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Sample records for zebra equus zebra

  1. The reaction of the Cape Mountain Zebra (Equus Zebra Zebra to certain chemical immobilisation drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Young

    1972-01-01

    Full Text Available he physiological reactions evoked by M@99 and Aza- perone in the Cape Mountain Zebra (Equus zebra Zebra are discussed. Notes on clinical as well as physiological parameters are presented and it is concluded that these drugs can be used effectively in the capture of individuals of this rare mammal.

  2. High variation and very low differentiation in wide ranging plains zebra (Equus quagga): insights from mtDNA and microsatellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Eline D; Arctander, Peter; Siegismund, Hans R

    2008-01-01

    Patterns of genetic differentiation in the plains zebra (Equus quagga) were analysed using mitochondrial DNA control region variation and seven microsatellites. The six morphologically defined subspecies of plains zebra lacked the population genetic structure indicative of distinct evolutionary u...

  3. Evolutionary constraints on equid domestication: Comparison of flight initiation distances of wild horses (Equus caballus ferus) and plains zebras (Equus quagga).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Alexali S; Coss, Richard G

    2015-11-01

    Habituation to humans was an essential component of horse (Equus caballus ferus) domestication, with the nondomestication of zebras (Equus quagga) possibly reflecting an adaptive constraint on habituation. We present the human hunting hypothesis, arguing that ancestral humans hunted African animals, including zebras, long enough to promote a persistent wariness of humans, whereas a briefer period of hunting horses in Central Asia influenced by glacial cycles was unlikely to produce an equally persistent wariness. An alternative habituation to humans hypothesis, prompted by field observations, posits that zebras can habituate well to nonthreatening humans given sufficient exposure. If so, other factors must account for zebra nondomestication. To examine these hypotheses, we compared the flight initiation distances (FIDs) of wild horses in the United States and plains zebras in Africa to a human approaching on foot (N = 87). We compared the flight behavior of both species at sites with low and high exposure to humans (mean humans/acre = .004 and .209, respectively). Analyses revealed a significant interaction (p = .0001) between equid species and level of human exposure. The mean FIDs of horses (146 m) and zebras (105 m) with low human exposure did not differ appreciably (p = .412), but these distances were substantially longer (p human exposure that did differ significantly (p humans than horses do might reflect an adaptive response to historical hunting and partly explain their resistance to domestication.

  4. Pre- and postnatal growth phenomena of Burchell's Zebra Equus Burchelli Antiquorum

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    G.L. Smuts

    1975-07-01

    Full Text Available Between 1969 and 1972 growth data were collected from 175 zebra Equus burchelli antiquorum and 138 zebra embryos and foetuses from the Central District of the Kruger National Park, Republic of South Africa. Statistical analysis of data indicated no significant difference between body mass of adult stallions (range == 267,3 to 373,3 kg; mean = 318,5 kg; n = 57 and adult non-pregnant mares (range = 272,6 to 386,9 kg; mean = 321,6 kg; n = 51 (t = 0,587. The heaviest zebra had a body mass of 429,4 kilogram. This was a pregnant mare carrying a 35,2 kg foetus. Von Bertalanffy growth curves indicated that shoulder heights in young zebra may reach the adult range by one year of age, the adult body mass range is, however, only attained after three years of age. These curves also showed that age classification of free roaming zebra is only reliable up to the age of about two years, after which individual variation is too great. Stallions were significantly taller at the shoulder than mares (mean = 1,8 cm (t = 2,032 and neck thickness was the only body dimension showing visible sexual dimorphism in adults. Here the stallion had a neck girth on average 8,1 cm greater than the mare. Regression equations for estimating body mass from body dimensions were calculated by using a standard logarithmic transformation and fitting a linear regression by the method of least squares and also by undertaking standard straight line linear regression analyses. Exponential curves obtained by the first method indicated that growth was not isometric (not linear and that the ratios of any of the dimensions of length to body mass were con- stantly changing, i.e. growth is allometric. Marked allometric growth differences existed between the two sexes except in the case of the heart girth-body mass relationship. Comparison of growth data from E. b. antiquorum with that of E. b. boehmi from Tanzania (Sachs 1967, indicates that E. b. antiquorum is considerably larger. Body masses

  5. Basis for the photoidentification of zebras (Equus burchellii in the National Zoological Garden of Cuba

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    Ernesto Testé Lozano

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Variability in facial strip patterns in zebras aloud its individualization. This is the basis for photo identification techniques that substitute traditional marking methods that can be expensive and traumatic. Current paper present an identification key of Equus burchelli captive in the National Zoological Garden of Cuba using left side pictures of their faces. Region of interest was limited by axes traced from posterior mouth edge, the eye and the lower base of neck. Strips crossing each ax were counted building a numerical code for each individual. The 68 % of captive zebras (54 individuals were photo identified. A group of 12 individuals had a code completely different from others, identifying each one. Remaining individuals could be grouped by similar codes, resulting in 11 pairs, and four groups of three, four, five and six individuals each. Every individual was characterized by the occurrence of spots, truncated strips, bridges between vertical stripes, periorbital bands, and bifurcated stripes. With all this characters a visual identification key was developed.

  6. Reproduction in the zebra mare Equus burchelli antiquorum from the Kruger National Park

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    G. L. Smuts

    1976-08-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive characteristics of Burchell's zebra mares are described using data collected from captive and free ranging animals and the reproductive tracts of 310 mares shot during a game cropping campaign. The pubertal interval in zebra mares ranges from age 16 to 22 months, succesful mating occurring for the first time at 23 months of age. Full reproductive capacity is attained at three years. Zebra mares are seasonally polyoestrous, with an average of 85 of all mating and foaling occurring during the wet summer months (October to March.

  7. Putative clinical piroplasmosis in a Burchell's zebra (Equus quagga burchelli : clinical communication

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    F. Lampen

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old tame zebra gelding was presented after suffering from lethargy, nervousness, reported anaemia and icterus as well as a decreased appetite. These symptoms were seen over some months, with changing severity. The animal was immobilised, treated, and blood specimens were submitted for haematology and biochemistry. This report describes molecular characterisation of Theileria equi recovered from this animal, as well as the clinical findings, treatment and historical relevance of piroplasmosis in zebra in southern Africa.

  8. Parasite-mediated selection drives an immunogenetic tradeoff in plains zebra (Equus quagga)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Pauline L.; Turner, Wendy C.; Küsters, Martina; Getz, Wayne M.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen evasion of the host immune system is a key force driving extreme polymorphism in genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Although this gene family is well characterized in structure and function, there is still much debate surrounding the mechanisms by which MHC diversity is selectively maintained. Many studies have investigated relationships between MHC variation and specific pathogens, and have found mixed support for and against the hypotheses of heterozygote advantage, frequency-dependent or fluctuating selection. Few, however, have focused on the selective effects of multiple parasite types on host immunogenetic patterns. Here, we examined relationships between variation in the equine MHC gene, ELA-DRA, and both gastrointestinal (GI) and ectoparasitism in plains zebras (Equus quagga). Specific alleles present at opposing population frequencies had antagonistic effects, with rare alleles associated with increased GI parasitism and common alleles with increased tick burdens. These results support a frequency-dependent mechanism, but are also consistent with fluctuating selection. Maladaptive GI parasite ‘susceptibility alleles’ were reduced in frequency, suggesting that these parasites may play a greater selective role at this locus. Heterozygote advantage, in terms of allele mutational divergence, also predicted decreased GI parasite burden in genotypes with a common allele. We conclude that an immunogenetic trade-off affects resistance/susceptibility to parasites in this system. Because GI and ectoparasites do not directly interact within hosts, our results uniquely show that antagonistic parasite interactions can be indirectly modulated through the host immune system. This study highlights the importance of investigating the role of multiple parasites in shaping patterns of host immunogenetic variation.

  9. Home range sizes for burchell's zebra equus burchelli antiquorum from the Kruger National Park

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    G.L. Smuts

    1975-07-01

    Full Text Available Annual home range sizes were determined for 49 marked zebra family groups in the Kruger National Park. Sizes varied from 49 to 566 sq. km, the mean for the Park being 164 square kilometre. Mean home range sizes for different zebra sub-populations and biotic areas were found to differ considerably. Present herbivore densities have not influenced intra- and inter-specific tolerance levels to the extent that home range sizes have increased. Local habitat conditions, and particularly seasonal vegetational changes, were found to have the most profound influence on the shape and mean size of home ranges. The large home range sizes obtained in the Kruger Park, when compared to an area such as the Ngorongoro Crater, can be ascribed to a lower carrying capacity with respect to zebra, large portions of the habitat being sub-optimal, either seasonally or annually.

  10. Prevalence of Theileria equi and Babesia caballi as well as the identification of associated ticks in sympatric Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi) and donkeys (Equus africanus asinus) in northern Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Elaine; Kock, Richard; McKeever, Declan; Gakuya, Francis; Musyoki, Charles; Chege, Stephen M; Mutinda, Mathew; Kariuki, Edward; Davidson, Zeke; Low, Belinda; Skilton, Robert A; Njahira, Moses N; Wamalwa, Mark; Maina, Elsie

    2015-01-01

    The role of equine piroplasmosis as a factor in the population decline of the Grevy's zebra is not known. We determined the prevalence of Babesia caballi and Theileria equi in cograzing Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi) and donkeys (Equus africanus asinus) in northern Kenya and identified the associated tick vectors. Blood samples were taken from 71 donkeys and 16 Grevy's zebras from March to May 2011. A nested PCR reaction using 18s ribosomal (r)RNA primers on 87 blood spots showed 72% (51/71; 95% confidence interval [CI] 60.4-81.0%) of donkeys and 100% (16/16; 95% CI, 77.3-100%) of Grevy's zebras were T. equi positive. No samples were positive for B. caballi. Sequence comparison using the National Center for Biotechnology Information's basic local alignment search tool identified homologous 18s rRNA sequences with a global geographic spread. The T. equi-derived sequences were evaluated using Bayesian approaches with independent Metropolis-coupled Markov chain Monte Carlo runs. The sequences clustered with those found in Sudan, Croatia, Mongolia, and the US, with statistical support greater than 80% for the two main clades. Hyalomma tick species were found on both donkeys and Grevy's zebras, whereas Rhipicephalus pulchellus was found exclusively on Grevy's zebras and Hyalomma marginatum rupfipes on donkeys. The prevalence of T. equi was 100% in Grevy's zebras and 72% in donkeys with common tick vectors identified. Our results suggest that donkeys and Grevy's zebras can be asymptomatic carriers and that piroplasmosis is endemic in the study area.

  11. Unraveling the effects of selection and demography on immune gene variation in free-ranging plains zebra (Equus quagga populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline L Kamath

    Full Text Available Demography, migration and natural selection are predominant processes affecting the distribution of genetic variation among natural populations. Many studies use neutral genetic markers to make inferences about population history. However, the investigation of functional coding loci, which directly reflect fitness, is critical to our understanding of species' ecology and evolution. Immune genes, such as those of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC, play an important role in pathogen recognition and provide a potent model system for studying selection. We contrasted diversity patterns of neutral data with MHC loci, ELA-DRA and -DQA, in two southern African plains zebra (Equus quagga populations: Etosha National Park, Namibia, and Kruger National Park, South Africa. Results from neutrality tests, along with observations of elevated diversity and low differentiation across populations, supported previous genus-level evidence for balancing selection at these loci. Despite being low, MHC divergence across populations was significant and may be attributed to drift effects typical of geographically separated populations experiencing little to no gene flow, or alternatively to shifting allele frequency distributions driven by spatially variable and fluctuating pathogen communities. At the DRA, zebra exhibited geographic differentiation concordant with microsatellites and reduced levels of diversity in Etosha due to highly skewed allele frequencies that could not be explained by demography, suggestive of spatially heterogeneous selection and local adaptation. This study highlights the complexity in which selection affects immune gene diversity and warrants the need for further research on the ecological mechanisms shaping patterns of adaptive variation among natural populations.

  12. Shedding of Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 078 by zoo animals, and report of an unstable metronidazole-resistant isolate from a zebra foal (Equus quagga burchellii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; Blanco, José L; Martínez-Nevado, Eva; Peláez, Teresa; Harmanus, Celine; Kuijper, Ed; García, Marta E

    2014-03-14

    Clostridium difficile is an emerging and potentially zoonotic pathogen, but its prevalence in most animal species, including exhibition animals, is currently unknown. In this study we assessed the prevalence of faecal shedding of C. difficile by zoo animals, and determined the ribotype, toxin profile and antimicrobial susceptibility of recovered isolates. A total of 200 samples from 40 animal species (36.5% of which came from plains zebra, Equus quagga burchellii) were analysed. C. difficile was isolated from 7 samples (3.5% of total), which came from the following animal species: chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes troglodytes), dwarf goat (Capra hircus), and Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica hispanica), with one positive sample each; and plains zebra, with 4 positive samples from 3 different individuals. Most recovered isolates (4/7, 57.1%) belonged to the epidemic PCR ribotype 078, produced toxins A and B, and had the genes encoding binary toxin (i.e. A(+)B(+)CDT(+) isolates). The remaining three isolates belonged to PCR ribotypes 039 (A(-)B(-)CDT(-)), 042 (A(+)B(+)CDT(-)) and 110 (A(-)B(+)CDT(-)). Regardless of their ribotype, all isolates displayed high-level resistance to the fluoroquinolones ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and levofloxacin. Some isolates were also resistant to meropenem and/or ertapenem. A ribotype 078 isolate recovered from a male zebra foal initially showed in vitro resistance to metronidazole (MIC ≥ 256 μg/ml), but lost that trait after subculturing on non-selective media. We conclude that zoo animals belonging to different species can carry ribotype 078 and other toxigenic strains of C. difficile showing resistance to antimicrobial compounds commonly used in veterinary and/or human medicine.

  13. Zebra: Searching for Rare Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragusin, Radu; Petcu, Paula; Lioma, Christina;

    2012-01-01

    disease diagnostic hypotheses in the domain of medical IR. In this work, we build upon an existing vertical medical search engine, Zebra, that is focused on rare disease diagnosis. In previous work, Zebra has been evaluated using real-life medical cases of rare and difficult diseases, and has been found...... to be a useful and competitive tool for clinicians. In this work, we extend Zebra’s functionalities to optimise the task of medical diagnosis through search as follows: we add the option of grouping retrieved documents into clusters based on disease name occurrence, and we offer a ‘disease-ranking’ option...

  14. Last news on zebra pattern

    CERN Document Server

    Chernov, Gennady

    2015-01-01

    The publications of the last three years concerning to studying of the most intriguing fine structure in type IV solar radio bursts - zebra pattern (ZP), are surveyed. The main attention is paid to new observations, irrespective of whether a paper does include detailed interpretation of an event or simply reports about the beginning of operation of a new tool. The radiation mechanism of the ZP on a double plasma resonance (DPR) remains the most widespread and standard, though ten alternative mechanisms were offered. However, in a number of works difficulties with the explanation of a complex zebra are noted, especially in a combination with fiber bursts and spikes. Therefore, several papers in which the radiation mechanism of a zebra on the DPR is improved, are considered in more detail. Without positional observations we have a great opportunity to follow the dynamics of flare processes using SDO / AIA images in several EUV lines. In the discussion, the debatable questions with the comparison of mechanism on...

  15. Androgen receptor gene polymorphism in zebra species

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    Hideyuki Ito

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor genes (AR have been found to have associations with reproductive development, behavioral traits, and disorders in humans. However, the influence of similar genetic effects on the behavior of other animals is scarce. We examined the loci AR glutamine repeat (ARQ in 44 Grevy's zebras, 23 plains zebras, and three mountain zebras, and compared them with those of domesticated horses. We observed polymorphism among zebra species and between zebra and horse. As androgens such as testosterone influence aggressiveness, AR polymorphism among equid species may be associated with differences in levels of aggression and tameness. Our findings indicate that it would be useful to conduct further studies focusing on the potential association between AR and personality traits, and to understand domestication of equid species.

  16. Zebra Stripes through the Eyes of Their Predators, Zebras, and Humans.

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    Amanda D Melin

    Full Text Available The century-old idea that stripes make zebras cryptic to large carnivores has never been examined systematically. We evaluated this hypothesis by passing digital images of zebras through species-specific spatial and colour filters to simulate their appearance for the visual systems of zebras' primary predators and zebras themselves. We also measured stripe widths and luminance contrast to estimate the maximum distances from which lions, spotted hyaenas, and zebras can resolve stripes. We found that beyond ca. 50 m (daylight and 30 m (twilight zebra stripes are difficult for the estimated visual systems of large carnivores to resolve, but not humans. On moonless nights, stripes are difficult for all species to resolve beyond ca. 9 m. In open treeless habitats where zebras spend most time, zebras are as clearly identified by the lion visual system as are similar-sized ungulates, suggesting that stripes cannot confer crypsis by disrupting the zebra's outline. Stripes confer a minor advantage over solid pelage in masking body shape in woodlands, but the effect is stronger for humans than for predators. Zebras appear to be less able than humans to resolve stripes although they are better than their chief predators. In conclusion, compared to the uniform pelage of other sympatric herbivores it appears highly unlikely that stripes are a form of anti-predator camouflage.

  17. ZEBRA battery meets USABC goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustmann, Cord-H.

    In 1990, the California Air Resources Board has established a mandate to introduce electric vehicles in order to improve air quality in Los Angeles and other capitals. The United States Advanced Battery Consortium has been formed by the big car companies, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Department of Energy in order to establish the requirements on EV-batteries and to support battery development. The ZEBRA battery system is a candidate to power future electric vehicles. Not only because its energy density is three-fold that of lead acid batteries (50% more than NiMH) but also because of all the other EV requirements such as power density, no maintenance, summer and winter operation, safety, failure tolerance and low cost potential are fulfilled. The electrode material is plain salt and nickel in combination with a ceramic electrolyte. The cell voltage is 2.58 V and the capacity of a standard cell is 32 Ah. Some hundred cells are connected in series and parallel to form a battery with about 300 V OCV. The battery system including battery controller, main circuit-breaker and cooling system is engineered for vehicle integration and ready to be mounted in a vehicle [J. Gaub, A. van Zyl, Mercedes-Benz Electric Vehicles with ZEBRA Batteries, EVS-14, Orlando, FL, Dec. 1997]. The background of these features are described.

  18. Cave crawling in zebra finch skulls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Salomon, Rasmus; Jensen, Kenneth Kragh;

    Cave crawling in zebra finch skulls: what is the functional interaural canal? Ole Næsbye Larsen, Rasmus Salomon, Kenneth Kragh Jensen, and Jakob Christensen-Dalsgaard Department of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark The middle ears of birds are...... gains and delays in the IAC can produce very different directionalities of the ears but it is still uncertain how interaural transmission gain and delay can be shaped by evolution by anatomical adaptations. A closer inspection of the zebra finch cranium using micro-CT scanning reveals that not only is...

  19. Research continues on zebra mussel control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researchers are working on many fronts to learn methods for controlling and combatting zebra mussels, a species of mussel that can attach to the inside of water intakes at hydroelectric and thermal power plants, and can reduce or block water flow. Biologists at the University of Toledo in Ohio report that compounds from the African soapberry plant called lemmatoxins are lethal to zebra mussels. In laboratory tests, researchers have determined 1 to 2 milligrams of purified lemmatoxins per liter will kill the mussels. In field tests, biologist Harold Lee flushed water through a mussel-infested pipe. He found that the berry extract killed mussels in four to eight hours, making continuous treatment of water intake pipes unnecessary, according to a report in New Scientists. The University of Toledo participated in another project, funded by the American Water Works Association Research Foundation. That project team included the cities of Toledo and Cleveland, Ohio, Finkbeiner, Pettis ampersand Strout, Ltd. consulting engineers, and researchers from Ohio's Case Western Reserve University. The team identified a chemical oxidant, sodium hypochlorite, as a cost-effective agent for controlling zebra mussels at water treatment plant intakes. Toledo has used the sodium hypochlorite and reports the chemical has cleared colonies of zebra mussels that had attached to the intake of its water treatment plant

  20. Dynamics of zebra finch and mockingbird vocalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimenser, Aylin

    Along with humans, whales, and bats, three groups of birds which include songbirds (oscines) such as the Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata) and Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) are the only creatures known to learn sounds by imitation. Numerous similarities between human and songbird vocalizations exist and, recently, it has been shown that Zebra Finch in particular possesses a gene, FoxP2, known to be involved in human language. This thesis investigates song development in Zebra Finches, as well as the temporal dynamics of song in Mockingbirds. Zebra Finches have long been the system of choice for studying vocal development, ontogeny, and complexity in birdsong. Physicists find them intriguing because the spectrally complex vocalizations of the Zebra Finch can exhibit sudden transitions to chaotic dynamics, period doubling & mode-locking phenomena. Mockingbirds, by contrast, provide an ideal system to examine the richness of an avian repertoire, since these musically versatile songbirds typically know upwards of 200 songs. To analyse birdsong data, we have developed a novel clustering algorithm that can be applied to the bird's syllables, tracing their dynamics back to the earliest stages of vocal development. To characterize birdsong we have used Fourier techniques, based upon multitaper spectral analysis, to optimally work around the constraints imposed by (Heisenberg's) time-frequency uncertainty principle. Furthermore, estimates that provide optimal compromise between frequency and temporal resolution have beautiful connections with solutions to the Helmholtz wave equation in prolate spheroidal coordinates. We have used this connection to provide firm foundation for certain heuristics used in the literature to compute associated spectral derivatives and supply a pedagogical account here in this thesis. They are of interest because spectral derivatives emphasize sudden changes in the dynamics of the underlying phenomenon, and often provide a nice way to visualize

  1. Physical Conditions in the Source Region of a Zebra Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasnov, L. V.; Karlický, M.; Stupishin, A. G.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the physical conditions in the source region of a zebra structure, observed with the Ondřejov radiospectrograph during the 1 August 2010 solar flare. To determine the gyro-frequency harmonic numbers of the observed zebra lines, we compute the magnetic field strength, the electron density, and their spatial scales in the source region of the zebra structure. The region where the flare occurred is analyzed using EUV (171 Å and 335 Å) observations. To determine the conditions in the zebra source region, the magnetic field structure is reconstructed using observed photospheric magnetic field data. By computing the dependence of the magnetic field vs. height in this reconstruction and by comparing the magnetic field strength derived from the zebra structure, we determine the dependence of the electron density vs. height in the zebra source-region. We identify the loops where the zebra structure was generated at heights of about 2.5 - 3.3 Mm. Assuming the barometric law for the electron density, we determine the temperature in the zebra source-region to be T ≈ 2.0 × 104 K. Comparing the obtained values of the temperature and electron density in the zebra source-region with a model of the solar atmosphere, we find that the zebra structure was generated in the transition region, in agreement with our previous results.

  2. Zebras and Biting Flies: Quantitative Analysis of Reflected Light from Zebra Coats in Their Natural Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britten, Kenneth H.; Thatcher, Timothy D.; Caro, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and comparative evidence suggests that the striped coats of zebras deter biting fly attack, but the mechanisms by which flies fail to target black-and-white mammals are still opaque. Two hypotheses have been proposed: stripes might serve either to defeat polarotaxis or to obscure the form of the animal. To test these hypotheses, we systematically photographed free-living plains zebras in Africa. We found that black and white stripes both have moderate polarization signatures with a similar angle, though the degree (magnitude) of polarization in white stripes is lower. When we modeled the visibility of these signals from different distances, we found that polarization differences between stripes are invisible to flies more than 10 m away because they are averaged out by the flies’ low visual resolution. At any distance, however, a positively polarotactic insect would have a distinct signal to guide its visual approach to a zebra because we found that polarization of light reflecting from zebras is higher than from surrounding dry grasses. We also found that the stripes themselves are visible to flies at somewhat greater distances (up to 20 m) than the polarization contrast between stripes. Together, these observations support hypotheses in which zebra stripes defeat visually guided orienting behavior in flies by a mechanism independent of polarotaxis. PMID:27223616

  3. Female Zebra Finches Smell Their Eggs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Golüke

    Full Text Available Parental investment in unrelated offspring seems maladaptive from an evolutionary perspective, due to the costs of energy and resources that cannot be invested in related offspring at the same time. Therefore selection should favour mechanisms to discriminate between own and foreign offspring. In birds, much emphasis has been placed on understanding the visual mechanisms underlying egg recognition. However, olfactory egg recognition has almost been completely ignored. Here, we investigated whether female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata are able to discriminate between their own and a conspecific egg based on olfactory cues alone. Zebra finches are colonial-breeding songbirds. Eggs are monomorphic, i.e. without any spotting pattern, and intraspecific brood parasitism frequently occurs. In a binary choice experiment, female zebra finches were given the choice between the scent of their own and a conspecific egg. After the onset of incubation, females chose randomly and showed no sign of discrimination. However, shortly before hatching, females preferred significantly the odour of their own egg. The finding that females are capable to smell their own egg may inspire more research on the potential of olfaction involved in egg recognition, especially in cases where visual cues might be limited.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Metriaclima zebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Song, Xiao-Lei; Chen, Ling-Yun; Li, Yong

    2016-09-01

    Cichlid fish from East Africa are remarkable for phenotypic and behavioral diversity on a backdrop of genomic similarity. Metriaclima zebra is a member of the Cichlidae family. Here, we reported the complete mitogenome sequence of M. zebra, which was 16 582 bp and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 1 non-coding control region. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on complete mitogenomes of M. zebra and 11 closely related Cichlidae species to approve the accuracy. The complete mitochondrial genome of the M. zebra would provide more information for the research of M. zebra and the evolution of Cichlidae family. PMID:26273916

  5. Cave crawling in zebra Finch skulls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Salomon, Rasmus; Jensen, Kenneth Kragh;

    2014-01-01

    The middle ears of birds are acoustically coupled through an air-filled interaural canal, often illustrated and modelled as a simple tube. It allows sound to propagate through the skull from one ear to the other and considerably enhance the cues for directional hearing by interaction with the...... by anatomical adaptations during evolution. A closer inspection of the zebra finch cranium using micro-CT scanning reveals that not only is IAC trabeculated and irregularly shaped but it also communicates with a set of highly complex, air-filled canals in the skull extending to the base of the beak...

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: zebra finch [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata Chordata/Vertebrata/Aves Taeniopygia_guttata_L.png Taeniopygia_gut...tata_NL.png Taeniopygia_guttata_S.png Taeniopygia_guttata_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxo...nomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Taeniopygia+guttata&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Taeniopygia+gut...tata&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Taeniopygia+guttata&t...=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Taeniopygia+guttata&t=NS ...

  7. Environmentally Safe Control of Zebra Mussel Fouling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel Molloy

    2008-02-29

    The two primary objectives of this USDOE-NETL contract were successfully achieved during the project: (1) to accelerate research on the development of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A (Pf-CL145A) as a biocontrol agent for zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and quagga mussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis)--two invasive freshwater bivalve species that are infesting water pipes in power plants; and (2) to identify a private-sector company that would move forward to commercialize Pf-CL145A as a substitute for the current polluting use of biocide chemicals for control of these dreissenid mussels in power plant pipes.

  8. The zebra mussel: US utility implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreissena polymorpha, the freshwater macrofouling zebra mussel, was introduced to Lake St. Clair, near Detroit, Michigan, in 1985. It has since spread throughout Lake Erie. Its planktonic veliger larval stage disperses on water currents and adults are transported by human and natural vectors, making it likely to spread throughout most of the United States and southern Canada except for the southwestern and southern United State, where summer water temperatures are above tolerated levels. Veligers enter raw water systems on intake currents to settle and grow to adults attached by secreted byssal threads to hard surfaces. Accumulations of adults impede flow, aggravate sedimentation and corrosion, and foul small-diameter components. Settlement occurs at flow velocities less than 1.5--2.0 m/sec. Mussels can reduce effective pipe diameters and foul intake structures, steam condensers, heat exchangers, fire protection systems, and cooling tower basins. Establishment of mussels in raw water systems should be prevented because subsequent removal is difficult and expensive. Mitigation procedures include manual removal, robotic cleaning, thermal backwashing, water jetting, application of molluscicides, and possibly line pigging and acidic chemical cleaning. Control technologies include oxidizing and non-oxidizing molluscicides, robotic cleaning, shell strainers, exposure of veligers to high voltage electrical fields, thermal backwashing and sand-filtration. The United States power industry can utilize extensive European experience with this species and domestic experience with the Asian clam in its development of effective controls for zebra mussel fouling

  9. Zebra and Quagga Mussel Distribution in North America - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The concern caused by the explosive spread of the zebra mussel, (Dreissena polymorpha), within the United States resulted in passage of the Nonindigenous Aquatic...

  10. A Minimally-Invasive Procedure for Sexing Young Zebra Finches

    OpenAIRE

    Soderstrom, Ken; Qin, Weixi; Leggett, Matthew H.

    2007-01-01

    Zebra finches have been widely used to study neurobiology underlying vocal development. Because only male zebra finches learn song, efficient developmental use of these animals requires early determination of sex at ages that precede maturation of secondary sex characteristics. We have developed a sex determination method that combines a forensics method of genomic DNA isolation (from very small blood samples) with PCR amplification from Z and W sex chromosomes (males are ZZ, females ZW). Thi...

  11. Zebra battery technologies for all electric smart car

    OpenAIRE

    O'Sullivan, T M; Bingham, Chris; Clark, R E

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the operational behaviour and advantages of the high temperature, sodium nickel chloride (Zebra) battery, for use in all electric urban (city) vehicles. It is shown that an equivalent parallel electrical circuit can be employed to accurately simulate the electrochemical behaviour inherent in the most recent generation of Zebra cells. The experimental procedure is outlined and summary attributes of the investigation validated by both simulation studies, and experimentally,...

  12. Zebra: An advanced PWR lattice code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, L.; Wu, H.; Zheng, Y. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi' an, ShannXi, 710049 (China)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of an advanced PWR lattice code ZEBRA developed at NECP laboratory in Xi'an Jiaotong Univ.. The multi-group cross-section library is generated from the ENDF/B-VII library by NJOY and the 361-group SHEM structure is employed. The resonance calculation module is developed based on sub-group method. The transport solver is Auto-MOC code, which is a self-developed code based on the Method of Characteristic and the customization of AutoCAD software. The whole code is well organized in a modular software structure. Some numerical results during the validation of the code demonstrate that this code has a good precision and a high efficiency. (authors)

  13. Zebra: An advanced PWR lattice code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of an advanced PWR lattice code ZEBRA developed at NECP laboratory in Xi'an Jiaotong Univ.. The multi-group cross-section library is generated from the ENDF/B-VII library by NJOY and the 361-group SHEM structure is employed. The resonance calculation module is developed based on sub-group method. The transport solver is Auto-MOC code, which is a self-developed code based on the Method of Characteristic and the customization of AutoCAD software. The whole code is well organized in a modular software structure. Some numerical results during the validation of the code demonstrate that this code has a good precision and a high efficiency. (authors)

  14. USGS Zebra Mussel Monitoring Program for north Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Christopher J.; Baldys, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Zebra Mussel Monitoring Program for north Texas provides early detection and monitoring of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) by using a holistic suite of detection methods. The program is designed to assess zebra mussel occurrence, distribution, and densities in north Texas waters by using four approaches: (1) SCUBA diving, (2) water-sample collection with plankton tow nets (followed by laboratory analyses), (3) artificial substrates, and (4) water-quality sampling. Data collected during this type of monitoring can assist rapid response efforts and can be used to quantify the economic and ecological effects of zebra mussels in the north Texas area. Monitoring under this program began in April 2010. The presence of large zebra mussel populations often causes undesirable economic and ecological effects, including damage to water-processing infrastructure and hydroelectric powerplants (with an estimated 10-year cost of $3.1 billion), displacement of native mussels, increases in concentrations of certain species of cyanobacteria, and increases in concentrations of geosmin (an organic compound that results in taste and odor issues in water). Since no large-scale, environmentally safe eradication method has been developed for zebra mussels, it is difficult to remove established populations. Broad physicochemical adaptability, prolific reproductive capacity, and rapid dispersal methods have enabled zebra mussels, within a period of about 20 years, to establish populations under differing environmental conditions across much of the eastern part of the United States. In Texas, the presence of zebra mussels was first confirmed in April 2009 in Lake Texoma in the Red River Basin along the Texas-Oklahoma border. They were most likely introduced into Lake Texoma through overland transport from an infested water body. Since then, the presence of zebra mussels has been reported in both the Red River and Washita River arms of Lake Texoma, in

  15. The zebra finch neuropeptidome: prediction, detection and expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annangudi Suresh P

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among songbirds, the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata is an excellent model system for investigating the neural mechanisms underlying complex behaviours such as vocal communication, learning and social interactions. Neuropeptides and peptide hormones are cell-to-cell signalling molecules known to mediate similar behaviours in other animals. However, in the zebra finch, this information is limited. With the newly-released zebra finch genome as a foundation, we combined bioinformatics, mass-spectrometry (MS-enabled peptidomics and molecular techniques to identify the complete suite of neuropeptide prohormones and final peptide products and their distributions. Results Complementary bioinformatic resources were integrated to survey the zebra finch genome, identifying 70 putative prohormones. Ninety peptides derived from 24 predicted prohormones were characterized using several MS platforms; tandem MS confirmed a majority of the sequences. Most of the peptides described here were not known in the zebra finch or other avian species, although homologous prohormones exist in the chicken genome. Among the zebra finch peptides discovered were several unique vasoactive intestinal and adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide 1 peptides created by cleavage at sites previously unreported in mammalian prohormones. MS-based profiling of brain areas required for singing detected 13 peptides within one brain nucleus, HVC; in situ hybridization detected 13 of the 15 prohormone genes examined within at least one major song control nucleus. Expression mapping also identified prohormone messenger RNAs in areas associated with spatial learning and social behaviours. Based on the whole-genome analysis, 40 prohormone probes were found on a commonly used zebra finch brain microarray. Analysis of these newly annotated transcripts revealed that six prohormone probes showed altered expression after birds heard song playbacks in a paradigm of song

  16. Song Recognition in Zebra Finches: Are There Sensitive Periods for Song Memorization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Richard F.

    2010-01-01

    Male zebra finches learn to sing songs that they hear between 25 and 65 days of age, the sensitive period for song learning. In this experiment, male and female zebra finches were exposed to zebra finch songs either before (n = 9) or during (n = 4) the sensitive period. Following song exposure, recognition memory for the songs was assessed with an…

  17. Chemical regulation of spawning in the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Jeffrey L.; Nichols, S. Jerrine; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Schloesser, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    Previous literature suggests that spawning in bivalves is chemically regulated, both by environmental chemical cues and by internal chemical mediators. In a model proposed for zebra mussels, chemicals from phytoplankton initially trigger spawning, and chemicals associated with gametes provide further stimulus for spawning. The response to environmental chemicals is internally mediated by a pathway utilizing serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, a neurotransmitter), which acts directly on both male and female gonads. The role of serotonin and most other aspects of the model have been tested only on bivalves other than zebra mussels. The effect of serotonin on zebra mussel spawning was tested. Serotonin (10-5 and 10-3 M) injected into ripe males induced spawning, but injection of serotonin into females did not. Gametes were not released by 10-6 serotonin; in most cases, serotonin injection did not release gametes from immature recipients. Serotonin injection provides a reliable means for identifying ripe male zebra mussels and for obtaining zebra mussel sperm without the need for dissection.

  18. Zebra finch as a developmental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Siu-Shan; Wrabel, Anna; Nagai, Hiroki; Ladher, Raj K; Sheng, Guojun

    2015-11-01

    The domesticated zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) is a well-established animal model for studying vocal learning. It is also a tractable model for developmental analyses. The finch genome has been sequenced and methods for its transgenesis have been reported. Hatching and sexual maturation in this species takes only two weeks and three months, respectively. Finch colonies can be established relatively easily and its eggs are laid at a stage earlier than in other common avian experimental models, facilitating the analysis of very early avian development. Representing the Neoaves to which 95% of all bird species belong, the finch can potentially complement two existing, Galloanserae developmental models, the chick, and quail. Here, we provide a step-by-step guide for how to set up a finch colony in a conventional laboratory environment. Technical tips are offered to optimize hens' productivity and ensure a constant supply of fertilized finch eggs. Methods of handling finch eggs and embryos for subsequent embryological, cellular, or molecular analyses are also discussed. We conclude by emphasizing scientific values and cost effectiveness of maintaining a finch colony for avian developmental studies. genesis 53:669-677, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26385755

  19. Vocal tract articulation in zebra finches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena R Ohms

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Birdsong and human vocal communication are both complex behaviours which show striking similarities mainly thought to be present in the area of development and learning. Recent studies, however, suggest that there are also parallels in vocal production mechanisms. While it has been long thought that vocal tract filtering, as it occurs in human speech, only plays a minor role in birdsong there is an increasing number of studies indicating the presence of sound filtering mechanisms in bird vocalizations as well. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Correlating high-speed X-ray cinematographic imaging of singing zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata to song structures we identified beak gape and the expansion of the oropharyngeal-esophageal cavity (OEC as potential articulators. We subsequently manipulated both structures in an experiment in which we played sound through the vocal tract of dead birds. Comparing acoustic input with acoustic output showed that OEC expansion causes an energy shift towards lower frequencies and an amplitude increase whereas a wide beak gape emphasizes frequencies around 5 kilohertz and above. CONCLUSION: These findings confirm that birds can modulate their song by using vocal tract filtering and demonstrate how OEC and beak gape contribute to this modulation.

  20. Regulation of stem cells in the zebra fish hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H-T; Zon, L I

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been used extensively as a model for stem cell biology. Stem cells share the ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple cell types, making them ideal candidates for tissue regeneration or replacement therapies. Current applications of stem cell technology are limited by our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms that control their proliferation and differentiation, and various model organisms have been used to fill these gaps. This chapter focuses on the contributions of the zebra fish model to our understanding of stem cell regulation within the hematopoietic system. Studies in zebra fish have been valuable for identifying new genetic and signaling factors that affect HSC formation and development with important implications for humans, and new advances in the zebra fish toolbox will allow other aspects of HSC behavior to be investigated as well, including migration, homing, and engraftment.

  1. IMPACT OF WATER PH ON ZEBRA MUSSEL MORTALITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiments conducted this past quarter have suggested that the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A is effective at killing zebra mussels throughout the entire range of pH values tested (7.2 to 8.6). Highest mortality was achieved at pH values characteristic of preferred zebra mussel waterbodies, i.e., hard waters with a range of 7.8 to 8.6. In all water types tested, however, ranging from very soft to very hard, considerable mussel kill was achieved (83 to 99% mean mortality), suggesting that regardless of the pH or hardness of the treated water, significant mussel kill can be achieved upon treatment with P. fluorescens strain CL0145A. These results further support the concept that this bacterium has significant potential for use as a zebra mussel control agent in power plant pipes receiving waters with a wide range of physical and chemical characteristics

  2. FindZebra: A search engine for rare diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragusin, Radu; Petcu, Paula; Lioma, Christina Amalia;

    2013-01-01

    queries and what factors contribute to successes and failures. Among diseases, rare (or orphan) diseases represent an especially challenging and thus interesting class to diagnose as each is rare, diverse in symptoms and usually has scattered resources associated with it. Methods: We use an evaluation...... approach for web search engines for rare disease diagnosis which includes 56 real life diagnostic cases, state-of-the-art evaluation measures, and curated information resources. In addition, we introduce FindZebra, a specialized (vertical) rare disease search engine. FindZebra is powered by open source...

  3. Annually recurring parthenogenesis in a zebra shark Stegostoma fasciatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D P; Baverstock, W; Al-Jaru, A; Hyland, K; Khazanehdari, K A

    2011-11-01

    A zebra shark, Stegostoma fasciatum, held in captivity at the Burj Al Arab aquarium, produced embryos and pups in the absence of a male. A total of 15 pups were produced from eggs laid within the aquarium over a period of four consecutive years commencing 2007. Parthenogenesis was confirmed through DNA analysis for three pups sampled during the first two consecutive egg cycles and is presumed to be the method of reproduction responsible thereafter. PMID:22026614

  4. Mortality of zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, veligers during downstream transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, T.G.; Lamberti, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    1. Streams flowing from lakes which contain zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, provide apparently suitable habitats for mussel colonization and downstream range expansion, yet most such streams contain few adult mussels. We postulated that mussel veligers experience high mortality during dispersal via downstream transport. They tested this hypothesis in Christiana Creek, a lake-outlet stream in south-western Michigan, U.S.A., in which adult mussel density declined exponentially with distance downstream. 2. A staining technique using neutral red was developed and tested to distinguish quickly live and dead veligers. Live and dead veligers were distinguishable after an exposure of fresh samples to 13.3 mg L-1 of neutral red for 3 h. 3. Neutral red was used to determine the proportion of live veligers in samples taken longitudinally along Christiana Creek. The proportion of live veligers (mean ?? SE) declined from 90 ?? 3% at the lake outlet to 40 ?? 8% 18 km downstream. 4. Veligers appear to be highly susceptible to damage by physical forces (e.g. shear), and therefore, mortality in turbulent streams could be an important mechanism limiting zebra mussel dispersal to downstream reaches. Predictions of zebra mussel spread and population growth should consider lake-stream linkages and high mortality in running waters.

