processing speed than the real images, while the points in time, when accuracy departed from chance, were not significantly different for both stimuli. The classification images for detecting illusory and real squares showed that observers employed similar detection strategies using surface regions of the real and illusory squares. The lack of significant differences between the x-intercepts of the SAT functions for illusory and luminance-modulated stimuli suggests that the detection of surface regions of both images could be based on activation of a single mechanism (the dorsal magnocellular visual pathway). The slower speed for detecting illusory images as compared to luminance-defined images could be attributed to slower processes of filling-in of regions of illusory images within the dorsal pathway.

  9. A New Analysis of Stark and Zeeman Effects on Hydrogen Lines in Magnetized DA White Dwarfs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ny Kieu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available White dwarfs with magnetic field strengths larger than 10 T are understood to represent more than 10% of the total population of white dwarfs. The presence of such strong magnetic fields is clearly indicated by the Zeeman triplet structure visible on absorption lines. In this work, we discuss the line broadening mechanisms and focus on the sensitivity of hydrogen lines on the magnetic field. We perform new calculations in conditions relevant to magnetized DA stellar atmospheres using models inspired from magnetic fusion plasma spectroscopy. A white dwarf spectrum from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS database is analyzed. An effective temperature is provided by an adjustment of the background radiation with a Planck function, and the magnetic field is inferred from absorption lines presenting a Zeeman triplet structure. An order-of-magnitude estimate for the electron density is also performed from Stark broadening analysis.

  10. Spin-flip transitions between Zeeman sublevels in semiconductor quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaetskii, Alexander V.; Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2001-01-01

    We have studied spin-flip transitions between Zeeman sublevels in GaAs electron quantum dots. Several different mechanisms which originate from spin-orbit coupling are shown to be responsible for such processes. It is shown that spin-lattice relaxation for the electron localized in a quantum dot is much less effective than for the free electron. The spin-flip rates due to several other mechanisms not related to the spin-orbit interaction are also estimated

  11. THE HANLE AND ZEEMAN POLARIZATION SIGNALS OF THE SOLAR Ca II 8542 Å LINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Štěpán, Jiri [Astronomical Institute ASCR, Fričova 298, 251 65 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Bueno, Javier Trujillo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2016-07-20

    We highlight the main results of a three-dimensional (3D) multilevel radiative transfer investigation about the solar disk-center polarization of the Ca ii 8542 Å line. First, through the use of a 3D model of the solar atmosphere, we investigate the linear polarization that occurs due to the atomic level polarization produced by the absorption and scattering of anisotropic radiation, taking into account the symmetry-breaking effects caused by its thermal, dynamic, and magnetic structure. Second, we study the contribution of the Zeeman effect to the linear and circular polarization. Finally, we show examples of the Stokes profiles produced by the joint action of the atomic level polarization and the Hanle and Zeeman effects. We find that the Zeeman effect tends to dominate the linear polarization signals only in the localized patches of opposite magnetic polarity, where the magnetic field is relatively strong and slightly inclined; outside such very localized patches, the linear polarization is often dominated by the contribution of atomic level polarization. We demonstrate that a correct modeling of this last contribution requires taking into account the symmetry-breaking effects caused by the thermal, dynamic, and magnetic structure of the solar atmosphere, and that in the 3D model used the Hanle effect in forward-scattering geometry (disk-center observation) mainly reduces the polarization corresponding to the zero-field case. We emphasize that, in general, a reliable modeling of the linear polarization in the Ca ii 8542 Å line requires taking into account the joint action of atomic level polarization and the Hanle and Zeeman effects.

  12. THE ZEEMAN EFFECT IN THE 44 GHZ CLASS I METHANOL MASER LINE TOWARD DR21(OH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momjian, E. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Sarma, A. P., E-mail: emomjian@nrao.edu, E-mail: asarma@depaul.edu [Physics Department, DePaul University, 2219 N. Kenmore Avenue, Byrne Hall 211, Chicago, IL 60614 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    We report detection of the Zeeman effect in the 44 GHz Class I methanol maser line, toward the star-forming region DR21(OH). In a 219 Jy beam{sup −1} maser centered at an LSR velocity of 0.83 km s{sup −1}, we find a 20- σ detection of zB {sub los} = 53.5 ± 2.7 Hz. If 44 GHz methanol masers are excited at n ∼ 10{sup 7–8} cm{sup −3}, then the B versus n {sup 1/2} relation would imply, from comparison with Zeeman effect detections in the CN(1 − 0) line toward DR21(OH), that magnetic fields traced by 44 GHz methanol masers in DR21(OH) should be ∼10 mG. Combined with our detected zB {sub los} = 53.5 Hz, this would imply that the value of the 44 GHz methanol Zeeman splitting factor z is ∼5 Hz mG{sup −1}. Such small values of z would not be a surprise, as the methanol molecule is non-paramagnetic, like H{sub 2}O. Empirical attempts to determine z , as demonstrated, are important because there currently are no laboratory measurements or theoretically calculated values of z for the 44 GHz CH{sub 3}OH transition. Data from observations of a larger number of sources are needed to make such empirical determinations robust.

  13. Doppler-Zeeman Mapping of the Rapidly Rotating Magnetic CP Star HD37776

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, V. L.; Vasilchenko, D. V.; Stepanov, V. V.; Romanyuk, I. I.

    2000-03-01

    We present the results of our analysis of magnetic-field configuration and abundance anomalies on the surface of the rapidly rotating, chemically peculiar helium-strong variable B2 V star HD37776 with unresolved Zeeman components of spectral lines. Simultaneous inversion of the observed Stokes I and V profiles, which realizes the method of Doppler-Zeeman mapping (Vasilchenko et al. 1996), has been applied for the first time. Spectroscopic observations were carried out with the Main stellar spectrograph of the 6-m Special Astrophysical Observatory telescope equipped with a Zeeman analyzer and a CCD array, which allowed spectra in right- and left-hand circularly polarized light to be taken simultaneously at a signal-to-noise ratio S/N > 200 (Romanyuk et al. 1999). The profile width of winged spectral lines (reaching 5 A) is determined by Zeeman line splitting; however, the observed Zeeman components are blurred and unresolved because of the rapid stellar rotation. When solving the inverse problem, we sought for the magnetic-field configuration in the form of a combination of arbitrarily oriented dipole, quadrupole, and octupole placed at the stellar center. The observed Stokes I and V profiles for eight spectral lines of He, OII, AlIII, SiIII, and FeIII averaged over the visible stellar surface were used as input data. We constructed a model of the magnetic field from the condition of coincidence of magnetic maps obtained from different lines of different chemical elements and from the condition of a minimum profile residual. This model is a combination of centered coaxial dipole and quadrupole with the dominant quadrupole component at 30 deg < i < 50 deg, beta = 40 deg, and a maximum surface field strength H_s = 60 kG. A comparison of our abundance maps with the field configuration shows that the He concentration is at a maximum in the regions of maximum radial field, while the maximum concentrations of O, Al, Si, and Fe coincide with the regions of maximum

  14. Diabetes that impacts on routine activities predicts slower recovery after total knee arthroplasty: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurudeen Amusat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Question: In the 6 months after total knee arthroplasty (TKA, what is the pattern of pain resolution and functional recovery in people without diabetes, with diabetes that does not impact on routine activities, and with diabetes that does impact on routine activities? Is diabetes that impacts on routine activities an independent predictor of slower resolution of pain and functional recovery after TKA? Design: Community-based prospective observational study. Participants: A consecutive cohort of 405 people undergoing primary TKA, of whom 60 (15% had diabetes. Participants with diabetes were also asked preoperatively whether diabetes impacted on their routine activities. Participants were categorised into three groups: no diabetes (n = 345, diabetes with no impact on activities (n = 41, and diabetes that impacted activities (n = 19. Outcome measures: Pain and function were measured using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index within the month before surgery and 1, 3 and 6 months after surgery. Demographic, medical and surgical factors were also measured, along with depression, social support and health-related quality of life. Results: No baseline differences in pain and function were seen among the three groups (p > 0.05. Adjusting for age, gender and contralateral joint involvement across the 6 postoperative months, participants with diabetes that impacted on routine activities had pain scores that were 8.3 points higher (indicating greater pain and function scores that were 5.4 points higher (indicating lower function than participants without diabetes. Participants with diabetes that doesn’t impact on routine activities had similar recovery to those without diabetes. Conclusion: People undergoing TKA who report preoperatively that diabetes impacts on their routine activities have less recovery over 6 months than those without diabetes or those with diabetes that does not impact on routine activities

  15. Aging children of long-lived parents experience slower cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Ambarish; Henley, William; Robine, Jean-Marie; Llewellyn, David; Langa, Kenneth M; Wallace, Robert B; Melzer, David

    2014-10-01

    Parental longevity confers lower risks for some age-related diseases in offspring. We tested the association between parental longevity and late-life cognitive decline or dementia. Data were from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a US national sample. Biennial cognitive assessment (Telephone Interview of Cognitive Status-Modified [TICS-m]) occurred for ages 64 years or older in 1996 through 2008 (maximum, 79 years), including physician-diagnosed memory disorder. Offspring were categorized into parental longevity groups based on gender-specific distributional cut points. Model covariates included race, respondents' education, and income status during childhood and adulthood. Offspring groups did not differ on TICS-m scores at baseline. During follow-up, offspring of two long-lived parents experienced 40% slower rates of TICS-m decline than those with no long-lived parents (95% confidence interval, 12-72; P=.003; n=4731). Increased parental longevity was also associated with lower risk of physician-diagnosed memory disorder. Estimates did not change after controlling for environmental variables. Parental longevity is associated inversely with cognitive decline and self-reported diagnosed memory disorders in aging offspring. Parental longevity may be a valuable trait for identifying early biomarkers for resistance to cognitive decline in aging. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Task-dependent activation of distinct fast and slow(er) motor pathways during motor imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Martin; Taube, Wolfgang; Lauber, Benedikt

    2018-02-22

    Motor imagery and actual movements share overlapping activation of brain areas but little is known about task-specific activation of distinct motor pathways during mental simulation of movements. For real contractions, it was demonstrated that the slow(er) motor pathways are activated differently in ballistic compared to tonic contractions but it is unknown if this also holds true for imagined contractions. The aim of the present study was to assess the activity of fast and slow(er) motor pathways during mentally simulated movements of ballistic and tonic contractions. H-reflexes were conditioned with transcranial magnetic stimulation at different interstimulus intervals to assess the excitability of fast and slow(er) motor pathways during a) the execution of tonic and ballistic contractions, b) motor imagery of these contraction types, and c) at rest. In contrast to the fast motor pathways, the slow(er) pathways displayed a task-specific activation: for imagined ballistic as well as real ballistic contractions, the activation was reduced compared to rest whereas enhanced activation was found for imagined tonic and real tonic contractions. This study provides evidence that the excitability of fast and slow(er) motor pathways during motor imagery resembles the activation pattern observed during real contractions. The findings indicate that motor imagery results in task- and pathway-specific subliminal activation of distinct subsets of neurons in the primary motor cortex. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. New diagnostic technique for Zeeman-compensated atomic beam slowing: technique and results

    OpenAIRE

    Molenaar, P.A.; Straten, P. van der; Heideman, H.G.M.; Metcalf, H.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a new diagnostic tool for the study of Zeeman-compensated slowing of an alkali atomic beam. Our time-of-flight technique measures the longitudinal veloc- ity distribution of the slowed atoms with a resolution below the Doppler limit of 30 cm/s. Furthermore, it can map the position and velocity distribution of atoms in either ground hyperfine level inside the solenoid without any devices inside the solenoid. The technique reveals the optical pumping ef- fects, and shows in de...

  18. Quadratic Zeeman spectra for the hydrogen atom by means of semiclassical quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Adachi, Satoshi

    1988-01-01

    The elliptic cylindrical coordinates of type I adapted to the Fock hypersphere in momentum space of the Kepler motion and their canonical momenta are used to construct an analytic form of the classical action integrals which yield an adequate parametrization of the KAM (Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser) tori of the Kepler trajectories weakly perturbed by a uniform magnetic field. The semiclassical quantization formula so provided presents a prototype of the exact EBK (Einstein-Brillouin-Keller) quantization scheme, and the resulting quantized energies vs the magnetic field strength correspond to the quadratic Zeeman spectra of each Rydberg multiplet lifted by the perturbation. (author)

  19. Optogalvanic detection of the Zeeman effect in a hollow-cathode discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlois, E.; Gagne, J.

    1987-01-01

    Optogalvanic detection of complex Zeeman patterns in a hollow-cathode lamp is investigated. Uranium lines with J 1 = 6 and J 2 = 7 are resolved, with our best results obtained using intermodulate optogalvanic spectroscopy (but this scheme is applicable only to lines giving strong signals). This detection method has a 40-MHz resolution, so a magnetic field of 0.1 T is sufficient to resolve most patterns. Weak lines can be studied with modulated optogalvanic spectroscopy. However, the stronger field required in this case perturbs the discharge. Although they are impractical for the measurement of component relative intensities, these detection methods may find applications in the determination of Lande g factors

  20. Slower Fibrosis Progression Among Liver Transplant Recipients With Sustained Virological Response After Hepatitis C Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid; Meister, Edward; Habib, Sana; Murakami, Traci; Walker, Courtney; Rana, Abbas; Shaikh, Obaid S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The natural course of hepatic fibrosis in HCV allograft recipients with sustained virological response (SVR) after anti-HCV therapy remains debatable. The aim of this study was to examine the progression of fibrosis in a cohort of patients who achieved SVR compared with those without treatment. Methods The 167 patients who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were chosen from a transplant database. All patients were required to have histological evidence of recurrent HCV infection post-liver transplantation and a follow-up biopsy. The 140 of these patients had received anti-viral therapy. Twenty-seven patients were identified as controls and were matched with the treatment group in all respects. The patients were categorized into four groups based on treatment response: 1) no treatment (control) (n = 27); 2) non-responders (n = 81); 3) relapsers (n = 32); and 4) SVR (n = 27). The endpoint was the stage of fibrosis on the follow-up liver biopsy. Results The treated and untreated groups were similar in clinical characteristics at the time of transplantation and prior to the initiation of treatment. The 72% of the cohort showed a fibrosis progression of ≥ 1 stage; this change did not significantly differ between the patient groups. Nonetheless, the fibrosis progression rate was the highest in the untreated group and lowest in the patients who achieved SVR. A coefficient of determination was used. Improvements in fibrosis scores were found with greater treatment duration. These improvements were most evident with the achievement of SVR. Conclusions In conclusion, SVR after anti-viral therapy for recurrent hepatitis C infection post-transplantation was associated with slower fibrosis progression and significantly improved graft survival. PMID:27785303

  1. Association of a Low-Protein Diet With Slower Progression of CKD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Metzger

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: In this prospective observational study, the lower the baseline DPI, the slower the progression toward ESRD. Most importantly, the absence of threshold for the relation between DPI and ESRD risk indicates that there is no optimal DPI in the range observed in this cohort.

  2. Zeeman relaxation of MnH (X7Σ+) in collisions with 3He: Mechanism and comparison with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turpin, F.; Stoecklin, T.; Halvick, Ph.

    2011-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the Zeeman relaxation of the magnetically trappable lowest field seeking state of MnH ( 7 Σ) in collisions with 3 He. We analyze the collisional Zeeman transition mechanism as a function of the final diatomic state and its variation as a function of an applied magnetic field. We show that as a result of this mechanism the levels with ΔM j >2 give negligible contributions to the Zeemam relaxation cross section. We also compare our results to the experimental cross sections obtained from the buffer-gas cooling and magnetic trapping of this molecule and investigate the dependence of the Zeeman relaxation cross section on the accuracy of the three-body interaction at ultralow energies.

  3. Zeeman relaxation of MnH (X7Σ+) in collisions with He3: Mechanism and comparison with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, F.; Stoecklin, T.; Halvick, Ph.

    2011-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of the Zeeman relaxation of the magnetically trappable lowest field seeking state of MnH (7Σ) in collisions with He3. We analyze the collisional Zeeman transition mechanism as a function of the final diatomic state and its variation as a function of an applied magnetic field. We show that as a result of this mechanism the levels with ΔMj>2 give negligible contributions to the Zeemam relaxation cross section. We also compare our results to the experimental cross sections obtained from the buffer-gas cooling and magnetic trapping of this molecule and investigate the dependence of the Zeeman relaxation cross section on the accuracy of the three-body interaction at ultralow energies.

  4. Zeeman-Stern Gerlach deceleration of supersonic beams of paramagnetic particles with traveling waves of magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimeche, Azer

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on the study and implementation of a new technique of deceleration of a supersonic beam of paramagnetic particles using a co-moving progressive wave of magnetic field. This technique relies on a method of slowing based on Stern-Gerlach forces acting on a paramagnetic system in motion in the presence of a co-propagating magnetic field. This highly innovative approach has the advantage of being applicable to a wide range of species and opens up new opportunities. A suitable theoretical approach is followed, that allows for a direct link between theory, programming of experimental parameters, and experimental results in a systematic, rational and predictive manner. The understanding and control of the dynamics of trapping at a given speed, acceleration and deceleration require decoupling between the transverse and longitudinal effects of the wave. These effects are clearly visible when the added uniform magnetic field limits the transverse effects of the progressive wave of magnetic field. The outlooks for the new Zeeman Stern Gerlach decelerator are numerous. Deceleration paramagnetic molecules, free radicals and neutrons are possible. (author) [fr

  5. Doppler-Zeeman mapping of the magnetic CP star HD 215441

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, V. L.; Vasilchenko, D. V.; Stepanov, V. V.; Tsymbal, V. V.

    1997-07-01

    The method of Vasilchenko et al. (1996) is used to obtain a Doppler-Zeeman map of the magnetic CP star HD 215441. The magnetic field is approximated by a magnetic dipole that is arbitrarily shifted from the star center. The solution of the inverse problem yields the dipole parameters and the maps of Si, Ti, Cr, and Fe abundance anomalies; the coordinates of local magnetic vectors on the star surface are computed. A comparison of the distribution of abundance anomalies and the magnetic-field configuration reveals that in the region where the magnetic-field lines are vertical (near the magnetic pole), Si, Ti and Cr are highly deficient, while the Fe enhancement is strongest. In the regions where the magnetic-field lines are horizontal (near the magnetic equator), Si, Ti and Cr show the greatest overabundance. In these regions, the Fe abundance is also slightly enhanced and exhibits, as it were, a secondary maximum. The factors that limit the accuracy of Doppler-Zeeman mapping are reviewed.

  6. Finite energy for a gravitational potential falling slower than 1/r

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comelli, Denis; Crisostomi, Marco; Pilo, Luigi; Nesti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The total energy of any acceptable self-gravitating physical system has to be finite. In GR, the static gravitational potential of a self-gravitating body goes as 1/r at large distances and any slower decrease leads to infinite energy. In this work we show that in modified gravity theories the situation can be much different. We show that there exist spherically symmetric solutions with finite total energy, featuring an asymptotic behavior slower than 1/r and generically of the form r γ . This suggests that configurations with nonstandard asymptotics may well turn out to be physical. The effect is due to an extra field coupled only gravitationally, which allows for modifications of the static potential generated by matter, while counterbalancing the apparently infinite energy budget.

  7. Very Large Array H I Zeeman Observations of the Cygnus X Region: DR 22 and ON 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, E. A.; Troland, T. H.

    2012-02-01

    We have used the Very Large Array to study the Zeeman effect in 21 cm H I absorption lines from two star-forming regions in the Cygnus X complex, DR 22 and ON 2. We measure the line-of-sight magnetic field toward these regions, finding B los = -84 ± 11 μG toward the DR 22 H II region and B los < 50 μG toward each of the two H II regions in ON 2. We interpret these results in terms of two different models. In one model, we assume that the H I Zeeman effect is a measure of magnetic fields in the associated molecular clouds. If so, then the DR 22 molecular cloud is magnetically subcritical, that is, magnetically dominated. The ON 2 molecular clouds are magnetically supercritical. In a second model, we assume that the H I Zeeman effect is a measure of magnetic fields in photon-dominated regions where the gas has been compressed (and the field amplified) by absorption of stellar radiation. We find that this second model, where the measured field strength has been affected by star formation, accounts well for the DR 22 H I Zeeman effect. This same model, however, overpredicts the magnetic field in ON 2. ON 2 may be a region where the magnetic field is energetically insignificant or where the field happens to lie nearly in the plane of the sky.

  8. Zeeman structure of red lines of lanthanum observed by laser spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewski, Ł. M.; Windholz, L.; Kwela, J.

    2017-11-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) Spectroscopy and Optogalvanic (OG) Spectroscopy were used for the investigation of the Zeeman hyperfine (hf) structures of 27 spectral lines of La I in the wavelength range between 633.86 and 667.54 nm. As a source of free La atoms a hollow cathode discharge lamp was used. Spectra were recorded in the presence of a relatively weak magnetic field (about 800G) produced by a permanent magnet, for two linear polarization directions of the exciting laser beam. As a result of the measurements, we determined for the first time the Landé gJ- factors of 18 levels of La I. The Landé gJ- factors of 12 other levels were re-investigated and determined with higher accuracy.

  9. Trends in measurement of solar vector magnetic fields using the Zeeman effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Trends in spectropolarimetry as applied to the problem of Zeeman effect measurement are discussed. The use of detector arrays to improve observing efficiency is obtained. Which required new polarization modulation schemes that match the time required to read detector arrays. Another significant trend is narrowband filters, to improve angular and temporal coverage, and to Fourier transform spectrometers, to improve spectral coverage and precision. Low-polarization designs and improved methods for compensating instrumental polarization were developed. A requirement for high angular resolution suggests using adaptive optical devices to subdue the effects of bad seeing. The ultimate strategy to beat the seeing is to loft the telescope above the atmosphere such as is planned with a 30-cm telescope in 1985 and a 1250-cm telescope in 1990

  10. Trends in measurement of solar vector magnetic fields using the Zeeman effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Trends in spectropolarimetry as applied to the problem of Zeeman effect measurement are discussed. The use of detector arrays to improve observing efficiency is obtained. Which required new polarization modulation schemes that match the time required to read detector arrays. Another significant trend is narrowband filters, to improve angular and temporal coverage, and to Fourier transform spectrometers, to improve spectral coverage and precision. Low-polarization designs and improved methods for compensating instrumental polarization were developed. A requirement for high angular resolution suggests using adaptive optical devices to subdue the effects of bad seeing. The ultimate strategy to beat the seeing is to loft the telescope above the atmosphere such as is planned with a 30-cm telescope in 1985 and a 1250-cm telescope in 1990.

  11. First Application of the Zeeman Technique to Remotely Measure Auroral Electrojet Intensity From Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, J. H.; Gjerloev, J.; Wu, D.; Schwartz, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Using the O2 118 GHz spectral radiance measurements obtained by the Microwave Limb Sounder instrument on board the Aura spacecraft, we demonstrate that the Zeeman effect can be used to remotely measure the magnetic field perturbations produced by the auroral electrojet near the Hall current closure altitudes. Our derived current-induced magnetic field perturbations are found to be highly correlated with those coincidently obtained by ground magnetometers. These perturbations are also found to be linearly correlated with auroral electrojet strength. The statistically derived polar maps of our measured magnetic field perturbation reveal a spatial-temporal morphology consistent with that produced by the Hall current during substorms and storms. With today's technology, a constellation of compact, low-power, high spectral-resolution cubesats would have the capability to provide high precision and spatiotemporal magnetic field samplings needed for auroral electrojet measurements to gain insights into the spatiotemporal behavior of the auroral electrojet system.

  12. Experimental studies of a zeeman-tuned xenon laser differential absorption apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, G J

    1973-06-01

    A Zeeman-tuned cw xenon laser differential absorption device is described. The xenon laser was tuned by axial magnetic fields up to 5500 G generated by an unusually large water-cooled dc solenoid. Xenon laser lines at 3.37 micro, 3.51 micro, and 3.99 micro were tuned over ranges of 6 A, 6 A, and 11 A, respectively. To date, this apparatus has been used principally to study the details of formaldehyde absorption lines lying near the 3 .508-micro xenon laser transition. These experiments revealed that the observed absorption spectrum of formaldehyde exhibits a sufficiently unique spectral structure that the present technique may readily be used to measure relative concentrations of formaldehyde in samples of polluted air.

  13. High-fidelity state detection and tomography of a single-ion Zeeman qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keselman, A; Glickman, Y; Akerman, N; Kotler, S; Ozeri, R

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate high-fidelity Zeeman qubit state detection in a single trapped 88 Sr + ion. Qubit readout is performed by shelving one of the qubit states to a metastable level using a narrow linewidth diode laser at 674 nm, followed by state-selective fluorescence detection. The average fidelity reached for the readout of the qubit state is 0.9989(1). We then measure the fidelity of state tomography, averaged over all possible single-qubit states, which is 0.9979(2). We also fully characterize the detection process using quantum process tomography. This readout fidelity is compatible with recent estimates of the detection error threshold required for fault-tolerant computation, whereas high-fidelity state tomography opens the way for high-precision quantum process tomography.

  14. Theory of substrate, Zeeman, and electron-phonon interaction effects on the quantum capacitance in graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.; Sabeeh, K.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Shaukat, A.

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of graphene, a lot of interest has been attracted by the zeroth Landau level, which has no analog in the conventional two dimensional electron gas. Recently, lifting of the spin and valley degeneracies has been confirmed experimentally by capacitance measurements, while in transport experiments, this is difficult due to the scattering in the device. In this context, we model interaction effects on the quantum capacitance of graphene in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field, finding good agreement with experiments. We demonstrate that the valley degeneracy is lifted by the substrate and by Kekule distortion, whereas the spin degeneracy is lifted by Zeeman interaction. The two cases can be distinguished by capacitance measurements.

  15. Generalized Euler transformation for summing strongly divergent Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation series: the Zeeman effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    A generalized Euler transformation (GET) is introduced which provides a powerful alternative method of accurately summing strongly divergent Rayleigh-Schroedinger (RS) perturbation series when other summability methods fail or are difficult to apply. The GET is simple to implement and, unlike a number of other summation procedures, requires no a priori knowledge of the analytic properties of the function underlying the RS series. Application of the GET to the difficult problem of the RS weak-field ground-state eigenvalue series of the hydrogen atom in a magnetic field (quadratic Zeeman effect) yields sums of good accuracy over a very wide range of field strengths up to the most intense fields of 10 14 G. The GET results are compared with those obtained by other summing methods

  16. New hybrid non-linear transformations of divergent perturbation series for quadratic Zeeman effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkic, D.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of hydrogen atoms in an external uniform magnetic field (quadratic Zeeman effect) is studied by means of perturbation theory. The power series for the ground-state energy in terms of magnetic-field strength B is divergent. Nevertheless, it is possible to induce convergence of this divergent series by applying various non-linear transformations. These transformations of originally divergent perturbation series yield new sequences, which then converge. The induced convergence is, however, quite slow. A new hybrid Shanks-Levin non-linear transform is devised here for accelerating these slowly converging series and sequences. Significant improvement in the convergence rate is obtained. Agreement with the exact results is excellent. (author)

  17. High-fidelity state detection and tomography of a single-ion Zeeman qubit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keselman, A; Glickman, Y; Akerman, N; Kotler, S; Ozeri, R, E-mail: ozeri@weizmann.ac.il [Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2011-07-15

    We demonstrate high-fidelity Zeeman qubit state detection in a single trapped {sup 88}Sr{sup +} ion. Qubit readout is performed by shelving one of the qubit states to a metastable level using a narrow linewidth diode laser at 674 nm, followed by state-selective fluorescence detection. The average fidelity reached for the readout of the qubit state is 0.9989(1). We then measure the fidelity of state tomography, averaged over all possible single-qubit states, which is 0.9979(2). We also fully characterize the detection process using quantum process tomography. This readout fidelity is compatible with recent estimates of the detection error threshold required for fault-tolerant computation, whereas high-fidelity state tomography opens the way for high-precision quantum process tomography.

  18. Theory of substrate, Zeeman, and electron-phonon interaction effects on the quantum capacitance in graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2013-12-10

    Since the discovery of graphene, a lot of interest has been attracted by the zeroth Landau level, which has no analog in the conventional two dimensional electron gas. Recently, lifting of the spin and valley degeneracies has been confirmed experimentally by capacitance measurements, while in transport experiments, this is difficult due to the scattering in the device. In this context, we model interaction effects on the quantum capacitance of graphene in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field, finding good agreement with experiments. We demonstrate that the valley degeneracy is lifted by the substrate and by Kekule distortion, whereas the spin degeneracy is lifted by Zeeman interaction. The two cases can be distinguished by capacitance measurements.

  19. Ultra-narrow EIA spectra of 85Rb atom in a degenerate Zeeman multiplet system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Hafeez Ur; Qureshi, Muhammad Mohsin; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2015-05-01

    Ultra-narrow EIA spectral features of thermal 85Rb atom with respect to coupling Rabi frequencies in a degenerate Zeeman multiplet system have been unraveled in the cases of same (σ+ -σ+ , π ∥ π) and orthogonal (σ+ -σ- , π ⊥ π)polarization configurations. The EIA signals with subnatural linewidth of ~ 100 kHz even in the cases of same circular and linear polarizations of coupling and probe laser have been obtained for the first time theoretically and experimentally. In weak coupling power limit of orthogonal polarization configurations, time-dependent transfer of coherence plays major role in the splitting of the EIA spectra while in strong coupling power, Mollow triplet-like mechanism due to strong power bring into broad split feature. The experimental ultra-narrow EIA features using one laser combined with an AOM match well with simulated spectra obtained by using generalized time-dependent optical Bloch equations.

  20. Theory of substrate, Zeeman, and electron-phonon interaction effects on the quantum capacitance in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, M.; Sabeeh, K.; Shaukat, A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of graphene, a lot of interest has been attracted by the zeroth Landau level, which has no analog in the conventional two dimensional electron gas. Recently, lifting of the spin and valley degeneracies has been confirmed experimentally by capacitance measurements, while in transport experiments, this is difficult due to the scattering in the device. In this context, we model interaction effects on the quantum capacitance of graphene in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field, finding good agreement with experiments. We demonstrate that the valley degeneracy is lifted by the substrate and by Kekule distortion, whereas the spin degeneracy is lifted by Zeeman interaction. The two cases can be distinguished by capacitance measurements

  1. Enhancement of phase-conjugate reflectivity using Zeeman coherence in highly degenerate molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Nandini

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical analysis is developed for the vectorial phase conjugation using resonant four-wave mixing (FWM) in a highly degenerate rotational vibrational molecular system. The dynamic Stark shifts, saturation, and Doppler broadening are included for a realistic analysis. It is shown that the electromagnetically induced multilevel coherence controls the nonlinear wave mixing yielding interesting results for the phase conjugate (PC) reflectivity. It turns out that the efficiency of the PC reflectivity is decided by the relative phase of the Zeeman coherence and the population grating. When these two contributions are aligned in phase by a small detuning of the pump frequency, a large PC reflectivity (∼20%) is obtained with moderate pump intensity (∼500 mW/cm 2 ).

  2. Determination of ion temperatures from Zeeman broadened spectral lines in the edge of Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepper, C.C.; Isler, R.C.; Tobin, S.J.; Hogan, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Fusion Energy Div.; Hess, W.R. [Association EURATOM-CEA sur la Fusion Controlee, St-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache

    1994-09-01

    The authors have examined a {sup 3}P {yields} {sup 3}S multiplet of C III in Tore Supra in order to assess the possibility of determining the ion temperatures from transitions where the Zeeman effect cannot be neglected compared to the Doppler broadening. The preliminary studies lead them to believe that with good quality data the temperatures can be determined within about 20% in the 20--30 eV range and within about 50% in the neighborhood of 5 eV by fitting the entire multiplet rather than a semi-isolated feature, even though certain parameters important for the analysis, such as polarization effects of the optics, are not well characterized. In order to quantify these conclusions more precisely, future work will concentrate on developing numerical fitting routines and on examining the validity of the assumption that the distribution function for low ionization stages is Maxwellian.

  3. Determination of ion temperatures from Zeeman broadened spectral lines in the edge of Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, C.C.; Isler, R.C.; Tobin, S.J.; Hogan, J.T.; Hess, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have examined a 3 P → 3 S multiplet of C III in Tore Supra in order to assess the possibility of determining the ion temperatures from transitions where the Zeeman effect cannot be neglected compared to the Doppler broadening. The preliminary studies lead them to believe that with good quality data the temperatures can be determined within about 20% in the 20--30 eV range and within about 50% in the neighborhood of 5 eV by fitting the entire multiplet rather than a semi-isolated feature, even though certain parameters important for the analysis, such as polarization effects of the optics, are not well characterized. In order to quantify these conclusions more precisely, future work will concentrate on developing numerical fitting routines and on examining the validity of the assumption that the distribution function for low ionization stages is Maxwellian

  4. Spatiotemporal Evolution of Hanle and Zeeman Synthetic Polarization in a Chromospheric Spectral Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlin, E. S.; Bianda, M., E-mail: escarlin@irsol.es [Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno, 6600, Locarno, Switzerland, associated to USI, Università della Svizzera Italiana (Switzerland)

    2017-07-01

    Due to the quick evolution of the solar chromosphere, its magnetic field cannot be inferred reliably without accounting for the temporal variations of its polarized light. This has been broadly overlooked in the modeling and interpretation of the polarization, due to technical problems (e.g., lack of temporal resolution or of time-dependent MHD solar models) and/or because many polarization measurements can apparently be explained without dynamics. Here, we show that the temporal evolution is critical for explaining the spectral-line scattering polarization because of its sensitivity to rapidly varying physical quantities and the possibility of signal cancellations and attenuation during extended time integration. For studying the combined effect of time-varying magnetic fields and kinematics, we solved the 1.5D non-LTE problem of the second kind in time-dependent 3D R-MHD solar models and synthesized the Hanle and Zeeman polarization in forward scattering for the chromospheric λ 4227 line. We find that the quiet-Sun polarization amplitudes depend on the periodicity and spectral coherence of the signal enhancements produced by kinematics, but that substantially larger linear polarization signals should exist all over the solar disk for short integration times. The spectral morphology of the polarization is discussed as a combination of Hanle, Zeeman, partial redistribution and dynamic effects. We give physical references for observations by degrading and characterizing our slit time series in different spatiotemporal resolutions. The implications of our results for the interpretation of the second solar spectrum and for the investigation of the solar atmospheric heatings are discussed.

  5. Stellar magnetometry and Zeeman-Doppler imaging in exo-planets research using the radial velocity method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebrard, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    Forthcoming instruments dedicated to exo-planets detection through the radial velocity method are numerous, and increasingly more accurate. However this method is indirect: orbiting planets are detected and characterised from variations on the spectrum of the host star. We are therefore sensitive to all activity phenomena impacting the spectrum and producing a radial velocity signal (pulsation, granulation, spots, magnetic cycle...). The detection of rocky Earth-like planets around main-sequence stars, and of hot Jupiters into young systems, are currently limited by the intrinsic magnetic activity of the host stars. The radial velocity fluctuations caused by activity (activity jitter) can easily mimic and hide signals from such planets, whose amplitude is of a few m/s and hundreds of m/s, respectively. As a result, the detection threshold of exo-planets is largely set by the stellar activity level. Currently, efforts are invested to overcome this intrinsic limitation. During my PhD, I studied how to take advantage of imaging tomographic techniques (Zeeman-Doppler imaging, ZDI) to characterize stellar activity and magnetic field topologies, ultimately allowing us to filter out the activity jitter. My work is based on spectro-polarimetric observations of a sample of weakly-active M-dwarfs, and young active T Tauri stars. Using a modified version of ZDI, we are able to reconstruct the distribution of active regions, and then model the induced stellar signal allowing us to clean RV curves from the activity jitter. First tests demonstrate that this technique can be efficient enough to recover the planet signal, especially for the more active ones. (author)

  6. Pedestrian crowd dynamics in merging sections: Revisiting the ;faster-is-slower; phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahhoseini, Zahra; Sarvi, Majid; Saberi, Meead

    2018-02-01

    The study of the discharge of active or self-driven matter in narrow passages has become of the growing interest in a variety of fields. The question has particularly important practical applications for the safety of pedestrian human flows notably in emergency scenarios. It has been suggested predominantly through simulation in some theoretical studies as well as through few experimentations that under certain circumstances, an elevated vigour to escape may exacerbate the outflow and cause further delay although the experimental evidence is rather mixed. The dimensions of this complex phenomenon known as the "faster-is slower" effect are of crucial importance to be understood owing to its potential practical implications for the emergency management. The contextual requirements of observing this phenomenon are yet to be identified. It is not clear whether a "do not speed up" policy is universally beneficial and advisable in an evacuation scenario. Here for the first time we experimentally examine this phenomenon in relation to the pedestrian flows at merging sections as a common geometric feature of crowd egress. Various merging angles and three different speed regimes were examined in high-density laboratory experiments. The measurements of flow interruptions and egress efficiency all indicated that the pedestrians were discharged faster when moving at elevated speed levels. We also observed clear dependencies between the discharge rate and the physical layout of the merging with certain designs clearly outperforming others. But regardless of the design, we observed faster throughput and greater avalanche sizes when we instructed pedestrians to run. Our results give the suggestion that observation of the faster-is-slower effect may necessitate certain critical conditions including passages being overly narrow relative to the size of participles (pedestrians) to create long-lasting blockages. The faster-is-slower assumption may not be universal and there may be

  7. Slower lower limb blood pooling in young women with orthostatic intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenberger, Marcus; Länne, Toste

    2015-01-01

    What is the central question of this study? Orthostatic stress is mostly caused by venous blood pooling in the lower limbs. Venous distension elicits sympathetic responses, and increased distension speed enhances the cardiovascular response. We examine whether lower limb blood pooling rate during lower body negative pressure is linked to orthostatic intolerance. What is the main finding and its importance? A similar amount of blood was pooled in the lower limb, but at a slower rate in women who developed signs of orthostatic intolerance. The difference in blood pooling rate increased with orthostatic stress and was most prominent at a presyncope-inducing level of lower body negative pressure. The findings have implications for the pathophysiology as well as treatment of orthostatic intolerance. Vasovagal syncope is common in young women, but its aetiology remains elusive. Orthostatic stress-induced lower limb blood pooling is linked with central hypovolaemia and baroreceptor unloading. Venous distension in the arm elicits a sympathetic response, which is enhanced with more rapid distension. Our aim was to study both the amount and the speed of lower limb pooling during orthostatic stress and its effects on compensatory mechanisms to maintain cardiovascular homeostasis in women with orthostatic intolerance. Twenty-seven healthy women, aged 20-27 years, were subjected to a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) of 11-44 mmHg. Five women developed symptoms of vasovagal syncope (orthostatic intolerant) and were compared with the remaining women, who tolerated LBNP well (orthostatic tolerant). Lower limb blood pooling, blood flow and compensatory mobilization of venous capacitance blood were measured. Lower body negative pressure induced equal lower limb blood pooling in both groups, but at a slower rate in orthostatic intolerant women (e.g. time to 50% of total blood pooling, orthostatic intolerant 44 ± 7 s and orthostatic tolerant 26 ± 2 s; P intolerant women (P = 0

  8. Slower phloem transport in gymnosperm trees can be attributed to higher sieve element resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Windt, Carel; Bohr, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    resulted from theoretical modeling using a simple transport resistance model. Analysis of the model parameters clearly identified sieve element (SE) anatomy as the main factor for the significantly slower carbohydrate transport speed inside the phloem in gymnosperm compared with angiosperm trees. In order......In trees, carbohydrates produced in photosynthesizing leaves are transported to roots and other sink organs over distances of up to 100 m inside a specialized transport tissue, the phloem. Angiosperm and gymnosperm trees have a fundamentally different phloem anatomy with respect to cell size, shape...... and connectivity. Whether these differences have an effect on the physiology of carbohydrate transport, however, is not clear. A meta-analysis of the experimental data on phloem transport speed in trees yielded average speeds of 56 cm h−1 for angiosperm trees and 22 cm h−1 for gymnosperm trees. Similar values...

  9. Residents in difficulty—just slower learners? A case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Lotte; Norberg, Karen; Thomsen, Maria

    2014-01-01

    were matched for graduation year. Medical school exam failures, grades, completion time, and academic dispensations as predictors of case status were examined with conditional logistic regression. RESULTS In total 89 cases and 343 controls were identified. The total number of medical school re......-examinations and the time it took to complete medical school were significant individual predictors of subsequent difficulties (deceleration, transferral or dropout) in residency whereas average medical school grades were not. CONCLUSIONS Residents in difficulty eventually reached similar competence levels as controls...... during medical school; however, they needed more exam attempts and longer time to complete their studies, and so seemed to be slower learners. A change from “fixed-length variable-outcome programmes” to “fixed-outcome variable-length programmes” has been proposed as a way of dealing with the fact...

  10. Comparing Zeeman qubits to hyperfine qubits in the context of the surface code: +174Yb and +171Yb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Natalie C.; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2018-05-01

    Many systems used for quantum computing possess additional states beyond those defining the qubit. Leakage out of the qubit subspace must be considered when designing quantum error correction codes. Here we consider trapped ion qubits manipulated by Raman transitions. Zeeman qubits do not suffer from leakage errors but are sensitive to magnetic fields to first order. Hyperfine qubits can be encoded in clock states that are insensitive to magnetic fields to first order, but spontaneous scattering during the Raman transition can lead to leakage. Here we compare a Zeeman qubit (+174Yb) to a hyperfine qubit (+171Yb) in the context of the surface code. We find that the number of physical qubits required to reach a specific logical qubit error can be reduced by using +174Yb if the magnetic field can be stabilized with fluctuations smaller than 10 μ G .

  11. Phase control of a Zeeman-split He-Ne gas laser by variation of the gaseous discharge voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, W N; Hunt, R H

    1992-07-20

    Zeeman-split lasers are useful for precise positioning or motion control. In applications that employ such a laser to control closely the position of a moving system, phase noise in the Zeeman frequency is a serious problem. Control of low-frequency phase noise can be obtained through variation of the external magnetic field by way of a solenoid wound around the laser tube. It is the finding in this work that control of the residual higher-frequency noise of a He-Ne laser can be obtained through small variations of the high voltage that is used to effect the gaseous discharge in the laser tube. The application of the present system is to the control of the path difference in a Fourier-transform interferometric spectrometer.

  12. Performance of the Zeeman analyzer system of the McDonald Observatory 2.7 meter telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, S. S.; Tull, R. G.; Kelton, P. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes a multichannel photoelectric Zeeman analyzer at the coude spectrograph of the McDonald 2.7 m reflector. A comparison of Lick and McDonald observations of HD 153882 reveals no significant difference in slopes or zero points of the two magnetic fields indicating that the systematic scale difference of 30-40% is probably instrumental in origin. Observations of the magnetic variable beta Cor Bor revealed a more nearly sinusoidal magnetic curve with less internal scatter than the photographically determined field measures of the Lick and Mauna Kea Zeeman systems. Investigation of periodicity in the secularly varying magnetic minima of beta Cor Bor did not yield evidence of previously noted periodicities other than that expected from the time structure of the data sampling.

  13. Electromagnetically induced transparency in a Zeeman-sublevels Λ-system of cold 87Rb atoms in free space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xiaojun; Zhang Haichao; Wang Yuzhu

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental investigation of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a Zeeman-sublevels Λ-type system of cold 87 Rb atoms in free space. We use the Zeeman substates of the hyperfine energy states 5 2 S 1/2 , F = 2 and 5 2 P 3/2 , F′ = 2 of 87 Rb D 2 line to form a Λ-type EIT scheme. The EIT signal is obtained by scanning the probe light over 1 MHz in 4 ms with an 80 MHz arbitrary waveform generator. More than 97% transparency and 100 kHz EIT window are observed. This EIT scheme is suited for an application of pulsed coherent storage atom clock (Yan B, et al. 2009 Phys. Rev. A 79 063820). (paper)

  14. Preterm newborns show slower repair of oxidative damage and paternal smoking associated DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Loock, Kim; Ciardelli, Roberta; Decordier, Ilse; Plas, Gina; Haumont, Dominique; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline

    2012-09-01

    Newborns have to cope with hypoxia during delivery and a sudden increase in oxygen at birth. Oxygen will partly be released as reactive oxygen species having the potential to cause damage to DNA and proteins. In utero, increase of most (non)-enzymatic antioxidants occurs during last weeks of gestation, making preterm neonates probably more sensitive to oxidative stress. Moreover, it has been hypothesized that oxidative stress might be the common etiological factor for certain neonatal diseases in preterm infants. The aim of this study was to assess background DNA damage; in vitro H(2)O(2) induced oxidative DNA damage and repair capacity (residual DNA damage) in peripheral blood mononucleated cells from 25 preterm newborns and their mothers. In addition, demographic data were taken into account and repair capacity of preterm was compared with full-term newborns. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that preterm infants from smoking fathers have higher background DNA damage levels than those from non-smoking fathers, emphasizing the risk of paternal smoking behaviour for the progeny. Significantly higher residual DNA damage found after 15-min repair in preterm children compared to their mothers and higher residual DNA damage after 2 h compared to full-term newborns suggest a slower DNA repair capacity in preterm children. In comparison with preterm infants born by caesarean delivery, preterm infants born by vaginal delivery do repair more slowly the in vitro induced oxidative DNA damage. Final impact of passive smoking and of the slower DNA repair activity of preterm infants need to be confirmed in a larger study population combining transgenerational genetic and/or epigenetic effects, antioxidant levels, genotypes, repair enzyme efficiency/levels and infant morbidity.

  15. Zeeman perturbed nuclear quadrupole spin echo envelope modulations for spin 3/2 nuclei in polycrystalline specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, R.; Narasimhan, P. T.

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies of Zeeman-perturbed nuclear quadrupole spin echo envelope modulations (ZSEEM) for spin 3/2 nuclei in polycrystalline specimens are presented. The response of the Zeeman-perturbed spin ensemble to resonant two pulse excitations has been calculated using the density matrix formalism. The theoretical calculation assumes a parallel orientation of the external r.f. and static Zeeman fields and an arbitrary orientation of these fields to the principal axes system of the electric field gradient. A numerical powder averaging procedure has been adopted to simulate the response of the polycrystalline specimens. Using a coherent pulsed nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer the ZSEEM patterns of the 35Cl nuclei have been recorded in polycrystalline specimens of potassium chlorate, barium chlorate, mercuric chloride (two sites) and antimony trichloride (two sites) using the π/2-τ-π/2 sequence. The theoretical and experimental ZSEEM patterns have been compared. In the case of mercuric chloride, the experimental 35Cl ZSEEM patterns are found to be nearly identical for the two sites and correspond to a near-zero value of the asymmetry parameter, η, of the electric field gradient tensor. The difference in the η values for the two 35Cl sites (η ˜0·06 and η˜0·16) in antimony trichloride is clearly reflected in the experimental and theoretical ZSEEM patterns. The present study indicates the feasibility of evaluating η for spin 3/2 nuclei in polycrystalline specimens from ZSEEM investigations.

  16. FIRST ZEEMAN DOPPLER IMAGING OF A COOL STAR USING ALL FOUR STOKES PARAMETERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosén, L.; Kochukhov, O.; Wade, G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fields are ubiquitous in active cool stars, but they are in general complex and weak. Current Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI) studies of cool star magnetic fields chiefly employ circular polarization observations because linear polarization is difficult to detect and requires a more sophisticated radiative transfer modeling to interpret. But it has been shown in previous theoretical studies, and in the observational analyses of magnetic Ap stars, that including linear polarization in the magnetic inversion process makes it possible to correctly recover many otherwise lost or misinterpreted magnetic features. We have obtained phase-resolved observations in all four Stokes parameters of the RS CVn star II Peg at two separate epochs. Here we present temperature and magnetic field maps reconstructed for this star using all four Stokes parameters. This is the very first such ZDI study of a cool active star. Our magnetic inversions reveal a highly structured magnetic field topology for both epochs. The strength of some surface features is doubled or even quadrupled when linear polarization is taken into account. The total magnetic energy of the reconstructed field map also becomes about 2.1–3.5 times higher. The overall complexity is also increased as the field energy is shifted toward higher harmonic modes when four Stokes parameters are used. As a consequence, the potential field extrapolation of the four Stokes parameter ZDI results indicates that magnetic field becomes weaker at a distance of several stellar radii due to a decrease of the large-scale field component

  17. Aperture synthesis observations of the 21 centimeter Zeeman effect toward Orion A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troland, T.H.; Heiles, C.; Goss, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    The VLA has been used to map the 21 cm Zeeman effect at 40 arcsec resolution in the absorbing H I gas in front of Orion A. Two such regions exist having typical velocities of 1 and 5 km/s; both almost certainly lie close to the H II region. Field strengths exceed 100 micro G in this H I gas. The field in the higher velocity component has been reliably detected across most of the continuum source. No field reversals exist. The distribution of line-of-sight field strengths derived for this component mimics that of tau(H I) for positions where the lines are not saturated, suggesting that the mass-to-flux ratio in this gas is approximately constant. The distribution of visual extinction across Orion A using existing radio and optical data is rederived. Maxima and minima of extinction are generally coincident with maxima and minima of magnetic field. This correspondence suggests that the observed association between field strength and tau(H I) is a real column density effect, that the effect encompasses all neutral gas in front of the source, and that the mass-to-flux ratio for this neutral gas is approximately constant. Results for Orion A lend weight to the conclusion that magnetic fields play a crucial role in the dynamics of interstellar material. 48 references

  18. A study of nuclear relaxation to the electron non-Zeeman system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honten, J. van.

    1979-01-01

    An examination of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation mechanism in a series of diluted copper-caesium Tutton salt crystals, containing different percentages of D 2 O in the waters of hydration, is described. Results of relaxation measurements are presented and a strong angular dependence is observed. It is proved, however, that under most experimental conditions applied, the bottleneck in the relaxation path is not the cross-relaxation but the thermal contact between the proton Zeeman system and the electron dipole-dipole interaction system. Hence the proton spin-lattice relaxation measurements have enabled determination of the time constant of this thermal contact. The microscopic coupling process which provides thermal contact, is a simultaneous transition of two electron spins and one proton spin. This so-called three-spin transition is described and calculations presented. Double resonance experiments are performed, where the resonance signal of deuterium or caesium spins is saturated and the effect on the proton resonance signal observed. (C.F.)

  19. Oxygen Uptake Kinetics Is Slower in Swimming Than Arm Cranking and Cycling during Heavy Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana; Borrani, Fabio; Rodríguez, Ferran A.; Millet, Grégoire P.

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen uptake (V·O2) kinetics has been reported to be influenced by the activity mode. However, only few studies have compared V·O2 kinetics between activities in the same subjects in which they were equally trained. Therefore, this study compared the V·O2 kinetics response to swimming, arm cranking, and cycling within the same group of subjects within the heavy exercise intensity domain. Ten trained male triathletes (age 23.2 ± 4.5 years; height 180.8 ± 8.3 cm; weight 72.3 ± 6.6 kg) completed an incremental test to exhaustion and a 6-min heavy constant-load test in the three exercise modes in random order. Gas exchange was measured by a breath-by-breath analyzer and the on-transient V·O2 kinetics was modeled using bi-exponential functions. V·O2peak was higher in cycling (65.6 ± 4.0 ml·kg−1·min−1) than in arm cranking or swimming (48.7 ± 8.0 and 53.0 ± 6.7 ml·kg−1·min−1; P kinetics were slower in swimming (τ1 = 31.7 ± 6.2 s) than in arm cranking (19.3 ± 4.2 s; P = 0.001) and cycling (12.4 ± 3.7 s; P = 0.001). The amplitude of the primary component was lower in both arm cranking and swimming (21.9 ± 4.7 and 28.4 ± 5.1 ml·kg−1·min−1) compared with cycling (39.4 ± 4.1 ml·kg−1·min−1; P = 0.001). Although the gain of the primary component was higher in arm cranking compared with cycling (15.3 ± 4.2 and 10.7 ± 1.3 ml·min−1·W−1; P = 0.02), the slow component amplitude, in both absolute and relative terms, did not differ between exercise modes. The slower V·O2 kinetics during heavy-intensity swimming is exercise-mode dependent. Besides differences in muscle mass and greater type II muscle fibers recruitment, the horizontal position adopted and the involvement of trunk and lower-body stabilizing muscles could be additional mechanisms that explain the differences between exercise modalities. PMID:28919863

  20. Slower resting alpha frequency is associated with superior localisation of moving targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Christina J; Arnold, Craig P A; Belmonte, Matthew K

    2017-10-01

    We examined the neurophysiological underpinnings of individual differences in the ability to maintain up-to-date representations of the positions of moving objects. In two experiments similar to the multiple object tracking (MOT) task, we asked observers to monitor continuously one or several targets as they moved unpredictably for a semi-random period. After all objects disappeared, observers were immediately prompted to report the perceived final position of one queried target. Precision of these position reports declined with attentional load, and reports tended to best resemble positions occupied by the queried target between 0 and 30ms in the past. Measurement of event-related potentials showed a contralateral delay activity over occipital scalp, maximal in the right hemisphere. The peak power-spectral frequency of observers' eyes-closed resting occipital alpha oscillations reliably predicted performance, such that lower-frequency alpha was associated with superior spatial localisation. Slower resting alpha might be associated with a cognitive style that depends less on memory-related processing and instead emphasises attention to changing stimuli. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Revisit the faster-is-slower effect for an exit at a corner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun Min; Lin, Peng; Wu, Fan Yu; Li Gao, Dong; Wang, Guo Yuan

    2018-02-01

    The faster-is-slower effect (FIS), which means that crowd at a high enough velocity could significantly increase the evacuation time to escape through an exit, is an interesting phenomenon in pedestrian dynamics. Such phenomenon had been studied widely and has been experimentally verified in different systems of discrete particles flowing through a centre exit. To experimentally validate this phenomenon by using people under high pressure is difficult due to ethical issues. A mouse, similar to a human, is a kind of self-driven and soft body creature with competitive behaviour under stressed conditions. Therefore, mice are used to escape through an exit at a corner. A number of repeated tests are conducted and the average escape time per mouse at different levels of stimulus are analysed. The escape times do not increase obviously with the level of stimulus for the corner exit, which is contrary to the experiment with the center exit. The experimental results show that the FIS effect is not necessary a universal law for any discrete system. The observation could help the design of buildings by relocating their exits to the corner in rooms to avoid the formation of FIS effect.

  2. Slower phloem transport in gymnosperm trees can be attributed to higher sieve element resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesche, Johannes; Windt, Carel; Bohr, Tomas; Schulz, Alexander; Jensen, Kaare H

    2015-04-01

    In trees, carbohydrates produced in photosynthesizing leaves are transported to roots and other sink organs over distances of up to 100 m inside a specialized transport tissue, the phloem. Angiosperm and gymnosperm trees have a fundamentally different phloem anatomy with respect to cell size, shape and connectivity. Whether these differences have an effect on the physiology of carbohydrate transport, however, is not clear. A meta-analysis of the experimental data on phloem transport speed in trees yielded average speeds of 56 cm h(-1) for angiosperm trees and 22 cm h(-1) for gymnosperm trees. Similar values resulted from theoretical modeling using a simple transport resistance model. Analysis of the model parameters clearly identified sieve element (SE) anatomy as the main factor for the significantly slower carbohydrate transport speed inside the phloem in gymnosperm compared with angiosperm trees. In order to investigate the influence of SE anatomy on the hydraulic resistance, anatomical data on SEs and sieve pores were collected by transmission electron microscopy analysis and from the literature for 18 tree species. Calculations showed that the hydraulic resistance is significantly higher in the gymnosperm than in angiosperm trees. The higher resistance is only partially offset by the considerably longer SEs of gymnosperms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Previous hepatitis a virus infection is related to slower psychomotor speed in elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cheng-Fang; Liu, Ching-Kuan; Fang, Tzu-Jung; Yu, Yau-Hua; Lai, Chiou-Lian; Kuo, Hsu-Ko

    2009-10-01

    Patients with chronic viral hepatitis are at a higher risk for cognitive dysfunction. Little is known about the association between hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection and cognitive function. From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2002, we selected study participants (> or =60 years, n = 1,529) without hepatitis B, C, or D virus infection; without previous hepatitis A vaccination; and without abnormal liver function. HAV-seropositive participants represented people with previous HAV infection. Psychomotor speed and executive functioning domain of cognitive function were measured by the Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST). HAV-seropositive participants had lower DSST scores than HAV-seronegative participants (weighted mean, 44.4 vs 53.9, p a multivariable model, the weighted adjusted beta coefficient of DSST score was -2.48 (95% CI -2.49 to -2.46, p < .001) for the HAV-seropositive participants. HAV seropositivity is associated with slower psychomotor speed among the U.S. community-dwelling elders.

  4. VERY LARGE ARRAY OH ZEEMAN OBSERVATIONS OF THE STAR-FORMING REGION S88B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarma, A. P.; Eftimova, M. [Physics Department, DePaul University, 2219 N. Kenmore Ave., Byrne Hall 211, Chicago, IL 60614 (United States); Brogan, C. L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Bourke, T. L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Troland, T. H., E-mail: asarma@depaul.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    We present observations of the Zeeman effect in OH thermal absorption main lines at 1665 and 1667 MHz taken with the Very Large Array toward the star-forming region S88B. The OH absorption profiles toward this source are complicated, and contain several blended components toward a number of positions. Almost all of the OH absorbing gas is located in the eastern parts of S88B, toward the compact continuum source S88B-2 and the eastern parts of the extended continuum source S88B-1. The ratio of 1665/1667 MHz OH line intensities indicates the gas is likely highly clumped, in agreement with other molecular emission line observations in the literature. S88-B appears to present a similar geometry to the well-known star-forming region M17, in that there is an edge-on eastward progression from ionized to molecular gas. The detected magnetic fields appear to mirror this eastward transition; we detected line-of-sight magnetic fields ranging from 90 to 400 {mu}G, with the lowest values of the field to the southwest of the S88B-1 continuum peak, and the highest values to its northeast. We used the detected fields to assess the importance of the magnetic field in S88B by a number of methods; we calculated the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressures, we calculated the critical field necessary to completely support the cloud against self-gravity and compared it to the observed field, and we calculated the ratio of mass to magnetic flux in terms of the critical value of this parameter. All these methods indicated that the magnetic field in S88B is dynamically significant, and should provide an important source of support against gravity. Moreover, the magnetic energy density is in approximate equipartition with the turbulent energy density, again pointing to the importance of the magnetic field in this region.

  5. VERY LARGE ARRAY OH ZEEMAN OBSERVATIONS OF THE STAR-FORMING REGION S88B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, A. P.; Eftimova, M.; Brogan, C. L.; Bourke, T. L.; Troland, T. H.

    2013-01-01

    We present observations of the Zeeman effect in OH thermal absorption main lines at 1665 and 1667 MHz taken with the Very Large Array toward the star-forming region S88B. The OH absorption profiles toward this source are complicated, and contain several blended components toward a number of positions. Almost all of the OH absorbing gas is located in the eastern parts of S88B, toward the compact continuum source S88B-2 and the eastern parts of the extended continuum source S88B-1. The ratio of 1665/1667 MHz OH line intensities indicates the gas is likely highly clumped, in agreement with other molecular emission line observations in the literature. S88-B appears to present a similar geometry to the well-known star-forming region M17, in that there is an edge-on eastward progression from ionized to molecular gas. The detected magnetic fields appear to mirror this eastward transition; we detected line-of-sight magnetic fields ranging from 90 to 400 μG, with the lowest values of the field to the southwest of the S88B-1 continuum peak, and the highest values to its northeast. We used the detected fields to assess the importance of the magnetic field in S88B by a number of methods; we calculated the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressures, we calculated the critical field necessary to completely support the cloud against self-gravity and compared it to the observed field, and we calculated the ratio of mass to magnetic flux in terms of the critical value of this parameter. All these methods indicated that the magnetic field in S88B is dynamically significant, and should provide an important source of support against gravity. Moreover, the magnetic energy density is in approximate equipartition with the turbulent energy density, again pointing to the importance of the magnetic field in this region.

  6. Slower eating rate is independent to gastric emptying in obese minipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val-Laillet, D; Guérin, S; Malbert, C H

    2010-11-02

    The aim of our study was to investigate whether the altered eating behavior observed in the context of a diet-induced metabolic syndrome is related to changes of the gastric emptying and autonomic balance. Eight adult male Göttingen minipigs were subjected during 5months to ad libitum Western diet (WD). Several factors were compared between the lean (before WD) and obese conditions: general activity and eating behavior, gastric emptying, adiposity, glycemia and insulinemia during IVGTT, and heart rate variability (HRV). In our model, obesity did not alter the gastric emptying (258±26 vs. 256±14 min, P>0.10) but induced insulin resistance: increased basal insulinemia (12.6±0.8 to 36.6±6.1 mU/l, P5E-4±0.7E-4 to 2.5E-4±0.2E-4 min(-1) per mU.l(-1) of insulin, P0.10). Fed ad libitum with WD, animals overate durably (P<0.001). During a 30-min meal test though, the ingestion speed, the food ingested (1076±48 vs. 520±52 g) and energy intake decreased in the obese condition (P<0.05), which can be explained by the fragmentation of the daily caloric intake. These data suggest that the slower eating rate and increased number of meals observed in obese minipigs without neuropathy is independent to gastric emptying. The explanation may be sought rather in central modifications induced by obesity that might modify the food perception and/or motivation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hepatitis C virus infection may lead to slower emergence of P. falciparum in blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odile Ouwe-Missi-Oukem-Boyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Areas endemic for Plasmodium falciparum, hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV overlap in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa. HBV and HCV infections develop in the liver, where takes place the first development stage of P. falciparum before its further spread in blood. The complex mechanisms involved in the development of hepatitis may potentially influence the development of the liver stage of malaria parasites. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of these interactions could provide new pathophysiological insights for treatment strategies in Malaria. METHODOLOGY: We studied a cohort of 319 individuals living in a village where the three infections are prevalent. The patients were initially given a curative antimalarial treatment and were then monitored for the emergence of asexual P. falciparum forms in blood, fortnightly for one year, by microscopy and polymerase chain reaction. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: At inclusion, 65 (20.4% subjects had detectable malaria parasites in blood, 36 (11.3% were HBV chronic carriers, and 61 (18.9% were HCV chronic carriers. During follow-up, asexual P. falciparum forms were detected in the blood of 203 patients. The median time to P. falciparum emergence in blood was respectively 140 and 120 days in HBV- and HBV+ individuals, and 135 and 224 days in HCV- and HCV+ individuals. HCV carriage was associated with delayed emergence of asexual P. falciparum forms in blood relative to patients without HCV infection. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study represents first tentative evidence of a potential epidemiological interaction between HBV, HCV and P. falciparum infections. Age is an important confounding factor in this setting however multivariate analysis points to an interaction between P. falciparum and HCV at the hepatic level with a slower emergence of P. falciparum in HCV chronic carriers. More in depth analysis are necessary to unravel the basis of hepatic interactions between these two pathogens

  8. Slower Perception Followed by Faster Lexical Decision in Longer Words: A Diffusion Model Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganian, Yulia; Froehlich, Eva; Schlickeiser, Ulrike; Hofmann, Markus J; Heekeren, Hauke R; Jacobs, Arthur M

    2015-01-01

    Effects of stimulus length on reaction times (RTs) in the lexical decision task are the topic of extensive research. While slower RTs are consistently found for longer pseudo-words, a finding coined the word length effect (WLE), some studies found no effects for words, and yet others reported faster RTs for longer words. Moreover, the WLE depends on the orthographic transparency of a language, with larger effects in more transparent orthographies. Here we investigate processes underlying the WLE in lexical decision in German-English bilinguals using a diffusion model (DM) analysis, which we compared to a linear regression approach. In the DM analysis, RT-accuracy distributions are characterized using parameters that reflect latent sub-processes, in particular evidence accumulation and decision-independent perceptual encoding, instead of typical parameters such as mean RT and accuracy. The regression approach showed a decrease in RTs with length for pseudo-words, but no length effect for words. However, DM analysis revealed that the null effect for words resulted from opposing effects of length on perceptual encoding and rate of evidence accumulation. Perceptual encoding times increased with length for words and pseudo-words, whereas the rate of evidence accumulation increased with length for real words but decreased for pseudo-words. A comparison between DM parameters in German and English suggested that orthographic transparency affects perceptual encoding, whereas effects of length on evidence accumulation are likely to reflect contextual information and the increase in available perceptual evidence with length. These opposing effects may account for the inconsistent findings on WLEs.

  9. Accurate 3He polarimetry using the Rb Zeeman frequency shift due to the Rb-3He spin-exchange collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romalis, M.V.; Cates, G.D.

    1998-01-01

    We describe a method of 3 He polarimetry relying on the polarization-dependent frequency shift of the Rb Zeeman resonance. Our method is ideally suited for on-line measurements of the 3 He polarization produced by spin-exchange optical pumping. To calibrate the frequency shift we performed an accurate measurement of the imaginary part of the Rb- 3 He spin-exchange cross section in the temperature range typical for spin-exchange optical pumping of 3 He. We also present a detailed study of possible systematic errors in the frequency shift polarimetry. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  10. Age-Related Imbalance Is Associated With Slower Walking Speed: An Analysis From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yanjun J; Liu, Elizabeth Y; Anson, Eric R; Agrawal, Yuri

    Walking speed is an important dimension of gait function and is known to decline with age. Gait function is a process of dynamic balance and motor control that relies on multiple sensory inputs (eg, visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular) and motor outputs. These sensory and motor physiologic systems also play a role in static postural control, which has been shown to decline with age. In this study, we evaluated whether imbalance that occurs as part of healthy aging is associated with slower walking speed in a nationally representative sample of older adults. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the previously collected 1999 to 2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data to evaluate whether age-related imbalance is associated with slower walking speed in older adults aged 50 to 85 years (n = 2116). Balance was assessed on a pass/fail basis during a challenging postural task-condition 4 of the modified Romberg Test-and walking speed was determined using a 20-ft (6.10 m) timed walk. Multivariable linear regression was used to evaluate the association between imbalance and walking speed, adjusting for demographic and health-related covariates. A structural equation model was developed to estimate the extent to which imbalance mediates the association between age and slower walking speed. In the unadjusted regression model, inability to perform the NHANES balance task was significantly associated with 0.10 m/s slower walking speed (95% confidence interval: -0.13 to -0.07; P imbalance mediates 12.2% of the association between age and slower walking speed in older adults. In a nationally representative sample, age-related balance limitation was associated with slower walking speed. Balance impairment may lead to walking speed declines. In addition, reduced static postural control and dynamic walking speed that occur with aging may share common etiologic origins, including the decline in visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular sensory and

  11. Ultrasound-assisted extraction technique for establishing selenium contents in breast cancer biopsies by Zeeman-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using multi-injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavilla, I.; Mosquera, A.; Millos, J.; Cameselle, J.; Bendicho, C.

    2006-01-01

    A solid-liquid extraction method is developed to establish the contents of selenium in breast cancer biopsies. The method is based on the ultrasound-assisted extraction of selenium from pretreated biopsies prior to Se determination by atomic absorption spectrometry with longitudinal-Zeeman background correction. Fifty-one breast biopsies were collected from the Cies Hospital (Vigo, Spain), 32 of which correspond to tumor tissue and 19 to normal tissue (parenchyma). Difficulties arising from the samples analyzed, i.e. small samples mass (50-100 mg), extremely low Se contents and sample texture modification including tissue hardening due to formaldehyde preservation are addressed and overcome. High intensity sonication using a probe together with addition of hydrogen peroxide succeeded in completely extracting Se from biopsies. The multiple injection technique was useful to tackle the low Se contents present in some biopsies. The detection limit was 25 ng g -1 of Se and the precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, was less than 10%. Se contents ranged from 0.08 to 0.4 μg g -1 for parenchyma samples and from 0.09 to 0.8 μg g -1 for tumor samples. In general, Se levels in tumor biopsies were higher as compared with the adjacent normal tissue in 19 patients by a factor of up to 6. Analytical data confirmed Se accumulation in the breast tumors

  12. Numerical simulation of a high-brightness lithium ion gun for a Zeeman polarimetry on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Atsushi; Kamiya, Kensaku; Fujita, Takaaki; Kamada, Yutaka; Iguchi, Harukazu

    2007-01-01

    A lithium ion gun is under construction for a lithium beam Zeeman polarimetry on JT-60U. The performance of the prototype ion gun has been estimated by the numerical simulation taking the space charge effects into account. The target values of the ion gun are the beam energy of 30 keV, the beam current of 10 mA and the beam divergence angle within 0.13 degrees. The low divergence of 0.13 degrees is required for the geometry of the Zeeman polarimetry on JT-60U where the observation area is 6.5 m away from the neutralizer. The numerical simulation needs to be carried out for the design study because the requirement of the divergence angle is severe for the development of the high-brightness ion gun. The simulation results show the beam loss of 50% caused by the clash to the electrode such as the cathode and the neutralizer. Moreover, the beam transport efficiency from the neutralizer to the observation area is low due to the broadening of the divergence angle. The total beam efficiency is about 5%. Extracted beam profile affects the beam focusing and the efficiency. The peaked profile achieves better efficiency than the hollow one. As a result, beam current of 1 mA is obtained at the observation area by the simulation for the prototype ion gun. (author)

  13. The Transfer of Resonance Line Polarization with Partial Frequency Redistribution in the General Hanle–Zeeman Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, E. Alsina; Bueno, J. Trujillo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Belluzzi, L., E-mail: ealsina@iac.es [Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno, CH-6605 Locarno Monti (Switzerland)

    2017-02-10

    The spectral line polarization encodes a wealth of information about the thermal and magnetic properties of the solar atmosphere. Modeling the Stokes profiles of strong resonance lines is, however, a complex problem both from a theoretical and computational point of view, especially when partial frequency redistribution (PRD) effects need to be taken into account. In this work, we consider a two-level atom in the presence of magnetic fields of arbitrary intensity (Hanle–Zeeman regime) and orientation, both deterministic and micro-structured. Working within the framework of a rigorous PRD theoretical approach, we have developed a numerical code that solves the full non-LTE radiative transfer problem for polarized radiation, in one-dimensional models of the solar atmosphere, accounting for the combined action of the Hanle and Zeeman effects, as well as for PRD phenomena. After briefly discussing the relevant equations, we describe the iterative method of solution of the problem and the numerical tools that we have developed and implemented. We finally present some illustrative applications to two resonance lines that form at different heights in the solar atmosphere, and provide a detailed physical interpretation of the calculated Stokes profiles. We find that magneto-optical effects have a strong impact on the linear polarization signals that PRD effects produce in the wings of strong resonance lines. We also show that the weak-field approximation has to be used with caution when PRD effects are considered.

  14. Effects of a laser beam profile on Zeeman electromagnetically induced transparency in the Rb buffer gas cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolić, S N; Radonjić, M; Krmpot, A J; Lučić, N M; Zlatković, B V; Jelenković, B M

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) due to Zeeman coherences in the Rb buffer gas cell is studied for different laser beam profiles, laser beam radii and intensities from 0.1 to 10 mW cm −2 . EIT line shapes can be approximated by the Lorentzian for wide Gaussian laser beam (6.5 mm in diameter) if laser intensity is weak and for a Π laser beam profile of the same diameter. Line shapes of EIT become non-Lorentzian for the Gaussian laser beam if it is narrow (1.3 mm in diameter) or if it has a higher intensity. EIT amplitudes and linewidths, for both laser beam profiles of the same diameter, have very similar behaviour regarding laser intensity and Rb cell temperature. EIT amplitudes are maximal at a certain laser beam intensity and this intensity is higher for narrower laser beams. The EIT linewidth estimated at zero laser intensity is about 50 nT or 0.7 kHz, which refers to 1.5 ms relaxation times of Zeeman coherences in 87 Rb atoms in our buffer gas cell. Blocking of the centre of the wide Gaussian laser beam in front of the photo detector yields Lorentzian profiles with a much better contrast to the linewidth ratio for EIT at higher intensities, above ∼2 mW cm −2 . (paper)

  15. Determination of serum aluminum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: A comparison between Zeeman and continuum background correction systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Pamela C. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, P.O. Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Parsons, Patrick J. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, P.O. Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Lead Poisoning/Trace Elements Laboratory, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, P.O. Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States)], E-mail: patrick.parsons@wadsworth.org

    2007-03-15

    Excessive exposure to aluminum (Al) can produce serious health consequences in people with impaired renal function, especially those undergoing hemodialysis. Al can accumulate in the brain and in bone, causing dialysis-related encephalopathy and renal osteodystrophy. Thus, dialysis patients are routinely monitored for Al overload, through measurement of their serum Al. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is widely used for serum Al determination. Here, we assess the analytical performances of three ETAAS instruments, equipped with different background correction systems and heating arrangements, for the determination of serum Al. Specifically, we compare (1) a Perkin Elmer (PE) Model 3110 AAS, equipped with a longitudinally (end) heated graphite atomizer (HGA) and continuum-source (deuterium) background correction, with (2) a PE Model 4100ZL AAS equipped with a transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) and longitudinal Zeeman background correction, and (3) a PE Model Z5100 AAS equipped with a HGA and transverse Zeeman background correction. We were able to transfer the method for serum Al previously established for the Z5100 and 4100ZL instruments to the 3110, with only minor modifications. As with the Zeeman instruments, matrix-matched calibration was not required for the 3110 and, thus, aqueous calibration standards were used. However, the 309.3-nm line was chosen for analysis on the 3110 due to failure of the continuum background correction system at the 396.2-nm line. A small, seemingly insignificant overcorrection error was observed in the background channel on the 3110 instrument at the 309.3-nm line. On the 4100ZL, signal oscillation was observed in the atomization profile. The sensitivity, or characteristic mass (m{sub 0}), for Al at the 309.3-nm line on the 3110 AAS was found to be 12.1 {+-} 0.6 pg, compared to 16.1 {+-} 0.7 pg for the Z5100, and 23.3 {+-} 1.3 pg for the 4100ZL at the 396.2-nm line. However, the instrumental detection

  16. Chromium, lead and cadmium in Danish milk products and cheese determined by Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after direct injection or pressurised ashing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Rasmussen, L.

    1991-01-01

    -degrees-C and then further ashed at 1 100-degrees-C with argon as the purge gas. Zeeman background correction was used in the atomisation step at 2 300-degrees-C. The detection limit was 0.7 ng/g. Direct detection of chromium in milk, using only argon as purge gas, was inferior. Non-homogeneous and solid...

  17. Determination of total selenium in nutritional supplements and selenised yeast by Zeeman-effect graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Ekelund, J.

    1989-01-01

    A method for the determination of total selenium in nutritional supplements and selenised yeast is described. The samples were ashed in nitric acid. Hydrochloric acid was used to prevent precipitation of, in particular, iron salts. After appropriate dilutions, the selenium was determined by Zeeman......-effect background corrected graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. A furnace ashing step at 1100 °C was necessary in order to obtain a total recovery of selenium when present in the organic form. Palladium nitrate-magnesium nitrate was used as a matrix modifier. Independent methods were used to determine...... the content of selenium in a selenised yeast check sample. Accuracy was assured using this sample and by recovery experiments. Between-day random error showed a coefficient of variation of 4.2%. Results from the analysis of eight different commercial supplements were in good agreement with declared contents....

  18. Effects of optical feedback in a birefringence-Zeeman dual frequency laser at high optical feedback levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Wei; Zhang Shulian

    2007-01-01

    Optical feedback effects are studied in a birefringence-Zeeman dual frequency laser at high optical feedback levels. The intensity modulation features of the two orthogonally polarized lights are investigated in both isotropic optical feedback (IOF) and polarized optical feedback (POF). In IOF, the intensities of both beams are modulated simultaneously, and four zones, i.e., the e-light zone, the o-light and e-light zone, the o-light zone, and the no-light zone, are formed in a period corresponding to a half laser wavelength displacement of the feedback mirror. In POF, the two orthogonally polarized lights will oscillate alternately. Strong mode competition can be observed, and it affects the phase difference between the two beams greatly. The theoretical analysis is presented, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. The potential use of the experimental results is also discussed

  19. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy for Zeeman Spectra of Ti I in Plasma Using a Facing Target Sputtering System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shinji; Nishimiya, Nobuo; Suzuki, Masao

    2017-10-01

    The saturated absorption lines of neutral titanium were measured in the region of 9950-14380 cm-1 using a Ti:sapphire ring laser. A facing target sputtering system was used to obtain the gaseous state of a Ti I atom. The Zeeman splitting of 38 transitions was observed under the condition that the electric field component of a linearly polarized laser beam was parallel to the magnetic field. The gJ factors of the odd parity states were determined for 28 states belonging to 3d24s4p and 3d34p using those of the even parity states reported by Stachowska in 1997. The gJ factors of z5P1,2,3 levels were newly determined. gJ of y3F2, y3D2, z3P2, and z5S2 levels were refined.

  20. Comparison of electrothermal atomization diode laser Zeeman- and wavelength-modulated atomic absorption and coherent forward scattering spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blecker, Carlo R.; Hermann, Gerd M.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic absorption and coherent forward scattering spectrometry by using a near-infrared diode laser with and without Zeeman and wavelength modulation were carried out with graphite furnace electrothermal atomization. Analytical curves and limits of detection were compared. The magnetic field was modulated with 50 Hz, and the wavelength of the diode laser with 10 kHz. Coherent forward scattering was measured with crossed and slightly uncrossed polarizers. The results show that the detection limits of atomic absorption spectrometry are roughly the same as those of coherent forward scattering spectrometry with crossed polarizers. According to the theory with bright flicker noise limited laser sources the detection limits and linear ranges obtained with coherent forward scattering spectrometry with slightly uncrossed polarizers are significantly better than those obtained with crossed polarizers and with atomic absorption spectrometry. This is due to the fact that employing approaches of polarization spectroscopy reduce laser intensity fluctuations to their signal carried fractions

  1. Quantum magnetotransport for the surface states of three-dimensional topological insulators in the presence of a Zeeman field

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, Muhammad

    2013-05-01

    We show that the surface states of magnetic topological insulators realize an activated behavior and Shubnikov de Haas oscillations. Applying an external magnetic field perpendicular to the surface of the topological insulator in the presence of Zeeman interaction, we investigate the opening of a gap at the Dirac point, making the surface Dirac fermions massive, and the effects on the transport properties. Analytical expressions are derived for the collisional conductivity for elastic impurity scattering in the first Born approximation. We also calculate the Hall conductivity using the Kubo formalism. Evidence for a transition from gapless to gapped surface states at n = 0 and activated transport is found from the temperature and magnetic-field dependence of the collisional and Hall conductivities. © Copyright EPLA, 2013.

  2. Not So Fast: How Slower Utilities Regulation Can Reduce Prices and Increase Profits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kent Fellows

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumers are facing cost pressures from multiple directions. Wholesale natural gas prices have been climbing substantially from their record lows. Oil prices have only recently cooled slightly after reaching nearly $100 a barrel (WTI earlier this year. That makes it that much more important to minimize costs to wholesale consumers of energy, and ultimately, retail buyers, wherever possible. There is little room in the energy network for unnecessary costs. But in a regulated system, profits for utilities must remain healthy, too, if we expect them to stay active in the market. But the way that government agencies regulate oil and gas pipelines in Canada, and elsewhere, appears to be increasing costs beyond where they need to be in order to fairly serve both utilities and customers. By relying on traditional rate-of-return regulation models — which calculate price-rates based on the regulated firm’s cost of capital (that is, how much it costs the company to finance its operations — regulators, including the National Energy Board and the Alberta Utilities Commission, reward firms for over-investing in their operations, rather than reducing costs. Utilities are motivated to prolong the period in which they can earn a return on their capital, since it is one of the few opportunities they have to increase profits under the widely used rateof-return regulatory model. That results in utilities keeping assets on the books — and paying for them — longer than they might otherwise need to be. The end result is a distortion of the decisions made by regulated firms and higher prices for consumers than might occur under a different regulatory model. Regulators that take a more passive role in setting the rate of return for their client industries, however, are likely to see their idleness pay off. Firms with a freer hand to do so will seek to accelerate the depreciation of capital assets, reducing costs more quickly. The result may see end

  3. Apparent and actual 14C retention in the slower turnover bicarbonate pool in man when using liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clague, M.B.; Keir, M.J.; Clayton, C.B.

    1979-01-01

    The use of liquid scintillation counting to determine 14 CO 2 expiration without correct calibration of the apparatus suggests that about 25% of the label is retained within the slower turnover bicarbonate pool. Calibration reduces this figure to 13% and is in agreement with the figure obtained using a calibrated ionisation chamber. The discrepancy is due to reduction in the specific radioactivity in the vial, the mechanism involved being unknown, but it may be a characteristic of certain liquid scintillators under certain conditions. (author)

  4. Colder, slower, better

    CERN Multimedia

    Dumé, Belle

    2004-01-01

    The international ATRAP collaboration has measured the velocity of slow-moving or "cold" antihydrogen atoms for the first time. The anti-atoms captured by the ATRAP and ATHENA teams could be used for a variety of experiments in fundamental physics, including the most accurate ever test of CPT symmetry

  5. SLOWER BUT HEALTHIER GROWTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN XINZHEN

    2010-01-01

    @@ China's economic growth has slowed,economic statistics released on July 15 show,confirming market expectations.But officials said the country's economy is still on track. The recovery has gained traction in China,which registered a double-digit growth of 11.1 percent in the first half of this year.

  6. The Zeeman effect in the (0,0) band of the A 7Pi-X 7Sigma(+) transition of manganese monohydride, MnH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimle, Timothy C; Wang, Hailing; Gengler, Jamie J; Stoll, Michael; Meijer, Gerard

    2008-10-28

    The Zeeman tuning of the P(1)(0) line (nu=17 568.35 cm(-1)) of the A (7)Pi-X (7)Sigma(+) (0,0) band of manganese monohydride, MnH, has been investigated. The laser induced fluorescence spectrum of a supersonic molecular beam sample was recorded at a resolution of approximately 40 MHz and with field strengths of up to 362.0 mT. The observed spectrum was successfully fitted using a traditional effective Zeeman Hamiltonian to determine an effective magnetic g-factor for the J=2 level of the F(1)-spin component of the A (7)Pi(v=0) state. Spectral predictions of the P(1)(0) line at field strengths used in magnetic trapping experiments are presented.

  7. The Zeeman effect in the (0,0) band of the A 7Π-X 7Σ+ transition of manganese monohydride, MnH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimle, Timothy C.; Wang, Hailing; Gengler, Jamie J.; Stoll, Michael; Meijer, Gerard

    2008-10-01

    The Zeeman tuning of the P1(0) line (ν =17 568.35 cm-1) of the A Π7-X Σ7+ (0,0) band of manganese monohydride, MnH, has been investigated. The laser induced fluorescence spectrum of a supersonic molecular beam sample was recorded at a resolution of approximately 40 MHz and with field strengths of up to 362.0 mT. The observed spectrum was successfully fitted using a traditional effective Zeeman Hamiltonian to determine an effective magnetic g-factor for the J =2 level of the F1-spin component of the A Π7(v =0) state. Spectral predictions of the P1(0) line at field strengths used in magnetic trapping experiments are presented.

  8. Observation of orientation- and k-dependent Zeeman spin-splitting in hole quantum wires on (100)-oriented AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J C H; Klochan, O; Micolich, A P; Hamilton, A R; Martin, T P; Ho, L H; Zuelicke, U; Reuter, D; Wieck, A D

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, We study the Zeeman spin-splitting in hole quantum wires oriented along the [011] and [01 1-bar] crystallographic axes of a high mobility undoped (100)-oriented AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. Our data show that the spin-splitting can be switched 'on' (finite g*) or 'off' (zero g*) by rotating the field from a parallel to a perpendicular orientation with respect to the wire, and the properties of the wire are identical for the two orientations with respect to the crystallographic axes. We also find that the g-factor in the parallel orientation decreases as the wire is narrowed. This is in contrast to electron quantum wires, where the g-factor is enhanced by exchange effects as the wire is narrowed. This is evidence for a k-dependent Zeeman splitting that arises from the spin-3/2 nature of holes.

  9. Quantum incommensurate skyrmion crystals and commensurate to in-commensurate transitions in cold atoms and materials with spin-orbit couplings in a Zeeman field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fadi; Ye, Jinwu; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we study strongly interacting spinor atoms in a lattice subject to a two dimensional (2d) anisotropic Rashba type of spin orbital coupling (SOC) and an Zeeman field. We find the interplay between the Zeeman field and the SOC provides a new platform to host rich and novel classes of quantum commensurate and in-commensurate phases, excitations and phase transitions. These commensurate phases include two collinear states at low and high Zeeman field, two co-planar canted states at mirror reflected SOC parameters respectively. Most importantly, there are non-coplanar incommensurate Skyrmion (IC-SkX) crystal phases surrounded by the four commensurate phases. New excitation spectra above all the five phases, especially on the IC-SKX phase are computed. Three different classes of quantum commensurate to in-commensurate transitions from the IC-SKX to its four neighboring commensurate phases are identified. Finite temperature behaviors and transitions are discussed. The critical temperatures of all the phases can be raised above that reachable by current cold atom cooling techniques simply by tuning the number of atoms N per site. In view of recent impressive experimental advances in generating 2d SOC for cold atoms in optical lattices, these new many-body phenomena can be explored in the current and near future cold atom experiments. Applications to various materials such as MnSi, {Fe}}0.5 {Co}}0.5Si, especially the complex incommensurate magnetic ordering in Li2IrO3 are given.

  10. Slower EEG alpha generation, synchronization and "flow"-possible biomarkers of cognitive impairment and neuropathology of minor stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Jelena; Milosevic, Vuk; Zivkovic, Miroslava; Stojanov, Dragan; Milojkovic, Olga; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Saponjic, Jasna

    2017-01-01

    We investigated EEG rhythms, particularly alpha activity, and their relationship to post-stroke neuropathology and cognitive functions in the subacute and chronic stages of minor strokes. We included 10 patients with right middle cerebral artery (MCA) ischemic strokes and 11 healthy controls. All the assessments of stroke patients were done both in the subacute and chronic stages. Neurological impairment was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), whereas cognitive functions were assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and MoCA memory index (MoCA-MIS). The EEG was recorded using a 19 channel EEG system with standard EEG electrode placement. In particular, we analyzed the EEGs derived from the four lateral frontal (F3, F7, F4, F8), and corresponding lateral posterior (P3, P4, T5, T6) electrodes. Quantitative EEG analysis included: the group FFT spectra, the weighted average of alpha frequency (αAVG), the group probability density distributions of all conventional EEG frequency band relative amplitudes (EEG microstructure), the inter- and intra-hemispheric coherences, and the topographic distribution of alpha carrier frequency phase potentials (PPs). Statistical analysis was done using a Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA with a post-hoc Mann-Whitney U two-tailed test, and Spearman's correlation. We demonstrated transient cognitive impairment alongside a slower alpha frequency ( α AVG) in the subacute right MCA stroke patients vs. the controls. This slower alpha frequency showed no amplitude change, but was highly synchronized intra-hemispherically, overlying the ipsi-lesional hemisphere, and inter-hemispherically, overlying the frontal cortex. In addition, the disturbances in EEG alpha activity in subacute stroke patients were expressed as a decrease in alpha PPs over the frontal cortex and an altered "alpha flow", indicating the sustained augmentation of inter-hemispheric interactions. Although the stroke induced slower alpha was a

  11. Slower EEG alpha generation, synchronization and “flow”—possible biomarkers of cognitive impairment and neuropathology of minor stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Petrovic

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background We investigated EEG rhythms, particularly alpha activity, and their relationship to post-stroke neuropathology and cognitive functions in the subacute and chronic stages of minor strokes. Methods We included 10 patients with right middle cerebral artery (MCA ischemic strokes and 11 healthy controls. All the assessments of stroke patients were done both in the subacute and chronic stages. Neurological impairment was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS, whereas cognitive functions were assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA and MoCA memory index (MoCA-MIS. The EEG was recorded using a 19 channel EEG system with standard EEG electrode placement. In particular, we analyzed the EEGs derived from the four lateral frontal (F3, F7, F4, F8, and corresponding lateral posterior (P3, P4, T5, T6 electrodes. Quantitative EEG analysis included: the group FFT spectra, the weighted average of alpha frequency (αAVG, the group probability density distributions of all conventional EEG frequency band relative amplitudes (EEG microstructure, the inter- and intra-hemispheric coherences, and the topographic distribution of alpha carrier frequency phase potentials (PPs. Statistical analysis was done using a Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA with a post-hoc Mann–Whitney U two-tailed test, and Spearman’s correlation. Results We demonstrated transient cognitive impairment alongside a slower alpha frequency (αAVG in the subacute right MCA stroke patients vs. the controls. This slower alpha frequency showed no amplitude change, but was highly synchronized intra-hemispherically, overlying the ipsi-lesional hemisphere, and inter-hemispherically, overlying the frontal cortex. In addition, the disturbances in EEG alpha activity in subacute stroke patients were expressed as a decrease in alpha PPs over the frontal cortex and an altered “alpha flow”, indicating the sustained augmentation of inter-hemispheric interactions

  12. Rates of change in climatic niches in plant and animal populations are much slower than projected climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezkova, Tereza

    2016-01-01

    Climate change may soon threaten much of global biodiversity. A critical question is: can species undergo niche shifts of sufficient speed and magnitude to persist within their current geographic ranges? Here, we analyse niche shifts among populations within 56 plant and animal species using time-calibrated trees from phylogeographic studies. Across 266 phylogeographic groups analysed, rates of niche change were much slower than rates of projected climate change (mean difference > 200 000-fold for temperature variables). Furthermore, the absolute niche divergence among populations was typically lower than the magnitude of projected climate change over the next approximately 55 years for relevant variables, suggesting the amount of change needed to persist may often be too great, even if these niche shifts were instantaneous. Rates were broadly similar between plants and animals, but especially rapid in some arthropods, birds and mammals. Rates for temperature variables were lower at lower latitudes, further suggesting that tropical species may be especially vulnerable to climate change. PMID:27881748

  13. Arabidopsis brassinosteroid biosynthetic mutant dwarf7-1 exhibits slower rates of cell division and shoot induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz Burkhard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant growth depends on both cell division and cell expansion. Plant hormones, including brassinosteroids (BRs, are central to the control of these two cellular processes. Despite clear evidence that BRs regulate cell elongation, their roles in cell division have remained elusive. Results Here, we report results emphasizing the importance of BRs in cell division. An Arabidopsis BR biosynthetic mutant, dwarf7-1, displayed various characteristics attributable to slower cell division rates. We found that the DWARF4 gene which encodes for an enzyme catalyzing a rate-determining step in the BR biosynthetic pathways, is highly expressed in the actively dividing callus, suggesting that BR biosynthesis is necessary for dividing cells. Furthermore, dwf7-1 showed noticeably slower rates of callus growth and shoot induction relative to wild-type control. Flow cytometric analyses of the nuclei derived from either calli or intact roots revealed that the cell division index, which was represented as the ratio of cells at the G2/M vs. G1 phases, was smaller in dwf7-1 plants. Finally, we found that the expression levels of the genes involved in cell division and shoot induction, such as PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN2 (PCNA2 and ENHANCER OF SHOOT REGENERATION2 (ESR2, were also lower in dwf7-1 as compared with wild type. Conclusions Taken together, results of callus induction, shoot regeneration, flow cytometry, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis suggest that BRs play important roles in both cell division and cell differentiation in Arabidopsis.

  14. Phase diagrams of antiferromagnetic spin-1 bosons on a square optical lattice with the quadratic Zeeman effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Forges de Parny, L.; Rousseau, V. G.

    2018-02-01

    We study the quadratic Zeeman effect (QZE) in a system of antiferromagnetic spin-1 bosons on a square lattice and derive the ground-state phase diagrams by means of quantum Monte Carlo simulations and mean-field treatment. The QZE imbalances the populations of the magnetic sublevels σ =±1 and σ =0 , and therefore affects the magnetic and mobility properties of the phases. Both methods show that the tip of the even Mott lobes, stabilized by singlet state, is destroyed when turning on the QZE, thus leaving the space to the superfluid phase. Contrariwise, the tips of odd Mott lobes remain unaffected. Therefore, the Mott-superfluid transition with even filling strongly depends on the strength of the QZE, and we show that the QZE can act as a control parameter for this transition at fixed hopping. Using quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we elucidate the nature of the phase transitions and examine in detail the nematic order: the first-order Mott-superfluid transition with even filling observed in the absence of QZE becomes second order for weak QZE, in contradistinction to our mean-field results which predict a first-order transition in a larger range of QZE. Furthermore, a spin nematic order with director along the z axis is found in the odd Mott lobes and in the superfluid phase for energetically favored σ =±1 states. In the superfluid phase with even filling, the x y components of the nematic director remain finite only for moderate QZE.

  15. Nickel and strontium nitrates as modifiers for the determination of selenium in wine by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvetkovic, J. [Inst. of Agriculture, Skopje (Yugoslavia); Stafilov, T. [Inst. of Chemistry, Faculty of Science Sts. Cyril and Methodius Univ., Skopje (Yugoslavia); Mihajlovic, D. [RZ Tehnicka Kontrola, Skopje (Yugoslavia)

    2001-08-01

    A mixed matrix modifier of nickel and strontium nitrates was used as a chemical modifier for the determination of selenium in wines by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Wine samples were heated on a boiling water bath with small amounts of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide. For complete elimination of interference, especially from sulfates and phosphates, selenium is complexed with ammonium pyrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDTC), extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), and measured by ETAAS. The graphite furnace temperature program was optimized for both aqueous and organic solutions. Pyrolysis temperatures of 1300 C and 800 C were chosen for aqueous and organic solutions, respectively; 2700 C and 2100 C were used as optimum atomization temperatures for aqueous and organic solutions, respectively. The optimum modifier mass established is markedly lower than those presented in the literature. The platform atomization ensures pretreatment stabilization up to 1100 C and 1600 C, respectively, for organic and aqueous selenium solutions. The procedure was verified by the method of standard addition. The investigated wine samples originated from the different regions of the Republic of Macedonia. The selenium concentration varied from not detectable to 0.93 {mu}g L{sup -1}. (orig.)

  16. Manipulation of Zeeman coherence in solids at room temperature: Ramsey interference in the coherent-population-trapping spectrum of ruby

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolesov, Roman; Scully, Marlan O.; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2006-01-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) in a three-level atomic medium pumped by two subsequent short optical pulses is considered under the condition of negligible population decay from the excited optical state. It is shown that the amount of atomic population transferred to the excited state by the combined action of the pulses strongly depends on the phase of the ground-state coherence excited by the first pulse at the arrival time of the second pulse. Oscillatory behavior of optical excitation efficiency on the time delay between the pulses is predicted. It is also shown that saturating optical pulses can produce population inversion in a resonantly pumped quasi-two-level system. A class of solid materials in which the predicted phenomena can be observed at room temperature is found. It includes some rare-earth and transition-metal doped dielectric crystals where Orbach relaxation between ground-state Zeeman states is suppressed: ruby, alexandrite, and several others. On the basis of the theoretical predictions, experimental observation of Ramsey fringes in CPT spectrum of ruby is reported

  17. Realization of a gain with electromagnetically induced transparency system using non-degenerate Zeeman sublevels in 87 Rb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Minchuan; Zhou, Zifan; Shahriar, Selim M.

    2017-11-01

    Previously, we had proposed an optically-pumped five-level Gain EIT (GEIT) system, which has a transparency dip superimposed on a gain profile and exhibits a negative dispersion suitable for the white-light-cavity signal-recycling (WLC-SR) scheme of the interferometric gravitational wave detector (Zhou et al., 2015). Using this system as the negative dispersion medium (NDM) in the WLC-SR, we get an enhancement in the quantum noise (QN) limited sensitivity-bandwidth product by a factor of ∼ 18. Here, we show how to realize this GEIT system in a realistic platform, using non-degenerate Zeeman sublevels in cold Rb atoms, employing anomalous dispersion at 795 nm. Using the Caves model for a phase insensitive linear amplifier, we show that an enhancement of the sensitivity-bandwidth product by a factor of ∼ 17 is possible for potentially realizable experimental parameters. While the current LIGO apparatus uses light at 1064 nm, a future embodiment thereof may operate at a wavelength that is consistent with the wavelength considered here.

  18. p -wave superconductivity in weakly repulsive 2D Hubbard model with Zeeman splitting and weak Rashba spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugdal, Henning G.; Sudbø, Asle

    2018-01-01

    We study the superconducting order in a two-dimensional square lattice Hubbard model with weak repulsive interactions, subject to a Zeeman field and weak Rashba spin-orbit interactions. Diagonalizing the noninteracting Hamiltonian leads to two separate bands, and by deriving an effective low-energy interaction we find the mean field gap equations for the superconducting order parameter on the bands. Solving the gap equations just below the critical temperature, we find that superconductivity is caused by Kohn-Luttinger-type interaction, while the pairing symmetry of the bands is indirectly affected by the spin-orbit coupling. The dominating attractive momentum channel of the Kohn-Luttinger term depends on the filling fraction n of the system, and it is therefore possible to change the momentum dependence of the order parameter by tuning n . Moreover, n also determines which band has the highest critical temperature. Rotating the magnetic field changes the momentum dependence from states that for small momenta reduce to a chiral px±i py type state for out-of-plane fields, to a nodal p -wave-type state for purely in-plane fields.

  19. Large spin relaxation anisotropy and valley-Zeeman spin-orbit coupling in WSe2/graphene/h -BN heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zihlmann, Simon; Cummings, Aron W.; Garcia, Jose H.; Kedves, Máté; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Schönenberger, Christian; Makk, Péter

    2018-02-01

    Large spin-orbital proximity effects have been predicted in graphene interfaced with a transition-metal dichalcogenide layer. Whereas clear evidence for an enhanced spin-orbit coupling has been found at large carrier densities, the type of spin-orbit coupling and its relaxation mechanism remained unknown. We show an increased spin-orbit coupling close to the charge neutrality point in graphene, where topological states are expected to appear. Single-layer graphene encapsulated between the transition-metal dichalcogenide WSe2 and h -BN is found to exhibit exceptional quality with mobilities as high as 1 ×105 cm2 V-1 s-1. At the same time clear weak antilocalization indicates strong spin-orbit coupling, and a large spin relaxation anisotropy due to the presence of a dominating symmetric spin-orbit coupling is found. Doping-dependent measurements show that the spin relaxation of the in-plane spins is largely dominated by a valley-Zeeman spin-orbit coupling and that the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling plays a minor role in spin relaxation. The strong spin-valley coupling opens new possibilities in exploring spin and valley degree of freedom in graphene with the realization of new concepts in spin manipulation.

  20. Growing slower and less accurate: adult age differences in time-accuracy functions for recall and recognition from episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaeghen, P; Vandenbroucke, A; Dierckx, V

    1998-01-01

    In 2 experiments, time-accuracy curves were derived for recall and recognition from episodic memory for both young and older adults. In Experiment 1, time-accuracy functions were estimated for free list recall and list recall cued by rhyme words or semantic associations for 13 young and 13 older participants. In Experiment 2, time-accuracy functions were estimated for recognition of word lists with or without distractor items and with or without articulatory suppression for 29 young and 30 older participants. In both studies, age differences were found in the asymptote (i.e., the maximum level of performance attainable) and in the rate of approach toward the asymptote (i.e., the steepness of the curve). These two parameters were only modestly correlated. In Experiment 2, it was found that 89% of the age-related variance in the rate of approach and 62% of the age-related variance in the asymptote was explained by perceptual speed. The data point at the existence of 2 distinct effects of aging on episodic memory, namely a dynamic effect (growing slower) and an asymptotic effect (growing less accurate). The absence of Age x Condition interactions in the age-related parameters in either experiment points at the rather general nature of both aging effects.

  1. Maximal intended velocity training induces greater gains in bench press performance than deliberately slower half-velocity training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Badillo, Juan José; Rodríguez-Rosell, David; Sánchez-Medina, Luis; Gorostiaga, Esteban M; Pareja-Blanco, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect on strength gains of two isoinertial resistance training (RT) programmes that only differed in actual concentric velocity: maximal (MaxV) vs. half-maximal (HalfV) velocity. Twenty participants were assigned to a MaxV (n = 9) or HalfV (n = 11) group and trained 3 times per week during 6 weeks using the bench press (BP). Repetition velocity was controlled using a linear velocity transducer. A complementary study (n = 10) aimed to analyse whether the acute metabolic (blood lactate and ammonia) and mechanical response (velocity loss) was different between the MaxV and HalfV protocols used. Both groups improved strength performance from pre- to post-training, but MaxV resulted in significantly greater gains than HalfV in all variables analysed: one-repetition maximum (1RM) strength (18.2 vs. 9.7%), velocity developed against all (20.8 vs. 10.0%), light (11.5 vs. 4.5%) and heavy (36.2 vs. 17.3%) loads common to pre- and post-tests. Light and heavy loads were identified with those moved faster or slower than 0.80 m · s(-1) (∼ 60% 1RM in BP). Lactate tended to be significantly higher for MaxV vs. HalfV, with no differences observed for ammonia which was within resting values. Both groups obtained the greatest improvements at the training velocities (≤ 0.80 m · s(-1)). Movement velocity can be considered a fundamental component of RT intensity, since, for a given %1RM, the velocity at which loads are lifted largely determines the resulting training effect. BP strength gains can be maximised when repetitions are performed at maximal intended velocity.

  2. Energy dispersion of the electrosubbands in parabolic confining quantum wires: interplay of Rashba, Dresselhaus, lateral spin-orbit interaction and the Zeeman effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tongyi; Zhao Wei; Liu Xueming

    2009-01-01

    We have made a thorough theoretical investigation of the interplay of spin-orbit interactions (SOIs) resulting from Rashba, Dresselhaus and the lateral parabolic confining potential on the energy dispersion relation of the spin subbands in a parabolic quantum wire. The influence of an applied external magnetic field is also discussed. We show the interplay of different types of SOI, as well as the Zeeman effect, leads to rather complex and intriguing electrosubbands for different spin branches. The effect of different coupling strengths and different magnetic field strengths is also investigated.

  3. VLA OH Zeeman Observations of the NGC 6334 Complex Source A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, E. A.; Sarma, A. P.; Troland, T. H.; Abel, N. P.

    2004-12-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the NGC 6334 complex source A, a compact continuum source in the SW region of the complex. Our intent is to determine the significance of the magnetic field in the support of the surrounding molecular cloud against gravitational collapse. We have performed OH 1665 and 1667 MHz observations taken with the Very Large Array in the BnA configuration and combined these data with the lower resolution CnB data of Sarma et al. (2000). These observations reveal magnetic fields with values of the order of 350 μ G toward source A, with maximum fields reaching 500 μ G. We have also theoretically modeled the molecular cloud surrounding source A using Cloudy, with the constraints to the model based on observation. This model provides significant information on the density of H2 through the cloud and also the relative density of H2 to OH which is important to our analysis of the region. We will combine the knowledge gained through the Cloudy modeling with Virial estimates to determine the significance of the magnetic field to the dynamics and evolution of source A.

  4. Measuring 20-100 T B-fields using Zeeman splitting of sodium emission lines on a 500 kA pulsed power machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banasek, J. T., E-mail: jtb254@cornell.edu; Engelbrecht, J. T.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A. [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We have shown that Zeeman splitting of the sodium (Na) D-lines at 5890 and 5896 Å can be used to measure the magnetic field (B-field) produced in high current pulsed power experiments. We have measured the B-field next to a return current conductor in a hybrid X-pinch experiment near a peak current of about 500 kA. Na is deposited on the conductor and then is desorbed and excited by radiation from the hybrid X-pinch. The D-line emission spectrum implies B-fields of about 20 T with a return current post of 4 mm diameter or up to 120 T with a return current wire of 0.455 mm diameter. These measurements were consistent or lower than the expected B-field, thereby showing that basic Zeeman splitting can be used to measure the B-field in a pulsed-power-driven high-energy-density (HED) plasma experiment. We hope to extend these measurement techniques using suitable ionized species to measurements within HED plasmas.

  5. Vortex solitons in two-dimensional spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensates: Effects of the Rashba-Dresselhaus coupling and Zeeman splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Sherman, E Ya; Malomed, Boris A

    2016-09-01

    We present an analysis of two-dimensional (2D) matter-wave solitons, governed by the pseudospinor system of Gross-Pitaevskii equations with self- and cross attraction, which includes the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in the general Rashba-Dresselhaus form, and, separately, the Rashba coupling and the Zeeman splitting. Families of semivortex (SV) and mixed-mode (MM) solitons are constructed, which exist and are stable in free space, as the SOC terms prevent the onset of the critical collapse and create the otherwise missing ground states in the form of the solitons. The Dresselhaus SOC produces a destructive effect on the vortex solitons, while the Zeeman term tends to convert the MM states into the SV ones, which eventually suffer delocalization. Existence domains and stability boundaries are identified for the soliton families. For physically relevant parameters of the SOC system, the number of atoms in the 2D solitons is limited by ∼1.5×10^{4}. The results are obtained by means of combined analytical and numerical methods.

  6. Band nesting, massive Dirac fermions, and valley Landé and Zeeman effects in transition metal dichalcogenides: A tight-binding model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniek, Maciej; Korkusiński, Marek; Szulakowska, Ludmiła; Potasz, Paweł; Ozfidan, Isil; Hawrylak, Paweł

    2018-02-01

    We present here the minimal tight-binding model for a single layer of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) MX 2(M , metal; X , chalcogen) which illuminates the physics and captures band nesting, massive Dirac fermions, and valley Landé and Zeeman magnetic field effects. TMDCs share the hexagonal lattice with graphene but their electronic bands require much more complex atomic orbitals. Using symmetry arguments, a minimal basis consisting of three metal d orbitals and three chalcogen dimer p orbitals is constructed. The tunneling matrix elements between nearest-neighbor metal and chalcogen orbitals are explicitly derived at K ,-K , and Γ points of the Brillouin zone. The nearest-neighbor tunneling matrix elements connect specific metal and sulfur orbitals yielding an effective 6 ×6 Hamiltonian giving correct composition of metal and chalcogen orbitals but not the direct gap at K points. The direct gap at K , correct masses, and conduction band minima at Q points responsible for band nesting are obtained by inclusion of next-neighbor Mo-Mo tunneling. The parameters of the next-nearest-neighbor model are successfully fitted to MX 2(M =Mo ; X =S ) density functional ab initio calculations of the highest valence and lowest conduction band dispersion along K -Γ line in the Brillouin zone. The effective two-band massive Dirac Hamiltonian for MoS2, Landé g factors, and valley Zeeman splitting are obtained.

  7. Second and third harmonic generations of a quantum ring with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings: Temperature and Zeeman effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Ali; Azargoshasb, Tahereh; Niknam, Elahe

    2017-10-01

    In current article, the Zeeman effect is considered in the presence of simultaneous Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions (SOI) and under such circumstances the second and third harmonic generations (SHG and THG) of a GaAs quantum ring are investigated at finite temperature. The effective Hamiltonian is derived in cylindrical coordinate while the angular part is eliminated because of axial symmetry and the energy eigenvalues and eigenvectors of two lowest levels are obtained numerically. Eventually, the optical properties of such system are studied hiring compact density matrix approach. The results show that, an increase in the magnetic field, leads to blue shift in resonant peaks of both SHG and THG. Furthermore, by reducing the temperature, all the resonant peaks of both SHG and THG experience a red shift. Finally, the effect of the structure dimension is studied and results illustrate that variation of size leads to both red and blue shifts in resonant peaks.

  8. Zeeman effect on disalignment of excited atoms by radiation re-absorption: neon 2p2 atoms in a discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deguchi, K; Imagawa, T; Shikama, T; Hasuo, M

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the relaxation rate of alignment of neon atoms in a 2p 2 (in Paschen notation) level, which were excited by a linearly polarized laser pulse in a glow discharge plasma at 77 K, in a magnetic field of up to 3 T in the Voigt configuration. The relaxation rate decreased with an increase in the magnetic field strength of up to 0.5 T and showed no magnetic field dependence above 0.5 T. We developed a Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate alignment relaxation, or disalignment, by radiation re-absorption of atomic resonance lines in a magnetic field. The simulated result was found to be consistent with the observed magnetic field dependence. We analysed the results of the simulation from a point of competition between the Zeeman splitting and the Doppler broadening of the transition lines from the 2p 2 level.

  9. Higher-order Zeeman and spin terms in the electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian; their description in irreducible form using Cartesian, tesseral spherical tensor and Stevens' operator expressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGavin, Dennis G; Tennant, W Craighead

    2009-01-01

    In setting up a spin Hamiltonian (SH) to study high-spin Zeeman and high-spin nuclear and/or electronic interactions in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments, it is argued that a maximally reduced SH (MRSH) framed in tesseral combinations of spherical tensor operators is necessary. Then, the SH contains only those terms that are necessary and sufficient to describe the particular spin system. The paper proceeds then to obtain interrelationships between the parameters of the MRSH and those of alternative SHs expressed in Cartesian tensor and Stevens operator-equivalent forms. The examples taken, initially, are those of Cartesian and Stevens' expressions for high-spin Zeeman terms of dimension BS 3 and BS 5 . Starting from the well-known decomposition of the general Cartesian tensor of second rank to three irreducible tensors of ranks 0, 1 and 2, the decomposition of Cartesian tensors of ranks 4 and 6 are treated similarly. Next, following a generalization of the tesseral spherical tensor equations, the interrelationships amongst the parameters of the three kinds of expressions, as derived from equivalent SHs, are determined and detailed tables, including all redundancy equations, set out. In each of these cases the lowest symmetry, 1-bar Laue class, is assumed and then examples of relationships for specific higher symmetries derived therefrom. The validity of a spin Hamiltonian containing mixtures of terms from the three expressions is considered in some detail for several specific symmetries, including again the lowest symmetry. Finally, we address the application of some of the relationships derived here to seldom-observed low-symmetry effects in EPR spectra, when high-spin electronic and nuclear interactions are present.

  10. Spectroscopic and magnetic properties of Fe2+ (3d6; S = 2) ions in Fe(NH4)2(SO4)2·6H2O - Modeling zero-field splitting and Zeeman electronic parameters by microscopic spin Hamiltonian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zając, Magdalena; Rudowicz, Czesław; Ohta, Hitoshi; Sakurai, Takahiro

    2018-03-01

    Utilizing the package MSH/VBA, based on the microscopic spin Hamiltonian (MSH) approach, spectroscopic and magnetic properties of Fe2+ (3d6; S = 2) ions at (nearly) orthorhombic sites in Fe(NH4)2(SO4)2·6H2O (FASH) are modeled. The zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters and the Zeeman electronic (Ze) factors are predicted for wide ranges of values of the microscopic parameters, i.e. the spin-orbit (λ), spin-spin (ρ) coupling constants, and the crystal-field (ligand-field) energy levels (Δi) within the 5D multiplet. This enables to consider the dependence of the ZFS parameters bkq (in the Stevens notation), or the conventional ones (e.g., D and E), and the Zeeman factors gi on λ, ρ, and Δi. By matching the theoretical SH parameters and the experimental ones measured by electron magnetic resonance (EMR), the values of λ, ρ, and Δi best describing Fe2+ ions in FASH are determined. The novel aspect is prediction of the fourth-rank ZFS parameters and the ρ(spin-spin)-related contributions, not considered in previous studies. The higher-order contributions to the second- and fourth-rank ZFSPs are found significant. The MSH predictions provide guidance for high-magnetic field and high-frequency EMR (HMF-EMR) measurements and enable assessment of suitability of FASH for application as high-pressure probes for HMF-EMR studies. The method employed here and the present results may be also useful for other structurally related Fe2+ (S = 2) systems.

  11. Fragmented Perception : Slower Space-Based but Faster Object-Based Attention in Recent-Onset Psychosis with and without Schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smid, Henderikus G. O. M.; Bruggeman, Richard; Martens, Sander

    2013-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is associated with impairments of the perception of objects, but how this affects higher cognitive functions, whether this impairment is already present after recent onset of psychosis, and whether it is specific for schizophrenia related psychosis, is not clear. We

  12. Child healthcare nurses believe that bilingual children show slower language development, simplify screening procedures and delay referrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayeb, Laleh; Wallby, Thomas; Westerlund, Monica; Salameh, Eva-Kristina; Sarkadi, Anna

    2015-02-01

    A significant number of children living in Sweden are bilingual, but how language screening is performed in this group is unknown. We investigated child healthcare nurses' perceptions of the language screening of bilingual children aged 30-36 months, together with their clinical practices. An online questionnaire was completed by 863 nurses who performed language screening of bilingual children in Sweden at least once a month, corresponding to 89% of the target population. Cox regression identified predictors of the nurses' tendency to simplify the screening of bilingual children. The nurses reported a greater lack of confidence and more difficulties in interpreting screening outcomes for bilingual than monolingual children (p bilingual children and 74% postponed referrals to speech and language services, basing these adaptations on their perceptions of the children's Swedish language skills (p bilingual children, and this was the strongest predictor of simplified screening practices (RR=2.00, 95% CI 1.44-2.77). Child healthcare nurses need easily accessible information and clear guidelines on the language development of bilingual children to ensure that bilingual and monolingual children receive equitable language screening services. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Rise in prostate-specific antigen in men with untreated low-grade prostate cancer is slower during spring-summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieth, R; Choo, R; Deboer, L; Danjoux, C; Morton, G C; Klotz, L

    2006-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the rate of rise in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is slower during the spring-summer than during the rest of the year, we used PSA data from a prospective single-arm cohort study of men who had been followed to characterize a watchful observation protocol with selective delayed intervention for clinically localized, low-to-intermediate grade prostate adenocarcinoma. The rate of PSA increase was calculated as the visit-to-visit slope of log (PSA) against time, from 1 calendar-quarter visit to the next. The nonparametric Friedman test confirmed differences in rate of PSA rise among the calendar quarters (P = 0.041). Post hoc analysis showed the rate of PSA increase during Q2 was significantly slower than in each one of the other calendar quarters (Q1 versus Q2, P = 0.025; Q3 versus Q2, P = 0.002; Q4 versus Q2, P = 0.013), with no differences among quarters Q1, Q3, and Q4. These results are consistent with the vitamin D hypothesis that the higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels associated with spring and summer have a desirable effect on prostate biology. The therapeutic implication is that vitamin D supplementation in the range of 2000 IU/d, a dose comparable to the effect of summer, can benefit men monitored for rising PSA.