  5. The first complete mitochondrial genome of the Maylandia zebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yan; Dang, Xiao; Xu, Qiwu; Zhang, Dongya

    2016-09-01

    Maylandia zebra, a member of the family cichlid living in individual African lakes, are regarded as a significant evolution model. Recently the genome sequencing had been done, but there is no sufficient information about its mitochondria. Herein, we first assembled the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Maylandia zebra. It is a 16 582 bp long sequence with most mitogenome's characteristic structure, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and 1 putative control region. The GC-content of our fresh sequence is 45.86%, similar to closely related species Oreochromis niloticus. The accuracy and utility of new determined mitogenome sequences can be verified by the phylogenetic analysis, based on whole mitogenome alignment with Neolamprologus brichardi, Pseudotropheus crabro, Oreochromis niloticu, which is closest relative to Maylandia zebra, and 6 others. Using the full mitogenome, we expect to address taxonomic issues and study the related evolution events. Moreover, this is the first report of the mitogenome of genus Maylandia. PMID:27158870

  6. DNA adduct measurements in zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, Pallas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to examine PAH accumulation and bulky DNA adduct formation in the digestive gland of zebra mussels exposed in their habitat or in controlled laboratory conditions to complex mixture of PAH. DNA adducts were measured using a 32P-postlabelling protocol with nuclease P1 enrichment adapted from Reddy and Randerath [Reddy, M.V., Randerath, K., 1986. Nuclease P1-mediated enhancement of sensitivity of 32P-postlabelling test for structurally diverse DNA adducts. Carcinogenesis 7, 1543-1551]. Specimens collected in the upper part of the Seine estuary were shown to accumulate higher levels of PAH (up to 1.6 μg g-1 dry weight) in comparison to individuals from the reference site (0.053 μg g-1 dry weight). The former exhibited elevated levels of DNA adducts (up to 4.0/108 nucleotides) and higher diversity of individual adducts with five distinct spots being specifically detected in individuals originating from the Seine estuary. Zebra mussels exposed for 5 days to 0.01% (v/v) of organic extract of sediment from the Seine estuary were shown to accumulate high amounts of PAH (up to 138 μg g-1 dry weight) but exhibited relatively low levels of DNA adducts. Exposure to benzo[a]pyrene led to a dose-dependent accumulation of B[a]P (up to 7063 μg g-1 dry weight) and a clear induction of DNA adduct formation in the digestive gland of mussels (up to 1.13/108 nucleotides). Comparisons with other bivalves exposed to the same model PAH, revealed similar levels of adducts and comparable adduct profiles with a main adduct spot and a second faint one. This study clearly demonstrated that zebra mussels are able to biotransform B[a]P and probably other PAH into reactive metabolites with DNA-binding activity. This work also demonstrated the applicability of the nuclease P1 enhanced 32P-postlabelling method for bulky adduct detection in the digestive gland of zebra mussels. DNA adduct measurement in zebra mussels could be a suitable biomarker to monitor PAH

  7. Modelling the effects of diving ducks on zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha in lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nes, van E.H.; Noordhuis, R.; Lammens, E.H.R.R.; Portielje, R.; Reeze, B.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    An individual-based model describing the growth of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) is presented. The model is spatially explicit and predicts length¿frequency distributions of zebra mussels. The parameters and model inputs with the strongest effect on the model outcomes were identified using a

  8. Are Horses Like Zebras, or Vice Versa? Children's Sensitivity to the Asymmetries of Directional Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestnut, Eleanor K.; Markman, Ellen M.

    2016-01-01

    Adults exhibit strong preferences when framing symmetrical relations. Adults prefer, for example, "A zebra is like a horse" to "A horse is like a zebra," and "The bicycle is near the building" to "The building is near the bicycle." This is because directional syntax requires more typical or prominent items…

  9. Bioaccumulation of pathogenic bacteria and amoeba by zebra mussels and their presence in watercourses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosteo, R; Goñi, P; Miguel, N; Abadías, J; Valero, P; Ormad, M P

    2016-01-01

    Dreissena polymorpha (the zebra mussel) has been invading freshwater bodies in Europe since the beginning of the nineteenth century. Filter-feeding organisms can accumulate and concentrate both chemical and biological contaminants in their tissues. Therefore, zebra mussels are recognized as indicators of freshwater quality. In this work, the capacity of the zebra mussel to accumulate human pathogenic bacteria and protozoa has been evaluated and the sanitary risk associated with their presence in surface water has also been assessed. The results show a good correlation between the pathogenic bacteria concentration in zebra mussels and in watercourses. Zebra mussels could therefore be used as an indicator of biological contamination. The bacteria (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., and Salmonella spp.) and parasites (Cryptosporidium oocysts and free-living amoebae) detected in these mussels reflect a potential sanitary risk in water.

  10. The use of positive reinforcement in training zebra sharks (Stegostoma fasciatum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marranzino, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Positive reinforcement training (PRT) was used on 4 adult zebra sharks, Stegostoma fasciatum, housed at the Downtown Aquarium, Denver, to determine the ability of zebra sharks to become desensitized to various stimuli associated with veterinary procedures. One male and 3 female sharks were trained for 12 weeks. As a result of PRT, all 4 zebra sharks were desensitized to staying within a closed holding tank off of the main exhibit, the presence of multiple trainers in the closed holding tank, and tactile stimulation. One of the 4 zebra sharks was also successfully desensitized to the presence of a stretcher being brought into the holding tank. All of these procedures are common in veterinary examinations, and it is hoped that desensitization to these stimuli will reduce the stress associated with examinations. The training accomplished has allowed for easier maintenance of the zebra sharks by the aquarium staff and an improvement in the care of the sharks.

  11. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  12. Food habits of diving ducks in the Great Lakes after the zebra mussel invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Christine M.; Custer, T.W.

    1996-01-01

    Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) invaded the Great Lakes in the mid-1980s and quickly reached high densities. The objective of this study was to determine current consumption of zebra mussels by waterfowl in the Great Lakes region. Feeding Lesser Scaups (Aythya affinis), Greater Scaups (A. marila), Canvasbacks (A. valisineria), Redheads (A. americana), Buffleheads (Bucephala albeola) and Common Goldeneyes (B. clangula) were collected in western Lake Erie and in Lake St. Clair between fall and spring, 1992-1993 to determine food habits. All 10 Redheads, 97% of Lesser Scaups, 83% of Goldeneyes, 60% of Buffleheads and 9% of Canvasbacks contained one or more zebra mussels in their upper gastrointestinal tracts. The aggregate percent of zebra mussels in the diet of Lesser Scaups was higher in Lake Erie (98.6%) than in Lake St. Clair (54.4%). Zebra mussels (aggregate percent) dominated the diet of Common Goldeneyes (79.2%) but not in Buffleheads (23.5%), Redheads (21%) or Canvasbacks (9%). Lesser Scaups from Lake Erie fed on larger zebra mussels ( = 10.7 i?? 0.66 mm SE) than did Lesser Scaups from Lake St. Clair ( = 4.4 i?? 0.22 mm). Lesser Scaups, Buffleheads and Common Goldeneyes from Lake Erie consumed zebra mussels of similar size.

  13. Developmental origins of mosaic brain evolution: Morphometric analysis of the developing zebra finch brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvet, Christine J; Striedter, Georg F

    2009-05-10

    In adult zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), the telencephalon occupies 64% of the entire brain. This fraction is similar to what is seen in parrots, but many other birds possess a significantly smaller telencephalon. The aim of the present study was to determine the developmental time course and cellular basis of telencephalic enlargement in zebra finches, and then to compare these findings with what is known about telencephalic enlargement in other birds. To this end we estimated the volumes of all major brain regions from serial sections in embryonic and post-hatching zebra finches. We also labeled proliferating cells with antibodies against proliferating cell nuclear antigen and phosphorylated histone H3. An important finding to emerge from this work is that the telencephalon of zebra finches at hatching contains a thick proliferative subventricular zone (SVZ) that extends from the subpallium into the dorsal pallium. The data also show that the onset and offset of telencephalic neurogenesis are both delayed in zebra finches relative to quail (Galliformes). This delay in neurogenesis, in conjunction with the expanded SVZ, probably accounts for most of the telencephalic enlargement in passerines such as the zebra finch. In addition, passerines enlarged their telencephalon by decreasing the proportional size of their midbrain tectum. Because the presumptive tectum is proportionally smaller in zebra finches than quail before neurogenesis begins, this difference in tectum size cannot be due to evolutionary alterations in neurogenesis timing. Collectively these findings indicate that several different developmental mechanisms underlie the evolution of a large telencephalon in passerines.

  14. Predation of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) by freshwater drum in western Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, John R. P.; Bur, Michael T.; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Schloesser, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    Environmental and economic problems associated with the colonization of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) in western Lake Erie created a need to investigate control mechanisms. Predation by fishes is one potential means of control, but predation on zebra mussels by native fishes in Lake Erie is unknown. The freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) is the most likely fish predator since it is the only fish with pharyngeal teeth capable of crushing mollusk shells. In 1990, freshwater drum were collected in western Lake Erie from 9 sites near rocky reefs and 13 sites with silt or sand bottoms, and gut contents were examined. Predation on zebra mussels increased as drum size increased. Small drum (200-249 mm in length) fed mainly on dipterans, amphipods, and small fish; small zebra mussels (375 mm in length) fed almost exclusively on zebra mussels (seasons and locations combined). The smallest drum capable of crushing zebra mussel shells was 265 mm. Since freshwater drum over 375 mm feed heavily on zebra mussels, they may become a possible biological control mechanism for mussels in portions of North America.

  15. Amyloidosis in a Captive Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata) Research Colony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shientag, Lisa J; Garlick, David S; Galati, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Five birds in a captive zebra finch research colony were diagnosed with systemic amyloidosis within a 7-mo period by means of postmortem Congo red staining and green birefringence under polarized light. The liver was the most frequently and usually the most seriously affected organ, followed by the spleen and then the kidney. All 5 birds had been clinically affected with various inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic conditions associated with amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis in humans and animals. Immunohistochemistry using antisera against duck AA protein revealed that tissues from 2 of the 5 birds were positive for the presence of AA protein and systemic inflammation-associated amyloidosis. Although the development of AA amyloidosis has been associated with chronic inflammation, trauma, and various infectious and neoplastic diseases as well as possible genetic predispositions and stresses linked to overcrowding, the root causes for individual cases of AA amyloidosis are incompletely understood. As far as we know, this report is the first description of AA amyloidosis in captive, research zebra finches. PMID:27298248

  16. Copper Wire Arrays at the 1 MA Zebra Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coverdale, C. A.; Jones, B.; Ampleford, D. J.; Deeney, C.; Lepell, P. D.; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Ouart, N.; Ivanov, V. V.

    2006-10-01

    Experiments to study the implosion dynamics and radiation characteristics of copper z-pinches have been fielded at the 1 MA Zebra facility. At Zebra, load diameters ranged from 8mm to 16mm, with 6 to 14 wires, and load masses of 80 to 200 μg. All arrays utilized 10 micron diameter wire. The impact of initial load mass and initial load diameter on the precursor and the stagnated plasma has been evaluated through spectroscopy, shadowgraphy, and fluence measurements. Plasma parameters have been extracted from modeling of the time-integrated L-shell spectra to study temperature and density variations as a function of spatial position and initial load configuration. Comparisons will be made with harder x-ray spectra and pinhole images to identify regions of highest temperature and density. Shadowgraphy has been fielded to study the formation of the precursor and the main implosion; significant structure is observed. Substantial radiation is observed from the precursor, with variations in the precursor associated with initial load configuration. *Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Co-existence of zebra mussels and freshwater unionids: Population dynamics of Leptodea fragilis in a coastal wetland infested with zebra mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, S. Jerrine; Amberg, Jon

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, thousands of live Leptodea fragilis were collected from a marsh located in the western basin of Lake Erie that was infested with zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha). Despite the presence of zebra mussels at this site for a number of years, this L. fragilis population showed no signs of competition-induced changes in population dynamics. Biofouling was limited: fewer than 1% of the L. fragilis showed evidence of recent or past zebra mussel colonization. Successful recruitment occurred yearly, with multiple year classes collected that ranged in age from 1 to 12 years. However, age and shell length were not well correlated. Seventy-one percent of the individuals collected were 51-80 mm long, but ranged in age from 2 to 4.5 years. Three different patterns of growth or shell deposition were found. Some individuals grew rapidly, reaching 105 mm in 3.5 years, while others grew only 4.5 mm over the same time period. A few grew poorly during some years but very rapidly in others. Individuals with a shell length of 41 mm or more were sexually mature and females were more common than males. The strong recruitment and steady growth of this population showed no change between the years before and after the zebra mussel invasion, indicating that this marsh is functioning as a natural refugium from potential problems caused by zebra mussels.

  18. Additions and amendments to the bird and mammal lists of the Mountain Zebra National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H Grobler

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The following account updates and amends various previous publications dealing with the birds and mammals of the Mountain Zebra National Park (MZNP. In the case of birds, Roberts' Birds of South Africa numbers are used.

  19. Recognition and Reconstruction of Zebra Crossings on Roads from Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zebra crossings provide guidance and warning to pedestrians and drivers, thereby playing an important role in traffic safety management. Most previous studies have focused on detecting zebra stripes but have not provided full information about the areas, which is critical to both driver assistance systems and guide systems for blind individuals. This paper presents a stepwise procedure for recognizing and reconstructing zebra crossings using mobile laser scanning data. First, we propose adaptive thresholding based on road surface partitioning to reduce the impact of intensity unevenness and improve the accuracy of road marking extraction. Then, dispersion degree filtering is used to reduce the noise. Finally, zebra stripes are recognized according to the rectangular feature and fixed size, which is followed by area reconstruction according to arrangement patterns. We test our method on three datasets captured by an Optech Lynx mobile mapping system. The total recognition rate of 90.91% demonstrates the effectiveness of the method.

  20. "Bird Song Metronomics": Isochronous Organization of Zebra Finch Song Rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Philipp; Scharff, Constance

    2016-01-01

    The human capacity for speech and vocal music depends on vocal imitation. Songbirds, in contrast to non-human primates, share this vocal production learning with humans. The process through which birds and humans learn many of their vocalizations as well as the underlying neural system exhibit a number of striking parallels and have been widely researched. In contrast, rhythm, a key feature of language, and music, has received surprisingly little attention in songbirds. Investigating temporal periodicity in bird song has the potential to inform the relationship between neural mechanisms and behavioral output and can also provide insight into the biology and evolution of musicality. Here we present a method to analyze birdsong for an underlying rhythmic regularity. Using the intervals from one note onset to the next as input, we found for each bird an isochronous sequence of time stamps, a "signal-derived pulse," or pulse(S), of which a subset aligned with all note onsets of the bird's song. Fourier analysis corroborated these results. To determine whether this finding was just a byproduct of the duration of notes and intervals typical for zebra finches but not dependent on the individual duration of elements and the sequence in which they are sung, we compared natural songs to models of artificial songs. Note onsets of natural song deviated from the pulse(S) significantly less than those of artificial songs with randomized note and gap durations. Thus, male zebra finch song has the regularity required for a listener to extract a perceived pulse (pulse(P)), as yet untested. Strikingly, in our study, pulses(S) that best fit note onsets often also coincided with the transitions between sub-note elements within complex notes, corresponding to neuromuscular gestures. Gesture durations often equaled one or more pulse(S) periods. This suggests that gesture duration constitutes the basic element of the temporal hierarchy of zebra finch song rhythm, an interesting parallel

  1. Removal of algae by the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) population in western Lake Erie: a bioenergetics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenjian, Charles P.

    1995-01-01

    A bioenergetics model for growth of a zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) individual was verified with observations on zebra mussel growth in western Lake Erie. The bioenergetics model was then applied to the zebra mussel population in the western basin of Lake Erie to estimate the removal of phytoplankton by mussels. According to the modeling results, the zebra mussel population consumed 5.0 million tonnes of phytoplankton, while 1.4 million tonnes of phytoplankton was deposited in pseudofeces from the mussels. Thus, a total of 6.4 ± 2.4 million tonnes of phytoplankton was removed from the water column by zebra mussel in western Lake Erie during 1990. Primary production was estimated to be 24.8 million tonnes; therefore, zebra mussel removed the equivalent of 26 ± 10% of the primary production for western Lake Erie.

  2. Effect of acute stresses on zebra fish (Danio rerio) metabolome measured by NMR-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Mian Yahya; Marçal, Rosilene Moretti; Champagne, Danielle L; van der Kooy, Frank; Verpoorte, Robert; Choi, Young Hae

    2014-09-01

    We applied an acute stress model to zebra fish in order to measure the changes in the metabolome due to biological stress. This was done by submitting the fish to fifteen minutes of acute confinement (netting) stress, and then five minutes for the open field and light/dark field tests. A polar extract of the zebra fish was then subjected to (1)H nuclear magnetic spectroscopy. Multivariate data analysis of the spectra showed a clear separation associated to a wide range of metabolites between zebra fish that were submitted to open field and light/dark field tests. Alanine, taurine, adenosine, creatine, lactate, and histidine were high in zebra fish to which the light/dark field test was applied, regardless of stress, while acetate and isoleucine/lipids appeared to be higher in zebra fish exposed to the open field test. These results show that any change in the environment, even for a small period of time, has a noticeable physiological impact. This research provides an insight of how different mechanisms are activated under different environments to maintain the homeostasis of the body. It should also contribute to establish zebra fish as a model for metabolomics studies. PMID:25098933

  3. Efficacy of Pseudomonas fluorescens (Pf-CL145A) spray dried powder for controlling zebra mussels adhering to test substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Severson, Todd J.; Weber, Kerry L.; Mayer, Denise A.

    2015-01-01

    A mobile bioassay trailer was used to assess the efficacy of Pseudomonas fluorescens (Pf-CL145A) spray dried powder (SDP) formulation for controlling zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) from two midwestern lakes: Lake Carlos (Alexandria, Minnesota) and Shawano Lake (Shawano, Wisconsin). The effects of SDP exposure concentration and exposure duration on zebra mussel survival were evaluated along with the evaluation of a benthic injection application technique to reduce the amount of SDP required to induce zebra mortality.

  4. Gaze strategy in the free flying zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Eckmeier

    Full Text Available Fast moving animals depend on cues derived from the optic flow on their retina. Optic flow from translational locomotion includes information about the three-dimensional composition of the environment, while optic flow experienced during a rotational self motion does not. Thus, a saccadic gaze strategy that segregates rotations from translational movements during locomotion will facilitate extraction of spatial information from the visual input. We analysed whether birds use such a strategy by highspeed video recording zebra finches from two directions during an obstacle avoidance task. Each frame of the recording was examined to derive position and orientation of the beak in three-dimensional space. The data show that in all flights the head orientation was shifted in a saccadic fashion and was kept straight between saccades. Therefore, birds use a gaze strategy that actively stabilizes their gaze during translation to simplify optic flow based navigation. This is the first evidence of birds actively optimizing optic flow during flight.

  5. Ultrastructural and Histochemical Characterization of the Zebra Mussel Adhesive Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsad, Nikrooz

    Since their accidental introduction into the Great Lakes in mid- to late-1980s, the freshwater zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, have colonized most lakes and waterways across eastern North America. Their rapid spread is partly attributed to their ability to tenaciously attach to hard substrates via an adhesive apparatus called the byssus, resulting in serious environmental and economic impacts. A detailed ultrastructural study of the byssus revealed a 10 nm adhesive layer at the attachment interface. Distributions of the main adhesive amino acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), and its oxidizing (cross-linking) enzyme, catechol oxidase, were determined histochemically. It was found that, upon aging, DOPA levels remained high in the portion of the byssus closest to the interface, consistent with an adhesive role. In contrast, reduced levels of DOPA corresponded well with high levels of catechol oxidase in the load-bearing component of the byssus, presumably forming cross-links and increasing the cohesive strength.

  6. Improving production of Zebra Fish Embryos in the lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jens Peter; Adu, Robert Ohene

    2011-01-01

    The utilization of fish embryos in toxicity testing of hazardous chemicals has recently been adopted in order to satisfy stricter rules and regulations related to using adult animals in toxicity testing. This paper presents optimising steps towards improving zebra fish embryo production in the...... within an hour of onset of light, an improvement over the 50-60 eggs produced in the previous work. This result demonstrates that with the right culture conditions and proper optimisation of procedure the required number of embryos needed for toxicity testing can be obtained....... laboratory. Culture conditions were maintained in the aquaria as stipulated in the OECD draft proposal for a new guideline on fish embryo tests. Furthermore, a sequence of steps were adopted and followed to improve upon previous work done in the lab in 2006. About 200 eggs were produced in one spawn trap...

  7. Recent results of zebra patterns in solar radio bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gennady P.Chernov

    2010-01-01

    This review covers the most recent experimental results and theoretical research on zebra patterns(ZPs)in solar radio bursts.The basic attention is given to events with new peculiar elements of zebra patterns received over the last few years.All new properties are considered in light of both what was known earlier and new theoretical models.Large-scale ZPs consisting of small-scale fiber bursts could be explained by simultaneous inclusion of two mechanisms when whistler waves"highlight"the levels of double plasma resonance(DPR).A unique fine structure was observed in the event on 2006 December 13: spikes in absorption formed dark ZP stripes against the absorptive type Ⅲ-like bursts.The spikes in absorption can appear in accordance with well known mechanisms of absorptive bursts.The additional injection of fast particles filled the loss-cone(breaking the loss-cone distribution),and the generation of the continuum was quenched at these moments.The maximum absorptive effect occurs at the DPR levels.The parameters of millisecond spikes are determined by small dimensions of the particle beams and local scale heights in the radio source.Thus,the DPR model helps to understand several aspects of unusual elements of ZPs.However,the simultaneous existence of several tens of the DPR levels in the corona is impossible for any realistic profile of the plasma density and magnetic field.Three new theories of ZPs are examined.The formation of eigenmodes of transparency and opacity during the propagation of radio waves through regular coronal inhomogeneities is the most natural and promising mechanism.Two other models(nonlinear periodic space-charge waves and scattering of fast protons on ion-sound harmonics)could happen in large radio bursts.

  8. The use of chlorine dioxide for zebra mussel control - A perspective of treatment histories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolik, N.; Rusznak, L.; Anderson, J.; Hale, L. [Ashland Chemical Coman, Drew Division, Booton, NJ (United States)

    1995-06-01

    It is of utmost importance to provide updated performance results of various chemical treatments presently being utilized for zebra mussel control. Zebra mussels have a distinctive ability to endure environmental changes by reproducing effectively and attaching to various hard surfaces. These traits are cause for concern and have resulted in some operating difficulties for industries bordering infested waterways. Various methods are being employed by industries to deal with the problems associated with these species. One of the options is control via chemical treatment. Prior field test studies showed that chlorine dioxide was determined to be an effective molluscicidal agent for adult zebra mussel eradication. Continuous feed of chlorine dioxide at treatment levels ranging from 0.25 - 5.0 ppm above the oxidant demand provided 100% adult zebra mussel mortality which required between 2.9 - 8.8 days of treatment. Previous studies also showed that water temperature was an essential parameter in determining the time required to achieve 100% mortality of adult zebra mussels. Further field applications were undertaken at three electric utility sites located in the midwest. These facilities were concerned with the potential for zebra mussels to reduce efficiency and availability by blocking water flow or plugging equipment. Treatment applications at these facilities consisted of a continuous feed of chlorine dioxide ranging from 0.15 - 0.5 ppm above the oxidant demand. Significant mortality was achieved in monitored mussels tested at each utility in a period ranging from two to four days. This time period was directly related to a number of parameters, with the predominant one being water temperature. Data from these field applications is presented in this paper and confirms that chlorine dioxide is an effective molluscicide for adult zebra mussel control.

  9. Zebra Delivers EPC Gen 2 RFID Printing/Encoding With Industry’s First Free,Downloadable Firmware Upgrade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Companies can add Gen2 support on existing Zebra RFID printer/encoders while continuing to use Gen 1 and other protocols: no new hardware required. Vernon Hills,Ⅲ., December 14,2005-Zebra Technologies (Nasdaq:ZBRA),a leading manufacturer of radio frequency identification (RFID) printer/encoders worldwide, today

  10. Zebra finch females prefer males with redder bills independent of song rate-a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, Mirre J.P.; Verhulst, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Male zebra finches display multiple secondary sexual traits such as song and red bill coloration. This color is dependent on carotenoids, which enhance immune function and are antioxidants. A red bill may thus function as an indicator signal. The zebra finch is extensively used in the study of carot

  11. LETHALITY OF PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS STRAIN CLO145A TO THE 2 ZEBRA MUSSEL SPECIES PRESENT IN NORTH AMERICA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These experiments indicated that bacterial strain CL0145A of Pseudomonas fluorescens is equally lethal to the 2 zebra mussel species present in North America, Dreissena polymorpha and Dreissena bugensis. Thus, this bacterial strain should be equally effective at killing zebra mussels in power plant pipes, irrespective of which species is present

  12. Rotationally driven 'zebra stripes' in Earth's inner radiation belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Mitchell, D G; Takahashi, K; Lanzerotti, L J; Mauk, B H

    2014-03-20

    Structured features on top of nominally smooth distributions of radiation-belt particles at Earth have been previously associated with particle acceleration and transport mechanisms powered exclusively by enhanced solar-wind activity. Although planetary rotation is considered to be important for particle acceleration at Jupiter and Saturn, the electric field produced in the inner magnetosphere by Earth's rotation can change the velocity of trapped particles by only about 1-2 kilometres per second, so rotation has been thought inconsequential for radiation-belt electrons with velocities of about 100,000 kilometres per second. Here we report that the distributions of energetic electrons across the entire spatial extent of Earth's inner radiation belt are organized in regular, highly structured and unexpected 'zebra stripes', even when the solar-wind activity is low. Modelling reveals that the patterns are produced by Earth's rotation. Radiation-belt electrons are trapped in Earth's dipole-like magnetic field, where they undergo slow longitudinal drift motion around the planet because of the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field. Earth's rotation induces global diurnal variations of magnetic and electric fields that resonantly interact with electrons whose drift period is close to 24 hours, modifying electron fluxes over a broad energy range into regular patterns composed of multiple stripes extending over the entire span of the inner radiation belt. PMID:24646996

  13. Prevention and control of zebra mussels: proactive and reactive strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most plant people would agree that having zebra mussels in any raw water system is not desirable. System blockage, loss of heat transfer and other associated safety hazards are not pleasant to deal with. Therefore most industries strive to minimise the effect of infestation. Opinions differ as to how to do this most efficiently and economically. Some facilities are committed to preventing the settlement of veligers in their piping systems and on some of the external structures they consider critical. This is the proactive approach. Others allow settlement and only treat the system or surface after fouling has occurred. This is the reactive approach. Which is the best and most economical treatment will depend on the individual facility and sometimes on the individual system. The paper examines the different proactive and reactive strategies available to-date and how they are being used. It will also discuss some of the criteria for choosing a proactive vs. reactive approach and why the decision has to be made individually by each facility. (author)

  14. Drinking songs: alcohol effects on learned song of zebra finches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R Olson

    Full Text Available Speech impairment is one of the most intriguing and least understood effects of alcohol on cognitive function, largely due to the lack of data on alcohol effects on vocalizations in the context of an appropriate experimental model organism. Zebra finches, a representative songbird and a premier model for understanding the neurobiology of vocal production and learning, learn song in a manner analogous to how humans learn speech. Here we show that when allowed access, finches readily drink alcohol, increase their blood ethanol concentrations (BEC significantly, and sing a song with altered acoustic structure. The most pronounced effects were decreased amplitude and increased entropy, the latter likely reflecting a disruption in the birds' ability to maintain the spectral structure of song under alcohol. Furthermore, specific syllables, which have distinct acoustic structures, were differentially influenced by alcohol, likely reflecting a diversity in the neural mechanisms required for their production. Remarkably, these effects on vocalizations occurred without overt effects on general behavioral measures, and importantly, they occurred within a range of BEC that can be considered risky for humans. Our results suggest that the variable effects of alcohol on finch song reflect differential alcohol sensitivity of the brain circuitry elements that control different aspects of song production. They also point to finches as an informative model for understanding how alcohol affects the neuronal circuits that control the production of learned motor behaviors.

  15. Association of Bactericera cockerelli (Homoptera: Psyllidae) with "zebra chip," a new potato disease in southwestern United States and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyaneza, J E; Crosslin, J M; Upton, J E

    2007-06-01

    A new defect of potato, Solanum tuberosum L., "zebra chip," so named for the characteristic symptoms that develop in fried chips from infected potato tubers, has recently been documented in several southwestern states of the United States, in Mexico, and in Central America. This defect is causing millions of dollars in losses to both potato producers and processors. Zebra chip plant symptoms resemble those caused by potato purple top and psyllid yellows diseases. Experiments were conducted to elucidate the association between the psyllid Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc) (Homoptera: Psyllidae) and zebra chip by exposing clean potato plants to this insect under greenhouse and field conditions. Potato plants and tubers exhibiting zebra chip symptoms were tested for phytoplasmas by polymerase chain reaction. Potato psyllids collected from infected potato fields also were tested. Results indicated that there was an association between the potato psyllid and zebra chip. Plants exposed to psyllids in the greenhouse and field developed zebra chip. In the greenhouse, 25.8 and 59.2% of tubers exhibited zebra chip symptoms in the raw tubers and fried chips, respectively. In the field, 15 and 57% of tubers showed symptoms in raw tubers and chips, respectively. No zebra chip was observed in tubers from plants that had not been exposed to psyllids, either in the greenhouse or field. No phytoplasmas were detected from potato plants or tubers with zebra chip symptoms, suggesting that these pathogens are not involved in zebra chip. Of the 47 samples of potato psyllids tested, only two tested positive for the Columbia Basin potato purple top phytoplasma. PMID:17598522

  16. Lessons learned in over 100 zebra mussel control applications at industrial facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGough, C.M.; Gilland, P.H.; Muia, R.A. [Calgon Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Since their introduction into US waterways, Zebra Mussels (Dreissena polymorphae) have spread rapidly throughout the Great Lakes and Mississippi regions. These mussels have continued to colonize the intake pipes of industrial water supplies and water distribution systems throughout the affected areas. Their colonization has compromised plant safety and production efficiency, and steadily increased costs to water users. The design of each industrial plant water distribution system is unique. A comprehensive zebra mussel control strategy using the best available options must be considered in each specific situation. This paper discusses the successful use of one strategy (a quaternary ammonia-based molluscicide) in the battle against zebra mussels. The commercial life cycle of an industrial molluscicide began with initial toxicity screening in the laboratory. The evaluation continued at plant sites through field trials and applications. Lessons learned from these experiences helped direct the efforts toward the development of a second generation program.

  17. The perception of regularity in an isochronous stimulus in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Aa, Jeroen; Honing, Henkjan; ten Cate, Carel

    2015-06-01

    Perceiving temporal regularity in an auditory stimulus is considered one of the basic features of musicality. Here we examine whether zebra finches can detect regularity in an isochronous stimulus. Using a go/no go paradigm we show that zebra finches are able to distinguish between an isochronous and an irregular stimulus. However, when the tempo of the isochronous stimulus is changed, it is no longer treated as similar to the training stimulus. Training with three isochronous and three irregular stimuli did not result in improvement of the generalization. In contrast, humans, exposed to the same stimuli, readily generalized across tempo changes. Our results suggest that zebra finches distinguish the different stimuli by learning specific local temporal features of each individual stimulus rather than attending to the global structure of the stimuli, i.e., to the temporal regularity. PMID:25725348

  18. The Zebra Fish IBD Model Assessed By Novel Probe Based TagMan Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kania, Per Walter; Buchmann, Kurt; Haarder, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is subdivided into ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, which are chronic disorders. Millions of persons throughout the Western world are affected by IBD, and the condition is associated with severe morbidity and reduced quality of life for afflicted persons....... The etiology is complex and not fully understood. The zebra fish (Danio rerio) may serve as a model for elucidation of these inadequately understood mechanisms. Two hapten-mediated IBD-like models in zebra fish have been generated by using the chemicals oxazolone and TNBS dissolved in ethanol. From mammalian...... models it is known that oxazolone and TNBS can induce conditions mimicking ulcerative colitis (Th2 like response) and Crohn's disease (Th1/Th17 like response), respectively. Zebra fish (body weight 0.5 g) were divided into 4 groups (each with 2 replicates) and instilled rectally with H2O, ethanol, TNBS...

  19. Scope of problem assessed at IVO. The zebra mussel`s campaign of world conquest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvonen, J.; Oesch, P. [ed.

    1998-07-01

    The migrating shell - or `zebra mussel` as it is called on account of its black and white stripes - was originally a fresh-water mussel, but has since also adapted to brackish waters. As a result of human activity the species has spread quickly and widely from its native habitat. Operators of power plants and water treatment plants in particular have not been very happy about this. During its larval stage the zebra mussel can enter the cooling water systems; fasten itself to the pipes and - in the worst case - clog the system. The Environmental Protection Division of IVO has been assessing the spread of the zebra mussel and the resulting problems with the aid of reference literature and the assistance of Finnish researchers

  20. Group dynamics of zebra and wildebeest in a woodland savanna: effects of predation risk and habitat density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Thaker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Group dynamics of gregarious ungulates in the grasslands of the African savanna have been well studied, but the trade-offs that affect grouping of these ungulates in woodland habitats or dense vegetation are less well understood. We examined the landscape-level distribution of groups of blue wildebeest, Connochaetes taurinus, and Burchell's zebra, Equus burchelli, in a predominantly woodland area (Karongwe Game Reserve, South Africa; KGR to test the hypothesis that group dynamics are a function of minimizing predation risk from their primary predator, lion, Panthera leo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using generalized linear models, we examined the relative importance of habitat type (differing in vegetation density, probability of encountering lion (based on utilization distribution of all individual lions in the reserve, and season in predicting group size and composition. We found that only in open scrub habitat, group size for both ungulate species increased with the probability of encountering lion. Group composition differed between the two species and was driven by habitat selection as well as predation risk. For both species, composition of groups was, however, dominated by males in open scrub habitats, irrespective of the probability of encountering lion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Distribution patterns of wildebeest and zebra groups at the landscape level directly support the theoretical and empirical evidence from a range of taxa predicting that grouping is favored in open habitats and when predation risk is high. Group composition reflected species-specific social, physiological and foraging constraints, as well as the importance of predation risk. Avoidance of high resource open scrub habitat by females can lead to loss of foraging opportunities, which can be particularly costly in areas such as KGR, where this resource is limited. Thus, landscape-level grouping dynamics are species specific and particular to the

  1. Formation of zebra pattern in low-frequency Jovian radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, A A

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the formation of zebra-like fine spectral structures (consisting of several parallel bands in the dynamic spectrum) in the Jovian broadband kilometric radiation; such radio bursts were observed by Cassini in 2000/2001. We assume that the emission is generated due to a plasma mechanism in the Io plasma torus. We have shown that the double plasma resonance effect (that was proposed earlier as a formation mechanism of the solar zebra patterns) is able to produce the observed spectral structures. The observed frequency drifts are caused, most likely, by the dynamics of the electron acceleration site. The required conditions in the emission source are discussed.

  2. Pathology and immunohistochemistry of papillomavirus-associated cutaneous lesions in Cape mountain zebra, giraffe, sable antelope and African buffalo in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Williams

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Skin lesions associated with papillomaviruses have been reported in many animal species and man. Bovine papillomavirus (BVP affects mainly the epidermis, but also the dermis in several species including bovine, the best-known example being equine sarcoid, which is associated with BVP types 1 and 2. This publication describes and illustrates the macroscopic and histological appearance of BPV-associated papillomatous, fibropapillomatous or sarcoid-like lesions in Cape mountain zebra (Equus zebra zebra from the Gariep Dam Nature Reserve, 2 giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis from the Kruger National Park, and a sable antelope (Hippotragus niger from the Kimberley area of South Africa. An African buffalo (Syncerus caffer cow from Kruger National Park also had papillomatous lesions but molecular characterisation of lesional virus was not done. Immunohistochemical staining using polyclonal rabbit antiserum to chemically disrupted BPV-1, which cross-reacts with the L1 capsid of most known papillomaviruses, was positive in cells of the stratum granulosum of lesions in Giraffe 1, the sable and the buffalo and negative in those of the zebra and Giraffe 2. Fibropapillomatous and sarcoid-like lesions from an adult bovine were used as positive control for the immunohistochemistry and are described and the immunohistochemistry illustrated for comparison. Macroscopically, both adult female giraffe had severely thickened multifocal to coalescing nodular and occasionally ulcerated lesions of the head, neck and trunk with local poorly-circumscribed invasion into the subcutis. Necropsy performed on the 2nd giraffe revealed neither internal metastases nor serious underlying disease. Giraffe 1 had scattered, and Giraffe 2 numerous, large, anaplastic, at times indistinctly multinucleated dermal fibroblasts with bizarre nuclei within the sarcoid-like lesions, which were BPV-1 positive in Giraffe 1 and BPV-1 and -2 positive in Giraffe 2 by RT-PCR. The sable antelope

  3. The ZEBRA electric vehicle battery: power and energy improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Roy C.; Haslam, Steven

    Vehicle trials with the first sodium/nickel chloride ZEBRA batteries indicated that the pulse power capability of the battery needed to be improved towards the end of the discharge. A research programme led to several design changes to improve the cell which, in combination, have improved the power of the battery to greater than 150 W kg -1 at 80% depth of discharge. Bench and vehicle tests have established the stability of the high power battery over several years of cycling. The gravimetric energy density of the first generation of cells was less than 100 Wh kg -1. Optimisation of the design has led to a cell with a specific energy of 120 Wh kg -1 or 86 Wh kg -1 for a 30 kWh battery. Recently, the cell chemistry has been altered to improve the useful capacity. The cell is assembled in the over-discharged state and during the first charge the following reactions occur: at 1.6 V: Al+4NaCl=NaAlCl 4+3Na; at 2.35 V: Fe+2NaCl=FeCl 2+2Na; at 2.58 V: Ni+2NaCl=NiCl 2+2 Na. The first reaction serves to prime the negative sodium electrode but occurs at too low a voltage to be of use in providing useful capacity. By minimising the aluminium content more NaCl is released for the main reactions to improve the capacity of the cell. This, and further composition optimisation, have resulted in cells with specific energies in excess of 140 Wh kg -1, which equates to battery energies>100 Wh kg -1. The present production battery, as installed in a Mercedes Benz A class electric vehicle, gives a driving range of 205 km (128 miles) in city and hill climbing. The cells with improved capacity will extend the practical driving range to beyond 240 km (150 miles).

  4. A dominance shift from the zebra mussel to the invasive quagga mussel may alter the trophic transfer of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioinvasions are a major cause of biodiversity and ecosystem changes. The rapid range expansion of the invasive quagga mussel (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis) causing a dominance shift from zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) to quagga mussels, may alter the risk of secondary poisoning to predators. Mussel samples were collected from various water bodies in the Netherlands, divided into size classes, and analysed for metal concentrations. Concentrations of nickel and copper in quagga mussels were significantly lower than in zebra mussels overall. In lakes, quagga mussels contained significantly higher concentrations of aluminium, iron and lead yet significantly lower concentrations of zinc66, cadmium111, copper, nickel, cobalt and molybdenum than zebra mussels. In the river water type quagga mussel soft tissues contained significantly lower concentrations of zinc66. Our results suggest that a dominance shift from zebra to quagga mussels may reduce metal exposure of predator species. - Highlights: • Invading quagga mussels often displace existing zebra mussels. • Interspecies difference in metal concentration may alter exposure of predators. • Zebra and quagga mussel soft tissue were analysed for metal concentrations. • Generally, quagga mussels contained lower concentrations of metals. • A dominance shift to quagga mussels may reduce metal exposure of predators. - A shift in dominance from zebra mussels to invading quagga mussels may reduce the transfer of metals to predator species

  5. Regulatory Differences in Natal Down Development between Altricial Zebra Finch and Precocial Chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Kuan; Ng, Chen Siang; Wu, Siao-Man; Chen, Jiun-Jie; Cheng, Po-Liang; Wu, Ping; Lu, Mei-Yeh Jade; Chen, Di-Rong; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Cheng, Hsu-Chen; Ting, Chau-Ti; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2016-08-01

    Birds can be classified into altricial and precocial. The hatchlings of altricial birds are almost naked, whereas those of precocial birds are covered with natal down. This regulatory divergence is thought to reflect environmental adaptation, but the molecular basis of the divergence is unclear. To address this issue, we chose the altricial zebra finch and the precocial chicken as the model animals. We noted that zebra finch hatchlings show natal down growth suppressed anterior dorsal (AD) skin but partially down-covered posterior dorsal (PD) skin. Comparing the transcriptomes of AD and PD skins, we found that the feather growth promoter SHH (sonic hedgehog) was expressed higher in PD skin than in AD skin. Moreover, the data suggested that the FGF (fibroblast growth factor)/Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is involved in natal down growth suppression and that FGF16 is a candidate upstream signaling suppressor. Ectopic expression of FGF16 on chicken leg skin showed downregulation of SHH, upregulation of the feather growth suppressor FGF10, and suppression of feather bud elongation, similar to the phenotype found in zebra finch embryonic AD skin. Therefore, we propose that FGF16-related signals suppress natal down elongation and cause the naked AD skin in zebra finch. Our study provides insights into the regulatory divergence in natal down formation between precocial and altricial birds.