  14. Skeletal muscle-specific overexpression of IGFBP-2 promotes a slower muscle phenotype in healthy but not dystrophic mdx mice and does not affect the dystrophic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderski, Kristy; Martins, Karen Janet Bernice; Chee, Annabel; Trieu, Jennifer; Naim, Timur; Gehrig, Stefan Martin; Baum, Dale Michael; Brenmoehl, Julia; Chau, Luong; Koopman, René; Gregorevic, Paul; Metzger, Friedrich; Hoeflich, Andreas; Lynch, Gordon Stuart

    The insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are thought to modulate cell size and homeostasis via IGF-I-dependent and -independent pathways. There is a considerable dearth of information regarding the function of IGFBPs in skeletal muscle, particularly their role in the pathophysiology of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In this study we tested the hypothesis that intramuscular IGFBP-2 overexpression would ameliorate the pathology in mdx dystrophic mice. 4week old male C57Bl/10 and mdx mice received a single intramuscular injection of AAV6-empty or AAV6-IGFBP-2 vector into the tibialis anterior muscle. At 8weeks post-injection the effect of IGFBP-2 overexpression on the structure and function of the injected muscle was assessed. AAV6-mediated IGFBP-2 overexpression in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of 4-week-old C57BL/10 and mdx mice reduced the mass of injected muscle after 8weeks, inducing a slower muscle phenotype in C57BL/10 but not mdx mice. Analysis of inflammatory and fibrotic gene expression revealed no changes between control and IGFBP-2 injected muscles in dystrophic (mdx) mice. Together these results indicate that the IGFBP-2-induced promotion of a slower muscle phenotype is impaired in muscles of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, which contributes to the inability of IGFBP-2 to ameliorate the dystrophic pathology. The findings implicate the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) in the signaling required for this adaptation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Infrared Zeeman study of the Nd.sup.3+./sup.-Cu.sup.2+./sup. anisotropic exchange interaction in Nd.sub.2./sub.CuO.sub.4./sub..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Richard, P.; Jandl, S.; Poirier, M.; Furnier, P.; Nekvasil, Vladimír; Sadowski, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 1 (2005), 014506/1-014506/10 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/03/0552 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : cuprate superconductors * Nd 2 CuO 4 * Zeeman and Stark splitting * anisotropic exchange interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.185, year: 2005

  16. Frequency bandwidth extension by use of multiple Zeeman field offsets for electron spin-echo EPR oxygen imaging of large objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Payam; Epel, Boris; Sundramoorthy, Subramanian V.; Mailer, Colin; Halpern, Howard J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Electron spin-echo (ESE) oxygen imaging is a new and evolving electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) imaging (EPRI) modality that is useful for physiological in vivo applications, such as EPR oxygen imaging (EPROI), with potential application to imaging of multicentimeter objects as large as human tumors. A present limitation on the size of the object to be imaged at a given resolution is the frequency bandwidth of the system, since the location is encoded as a frequency offset in ESE imaging. The authors’ aim in this study was to demonstrate the object size advantage of the multioffset bandwidth extension technique.Methods: The multiple-stepped Zeeman field offset (or simply multi-B) technique was used for imaging of an 8.5-cm-long phantom containing a narrow single line triaryl methyl compound (trityl) solution at the 250 MHz imaging frequency. The image is compared to a standard single-field ESE image of the same phantom.Results: For the phantom used in this study, transverse relaxation (T2e) electron spin-echo (ESE) images from multi-B acquisition are more uniform, contain less prominent artifacts, and have a better signal to noise ratio (SNR) compared to single-field T2e images.Conclusions: The multi-B method is suitable for imaging of samples whose physical size restricts the applicability of the conventional single-field ESE imaging technique. PMID:21815379

  17. Studies of transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the potassium 4P states induced by nonresonant thermal collisions at high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggy, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments have been performed which examine the response of selectively excited potassium atoms to thermal collisions with inert gas atoms at magnetic fields between 9 and 31 kOe. Using laser excitation of individual Zeeman sublevels of the potassium 4P states and interferometric analysis of fluorescent light, cross sections have been determined for excitation transfer between the potassium 4 2 P/sub 1/2/ and 4 2 P/sub 3/2/ fine-structure states and for depolarization of each of the fine-structure states. The experimental results for helium and neon collision partners are presented both as cross sections for transitions between individual magnetic sublevels and as irreducible cross sections for multipole depolarization, excitation transfer, and coherence transfer. Although cross sections obtained here for depolarization of 2 P/sub 1/2/ state are smaller than the high-field results of Berdowski and Krause, they agree more closely with nuclear-spin corrected low-field results and with theory. However, cross sections were found for 2 P/sub 3/2/ depolarization which are significantly larger than the theoretical predictions and the previously obtained high-field cross sections of Berdowski, Shiner, and Krause

  18. Velocity-tunable slow beams of cold O2 in a single spin-rovibronic state with full angular-momentum orientation by multistage Zeeman deceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederkehr, A. W.; Schmutz, H.; Motsch, M.; Merkt, F.

    2012-08-01

    Cold samples of oxygen molecules in supersonic beams have been decelerated from initial velocities of 390 and 450 m s-1 to final velocities in the range between 150 and 280 m s-1 using a 90-stage Zeeman decelerator. (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced-multiphoton-ionization (REMPI) spectra of the 3sσ g 3Π g (C) ? two-photon transition of O2 have been recorded to characterize the state selectivity of the deceleration process. The decelerated molecular sample was found to consist exclusively of molecules in the J ‧‧ = 2 spin-rotational component of the X ? ground state of O2. Measurements of the REMPI spectra using linearly polarized laser radiation with polarization vector parallel to the decelerator axis, and thus to the magnetic-field vector of the deceleration solenoids, further showed that only the ? magnetic sublevel of the N‧‧ = 1, J ‧‧ = 2 spin-rotational level is populated in the decelerated sample, which therefore is characterized by a fully oriented total-angular-momentum vector. By maintaining a weak quantization magnetic field beyond the decelerator, the polarization of the sample could be maintained over the 5 cm distance separating the last deceleration solenoid and the detection region.

  19. An acute fall in estimated glomerular filtration rate during treatment with losartan predicts a slower decrease in long-term renal function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtkamp, Frank A; de Zeeuw, Dick; Thomas, Merlin C

    2011-01-01

    initial fall in eGFR had a significant lower long-term eGFR slope compared to those with a moderate fall or rise. This relationship was independent of other risk markers or change in risk markers for progression of renal disease such as blood pressure and albuminuria. Thus, the greater the acute fall in e......Intervention in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system (RAAS) is associated with slowing the progressive loss of renal function. During initiation of therapy, however, there may be an acute fall in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). We tested whether this initial fall in GFR reflects a renal...... a significantly greater acute fall in estimated (eGFR) during the first 3 months compared to patients assigned to placebo, but a significantly slower long-term mean decline of eGFR thereafter. A large interindividual difference, however, was noticed in the acute eGFR change. When patients were divided...

  20. Cultured cells from a severe combined immunodeficient mouse have a slower than normal rate of repair of potentially lethal damage sensitive to hypertonic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, H.; Terado, T.; Ikebuchi, M.; Aoyama, T.; Komatsu, K.; Nozawa, A.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of hypertonic 0.5 M NaCl treatment after irradiation on the repair of DNA damage were examined in fibroblasts of the severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mouse. These cells are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation because of a deficiency in the repair of double-strand breaks. Hypertonic treatment caused radiosensitization due to a fixation of potentially lethal damage (PLD) in scid cells, demonstrating that scid cells normally repair PLD. To assess the kinetics of the repair of PLD, hypertonic treatment was delayed for various times after irradiation. Potentially lethal damage was repaired during these times in isotonic medium at 37 degrees C. It was found that the rate of repair of PLD was much slower in scid cells than in BALB/c 3T3 cells, which have a open-quotes wild-typeclose quotes level of radiosensitivity. This fact indicates that the scid mutation affects the type of repair of PLD that is sensitive to 0.5 M NaCl treatment. In scid hybrid cells containing fragments of human chromosome 8, which complements the radiosensitivity of the scid cells, the rate of repair was restored to a normal level. An enzyme encoded by a gene on chromosome 8 may also be connected with PLD which is sensitive to hypertonic treatment. 29 refs., 3 figs

  1. The Trochanteric Localization is a Mediator of Slower Short-Term Functional Recovery in Overweight and Obese Elderly Women with Recent Hip Fracture: The BREAK Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnelli, Stefano; Caffarelli, Carla; Rossi, Stefania; Siviero, Paola; Maggi, Stefania; Crepaldi, Gaetano; Nuti, Ranuccio

    2015-12-01

    The hypothesis tested in this study, carried out on elderly Italian women with recent hip fracture, was to assess the extent to which the effect of a condition of being overweight/obese on short-term functional recovery as evaluated by the "time to permitted load" could be explained by a mediator variable (type of hip fracture). We studied 727 women aged 60 years or over with a recent low trauma surgically treated hip fracture and for whom an information on post-surgery complications and on the time to permitted load was available. To assess for mediation, the statistical analyses were carried out following the procedure described by Baron and Kenny. In this study, 46 % of women with hip fracture presented a time to permitted load of ≥ 10 days. The women with a post-surgery time to permitted load of ≥ 10 days showed a significantly higher proportion of trochanteric fracture localization (72.1 vs 42 %), of total overweight/obesity (46.5 vs 36.8 %) and of post-surgery complications (38.8 vs 18.8 %). The mediating effect of hip fracture localization on the association between overweight/obesity and the time of permitted load was demonstrated and confirmed in a multivariate logistic regression model. This study, carried out using a "mediator" statistical analysis, suggests that in elderly women with hip fracture being overweight/obese is associated with a slower short-term functional recovery as evaluated by the time to permitted load and that this association is mediated by the trochanteric localization of hip fracture.

  2. An Increase in Religiousness/Spirituality Occurs After HIV Diagnosis and Predicts Slower Disease Progression over 4 Years in People with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ironson, Gail; Stuetzle, Rick; Fletcher, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Most studies on religion/spirituality predicting health outcomes have been limited to church attendance as a predictor and have focused on healthy people. However, confronting a major medical crisis may be a time when people turn to the sacred. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which changes in spirituality/religiousness occur after HIV diagnosis and whether changes predict disease progression. DESIGN/PARTICIPANTS This longitudinal study examined the relationship between changes in spirituality/religiousness from before with after the diagnosis of HIV, and disease progression (CD4 and viral load [VL] every 6 months) over 4 years in 100 people with HIV. Measures included change in religiousness/spirituality after diagnosis of HIV, religiousness/spirituality at various times in one’s life, church attendance, depression, hopelessness, optimism, coping (avoidant, proactive), social support, CD4/VL, and health behaviors. RESULTS Forty-five percent of the sample showed an increase in religiousness/spirituality after the diagnosis of HIV, 42% remained the same, and 13% decreased. People reporting an increase in spirituality/religiousness after the diagnosis had significantly greater preservation of CD4 cells over the 4-year period, as well as significantly better control of VL. Results were independent of (i.e., held even after controlling for) church attendance and initial disease status (CD4/VL), medication at every time point, age, gender, race, education, health behaviors (adherence, risky sex, alcohol, cocaine), depression, hopelessness, optimism, coping (avoidant, proactive), and social support. CONCLUSIONS There is an increase in spirituality/religiousness after HIV diagnosis, and this increase predicts slower disease progression; medical personnel should be aware of its potential importance. PMID:17083503

  3. Tremor-genic slow slip regions may be deeper and warmer and may slip slower than non-tremor-genic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery-Brown, Emily; Syracuse, Ellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) are observed worldwide and often coincide with tectonic tremor. Notable examples of SSEs lacking observed tectonic tremor, however, occur beneath Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii, the Boso Peninsula, Japan, near San Juan Bautista on the San Andreas Fault, California, and recently in Central Ecuador. These SSEs are similar to other worldwide SSEs in many ways (e.g., size or duration), but lack the concurrent tectonic tremor observed elsewhere; instead, they trigger swarms of regular earthquakes. We investigate the physical conditions that may distinguish these non-tremor-genic SSEs from those associated with tectonic tremor, including slip velocity, pressure, temperature, fluids, and fault asperities, although we cannot eliminate the possibility that tectonic tremor may be obscured in highly attenuating regions. Slip velocities of SSEs at Kīlauea Volcano (∼10−6 m/s) and Boso Peninsula (∼10−7 m/s) are among the fastest SSEs worldwide. Kīlauea Volcano, the Boso Peninsula, and Central Ecuador are also among the shallowest SSEs worldwide, and thus have lower confining pressures and cooler temperatures in their respective slow slip zones. Fluids also likely contribute to tremor generation, and no corresponding zone of high vp/vs has been noted at Kīlauea or Boso. We suggest that the relatively faster slip velocities at Kīlauea Volcano and the Boso Peninsula result from specific physical conditions that may also be responsible for triggering swarms of regular earthquakes adjacent to the slow slip, while different conditions produce slower SSE velocities elsewhere and trigger tectonic tremor.

  4. Investigation of chemical modifiers for the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction and slurry sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Aline R. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq–INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Becker, Emilene M.; Dessuy, Morgana B. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R., E-mail: mgrvale@ufrgs.br [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq–INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard [Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do CNPq–INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2014-02-01

    In this work, chemical modifiers in solution (Pd/Mg, NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}/Pd) were compared with permanent modifiers (Ir and Ru) for the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples using slurry sampling and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction. The analytical line at 283.3 nm was used due to some spectral interference observed at 217.0 nm. The NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} was abandoned due to severe spectral interference even at the 283.3-nm line. For Pd/Mg and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}/Pd the optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 900 °C and 1900 °C, respectively. For Ru and Ir, the integrated absorbance signal was stable up to pyrolysis temperatures of 700 °C and 900 °C, respectively, and up to atomization temperature of 1700 °C. The limit of detection (LOD) was 17 ng g{sup −1} using Pd/Mg and 29 ng g{sup −1} using NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}/Pd. Among the permanent modifiers investigated, the LOD was 22 ng g{sup −1} Pb for Ir and 10 ng g{sup −1} Pb for Ru. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using the certified reference material NIST SRM 695. Although Ru provided lower LOD, which can be attributed to a lower blank signal, only the modifiers in solution showed concordant values of Pb concentration for the NIST SRM 695 and the most of analyzed samples. Moreover, the Pd/Mg modifier provided the highest sensitivity and for this reason it is more suitable for the determination of Pb in fertilizers samples in slurry; besides this it presented a better signal-to-noise ratio than NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}/Pd. - Highlights: • Lead has been determined in fertilizers using slurry sampling GF AAS. • The mixture of palladium and magnesium nitrates was found to be the ideal chemical modifier. • Calibration could be carried out against aqueous standard solutions. • The proposed method is much faster than the EPA method, which includes sample digestion.

  5. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of He{_2}^+ Using Rydberg-Series Extrapolation and Zeeman-Decelerated Supersonic Beams of Metastable He_2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Paul; Semeria, Luca; Merkt, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    Having only three electrons, He{_2}^+ represents a system for which highly accurate ab initio calculations are possible. The latest calculations of rovibrational energies in He{_2}^+ do not include relativistic or QED corrections but claim an accuracy of 120 MHz We have performed high-resolution Rydberg spectroscopy of metastable He_2 molecules and employed multichannel-quantum-defect-theory extrapolation techniques to determine the rotational energy-level structure in the He{_2}^+ ion. To this end, we have produced samples of metastable helium molecules in supersonic beams with velocities tunable down to 100 m/s by combining a cryogenic supersonic-beam source with a multistage Zeeman decelerator. The metastable He_2 molecules are excited to np Rydberg states using the frequency-doubled output of a pulse-amplified ring dye laser. Although the bandwidth of the laser system is too large to observe the reduction of the Doppler width resulting from deceleration, the deceleration greatly simplifies the spectral assignments because of its spin-rotational state selectivity. Our approach enabled us to determine the rotational structure of He_2 with an unprecedented accuracy of 18 MHz, to quantify the size of the relativistic and QED corrections by comparison with the results of Tung et al. and to precisely measure the rotational structure of the metastable state for comparison with the results of Focsa et al. Here, we present an extension of these measurements in which we have measured higher rotational intervals of He{_2}^+. In addition, we have replaced the pulsed UV laser by a cw UV laser and improved the resolution of the spectra by a factor of more than five. W.-C. Tung, M. Pavanello and L. Adamowicz, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 104309 (2012). P. Jansen, L. Semeria, L. Esteban Hofer, S. Scheidegger, J.A. Agner, H. Schmutz, and F. Merkt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 133202 (2015). D. Sprecher, J. Liu, T. Krähenmann, M. Schäfer, and F. Merkt, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 064304 (2014). M

  6. Gastroenteritis Aggressive Versus Slow Treatment For Rehydration (GASTRO). A pilot rehydration study for severe dehydration: WHO plan C versus slower rehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Kirsty A.; Gibb, Jack G.; Mpoya, Ayub; Obonyo, Nchafatso; Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Nakuya, Margeret; Evans, Jennifer A; George, Elizabeth C; Gibb, Diana M; Maitland, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) rehydration management guidelines (Plan C) for children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and severe dehydration are widely practiced in resource-poor settings, yet have never been formally evaluated in a clinical trial. A recent audit of outcome of AGE at Kilifi County Hospital, Kenya noted that 10% of children required high dependency care (20% mortality) and a number developed fluid-related complications. The fluid resuscitation trial, FEAST, conducted in African children with severe febrile illness, demonstrated higher mortality with fluid bolus therapy and raised concerns regarding the safety of rapid intravenous rehydration therapy. Those findings warrant a detailed physiological study of children’s responses to rehydration therapy incorporating quantification of myocardial performance and haemodynamic changes.  Methods: GASTRO is a multi-centre, unblinded Phase II randomised controlled trial of 120 children aged 2 months to 12 years admitted to hospital with severe dehydration secondary to AGE. Children with severe malnutrition, chronic diarrhoea and congenital/rheumatic heart disease are excluded. Children will be enrolled over 18 months in 3 centres in Kenya and Uganda and followed until 7 days post-discharge. The trial will randomise children 1:1 to standard rapid rehydration using Ringers Lactate  (WHO plan ‘C’ – 100mls/kg over 3-6 hours according to age, plus additional 0.9% saline boluses for children presenting in shock) or to a slower rehydration regimen (100mls/kg given over 8 hours and without the addition of fluid boluses). Enrolment started in November 2016 and is on-going. Primary outcome is frequency of adverse events, particularly related to cardiovascular compromise and neurological sequelae.  Secondary outcomes focus on clinical, biochemical, and physiological measures related to assessment of severity of dehydration, and response to treatment by intravenous rehydration. Discussion

  7. Gastroenteritis Aggressive Versus Slow Treatment For Rehydration (GASTRO. A pilot rehydration study for severe dehydration: WHO plan C versus slower rehydration [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty A. Houston

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The World Health Organization (WHO rehydration management guidelines (Plan C for children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE and severe dehydration are widely practiced in resource-poor settings, yet have never been formally evaluated in a clinical trial. A recent audit of outcome of AGE at Kilifi County Hospital, Kenya noted that 10% of children required high dependency care (20% mortality and a number developed fluid-related complications. The fluid resuscitation trial, FEAST, conducted in African children with severe febrile illness, demonstrated higher mortality with fluid bolus therapy and raised concerns regarding the safety of rapid intravenous rehydration therapy. Those findings warrant a detailed physiological study of children’s responses to rehydration therapy incorporating quantification of myocardial performance and haemodynamic changes.    Methods: GASTRO is a multi-centre, unblinded Phase II randomised controlled trial of 120 children aged 2 months to 12 years admitted to hospital with severe dehydration secondary to AGE. Children with severe malnutrition, chronic diarrhoea and congenital/rheumatic heart disease are excluded. Children will be enrolled over 18 months in 3 centres in Kenya and Uganda and followed until 7 days post-discharge. The trial will randomise children 1:1 to standard rapid rehydration using Ringers Lactate  (WHO plan ‘C’ – 100mls/kg over 3-6 hours according to age, plus additional 0.9% saline boluses for children presenting in shock or to a slower rehydration regimen (100mls/kg given over 8 hours and without the addition of fluid boluses. Enrolment started in November 2016 and is on-going. Primary outcome is frequency of adverse events, particularly related to cardiovascular compromise and neurological sequelae.  Secondary outcomes focus on clinical, biochemical, and physiological measures related to assessment of severity of dehydration, and response to treatment by intravenous

  8. Investigation of the feasibility to use Zeeman-effect background correction for the graphite furnace determination of phosphorus using high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry as a diagnostic tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepri, Fabio G. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard, E-mail: w.bernardo@terra.com.b [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Dessuy, Morgana B.; Vale, Maria Goreti R. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre-RS (Brazil); Bohrer, Denise [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97110-905 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T.C. de [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Analytical Biotechnology, Julianalaan 137, 2628 BL Delft (Netherlands); Department of Analytical Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 - S12, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Mao Donghuang; Becker-Ross, Helmut [ISAS, Institute for Analytical Sciences, Department of Interface Spectroscopy, Albert-Einstein Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    The determination of phosphorus by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry at the non-resonance line at 213.6 nm, and the capability of Zeeman-effect background correction (Z-BC) to deal with the fine-structured background absorption due to the PO molecule have been investigated in the presence of selected chemical modifiers. Two line source atomic absorption spectrometers, one with a longitudinally heated and the other with a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer have been used in this study, as well as two prototype high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometers, one of which had a longitudinally arranged magnet at the furnace. It has been found that Z-BC is capable correcting very well the background caused by the PO molecule, and also that of the NO molecule, which has been encountered when the Pd + Ca mixed modifier was used. Both spectra exhibited some Zeeman splitting, which, however, did not cause any artifacts or correction errors. The practical significance of this study is to confirm that accurate results can be obtained for the determination of phosphorus using Z-BC. The best sensitivity with a characteristic mass of m{sub 0} = 11 ng P has been obtained with the pure Pd modifier, which also caused the lowest background level. The characteristic mass obtained with the mixed Pd+Ca modifier depended on the equipment used and was between m{sub 0} = 9 ng P and m{sub 0} = 15 ng P, and the background signal was higher. The major problem of Z-BC remains the relatively restricted linear working range.

  9. CCR5Δ32 Polymorphism Associated with a Slower Rate Disease Progression in a Cohort of RR-MS Sicilian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalia D'Angelo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS disease is carried through inflammatory and degenerative stages. Based on clinical feaures, it can be subdivided into three groups: relapsing-remitting MS, secondary progressive MS, and primary progressive MS. Multiple sclerosis has a multifactorial etiology with an interplay of genetic predisposition, environmental factors, and autoimmune inflammatory mechanism in which play a key role CC-chemokines and its receptors. In this paper, we studied the frequency of CCR5 gene Δ32 allele in a cohort of Sicilian RR-MS patients comparing with general Sicilian population. Also, we evaluate the association between this commonly polymorphism and disability development and age of disease onset in the same cohort. Our results show that presence of CCR5Δ32 is significantly associated with expanded disability status scale score (EDSS but not with age of disease onset.

  10. Slower nicotine metabolism among postmenopausal Polish smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmider, Leon; Delijewski, Marcin; Koszowski, Bartosz; Sobczak, Andrzej; Benowitz, Neal L; Goniewicz, Maciej L

    2018-06-01

    A non-invasive phenotypic indicator of the rate of nicotine metabolism is nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR) defined as a ratio of two major metabolites of nicotine - trans-3'-hydroxycotinine/cotinine. The rate of nicotine metabolism has important clinical implications for the likelihood of successful quitting with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). We conducted a study to measure NMR among Polish smokers. In a cross-sectional study of 180 daily cigarette smokers (42% men; average age 34.6±13.0), we collected spot urine samples and measured trans-3'-hydroxycotinine (3-HC) and cotinine levels with LC-MS/MS method. We calculated NMR (molar ratio) and analyzed variations in NMR among groups of smokers. In the whole study group, an average NMR was 4.8 (IQR 3.4-7.3). The group of women below 51 years had significantly greater NMR compared to the rest of the population (6.4; IQR 4.1-8.8 vs. 4.3; IQR 2.8-6.4). No differences were found among group ages of male smokers. This is a first study to describe variations in nicotine metabolism among Polish smokers. Our findings indicate that young women metabolize nicotine faster than the rest of population. This finding is consistent with the known effects of estrogen to induce CYP2A6 activity. Young women may require higher doses of NRT or non-nicotine medications for most effective smoking cessation treatment. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Faster than light, slower than time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucker, R.

    1981-01-01

    The problem with faster-than-light travel is that, in the framework of Special Relativity, it is logically equivalent to time-travel. The problem with time-travel is that it leads to two types of paradoxes. The paradoxes, and the various means of skirting them, are all discussed here. Virtually all the examples are drawn from science-fiction novels, which are a large and neglected source of thought-experiments. (Auth.)

  12. A history of childhood trauma is associated with slower improvement rates: Findings from a one-year follow-up study of patients with a first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aas, Monica; Andreassen, Ole A; Aminoff, Sofie R; Færden, Ann; Romm, Kristin L; Nesvåg, Ragnar; Berg, Akiah O; Simonsen, Carmen; Agartz, Ingrid; Melle, Ingrid

    2016-05-04

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether childhood trauma was associated with more severe clinical features in patients with first-episode psychosis, both at the initial assessment and after one year. Ninety-six patients with a first-episode of a DSM-IV diagnosis of psychosis, in addition to 264 healthy controls from the same catchment area, were recruited to the TOP NORMENT study. A history of childhood trauma was obtained using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Function and symptom severity were measured using the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) Scale divided into function (GAF-F) and symptoms (GAF-S), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS). All clinical assessments were completed at two time points: At an initial assessment within the first year of initiating treatment for psychosis and after one year. Childhood trauma was associated with significantly reduced global functioning and more severe clinical symptoms at both baseline and follow-up, whereas emotional neglect was associated with a significantly reduced improvement rate for global functioning (GAF-F) over the follow-up period. Our data indicate that patients with first-episode psychosis who report a history of childhood trauma constitute a subgroup characterized by more severe clinical features over the first year of treatment, as well as slower improvement rates.

  13. Application of Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with high-frequency modulation polarization for the direct determination of aluminum, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, manganese, nickel, lead, and thallium in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanenko, Natalya B; Solovyev, Nikolay D; Ivanenko, Anatoly A; Ganeev, Alexander A

    2012-10-01

    Determination of aluminum (Al), beryllium (Be), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), mercury (Hg), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and thallium (Tl) concentrations in human blood using high-frequency modulation polarization Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) was performed. No sample digestion was used in the current study. Blood samples were diluted with deionized water or 0.1 % (m/v) Triton X-100 solution for Tl. Dilution factors ranged from 1/5 per volume for Be and Tl to 1/20 per volume for Cd and Pb. For Tl, Cd, and Hg, noble metals (gold, platinum, rhodium, etc.) were applied as surface modifiers. To mitigate chloride interference, 2 % (m/v) solution of NH(4)NO(3) was used as matrix modifier for Tl and Ni assessment. The use of Pd(NO(3))(2) as oxidative modifier was necessary for blood Hg and Tl measurement. Validation of the methods was performed by analyzing two-level reference material Seronorm. The precision of the designed methods as relative SD was between 4 and 12 % (middle of a dynamic range) depending on the element. For additional validation, spiked blood samples were analyzed. Limits of detection (LoDs, 3σ, n = 10) for undiluted blood samples were 2.0 μg L(-1) for Al, 0.08 μg L(-1) for Be, 0.10 μg L(-1) for Cd, 2.2 μg L(-1) for Cr, 7 μg L(-1) for Hg, 0.4 μg L(-1) for Mn, 2.3 μg L(-1) for Ni, 3.4 μg L(-1) for Pb, and 0.5 μg L(-1) for Tl. The LoDs achieved allowed determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Mn, Ni, and Pb at both toxic and background levels. Be, Hg, and Tl could be reliably measured at toxic levels only. The methods developed are used for clinical diagnostics and biological monitoring of work-related exposure.

  14. Zeeman effects in heavy electron superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michal, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the properties of newly discovered strongly correlated electron compounds is a considerable challenge for both fundamental matters and long-term industrial impact. Experimental activity on heavy electron metals and superconductors has lead to highlighting effects that depart from current knowledge. The thesis is aimed at modelling effects that have been observed in response to magnetic field in the heavy electron superconductor CeCoIn 5 . This consists of two parts. In the first time we deal with the vortex lattice state anomalous local magnetic field space variations as highlighted by small angle neutron scattering and muon spin rotation experiment. On the basis of the Ginzburg-Landau theory with account of spin effect, we analyse the local field inhomogeneity in the vortex lattice and derive expressions for the neutron scattering form factors and muon spin rotation static linewidth. The anomalous experimental data are shown to be result of spin driven supercurrents which circulate around the vortex cores and lead to an increase with external field in the internal field inhomogeneity on a distance of the order of the superconducting coherence length from the vortex axis. The importance of the effect is controlled by a single quantity (the Maki parameter). The second part is on nearly commensurate spin density wave transition in a quasi two-dimensional superconductor. It is motivated by observation of the confinement of spin density wave ordering inside the superconducting state of CeCoIn 5 in magnetic field. In the frame of the spin-fermion formulation we propose a mechanism for the ground state transition consisting in the field-induced slowing down of a collective spin density fluctuation mode (spin-exciton) to static ordering. This represents a scenario by which the transition to spin ordering is intrinsically related to superconductivity. (author) [fr

  15. Quantum computers based on electron spins controlled by ultrafast off-resonant single optical pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan M; Fu, Kai-Mei C; Ladd, Thaddeus D; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2007-07-27

    We describe a fast quantum computer based on optically controlled electron spins in charged quantum dots that are coupled to microcavities. This scheme uses broadband optical pulses to rotate electron spins and provide the clock signal to the system. Nonlocal two-qubit gates are performed by phase shifts induced by electron spins on laser pulses propagating along a shared waveguide. Numerical simulations of this scheme demonstrate high-fidelity single-qubit and two-qubit gates with operation times comparable to the inverse Zeeman frequency.

  16. Transient time of an Ising machine based on injection-locked laser network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takata, Kenta; Utsunomiya, Shoko; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    We numerically study the dynamics and frequency response of the recently proposed Ising machine based on the polarization degrees of freedom of an injection-locked laser network (Utsunomiya et al 2011 Opt. Express 19 18091). We simulate various anti-ferromagnetic Ising problems, including the ones with symmetric Ising and Zeeman coefficients, which enable us to study the problem size up to M = 1000. Transient time, to reach a steady-state polarization configuration after a given Ising problem is mapped onto the system, is inversely proportional to the locking bandwidth and does not scale exponentially with the problem size. In the Fourier analysis with first-order linearization approximation, we find that the cut-off frequency of a system's response is almost identical to the locking bandwidth, which supports the time-domain analysis. It is also shown that the Zeeman term, which is created by the horizontally polarized injection signal from the master laser, serves as an initial driving force on the system and contributes to the transient time in addition to the inverse locking bandwidth. (paper)

  17. Africanized honeybees are slower learners than their European counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvillon, Margaret J.; Degrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Gronenberg, Wulfila

    2010-02-01

    Does cognitive ability always correlate with a positive fitness consequence? Previous research in both vertebrates and invertebrates provides mixed results. Here, we compare the learning and memory abilities of Africanized honeybees ( Apis mellifera scutellata hybrid) and European honeybees ( Apis mellifera ligustica). The range of the Africanized honeybee continues to expand, superseding the European honeybee, which led us to hypothesize that they might possess greater cognitive capabilities as revealed by a classical conditioning assay. Surprisingly, we found that fewer Africanized honeybees learn to associate an odor with a reward. Additionally, fewer Africanized honeybees remembered the association a day later. While Africanized honeybees are replacing European honeybees, our results show that they do so despite displaying a relatively poorer performance on an associative learning paradigm.

  18. Slower speed and stronger coupling: adaptive mechanisms of chaos synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Fan

    2002-06-01

    We show that two initially weakly coupled chaotic systems can achieve synchronization by adaptively reducing their speed and/or enhancing the coupling strength. Explicit adaptive algorithms for speed reduction and coupling enhancement are provided. We apply these algorithms to the synchronization of two coupled Lorenz systems. It is found that after a long-time adaptive process, the two coupled chaotic systems can achieve synchronization with almost the minimum required coupling-speed ratio.

  19. Does Africa grow slower than Asia and Latin America?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Paap (Richard); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); D.J.C. van Dijk (Dick)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we address the question whether countries on the African continent have lower average growth rates in real GDP per capita than countries in Asia and Latin America. In contrast to previous studies, we do not aggregate the data, nor do we a priori assign countries to

  20. Rule-Based Reasoning Is Fast and Belief-Based Reasoning Can Be Slow: Challenging Current Explanations of Belief-Bias and Base-Rate Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Ian R.; Gibb, Maia; Thompson, Valerie A.

    2017-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that belief-based reasoning is fast and automatic, whereas rule-based reasoning is slower and more effortful. Dual-Process theories of reasoning rely on this speed-asymmetry explanation to account for a number of reasoning phenomena, such as base-rate neglect and belief-bias. The goal of the current study was to test this…

  1. Acoustic frequency filter based on anisotropic topological phononic crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zeguo

    2017-11-02

    We present a design of acoustic frequency filter based on a two-dimensional anisotropic phononic crystal. The anisotropic band structure exhibits either a directional or a combined (global + directional) bandgap at certain frequency regions, depending on the geometry. When the time-reversal symmetry is broken, it may introduce a topologically nontrivial bandgap. The induced nontrivial bandgap and the original directional bandgap result in various interesting wave propagation behaviors, such as frequency filter. We develop a tight-binding model to characterize the effective Hamiltonian of the system, from which the contribution of anisotropy is explicitly shown. Different from the isotropic cases, the Zeeman-type splitting is not linear and the anisotropic bandgap makes it possible to achieve anisotropic propagation characteristics along different directions and at different frequencies.

  2. Acoustic frequency filter based on anisotropic topological phononic crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zeguo; Zhao, Jiajun; Mei, Jun; Wu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    We present a design of acoustic frequency filter based on a two-dimensional anisotropic phononic crystal. The anisotropic band structure exhibits either a directional or a combined (global + directional) bandgap at certain frequency regions, depending on the geometry. When the time-reversal symmetry is broken, it may introduce a topologically nontrivial bandgap. The induced nontrivial bandgap and the original directional bandgap result in various interesting wave propagation behaviors, such as frequency filter. We develop a tight-binding model to characterize the effective Hamiltonian of the system, from which the contribution of anisotropy is explicitly shown. Different from the isotropic cases, the Zeeman-type splitting is not linear and the anisotropic bandgap makes it possible to achieve anisotropic propagation characteristics along different directions and at different frequencies.

  3. VALIDACIÓN DEL MÉTODO ANALÍTICO PARA LA DETERMINACIÓN DE MERCURIO TOTAL EN SANGRE HUMANA POR ESPECTROFOTOMETRÍA DE ABSORCIÓN ATÓMICA ZEEMAN RA-915+ CON EL MÓDULO DE PIROLISIS PYRO-915+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Ramírez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo describe la metodología de validación para la técnica de identificación de mercurio total en muestras de sangre por espectrofotometría de absorción atómica Zeeman RA-915+ con el módulo de Pirólisis PYRO-915+, adecuada para la determinación directa de las concentraciones de mercurio total en varias matrices, que a diferencia de otras técnicas de atomización (horno de grafito, vapor frio, o generador de hidruros no necesita un pre-tratamiento de la muestra. Con la aplicación de ésta validación en la realización de los análisis se brinda la confiabilidad necesaria en la obtención y emisión de los resultados. La mayoría de parámetros de la validación, se sometieron a análisis de varianza tipo ANOVA con un nivel de confianza del 95 %. Se obtuvo un límite de detección de 2.16 µg/L, un límite de cuantificación de 5.54 µg/L y una linealidad en el rango de 5.54 µg/L a 100 µg/L, adicionalmente, se evaluó exactitud y precisión, obteniendo resultados favorables para el análisis. El cálculo de la incertidumbre expandida para este método fue 0.610 µg/L.  

  4. Exact solution of the classical mechanical quadratic Zeeman effect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While the radial distance is defined in a closed form as a transcendental function of the image-circular angle, the corresponding orbit angle and time variables are found in the form of two convergent series expansions. The latter two variables are especially contracted, thereby leading to a precession of the open cycles ...

  5. Zeeman and orbital limiting magnetic fields in cuprates: The ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598, ... In cuprates, in a view where pairing correlations set in at the pseudogap ... the field Hc2 bounding the superconducting response and the pseudogap closing field.

  6. VLA Zeeman Observations of the NGC 6334 Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, E. A.; Sarma, A. P.; Troland, T. H.

    2004-05-01

    We present OH 1665 and 1667 MHz observations of the NGC 6334 complex taken with the Very Large Array in the BnA configuration. We have combined our data with the lower resolution CnB data of Sarma et al (1999), in order to perform a detailed study of Source A, a compact continuum source in the SW region of the complex. Our observations reveal magnetic fields with peak values of the order of 700μ G toward Source A. Virial estimates presented indicate the significance of the magnetic field in the support of the molecular cloud against gravitational collapse.

  7. Zeeman-Doppler Imaging of active late-type stars

    OpenAIRE

    Kopf, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Stellare Magnetfelder spielen eine wichtige Rolle bei der Entstehung und Entwicklung von Sternen. Leider entziehen sie sich aber, aufgrund ihrer großen Entfernung zur Erde, einer direkten Beobachtung. Dies gilt zumindest für derzeitige und in naher Zukunft zur Verfügung stehende Instrumente. Um aber beispielsweise zu verstehen, ob Magnetfelder durch einen Dynamoprozess generiert werden oder Überbleibsel der Sternentstehung sind, ist es zwingend erforderlich, die Oberflächenstruktur und die ze...

  8. Zeeman effect: new outlook on old perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turbiner, A.V.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of hydrogen atom placed in constant external magnetic field is studied. The properties of ordinary perturbation theory (in powers of the field) in the framework of a new approach proposed earlier are investigated. The ground state are considered in detailed while the excited states are discussed only in brief. It is shown that the ''wave function corrections'' with in this approach are simpler than within ordinary one and contain a finite number of harmonics with polynomial coefficients. Some coefficients of these polynomials are found explicitly

  9. Hanle-Zeeman Scattering Matrix for Magnetic Dipole Transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megha, A.; Sampoorna, M.; Nagendra, K. N.; Sankarasubramanian, K., E-mail: megha@iiap.res.in, E-mail: sampoorna@iiap.res.in, E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in, E-mail: sankar@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bengaluru 560 034 (India)

    2017-06-01

    The polarization of the light that is scattered by the coronal ions is influenced by the anisotropic illumination from the photosphere and the magnetic field structuring in the solar corona. The properties of the coronal magnetic fields can be well studied by understanding the polarization properties of coronal forbidden emission lines that arise from magnetic dipole ( M 1) transitions in the highly ionized atoms that are present in the corona. We present the classical scattering theory of the forbidden lines for a more general case of arbitrary-strength magnetic fields. We derive the scattering matrix for M 1 transitions using the classical magnetic dipole model of Casini and Lin and applying the scattering matrix approach of Stenflo. We consider a two-level atom model and neglect collisional effects. The scattering matrix so derived is used to study the Stokes profiles formed in coronal conditions in those regions where the radiative excitations dominate collisional excitations. To this end, we take into account the integration over a cone of an unpolarized radiation from the solar disk incident on the scattering atoms. Furthermore, we also integrate along the line of sight to calculate the emerging polarized line profiles. We consider radial and dipole magnetic field configurations and spherically symmetric density distributions. For our studies we adopt the atomic parameters corresponding to the [Fe xiii] 10747 Å coronal forbidden line. We also discuss the nature of the scattering matrix for M 1 transitions and compare it with that for the electric dipole ( E 1) transitions.

  10. Base

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjulmand, Lise-Lotte; Johansson, Christer

    2004-01-01

    BASE - Engelsk basisgrammatik er resultatet af Lise-Lotte Hjulmands grundige bearbejdning og omfattende revidering af Christer Johanssons Engelska basgrammatik. Grammatikken adskiller sig fra det svenske forlæg på en lang række punkter. Den er bl.a. tilpasset til et dansk publikum og det danske...

  11. Internalizing versus Externalizing Control: Different Ways to Perform a Time-Based Prospective Memory Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tracy; Loft, Shayne; Humphreys, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    "Time-based prospective memory" (PM) refers to performing intended actions at a future time. Participants with time-based PM tasks can be slower to perform ongoing tasks (costs) than participants without PM tasks because internal control is required to maintain the PM intention or to make prospective-timing estimates. However, external…

  12. Mn concentration and quantum size effects on spin-polarized transport through CdMnTe based magnetic resonant tunneling diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnasri, S; Abdi-Ben Nasrallahl, S; Sfina, N; Lazzari, J L; Saïd, M

    2012-11-01

    Theoretical studies on spin-dependent transport in magnetic tunneling diodes with giant Zeeman splitting of the valence band are carried out. The studied structure consists of two nonmagnetic layers CdMgTe separated by a diluted magnetic semiconductor barrier CdMnTe, the hole is surrounded by two p-doped CdTe layers. Based on the parabolic valence band effective mass approximation and the transfer matrix method, the magnetization and the current densities for holes with spin-up and spin-down are studied in terms of the Mn concentration, the well and barrier thicknesses as well as the voltage. It is found that, the current densities depend strongly on these parameters and by choosing suitable values; this structure can be a good spin filter. Such behaviors are originated from the enhancement and suppression in the spin-dependent resonant states.

  13. Updating Assessment Styles: Website Development Rather than Report Writing for Project Based Learning Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    While teaching methods tend to be updated frequently, the implementation of new innovative assessment tools is much slower. For example project based learning has become popular as a teaching technique, however, the assessment tends to be via traditional reports. This paper reports on the implementation and evaluation of using website development…

  14. Portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fan; Yang, Renfu; Nian, Feng; Zhang, Zhenwei; Cui, Yongshun; Zhao, Huan; Wang, Nuanrang; Feng, Keming

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a portable atomic frequency standard based on coherent population trapping is designed and demonstrated. To achieve a portable prototype, in the system, a single transverse mode 795nm VCSEL modulated by a 3.4GHz RF source is used as a pump laser which generates coherent light fields. The pump beams pass through a vapor cell containing atom gas and buffer gas. This vapor cell is surrounded by a magnetic shield and placed inside a solenoid which applies a longitudinal magnetic field to lift the Zeeman energy levels' degeneracy and to separate the resonance signal, which has no first-order magnetic field dependence, from the field-dependent resonances. The electrical control system comprises two control loops. The first one locks the laser wavelength to the minimum of the absorption spectrum; the second one locks the modulation frequency and output standard frequency. Furthermore, we designed the micro physical package and realized the locking of a coherent population trapping atomic frequency standard portable prototype successfully. The short-term frequency stability of the whole system is measured to be 6×10-11 for averaging times of 1s, and reaches 5×10-12 at an averaging time of 1000s.

  15. Moving Phones Tick Slower: Creating an Android App to Demonstrate Time Dilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Bret; Zhai, Yunxiao

    2016-05-01

    Smartphones and tablets are packed with sensors that allow us to take experimental data, essentially making them mobile physics labs. Apps exist that make it easy to capture and analyze data from these sensors, allowing users to study diverse phenomena such as free fall acceleration, the speed of sound, radioactivity, and many others. Commonly, the use of apps in the physics classroom focuses on existing apps rather than on the creation of apps themselves. This is for a good reason-writing an app usually requires advanced knowledge of programming languages and experience with app design. These skills are generally regarded as beyond the typical physics student. However, there are app development environments, such as MIT App Inventor 2 for Android, which make the process of creating an app and utilizing the sensors much more accessible to students. Putting the ability to create and configure apps within the reach of students can also help integrate computation into the curriculum. In this article, we discuss our creation of an Android app, Time Dilation Calculator, done as part of a senior undergraduate capstone project, which uses App Inventor and a mobile device's global positioning system (GPS) receiver to calculate the time dilation effect of special relativity.

  16. Moving Phones Tick Slower: Creating an Android App to Demonstrate Time Dilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Bret; Zhai, Yunxiao

    2016-01-01

    Smartphones and tablets are packed with sensors that allow us to take experimental data, essentially making them mobile physics labs. Apps exist that make it easy to capture and analyze data from these sensors, allowing users to study diverse phenomena such as free fall acceleration, the speed of sound,radioactivity, and many others. Commonly, the…

  17. Dynamic modulation of epileptic high frequency oscillations by the phase of slower cortical rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, George M; Wong, Simeon M; Anderson, Ryan A; Singh-Cadieux, Gabrielle; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Ochi, Ayako; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Okanishi, Tohru; Valiante, Taufik A; Donner, Elizabeth; Rutka, James T; Snead, O Carter; Doesburg, Sam M

    2014-01-01

    Pathological high frequency oscillations (pHFOs) have been proposed to be robust markers of epileptic cortex. Oscillatory activity below this frequency range has been shown to be modulated by phase of lower frequency oscillations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dynamic cross-frequency interactions involving pHFOs are concentrated within the epileptogenic cortex. Intracranial electroencephalographic recordings from 17 children with medically-intractable epilepsy secondary to focal cortical dysplasia were obtained. A time-resolved analysis was performed to determine topographic concentrations and dynamic changes in cross-frequency amplitude-to-phase coupling (CFC). CFC between pHFOs and the phase of theta and alpha rhythms was found to be significantly elevated in the seizure-onset zone compared to non-epileptic regions (pfrequency oscillations at which pHFO amplitudes were maximal was inconsistent at seizure initiation, yet consistently at the trough of the low frequency rhythm at seizure termination. Amplitudes of pHFOs were most significantly modulated by the phase of alpha-band oscillations (p<0.01). These results suggest that increased CFC between pHFO amplitude and alpha phase may constitute a marker of epileptogenic brain areas and may be relevant for understanding seizure dynamics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Learning to Think Slower: Review of Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman (2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel L. Tunstall

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Kahneman. Thinking, Fast and Slow (New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux 499 pp. ISBN 978-0374275631. As an expansive review of Kahneman and others' work over the past half-century in understanding human decision-making, Thinking, Fast and Slow provides Numeracy readers much to consider for both pedagogy and research. In this review, we outline Kahneman's core argument—that humans use both rash (emotional System 1 thinking and slow (logical System 2 thinking—then discuss how such systems might be addressed in a quantitative literacy classroom.

  19. Handwriting speed in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: are they really slower?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunty, Mellissa M; Barnett, Anna L; Wilmut, Kate; Plumb, Mandy S

    2013-09-01

    Handwriting difficulties are often included in descriptions of Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). They are cited as the most common reason for referral to health professionals following parent and teacher concerns about slow and untidy writing. The aim of this study was to compare handwriting performance in English children with and without DCD across a range of writing tasks, to gain a better understanding of the nature of 'slowness' so commonly reported. Twenty-eight 8-14 year-old children with a diagnosis of DCD participated in the study, with 28 typically developing age and gender matched controls. Participants completed the four handwriting tasks from the Detailed Assessment of Speed of Handwriting (DASH) and wrote their own name; all on a digitising writing tablet. The number of words written, speed of pen movements and the time spent pausing during the tasks were calculated. The findings confirmed what many professionals report, that children with DCD produce less text than their peers. However, this was not due to slow movement execution, but rather a higher percentage of time spent pausing. Discussion centres on the understanding of the pausing phenomenon in children with DCD and areas for further research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Large centric diatoms allocate more cellular nitrogen to photosynthesis to counter slower RUBISCO turnover rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaping eWu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms contribute ~40% of primary production in the modern ocean and encompass the largest cell size range of any phytoplankton group. Diatom cell size influences their nutrient uptake, photosynthetic light capture, carbon export efficiency, and growth responses to increasing pCO2. We therefore examined nitrogen resource allocations to the key protein complexes mediating photosynthesis across six marine centric diatoms, spanning 5 orders of magnitude in cell volume, under past, current and predicted future pCO2 levels, in balanced growth under nitrogen repletion. Membrane bound photosynthetic protein concentrations declined with cell volume in parallel with cellular concentrations of total protein, total nitrogen and chlorophyll. Larger diatom species, however, allocated a greater fraction (by 3.5 fold of their total cellular nitrogen to the soluble RUBISCO carbon fixation complex than did smaller species. Carbon assimilation per unit of RUBISCO large subunit (C RbcL-1 s-1 decreased with cell volume, from ~8 to ~2 C RbcL-1 s-1 from the smallest to the largest cells. Whilst a higher allocation of cellular nitrogen to RUBISCO in larger cells increases the burden upon their nitrogen metabolism, the higher RUBISCO allocation buffers their lower achieved RUBISCO turnover rate to enable larger diatoms to maintain carbon assimilation rates per total protein comparable to small diatoms. Individual species responded to increased pCO2, but cell size effects outweigh pCO2 responses across the diatom species size range examined. In large diatoms a higher nitrogen cost for RUBISCO exacerbates the higher nitrogen requirements associated with light absorption, so the metabolic cost to maintain photosynthesis is a cell size-dependent trait.

  1. Disease severity and slower psychomotor speed in adults with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Dana R; Metti, Andrea; Butters, Meryl A; Mettenburg, Joseph M; Rosano, Caterina; Novelli, Enrico M

    2017-09-26

    Psychomotor slowing is common in children with sickle cell disease (SCD), but little is known about its severity in adults. We conducted a cross-sectional study to quantify psychomotor speed, measured with the digit symbol substitution test (DSST), in relationship with disease severity in adults with SCD attending an outpatient clinic (n = 88, age 36.3 years). Genotype was used to group patients in "severe" (homozygous for hemoglobin S or compound heterozygous with β 0 thalassemia) or "moderate" groups (compound heterozygous for HbS, with either HbC or β + thalassemia). Analyses were repeated after exclusion of patients with a history of stroke (n = 11). Mild impairment in processing speed was detectable in both the "severe" and the "moderate" group (30% and 9%, respectively; age-adjusted P = .14). Compared with the "moderate" group, those in the "severe" group had significantly lower standardized DSST scores ( P = .004), independent of adjustment for factors that differed between the groups: hemoglobin, ferritin, hydroxyurea use, blood pressure parameters, and stroke history. Results were similar after excluding patients with stroke. Psychomotor slowing in SCD differs in relationship to genotype; this difference appears unrelated to history of stroke or severity of anemia and other risk factors examined cross-sectionally. Although less prevalent, mild cognitive impairment was also detectable in patients with a less severe genotype. Longitudinal studies of SCD should include all diseases genotypes and examine factors that would reduce the risk of slow processing speed and perhaps more general cognitive impairment in each subgroup.

  2. Selective Interareal Synchronization through Gamma Frequency Differences and Slower-Rhythm Gamma Phase Reset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwick, Thomas; Bouras, Alexandros

    2017-03-01

    The communication-through-coherence (CTC) hypothesis states that a sending group of neurons will have a particularly strong effect on a receiving group if both groups oscillate in a phase-locked ("coherent") manner (Fries, 2005 , 2015 ). Here, we consider a situation with two visual stimuli, one in the focus of attention and the other distracting, resulting in two sites of excitation at an early cortical area that project to a common site in a next area. Taking a modeler's perspective, we confirm the workings of a mechanism that was proposed by Bosman et al. ( 2012 ) in the context of providing experimental evidence for the CTC hypothesis: a slightly higher gamma frequency of the attended sending site compared to the distracting site may cause selective interareal synchronization with the receiving site if combined with a slow-rhythm gamma phase reset. We also demonstrate the relevance of a slightly lower intrinsic frequency of the receiving site for this scenario. Moreover, we discuss conditions for a transition from bottom-up to top-down driven phase locking.

  3. Slower CCN growth kinetics of anthropogenic aerosol compared to biogenic aerosol observed at a rural site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantz, N. C.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Slowik, J. G.; Vlasenko, A.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2010-01-01

    Growth rates of water droplets were measured with a static diffusion cloud condensation chamber in May-June 2007 at a rural field site in Southern Ontario, Canada, 70 km north of Toronto. The observations include periods when the winds were from the south and the site was impacted by anthropogenic air from the U.S. and Southern Ontario as well as during a 5-day period of northerly wind flow when the aerosol was dominated by biogenic sources. The growth of droplets on anthropogenic size-selected particles centred at 0.1 μm diameter and composed of approximately 40% organic and 60% ammonium sulphate (AS) by mass, was delayed by on the order of 1 s compared to a pure AS aerosol. Simulations of the growth rate on monodisperse particles indicate that a lowering of the water mass accommodation coefficient from αc=1 to an average of αc=0.04 is needed (assuming an insoluble organic with hygroscopicity parameter, κorg, of zero). Simulations of the initial growth rate on polydisperse anthropogenic particles agree best with observations for αc=0.07. In contrast, the growth rate of droplets on size-selected aerosol of biogenic character, consisting of >80% organic, was similar to that of pure AS. Simulations of the predominantly biogenic polydisperse aerosol show agreement between the observations and simulations when κorg=0.2 (with upper and lower limits of 0.5 and 0.07, respectively) and αc=1. Inhibition of water uptake by the anthropogenic organic applied to an adiabatic cloud parcel model in the form of a constant low αc increases the number of droplets in a cloud compared to pure AS. If the αc is assumed to increase with increasing liquid water on the droplets, then the number of droplets decreases which could diminish the indirect climate forcing effect. The slightly lower κorg in the biogenic case decreases the number of droplets in a cloud compared to pure AS.

  4. Learning to Think Slower: Review of Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman (2011)

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel L. Tunstall; Patrick N. Beymer

    2017-01-01

    Daniel Kahneman. Thinking, Fast and Slow (New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux) 499 pp. ISBN 978-0374275631. As an expansive review of Kahneman and others' work over the past half-century in understanding human decision-making, Thinking, Fast and Slow provides Numeracy readers much to consider for both pedagogy and research. In this review, we outline Kahneman's core argument—that humans use both rash (emotional) System 1 thinking and slow (logical) System 2 thinking—then discuss how su...

  5. Space- and Ground-based Coronal Spectro-Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineschi, Silvano; Bemporad, Alessandro; Rybak, Jan; Capobianco, Gerardo

    This presentation gives an overview of the near-future perspectives of ultraviolet and visible-light spectro-polarimetric instrumentation for probing coronal magnetism from space-based and ground-based observatories. Spectro-polarimetric imaging of coronal emission-lines in the visible-light wavelength-band provides an important diagnostics tool of the coronal magnetism. The interpretation in terms of Hanle and Zeeman effect of the line-polarization in forbidden emission-lines yields information on the direction and strength of the coronal magnetic field. As study case, this presentation will describe the Torino Coronal Magnetograph (CorMag) for the spectro-polarimetric observation of the FeXIV, 530.3 nm, forbidden emission-line. CorMag - consisting of a Liquid Crystal (LC) Lyot filter and a LC linear polarimeter - has been recently installed on the Lomnicky Peak Observatory 20cm Zeiss coronagraph. The preliminary results from CorMag will be presented. The linear polarization by resonance scattering of coronal permitted line-emission in the ultraviolet (UV)can be modified by magnetic fields through the Hanle effect. Space-based UV spectro-polarimeters would provide an additional tool for the disgnostics of coronal magnetism. As a case study of space-borne UV spectro-polarimeters, this presentation will describe the future upgrade of the Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment (SCORE) to include the capability of imaging polarimetry of the HI Lyman-alpha, 121.6 nm. SCORE is a multi-wavelength imager for the emission-lines, HeII 30.4 nm and HI 121.6 nm, and visible-light broad-band emission of the polarized K-corona. SCORE has flown successfully in 2009. This presentation will describe how in future re-flights SCORE could observe the expected Hanle effect in corona with a HI Lyman-alpha polarimeter.

  6. Evaluation of finite difference and FFT-based solutions of the transport of intensity equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Zhou, Wen-Jing; Liu, Ying; Leber, Donald; Banerjee, Partha; Basunia, Mahmudunnabi; Poon, Ting-Chung

    2018-01-01

    A finite difference method is proposed for solving the transport of intensity equation. Simulation results show that although slower than fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based methods, finite difference methods are able to reconstruct the phase with better accuracy due to relaxed assumptions for solving the transport of intensity equation relative to FFT methods. Finite difference methods are also more flexible than FFT methods in dealing with different boundary conditions.

  7. Wood formation from the base to the crown in Pinus radiata: gradients of tracheid wall thickness, wood density, radial growth rate and gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheree Cato; Lisa McMillan; Lloyd Donaldson; Thomas Richardson; Craig Echt; Richard Gardner

    2006-01-01

    Wood formation was investigated at five heights along the bole for two unrelated trees of Pinus radiataBoth trees showed clear gradients in wood properties from the base to the crown. Cambial cells at the base of the tree were dividing 3.3-fold slower than those at the crown, while the average thickness of cell walls in wood was highest at the base....

  8. Determination of arsenic in petroleum refinery streams by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after multivariate optimization based on Doehlert design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassella, Ricardo J.; de Sant'Ana, Otoniel D.; Santelli, Ricardo E.

    2002-12-01

    This paper reports the development of a methodology for the determination of arsenic in petroleum refinery aqueous streams containing large amounts of unknown volatile organic compounds, employing electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with polarized Zeeman-effect background correction. In order to make the procedure applicable, the influence of chemical modification and the drying step was examined. Also, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures and the amount of nitric acid added to the sample were optimized using a multivariate approach based on Doehlert matrix. Obtained results indicate that, in this kind of sample, arsenic must be determined by standard addition procedure with a careful control of the drying step temperature and ramp pattern. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the procedure, a test was performed in six spiked samples of petroleum refinery aqueous streams and the relative errors verified in the analysis of such samples (added As between 12.5 and 190 μg l -1) ranged from -7.2 to +16.7%. The detection limit and the relative standard deviation were also calculated and the values are 68 pg and 7.5% (at 12.5 μg l -1 level), respectively.

  9. Determination of arsenic in petroleum refinery streams by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after multivariate optimization based on Doehlert design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassella, Ricardo J.; Sant'Ana, Otoniel D. de; Santelli, Ricardo E.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a methodology for the determination of arsenic in petroleum refinery aqueous streams containing large amounts of unknown volatile organic compounds, employing electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with polarized Zeeman-effect background correction. In order to make the procedure applicable, the influence of chemical modification and the drying step was examined. Also, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures and the amount of nitric acid added to the sample were optimized using a multivariate approach based on Doehlert matrix. Obtained results indicate that, in this kind of sample, arsenic must be determined by standard addition procedure with a careful control of the drying step temperature and ramp pattern. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the procedure, a test was performed in six spiked samples of petroleum refinery aqueous streams and the relative errors verified in the analysis of such samples (added As between 12.5 and 190 μg l -1 ) ranged from -7.2 to +16.7%. The detection limit and the relative standard deviation were also calculated and the values are 68 pg and 7.5% (at 12.5 μg l -1 level), respectively

  10. Fast mutual-information-based contrast enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gang; Yu, Lifang; Tian, Huawei; Huang, Xianglin; Wang, Yongbin

    2017-07-01

    Recently, T. Celik proposed an effective image contrast enhancement (CE) method based on spatial mutual information and PageRank (SMIRANK). According to the state-of-the-art evaluation criteria, it achieves the best visual enhancement quality among existing global CE methods. However, SMIRANK runs much slower than the other counterparts, such as histogram equalization (HE) and adaptive gamma correction. Low computational complexity is also required for good CE algorithms. In this paper, we novelly propose a fast SMIRANK algorithm, called FastSMIRANK. It integrates both spatial and gray-level downsampling into the generation of pixel value mapping function. Moreover, the computation of rank vectors is speeded up by replacing PageRank with a simple yet efficient row-based operation of mutual information matrix. Extensive experimental results show that the proposed FastSMIRANK could accelerate the processing speed of SMIRANK by about 20 times, and is even faster than HE. Comparable enhancement quality is preserved simultaneously.

  11. A classical treatment of the quadratic Zeeman effect in atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Laithy, M. A.; Farmer, C. M.; McDowell, M. R. C.

    1985-03-01

    A description of the non-relativistic classical motion of the electron of a hydrogen atom in the presence of a static magnetic field of arbitrary (non-relativistic) strength is given for arbitrary angular momentum. Applications are given to m = 0 and m = 3 at B = 26.877 kG.

  12. Rashba-Zeeman-effect-induced spin filtering energy windows in a quantum wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Xianbo; Nie, Wenjie; Chen, Zhaoxia; Zhou, Guanghui; Li, Fei

    2014-01-01

    We perform a numerical study on the spin-resolved transport in a quantum wire (QW) under the modulation of both Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and a perpendicular magnetic field by using the developed Usuki transfer-matrix method in combination with the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. Wide spin filtering energy windows can be achieved in this system for unpolarized spin injection. In addition, both the width of energy window and the magnitude of spin conductance within these energy windows can be tuned by varying Rashba SOC strength, which can be apprehended by analyzing the energy dispersions and spin-polarized density distributions inside the QW, respectively. Further study also demonstrates that these Rashba-SOC-controlled spin filtering energy windows show a strong robustness against disorders. These findings may not only benefit to further understand the spin-dependent transport properties of a QW in the presence of external fields but also provide a theoretical instruction to design a spin filter device.

  13. Rashba-Zeeman-effect-induced spin filtering energy windows in a quantum wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xianbo, E-mail: xxb-11@hotmail.com; Nie, Wenjie [School of Computer, Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanchang 330004 (China); Chen, Zhaoxia [School of Mechatronics Engineering, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang 330013 (China); Zhou, Guanghui [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory for Low-Dimensional Quantum Structures and Manipulation (Ministry of Education), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China); Li, Fei, E-mail: wltlifei@sina.com [Office of Scientific Research, Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanchang 330004 (China)

    2014-06-14

    We perform a numerical study on the spin-resolved transport in a quantum wire (QW) under the modulation of both Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and a perpendicular magnetic field by using the developed Usuki transfer-matrix method in combination with the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. Wide spin filtering energy windows can be achieved in this system for unpolarized spin injection. In addition, both the width of energy window and the magnitude of spin conductance within these energy windows can be tuned by varying Rashba SOC strength, which can be apprehended by analyzing the energy dispersions and spin-polarized density distributions inside the QW, respectively. Further study also demonstrates that these Rashba-SOC-controlled spin filtering energy windows show a strong robustness against disorders. These findings may not only benefit to further understand the spin-dependent transport properties of a QW in the presence of external fields but also provide a theoretical instruction to design a spin filter device.

  14. Zeeman ratchets: pure spin current generation in mesoscopic conductors with non-uniform magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheid, Matthias; Bercioux, Dario; Richter, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    We consider the possibility to employ a quantum wire realized in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) as a spin ratchet. We show that a net spin current without accompanying net charge transport can be induced in the nonlinear regime by an unbiased external driving via an ac voltage applied between the contacts at the ends of the quantum wire. To achieve this, we make use of the coupling of the electron spin to inhomogeneous magnetic fields created by ferromagnetic stripes patterned on the semiconductor heterostructure that harbors the 2DEG. Using recursive Green function techniques, we numerically study two different set-ups, consisting of one and two ferromagnetic stripes, respectively

  15. Algebra with polynomial commutation relations for Zeeman effect in Coulomb-Dirac field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasev, M.V.; Novikova, E.M.

    2005-01-01

    One studies a model of a particle motion in the field of electromagnetic monopole (the Coulomb-Dirac field) disturbed by homogeneous magnetic and inhomogeneous electric fields. The quantum averaging is followed by occurrence of the integrated system the Hamiltonian of which is represented by the algebra elements with polynomial commutation relations. One forms irreducible representations of the mentioned algebra and its hypergeometric coherent states. One obtains the representation of the eigenfunction of the assumption problem and specifies the asymptotics of eigenvalues in the first order of perturbation theory [ru

  16. Algebraic theory of Stark-Zeeman dynamic effect in hydrogen-like atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fursa, D.V.; Yudin, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of calculating time evolution operator within the given n-shell (here n is main quantum number) for the hydrogen atom located in non-stationary electric and magnetic fields is under investigation. Making use of the Fock SO(4) group reduces this problem to the set of problems with linear realization of the dynamic symmetry group for which the evolution operator is the operator of corresponding groups representation. The types of evolution operator parametrization in the form of exponents product (the Wei-Norman method) any by means of D-functions connected with Euler angles and Cayley-Klein parameters are discussed. It is shown that the problem of evolution operator calculation can be reduced to investigation of a pair of two-level systems. 35 refs

  17. The Hanle and Zeeman Polarization Signals of the Solar Ca II 8542 angstromLine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpán, Jiří; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 826, č. 1 (2016), L10/1-L10/6 ISSN 2041-8205 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-16861S Grant - others:COST Action(XE) MP1104 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : line profiles * polarization * radiative transfer Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.522, year: 2016

  18. Ultrathin Epitaxial Ferromagneticγ-Fe2O3Layer as High Efficiency Spin Filtering Materials for Spintronics Device Based on Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng

    2016-06-01

    In spintronics, identifying an effective technique for generating spin-polarized current has fundamental importance. The spin-filtering effect across a ferromagnetic insulating layer originates from unequal tunneling barrier heights for spin-up and spin-down electrons, which has shown great promise for use in different ferromagnetic materials. However, the low spin-filtering efficiency in some materials can be ascribed partially to the difficulty in fabricating high-quality thin film with high Curie temperature and/or partially to the improper model used to extract the spin-filtering efficiency. In this work, a new technique is successfully developed to fabricate high quality, ferrimagnetic insulating γ-Fe2O3 films as spin filter. To extract the spin-filtering effect of γ-Fe2O3 films more accurately, a new model is proposed based on Fowler–Nordheim tunneling and Zeeman effect to obtain the spin polarization of the tunneling currents. Spin polarization of the tunneled current can be as high as −94.3% at 2 K in γ-Fe2O3 layer with 6.5 nm thick, and the spin polarization decays monotonically with temperature. Although the spin-filter effect is not very high at room temperature, this work demonstrates that spinel ferrites are very promising materials for spin injection into semiconductors at low temperature, which is important for development of novel spintronics devices. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  19. MEMS Gyroscopes Based on Acoustic Sagnac Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the design, fabrication and preliminary test results of a novel microelectromechanical systems (MEMS device—the acoustic gyroscope. The unique operating mechanism is based on the “acoustic version” of the Sagnac effect in fiber-optic gyros. The device measures the phase difference between two sound waves traveling in opposite directions, and correlates the signal to the angular velocity of the hosting frame. As sound travels significantly slower than light and develops a larger phase change within the same path length, the acoustic gyro can potentially outperform fiber-optic gyros in sensitivity and form factor. It also promises superior stability compared to vibratory MEMS gyros as the design contains no moving parts and is largely insensitive to mechanical stress or temperature. We have carried out systematic simulations and experiments, and developed a series of processes and design rules to implement the device.

  20. Metamodeling for Business Model Design : Facilitating development and communication of Business Model Canvas (BMC) models with an OMG standards-based metamodel.

    OpenAIRE

    Hauksson, Hilmar

    2013-01-01

    Interest for business models and business modeling has increased rapidly since the mid-1990‘s and there are numerous approaches used to create business models. The business model concept has many definitions which can lead to confusion and slower progress in the research and development of business models. A business model ontology (BMO) was created in 2004 where the business model concept was conceptualized based on an analysis of existing literature. A few years later the Business Model Can...

  1. Effect of Early Intensive Care on Recovery From Whiplash-Associated Disorders: Results of a Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillgate, Eva; Côté, Pierre; Cassidy, J David; Boyle, Eleanor; Carroll, Linda; Holm, Lena W

    2016-05-01

    To determine whether the results from previous research suggesting that early intensive health care delays recovery from whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) were confounded by expectations of recovery and whether the association between early health care intensity and time to recovery varies across patterns of health care. Population-based inception cohort. All adults (≥18y) injured in motor vehicle collisions who received treatment from a regulated health professional or reported their injuries to the single provincially administered motor vehicle insurer. Participants with WAD (N=5204). Self-report visits to physicians, chiropractors, physiotherapists, massage therapists, and other professionals during the first 42 days postcollision were used to define health care intensity. Not applicable. Self-perceived recovery. Individuals with high utilization health care had slower recovery independent of expectation of recovery and other confounders. Compared with individuals who reported low utilization of physician services, recovery was slower for those with high health care utilization, regardless of the type of profession. For instance, those with high physician (hazard rate ratio [HRR]=.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], .42-.75), physician and high physiotherapy utilization (HRR=.68; 95% CI, .61-.77), physician and high chiropractor utilization (HRR=.74; 95% CI, .64-.85), and physician and high massage therapy utilization (HRR=.78; 95% CI, .68-.90) had significantly slower recovery. Our study adds to the existing evidence that early intensive care is associated with slower recovery from WAD, independent of expectation of recovery. The results have policy implications and suggest that the optimal management of WADs focuses on reassurance and education instead of intensive care. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Construction of an apparatus for the magnetic capture of fermionic lithium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochim, S.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis reports on the construction of an apparatus for the magneto-optical trapping of the fermionic 6 Li-Isotope. This represents a first step towards experiments on the quantum degeneracy of dilute fermionic gases. The magneto-optical trap (MOT) will serve as a cold atom source for loading an optical trap. The apparatus consists of a laser system that excites the two 6 Li-D 2 -lines at 671 nm, an arrangement of coils generating the magnetic fields necessary to operate the MOT and a Zeeman slower, and a UHV-apparatus. The MOT is loaded from a thermal atomic beam. The Zeeman slower decelerates atoms with a velocity smaller than 600 m/s to about 40 m/s, so that they can be captured in the MOT. We expect to trap at least 10 8 atoms at a temperature of about 400 μK. (orig.)

  3. Phenomenological and ratio bifurcations of a class of discrete time stochastic processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diks, C.G.H.; Wagener, F.O.O.

    2011-01-01

    Zeeman proposed a classification of stochastic dynamical systems based on the Morse classification of their invariant probability densities; the associated bifurcations are the ‘phenomenological bifurcations’ of L. Arnold. The classification is however not invariant under diffeomorphisms of the

  4. New Structure Design and Simulation of Brake by Wire System Based on Giant-magnetostrictive Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changbao CHU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Existing electronic mechanical brake by wire system has several disadvantages. For instance, system actuators are complex, response speed slower, larger vibration noise, etc. This paper discusses a new type brake by wire system based on giant-magnetostrictive material. The new type brake by wire system model was set up under Matlab/Simulink software environment. PID control method was used to control the brake by wire system. Simulation results shows that the new type brake by wire system achieves better braking performance compared with hydraulic braking system. This work provides a new idea for researching automobile brake by wire system.

  5. Controllable SET process in O-Ti-Sb-Te based phase change memory for synaptic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kun; Li, Ruiheng; Chen, Xin; Wang, Yong; Shen, Jiabin; Xia, Mengjiao; Lv, Shilong; Ji, Zhenguo; Song, Zhitang

    2018-02-01

    The nonlinear resistance change and small bit resolution of phase change memory (PCM) under identical operation pulses will limit its performance as a synaptic device. The octahedral Ti-Te units in Ti-Sb-Te, regarded as nucleation seeds, are degenerated when Ti is bonded with O, causing a slower crystallization and a controllable SET process in PCM cells. A linear resistance change under identical pulses, a resolution of ˜8 bits, and an ON/OFF ratio of ˜102 has been achieved in O-Ti-Sb-Te based PCM, showing its potential application as a synaptic device to improve recognition performance of the neural network.

  6. Identifiability study of the proteins degradation model, based on ADM1, using simultaneous batch experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flotats, X.; Palatsi, J.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2006-01-01

    are not inhibiting the hydrolysis process. The ADM1 model adequately expressed the consecutive steps of hydrolysis and acidogenesis, with estimated kinetic values corresponding to a fast acidogenesis and slower hydrolysis. The hydrolysis was found to be the rate limiting step of anaerobic degradation. Estimation...... of yield coefficients based on the relative initial slopes of VFA profiles obtained in a simple batch experiment produced satisfactory results. From the identification study, it was concluded that it is possible to determine univocally the related kinetic parameter values for protein degradation...... if the evolution of amino acids is measured in simultaneous batch experiments, with different initial protein and amino acids concentrations....

  7. Vertical and Horizontal Asymmetries are Related to Slower Sprinting and Jump Performance in Elite Youth Female Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Chris; Read, Paul; McCubbine, Jermaine; Turner, Anthony

    2018-02-27

    Inter-limb asymmetries have been shown to be greater during vertical jumping compared to horizontal jumping. Notable inter-limb differences have also been established at an early age in male youth soccer players. Furthermore, given the multi-planar nature of soccer, establishing between-limb differences from multiple jump tests is warranted. At present, a paucity of data exists regarding asymmetries in youth female soccer players and their effects on physical performance. The aims of this study were to quantify inter-limb asymmetries from unilateral jump tests and examine their effects on speed and jump performance. Nineteen elite youth female soccer players performed a single leg countermovement jump (SLCMJ), single, triple, and crossover hops for distance and a 20 m sprint test. Test reliability was good to excellent (ICC = 0.81-0.99) and variability acceptable (CV = 1.74-5.42%). A one-way ANOVA highlighted larger asymmetries from the SLCMJ compared to all other jump tests (p jump performance (r = -0.47 to -0.58) and vertical asymmetries during the SLCMJ and vertical jump performance (r = -0.47 to -0.53). The results from this study highlight that the SLCMJ appears to be the most appropriate jump test for identifying between-limb differences with values ∼12% showing negative associations with sprint times. Furthermore, larger asymmetries are associated with reduced jump performance and would appear to be direction-specific. Practitioners can use this information as normative data to be mindful of when quantifying inter-limb asymmetries and assessing their potential impact on physical performance in youth female soccer players.

  8. Tibial Eminence Involvement With Tibial Plateau Fracture Predicts Slower Recovery and Worse Postoperative Range of Knee Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, Sanjit R; Driesman, Adam; Manoli, Arthur; Davidovitch, Roy I; Egol, Kenneth A

    2017-07-01

    To examine 1-year functional and clinical outcomes in patients with tibial plateau fractures with tibial eminence involvement. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. Academic Medical Center. All patients who presented with a tibial plateau fracture (Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) 41-B and 41-C). Patients were divided into fractures with a tibial eminence component (+TE) and those without (-TE) cohorts. All patients underwent similar surgical approaches and fixation techniques for fractures. No tibial eminence fractures received fixation specifically. Short musculoskeletal functional assessment (SMFA), pain (Visual Analogue Scale), and knee range-of-motion (ROM) were evaluated at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively and compared between cohorts. Two hundred ninety-three patients were included for review. Patients with OTA 41-C fractures were more likely to have an associated TE compared with 41-B fractures (63% vs. 28%, P knee ROM (75.16 ± 51 vs. 86.82 ± 53 degree, P = 0.06). At 6 months, total SMFA and knee ROM was significantly worse in the +TE cohort (29 ± 17 vs. 21 ± 18, P ≤ 0.01; 115.6 ± 20 vs. 124.1 ± 15, P = 0.01). By 12 months postoperatively, only knee ROM remained significantly worse in the +TE cohort (118.7 ± 15 vs. 126.9 ± 13, P time points. Knee ROM remains worse throughout the postoperative period in the +TE cohort. Functional outcome improves less rapidly in the +TE cohort but achieves similar results by 1 year. Prognostic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  9. Ivabradine, a novel heart rate slower: is it a sword of double blades in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Mona; Tawfik, Mazen; Alabd, Ali; Gamal, Amr

    2011-08-01

    To prospectively assess the safety and efficacy of ivabradine in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. We included 35 patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy with an ejection fraction (EF) 70 beats/min despite optimal medical therapy, according to the international guidelines in this prospective, non-randomized, single-arm, open-label safety study. Ivabradine was used as an add-on therapy to the maximally tolerated b-blocker in an increasing titrated dose till a target dose of 15 mg/day or resting heart rate of 60 beats/min for 3 months. During follow-up period the safety, patient tolerance and efficacy of this drug were assessed. All patients underwent 12-lead resting electrocardiography and Holter monitoring at inclusion and after 3 months. Statistical analysis was accomplished using paired t-test and Pearson correlation analysis. We found a significant reduction in the resting heart rate by a mean of 25.9 ± 9.4%, without a significant change of blood pressure. There was no prolongation of PR, QTc or QRS durations. Ventricular ectopic activity showed significant reduction (p<0.001). There was a significant correlation between the resting heart rate, NYHA and left ventricular ejection fraction (p<0.001 for both). One patient developed photopsia and decompensation was observed in another patient. Ivabradine is a safe and effective drug in reducing resting heart rate, improving NYHA functional class without undesirable effects on conduction parameters or ectopic activity.

  10. Traditional Malian Solid Foods Made from Sorghum and Millet Have Markedly Slower Gastric Emptying than Rice, Potato, or Pasta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimata Cisse

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available From anecdotal evidence that traditional African sorghum and millet foods are filling and provide sustained energy, we hypothesized that gastric emptying rates of sorghum and millet foods are slow, particularly compared to non-traditional starchy foods (white rice, potato, wheat pasta. A human trial to study gastric emptying of staple foods eaten in Bamako, Mali was conducted using a carbon-13 (13C-labelled octanoic acid breath test for gastric emptying, and subjective pre-test and satiety response questionnaires. Fourteen healthy volunteers in Bamako participated in a crossover design to test eight starchy staples. A second validation study was done one year later in Bamako with six volunteers to correct for endogenous 13C differences in the starches from different sources. In both trials, traditional sorghum and millet foods (thick porridges and millet couscous had gastric half-emptying times about twice as long as rice, potato, or pasta (p < 0.0001. There were only minor changes due to the 13C correction. Pre-test assessment of millet couscous and rice ranked them as more filling and aligned well with postprandial hunger rankings, suggesting that a preconceived idea of rice being highly satiating may have influenced subjective satiety scoring. Traditional African sorghum and millet foods, whether viscous in the form of a thick porridge or as non-viscous couscous, had distinctly slow gastric emptying, in contrast to the faster emptying of non-traditional starchy foods, which are popular among West African urban consumers.

  11. Our eclectic adventures in the slower eras of photosynthesis: from New England Down Under to biosphere 2 and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmond, Barry

    2014-01-01

    This is a tale of a career in plant physiological ecology that enjoyed the freedom to address photosynthetic physiology and biochemistry in leaves of plants from diverse environments. It was supported by block funding (now sadly a thing of the past) for research at the Australian National University, by grants during appointments in the United States and in Germany, and by Columbia University. It became a "career experiment" in which long-term, high-trust support for curiosity-driven plant biology in Australia, and at times in the United States, led to surprisingly innovative results. Although the rich diversity of short-term competitive grant opportunities in the United States sustained ongoing research, it proved difficult to mobilize support for more risky long-term projects. A decade after the closure of the Biosphere 2 Laboratory, this article highlights the achievements of colleagues in experimental climate change research from 1998 to 2003.

  12. Presence of the variant mannose-binding lectin alleles associated with slower progression to AIDS. Amsterdam Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.; de Roda Husman, A. M.; Brouwer, M.; Krol, A.; Coutinho, R.; Keet, I.; van Leeuwen, R.; Schuitemaker, H.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between mannose-binding lectin (MBL) polymorphism and progression to AIDS and death in HIV-1 infection. DESIGN AND METHODS: In 131 HIV-1-infected homosexual seroconverters, survival analyses were performed to determine both the association between MBL genotype

  13. Slower EEG alpha generation, synchronization and “flow”—possible biomarkers of cognitive impairment and neuropathology of minor stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Petrovic, Jelena; Milosevic, Vuk; Zivkovic, Miroslava; Stojanov, Dragan; Milojkovic, Olga; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Saponjic, Jasna

    2017-01-01

    Background We investigated EEG rhythms, particularly alpha activity, and their relationship to post-stroke neuropathology and cognitive functions in the subacute and chronic stages of minor strokes. Methods We included 10 patients with right middle cerebral artery (MCA) ischemic strokes and 11 healthy controls. All the assessments of stroke patients were done both in the subacute and chronic stages. Neurological impairment was measured using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHS...

  14. Slower Decline in C-Reactive Protein after an Inflammatory Insult Is Associated with Longer Survival in Older Hospitalised Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Barma

    Full Text Available Enhancing biological resilience may offer a novel way to prevent and ameliorate disease in older patients. We investigated whether changes in C-reactive protein (CRP, as a dynamic marker of the acute inflammatory response to diverse stressors, may provide a way to operationalize the concept of resilience in older adults. We tested this hypothesis by examining whether such changes could predict prognosis by identifying which individuals are at greater risk of 6-month mortality.Analysis of prospective, routinely collected datasets containing data on hospitalization, clinical chemistry and rehabilitation outcomes for rehabilitation inpatients between 1999 and 2011. Maximum CRP response during acute illness and CRP recovery indices (time and slope of CRP decay to half maximum, and to <50mg/L if peak values were greater than 50mg/L was derived from biochemistry data. 6-month survival plots were conducted on quartiles of CRP recovery indices. Cox proportional hazards models were used to test univariate and multivariate predictors of 6-month mortality. Covariates included age, sex, number of medications, serum calcium, haemoglobin level, renal function, and the presence of previous myocardial infarction, stroke, chronic heart failure, COPD and diabetes.3723 patients, mean age 84 years, were included. 1535 (41% were male and 733 (20% died during six-month follow-up. The lower an individual's peak CRP reading, and the longer the time taken for their CRP to fall, the better their 6-month survival. The time for CRP to reach half of its maximum value was the best dynamic CRP index of survival (HR 0.93 per week, 95% CI 0.89 to 0.98; p = 0.004; this remained significant even after adjustment for maximum CRP level and covariates listed above.CRP recovery indices are associated with survival in older people; further work is required to explain differences in physiology between patients with a fast and slow CRP recovery.

  15. Selective Strolls: Fixation and Extinction in Diploids Are Slower for Weakly Selected Mutations Than for Neutral Ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafessoni, Fabrizio; Lachmann, Michael

    2015-12-01

    In finite populations, an allele disappears or reaches fixation due to two main forces, selection and drift. Selection is generally thought to accelerate the process: a selected mutation will reach fixation faster than a neutral one, and a disadvantageous one will quickly disappear from the population. We show that even in simple diploid populations, this is often not true. Dominance and recessivity unexpectedly slow down the evolutionary process for weakly selected alleles. In particular, slightly advantageous dominant and mildly deleterious recessive mutations reach fixation slightly more slowly than neutral ones (at most 5%). This phenomenon determines genetic signatures opposite to those expected under strong selection, such as increased instead of decreased genetic diversity around the selected site. Furthermore, we characterize a new phenomenon: mildly deleterious recessive alleles, thought to represent a wide fraction of newly arising mutations, on average survive in a population slightly longer than neutral ones, before getting lost. Consequently, these mutations are on average slightly older than neutral ones, in contrast with previous expectations. Furthermore, they slightly increase the amount of weakly deleterious polymorphisms, as a consequence of the longer unconditional sojourn times compared to neutral mutations. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. Gender differences in HIV progression to AIDS and death in industrialized countries: slower disease progression following HIV seroconversion in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarrin, Inmaculada; Geskus, Ronald; Bhaskaran, Krishnan; Prins, Maria; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Muga, Roberto; Hernández-Aguado, Ildefonso; Meyer, Laurence; Porter, Kholoud; del Amo, Julia; Bucher, Heiner; Chêne, Geneviève; Pillay, Deenan; Rosinska, Magda; Sabin, Caroline; Touloumi, Giota; Walker, Sarah; Babiker, Abdel; Darbyshire, Janet; de Luca, Andrea; Fisher, Martin; Goujard, Cécile; Kaldor, John; Kelleher, Tony; Gelgor, Linda; Ramacciotti, Tim; Cooper, David; Smith, Don; Gill, John; Jørgensen, Louise Bruun; Nielsen, Claus; Pedersen, Court; Lutsar, Irja; Dabis, Francois; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Masquelier, Bernard; Costagliola, Dominique; Vanhems, Philippe; Boufassa, Faroudy; Hamouda, Osamah; Kucherer, Claudia; Pantazis, Nikos; Hatzakis, Angelos; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Karafoulidou, Anastasia; Rezza, Giovanni; Dorrucci, Maria; Longo, Benedetta; Balotta, Claudia; Coutinho, Roel

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate sex differences in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression before (pre-1997) and after (1997-2006) introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, the authors used data from a collaboration of 23 HIV seroconverter cohort studies from Europe, Australia, and Canada

  17. Neighbourhood greenspace is associated with a slower decline in physical activity in older adults: A prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice M. Dalton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining physical activity in later life is important for maintaining health and function. Activity outdoors, such as walking, jogging and cycling, may provide an accessible, sociable and practical solution, but maintaining outdoor mobility may be a challenge in later life. Providing green environments which are supportive of physical activity may facilitate this, yet research into how greenspace could be best used is inconclusive. This study evaluates the role of greenspace in protecting against decline in physical activity over time in older adults.Data from the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer Norfolk, UK, cohort 1993–2009 (N=15,672 was used. Linear regression modelling was used to examine the association between exposure to greenspace in the home neighbourhood and change in overall, recreational and outdoor physical activity measured in terms of metabolic equivalent cost (MET in hours/week. Mediation analysis was conducted to assess if dog walking explained the relationship between greenspace and physical activity change. Models were adjusted for known and hypothesised confounders.People living in greener neighbourhoods experienced less of a decline in physical activity than those living in less green areas. Comparing change for those living in the greenest versus least green quartiles, participants showed a difference in overall physical activity of 4.21 MET hours/week (trend P=0.001, adjusted for baseline physical activity, age, sex, BMI, social class and marital status. This difference was 4.03 MET hours/week for recreational physical activity (trend P<0.001 and 1.28 MET hours/week for outdoor physical activity (trend P=0.007. Dog walking partially mediated the association between greenspace and physical activity change, by 22.6% for overall, 28.1% for recreational and 50.0% for outdoor physical activity (all P<0.001.Greenspace in the home neighbourhood may be protective against decline in physical activity among older people as they age. Dog walking is a potential mechanism in this relationship, and warrants further investigation as a way of maintaining physical activity in later life. Keywords: Physical activity, Greenspace exposure, Older adults, Dog walking

  18. Glaucomatous retinal nerve fiber layer thickness loss is associated with slower reaction times under a divided attention task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatham, Andrew J; Boer, Erwin R; Rosen, Peter N; Della Penna, Mauro; Meira-Freitas, Daniel; Weinreb, Robert N; Zangwill, Linda M; Medeiros, Felipe A

    2014-11-01

    To examine the relationship between glaucomatous structural damage and ability to divide attention during simulated driving. Cross-sectional observational study. Hamilton Glaucoma Center, University of California San Diego. Total of 158 subjects from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study, including 82 with glaucoma and 76 similarly aged controls. Ability to divide attention was investigated by measuring reaction times to peripheral stimuli (at low, medium, or high contrast) while concomitantly performing a central driving task (car following or curve negotiation). All subjects had standard automated perimetry (SAP) and optical coherence tomography was used to measure retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness. Cognitive ability was assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and subjects completed a driving history questionnaire. Reaction times to the driving simulator divided attention task. The mean reaction times to the low-contrast stimulus were 1.05 s and 0.64 s in glaucoma and controls, respectively, during curve negotiation (P divide attention, RNFL thickness measurements provided additional information. Information from structural tests may improve our ability to determine which patients are likely to have problems performing daily activities, such as driving. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Event-based state estimation a stochastic perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Dawei; Chen, Tongwen

    2016-01-01

    This book explores event-based estimation problems. It shows how several stochastic approaches are developed to maintain estimation performance when sensors perform their updates at slower rates only when needed. The self-contained presentation makes this book suitable for readers with no more than a basic knowledge of probability analysis, matrix algebra and linear systems. The introduction and literature review provide information, while the main content deals with estimation problems from four distinct angles in a stochastic setting, using numerous illustrative examples and comparisons. The text elucidates both theoretical developments and their applications, and is rounded out by a review of open problems. This book is a valuable resource for researchers and students who wish to expand their knowledge and work in the area of event-triggered systems. At the same time, engineers and practitioners in industrial process control will benefit from the event-triggering technique that reduces communication costs ...

  20. GPU Based Software Correlators - Perspectives for VLBI2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobiger, Thomas; Kimura, Moritaka; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Oyama, Tomoaki; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Tetsuro; Gotoh, Tadahiro; Amagai, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Caused by historical separation and driven by the requirements of the PC gaming industry, Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) have evolved to massive parallel processing systems which entered the area of non-graphic related applications. Although a single processing core on the GPU is much slower and provides less functionality than its counterpart on the CPU, the huge number of these small processing entities outperforms the classical processors when the application can be parallelized. Thus, in recent years various radio astronomical projects have started to make use of this technology either to realize the correlator on this platform or to establish the post-processing pipeline with GPUs. Therefore, the feasibility of GPUs as a choice for a VLBI correlator is being investigated, including pros and cons of this technology. Additionally, a GPU based software correlator will be reviewed with respect to energy consumption/GFlop/sec and cost/GFlop/sec.

  1. Impact of Glaucoma and Dry Eye on Text-Based Searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Michelle J.; Rubin, Gary S.; Akpek, Esen K.; Ramulu, Pradeep Y.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We determine if visual field loss from glaucoma and/or measures of dry eye severity are associated with difficulty searching, as judged by slower search times on a text-based search task. Methods Glaucoma patients with bilateral visual field (VF) loss, patients with clinically significant dry eye, and normally-sighted controls were enrolled from the Wilmer Eye Institute clinics. Subjects searched three Yellow Pages excerpts for a specific phone number, and search time was recorded. Results A total of 50 glaucoma subjects, 40 dry eye subjects, and 45 controls completed study procedures. On average, glaucoma patients exhibited 57% longer search times compared to controls (95% confidence interval [CI], 26%–96%, P Dry eye subjects demonstrated similar search times compared to controls, though worse Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) vision-related subscores were associated with longer search times (P dry eye (P > 0.08 for Schirmer's testing without anesthesia, corneal fluorescein staining, and tear film breakup time). Conclusions Text-based visual search is slower for glaucoma patients with greater levels of VF loss and dry eye patients with greater self-reported visual difficulty, and these difficulties may contribute to decreased quality of life in these groups. Translational Relevance Visual search is impaired in glaucoma and dry eye groups compared to controls, highlighting the need for compensatory strategies and tools to assist individuals in overcoming their deficiencies. PMID:28670502

  2. MIS gas sensors based on porous silicon with Pd and WO{sub 3}/Pd electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solntsev, V.S. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028, Kiev (Ukraine); Gorbanyuk, T.I., E-mail: tatyanagor@mail.r [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028, Kiev (Ukraine); Litovchenko, V.G.; Evtukh, A.A. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2009-09-30

    Pd and WO{sub 3}/Pd gate metal-oxide-semiconductor (MIS) gas sensitive structures based on porous silicon layers are studied by the high frequency C(V) method. The chemical compositions of composite WO{sub 3}/Pd electrodes are characterized by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used for morphologic studies of WO{sub 3}/Pd films. As shown in the experiments, WO{sub 3}/Pd structures are more sensitive and selective to the adsorption of hydrogen sulphide compared to Pd gate. The analyses of kinetic characteristics allow us to determine the response and characteristic times for these structures. The response time of MIS-structures with thin composite WO{sub 3}/Pd electrodes (the thickness of Pd is about 50 nm with WO{sub 3} clusters on its surface) is slower compared to the structures with Pd electrodes. Slower sensor responses of WO{sub 3}-based gas sensors may be associated with different mechanism of gas sensitivity of given structures. The enhanced sensitivity and selectivity to H{sub 2}S action of WO{sub 3}/Pd MIS-structures can also be explained by the chemical reaction that occurs at the catalytic active surface of gate electrodes. The possible mechanisms of enhanced sensitivity and selectivity to H{sub 2}S adsorption of MIS gas sensors with WO{sub 3}/Pd composite gate electrodes compared to pure Pd have been analyzed.

  3. Base metals in the new economic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennon, J.

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this paper was on the demand side of the base metals industry. It is expected that in the next decade more than 50 per cent of global demand growth will come from China and other countries of the former Eastern block. Following the large decline in base metals demand in 2001, it is expected that a large growth in metals supply will be needed over the next decade and there is a real possibility that the mining industry will struggle to meet demand growth. While industry performance is usually driven by economic growth and its impact on metals demand, analysts realize that every cycle is different and it can be easily affected by unpredicted, economic and geopolitical events. The author suggests that the while next few years will be a period of slower growth in the traditional consuming countries, this will be offset by the significant rise in the importance of China and the possible resurgence in demand growth in the Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. The paper presented a brief historical overview of the different growth phases for metals over the past 50 years. Strong metal demand in the 1990s was driven by the telecommunications and computer revolutions. Stainless steel/nickel, zinc/galvanized applications and aluminium were used to save on maintenance costs and to improve energy efficiency. The paper also discussed the shifting pattern of copper and aluminium demand by decade. 2 tabs., 7 figs

  4. Gap Acceptance During Lane Changes by Large-Truck Drivers—An Image-Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobukawa, Kazutoshi; Bao, Shan; LeBlanc, David J.; Zhao, Ding; Peng, Huei; Pan, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of rearward gap acceptance characteristics of drivers of large trucks in highway lane change scenarios. The range between the vehicles was inferred from camera images using the estimated lane width obtained from the lane tracking camera as the reference. Six-hundred lane change events were acquired from a large-scale naturalistic driving data set. The kinematic variables from the image-based gap analysis were filtered by the weighted linear least squares in order to extrapolate them at the lane change time. In addition, the time-to-collision and required deceleration were computed, and potential safety threshold values are provided. The resulting range and range rate distributions showed directional discrepancies, i.e., in left lane changes, large trucks are often slower than other vehicles in the target lane, whereas they are usually faster in right lane changes. Video observations have confirmed that major motivations for changing lanes are different depending on the direction of move, i.e., moving to the left (faster) lane occurs due to a slower vehicle ahead or a merging vehicle on the right-hand side, whereas right lane changes are frequently made to return to the original lane after passing. PMID:26924947

  5. Gap Acceptance During Lane Changes by Large-Truck Drivers-An Image-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobukawa, Kazutoshi; Bao, Shan; LeBlanc, David J; Zhao, Ding; Peng, Huei; Pan, Christopher S

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an analysis of rearward gap acceptance characteristics of drivers of large trucks in highway lane change scenarios. The range between the vehicles was inferred from camera images using the estimated lane width obtained from the lane tracking camera as the reference. Six-hundred lane change events were acquired from a large-scale naturalistic driving data set. The kinematic variables from the image-based gap analysis were filtered by the weighted linear least squares in order to extrapolate them at the lane change time. In addition, the time-to-collision and required deceleration were computed, and potential safety threshold values are provided. The resulting range and range rate distributions showed directional discrepancies, i.e., in left lane changes, large trucks are often slower than other vehicles in the target lane, whereas they are usually faster in right lane changes. Video observations have confirmed that major motivations for changing lanes are different depending on the direction of move, i.e., moving to the left (faster) lane occurs due to a slower vehicle ahead or a merging vehicle on the right-hand side, whereas right lane changes are frequently made to return to the original lane after passing.

  6. Comparing the Performance of NoSQL Approaches for Managing Archetype-Based Electronic Health Record Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Sergio Miranda; Teodoro, Douglas; Wei-Kleiner, Fang; Sundvall, Erik; Karlsson, Daniel; Lambrix, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This study provides an experimental performance evaluation on population-based queries of NoSQL databases storing archetype-based Electronic Health Record (EHR) data. There are few published studies regarding the performance of persistence mechanisms for systems that use multilevel modelling approaches, especially when the focus is on population-based queries. A healthcare dataset with 4.2 million records stored in a relational database (MySQL) was used to generate XML and JSON documents based on the openEHR reference model. Six datasets with different sizes were created from these documents and imported into three single machine XML databases (BaseX, eXistdb and Berkeley DB XML) and into a distributed NoSQL database system based on the MapReduce approach, Couchbase, deployed in different cluster configurations of 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 machines. Population-based queries were submitted to those databases and to the original relational database. Database size and query response times are presented. The XML databases were considerably slower and required much more space than Couchbase. Overall, Couchbase had better response times than MySQL, especially for larger datasets. However, Couchbase requires indexing for each differently formulated query and the indexing time increases with the size of the datasets. The performances of the clusters with 2, 4, 8 and 12 nodes were not better than the single node cluster in relation to the query response time, but the indexing time was reduced proportionally to the number of nodes. The tested XML databases had acceptable performance for openEHR-based data in some querying use cases and small datasets, but were generally much slower than Couchbase. Couchbase also outperformed the response times of the relational database, but required more disk space and had a much longer indexing time. Systems like Couchbase are thus interesting research targets for scalable storage and querying of archetype-based EHR data when population-based use

  7. Comparing the Performance of NoSQL Approaches for Managing Archetype-Based Electronic Health Record Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Sergio Miranda; Teodoro, Douglas; Wei-Kleiner, Fang; Sundvall, Erik; Karlsson, Daniel; Lambrix, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This study provides an experimental performance evaluation on population-based queries of NoSQL databases storing archetype-based Electronic Health Record (EHR) data. There are few published studies regarding the performance of persistence mechanisms for systems that use multilevel modelling approaches, especially when the focus is on population-based queries. A healthcare dataset with 4.2 million records stored in a relational database (MySQL) was used to generate XML and JSON documents based on the openEHR reference model. Six datasets with different sizes were created from these documents and imported into three single machine XML databases (BaseX, eXistdb and Berkeley DB XML) and into a distributed NoSQL database system based on the MapReduce approach, Couchbase, deployed in different cluster configurations of 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 machines. Population-based queries were submitted to those databases and to the original relational database. Database size and query response times are presented. The XML databases were considerably slower and required much more space than Couchbase. Overall, Couchbase had better response times than MySQL, especially for larger datasets. However, Couchbase requires indexing for each differently formulated query and the indexing time increases with the size of the datasets. The performances of the clusters with 2, 4, 8 and 12 nodes were not better than the single node cluster in relation to the query response time, but the indexing time was reduced proportionally to the number of nodes. The tested XML databases had acceptable performance for openEHR-based data in some querying use cases and small datasets, but were generally much slower than Couchbase. Couchbase also outperformed the response times of the relational database, but required more disk space and had a much longer indexing time. Systems like Couchbase are thus interesting research targets for scalable storage and querying of archetype-based EHR data when population-based use

  8. Gait initiation time is associated with the risk of multiple falls-A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callisaya, Michele L; Blizzard, Leigh; Martin, Kara; Srikanth, Velandai K

    2016-09-01

    In a population-based study of older people to examine whether 1) overall gait initiation (GI) time or its components are associated with falls and 2) GI under dual-task is a stronger predictor of falls risk than under single-task. Participants aged 60-85 years were randomly selected from the electoral roll. GI was obtained with a force platform under both single and dual-task conditions. Falls were ascertained prospectively over a 12-month period. Log multinomial regression was used to examine the association between GI time (total and its components) and risk of single and multiple falls. Age, sex and physiological and cognitive falls risk factors were considered as confounders. The mean age of the sample (n=124) was 71.0 (SD 6.8) years and 58.9% (n=73) were male. Over 12 months 21.8% (n=27) of participants reported a single fall and 16.1% (n=20) reported multiple falls. Slower overall GI time under both single (RR all per 100ms 1.28, 95%CI 1.03, 1.58) and dual-task (RR 1.14, 95%CI 1.02, 1.27) was associated with increased risk of multiple, but not single falls (pfalls were also associated with slower time to first lateral movement under single-task (RR 1.90 95%CI 0.59, 1.51) and swing time under dual-task condition (RR 1.44 95%CI 1.08, 1.94). Slower GI time is associated with the risk of multiple falls independent of other risk factors, suggesting it could be used as part of a comprehensive falls assessment. Time to the first lateral movement under single-task may be the best measures of this risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of Gene-Based Family-Based Methods to Detect Novel Genes Associated With Familial Late Onset Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. Fernández

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene-based tests to study the combined effect of rare variants on a particular phenotype have been widely developed for case-control studies, but their evolution and adaptation for family-based studies, especially studies of complex incomplete families, has been slower. In this study, we have performed a practical examination of all the latest gene-based methods available for family-based study designs using both simulated and real datasets. We examined the performance of several collapsing, variance-component, and transmission disequilibrium tests across eight different software packages and 22 models utilizing a cohort of 285 families (N = 1,235 with late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD. After a thorough examination of each of these tests, we propose a methodological approach to identify, with high confidence, genes associated with the tested phenotype and we provide recommendations to select the best software and model for family-based gene-based analyses. Additionally, in our dataset, we identified PTK2B, a GWAS candidate gene for sporadic AD, along with six novel genes (CHRD, CLCN2, HDLBP, CPAMD8, NLRP9, and MAS1L as candidate genes for familial LOAD.

  10. Modelling the factors that influence computer science students' attitude towards serious games in class / Maria Jacomina Zeeman

    OpenAIRE

    Zeeman, Maria Jacomina

    2014-01-01

    Although the software development industry is one of the fastest growing sections in the labour market currently, computer science is one of the subject fields with the least growth in number of enrolments at tertiary institutions. Low enrolment figures and high dropout rates are common in computer science courses. Apart from the fact that programming is a difficult skill to master, irrelevant course material and out-dated teaching and learning strategies could be to blame for this phenomenon...

  11. Hedonic and utilitarian shopping motivations among South African black Generation Y students / Riané Cherylise Zeeman

    OpenAIRE

    Zeeman, Riané Cherylise

    2013-01-01

    With the South African retail industry being a major and attractive industry, marketers and retailers are pressured to obtain and maintain a competitive advantage by developing marketing strategies that appeal to various consumers. Retailers need to focus on satisfying consumers’ needs, as well as offering a full shopping experience. Shopping entails more than the mere selection of products. Consumers’ motivation or driving force behind the act of shopping is embedded in satisfying internal n...

  12. Zeeman interaction in the Δ31 state of HfF+ to search for the electron electric dipole moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A. N.; Skripnikov, L. V.; Titov, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    A theoretical study devoted to suppression of magnetic systematic effects in HfF+ cation for an experiment to search for the electron electric dipole moment is reported. The g factors for J =1 , F =3 /2 , | MF|=3 /2 hyperfine levels of the Δ31 state are calculated as functions of the external electric field. The minimal value for the difference between the g factors of Ω -doublet levels, Δ g =3 ×10-6 , is attained at the electric field 7 V/cm. The body-fixed g factor, G∥, was obtained both within the ab initio electronic structure calculations and with our fit of the experimental data [H. Loh, K. C. Cossel, M. C. Grau, K.-K. Ni, E. R. Meyer, J. L. Bohn, J. Ye, and E. A. Cornell, Science 342, 1220 (2013), 10.1126/science.1243683]. For the electronic structure calculations we used a combined scheme to perform correlation calculations of HfF+, which includes both the direct four-component all-electron and generalized relativistic effective core potential approaches. The electron correlation effects were treated using the coupled cluster methods. The calculated value G∥=0.0115 agrees very well with the G∥=0.0118 obtained with our fitting procedure. The calculated ab initio value D∥=-1.53 a.u. for the molecule-frame dipole moment (with the origin in the center of mass) is in agreement with the experimental datum D∥=-1.54 (1 ) a.u. [H. Loh, Ph.D. thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2006.].

  13. Quantum magnetotransport for the surface states of three-dimensional topological insulators in the presence of a Zeeman field

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, Muhammad; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    We show that the surface states of magnetic topological insulators realize an activated behavior and Shubnikov de Haas oscillations. Applying an external magnetic field perpendicular to the surface of the topological insulator in the presence

  14. NASA/ORNL/AFRL Project Work on EBM LSHR: Additive Manufacturing of High-Temperature Gamma-Prime Strengthened Ni-Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudbrack, Chantal K.; Kirka, Michael M.; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Carter, Robert W.; Semiatin, Sheldon L.; Gabb, Timothy P.

    2016-01-01

    Powder-bed fabrication of aerospace alloys may revolutionize production by eliminating the need for extensive machining and expensive tooling. Heated-bed electron-beam melting (EBM) offers advantages over non-heated laser additive manufacturing (AM) methods, including lower residual stress, reduced risk of contamination, slower cooling rates, and faster build times. NASA Glenn Research Center has joint project work with Oak Ridge National Lab and the Air Force Research Laboratory to explore the feasibility of fabricating advanced Ni-based gamma-prime superalloys with EBM AM.

  15. Erbium-based optical coherent transient correlator for the 1.5-micron communication bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Todd Louis

    2001-08-01

    Correlators are needed in communications, memory, and signal processing applications to perform cross- correlations for tasks such as address-header decoding for data-packet switching, spread spectrum and code division multiple access communication, associative memory, database searching, and pattern recognition. Correlators based on optical coherent transients, Fourier theory, and holography can potentially perform real-time correlations with multi-phase encoded information at gigahertz bandwidths, a capability conventional electronics lack. The first operation of spatial-spectral holographic correlators in the 1.5-gm communication bands was demonstrated at 1536 nm using Er3+:Y 2SiO5 and the correlator processed multi-phase encoded optical pulses. Real-time decoding of 20-bit binary-phase-shift key encoded address-header pulses is demonstrated using stimulated photon echoes in a phase-matched crossed-beam configuration; this function is required for coherent transient optical data routing and packet switching. Optical 30-symbol quadriphase-shift keyed (QPSK) and binary-phase-shift keyed (BPSK) codes were processed, and the results demonstrated the ability of such correlators to process QPSK codes and BPSK codes with the same apparatus. The high-fidelity correlations exhibit the low sidelobe characteristics expected for the codes used. The 4I15/2 and 4I13/2 crystal field levels of 0.005% Er3+:Y2O3 were measured by absorption and laser excited fluorescence on oriented samples. Site selective fluorescence distinguished transitions of Er3+ in crystallographic sites of C2 and C3i symmetry. The paramagnetic g-tensors for ions in sites of C2 symmetry were measured by orientation dependent Zeeman absorption spectroscopy. For the lowest crystal field level of 4I15/2 the g-tensor principal x-axis in the (100) plane is tipped +2.06° from [001] and principal g-values are: gz = 11.93, gx = 1.603, and gy = 4.711. For the lowest crystal field level of 4I13/2 the g

  16. Preparation and Characterization of Azadirachtin Alginate-Biosorbent Based Formulations: Water Release Kinetics and Photodegradation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Céspedes, Francisco; Martínez-Domínguez, Gerardo P; Villafranca-Sánchez, Matilde; Fernández-Pérez, Manuel

    2015-09-30

    The botanical insecticide azadirachtin was incorporated in alginate-based granules to obtain controlled release formulations (CRFs). The basic formulation [sodium alginate (1.47%) - azadirachtin (0.28%) - water] was modified by the addition of biosorbents, obtaining homogeneous hybrid hydrogels with high azadirachtin entrapment efficiency. The effect on azadirachtin release rate caused by the incorporation of biosorbents such as lignin, humic acid, and olive pomace in alginate formulation was studied by immersion of the granules in water under static conditions. The addition of the biosorbents to the basic alginate formulation reduces the rate of release because the lignin-based formulation produces a slower release. Photodegradation experiments showed the potential of the prepared formulations in protecting azadirachtin against simulated sunlight, thus improving its stability. The results showed that formulation prepared with lignin provided extended protection. Therefore, this study provides a new procedure to encapsulate the botanical insecticide azadirachtin, improving its delivery and photostability.

  17. Separation of time-based and trial-based accounts of the partial reinforcement extinction effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouton, Mark E; Woods, Amanda M; Todd, Travis P

    2014-01-01

    Two appetitive conditioning experiments with rats examined time-based and trial-based accounts of the partial reinforcement extinction effect (PREE). In the PREE, the loss of responding that occurs in extinction is slower when the conditioned stimulus (CS) has been paired with a reinforcer on some of its presentations (partially reinforced) instead of every presentation (continuously reinforced). According to a time-based or "time-accumulation" view (e.g., Gallistel and Gibbon, 2000), the PREE occurs because the organism has learned in partial reinforcement to expect the reinforcer after a larger amount of time has accumulated in the CS over trials. In contrast, according to a trial-based view (e.g., Capaldi, 1967), the PREE occurs because the organism has learned in partial reinforcement to expect the reinforcer after a larger number of CS presentations. Experiment 1 used a procedure that equated partially and continuously reinforced groups on their expected times to reinforcement during conditioning. A PREE was still observed. Experiment 2 then used an extinction procedure that allowed time in the CS and the number of trials to accumulate differentially through extinction. The PREE was still evident when responding was examined as a function of expected time units to the reinforcer, but was eliminated when responding was examined as a function of expected trial units to the reinforcer. There was no evidence that the animal responded according to the ratio of time accumulated during the CS in extinction over the time in the CS expected before the reinforcer. The results thus favor a trial-based account over a time-based account of extinction and the PREE. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Associative and Temporal Learning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Ultracold lithium-6 atoms in the BEC-BCS crossover: experiments and the construction of a new apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teichmann, M.

    2007-09-01

    We use a fermionic gas of Lithium-6 as a model system to study superfluidity. The limiting cases of superfluidity are Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) and superconductivity, described by the theory by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS). In Lithium-6 gases, we can explore the whole range between the two cases, known as the BEC-BCS crossover, using a Feshbach resonance. We study the change of the momentum distribution of the gas in this cross-over and compare to theoretical models. We also investigate the hydrodynamic expansion, characteristic for a superfluid gas. We observe a sudden change of the ellipticity of the gas close to the transition to the superfluid phase. Moreover, we localized heteronuclear Feshbach resonances between 6 Li and 7 Li. We are currently constructing a second generation of the experimental setup. An new laser system, based on high power laser diodes, was developed. Changes in the vacuum chamber, including a complete reconstruction of the Zeeman slower, have increased the atomic flux, allowing us to increase the repetition rate of our experiment. Modifications of the geometry of the magnetic traps lead to a higher number of trapped atoms. (author)

  19. Ultracold lithium-6 atoms in the BEC-BCS crossover: experiments and the construction of a new apparatus; Atomes de lithium-6 ultra froids dans la transition BEC-BCS: experiences et construction d'un montage experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichmann, M

    2007-09-15

    We use a fermionic gas of Lithium-6 as a model system to study superfluidity. The limiting cases of superfluidity are Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) and superconductivity, described by the theory by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS). In Lithium-6 gases, we can explore the whole range between the two cases, known as the BEC-BCS crossover, using a Feshbach resonance. We study the change of the momentum distribution of the gas in this cross-over and compare to theoretical models. We also investigate the hydrodynamic expansion, characteristic for a superfluid gas. We observe a sudden change of the ellipticity of the gas close to the transition to the superfluid phase. Moreover, we localized heteronuclear Feshbach resonances between {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li. We are currently constructing a second generation of the experimental setup. An new laser system, based on high power laser diodes, was developed. Changes in the vacuum chamber, including a complete reconstruction of the Zeeman slower, have increased the atomic flux, allowing us to increase the repetition rate of our experiment. Modifications of the geometry of the magnetic traps lead to a higher number of trapped atoms. (author)

  20. Ultracold lithium-6 atoms in the BEC-BCS crossover: experiments and the construction of a new apparatus; Atomes de lithium-6 ultra froids dans la transition BEC-BCS: experiences et construction d'un montage experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichmann, M

    2007-09-15

    We use a fermionic gas of Lithium-6 as a model system to study superfluidity. The limiting cases of superfluidity are Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) and superconductivity, described by the theory by Bardeen, Cooper and Schrieffer (BCS). In Lithium-6 gases, we can explore the whole range between the two cases, known as the BEC-BCS crossover, using a Feshbach resonance. We study the change of the momentum distribution of the gas in this cross-over and compare to theoretical models. We also investigate the hydrodynamic expansion, characteristic for a superfluid gas. We observe a sudden change of the ellipticity of the gas close to the transition to the superfluid phase. Moreover, we localized heteronuclear Feshbach resonances between {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li. We are currently constructing a second generation of the experimental setup. An new laser system, based on high power laser diodes, was developed. Changes in the vacuum chamber, including a complete reconstruction of the Zeeman slower, have increased the atomic flux, allowing us to increase the repetition rate of our experiment. Modifications of the geometry of the magnetic traps lead to a higher number of trapped atoms. (author)

  1. Acid base catalyzed transesterification kinetics of waste cooking oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Siddharth; Sharma, M.P.; Rajvanshi, Shalini [Alternate Hydro Energy Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)

    2011-01-15

    The present study reports the results of kinetics study of acid base catalyzed two step transesterification process of waste cooking oil, carried out at pre-determined optimum temperature of 65 C and 50 C for esterification and transesterification process respectively under the optimum condition of methanol to oil ratio of 3:7 (v/v), catalyst concentration 1%(w/w) for H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH and 400 rpm of stirring. The optimum temperature was determined based on the yield of ME at different temperature. Simply, the optimum concentration of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH was determined with respect to ME Yield. The results indicated that both esterification and transesterification reaction are of first order rate reaction with reaction rate constant of 0.0031 min{sup -1} and 0.0078 min{sup -1} respectively showing that the former is a slower process than the later. The maximum yield of 21.50% of ME during esterification and 90.6% from transesterification of pretreated WCO has been obtained. This is the first study of its kind which deals with simplified kinetics of two step acid-base catalyzed transesterification process carried under the above optimum conditions and took about 6 h for complete conversion of TG to ME with least amount of activation energy. Also various parameters related to experiments are optimized with respect to ME yield. (author)

  2. Optimal diabatic dynamics of Majorana-based quantum gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Armin; Seradjeh, Babak; Franz, Marcel

    2017-08-01

    In topological quantum computing, unitary operations on qubits are performed by adiabatic braiding of non-Abelian quasiparticles, such as Majorana zero modes, and are protected from local environmental perturbations. In the adiabatic regime, with timescales set by the inverse gap of the system, the errors can be made arbitrarily small by performing the process more slowly. To enhance the performance of quantum information processing with Majorana zero modes, we apply the theory of optimal control to the diabatic dynamics of Majorana-based qubits. While we sacrifice complete topological protection, we impose constraints on the optimal protocol to take advantage of the nonlocal nature of topological information and increase the robustness of our gates. By using the Pontryagin's maximum principle, we show that robust equivalent gates to perfect adiabatic braiding can be implemented in finite times through optimal pulses. In our implementation, modifications to the device Hamiltonian are avoided. Focusing on thermally isolated systems, we study the effects of calibration errors and external white and 1 /f (pink) noise on Majorana-based gates. While a noise-induced antiadiabatic behavior, where a slower process creates more diabatic excitations, prohibits indefinite enhancement of the robustness of the adiabatic scheme, our fast optimal protocols exhibit remarkable stability to noise and have the potential to significantly enhance the practical performance of Majorana-based information processing.