  6. Wild at heart? : differential maternal investment in wild and domesticated zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata)

    OpenAIRE

    Pariser, Emma C

    2010-01-01

    Over the past twenty years there has been an exponential increase in the investigation of maternal effects. Understanding the adaptive function of maternal allocation strategies is integral to interpreting the evolutionary outcomes of sexual selection. Thus, model animal systems that facilitate experimental manipulation and controlled investigation of the physiological and behavioural mechanisms underlying maternal effects are important to evolutionary biologists. The zebra finch (Taeniopygia...

  7. Zebra - sõbralik ja lillelõhnaline / Ell-Maaja Randküla

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Randküla, Ell-Maaja, 1939-2016

    2006-01-01

    Tallinnas Narva mnt. 7 asuva kohviku Zebra sisekujundus. Sisearhitekt Tiiu Truus. Ehitus: AS KMG Ehitus. Materjalidest on kasutatud triibulise mustriga puitu Zebrano ja looduskivi. Laes on dekoratiivsed lipud, mille graafiline kujundus on Tiiu Priskolt ja Mati Veermetsalt. Tualettruumi looduskivist valamu ja põrandavaasi autor on Kaido Kivi. Ill.: põhiplaan, 11 värv. vaadet

  8. Study of bioengineered zebra fish olfactory receptor 131-2: receptor purification and secondary structure analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwong-Joo Leck

    Full Text Available How fishes are able to detect trace molecules in large bodies of water is not understood. It is plausible that they use olfactory receptors to detect water-soluble compounds. How the zebra fish Danio Rerio, an organism with only 98 functional olfactory receptors, is able to selectively detect and recognize numerous compounds in water remains a puzzling phenomenon. We are interested in studying the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of olfaction in fish. Here, we report on the study of a bioengineered zebra fish olfactory receptor OR131-2, affinity-purified from a HEK293S tetracycline-inducible system. This receptor was expressed and translocated to the cell plasma membrane as revealed by confocal microscopy. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the purified zebra fish receptor folded into an α-helical structure, as observed for other G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. Our study shows that it is possible to produce viable quantities of the zebra fish olfactory receptor. This will not only enable detailed structural and functional analyses, but also aid in the design of biosensor devices in order to detect water-soluble metabolites or its intermediates, which are associated with human health.

  9. Song decrystallization in adult zebra finches does not require the song nucleus NIf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arani; Mooney, Richard

    2009-08-01

    In adult male zebra finches, transecting the vocal nerve causes previously stable (i.e., crystallized) song to slowly degrade, presumably because of the resulting distortion in auditory feedback. How and where distorted feedback interacts with song motor networks to induce this process of song decrystallization remains unknown. The song premotor nucleus HVC is a potential site where auditory feedback signals could interact with song motor commands. Although the forebrain nucleus interface of the nidopallium (NIf) appears to be the primary auditory input to HVC, NIf lesions made in adult zebra finches do not trigger song decrystallization. One possibility is that NIf lesions do not interfere with song maintenance, but do compromise the adult zebra finch's ability to express renewed vocal plasticity in response to feedback perturbations. To test this idea, we bilaterally lesioned NIf and then transected the vocal nerve in adult male zebra finches. We found that bilateral NIf lesions did not prevent nerve section-induced song decrystallization. To test the extent to which the NIf lesions disrupted auditory processing in the song system, we made in vivo extracellular recordings in HVC and a downstream anterior forebrain pathway (AFP) in NIf-lesioned birds. We found strong and selective auditory responses to the playback of the birds' own song persisted in HVC and the AFP following NIf lesions. These findings suggest that auditory inputs to the song system other than NIf, such as the caudal mesopallium, could act as a source of auditory feedback signals to the song motor network.

  10. Automatic detection of zebra crossings from mobile LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveiro, B.; González-Jorge, H.; Martínez-Sánchez, J.; Díaz-Vilariño, L.; Arias, P.

    2015-07-01

    An algorithm for the automatic detection of zebra crossings from mobile LiDAR data is developed and tested to be applied for road management purposes. The algorithm consists of several subsequent processes starting with road segmentation by performing a curvature analysis for each laser cycle. Then, intensity images are created from the point cloud using rasterization techniques, in order to detect zebra crossing using the Standard Hough Transform and logical constrains. To optimize the results, image processing algorithms are applied to the intensity images from the point cloud. These algorithms include binarization to separate the painting area from the rest of the pavement, median filtering to avoid noisy points, and mathematical morphology to fill the gaps between the pixels in the border of white marks. Once the road marking is detected, its position is calculated. This information is valuable for inventorying purposes of road managers that use Geographic Information Systems. The performance of the algorithm has been evaluated over several mobile LiDAR strips accounting for a total of 30 zebra crossings. That test showed a completeness of 83%. Non-detected marks mainly come from painting deterioration of the zebra crossing or by occlusions in the point cloud produced by other vehicles on the road.

  11. Variations in Zebra Chip disease expression and tuber biochemistry in response to vector density

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined effects of the number of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso)-positive psyllids feeding on potatoes to Lso titers, zebra chip disease (ZC) symptom severity, and levels of amino acids, carbohydrates, and phenolics in tubers harvested weeks later. Red La Soda and Russet Nor...

  12. Examining the role of tuber biochemistry in the development of zebra chip in stored potato tubers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebra chip disease (ZC), associated with infection by the bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso), is an emerging problem for potato growers in the United States, Mexico, and New Zealand. Although potato tubers exhibiting ZC symptoms will be rejected by processors, it remains possible...

  13. Assimilation and depuration of microcystin–LR by the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pires, L.M.D.; Karlsson, K.M.; Meriluoto, J.A.O.; Kardinaal, E.A.; Visser, P.M.; Siewertsen, K.; Van Donk, E.; Ibelings, B.W.

    2004-01-01

    Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) are an important component of the foodweb of shallow lakes in the Netherlands, amongst others in Lake IJsselmeer, an international important wetland. Large numbers of ducks feed on these mussels in autumn and winter. The mussels are filter feeders and are exposed

  14. Effects of suspended sediments on food uptake for zebra mussels in Lake Markermeer, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning, W.E.; Pozzato, L.; Vijverberg, T.; Noordhuis, R.; bij de Vaate, A.; Van Donk, E.; Dionisio Pires, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Until 1992, zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) were an important food source for diving ducks in Lake Markermeer (The Netherlands). After 1993, the mussel biomass sharply declined, and the current population is in poor condition (maximum shell length <15 mm) compared to populations from adjacent L

  15. Potato tuber chemistry of promising germplasm exhibiting tolerance to zebra chip disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-term sustainable management of zebra chip (ZC) disease of potato requires development of tolerant or resistant germplasm. To this end, 283 potato varieties and breeding clones were infected with the ZC putative causal agent ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso) by potato psyllid vector i...

  16. Oxygen profile in zebra fish (Danio rerio) elucidated by theory and experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenbarg, S.; Boogaart, van den J.G.M.; Leeuwen, van J.L.

    2003-01-01

    We present a numerical-experi mental diffusion study in which we elucidate the spatial oxygen profile around and inside a zebra fish embryo in the pre-circulation stage (24-28 hpf). Lowest oxygen partial pressures are found in the head with a gradient of posteriorly increasing pressure along the mid

  17. Assessing the potential for fish predation to impact zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha): Insight from bioenergetics models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleton, M.A.; Miranda, L.E.; Kirk, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Rates of annual food consumption and biomass were modeled for several fish species across representative rivers and lakes in eastern North America. Results were combined to assess the relative potential of fish predation to impact zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha). Predicted annual food consumption by fishes in southern waters was over 100% greater than that in northern systems because of warmer annual water temperatures and presumed increases in metabolic demand. Although generally increasing with latitude, biomasses of several key zebra mussel fish predators did not change significantly across latitudes. Biomasses of some less abundant fish predators did increase significantly with latitude, but increases were not of the magnitude to offset predicted decreases in food consumption. Our results generally support the premise that fishes in rivers and lakes of the southern United States (U.S.) have inherently greater potential to impact zebra mussels by predation. Our simulations may provide a partial explanation of why zebra mussel invasions have not been as rapid and widespread in southern U.S. waters compared to the Great Lakes region. ?? Blackwell Munksgaard, 2004.

  18. Regulatory Differences in Natal Down Development between Altricial Zebra Finch and Precocial Chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Kuan; Ng, Chen Siang; Wu, Siao-Man; Chen, Jiun-Jie; Cheng, Po-Liang; Wu, Ping; Lu, Mei-Yeh Jade; Chen, Di-Rong; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Cheng, Hsu-Chen; Ting, Chau-Ti; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2016-08-01

    Birds can be classified into altricial and precocial. The hatchlings of altricial birds are almost naked, whereas those of precocial birds are covered with natal down. This regulatory divergence is thought to reflect environmental adaptation, but the molecular basis of the divergence is unclear. To address this issue, we chose the altricial zebra finch and the precocial chicken as the model animals. We noted that zebra finch hatchlings show natal down growth suppressed anterior dorsal (AD) skin but partially down-covered posterior dorsal (PD) skin. Comparing the transcriptomes of AD and PD skins, we found that the feather growth promoter SHH (sonic hedgehog) was expressed higher in PD skin than in AD skin. Moreover, the data suggested that the FGF (fibroblast growth factor)/Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is involved in natal down growth suppression and that FGF16 is a candidate upstream signaling suppressor. Ectopic expression of FGF16 on chicken leg skin showed downregulation of SHH, upregulation of the feather growth suppressor FGF10, and suppression of feather bud elongation, similar to the phenotype found in zebra finch embryonic AD skin. Therefore, we propose that FGF16-related signals suppress natal down elongation and cause the naked AD skin in zebra finch. Our study provides insights into the regulatory divergence in natal down formation between precocial and altricial birds. PMID:27189543

  19. Bindweed Psyllid: Biology, Natural History, and Interactions with the Zebra Chip Pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bactericera maculipennis is a native psyllid that commonly occurs on field bindweed in the western United States. We have found that Pacific Northwest populations of B. maculipennis carry Liberibacter solanacearum, the pathogen associated with zebra chip disease of potato. In North America, this p...

  20. Non-destructive NIR detection of Zebra Chip disease in whole potatoes (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potatoes are the 4th biggest food crop worldwide and the leading vegetable crop in the U.S., accounting for 15 percent of vegetable sales. Over 50% of potatoes are consumed as processed products such as French fries and chips. Zebra Chip (ZC) is a disease of potatoes that causes brown discoloration ...

  1. Early experience and plasticity of song in adult male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, AE; TenCate, C; Slater, PJB

    1996-01-01

    Zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) learn song primarily at 35-65 days of age, but birds deprived of experience at that stage may modify their songs later. Experiments on 5 groups examined the effect of varying early social experience on the plasticity of adult song. Major changes of song in adultho

  2. Zebra Crossing: Walking in Two Continents Sharing and Celebrating Difference through Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    I use the metaphor "zebra crossing" in my reflective narrative to describe my plight and struggle as a non-white person growing up and working in Johannesburg, South Africa, during the apartheid era. This article considers and compares the notions of culture, diversity and identity as I now work in a tertiary institution in Melbourne, Australia. I…

  3. The Quantitative Ethology of the Zebra Finch: A Study in Comparative Psychometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo, Aurelio Jose; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A quantitative ethogram was developed for the zebra finch, using one-zero focal animal sampling on an ethologically comprehensive checklist of 52 behavioral items, and it was assessed for interobserver reliability and construct validity. Applying the quantitative methods of psychometrics allows verification of ethological theory and testing of…

  4. Sex-specific effects of yolk testosterone on survival, begging and growth of zebra finches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Engelhardt, N; Carere, C; Dijkstra, C; Groothuis, TGG

    2006-01-01

    Yolk androgens affect offspring hatching, begging, growth and survival in many bird species. If these effects are sex-specific, yolk androgen deposition may constitute a mechanism for differential investment in male and female offspring. We tested this hypothesis in zebra finches. In this species, f

  5. Factors Affecting Driver Yielding Behavior at a Mid-Block Zebra Crossing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirach Hirun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Zebra crossing is one of an important pedestrian facility but a number of mid-block zebra crossings for pedestrians in Thailand are not yet utilized. Although the law requires drivers to yield the right-of-way to pedestrians at crossing, within a marked crosswalk in Thailand, a number of drivers still will not yield for a pedestrian. This situation affects the safety of pedestrians and needs urgent attention of the relevant authorities/agencies to improve the situation, before the zebra crossings becomes a safety hazard. The objective of this paper is to investigate the driver behavior at zebra crossings and the factors that are affecting driver yield behavior are also explored. The questionnaire was produced by a Google Form and the drivers were recruited using a snowball sampling technique via a Facebook and Application LINE. Friends and family of the researcher were invited to complete the survey via Facebook and Application LINE and were also asked to pass on the questionnaire to their friends and family. A total of 445 people completed the survey. The descriptive statistics and the logistic regression were employed for analysis. The binary logit model was used with six attributes: age, sex, education, experience, type of vehicle, and knowledge of pedestrian’s right-of-way law was developed. The results indicated that more than 50% of drivers do not have an understanding of the pedestrian’s right-of-way law. The developed model revealed that the yielding behavior of the driver depends on age, education, and knowledge of the pedestrian right-of-way law. The odd number of knowledge of the pedestrian rightof- way law is 1.588. For this reason, educating the drivers to the pedestrian right-of-way law is a beginning point to improve the safety for pedestrians at a zebra crossing in Thailand.

  6. Zebra Finch Song Phonology and Syntactical Structure across Populations and Continents-A Computational Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachlan, Robert F; van Heijningen, Caroline A A; Ter Haar, Sita M; Ten Cate, Carel

    2016-01-01

    Learned bird songs are often characterized by a high degree of variation between individuals and sometimes between populations, while at the same time maintaining species specificity. The evolution of such songs depends on the balance between plasticity and constraints. Captive populations provide an opportunity to examine signal variation and differentiation in detail, so we analyzed adult male zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) songs recorded from 13 populations across the world, including one sample of songs from wild-caught males in their native Australia. Cluster analysis suggested some, albeit limited, evidence that zebra finch song units belonged to universal, species-wide categories, linked to restrictions in vocal production and non-song parts of the vocal repertoire. Across populations, songs also showed some syntactical structure, although any song unit could be placed anywhere within the song. On the other hand, there was a statistically significant differentiation between populations, but the effect size was very small, and its communicative significance dubious. Our results suggest that variation in zebra finch songs within a population is largely determined by species-wide constraints rather than population-specific features. Although captive zebra finch populations have been sufficiently isolated to allow them to genetically diverge, there does not appear to have been any divergence in the genetically determined constraints that underlie song learning. Perhaps more surprising is the lack of locally diverged cultural traditions. Zebra finches serve as an example of a system where frequent learning errors may rapidly create within-population diversity, within broad phonological and syntactical constraints, and prevent the formation of long-term cultural traditions that allow populations to diverge. PMID:27458396

  7. Zebra Finch Song Phonology and Syntactical Structure across Populations and Continents—A Computational Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachlan, Robert F.; van Heijningen, Caroline A. A.; ter Haar, Sita M.; ten Cate, Carel

    2016-01-01

    Learned bird songs are often characterized by a high degree of variation between individuals and sometimes between populations, while at the same time maintaining species specificity. The evolution of such songs depends on the balance between plasticity and constraints. Captive populations provide an opportunity to examine signal variation and differentiation in detail, so we analyzed adult male zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) songs recorded from 13 populations across the world, including one sample of songs from wild-caught males in their native Australia. Cluster analysis suggested some, albeit limited, evidence that zebra finch song units belonged to universal, species-wide categories, linked to restrictions in vocal production and non-song parts of the vocal repertoire. Across populations, songs also showed some syntactical structure, although any song unit could be placed anywhere within the song. On the other hand, there was a statistically significant differentiation between populations, but the effect size was very small, and its communicative significance dubious. Our results suggest that variation in zebra finch songs within a population is largely determined by species-wide constraints rather than population-specific features. Although captive zebra finch populations have been sufficiently isolated to allow them to genetically diverge, there does not appear to have been any divergence in the genetically determined constraints that underlie song learning. Perhaps more surprising is the lack of locally diverged cultural traditions. Zebra finches serve as an example of a system where frequent learning errors may rapidly create within-population diversity, within broad phonological and syntactical constraints, and prevent the formation of long-term cultural traditions that allow populations to diverge. PMID:27458396

  8. A dominance shift from the zebra mussel to the invasive quagga mussel may alter the trophic transfer of metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Jonathan; Schipper, Aafke M; Hendriks, A Jan; Yen Le, T T; Bij de Vaate, Abraham; van der Velde, Gerard; Leuven, Rob S E W

    2015-08-01

    Bioinvasions are a major cause of biodiversity and ecosystem changes. The rapid range expansion of the invasive quagga mussel (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis) causing a dominance shift from zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) to quagga mussels, may alter the risk of secondary poisoning to predators. Mussel samples were collected from various water bodies in the Netherlands, divided into size classes, and analysed for metal concentrations. Concentrations of nickel and copper in quagga mussels were significantly lower than in zebra mussels overall. In lakes, quagga mussels contained significantly higher concentrations of aluminium, iron and lead yet significantly lower concentrations of zinc66, cadmium111, copper, nickel, cobalt and molybdenum than zebra mussels. In the river water type quagga mussel soft tissues contained significantly lower concentrations of zinc66. Our results suggest that a dominance shift from zebra to quagga mussels may reduce metal exposure of predator species. PMID:25910461

  9. Zebra Fish Dnmt1 and Suv39h1 Regulate Organ-Specific Terminal Differentiation during Development

    OpenAIRE

    Rai, Kunal; Nadauld, Lincoln D; Chidester, Stephanie; Manos, Elizabeth J.; James, Smitha R.; Karpf, Adam R.; Cairns, Bradley R.; Jones, David A.

    2006-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone methylation are two key epigenetic modifications that help govern heterochromatin dynamics. The roles for these chromatin-modifying activities in directing tissue-specific development remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we examined the roles of DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) and the H3K9 histone methyltransferase Suv39h1 in zebra fish development. Knockdown of Dnmt1 in zebra fish embryos caused defects in terminal differentiation of the intestine, exocr...

  10. Breeding experience, alternative reproductive strategies and reproductive success in a captive colony of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Nicole M; Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Birds exhibit a remarkable diversity of different reproductive strategies both between and within species. Species such as the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) may evolve the flexible use of alternative reproductive strategies, as well as benefit from prior breeding experience, which allows them to adaptively respond to unpredictable environments. In birds, the flexible use of alternative reproductive strategies, such as extra-pair mating, has been reported to be associated with fast reproduction, high mortality and environmental variability. However, little is known about the role of previous breeding experience in the adaptive use of alternative reproductive strategies. Here we performed an in-depth study of reproductive outcomes in a population of domesticated zebra finches, testing the impact of prior breeding experience on the use of alternative reproductive strategies and reproductive success. We provide evidence that older females with prior breeding experience are quicker to initiate a clutch with a new partner and have increased success in chick rearing, even in a captive colony of zebra finches with minimal foraging demands. We also find evidence that the breeding experience of other females in the same social group influences reproductive investment by female zebra finches. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the use of alternative reproductive strategies in female zebra finches is associated with previous failed breeding attempts with the same pair partner. The results provide evidence that age and breeding experience play important roles in the flexible use of both facultative and adaptive reproductive strategies in female zebra finches.

  11. Breeding experience, alternative reproductive strategies and reproductive success in a captive colony of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Baran

    Full Text Available Birds exhibit a remarkable diversity of different reproductive strategies both between and within species. Species such as the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata may evolve the flexible use of alternative reproductive strategies, as well as benefit from prior breeding experience, which allows them to adaptively respond to unpredictable environments. In birds, the flexible use of alternative reproductive strategies, such as extra-pair mating, has been reported to be associated with fast reproduction, high mortality and environmental variability. However, little is known about the role of previous breeding experience in the adaptive use of alternative reproductive strategies. Here we performed an in-depth study of reproductive outcomes in a population of domesticated zebra finches, testing the impact of prior breeding experience on the use of alternative reproductive strategies and reproductive success. We provide evidence that older females with prior breeding experience are quicker to initiate a clutch with a new partner and have increased success in chick rearing, even in a captive colony of zebra finches with minimal foraging demands. We also find evidence that the breeding experience of other females in the same social group influences reproductive investment by female zebra finches. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the use of alternative reproductive strategies in female zebra finches is associated with previous failed breeding attempts with the same pair partner. The results provide evidence that age and breeding experience play important roles in the flexible use of both facultative and adaptive reproductive strategies in female zebra finches.

  12. High-Throughput Selection of Retrovirus Producer Cell Lines Leads to Markedly Improved Efficiency of Germ Line-Transmissible Insertions in Zebra Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wenbiao; Burgess, Shawn; Golling, Greg; Amsterdam, Adam; Hopkins, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G-pseudotyped mouse retroviral vectors have been used as mutagens for a large-scale insertional mutagenesis screen in the zebra fish. To reproducibly generate high-titer virus stocks, we devised a method for rapidly selecting cell lines that can yield high-titer viruses and isolated a producer cell line that yields virus at a high titer on zebra fish embryos. Virus produced from this line, designated GT virus, is nontoxic following injection of zebra fi...

  13. Genomic and neural analysis of the estradiol-synthetic pathway in the zebra finch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    London Sarah E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Steroids are small molecule hormones derived from cholesterol. Steroids affect many tissues, including the brain. In the zebra finch, estrogenic steroids are particularly interesting because they masculinize the neural circuit that controls singing and their synthesis in the brain is modulated by experience. Here, we analyzed the zebra finch genome assembly to assess the content, conservation, and organization of genes that code for components of the estrogen-synthetic pathway and steroid nuclear receptors. Based on these analyses, we also investigated neural expression of a cholesterol transport protein gene in the context of song neurobiology. Results We present sequence-based analysis of twenty steroid-related genes using the genome assembly and other resources. Generally, zebra finch genes showed high homology to genes in other species. The diversity of steroidogenic enzymes and receptors may be lower in songbirds than in mammals; we were unable to identify all known mammalian isoforms of the 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase families in the zebra finch genome assembly, and not all splice sites described in mammals were identified in the corresponding zebra finch genes. We did identify two factors, Nobox and NR1H2-RXR, that may be important for coordinated transcription of multiple steroid-related genes. We found very little qualitative overlap in predicted transcription factor binding sites in the genes for two cholesterol transport proteins, the 18 kDa cholesterol transport protein (TSPO and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR. We therefore performed in situ hybridization for TSPO and found that its mRNA was not always detected in brain regions where StAR and steroidogenic enzymes were previously shown to be expressed. Also, transcription of TSPO, but not StAR, may be regulated by the experience of hearing song. Conclusions The genes required for estradiol synthesis and

  14. Statistics and Classification of the Microwave Zebra Patterns Associated with Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Meszarosova, H; Karlicky, M

    2013-01-01

    The microwave zebra pattern (ZP) is the most interesting, intriguing, and complex spectral structure frequently observed in solar flares. A comprehensive statistical study will certainly help us to understand the formation mechanism, which is not exactly clear now. This work presents a comprehensive statistical analysis on a big sample with 202 ZP events collected from observations at the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer at Huairou and the Ondrejov Radiospectrograph in Czech Republic at frequencies of 1.00 - 7.60 GHz during 2000 - 2013. After investigating the parameter properties of ZPs, such as the occurrence in flare phase, frequency range, polarization degree, duration, etc., we find that the variation of zebra stripe frequency separation with respect to frequency is the best indicator for a physical classification of ZPs. Microwave ZPs can be classified into 3 types: equidistant ZP, variable-distant ZP, and growing-distant ZP, possibly corresponding to mechanisms of Bernstein wave model, whistl...

  15. Quasi-periodic wiggles of microwave zebra structures in a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Sijie; Selzer, L A; Tan, Baolin; Yan, Yihua

    2013-01-01

    Quasi-periodic wiggles of microwave zebra pattern structures with period range from about 0.5 s to 1.5 s are found in a X-class solar flare on 2006 December 13 at the 2.6-3.8 GHz with the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Huairou). Periodogram and correlation analysis show that the wiggles have two-three significant periodicities and almost in phase between stripes at different frequency. The Alfven speed estimated from the zebra pattern structures is about 700 Km/s. We obtain the spatial size of the waveguiding plasma structure to be about 1 Mm with the detected period of about 1 s. It suggests the ZP wiggles can be associated with the fast mag- netoacoustic oscillations in the flaring active region. The lack of a significant phase shift between wiggles of different stripes suggests that the ZP wiggles are caused by a standing sausage oscillation.

  16. PERBANDINGAN KECEPATAN PEMBIUSAN DAN RECOVERY IKAN HIAS ZEBRA JAKARTA MENGGUNAKAN SIANIDA DAN MINYAK CENGKEH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Andy Nugraha

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to compare the stunning time and recovery time of reef fish Zebra Jakarta. Sianida and clove oil was used as anaesthetic agent in this experiment. Both substances used concentration of 5 ppm. 5 fish was used in each concentration. Fish was exposed to each concentration one by one and once fish undergo in total loss of equilibrium, time was recorded. Fish then tranferred to recovery tank contained fresh aerated sea water. Once fish recovered, time was recorded. Result shows that fish exposed to clove oil 5 ppm have faster stunning time than fish exposed to cyanide 5 ppm. However, fish exposed to cyanide 5 ppm have faster recovery time compared to fish exposed to clove oil 5 ppm.Key words : Stunning time, Zebra Jakarta, Cyanide, Clove oil

  17. A model of so-called "Zebra" emissions in solar flare radio burst continua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple mechanism for the generation of electromagnetic "Zebra" pattern emissions is proposed. "Zebra" bursts are regularly spaced narrow-band radio emissions on the otherwise broadband radio continuum emitted by the active solar corona. The mechanism is based on the generation of an ion-ring distribution in a magnetic mirror geometry in the presence of a properly directed field-aligned electric potential field. Such ion-rings or ion-conics are well known from magnetospheric observations. Under coronal conditions they may become weakly relativistic. In this case the ion-cyclotron maser generates a number of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron harmonics which modulate the electron maser emission. The mechanism is capable of switching the emission on and off or amplifying it quasi-periodically which is a main feature of the observations.

  18. The effects of rearing conditions on sexual traits and preferences in zebra finches

    OpenAIRE

    Holveck, Marie-Jeanne

    2008-01-01

    Although theory predicts that females should prefer the highest quality male, female mating preferences within populations often show pronounced variation. What causes and maintains this variation remains poorly understood. This thesis addresses the influence of rearing conditions both on female mating preferences and male advertising signals in the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata. It reconciles earlier apparently contradicting findings on the relative importance of visual versus acoustic sig...

  19. Preparation and evaluation of biocide-loaded particles to control the biofouling zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha

    OpenAIRE

    R. Costa; Aldridge, D. C.; Moggridge, G. D.

    2011-01-01

    The freshwater zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha is a powerful biofouling bivalve, which has tremendous impact on industrial facilities whose operation depends on the intensive use of freshwater, such as waterworks and power stations. The control of the pest in industrial environments remains a major challenge due to low selectivity over non-target organisms and the expense of the large quantities of biocides required. A novel delivery technique involving the encapsulation of a toxin within h...

  20. Pharyngeal teeth of the freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) a predator of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha)

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, John R. P., III

    1997-01-01

    The morphology of pharyngeal teeth of freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) was studied to determine changes that occur during growth of drum that may relate to consumption of zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) by larger fish. Pharyngeal teeth were of three types. Cardiform teeth were replaced by villiform teeth, which were replaced by molariform teeth as the size class of drum increased. Molariform teeth comprised over 85% of total surface area of dentition in fish 265 mm long.

  1. Myosin heavy-chain isoforms in the flight and leg muscles of hummingbirds and zebra finches

    OpenAIRE

    Velten, Brandy P.; Welch, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform complement is intimately related to a muscle's contractile properties, yet relatively little is known about avian MHC isoforms or how they may vary with fiber type and/or the contractile properties of a muscle. The rapid shortening of muscles necessary to power flight at the high wingbeat frequencies of ruby-throated hummingbirds and zebra finches (25–60 Hz), along with the varied morphology and use of the hummingbird hindlimb, provides a unique opportunity to...

  2. Juvenile zebra finches learn the underlying structural regularities of their fathers’ song

    OpenAIRE

    Otilia eMenyhart; Oren eKolodny; Goldstein, Michael H.; DeVoogd, Timothy J.; Shimon eEdelman

    2015-01-01

    Natural behaviors, such as foraging, tool use, social interaction, birdsong, and language, exhibit branching sequential structure. Such structure should be learnable if it can be inferred from the statistics of early experience. We report that juvenile zebra finches learn such sequential structure in song. Song learning in finches has been extensively studied, and it is generally believed that young males acquire song by imitating tutors (Zann, 1996). Variability in the order of elements in a...

  3. Sex-specific effects of yolk testosterone on survival, begging and growth of zebra finches

    OpenAIRE

    von Engelhardt, N.; Carere, C; Dijkstra, C; Groothuis, TGG

    2006-01-01

    Yolk androgens affect offspring hatching, begging, growth and survival in many bird species. If these effects are sex-specific, yolk androgen deposition may constitute a mechanism for differential investment in male and female offspring. We tested this hypothesis in zebra finches. In this species, females increase yolk-testosterone levels and produce male-biased sex ratios when paired to more attractive males. We therefore predicted that especially sons benefit from elevated yolk androgens. E...

  4. The Zebra Battery: a South African contender for electric vehicle application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Coertzer

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available The Zebra battery is one of the most promising power sources for electric vehicles which might be on sale before the year 2000. It is a South African development which started at the CSIR and is at present jointly managed by the Anglo American Corpora­tion of S.A. and the German company A.E.G. The chemical reaction converts common salt and nickel to nickel chloride and sodium during the charging phase.

  5. Batteries: An Advanced Na-FeCl2 ZEBRA Battery for Stationary Energy Storage Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2015-06-17

    Sodium-metal chloride batteries, ZEBRA, are considered as one of the most important electrochemical devices for stationary energy storage applications because of its advantages of good cycle life, safety, and reliability. However, sodium-nickel chloride (Na-NiCl2) batteries, the most promising redox chemistry in ZEBRA batteries, still face great challenges for the practical application due to its inevitable feature of using Ni cathode (high materials cost). In this work, a novel intermediate-temperature sodium-iron chloride (Na-FeCl2) battery using a molten sodium anode and Fe cathode is proposed and demonstrated. The first use of unique sulfur-based additives in Fe cathode enables Na-FeCl2 batteries can be assembled in the discharged state and operated at intermediate-temperature (<200°C). The results in this work demonstrate that intermediate-temperature Na-FeCl2 battery technology could be a propitious solution for ZEBRA battery technologies by replacing the traditional Na-NiCl2 chemistry.

  6. Simple Approaches to Improve the Automatic Inventory of ZEBRA Crossing from Mls Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, P.; Riveiro, B.; Soilán, M.; Díaz-Vilariño, L.; Martínez-Sánchez, J.

    2015-08-01

    The city management is increasingly supported by information technologies, leading to paradigms such as smart cities, where decision-makers, companies and citizens are continuously interconnected. 3D modelling turns of great relevance when the city has to be managed making use of geospatial databases or Geographic Information Systems. On the other hand, laser scanning technology has experienced a significant growth in the last years, and particularly, terrestrial mobile laser scanning platforms are being more and more used with inventory purposes in both cities and road environments. Consequently, large datasets are available to produce the geometric basis for the city model; however, this data is not directly exploitable by management systems constraining the implementation of the technology for such applications. This paper presents a new algorithm for the automatic detection of zebra crossing. The algorithm is divided in three main steps: road segmentation (based on a PCA analysis of the points contained in each cycle of collected by a mobile laser system), rasterization (conversion of the point cloud to a raster image coloured as a function of intensity data), and zebra crossing detection (using the Hough Transform and logical constrains for line classification). After evaluating different datasets collected in three cities located in Northwest Spain (comprising 25 strips with 30 visible zebra crossings) a completeness of 83% was achieved.

  7. Acetylcholinesterase in central vocal control nuclei of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Monika Sadananda

    2004-06-01

    The distribution of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the central vocal control nuclei of the zebra finch was studied using enzyme histochemistry. AChE fibres and cells are intensely labelled in the forebrain nucleus area X, strongly labelled in high vocal centre (HVC) perikarya, and moderately to lightly labelled in the somata and neuropil of vocal control nuclei robust nucleus of arcopallium (RA), medial magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (MMAN) and lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (LMAN). The identified sites of cholinergic and/or cholinoceptive neurons are similar to the cholinergic presence in vocal control regions of other songbirds such as the song sparrow, starling and another genus of the zebra finch (Poephila guttata), and to a certain extent in parallel vocal control regions in vocalizing birds such as the budgerigar. AChE presence in the vocal control system suggests innervation by either afferent projecting cholinergic systems and/or local circuit cholinergic neurons. Co-occurrence with choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) indicates efferent cholinergic projections. The cholinergic presence in parts of the zebra finch vocal control system, such as the area X, that is also intricately wired with parts of the basal ganglia, the descending fibre tracts and brain stem nuclei could underlie this circuitry’s involvement in sensory processing and motor control of song.

  8. [Mollusc diversity in an Arca zebra (Mollusca: Bivalvia) community, Chacopata, Sucre, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, A S; Ruiz, L J; García, N; Alvarez, M

    2001-06-01

    The diversity of a subtidal epifaunal mollusk community was studied from September, 1990 to September, 1991 in Chacopata, Sucre State, Venezuela. There were 40 species (24 bivalves and 16 gastropods). The diversity indexes (H' = 2.087, J' = 0.392, 1/D = 0.528) were low when compared with other tropical zones. Monthly diversity reached its maximum in September, 1990 (1.63 bits/ind.) and July, 1991 (1.60 bits/ind.); minimum diversity occurred in June, 1991 (0.52 bits/ind.). A Log series model applied to species abundance data showed a straight line with a diversity index alpha of 5.56. Of 40 species identified, the turkeywing Arca zebra was dominant (69% in number of individuals and 72% of biomass) followed by Pinctada imbricata, Modiolus squamosus, Chama macerophyla and Anadara notabilis. The predatory snails Phyllonotus pomum, Chicoreus brevifrons and Murex recurvirostris seemed to have trophic relationships with A. zebra. The total mean biomass in wet weight (469.20 +/- 263 g m-2, shell included) was high which indicates that A. zebra, a species with a rapid growth rate, occupies a central role in the assemblage as an efficient filter feeder that converts planktonic food into available biomass, supporting one of the most important fisheries in Venezuela. PMID:11935909

  9. Castration modulates singing patterns and electrophysiological properties of RA projection neurons in adult male zebra finches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songhua Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Castration can change levels of plasma testosterone. Androgens such as testosterone play an important role in stabilizing birdsong. The robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA is an important premotor nucleus critical for singing. In this study, we investigated the effect of castration on singing patterns and electrophysiological properties of projection neurons (PNs in the RA of adult male zebra finches. Adult male zebra finches were castrated and the changes in bird song assessed. We also recorded the electrophysiological changes from RA PNs using patch clamp recording. We found that the plasma levels of testosterone were significantly decreased, song syllable’s entropy was increased and the similarity of motif was decreased after castration. Spontaneous and evoked firing rates, membrane time constants, and membrane capacitance of RA PNs in the castration group were lower than those of the control and the sham groups. Afterhyperpolarization AHP time to peak of spontaneous action potential (AP was prolonged after castration.These findings suggest that castration decreases song stereotypy and excitability of RA PNs in male zebra finches.

  10. The zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771), in North America: impact on raw water users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Ronald W.; Kovalak, William P.; Schloesser, Donald W.

    1989-01-01

    The zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas), is a small mollusc native to the Black, Caspian, and Azov Seas that was discovered in Lake Erie of the Laurentian Great Lakes of North America in 1988. Its presence there raises immediate concerns for users of raw water because it can become abundant enough to obstruct the flow of water through pipes, hoses, screens, and condensers. Biofouling attributed to this mussel was observed at several power plants, water treatment plants, and food processing and industrial facilities along Lake Erie in 1989. Estimated densities at one power plant intake canal were as high as 700,000 per m2. In addition, large numbers were found in main steam condensors and in the service water system, threatening the water supply for cooling, fire protection, and dust suppression systems. Municipal water intakes along the Canadian and United States shorelines have also been impaired. In one southeast Michigan city, drinking water withdrawal from Lake Erie was reduced 45% by the mussel. Routine checks of raw water supplies for free-floating zebra mussel veligers are reommended to determine if reproducing adult populations are present in local water bodies. After an early alert, raw water intakes could be protected to alleviate damage from the biofouling zebra mussel.

  11. Investigation of Acute Toxicity Diazinon, Deltamethrin, Butachlor and pretilachlor on Zebra Cichlid (Cryptoheros nigrofasciatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sadeghi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of pesticide due to the huge demand for agricultural purposes is very prevalent in surface waters of Iran. These pesticides could finally accumulate in aquatic ecosystems and have been proved to have toxic effects on aquatic animals. The aim of this study was to assess the acute toxicity of Diazinon, Deltamethrin, Butachlor and Pretilachlor on Zebra Cichlid (Cryptoheros nigrofasciatus. Methods: Fish samples were exposed to different concentrations of Diazinon (60% (0, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 ppm, Deltamethrin (2.5% (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.10, 0.20 and 0.40 ppm, butachlor (60% (0, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 ppm and pretilachlor (50% (0, 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 ppm for 96 h within the 100 L glass aquaria and cumulative mortality of Zebra Cichlid fish was calculated in 24-h interval. Results: The very low LC50 obtained for diazinon (5.06±0.37 ppm, deltamethrin (0.15±0.39 ppm, butachlor (8.93±0.26 ppm and pretilachlor (20.72±0.58 ppm indicated that these are highly toxic chemicals. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that deltamethrin and pretilachlor had the lowest and highest rate of mortality on the Zebra Cichlid respectively.

  12. Zebra Alphaherpesviruses (EHV-1 and EHV-9): Genetic Diversity, Latency and Co-Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgawad, Azza; Damiani, Armando; Ho, Simon Y. W.; Strauss, Günter; Szentiks, Claudia A.; East, Marion L.; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2016-01-01

    Alphaherpesviruses are highly prevalent in equine populations and co-infections with more than one of these viruses’ strains frequently diagnosed. Lytic replication and latency with subsequent reactivation, along with new episodes of disease, can be influenced by genetic diversity generated by spontaneous mutation and recombination. Latency enhances virus survival by providing an epidemiological strategy for long-term maintenance of divergent strains in animal populations. The alphaherpesviruses equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) and 9 (EHV-9) have recently been shown to cross species barriers, including a recombinant EHV-1 observed in fatal infections of a polar bear and Asian rhinoceros. Little is known about the latency and genetic diversity of EHV-1 and EHV-9, especially among zoo and wild equids. Here, we report evidence of limited genetic diversity in EHV-9 in zebras, whereas there is substantial genetic variability in EHV-1. We demonstrate that zebras can be lytically and latently infected with both viruses concurrently. Such a co-occurrence of infection in zebras suggests that even relatively slow-evolving viruses such as equine herpesviruses have the potential to diversify rapidly by recombination. This has potential consequences for the diagnosis of these viruses and their management in wild and captive equid populations. PMID:27657113

  13. Using Digital Images of the Zebra Finch Song System as a Tool to Teach Organizational Effects of Steroid Hormones: A Free Downloadable Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisham, William; Schottler, Natalie A.; Beck McCauley, Lisa M.; Pham, Anh P.; Ruiz, Maureen L.; Fong, Michelle C.; Cui, Xinran

    2011-01-01

    Zebra finch song behavior is sexually dimorphic: males sing and females do not. The neural system underlying this behavior is sexually dimorphic, and this sex difference is easy to quantify. During development, the zebra finch song system can be altered by steroid hormones, specifically estradiol, which actually masculinizes it. Because of the…

  14. Induction of Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Replication by Recombinant Adenoviruses Expressing the Zebra Gene with EBV Specific Promoters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu CHEN; Juan YIN; Yi CHEN; Jiang ZHONG

    2005-01-01

    The latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is found in the cells of many tumors. For example, EBV is detectable in almost all cases, and in almost all tumor cells, of non-keratinizing nasopharyngeal carcinoma.Activating the latent virus, which will result in its lytic replication and the death of tumor cells, is a potential approach for the treatment of EBV-associated cancers. In this study, three recombinant adenoviruses were constructed to express the Zebra gene, an EBV gene responsible for switching from the latent state to lytic replication. EBV-specific promoters were used in order to limit Zebra expression in EBV-positive cells, and reduce the potential side effects. The EBV promoters used were Cp, Zp and a dual promoter combining both promoters, CpZp. The Zebra protein was detected in HEK293 cells as well as the EBV-positive D98-HR1 cells infected with recombinant viruses. An EBV lytic replication early antigen, EA-D, was also detected in infected D98-HR1, implying the initiation of lytic replication. In the cell viability assay, Zebra-expressing adenoviruses had little effect on EBV-negative HeLa cells, while significantly reducing the cell viability and proliferation of D98-HR1 cells. The results indicate that EBV virus promoters can be used in adenovirus vectors to express the Zebra gene and induce EBV lytic replication in D98-HR1 cells.