  3. Silicon based quantum dot hybrid qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohun

    2015-03-01

    The charge and spin degrees of freedom of an electron constitute natural bases for constructing quantum two level systems, or qubits, in semiconductor quantum dots. The quantum dot charge qubit offers a simple architecture and high-speed operation, but generally suffers from fast dephasing due to strong coupling of the environment to the electron's charge. On the other hand, quantum dot spin qubits have demonstrated long coherence times, but their manipulation is often slower than desired for important future applications. This talk will present experimental progress of a `hybrid' qubit, formed by three electrons in a Si/SiGe double quantum dot, which combines desirable characteristics (speed and coherence) in the past found separately in qubits based on either charge or spin degrees of freedom. Using resonant microwaves, we first discuss qubit operations near the `sweet spot' for charge qubit operation. Along with fast (>GHz) manipulation rates for any rotation axis on the Bloch sphere, we implement two independent tomographic characterization schemes in the charge qubit regime: traditional quantum process tomography (QPT) and gate set tomography (GST). We also present resonant qubit operations of the hybrid qubit performed on the same device, DC pulsed gate operations of which were recently demonstrated. We demonstrate three-axis control and the implementation of dynamic decoupling pulse sequences. Performing QPT on the hybrid qubit, we show that AC gating yields π rotation process fidelities higher than 93% for X-axis and 96% for Z-axis rotations, which demonstrates efficient quantum control of semiconductor qubits using resonant microwaves. We discuss a path forward for achieving fidelities better than the threshold for quantum error correction using surface codes. This work was supported in part by ARO (W911NF-12-0607), NSF (PHY-1104660), DOE (DE-FG02-03ER46028), and by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories

  4. Quaternary ammonium based task specific ionic liquid for the efficient and selective extraction of neptunium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Nishesh Kumar [National Institute of Technology, Odisha (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Sengupta, Arijit [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry Div.; Biswas, Sujoy [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Uranium Extraction Div.

    2017-07-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction of neptunium from aqueous acidic solution using quaternary ammonium based task specific ionic liquid (TSIL) was investigated. The extraction of Np was predominated by the 'cation exchange' mechanism via [NpO{sub 2}.Hpth]{sup +} species for NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, while NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was extracted in ionic liquid as [NpO{sub 2}.H.Hpth]{sup +}. The extraction process was thermodynamically spontaneous while kinetically slower. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as strippant showed quantitative back extraction of neptunium ions from TSIL. TSIL showed excellent radiolytic stability upto 500 kGy gamma exposure. Finally, the TSIL was employed for the processing of simulated high level waste solutions revealing high selectivity of TSIL towards neptunium.

  5. Object formation in visual working memory: Evidence from object-based attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jifan; Zhang, Haihang; Ding, Xiaowei; Shui, Rende; Shen, Mowei

    2016-09-01

    We report on how visual working memory (VWM) forms intact perceptual representations of visual objects using sub-object elements. Specifically, when objects were divided into fragments and sequentially encoded into VWM, the fragments were involuntarily integrated into objects in VWM, as evidenced by the occurrence of both positive and negative object-based attention effects: In Experiment 1, when subjects' attention was cued to a location occupied by the VWM object, the target presented at the location of that object was perceived as occurring earlier than that presented at the location of a different object. In Experiment 2, responses to a target were significantly slower when a distractor was presented at the same location as the cued object (Experiment 2). These results suggest that object fragments can be integrated into objects within VWM in a manner similar to that of visual perception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Viscosity-Based Model for Bubble-Propelled Catalytic Micromotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Micromotors have shown significant potential for diverse future applications. However, a poor understanding of the propelling mechanism hampers its further applications. In this study, an accurate mechanical model of the micromotor has been proposed by considering the geometric asymmetry and fluid viscosity based on hydrodynamic principles. The results obtained from the proposed model are in a good agreement with the experimental results. The effects of the semi-cone angle on the micromotor are re-analyzed. Furthermore, other geometric parameters, like the length-radius aspect ratio, exert great impact on the velocity. It is also observed that micromotors travel much slower in highly viscous solutions and, hence, viscosity plays an important role.

  7. Effects of Surface and Morphological Properties of Zeolite on Impedance Spectroscopy-Based Sensing Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabir K. Dutta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Measurement by impedance spectroscopy of the changes in intrazeolitic cation motion of pressed pellets of zeolite particles upon adsorption of dimethylmethylphosphonate (DMMP provides a strategy for sensing DMMP, a commonly used simulant for highly toxic organophosphate nerve agents. In this work, two strategies for improving the impedance spectroscopy based sensing of DMMP on zeolites were investigated. The first one is the use of cerium oxide (CeO2 coated on the zeolite surface to neutralize acidic groups that may cause the decomposition of DMMP, and results in better sensor recovery. The second strategy was to explore the use of zeolite Y membrane. Compared to pressed pellets, the membranes have connected supercages of much longer length scales. The zeolite membranes resulted in higher sensitivity to DMMP, but recovery of the device was significantly slower as compared to pressed zeolite pellets.

  8. Implementation and Test of a LED-Based Lamp for a Lighthouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Mercatelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel sustainable source was developed for an existing Italian lighthouse, exploiting the light emitting diode (LED technology and the norms evolution. The research work started with the optical design of the device, while this work concerns the realization, installation, and test of the new LED lamp. The lamp recombines multiple separated LEDs, realizing a quasipunctual localized source. After installation in the lighthouse, specific photometric tests verified that the proposed power-saving source satisfied the illumination requirements of the marine signaling norms. The advantages of the LED-based lamp are reduced energy consumption, enhanced efficiency, longer life, decreased faults, slower aging, and lower maintenance costs. The obtained LED signalling device is more durable and reliable. In the future the application of these power-saving long-life sources could be extended to other maritime signaling devices or to other traffic signs.

  9. Evidence of cognitive dysfunction after soccer playing with ball heading using a novel tablet-based approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha R Zhang

    Full Text Available Does frequent head-to-ball contact cause cognitive dysfunctions and brain injury to soccer players? An iPad-based experiment was designed to examine the impact of ball-heading among high school female soccer players. We examined both direct, stimulus-driven, or reflexive point responses (Pro-Point as well as indirect, goal-driven, or voluntary point responses (Anti-Point, thought to require cognitive functions in the frontal lobe. The results show that soccer players were significantly slower than controls in the Anti-Point task but displayed no difference in Pro-Point latencies, indicating a disruption specific to voluntary responses. These findings suggest that even subconcussive blows in soccer can result in cognitive function changes that are consistent with mild traumatic brain injury of the frontal lobes. There is great clinical and practical potential of a tablet-based application for quick detection and monitoring of cognitive dysfunction.

  10. Evidence of Cognitive Dysfunction after Soccer Playing with Ball Heading Using a Novel Tablet-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Angela H.; Patel, Saumil S.; Sereno, Anne B.

    2013-01-01

    Does frequent head-to-ball contact cause cognitive dysfunctions and brain injury to soccer players? An iPad-based experiment was designed to examine the impact of ball-heading among high school female soccer players. We examined both direct, stimulus-driven, or reflexive point responses (Pro-Point) as well as indirect, goal-driven, or voluntary point responses (Anti-Point), thought to require cognitive functions in the frontal lobe. The results show that soccer players were significantly slower than controls in the Anti-Point task but displayed no difference in Pro-Point latencies, indicating a disruption specific to voluntary responses. These findings suggest that even subconcussive blows in soccer can result in cognitive function changes that are consistent with mild traumatic brain injury of the frontal lobes. There is great clinical and practical potential of a tablet-based application for quick detection and monitoring of cognitive dysfunction. PMID:23460843

  11. The use of sodium alginate-based coating and cellulose acetate in papaya post-harvest preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Andrade Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the ripening of papaya fruit (Carica papaya L. at room temperature (±25°C and10°C with 80% relative humidity, coated with edible film based on sodium alginate (1% and cellulose acetate film (3% by dipping the fruit in the suspensions for 1 min. On the application of the treatment and every three days during 12 days of storage, fruit were evaluated for weight loss, firmness, total carotenoid content, lycopene content and vitamin C content of the pulp. The cellulose acetate film extended the shelf-life of papayas, without affecting their quality. This treatment delayed fruit ripening, whose changes in all the parameters analyzed were significantly slower than fruit treated with sodium alginate-based coating. The coating with cellulose acetate at 3% was more effective in the preservation of papaya stored for 12 days under both temperatures.

  12. Optimal power and performance trade-offs for dynamic voltage scaling in power management based wireless sensor node

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Pughat

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic voltage scaling contributes to a significant amount of power saving, especially in the energy constrained wireless sensor networks (WSNs. Existing dynamic voltage scaling techniques make the system slower and ignore the event miss rate. This results in degradation of the system performance when there is non-stationary workload at input. The overhead due to transition between voltage level and discrete voltage levels are also the limitations of available dynamic voltage scaling (DVS techniques at sensor node (SN. This paper proposes a workload dependent DVS based MSP430 controller model used for SN. An online gradient estimation technique has been used to optimize power and performance trade-offs. The analytical results are validated with the simulation results obtained using simulation tool “SimEvents” and compared with the available AT9OS8535 controller. Based on the stochastic workload, the controller's input voltage, operational frequency, utilization, and average wait time of events are obtained.

  13. Collimation of a thulium atomic beam by two-dimensional optical molasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukachev, D D; Kalganova, E S; Sokolov, A V; Savchenkov, A V; Vishnyakova, G A; Golovizin, A A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevsky, Nikolai N; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2013-04-30

    The number of laser cooled and trapped thulium atoms in a magneto-optical trap is increased by a factor of 3 using a two-dimensional optical molasses which collimated the atomic beam before entering a Zeeman slower. A diode laser operating at 410.6 nm was employed to form optical molasses: The laser was heated to 70 Degree-Sign C by a two-step temperature stabilisation system. The laser system consisting of a master oscillator and an injection-locked amplifier emitted more than 100 mW at 410 nm and had a spectral linewidth of 0.6 MHz. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  14. Microbial chain elongation based on methanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei-Shan

    2017-01-01

    Our society relies heavily on fossil resources to fulfill our energy and commodity demands and this dependence has led to negative economic, environmental and societal consequences. The re-generation rate of fossil resources is much slower than their consumption rate, making these resources a

  15. InfiniBand-based real-time simulation of HVDC, STATCOM and SVC devices with commercial-off-the-shelf PCs and FPGAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufour, C.; Abourida, S.; Belanger, J.; Lapointe, V. [OPAL-RT Technologies Inc., Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Details of a real-time simulator for large power networks using commercial-off-the-shelf products and an RT-LAB platform were presented. The simulator was designed to realistically simulate bipolar high voltage DC (HVDC) networks transmission systems and to meet large grid simulation challenges. The system was also designed to cope with complex power grid design and validation tests as well as to interface with modern power electronic controllers and protection systems. The platform used Pentium, Xeon or Opteron based PCs and InfiniBand communication fabric for fast inter-PC communications. The real-time PC ran under well-known operating systems while the main control interface used Simulink software. Grid circuits were designed using an SPS interface using an ARTEMIS plug-in. Various model performances were reported. The results of several simulations suggested that InfiniBand communication was slower than shared-memory communication, while STATCOM timing was difficult to compare with the Opteron benchmarks. Results also suggested that XEON CPUs were slower than Opteron counterparts. Hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) testing was also performed with a prototype controller and with a real production controller. It was concluded that a communication time of 5 microseconds was obtained across the 2 PCs. The paper also discussed recent advances in HIL simulation and programming devices. 10 refs., 15 figs.

  16. Laser induced photocurrent and photovoltage transient measurements of dye-sensitized solar cells based on TiO_2 nanosheets and TiO_2 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaithan, Hamid M.; Qaid, Saif M.H.; Hezam, Mahmoud; Labis, Joselito P.; Alduraibi, Mohammad; Bedja, Idriss M.; Aldwayyan, Abdullah S.

    2016-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on TiO_2 nanoparticles and TiO_2 nanosheets with exposed {001} facets are investigated using laser-induced photovoltage and photocurrent transient decay (LIPVCD) measurements. We adopted a simplified version of LIPVCD technique, in which a single illumination light source and a laboratory oscilloscope could be conveniently used for the measurements. Although the {001} surface of TiO_2 nanosheets allowed a noticeably slower recombination with the electrolyte, this was counterpoised by a slower electron transport probably due to its planar morphology, resulting in a shorter diffusion length in TiO_2 nanosheets. The nanosheet morphology also resulted in less surface area and therefore reduced short circuit current density in the fabricated devices. Our work highlights the fact that the morphological parameters of TiO_2 nanosheets finally resulting after electrode film deposition is of no less importance than the reported efficient dye adsorption and slow electron recombination at the surface of individual nanosheets.

  17. The use of quasi-isothermal modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry for the characterization of slow crystallization processes in lipid-based solid self-emulsifying systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otun, Sarah O; Meehan, Elizabeth; Qi, Sheng; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2015-04-01

    Slow or incomplete crystallization may be a significant manufacturing issue for solid lipid-based dosage forms, yet little information is available on this phenomenon. In this investigation we suggest a novel means by which slow solidification may be monitored in Gelucire 44/14 using quasi-isothermal modulated temperature DSC (QiMTDSC). Conventional linear heating and cooling DSC methods were employed, along with hot stage microscopy (HSM), for basic thermal profiling of Gelucire 44/14. QiMTDSC experiments were performed on cooling from the melt, using a range of incremental decreases in temperature and isothermal measurement periods. DSC and HSM highlighted the main (primary) crystallization transition; solid fat content analysis and kinetic analysis were used to profile the solidification process. The heat capacity profile from QiMTDSC indicated that after an initial energetic primary crystallisation, the lipid underwent a slower period of crystallization which continued to manifest at much lower temperatures than indicated by standard DSC. We present evidence that Gelucire 44/14 undergoes an initial crystallization followed by a secondary, slower process. QIMTDSC appears to be a promising tool in the investigation of this secondary crystallization process.

  18. Experimental Study of Na based Titanium Nanofluid-Water Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gunyeop; Kim, Soo Jae; Baek, Jehyun; Kim, Hyun Soo; Oh, Sun Ryung; Park, Hyun Sun; Kim, Moo Hwan [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In KALIMER-600, a sodium-cooled fast reactor designed by KAERI, thermal energy is transported from high-temperature liquid Na (526 .deg. C at 0.1 MPa) to low temperature water (230 .deg. C at - 19.5 MPa) through a heat exchanger. If any leakage or rupture occurs during the operation of this heat exchanger, highly pressurized liquid water can penetrate into the liquid Na channels; this contact should instantly cause SWR. As reaction continues, liquid water is soon vaporized by pressure drop and huge amount of reaction heat. This generated water vapor expands large reaction area and increases sodium-water vapor reaction process. Therefore, the rapid generation of reaction product (like H{sub 2}) and water vapor increases the system pressure that can cause the system failure in SFR. To reduce this strong chemical reaction phenomena between Na and water, some we have focused on suppressing the chemical reactivity of liquid Na by dispersing nanoparticles (NPs). For the real application of NaTiNF, the pressure change induced by NaTiNF-water reaction is compared with Na-water reaction in the present study. NaTiNF contains 100nm of Ti NPs at 0.2 vol. %. The reaction rate of NaTiNF-water reaction is also investigated as reaction temperature increases. Sodium-water vapor reaction (SVR) will occur when an SWR accident occurs in SFR. In this manner, NaTiNF-water vapor reaction is experimentally performed for ensuring the suppression of chemical reactivity of NaTiNF in contact with water vapor. In the basic step for reducing risk of an SWR in SFR, we have experimentally verified the suppressed chemical reactivity of liquid sodium using Ti NPs through SWR and SVR experiments. In SWR, Na based titanium nanofluid (NaTiNF) shows lower pressure change than Na. As T{sub R} increases, P{sub max} in Na-water reaction increases while NaTiNF does not. The reaction rate of NaTiNF shows twice slower than that of Na. In SVR, NaTiNF shows slower temperature increase than Na. The distinct

  19. Pump-probe nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with frequency-modulated light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustelny, S.; Gawlik, W.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Rochester, S. M.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Budker, D.

    2006-01-01

    Specific types of atomic coherences between Zeeman sublevels can be generated and detected using a method based on nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with frequency-modulated light. Linearly polarized, frequency-modulated light is employed to selectively generate ground-state coherences between Zeeman sublevels for which Δm=2 and Δm=4 in 85 Rb and 87 Rb atoms, and additionally Δm=6 in 85 Rb. The atomic coherences are detected with a separate, unmodulated probe light beam. Separation of the pump and probe beams enables independent investigation of the processes of creation and detection of the atomic coherences. With the present technique the transfer of the Zeeman coherences, including high-order coherences, from excited to ground state by spontaneous emission has been observed

  20. Targeting of conserved gag-epitopes in early HIV infection is associated with lower plasma viral load and slower CD4+ T cell depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Carina L.; Milush, Jeffrey M.; Buggert, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether the character of the immunodominant HIV-Gag peptide (variable or conserved) targeted by CD8+ T cells in early HIV infection would influence the quality and quantity of T cell responses, and whether this would affect the rate of disease progression. Treatment-naive ...

  1. γ1-Containing GABA-A Receptors Cluster at Synapses Where they Mediate Slower Synaptic Currents than γ2-Containing GABA-A Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine L. Dixon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available GABA-A receptors (GABAARs are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels that are assembled mainly from α (α1–6, β (β1–3 and γ (γ1–3 subunits. Although GABAARs containing γ2L subunits mediate most of the inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain, significant expression of γ1 subunits is seen in the amygdala, pallidum and substantia nigra. However, the location and function of γ1-containing GABAARs in these regions remains unclear. In “artificial” synapses, where the subunit composition of postsynaptic receptors is specifically controlled, γ1 incorporation slows the synaptic current decay rate without affecting channel deactivation, suggesting that γ1-containing receptors are not clustered and therefore activated by diffuse neurotransmitter. However, we show that γ1-containing receptors are localized at neuronal synapses and form clusters in both synaptic and extrasynaptic regions. In addition, they exhibit rapid membrane diffusion and a higher frequency of exchange between synaptic and perisynaptic populations compared to γ2L-containing GABAARs. A point mutation in the large intracellular domain and a pharmacological analysis reveal that when a single non-conserved γ2L residue is mutated to its γ1 counterpart (T349L, the synaptic current decay is slowed from γ2L- to γ1-like without changing the clustering or diffusion properties of the receptors. In addition, previous fast perfusion and single channel kinetic experiments revealed no difference in the intrinsic closing rates of γ2L- and γ1-containing receptors when expressed in HEK293 cells. These observations together with Monte Carlo simulations of synaptic function confirm that decreased clustering does not control γ1-containing GABAAR kinetics. Rather, they suggest that γ1- and γ2L-containing receptors exhibit differential synaptic current decay rates due to differential gating dynamics when localized at the synapse.

  2. Low Schooling for Girls, Slower Growth for All? Cross-Country Evidence on the Effect of Gender Inequality in Education on Economic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Klasen, Stephan

    2002-01-01

    Using cross-country and panel regressions, this article investigates how gender inequality in education affects long-term economic growth. Such inequality is found to have an effect on economic growth that is robust to changes in specifications and controls for potential endogeneities. The results suggest that gender inequality in education directly affects economic growth by lowering the ...

  3. A single nucleotide polymorphism in cBIM is associated with a slower achievement of major molecular response in chronic myeloid leukaemia treated with imatinib.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Augis

    Full Text Available BIM is essential for the response to tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKI in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML patients. Recently, a deletion polymorphism in intron 2 of the BIM gene was demonstrated to confer an intrinsic TKI resistance in Asian patients. The present study aimed at identifying mutations in the BIM sequence that could lead to imatinib resistance independently of BCR-ABL mutations.BIM coding sequence analysis was performed in 72 imatinib-treated CML patients from a French population of our centre and in 29 healthy controls (reference population as a case-control study. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT qPCR was performed to assess Bim expression in our reference population.No mutation with amino-acid change was found in the BIM coding sequence. However, we observed a silent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP c465C>T (rs724710. A strong statistical link was found between the presence of the T allele and the high Sokal risk group (p = 0.0065. T allele frequency was higher in non responsive patients than in the reference population (p = 0.0049. Similarly, this T allele was associated with the mutation frequency on the tyrosine kinase domain of BCR-ABL (pT SNP of BIM could be useful for predicting the outcome of imatinib-treated CML patients.

  4. Gastroenteritis Aggressive Versus Slow Treatment For Rehydration (GASTRO). A pilot rehydration study for severe dehydration: WHO plan C versus slower rehydration

    OpenAIRE

    Houston, Kirsty A.; Gibb, Jack G.; Mpoya, Ayub; Obonyo, Nchafatso; Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Nakuya, Margeret; Evans, Jennifer A; George, Elizabeth C; Gibb, Diana M; Maitland, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) rehydration management guidelines (Plan C) for children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and severe dehydration are widely practiced in resource-poor settings, yet have never been formally evaluated in a clinical trial. A recent audit of outcome of AGE at Kilifi County Hospital, Kenya noted that 10% of children required high dependency care (20% mortality) and a number developed fluid-related complications. The fluid resuscitation trial, FEAST, ...

  5. Do infants fed directly from the breast have improved appetite regulation and slower growth during early childhood compared with infants fed from a bottle?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisher Jennifer O

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Behavioral mechanisms that contribute to the association between breastfeeding and reduced obesity risk are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that feeding human milk from the breast (direct breastfeeding has a more optimal association with subsequent child appetite regulation behaviors and growth, when compared to bottle-feeding. Methods Children (n = 109 aged 3- to 6- years were retrospectively classified as directly breastfed (fed exclusively at the breast, bottle-fed human milk, or bottle-fed formula in the first three months of life. Young children's appetite regulation was examined by measuring three constructs (satiety response, food responsiveness, enjoyment of food associated with obesity risk, using the Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were used to test whether children bottle-fed either human milk or formula had reduced odds of high satiety and increased odds of high food responsiveness and high enjoyment of food compared to children fed directly from the breast. Current child weight status and growth trends from 6-36 months were also examined for their relation to direct breastfeeding and appetite regulation behaviors in early childhood. Results Children fed human milk in a bottle were 67% less likely to have high satiety responsiveness compared to directly breastfed children, after controlling for child age, child weight status, maternal race/ethnicity, and maternal education. There was no association of bottle-feeding (either human milk or formula with young children's food responsiveness and enjoyment of food. There was neither an association of direct breastfeeding with current child weight status, nor was there a clear difference between directly breastfed and bottle-fed children in growth trajectories from 6- to 36-months. More rapid infant changes in weight-for-age score were associated with lower satiety responsiveness, higher food responsiveness and higher enjoyment of food in later childhood Conclusion While direct breastfeeding was not found to differentially affect growth trajectories from infancy to childhood compared to bottle-feeding, results suggest direct breastfeeding during early infancy is associated with greater appetite regulation later in childhood. A better understanding of such behavioral distinctions between direct breastfeeding and bottle-feeding may identify new pathways to reduce the pediatric obesity epidemic.

  6. Mice lacking the UbCKmit isoform of creatine kinase reveal slower spatial learning acquisition, diminished exploration and habituation, and reduced acoustic startle reflex responses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streijger, F.; Jost, C.R.; Oerlemans, F.T.J.J.; Ellenbroek, B.A.; Cools, A.R.; Wieringa, B.; Zee, C.E.E.M. van der

    2004-01-01

    Brain-type creatine kinases B-CK (cytosolic) and UbCKmit (mitochondrial) are considered important for the maintenance and distribution of cellular energy in the central nervous system. Previously, we have demonstrated an abnormal behavioral phenotype in mice lacking the B-CK creatine kinase isoform,

  7. Selective toxin effects on faster and slower growing individuals in the formation of hormesis at the population level - A case study with Lactuca sativa and PCIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, Regina G; Sinkkonen, Aki

    2016-10-01

    Natural plant populations have large phenotypic plasticity that enhances acclimation to local stress factors such as toxin exposures. While consequences of high toxin exposures are well addressed, effects of low-dose toxin exposures on plant populations are seldom investigated. In particular, the importance of 'selective low-dose toxicity' and hormesis, i.e. stimulatory effects, has not been studied simultaneously. Since selective toxicity can change the size distribution of populations, we assumed that hormesis alters the size distribution at the population level, and investigated whether and how these two low-dose phenomena coexist. The study was conducted with Lactuca sativa L. exposed to the auxin-inhibitor 2-(p-chlorophenoxy)-2-methylpropionic acid (PCIB) in vitro. In two separate experiments, L. sativa was exposed to 12 PCIB doses in 24 replicates (50 plants/replicate). Shoot/root growth responses at the population level were compared to the fast-growing (≥90% percentile) and the slow-growing subpopulations (≤10% percentile) by Mann-Whitney U testing and dose-response modelling. In the formation of pronounced PCIB hormesis at the population level, low-dose effects proved selective, but widely stimulatory which seems to counteract low-dose selective toxicity. The selectivity of hormesis was dose- and growth rate-dependent. Stimulation occurred at lower concentrations and stimulation percentage was higher among slow-growing individuals, but partly or entirely masked at the population level by moderate or negligible stimulation among the faster growing individuals. We conclude that the hormetic effect up to the maximum stimulation may be primarily facilitated by an increase in size of the most slow-growing individuals, while thereafter it seems that mainly the fast-growing individuals contributed to the observed hormesis at the population level. As size distribution within a population is related to survival, our study hints that selective effects on slow- and fast-growing individuals may change population dynamics, providing that similar effects can be repeated under field conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Lotus Base

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mun, Terry; Bachmann, Asger; Gupta, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    exploration of Lotus genomic and transcriptomic data. Equally important are user-friendly in-browser tools designed for data visualization and interpretation. Here, we present Lotus Base, which opens to the research community a large, established LORE1 insertion mutant population containing an excess of 120...... such data, allowing users to construct, visualize, and annotate co-expression gene networks. Lotus Base takes advantage of modern advances in browser technology to deliver powerful data interpretation for biologists. Its modular construction and publicly available application programming interface enable...... developers to tap into the wealth of integrated Lotus data. Lotus Base is freely accessible at: https://lotus.au.dk....

  9. Fast spot-based multiscale simulations of granular drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rycroft, Chris H.; Wong, Yee Lok; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2009-05-22

    We develop a multiscale simulation method for dense granular drainage, based on the recently proposed spot model, where the particle packing flows by local collective displacements in response to diffusing"spots'" of interstitial free volume. By comparing with discrete-element method (DEM) simulations of 55,000 spheres in a rectangular silo, we show that the spot simulation is able to approximately capture many features of drainage, such as packing statistics, particle mixing, and flow profiles. The spot simulation runs two to three orders of magnitude faster than DEM, making it an appropriate method for real-time control or optimization. We demonstrateextensions for modeling particle heaping and avalanching at the free surface, and for simulating the boundary layers of slower flow near walls. We show that the spot simulations are robust and flexible, by demonstrating that they can be used in both event-driven and fixed timestep approaches, and showing that the elastic relaxation step used in the model can be applied much less frequently and still create good results.

  10. Micromechanics of base pair unzipping in the DNA duplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, Sergey N; Paramonova, Ekaterina V; Yakubovich, Alexander V; Solov’yov, Andrey V

    2012-01-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of DNA duplex unzipping in a water environment were performed. The investigated DNA double helix consists of a Drew-Dickerson dodecamer sequence and a hairpin (AAG) attached to the end of the double-helix chain. The considered system is used to examine the process of DNA strand separation under the action of an external force. This process occurs in vivo and now is being intensively investigated in experiments with single molecules. The DNA dodecamer duplex is consequently unzipped pair by pair by means of the steered MD. The unzipping trajectories turn out to be similar for the duplex parts with G⋅C content and rather distinct for the parts with A⋅T content. It is shown that during the unzipping each pair experiences two types of motion: relatively quick rotation together with all the duplex and slower motion in the frame of the unzipping fork. In the course of opening, the complementary pair passes through several distinct states: (i) the closed state in the double helix, (ii) the metastable preopened state in the unzipping fork and (iii) the unbound state. The performed simulations show that water molecules participate in the stabilization of the metastable states of the preopened base pairs in the DNA unzipping fork. (paper)

  11. Propagation law of impact elastic wave based on specific materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmin CHEN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the propagation law of the impact elastic wave on the platform, the experimental platform is built by using the specific isotropic materials and anisotropic materials. The glass cloth epoxy laminated plate is used for anisotropic material, and an organic glass plate is used for isotropic material. The PVDF sensors adhered on the specific materials are utilized to collect data, and the elastic wave propagation law of different thick plates and laminated plates under impact conditions is analyzed. The Experimental results show that in anisotropic material, transverse wave propagation speed along the fiber arrangement direction is the fastest, while longitudinal wave propagation speed is the slowest. The longitudinal wave propagation speed in anisotropic laminates is much slower than that in the laminated thick plates. In the test channel arranged along a particular angle away from the central region of the material, transverse wave propagation speed is larger. Based on the experimental results, this paper proposes a material combination mode which is advantageous to elastic wave propagation and diffusion in shock-isolating materials. It is proposed to design a composite material with high acoustic velocity by adding regularly arranged fibrous materials. The overall design of the barrier material is a layered structure and a certain number of 90°zigzag structure.

  12. Understanding of Object Detection Based on CNN Family and YOLO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan

    2018-04-01

    As a key use of image processing, object detection has boomed along with the unprecedented advancement of Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) and its variants since 2012. When CNN series develops to Faster Region with CNN (R-CNN), the Mean Average Precision (mAP) has reached 76.4, whereas, the Frame Per Second (FPS) of Faster R-CNN remains 5 to 18 which is far slower than the real-time effect. Thus, the most urgent requirement of object detection improvement is to accelerate the speed. Based on the general introduction to the background and the core solution CNN, this paper exhibits one of the best CNN representatives You Only Look Once (YOLO), which breaks through the CNN family’s tradition and innovates a complete new way of solving the object detection with most simple and high efficient way. Its fastest speed has achieved the exciting unparalleled result with FPS 155, and its mAP can also reach up to 78.6, both of which have surpassed the performance of Faster R-CNN greatly. Additionally, compared with the latest most advanced solution, YOLOv2 achieves an excellent tradeoff between speed and accuracy as well as an object detector with strong generalization ability to represent the whole image.

  13. Impact of Humidity on Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy Based CO Detection Using a Near-IR Telecommunication Diode Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xukun Yin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A near-IR CO trace gas sensor based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS is evaluated using humidified nitrogen samples. Relaxation processes in the CO-N2-H2O system are investigated. A simple kinetic model is used to predict the sensor performance at different gas pressures. The results show that CO has a ~3 and ~5 times slower relaxation time constant than CH4 and HCN, respectively, under dry conditions. However, with the presence of water, its relaxation time constant can be improved by three orders of magnitude. The experimentally determined normalized detection sensitivity for CO in humid gas is 1.556 × 10 − 8   W ⋅ cm − 1 / Hz 1 / 2 .

  14. Corrosion characterisation of laser beam and tungsten inert gas weldment of nickel base alloys: Micro-cell technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, Geogy J.; Kain, V.; Dey, G.K.; Raja, V.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Grain matrix showed better corrosion resistance than grain boundary. • Microcell studies showed distinct corrosion behaviour of individual regions of weldment. • TIG welding resulted in increased stable anodic current density on weld fusion zone. • LB welding resulted in high stable anodic current density for heat affected zone. - Abstract: The electrochemical studies using micro-cell technique gave new understanding of electrochemical behaviour of nickel base alloys in solution annealed and welded conditions. The welding simulated regions depicted varied micro structural features. In case of tungsten inert gas (TIG) weldments, the weld fusion zone (WFZ) showed least corrosion resistance among all other regions. For laser beam (LB) weldments it was the heat-affected zone (HAZ) that showed comparatively high stable anodic current density. The high heat input of TIG welding resulted in slower heat dissipation hence increased carbide precipitation and segregation in WFZ resulting in high stable anodic current density

  15. Operando studies of all-vanadium flow batteries: Easy-to-make reference electrode based on silver-silver sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventosa, Edgar; Skoumal, Marcel; Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Flox, Cristina; Morante, Joan Ramon

    2014-12-01

    In-depth evaluation of the electrochemical performance of all-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) under operando conditions requires the insertion of a reliable reference electrode in the battery cell. In this work, an easy-to-make reference electrode based on silver-silver sulfate is proposed and described for VRFBs. The relevance and feasibility of the information obtained by inserting the reference electrode is illustrated with the study of ammoxidized graphite felts. In this case, we show that the kinetic of the electrochemical reaction VO2+/VO2+ is slower than that of V2+/V3+ at the electrode. While the slow kinetics at the positive electrode limits the voltage efficiency, the operating potential of the negative electrode, which is outside the stability widow of water, reduces the coulombic efficiency due to the hydrogen evolution.

  16. Touch BASE

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    In a recent Nature article (see here), the BASE collaboration reported the most precise comparison of the charge-to-mass ratio of the proton to its antimatter equivalent, the antiproton. This result is just the beginning and many more challenges lie ahead.   CERN's AD Hall, where the BASE experiment is set-up. The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) was approved in June 2013 and was ready to take data in August 2014. During these 14 months, the BASE collaboration worked hard to set up its four cryogenic Penning traps, which are the heart of the whole experiment. As their name indicates, these magnetic devices are used to trap antiparticles – antiprotons coming from the Antiproton Decelerator – and particles of matter – negative hydrogen ions produced in the system by interaction with a degrader that slows the antiprotons down, allowing scientists to perform their measurements. “We had very little time to set up the wh...

  17. Implementation of Evidence-Based Practice From a Learning Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Per; Neher, Margit; Ellström, Per-Erik; Gardner, Benjamin

    2017-06-01

    For many nurses and other health care practitioners, implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) presents two interlinked challenges: acquisition of EBP skills and adoption of evidence-based interventions and abandonment of ingrained non-evidence-based practices. The purpose of this study to describe two modes of learning and use these as lenses for analyzing the challenges of implementing EBP in health care. The article is theoretical, drawing on learning and habit theory. Adaptive learning involves a gradual shift from slower, deliberate behaviors to faster, smoother, and more efficient behaviors. Developmental learning is conceptualized as a process in the "opposite" direction, whereby more or less automatically enacted behaviors become deliberate and conscious. Achieving a more EBP depends on both adaptive and developmental learning, which involves both forming EBP-conducive habits and breaking clinical practice habits that do not contribute to realizing the goals of EBP. From a learning perspective, EBP will be best supported by means of adaptive learning that yields a habitual practice of EBP such that it becomes natural and instinctive to instigate EBP in appropriate contexts by means of seeking out, critiquing, and integrating research into everyday clinical practice as well as learning new interventions best supported by empirical evidence. However, the context must also support developmental learning that facilitates disruption of existing habits to ascertain that the execution of the EBP process or the use of evidence-based interventions in routine practice is carefully and consciously considered to arrive at the most appropriate response. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Three-dimensional brain growth abnormalities in childhood-onset schizophrenia visualized by using tensor-based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogtay, Nitin; Lu, Allen; Leow, Alex D; Klunder, Andrea D; Lee, Agatha D; Chavez, Alex; Greenstein, Deanna; Giedd, Jay N; Toga, Arthur W; Rapoport, Judith L; Thompson, Paul M

    2008-10-14

    Earlier studies revealed progressive cortical gray matter (GM) loss in childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS) across both lateral and medial surfaces of the developing brain. Here, we use tensor-based morphometry to visualize white matter (WM) growth abnormalities in COS throughout the brain. Using high-dimensional elastic image registration, we compared 3D maps of local WM growth rates in COS patients and healthy children over a 5-year period, based on analyzing longitudinal brain MRIs from 12 COS patients and 12 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and scan interval. COS patients showed up to 2.2% slower growth rates per year than healthy controls in WM (P = 0.02, all P values corrected). The greatest differences were in the right hemisphere (P = 0.006). This asymmetry was attributable to a right slower than left hemisphere growth rate mapped in COS patients (P = 0.037) but not in healthy controls. WM growth rates reached 2.6% per year in healthy controls (P = 0.0002). COS patients showed only a 1.3% per year trend for growth in the left hemisphere (P = 0.066). In COS, WM growth rates were associated with improvement in the Children's Global Assessment Scale (R = 0.64, P = 0.029). Growth rates were reduced throughout the brain in COS, but this process appeared to progress in a front-to-back (frontal-parietal) fashion, and this effect was not attributable to lower IQ. Growth rates were correlated with functional prognosis and were visualized as detailed 3D maps. Finally, these findings also confirm that the progressive GM deficits seen in schizophrenia are not the result of WM overgrowth.

  19. Poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT) two-pathway proton exchange mechanism. Effect of general and specific base catalysis on deuteration rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, B.; Leng, M.; Ramstein, J.

    1986-01-01

    The deuteration rates of the poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT) amino and imino protons have been measured with stopped-flow spectrophotometry as a function of general and specific base catalyst concentration. Two proton exchange classes are found with time constants differing by a factor of 10 (4 and 0.4 s-1). The slower class represents the exchange of the adenine amino protons whereas the proton of the faster class has been assigned to the thymine imino proton. The exchange rates of these two classes of protons are independent of general and specific base catalyst concentration. This very characteristic behavior demonstrates that in our experimental conditions the exchange rates of the imino and amino protons in poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT) are limited by two different conformational fluctuations. We present a three-state exchange mechanism accounting for our experimental results

  20. Comparing the Performance of NoSQL Approaches for Managing Archetype-Based Electronic Health Record Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Miranda Freire

    Full Text Available This study provides an experimental performance evaluation on population-based queries of NoSQL databases storing archetype-based Electronic Health Record (EHR data. There are few published studies regarding the performance of persistence mechanisms for systems that use multilevel modelling approaches, especially when the focus is on population-based queries. A healthcare dataset with 4.2 million records stored in a relational database (MySQL was used to generate XML and JSON documents based on the openEHR reference model. Six datasets with different sizes were created from these documents and imported into three single machine XML databases (BaseX, eXistdb and Berkeley DB XML and into a distributed NoSQL database system based on the MapReduce approach, Couchbase, deployed in different cluster configurations of 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 machines. Population-based queries were submitted to those databases and to the original relational database. Database size and query response times are presented. The XML databases were considerably slower and required much more space than Couchbase. Overall, Couchbase had better response times than MySQL, especially for larger datasets. However, Couchbase requires indexing for each differently formulated query and the indexing time increases with the size of the datasets. The performances of the clusters with 2, 4, 8 and 12 nodes were not better than the single node cluster in relation to the query response time, but the indexing time was reduced proportionally to the number of nodes. The tested XML databases had acceptable performance for openEHR-based data in some querying use cases and small datasets, but were generally much slower than Couchbase. Couchbase also outperformed the response times of the relational database, but required more disk space and had a much longer indexing time. Systems like Couchbase are thus interesting research targets for scalable storage and querying of archetype-based EHR data when

  1. Screen-Printed Photochromic Textiles through New Inks Based on SiO2@naphthopyran Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Tânia V; Costa, Paula; Sousa, Céu M; Sousa, Carlos A D; Pereira, Clara; Silva, Carla J S M; Pereira, Manuel Fernando R; Coelho, Paulo J; Freire, Cristina

    2016-10-26

    Photochromic silica nanoparticles (SiO 2 @NPT), fabricated through the covalent immobilization of silylated naphthopyrans (NPTs) based on 2H-naphtho[1,2-b]pyran (S1, S2) and 3H-naphtho[2,1-b]pyran (S3, S4) or through the direct adsorption of the parent naphthopyrans (1, 3) onto silica nanoparticles (SiO 2 NPs), were successfully incorporated onto cotton fabrics by a screen-printing process. Two aqueous acrylic- (AC-) and polyurethane- (PU-) based inks were used as dispersing media. All textiles exhibited reversible photochromism under UV and solar irradiation, developing fast responses and intense coloration. The fabrics coated with SiO 2 @S1 and SiO 2 @S2 showed rapid color changes and high contrasts (ΔE* ab = 39-52), despite presenting slower bleaching kinetics (2-3 h to fade to the original color), whereas the textiles coated with SiO 2 @S3 and SiO 2 @S4 exhibited excellent engagement between coloration and decoloration rates (coloration and fading times of 1 and 2 min, respectively; ΔE* ab = 27-53). The PU-based fabrics showed excellent results during the washing fastness tests, whereas the AC-based textiles evidenced good results only when a protective transfer film was applied over the printed design.

  2. Structure modulates similarity-based interference in sluicing: An eye tracking study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse A. Harris

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In cue-based content-addressable approaches to memory, a target and its competitors are retrieved in parallel from memory via a fast, associative cue-matching procedure under a severely limited focus of attention. Such a parallel matching procedure could in principle ignore the serial order or hierarchical structure characteristic of linguistic relations. I present an eye tracking while reading experiment that investigates whether the sentential position of a potential antecedent modulates the strength of similarity-based interference, a well-studied effect in which increased similarity in features between a target and its competitors results in slower and less accurate retrieval overall. The manipulation trades on an independently established Locality bias in sluiced structures to associate a wh-remnant (which ones in clausal ellipsis with the most local correlate (some wines, as in The tourists enjoyed some wines, but I don’t know which ones. The findings generally support cue-based parsing models of sentence processing that are subject to similarity-based interference in retrieval, and provide additional support to the growing body of evidence that retrieval is sensitive to both the structural position of a target antecedent and its competitors, and the specificity of retrieval cues.

  3. Application of State Quantization-Based Methods in HEP Particle Transport Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Lucio; Ponieman, Nicolás; Jun, Soon Yung; Genser, Krzysztof; Elvira, Daniel; Castro, Rodrigo

    2017-10-01

    Simulation of particle-matter interactions in complex geometries is one of the main tasks in high energy physics (HEP) research. An essential aspect of it is an accurate and efficient particle transportation in a non-uniform magnetic field, which includes the handling of volume crossings within a predefined 3D geometry. Quantized State Systems (QSS) is a family of numerical methods that provides attractive features for particle transportation processes, such as dense output (sequences of polynomial segments changing only according to accuracy-driven discrete events) and lightweight detection and handling of volume crossings (based on simple root-finding of polynomial functions). In this work we present a proof-of-concept performance comparison between a QSS-based standalone numerical solver and an application based on the Geant4 simulation toolkit, with its default Runge-Kutta based adaptive step method. In a case study with a charged particle circulating in a vacuum (with interactions with matter turned off), in a uniform magnetic field, and crossing up to 200 volume boundaries twice per turn, simulation results showed speedups of up to 6 times in favor of QSS while it being 10 times slower in the case with zero volume boundaries.

  4. Neural network-based sensor signal accelerator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, M. C.

    2000-10-16

    A strategy has been developed to computationally accelerate the response time of a generic electronic sensor. The strategy can be deployed as an algorithm in a control system or as a physical interface (on an embedded microcontroller) between a slower responding external sensor and a higher-speed control system. Optional code implementations are available to adjust algorithm performance when computational capability is limited. In one option, the actual sensor signal can be sampled at the slower rate with adaptive linear neural networks predicting the sensor's future output and interpolating intermediate synthetic output values. In another option, a synchronized collection of predictors sequentially controls the corresponding synthetic output voltage. Error is adaptively corrected in both options. The core strategy has been demonstrated with automotive oxygen sensor data. A prototype interface device is under construction. The response speed increase afforded by this strategy could greatly offset the cost of developing a replacement sensor with a faster physical response time.

  5. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jae Min; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Ko, K. H.; Lee, J. M.; Kim, M.K.

    2000-01-01

    Study on one dimensional atom cooling and trapping process which is basic to the development of atom manipulation technology has been performed. A Zeeman slower has been designed and manufactured for efficient cooling of atoms. The speed of atoms finally achieved is as slow as 15 m/s with proper cooling conditions. By six circularly-polarized laser beams and quadrupole magnetic field, the atoms which have been slowed down by zeeman slower have been trapped in a small spatial region inside MOT. The higher the intensity of the slowing laser is the more is the number of atoms slowed and the maximum number of atoms trapped has been 10 8 . The atoms of several tens of μK degree have been trapped by controlling the intensity of trapping laser and intensity gradient of magnetic field. EIT phenomena caused by atomic coherent interaction has been studied for the development of atom optical elements. For the investigation of the focusing phenomena induced by the coherent interaction, experimental measurements and theoretical analysis have been performed. Spatial dependency of spectrum and double distribution signal of coupling laser have been obtained. The deflection of laser beams utilizing the EIT effects has also been considered. (author)

  6. Fragmentation based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Gaining the understanding of mobile agent architecture and the security concerns, in this paper, we proposed a security protocol which addresses security with mitigated computational cost. The protocol is a combination of self decryption, co-operation and obfuscation technique. To circumvent the risk of malicious code execution in attacking environment, we have proposed fragmentation based encryption technique. Our encryption technique suits the general mobile agent size and provides hard and thorny obfuscation increasing attacker’s challenge on the same plane providing better performance with respect to computational cost as compared to existing AES encryption.

  7. The neural mediators of kindness-based meditation: a theoretical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Streiffer Mascaro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although kindness-based contemplative practices are increasingly employed by clinicians and cognitive researchers to enhance prosocial emotions, social cognitive skills, and well-being, and as a tool to understand the basic workings of the social mind, we lack a coherent theoretical model with which to test the mechanisms by which kindness-based meditation may alter the brain and body. Here we link contemplative accounts of compassion and loving-kindness practices with research from social cognitive neuroscience and social psychology to generate predictions about how diverse practices may alter brain structure and function and related aspects of social cognition. Contingent on the nuances of the practice, kindness-based meditation may enhance the neural systems related to faster and more basic perceptual or motor simulation processes, simulation of another’s affective body state, slower and higher-level perspective-taking, modulatory processes such as emotion regulation and self/other discrimination, and combinations thereof. This theoretical model will be discussed alongside best practices for testing such a model and potential implications and applications of future work.

  8. Antimicrobial Films Based on Chitosan and Methylcellulose Containing Natamycin for Active Packaging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Santonicola

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable polymers are gaining interest as antimicrobial carriers in active packaging. In the present study, two active films based on chitosan (1.5% w/v and methylcellulose (3% w/v enriched with natamycin were prepared by casting. The antimicrobial’s release behavior was evaluated by immersion of the films in 95% ethanol (v/v at different temperatures. The natamycin content in the food simulant was determined by reversed-high performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection (HPLC-DAD. The apparent diffusion (DP and partition (KP/S coefficients were calculated using a mathematical model based on Fick’s Second Law. Results showed that the release of natamycin from chitosan based film (DP = 3.61 × 10−13 cm2/s was slower, when compared with methylcellulose film (DP = 3.20 × 10−8 cm2/s at the same temperature (p < 0.05. To evaluate the antimicrobial efficiency of active films, cheese samples were completely covered with the films, stored at 20 °C for 7 days, and then analyzed for moulds and yeasts. Microbiological analyses showed a significant reduction in yeasts and moulds (7.91 log CFU/g in samples treated with chitosan active films (p < 0.05. The good compatibility of natamycin with chitosan, the low Dp, and antimicrobial properties suggested that the film could be favorably used in antimicrobial packagings.

  9. Expectation violations in sensorimotor sequences: shifting from LTM-based attentional selection to visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Rebecca M; Schneider, Werner X

    2015-03-01

    Long-term memory (LTM) delivers important control signals for attentional selection. LTM expectations have an important role in guiding the task-driven sequence of covert attention and gaze shifts, especially in well-practiced multistep sensorimotor actions. What happens when LTM expectations are disconfirmed? Does a sensory-based visual-search mode of attentional selection replace the LTM-based mode? What happens when prior LTM expectations become valid again? We investigated these questions in a computerized version of the number-connection test. Participants clicked on spatially distributed numbered shapes in ascending order while gaze was recorded. Sixty trials were performed with a constant spatial arrangement. In 20 consecutive trials, either numbers, shapes, both, or no features switched position. In 20 reversion trials, participants worked on the original arrangement. Only the sequence-affecting number switches elicited slower clicking, visual search-like scanning, and lower eye-hand synchrony. The effects were neither limited to the exchanged numbers nor to the corresponding actions. Thus, expectation violations in a well-learned sensorimotor sequence cause a regression from LTM-based attentional selection to visual search beyond deviant-related actions and locations. Effects lasted for several trials and reappeared during reversion. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. Methods for Probing Magnetic Films with Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikov, S. V.; Ott, F.; Radu, F.

    2018-03-01

    We review various methods in the investigation of magnetic films with neutrons, including those based on the effects of Larmor precession, Zeeman spatial splitting of the beam, neutron spin resonance, and polarized neutron channeling. The underlying principles, examples of the investigated systems, specific features, applications, and perspectives of these methods are discussed.

  11. The Architecture of WiFi-Based WSN for AMR System and E-HWMP Routing Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li LI

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With the development of SoC technology in recent years, the ultra-low power WiFi System on SoC Chip has emerged. As a result, WiFi-based Wireless Sensor Networks come into use, especially used in Automatic Meter Reading. While because the nodes of Wireless Sensor Networks have limited energy supply, smaller storage capability and slower calculation ability, the current WiFi technology cannot be directly applied to WiFi-based Wireless Sensor Networks. The protocols should be upgraded and the security algorithms should be improved to meet the new requests. Firstly, this article describes the network architecture of WiFi-based WSN for AMR system and discusses the reason for using this analogous Mesh architecture. Secondly, the new Hardware architecture of WiFi-based WSN node is designed to realize the AMR system and verify the research work. The node can collect the data of power meter by WiFi and can be powered by a Lithium Battery. Thirdly, on the basis of study work of WiFi original routing protocol HWMP, a new method on improving the energy saving ability of HWMP to adapt the new features of WiFi-based WSN is proposed. And the simulation work on the new routing protocol E-HWMP has been done with NS2 and the simulation results show that the life cycle of the network has been extended to some degree.

  12. A cross-bridge based model of force depression: Can a single modification address both transient and steady-state behaviors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corr, David T; Herzog, Walter

    2016-03-21

    Force depression (FD), the reduction of isometric force following active shortening, is a phenomenon of skeletal muscle that has received significant attention in biomechanical and physiological literature, yet the mechanisms underlying FD remain unknown. Recent experiments identified a slower rate of force redevelopment with increasing amounts of steady-state FD, suggesting that FD may be caused, at least in part, by a decrease in cross-bridge binding rate (Corr and Herzog, 2005; Koppes et al., 2014). Herein, we develop a cross-bridge based model of FD in which the binding rate function, f, decreases with the mechanical work performed during shortening. This modification incorporates a direct relationship between steady-state FD and muscle mechanical work (Corr and Herzog, 2005; Herzog et al., 2000; Kosterina et al., 2008), and is consistent with a proposed mechanism attributing FD to stress-induced inhibition of cross-bridge attachments (Herzog, 1998; Maréchal and Plaghki, 1979). Thus, for an increase in mechanical work, the model should predict a slower force redevelopment (decreased attachment rate) to a more depressed steady-state force (fewer attached cross-bridges), and a reduction in contractile element stiffness (Ford et al., 1981). We hypothesized that since this modification affects the cross-bridge kinetics, a corresponding model would be able to account for both transient and steady-state FD behaviors. Comparisons to prior experiments (Corr and Herzog, 2005; Herzog et al., 2000; Kosterina et al., 2008) show that both steady-state and transient aspects of FD, as well as the relationship of FD with respect to speed and amplitude of shortening, are well captured by this model. Thus, this relatively simple cross-bridge based model of FD lends support to a mechanism involving the inhibition of cross-bridge binding, and indicates that cross-bridge kinetics may play a critical role in FD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of learning strategy on response time during complex value-based learning and choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Farashahi

    Full Text Available Measurements of response time (RT have long been used to infer neural processes underlying various cognitive functions such as working memory, attention, and decision making. However, it is currently unknown if RT is also informative about various stages of value-based choice, particularly how reward values are constructed. To investigate these questions, we analyzed the pattern of RT during a set of multi-dimensional learning and decision-making tasks that can prompt subjects to adopt different learning strategies. In our experiments, subjects could use reward feedback to directly learn reward values associated with possible choice options (object-based learning. Alternatively, they could learn reward values of options' features (e.g. color, shape and combine these values to estimate reward values for individual options (feature-based learning. We found that RT was slower when the difference between subjects' estimates of reward probabilities for the two alternative objects on a given trial was smaller. Moreover, RT was overall faster when the preceding trial was rewarded or when the previously selected object was present. These effects, however, were mediated by an interaction between these factors such that subjects were faster when the previously selected object was present rather than absent but only after unrewarded trials. Finally, RT reflected the learning strategy (i.e. object-based or feature-based approach adopted by the subject on a trial-by-trial basis, indicating an overall faster construction of reward value and/or value comparison during object-based learning. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the pattern of RT can be informative about how reward values are learned and constructed during complex value-based learning and decision making.

  14. Preservation of memory-based automaticity in reading for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Katherine A; Touron, Dayna R

    2015-12-01

    Concerning age-related effects on cognitive skill acquisition, the modal finding is that older adults do not benefit from practice to the same extent as younger adults in tasks that afford a shift from slower algorithmic processing to faster memory-based processing. In contrast, Rawson and Touron (2009) demonstrated a relatively rapid shift to memory-based processing in the context of a reading task. The current research extended beyond this initial study to provide more definitive evidence for relative preservation of memory-based automaticity in reading tasks for older adults. Younger and older adults read short stories containing unfamiliar noun phrases (e.g., skunk mud) followed by disambiguating information indicating the combination's meaning (either the normatively dominant meaning or an alternative subordinate meaning). Stories were repeated across practice blocks, and then the noun phrases were presented in novel sentence frames in a transfer task. Both age groups shifted from computation to retrieval after relatively few practice trials (as evidenced by convergence of reading times for dominant and subordinate items). Most important, both age groups showed strong evidence for memory-based processing of the noun phrases in the transfer task. In contrast, older adults showed minimal shifting to retrieval in an alphabet arithmetic task, indicating that the preservation of memory-based automaticity in reading was task-specific. Discussion focuses on important implications for theories of memory-based automaticity in general and for specific theoretical accounts of age effects on memory-based automaticity, as well as fruitful directions for future research. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Absorption coefficient and refractive index changes of a quantum ring in the presence of spin-orbit couplings: Temperature and Zeeman effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A.; Azargoshasb, T.; Niknam, E.