  15. Simple sequence repeats in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata expressed sequence tags: a new resource for evolutionary genetic studies of passerines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkhead Timothy R

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Passerines (perching birds are widely studied across many biological disciplines including ecology, population biology, neurobiology, behavioural ecology and evolutionary biology. However, understanding the molecular basis of relevant traits is hampered by the paucity of passerine genomics tools. Efforts to address this problem are underway, and the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata will be the first passerine to have its genome sequenced. Here we describe a bioinformatic analysis of zebra finch expressed sequence tag (EST Genbank entries. Results A total of 48,862 ESTs were downloaded from GenBank and assembled into contigs, representing an estimated 17,404 unique sequences. The unique sequence set contained 638 simple sequence repeats (SSRs or microsatellites of length ≥20 bp and purity ≥90% and 144 simple sequence repeats of length ≥30 bp. A chromosomal location for the majority of SSRs was predicted by BLASTing against assembly 2.1 of the chicken genome sequence. The relative exonic location (5' untranslated region, coding region or 3' untranslated region was predicted for 218 of the SSRs, by BLAST search against the ENSEMBL chicken peptide database. Ten loci were examined for polymorphism in two zebra finch populations and two populations of a distantly related passerine, the house sparrow Passer domesticus. Linkage was confirmed for four loci that were predicted to reside on the passerine homologue of chicken chromosome 7. Conclusion We show that SSRs are abundant within zebra finch ESTs, and that their genomic location can be predicted from sequence similarity with the assembled chicken genome sequence. We demonstrate that a useful proportion of zebra finch EST-SSRs are likely to be polymorphic, and that they can be used to build a linkage map. Finally, we show that many zebra finch EST-SSRs are likely to be useful in evolutionary genetic studies of other passerines.

  16. Effects of elevated carbon dioxide concentrations on survivorship in zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) and Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, R.F.; Matthews, M.A.; Shaffer, L.R.; Johnson, P.D. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States)

    1995-06-01

    In order to determine their tolerance to elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide, Asian clams and zebra mussels were collected. Subsamples of both species were acclimated to 25{degrees}C>14 days and then exposed in water at 25{degrees}C to various concentrations of CO{sub 2} and survivorship recorded. Zebra mussels were allowed to byssally attach prior to testing. Media CO{sub 2} concentrations were maintained by continuous bubbling with appropriate gas mixtures. Gas treatment included: (1) anoxia; (2) hypercapnic anoxia; and (3) hypercapnic normoxia. Deaths were recorded in subsamples of both species every 12-24 h until 100% mortality was achieved. No significant mortality occurred among specimens of either species in air bubbled control media in any experiment. Mortality time of zebra mussels exposed to anoxia under 100% N{sub 2} was 103.7 h and of Asian clams, 349.7 h. Mortality was more rapid among samples of both species exposed to anoxia under 100% CO{sub 2}, mean time to death being 43.6 h for zebra mussels and 46.3 h for Asian clams. There was no difference in the survivorship of samples of either species under atmospheres of either 5% CO{sub 2} and 95% N{sub 2} or 100% N{sub 2}, however, Asian clams survived anoxia under either atmosphere 4 to 5 times longer than did zebra mussels. There was no significant mortality among Asian clam or zebra mussel samples after a 39 day exposure to hypercapnic normoxia. While exposure to hypercapnic normoxia under an atmosphere of 5% CO{sub 2}:19% O{sub 2}:76% N{sub 2} did not induce mortality in zebra mussel samples, it completely suppressed all byssal thread production after 7 days of exposure and induced all sampled individuals to release from their byssal attachments within 10 days of exposure. These results indicate that CO{sub 2} injection may be an easily applied, cost-effective, environmentally acceptable molluscicide for mitigation and control of raw water system macrofouling by Asian clams and zebra mussels.

  17. Examination of the potential of chlorine dioxide for use in zebra mussel veliger control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusznak, L.; Smolik, N.; Hale, L.; Freymark, S. [Ashland Chemical Company, Drew Division, Boonton, NJ (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Dreissena polymorpha (zebra mussel) veligers were treated with various concentrations of chlorine dioxide and exposed at several time intervals to determine the effectiveness of this oxidant as a veliger control agent. The direction of this testing was based on previous studies which determined the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide as a molluscicide for adult zebra mussel control. Zebra mussel veligers were collected from the Niagara River shoreline at an untreated site and tested using filtered river water from the same source. All testing was conducted on site at an industrial plant in order to insure the integrity of veligers collected for this study. The plankton wheel method was used to examine the effects of chlorine dioxide. This methodology involves intense microscopic examination of the test organism prior to and after chemical exposure todeterminen molluscicidal efficacy. Veliger mortality was determined based on observations of veliger movement. Typical criteria for the determination of mortality was expanded to include four categories; veliger actively swimming, internal musculature movement, no internal musculature movement observed, however not necessarily indicating a mortality and obviously a mortality. The treatment levels ranged from 0.75 ppm - 2.0 ppm which are considered to simulate treatment levels in actual applications. Mortality levels ranged on average from 16%-42% based on 30 minute or 60 minute exposure times. The determination exposure time was based on water flow time intervals in actural applications. Sodium hypochlorite was also evaluated in order to compare the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide against this known veliger control agent. Testing resulted in chlorine dioxide providing significantly better veliger control than sodium hypochlorite under similar conditions.

  18. Combined effects of depleted uranium and ionising radiation on zebra fish embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the environment, living organisms are exposed to a mixture of stressors, and the combined effects are deemed as multiple stressor effects. In the present work, the authors studied the multiple stressor effect in embryos of the zebra fish (Danio rerio) from simultaneous exposure to alpha particles and depleted uranium (DU) through quantification of apoptotic signals at 24 h post-fertilisation (hpf) revealed by vital dye acridine orange staining. In each set of experiments, dechorionated zebra fish embryos were divided into 4 groups, each having 10 embryos: Group (C) in which the embryos did not receive any further treatment; Group (IU) in which the embryos received an alpha-particle dose of 0.44 mGy at 5 hpf and were then exposed to 100 μg l-1 of DU from 5 to 6 hpf; Group (I) in which the embryos received an alpha-particle dose of 0.44 mGy at 5 hpf and Group (U) in which the dechorionated embryos were exposed to 100 μg l-1 of DU from 5 to 6 hpf. The authors confirmed that an alpha-particle dose of 0.44 mGy and a DU exposure for 1 h separately led to hormetic and toxic effects assessed by counting apoptotic signals, respectively, in the zebra fish. Interestingly, the combined exposure led to an effect more toxic than that caused by the DU exposure alone, so effectively DU changed the beneficial effect (hormesis) brought about by alpha-particle irradiation into an apparently toxic effect. This could be explained in terms of the promotion of early death of cells predisposed to spontaneous transformation by the small alpha-particle dose (i.e. hormetic effect) and the postponement of cell death upon DU exposure. (authors)

  19. Current Status of Health and Safety Issues of Sodium/Metal Chloride (Zebra) Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report addresses environmental, health, and safety (EH ampersand S) issues associated with sodium/ metal chloride batteries, in general, although most references to specific cell or battery types refer to units developed or being developed under the Zebra trademark. The report focuses on issues pertinent to sodium/metal chloride batteries and their constituent components; however, the fact that some ''issues'' arise from interaction between electric vehicle (EV) and battery design com- pels occasional discussion amid the context of EV vehicle design and operation. This approach has been chosen to provide a reasonably comprehensive account of the topic from a cell technology perspective and an applications perspective

  20. Todralazine protects zebra fish from lethal doses of ionizing radiation: role of hematopoietic stem cell expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced cell killing and hematopoietic stem cell depletion leads to compromised immune functions and opportunistic infections which significantly affect the recovery and survival upon irradiation. Any agent which can expand residual hematopoietic stem cells in irradiated organism can render protection from the effects of lethal doses of ionizing radiation. Johns Hopkins Clinical compound library (JHCCL) was screened for protection against lethal doses of ionizing radiation using developing zebra fish as a model organism. Modulation of radiation induced reactive oxygen species by the small molecules were done by DCFDA staining and for visual identification and quantification of apoptosis acridine orange assay, flow cytometry were employed respectively. Hematopoietic stem cell expansion potential was assessed by quantifying runx1 expression, a marker for definitive stem cells, were done by RT-PCR and by the kinetics of recovery from chemically induced anaemia. Todralazine hydrochloride from JHCCL exhibited promising results with potential anti radiation effects. A dose of 5μM was found to be the most effective and has rendered significant organ and whole body protection (100% survival advantage over a period of 6 days) against 20 Gy. However todralazine did not modulated radiation induced free radicals (monitored within 2 h of irradiation) and apoptosis in zebra fish embryos analysed at 8 and 24h post irradiation. Flow cytometric quantification of pre G1 population suggested the same. Chemoinformatics approaches were further carried out to elucidate possible targets which are contributing to its radioprotection potential. Structural similarity search suggested several targets and possible hematopoietic stem cell expanding potential. Treatment of zebra fish embryos with todralazine has lead to significant proliferation of hematopoietic stem cell as indicated by increase in expression of runx1. HSC expanding potential of todralazine was further supported by

  1. Oscillating magnetic field disrupts magnetic orientation in Zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiltschko Wolfgang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zebra finches can be trained to use the geomagnetic field as a directional cue for short distance orientation. The physical mechanisms underlying the primary processes of magnetoreception are, however, largely unknown. Two hypotheses of how birds perceive magnetic information are mainly discussed, one dealing with modulation of radical pair processes in retinal structures, the other assuming that iron deposits in the upper beak of the birds are involved. Oscillating magnetic fields in the MHz range disturb radical pair mechanisms but do not affect magnetic particles. Thus, application of such oscillating fields in behavioral experiments can be used as a diagnostic tool to decide between the two alternatives. Methods In a setup that eliminates all directional cues except the geomagnetic field zebra finches were trained to search for food in the magnetic north/south axis. The birds were then tested for orientation performance in two magnetic conditions. In condition 1 the horizontal component of the geomagnetic field was shifted by 90 degrees using a helmholtz coil. In condition 2 a high frequently oscillating field (1.156 MHz was applied in addition to the shifted field. Another group of birds was trained to solve the orientation task, but with visual landmarks as directional cue. The birds were then tested for their orientation performance in the same magnetic conditions as applied for the first experiment. Results The zebra finches could be trained successfully to orient in the geomagnetic field for food search in the north/south axis. They were also well oriented in test condition 1, with the magnetic field shifted horizontally by 90 degrees. In contrast, when the oscillating field was added, the directional choices during food search were randomly distributed. Birds that were trained to visually guided orientation showed no difference of orientation performance in the two magnetic conditions. Conclusion The results

  2. Current Status of Health and Safety Issues of Sodium/Metal Chloride (Zebra) Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trickett, D.

    1998-12-15

    This report addresses environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues associated with sodium/ metal chloride batteries, in general, although most references to specific cell or battery types refer to units developed or being developed under the Zebra trademark. The report focuses on issues pertinent to sodium/metal chloride batteries and their constituent components; however, the fact that some ''issues'' arise from interaction between electric vehicle (EV) and battery design compels occasional discussion amid the context of EV vehicle design and operation. This approach has been chosen to provide a reasonably comprehensive account of the topic from a cell technology perspective and an applications perspective.

  3. Assessment of Mercury Bioaccumulation in Zebra Cichlid (Cichlasoma Nigrofasciatum Exposed to Sublethal Concentrations of Permethrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Banaee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aquatic ecosystems are frequently subjected to contamination by toxic heavy metals and pesticides, yet very little is known about the influence of pesticides on bioaccumulation of heavy metals in aquatic organisms. Mercury is a toxic metal with no known biological benefit to organisms. Bioavailability of mercury in aquatic environments depends on biological and non-biological parameters including other pollutants. Therefore, the objectives of this research were to determine the effects of permethrin on bioaccumulation of mercury in zebra cichlid. Methods: Acute toxicity (LC50 of permethrin and mercury chloride was evaluated by estimating mortality in Probit Model in SPSS (version 19.0 IBM. In sub-lethal toxicity, zebra cichlid (Cichlasoma nigrofasciatum was exposed to various concentrations of permethrin (0.0, 0.40, 0.80, 1.20 and 1.60 µg.L-1 combined with 20 µg.L-1 mercury chloride for 15 days. At the end of the experiment, mercury concentrations were measured using ICP-OES-Perkin elmer (optima 7300-DV. Results: 96 h LC50 values of permethrin and mercury for C. nigrofasciatum were calculated to be 17.55 µg.L-1 and 140.38 µg.L-1, respectively. Our results clearly showed that the bioaccumulation of mercury in the specimens increased with increasing concentrations of permethrin to 1.20 and 1.60 µg.L-1. Conclusion: Increasing the concentration of permethrin had synergistic effects on the bioaccumulation of mercury in fish.

  4. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation impairs extracellular matrix remodeling during zebra fish fin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Eric A; Mathew, Lijoy K; Löhr, Christiane V; Hasson, Rachelle; Tanguay, Robert L

    2007-01-01

    Adult zebra fish completely regenerate their caudal (tail) fin following partial amputation. Exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) inhibits this regenerative process. Proper regulation of transcription, innervation, vascularization, and extracellular matrix (ECM) composition is essential for complete fin regeneration. Previous microarray studies suggest that genes involved in ECM regulation are misexpressed following activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. To investigate whether TCDD blocks regeneration by impairing ECM remodeling, male zebra fish were i.p. injected with 50 ng/g TCDD or vehicle, and caudal fins were amputated. By 3 days postamputation (dpa), the vascular network in the regenerating fin of TCDD-exposed fish was disorganized compared to vehicle-exposed animals. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining revealed that axonal outgrowth was impacted by TCDD as early as 3 dpa. Histological analysis demonstrated that TCDD exposure leads to an accumulation of collagen at the end of the fin ray just distal to the amputation site by 3 dpa. Mature lepidotrichial-forming cells (fin ray-forming cells) were not observed in the fins of TCDD-treated fish. The capacity to metabolize ECM was also altered by TCDD exposure. Quantitative real-time PCR studies revealed that the aryl hydrocarbon pathway is active and that matrix-remodeling genes are expressed in the regenerate following TCDD exposure.

  5. Female but not male zebra finches adjust heat output in response to increased incubation demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Davina L; Lindström, Jan; McCafferty, Dominic J; Nager, Ruedi G

    2014-04-15

    In many incubating birds, heat transfer from parent to egg is facilitated by the brood patch, an area of ventral abdominal skin that becomes highly vascularised, swells and loses its down feathers around the time of laying. Only the female develops a brood patch in most passerine species, but males of some species can incubate and maintain the eggs at similar temperatures to females even without a brood patch. Here we used a novel application of infrared thermography to examine sex differences in parental care from a physiological perspective. Using incubating male and female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), a species in which the male lacks a brood patch, we measured the surface temperature of the ventral plumage overlying the abdomen and a reference area that does not contact the eggs (thorax) twice per pair. In half of the pairs, clutch size was experimentally enlarged between the two sets of measurements to increase incubation demand. We found that the temperature differential between abdomen and thorax plumage was greater in females than in males, and that abdomen plumage was warmer after clutch enlargement than before in females but not in males. These findings are consistent with morphological sex differences in brood patch development and suggest that male and female zebra finches differ in the way they regulate abdomen versus general body surface temperature in response to variation in incubation demand.

  6. Zebra finches can use positional and transitional cues to distinguish vocal element strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiani; Ten Cate, Carel

    2015-08-01

    Learning sequences is of great importance to humans and non-human animals. Many motor and mental actions, such as singing in birds and speech processing in humans, rely on sequential learning. At least two mechanisms are considered to be involved in such learning. The chaining theory proposes that learning of sequences relies on memorizing the transitions between adjacent items, while the positional theory suggests that learners encode the items according to their ordinal position in the sequence. Positional learning is assumed to dominate sequential learning. However, human infants exposed to a string of speech sounds can learn transitional (chaining) cues. So far, it is not clear whether birds, an increasingly important model for examining vocal processing, can do this. In this study we use a Go-Nogo design to examine whether zebra finches can use transitional cues to distinguish artificially constructed strings of song elements. Zebra finches were trained with sequences differing in transitional and positional information and next tested with novel strings sharing positional and transitional similarities with the training strings. The results show that they can attend to both transitional and positional cues and that their sequential coding strategies can be biased toward transitional cues depending on the learning context. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: In Honor of Jerry Hogan.

  7. Parasitism can be a confounding factor in assessing the response of zebra mussels to water contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological responses measured in aquatic organisms to monitor environmental pollution could be also affected by different biotic and abiotic factors. Among these environmental factors, parasitism has often been neglected even if infection by parasites is very frequent. In the present field investigation, the parasite infra-communities and zebra mussel biological responses were studied up- and downstream a waste water treatment plant in northeast France. In both sites, mussels were infected by ciliates and/or intracellular bacteria, but prevalence rates and infection intensities were different according to the habitat. Concerning the biological responses differences were observed related to the site quality and the infection status. Parasitism affects both systems but seemed to depend mainly on environmental conditions. The influence of parasites is not constant, but remains important to consider it as a potential confounding factor in ecotoxicological studies. This study also emphasizes the interesting use of integrative indexes to synthesize data set. Highlights: ► Study of potential bias associated with the use of infected zebra mussels in ecotoxicological studies. ► Presence of infected mussels on banks and channels, up- and downstream a waste water treatment plant. ► Parasitism influence on biological responses dependent of mussel population history. ► Integrative index, an interesting tool to synthesize the set of biological data. - Parasitism influence on the host physiology would be strongly dependent on environmental conditions but remains a potential confounding factor in ecotoxicological studies.

  8. Budgerigars and zebra finches differ in how they generalize in an artificial grammar learning experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierings, Michelle J.; ten Cate, Carel

    2016-01-01

    The ability to abstract a regularity that underlies strings of sounds is a core mechanism of the language faculty but might not be specific to language learning or even to humans. It is unclear whether and to what extent nonhuman animals possess the ability to abstract regularities defining the relation among arbitrary auditory items in a string and to generalize this abstraction to strings of acoustically novel items. In this study we tested these abilities in a songbird (zebra finch) and a parrot species (budgerigar). Subjects were trained in a go/no-go design to discriminate between two sets of sound strings arranged in an XYX or an XXY structure. After this discrimination was acquired, each subject was tested with test strings that were structurally identical to the training strings but consisted of either new combinations of known elements or of novel elements belonging to other element categories. Both species learned to discriminate between the two stimulus sets. However, their responses to the test strings were strikingly different. Zebra finches categorized test stimuli with previously heard elements by the ordinal position that these elements occupied in the training strings, independent of string structure. In contrast, the budgerigars categorized both novel combinations of familiar elements as well as strings consisting of novel element types by their underlying structure. They thus abstracted the relation among items in the XYX and XXY structures, an ability similar to that shown by human infants and indicating a level of abstraction comparable to analogical reasoning. PMID:27325756

  9. Involvement of apoptosis in host-parasite interactions in the zebra mussel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laëtitia Minguez

    Full Text Available The question of whether cell death by apoptosis plays a biological function during infection is key to understanding host-parasite interactions. We investigated the involvement of apoptosis in several host-parasite systems, using zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha as test organisms and their micro- and macroparasites. As a stress response associated with parasitism, heat shock proteins (Hsp can be induced. In this protein family, Hsp70 are known to be apoptosis inhibitors. Mussels were diagnosed for their respective infections by standard histological methods; apoptosis was detected using the TUNEL methods on paraffin sections and Hsp70 by immunohistochemistry on cryosections. Circulating hemocytes were the main cells observed in apoptosis whereas infected tissues displayed no or few apoptotic cells. Parasitism by intracellular bacteria Rickettsiales-like and the trematode Bucephalus polymorphus were associated with the inhibition of apoptosis whereas ciliates Ophryoglena spp. or the trematode Phyllodistomum folium did not involve significant differences in apoptosis. Even if some parasites were able to modulate apoptosis in zebra mussels, we did not see evidence of any involvement of Hsp70 on this mechanism.

  10. Juvenile zebra finches learn the underlying structural regularities of their fathers’ song

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otilia eMenyhart

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural behaviors, such as foraging, tool use, social interaction, birdsong, and language, exhibit branching sequential structure. Such structure should be learnable if it can be inferred from the statistics of early experience. We report that juvenile zebra finches learn such sequential structure in song. Song learning in finches has been extensively studied, and it is generally believed that young males acquire song by imitating tutors (Zann, 1996. Variability in the order of elements in an individual’s mature song occurs, but the degree to which variation in a zebra finch’s song follows statistical regularities has not been quantified, as it has typically been dismissed as production error (Sturdy et al., 1999. Allowing for the possibility that such variation in song is non-random and learnable, we applied a novel analytical approach, based on graph-structured finite-state grammars, to each individual’s full corpus of renditions of songs. This method does not assume syllable-level correspondence between individuals. We find that song variation can be described by probabilistic finite-state graph grammars that are individually distinct, and that the graphs of juveniles are more similar to those of their fathers than to those of other adult males. This grammatical learning is a new parallel between birdsong and language. Our method can be applied across species and contexts to analyze complex variable learned behaviors, as distinct as foraging, tool use, and language.

  11. Brain activation pattern depends on the strategy chosen by zebra finches to solve an orientation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Uwe; Bischof, Hans-Joachim

    2012-02-01

    Zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) were trained to find food in one of four feeders on the floor of an aviary. This feeder was always in the same place during training and was additionally marked by a distinct pattern. In the test trial the distinctly patterned feeder was interchanged with one of the other feeders, so that the birds had to decide to use either the pattern or the original location for finding food. Half of the birds used one strategy and half used the other. According to the strategy applied, different brain areas were activated, as demonstrated by c-Fos immunohistochemistry. The hippocampus was activated when spatial cues were used, while in birds orienting using the pattern of the feeder, part of the collothalamic (tectofugal) visual system showed stronger activation. The visual wulst of the lemnothalamic (thalamofugal) visual system was activated with both strategies, indicating an involvement in both spatial and pattern-directed orientation. Because the experimental situation was the same for all zebra finches, the activation pattern was only dependent on the strategy that was voluntarily chosen by each of the birds.

  12. Altered auditory BOLD response to conspecific birdsong in zebra finches with stuttered syllables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning U Voss

    Full Text Available How well a songbird learns a song appears to depend on the formation of a robust auditory template of its tutor's song. Using functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging we examine auditory responses in two groups of zebra finches that differ in the type of song they sing after being tutored by birds producing stuttering-like syllable repetitions in their songs. We find that birds that learn to produce the stuttered syntax show attenuated blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD responses to tutor's song, and more pronounced responses to conspecific song primarily in the auditory area field L of the avian forebrain, when compared to birds that produce normal song. These findings are consistent with the presence of a sensory song template critical for song learning in auditory areas of the zebra finch forebrain. In addition, they suggest a relationship between an altered response related to familiarity and/or saliency of song stimuli and the production of variant songs with stuttered syllables.

  13. Parental influence on begging call structure in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata): evidence of early vocal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villain, Avelyne S; Boucaud, Ingrid C A; Bouchut, Colette; Vignal, Clémentine

    2015-11-01

    Begging calls are signals of need used by young birds to elicit care from adults. Different theoretical frameworks have been proposed to understand this parent-offspring communication. But relationships between parental response and begging intensity, or between begging characteristics and proxies of a young's need remain puzzling. Few studies have considered the adjustment of nestling begging features to previous experience as a possible explanation of these discrepancies. In this study, we tested the effect of a heterospecific rearing environment on individual developmental trajectories of the acoustic structure of nestling begging calls. Fifty-two zebra finch chicks were fostered either to Bengalese finch or to zebra finch parents, and begging calls were recorded at several stages of nestling development. Acoustic analyses revealed that the development of the spectral features of the begging calls differed between experimental conditions: chicks reared by Bengalese finches produced higher pitched and less broadband begging calls than chicks reared by conspecific parents. Differences were stronger in males than females and were not explained by differences in growth rate. We conclude that nestling begging calls can be plastic in response to social interactions with parents. PMID:26716009

  14. Budgerigars and zebra finches differ in how they generalize in an artificial grammar learning experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierings, Michelle J; Ten Cate, Carel

    2016-07-01

    The ability to abstract a regularity that underlies strings of sounds is a core mechanism of the language faculty but might not be specific to language learning or even to humans. It is unclear whether and to what extent nonhuman animals possess the ability to abstract regularities defining the relation among arbitrary auditory items in a string and to generalize this abstraction to strings of acoustically novel items. In this study we tested these abilities in a songbird (zebra finch) and a parrot species (budgerigar). Subjects were trained in a go/no-go design to discriminate between two sets of sound strings arranged in an XYX or an XXY structure. After this discrimination was acquired, each subject was tested with test strings that were structurally identical to the training strings but consisted of either new combinations of known elements or of novel elements belonging to other element categories. Both species learned to discriminate between the two stimulus sets. However, their responses to the test strings were strikingly different. Zebra finches categorized test stimuli with previously heard elements by the ordinal position that these elements occupied in the training strings, independent of string structure. In contrast, the budgerigars categorized both novel combinations of familiar elements as well as strings consisting of novel element types by their underlying structure. They thus abstracted the relation among items in the XYX and XXY structures, an ability similar to that shown by human infants and indicating a level of abstraction comparable to analogical reasoning. PMID:27325756

  15. Antimicrobial resistance in faecal samples from buffalo, wildebeest and zebra grazing together with and without cattle in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katakweba, A. A. S.; Møller, K. S.; Muumba, J.;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to determine whether the practice of co-grazing with cattle and wild life constitutes a risk of transmission of antibiotic resistant bacteria to wild ungulates. METHODS AND RESULTS: Faecal samples were collected from buffalo (n = 35), wildebeest (n = 40), zebra (n =...

  16. Origin of Spanish invasion by the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771) revealed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajagopal, S.; Pollux, B.J.A.; Peters, J.L.; Cremers, G.; Moon- van der Staay, S.Y.; Alen, van T.; Eygensteyn, J.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Palau, A.; Vaate, de A.B.; Velde, van der G.

    2009-01-01

    The zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha is an aquatic nuisance invasive species originally native to the Ponto-Caspian region where it is found in lakes and delta areas of large rivers draining into the Black and Caspian seas. The dispersal of D. polymorpha began at the end of the 18th century, at a

  17. Food intake rates and habitat segregation of tufted duck Aythya fuligula scaup Aythya marila exploiting zebra mussels Dreissena Polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, de J.J.

    1999-01-01

    The foraging skills of Tufted Duck Aythya fuligula and Scaup Aythya marila feeding on Zebra Mussels Dreissena polymorpha were studied in experiments under semi-natural diving conditions with relevance to the IJsselmeer/Markermeer area (large lakes in the centre of The Netherlands, former Zuiderzee a

  18. Food intake rates and habitat segregation of tufted duck Aythya fuligula and scaup Aythya marila exploiting zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Leeuw, JJ

    1999-01-01

    The foraging skills of Tufted Duck Aythya fuligula and Scaup Aythya marila feeding on Zebra Mussels Dreissena polymorpha were studied in experiments under seminatural diving conditions with relevance to the IJssalmeer/Markermeer area (large lakes in the centre of The Netherlands, former Zuiderzee ar

  19. An eye for beauty: lateralized visual stimulation of courtship behavior and mate preferences in male zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Jennifer J; McCracken, Brianna G; Sher, Melissa; Mountjoy, D James

    2014-02-01

    Research on intersexual selection focuses on traits that have evolved for attracting mates and the consequences of mate choice. However, little is known about the cognitive and neural mechanisms that allow choosers to discriminate among potential mates and express an attraction to specific traits. Preferential use of the right eye during lateral displays in zebra finches, and lateralized expression of intermediate early genes in the left hemisphere during courtship led us to hypothesize that: (1) visual information from each eye differentially mediates courtship responses to potential mates; and (2) the ability to discriminate among mates and prefer certain mates over others is lateralized in the right eye/left hemisphere system of zebra finch brains. First, we exposed male zebra finches to females when using left, right or both eyes. Males courted more when the right eye was available than when only the left eye was used. Secondly, male preference for females - using beak color to indicate female quality - was tested. Right-eyed and binocular males associated with and courted orange-beaked more than gray-beaked females; whereas left-eyed males showed no preference. Lateral displays and eye use in male zebra finches increase their attractiveness and ability to assess female quality, potentially enhancing reproductive success. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: CO3 2013.

  20. Zebra Chip disease and potato biochemistry: Tuber physiological changes in response to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ infection over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebra chip disease (ZC), putatively caused by ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso), is of increasing concern to potato production in Mexico, the United States, and New Zealand. However, little is known about host tuber physiological changes that result in ZC symptom formation. This study exp...

  1. Size limitation on zebra mussels consumed by freshwater drum may preclude the effectiveness of drum as a biological controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, John R. P., III; Love, Joy G.

    1995-01-01

    The septa lengths of bivalve shells were used to estimate shell lengths of the largest zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) crushed and consumed by freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) to determine if size limitation could preclude the effectiveness of drum as a biological controller of the zebra mussel. We examined gut samples of drum (273 to 542 mm long) collected from western Lake Erie in 1991, found the largest mussel (shell length = 21.4 mm) in the 11th largest drum (TL = 405 mm), and observed a reduction of mussel size in larger drum. The lack of a relationship between mussel size and drum size for larger specimens suggests that either drum prefer smaller mussels or the gape between the upper and lower pharyngeal teeth restricts drum feeding to zebra mussels of limited size. Although drum may reduce zebra mussel populations, because of the apparent size limitation of prey it is unlikely that drum would be fully effective as a biological controller; thus, this fish should not be introduced beyond its native range for that purpose.

  2. “Bird Song Metronomics”: Isochronous Organization of Zebra Finch Song Rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Philipp; Scharff, Constance

    2016-01-01

    The human capacity for speech and vocal music depends on vocal imitation. Songbirds, in contrast to non-human primates, share this vocal production learning with humans. The process through which birds and humans learn many of their vocalizations as well as the underlying neural system exhibit a number of striking parallels and have been widely researched. In contrast, rhythm, a key feature of language, and music, has received surprisingly little attention in songbirds. Investigating temporal periodicity in bird song has the potential to inform the relationship between neural mechanisms and behavioral output and can also provide insight into the biology and evolution of musicality. Here we present a method to analyze birdsong for an underlying rhythmic regularity. Using the intervals from one note onset to the next as input, we found for each bird an isochronous sequence of time stamps, a “signal-derived pulse,” or pulseS, of which a subset aligned with all note onsets of the bird's song. Fourier analysis corroborated these results. To determine whether this finding was just a byproduct of the duration of notes and intervals typical for zebra finches but not dependent on the individual duration of elements and the sequence in which they are sung, we compared natural songs to models of artificial songs. Note onsets of natural song deviated from the pulseS significantly less than those of artificial songs with randomized note and gap durations. Thus, male zebra finch song has the regularity required for a listener to extract a perceived pulse (pulseP), as yet untested. Strikingly, in our study, pulsesS that best fit note onsets often also coincided with the transitions between sub-note elements within complex notes, corresponding to neuromuscular gestures. Gesture durations often equaled one or more pulseS periods. This suggests that gesture duration constitutes the basic element of the temporal hierarchy of zebra finch song rhythm, an interesting parallel to the

  3. Song exposure regulates known and novel microRNAs in the zebra finch auditory forebrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jong H

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an important model for neuroscience, songbirds learn to discriminate songs they hear during tape-recorded playbacks, as demonstrated by song-specific habituation of both behavioral and neurogenomic responses in the auditory forebrain. We hypothesized that microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs may participate in the changing pattern of gene expression induced by song exposure. To test this, we used massively parallel Illumina sequencing to analyse small RNAs from auditory forebrain of adult zebra finches exposed to tape-recorded birdsong or silence. Results In the auditory forebrain, we identified 121 known miRNAs conserved in other vertebrates. We also identified 34 novel miRNAs that do not align to human or chicken genomes. Five conserved miRNAs showed significant and consistent changes in copy number after song exposure across three biological replications of the song-silence comparison, with two increasing (tgu-miR-25, tgu-miR-192 and three decreasing (tgu-miR-92, tgu-miR-124, tgu-miR-129-5p. We also detected a locus on the Z sex chromosome that produces three different novel miRNAs, with supporting evidence from Northern blot and TaqMan qPCR assays for differential expression in males and females and in response to song playbacks. One of these, tgu-miR-2954-3p, is predicted (by TargetScan to regulate eight song-responsive mRNAs that all have functions in cellular proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Conclusions The experience of hearing another bird singing alters the profile of miRNAs in the auditory forebrain of zebra finches. The response involves both known conserved miRNAs and novel miRNAs described so far only in the zebra finch, including a novel sex-linked, song-responsive miRNA. These results indicate that miRNAs are likely to contribute to the unique behavioural biology of learned song communication in songbirds.

  4. Investigation to determine staff exposure and describe animal bite surveillance after detection of a rabid zebra in a safari lodge in Kenya, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Obonyo, Mark; Arvelo, Wences; Kadivane, Samuel; Orundu, Moses; Lankau, Emily; Gakuya, Francis; Munyua, Peninah; Githinji, Jane; Marano, Nina; Njenga, Kariuki; Omolo, Jared; Montgomery, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Rabies is a fatal viral infection, resulting in >55,000 deaths globally each year. In August 2011, a young orphaned zebra at a Kenyan safari lodge acquired rabies and potentially exposed >150 tourists and local staff. An investigation was initiated to determine exposures among the local staff, and to describe animal bite surveillance in the affected district. Methods We interviewed lodge staff on circumstances surrounding the zebra's illness and assessed their exposure status. We...

  5. Evaluation of several priority pollutants in zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) in the largest Italian subalpine lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Consuelo; Binelli, Andrea; Provini, Alfredo

    2008-02-01

    Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) has been used for the biomonitoring of several POPs (PCBs, DDTs, HCB and HCHs) in the largest Italian subalpine great lakes (Lake Maggiore, Garda, Como, Iseo and Lugano). Samplings were carried out in April 2003 at 15 locations selected according to industrial and anthropic levels of lakes. Results have pointed out high DDT levels in D. polymorpha specimens from Lake Maggiore (700-1400 ng/g lipids, 5-9 times higher than those measured in mussels of other Italian lakes), due to a contamination from a chemical plant located on one of the main lake inlet that occurred in 1996. On the contrary, PCB levels (400-2509 ng/g lipids) highlighted an overall pollution, with some sporadic peaks of contamination. Data showed a moderate increase trend compared to those found in a previous monitoring campaign carried out in 1996. Future monitoring is needed in order to confirm this tendency.

  6. Personality over ontogeny in zebra finches: long-term repeatable traits but unstable behavioural syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuerz, Yvonne; Krüger, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    A crucial assumption of animal personality research is that behaviour is consistent over time, showing a high repeatability within individuals. This assumption is often made, sometimes tested using short time intervals between behavioural tests, but rarely thoroughly investigated across long time intervals crossing different stages of ontogeny. We performed such a longitudinal test across three life stages in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), representing about 15-20% of their life span in captivity, and found repeatabilities ranging from 0.03 to 0.67. Fearlessness and exploration were the most repeatable traits both within and across life stages. Activity and aggression were repeatable across, but not or only partly within life stages. Boldness was not repeatable. Furthermore, we found no evidence for a consistent behavioural syndrome structure across ontogeny. Our results indicate that the consistency of behavioural traits and their correlations might be overestimated and suggest that life-long stability of animal personality should not simply be assumed. PMID:26813709

  7. Quagga and zebra mussel risk via veliger transfer by overland hauled boats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry B. Dalton

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Invasive quagga and zebra mussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis and Dreissena polymorpha, respectively pose a great threat to USwaters. Recreational boats constitute a significant risk for spreading the organisms. Recreational boats circulate large amounts of raw waterwhen in use, and if not drained and dried correctly can transport many mussel larvae, called veligers. Veligers experience very high mortality rates; however, the number of potentially transported veligers can be a serious risk to non-infested bodies of water, especially if multiple boats are involved. The risk of veliger transport was calculated for Lake Mead and Lake Michigan using boat capacities for water circulation and specific veliger density data. Results illustrate the importance of draining, drying, and/or decontaminating recreational boats after use.

  8. First Report of Coccidiosis and Gizzard Erosion in a Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moini, M.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Coccidiosis and gizzard erosion are rare conditions in cage bird. A male zebra finch was presented with a history of watery diarrhea, anorexia, ruffled feathers, weight loss, and lethargy and died finally. Gross necropsy revealed small areas of erosions and hemorrhages on the gizzard wall. The intestine was oedematous. The spleen appeared pale and small. The testes were asymmetric.Histologically, necrosis of mucosal layer with infiltration of inflammatory cells observed in cecum. Eimeria stages were detected in the enterocytes. In Gizzard, hemorrhage and ulceration of mucosal layer with infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells in to the underlying mucosa were seen. In hepatic tissue, mild focal necrosis with mononuclear cells infiltration was seen. The disease was diagnosed as coccidiosis and gizzard erosion.

  9. Productivity of Mountain Reedbugk Redunca Fulvorufula (Afzelius, 1815 at the Mountain Zebra National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D Skinner

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighty two adult mountain reedbuck Redunca fulvoru- fula were collected during four seasons, autumn, winter, spring and summer at the Mountain Zebra National Park mainly during 1975 and 1976. Body mass and carcass characteristics varied little with season, body mass varying from 24,0-35,5 kg for all buck shot and dressing percentage always exeeded 50. According to KFI animals were all in fair to good condition. Sixty four percent of all ewes were pregnant and 38,5 lactating. Females and males bred throughout the year but there was a peak in births during mid-summer. The species is highly productive, well adapted to the niche it occupies and lends itself to exploitation for meat production.

  10. Effect of a sausage oscillation on radio zebra-pattern structures in a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Sijie; Yan, Yihua

    2016-01-01

    Sausage modes that are axisymmetric fast magnetoacoustic oscillations of solar coronal loops are characterized by variation of the plasma density and magnetic field, and hence cause time variations of the electron plasma frequency and cyclotron frequency. The latter parameters determine the condition for the double plasma resonance (DPR), which is responsible for the appearance of zebra-pattern (ZP) structures in time spectra of solar type IV radio bursts. We perform numerical simulations of standing and propagating sausage oscillations in a coronal loop modeled as a straight, field-aligned plasma slab, and determine the time variation of the DPR layer locations. Instant values of the plasma density and magnetic field at the DPR layers allowed us to construct skeletons of the time variation of ZP stripes in radio spectra. In the presence of a sausage oscillation, the ZP structures are shown to have characteristic wiggles with the time period prescribed by the sausage oscillation. Standing and propagating saus...

  11. An experimental test of condition-dependent male and female mate choice in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holveck, Marie-Jeanne; Geberzahn, Nicole; Riebel, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    In mating systems with social monogamy and obligatory bi-parental care, such as found in many songbird species, male and female fitness depends on the combined parental investment. Hence, both sexes should gain from choosing mates in high rather than low condition. However, theory also predicts that an individual's phenotypic quality can constrain choice, if low condition individuals cannot afford prolonged search efforts and/or face higher risk of rejection. In systems with mutual mate choice, the interaction between male and female condition should thus be a better predictor of choice than either factor in isolation. To address this prediction experimentally, we manipulated male and female condition and subsequently tested male and female mating preferences in zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata, a songbird species with mutual mate choice and obligatory bi-parental care. We experimentally altered phenotypic quality by manipulating the brood size in which the birds were reared. Patterns of association for high- or low-condition individuals of the opposite sex differed for male and female focal birds when tested in an 8-way choice arena. Females showed repeatable condition-assortative preferences for males matching their own rearing background. Male preferences were also repeatable, but not predicted by their own or females' rearing background. In combination with a brief review of the literature on condition-dependent mate choice in the zebra finch we discuss whether the observed sex differences and between-studies differences arise because males and females differ in context sensitivity (e.g. male-male competition suppressing male mating preferences), sampling strategies or susceptibility to rearing conditions (e.g. sex-specific effect on physiology). While a picture emerges that juvenile and current state indeed affect preferences, the development and context-dependency of mutual state-dependent mate choice warrants further study. PMID:21901147

  12. Sex-Specific Audience Effect in the Context of Mate Choice in Zebra Finches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Kniel

    Full Text Available Animals observing conspecifics during mate choice can gain additional information about potential mates. However, the presence of an observer, if detected by the observed individuals, can influence the nature of the behavior of the observed individuals, called audience effect. In zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata castanotis, domesticated males show an audience effect during mate choice. However, whether male and female descendants of the wild form show an audience effect during mate choice is unknown. Therefore, we conducted an experiment where male and female focal birds could choose between two distinctive phenotypes of the opposite sex, an artificially adorned stimulus bird with a red feather on the forehead and an unadorned stimulus bird, two times consecutively, once without an audience and once with an audience bird (same sex as test bird. Males showed an audience effect when an audience male was present and spent more time with adorned and less time with unadorned females compared to when there was no audience present. The change in time spent with the respective stimulus females was positively correlated with the time that the audience male spent in front of its cage close to the focal male. Females showed no change in mate choice when an audience female was present, but their motivation to associate with both stimulus males decreased. In a control for mate-choice consistency there was no audience in either test. Here, both focal females and focal males chose consistently without a change in choosing motivation. Our results showed that there is an audience effect on mate choice in zebra finches and that the response to a same-sex audience was sex-specific.

  13. Sex-Specific Audience Effect in the Context of Mate Choice in Zebra Finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniel, Nina; Bender, Stefanie; Witte, Klaudia

    2016-01-01

    Animals observing conspecifics during mate choice can gain additional information about potential mates. However, the presence of an observer, if detected by the observed individuals, can influence the nature of the behavior of the observed individuals, called audience effect. In zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata castanotis), domesticated males show an audience effect during mate choice. However, whether male and female descendants of the wild form show an audience effect during mate choice is unknown. Therefore, we conducted an experiment where male and female focal birds could choose between two distinctive phenotypes of the opposite sex, an artificially adorned stimulus bird with a red feather on the forehead and an unadorned stimulus bird, two times consecutively, once without an audience and once with an audience bird (same sex as test bird). Males showed an audience effect when an audience male was present and spent more time with adorned and less time with unadorned females compared to when there was no audience present. The change in time spent with the respective stimulus females was positively correlated with the time that the audience male spent in front of its cage close to the focal male. Females showed no change in mate choice when an audience female was present, but their motivation to associate with both stimulus males decreased. In a control for mate-choice consistency there was no audience in either test. Here, both focal females and focal males chose consistently without a change in choosing motivation. Our results showed that there is an audience effect on mate choice in zebra finches and that the response to a same-sex audience was sex-specific.

  14. An experimental test of condition-dependent male and female mate choice in zebra finches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Jeanne Holveck

    Full Text Available In mating systems with social monogamy and obligatory bi-parental care, such as found in many songbird species, male and female fitness depends on the combined parental investment. Hence, both sexes should gain from choosing mates in high rather than low condition. However, theory also predicts that an individual's phenotypic quality can constrain choice, if low condition individuals cannot afford prolonged search efforts and/or face higher risk of rejection. In systems with mutual mate choice, the interaction between male and female condition should thus be a better predictor of choice than either factor in isolation. To address this prediction experimentally, we manipulated male and female condition and subsequently tested male and female mating preferences in zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata, a songbird species with mutual mate choice and obligatory bi-parental care. We experimentally altered phenotypic quality by manipulating the brood size in which the birds were reared. Patterns of association for high- or low-condition individuals of the opposite sex differed for male and female focal birds when tested in an 8-way choice arena. Females showed repeatable condition-assortative preferences for males matching their own rearing background. Male preferences were also repeatable, but not predicted by their own or females' rearing background. In combination with a brief review of the literature on condition-dependent mate choice in the zebra finch we discuss whether the observed sex differences and between-studies differences arise because males and females differ in context sensitivity (e.g. male-male competition suppressing male mating preferences, sampling strategies or susceptibility to rearing conditions (e.g. sex-specific effect on physiology. While a picture emerges that juvenile and current state indeed affect preferences, the development and context-dependency of mutual state-dependent mate choice warrants further study.

  15. Dynamic gene expression in the song system of zebra finches during the song learning period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Christopher R; Hodges, Lisa K; Mello, Claudio V

    2015-12-01

    The brain circuitry that controls song learning and production undergoes marked changes in morphology and connectivity during the song learning period in juvenile zebra finches, in parallel to the acquisition, practice and refinement of song. Yet, the genetic programs and timing of regulatory change that establish the neuronal connectivity and plasticity during this critical learning period remain largely undetermined. To address this question, we used in situ hybridization to compare the expression patterns of a set of 30 known robust molecular markers of HVC and/or area X, major telencephalic song nuclei, between adult and juvenile male zebra finches at different ages during development (20, 35, 50 days post-hatch, dph). We found that several of the genes examined undergo substantial changes in expression within HVC or its surrounds, and/or in other song nuclei. They fit into broad patterns of regulation, including those whose expression within HVC during this period increases (COL12A1, COL 21A1, MPZL1, PVALB, and CXCR7) or decreases (e.g., KCNT2, SAP30L), as well as some that show decreased expression in the surrounding tissue with little change within song nuclei (e.g. SV2B, TAC1). These results reveal a broad range of molecular changes that occur in the song system in concert with the song learning period. Some of the genes and pathways identified are potential modulators of the developmental changes associated with the emergence of the adult properties of the song control system, and/or the acquisition of learned vocalizations in songbirds.

  16. Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) limit food for larval fish (Pimephales promelas) in turbulent systems: A bioenergetics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, L.A.; Richardson, W.B.; Sandheinrich, M.B.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a factorial experiment, in outdoor mesocosms, on the effects of zebra mussels and water column mixing (i.e., turbulence) on the diet, growth, and survival of larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Significant (P bioenergetics modeling and measured prey standing stocks indicated caloric resources of suitable prey in turbulence treatments during the early weeks of the experiment were insufficient to prevent starvation. Early mortality in the turbulence and mussels treatment likely released surviving fish from intense intraspecific competition and resulted in higher individual growth rates. A combination of high abundance of zebra mussels in an environment with a well-mixed water column can have significant effects on larval fish survival and growth.

  17. Genotoxic effects induced by the exposure to an environmental mixture of illicit drugs to the zebra mussel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Marco; Magni, Stefano; Castiglioni, Sara; Binelli, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    Despite the growing interest on the presence of illicit drugs in freshwater ecosystems, just recently the attention has been focused on their potential toxicity towards non-target aquatic species. However, these studies largely neglected the effects induced by exposure to complex mixtures of illicit drugs, which could be different compared to those caused by single psychoactive molecules. This study was aimed at investigating the genetic damage induced by a 14-day exposure to a realistic mixture of the most common illicit drugs found in surface waters worldwide (cocaine, benzoylecgonine, amphetamine, morphine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) on the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha). The mixture caused a significant increase of DNA fragmentation and triggered the apoptotic process and micronuclei formation in zebra mussel hemocytes, pointing out its potential genotoxicity towards this bivalve species. PMID:27261879

  18. Temperature and Ca2+-dependence of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2(+)-ATPase in haddock, salmon, rainbow trout and zebra cichlid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Helene; Jessen, Flemming

    2002-01-01

    Temperature dependence of Ca2+-ATPase from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in rabbit muscle has been widely studied, and it is generally accepted that a break point in Arrhenius plot exist at approximately 20 degreesC. Whether the break point arises as a result of temperature dependent changes...... in the enzyme or its membrane lipid environment is still a matter of discussion. In this study we compared the temperature dependence and Ca2+-dependence of SR Ca2+-ATPase in haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus), salmon (Salmo, salar), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and zebra cichlid (Cichlasoma...... nigrofasciatum). The Arrhenius plot of zebra cichlid showed a break point at 20 degreesC, and the haddock Arrhenius plot was non-linear with pronounced changes in slope in the. temperature area, 6-14 degreesC. In Arrhenius plot from both salmon and rainbow trout a plateau exists with an almost constant SR Ca2...

  19. Comparing a microbial biocide and chlorine as zebra mussel control strategies in an Irish drinking water treatment plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Meehan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A need exists for an environmentally friendly mussel control method to replace chlorine and other traditional control methods currentlyutilised in drinking water plants and other infested facilities. Zequanox® is a newly commercialised microbial biocide for zebra and quaggamussels comprised of killed Pseudomonas fluorescens CL145A cells. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of adevelopmental formulation of Zequanox (referred to as MBI 401 FDP and chlorine treatments on adult and juvenile zebra mussels byrunning a biobox trial in conjunction with chlorine treatments at an infested Irish drinking water treatment plant. Since 2009, the plantmanagement has used a residual chlorine concentration of 2 mg/L in autumn to control both adult zebra mussels and juvenile settlement intheir three concrete raw water chambers. Juvenile mussel settlement was monitored in three bioboxes as well as in three treatment chambersin the plant for three months prior to treatment. Adult mussels were seeded into the chambers and bioboxes four days before treatment. InOctober 2011, the bioboxes were treated with MBI 401 FDP at 200 mg active substance/L, while chlorine treatment took place in the waterchambers. The MBI 401 FDP treatment lasted only 8 hours while chlorine treatment lasted seven days. Juvenile numbers were reduced tozero in both the bioboxes and treated chambers within seven days. Adult mussel mortality reached 80% for both the chlorine and MBI 401FDP treatment; however, mortality was achieved faster in the chlorine treatment. These results provided important insights into zebra musselcontrol alternatives to chlorine and supported further development of the now commercial product, Zequanox.

  20. The zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha), a new pest in North America: reproductive mechanisms as possible targets of control strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Jeffrey L.; Fong, Peter; Croll, Roger P.; Nichols, Susan J.; Wall, Darcie

    1992-01-01

    The zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) has spread rapidly in temperate fresh waters of North America since its introduction into the Great Lakes in 1985 or 1986. It attaches to hard substrates, forming layers, occluding water intakes, encrusting and killing native mussels, filtering algae in competition with other planktivores, and possibly interfering with fish spawning. It reproduces prolifically, suggesting that an approach to its control may be by controlling its reproduction. Previous literature suggests that spawning in bivalves is regulated by both environmental and internal chemical cues. A suggested sequence is that phytoplankton chemicals initially trigger spawning; chemicals associated with gametes provide a species-specific pheromonal positive feedback for spawning; and the response to environmental chemicals is mediated internally by serotonin (5-HT). The role of 5-HT in zebra mussels is under investigation. Both males and females can be induced to spawn by either injection or external application of 5-HT. The response can also be activated by 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin, an agonist at 5-HT1A receptors. HPLC analysis has detected 5-HT as the major biogenic amine in both male and female gonads. 5-HT immunocytochemistry demonstrates nerves containing serotonergic fibers innervating gonads of both males and females, with prominent varicosities surrounding the follicles in both sexes. A role of 5-HT in mediating spawning responses in zebra mussels is thus strongly supported. These studies have shown that reproductive behavior of zebra mussels can be modified by outside chemicals, a property that may be exploited for purposes of control.

  1. Environmental transmission of a personality trait: foster parent exploration behaviour predicts offspring exploration behaviour in zebra finches

    OpenAIRE

    Schuett, Wiebke; Dall, Sasha R X; Wilson, Alastair J.; Royle, Nick J.

    2013-01-01

    Consistent behavioural differences among individuals are common in many species and can have important effects on offspring fitness. To understand such ‘personality’ variation, it is important to determine the mode of inheritance, but this has been quantified for only a few species. Here, we report results from a breeding experiment in captive zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata, in which we cross-fostered offspring to disentangle the importance of genetic and non-genetic transmission of behav...

  2. Screening of POP pollution by AChE and EROD activities in Zebra mussels from the Italian Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binelli, A; Ricciardi, Francesco; Riva, Consuelo; Provini, Alfredo

    2005-12-01

    The increase of ethoxyresorufin dealkylation (EROD) and the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as biomarkers have been commonly used in vertebrates for the persistent organic pollutants (POPs) biomonitoring of aquatic environments, but very few studies have been performed for invertebrates. Previous researches demonstrated the interference due to some chemicals on EROD and AChE activities of the freshwater bivalve Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) in laboratory and field studies, showing its possible use for the screening of POP effects. We investigated the contamination of the Italian sub-alpine great lakes (Maggiore, Lugano, Como, Iseo, Garda) by the biomarker approach on Zebra mussel specimens collected at 17 sampling sites with different morphometric characteristics and anthropization levels. Results showed a homogeneous contamination of AChE inhibitors in Lake Garda, Maggiore, Como and Iseo with values ranging from 0.5 to 3 nmol/min/mg proteins and with an average inhibition of about 66% to controls. The planar compounds pollution, able to activate the EROD activity, seems higher in some sampling stations of Lake Garda, Como and Iseo (2-4 pmol/min/mg proteins) than that measured in Lake Lugano (1.5-3 pmol/min/mg proteins). On the contrary, the enzyme activity in Lake Maggiore showed an interesting opposite effect of AhR-binding compounds and trace metals. Finally, the possible use of Zebra mussel specimens maintained at laboratory conditions as controls against the selection of the less polluted sampling site is discussed.

  3. Molecular Cloning and Functional Characterization of Mannose Receptor in Zebra Fish (Danio rerio during Infection with Aeromonas sobria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Zheng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mannose receptor (MR is a member of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, which plays a significant role in immunity responses. Much work on MR has been done in mammals and birds while little in fish. In this report, a MR gene (designated as zfMR was cloned from zebra fish (Danio rerio, which is an attractive model for the studies of animal diseases. The full-length cDNA of zfMR contains 6248 bp encoding a putative protein of 1428 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequences showed that zfMR contained a cysteine-rich domain, a single fibronectin type II (FN II domain, eight C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs, a transmembrane domain and a short C-terminal cytoplasmic domain, sharing highly conserved structures with MRs from the other species. The MR mRNA could be detected in all examined tissues with highest level in kidney. The temporal expression patterns of MR, IL-1β and TNF-α mRNAs were analyzed in the liver, spleen, kidney and intestine post of infection with Aeromonas sobria. By immunohistochemistry assay, slight enhancement of MR protein was also observed in the spleen and intestine of the infected zebra fish. The established zebra fish-A. sobria infection model will be valuable for elucidating the role of MR in fish immune responses to infection.

  4. Calbindin-D28K expression increases in the dorsolateral hippocampus following corticosterone treatment in female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Ashley L; Saldanha, Colin J; Bailey, David J

    2012-03-01

    The hippocampus (HP) in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) is important in the consolidation of spatial memories. Chronic, elevated levels of steroid hormones, like the glucocorticoids, can decrease this type of memory function in birds and mammals; neuronal atrophy, loss, and a decrease in synaptic contacts in the mammalian HP are observed as the underlying cause. Calbindin-D28k is constitutively expressed in cells of the nervous system but increases in concentration following a neurotoxic insult, protecting neurons against apoptotic cell death. We hypothesized that treatment of female zebra finches with a glucocorticoid (corticosterone) would increase calbindin expression in the HP and the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM), a region important for perceptual (song) memories, relative to "blank" controls. Additionally, because the HP in zebra finches appears similar to that in mammals, based on a variety of structural and functional factors, and as particular regions of the HP in mammals are more vulnerable to glucocorticoid-induced damage, we also hypothesized that expression of calbindin would vary among the HP subdivisions. Overall levels of calbindin were higher in the HP of corticosterone-treated birds, due almost entirely to elevated calbindin expression in the dorsolateral subdivision of the HP only. In contrast, the dorsomedial HP, ventral HP, and NCM appear less affected by glucocorticoid exposure. These results suggest a role for glucocorticoids in the modulation of HP- but not NCM-dependent memories as well as a further functional differentiation among the HP subdivisions.

  5. Efficacy of spray –Dried Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain CL145A (Zequanox®), for controlling Zebra Mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) within Lake Minnetonka, MN enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Severson, Todd J.

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of whole water column and subsurface applications of the biopesticide Zequanox®, a commercially prepared spray-dried powder formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A), were evaluated for controlling zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) within 27-m2 enclosures in Lake Minnetonka (Deephaven, Minnesota). Five treatments consisting of (1) two whole water column Zequanox applications, (2) two subsurface Zequanox applications, and (3) an untreated control were completed on each of three independent treatment days during September 2014. The two types of samplers used in the study were (1) type 1 samplers, which were custom built multi-plate samplers (wood, perforated aluminum, and tile substrates) that were placed into Robinson’s Bay in June of 2013 to allow for natural colonization by zebra mussels, and (2) type 2 samplers, which consisted of zebra mussels adhering to perforated aluminum trays that were placed into mesh containment bags. One day prior to treatment, three individual samplers of each type were distributed to test enclosures and exposed to a randomly assigned treatment. Sampling to determine the zebra mussel biomass adhering to type 1 samplers and the survival assessments for zebra mussels contained in type 2 samplers were completed ~40 days after exposure. The zebra mussel biomass adhering to type 1 samplers and the survival of zebra mussels contained in type 2 samplers were significantly less in groups treated with the highest Zequanox concentrations and in groups that received whole water column applications than comparable groups treated with lower Zequanox concentrations and subsurface applications. However, standardization of biomass and survival results to the amount of Zequanox applied showed that the lower concentrations and subsurface applications were more cost efficient, with respect to product used, at reducing zebra mussel biomass and for inducing zebra mussel mortality. Although the subsurface application methods

  6. Increased Benthic Algal Primary Production in Response to the Invasive Zebra Mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) in a Productive Ecosystem, Oneida Lake, New York

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rebecca K. Cecala; Christine M. Mayer; Kimberly L. Schulz; Edward L. Mills

    2008-01-01

    Increased water clarity associated with zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) populations may favor benthic algal primary production in freshwater systems previously dominated by pelagic phytoplankton production. While zebra mussel-mediated water clarity effects on benthic primary production have been implicated in published reports, few production estimates are available. This study estimates benthic primary production in Oneida Lake, NY before and after zebra mussel invasion (1992), using measured photosynthetic parameters (PBmax, aB and ? from sampled benthic algal communities. In the summers of 2003 and 2004, primary production was measured as O2 evolution from algal communities on hard (cobble) and soft (sediment) substrate from several depths. We also backcast estimates of benthic primary production from measurements of light penetration since 1975. Estimates of whole-lake epipelic and epilithic algal primary production showed a significant (4%) increase and exhibited significantly less interannual variability subsequent to the establishment of zebra mussels. We applied our model to two lakes of differing trophic status; the model significantly overestimated benthic primary production in a hypereutrophic lake, but there was no significant difference between the actual and predicted primary production values in the oligotrophic lake. The hypereutrophic lake had higher zebra mussel densities than Oneida (224 vs. 41 per sample respectively). Though total community respiration (measured in total darkness) was factored into our model predictions of production, our model may need modification when hetsrotrophic respiration is a large portion of total community metabolism.

  7. Evaluation of several priority pollutants in zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) in the largest Italian subalpine lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riva, Consuelo [Department of Biology, Ecology Section, University of Milan, Via Celoria 26, 20133 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: consuelo.riva@unimi.it; Binelli, Andrea; Provini, Alfredo [Department of Biology, Ecology Section, University of Milan, Via Celoria 26, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2008-02-15

    Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) has been used for the biomonitoring of several POPs (PCBs, DDTs, HCB and HCHs) in the largest Italian subalpine great lakes (Lake Maggiore, Garda, Como, Iseo and Lugano). Samplings were carried out in April 2003 at 15 locations selected according to industrial and anthropic levels of lakes. Results have pointed out high DDT levels in D. polymorpha specimens from Lake Maggiore (700-1400 ng/g lipids, 5-9 times higher than those measured in mussels of other Italian lakes), due to a contamination from a chemical plant located on one of the main lake inlet that occurred in 1996. On the contrary, PCB levels (400-2509 ng/g lipids) highlighted an overall pollution, with some sporadic peaks of contamination. Data showed a moderate increase trend compared to those found in a previous monitoring campaign carried out in 1996. Future monitoring is needed in order to confirm this tendency. - Significant levels of DDTs and PCBs are still present in the Italian subalpine great lakes.

  8. Early-Life Stress Triggers Juvenile Zebra Finches to Switch Social Learning Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farine, Damien R; Spencer, Karen A; Boogert, Neeltje J

    2015-08-17

    Stress during early life can cause disease and cognitive impairment in humans and non-humans alike. However, stress and other environmental factors can also program developmental pathways. We investigate whether differential exposure to developmental stress can drive divergent social learning strategies between siblings. In many species, juveniles acquire essential foraging skills by copying others: they can copy peers (horizontal social learning), learn from their parents (vertical social learning), or learn from other adults (oblique social learning). However, whether juveniles' learning strategies are condition dependent largely remains a mystery. We found that juvenile zebra finches living in flocks socially learned novel foraging skills exclusively from adults. By experimentally manipulating developmental stress, we further show that social learning targets are phenotypically plastic. While control juveniles learned foraging skills from their parents, their siblings, exposed as nestlings to experimentally elevated stress hormone levels, learned exclusively from unrelated adults. Thus, early-life conditions triggered individuals to switch strategies from vertical to oblique social learning. This switch could arise from stress-induced differences in developmental rate, cognitive and physical state, or the use of stress as an environmental cue. Acquisition of alternative social learning strategies may impact juveniles' fit to their environment and ultimately change their developmental trajectories.

  9. Long-term effects of manipulated natal brood size on metabolic rate in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Simon; Holveck, Marie-Jeanne; Riebel, Katharina

    2006-09-22

    Long-term effects of developmental conditions on health, longevity and other fitness components in humans are drawing increasing attention. In evolutionary ecology, such effects are of similar importance because of their role in the trade-off between quantity and quality of offspring. The central role of energy consumption is well documented for some long-term health effects in humans (e.g. obesity), but little is known of the long-term effects of rearing conditions on energy requirements later in life. We manipulated the rearing conditions in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) using brood size manipulation and cross-fostering. It has previously been shown in this species that being reared in a large brood has negative fitness consequences, and that such effects are stronger in daughters than in sons. We show that, independent of mass, standard metabolic rate of 1-year-old birds was higher when they had been reared in a large brood, and this is to our knowledge the first demonstration of such an effect. Furthermore, the brood size effect was stronger in daughters than in sons. This suggests that metabolic efficiency may play a role in mediating the long-term fitness consequences of rearing conditions. PMID:17148435

  10. Metabolic and respiratory costs of increasing song amplitude in zebra finches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Anne Zollinger

    Full Text Available Bird song is a widely used model in the study of animal communication and sexual selection, and several song features have been shown to reflect the quality of the singer. Recent studies have demonstrated that song amplitude may be an honest signal of current condition in males and that females prefer high amplitude songs. In addition, birds raise the amplitude of their songs to communicate in noisy environments. Although it is generally assumed that louder song should be more costly to produce, there has been little empirical evidence to support this assumption. We tested the assumption by measuring oxygen consumption and respiratory patterns in adult male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata singing at different amplitudes in different background noise conditions. As background noise levels increased, birds significantly increased the sound pressure level of their songs. We found that louder songs required significantly greater subsyringeal air sac pressure than quieter songs. Though increased pressure is probably achieved by increasing respiratory muscle activity, these increases did not correlate with measurable increases in oxygen consumption. In addition, we found that oxygen consumption increased in higher background noise, independent of singing behaviour. This observation supports previous research in mammals showing that high levels of environmental noise can induce physiological stress responses. While our study did not find that increasing vocal amplitude increased metabolic costs, further research is needed to determine whether there are other non-metabolic costs of singing louder or costs associated with chronic noise exposure.

  11. Increased fat catabolism sustains water balance during fasting in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska, Joanna; Sadowska, Edyta T; Cichoń, Mariusz; Bauchinger, Ulf

    2016-09-01

    Patterns of physiological flexibility in response to fasting are well established, but much less is known about the contribution of water deprivation to the observed effects. We investigated body composition and energy and water budget in three groups of zebra finches: birds with access to food and water, food-deprived birds having access to drinking water and food-and-water-deprived birds. Animals were not stimulated by elevated energy expenditure and they were in thermoneutral conditions; thus, based on previous studies, water balance of fasting birds was expected to be maintained by increased catabolism of proteins. In contrast to this expectation, we found that access to water did not prevent reduction of proteinaceous tissue, but it saved fat reserves of the fasting birds. Thus, water balance of birds fasting without access to water seemed to be maintained by elevated fat catabolism, which generated 6 times more metabolic water compared with that in birds that had access to water. Therefore, we revise currently established views and propose fat to serve as the primary source for metabolic water production. Previously assumed increased protein breakdown for maintenance of water budget would occur if fat stores were depleted or if fat catabolism reached its upper limits due to high energy demands. PMID:27582561

  12. Analytical developments for the speciation of uranium in zebra fish (Danio rerio) gills after exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this thesis is to study the cellular compartmentalization and the chelation of uranium (U) by cytosolic proteins of gill cells of the zebra fish (Danio rerio, model specie in aquatic toxicology) under different direct exposure conditions (chronic vs. acute, 20 and 250 μg.L-1). This study required the development of hyphenated techniques (SEC, IEF off-gel, RP-UHPLC for the separation, ICP-SFMS, ESI-FTMS/MS for the detection) with the main challenges of maintaining the non-covalent U-biomolecule interactions and enhancing sensitivity for the analysis of environmentally relevant samples. After extraction, 24% to 32% of the total U detected in the gills were present in the cytosolic fraction, in which the U distribution on the biomolecules (as a function of their MW and pI) varied depending on the exposure level. Finally, U target biomolecules mapping allowed us (i) to highlight a particular affinity of U for acidic and/or P-containing proteins and (ii) to identify 24 protein candidates for U binding. (author)

  13. Evaluation of coatings to control zebra mussel colonization: Year two interim report, 1990-1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitch, E.G.

    1992-05-25

    A study was carried out to identify coatings which are effective in protecting structures from zebra mussel fouling. Plates coated with antifouling paints were tested at Ontario Hydro's Nanticoke thermal generating station in 1990 and 1991 and were rated for their ability to resist mussel fouling or provide easily cleaned surfaces. Of the paints evaluated in 1990, only two silicones demonstrated good resistance to fouling, with the few mussels which did attach easily dislodged. Silicon-coated trash racks, after a year in use, were found to be in good condition and virtually free of mussels. All other coatings failed to prevent strong mussel attachment and were excluded from the 1991 trials. In addition to the two successful 1990 coatings, four silicones, a zinc silicate and a polyurethane were tested. The two silicones that were successful in 1990 continued to be in 1991. Three of the four 1991 silicones and the zinc silicate showed excellent resistance to mussel attachment, however mussels attached to the remaining silicone and the polyurethane with maximum percentage covers of 45% and 40%, respectively. 23 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Multi-functional foot use during running in the zebra-tailed lizard (Callisaurus draconoides)

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chen; Goldman, Daniel I; 10.1242/jeb.061937

    2013-01-01

    A diversity of animals that run on solid, level, flat, non-slip surfaces appear to bounce on their legs; elastic elements in the limbs can store and return energy during each step. The mechanics and energetics of running in natural terrain, particularly on surfaces that can yield and flow under stress, is less understood. The zebra-tailed lizard (Callisaurus draconoides), a small desert generalist with a large, elongate, tendinous hind foot, runs rapidly across a variety of natural substrates. We use high speed video to obtain detailed three-dimensional running kinematics on solid and granular surfaces to reveal how leg, foot, and substrate mechanics contribute to its high locomotor performance. Running at ~10 body length/s (~1 m/s), the center of mass oscillates like a spring-mass system on both substrates, with only 15% reduction in stride length on the granular surface. On the solid surface, a strut-spring model of the hind limb reveals that the hind foot saves about 40% of the mechanical work needed per s...

  15. ZebraBeat: a flexible platform for the analysis of the cardiac rate in zebrafish embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, Elisa; Zaccaria, Gian Maria; Hadhoud, Marwa; Rizzo, Giovanna; Ponzini, Raffaele; Morbiducci, Umberto; Santoro, Massimo Mattia

    2014-05-01

    Heartbeat measurement is important in assesssing cardiac function because variations in heart rhythm can be the cause as well as an effect of hidden pathological heart conditions. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as one of the most useful model organisms for cardiac research. Indeed, the zebrafish heart is easily accessible for optical analyses without conducting invasive procedures and shows anatomical similarity to the human heart. In this study, we present a non-invasive, simple, cost-effective process to quantify the heartbeat in embryonic zebrafish. To achieve reproducibility, high throughput and flexibility (i.e., adaptability to any existing confocal microscope system and with a user-friendly interface that can be easily used by researchers), we implemented this method within a software program. We show here that this platform, called ZebraBeat, can successfully detect heart rate variations in embryonic zebrafish at various developmental stages, and it can record cardiac rate fluctuations induced by factors such as temperature and genetic- and chemical-induced alterations. Applications of this methodology may include the screening of chemical libraries affecting heart rhythm and the identification of heart rhythm variations in mutants from large-scale forward genetic screens.

  16. EVALUATION OF BIOTIC AND TREATMENT FACTORS RELATING TO BACTERIAL CONTROL OF ZEBRA MUSSELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing over the last quarter has indicated the following regarding control of zebra mussels with bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL0145A: (1) the concentration of bacteria suspended in water is directly correlated with mussel kill; (2) the ratio of bacterial mass per mussel, if too low, could limit mussel kill; a treatment must be done at a high enough ratio so that mussels do not deplete all the suspended bacteria before the end of the desired exposure period; (3) bacteria appear to lose almost all their toxicity after suspension for 24 hr in highly oxygenated water; (4) in a recirculating pipe system, the same percentage mussel kill will be achieved irrespective of whether all the bacteria are applied at once or divided up and applied intermittently in smaller quantities over a 10-hr period. Since this is the fourth quarterly report, a summation of all test results over the last twelve months is provided as a table in this report. The table includes the above-mentioned fourth-quarter results

  17. QUASI-PERIODIC WIGGLES OF MICROWAVE ZEBRA STRUCTURES IN A SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Sijie; Tan, Baolin; Yan, Yihua [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Nakariakov, V. M.; Selzer, L. A., E-mail: sjyu@nao.cas.cn [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-10

    Quasi-periodic wiggles of microwave zebra pattern (ZP) structures with periods ranging from about 0.5 s to 1.5 s are found in an X-class solar flare on 2006 December 13 at the 2.6-3.8 GHz with the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Huairou). Periodogram and correlation analysis show that the wiggles have two to three significant periodicities and are almost in phase between stripes at different frequencies. The Alfvén speed estimated from the ZP structures is about 700 km s{sup –1}. We find the spatial size of the wave-guiding plasma structure to be about 1 Mm with a detected period of about 1 s. This suggests that the ZP wiggles can be associated with the fast magnetoacoustic oscillations in the flaring active region. The lack of a significant phase shift between wiggles of different stripes suggests that the ZP wiggles are caused by a standing sausage oscillation.

  18. Effect of a Sausage Oscillation on Radio Zebra-pattern Structures in a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sijie; Nakariakov, V. M.; Yan, Yihua

    2016-07-01

    Sausage modes that are axisymmetric fast magnetoacoustic oscillations of solar coronal loops are characterized by variation of the plasma density and magnetic field, and hence cause time variations of the electron plasma frequency and cyclotron frequency. The latter parameters determine the condition for the double plasma resonance (DPR), which is responsible for the appearance of zebra-pattern (ZP) structures in time spectra of solar type IV radio bursts. We perform numerical simulations of standing and propagating sausage oscillations in a coronal loop modeled as a straight, field-aligned plasma slab, and determine the time variation of the DPR layer locations. Instant values of the plasma density and magnetic field at the DPR layers allowed us to construct skeletons of the time variation of ZP stripes in radio spectra. In the presence of a sausage oscillation, the ZP structures are shown to have characteristic wiggles with the time period prescribed by the sausage oscillation. Standing and propagating sausage oscillations are found to have different signatures in ZP patterns. We conclude that ZP wiggles can be used for the detection of short-period sausage oscillations and the exploitation of their seismological potential.

  19. The Largest Multi-Planar Wire Arrays on Zebra with LCM and their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Weller, M. E.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Shrestha, I. K.; Lorance, M. Y.; Stafford, A.; Schultz, K. A.; Coverdale, C. A.; Chuvatin, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Two new approaches of i) simultaneous study of implosion and radiative characteristics of different materials in wire array Z-pinch plasma in one shot [Safronova et al, PoP 21, 031205 (2014)] and ii) investigation of larger sized wire arrays (to enhance energy coupling to plasmas and provide better diagnostic access) were further developed in experiments with 1.7 MA Zebra with a Load Current Multiplier. In particular, the largest multi-Planar Wire Arrays with two outer planes from alloyed Al wires placed as far from each other as at 19 mm (compare with 6 and 9 mm studied before) and with a modified central plane from Ni-60 (mostly Cu), were investigated. Though K-shell Al and L-shell Cu plasmas have similar temperatures and densities, the ablation dynamics and radiation of Al and Cu planes is somewhat different, which was investigated in detail using the full set of diagnostics and modeling. Advantages of using such wire arrays at higher currents to study plasma flow and radiation from different materials and jets are highlighted. This work was supported by NNSA under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001984 and in part by DE-NA0002075. SNL is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Carbachol-Induced Reduction in the Activity of Adult Male Zebra Finch RA Projection Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Wei; Wang, Song-Hua; Li, Dong-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Cholinergic mechanism is involved in motor behavior. In songbirds, the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA) is a song premotor nucleus in the pallium and receives cholinergic inputs from the basal forebrain. The activity of projection neurons in RA determines song motor behavior. Although many evidences suggest that cholinergic system is implicated in song production, the cholinergic modulation of RA is not clear until now. In the present study, the electrophysiological effects of carbachol, a nonselective cholinergic receptor agonist, were investigated on the RA projection neurons of adult male zebra finches through whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in vitro. Our results show that carbachol produced a significant decrease in the spontaneous and evoked action potential (AP) firing frequency of RA projection neurons, accompanying a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential, an increase in the evoked AP latency, afterhyperpolarization (AHP) peak amplitude, and AHP time to peak, and a decrease in the membrane input resistance, membrane time constant, and membrane capacitance. These results indicate that carbachol reduces the activity of RA projection neurons by hyperpolarizing the resting membrane potential and increasing the AHP and the membrane conductance, suggesting that the cholinergic modulation of RA may play an important role in song production. PMID:26904300

  1. Colour vision and background adaptation in a passerine bird, the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Today, there is good knowledge of the physiological basis of bird colour vision and how mathematical models can be used to predict visual thresholds. However, we still know only little about how colour vision changes between different viewing conditions. This limits the understanding of how colour signalling is configured in habitats where the light of the illumination and the background may shift dramatically. I examined how colour discrimination in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) is affected by adaptation to different backgrounds. I trained finches in a two-alternative choice task, to choose between red discs displayed on backgrounds with different colours. I found that discrimination thresholds correlate with stimulus contrast to the background. Thresholds are low, and in agreement with model predictions, for a background with a red colour similar to the discs. For the most contrasting green background, thresholds are about five times higher than this. Subsequently, I trained the finches for the detection of single discs on a grey background. Detection thresholds are about 2.5 to 3 times higher than discrimination thresholds. This study demonstrates close similarities in human and bird colour vision, and the quantitative data offer a new possibility to account for shifting viewing conditions in colour vision models.

  2. [Determination of processing conditions for obtaining a pepitona (Arca zebra) hydrolysate for human consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixeras, S; Luna, G

    1985-12-01

    For the purpose of obtaining two protein hydrolysates from peptiona (Arca zebra), to be used as nutritional ingredients in accepted food items destined for human consumption, the enzymes bromelain and papain were studied. The effect of adding each of these proteases, on the rate of hydrolysis and conversion extent of insoluble pepitona protein to soluble nitrogen, were examined. Distilled water was added to the raw material to give a 2:1 ratio of solvent to pepitona, and mixed to produce a slurry at a pH of 6.4-6.5, with a total nitrogen value of 0.97% (w/v). Optimum conditions of hydrolysis were found to be two hours at 40 degrees C for both enzymes, at a pH of 7 and 0.3 g enzyme/100 g pepitona for papain, and a 0.2 g enzyme/100 g pepitona at pH 6.4 normally found in pepitona in the case of bromelain.

  3. Frequency Dependence of Polarization of Zebra Pattern in Type-IV Solar Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneda, Kazutaka; Iwai, Kazumasa; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Obara, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the polarization characteristics of a zebra pattern (ZP) in a type-IV solar radio burst observed with AMATERAS on 2011 June 21 for the purpose of evaluating the generation processes of ZP. Analyzing highly resolved spectral and polarization data revealed the frequency dependence of the degree of circular polarization and the delay between two polarized components for the first time. The degree of circular polarization was 50-70 percent right-handed and it varied little as a function of frequency. Cross-correlation analysis determined that the left-handed circularly polarized component was delayed by 50-70 ms relative to the right-handed component over the entire frequency range of the ZP and this delay increased with the frequency. We examined the obtained polarization characteristics by using pre-existing ZP models and concluded that the ZP was generated by the double plasma resonance process. Our results suggest that the ZP emission was originally generated in a completely polarized state in...

  4. FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF POLARIZATION OF ZEBRA PATTERN IN TYPE-IV SOLAR RADIO BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneda, Kazutaka; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Obara, T. [Planetary Plasma and Atmospheric Research Center, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Iwai, K., E-mail: k.kaneda@pparc.gp.tohoku.ac.jp [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 4-2-1, Nukui-Kitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan)

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the polarization characteristics of a zebra pattern (ZP) in a type-IV solar radio burst observed with AMATERAS on 2011 June 21 for the purpose of evaluating the generation processes of ZPs. Analyzing highly resolved spectral and polarization data revealed the frequency dependence of the degree of circular polarization and the delay between two polarized components for the first time. The degree of circular polarization was 50%–70% right-handed and it varied little as a function of frequency. Cross-correlation analysis determined that the left-handed circularly polarized component was delayed by 50–70 ms relative to the right-handed component over the entire frequency range of the ZP and this delay increased with the frequency. We examined the obtained polarization characteristics by using pre-existing ZP models and concluded that the ZP was generated by the double-plasma-resonance process. Our results suggest that the ZP emission was originally generated in a completely polarized state in the O-mode and was partly converted into the X-mode near the source. Subsequently, the difference between the group velocities of the O-mode and X-mode caused the temporal delay.

  5. Extracellular acidification activates ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor 1 and GPR4 homologs of zebra fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochimaru, Yuta [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Azuma, Morio [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Oshima, Natsuki; Ichijo, Yuta; Satou, Kazuhiro [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan); Matsuda, Kouhei [Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Asaoka, Yoichi; Nishina, Hiroshi [Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakakura, Takashi [Department of Anatomy, Graduate School of Medicine, Teikyo University, 2-11-1 Kaga Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Tomura, Hideaki, E-mail: tomurah@meiji.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Signaling Regulation, Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki 214-8571 (Japan)

    2015-02-20

    Mammalian ovarian G-protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1) and GPR4 are identified as a proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptor coupling to multiple intracellular signaling pathways. In the present study, we examined whether zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1 and zGPR4) could sense protons and activate the multiple intracellular signaling pathways and, if so, whether the similar positions of histidine residue, which is critical for sensing protons in mammalian OGR and GPR4, also play a role to sense protons and activate the multiple signaling pathways in the zebra fish receptors. We found that extracellular acidic pH stimulated CRE-, SRE-, and NFAT-promoter activities in zOGR1 overexpressed cells and stimulated CRE- and SRE- but not NFAT-promoter activities in zGPR4 overexpressed cells. The substitution of histidine residues at the 12th, 15th, 162th, and 264th positions from the N-terminal of zOGR1 with phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. The mutation of the histidine residue at the 78th but not the 84th position from the N-terminal of zGPR4 to phenylalanine attenuated the proton-induced SRE-promoter activities. These results suggest that zOGR1 and zGPR4 are also proton-sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, and the receptor activation mechanisms may be similar to those of the mammalian receptors. - Highlights: • Zebra fish OGR1 and GPR4 homologs (zOGR1, zGPR4) are proton-sensing receptors. • The signaling pathways activated by zOGR1 and zGPR4 are different. • Histidine residues critical for sensing protons are conserved.

  6. Underwater cleaning techniqued used for removal of zebra mussels at the FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the use of a mechanical brush cleaning technology recently used to remove biofouling from the Circulating Water (CW) System at New York Power Authority's James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Plant. The FitzPatrick plant had previously used chemical molluscicide to treat zebra mussels in the CW system. Full system treatment was performed in 1992 with limited forebay/screenwell treatment in 1993. The New York Power Authority (NYPA) decided to conduct a mechanical cleaning of the intake system in 1994. Specific project objectives included: (1) Achieve a level of surface cleaniness greater than 98%; (2) Remove 100% of debris, both existing sediment and debris generated as a result of cleaning; (3) Inspect all surfaces and components, identifying any problem areas; (4) Complete the task in a time frame within the 1994-95 refueling outage schedule window, and; (5) Determine if underwater mechanical cleaning is a cost-effective zebra mussel control method suitable for future application at FitzPatrick. A pre-cleaning inspection, including underwater video photography, was conducted of each area. Cleaning was accomplished using diver-controlled, multi-brush equipment included the electro-hydraulic powered Submersible Cleaning and Maintenance Platform (SCAMP), and several designs of hand-held machines. The brushes swept all zebra mussels off surfaces, restoring concrete and metal substrates to their original condition. Sensitive areas including pump housings, standpipes, sensor piping and chlorine injection tubing, were cleaned without degradation. Submersible vortex vacuum pumps were used to remove debris from the cavity. More than 46,000 ft2 of surface area was cleaned and over 460 cubic yards of dewatered debris were removed. As each area was completed, a post-clean inspection with photos and video was performed

  7. Underwater cleaning techniqued used for removal of zebra mussels at the FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, B. [Seaward Marine Services, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Kahabka, J. [New York Power Authority, White Plains, NY (United States)

    1995-06-01

    This paper discusses the use of a mechanical brush cleaning technology recently used to remove biofouling from the Circulating Water (CW) System at New York Power Authority`s James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Plant. The FitzPatrick plant had previously used chemical molluscicide to treat zebra mussels in the CW system. Full system treatment was performed in 1992 with limited forebay/screenwell treatment in 1993. The New York Power Authority (NYPA) decided to conduct a mechanical cleaning of the intake system in 1994. Specific project objectives included: (1) Achieve a level of surface cleaniness greater than 98%; (2) Remove 100% of debris, both existing sediment and debris generated as a result of cleaning; (3) Inspect all surfaces and components, identifying any problem areas; (4) Complete the task in a time frame within the 1994-95 refueling outage schedule window, and; (5) Determine if underwater mechanical cleaning is a cost-effective zebra mussel control method suitable for future application at FitzPatrick. A pre-cleaning inspection, including underwater video photography, was conducted of each area. Cleaning was accomplished using diver-controlled, multi-brush equipment included the electro-hydraulic powered Submersible Cleaning and Maintenance Platform (SCAMP), and several designs of hand-held machines. The brushes swept all zebra mussels off surfaces, restoring concrete and metal substrates to their original condition. Sensitive areas including pump housings, standpipes, sensor piping and chlorine injection tubing, were cleaned without degradation. Submersible vortex vacuum pumps were used to remove debris from the cavity. More than 46,000 ft{sup 2} of surface area was cleaned and over 460 cubic yards of dewatered debris were removed. As each area was completed, a post-clean inspection with photos and video was performed.