    2017-10-01

    Effects of applied magnetic field, temperature and dimensions on the optical absorption coefficients (AC) and refractive index (RI) changes of a GaAs quantum ring are investigated in the presence of both Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions (SOI). To this end, the finite difference method (FDM) is used in order to numerically calculate the energy eigenvalues and eigenstates of the system while the compact density matrix approach is hired to calculate the optical properties. It is shown that application of magnetic field, temperature as well as the geometrical size in the presence of spin-orbit interactions, alter the electronic structure and consequently influence the linear and third-order nonlinear optical absorption coefficients as well as the refractive index changes of the system. Results show an obvious blue shift in optical curves with enhancing external magnetic field and temperature while the increment of dimensions result in red shift.

  16. Electronic structure and Landé g-factor of a quantum ring in the presence of spin-orbit coupling: Temperature and Zeeman effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, A.; Setareh, F.; Azargoshasb, T.; Niknam, E.

    2017-10-01

    A wide variety of semiconductor nanostructures have been fabricated experimentally and both theoretical and experimental investigations of their features imply the great role they have in new generation technological devices. However, mathematical modeling provide a powerful means due to definitive goal of predicting the features and understanding of such structures behavior under different circumstances. Therefore, effective Hamiltonian for an electron in a quantum ring with axial symmetry in the presence of both Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions (SOI) is derived. Here we report our study of the electronic structure and electron g-factor in the presence of spin-orbit (SO) couplings under the influence of external magnetic field at finite temperature. This investigation shows that, when Rashba and Dresselhaus couplings are simultaneously present, the degeneracy is removed and energy levels split into two branches. Furthermore, with enhancing the applied magnetic field, separation of former degenerate levels increases and also avoided crossings (anti-crossing) in the energy spectra is detected. It is also discussed how the energy levels of the system can be adjusted with variation of temperature as well as the magnetic field and geometrical sizes.

  17. Preconcentration of trace elements from high-purity thorium and uranium on Chelex-100 and determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raje, Naina; Kayasth, Satish; Asari, T.P.S.; Gangadharan, S.

    1994-01-01

    Preconcentration of trace impurities from large-sized samples of uranium metal and thorium oxide using a small column of Chelex-100 followed by their determination using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) is reported. A 0.5-10-g amount of the sample (uranium metal or thorium oxide) was dissolved, complexed with ammonium carbonate and subjected to the ion-exchange procedure. The retained analytes were eluted with 2-4 M nitric acid and brought to a small volume for a final dilution to 10-25 ml for their determination using GFAAS. The validity of the separation procedure and recoveries at μg kg -1 levels was checked by standard addition; the recoveries were >95%

  18. Investigation of trace level binding of PtCl6 and PtCl4 to alfalfa biomass (Medicago sativa) using Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, J.G.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Tiemann, K.J.; Gamez, G.

    2002-01-01

    Batch laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the effects of pH, chemical modification, time dependency, and interference studies on the binding of trace concentrations of hexachloroplatinate(IV) and tetrachloroplatinate(II) to alfalfa biomass. The pH profiles were measured between pH 2.0 and 6.0. It was found that the binding of trace concentrations of platinum(IV and II) to alfalfa biomass was dependent on pH with a maximum binding occurring at pH 3.0 and a minimum at pH 6.0. When the alfalfa biomass was chemically modified (esterified), maximum binding occurred at pH 6.0 for both oxidation states of platinum. From the batch time dependency experiments, it was found that binding took at least 20 min to level off for both platinum oxidation states. Batch experiments were performed with various concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and sodium (0.1, 1.0, 10, 100 and 1000 ppm) and it was found that calcium affected the binding of platinum(II and IV) to the alfalfa biomass. It was determined that magnesium and sodium did not interfere appreciably with the binding of platinum in either of the oxidation states studied. Finally, batch experiments were performed with Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ and Na + in solutions at various concentrations, and it was observed that the binding was affected similarly to that by calcium alone

  19. Comparison of Chemical Modifiers for Simultaneous Determination of Different Selenium-Compounds in Serum and Urine by Zeeman-Effect Electrothermal Atomic-Absorption Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, J.K.; Gammelgaard, Bente; Jons, O.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal stability of selenite, selenate, selenomethionine and trimethylselenonium was studied using different chemical modifiers in various amounts. The normally recommended amounts of nickel nitrate, magnesium nitrate, copper nitrate, copper nitrate mixed with magnesium nitrate, palladium ni...

  20. Comparison of palladium chemical modifiers for the determination of selenium in plasma by Zeeman-effect background corrected electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jons, O.

    1997-01-01

    , It was not possible to stabilize trimethylselenonium to the same extent with this modifier, Peak shapes and appearance times of the atomization signals were equal for the four selenium species with this modifier, The addition of 20 mu g of palladium was used for the analysis of the serum reference material Seronorm...

  1. Determination of lead in whole blood: Comparison of the LeadCare blood lead testing system with zeeman longitudinal electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineau, A.; Viallefont, A.; Fauconneau, B.; Rafael, M.; Guillard, O.

    2002-01-01

    This study compares the efficiency of blood lead level analysis by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and the portable LeadCare Blood lead testing system (LCS). Recoveries of two added lead concentrations of 22 and 42 μg/dL ranged from 102.4 to 105.5% for LCS and from 96.3 to 97.2% for GFAAS. Measurement of a certified sample (Certified Danish Whole Blood) at a blood lead concentration of 26.2 μg/dL gave within- and between-run coefficients of variation which were both approximately 8% by LCS and 2% by GFAAS. Comparison of the tested method (LCS) versus GFAAS from analysis of 76 samples of blood lead collected from workers in different industrial sectors showed imperfect overall correlation (r = 0.95). The LCS is quite suitable for screening purposes, but requires the use of non-frozen blood collected less than 24 h before. Conservative threshold values should be applied when using the LCS for initial screening in the field. (orig.)

  2. Detection mechanism and characteristics of ZnO-based N2O sensors operating with photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, T. S.; Yu, J. H.; Mo, H. S.; Kim, T. S.; Youn, C. J.; Hong, K. J.

    2013-11-01

    N2O sensors made with ZnO-based ZnCdO films were grown on Pyrex substrates by using the RF co-sputtering method. The structure of the N2O sensor was electrode/sensor/glass/illuminant. The mechanism of the photo-assisted oxidation and reduction process on the surface of the N2O sensors was investigated using light from a UV lamp and violet light emitting diode (LED). For photon exposure wavelengths of 365 and 405 nm, the sensitivity of the ZnO-based ZnCdO sensors was measured. From these measurements, the values of the sensitivity of the sensors with x = 0, 0.01, and 0.05 were found to be S = 1.44, 1.39, and 1.33 under LED light with a wavelength of 405 nm, respectively. These sensitivities were compared to those of SnO2 and WO3 materials measured at operating temperatures of 300-600 °C. Also, under exposure with UV light, the response times were observed to be 130 to 270 sec. These response times were slightly slower than that for the traditional method of thermal heating. However, they indicate that the described photon exposure method for N2O detection can replace the conventional heating mode. Consequently, we demonstrated that portable N2O sensors for room-temperature operation could be fabricated without thermal heating.

  3. An Update on ConSys Including a New LabVIEW FPGA Based LLRF System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Torben; Nielsen, Jørgen S.

    . This system use a National Instruments NI-PCIe7852R DAQ card, which includes an on-board FPGA and are hosted in a standard PC. The fast (50 kHz) amplitude loop has been implemented on the FPGA, whereas the slower tuning and phase loops are implemented in the real-time system. An operator interface including......ConSys, the Windows based control system for ASTRID and ASTRID2, is now a mature system, having been in operation for more than 15 years. All the standard programs (Console, plots, data logging, control setting store/restore etc.) are fully general and are configured through a database or file. Con......Sys is a standard publisher/subscriber system, where all nodes can act both as client and server. One very strong feature is the easy ability to make virtual devices (devices which do not depend on hardware directly, but combine hardware parameters.) For ASTRID2 a new LabVIEW based Low-Level RF system has been made...

  4. Sequence-based heuristics for faster annotation of non-coding RNA families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Zasha; Ruzzo, Walter L

    2006-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are functional RNA molecules that do not code for proteins. Covariance Models (CMs) are a useful statistical tool to find new members of an ncRNA gene family in a large genome database, using both sequence and, importantly, RNA secondary structure information. Unfortunately, CM searches are extremely slow. Previously, we created rigorous filters, which provably sacrifice none of a CM's accuracy, while making searches significantly faster for virtually all ncRNA families. However, these rigorous filters make searches slower than heuristics could be. In this paper we introduce profile HMM-based heuristic filters. We show that their accuracy is usually superior to heuristics based on BLAST. Moreover, we compared our heuristics with those used in tRNAscan-SE, whose heuristics incorporate a significant amount of work specific to tRNAs, where our heuristics are generic to any ncRNA. Performance was roughly comparable, so we expect that our heuristics provide a high-quality solution that--unlike family-specific solutions--can scale to hundreds of ncRNA families. The source code is available under GNU Public License at the supplementary web site.

  5. Use of a Paraffin Based Grout to Stabilize Buried Beryllium and Other Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gretchen Matthern; Duane Hanson; Neal Yancey; Darrell Knudson

    2005-12-01

    The long term durability of WAXFIXi, a paraffin based grout, was evaluated for in situ grouting of activated beryllium wastes in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA), a radioactive landfill at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, part of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The evaluation considered radiological and biological mechanisms that could degrade the grout using data from an extensive literature search and previous tests of in situ grouting at the INL. Conservative radioactive doses for WAXFIX were calculated from the "hottest" (i.e., highest-activity) Advanced Test Reactor beryllium block in the SDA.. These results indicate that WAXFIX would not experience extensive radiation damage for many hundreds of years. Calculation of radiation induced hydrogen generation in WAXFIX indicated that grout physical performance should not be reduced beyond the effects of radiation dose on the molecular structure. Degradation of a paraffin-based grout by microorganisms in the SDA is possible and perhaps likely, but the rate of degradation will be at a slower rate than found in the literature reviewed. The calculations showed the outer 0.46 m (18 in.) layer of each monolith, which represents the minimum expected distance to the beryllium block, was calculated to require 1,000 to 3,600 years to be consumed. The existing data and estimations of biodegradation and radiolysis rates

  6. Performance-based interpretation bias in clinically anxious youths: relationships with attention, anxiety, and negative cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenman, Michelle; Amir, Nader; Weersing, V Robin

    2014-09-01

    This preliminary investigation sought to examine basic interpretive biases, as assessed via performance-based means, in the context of anxious symptomatology, attention, and negative cognition in children and adolescents. At a single assessment, 26 youths diagnosed with primary separation anxiety, social phobia, or generalized anxiety disorder completed performance-based assessments of interpretation and attention. Youths and parents also completed diagnostic interviews and youths completed a measure of negative self-statements. Components of interpretation (threat-valence judgments and speed of responding) were examined, and interpretation was explored as a correlate of youth anxiety, attention bias, and negative self-statements. Results found percentage of negative interpretations endorsed as the strongest predictor of anxiety symptoms; this index was also correlated with attention bias. Slower rejection of benign interpretations was also associated with youth-reported negative self-statements.This initial investigation provides support for a relationship between interpretation bias and anxiety and preliminary evidence for a relationship between attention and interpretation biases. Continued research dismantling the stages of basic cognition within the chain of information processing may provide a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying anxiety disorders in youths and lead to continued development and refinement of cognitive interventions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Improving Mobility Performance in Low Vision With a Distance-Based Representation of the Visual Scene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rheede, Joram J; Wilson, Iain R; Qian, Rose I; Downes, Susan M; Kennard, Christopher; Hicks, Stephen L

    2015-07-01

    Severe visual impairment can have a profound impact on personal independence through its effect on mobility. We investigated whether the mobility of people with vision low enough to be registered as blind could be improved by presenting the visual environment in a distance-based manner for easier detection of obstacles. We accomplished this by developing a pair of "residual vision glasses" (RVGs) that use a head-mounted depth camera and displays to present information about the distance of obstacles to the wearer as brightness, such that obstacles closer to the wearer are represented more brightly. We assessed the impact of the RVGs on the mobility performance of visually impaired participants during the completion of a set of obstacle courses. Participant position was monitored continuously, which enabled us to capture the temporal dynamics of mobility performance. This allowed us to find correlates of obstacle detection and hesitations in walking behavior, in addition to the more commonly used measures of trial completion time and number of collisions. All participants were able to use the smart glasses to navigate the course, and mobility performance improved for those visually impaired participants with the worst prior mobility performance. However, walking speed was slower and hesitations increased with the altered visual representation. A depth-based representation of the visual environment may offer low vision patients improvements in independent mobility. It is important for further work to explore whether practice can overcome the reductions in speed and increased hesitation that were observed in our trial.

  8. A Pressure Plate-Based Method for the Automatic Assessment of Foot Strike Patterns During Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santuz, Alessandro; Ekizos, Antonis; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2016-05-01

    The foot strike pattern (FSP, description of how the foot touches the ground at impact) is recognized to be a predictor of both performance and injury risk. The objective of the current investigation was to validate an original foot strike pattern assessment technique based on the numerical analysis of foot pressure distribution. We analyzed the strike patterns during running of 145 healthy men and women (85 male, 60 female). The participants ran on a treadmill with integrated pressure plate at three different speeds: preferred (shod and barefoot 2.8 ± 0.4 m/s), faster (shod 3.5 ± 0.6 m/s) and slower (shod 2.3 ± 0.3 m/s). A custom-designed algorithm allowed the automatic footprint recognition and FSP evaluation. Incomplete footprints were simultaneously identified and corrected from the software itself. The widely used technique of analyzing high-speed video recordings was checked for its reliability and has been used to validate the numerical technique. The automatic numerical approach showed a good conformity with the reference video-based technique (ICC = 0.93, p < 0.01). The great improvement in data throughput and the increased completeness of results allow the use of this software as a powerful feedback tool in a simple experimental setup.

  9. Wind farms providing secondary frequency regulation: Evaluating the performance of model-based receding horizon control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, Carl R.; Meneveau, Charles; Gayme, Dennice F.; Meyers, Johan

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the use of wind farms to provide secondary frequency regulation for a power grid. Our approach uses model-based receding horizon control of a wind farm that is tested using a large eddy simulation (LES) framework. In order to enable real-time implementation, the control actions are computed based on a time-varying one-dimensional wake model. This model describes wake advection and interactions, both of which play an important role in wind farm power production. This controller is implemented in an LES model of an 84-turbine wind farm represented by actuator disk turbine models. Differences between the velocities at each turbine predicted by the wake model and measured in LES are used for closed-loop feedback. The controller is tested on two types of regulation signals, “RegA” and “RegD”, obtained from PJM, an independent system operator in the eastern United States. Composite performance scores, which are used by PJM to qualify plants for regulation, are used to evaluate the performance of the controlled wind farm. Our results demonstrate that the controlled wind farm consistently performs well, passing the qualification threshold for all fastacting RegD signals. For the RegA signal, which changes over slower time scales, the controlled wind farm's average performance surpasses the threshold, but further work is needed to enable the controlled system to achieve qualifying performance all of the time. (paper)

  10. Use of a Paraffin Based Grout to Stabilize Buried Beryllium and Other Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gretchen Matthern; Duane Hanson; Neal Yancey; Darrell Knudson

    2005-01-01

    The long term durability of WAXFIXi, a paraffin based grout, was evaluated for in situ grouting of activated beryllium wastes in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA), a radioactive landfill at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, part of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The evaluation considered radiological and biological mechanisms that could degrade the grout using data from an extensive literature search and previous tests of in situ grouting at the INL. Conservative radioactive doses for WAXFIX were calculated from the ''hottest'' (i.e., highest-activity) Advanced Test Reactor beryllium block in the SDA.. These results indicate that WAXFIX would not experience extensive radiation damage for many hundreds of years. Calculation of radiation induced hydrogen generation in WAXFIX indicated that grout physical performance should not be reduced beyond the effects of radiation dose on the molecular structure. Degradation of a paraffin-based grout by microorganisms in the SDA is possible and perhaps likely, but the rate of degradation will be at a slower rate than found in the literature reviewed. The calculations showed the outer 0.46 m (18 in.) layer of each monolith, which represents the minimum expected distance to the beryllium block, was calculated to require 1,000 to 3,600 years to be consumed. The existing data and estimations of biodegradation and radiolysis rates for WAXFIX/paraffin do not indicate any immediate problems with the use of WAXFIX for grouting beryllium or other wastes in the SDA

  11. Mixed P25 nanoparticles and large rutile particles as a top scattering layer to enhance performance of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} based dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiaohua, E-mail: mksxh@163.com; Zhou, Xin; Xu, Yalong; Sun, Panpan; Huang, Niu; Sun, Yihua

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mixed P25 nanoparticles and large rutile particles were employed to form a top scattering layer. • The top scattering layer exhibits superior light scattering effect. • The bottom nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} layer can make good use of the back-scattered light. • Bilayer TiO{sub 2} photoanode shows faster interfacial electron transfer and slower charge recombination process. • Bilayer photoanode enhances the DSSC efficiency by a factor of 25%. - Abstract: Herein, we report a bilayer TiO{sub 2} photoanode composed of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} (NCT) bottom layer and mixed P25 nanoparticles and large rutile particles (PR) top scattering layer. The present structure performs well in solar light harvesting which is mainly attributed to the fact that the top scattering layer exhibits superior light scattering effect and meanwhile the NCT bottom layer with large dye-loading capacity can make better use of the back-scattered light. Moreover, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and open circuit voltage decay measurements demonstrate that DSSC based on bilayer photoanode shows faster interfacial electron transfer and slower charge recombination process than that based on NCT monolayer photoanode. These advantages render the DSSCs based on NCT-PR bilayer photoanode exhibiting superior performance under AM1.5G simulated solar irradiation. As an example, by tuning mass ratio between P25 nanoparticles and large rutile particles in the top scattering layer, the DSSC based on NCT-PR bilayer photoanode exhibits an optimum solar energy conversion efficiency of 9.0%, which is about 1.25 times higher than that of monolayer NCT device (7.2%) with the same film thickness.

  12. Isogeometric shell formulation based on a classical shell model

    KAUST Repository

    Niemi, Antti

    2012-09-04

    This paper constitutes the first steps in our work concerning isogeometric shell analysis. An isogeometric shell model of the Reissner-Mindlin type is introduced and a study of its accuracy in the classical pinched cylinder benchmark problem presented. In contrast to earlier works [1,2,3,4], the formulation is based on a shell model where the displacement, strain and stress fields are defined in terms of a curvilinear coordinate system arising from the NURBS description of the shell middle surface. The isogeometric shell formulation is implemented using the PetIGA and igakit software packages developed by the authors. The igakit package is a Python package used to generate NURBS representations of geometries that can be utilised by the PetIGA finite element framework. The latter utilises data structures and routines of the portable, extensible toolkit for scientific computation (PETSc), [5,6]. The current shell implementation is valid for static, linear problems only, but the software package is well suited for future extensions to geometrically and materially nonlinear regime as well as to dynamic problems. The accuracy of the approach in the pinched cylinder benchmark problem and present comparisons against the h-version of the finite element method with bilinear elements. Quadratic, cubic and quartic NURBS discretizations are compared against the isoparametric bilinear discretization introduced in [7]. The results show that the quadratic and cubic NURBS approximations exhibit notably slower convergence under uniform mesh refinement as the thickness decreases but the quartic approximation converges relatively quickly within the standard variational framework. The authors future work is concerned with building an isogeometric finite element method for modelling nonlinear structural response of thin-walled shells undergoing large rigid-body motions. The aim is to use the model in a aeroelastic framework for the simulation of flapping wings.

  13. Instant polysaccharide-based emulsions: impact of microstructure on lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torcello-Gómez, Amelia; Foster, Timothy J

    2017-06-21

    The development of emulsion-based products through optimisation of ingredients, reduction in energy-input during manufacture, while fulfilling healthy attributes, are major objectives within the food industry. Instant emulsions can meet these features, but comprehensive studies are necessary to investigate the effect of the initial formulation on the final microstructure and, in turn, on the in vitro lipolysis, comprising the double aim of this work. The instant emulsion is formed within 1.5-3 min after pouring the aqueous phase into the oil phase which contains a mixture of emulsifier (Tween 20), swelling particles (Sephadex) and thickeners (hydroxypropylmethylcellulose, HPMC, and guar gum, GG) under mild shearing (180 rpm). The creation of oil-in-water emulsions is monitored in situ by viscosity analysis, the final microstructure visualised by microscopy and the release of free fatty acids under simulated intestinal conditions quantified by titration. Increasing the concentration and molecular weight (M w ) of GG leads to smaller emulsion droplets due to increased bulk viscosity upon shearing. This droplet size reduction is magnified when increasing the M w of HPMC or swelling capacity of viscosifying particles. In addition, in the absence of the emulsifier Tween 20, the sole use of high-Mw HPMC is effective in emulsification due to combined increased bulk viscosity and interfacial activity. Hence, optimisation of the ingredient choice and usage level is possible when designing microstructures. Finally, emulsions with larger droplet size (>20 μm) display a slower rate and lower extent of lipolysis, while finer emulsions (droplet size ≤20 μm) exhibit maximum rate and extent profiles. This correlates with the extent of emulsion destabilisation observed under intestinal conditions.

  14. Fuzzy knowledge bases integration based on ontology

    OpenAIRE

    Ternovoy, Maksym; Shtogrina, Olena

    2012-01-01

    the paper describes the approach for fuzzy knowledge bases integration with the usage of ontology. This approach is based on metadata-base usage for integration of different knowledge bases with common ontology. The design process of metadata-base is described.

  15. Foundation: Transforming data bases into knowledge bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, R. B.; Carnes, James R.; Cutts, Dannie E.

    1987-01-01

    One approach to transforming information stored in relational data bases into knowledge based representations and back again is described. This system, called Foundation, allows knowledge bases to take advantage of vast amounts of pre-existing data. A benefit of this approach is inspection, and even population, of data bases through an intelligent knowledge-based front-end.

  16. Address-event-based platform for bioinspired spiking systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Fernández, A.; Luján, C. D.; Linares-Barranco, A.; Gómez-Rodríguez, F.; Rivas, M.; Jiménez, G.; Civit, A.

    2007-05-01

    Address Event Representation (AER) is an emergent neuromorphic interchip communication protocol that allows a real-time virtual massive connectivity between huge number neurons, located on different chips. By exploiting high speed digital communication circuits (with nano-seconds timings), synaptic neural connections can be time multiplexed, while neural activity signals (with mili-seconds timings) are sampled at low frequencies. Also, neurons generate "events" according to their activity levels. More active neurons generate more events per unit time, and access the interchip communication channel more frequently, while neurons with low activity consume less communication bandwidth. When building multi-chip muti-layered AER systems, it is absolutely necessary to have a computer interface that allows (a) reading AER interchip traffic into the computer and visualizing it on the screen, and (b) converting conventional frame-based video stream in the computer into AER and injecting it at some point of the AER structure. This is necessary for test and debugging of complex AER systems. In the other hand, the use of a commercial personal computer implies to depend on software tools and operating systems that can make the system slower and un-robust. This paper addresses the problem of communicating several AER based chips to compose a powerful processing system. The problem was discussed in the Neuromorphic Engineering Workshop of 2006. The platform is based basically on an embedded computer, a powerful FPGA and serial links, to make the system faster and be stand alone (independent from a PC). A new platform is presented that allow to connect up to eight AER based chips to a Spartan 3 4000 FPGA. The FPGA is responsible of the network communication based in Address-Event and, at the same time, to map and transform the address space of the traffic to implement a pre-processing. A MMU microprocessor (Intel XScale 400MHz Gumstix Connex computer) is also connected to the FPGA

  17. Polarized Line Formation in Arbitrary Strength Magnetic Fields Angle-averaged and Angle-dependent Partial Frequency Redistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampoorna, M.; Nagendra, K. N. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bengaluru 560 034 (India); Stenflo, J. O., E-mail: sampoorna@iiap.res.in, E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in, E-mail: stenflo@astro.phys.ethz.ch [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere leave their fingerprints in the polarized spectrum of the Sun via the Hanle and Zeeman effects. While the Hanle and Zeeman effects dominate, respectively, in the weak and strong field regimes, both these effects jointly operate in the intermediate field strength regime. Therefore, it is necessary to solve the polarized line transfer equation, including the combined influence of Hanle and Zeeman effects. Furthermore, it is required to take into account the effects of partial frequency redistribution (PRD) in scattering when dealing with strong chromospheric lines with broad damping wings. In this paper, we present a numerical method to solve the problem of polarized PRD line formation in magnetic fields of arbitrary strength and orientation. This numerical method is based on the concept of operator perturbation. For our studies, we consider a two-level atom model without hyperfine structure and lower-level polarization. We compare the PRD idealization of angle-averaged Hanle–Zeeman redistribution matrices with the full treatment of angle-dependent PRD, to indicate when the idealized treatment is inadequate and what kind of polarization effects are specific to angle-dependent PRD. Because the angle-dependent treatment is presently computationally prohibitive when applied to realistic model atmospheres, we present the computed emergent Stokes profiles for a range of magnetic fields, with the assumption of an isothermal one-dimensional medium.

  18. Longitudinal study of alcohol consumption and HDL concentrations: a community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shue; Li, Junjuan; Shearer, Gregory C; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Zheng, Xiaoming; Wu, Yuntao; Jin, Cheng; Wu, Shouling; Gao, Xiang

    2017-04-01

    Background: In cross-sectional studies and short-term clinical trials, it has been suggested that there is a positive dose-response relation between alcohol consumption and HDL concentrations. However, prospective data have been limited. Objective: We sought to determine the association between total alcohol intake, the type of alcohol-containing beverage, and the 6-y (2006-2012) longitudinal change in HDL-cholesterol concentrations in a community-based cohort. Design: A total of 71,379 Chinese adults (mean age: 50 y) who were free of cardiovascular diseases and cancer and did not use cholesterol-lowering agents during follow-up were included in the study. Alcohol intake was assessed via a questionnaire in 2006 (baseline), and participants were classified into the following categories of alcohol consumption: never, past, light (women: 0-0.4 servings/d; men: 0-0.9 servings/d), moderate (women: 0.5-1.0 servings/d; men: 1-2 servings/d), and heavy (women: >1.0 servings/d; men: >2 servings/d). HDL-cholesterol concentrations were measured in 2006, 2008, 2010, and 2012. We used generalized estimating equation models to examine the associations between baseline alcohol intake and the change in HDL-cholesterol concentrations with adjustment for age, sex, smoking, physical activity, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, liver function, and C-reactive protein concentrations. Results: An umbrella-shaped association was observed between total alcohol consumption and changes in HDL-cholesterol concentrations. Compared with never drinkers, past, light, moderate, and heavy drinkers experienced slower decreases in HDL cholesterol of 0.012 mmol · L -1 · y -1 (95% CI: 0.008, 0.016 mmol · L -1 · y -1 ), 0.013 mmol · L -1 · y -1 (95% CI: 0.010, 0.016 mmol · L -1 · y -1 ), 0.017 mmol · L -1 · y -1 (95% CI: 0.009, 0.025 mmol · L -1 · y -1 ), and 0.008 mmol · L -1 · y -1 (95% CI: 0.005, 0.011 mmol · L -1 · y -1 ), respectively ( P alcohol consumption was associated with the

  19. Comparison of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with lidar, radiosonde and satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2015-04-01

    The importance of the knowledge of the temperature structure in the atmosphere has been widely recognized. Temperature is a key parameter for dynamical, chemical and radiative processes in the atmosphere. The cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming ( [1] and references therein). However, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. Stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another [1]. Therefore it is important that in the future such datasets are generated. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. TEMPERA (TEMPERature RAdiometer) is a newly developed ground-based microwave radiometer designed, built and operated at the University of Bern. The instrument and the retrieval of temperature profiles has been described in detail in [2]. TEMPERA is measuring a pressure broadened oxygen line at 53.1 GHz in order to determine stratospheric temperature profiles. The retrieved profiles of TEMPERA cover an altitude range of approximately 20 to 45 km with a vertical resolution in the order of 15 km. The lower limit is given by the instrumental baseline and the bandwidth of the measured spectrum. The upper limit is given by the fact that above 50 km the oxygen lines are splitted by the Zeeman effect in the terrestrial magnetic field. In this study we present a comparison of stratospheric

  20. Sorbitol-based osmotic diarrhea: possible causes and mechanism of prevention investigated in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Sakaguchi, Ei

    2006-12-21

    To study the possible causes of sorbitol (S)-based diarrhea and its mechanism of reduction by rice gruel (RG) in cecectomized rats. S was dissolved either in distilled water or in RG (50 g/L) and ingested as a single oral dose (1.2 g/kg body mass, containing 0.5 g/L phenol red as a recovery marker) by S (control) and S + RG groups (n = 7), respectively. This dose is over the laxative dose for humans. Animals were sacrificed exactly 1 h after dose ingestion, without any access to drinking water. The whole gastro-intestinal tract was divided into seven segments and sampled to analyze the S and marker remaining in its contents. Gastric-emptying and intestinal transit were comparatively slower in the S + RG group. Also, the S absorption index in the 3(rd) and last quarter of the small intestine (24.85 +/- 18.88% vs 0.0 +/- 0.0% and 39.09 +/- 32.75% vs 0.0 +/- 0.0%, respectively, P osmotic diarrhea. Where RG enhanced the absorption of S through passive diffusion, the degree of diarrhea was reduced in cecectomized rats.

  1. A VXI-based high speed x-ray CCD detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Qiang; Hopf, R.; Rodricks, B.

    1993-01-01

    For time-resolved x-ray scattering, one ideally wants a high speed detector that also is capable of giving position sensitive information. Charge Coupled Devices (CCDS) have been used successfully as x-ray detectors. Unfortunately, they are inherently slow because of the serial readout EEV has developed a CCD that has eight channels of parallel readout, thus increasing the speed eight fold. Using state-of-the-art VXI electronics, we have developed a readout system that could read the entire array in 2.5 ms using a 20-MHz readout clock. For testing and characterization the device was clocked at a significantly slower speed of 30 kHz. The data is preamplified and all eight channels of output are simultaneously digitized to 12 bits and stored in buffer memory. The system is controlled by a 486-based PC through an MXI bus and VXI controller using commercially available software. The system is also capable of real-time image display and manipulation

  2. Training induces cognitive bias: the case of a simulation-based emergency airway curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Christine S; Stojiljkovic, Ljuba; Milicic, Biljana; Lin, Brian F; Dror, Itiel E

    2014-04-01

    Training-induced cognitive bias may affect performance. Using a simulation-based emergency airway curriculum, we tested the hypothesis that curriculum design would induce bias and affect decision making. Twenty-three novice anesthesiology residents were randomized into 2 groups. The primary outcome measure was the initiation of supraglottic airway and cricothyroidotomy techniques in a simulated cannot-ventilate, cannot-intubate scenario during 3 evaluation sessions. Secondary outcomes were response times for device initiation. After a baseline evaluation and didactic lecture, residents received an initial practical training in either surgical cricothyroidotomy (CRIC group) or supraglottic airway (SGA group). After the midtest, the groups switched to receive the alternate training. From baseline to midtest, the SGA group increased initiation of supraglottic airway but not cricothyroidotomy. The CRIC group increased initiation of cricothyroidotomy but not supraglottic airway. After completion of training in both techniques, the SGA group increased initiation of both supraglottic airway and cricothyroidotomy. In contrast, the CRIC group increased initiation of cricothyroidotomy but failed to change practice in supraglottic airway. Final test response times showed that the CRIC group was slower to initiate supraglottic airway and faster to initiate cricothyroidotomy. Practical training in only 1 technique caused bias in both groups despite a preceding didactic lecture. The chief finding was an asymmetrical effect of training sequence even after training in both techniques. Initial training in cricothyroidotomy caused bias that did not correct despite subsequent supraglottic airway training. Educators must be alert to the risk of inducing cognitive bias when designing curricula.

  3. Poly lactic acid based injectable delivery systems for controlled release of a model protein, lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tahami, Khaled; Meyer, Amanda; Singh, Jagdish

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the critical formulation parameters (i.e., polymer concentration, polymer molecular weight, and solvent nature) affecting the controlled delivery of a model protein, lysozyme, from injectable polymeric implants. The conformational stability and biological activity of the released lysozyme were also investigated. Three formulations containing 10%, 20%, and 30% (w/v) poly lactic acid (PLA) in triacetin were investigated. It was found that increasing polymer concentration in the formulations led to a lower burst effect and a slower release rate. Formulation with a high molecular weight polymer showed a greater burst effect as compared to those containing low molecular weight. Conformational stability and biological activity of released samples were studied by differential scanning calorimeter and enzyme activity assay, respectively. The released samples had significantly (P solution kept at same conditions). Increasing polymer concentration increased both the conformational stability and the biological activity of released lysozyme. In conclusion, phase sensitive polymer-based delivery systems were able to deliver a model protein, lysozyme, in a conformationally stable and biologically active form at a controlled rate over an extended period.

  4. CloudLM: a Cloud-based Language Model for Machine Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrández-Tordera Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Language models (LMs are an essential element in statistical approaches to natural language processing for tasks such as speech recognition and machine translation (MT. The advent of big data leads to the availability of massive amounts of data to build LMs, and in fact, for the most prominent languages, using current techniques and hardware, it is not feasible to train LMs with all the data available nowadays. At the same time, it has been shown that the more data is used for a LM the better the performance, e.g. for MT, without any indication yet of reaching a plateau. This paper presents CloudLM, an open-source cloud-based LM intended for MT, which allows to query distributed LMs. CloudLM relies on Apache Solr and provides the functionality of state-of-the-art language modelling (it builds upon KenLM, while allowing to query massive LMs (as the use of local memory is drastically reduced, at the expense of slower decoding speed.

  5. The efficacy of internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan YE

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the effectiveness of internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT for the treatment of insomnia by comparison of sleep parameters, degrees of anxiety and depression of the ICBT, with traditional face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT and pharmacotherapy for insomnia. Methods  Seventy-nine cases meeting proposed DSM-5 criteria for insomnia disorder were randomly assigned to ICBT (n=27, CBT (n=26, and pharmacotherapy (n=26 group, and treated accordingly for 8 consecutive weeks. The sleep parameters, the levels of anxiety and depression in the 3 groups were compared and analyzed before, 4 weeks after and the termination of treatment. Results  Comparing to that of pre-treatment, the sleep parameters were significantly improved, anxiety and depression levels obviously decreased after treatment for 4 and 8 consecutive weeks, the differences were statistically significant (P0.05 was found in sleep parameters and anxiety level between ICBT group and CBT group. Conclusion  ICBT may display a slower effect on improving speed in falling asleep than the pharmacotherapy does, but the efficacy of ICBT is better than that of pharmacotherapy after treatment, and there is no significant difference compared to traditional face-to-face CBT. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.04.09

  6. A fast global fitting algorithm for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy based on image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelet, S; Previte, M J R; Laiho, L H; So, P T C

    2004-10-01

    Global fitting algorithms have been shown to improve effectively the accuracy and precision of the analysis of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy data. Global analysis performs better than unconstrained data fitting when prior information exists, such as the spatial invariance of the lifetimes of individual fluorescent species. The highly coupled nature of global analysis often results in a significantly slower convergence of the data fitting algorithm as compared with unconstrained analysis. Convergence speed can be greatly accelerated by providing appropriate initial guesses. Realizing that the image morphology often correlates with fluorophore distribution, a global fitting algorithm has been developed to assign initial guesses throughout an image based on a segmentation analysis. This algorithm was tested on both simulated data sets and time-domain lifetime measurements. We have successfully measured fluorophore distribution in fibroblasts stained with Hoechst and calcein. This method further allows second harmonic generation from collagen and elastin autofluorescence to be differentiated in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy images of ex vivo human skin. On our experimental measurement, this algorithm increased convergence speed by over two orders of magnitude and achieved significantly better fits. Copyright 2004 Biophysical Society

  7. Ethyl Ferulate, a Component with Anti-Inflammatory Properties for Emulsion-Based Creams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. Nazaré

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethyl ferulate (FAEE has been widely studied due to its beneficial heath properties and, when incorporated in creams, shows a high sun protection capacity. Here we aimed to compare FAEE and its precursor, ferulic acid (FA, as free radical scavengers, inhibitors of oxidants produced by leukocytes and the alterations in rheological properties when incorporated in emulsion based creams. The cell-free antiradical capacity of FAEE was decreased compared to FA. However, FAEE was more effective regarding the scavenging of reactive oxygen species produced by activated leukocytes. Stress and frequency sweep tests showed that the formulations are more elastic than viscous. The viscoelastic features of the formulations were confirmed in the creep and recovery assay and showed that the FAEE formulation was less susceptive to deformation. Liberation experiments showed that the rate of FAEE release from the emulsion was slower compared to FA. In conclusion, FAEE is more effective than FA as a potential inhibitor of oxidative damage produced by oxidants generated by leukocytes. The rheological alterations caused by the addition of FAEE are indicative of lower spreadability, which could be useful for formulations used in restricted areas of the skin.

  8. Ethyl ferulate, a component with anti-inflammatory properties for emulsion-based creams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazaré, Ana C; de Faria, Carolina M Q G; Chiari, Bruna G; Petrônio, Maicon S; Regasini, Luis O; Silva, Dulce H S; Corrêa, Marcos A; Isaac, Vera L B; da Fonseca, Luiz M; Ximenes, Valdecir F

    2014-06-17

    Ethyl ferulate (FAEE) has been widely studied due to its beneficial heath properties and, when incorporated in creams, shows a high sun protection capacity. Here we aimed to compare FAEE and its precursor, ferulic acid (FA), as free radical scavengers, inhibitors of oxidants produced by leukocytes and the alterations in rheological properties when incorporated in emulsion based creams. The cell-free antiradical capacity of FAEE was decreased compared to FA. However, FAEE was more effective regarding the scavenging of reactive oxygen species produced by activated leukocytes. Stress and frequency sweep tests showed that the formulations are more elastic than viscous. The viscoelastic features of the formulations were confirmed in the creep and recovery assay and showed that the FAEE formulation was less susceptive to deformation. Liberation experiments showed that the rate of FAEE release from the emulsion was slower compared to FA. In conclusion, FAEE is more effective than FA as a potential inhibitor of oxidative damage produced by oxidants generated by leukocytes. The rheological alterations caused by the addition of FAEE are indicative of lower spreadability, which could be useful for formulations used in restricted areas of the skin.

  9. Preliminary neutronic assessment for ATF (Accident Tolerant Fuel) based on iron alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Alfredo; Carluccio, Thiago; Piovezan, Pamela; Giovedi, Claudia; Martins, Marcelo R.

    2015-01-01

    After Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in 2011, the nuclear fuel performance under accident condition became a very important issue and currently different research and development program are in progress toward to reliability and withstand under accident condition. These initiatives are known as ATF (Accident Tolerant Fuel) R and D program, which many countries with different research institutes, fuel vendors and others are nowadays involved. Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) can be defined as enhanced fuel which can tolerate loss of active cooling system capability for a considerably longer time period and the fuel/cladding system can be maintained without significant degradation and can also improve the fuel performance during normal operations and transients, as well as design-basis accident (DBA) and beyond design-basis (BDBA) accident. Different materials have being proposed as fuel cladding candidates considering thermo-mechanical properties and lower reaction kinetic with steam and slower hydrogen production. The aim of this work is to perform a neutronic assessment for several cladding candidates based on iron alloy considering a standard PWR fuel rod (fuel pellet and dimension). The purpose of the assessment is to address different parameters that might contribute for possible neutronic reactivity gain in order to overcome the penalty due to increase of neutron absorption in the cladding materials. All the neutronic assessment is performed using MCNP, Monte Carlo code. (author)

  10. Lightweight UDP Pervasive Protocol in Smart Home Environment Based on Labview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Wijaya; Hannats Hanafi Ichsan, Mochammad; Rizqika Akbar, Sabriansyah; Arwani, Issa

    2017-04-01

    TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) technology in a reliable environment was not a problem, but not in an environment where the entire Smart Home network connected locally. Currently employing pervasive protocols using TCP technology, when data transmission is sent, it would be slower because they have to perform handshaking process in advance and could not broadcast the data. On smart home environment, it does not need large size and complex data transmission between monitoring site and monitoring center required in Smart home strain monitoring system. UDP (User Datagram Protocol) technology is quick and simple on data transmission process. UDP can broadcast messages because the UDP did not require handshaking and with more efficient memory usage. LabVIEW is a programming language software for processing and visualization of data in the field of data acquisition. This paper proposes to examine Pervasive UDP protocol implementations in smart home environment based on LabVIEW. UDP coded in LabVIEW and experiments were performed on a PC and can work properly.

  11. Features in Microfluidic Paper-Based Devices Made by Laser Cutting: How Small Can They Be?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Almostasim Mahmud

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we determine the smallest feature size that enables fluid flow in microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (µPADs fabricated by laser cutting. The smallest feature sizes fabricated from five commercially available paper types: Whatman filter paper grade 50 (FP-50, Whatman 3MM Chr chromatography paper (3MM Chr, Whatman 1 Chr chromatography paper (1 Chr, Whatman regenerated cellulose membrane 55 (RC-55 and Amershan Protran 0.45 nitrocellulose membrane (NC, were 139 ± 8 µm, 130 ± 11 µm, 103 ± 12 µm, 45 ± 6 µm, and 24 ± 3 µm, respectively, as determined experimentally by successful fluid flow. We found that the fiber width of the paper correlates with the smallest feature size that has the capacity for fluid flow. We also investigated the flow speed of Allura red dye solution through small-scale channels fabricated from different paper types. We found that the flow speed is significantly slower through microscale features and confirmed the similar trends that were reported previously for millimeter-scale channels, namely that wider channels enable quicker flow speed.

  12. Characterization and optimization of GMO-based gels with long term release for intraarticular administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réeff, J; Gaignaux, A; Goole, J; Siepmann, J; Siepmann, F; Jerome, C; Thomassin, J M; De Vriese, C; Amighi, K

    2013-07-15

    Osteoarthritis is characterized by slow degenerative processes in the articular cartilage within synovial joints. It could be interesting to develop a sustained-release formulation that could be effective on both pain/inflammation and restoration of mechanical integrity of the joint. Recently, an injectable system based on glycerol monooleate (GMO), containing clonidine as a model hydrophilic analgesic/anti-inflammatory drug and hyaluronic acid as a viscoelastic scaffold, showed promising potential as a biodegradable and biocompatible preparation to sustain the drug activity. However, drug release from the system is relatively fast (complete within 1 week) and the underlying drug release mechanisms not fully understood. The aims of this study were: (i) to significantly improve this type of local controlled drug delivery system by further sustaining clonidine release, and (ii) to elucidate the underlying mass transport mechanisms. The addition of FDA-approved inactive ingredients such as sodium oleate or purified soybean oil was found to be highly effective. The release rate could be substantially reduced (e.g., 50% release after 10 days), due to the increased hydrophobicity of the systems, resulting in slower and reduced water uptake and reduced drug mobility. Interestingly, Fick's second law of diffusion could be used to quantitatively describe drug release. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Design And Analysis Of Doppler Radar-Based Vehicle Speed Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Myat Paing

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The most unwanted thing to happen to a road user is road accident. Most of the fatal accidents occur due to over speeding. Faster vehicles are more prone to accident than the slower one. Among the various methods for detecting speed of the vehicle object detection systems based on Radar have been replaced for about a century for various purposes like detection of aircrafts spacecraft ships navigation reading weather formations and terrain mapping. The essential feature in adaptive vehicle activated sign systems is the accurate measurement of a vehicles velocity. The velocities of the vehicles are acquired from a continuous wave Doppler radar. A very low amount of power is consumed in this system and only batteries can use to operate. The system works on the principle of Doppler Effect by detecting the Doppler shift in microwaves reflected from a moving object. Since the output of the sensor is sinusoidal wave with very small amplitude and needs to be amplified with the help of the amplifier before further processing. The purpose to calculate and display the speed on LCD is performed by the microcontroller.

  14. Preparation and Characterization of Controlled-Release Avermectin/Castor Oil-Based Polyurethane Nanoemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Qin, He; Li, Lingxiao; Zhou, Xiaoteng; Wang, Wei; Kan, Chengyou

    2017-06-12

    Avermectin (AVM) is a low-toxic and high-active biopesticide, but it can be easily degraded by UV light. In this paper, biodegradable castor oil-based polyurethanes (CO-PU) are synthesized and used as carriers to fabricate a new kind of AVM/CO-PU nanoemulsion through an emulsion solvent evaporation method, and the chemical structure, colloidal property, AVM loading capacity, controlled-release behavior, foliar adhesion, and photostability of the AVM/CO-PU drug delivery systems are investigated. Results show that AVM is physically encapsulated in the CO-PU carrier nanospheres, the diameter of the AVM/CO-PU nanoparticles is 85%. The release profiles indicate that the release rate is relatively high at the early stage and then slows, which can be adjusted by loaded AVM content, temperature, and pH of the release medium. The foliar pesticide retention of the AVM/CO-PU nanoemulsions is improved, and the photolysis rate of AVM in the AVM/CO-PU nanoparticles is significantly slower than that of the free AVM. A release mechanism of the AVM/CO-PU nanoemulsions is proposed, which is controlled by both diffusion and matrix erosion.

  15. Structural brain aging and speech production: a surface-based brain morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Pascale; Deschamps, Isabelle

    2016-07-01

    While there has been a growing number of studies examining the neurofunctional correlates of speech production over the past decade, the neurostructural correlates of this immensely important human behaviour remain less well understood, despite the fact that previous studies have established links between brain structure and behaviour, including speech and language. In the present study, we thus examined, for the first time, the relationship between surface-based cortical thickness (CT) and three different behavioural indexes of sublexical speech production: response duration, reaction times and articulatory accuracy, in healthy young and older adults during the production of simple and complex meaningless sequences of syllables (e.g., /pa-pa-pa/ vs. /pa-ta-ka/). The results show that each behavioural speech measure was sensitive to the complexity of the sequences, as indicated by slower reaction times, longer response durations and decreased articulatory accuracy in both groups for the complex sequences. Older adults produced longer speech responses, particularly during the production of complex sequence. Unique age-independent and age-dependent relationships between brain structure and each of these behavioural measures were found in several cortical and subcortical regions known for their involvement in speech production, including the bilateral anterior insula, the left primary motor area, the rostral supramarginal gyrus, the right inferior frontal sulcus, the bilateral putamen and caudate, and in some region less typically associated with speech production, such as the posterior cingulate cortex.

  16. Fabrication and In Vitro Evaluation of Nanosized Hydroxyapatite/Chitosan-Based Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite scaffolds based on biodegradable natural polymer and osteoconductive hydroxyapatite (HA nanoparticles can be promising for a variety of tissue engineering (TE applications. This study addressed the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D porous composite scaffolds composed of HA and chitosan fabricated via thermally induced phase separation and freeze-drying technique. The scaffolds produced were subsequently characterized in terms of microstructure, porosity, and mechanical property. In vitro degradation and in vitro biological evaluation were also investigated. The scaffolds were highly porous and had interconnected pore structures. The pore sizes ranged from several microns to a few hundred microns. The incorporated HA nanoparticles were well mixed and physically coexisted with chitosan in composite scaffold structures. The addition of 10% (w/w HA nanoparticles to chitosan enhanced the compressive mechanical properties of composite scaffold compared to pure chitosan scaffold. In vitro degradation results in phosphate buffered saline (PBS showed slower uptake properties of composite scaffolds. Moreover, the scaffolds showed positive response to mouse fibroblast L929 cells attachment. Overall, the findings suggest that HA/chitosan composite scaffolds could be suitable for TE applications.

  17. A laparoscopy-based method for BRDF estimation from in vivo human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A L P; Maciel, A; Cavazzola, L T; Walter, M

    2017-01-01

    While improved visual realism is known to enhance training effectiveness in virtual surgery simulators, the advances on realistic rendering for these simulators is slower than similar simulations for man-made scenes. One of the main reasons for this is that in vivo data is hard to gather and process. In this paper, we propose the analysis of videolaparoscopy data to compute the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of living organs as an input to physically based rendering algorithms. From the interplay between light and organic matter recorded in video images, we propose the definition of a process capable of establishing the BRDF for inside-the-body organic surfaces. We present a case study around the liver with patient-specific rendering under global illumination. Results show that despite the limited range of motion allowed within the body, the computed BRDF presents a high-coverage of the sampled regions and produces plausible renderings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Charge transport properties of poly(dA)-poly(dT) DNA in variation of backbone disorder and amplitude of base-pair twisting motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmi, Kinanti Aldilla, E-mail: kinanti.aldilla@ui.ac.id; Yudiarsah, Efta [Physics Department, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    By using tight binding Hamiltonian model, charge transport properties of poly(dA)-poly(dT) DNA in variation of backbone disorder and amplitude of base-pair twisting motion is studied. The DNA chain used is 32 base pairs long poly(dA)-poly(dT) molecule. The molecule is contacted to electrode at both ends. The influence of environment on charge transport in DNA is modeled as variation of backbone disorder. The twisting motion amplitude is taking into account by assuming that the twisting angle distributes following Gaussian distribution function with zero average and standard deviation proportional to square root of temperature and inversely proportional to the twisting motion frequency. The base-pair twisting motion influences both the onsite energy of the bases and electron hopping constant between bases. The charge transport properties are studied by calculating current using Landauer-Buttiker formula from transmission probabilities which is calculated by transfer matrix methods. The result shows that as the backbone disorder increases, the maximum current decreases. By decreasing the twisting motion frequency, the current increases rapidly at low voltage, but the current increases slower at higher voltage. The threshold voltage can increase or decrease with increasing backbone disorder and increasing twisting frequency.

  19. Paper based electronics platform

    KAUST Repository

    Nassar, Joanna Mohammad; Sevilla, Galo Andres Torres; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    A flexible and non-functionalized low cost paper-based electronic system platform fabricated from common paper, such as paper based sensors, and methods of producing paper based sensors, and methods of sensing using the paper based sensors

  20. Ground based mobile isotopic methane measurements in the Front Range, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, B. H.; Rella, C.; Petron, G.; Sherwood, O.; Mielke-Maday, I.; Schwietzke, S.

    2014-12-01

    Increased development of unconventional oil and gas resources in North America has given rise to attempts to monitor and quantify fugitive emissions of methane from the industry. Emission estimates of methane from oil and gas basins can vary significantly from one study to another as well as from EPA or State estimates. New efforts are aimed at reconciling bottom-up, or inventory-based, emission estimates of methane with top-down estimates based on atmospheric measurements from aircraft, towers, mobile ground-based vehicles, and atmospheric models. Attributing airborne measurements of regional methane fluxes to specific sources is informed by ground-based measurements of methane. Stable isotopic measurements (δ13C) of methane help distinguish between emissions from the O&G industry, Confined Animal Feed Operations (CAFO), and landfills, but analytical challenges typically limit meaningful isotopic measurements to individual point sampling. We are developing a toolbox to use δ13CH4 measurements to assess the partitioning of methane emissions for regions with multiple methane sources. The method was applied to the Denver-Julesberg Basin. Here we present data from continuous isotopic measurements obtained over a wide geographic area by using MegaCore, a 1500 ft. tube that is constantly filled with sample air while driving, then subsequently analyzed at slower rates using cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS). Pressure, flow and calibration are tightly controlled allowing precise attribution of methane enhancements to their point of collection. Comparisons with point measurements are needed to confirm regional values and further constrain flux estimates and models. This effort was made in conjunction with several major field campaigns in the Colorado Front Range in July-August 2014, including FRAPPÉ (Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment), DISCOVER-AQ, and the Air Water Gas NSF Sustainability Research Network at the University of Colorado.

  1. A new incomplete-repair model based on a ''reciprocal-time'' pattern of sublethal damage repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, R.G.; Fowler, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    A radiobiological model for closely spaced non-instantaneous radiation fractions is presented, based on the premise that the time process of sublethal damage (SLD) repair is 'reciprocal-time' (second order), rather than exponential (first order), in form. The initial clinical implications of such an incomplete-repair model are assessed. A previously derived linear-quadratic-based model was revised to take account of the possibility that SLD may repair with time such that the fraction of an element of initial damage remaining at time t is given as 1/(1+zt), where z is an appropriate rate constant; z is the reciprocal of the first half-time (τ) of repair. The general equation so derived for incomplete repair is applicable to all types of radiotherapy delivered at high, low and medium dose-rate in fractions delivered at regular time intervals. The model allows both the fraction duration and interfraction intervals to vary between zero and infinity. For any given value of z, reciprocal repair is associated with an apparent 'slowing-down' in the SLD repair rate as treatment proceeds. The instantaneous repair rates are not directly governed by total dose or dose per fraction, but are influenced by the treatment duration and individual fraction duration. Instantaneous repair rates of SLD appear to be slower towards the end of a continuous treatment, and are also slower following 'long' fractions than they are following 'short' fractions. The new model, with its single repair-rate parameter, is shown to be capable of providing a degree of quantitative explanation for some enigmas that have been encountered in clinical studies. A single-component reciprocal repair process provides an alternative explanation for the apparent existence of a range of repair rates in human tissues, and which have hitherto been explained by postulating the existence of a multi-exponential repair process. The build-up of SLD over extended treatments is greater than would be inferred using a

  2. Speeding Up Non-Parametric Bootstrap Computations for Statistics Based on Sample Moments in Small/Moderate Sample Size Applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Chaibub Neto

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a vectorized implementation of the non-parametric bootstrap for statistics based on sample moments. Basically, we adopt the multinomial sampling formulation of the non-parametric bootstrap, and compute bootstrap replications of sample moment statistics by simply weighting the observed data according to multinomial counts instead of evaluating the statistic on a resampled version of the observed data. Using this formulation we can generate a matrix of bootstrap weights and compute the entire vector of bootstrap replications with a few matrix multiplications. Vectorization is particularly important for matrix-oriented programming languages such as R, where matrix/vector calculations tend to be faster than scalar operations implemented in a loop. We illustrate the application of the vectorized implementation in real and simulated data sets, when bootstrapping Pearson's sample correlation coefficient, and compared its performance against two state-of-the-art R implementations of the non-parametric bootstrap, as well as a straightforward one based on a for loop. Our investigations spanned varying sample sizes and number of bootstrap replications. The vectorized bootstrap compared favorably against the state-of-the-art implementations in all cases tested, and was remarkably/considerably faster for small/moderate sample sizes. The same results were observed in the comparison with the straightforward implementation, except for large sample sizes, where the vectorized bootstrap was slightly slower than the straightforward implementation due to increased time expenditures in the generation of weight matrices via multinomial sampling.

  3. Fat emulsions based on structured lipids (1,3-specific triglycerides): an investigation of the in vivo fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedeman, H; Brøndsted, H; Müllertz, A; Frokjaer, S

    1996-05-01

    Structured lipids (1,3-specific triglycerides) are new chemical entities made by enzymatic transesterification of the fatty acids in the 1,3 positions of the triglyceride. The purpose of this study is to characterize structured lipids with either short chain fatty acids or medium chain fatty acids in the 1,3 positions with regard to their hydrophobicity, and investigate the in vivo fate in order to evaluate the potential of structured lipids as core material in fat emulsions used as parenteral drug delivery system. The lipids were characterized by employing reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. The biodistribution of radioactively labeled emulsions was studied in rats. By employing high performance liquid chromatography a rank order of the hydrophobicities of the lipids could be given, with the triglycerides containing long chain fatty acids being the most hydrophobic and the structured lipid with short chain fatty acids in the 1,3 positions the least. When formulated as fat emulsions, the emulsion based on structured lipids with short fatty acids in the 1,3 positions was removed slower from the general blood circulation compared to emulsions based on lipids with long chain fatty acids in the 1,3 positions. The type of core material influences the in vivo circulation time of fat emulsions.

  4. Development and gamma-scintigraphy study of Hibiscus rosasinensis polysaccharide-based microspheres for nasal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nitin; Tyagi, Shanu; Gupta, Satish Kumar; Kulkarni, Giriraj Thirupathirao; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Kumar, Neeraj

    2016-11-01

    This work describes the application of natural plant polysaccharide as pharmaceutical mucoadhesive excipients in delivery systems to reduce the clearance rate through nasal cavity. Novel natural polysaccharide (Hibiscus rosasinensis)-based mucoadhesive microspheres were prepared by using emulsion crosslinking method for the delivery of rizatriptan benzoate (RB) through nasal route. Mucoadhesive microspheres were characterized for different parameters and nasal clearance of technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-radiolabeled microspheres was determined by using gamma-scintigraphy. Their Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies showed that the drug was stable during preparation of microspheres. Aerodynamic diameter of microspheres was in the range 13.23 ± 1.83-33.57 ± 3.69 µm. Change in drug and polysaccharide ratio influenced the mucoadhesion, encapsulation efficiency and in-vitro release property. Scintigraphs taken at regular interval indicate that control solution was cleared rapidly from nasal cavity, whereas microspheres showed slower clearance (p < 0.005) with half-life of 160 min. Natural polysaccharide-based microspheres achieved extended residence by minimizing effect of mucociliary clearance with opportunity of sustained delivery for longer duration.