  8. Regeneração da barbatana caudal em peixe-zebra (Danio rerio): uma perspectiva biofísica

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Fernando Ricardo da Silva, 1987-

    2011-01-01

    Tese de mestrado. Biologia (Biologia Evolutiva e do Desenvolvimento). Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2011 O peixe-zebra (Danio rerio) regenera vários órgãos, o que o torna um excelente modelo para estudos de regeneração. Partindo de uma hipótese biofísica onde fluxos iónicos e correntes associadas são considerados eventos epigenéticos à regeneração, determinou-se o perfil de fluxos extracelulares dos iões cloreto e sódio na barbatana caudal durante as diferentes fases da re...

  9. In search of greener pastures: Using satellite images to predict the effects of environmental change on zebra migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlam-Brooks, Hattie L. A.; Beck, Pieter S. A.; Bohrer, Gil; Harris, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    ungulate migrations occurred in most grassland and boreal woodland ecosystems, but many have been lost due to increasing habitat loss and fragmentation. With the rate of environmental change increasing, identifying and prioritizing migration routes for conservation has taken on a new urgency. Understanding the cues that drive long-distance animal movements is critical to predicting the fate of migrations under different environmental change scenarios and how large migratory herbivores will respond to increasing resource heterogeneity and anthropogenic influences. We used an individual-based modeling approach to investigate the influence of environmental conditions, monitored using satellite data, on departure date and movement speed of migrating zebras in Botswana. Daily zebra movements between dry and rainy season ranges were annotated with coincident observations of precipitation from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission data set and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). An array of increasingly complex movement models representing alternative hypotheses regarding the environmental cues and controls for movement was parameterized and tested. The best and most justified model predicted daily zebra movement as two linear functions of precipitation rate and NDVI and included a modeled departure date as a function of cumulative precipitation. The model was highly successful at replicating both the timing and pace of seven actual migrations observed using GPS telemetry (R2 = 0.914). It shows how zebras rapidly adjust their movement to changing environmental conditions during migration and are able to reverse migration to avoid adverse conditions or exploit renewed resource availability, a nomadic behavior which should lend them a degree of resilience to climate and environmental change. Our results demonstrate how competing individual-based migration models, informed by freely available satellite data

  10. The influence of temperature, daylength and sucrose concentration on the growth and development of Alstroemeria 'Zebra' in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Eleonora Gabryszewska

    2013-01-01

    The influence of temperature, daylength and sucrose concentration on the growth and development of Alstroemeria 'Zebra' in vitro was investigated. Only slightly more lateral rhizomes were formed at 25°C in comparison with 17°C on the medium with BA. Presence of BA in the medium strongly increased number of upright growing shoots and more shoots were formed in temperature 25°C than in temperature 17°C. Rhizome multiplication and formation of upright growing shoots were not significantly influe...

  11. Optical imaging of retinotopic maps in a small songbird, the zebra finch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Keary

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The primary visual cortex of mammals is characterised by a retinotopic representation of the visual field. It has therefore been speculated that the visual wulst, the avian homologue of the visual cortex, also contains such a retinotopic map. We examined this for the first time by optical imaging of intrinsic signals in zebra finches, a small songbird with laterally placed eyes. In addition to the visual wulst, we visualised the retinotopic map of the optic tectum which is homologue to the superior colliculus in mammals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For the optic tectum, our results confirmed previous accounts of topography based on anatomical studies and conventional electrophysiology. Within the visual wulst, the retinotopy revealed by our experiments has not been illustrated convincingly before. The frontal part of the visual field (0 degrees +/-30 degrees azimuth was not represented in the retinotopic map. The visual field from 30 degrees -60 degrees azimuth showed stronger magnification compared with more lateral regions. Only stimuli within elevations between about 20 degrees and 40 degrees above the horizon elicited neuronal activation. Activation from other elevations was masked by activation of the preferred region. Most interestingly, we observed more than one retinotopic representation of visual space within the visual wulst, which indicates that the avian wulst, like the visual cortex in mammals, may show some compartmentation parallel to the surface in addition to its layered structure. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show the applicability of the optical imaging method also for small songbirds. We obtained a more detailed picture of retinotopic maps in birds, especially on the functional neuronal organisation of the visual wulst. Our findings support the notion of homology of visual wulst and visual cortex by showing that there is a functional correspondence between the two areas but also raise questions based

  12. On the Zebra Structure in the Frequency Range near 3 GHz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We present 19 cases of zebra pattern structure (ZPS) and fiber bursts(FB) in radio bursts in frequency range around 3 GHz, and one such case in the range 5.2-7.6 GHz, using the new microwave spectrometer of NAOC between 2.6-3.8 and 5.2-7.6 GHz (China, Huairou station) with high resolution (10 MHz and 8 ms). The FB and ZPS have about the same spectral parameters: the frequency bandwidth of emission stripes △f ~ 20 MHz, the frequency separation between the emission and the neighboring low frequency absorption -△fea ~ 30 MHz and the frequency separation between emission stripes (when a periodic structure persists)△fs ~ 60-70 MHz. Therefore we consider both these fine structures to be whistlermanifestations, i.e., interactions of plasma electrostatic waves with whistler waves(generated by the same fast particles with loss-cone anisotropy) l + w → t. The duration of the fiber bursts of about 2 s corresponds to whistler waves propagat-ing undamped at about 2s, which requires a whistler increment < 0.5 s-1. Inthe frequency range 3-7 GHz the relation between the ratios of plasma to cyclotronfrequencies and whistler to cyclotron frequencies is almost independent of the decre-ment of whistler electron damping. This finding is used to obtain the magnetic fieldstrength in the region of generation. For a reasonable value of electron temperature(2-20 MK), we find B = 125-190 G when the electron density is (8-18) x 1010 cm-3and B = 520 - 610 G when the electron density is (35-60) × 1010 cm-3. In two re-markable events, 1998-04-15 and 2000-10-29, the right-hand polarization is strong for all the fine structures and corresponds to ordinary wave.

  13. Effect of laying sequence on egg mercury in captive zebra finches: an interpretation considering individual variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Langbo; Varian-Ramos, Claire W; Cristol, Daniel A

    2015-08-01

    Bird eggs are used widely as noninvasive bioindicators for environmental mercury availability. Previous studies, however, have found varying relationships between laying sequence and egg mercury concentrations. Some studies have reported that the mercury concentration was higher in first-laid eggs or declined across the laying sequence, whereas in other studies mercury concentration was not related to egg order. Approximately 300 eggs (61 clutches) were collected from captive zebra finches dosed throughout their reproductive lives with methylmercury (0.3 μg/g, 0.6 μg/g, 1.2 μg/g, or 2.4 μg/g wet wt in diet); the total mercury concentration (mean ± standard deviation [SD] dry wt basis) of their eggs was 7.03 ± 1.38 μg/g, 14.15 ± 2.52 μg/g, 26.85 ± 5.85 μg/g, and 49.76 ± 10.37 μg/g, respectively (equivalent to fresh wt egg mercury concentrations of 1.24 μg/g, 2.50 μg/g, 4.74 μg/g, and 8.79 μg/g). The authors observed a significant decrease in the mercury concentration of successive eggs when compared with the first egg and notable variation between clutches within treatments. The mercury level of individual females within and among treatments did not alter this relationship. Based on the results, sampling of a single egg in each clutch from any position in the laying sequence is sufficient for purposes of population risk assessment, but it is not recommended as a proxy for individual female exposure or as an estimate of average mercury level within the clutch. PMID:25760460

  14. [Preparation and nutritional characteristics of a hydrolysate from pepitona (Arca zebra)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbej, J; Luna, G

    1985-12-01

    Two soluble products resulting from the hydrolysis of pepitona (Arca zebra) were prepared as flour. Papain at its optimum hydrolysis conditions, previously established, was the enzyme used (40 degrees C for two hours at a pH of 7 in the proportion of 0.3% weight/enzyme/100 g meat). The hydrolysate obtained was then subjected to two different dehydration techniques: drum drying at 121 degrees C and 18 seconds retention, and spray drying at 101 degrees C and 40 psi pressure. The products were then stored for a five-month period at a temperature of 25 degrees C +/- 2 degrees C, time during which chemical determinations were performed in both hydrolysates. Findings showed that the time of storage does exert a significant effect of deterioration on the products. The greater and more significant quality losses occur during the first two months. The dehydration techniques used also affect significantly the soluble nitrogen content, and non-protein nitrogen and soluble solids content, as well as color of pepitona hydrolysates. Spray-drying dehydration technique does not have a significant deteriorating effect. Biological studies undertaken demonstrated that the quality of both hydrolysates is satisfactory from the nutritional and amino acid composition points of view. A protein efficiency ratio (PER) of 2.27 and 2.29 was determined for the hydrolysate dehydrated by drum drier and for the dehydrated by spray drier, respectively. With regard to amino acid composition, both had satisfactory levels of essential amino acids, with a lysine content of 6.9 g/100 g protein for the hydrolysate dehydrated by drum drying, and 8.6 g/100 g protein for the other hydrolysate dehydrated by spray drying. PMID:3842922

  15. Vegetation description of the Doornhoek section of the Mountain Zebra National Park (MZNP, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Bezuidenhout

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The Mountain Zebra National Park (MZNP has been extended over the last couple of years. One of the newly procured areas is the Doornhoek section, which had been adjacent to the park. To develop scientifically sound management programmes for conservation areas, it is essential that an inventory of their natural resources be undertaken. The aim of this study was to classify, describe and map the vegetation of the Doornhoek section of the park. The floristic data were analysed in accordance with the Braun-Blanquet procedures using the BBPC suite. The data analysis resulted in the identification of eight communities, which can be grouped into seven major community types (Rhus lucida–Buddleja glomerata Shrubland, Rhigozum obovatum–Rhus longispina Shrubland, Helichrysum dregeanum–Aristida diffusa Grassland, Pentzia globosa–Enneapogon scoparius Grassland, Aristida adscensionus–Pentzia globosa Grassland, Cadaba aphylla–Acacia karroo Woodland and Lycium oxycarpum–Acacia karroo Woodland. Four of these communities occur on the higher-lying plateau, mid-slope and crest areas, while the other four communities are located on the lower-lying mid-plateau and foot slope, along drainage lines and in valley-bottom areas. The description of the plant communities, together with the vegetation map, can serve as a basis for formulating a management programme for the larger park. Although sections of Doornhoek have been overgrazed and degraded in the past, its recent addition to the MZNP contributes to the available habitat preferred by large herbivores, such as valley bottoms, foot-slopes and plateaux.

  16. The complete genome sequence of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum', the bacterium associated with potato zebra chip disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Lin

    Full Text Available Zebra Chip (ZC is an emerging plant disease that causes aboveground decline of potato shoots and generally results in unusable tubers. This disease has led to multi-million dollar losses for growers in the central and western United States over the past decade and impacts the livelihood of potato farmers in Mexico and New Zealand. ZC is associated with 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum', a fastidious alpha-proteobacterium that is transmitted by a phloem-feeding psyllid vector, Bactericera cockerelli Sulc. Research on this disease has been hampered by a lack of robust culture methods and paucity of genome sequence information for 'Ca. L. solanacearum'. Here we present the sequence of the 1.26 Mbp metagenome of 'Ca. L. solanacearum', based on DNA isolated from potato psyllids. The coding inventory of the 'Ca. L. solanacearum' genome was analyzed and compared to related Rhizobiaceae to better understand 'Ca. L. solanacearum' physiology and identify potential targets to develop improved treatment strategies. This analysis revealed a number of unique transporters and pathways, all potentially contributing to ZC pathogenesis. Some of these factors may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Taxonomically, 'Ca. L. solanacearum' is related to 'Ca. L. asiaticus', a suspected causative agent of citrus huanglongbing, yet many genome rearrangements and several gene gains/losses are evident when comparing these two Liberibacter. species. Relative to 'Ca. L. asiaticus', 'Ca. L. solanacearum' probably has reduced capacity for nucleic acid modification, increased amino acid and vitamin biosynthesis functionalities, and gained a high-affinity iron transport system characteristic of several pathogenic microbes.

  17. Significance and Epidemiological Aspects of Late-Season Infections in the Management of Potato Zebra Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, C M; Workneh, F; Rashed, A

    2015-07-01

    Zebra chip (ZC) of potato is putatively caused by the fastidious, phloem-limited bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' (Lso), which is transmitted by the potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli). The disease, which significantly impacts both crop yield and quality, was first identified in the United States from south Texas in 2000. It reached epidemic levels in north Texas and certain production areas in Colorado, Nebraska, and New Mexico from 2004 to 2007 and it caused severe losses in fields in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho in 2011. The potato plant is susceptible to infection at all developmental stages, but disease management programs have focused on vector control through early and repeated insecticide applications, in an effort to minimize early to midseason infections which are most damaging. Growers often terminate spray programs 2 to 3 weeks prior to crop harvest due to lack of visible treatment effects on crop yield or quality. However, recent studies on vector transmission and host-pathogen interactions have revealed that late-season infections pose a significant, previously unrecognized, threat to crop quality. The pathogen can move from an infected leaf to tubers within 2 days; however, tubers infected less than 1 week before harvest will remain asymptomatic and the pathogen will be undetectable. When these tubers are placed into storage they are assumed to be disease free. However, Lso can continue to multiply in respiring tubers during storage, resulting in reduced tuber quality. Likewise, if plants become infected a few days before vines are killed, ZC can continue to develop in infected tubers before they are harvested. Perspectives on the significance of late-season infections and some of the more important issues associated with those infections are discussed. PMID:25894320

  18. Use of zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) to assess trace metal contamination in the largest Italian subalpine lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camusso, M; Balestrini, R; Binelli, A

    2001-07-01

    Trace metal (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn) contamination was evaluated in zebra mussels from the lakes Maggiore, Lugano, Como, Iseo and Garda, which are located in the most highly populated and industrialised area in Italy. Zebra mussels from Lake Maggiore contained the highest concentrations (3.44, 1.51, 4.97, 0.158, 5.87, 346 microg g(-1) for Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Pb, Zn, respectively) of all metals analysed except Cu and Ni. The lowest levels of most metals were in animals from Garda and Lugano (0.78 and 0.60 microg g(-1) for Cd, 2.87 and 2.03 microg g(-1) for Cr, 0.065 and 0.049 microg g(-1) for Hg, 12.1 and 11.9 microg g(-1) for Ni, 1.96 and 2.46 microg g(-1) for Pb, 158 and 163 microg g(-1) for Zn). The most contaminated sites and possible local sources of metals were identified for each lake, and the lakes classified into quality classes concerning metal pollution.

  19. Effects of early developmental conditions on innate immunity are only evident under favourable adult conditions in zebra finches

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Coster, Greet; Verhulst, Simon; Koetsier, Egbert; de Neve, Liesbeth; Briga, Michael; Lens, Luc

    2011-12-01

    Long-term effects of unfavourable conditions during development can be expected to depend on the quality of the environment experienced by the same individuals during adulthood. Yet, in the majority of studies, long-term effects of early developmental conditions have been assessed under favourable adult conditions only. The immune system might be particularly vulnerable to early environmental conditions as its development, maintenance and use are thought to be energetically costly. Here, we studied the interactive effects of favourable and unfavourable conditions during nestling and adult stages on innate immunity (lysis and agglutination scores) of captive male and female zebra finches ( Taeniopygia guttata). Nestling environmental conditions were manipulated by a brood size experiment, while a foraging cost treatment was imposed on the same individuals during adulthood. This combined treatment showed that innate immunity of adult zebra finches is affected by their early developmental conditions and varies between both sexes. Lysis scores, but not agglutination scores, were higher in individuals raised in small broods and in males. However, these effects were only present in birds that experienced low foraging costs. This study shows that the quality of the adult environment may shape the long-term consequences of early developmental conditions on innate immunity, as long-term effects of nestling environment were only evident under favourable adult conditions.

  20. Karyotypic conservatism in samples of Characidium cf. zebra (Teleostei, Characiformes, Crenuchidae): Physical mapping of ribosomal genes and natural triploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2011-04-01

    Basic and molecular cytogenetic analyses were performed in specimens of Characidium cf. zebra from five collection sites located throughout the Tietê, Paranapanema and Paraguay river basins. The diploid number in specimens from all samples was 2n = 50 with a karyotype composed of 32 metacentric and 18 submetacentric chromosomes in both males and females. Constitutive heterochromatin was present at the centromeric regions of all chromosomes and pair 23, had additional interstitial heterochromatic blocks on its long arms. The nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) were located on the long arms of pair 23, while the 5S rDNA sites were detected in different chromosomes among the studied samples. One specimen from the Alambari river was a natural triploid and had two extra chromosomes, resulting in 2n = 77. The remarkable karyotypic similarity among the specimens of C. cf. zebra suggests a close evolutionary relationship. On the other hand, the distinct patterns of 5S rDNA distribution may be the result of gene flow constraints during their evolutionary history.

  1. Karyotypic conservatism in samples of Characidium cf. zebra (Teleostei, Characiformes, Crenuchidae: physical mapping of ribosomal genes and natural triploidy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Pansonato-Alves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic and molecular cytogenetic analyses were performed in specimens of Characidium cf. zebra from five collection sites located throughout the Tietê, Paranapanema and Paraguay river basins. The diploid number in specimens from all samples was 2n = 50 with a karyotype composed of 32 metacentric and 18 submetacentric chromosomes in both males and females. Constitutive heterochromatin was present at the centromeric regions of all chromosomes and pair 23, had additional interstitial heterochromatic blocks on its long arms. The nucleolar organizer regions (NORs were located on the long arms of pair 23, while the 5S rDNA sites were detected in different chromosomes among the studied samples. One specimen from the Alambari river was a natural triploid and had two extra chromosomes, resulting in 2n = 77. The remarkable karyotypic similarity among the specimens of C. cf. zebra suggests a close evolutionary relationship. On the other hand, the distinct patterns of 5S rDNA distribution may be the result of gene flow constraints during their evolutionary history.

  2. Developmental effects of vasotocin and nonapeptide receptors on early social attachment and affiliative behavior in the zebra finch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Nicole M; Sklar, Nathan C; Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth

    2016-02-01

    Zebra finches demonstrate selective affiliation between juvenile offspring and parents, which, like affiliation between pair partners, is characterized by proximity, vocal communication and contact behaviors. This experiment tested the hypothesis that the nonapeptide arginine vasotocin (AVT, avian homologue of vasopressin) and nonapeptide receptors play a role prior to fledging in the development of affiliative behavior. Zebra finch hatchlings of both sexes received daily intracranial injections (post-hatch days 2-8) of either AVT, Manning Compound (MC, a potent V1a receptor antagonist) or saline (vehicle control). The social development of both sexes was assessed by measuring responsiveness to isolation from the family and subsequent reunion with the male parent after fledging. In addition, we assessed the changes in affiliation with the parents, unfamiliar males, and unfamiliar females each week throughout juvenile development. Compared to controls, MC subjects showed decreased attachment to the parents and MC males did not show the normal increase in affiliative interest in opposite sex individuals as they reached reproductive maturity. In contrast, AVT subjects showed a sustained affiliative interest in parents throughout development, and males showed increased interest in opposite sex conspecifics as they matured. These results provide the first evidence suggesting that AVT and nonapeptide receptors play organizational roles in social development in a bird. PMID:26476409

  3. Acoustic communication and sound degradation: how do the individual signatures of male and female zebra finch calls transmit over distance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solveig C Mouterde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Assessing the active space of the various types of information encoded by songbirds' vocalizations is important to address questions related to species ecology (e.g. spacing of individuals, as well as social behavior (e.g. territorial and/or mating strategies. Up to now, most of the previous studies have investigated the degradation of species-specific related information (species identity, and there is a gap of knowledge of how finer-grained information (e.g. individual identity can transmit through the environment. Here we studied how the individual signature coded in the zebra finch long distance contact call degrades with propagation. METHODOLOGY: We performed sound transmission experiments of zebra finches' distance calls at various propagation distances. The propagated calls were analyzed using discriminant function analyses on a set of analytical parameters describing separately the spectral and temporal envelopes, as well as on a complete spectrographic representation of the signals. RESULTS/CONCLUSION: We found that individual signature is remarkably resistant to propagation as caller identity can be recovered even at distances greater than a hundred meters. Male calls show stronger discriminability at long distances than female calls, and this difference can be explained by the more pronounced frequency modulation found in their calls. In both sexes, individual information is carried redundantly using multiple acoustical features. Interestingly, features providing the highest discrimination at short distances are not the same ones that provide the highest discrimination at long distances.

  4. Spectral and spatial observations of microwave spikes and zebra structure in the short radio burst of May 29, 2003

    CERN Document Server

    Chernov, G P; Meshalkina, N S; Yan, Y; Tan, C

    2011-01-01

    The unusual radio burst of May 29, 2003 connected with the M1.5 flare in AR 10368 has been analyzed. It was observed by the Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Huairou station, Beijing) in the 5.2-7.6 GHz range. It proved to be only the third case of a neat zebra structure appearing among all observations at such high frequencies. Despite the short duration of the burst (25 s), it provided a wealth of data for studying the superfine structure with millisecond resolution (5 ms). We localize the site of emission sources in the flare region, estimate plasma parameters in the generation sites, and suggest applicable mechanisms for interpretating spikes and zebra-structure generation. Positions of radio bursts were obtained by the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT) (5.7 GHz) and Nobeyama radioheliograph (NoRH) (17 GHz). The sources in intensity gravitated to tops of short loops at 17 GHz, and to long loops at 5.7 GHz. Short pulses at 17 GHz (with a temporal resolution of 100 ms) are registered in the R-pol...

  5. HTR2 receptors in a songbird premotor cortical-like area modulate spectral characteristics of zebra finch song.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William E; Roseberry, Thomas K; Perkel, David J

    2013-02-13

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is involved in modulating an array of complex behaviors including learning, depression, and circadian rhythms. Additionally, HTR2 receptors on layer V pyramidal neurons are thought to mediate the actions of psychedelic drugs; the native function of these receptors at this site, however, remains unknown. Previously, we found that activation of HTR2 receptors in the zebra finch forebrain song premotor structure the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA) led to increased excitation, and that endogenous 5-HT could roughly double spontaneous firing rate. Here, using in vivo single-unit recordings, we found that direct application of 5-HT to these same RA projection neurons, which are analogous to layer V cortical pyramidal neurons, caused a significant increase in the number of action potentials per song-related burst, and a dramatic decrease in signal-to-noise ratio. Injection of the serotonergic neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine into the third ventricle greatly reduced telencephalic 5-HT and resulted in decreased fundamental frequency of harmonic syllables as well as increased goodness of pitch. Both of these results can be explained by the observed actions of 5-HT on RA projection neurons, and both effects recovered to baseline within 2 weeks following the toxin injection. These results show that 5-HT is involved in modulating spectral properties of song, likely via effects on RA projection neurons, but that adult zebra finches can partially compensate for this deficit within 7 d. PMID:23407949

  6. Evaluation of Octhylphenol Effect on Development and Survival on Zebra Fish (Danio Rerio During Different Ontogenic Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi Dumitrescu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is part of a complex study of our research collective that studies the toxic effect of the ethinylestradiolum, and some of the polyethoxylated alkylphenols on the growth and reproduction of the Zebra fish (Danio rerio and of the common Carp (Cyprinus carpio. Our study aim was to evaluate the effect of octylphenol on growth and survival of zebra fish, from 21-115 days, and within 21-75 days of life. For this purpose, for each period under study, fishes were divided into three groups of 30 individuals, named: Lot 1 - Control, respectively lots 2 and 3, at which the administrated octylphenol concentrations were of 60 μg L-1, respectively 100 μg L-1. Fishes of the six groups were raised in 30-liters aquariums (30 fish / aquarium. The growth was measured by weighing and biometric measurements (total length, standard length, the length of the head, maximal height, minimal height and the mass of the body, while the surviving rate was established at the end of every period and at the end of the experiment, when we were able to calculate the total number of dead fish. Biometric study of the analysis performed in 75 days, 115 days respectively shows that octylphenol has negative influence on body development, and survival both, the highest percentage of mortality (46,66% was registered at 100 μgL-1 concentration, between 21 -75 days.

  7. Short-term exposure to testosterone propionate leads to rapid bill color and dominance changes in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardia, Daniel R; Broughton, Deanna R; Gleicher, Michael J

    2010-08-01

    Testosterone (T) can influence both male-male competition and mate choice displays. In zebra finches, female mate choice is based in part on bill color, and bill color has been shown to be enhanced by long-term testosterone supplementation. However, it is not clear whether bill color plays a role in male-male interactions and how bill color responds to shorter-term changes in T. We tested whether a single injection of testosterone propionate (TP) would influence male-male dominance interactions and lead to rapid (over a three-day period) changes in bill color. In addition, we tested whether bill color predicted aggression and dominance. We allowed birds in triads to establish hierarchies and then injected either dominant or subordinate individuals with TP, in addition to establishing sham control triads. We found that red chroma, but not hue, predicted aggressiveness of males. Exposure to TP led both dominant and subordinate birds to increase dominance scores over three days, longer than the bill. Our results suggest that zebra finches can modulate T and bill color levels over short time periods and these changes may occur through positive feedback between T-levels and dominance. PMID:20406643

  8. Experimental exposure to urban and pink noise affects brain development and song learning in zebra finches (Taenopygia guttata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, Michael T.; Swaddle, John P.; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, numerous studies have observed changes in bird vocalizations—especially song—in urban habitats. These changes are often interpreted as adaptive, since they increase the active space of the signal in its environment. However, the proximate mechanisms driving cross-generational changes in song are still unknown. We performed a captive experiment to identify whether noise experienced during development affects song learning and the development of song-control brain regions. Zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) were bred while exposed, or not exposed, to recorded traffic urban noise (Study 1) or pink noise (Study 2). We recorded the songs of male offspring and compared these to fathers’ songs. We also measured baseline corticosterone and measured the size of song-control brain regions when the males reached adulthood (Study 1 only). While male zebra finches tended to copy syllables accurately from tutors regardless of noise environment, syntax (the ordering of syllables within songs) was incorrectly copied affected by juveniles exposed to noise. Noise did not affect baseline corticosterone, but did affect the size of brain regions associated with song learning: these regions were smaller in males that had been had been exposed to recorded traffic urban noise in early development. These findings provide a possible mechanism by which noise affects behaviour, leading to potential population differences between wild animals occupying noisier urban environments compared with those in quieter habitats.

  9. Invasive zebra mussels (Driessena polymorpha) and Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea) survive gut passage of migratory fish species: implications for dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatlin, Michael R.; Shoup, Daniel E.; Long, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction and spread of invasive species is of great concern to natural resource managers in the United States. To effectively control the spread of these species, managers must be aware of the multitude of dispersal methods used by the organisms. We investigated the potential for survival through the gut of a migrating fish (blue catfish, Ictalurus furcatus) as a dispersal mechanism for two invasive bivalves: zebra mussel (Driessena polymorpha) and Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea). Blue catfish (N = 62) were sampled over several months from Sooner Lake, Oklahoma, transported to a laboratory and held in individual tanks for 48 h. All fecal material was collected and inspected for live mussels. Survival was significantly related to water temperature in the lake at the time of collection, with no mussels surviving above 21.1 C°, whereas 12 % of zebra mussels (N = 939) and 39 % of Asian clams (N = 408) consumed in cooler water survived gut passage. This research demonstrates the potential for blue catfish to serve as a dispersal vector for invasive bivalves at low water temperatures.

  10. Subdivisions of the auditory midbrain (n. mesencephalicus lateralis, pars dorsalis in zebra finches using calcium-binding protein immunocytochemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Logerot

    Full Text Available The midbrain nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis pars dorsalis (MLd is thought to be the avian homologue of the central nucleus of the mammalian inferior colliculus. As such, it is a major relay in the ascending auditory pathway of all birds and in songbirds mediates the auditory feedback necessary for the learning and maintenance of song. To clarify the organization of MLd, we applied three calcium binding protein antibodies to tissue sections from the brains of adult male and female zebra finches. The staining patterns resulting from the application of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin antibodies differed from each other and in different parts of the nucleus. Parvalbumin-like immunoreactivity was distributed throughout the whole nucleus, as defined by the totality of the terminations of brainstem auditory afferents; in other words parvalbumin-like immunoreactivity defines the boundaries of MLd. Staining patterns of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin defined two regions of MLd: inner (MLd.I and outer (MLd.O. MLd.O largely surrounds MLd.I and is distinct from the surrounding intercollicular nucleus. Unlike the case in some non-songbirds, however, the two MLd regions do not correspond to the terminal zones of the projections of the brainstem auditory nuclei angularis and laminaris, which have been found to overlap substantially throughout the nucleus in zebra finches.

  11. Cholesterol regulatory effects and antioxidant activities of protein hydrolysates from zebra blenny (Salaria basilisca) in cholesterol-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ktari, Naourez; Belguith-Hadriche, Olfa; Ben Amara, Ibtissem; Ben Hadj, Aïda; Turki, Mouna; Makni-Ayedi, Fatma; Boudaouara, Tahia; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Boualga, Ahmed; Ben Salah, Riadh; Nasri, Moncef

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to explore the hypocholesterolemic effects and antioxidative activities of zebra blenny protein hydrolysates (ZBPHs) in rats fed with a hypercholesterolemic diet. The rats were fed during eight weeks a standard laboratory diet (normal rats), a high-cholesterol diet (HCD) (1%) or a HCD and orally treated with ZBPHs or undigested zebra blenny proteins (UZBPs) (400 mg per kg per day). Results showed that a hypercholesterolemic diet induced the increase of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Treatment with ZBPHs increased the level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and decreased significantly the levels of TC, TG, and LDL-C. In addition, ZBPH treatment showed significant normalization of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels as well as catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities in renal and hepatic tissues. Furthermore, ZBPHs may also exert significant protective effects on liver and kidney functions, evidenced by a marked decrease in the level of serum urea, uric acid, creatinine, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT). Histological studies confirmed that ZBPHs effectively protected the livers and kidneys against hypercholesterolemia-mediated oxidative damage. Therefore, the study strengthens the hypothesis that ZBPHs can be used as novel antioxidants and hypocholesterolemic compounds against hyperlipidemia induced atherosclerosis. PMID:26065510

  12. Effects of lethal and sublethal concentrations of the herbicide, triclopyr butoxyethyl ester, in the diet of zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, S B; Thompson, D G; Wainio-Keizer, K L; Capell, S S; Staznik, B

    1994-07-01

    Lethal and sublethal effects of dietary triclopyr butoxyethyl ester (TBEE) on zebra finches (Poephila guttata Gould) were determined in laboratory experiments conducted between 8 January and 1 May 1991. The 8-day median lethal dietary concentration, LC50 (95% confidence interval), of TBEE to zebra finches was 1,923 (1,627 to 2,277) mg/kg. In the sublethal effects experiment, when birds were exposed to 500 mg/kg TBEE in the diet for 29 days, food consumption and body weight were significantly depressed (P 0.05). Perch-hopping activity was depressed relative to controls in the 500 mg/kg group, and elevated in the 150 mg/kg group, but neither of these differences was significantly (P > 0.05). Disappearance of TBEE residues from treated seeds over the 29 day experimental period followed an exponential decay model, with half-lives in the order of 15 to 18 days. On the basis of our observation that TBEE had no significant adverse effects at a concentration greater than the maximum expected environmental concentration, we propose that forestry applications of triclopyr at registered dosage rates pose little risk to wild songbirds. PMID:7933272

  13. Zebra chip disease and potato biochemistry: tuber physiological changes in response to 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' infection over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, A; Wallis, C M; Paetzold, L; Workneh, F; Rush, C M

    2013-05-01

    Zebra chip disease, putatively caused by the bacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum', is of increasing concern to potato production in Mexico, the United States, and New Zealand. However, little is known about the etiology of this disease and changes that occur within host tubers that result in its symptoms. Previous studies found that increased levels of phenolics, amino acids, defense proteins, and carbohydrates in 'Ca. L. solanacearum'-infected tubers are associated with symptoms of zebra chip. This study was conducted to quantify variations in levels of these biochemical components in relation to the time of infestation, symptom severity, and 'Ca. L. solanacearum' titer. Levels of phenolics, peroxidases, polyphenol oxidases, and reducing sugars (glucose and, to some extent, fructose) changed during infection, with higher levels occurring in tubers infected at least 5 weeks before harvest than in those infected only a week before harvest and those of controls. Compared with the apical tuber ends, greater levels of phenolics, peroxidases, and sucrose occurred at the basal (stolon attachment) end of infected tubers. With the exception of phenolics, concentrations of the evaluated compounds were not associated with 'Ca. L. solanacearum' titer. However, there were significant associations between biochemical responses and symptom severity. The lack of a linear correlation between most plant biochemical responses and 'Ca. L. solanacearum' titer suggests that shifts in metabolic profiles are independent of variations in 'Ca. L. solanacearum' levels. PMID:23425237

  14. Mutations of amino acids in the DNA-recognition domain of Epstein-Barr virus ZEBRA protein alter its sub-nuclear localization and affect formation of replication compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZEBRA, a transcription factor and DNA replication protein encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BZLF1 gene, plays indispensable roles in the EBV lytic cycle. We recently described the phenotypes of 46 single amino acid substitutions introduced into the DNA-recognition region of ZEBRA [Heston, L., El-Guindy, A., Countryman, J., Dela Cruz, C., Delecluse, H.J., and Miller, G. 2006]. The 27 DNA-binding-proficient mutants exhibited distinct defects in their ability to activate expression of the kinetic classes of viral genes. Four phenotypic variants could be discerned: wild-type, defective at activating Rta, defective at activating early genes, and defective at activating late genes. Here we analyze the distribution of ZEBRA within the nucleus and the localization of EA-D (the viral DNA polymerase processivity factor), an indicator of the development of replication compartments, in representatives of each phenotypic group. Plasmids encoding wild-type (WT) and mutant ZEBRA were transfected into 293 cells containing EBV-bacmids. WT ZEBRA protein was diffusely and smoothly distributed throughout the nucleus, sparing nucleoli, and partially recruited to globular replication compartments. EA-D induced by WT ZEBRA was present diffusely in some cells and concentrated in globular replication compartments in other cells. The distribution of ZEBRA and EA-D proteins was identical to WT following transfection of K188R, a mutant with a conservative change. The distribution of S186A mutant ZEBRA protein, defective for activation of Rta and EA-D, was identical to WT, except that the mutant ZEBRA was never found in globular compartments. Co-expression of Rta with S186A mutant rescued diffuse EA-D but not globular replication compartments. The most striking observation was that several mutant ZEBRA proteins defective in activating EA-D (R179A, K181A and A185V) and defective in activating lytic viral DNA replication and late genes (Y180E and K188A) were localized to numerous punctate

  15. Spatio-temporal spawning and larval dynamics of a zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) population in a North Texas Reservoir: implications for invasions in the southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Christopher John

    2013-01-01

    Zebra mussels were first observed in Texas in 2009 in a reservoir (Lake Texoma) on the Texas-Oklahoma border. In 2012, an established population was found in a near-by reservoir, Ray Roberts Lake, and in June 2013, settled mussels were detected in a third north Texas reservoir, Lake Lewisville. An established population was detected in Belton Lake in September 2013. With the exception of Louisiana, these occurrences in Texas mark the current southern extent of the range of this species in the United States. Previous studies indicate that zebra mussel populations could be affected by environmental conditions, especially increased temperatures and extreme droughts, which are characteristic of surface waters of the southern and southwestern United States. Data collected during the first three years (2010–12) of a long-term monitoring program were analyzed to determine if spatio-temporal zebra mussel spawning and larval dynamics were related to physicochemical water properties in Lake Texoma. Reproductive output of the local population was significantly related to water temperature and lake elevation. Estimated mean date of first spawn in Lake Texoma was approximately 1.5 months earlier and peak veliger densities were observed two months earlier than in Lake Erie. Annual maximum veliger density declined significantly during the study period (p extreme droughts likely will affect spatio-temporal dynamics of established populations if zebra mussels spread farther into the southern and southwestern United States.

  16. A cost-benefit analysis of preventative management for zebra and quagga mussels in the Colorado-Big Thompson System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Catherine M.

    2010-01-01

    Zebra and quagga mussels are fresh water invaders that have the potential to cause severe ecological and economic damage. It is estimated that mussels cause $1 billion dollars per year in damages to water infrastructure and industries in the United States (Pimentel et al., 2004). Following their introduction to the Great Lakes in the late 1980s, mussels spread rapidly throughout the Mississippi River Basin and the Eastern U.S. The mussel invasion in the West is young. Mussels were first identified in Nevada in 2007, and have since been identified in California, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, and Texas. Western water systems are very different from those found in the East. The rapid spread of mussels through the eastern system was facilitated by connected and navigable waterways. Western water systems are less connected and are characterized by man-made reservoirs and canals. The main vector of spread for mussels in the West is overland on recreational boats (Bossenbroek et al., 2001). In response to the invasion, many western water managers have implemented preventative management programs to slow the overland spread of mussels on recreational boats. In Colorado, the Colorado Department of Wildlife (CDOW) has implemented a mandatory boat inspection program that requires all trailered boats to be inspected before launching in any Colorado water body. The objective of this study is to analyze the costs and benefits of the CDOW boat inspection program in Colorado, and to identify variables that affect the net benefits of preventative management. Predicting the potential economic benefits of slowing the spread of mussels requires integrating information about mussel dispersal potential with estimates of control costs (Keller et al., 2009). Uncertainty surrounding the probabilities of establishment, the timing of invasions, and the damage costs associated with an invasion make a simulation model an excellent tool for addressing "what if" scenarios and shedding light on the

  17. Epi-genetics modifications induced by a depleted uranium exposure in the zebra fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gombeau, K.; Pereira, S.; Adam-Guillermin, C. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO (France); Bourdineaud, J.P. [UMR CNRS 5805 EPOC (France); Ravanat, J.L. [INAC/Scib UMR E3 CEA-UJF (France)

    2014-07-01

    The work presented here integrates in the general framework of assessment of effects of chronic exposure to low doses of radionuclides. This evaluation necessarily involves the study of the mechanisms of toxic action at the cellular or subcellular level, in order to better understand the processes of propagation of effects to the level of the populations or ecosystems. As such, the question of the mechanisms underlying the trans-generational effects and the adaptive capacity of organisms is central, both in humans and in animal species. Epigenetic refer to changes in gene function that do not involve changes in DNA sequence, and which are transmitted in a hereditary manner by mitosis or meiosis. The latter plays a key role in these trans-generational effects. Among these changes, DNA-methylation is one of the most studied epigenetic parameters. This work is part of a PhD, included in the European COMET project (Euratom 7. Framework Program), and focuses on epigenetic modifications induced in zebra fish after a chronic exposure to radionuclides. Male and female fishes were exposed to 2 and 20 μg.L{sup -1} of depleted uranium for 24 days. After 7 and 24 days of exposure, brain, gonads, and eyes were collected in order to study changes in DNA methylation. In addition, genotoxicity was measured by the γH2AX assay. The overall changes in DNA methylation were studied by AFLP-MS and HPLC-MS, in order to know if the exposure to depleted uranium changes the global status of DNA methylation. We have found a decrease in the global level of methylation in the eyes of males after 24 days of exposure, the diminution being much more important and significant at the higher concentration of exposure (11.79 ± 3.62 against 52.43 ± 3.01 for controls) This study will be refined by analyzing the methylation of specific regions of the genome, because it represent the sequences of genes involved in major physiological functions and that may be subject to variations in the methylation

  18. Impacts of microcystins on the feeding behaviour and energy balance of zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha: a bioenergetics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhel, G; Davenport, J; O'Halloran, J; Culloty, S C; O'Riordan, R M; James, K F; Furey, A; Allis, O

    2006-10-12

    Microcystins are produced by bloom-forming cyanobacteria and pose significant health and ecological problems. To investigate the impacts of these biotoxins on the physiology of the zebra mussels, Dreissena polymorpha, a series of short-term feeding experiments were conducted in the laboratory. We used five microalgal diets consisting of single-cell suspensions of the green algae, Chlorella vulgaris, the diatom, Asterionella formosa, the cryptophyte, Cryptomonas sp. and two strains of the toxic cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa (strains CCAP 1450/06 and CCAP 1450/10). A sixth diet was a mixture of the diatom and the CCAP 1450/10 cyanobacterial strain. The low-toxicity strain CCAP 1450/06 contained 7.4 microg l(-1) of the MC-LR variant while the very toxic strain CCAP 1450/10 contained 23.8 microg l(-1) of MC-LR and 82.9 microg l(-1) of MC-LF. A flow-through system was designed to measure the following feeding parameters: clearance, filtration, ingestion and absorption rates. Ultimately the scope for growth (SFG) was determined as a net energy balance. We observed that mussels cleared the cyanobacterial species containing MC-LF (mean+/-95% confidence interval) at a significant lower rate (498+/-82 ml h(-1) g(-1) for the single cell suspension and 663+/-100 ml h(-1) g(-1) for the mixture diet) than all of the non-toxic species and the cyanobacterium containing MC-LR (all above 1l h(-1) g(-1)). The same pattern was observed with all the feeding parameters, particularly absorption rates. Furthermore, MC-LF caused an acute irritant response manifested by the production of 'pseudodiarrhoea', unusually fluid pseudofaeces, rich in mucus and MC-LF-producing Microcystis cells, ejected through the pedal gape of the mussels. This overall response therefore demonstrates selective rejection of MC-LF-producing cyanobacteria by zebra mussels, enhancing the presence of the very toxic MC-LF-producing M. aeruginosa in mixed cyanobacterial blooms and in the benthos. Finally, we

  19. Research progress on potato zebra chip disease%马铃薯斑马片病研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志强

    2012-01-01

    马铃薯斑马片病(potato zebra chip disease)是20世纪90年代中期在南美洲首次发现的新病害.近年该病害在美国、墨西哥及新西兰等地扩散为害,对当地马铃薯生产构成严重威胁.同时,也为害其他茄科作物.为此,对该病害的发生历史、分布、为害、病原、发生规律、检测技术及防控措施进行综述,并指出应加强检疫,防止该病害传入我国.

  20. Competitive replacement of invasive congeners may relax impact on native species: interactions among zebra, quagga, and native unionid mussels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubov E Burlakova

    Full Text Available Determining when and where the ecological impacts of invasive species will be most detrimental and whether the effects of multiple invaders will be superadditive, or subadditive, is critical for developing global management priorities to protect native species in advance of future invasions. Over the past century, the decline of freshwater bivalves of the family Unionidae has been greatly accelerated by the invasion of Dreissena. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current infestation rates of unionids by zebra (Dreissena polymorpha and quagga (D. rostriformis bugensis mussels in the lower Great Lakes region 25 years after they nearly extirpated native unionids. In 2011-2012, we collected infestation data for over 4000 unionids from 26 species at 198 nearshore sites in lakes Erie, Ontario, and St. Clair, the Detroit River, and inland Michigan lakes and compared those results to studies from the early 1990 s. We found that the frequency of unionid infestation by Dreissena recently declined, and the number of dreissenids attached to unionids in the lower Great Lakes has fallen almost ten-fold since the early 1990s. We also found that the rate of infestation depends on the dominant Dreissena species in the lake: zebra mussels infested unionids much more often and in greater numbers. Consequently, the proportion of infested unionids, as well as the number and weight of attached dreissenids were lower in waterbodies dominated by quagga mussels. This is the first large-scale systematic study that revealed how minor differences between two taxonomically and functionally related invaders may have large consequences for native communities they invade.

  1. Early Life Manipulations of the Nonapeptide System Alter Pair Maintenance Behaviors and Neural Activity in Adult Male Zebra Finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Nicole M; Tomaszycki, Michelle L; Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Adult zebra finches (T. guttata) form socially monogamous pair bonds characterized by proximity, vocal communication, and contact behaviors. In this experiment, we tested whether manipulations of the nonapeptide hormone arginine vasotocin (AVT, avian homolog of vasopressin) and the V1a receptor (V1aR) early in life altered species-typical pairing behavior in adult zebra finches of both sexes. Although there was no effect of treatment on the tendency to pair in either sex, males in different treatments exhibited profoundly different profiles of pair maintenance behavior. Following a brief separation, AVT-treated males were highly affiliative with their female partner but sang very little compared to Controls. In contrast, males treated with a V1aR antagonist sang significantly less than Controls, but did not differ in affiliation. These effects on behavior in males were also reflected in changes in the expression of V1aR and immediate early gene activity in three brain regions known to be involved in pairing behavior in birds: the medial amygdala, medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and the lateral septum. AVT males had higher V1aR expression in the medial amygdala than both Control and antagonist-treated males and immediate early gene activity of V1aR neurons in the medial amygdala was positively correlated with affiliation. Antagonist treated males showed decreased activity in the medial amygdala. In addition, there was a negative correlation between the activity of V1aR cells in the medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and singing. Treatment also affected the expression of V1aR and activity in the lateral septum, but this was not correlated with any behaviors measured. These results provide evidence that AVT and V1aR play developmental roles in specific pair maintenance behaviors and the neural substrate underlying these behaviors in a bird. PMID:27065824

  2. Early Life Manipulations of the Nonapeptide System Alter Pair Maintenance Behaviors and Neural Activity in Adult Male Zebra Finches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. Baran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adult zebra finches (T. guttata form socially monogamous pair bonds characterized by proximity, vocal communication, and contact behaviors. In this experiment, we tested whether manipulations of the nonapeptide hormone arginine vasotocin (AVT, avian homologue of vasopressin and the V1a receptor (V1aR early in life altered species-typical pairing behavior in adult zebra finches of both sexes. Although there was no effect of treatment on the tendency to pair in either sex, males in different treatments exhibited profoundly different profiles of pair maintenance behavior. Following a brief separation, AVT-treated males were highly affiliative with their female partner but sang very little compared to Controls. In contrast, males treated with a V1aR antagonist sang significantly less than Controls, but did not differ in affiliation. These effects on behavior in males were also reflected in changes in the expression of V1aR and immediate early gene activity in three brain regions known to be involved in pairing behavior in birds: the medial amygdala, medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and the lateral septum. AVT males had higher V1aR expression in the medial amygdala than both Control and antagonist-treated males and immediate early gene activity of V1aR neurons in the medial amygdala was positively correlated with affiliation. Antagonist treated males showed decreased activity in the medial amygdala. In addition, there was a negative correlation between the activity of V1aR cells in the medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and singing. Treatment also affected the expression of V1aR and activity in the lateral septum, but this was not correlated with any behaviors measured. These results provide evidence that AVT and V1aR play developmental roles in specific pair maintenance behaviors and the neural substrate underlying these behaviors in a bird.

  3. Competitive replacement of invasive congeners may relax impact on native species: Interactions among zebra, quagga, and native unionid mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlakova, Lyubov E.; Tulumello, Brianne L.; Karatayev, Alexander Y.; Krebs, Robert A.; Schloesser, Donald W.; Paterson, Wendy L.; Griffith, Traci A.; Scott, Mariah W.; Crail, Todd D.; Zanatta, David T

    2014-01-01

    Determining when and where the ecological impacts of invasive species will be most detrimental and whether the effects of multiple invaders will be superadditive, or subadditive, is critical for developing global management priorities to protect native species in advance of future invasions. Over the past century, the decline of freshwater bivalves of the family Unionidae has been greatly accelerated by the invasion of Dreissena. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current infestation rates of unionids by zebra (Dreissena polymorpha) and quagga (D. rostriformis bugensis) mussels in the lower Great Lakes region 25 years after they nearly extirpated native unionids. In 2011–2012, we collected infestation data for over 4000 unionids from 26 species at 198 nearshore sites in lakes Erie, Ontario, and St. Clair, the Detroit River, and inland Michigan lakes and compared those results to studies from the early 1990s. We found that the frequency of unionid infestation by Dreissena recently declined, and the number of dreissenids attached to unionids in the lower Great Lakes has fallen almost ten-fold since the early 1990s. We also found that the rate of infestation depends on the dominant Dreissena species in the lake: zebra mussels infested unionids much more often and in greater numbers. Consequently, the proportion of infested unionids, as well as the number and weight of attached dreissenids were lower in waterbodies dominated by quagga mussels. This is the first large-scale systematic study that revealed how minor differences between two taxonomically and functionally related invaders may have large consequences for native communities they invade.

  4. Alteration of CaBP expression pattern in the nucleus magnocellularis following unilateral cochlear ablation in adult zebra finches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    Full Text Available Songbirds have the rare ability of auditory-vocal learning and maintenance. Up to now, the organization and function of the nucleus magnocellularis (NM, the first relay of the avian ascending auditory pathway is largely based on studies in non-vocal learning species, such as chickens and owls. To investigate whether NM exhibits different histochemical properties associated with auditory processing in songbirds, we examined the expression patterns of three calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs, including calretinin (CR, parvalbumin (PV and calbindin-D28k (CB, and their relations to auditory inputs in NM in adult zebra finches. We found enriched and co-localized immunostaining of CR, PV and CB in the majority of NM neurons, without neuronal population preference. Furthermore, they were sensitive to adult deafferentation with differential plasticity patterns. After unilateral cochlear removal, CR staining in the ipsilateral NM decreased appreciably at 3 days after surgery, and continued to decline thereafter. PV staining showed down-regulation first at 3 days, but subsequently recovered slightly. CB staining did not significantly decrease until 7 days after surgery. Our findings suggest that the three CaBPs might play distinct roles in association with auditory processing in zebra finches. These results are in contrast to the findings in the NM of chickens where CR is the predominant CaBP and deafferentation had no apparent effect on its expression. Further extended studies in other avian species are required to establish whether the difference in CaBP patterns in NM is functionally related to the different auditory-vocal behaviors.

  5. Metabolic responses to dietary protein/carbohydrate ratios in zebra sea bream (Diplodus cervinus, Lowe, 1838) juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Filipe; Peres, Helena; Castro, Carolina; Pérez-Jiménez, Amalia; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Oliva-Teles, Aires; Enes, Paula

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of diets with different protein to carbohydrate ratios (P:C) on the omnivorous zebra sea bream (Diplodus cervinus) juveniles growth performance, feed efficiency, N excretion and metabolic response of intermediary metabolism enzymes. Four isoenergetic and isolipidic diets were formulated to contain increasing protein levels (25, 35, 45 and 55%) at the expense of carbohydrates (43, 32, 21 and 9%): diets P25C43, P35C32, P45C21 and P55C9. Growth performance, feed efficiency (FE), N intake [(g kg(-1) average body weight (ABW) day(-1))], N retention (g kg(-1) ABW day(-1)) and energy retention (kJ kg(-1) ABW day(-1)) increased with the increase of P:C ratio. The best growth performance and FE were achieved with diet P45C21. Ammonia excretion (mg NH4–N kg(-1) ABW day(-1)) increased as dietary protein level increased. Alanine aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities increased with the increase of dietary P:C ratio. The opposite was observed for malic enzyme activity. Aspartate aminotransferase, hexokinase, glucokinase, fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase and fatty acid synthetase activities were unaffected by dietary treatments. Response of key amino acid catabolic enzymes and N excretion levels to dietary P:C ratio supports the metabolic adaptability of this species to dietary protein inclusion levels. Overall, zebra sea bream seems capable of better utilize dietary protein rather than dietary carbohydrates as energy source which may be an obstacle for using more economically diets and thus for reducing environmental N loads in semi-intensive aquaculture of this species. PMID:26480835

  6. Developmental exposure to a brominated flame retardant: an assessment of effects on physiology, growth, and reproduction in a songbird, the zebra finch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Margaret L; Williams, Tony D; Elliott, John E

    2013-07-01

    Mixtures of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been widely used as additive flame retardants, and BDE-99 is one of the most predominant congeners found in the environment. BDE-99 has been reported in avian samples worldwide, yet knowledge of its toxicity to birds is minimal. We assessed the short- and long-term effects of nestling exposure to environmentally relevant levels of BDE-99 in a model passerine, the zebra finch. Early exposure to BDE-99 did not affect hematocrit, oxidative stress, or thyroid hormones in either the juvenile or adult stages, and there were no effects on chick growth or survival. BDE-99 exposure caused a dose-dependent delay in timing of reproduction, but there were no other effects on reproductive success. In zebra finches, endpoints related to reproductive behavior appear to be the most sensitive to BDE-99. However, passerines overall appear to be less sensitive than birds of prey or mammals to PBDE exposure. PMID:23603472

  7. Efficacy of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A spray dried powder for controlling zebra mussels adhering to native unionid mussels within field enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Weber, Kerry L.; Severson, Todd J.; Mayer, Denise A.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of a commercially prepared spray dried powder (SDP) formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A) was evaluated for removing zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) adhering to a population of unionid mussels in Lake Darling (Alexandria, Minnesota). Two groups of unionid mussels were used in the study. Unionid mussels were collected near the test area, weighed, photographed, individually tagged, and randomly allocated to one of nine test enclosures in equal proportions and then divided into two groups. The first group of unionid mussels (Group 1, n = 5 per test enclosure) were indiscriminately selected from each test enclosure and used to estimate the number of zebra mussels adhering to unionid mussels prior to exposure. The second group of unionid mussels (Group 2, n = 22 per test enclosure) were used to evaluate the efficacy of SDP for removal of adhering zebra mussels. Both Group 1 and Group 2 mussels were used to evaluate the effects of SDP exposure on unionid mussel survival.

  8. Daily rhythms of lipid metabolic gene expression in zebra fish liver: Response to light/dark and feeding cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, J F; López-Olmeda, J F; Martínez, F J; Sánchez-Vázquez, F J

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies about fish nutrition and lipid metabolism, very little is known about the daily rhythm expression of lipogenesis and lipolysis genes. This research aimed to investigate the existence of daily rhythm expressions of the genes involved in lipid metabolism and their synchronization to different light/dark (LD) and feeding cycles in zebra fish liver. For this purpose, three groups of zebra fish were submitted to a 12:12 h LD cycle. A single daily meal was provided to each group at various times: in the middle of the light phase (ML); in the middle of the dark phase (MD); at random times. After 20 days of acclimation to these experimental conditions, liver samples were collected every 4 h in one 24-h cycle. The results revealed that most genes displayed a significant daily rhythm with an acrophase of expression in the dark phase. The acrophase of lipolytic genes (lipoprotein lipase - lpl, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor - pparα and hydroxyacil CoA dehydrogenase - hadh) was displayed between ZT 02:17 h and ZT 18:31 h. That of lipogenic genes (leptin-a - lepa, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor - pparγ, liver X receptor - lxr, insulin-like growth factor - igf1, sterol regulatory element-binding protein - srebp and fatty acid synthase - fas) was displayed between ZT 15:25 h and 20:06 h (dark phase). Feeding time barely influenced daily expression rhythms, except for lxr in the MD group, whose acrophase shifted by about 14 h compared with the ML group (ZT 04:31 h versus ZT 18:29 h, respectively). These results evidence a strong synchronization to the LD cycle, but not to feeding time, and most genes showed a nocturnal acrophase. These findings highlight the importance of considering light and feeding time to optimize lipid metabolism and feeding protocols in fish farming. PMID:26595085

  9. Integrated use of biomarkers and bioaccumulation data in Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) for site-specific quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binelli, A; Ricciardi, F; Riva, C; Provini, A

    2006-01-01

    One of the useful biological tools for environmental management is the measurement of biomarkers whose changes are related to the exposure to chemicals or environmental stress. Since these responses might vary with different contaminants or depending on the pollutant concentration reached in the organism, the support of bioaccumulation data is needed to prevent false conclusions. In this study, several persistent organic pollutants -- 23 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, 11 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), six dichlorodiphenyltricholroethane (DDT) relatives, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), chlorpyrifos and its oxidized metabolite -- and some herbicides (lindane and the isomers alpha, beta, delta; terbutilazine; alachlor; metolachlor) were measured in the soft tissues of the freshwater mollusc Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) from 25 sampling sites in the Italian portions of the sub-alpine great lakes along with the measure of ethoxyresorufin dealkylation (EROD) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The linkage between bioaccumulation and biomarker data allowed us to create site-specific environmental quality indexes towards man-made chemicals. This classification highlighted three different degrees of xenobiotic contamination of the Italian sub-alpine great lakes: a high water quality in Lake Lugano with negligible pollutant levels and no effects on enzyme activities, an homogeneous poor quality for Lakes Garda, Iseo and Como, and the presence of some xenobiotic point-sources in Lake Maggiore, whose ecological status could be jeopardized, also due to the heavy DDT contamination revealed since 1996.

  10. Characterization of synaptically connected nuclei in a potential sensorimotor feedback pathway in the zebra finch song system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayna M Williams

    Full Text Available Birdsong is a learned behavior that is controlled by a group of identified nuclei, known collectively as the song system. The cortical nucleus HVC (used as a proper name is a focal point of many investigations as it is necessary for song production, song learning, and receives selective auditory information. HVC receives input from several sources including the cortical area MMAN (medial magnocellular nucleus of the nidopallium. The MMAN to HVC connection is particularly interesting as it provides potential sensorimotor feedback to HVC. To begin to understand the role of this connection, we investigated the physiological relation between MMAN and HVC activity with simultaneous multiunit extracellular recordings from these two nuclei in urethane anesthetized zebra finches. As previously reported, we found similar timing in spontaneous bursts of activity in MMAN and HVC. Like HVC, MMAN responds to auditory playback of the bird's own song (BOS, but had little response to reversed BOS or conspecific song. Stimulation of MMAN resulted in evoked activity in HVC, indicating functional excitation from MMAN to HVC. However, inactivation of MMAN resulted in no consistent change in auditory responses in HVC. Taken together, these results indicate that MMAN provides functional excitatory input to HVC but does not provide significant auditory input to HVC in anesthetized animals. We hypothesize that MMAN may play a role in motor reinforcement or coordination, or may provide modulatory input to the song system about the internal state of the animal as it receives input from the hypothalamus.

  11. Characterization of synaptically connected nuclei in a potential sensorimotor feedback pathway in the zebra finch song system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shayna M; Nast, Alexis; Coleman, Melissa J

    2012-01-01

    Birdsong is a learned behavior that is controlled by a group of identified nuclei, known collectively as the song system. The cortical nucleus HVC (used as a proper name) is a focal point of many investigations as it is necessary for song production, song learning, and receives selective auditory information. HVC receives input from several sources including the cortical area MMAN (medial magnocellular nucleus of the nidopallium). The MMAN to HVC connection is particularly interesting as it provides potential sensorimotor feedback to HVC. To begin to understand the role of this connection, we investigated the physiological relation between MMAN and HVC activity with simultaneous multiunit extracellular recordings from these two nuclei in urethane anesthetized zebra finches. As previously reported, we found similar timing in spontaneous bursts of activity in MMAN and HVC. Like HVC, MMAN responds to auditory playback of the bird's own song (BOS), but had little response to reversed BOS or conspecific song. Stimulation of MMAN resulted in evoked activity in HVC, indicating functional excitation from MMAN to HVC. However, inactivation of MMAN resulted in no consistent change in auditory responses in HVC. Taken together, these results indicate that MMAN provides functional excitatory input to HVC but does not provide significant auditory input to HVC in anesthetized animals. We hypothesize that MMAN may play a role in motor reinforcement or coordination, or may provide modulatory input to the song system about the internal state of the animal as it receives input from the hypothalamus. PMID:22384172

  12. Histological Changes Induced in Gonads, Liver and Kidney of Zebra Fish (Danio Rerio Under the Effect Octylphenol (OP

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    Gabi Dumitrescu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available World-wide researches during the last years are focused upon the negative effects caused by the natural chemical compounds and anthropogenic compounds, already being demonstrated that a great part of them change the endocrine control over reproduction at different species. The issue studied by our team is concerned with the histological changes that appear within liver, kidney and gonadal development at the zebra fish (Danio rerio, exposed to octylphenol from 21-115 days, and within 21-75 days of life. In order to achieve the histological preparations, for each period under study, fishes were divided into three groups of 30 individuals, namely: Lot 1 - Control, respectively lots 2 and 3, at which the administrated octylphenol concentrations were of 60 μg L-1, respectively 100 μg L-1. Fishes of the six groups were raised in 30-liters aquariums (30 fish / aquarium. Fragments of liver, kidney and gonads were processed histologically, colored with the Mallory thrichromic staining method and examined with the optical microscope. Histopathological study revealed changes in the three organs, namely this fine granulation hepatocytes, peritubular edema and vascular ectasia in renal parenchyma and their differentiation in the gonads to sex predominantly female, issues that demonstrate the estrogenic effect of the octylphenol. Those microscopical aspects observed in the kidney and liver of the specimens exposed to action of octhylphenol, suggest that the octhlyphenol is bind to the estrogenic receptors on the membrane of hepatic cells, inducing vitellogenin synthesis.

  13. The influence of temperature, daylength and sucrose concentration on the growth and development of Alstroemeria 'Zebra' in vitro

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    Eleonora Gabryszewska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of temperature, daylength and sucrose concentration on the growth and development of Alstroemeria 'Zebra' in vitro was investigated. Only slightly more lateral rhizomes were formed at 25°C in comparison with 17°C on the medium with BA. Presence of BA in the medium strongly increased number of upright growing shoots and more shoots were formed in temperature 25°C than in temperature 17°C. Rhizome multiplication and formation of upright growing shoots were not significantly influenced by daylength. Sucrose was required for the formation of lateral rhizomes, upright growing shoots and roots. The highest number Of lateral rhizomes was observed on the medium containing 60 and 80 gl-1 sucrose and BA. Presence of BA in the medium with different sucrose concentrations markedly influenced the formation of upright growing shoots; the highest number of shoots was found on the explants cultured on the media with 20 and 30 gl-1 sucrose. Low and high concentrations of sucrose inhibited upright growing shoots formation and their elongation. Rhizogenesis was not observed on rhizomes growing on the medium without sucrose and with 10 gl-1 sucrose, either in the presence or absence of NAA„ The number of roots per plantlet on the medium with NAA increased with increasing sucrose levels. The highest sucrose concentrations slightly inhibited roots formation.

  14. Crystal structure and potential physiological role of zebra fish thioesterase superfamily member 2 (fTHEM2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Shanshan; Li, Han; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Ying, E-mail: zhouying@moon.ibp.ac.cn

    2015-08-07

    Thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2) is an essential protein for mammalian cell proliferation. It belongs to the hotdog-fold thioesterase superfamily and catalyzes hydrolysis of thioester bonds of acyl-CoA in vitro, while its in vivo function remains unrevealed. In this study, Zebra fish was selected as a model organism to facilitate the investigations on THEM2. First, we solved the crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 at the resolution of 1.80 Å, which displayed a similar scaffolding as hTHEM2. Second, functional studies demonstrated that fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA in vitro. In addition, injection of morpholino against fTHEM2 at one-cell stage resulted in distorted early embryo development, including delayed cell division, retarded development and increased death rate. The above findings validated our hypothesis that fTHEM2 could serve as an ideal surrogate for studying the physiological functions of THEM2. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 is presented. • fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA. • The influence of fTHEM2 on early embryo development is demonstrated.

  15. 铅对斑马鱼生殖系统毒性作用研究%Toxic Effect of Lead on Reproductive System in Zebra Fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    豆长明; 王晓辉; 谢贤政; 周鸣鸣; 张洁

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] To evaluate the toxic effect of lead on the reproductive system of mature zebra fish. [Method] Healthy adult zebra fish aged three months were randomly divided into one control group and three experimental groups. Twenty zebra fish in each group were treated with lead acetate solution at the dose of 0,0.4,0.8 and 1.6 mg/L for seven consecutive days. The zebra fish was sacrificed for the measurement of the sperm density,sperm volume and fecundity. [Result] The eggs counts produced by female zebra fish in 0.4 and 0.8 mg/L groups were both decreased significantly compared with the control group (P < 0. 05). 1.6 mg/L groups did not produce any eggs at all. With the increase of lead concentration, a decreasing trend in sperm counts was observed. There were no statistical significances in sperm density between the experiment and the control groups; the sperm volume of 0.4,0. 8 and 1.6 mg/L groups were all decreased significantly compared with the control group ( P < 0.05). With the lead administration dose increasing,a downtrend in the sperm volume was observed. The experiment of male and female replacement trials in seven days led to the same result. [ Conclusion ] Lead exposure can induce reproductive toxicity to mature zebra fish.%[目的]研究Pb对斑马鱼生殖系统的毒性作用.[方法]将成年斑马鱼(3月龄)随机分为4组,分别为对照(蒸馏水)组和低(0.4mg/L)、中(0.8 mg/L)、高(1.6 mg/L)剂量PbAc染毒组,每组20条,连续染毒7d.染毒结束后,测定雌性斑马鱼产卵数和雄性斑马鱼产精子体积以及精子密度.[结果]与对照组相比,0.4和0.8 mg/L Pb染毒组斑马鱼产卵数较低,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05);1.6mg/L Pb染毒组斑马鱼已不产卵.随着染毒剂量的增高,斑马鱼产卵数呈减少趋势.各Pb染毒组雄性斑马鱼精子密度与对照组比较,差异均无统计学意义.与对照组比较,0.4、0.8和1.6 mg/L Pb染毒组雄性斑马鱼精子体积均较

  16. The Influence of Infective Dose on the Virulence of a Generalist Pathogen in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and Zebra Fish (Danio rerio.

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    Hanna Kinnula

    Full Text Available Pathogen density and genetic diversity fluctuate in the outside-host environment during and between epidemics, affecting disease emergence and the severity and probability of infections. Although the importance of these factors for pathogen virulence and infection probability has been acknowledged, their interactive effects are not well understood. We studied how an infective dose in an environmentally transmitted opportunistic fish pathogen, Flavobacterium columnare, affects its virulence both in rainbow trout, which are frequently infected at fish farms, and in zebra fish, a host that is not naturally infected by F. columnare. We used previously isolated strains of confirmed high and low virulence in a single infection and in a co-infection. Infection success (measured as host morbidity correlated positively with dose when the hosts were exposed to the high-virulence strain, but no response for the dose increase was found when the hosts were exposed to the low-virulence strain. Interestingly, the co-infection resulted in poorer infection success than the single infection with the high-virulence strain. The rainbow trout were more susceptible to the infection than the zebra fish but, in both species, the effects of the doses and the strains were qualitatively similar. We suggest that as an increase in dose can lead to increased host morbidity, both the interstrain interactions and differences in infectivity in different hosts may influence the severity and consequently the evolution of disease. Our results also confirm that the zebra fish is a good laboratory model to study F. columnare infection.

  17. Investigation to determine staff exposure and describe animal bite surveillance after detection of a rabid zebra in a safari lodge in Kenya, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obonyo, Mark; Arvelo, Wences; Kadivane, Samuel; Orundu, Moses; Lankau, Emily; Gakuya, Francis; Munyua, Peninah; Githinji, Jane; Marano, Nina; Njenga, Kariuki; Omolo, Jared; Montgomery, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Rabies is a fatal viral infection, resulting in >55,000 deaths globally each year. In August 2011, a young orphaned zebra at a Kenyan safari lodge acquired rabies and potentially exposed >150 tourists and local staff. An investigation was initiated to determine exposures among the local staff, and to describe animal bite surveillance in the affected district. Methods We interviewed lodge staff on circumstances surrounding the zebra's illness and assessed their exposure status. We reviewed animal bite report forms from the outpatient department at the district hospital. Results The zebra was reported bitten by a dog on 31st July 2011, became ill on 23rdAugust, and died three days later. There were 22 employees working at the lodge during that time. Six (27%) had high exposure due to contact with saliva (bottle feeding, veterinary care) and received four doses of rabies vaccine and one of immune-globulin, and 16 (73%) had low exposure due to casual contact and received only four doses of rabies vaccine. From January 2010 to September 2011, 118 cases of animal bites were reported in the district; 67 (57%) occurred among males, 65 (57%) in children <15 years old, and 61 (52%) were inflicted in a lower extremity. Domestic and stray dogs accounted for 98% of reported bites. Conclusion Dog bites remains the main source of rabies exposure in the district, but exposure can result from wildlife. This highlights the importance of a one health approach with strong communication between wildlife, veterinary, and human health sectors to improve rabies prevention and control. PMID:25815092

  18. Prox1 Is a Novel Coregulator of Ff1b and Is Involved in the Embryonic Development of the Zebra Fish Interrenal Primordium

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yi-Wen; Gao, Wei; Teh, Hui-Ling; Tan, Jee-Hian; Chan, Woon-Khiong

    2003-01-01

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) plays an essential role in adrenal development, although the exact molecular mechanisms are unclear. Our previous work established that Ff1b is the zebra fish homologue of SF-1 and that its disruption by antisense morpholinos leads to a complete ablation of the interrenal organ. In this study, results of biochemical analyses suggest that Ff1b and other Ff1 members interact with Prox1, a homeodomain protein. Fine mapping using site-directed mutants showed that thi...

  19. The songbird syrinx morphome: a three-dimensional, high-resolution, interactive morphological map of the zebra finch vocal organ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Düring Daniel N

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Like human infants, songbirds learn their species-specific vocalizations through imitation learning. The birdsong system has emerged as a widely used experimental animal model for understanding the underlying neural mechanisms responsible for vocal production learning. However, how neural impulses are translated into the precise motor behavior of the complex vocal organ (syrinx to create song is poorly understood. First and foremost, we lack a detailed understanding of syringeal morphology. Results To fill this gap we combined non-invasive (high-field magnetic resonance imaging and micro-computed tomography and invasive techniques (histology and micro-dissection to construct the annotated high-resolution three-dimensional dataset, or morphome, of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata syrinx. We identified and annotated syringeal cartilage, bone and musculature in situ in unprecedented detail. We provide interactive three-dimensional models that greatly improve the communication of complex morphological data and our understanding of syringeal function in general. Conclusions Our results show that the syringeal skeleton is optimized for low weight driven by physiological constraints on song production. The present refinement of muscle organization and identity elucidates how apposed muscles actuate different syringeal elements. Our dataset allows for more precise predictions about muscle co-activation and synergies and has important implications for muscle activity and stimulation experiments. We also demonstrate how the syrinx can be stabilized during song to reduce mechanical noise and, as such, enhance repetitive execution of stereotypic motor patterns. In addition, we identify a cartilaginous structure suited to play a crucial role in the uncoupling of sound frequency and amplitude control, which permits a novel explanation of the evolutionary success of songbirds.

  20. Transient and permanent effects of suboptimal incubation temperatures on growth, metabolic rate, immune function and adrenocortical responses in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Haruka; Kriengwatana, Buddhamas; Allen, Natalie; Schmidt, Kimberly L; Soma, Kiran K; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A

    2015-09-01

    In birds, incubation temperature can vary by several degrees Celsius among nests of a given species. Parents may alter incubation temperature to cope with environmental conditions and/or to manipulate embryonic development, and such changes in incubation behavior could have long-lasting effects on offspring phenotype. To investigate short- and long-term effects of suboptimal incubation temperatures on survival and physiological functions in zebra finches, eggs were incubated at 36.2, 37.4 or 38.4 °C for the entire incubation period. The post-hatch environment was identical among the treatment groups. We found that hatching success was lowest in the 38.4 °C group, while post-hatch survival was lowest in the 36.2 °C group. Incubation temperature had sex-specific effects on offspring phenotype: incubation temperatures affected body mass (Mb) but not physiological parameters of males and conversely, the physiological parameters but not Mb of females. Specifically, males from the 38.4 °C group weighed significantly less than males from the 36.2 °C group from the nestling period to adulthood, whereas females from different incubation temperature groups did not differ in Mb. In contrast, females incubated at 36.2 °C had transient but significantly elevated basal metabolic rate and adrenocortical responses during the nestling and fledgling periods, whereas no treatment effect was observed in males. Innate immunity was not affected by incubation temperature in either sex. These results suggest that a 1 °C deviation from what is considered an optimal incubation temperature can lower offspring performance and offspring survival.

  1. Early fasting is long lasting: differences in early nutritional conditions reappear under stressful conditions in adult female zebra finches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Tobias Krause

    Full Text Available Conditions experienced during early life can have profound effects on individual development and condition in adulthood. Differences in nutritional provisioning in birds during the first month of life can lead to differences in growth, reproductive success and survival. Yet, under natural conditions shorter periods of nutritional stress will be more prevalent. Individuals may respond differently, depending on the period of development during which nutritional stress was experienced. Such differences may surface specifically when poor environmental conditions challenge individuals again as adults. Here, we investigated long term consequences of differences in nutritional conditions experienced during different periods of early development by female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata on measures of management and acquisition of body reserves. As nestlings or fledglings, subjects were raised under different nutritional conditions, a low or high quality diet. After subjects reached sexual maturity, we measured their sensitivity to periods of food restriction, their exploration and foraging behaviour as well as adult resting metabolic rate (RMR. During a short period of food restriction, subjects from the poor nutritional conditions had a higher body mass loss than those raised under qualitatively superior nutritional conditions. Moreover, subjects that were raised under poor nutritional conditions were faster to engage in exploratory and foraging behaviour. But RMR did not differ among treatments. These results reveal that early nutritional conditions affect adult exploratory behaviour, a representative personality trait, foraging and adult's physiological condition. As early nutritional conditions are reflected in adult phenotypic plasticity specifically when stressful situations reappear, the results suggest that costs for poor developmental conditions are paid when environmental conditions deteriorate.

  2. Food for song: expression of c-Fos and ZENK in the zebra finch song nuclei during food aversion learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill Tokarev

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Specialized neural pathways, the song system, are required for acquiring, producing, and perceiving learned avian vocalizations. Birds that do not learn to produce their vocalizations lack telencephalic song system components. It is not known whether the song system forebrain regions are exclusively evolved for song or whether they also process information not related to song that might reflect their 'evolutionary history'. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address this question we monitored the induction of two immediate-early genes (IEGs c-Fos and ZENK in various regions of the song system in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata in response to an aversive food learning paradigm; this involves the association of a food item with a noxious stimulus that affects the oropharyngeal-esophageal cavity and tongue, causing subsequent avoidance of that food item. The motor response results in beak and head movements but not vocalizations. IEGs have been extensively used to map neuro-molecular correlates of song motor production and auditory processing. As previously reported, neurons in two pallial vocal motor regions, HVC and RA, expressed IEGs after singing. Surprisingly, c-Fos was induced equivalently also after food aversion learning in the absence of singing. The density of c-Fos positive neurons was significantly higher than that of birds in control conditions. This was not the case in two other pallial song nuclei important for vocal plasticity, LMAN and Area X, although singing did induce IEGs in these structures, as reported previously. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results are consistent with the possibility that some of the song nuclei may participate in non-vocal learning and the populations of neurons involved in the two tasks show partial overlap. These findings underscore the previously advanced notion that the specialized forebrain pre-motor nuclei controlling song evolved from circuits involved in behaviors related to feeding.

  3. Male foraging efficiency, but not male problem-solving performance, influences female mating preferences in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantal, Véronique; Gibelli, Julie; Dubois, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that females would prefer males with better cognitive abilities as mates. However, little is known about the traits reflecting enhanced cognitive skills on which females might base their mate-choice decisions. In particular, it has been suggested that male foraging performance could be used as an indicator of cognitive capacity, but convincing evidence for this hypothesis is still lacking. In the present study, we investigated whether female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) modify their mating preferences after having observed the performance of males on a problem-solving task. Specifically, we measured the females' preferences between two males once before and once after an observation period, during which their initially preferred male was incapable of solving the task contrary to their initially less-preferred male. We also conducted a control treatment to test whether the shift in female preferences was attributable to differences between the two stimulus males in their foraging efficiency. Finally, we assessed each bird's performance in a color associative task to check whether females can discriminate among males based on their learning speed. We found that females significantly increased their preference toward the most efficient male in both treatments. Yet, there was no difference between the two treatments and we found no evidence that females assess male cognitive ability indirectly via morphological traits. Thus, our results suggest that females would not use the males' problem-solving performance as an indicator of general cognitive ability to gain indirect fitness benefits (i.e., good genes) but rather to assess their foraging efficiency and gain direct benefits.

  4. Inhibition of the thioredoxin system in the brain and liver of zebra-seabreams exposed to waterborne methylmercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Vasco; Canário, João; Holmgren, Arne; Carvalho, Cristina

    2011-03-01

    Mercury compounds were recently found to interact in vitro with the thioredoxin system, inhibiting both Thioredoxin (Trx) and Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). In order to evaluate if Trx and TrxR are affected in vivo by methylmercury (MeHg), we exposed juvenile zebra-seabreams to different concentrations of this toxicant in water for 28days followed by a 14-day depuration period. Methylmercury accumulated to a larger extent in the kidney and liver of fishes, but decreased significantly during the depuration. During the exposure, MeHg percentage in the liver reached levels above 90% of total mercury (HgT) decreasing to 60% of HgT by the end of the depuration period. In the kidney, MeHg accounted for 50-70% of HgT. In the brain and muscle, mercury accumulated throughout the exposure with all mercury being MeHg. The total mercury kept increasing in these organs during the depuration period. However, in the brain, this increase in HgT was accompanied by a decrease in the MeHg percentage (~10%). In the liver, both Trx and TrxR activities were significantly reduced (TrxR--40%; Trx--70%) by the end of the exposure, but recovered to control levels (100%) during the depuration. In the brain, both enzymes where inhibited during the depuration period (TrxR--75%; Trx--70%) when some production of inorganic mercury was detected. Activity of glutathione reductase showed increased levels when TrxR activity was low, suggesting complementarity between both systems. These results indicate that in vivo the thioredoxin system is a toxicological target for MeHg with TrxR being particularly affected.

  5. Activation changes in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata brain areas evoked by alterations of the earth magnetic field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Keary

    Full Text Available Many animals are able to perceive the earth magnetic field and to use it for orientation and navigation within the environment. The mechanisms underlying the perception and processing of magnetic field information within the brain have been thoroughly studied, especially in birds, but are still obscure. Three hypotheses are currently discussed, dealing with ferromagnetic particles in the beak of birds, with the same sort of particles within the lagena organs, or describing magnetically influenced radical-pair processes within retinal photopigments. Each hypothesis is related to a well-known sensory organ and claims parallel processing of magnetic field information with somatosensory, vestibular and visual input, respectively. Changes in activation within nuclei of the respective sensory systems have been shown previously. Most of these previous experiments employed intensity enhanced magnetic stimuli or lesions. We here exposed unrestrained zebra finches to either a stationary or a rotating magnetic field of the local intensity and inclination. C-Fos was used as an activity marker to examine whether the two treatments led to differences in fourteen brain areas including nuclei of the somatosensory, vestibular and visual system. An ANOVA revealed an overall effect of treatment, indicating that the magnetic field change was perceived by the birds. While the differences were too small to be significant in most areas, a significant enhancement of activation by the rotating stimulus was found in a hippocampal subdivision. Part of the hyperpallium showed a strong, nearly significant, increase. Our results are compatible with previous studies demonstrating an involvement of at least three different sensory systems in earth magnetic field perception and suggest that these systems, probably less elaborated, may also be found in nonmigrating birds.

  6. Study of the biological effects of uranium exposure on zebra fish (D. rerio). Impact on life stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is part of an ongoing project (ENVIRHOM) started at IRSN in 2000, which consists in studying the environmental effects of radioactive substances at chronic low level of exposure. In this general frame, our aim was two fold: (i) to identify sensitivity of different critical life stages of zebra fish (fish of fresh water frequently used for tests standards in ecotoxicology) to uranium exposure and (ii) to evaluate underlying mechanisms. Experiments were conducted with eggs, larvae and genitors exposed to uranium at environmentally relevant concentrations (from 20 to 500 μg/L) in order to study survival, hatching of eggs, growth of larvae and reproduction of genitors. Bio-markers of exposure (i.e. U bioaccumulation) and bio-markers of effects at molecular level (i.e. genotoxic effects, reproductive-toxicity) were also measured. Sensitivity of fish to uranium was dependent of the life stage of development with the early life stage being the most sensitive to U either directly or maternally exposed. It underlines the relevance of including pro-larval stages for toxicity assessments in fish. Moreover drastic effects of uranium on reproductive success and DNA damages in the germ cells foretell a strong impact on the population for low concentration of exposure (20 μg/L). As it is increasingly recognized that population-level effects of toxic substances are more relevant in terms of ecological risk assessment, this study points out the need to include different life stages of organisms in eco-toxicological studies, especially the sensitive early stages. Moreover, it appears, through the comparative study of the radiological effects or by another isotope of the uranium of stronger radioactivity (233U or by an irradiation with 137Cs), that the effects of the uranium are due to its chemo-toxicity. (author)

  7. Calculations to compare different ways of modelling the plate geometry cells of the Zebra fast critical assembly, MZA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowlands, John, E-mail: rowlandsjl@aol.com

    2009-03-15

    The core region cells of the Zebra fast critical assembly MZA comprise 14 plates in a square steel tube, with 12 cells being stacked axially to form the core section of the assembly. The cells can be modelled in different levels of detail, ranging from a three-dimensional representation in which the core (The word core is used to describe both the region of a plate containing the main material, such as plutonium, UO{sub 2} or sodium, and the region of the assembly containing fissile material cells.) and canning regions of the plates and the void gaps between the edges of the plates and the steel tube, and between tubes, are represented. Simplified models include a three-dimensional representation in which the void regions are combined with the tube material. A further simplified three-dimensional model, called the MURAL model, represents the core regions of the plates but homogenises the canning, tube material and void regions. Two types of one-dimensional slab geometry model are found in the literature, one in which the materials are homogenised within each of the three axial slab regions of a canned plate (plate core and upper and lower canning regions) and a further simplified version in which the plate is modelled as a single region, the compositions being averaged over the whole thickness of the plate, comprising the plate core material, the canning and the tube material. MONK Monte Carlo calculations have been made for each of these models, and also for the fully homogenised cells, and the k-effective values, core sodium void reactivities and reaction rate ratios are compared.