  5. Influence of Weak Base Addition to Hole-Collecting Buffer Layers in Polymer:Fullerene Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jooyeok Seo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of weak base addition to acidic polymer hole-collecting layers in normal-type polymer:fullerene solar cells. Varying amounts of the weak base aniline (AN were added to solutions of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:poly(styrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS. The acidity of the aniline-added PEDOT:PSS solutions gradually decreased from pH = 1.74 (AN = 0 mol% to pH = 4.24 (AN = 1.8 mol %. The electrical conductivity of the PEDOT:PSS-AN films did not change much with the pH value, while the ratio of conductivity between out-of-plane and in-plane directions was dependent on the pH of solutions. The highest power conversion efficiency (PCE was obtained at pH = 2.52, even though all devices with the PEDOT:PSS-AN layers exhibited better PCE than those with the pristine PEDOT:PSS layers. Atomic force microscopy investigation revealed that the size of PEDOT:PSS domains became smaller as the pH increased. The stability test for 100 h illumination under one sun condition disclosed that the PCE decay was relatively slower for the devices with the PEDOT:PSS-AN layers than for those with pristine PEDOT:PSS layers.

  6. Effect of processing on microstructure and physical properties of three nickel-based superalloys with different hardening mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strondl, Annika; Frommeyer, Georg [Department of Materials Technology, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, D-40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Klement, Uta [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Milenkovic, Srdjan; Schneider, Andre

    2012-07-15

    The nickel-based superalloys Inconel alloy 600, Udimet alloy 720, and Inconel alloy 718 were produced by electron beam melting (EBM), casting, and directional solidification (DS). The distance between dendrites and the size of the precipitates indicated the difference in solidification rates between the three processes. In this study, the solidification rate was fastest with EBM, closely followed by casting, whereas it was much slower with DS. In the directional solidified materials the <100> direction was the fastest and thus, preferred growth direction. The EBM samples show a sharp (001)[100] texture in the building direction and in the two scanning directions of the electron beam. Macrosegregation was observed in some cast and directionally solidified samples, but not in the EBM samples. The melting temperatures are in good agreement with literature and the narrow melting interval of IN600 compare to UD720 and IN718 might reduce the risk of incipient melting during EBM processing. Porosity was observed in the EBM samples and the reasons are discussed. However, EBM seems to be a feasible process route to produce nickel-based superalloys with well-defined texture, no macrosegregation and a rapidly solidified microstructure. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Enhanced sensitivity in non-enzymatic glucose detection by improved growth kinetics of Ni-based nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urso, M.; Pellegrino, G.; Strano, V.; Bruno, E.; Priolo, F.; Mirabella, S.

    2018-04-01

    Ni-based nanostructures are attractive catalytic materials for many electrochemical applications, among which are non-enzymatic sensing, charge storage, and water splitting. In this work, we clarify the synthesis kinetics of Ni(OH)2/NiOOH nanowalls grown by chemical bath deposition at room temperature and at 50 °C. We applied the results to non-enzymatic glucose sensing, reaching a highest sensitivity of 31 mA cm-2mM-1. Using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry we found that the growth occurs through two regimes: first, a quick random growth leading to disordered sheets of Ni oxy-hydroxide, followed by a slower growth of well-aligned sheets of Ni hydroxide. A high growth temperature (50 °C), leading mainly to well-aligned sheets, offers superior electrochemical properties in terms of charge storage, charge carrier transport and catalytic action, as confirmed by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analyses. The reported results on the optimization and application of low-cost synthesis of these Ni-based nanostructures have a large potential for application in catalysis, (bio)sensing, and supercapacitors areas.

  8. Assessing connectivity of estuarine fishes based on stable isotope ratio analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzka, Sharon Z.

    2005-07-01

    Assessing connectivity is fundamental to understanding the population dynamics of fishes. I propose that isotopic analyses can greatly contribute to studies of connectivity in estuarine fishes due to the high diversity of isotopic signatures found among estuarine habitats and the fact that variations in isotopic composition at the base of a food web are reflected in the tissues of consumers. Isotopic analysis can be used for identifying nursery habitats and estimating their contribution to adult populations. If movement to a new habitat is accompanied by a shift to foods of distinct isotopic composition, recent immigrants and residents can be distinguished based on their isotopic ratios. Movement patterns thus can be reconstructed based on information obtained from individuals. A key consideration is the rate of isotopic turnover, which determines the length of time that an immigrant to a given habitat will be distinguishable from a longtime resident. A literature survey indicated that few studies have measured turnover rates in fishes and that these have focused on larvae and juveniles. These studies reveal that biomass gain is the primary process driving turnover rates, while metabolic turnover is either minimal or undetectable. Using a simple dilution model and biomass-specific growth rates, I estimated that young fishes with fast growth rates will reflect the isotopic composition of a new diet within days or weeks. Older or slower-growing individuals may take years or never fully equilibrate. Future studies should evaluate the factors that influence turnover rates in fishes during various stages of the life cycle and in different tissues, as well as explore the potential for combining stable isotope and otolith microstructure analyses to examine the relationship between demographic parameters, movement and connectivity.

  9. Molecular dynamics based enhanced sampling of collective variables with very large time steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Yang; Tuckerman, Mark E.

    2018-01-01

    Enhanced sampling techniques that target a set of collective variables and that use molecular dynamics as the driving engine have seen widespread application in the computational molecular sciences as a means to explore the free-energy landscapes of complex systems. The use of molecular dynamics as the fundamental driver of the sampling requires the introduction of a time step whose magnitude is limited by the fastest motions in a system. While standard multiple time-stepping methods allow larger time steps to be employed for the slower and computationally more expensive forces, the maximum achievable increase in time step is limited by resonance phenomena, which inextricably couple fast and slow motions. Recently, we introduced deterministic and stochastic resonance-free multiple time step algorithms for molecular dynamics that solve this resonance problem and allow ten- to twenty-fold gains in the large time step compared to standard multiple time step algorithms [P. Minary et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 150201 (2004); B. Leimkuhler et al., Mol. Phys. 111, 3579-3594 (2013)]. These methods are based on the imposition of isokinetic constraints that couple the physical system to Nosé-Hoover chains or Nosé-Hoover Langevin schemes. In this paper, we show how to adapt these methods for collective variable-based enhanced sampling techniques, specifically adiabatic free-energy dynamics/temperature-accelerated molecular dynamics, unified free-energy dynamics, and by extension, metadynamics, thus allowing simulations employing these methods to employ similarly very large time steps. The combination of resonance-free multiple time step integrators with free-energy-based enhanced sampling significantly improves the efficiency of conformational exploration.

  10. Future Urban Climate Projection in A Tropical Megacity Based on Global and Regional Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmanto, N. S.; Varquez, A. C. G.; Kanda, M.

    2017-12-01

    Cities in Asian developing countries experience rapid transformation in urban morphology and energy consumption, which correspondingly affects urban climate. Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model coupled with improved single-layer urban canopy model incorporating realistic distribution of urban parameters and anthropogenic heat emission (AHE) in the tropic Jakarta Greater Area was conducted. Simulation was conducted during the dry months from 2006 to 2015 and agreed well with point and satellite observation. The same technology coupled with pseudo global warming (PGW) method based on representative concentration pathways (RCP) scenario 2.6 and 8.5 was conducted to produce futuristic climate condition in 2050. Projected urban morphology and AHE in 2050s were constructed using regional urban growing model with shared socioeconomic pathways (SSP) among its inputs. Compact future urban configuration, based on SSP1, was coupled to RCP2.6. Unrestrained future urban configuration, based on SSP3, was coupled to RCP8.5. Results show that background warming from RCP 2.6 and 8.5 will increase background temperature by 0.55°C and 1.2°C throughout the region, respectively. Future projection of urban sprawl results to an additional 0.3°C and 0.5°C increase on average, with maximum increase of 1.1°C and 1.3°C due to urban effect for RCP2.6/compact and RCP8.5/unrestrained, respectively. Higher moisture content in urban area is indicated in the future due to higher evaporation. Change in urban roughness is likely affect slower wind velocity in urban area and sea breeze front inland penetration the future compare with current condition. Acknowledgement: This research was supported by the Environment Research and Technology Development Fund (S-14) of the Ministry of the Environment, Japan.

  11. Evaluating Fast Maximum Likelihood-Based Phylogenetic Programs Using Empirical Phylogenomic Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaofan; Shen, Xing-Xing; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The sizes of the data matrices assembled to resolve branches of the tree of life have increased dramatically, motivating the development of programs for fast, yet accurate, inference. For example, several different fast programs have been developed in the very popular maximum likelihood framework, including RAxML/ExaML, PhyML, IQ-TREE, and FastTree. Although these programs are widely used, a systematic evaluation and comparison of their performance using empirical genome-scale data matrices has so far been lacking. To address this question, we evaluated these four programs on 19 empirical phylogenomic data sets with hundreds to thousands of genes and up to 200 taxa with respect to likelihood maximization, tree topology, and computational speed. For single-gene tree inference, we found that the more exhaustive and slower strategies (ten searches per alignment) outperformed faster strategies (one tree search per alignment) using RAxML, PhyML, or IQ-TREE. Interestingly, single-gene trees inferred by the three programs yielded comparable coalescent-based species tree estimations. For concatenation-based species tree inference, IQ-TREE consistently achieved the best-observed likelihoods for all data sets, and RAxML/ExaML was a close second. In contrast, PhyML often failed to complete concatenation-based analyses, whereas FastTree was the fastest but generated lower likelihood values and more dissimilar tree topologies in both types of analyses. Finally, data matrix properties, such as the number of taxa and the strength of phylogenetic signal, sometimes substantially influenced the programs’ relative performance. Our results provide real-world gene and species tree phylogenetic inference benchmarks to inform the design and execution of large-scale phylogenomic data analyses. PMID:29177474

  12. Changes in Alpha Frequency and Power of the Electroencephalogram during Volatile-Based General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Hight

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG at the alpha frequency (8–12 Hz are thought to be ubiquitous during surgical anesthesia, but the details of how this oscillation responds to ongoing changes in volatile anesthetic concentration have not been well characterized. It is not known how often alpha oscillations are absent in the clinical context, how sensitively alpha frequency and power respond to changes in anesthetic concentration, and what effect increased age has on alpha frequency. Bipolar EEG was recorded frontally from 305 patients undergoing surgery with sevoflurane or desflurane providing general anesthesia. A new method of detecting the presence of alpha oscillations based on the stability of the rate of change of the peak frequency in the alpha range was developed. Linear concentration-response curves were fitted to assess the sensitivity of alpha power and frequency measures to changing levels of anesthesia. Alpha oscillations were seen to be inexplicably absent in around 4% of patients. Maximal alpha power increased with increasing volatile anesthetic concentrations in half of the patients, and decreased in the remaining patients. Alpha frequency decreased with increasing anesthetic concentrations in near to 90% of patients. Increasing age was associated with decreased sensitivity to volatile anesthesia concentrations, and with decreased alpha frequency, which sometimes transitioned into the theta range (5–7 Hz. While peak alpha frequency shows a consistent slowing to increasing volatile concentrations, the peak power of the oscillation does not, suggesting that frequency might be more informative of depth of anesthesia than traditional power based measures during volatile-based anesthesia. The alpha oscillation becomes slower with increasing age, even when the decreased anesthetic needs of older patients were taken into account.

  13. Microbial control of food-related surfaces: Na-Chlorophyllin-based photosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksiene, Zivile; Paskeviciute, Egle

    2011-10-05

    The aim of this study was to evaluate efficiency of photosensitization as surface sanitation alternative using model systems when food pathogens, their spores and biofilms were attached to the food-related surface (polyolefine). In addition it was important to compare antibacterial efficiency of Na-Chlorophyllin (Na-Chl)-based photosensitization with conventional sanitizers. Obtained results indicate that Bacilluscereus ATCC 12826 and Listeriamonocytogenes ATCC 7644 as well as their thermoresistant strains B.cereus SV90 and L.monocytogenes 56LY were effectively inactivated (7 log) by Na-Chl-based photosensitization in vitro. Inactivation rate of thermoresistant strains was slower. The number of attached to the surface B.cereus ATCC 12826 and L.monocytogenes ATCC 7644 was reduced from 4-4.5 log to 0 log after photosensitization treatment. To achieve adequate inactivation of thermoresistant strains the higher Na-Chl concentration and longer illumination times had to be used. Comparison of different surface decontamination treatments reveal that photosensitization is much more effective against all surface-attached B.cereus and L.monocytogenes strains than washing with water or 200 ppm Na-hypochlorite. It is important to note, that surface-attached B.cereus spores and L.monocytogenes biofilms can be eliminated from it by photosensitization as well. Our data support the idea that Na-Chlorophyllin-based photosensitization has high antibacterial potential which may serve in the future for the development of human and environment friendly, non-thermal surface decontamination technique. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. TU-EF-304-07: Monte Carlo-Based Inverse Treatment Plan Optimization for Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y; Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Song, T; Wu, Z; Liu, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is increasingly used in proton therapy. For IMPT optimization, Monte Carlo (MC) is desired for spots dose calculations because of its high accuracy, especially in cases with a high level of heterogeneity. It is also preferred in biological optimization problems due to the capability of computing quantities related to biological effects. However, MC simulation is typically too slow to be used for this purpose. Although GPU-based MC engines have become available, the achieved efficiency is still not ideal. The purpose of this work is to develop a new optimization scheme to include GPU-based MC into IMPT. Methods: A conventional approach using MC in IMPT simply calls the MC dose engine repeatedly for each spot dose calculations. However, this is not the optimal approach, because of the unnecessary computations on some spots that turned out to have very small weights after solving the optimization problem. GPU-memory writing conflict occurring at a small beam size also reduces computational efficiency. To solve these problems, we developed a new framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculations and plan optimizations. At each dose calculation step, the particles were sampled from different spots altogether with Metropolis algorithm, such that the particle number is proportional to the latest optimized spot intensity. Simultaneously transporting particles from multiple spots also mitigated the memory writing conflict problem. Results: We have validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one prostate case. The total computation time of our method was ∼5–6 min on one NVIDIA GPU card, including both spot dose calculation and plan optimization, whereas a conventional method naively using the same GPU-based MC engine were ∼3 times slower. Conclusion: A fast GPU-based MC dose calculation method along with a novel optimization workflow is developed. The high efficiency makes it attractive for clinical

  15. TU-EF-304-07: Monte Carlo-Based Inverse Treatment Plan Optimization for Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y [Tsinghua University, Beijing, Beijing (China); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Song, T [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Wu, Z; Liu, Y [Tsinghua University, Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is increasingly used in proton therapy. For IMPT optimization, Monte Carlo (MC) is desired for spots dose calculations because of its high accuracy, especially in cases with a high level of heterogeneity. It is also preferred in biological optimization problems due to the capability of computing quantities related to biological effects. However, MC simulation is typically too slow to be used for this purpose. Although GPU-based MC engines have become available, the achieved efficiency is still not ideal. The purpose of this work is to develop a new optimization scheme to include GPU-based MC into IMPT. Methods: A conventional approach using MC in IMPT simply calls the MC dose engine repeatedly for each spot dose calculations. However, this is not the optimal approach, because of the unnecessary computations on some spots that turned out to have very small weights after solving the optimization problem. GPU-memory writing conflict occurring at a small beam size also reduces computational efficiency. To solve these problems, we developed a new framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculations and plan optimizations. At each dose calculation step, the particles were sampled from different spots altogether with Metropolis algorithm, such that the particle number is proportional to the latest optimized spot intensity. Simultaneously transporting particles from multiple spots also mitigated the memory writing conflict problem. Results: We have validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one prostate case. The total computation time of our method was ∼5–6 min on one NVIDIA GPU card, including both spot dose calculation and plan optimization, whereas a conventional method naively using the same GPU-based MC engine were ∼3 times slower. Conclusion: A fast GPU-based MC dose calculation method along with a novel optimization workflow is developed. The high efficiency makes it attractive for clinical

  16. The physics data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gault, F.D.

    1984-01-01

    The physics data base is introduced along with its associated data base management system. The emphasis is on data and their use and a classification of data and of data bases is developed to distinguish compilation organizations. The characteristics of these organizations are examined briefly and the long term consequences of the physics data base discussed. (orig.)

  17. A comparative study of history-based versus vectorized Monte Carlo methods in the GPU/CUDA environment for a simple neutron eigenvalue problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianyu; Du, Xining; Ji, Wei; Xu, X. George; Brown, Forrest B.

    2014-06-01

    For nuclear reactor analysis such as the neutron eigenvalue calculations, the time consuming Monte Carlo (MC) simulations can be accelerated by using graphics processing units (GPUs). However, traditional MC methods are often history-based, and their performance on GPUs is affected significantly by the thread divergence problem. In this paper we describe the development of a newly designed event-based vectorized MC algorithm for solving the neutron eigenvalue problem. The code was implemented using NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), and tested on a NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPU card. We found that although the vectorized MC algorithm greatly reduces the occurrence of thread divergence thus enhancing the warp execution efficiency, the overall simulation speed is roughly ten times slower than the history-based MC code on GPUs. Profiling results suggest that the slow speed is probably due to the memory access latency caused by the large amount of global memory transactions. Possible solutions to improve the code efficiency are discussed.

  18. A comparative study of history-based versus vectorized Monte Carlo methods in the GPU/CUDA environment for a simple neutron eigenvalue problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, T.; Du, X.; Ji, W.; Xu, G.; Brown, F.B.

    2013-01-01

    For nuclear reactor analysis such as the neutron eigenvalue calculations, the time consuming Monte Carlo (MC) simulations can be accelerated by using graphics processing units (GPUs). However, traditional MC methods are often history-based, and their performance on GPUs is affected significantly by the thread divergence problem. In this paper we describe the development of a newly designed event-based vectorized MC algorithm for solving the neutron eigenvalue problem. The code was implemented using NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), and tested on a NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPU card. We found that although the vectorized MC algorithm greatly reduces the occurrence of thread divergence thus enhancing the warp execution efficiency, the overall simulation speed is roughly ten times slower than the history-based MC code on GPUs. Profiling results suggest that the slow speed is probably due to the memory access latency caused by the large amount of global memory transactions. Possible solutions to improve the code efficiency are discussed. (authors)

  19. Effects of Zn2+ and Pb2+ dopants on the activity of Ga2O3-based photocatalysts for water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Shen, Shuai; Jin, Shaoqing; Yang, Jingxiu; Li, Mingrun; Wang, Xiuli; Han, Hongxian; Li, Can

    2013-11-28

    Zn-doped and Pb-doped β-Ga2O3-based photocatalysts were prepared by an impregnation method. The photocatalyst based on the Zn-doped β-Ga2O3 shows a greatly enhanced activity in water splitting while the Pb-doped β-Ga2O3 one shows a dramatic decrease in activity. The effects of Zn(2+) and Pb(2+) dopants on the activity of Ga2O3-based photocatalysts for water splitting were investigated by HRTEM, XPS and time-resolved IR spectroscopy. A ZnGa2O4-β-Ga2O3 heterojunction is formed in the surface region of the Zn-doped β-Ga2O3 and a slower decay of photogenerated electrons is observed. The ZnGa2O4-β-Ga2O3 heterojunction exhibits type-II band alignment and facilitates charge separation, thus leading to an enhanced photocatalytic activity for water splitting. Unlike Zn(2+) ions, Pb(2+) ions are coordinated by oxygen atoms to form polyhedra as dopants, resulting in distorted surface structure and fast decay of photogenerated electrons of β-Ga2O3. These results suggest that the Pb dopants act as charge recombination centers expediting the recombination of photogenerated electrons and holes, thus decreasing the photocatalytic activity.

  20. Solid Base Catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ono, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    The importance of solid base catalysts has come to be recognized for their environmentally benign qualities, and much significant progress has been made over the past two decades in catalytic materials and solid base-catalyzed reactions. The book is focused on the solid base. Because of the advantages over liquid bases, the use of solid base catalysts in organic synthesis is expanding. Solid bases are easier to dispose than liquid bases, separation and recovery of products, catalysts and solvents are less difficult, and they are non-corrosive. Furthermore, base-catalyzed reactions can be performed without using solvents and even in the gas phase, opening up more possibilities for discovering novel reaction systems. Using numerous examples, the present volume describes the remarkable role solid base catalysis can play, given the ever increasing worldwide importance of "green" chemistry. The reader will obtain an overall view of solid base catalysis and gain insight into the versatility of the reactions to whic...

  1. Analysis of regional brain mitochondrial bioenergetics and susceptibility to mitochondrial inhibition utilizing a microplate based system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerbeck, Andrew; Pandya, Jignesh; Singh, Indrapal; Bittman, Kevin; Readnower, Ryan; Bing, Guoying; Sullivan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetic function typically has required 50–100 μg of protein per sample and at least 15 min per run when utilizing a Clark-type oxygen electrode. In the present work we describe a method utilizing the Seahorse Biosciences XF24 Flux Analyzer for measuring mitochondrial oxygen consumption simultaneously from multiple samples and utilizing only 5 μg of protein per sample. Utilizing this method we have investigated whether regionally based differences exist in mitochondria isolated from the cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebellum. Analysis of basal mitochondrial bioenergetics revealed that minimal differences exist between the cortex, striatum, and hippocampus. However, the cerebellum exhibited significantly slower basal rates of Complex I and Complex II dependent oxygen consumption (p < 0.05). Mitochondrial inhibitors affected enzyme activity proportionally across all samples tested and only small differences existed in the effect of inhibitors on oxygen consumption. Investigation of the effect of rotenone administration on Complex I dependent oxygen consumption revealed that exposure to 10 pM rotenone led to a clear time dependent decrease in oxygen consumption beginning 12 min after administration (p < 0.05). These studies show that the utilization of this microplate based method for analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics is effective at quantifying oxygen consumption simultaneously from multiple samples. Additionally, these studies indicate that minimal regional differences exist in mitochondria isolated from the cortex, striatum, or hippocampus. Furthermore, utilization of the mitochondrial inhibitors suggests that previous work indicating regionally specific deficits following systemic mitochondrial toxin exposure may not be the result of differences in the individual mitochondria from the affected regions. PMID:21402103

  2. A Multifactorial, Criteria-based Progressive Algorithm for Hamstring Injury Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Martinez-Ruiz, Enrique; Edouard, Pascal; Morin, Jean-Benoît; Martinez-Martinez, Francisco; Idoate, Fernando; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto

    2017-07-01

    Given the prevalence of hamstring injuries in football, a rehabilitation program that effectively promotes muscle tissue repair and functional recovery is paramount to minimize reinjury risk and optimize player performance and availability. This study aimed to assess the concurrent effectiveness of administering an individualized and multifactorial criteria-based algorithm (rehabilitation algorithm [RA]) on hamstring injury rehabilitation in comparison with using a general rehabilitation protocol (RP). Implementing a double-blind randomized controlled trial approach, two equal groups of 24 football players (48 total) completed either an RA group or a validated RP group 5 d after an acute hamstring injury. Within 6 months after return to sport, six hamstring reinjuries occurred in RP versus one injury in RA (relative risk = 6, 90% confidence interval = 1-35; clinical inference: very likely beneficial effect). The average duration of return to sport was possibly quicker (effect size = 0.34 ± 0.42) in RP (23.2 ± 11.7 d) compared with RA (25.5 ± 7.8 d) (-13.8%, 90% confidence interval = -34.0% to 3.4%; clinical inference: possibly small effect). At the time to return to sport, RA players showed substantially better 10-m time, maximal sprinting speed, and greater mechanical variables related to speed (i.e., maximum theoretical speed and maximal horizontal power) than the RP. Although return to sport was slower, male football players who underwent an individualized, multifactorial, criteria-based algorithm with a performance- and primary risk factor-oriented training program from the early stages of the process markedly decreased the risk of reinjury compared with a general protocol where long-length strength training exercises were prioritized.

  3. Microsurgery Workout: A Novel Simulation Training Curriculum Based on Nonliving Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jose R; Yañez, Ricardo; Cifuentes, Ignacio; Varas, Julian; Dagnino, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    Currently, there are no valid training programs based solely on nonliving models. The authors aimed to develop and validate a microsurgery training program based on nonliving models and assess the transfer of skills to a live rat model. Postgraduate year-3 general surgery residents were assessed in a 17-session program, performing arterial and venous end-to-end anastomosis on ex vivo chicken models. Procedures were recorded and rated by two blinded experts using validated global and specific scales (objective structured assessment of technical skills) and a validated checklist. Operating times and patency rates were assessed. Hand-motion analysis was used to measure economy of movements. After training, residents performed an arterial and venous end-to-end anastomosis on live rats. Results were compared to six experienced surgeons in the same models. Values of p < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Learning curves were achieved. Ten residents improved their median global and specific objective structured assessment of technical skills scores for artery [10 (range, 8 to 10) versus 28 (range, 27 to 29), p < 0.05; and 8 (range, 7 to 9) versus 28 (range, 27 to 28), p < 0.05] and vein [8 (range, 8 to 11) versus 28 (range, 27 to 28), p < 0.05; and 8 (range, 7 to 9) versus 28 (range, 27 to 29), p < 0.05]. Checklist scores also improved for both procedures (p < 0.05). Trainees were slower and less efficient than experienced surgeons (p < 0.05). In the living rat, patency rates at 30 minutes were 100 percent and 50 percent for artery and vein, respectively. Significant acquisition of microsurgical skills was achieved by trainees to a level similar to that of experienced surgeons. Acquired skills were transferred to a more complex live model.

  4. Novel Zn-based alloys for biodegradable stent applications: Design, development and in vitro degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaed, E; Sikora-Jasinska, M; Mostaed, A; Loffredo, S; Demir, A G; Previtali, B; Mantovani, D; Beanland, R; Vedani, M

    2016-07-01

    The search for a degradable metal simultaneously showing mechanical properties equal or higher to that of stainless steel and uniform degradation is still an open challenge. Several magnesium-based alloys have been studied, but their degradation rate has proved to be too fast and rarely homogeneous. Fe-based alloys show appropriate mechanical properties but very low degradation rate. In the present work, four novel Zn-Mg and two Zn-Al binary alloys were investigated as potential biodegradable materials for stent applications. The alloys were developed by casting process and homogenized at 350°C for 48h followed by hot extrusion at 250°C. Tube extrusion was performed at 300°C to produce tubes with outer/inner diameter of 4/1.5mm as precursors for biodegradable stents. Corrosion tests were performed using Hanks׳ modified solution. Extruded alloys exhibited slightly superior corrosion resistance and slower degradation rate than those of their cast counterparts, but all had corrosion rates roughly half that of a standard purity Mg control. Hot extrusion of Zn-Mg alloys shifted the corrosion regime from localized pitting to more uniform erosion, mainly due to the refinement of second phase particles. Zn-0.5Mg is the most promising material for stent applications with a good combination of strength, ductility, strain hardening exponent and an appropriate rate of loss of mechanical integrity during degradation. An EBSD analysis in the vicinity of the laser cut Zn-0.5Mg tube found no grain coarsening or texture modification confirming that, after laser cutting, the grain size and texture orientation of the final stent remains unchanged. This work shows the potential for Zn alloys to be considered for stent applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. GPU-based parallel computing in real-time modeling of atmospheric transport and diffusion of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Marcelo C. dos; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Schirru, Roberto; Pinheiro, André; Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric radionuclide dispersion systems (ARDS) are essential mechanisms to predict the consequences of unexpected radioactive releases from nuclear power plants. Considering, that during an eventuality of an accident with a radioactive material release, an accurate forecast is vital to guide the evacuation plan of the possible affected areas. However, in order to predict the dispersion of the radioactive material and its impact on the environment, the model must process information about source term (radioactive materials released, activities and location), weather condition (wind, humidity and precipitation) and geographical characteristics (topography). Furthermore, ARDS is basically composed of 4 main modules: Source Term, Wind Field, Plume Dispersion and Doses Calculations. The Wind Field and Plume Dispersion modules are the ones that require a high computational performance to achieve accurate results within an acceptable time. Taking this into account, this work focuses on the development of a GPU-based parallel Plume Dispersion module, focusing on the radionuclide transport and diffusion calculations, which use a given wind field and a released source term as parameters. The program is being developed using the C ++ programming language, allied with CUDA libraries. In comparative case study between a parallel and sequential version of the slower function of the Plume Dispersion module, a speedup of 11.63 times could be observed. (author)

  6. A new concept of assistive virtual keyboards based on a systematic review of text entry optimization techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato de Sousa Gomide

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Due to the increasing popularization of computers and the internet expansion, Alternative and Augmentative Communication technologies have been employed to restore the ability to communicate of people with aphasia and tetraplegia. Virtual keyboards are one of the most primitive mechanisms for alternatively entering text and play a very important role in accomplishing this task. However, the text entry for this kind of keyboard is much slower than entering information through their physical counterparts. Many techniques and layouts have been proposed to improve the typing performance of virtual keyboards, each one concerning a different issue or solving a specific problem. However, not all of them are suitable to assist seriously people with motor impairment. Methods: In order to develop an assistive virtual keyboard with improved typing performance, we performed a systematic review on scientific databases. Results: We found 250 related papers and 52 of them were selected to compose. After that, we identified eight essentials virtual keyboard features, five methods to optimize data entry performance and five metrics to assess typing performance. Conclusion: Based on this review, we introduce a concept of an assistive, optimized, compact and adaptive virtual keyboard that gathers a set of suitable techniques such as: a new ambiguous keyboard layout, disambiguation algorithms, dynamic scan techniques, static text prediction of letters and words and, finally, the use of phonetic and similarity algorithms to reduce the user's typing error rate.

  7. GPU-based parallel computing in real-time modeling of atmospheric transport and diffusion of radioactive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcelo C. dos; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Schirru, Roberto; Pinheiro, André, E-mail: jovitamarcelo@gmail.com, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.br, E-mail: schirru@lmp.ufrj.br, E-mail: apinheiro99@gmail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Atmospheric radionuclide dispersion systems (ARDS) are essential mechanisms to predict the consequences of unexpected radioactive releases from nuclear power plants. Considering, that during an eventuality of an accident with a radioactive material release, an accurate forecast is vital to guide the evacuation plan of the possible affected areas. However, in order to predict the dispersion of the radioactive material and its impact on the environment, the model must process information about source term (radioactive materials released, activities and location), weather condition (wind, humidity and precipitation) and geographical characteristics (topography). Furthermore, ARDS is basically composed of 4 main modules: Source Term, Wind Field, Plume Dispersion and Doses Calculations. The Wind Field and Plume Dispersion modules are the ones that require a high computational performance to achieve accurate results within an acceptable time. Taking this into account, this work focuses on the development of a GPU-based parallel Plume Dispersion module, focusing on the radionuclide transport and diffusion calculations, which use a given wind field and a released source term as parameters. The program is being developed using the C ++ programming language, allied with CUDA libraries. In comparative case study between a parallel and sequential version of the slower function of the Plume Dispersion module, a speedup of 11.63 times could be observed. (author)

  8. In vivo retention of poloxamer-based in situ hydrogels for vaginal application in mouse and rat models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the in vivo retention capabilities of poloxamer-based in situ hydrogels for vaginal application with nonoxinol-9 as the model drug. Two in situ hydrogel formulations, which contained 18% poloxamer 407 plus 1% poloxamer 188 (GEL1, relative hydrophobic or 6% poloxamer 188 (GEL2, relative hydrophilic, were compared with respect to the rheological properties, in vitro hydrogel erosion and drug release. The vaginal retention capabilities of these hydrogel formulations were further determined in two small animal models, including drug quantitation of vaginal rinsing fluid in mice and isotope tracing with 99mTc in rats. The two formulations exhibited similar phase transition temperatures ranging from 27 to 32 °C. Increasing the content of poloxamer 188 resulted in higher rheological moduli under body temperature, but slightly accelerated hydrogel erosion and drug release. When compared in vivo, GEL1 was eliminated significantly slower in rat vagina than GEL2, while the vaginal retention of these two hydrogel formulations behaved similarly in mice. In conclusion, increases in the hydrophilic content of formulations led to faster hydrogel erosion, drug release and intravaginal elimination. Rats appear to be a better animal model than mice to evaluate the in situ hydrogel for vaginal application.

  9. Preparation and evaluation of carvacrol pellets based on PVP solid-dispersion by extrusion-spheronization technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Taghizadeh*

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Carvacrol is one of the main pharmacologically active components of Thymus vulgaris essential oil which has shown several therapeutic effects. There are few works regarding the formulation of essential oils as oral solid dosage forms due to their liquid nature, stability and technical problems. The aim of this study was to combine the solid-dispersion approach and extrusion-spheronization technique to produce pellets with desirable physico-mechanical and release properties. Methods: Solid dispersion matrix (30% of carvacrol in polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 was prepared by solvent evaporation. The matrix was mixed with Avicel and lactose and granulated by water. The wet mass was transformed into pellets by extrusion-spheronization. In order to compare the solid dispersion method with the classic approaches, another pellet formulation was prepared by absorption of carvacrol on Aerosil. The pellets were characterized for size (sieve analysis, shape factors (image analysis, mechanical strength, carvacrol content, and release rate (dissolution test. Accelerated stability test of formulations was also carried out. Results: Using suitable composition of solid dispersion matrix and granulation fluid, the pellets with desirable size and shape and mechanical properties could be produced. PVP-based pellets had higher mechanical strength, slower release rate and improved content and stability. The PVP ratio showed considerable effect on release properties of the pellets. Conclusion: Overall, the results revealed the feasibility of preparing desirable pellets containing carvacrol with acceptable content, stability and release properties which can be administered as hard gelatin capsules.

  10. Restricted lithium ion dynamics in PEO-based block copolymer electrolytes measured by high-field nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Tan Vu; Messinger, Robert J.; Sarou-Kanian, Vincent; Fayon, Franck; Bouchet, Renaud; Deschamps, Michaël

    2017-10-01

    The intrinsic ionic conductivity of polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based block copolymer electrolytes is often assumed to be identical to the conductivity of the PEO homopolymer. Here, we use high-field 7Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) NMR diffusion measurements to probe lithium ion dynamics over nanosecond and millisecond time scales in PEO and polystyrene (PS)-b-PEO-b-PS electrolytes containing the lithium salt LiTFSI. Variable-temperature longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) 7Li NMR relaxation rates were acquired at three magnetic field strengths and quantitatively analyzed for the first time at such fields, enabling us to distinguish two characteristic time scales that describe fluctuations of the 7Li nuclear electric quadrupolar interaction. Fast lithium motions [up to O (ns)] are essentially identical between the two polymer electrolytes, including sub-nanosecond vibrations and local fluctuations of the coordination polyhedra between lithium and nearby oxygen atoms. However, lithium dynamics over longer time scales [O (10 ns) and greater] are slower in the block copolymer compared to the homopolymer, as manifested experimentally by their different transverse 7Li NMR relaxation rates. Restricted dynamics and altered thermodynamic behavior of PEO chains anchored near PS domains likely explain these results.

  11. Formation and dielectric properties of polyelectrolyte multilayers studied by a silicon-on-insulator based thin film resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Petra A; Wunderlich, Bernhard K; Klitzing, Regine V; Bausch, Andreas R

    2007-03-27

    The formation of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) is investigated using a silicon-on-insulator based thin film resistor which is sensitive to variations of the surface potential. The buildup of the PEMs at the silicon oxide surface of the device can be observed in real time as defined potential shifts. The influence of polymer charge density is studied using the strong polyanion poly(styrene sulfonate), PSS, combined with the statistical copolymer poly(diallyl-dimethyl-ammoniumchloride-stat-N-methyl-N-vinylacetamide), P(DADMAC-stat-NMVA), at various degrees of charge (DC). The multilayer formation stops after a few deposition steps for a DC below 75%. We show that the threshold of surface charge compensation corresponds to the threshold of multilayer formation. However, no reversion of the preceding surface charge was observed. Screening of polyelectrolyte charges by mobile ions within the polymer film leads to a decrease of the potential shifts with the number of layers deposited. This decrease is much slower for PEMs consisting of P(DADMAC-stat-NMVA) and PSS as compared to PEMs consisting of poly(allylamine-hydrochloride), PAH, and PSS. From this, significant differences in the dielectric constants of the polyelectrolyte films and in the concentration of mobile ions within the films can be derived.

  12. Hydrolysis and Sulfation Pattern Effects on Release of Bioactive Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 from Heparin-Based Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, Liane E; Miller, Tobias; McDevitt, Todd C; Temenoff, Johnna S

    2015-10-28

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) such as heparin are promising materials for growth factor delivery due to their ability to efficiently bind positively charged growth factors including bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) through their negatively charged sulfate groups. Therefore, the goal of this study was to examine BMP-2 release from heparin-based microparticles (MPs) after first, incorporating a hydrolytically degradable crosslinker and varying heparin content within MPs to alter MP degradation and second, altering the sulfation pattern of heparin within MPs to vary BMP-2 binding and release. Using varied MP formulations, it was found that the time course of MP degradation for 1 wt% heparin MPs was ~4 days slower than 10 wt% heparin MPs, indicating that MP degradation was dependent on heparin content. After incubating 100 ng BMP-2 with 0.1 mg MPs, most MP formulations loaded BMP-2 with ~50% efficiency and significantly more BMP-2 release (60% of loaded BMP-2) was observed from more sulfated heparin MPs (MPs with ~100% and 80% of native sulfation). Similarly, BMP-2 bioactivity in more sulfated heparin MP groups was at least four-fold higher than soluble BMP-2 and less sulfated heparin MP groups, as determined by an established C2C12 cell alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay. Ultimately, the two most sulfated 10 wt% heparin MP formulations were able to efficiently load and release BMP-2 while enhancing BMP-2 bioactivity, making them promising candidates for future growth factor delivery applications.

  13. Phylogeny of Eleusine (Poaceae: Chloridoideae) based on nuclear ITS and plastid trnT-trnF sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Susana S; Swire-Clark, Ginger; Hilu, Khidir W; Baird, Wm Vance

    2005-05-01

    Phylogenetic relationships in the genus Eleusine (Poaceae: Chloridoideae) were investigated using nuclear ITS and plastid trnT-trnF sequences. Separate and combined data sets were analyzed using parsimony, distance, and likelihood based methods, including Bayesian. Data congruence was examined using character and topological measures. Significant data heterogeneity was detected, but there was little conflict in the topological substructure measures for triplets and quartets, and resolution and clade support increased in the combined analysis. Data incongruence may be a result of noise and insufficient information in the slower evolving trnT-trnF. Monophyly of Eleusine is strongly supported in all analyses, but basal relationships in the genus remain uncertain. There is good support for a CAIK clade (E. coracana subsp. coracana and africana, E. indica, and E. kigeziensis), with E. tristachya as its sister group. Two putative ITS homeologues (A and B loci) were identified in the allotetraploid E. coracana; the 'B' locus sequence type was not found in the remaining species. Eleusine coracana and its putative 'A' genome donor, the diploid E. indica, are confirmed close allies, but sequence data contradicts the hypothesis that E. floccifolia is its second genome donor. The 'B' genome donor remains unidentified and may be extinct.

  14. Splitting CO2 with a ceria‐based redox cycle in a solar‐driven thermogravimetric analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, M.; Ackermann, S.; Bonk, A.; Neises‐von Puttkamer, M.; Haueter, Ph.; Scheffe, J. R.; Vogt, U. F.

    2016-01-01

    Thermochemical splitting of CO2 via a ceria‐based redox cycle was performed in a solar‐driven thermogravimetric analyzer. Overall reaction rates, including heat and mass transport, were determined under concentrated irradiation mimicking realistic operation of solar reactors. Reticulated porous ceramic (RPC) structures and fibers made of undoped and Zr4+‐doped CeO2, were endothermally reduced under radiative fluxes of 1280 suns in the temperature range 1200–1950 K and subsequently re‐oxidized with CO2 at 950–1400 K. Rapid and uniform heating was observed for 8 ppi ceria RPC with mm‐sized porosity due to its low optical thickness and volumetric radiative absorption, while ceria fibers with μm‐sized porosity performed poorly due to its opacity to incident irradiation. The 10 ppi RPC exhibited higher fuel yield because of its higher sample density. Zr4+‐doped ceria showed increasing reduction extents with dopant concentration but decreasing specific CO yield due to unfavorable oxidation thermodynamics and slower kinetics. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 63: 1263–1271, 2017 PMID:28405030

  15. Splitting CO2 with a ceria-based redox cycle in a solar-driven thermogravimetric analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, M; Ackermann, S; Bonk, A; Neises-von Puttkamer, M; Haueter, Ph; Scheffe, J R; Vogt, U F; Steinfeld, A

    2017-04-01

    Thermochemical splitting of CO 2 via a ceria-based redox cycle was performed in a solar-driven thermogravimetric analyzer. Overall reaction rates, including heat and mass transport, were determined under concentrated irradiation mimicking realistic operation of solar reactors. Reticulated porous ceramic (RPC) structures and fibers made of undoped and Zr 4+ -doped CeO 2 , were endothermally reduced under radiative fluxes of 1280 suns in the temperature range 1200-1950 K and subsequently re-oxidized with CO 2 at 950-1400 K. Rapid and uniform heating was observed for 8 ppi ceria RPC with mm-sized porosity due to its low optical thickness and volumetric radiative absorption, while ceria fibers with μm-sized porosity performed poorly due to its opacity to incident irradiation. The 10 ppi RPC exhibited higher fuel yield because of its higher sample density. Zr 4+ -doped ceria showed increasing reduction extents with dopant concentration but decreasing specific CO yield due to unfavorable oxidation thermodynamics and slower kinetics. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers , 63: 1263-1271, 2017.

  16. Beyond Zero Based Budgeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Daniel M., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Suggests that the most practical budgeting system for most managers is a formalized combination of incremental and zero-based analysis because little can be learned about most programs from an annual zero-based budget. (Author/IRT)

  17. VectorBase

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — VectorBase is a Bioinformatics Resource Center for invertebrate vectors. It is one of four Bioinformatics Resource Centers funded by NIAID to provide web-based...

  18. Mobile Inquiry Based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Specht, M. (2012, 8 November). Mobile Inquiry Based Learning. Presentation given at the Workshop "Mobile inquiry-based learning" at the Mobile Learning Day 2012 at the Fernuniversität Hagen, Hagen, Germany.

  19. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas; Castro, David; Foulds, Ian G.; Parameswaran, Ash M.; Sumanpreet, K. Chhina

    2013-01-01

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling

  20. Carbon Based Nanotechnology: Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviews publicly available information related to carbon based nanotechnology. Topics covered include nanomechanics, carbon based electronics, nanodevice/materials applications, nanotube motors, nano-lithography and H2O storage in nanotubes.

  1. First observation of the strongly forbidden transition 1S0 - 3P0 in Strontium, for an atomic clock with trapped atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtillot, I.

    2003-11-01

    This thesis reports the first results towards the realization of an optical clock using trapped strontium atoms. This set up would combine advantages of the different approaches commonly used to develop an atomic frequency standard. The first part describes the cold atoms source which is implemented. A magneto-optical trap operating on the 1 S 0 - 1 P 1 transition at 461 nm is loaded from an atomic beam decelerated by a Zeeman slower. The 461 nm laser is obtained by sum-frequency mixing in a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystal. The second part is devoted to the different stages developed to achieve the direct excitation of the 1 S 0 - 3 P 0 clock transition in 87 Sr. This line has a theoretical natural width of 10 -3 Hz. Before this detection, we obtained an estimate of the resonance frequency by measuring absolute frequencies of several allowed optical transitions. (author)

  2. The ground based plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents a report of ''The Ground Based Plan'' of the United Kingdom Science and Engineering Research Council. The ground based plan is a plan for research in astronomy and planetary science by ground based techniques. The contents of the report contains a description of:- the scientific objectives and technical requirements (the basis for the Plan), the present organisation and funding for the ground based programme, the Plan, the main scientific features and the further objectives of the Plan. (U.K.)

  3. Stolen Base Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, David

    2013-01-01

    Few plays in baseball are as consistently close and exciting as the stolen base. While there are several studies of sprinting, the art of base stealing is much more nuanced. This article describes the motion of the base-stealing runner using a very basic kinematic model. The model will be compared to some data from a Major League game. The…

  4. Convergent Filter Bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghetto Roland

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We are inspired by the work of Henri Cartan [16], Bourbaki [10] (TG. I Filtres and Claude Wagschal [34]. We define the base of filter, image filter, convergent filter bases, limit filter and the filter base of tails (fr: filtre des sections.

  5. Cholinesterase-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štěpánková, Šárka; Vorčáková, Katarína

    2016-01-01

    Recently, cholinesterase-based biosensors are widely used for assaying anticholinergic compounds. Primarily biosensors based on enzyme inhibition are useful analytical tools for fast screening of inhibitors, such as organophosphates and carbamates. The present review is aimed at compilation of the most important facts about cholinesterase based biosensors, types of physico-chemical transduction, immobilization strategies and practical applications.

  6. Stability-based sorting: The forgotten process behind (not only) biological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toman, Jan; Flegr, Jaroslav

    2017-12-21

    Natural selection is considered to be the main process that drives biological evolution. It requires selected entities to originate dependent upon one another by the means of reproduction or copying, and for the progeny to inherit the qualities of their ancestors. However, natural selection is a manifestation of a more general persistence principle, whose temporal consequences we propose to name "stability-based sorting" (SBS). Sorting based on static stability, i.e., SBS in its strict sense and usual conception, favours characters that increase the persistence of their holders and act on all material and immaterial entities. Sorted entities could originate independently from each other, are not required to propagate and need not exhibit heredity. Natural selection is a specific form of SBS-sorting based on dynamic stability. It requires some form of heredity and is based on competition for the largest difference between the speed of generating its own copies and their expiration. SBS in its strict sense and selection thus have markedly different evolutionary consequences that are stressed in this paper. In contrast to selection, which is opportunistic, SBS is able to accumulate even momentarily detrimental characters that are advantageous for the long-term persistence of sorted entities. However, it lacks the amplification effect based on the preferential propagation of holders of advantageous characters. Thus, it works slower than selection and normally is unable to create complex adaptations. From a long-term perspective, SBS is a decisive force in evolution-especially macroevolution. SBS offers a new explanation for numerous evolutionary phenomena, including broad distribution and persistence of sexuality, altruistic behaviour, horizontal gene transfer, patterns of evolutionary stasis, planetary homeostasis, increasing ecosystem resistance to disturbances, and the universal decline of disparity in the evolution of metazoan lineages. SBS acts on all levels in

  7. Influence of cooling rate on the development of multiple generations of {gamma}' precipitates in a commercial nickel base superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, A.R.P. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Nag, S., E-mail: nag.soumya@gmail.com [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Hwang, J.Y. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Viswanathan, G.B.; Tiley, J. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Dayton, OH (United States); Srinivasan, R. [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, NJ (United States); Fraser, H.L. [Center for the Accelerated Maturation of Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Banerjee, R. [Center for Advanced Research and Technology and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)

    2011-09-15

    The compositional and microstructural evolution of different generations of {gamma}' precipitates during the continuous cooling of a commercial nickel base superalloy, Rene88DT, has been characterized by three dimensional atom probe tomography coupled with energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy studies. After solutionizing in the single {gamma} phase field, continuous cooling at a very high rate results in a monomodal size distribution of {gamma}' precipitates with a high nucleation density and non-equilibrium compositions. In contrast, a relatively slower cooling rate ({approx} 24 deg. C/min) results in a multi-modal size distribution of {gamma}' precipitates with the larger first generation primary precipitates exhibiting close to equilibrium composition, along with the smaller scale secondary {gamma}' precipitates, exhibiting non-equilibrium composition (excess of Co and Cr, depleted in Al and Ti). The composition of the {gamma} matrix near these precipitates also exhibits similar trends with the composition being closer to equilibrium near the primary precipitates as compared to the secondary precipitates. - Highlights: {yields} Effect of cooling rate on the precipitation of {gamma}' particles in commercial nickel base superalloy. {yields} Couples EFTEM and 3DAP studies to determine the composition and morphology of {gamma}' precipitates. {yields} Determination of near and far field compositional variations within the gamma matrix leading to subsequent precipitation.

  8. Balance and Gait in People with Multiple Sclerosis: A Comparison with Healthy Controls and the Immediate Change after an Intervention based on the Bobath Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilett, P; Lythgo, N; Martin, C; Brock, K

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the balance and gait of 11 people with multiple sclerosis (MS) to 11 healthy controls and to investigate the immediate change after a single intervention based on the Bobath concept on these activities in the MS group. Balance was assessed by ground reaction forces (GRF) and centre of pressure movements during single limb standing (SLS), the Lateral Reach Test (LRT) and the Four Square Step Test (FSST). Gait was evaluated by GRF, ankle kinematics and spatiotemporal measures. Baseline measures in the MS group showed significantly greater vertical GRF variability (p = 0.008) during SLS reached less distance on the LRT (p = 0.001) and were slower completing the FSST (p Bobath concept delivered to the most impaired foot and ankle. After the intervention, the MS group had significant changes towards the control group values with reduced mediolateral (p = 0.002) and vertical (p = 0.016) GRF variability in the SLS task, faster FSST time (p = 0.006) and increased ankle PF during gait (p = 0.002). This study provides further evidence of balance and gait limitations in people with MS and indicates that a single treatment based on principles of the Bobath concept to the foot and ankle can result in immediate improvements in balance and ankle PF during gait in people with MS. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Assessment of the 3He pressure inside the CABRI transient rods - Development of a surrogate model based on measurements and complementary CFD calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clamens, Olivier; Lecerf, Johann; Hudelot, Jean-Pascal; Duc, Bertrand; Cadiou, Thierry; Blaise, Patrick; Biard, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    CABRI is an experimental pulse reactor, funded by the French Nuclear Safety and Radioprotection Institute (IRSN) and operated by CEA at the Cadarache research center. It is designed to study fuel behavior under RIA conditions. In order to produce the power transients, reactivity is injected by depressurization of a neutron absorber (3He) situated in transient rods inside the reactor core. The shapes of power transients depend on the total amount of reactivity injected and on the injection speed. The injected reactivity can be calculated by conversion of the 3He gas density into units of reactivity. So, it is of upmost importance to properly master gas density evolution in transient rods during a power transient. The 3He depressurization was studied by CFD calculations and completed with measurements using pressure transducers. The CFD calculations show that the density evolution is slower than the pressure drop. Surrogate models were built based on CFD calculations and validated against preliminary tests in the CABRI transient system. Studies also show that it is harder to predict the depressurization during the power transients because of neutron/3He capture reactions that induce a gas heating. This phenomenon can be studied by a multiphysics approach based on reaction rate calculation thanks to Monte Carlo code and study the resulting heating effect with the validated CFD simulation.

  10. A Cell-to-Cell Equalizer Based on Three-Resonant-State Switched-Capacitor Converters for Series-Connected Battery Strings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Shang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the low cost, small size, and ease of control, the switched-capacitor (SC battery equalizers are promising among active balancing methods. However, it is difficult to achieve the full cell equalization for the SC equalizers due to the inevitable voltage drops across Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET switches. Moreover, when the voltage gap among cells is larger, the balancing efficiency is lower, while the balancing speed becomes slower as the voltage gap gets smaller. In order to soften these downsides, this paper proposes a cell-to-cell battery equalization topology with zero-current switching (ZCS and zero-voltage gap (ZVG among cells based on three-resonant-state SC converters. Based on the conventional inductor-capacitor (LC converter, an additional resonant path is built to release the charge of the capacitor into the inductor in each switching cycle, which lays the foundations for obtaining ZVG among cells, improves the balancing efficiency at a large voltage gap, and increases the balancing speed at a small voltage gap. A four-lithium-ion-cell prototype is applied to validate the theoretical analysis. Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed topology has good equalization performances with fast equalization, ZCS, and ZVG among cells.

  11. Machine Learning-based Individual Assessment of Cortical Atrophy Pattern in Alzheimer's Disease Spectrum: Development of the Classifier and Longitudinal Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin San; Kim, Changsoo; Shin, Jeong-Hyeon; Cho, Hanna; Shin, Dae-Seock; Kim, Nakyoung; Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Yeshin; Lockhart, Samuel N; Na, Duk L; Seo, Sang Won; Seong, Joon-Kyung

    2018-03-07

    To develop a new method for measuring Alzheimer's disease (AD)-specific similarity of cortical atrophy patterns at the individual-level, we employed an individual-level machine learning algorithm. A total of 869 cognitively normal (CN) individuals and 473 patients with probable AD dementia who underwent high-resolution 3T brain MRI were included. We propose a machine learning-based method for measuring the similarity of an individual subject's cortical atrophy pattern with that of a representative AD patient cohort. In addition, we validated this similarity measure in two longitudinal cohorts consisting of 79 patients with amnestic-mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and 27 patients with probable AD dementia. Surface-based morphometry classifier for discriminating AD from CN showed sensitivity and specificity values of 87.1% and 93.3%, respectively. In the longitudinal validation study, aMCI-converts had higher atrophy similarity at both baseline (p < 0.001) and first year visits (p < 0.001) relative to non-converters. Similarly, AD patients with faster decline had higher atrophy similarity than slower decliners at baseline (p = 0.042), first year (p = 0.028), and third year visits (p = 0.027). The AD-specific atrophy similarity measure is a novel approach for the prediction of dementia risk and for the evaluation of AD trajectories on an individual subject level.

  12. Assessment of the 3He pressure inside the CABRI transient rods - Development of a surrogate model based on measurements and complementary CFD calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clamens Olivier

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available CABRI is an experimental pulse reactor, funded by the French Nuclear Safety and Radioprotection Institute (IRSN and operated by CEA at the Cadarache research center. It is designed to study fuel behavior under RIA conditions. In order to produce the power transients, reactivity is injected by depressurization of a neutron absorber (3He situated in transient rods inside the reactor core. The shapes of power transients depend on the total amount of reactivity injected and on the injection speed. The injected reactivity can be calculated by conversion of the 3He gas density into units of reactivity. So, it is of upmost importance to properly master gas density evolution in transient rods during a power transient. The 3He depressurization was studied by CFD calculations and completed with measurements using pressure transducers. The CFD calculations show that the density evolution is slower than the pressure drop. Surrogate models were built based on CFD calculations and validated against preliminary tests in the CABRI transient system. Studies also show that it is harder to predict the depressurization during the power transients because of neutron/3He capture reactions that induce a gas heating. This phenomenon can be studied by a multiphysics approach based on reaction rate calculation thanks to Monte Carlo code and study the resulting heating effect with the validated CFD simulation.

  13. Detection of Time Lags between Quasar Continuum Emission Bands Based On Pan-STARRS Light Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Green, Paul J.; Pancoast, Anna; MacLeod, Chelsea L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Greene, Jenny E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Morganson, Eric; Shen, Yue [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Brandt, W. N.; Grier, C. J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Rix, H.-W. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Protopapas, Pavlos [Institute for Applied Computational Science, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Scott, Caroline [Astrophysics, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Burgett, W. S.; Hodapp, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Magnier, E. A. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2017-02-20

    We study the time lags between the continuum emission of quasars at different wavelengths, based on more than four years of multi-band ( g , r , i , z ) light curves in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Fields. As photons from different bands emerge from different radial ranges in the accretion disk, the lags constrain the sizes of the accretion disks. We select 240 quasars with redshifts of z ≈ 1 or z ≈ 0.3 that are relatively emission-line free. The light curves are sampled from day to month timescales, which makes it possible to detect lags on the scale of the light crossing time of the accretion disks. With the code JAVELIN , we detect typical lags of several days in the rest frame between the g band and the riz bands. The detected lags are ∼2–3 times larger than the light crossing time estimated from the standard thin disk model, consistent with the recently measured lag in NGC 5548 and microlensing measurements of quasars. The lags in our sample are found to increase with increasing luminosity. Furthermore, the increase in lags going from g − r to g − i and then to g − z is slower than predicted in the thin disk model, particularly for high-luminosity quasars. The radial temperature profile in the disk must be different from what is assumed. We also find evidence that the lags decrease with increasing line ratios between ultraviolet Fe ii lines and Mg ii, which may point to changes in the accretion disk structure at higher metallicity.

  14. Hypnosis-based psychodynamic treatment in ALS: a longitudinal study on patients and their caregivers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Roland Kleinbub

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence of psychological treatment efficacy is strongly needed in ALS, particularly regarding long-term effects.Methods: Fifteen patients participated in a hypnosis treatment and self-hypnosis training protocol after an in-depth psychological and neurological evaluation. Patients’ primary caregivers and 15 one-by-one matched control patients were considered in the study.Measurements of anxiety, depression and quality of life were collected at the baseline, post-treatment, and after 3 and 6 months from the intervention. Bayesian linear mixed-models were used to evaluate the impact of treatment and defense style on patients’ anxiety, depression, quality of life, and functional impairment (ALSFRS-r, as well as on caregivers’ anxiety and depression.Results: The statistical analyses revealed an improvement in psychological variables’ scores immediately after the treatment. Amelioration in patients’ and caregivers’ anxiety as well as caregivers’ depression, were found to persist at 3 and 6 months follow-ups. The observed massive use of primitive defense mechanisms was found to have a reliable and constant buffer effect on psychopathological symptoms in both patients and caregivers. Notably, treated patients decline in ALSFRS-r score was observed to be slower than that of control group’s patients.Discussion: Our brief psychodynamic hypnosis-based treatment showed efficacy both at psychological and physical levels in patients with ALS, and was indirectly associated to long-lasting benefits in caregivers. The implications of peculiar psychodynamic factors and mind-body techniques are discussed. Future directions should be oriented toward a convergence of our results and further psychological interventions, in order to delineate clinical best practices for ALS.

  15. Fast Dynamic Simulation-Based Small Signal Stability Assessment and Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, Naresh [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Baone, Chaitanya [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Veda, Santosh [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Dai, Jing [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Chaudhuri, Nilanjan [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Leonardi, Bruno [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Sanches-Gasca, Juan [General Electric Company, Fairfield, CT (United States); Diao, Ruisheng [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wu, Di [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Huang, Zhenyu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhang, Yu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jin, Shuangshuang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zheng, Bin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, Yousu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    Power grid planning and operation decisions are made based on simulation of the dynamic behavior of the system. Enabling substantial energy savings while increasing the reliability of the aging North American power grid through improved utilization of existing transmission assets hinges on the adoption of wide-area measurement systems (WAMS) for power system stabilization. However, adoption of WAMS alone will not suffice if the power system is to reach its full entitlement in stability and reliability. It is necessary to enhance predictability with "faster than real-time" dynamic simulations that will enable the dynamic stability margins, proactive real-time control, and improve grid resiliency to fast time-scale phenomena such as cascading network failures. Present-day dynamic simulations are performed only during offline planning studies, considering only worst case conditions such as summer peak, winter peak days, etc. With widespread deployment of renewable generation, controllable loads, energy storage devices and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles expected in the near future and greater integration of cyber infrastructure (communications, computation and control), monitoring and controlling the dynamic performance of the grid in real-time would become increasingly important. The state-of-the-art dynamic simulation tools have limited computational speed and are not suitable for real-time applications, given the large set of contingency conditions to be evaluated. These tools are optimized for best performance of single-processor computers, but the simulation is still several times slower than real-time due to its computational complexity. With recent significant advances in numerical methods and computational hardware, the expectations have been rising towards more efficient and faster techniques to be implemented in power system simulators. This is a natural expectation, given that the core solution algorithms of most commercial simulators were developed

  16. Model-based evaluation of highly and low pathogenic avian influenza dynamics in wild birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Hénaux

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in avian influenza (AI epidemiology to predict disease risk in wild and domestic birds, and prevent transmission to humans. However, understanding the epidemic dynamics of highly pathogenic (HPAI viruses remains challenging because they have rarely been detected in wild birds. We used modeling to integrate available scientific information from laboratory and field studies, evaluate AI dynamics in individual hosts and waterfowl populations, and identify key areas for future research. We developed a Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered (SEIR model and used published laboratory challenge studies to estimate epidemiological parameters (rate of infection, latency period, recovery and mortality rates, considering the importance of age classes, and virus pathogenicity. Infectious contact leads to infection and virus shedding within 1-2 days, followed by relatively slower period for recovery or mortality. We found a shorter infectious period for HPAI than low pathogenic (LP AI, which may explain that HPAI has been much harder to detect than LPAI during surveillance programs. Our model predicted a rapid LPAI epidemic curve, with a median duration of infection of 50-60 days and no fatalities. In contrast, HPAI dynamics had lower prevalence and higher mortality, especially in young birds. Based on field data from LPAI studies, our model suggests to increase surveillance for HPAI in post-breeding areas, because the presence of immunologically naïve young birds is predicted to cause higher HPAI prevalence and bird losses during this season. Our results indicate a better understanding of the transmission, infection, and immunity-related processes is required to refine predictions of AI risk and spread, improve surveillance for HPAI in wild birds, and develop disease control strategies to reduce potential transmission to domestic birds and/or humans.

  17. Model-based evaluation of highly and low pathogenic avian influenza dynamics in wild birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénaux, Viviane; Samuel, Michael D.; Bunck, Christine M.

    2010-01-01

    There is growing interest in avian influenza (AI) epidemiology to predict disease risk in wild and domestic birds, and prevent transmission to humans. However, understanding the epidemic dynamics of highly pathogenic (HPAI) viruses remains challenging because they have rarely been detected in wild birds. We used modeling to integrate available scientific information from laboratory and field studies, evaluate AI dynamics in individual hosts and waterfowl populations, and identify key areas for future research. We developed a Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered (SEIR) model and used published laboratory challenge studies to estimate epidemiological parameters (rate of infection, latency period, recovery and mortality rates), considering the importance of age classes, and virus pathogenicity. Infectious contact leads to infection and virus shedding within 1–2 days, followed by relatively slower period for recovery or mortality. We found a shorter infectious period for HPAI than low pathogenic (LP) AI, which may explain that HPAI has been much harder to detect than LPAI during surveillance programs. Our model predicted a rapid LPAI epidemic curve, with a median duration of infection of 50–60 days and no fatalities. In contrast, HPAI dynamics had lower prevalence and higher mortality, especially in young birds. Based on field data from LPAI studies, our model suggests to increase surveillance for HPAI in post-breeding areas, because the presence of immunologically naïve young birds is predicted to cause higher HPAI prevalence and bird losses during this season. Our results indicate a better understanding of the transmission, infection, and immunity-related processes is required to refine predictions of AI risk and spread, improve surveillance for HPAI in wild birds, and develop disease control strategies to reduce potential transmission to domestic birds and/or humans.

  18. Dynamics of actin-based movement by Rickettsia rickettsii in vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzen, R A; Grieshaber, S S; Van Kirk, L S; Devin, C J

    1999-08-01

    Actin-based motility (ABM) is a virulence mechanism exploited by invasive bacterial pathogens in the genera Listeria, Shigella, and Rickettsia. Due to experimental constraints imposed by the lack of genetic tools and their obligate intracellular nature, little is known about rickettsial ABM relative to Listeria and Shigella ABM systems. In this study, we directly compared the dynamics and behavior of ABM of Rickettsia rickettsii and Listeria monocytogenes. A time-lapse video of moving intracellular bacteria was obtained by laser-scanning confocal microscopy of infected Vero cells synthesizing beta-actin coupled to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Analysis of time-lapse images demonstrated that R. rickettsii organisms move through the cell cytoplasm at an average rate of 4.8 +/- 0.6 micrometer/min (mean +/- standard deviation). This speed was 2.5 times slower than that of L. monocytogenes, which moved at an average rate of 12.0 +/- 3.1 micrometers/min. Although rickettsiae moved more slowly, the actin filaments comprising the actin comet tail were significantly more stable, with an average half-life approximately three times that of L. monocytogenes (100.6 +/- 19.2 s versus 33.0 +/- 7.6 s, respectively). The actin tail associated with intracytoplasmic rickettsiae remained stationary in the cytoplasm as the organism moved forward. In contrast, actin tails of rickettsiae trapped within the nucleus displayed dramatic movements. The observed phenotypic differences between the ABM of Listeria and Rickettsia may indicate fundamental differences in the mechanisms of actin recruitment and polymerization.

  19. ARTROC—a readout ASIC for GEM-based full-field XRF imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiutowski, T.; Koperny, S.; Łach, B.; Mindur, B.; Świentek, K.; Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2017-12-01

    In the paper we report on development of an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), called ARTROC, being part of a full-field X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) imaging system equipped with a standard three stage Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector of 10×10 cm2 area. The ARTROC consists of 64 independent channels, allowing for simultaneous recording of the amplitudes (energy sub-channel) and time stamps (timing sub-channel) of incoming signals. Thanks to the implemented token-based read out of derandomizing buffers, the ASIC also provides data sparsification and full zero suppression. Reconstruction of the hit positions is performed in an external data acquisition system by matching the time stamps of signals recorded in X- and Y-strips. The amplitude information is used for centre of gravity finding in clusters of signals on neighbouring strips belonging to the same detection events. The ASIC could work in one of six gain modes and one of two speed modes. In a slower mode the maximum count rate per channel is 105/s while in a faster mode it is three times higher. The ARTROC comprises also input protection circuits against possible random discharges inside active detector volume, so it can be used without any additional input components. The ASIC has been designed in 350 nm CMOS process. The basic functionality and parameters have been evaluated using the testability functions implemented in the ASIC design. The ASIC has been also tested in a fully equipped GEM detector set-up with X-rays source.

  20. A cellular automata model for traffic flow based on kinetics theory, vehicles capabilities and driver reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, H. A.; Lárraga, M. E.; Alvarez-Icaza, L.; Carvajal, J.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a reliable cellular automata model oriented to faithfully reproduce deceleration and acceleration according to realistic reactions of drivers, when vehicles with different deceleration capabilities are considered is presented. The model focuses on describing complex traffic phenomena by coding in its rules the basic mechanisms of drivers behavior, vehicles capabilities and kinetics, while preserving simplicity. In particular, vehiclés kinetics is based on uniform accelerated motion, rather than in impulsive accelerated motion as in most existing CA models. Thus, the proposed model calculates in an analytic way three safe preserving distances to determine the best action a follower vehicle can take under a worst case scenario. Besides, the prediction analysis guarantees that under the proper assumptions, collision between vehicles may not happen at any future time. Simulations results indicate that all interactions of heterogeneous vehicles (i.e., car-truck, truck-car, car-car and truck-truck) are properly reproduced by the model. In addition, the model overcomes one of the major limitations of CA models for traffic modeling: the inability to perform smooth approach to slower or stopped vehicles. Moreover, the model is also capable of reproducing most empirical findings including the backward speed of the downstream front of the traffic jam, and different congested traffic patterns induced by a system with open boundary conditions with an on-ramp. Like most CA models, integer values are used to make the model run faster, which makes the proposed model suitable for real time traffic simulation of large networks.

  1. Differential cognitive profiles of intimate partner violence perpetrators based on alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitoria-Estruch, Sara; Romero-Martínez, Angel; Lila, Marisol; Moya-Albiol, Luis

    2018-08-01

    Despite extensive evidence of heterogeneity in intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrator profiles, there has been little research into neuropsychological deficits that might help us understand differences within this violent population. Moreover, studies on this topic have not paid much attention to the role of alcohol abuse in neuropsychological domains of IPV perpetrators. Hence, the current study was designed to examine neuropsychological differences among individuals who have committed domestic violence with high (n = 28, HA) and low (n = 35, LA) levels of alcohol consumption, and non-violent individuals (n = 37) to establish differential neuropsychological profiles. An exhaustive neuropsychological assessment battery was employed which combined the computer-based Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery with pencil-and-paper measures. Compared to controls, HA IPV perpetrators had slower processing speed and significantly more impairments in attentional set-shifting or switch attention, working and long-term memory, cognitive flexibility, planning, decision-making, emotion decoding skills, and perspective taking. Furthermore, there were differences between IPV perpetrator subgroups in attentional set-shifting or switch attention and cognitive empathy, with HA IPV perpetrators displaying more severe impairments in both cognitive domains than LA IPV perpetrators. Finally, the LA IPV perpetrators had significantly more impairments in working and long-term memory, executive functioning, and emotion decoding skills than controls, but they did not differ in processing speed, attentional set-shifting or switch attention, decision making, or perspective taking. Thus, the current findings suggest that IPV perpetrators with neuropsychological difficulties, especially those who are heavy drinkers, may have the greatest need for cognitive interventions. These cognitive deficits could be employed as targets for developing specific cognitive rehabilitation

  2. Age assessment based on third molar mineralisation : An epidemiological-radiological study on a Central-European population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Elisabeth; Robold, Matthias; Proff, Peter; Kirschneck, Christian

    2017-03-01

    The method published in 1973 by Demirjian et al. to assess age based on the mineralisation stage of permanent teeth is standard practice in forensic and orthodontic diagnostics. From age 14 onwards, however, this method is only applicable to third molars. No current epidemiological data on third molar mineralisation are available for Caucasian Central-Europeans. Thus, a method for assessing age in this population based on third molar mineralisation is presented, taking into account possible topographic and gender-specific differences. The study included 486 Caucasian Central-European orthodontic patients (9-24 years) with unaffected dental development. In an anonymized, randomized, and blinded manner, one orthopantomogram of each patient at either start, mid or end of treatment was visually analysed regarding the mineralisation stage of the third molars according to the method by Demirjian et al. Corresponding topographic and gender-specific point scores were determined and added to form a dental maturity score. Prediction equations for age assessment were derived by linear regression analysis with chronological age and checked for reliability within the study population. Mineralisation of the lower third molars was slower than mineralisation of the upper third molars, whereas no jaw-side-specific differences were detected. Gender-specific differences were relatively small, but girls reached mineralisation stage C earlier than boys, whereas boys showed an accelerated mineralisation between the ages of 15 and 16. The global equation generated by regression analysis (age = -1.103 + 0.268 × dental maturity score 18 + 28 + 38 + 48) is sufficiently accurate and reliable for clinical use. Age assessment only based on either maxilla or mandible also shows good prognostic reliability.

  3. Research on the Lift-off Effect of Receiving Longitudinal Mode Guided Waves in Pipes Based on the Villari Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The magnetostrictive guided wave technology as a non-contact measurement can generate and receive guided waves with a large lift-off distance up to tens of millimeters. However, the lift-off distance of the receiving coil would affect the coupling efficiency from the elastic energy to the electromagnetic energy. In the existing magnetomechanical models, the change of the magnetic field in the air gap was ignored since the permeability of the rod is much greater than that of air. The lift-off distance of the receiving coil will not affect the receiving signals based on these models. However, the experimental phenomenon is in contradiction with these models. To solve the contradiction, the lift-off effect of receiving the longitudinal mode guided waves in pipes is investigated based on the Villari effect. A finite element model of receiving longitudinal guided waves in pipes is obtained based on the Villari effect, which takes into account the magnetic field in the pipe wall and the air zone at the same time. The relation between the amplitude of the induced signals and the radius (lift-off distance of the receiving coil is obtained, which is verified by experiment. The coupling efficiency of the receiver is a monotonic decline with the lift-off distance increasing. The decay rate of the low frequency wave is slower than the high frequency wave. Additionally, the results show that the rate of change of the magnetic flux in the air zone and in the pipe wall is the same order of magnitude, but opposite. However, the experimental results show that the error of the model in the large lift-off distance is obvious due to the diffusion of the magnetic field in the air, especially for the high frequency guided waves.

  4. Why does the Y326I mutant of monoamine oxidase B decompose an endogenous amphetamine at a slower rate than the wild type enzyme? Reaction step elucidated by multiscale molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregeljc, Domen; Jug, Urška; Mavri, Janez; Stare, Jernej

    2018-02-07

    This work investigates the Y326I point mutation effect on the kinetics of oxidative deamination of phenylethylamine (PEA) catalyzed by the monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) enzyme. PEA is a neuromodulator capable of affecting the plasticity of the brain and is responsible for the mood enhancing effect caused by physical exercise. Due to a similar functionality, PEA is often regarded as an endogenous amphetamine. The rate limiting step of the deamination was simulated at the multiscale level, employing the Empirical Valence Bond approach for the quantum treatment of the involved valence states, whereas the environment (solvated protein) was represented with a classical force field. A comparison of the reaction free energy profiles delivered by simulation of the reaction in the wild type MAO B and its Y326I mutant yields an increase in the barrier by 1.06 kcal mol -1 upon mutation, corresponding to a roughly 6-fold decrease in the reaction rate. This is in excellent agreement with the experimental kinetic studies. Inspection of simulation trajectories reveals possible sources of the point mutation effect, namely vanishing favorable electrostatic interactions between PEA and a Tyr326 side chain and an increased amount of water molecules at the active site due to the replacement of tyrosine by a less spacious isoleucine residue, thereby increasing the dielectric shielding of the catalytic environment provided by the enzyme.

  5. The NATO Alliance: US Conventional Force Level Options Toward it Based on US National Interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    24 percent level for 1979, it has recently slowed down due to price controls and the slower depreciation of the escudo . Real wage increases declined...one can readily establisb US current and past generosity, in fiscal terms, toward the Atlantic Alliance. In conclusion, the fifteen countries presently

  6. Community-Based Cause of Death Study Linked to Maternal and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    While Ethiopia has successfully reduced under-five childhood mortality, there have been slower gains in reducing neonatal (newborn) and maternal mortality rates. About 220,000 children and mothers die every year in Ethiopia. For most, the causes of death are unknown as fewer than 30% of Ethiopia's births and deaths ...

  7. The impact of engagement in street-based income generation activities on stimulant drug use cessation among people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ti, Lianping; Richardson, Lindsey; DeBeck, Kora; Nguyen, Paul; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Despite the growing prevalence of illicit stimulant drug use internationally, and the widespread involvement of people who inject drugs (IDU) within street-based drug markets, little is known about the impact of different types of street-based income generation activities on the cessation of stimulant use among IDU. Data were derived from an open prospective cohort of IDU in Vancouver, Canada. We used Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazards regression to examine the effect of different types of street-based income generation activities (e.g., sex work, drug dealing, and scavenging) on time to cessation of stimulant use. Between December, 2005 and November, 2012, 887 IDU who use stimulant drugs (cocaine, crack cocaine, or crystal methamphetamine) were prospectively followed-up for a median duration of 47 months. In Kaplan-Meier analyses, compared to those who did not engage in street-based income generation activities, participants who reported sex work, drug dealing, scavenging, or more than one of these activities were significantly less likely to report stimulant drug use cessation (all pstreet-based income generation activity remained significantly associated with a slower time to stimulant drug cessation (all p<0.005). Our findings highlight the urgent need for strategies to address stimulant dependence, including novel pharmacotherapies. Also important, structural interventions, such as low-threshold employment opportunities, availability of supportive housing, legal reforms regarding drug use, and evidence-based approaches that reduce harm among IDU are urgently required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Examining the utility of satellite-based wind sheltering estimates for lake hydrodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Hoek, Jamon; Read, Jordan S.; Winslow, Luke A.; Montesano, Paul; Markfort, Corey D.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite-based measurements of vegetation canopy structure have been in common use for the last decade but have never been used to estimate canopy's impact on wind sheltering of individual lakes. Wind sheltering is caused by slower winds in the wake of topography and shoreline obstacles (e.g. forest canopy) and influences heat loss and the flux of wind-driven mixing energy into lakes, which control lake temperatures and indirectly structure lake ecosystem processes, including carbon cycling and thermal habitat partitioning. Lakeshore wind sheltering has often been parameterized by lake surface area but such empirical relationships are only based on forested lakeshores and overlook the contributions of local land cover and terrain to wind sheltering. This study is the first to examine the utility of satellite imagery-derived broad-scale estimates of wind sheltering across a diversity of land covers. Using 30 m spatial resolution ASTER GDEM2 elevation data, the mean sheltering height, hs, being the combination of local topographic rise and canopy height above the lake surface, is calculated within 100 m-wide buffers surrounding 76,000 lakes in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. Uncertainty of GDEM2-derived hs was compared to SRTM-, high-resolution G-LiHT lidar-, and ICESat-derived estimates of hs, respective influences of land cover type and buffer width on hsare examined; and the effect of including satellite-based hs on the accuracy of a statewide lake hydrodynamic model was discussed. Though GDEM2 hs uncertainty was comparable to or better than other satellite-based measures of hs, its higher spatial resolution and broader spatial coverage allowed more lakes to be included in modeling efforts. GDEM2 was shown to offer superior utility for estimating hs compared to other satellite-derived data, but was limited by its consistent underestimation of hs, inability to detect within-buffer hs variability, and differing accuracy across land cover types. Nonetheless

  9. ARAC terrain data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, H.

    1982-11-01

    A terrain data base covering the continental United States at 500-meter resolution has been generated. Its function is to provide terrain data for input to mesoscale atmospheric models that are used as part of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL). The structure of the data base as it exists on the LLNL computer system is described. The data base has been written to tapes for transfer to other systems and the format of these tapes is also described

  10. Base Station Performance Model

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Barbara; Farrell, Ronan

    2005-01-01

    At present the testing of power amplifiers within base station transmitters is limited to testing at component level as opposed to testing at the system level. While the detection of catastrophic failure is possible, that of performance degradation is not. This paper proposes a base station model with respect to transmitter output power with the aim of introducing system level monitoring of the power amplifier behaviour within the base station. Our model reflects the expe...

  11. Value-based pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Netseva-Porcheva Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of the paper is to present the value-based pricing. Therefore, the comparison between two approaches of pricing is made - cost-based pricing and value-based pricing. The 'Price sensitively meter' is presented. The other topic of the paper is the perceived value - meaning of the perceived value, the components of perceived value, the determination of perceived value and the increasing of perceived value. In addition, the best company strategies in matrix 'value-cost' are outlined. .

  12. Network-Based Effectiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friman, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    ...) to increase competitive advantage, innovation, and mission effectiveness. Network-based effectiveness occurs due to the influence of various factors such as people, procedures, technology, and organizations...

  13. Case-based reasoning

    CERN Document Server

    Kolodner, Janet

    1993-01-01

    Case-based reasoning is one of the fastest growing areas in the field of knowledge-based systems and this book, authored by a leader in the field, is the first comprehensive text on the subject. Case-based reasoning systems are systems that store information about situations in their memory. As new problems arise, similar situations are searched out to help solve these problems. Problems are understood and inferences are made by finding the closest cases in memory, comparing and contrasting the problem with those cases, making inferences based on those comparisons, and asking questions whe

  14. Strengths-based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledertoug, Mette Marie

    -being. The Ph.D.-project in Strength-based learning took place in a Danish school with 750 pupils age 6-16 and a similar school was functioning as a control group. The presentation will focus on both the aware-explore-apply processes and the practical implications for the schools involved, and on measurable......Strength-based learning - Children͛s Character Strengths as Means to their Learning Potential͛ is a Ph.D.-project aiming to create a strength-based mindset in school settings and at the same time introducing strength-based interventions as specific tools to improve both learning and well...

  15. Monitoring Knowledge Base (MKB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Monitoring Knowledge Base (MKB) is a compilation of emissions measurement and monitoring techniques associated with air pollution control devices, industrial...

  16. Imagery Data Base Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Imagery Data Base Facility supports AFRL and other government organizations by providing imagery interpretation and analysis to users for data selection, imagery...

  17. Game-Based Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanghøj, Thorkild

    2013-01-01

    This chapter outlines theoretical and empirical perspectives on how Game-Based Teaching can be integrated within the context of formal schooling. Initially, this is done by describing game scenarios as models for possible actions that need to be translated into curricular knowledge practices...... approaches to game-based teaching, which may or may not correspond with the pedagogical models of particular games....

  18. Secure base stations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Peter; Brusilovsky, Alec; McLellan, Rae; Mullender, Sape J.; Polakos, Paul

    2009-01-01

    With the introduction of the third generation (3G) Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) base station router (BSR) and fourth generation (4G) base stations, such as the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) Long Term Evolution (LTE) Evolved Node B (eNB), it has become important to

  19. Hydrogel based occlusion systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, F.A.; Jackson, N.; Dubruel, P.; Adesanya, K.; Embrechts, A.; Mendes, E.; Neves, H.P.; Herijgers, P.; Verbrugghe, Y.; Shacham, Y.; Engel, L.; Krylov, V.

    2013-01-01

    A hydrogel based occlusion system, a method for occluding vessels, appendages or aneurysms, and a method for hydrogel synthesis are disclosed. The hydrogel based occlusion system includes a hydrogel having a shrunken and a swollen state and a delivery tool configured to deliver the hydrogel to a

  20. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Fogh Olsen, Ole; Sporring, Jon

    2007-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  1. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Olsen, Ole Fogh; Sporring, Jon

    2006-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  2. Zero-Based Budgeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichowski, Chester

    1979-01-01

    The zero-based budgeting approach is designed to achieve the greatest benefit with the fewest undesirable consequences. Seven basic steps make up the zero-based decision-making process: (1) identifying program goals, (2) classifying goals, (3) identifying resources, (4) reviewing consequences, (5) developing decision packages, (6) implementing a…

  3. Office-based anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infection, and consistency in nursing personnel. In the USA 17 -. 24% of all elective ambulatory surgery is ... knowledge base or personality to deal with the OBA environment. Compared with hospitals, office-based facilities currently ... disease or major cardiovascular risk factors). Intravenous access via a flexible cannula is.

  4. High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul T. Fini; Shuji Nakamura

    2005-07-30

    In this final technical progress report we summarize research accomplished during Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-01NT41203, entitled ''High-Efficiency Nitride-Based Solid-State Lighting''. Two teams, from the University of California at Santa Barbara (Principle Investigator: Dr. Shuji Nakamura) and the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (led by Dr. N. Narendran), pursued the goals of this contract from thin film growth, characterization, and packaging/luminaire design standpoints. The UCSB team initially pursued the development of blue gallium nitride (GaN)-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, as well as ultraviolet GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). In Year 2, the emphasis shifted to resonant-cavity light emitting diodes, also known as micro-cavity LEDs when extremely thin device cavities are fabricated. These devices have very directional emission and higher light extraction efficiency than conventional LEDs. Via the optimization of thin-film growth and refinement of device processing, we decreased the total cavity thickness to less than 1 {micro}m, such that micro-cavity effects were clearly observed and a light extraction efficiency of over 10% was reached. We also began the development of photonic crystals for increased light extraction, in particular for so-called ''guided modes'' which would otherwise propagate laterally in the device and be re-absorbed. Finally, we pursued the growth of smooth, high-quality nonpolar a-plane and m-plane GaN films, as well as blue light emitting diodes on these novel films. Initial nonpolar LEDs showed the expected behavior of negligible peak wavelength shift with increasing drive current. M-plane LEDs in particular show promise, as unpackaged devices had unsaturated optical output power of {approx} 3 mW at 200 mA drive current. The LRC's tasks were aimed at developing the subcomponents necessary for packaging UCSB's light

  5. Knowledge base mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwa, M; Furukawa, K; Makinouchi, A; Mizoguchi, T; Mizoguchi, F; Yamasaki, H

    1982-01-01

    One of the principal goals of the Fifth Generation Computer System Project for the coming decade is to develop a methodology for building knowledge information processing systems which will provide people with intelligent agents. The key notion of the fifth generation computer system is knowledge used for problem solving. In this paper the authors describe the plan of Randd on knowledge base mechanisms. A knowledge representation system is to be designed to support knowledge acquisition for the knowledge information processing systems. The system will include a knowledge representation language, a knowledge base editor and a debugger. It is also expected to perform as a kind of meta-inference system. In order to develop the large scale knowledge base systems, a knowledge base mechanism based on the relational model is to be studied in the earlier stage of the project. Distributed problem solving is also one of the main issues of the project. 19 references.

  6. Skull base tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Servico de Radiologia, Rua Professor Lima Basto, 1093 Lisboa Codex (Portugal)], E-mail: borgesalexandra@clix.pt

    2008-06-15

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base.

  7. Evidence-based radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafslund, Bjorg; Clare, Judith; Graverholt, Birgitte; Wammen Nortvedt, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) offers the integration of the best research evidence with clinical knowledge and expertise and patient values. EBP is a well known term in health care. This paper discusses the implementation of EBP into radiography and introduces the term evidence-based radiography. Evidence-based radiography is radiography informed and based on the combination of clinical expertise and the best available research-based evidence, patient preferences and resources available. In Norway, EBP in radiography is being debated and radiographers are discussing the challenges of implementing EBP in both academic and clinical practice. This discussion paper explains why EBP needs to be a basis for a radiography curriculum and a part of radiographers' practice. We argue that Norwegian radiographers must increase participation in research and developing practice within their specific radiographic domain

  8. Skull base tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base

  9. Determinação simultânea de As, Cd e Pb em amostras de água purificada para hemodiálise por espectrometria de absorção atômica com forno de grafite, após otimização multivariada baseada no uso de planejamento experimental Simultaneous determination of arsenic, cadmium and lead by GF AAS in purified water samples for hemodialysis after multivariate optimization based on factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisia Maria G. dos Santos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the development of a methodology for simultaneously determining As, Cd and Pb, employing GF AAS with polarized Zeeman-effect background correction. In order to make the procedure applicable, the influence of pyrolysis and atomization temperatures and the amount of chemical modifiers were studied. Factorial and central composite designs were used to optimize these variables. Precision and accuracy of the method were investigated using Natural Water Reference material, Nist SRM 1640. Results are in agreement with certified values at the 95% confidence limit when the Student t-test is used. This methodology was used for quality control of purified water for hemodialysis.

  10. Time-kill kinetic analysis of antimicrobial chemotherapy based on hydrogen peroxide photolysis against Streptococcus mutans biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirato, Midori; Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Lingström, Peter; Niwano, Yoshimi; Örtengren, Ulf

    2017-08-01

    A recently developed antimicrobial technique utilizing hydroxyl radicals generated by hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) photolysis represents a promising new therapy for preventing and treating dental caries. The present study compared the antimicrobial time-kill kinetics of H 2 O 2 photolysis, conventional antiseptics, and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) against biofilm-forming Streptococcus mutans (cariogenic bacteria) grown on hydroxyapatite disks. H 2 O 2 photolysis was performed by irradiating the biofilm immersed in 3% H 2 O 2 with 365-nm light-emitting diode (LED) light at an irradiance of 1000mW/cm 2 for up to 1.5min. Antiseptic treatments consisted of 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate, 0.5% povidone-iodine, and 3% H 2 O 2 . The biofilm was immersed in each antiseptic for up to 4min. aPDT was performed by irradiating the biofilm immersed in 100μM methylene blue or toluidine blue O with 655-nm laser light at 1000mW/cm 2 for up to 4min. Based on the time-kill assay, the decimal reduction value (D-value) of each treatment was determined. With a D-value of 0.06min, H 2 O 2 photolysis exhibited the highest bactericidal effect against biofilm-forming S. mutans. In contrast, antiseptics and aPDT exerted a slower bactericidal effect, with D-values of 0.9-2.7min. In conclusion, the antimicrobial technique based on H 2 O 2 photolysis using 365-nm LED represents a strong adjunctive chemotherapy for dental caries treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Impact of a Population-Based Screening Program on Income- and Immigration-Related Disparities in Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, Tara; Glazier, Richard H; Moineddin, Rahim; Gu, Sumei; Wilton, Andrew S; Paszat, Lawrence

    2017-09-01

    Background: A population-based program promoting the Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT) for colorectal cancer screening was introduced in 2008 in Ontario, Canada, where opportunistic screening with colonoscopy had been increasing in frequency. We evaluated the impact of the program on income and immigration-related disparities in screening. Methods: We used linked administrative data to calculate colorectal cancer screening rates for eligible Ontarians in each year between 2001/02 ( n = 2,852,619) and 2013/14 ( n = 4,139,304). We quantified disparities using an "inequality ratio" of screening rates in the most disadvantaged group relative to the most advantaged group. We performed segmented logistic regression analyses stratified by screening modality and adjusted for age, sex, rurality, comorbidity, and morbidity. Results: Between 2001/02 and 2013/14, the income and immigration inequality ratios narrowed from 0.74 to 0.80 and 0.55 to 0.69, respectively. Before the screening program, the income inequality ratio was widening by 1% per year (95% CI 1% to 1%); in the year it was introduced, it narrowed by 4% (95% CI 2% to 7%) and in the years following, it remained stable [0% decrease (95% CI 1% decrease to 0% decrease) per year]. Results were similar for immigration-related disparities. After program introduction, disparities in receiving FOBT were narrowing at a faster rate while disparities in receiving colonoscopy were widening at a slower rate. Conclusions: Introduction of a population-based screening program promoting FOBT for colorectal cancer was associated with only modest improvements in immigration and income-related disparities. Impact: Reducing immigration and income-related disparities should be a focus for future research and policy work. Disparities in Ontario seem to be driven by a higher uptake of colonoscopy among more advantaged groups. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(9); 1401-10. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Coarsening behaviour and interfacial structure of γ′ precipitates in Co-Al-W based superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorontsov, V.A.; Barnard, J.S.; Rahman, K.M.; Yan, H.-Y.; Midgley, P.A.; Dye, D.

    2016-01-01

    This work discusses the effects of alloying on the coarsening behaviour of the L1 2 ordered γ ′ phase and the structure of the γ/γ ′ interfaces in three Co-Al-W base superalloys aged at ∼90 °C below the respective solvus temperatures: Co-7Al-7W, Co-10Al-5W-2Ta and Co-7Al-7W-20Ni (at.%). The coarsening kinetics are adequately characterised by the classical Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner model for Ostwald ripening. Co-7Al-7W exhibited much slower coarsening than its quaternary derivatives. Alloying can be exploited to modify the coarsening kinetics either by increasing the solvus temperature by adding tantalum, or by adding nickel to shift the rate controlling mechanism towards dependence on the diffusion of aluminium rather than tungsten. Lattice resolution STEM imaging was used to measure the widths of the order-disorder (structural) and Z-contrast (compositional) gradients across the γ/γ ′ interfaces. Similarly to nickel base superalloys, the compositional gradient was found to be wider than the structural. Co-7Al-7W-20Ni had much wider interface gradients than Co-7Al-7W and Co-10Al-5W-2Ta, which suggests that its γ ′ phase stoichiometry is less constrained. A possible correlation between temperature and misfit normalised r vs. t 1/3 coarsening rate coefficients and the structural gradient width has also been identified, whereby alloys with wider interfaces exhibit faster coarsening rates.

  13. Lactose Binding Induces Opposing Dynamics Changes in Human Galectins Revealed by NMR-Based Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chih-Ta Henry; Ho, Meng-Ru; Lin, Chung-Hung; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2017-08-16

    Galectins are β-galactoside-binding proteins implicated in a myriad of biological functions. Despite their highly conserved carbohydrate binding motifs with essentially identical structures, their affinities for lactose, a common galectin inhibitor, vary significantly. Here, we aimed to examine the molecular basis of differential lactose affinities amongst galectins using solution-based techniques. Consistent dissociation constants of lactose binding were derived from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry and bio-layer interferometry for human galectin-1 (hGal1), galectin-7 (hGal7), and the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of galectin-8 (hGal8 NTD and hGal8 CTD , respectively). Furthermore, the dissociation rates of lactose binding were extracted from NMR lineshape analyses. Structural mapping of chemical shift perturbations revealed long-range perturbations upon lactose binding for hGal1 and hGal8 NTD . We further demonstrated using the NMR-based hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) that lactose binding increases the exchange rates of residues located on the opposite side of the ligand-binding pocket for hGal1 and hGal8 NTD , indicative of allostery. Additionally, lactose binding induces significant stabilisation of hGal8 CTD across the entire domain. Our results suggested that lactose binding reduced the internal dynamics of hGal8 CTD on a very slow timescale (minutes and slower) at the expense of reduced binding affinity due to the unfavourable loss of conformational entropy.

  14. Tract-based spatial statistics analysis of diffusion-tensor imaging data in pediatric- and adult-onset multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliotta, Rachel; Cox, Jennifer L; Donohue, Katelyn; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Yeh, E Ann; Polak, Paul; Dwyer, Michael G; Zivadinov, Robert

    2014-01-01

    White matter (WM) microstructure may vary significantly in pediatric-onset (PO) and adult-onset (AO) patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a difference that could be explained by the effects of an inherent plasticity in the affected pediatric brains early in the disease, and a phenomenon that does not occur later in life. This hypothesis would support the observation that disease progression is much slower in POMS compared to AOMS patients. To examine WM microstructure in the brain of adults with POMS and AOMS, using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis of diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI). Adults with relapsing-remitting (RR) POMS, who were diagnosed before age of 18 years (n = 16), were compared with age-matched (AOA, n = 23) and disease duration-matched (AOD, n = 22) RR patients who developed MS after the age of 18 years. Scans were analyzed using the FSL software package (Oxford, UK) and statistics were performed using TBSS to evaluate WM microstructure between groups based on the mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values obtained from the DTI. Widespread cortical and deep WM area differences characterized by increased FA values were seen in the AOAMS compared with POMS group (P < 0.05, TFCE corrected). Significantly increased FA values of posterior WM areas were detected in the AODMS compared with POMS group (P < 0.05, TFCE corrected). Increased FA values in WM areas of the AOMS compared with the POMS patients suggest that diffuse WM microstructure changes are more attributable to age of onset than a simple function of disease duration and age. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Design-Based Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gynther, Karsten; Christensen, Ove; Petersen, Trine Brun

    2012-01-01

    I denne artikel introduceres Design Based Research for første gang på dansk i et videnskabeligt tidsskrift. Artiklen præsenterer de grundlæggende antagelser, som ligger til grund for Design Based Research-traditionen, og artiklen diskuterer de principper, som ligger til grund for gennemførelse af...... et DBR-forskningsprojekt. Med udgangspunkt i forsknings- og udviklingsprojektet ELYK: E-læring, Yderområder og Klyngedannelse, præsenteres den innovationsmodel, som projektet har udviklet med udgangspunkt i Design Based Research traditionen. ELYKs DBR innovationsmodel har vist sig effektiv i forhold...

  16. Nature-based integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitkänen, Kati; Oratuomi, Joose; Hellgren, Daniela

    Increased attention to, and careful planning of the integration of migrants into Nordic societies is ever more important. Nature based integration is a new solution to respond to this need. This report presents the results of a Nordic survey and workshop and illustrates current practices of nature...... based integration by case study descriptions from Denmark, Sweden Norway and Finland. Across Nordic countries several practical projects and initiatives have been launched to promote the benefits of nature in integration and there is also growing academic interest in the topic. Nordic countries have...... the potential of becoming real forerunners in nature based integration even at the global scale....

  17. Data base management study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Data base management techniques and applicable equipment are described. Recommendations which will assist potential NASA data users in selecting and using appropriate data base management tools and techniques are presented. Classes of currently available data processing equipment ranging from basic terminals to large minicomputer systems were surveyed as they apply to the needs of potential SEASAT data users. Cost and capabilities projections for this equipment through 1985 were presented. A test of a typical data base management system was described, as well as the results of this test and recommendations to assist potential users in determining when such a system is appropriate for their needs. The representative system tested was UNIVAC's DMS 1100.

  18. Value-based pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netseva-Porcheva Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the paper is to present the value-based pricing. Therefore, the comparison between two approaches of pricing is made - cost-based pricing and value-based pricing. The 'Price sensitively meter' is presented. The other topic of the paper is the perceived value - meaning of the perceived value, the components of perceived value, the determination of perceived value and the increasing of perceived value. In addition, the best company strategies in matrix 'value-cost' are outlined. .

  19. QuickBase

    CERN Document Server

    Conner, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Ready to put Intuit's QuickBase to work? Our new Missing Manual shows you how to capture, modify, share, and manage data and documents with this web-based data-sharing program quickly and easily. No longer do you have to coordinate your team through a blizzard of emails or play frustrating games of "guess which document is the right one."QuickBase saves your organization time and money, letting you manage and share the information that makes your business tick: sales figures, project timelines, drafts of documents, purchase or work requests--whatever information you need to keep business flowi

  20. Biocatalytic Synthesis of Flavor Ester “Pentyl Valerate” Using Candida rugosa Lipase Immobilized in Microemulsion Based Organogels: Effect of Parameters and Reusability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripti Raghavendra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pentyl valerate was synthesized biocatalytically using Candida rugosa lipase (CRL immobilized in microemulsion based organogels (MBGs. The optimum conditions were found to be pH 7.0, temperature of 37°C, ratio of concentration of water to surfactant (Wo of 60, and the surfactant sodium bis-2-(ethylhexylsulfosuccinate (AOT for MBG preparation. Although kinetic studies revealed that the enzyme in free form had high affinity towards substrates (Km = 23.2 mM for pentanol and 76.92 mM for valeric acid whereas, after immobilization, the Km values increased considerably (74.07 mM for pentanol and 83.3 mM for valeric acid resulting in a slower reaction rate, the maximum conversion was much higher in case of immobilized enzyme (~99% as compared to free enzyme (~19%. Simultaneous effects of important parameters were studied using response surface methodology (RSM conjugated with Box-Behnken design (BBD with five variables (process parameters, namely, enzyme concentration, initial water content (Wo, solvent used for MBG preparation, substrate ratio and time, and response as the final product formation, that is, pentyl valerate (%. The MBGs were reused for 10 consecutive cycles for ester synthesis. Efficacy of AOT/isooctane as dehydrating agent for extracting excess water from MBGs was found to exert a positive effect on the esterification reaction.

  1. Do gender-based disparities in authorship also exist in cancer palliative care? A 15-year survey of the cancer palliative care literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Preet Paul; Jatoi, Aminah

    2008-01-01

    Women physicians in the United States publish less than men and advance academically at a slower pace. Do such gender-based disparities also occur in cancer palliative care, a field in which women appear to hold a strong interest? We undertook a detailed survey of the cancer palliative care literature. We selected 5 cancer palliative care journals on the basis of their high impact factors, and we assessed authorship for the years 1990, 1995, 2000, and 2005. We determined gender and highest educational degree for all US first and last authors. A total of 794 authors are the focus of this report. In 2005, 50% of first authors were women, but only 14% were women physicians. Similarly, 39% of senior authors were women during this year, but only 8% were women physicians. Over this 15-year period, no statistically significant trends were detected to indicate an increase in the number of women authors. These findings are sobering. Future efforts might focus on strategies to improve rates of authorship and, ultimately, improve rates of academic promotion for women interested in cancer palliative care.

  2. Changes of glacier, glacier-fed rivers and lakes in Altai Tavan Bogd National Park, Western Mongolia, based on multispectral satellite data from 1990 to 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsaikhan, B.; Lkhamjav, O.; Batsaikhan, N.

    2017-12-01

    Impacts on glaciers and water resource management have been altering through climate changes in Mongolia territory characterized by dry and semi-arid climate with low precipitation. Melting glaciers are early indicators of climate change unlike the response of the forests which is slower and takes place over a long period of time. Mountain glaciers are important environmental components of local, regional, and global hydrological cycles. The study calculates an overview of changes for glacier, glacier-fed rivers and lakes in Altai Tavan Bogd mountain, the Western Mongolia, based on the indexes of multispectral data and the methods typically applied in glacier studies. Were utilized an integrated approach of Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI) and Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) to combine Landsat, MODIS imagery and digital elevation model, to identify glacier cover are and quantify water storage change in lakes, and compared that with and climate parameters including precipitation, land surface temperature, evaporation, moisture. Our results show that melts of glacier at the study area has contributed to significantly increase of water storage of lakes in valley of The Altai Tavan Bogd mountain. There is hydrologic connection that lake basin is directly fed by glacier meltwater.

  3. A study of El Niño-Southern oscillation impacts to the South China Sea region using ground-based GPS receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suparta, Wayan; Iskandar, Ahmad; Singh Jit Singh, Mandeep; Alauddin Mohd Ali, Mohd; Yatim, Baharudin; Tangang, Fredolin

    2013-04-01

    We observe an ENSO activity by using ground-based GPS receiver as an effort to study the effects of global warming and climate change in the tropical region. The precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from Global Positioning System (GPS) meteorology in line with the sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTa) is used to indicate their response on ENSO activities. The PWV data used in this study was taken from the station at Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu (UMSK) over 2011, together with NTUS station (in the Singapore), PIMO (in Philippines) and BAKO (in Indonesia) are also compared. The relationship between PWV and SSTa at all stations on weekly basis exhibited modest with correlation coefficients between -0.30 and -0.78 significantly at the 99% confidence level. The negative correlation indicates that during a La Niña phase, the PWV is increased when the sea surface temperatures getting cold causes warm air mass in the central Pacific moved to west Pacific. The increased of PWV causes the GPS signals will be getting slower.

  4. On the low pressure shock initiation of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine based plastic bonded explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Tarver, Craig M.; Garcia, Frank; Chidester, Steven K.

    2010-05-01

    In large explosive and propellant charges, relatively low shock pressures on the order of 1-2 GPa impacting large volumes and lasting tens of microseconds can cause shock initiation of detonation. The pressure buildup process requires several centimeters of shock propagation before shock to detonation transition occurs. In this paper, experimentally measured run distances to detonation for lower input shock pressures are shown to be much longer than predicted by extrapolation of high shock pressure data. Run distance to detonation and embedded manganin gauge pressure histories are measured using large diameter charges of six octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) based plastic bonded explosives (PBX's): PBX 9404; LX-04; LX-07; LX-10; PBX 9501; and EDC37. The embedded gauge records show that the lower shock pressures create fewer and less energetic "hot spot" reaction sites, which consume the surrounding explosive particles at reduced reaction rates and cause longer distances to detonation. The experimental data is analyzed using the ignition and growth reactive flow model of shock initiation in solid explosives. Using minimum values of the degrees of compression required to ignite hot spot reactions, the previously determined high shock pressure ignition and growth model parameters for the six explosives accurately simulate the much longer run distances to detonation and much slower growths of pressure behind the shock fronts measured during the shock initiation of HMX PBX's at several low shock pressures.

  5. Mechanistic Insight into the Degradation of Nitrosamines via Aqueous-Phase UV Photolysis or a UV-Based Advanced Oxidation Process: Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Minakata

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitrosamines are a group of carcinogenic chemicals that are present in aquatic environments that result from byproducts of industrial processes and disinfection products. As indirect and direct potable reuse increase, the presence of trace nitrosamines presents challenges to water infrastructures that incorporate effluent from wastewater treatment. Ultraviolet (UV photolysis or UV-based advanced oxidation processes that produce highly reactive hydroxyl radicals are promising technologies to remove nitrosamines from water. However, complex reaction mechanisms involving radicals limit our understandings of the elementary reaction pathways embedded in the overall reactions identified experimentally. In this study, we perform quantum mechanical calculations to identify the hydroxyl radical-induced initial elementary reactions with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA, N-nitrosomethylethylamine, and N-nitrosomethylbutylamine. We also investigate the UV-induced NDMA degradation mechanisms. Our calculations reveal that the alkyl side chains of nitrosamine affect the reaction mechanism of hydroxyl radicals with each nitrosamine investigated in this study. Nitrosamines with one- or two-carbon alkyl chains caused the delocalization of the electron density, leading to slower subsequent degradation. Additionally, three major initial elementary reactions and the subsequent radical-involved reaction pathways are identified in the UV-induced NDMA degradation process. This study provides mechanistic insight into the elementary reaction pathways, and a future study will combine these results with the kinetic information to predict the time-dependent concentration profiles of nitrosamines and their transformation products.

  6. Mechanistic Insight into the Degradation of Nitrosamines via Aqueous-Phase UV Photolysis or a UV-Based Advanced Oxidation Process: Quantum Mechanical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakata, Daisuke; Coscarelli, Erica

    2018-02-28

    Nitrosamines are a group of carcinogenic chemicals that are present in aquatic environments that result from byproducts of industrial processes and disinfection products. As indirect and direct potable reuse increase, the presence of trace nitrosamines presents challenges to water infrastructures that incorporate effluent from wastewater treatment. Ultraviolet (UV) photolysis or UV-based advanced oxidation processes that produce highly reactive hydroxyl radicals are promising technologies to remove nitrosamines from water. However, complex reaction mechanisms involving radicals limit our understandings of the elementary reaction pathways embedded in the overall reactions identified experimentally. In this study, we perform quantum mechanical calculations to identify the hydroxyl radical-induced initial elementary reactions with N -nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N -nitrosomethylethylamine, and N -nitrosomethylbutylamine. We also investigate the UV-induced NDMA degradation mechanisms. Our calculations reveal that the alkyl side chains of nitrosamine affect the reaction mechanism of hydroxyl radicals with each nitrosamine investigated in this study. Nitrosamines with one- or two-carbon alkyl chains caused the delocalization of the electron density, leading to slower subsequent degradation. Additionally, three major initial elementary reactions and the subsequent radical-involved reaction pathways are identified in the UV-induced NDMA degradation process. This study provides mechanistic insight into the elementary reaction pathways, and a future study will combine these results with the kinetic information to predict the time-dependent concentration profiles of nitrosamines and their transformation products.

  7. A study of El Niño-Southern oscillation impacts to the South China Sea region using ground-based GPS receiver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suparta, Wayan; Iskandar, Ahmad; Singh, Mandeep Singh Jit; Ali, Mohd Alauddin Mohd; Yatim, Baharudin; Tangang, Fredolin

    2013-01-01

    We observe an ENSO activity by using ground-based GPS receiver as an effort to study the effects of global warming and climate change in the tropical region. The precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from Global Positioning System (GPS) meteorology in line with the sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTa) is used to indicate their response on ENSO activities. The PWV data used in this study was taken from the station at Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu (UMSK) over 2011, together with NTUS station (in the Singapore), PIMO (in Philippines) and BAKO (in Indonesia) are also compared. The relationship between PWV and SSTa at all stations on weekly basis exhibited modest with correlation coefficients between −0.30 and −0.78 significantly at the 99% confidence level. The negative correlation indicates that during a La Niña phase, the PWV is increased when the sea surface temperatures getting cold causes warm air mass in the central Pacific moved to west Pacific. The increased of PWV causes the GPS signals will be getting slower.

  8. X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a tool investigating arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) sorption by an aluminum-based drinking-water treatment residual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Parsons, Jason G; Datta, Rupali; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2009-11-15

    Historic applications of arsenical pesticides to agricultural land have resulted in accumulation of residual arsenic (As) in such soils. In situ immobilization represents a cost-effective and least ecological disrupting treatment technology for soil As. Earlier work in our laboratory showed that drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs), a low-cost, waste by-product of the drinking-water treatment process exhibit a high affinity for As. Wet chemical experiments (sorption kinetics and desorption) were coupled with X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements to elucidate the bonding strength and type of As(V) and As(III) sorption by an aluminum-based WTR. A fast (1h), followed by a slower sorption stage resulted in As(V) and As(III) sorption capacities of 96% and 77%, respectively. Arsenic desorption with a 5mM oxalate from the WTR was minimal, being always absorption spectroscopy data showed inner-sphere complexation between As and surface hydroxyls. Reaction time (up to 48h) had no effect on the initial As oxidation state for sorbed As(V) and As(III). A combination of inner-sphere bonding types occurred between As and Al on the WTR surface because mixed surface geometries and interatomic distances were observed.

  9. Influence of the ionic character of a drug on its release rate from hydrogels based on 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate and acrylamide synthesized by photopolymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Gomez

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the ionic character of a specific drug on its release rate from a hydrogel based on 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA and acrylamide (AAm is analyzed. The hydrogel was synthesized by photopolymerization employing visible light, safranine O (Saf, as sensitizer, and a silsesquioxane functionalized with amine and methacrylate groups (SFMA, as co-initiator and crosslinker. Safranine O (Saf was employed as a model of a cationic drug and the anionic form of resorufin (Rf as a model of an anionic drug. Saf exhibited a larger affinity with functional groups of the hydrogel than that of Rf. This produced a lower loading and a faster release rate of Rf with respect to Saf. Besides, the release rate of Rf followed a Fickian behavior, while that of Saf exhibited a non-Fickian behavior. By hydrolyzing the hydrogel at pH = 13, amide groups supplied by AAm were irreversibly converted into carboxylic acid groups. Higher loadings and slower release rates of Saf from the hydrolyzed hydrogels were observed, making them particularly suitable for the slow drug-delivery of cationic drugs.

  10. Improvements of an FDTD-based surge simulation code and its application to the lightning overvoltage calculation of a transmission tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Taku; Tatematsu, Akiyoshi; Yokoyama, Shigeru [Electric Power Engineering Research Lab., CRIEPI (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry), 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka-shi, Kanagawa-pref. 240-0196 (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    This paper presents new features recently added to a general-purpose surge simulation code based on the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. The added features include various-shape conductor models, lumped-parameter circuit-element models, a lightning-channel model, and an integrated analysis environment (IAE). For precisely modelling the shapes of various conductors, the following conductor models have been added: inclined thin wire; disc; square plate; cylinder; cone; and quadrangular pyramid. The lumped-parameter circuit-element models allow the user to represent the lumped impedance of an apparatus placed inside the analysis space. The lightning-channel model realizes a return-stroke development at a speed slower than the light speed. The IAE includes a Graphical User Interface (GUI), which allows the user to enter geometrical data in a visual way. It also provides a waveform plotting program for viewing voltage, current, electric-field, and magnetic-field waveforms and a movie program for displaying the animation of a transient electric/magnetic field intensity distribution. For an illustrative example, the lightning overvoltage calculation of a transmission tower is presented. (author)

  11. Texture-Based Differences in Eating Rate Reduce the Impact of Increased Energy Density and Large Portions on Meal Size in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrickerd, Keri; Lim, Charlotte Mh; Leong, Claudia; Chia, Edwin M; Forde, Ciaran G

    2017-06-01

    Background: Large portions and high dietary energy density promote overconsumption at meal times. This could be reduced by eating slowly. Objective: Two studies investigated whether texture-based reductions in eating rate and oral processing moderate consumption at breakfast in combination with variations in energy density and portion size. Methods: Adults attended 4 breakfast sessions (2 × 2 repeated-measures design) to consume rice porridge, combining a 45% reduction in eating rate [thin porridge (140 g/min) compared with thick porridge (77 g/min)] with a 77% increase in energy density (0.57 compared with 1.01 kcal/g) in study 1 [ n = 61; aged 21-48 y; body mass index (BMI; in kg/m 2 ): 16-29] and a 50% increase in portion size (100% compared with 150%) in study 2 ( n = 53; aged 21-42 y; BMI: 16-29). Oral processing behaviors were coded by using webcams. Porridge intake was measured alongside changes in rated appetite. Results: Increases in energy density and portion size led to increases of 80% and 13% in energy intake at breakfast, respectively ( P portion size increased the weight of food consumed (13%). The thicker porridges were consumed at a slower rate and led to 11-13% reductions in food weight and energy intake compared with the thin versions ( P portion ( P portions, and natural variations in food texture to design meals that promote reductions in energy intake while maintaining satiety. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Cheboygan Vessel Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Cheboygan Vessel Base (CVB), located in Cheboygan, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). CVB was established by congressional...

  13. Hanscom Air Force Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — MIT Lincoln Laboratory occupies 75 acres (20 acres of which are MIT property) on the eastern perimeter of Hanscom Air Force Base, which is at the nexus of Lexington,...

  14. Network-Based Effectiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friman, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    ... (extended from Leavitt, 1965). This text identifies aspects of network-based effectiveness that can benefit from a better understanding of leadership and management development of people, procedures, technology, and organizations...

  15. WormBase

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — WormBase is an international consortium of biologists and computer scientists dedicated to providing the research community with accurate, current, accessible...

  16. Kelomehele preemia Baseli festivalil

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Baselis festivalil "VIPER - International Festival for Film Video and New Media" tunnistati parimaks CD-ROMiks Gustav Deutschi/Anna Schimeki "Odysee today", netiprojektiks itaallaste "01.ORG", äramärkimispreemia - Raivo Kelomehe "Videoweaver"

  17. Risk based modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, O.J.V.; Baker, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    Risk based analysis is a tool becoming available to both engineers and managers to aid decision making concerning plant matters such as In-Service Inspection (ISI). In order to develop a risk based method, some form of Structural Reliability Risk Assessment (SRRA) needs to be performed to provide a probability of failure ranking for all sites around the plant. A Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) can then be carried out to combine these possible events with the capability of plant safety systems and procedures, to establish the consequences of failure for the sites. In this way the probability of failures are converted into a risk based ranking which can be used to assist the process of deciding which sites should be included in an ISI programme. This paper reviews the technique and typical results of a risk based ranking assessment carried out for nuclear power plant pipework. (author)

  18. Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Graaff, Erik; Guerra, Aida

    , the key principles remain the same everywhere. Graaff & Kolmos (2003) identify the main PBL principles as follows: 1. Problem orientation 2. Project organization through teams or group work 3. Participant-directed 4. Experiental learning 5. Activity-based learning 6. Interdisciplinary learning and 7...... model and in general problem based and project based learning. We apply the principle of teach as you preach. The poster aims to outline the visitors’ workshop programme showing the results of some recent evaluations.......Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is an innovative method to organize the learning process in such a way that the students actively engage in finding answers by themselves. During the past 40 years PBL has evolved and diversified resulting in a multitude in variations in models and practices. However...

  19. Biomimetics: nature based innovation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    "Based on the concept that nature offers numerous sources of inspiration for inventions related to mechanisms, materials, processes, and algorithms, this book covers the topic of biomimetics and the inspired innovation...

  20. BaseMap

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The goal of this project is to provide a convenient base map that can be used as a starting point for CA projects. It's simple, but designed to work at a number of...