  8. Characterization of uranium effects on the zebra fish Danio rerio. Stress mechanisms, neuro-toxicity and mitochondrial metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research explored several biological effects of uranium (U) in zebra fish exposed to low waterborne uranium concentrations (20 and 100 microgram/L). In tissue specific study (brain, liver, skeletal muscles and gills) of transcriptional responses in 20 genes identified the nature of the potential U effects during 28 days of exposure followed by an 8-day depuration phase in connection with U bioaccumulation. Liver and gills accumulate high concentrations of U and the depuration is efficient contrary to the brain and muscles. U exposure induced a later response in liver (inflammatory process, apoptosis and detoxification) and gills (oxidative balance) and an early one in brain (neuronal response) and muscles (mitochondrial metabolism). Brain and muscles appear sensitive since defence mechanisms are inefficient above low concentrations. A further study on these two organs examined the function and protein content of the respiratory mitochondrial chain following U exposure. An inhibition of the respiratory control ratio for the lowest concentration, variation in the protein synthesis of the complex IV (induction of cytochrome c oxidase sub-unit I and IV) and histological damage (dilatation in brain and vacuolisation in muscles) were observed. Another study focused on the early effects on the brain and was accomplished through a large transcriptional analysis coupled with examinations of the olfactory bulb ultrastructure. A depression of genes encoding olfactory receptor or111-7 and or102-5 was observed as rapidly as 3 days post-exposure to the lowest concentration of U. These responses and histological injuries suggest that the olfactory system could be sensitive to U exposure. (author)

  9. Environmental concentrations of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)-induced cellular stress and modulated antioxidant enzyme activity in the zebra mussel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Marco; Magni, Stefano; Binelli, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Recent monitoring studies showed measurable levels of the 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) in aquatic environments. However, no information is currently available on its potential hazard to aquatic non-target organisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential sub-lethal effects induced by 14-day exposures to low MDMA concentrations (0.05 and 0.5 μg/L) to zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) specimens through the application of a biomarker suite. The trypan blue exclusion method and the neutral red retention assay (NRRA) were used to assess MDMA cytotoxicity. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione S-transferase (GST), as well as the lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonyl content (PCC), were measured as oxidative stress indexes. The single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay, the DNA diffusion assay, and the micronucleus test (MN test) were applied to investigate DNA damage, while filtration rate was measured as physiological parameter. Despite significant decrease in lysosome membrane stability, hemocyte viability and imbalances in CAT and GST activities pointed out at the end of the exposure to 0.5 μg/L, no significant variations for the other end points were noticed at both the treatments, suggesting that environmentally relevant MDMA concentrations did not induce deleterious effects to the zebra mussel.

  10. Two-photon deep imaging through skin and skull of Zebra finches: preliminary studies for in-vivo brain metabolism monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Haidar, D.; Olivier, T.; Mottin, S.; Vignal, C.; Mathevon, N.

    2007-02-01

    Zebra Finches are songbirds which constitute a model for neuro-ethologists to study the neuro-mechanisms of vocal recognition. For this purpose, in vivo and non invasive monitoring of brain activity is required during acoustical stimulation. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) or NIRS (Near InfraRed Spectroscopy) are suitable methods for these measurements, even though MRI is difficult to link quantitatively with neural activity and NIRS suffers from a poor resolution. In the particular case of songbirds (whose skin is thin and quite transparent and whose skull structure is hollow), two-photon microscopy enables a quite deep penetration in tissues and could be an alternative. We present here preliminary studies on the feasability of two-photon microscopy in these conditions. To do so, we chose to image hollow fibers, filled with Rhodamine B, through the skin of Zebra finches in order to evaluate the spatial resolution we may expect in future in vivo experiments. Moreover, we used the reflectance-mode confocal configuration to evaluate the exponential decrease of backreflected light in skin and in skull samples. Following this procedure recently proposed by S.L. Jacques and co-workers, we planned to determine the scattering coefficient μ s and the anisotropy g of these tissues and make a comparison between fixed and fresh skin and skull samples for future Monte Carlo simulations of the scattering in our particular multi-layered structure.

  11. Metabolic programming of zebra fish Danio rerio uncovered. Physiological performance as explained by dynamic energy budget theory and life-cycle consequence of uranium induced perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this dissertation is to characterize the toxicity of uranium on the metabolism of zebra fish, nio rerio. The first three chapters of this manuscript are dedicated to characterizing the blank metabolism of zebra fish. I used the Dynamic Energy Budget (deb) theory for this characterisation; it is presently the only theory that covers the full life cycle of the organism and quantifies feeding, assimilation, growth, reproduction, maturation, maintenance and ageing. Any metabolic effect of uranium should appear as effects on one or more of these fundamental processes. Since the life span of zebra fish is some four and a half years, and larger individuals respond slower to chemical stress, the focus was on the early life stages. Considerable breakthroughs in the quantification of zebra fish development, growth and reproduction have been made. It turned out the zebra fish accelerates its metabolism after birth till metamorphosis, when acceleration ceases. This process is seen in some, but not all, species of fish. Another striking conclusion was that somatic maintenance was much higher than is typical for fish. We don't yet have an explanation for this funding. Further it turned out that the details of reproduction matter: allocation to reproduction (in adults) accumulates in a reproduction buffer and this buffer is used to prepare batches of eggs. We needed to detail this preparation process to understand how zebra fish can eliminate uranium via eggs. Deb theory specifies that a particular developmental stage (birth, metamorphosis, puberty) is reached at specified levels of maturity. For different temperatures and food levels, that can occur at different ages and body sizes. We extended this idea to include all the described morphologically defined developmental stages of the zebra fish in the literature; the observed variations in ages and body sizes can now be explained by deb theory. To test if deb theory can also explain perturbations of maturation, we

  12. Boat ramp locations within the Columbia River Basin with associated recreational use, water quality measurements, and risk assessment data for zebra and quagga mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Jill M.; Holmberg, Glen S.; Elder, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic invasive species are often transported between water bodies on boats or boat trailers, thus they are considered one of the primary vectors for new introductions of invasive species to a water body. This data set contains geographic positioning system locational data for boater access points, use data (i.e. recreational, fishing), water quality measurements (e.g. calcium concentrations, pH), risk assessment data, and other physical attributes (i.e. size, elevation) where available within the Columbia and Snake Rivers and throughout the Columbia River Basin. This work builds on an earlier body of work by Wells et al. 2011, Prioritizing Zebra and Quagga Mussel Monitoring in the Columbia River Basin (PDF link below), which provided much of the initial water quality, use information, and risk assessment data (categorical values for the risk of introduction and the risk of establishment). Updated information has been added by collecting additional data on use of water bodies, as well as combined categorical ranking methodology for identifying water bodies that may be high risk for both introduction and establishment of zebra and quagga mussels. This data is also related to a regional effort to contribute to the coordination of monitoring efforts for early detection of zebra and quagga mussels in the context of risk assessment data (CRBAIS weblink below). Data sets provided here include a service definition file, provided with a few reference layers within the region for viewing and an online map ( http://arcg.is/1LrNmBj) with some query options, a GIS shapefile (Child Item), and a tabular data set (csv file; Child Item). It is recommended that all users of this data thoroughly read the metadata files for data definitions, sources, and data limitations. It is recommended to use the online map link ( http://arcg.is/1LrNmBj) for a quick view of the data set and some basic query options.  Once on the ArcGIS online map, to view all the data layers click the show

  13. On the origin of zebra textures in Mississippi Valley-Type Pb-Zn Deposits with a special emphasis on the San Vicente Mine, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelka, Ulrich; Koehn, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Alternating dark and white bands are common features of ore hosting dolostones which are generally termed zebra textures. Worldwide these structures occur in ore deposits of the Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT). This type of deposit frequently develops in hydrothermal systems located in the flanks of foreland basins. In most MVT ore deposits it is possible to distinguish between different stages which occur during the formation of the zebra textures and the precipitation of the ore-minerals (mostly Sphalerite and Galena). As the dark and white bands consist nearly completely of dolomite, despite the colour, the only clearly recognisable difference is the grain size. Today there are several theories which try to explain the formation of this kind of structure, for example by dissolution-precipitation (FONTBONTé et al., 1993) or by displacive vein growth (MERINO et al., 2006). Based on these theories and additional analytical findings, we want to develop a numerical model to study the banding and mineralisation. This model should include all processes from dolomitization, to the development of the zebra textures and finally the precipitation of Sphalerite and Galena. Using optical microscope and SEM, we found, that there are also differences in the shapes of the grain boundaries of the fine grained dark (lobate) and coarse grained white bands (polygonal). Furthermore, there is a large number of second-phase particles, namely apatite, iron oxides and organic matter, present in the dark bands. Often these particles are lined up at the grain boundaries. These insights lead to the hypothesis that the grain growth in the dark bands is influenced by obstacles that reduce the growth rate and therefore lead to a bifurcation of this rate in the system. For the modelling the microdynamic simulation software ELLE is used to perform a 2D-simulation at the scale of a thin section. This simulation uses a boundary-model coupled with a lattice-particle-code (BONS et al. 2001). The

  14. Effects of the bioaccumulative polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardant congener BDE-47 on growth, development, and reproductive success in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Heidi A; Letcher, Robert J; Williams, Tony D; Elliott, John E

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of the polybrominated diphenyl ether congener, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) on the growth and development, and subsequent breeding success of exposed zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Using oral dosing procedures and treatments adjusted by weight, we treated newly hatched chicks daily for the first 20-days-post-hatch (dph) with varying treatments of BDE-47 (0, 5, 50, and 500 ng/g bw/day). Weight and tarsal measurements were monitored from hatch to 90 dph, but no differences were observed between treatment groups at any age. Treated females that reached sexual maturity were mated with untreated males; however, again no treatment effects were observed on breeding success. Analysis of tissue samples at 21 dph did indicate that debromination of BDE-47 had occurred resulting in BDE-28 and BDE-17 metabolites.

  15. The Black Cuckoo-Shrike Campephaga flava: A new record for the Mountain Zebra National Park and the Cradock district, Cape Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A.W Macdonald

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available The avifauna of the Mountain Zebra National Park (MZNP has been recorded over a period of some two decades (Skead 1965, Koedoe 8: 1-40; Penzhorn & Bronkhorst 1976, Koedoe 19: 171-174; Penzhorn 1977, Koedoe 20: 205-207; Grobler & Bronkhorst 1981, Koedoe 24: 199-203. Collett (1982 Southern Birds 9: 1-65 has summarised all the available information on the avifauna of the Cradock district assembled since the turn of the century. Although 203 species are recorded from the MZNP by these authors (and a further four in the roneoed checklist for the park (Anon, updated, National Parks Board of Trustees, roneod, 15 pp no mention is made of the Black Cuckoo-Shrike Campephaga flava. Collett (1982 does not list it for the Cradock district.

  16. Lysogenic Streptococcus suis isolate SS2-4 containing prophage SMP showed increased mortality in zebra fish compared to the wild-type isolate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Tang

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis (S. suis infection is considered to be a major problem in the swine industry worldwide. Based on the capsular type, 33 serotypes of S. suis have been described, with serotype 2 (SS2 being the most frequently isolated from diseased piglets. Little is known, however, about the pathogenesis and virulence factors of S. suis. Research on bacteriophages highlights a new area in S. suis research. A S. suis serotype 2 bacteriophage, designated SMP, has been previously isolated in our laboratory. Here, we selected a lysogenic isolate in which the SMP phage was integrated into the chromosome of strain SS2-4. Compared to the wild-type isolate, the lysogenic strain showed increased mortality in zebra fish. Moreover the sensitivity of the lysogenic strain to lysozyme was seven times higher than that of the wild-type.

  17. 剑麻抗斑马纹病鉴定技术研究%Identification technology for agave resistance to zebra disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵艳龙; 常金梅; 何衍彪; 李国平; 周文钊

    2012-01-01

    To promote a set of identification technology for agave resistance to zebra disease, the most appropriate inoculating conditions of agave zebra disease pathogen were explored, and in vivo inoculation in glasshouses and in vitro in artificial climate chambers were performed with 8 agave germplasms for checking disease resistance. The results were compared with those obtained from open fields. The results showed that needle penetration inoculation, 25 - 30 °C and moisture retention were the most appropriate inoculating conditions. Both inoculating methods could identify the disease resistance and in vivo inoculation was more accurate.%为了促进形成一套剑麻抗斑马纹病的鉴定技术,本研究对剑麻斑马纹病最适宜接种条件进行了探讨,并利用活体叶片接种和离体叶片接种两种方式,以抗性不同的8个剑麻种质为试验材料,在人工气候箱和恒温室中进行剑麻抗斑马纹病接种试验,并与大田抗病性进行比较.结果表明:针刺法接种,25~30℃保湿培养是该病最适宜的发病条件;两种接种方法都能比较准确地鉴定剑麻种质对斑马纹病的抗病性,而活体叶片接种较离体叶片接种鉴定抗病性更加准确.

  18. Organochlorine and trace element contamination in wintering and migrating diving ducks in the southern Great Lakes, USA, since the zebra mussel invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Christine M.; Custer, T.W.

    2000-01-01

    Because of the potential for increased trophic transfer of contaminants by zebra mussels (Dreissena sp.) to higher trophic levels, we collected four species of waterfowl (n = 65 ducks) from four locations in Lake Erie, Lake St. Clair, and Lake Michigan, USA, between 1991 and 1993 for organochlorine contaminant and trace element analyses. Geometric mean concentrations of total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and p,pa??-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) were 1.35 and 0.15 I?g/g wet weight in lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) carcasses and were below known effect levels. Total PCBs in 80% of carcasses, however, were above the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's threshold of 3.0 I?g/g lipid weight for consumption of poultry. With the exception of selenium, trace elements were also at background or no-effect levels. Selenium concentrations in livers of 95% of lesser scaup, 90% of bufflehead (Bucephala albeola), and 72% of common goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) were in the elevated (>10 I?g/g dry wt) or potentially harmful range (>33 I?g/g dry wt). The effects of these high selenium concentrations are unknown but should be investigated further based on reproductive effects observed in field and laboratory studies of dabbling ducks and because lesser scaup populations are declining. Concentrations of total PCBs in dreissenid mussels in western Lake Erie were 10 times higher than in the upper Mississippi River but were similar to concentrations in other industrialized rivers in Europe and the United States. Metal concentrations were similar to other industrialized sites where zebra mussels have been sampled.

  19. SK channels modulate the excitability and firing precision of projection neurons in the robust nucleus of the arcopallium in adult male zebra finches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Qiang Hou; Xuan Pan; Cong-Shu Liao; Song-Hua Wang; Dong-Feng Li

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] Motor control is encoded by neuronal activity.Small conductance Ca2+-activated Kˉ channels (SK channels) maintain the regularity and precision of firing by contributing to the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) of the action potential in mammals.However,it is not clear how SK channels regulate the output of the vocal motor system in songbirds.The premotor robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA) in the zebra finch is responsible for the output of song information.The temporal pattern of spike bursts in RA projection neurons is associated with the timing of the acoustic features of birdsong.[Methods] The firing properties of RA projection neurons were analyzed using patch clamp wholecell and cell-attached recording techniques.[Results] SK channel blockade by apamin decreased the AHP amplitude and increased the evoked firing rate in RA projection neurons.It also caused reductions in the regularity and precision of firing.RA projection neurons displayed regular spontaneous action potentials,while apamin caused irregular spontaneous firing but had no effect on the firing rate.In the absence of synaptic inputs,RA projection neurons still had spontaneous firing,and apamin had an evident effect on the firing rate,but caused no significant change in the firing regularity,compared with apamin application in the presence of synaptic inputs.[Conclusion]SK channels contribute to the maintenance of firing regularity in RA projection neurons whichrequires synaptic activity,and consequently ensures the precision of song encoding.

  20. Uptake and bioaccumulation of platinum group metals (Pd, Pt, Rh) from automobile catalytic converter materials by the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Sonja; Messerschmidt, Jürgen; von Bohlen, Alex; Sures, Bernd

    2005-06-01

    The uptake and bioaccumulation of the platinum group metals (PGM) platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), and rhodium (Rh) by the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) were investigated in exposure studies using ground material from unused automobile catalytic converters as metal source. The mussels were exposed to the metals in tap water or humic water. In the soft tissue samples of exposed mussels mean Pt levels ranged in dependence on the type of tank water and the exposure period (6, 9, or 18 weeks) between 780 and 4300 ng/g, the Pd levels ranged between 720 and 6300 ng/g, and the Rh levels ranged between 270 and 1900 ng/g. In contrast, the control mussels had metal concentrations of <20 ng/g (Pt), <50 ng/g (Pd), and <40 ng/g (Rh). Considerably higher PGM levels were found in the exposed mussels of the humic water group than in those of the tap water group. Although there is a cumulative increase of the PGM concentrations in the environment since the introduction of the automobile catalyst more than 20 years ago, only little information about the PGM contamination in the biosphere, especially the fauna, is available. Due to the high capacity of D. polymorpha to accumulate PGM, this bivalve could be used as a potential sentinel for monitoring the noble metals in aquatic ecosystems. PMID:15820726

  1. Activity in a premotor cortical nucleus of zebra finches is locally organized and exhibits auditory selectivity in neurons but not in glia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Graber

    Full Text Available Motor functions are often guided by sensory experience, most convincingly illustrated by complex learned behaviors. Key to sensory guidance in motor areas may be the structural and functional organization of sensory inputs and their evoked responses. We study sensory responses in large populations of neurons and neuron-assistive cells in the songbird motor area HVC, an auditory-vocal brain area involved in sensory learning and in adult song production. HVC spike responses to auditory stimulation display remarkable preference for the bird's own song (BOS compared to other stimuli. Using two-photon calcium imaging in anesthetized zebra finches we measure the spatio-temporal structure of baseline activity and of auditory evoked responses in identified populations of HVC cells. We find strong correlations between calcium signal fluctuations in nearby cells of a given type, both in identified neurons and in astroglia. In identified HVC neurons only, auditory stimulation decorrelates ongoing calcium signals, less for BOS than for other sound stimuli. Overall, calcium transients show strong preference for BOS in identified HVC neurons but not in astroglia, showing diversity in local functional organization among identified neuron and astroglia populations.

  2. New Regimes of Implosions of Larger Sized Wire Arrays With and Without Modified Central Plane at 1.5-1.7 MA Zebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Weller, M. E.; Shrestha, I.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Stafford, A.; Keim, S. F.; Petkov, E. E.; Lorance, M.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Coverdale, C. A.; Jones, B.

    2013-10-01

    The recent experiments at 1.5-1.7 MA on Zebra at UNR with larger sized planar wires arrays (compared to the wire loads at 1 MA current) have demonstrated higher linear radiation yield and electron temperatures as well as advantages of better diagnostics access to observable plasma regions. Such multi-planar wire arrays had two outer wire planes from mid-Z material to create a global magnetic field (gmf) and mid-Z plasma flow between them. Also, they included a modified central plane with a few Al wires at the edges to influence gmf and to create Al plasma flow in the perpendicular direction. The stationary shock waves which existed over tens of ns on shadow images and the early x-ray emissions before the PCD peak on time-gated spectra were observed. The most recent experiments with similar loads but without the central wires demonstrated a very different regime of implosion with asymmetrical jets and no precursor formation. This work was supported by NNSA under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001984 and in part by DE-FC52-06NA27616. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Development of Sustainable Solutions for Zebra Mussel Control Through Chemical Product Engineering%通过化工产品工程开发可持续的技术来控制斑纹蚌种群

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Costa; P.Elliott; P M.Saraiva; D.Aldridge; G D.Moggridge

    2008-01-01

    The zebra mussel is an important aquatic pest that causes great damage to freshwater-dependent industries, due to biofouling. The main goal of the project discussed here is to develop improved solutions to control this species. Three approaches have been explored in an attempt to design innovative application strategies for existing biocides: (i) encapsulation of toxins; (ii) combination of toxins; (iii) investigation of the seasonal variation of the species' tolerance to toxins. In this paper, the principles behind these approaches and the major results on each topic are presented. The benefits of adopting a chemical product engineering approach in conducting this project are also discussed.

  4. In vivo synaptic transmission in the zebra finch high vocal center and robust nucleus of the arcopallium after different stimulus patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suqun Liao; Wenxiao Liu; Peng Xiao; Dongfeng Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electrophysiological studies using brain slices have revealed that the developmental regulation of synaptic plasticity in vocal learning pathway is essential for song learning in zebra finches. Publications reporting in vivo electrophysiological investigation are scarce. Many aspects of neural mechanisms underlying song learning and production still remain uncertain.OBJECTIVE: To observe the efficacy of paired pulses and the effect on synaptic transmission induced by low-frequency stimulations, high-frequency stimulations, and theta-burst stimulations.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A comparative observation. The experiment was conducted from October 2006 to October 2007 in the Neurophysiology Laboratory of South-China Normal University.MATERIALS: Twenty-four adult male zebra finches were supplied by the Department of Animal Experiment of College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University. A SEN-7203 stimulator (NIHON KOHDEN), as well as a DSJ-731WF microelectrode amplifier and DSJ-F amplifier (provided by South-China Normal University), were used to stimulate and record, respectively.METHODS: Animals were randomly divided into low-frequency, high-frequency, and theta-burst frequency stimulation groups. After recording evoked potentials, an input-output curve was evaluated. Subsequently, the efficacy of paired pulses with different stimulus intensity (1/3, 1/2, 2/3, or 3/4 of the value that induced the largest synaptic response), as well as interpulse intervals (50, 75, and 100ms), was measured in each group. The test stimulus intensity was set to a level that evoked 1/2 or 1/3 amplitude of the maximum response.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in amplitude, slope, and area of evoked potentials elicited by different stimulus patterns.RESULTS: (1) Efficacy of paired pulses: there was significant paired-pulse facilitation in the high vocal center and robust nucleus of the arcopallium (HVC-RA) synapse. Efficacy decreased when paired-pulse intervals or stimulus

  5. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CART) in the brain of zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata: Organization, interaction with neuropeptide Y, and response to changes in energy status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Omprakash; Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Uday; Kumar, Vinod; Lechan, Ronald M; Singru, Praful S

    2016-10-15

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) has emerged as a potent anorectic agent. CART is widely distributed in the brain of mammals, amphibians, and teleosts, but the relevant information in avian brain is not available. In birds, CART inhibits food intake, whereas neuropeptide Y (NPY), a well-known orexigenic peptide, stimulates it. How these neuropeptides interact in the brain to regulate energy balance is not known. We studied the distribution of CART-immunoreactivity in the brain of zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, its interaction with NPY, and their response to dynamic energy states. CART-immunoreactive fibers were found in the subpallium, hypothalamus, midbrain, and brainstem. Conspicuous CART-immunoreactive cells were observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, hypothalamic paraventricular, supraoptic, dorsomedial, infundibular (IN), lateral hypothalamic, Edinger-Westphal, and parabrachial nuclei. Hypothalamic sections of fed, fasted, and refed animals were immunostained with cFos, NPY, and CART antisera. Fasting dramatically increased cFos- and NPY-immunoreactivity in the IN, followed by rapid reduction by 2 hours and restoration to normal fed levels 6-10 hours after refeeding. CART-immunoreactive fibers in IN showed a significant reduction during fasting and upregulation with refeeding. Within the IN, double immunofluorescence revealed that 94 ± 2.1% of NPY-immunoreactive neurons were contacted by CART-immunoreactive fibers and 96 ± 2.8% NPY-immunoreactive neurons expressed cFos during fasting. Compared to controls, superfused hypothalamic slices of fasted birds treated with CART-peptide showed a significant reduction (P brain of T. guttata may perform several functions, and has a particularly important role in the hypothalamic regulation of energy homeostasis. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3014-3041, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018984

  6. Molecular and physiological properties associated with zebra complex disease in potatoes and its relation with Candidatus Liberibacter contents in psyllid vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veria Y Alvarado

    Full Text Available Zebra complex (ZC disease on potatoes is associated with Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLs, an α-proteobacterium that resides in the plant phloem and is transmitted by the potato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc. The name ZC originates from the brown striping in fried chips of infected tubers, but the whole plants also exhibit a variety of morphological features and symptoms for which the physiological or molecular basis are not understood. We determined that compared to healthy plants, stems of ZC-plants accumulate starch and more than three-fold total protein, including gene expression regulatory factors (e.g. cyclophilin and tuber storage proteins (e.g., patatins, indicating that ZC-affected stems are reprogrammed to exhibit tuber-like physiological properties. Furthermore, the total phenolic content in ZC potato stems was elevated two-fold, and amounts of polyphenol oxidase enzyme were also high, both serving to explain the ZC-hallmark rapid brown discoloration of air-exposed damaged tissue. Newly developed quantitative and/or conventional PCR demonstrated that the percentage of psyllids in laboratory colonies containing detectable levels of CLs and its titer could fluctuate over time with effects on colony prolificacy, but presumed reproduction-associated primary endosymbiont levels remained stable. Potato plants exposed in the laboratory to psyllid populations with relatively low-CLs content survived while exposure of plants to high-CLs psyllids rapidly culminated in a lethal collapse. In conclusion, we identified plant physiological biomarkers associated with the presence of ZC and/or CLs in the vegetative potato plant tissue and determined that the titer of CLs in the psyllid population directly affects the rate of disease development in plants.

  7. Zebra chip disease incidence on potato is influenced by timing of potato psyllid infestation,but not by the host plants on which they were reared

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Gao; John Jifon; Xiangbing Yang; Tong-Xian Liu

    2009-01-01

    The Zebra chip (ZC) syndrome is an emerging disease of potato and a major threat to the potato industry.The potato psyllid,Bactericerca cockerelli (Sulc) is believed to be a vector of the ZC pathogen,which is now thought to be Candidatus Liberibacter,a bacterium.To further understand the relationship between potato psyllid infestation and ZC disease expression,healthy potato plants at different growth stages (4,6 and 10 weeks after germination) were exposed separately to potato psyllids that were separately reared on four solanaceons hosts plants (potato,tomato,eggplant or bell pepper) for more than 1 year.ZC symptoms,leaf rates and total nonstructural carbohydrate accumulation in leaves and tubers of healthy and psyllid-infested plants were monitored and recorded.Typical ZC symptoms were observed in leaves and tubers of all plants exposed to potato psyllids regardless of the host plant on which they were reared.This was also accompanied by significant reductions in net photosynthetic rate.Caged potato plants without exposure to potato psyllids (uninfested controls) did not show any ZC symptom in both foliage and in harvested tubers.Foliage damage and ZC expression were most severe in the potato plants that were exposed to potato psyllids 4 weeks after germination compared to plants infested at later growth stages.Tubers from potato psyllid-infested plants had significantly higher levels of reducing sugars (glucose) and lower levels of starch than those in healthy plants,indicating that potato psyllid infestation interfered with carbohydrate metabolism in either leaves or tubers,resulting in ZC expression.

  8. Influence of body size on Cu bioaccumulation in zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha exposed to different sources of particle-associated Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Huan, E-mail: huanzhong1982@hotmail.com [Environmental and Resource Studies Program, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario (Canada); Nanjing University, School of Environment, State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Kraemer, Lisa; Evans, Douglas [Environmental and Resource Studies Program, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Mussels exposed to algal/sediment-Cu have different size-related Cu accumulation. • Size-related Cu accumulation in mussels could be more dependant on algal-Cu uptake. • Importance of algal/sediment-Cu to Cu bioaccumulation varies with mussel body size. • Cu sources (algae and sediments) should be considered in “mussel watch” programs. • Cu stable isotope offers many advantages in Cu bioaccumulation studies. -- Abstract: Size of organisms is critical in controlling metal bioavailability and bioaccumulation, while mechanisms of size-related metal bioaccumulation are not fully understood. To investigate the influences of different sources of particle-associated Cu on body size-related Cu bioavailability and bioaccumulation, zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) of different sizes were exposed to stable Cu isotope ({sup 65}Cu) spiked algae (Chlorella vulgaris) or sediments in the laboratory and the Cu tissue concentration-size relationships were compared with that in unexposed mussels. Copper tissue concentrations decreased with mussel size (tissue or shell dry weight) in both unexposed and algal-exposed mussels with similar decreasing patterns, but were independent of size in sediment-exposed mussels. Furthermore, the relative contribution of Cu uptake from algae (65–91%) to Cu bioaccumulation is always higher than that from sediments (9–35%), possibly due to the higher bioavailability of algal-Cu. Therefore, the size-related ingestion of algae could be more important in influencing the size-related variations in Cu bioaccumulation. However, the relative contribution of sediment-Cu to Cu bioaccumulation increased with body size and thus sediment ingestion may also affect the size-related Cu variations in larger mussels (tissue weight >7.5 mg). This study highlights the importance of considering exposure pathways in normalization of metal concentration variation when using bivalves as biomonitors.

  9. Circulating breeding and pre-breeding prolactin and LH are not associated with clutch size in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Calen P; Dawson, Alistair; Sharp, Peter J; Meddle, Simone L; Williams, Tony D

    2014-06-01

    Clutch size is a fundamental predictor of avian fitness, widely-studied from evolutionary and ecological perspectives, but surprisingly little is known about the physiological mechanisms regulating clutch size variation. The only formal mechanistic hypothesis for avian clutch-size determination predicts an anti-gonadal effect of circulating prolactin (PRL) via the inhibition of luteinizing hormone (LH), and has become widely-accepted despite little experimental support. Here we investigated the relationship between pre-breeding and breeding plasma PRL and LH and clutch-size in captive-breeding female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Using a repeated-measures design, we followed individual females from pre-breeding, through multiple breeding attempts, and attempted to decrease PRL using the D2-receptor agonist, bromocriptine. Clutch size was independent of variation in pre-breeding PRL or LH, although pre-breeding LH was negatively correlated with the time between pairing and the onset of laying. Clutch size was independent of variation in plasma PRL on all days of egg-laying. Bromocriptine treatment had no effect on plasma PRL, but in this breeding attempt clutch size was also independent of plasma PRL. Finally, we found no evidence for an inverse relationship between plasma PRL and LH levels, as predicted if PRL had inhibitory effects via LH. Thus, our data fail to provide any support for the involvement of circulating PRL in clutch size determination. These findings suggest that alternative models for hormonal control of avian clutch size need to be considered, perhaps involving downstream regulation of plasma PRL at the level of the ovary, or other hormones that have not been considered to date.

  10. Comparison of acute toxicity of process chemicals used in the oil refinery industry, tested with the diatom Chaetoceros gracilis, the flagellate Isochrysis galbana, and the zebra fish, Brachydanio rerio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roseth, S.; Edvardsson, T.; Botten, T.M.; Fuglestad, J.; Fonnum, F.; Stenersen, J. [Univ. of Oslo (Norway)

    1996-07-01

    Chemicals under the trade names Nalco 537-DA, Nalco 625, Nalco 7607, Nalco 5165, Ivamin, and technical monoethanolamine are used extensively in the oil refinery industry. Aquatic toxicity tests were conducted using zebra fish fry (Brachydanio rerio) and the unicellular algae Isochrysis galbana (a flagellate) and Chaetoceros gracilis (a diatom). Inhibition of cell division, chlorophyll content, and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} uptake in the algae were sensitive end points. The effective concentrations (EC50s) of growth inhibition were 0.1 mg/L (Ivamin; I. galbana), 0.8 mg/L (Nalco 7607; I. galbana), 6 mg/L (Nalco 625; I. galbana), 10 mg/L (Nalco 5165; C. gracilis), and 15 mg/L (Nalco 537-DA; C. gracilis). The lethal concentrations (LC50s) (96 h) toward zebra fish fry was 1 mg/L for Nalco 7607, 6.5 mg/L for Nalco 537-DA, 7.1 mg/L for Nalco 625, and 20 mg/L for Ivamin 803. Monoethanolamine had an LC50 higher than 5,000 mg/L. Nalco 5165 was not tested on fish fry. The heartbeat frequency of fish embryos was reduced by 2.5 mg/L Nalco 537-DA, but this was an insensitive end point for the other chemicals.

  11. Comparison of acute toxicity of process chemicals used in the oil refinery industry, tested with the diatom Chaetoceros gracilis, the flagellate Isochrysis galbana, and the zebra fish, Brachydanio rerio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemicals under the trade names Nalco 537-DA, Nalco 625, Nalco 7607, Nalco 5165, Ivamin, and technical monoethanolamine are used extensively in the oil refinery industry. Aquatic toxicity tests were conducted using zebra fish fry (Brachydanio rerio) and the unicellular algae Isochrysis galbana (a flagellate) and Chaetoceros gracilis (a diatom). Inhibition of cell division, chlorophyll content, and 14CO2 uptake in the algae were sensitive end points. The effective concentrations (EC50s) of growth inhibition were 0.1 mg/L (Ivamin; I. galbana), 0.8 mg/L (Nalco 7607; I. galbana), 6 mg/L (Nalco 625; I. galbana), 10 mg/L (Nalco 5165; C. gracilis), and 15 mg/L (Nalco 537-DA; C. gracilis). The lethal concentrations (LC50s) (96 h) toward zebra fish fry was 1 mg/L for Nalco 7607, 6.5 mg/L for Nalco 537-DA, 7.1 mg/L for Nalco 625, and 20 mg/L for Ivamin 803. Monoethanolamine had an LC50 higher than 5,000 mg/L. Nalco 5165 was not tested on fish fry. The heartbeat frequency of fish embryos was reduced by 2.5 mg/L Nalco 537-DA, but this was an insensitive end point for the other chemicals

  12. Applicational progress of zebra fish in the aquatic ecotoxicology researches%斑马鱼在水生生态毒理学研究中的应用进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹秀明; 梁荣朝; 王珊珊; 宋冬雪

    2013-01-01

    As a new model animal,zebra fish,because of its excellent biological characteristics and highly similar genome to the human,it plays an important role in the researches of aquatic ecological toxicology recent years.This review summarized the application of the zebra fish in the general toxicology experiments,evaluation the toxicity of environmental pollutants including of nanoparticles and environmental hormones and effects of these pollutants on the aquatic organisms.Finally,the prospect in this research field was discussed.%  由于斑马鱼优异的生物学特点,其基因组与人类基因组的相似度高,斑马鱼越来越多的用于生态毒理学研究中。对斑马鱼在常规的毒理学实验,评价纳米粒子、环境激素等环境污染物对水生生物影响等方面的应用进行了综述,并展望了斑马鱼在未来生态毒理学领域发挥的作用。

  13. QSAR Study of Acute Toxicity of Substituted Benzene Compounds to Zebra Fish%取代苯类化合物对斑马鱼急性毒性的QSAR研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洋; 范雪兰; 王志平; 李捍东

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR)method,the internal effects between 26 substituted benzene compounds and zebra fish 48 h acute toxicity (-lgLC50) were quantitatively studied.By using AMI quantum chemistry calculation method,first the correlation between 8 typical quantum chemistry parameters with zebra fish 48 h-lgLC50 were calculated,then through the stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) method,a QSAR model was established depicting the relationship between substituted benzene compounds and 48 h-lgLC50 on zebra fish,which were tested by internal and external validations,with the obtained multiple correlation coefficient 0.942.Finally using QSAR model to study the influence of substituted benzene compounds quantum chemistry parameters on zebra fish 48 h-lgLC50,and results indicated that the strongest correlation parameter with-lgLC50 is n-octanol-water partition coefficient (LogP),and the electronegativity is negatively correlated with-lgLC50.The obtained QSAR model showed good robustness and high predictive ability,which can be used to predict acute toxicity of substituted benzene compounds on zebra fish.%该文基于定量-构效关系(QSAR)原理,研究了26种取代苯类化合物与斑马鱼的48h急性毒性(-lgLC50)之间的内在定量关系.利用AM1量子化学计算方法,首先计算了8种典型量子化学参数与斑马鱼48 h-lgLC50的相关性;然后通过逐步多元线性回归(MLR)方法建立了取代苯类化合物对斑马鱼48h-lgLC50的QSAR模型,并对所建模型分别进行了内部验证和外部验证,所得复相关系数R2=0.942;最后利用QSAR模型,分析了取代苯类化合物量子化学参数对斑马鱼48 h-lgLC50的影响.结果表明:正辛醇-水分配系数(LogP)与-lgLC50的相关性最大,负电性[-(L+H)/2]与-lgLC50负相关.所得QSAR模型具有较高的稳定性及预测能力,可以用来预测取代苯类化合物对斑马鱼的急性毒性.

  14. Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH) in the songbird hippocampus: regional and sex differences in adult zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Nicolette; Ferris, Jennifer K; Arckens, Lutgarde; Bentley, George E; Soma, Kiran K

    2013-08-01

    Hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH) are vital to reproduction in all vertebrates. These neuropeptides are also present outside of the hypothalamus, but the roles of extra-hypothalamic GnRH and GnIH remain enigmatic and widely underappreciated. We used immunohistochemistry and PCR to examine whether multiple forms of GnRH (chicken GnRH-I (GnRH1), chicken GnRH-II (GnRH2) and lamprey GnRH-III (GnRH4)) and GnIH are present in the hippocampus (Hp) of adult zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Using immunohistochemistry, we provide evidence that GnRH1, GnRH2 and GnRH4 are present in hippocampal cell bodies and/or fibers and that GnIH is present in hippocampal fibers only. There are regional differences in hippocampal GnRH immunoreactivity, and these vary across the different forms of GnRH. There are also sex differences in hippocampal GnRH immunoreactivity, with generally more GnRH1 and GnRH2 in the female Hp. In addition, we used PCR to examine the presence of GnRH1 mRNA and GnIH mRNA in micropunches of Hp. PCR and subsequent product sequencing demonstrated the presence of GnRH1 mRNA and the absence of GnIH mRNA in the Hp, consistent with the pattern of immunohistochemical results. To our knowledge, this is the first study in any species to systematically examine multiple forms of GnRH in the Hp or to quantify sex or regional differences in hippocampal GnRH. Moreover, this is the first demonstration of GnIH in the avian Hp. These data shed light on an important issue: the sites of action and possible functions of GnRH and GnIH outside of the HPG axis. PMID:23727031

  15. Recalibrating Equus evolution using the genome sequence of an early Middle Pleistocene horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Ludovic; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Zhang, Guojie; Froese, Duane; Albrechtsen, Anders; Stiller, Mathias; Schubert, Mikkel; Cappellini, Enrico; Petersen, Bent; Moltke, Ida; Johnson, Philip L F; Fumagalli, Matteo; Vilstrup, Julia T; Raghavan, Maanasa; Korneliussen, Thorfinn; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Vogt, Josef; Szklarczyk, Damian; Kelstrup, Christian D; Vinther, Jakob; Dolocan, Andrei; Stenderup, Jesper; Velazquez, Amhed M V; Cahill, James; Rasmussen, Morten; Wang, Xiaoli; Min, Jiumeng; Zazula, Grant D; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Mortensen, Cecilie; Magnussen, Kim; Thompson, John F; Weinstock, Jacobo; Gregersen, Kristian; Røed, Knut H; Eisenmann, Véra; Rubin, Carl J; Miller, Donald C; Antczak, Douglas F; Bertelsen, Mads F; Brunak, Søren; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Ryder, Oliver; Andersson, Leif; Mundy, John; Krogh, Anders; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Kjær, Kurt; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Olsen, Jesper V; Hofreiter, Michael; Nielsen, Rasmus; Shapiro, Beth; Wang, Jun; Willerslev, Eske

    2013-07-01

    The rich fossil record of equids has made them a model for evolutionary processes. Here we present a 1.12-times coverage draft genome from a horse bone recovered from permafrost dated to approximately 560-780 thousand years before present (kyr BP). Our data represent the oldest full genome sequence determined so far by almost an order of magnitude. For comparison, we sequenced the genome of a Late Pleistocene horse (43 kyr BP), and modern genomes of five domestic horse breeds (Equus ferus caballus), a Przewalski's horse (E. f. przewalskii) and a donkey (E. asinus). Our analyses suggest that the Equus lineage giving rise to all contemporary horses, zebras and donkeys originated 4.0-4.5 million years before present (Myr BP), twice the conventionally accepted time to the most recent common ancestor of the genus Equus. We also find that horse population size fluctuated multiple times over the past 2 Myr, particularly during periods of severe climatic changes. We estimate that the Przewalski's and domestic horse populations diverged 38-72 kyr BP, and find no evidence of recent admixture between the domestic horse breeds and the Przewalski's horse investigated. This supports the contention that Przewalski's horses represent the last surviving wild horse population. We find similar levels of genetic variation among Przewalski's and domestic populations, indicating that the former are genetically viable and worthy of conservation efforts. We also find evidence for continuous selection on the immune system and olfaction throughout horse evolution. Finally, we identify 29 genomic regions among horse breeds that deviate from neutrality and show low levels of genetic variation compared to the Przewalski's horse. Such regions could correspond to loci selected early during domestication.

  16. The zebras come to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    From 23 to 26 November CERN played host to an unusual group of visitors, who arrived in a red-and-white striped camper. On the tenth anniversary of "Les Zèbres”, a children’s broadcast on Swiss radio, the show’s makers invited 8th and 9th grade pupils from Swiss schools to conduct a live broadcast from CERN.   Students in the cryogenic hall: cryolab. Popular Franco-Swiss host Jean-Marc Richard brought Les Zèbres to the Laboratory with a live broadcast. The idea was to let the children themselves host the broadcast. Accompanied by their physics teachers, pupils from junior secondary schools in Golette, Colombières and Drize were given the opportunity to spend half a day at CERN. Each day, one class came to find out about a particular aspect of the Laboratory and then conduct a live broadcast with Jean-Marc Richard from 12:10 to 12:30. The young people, aged 13 to 15, had a chance to explore the Universe of Particles exhibitio...

  17. 螺虫乙酯对斑马鱼的急性毒性及细胞凋亡的影响%Effects of Spirotetramat on Acute Toxicity and Apoptosis of Zebra fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李江; 赖柯华; 冯青; 范咏梅; 章程辉

    2015-01-01

    螺虫乙酯作为一种结构新颖、作用机制独特和广谱高效的季酮酸类衍生物杀虫杀螨剂,在农业生产中普遍应用,随着用量的增加,对水生生物会造成一定的影响。采用经济合作与发展组织(OECD)方法在预试验基础上设螺虫乙酯2.5、2.97、3.54、4.20、5.00 mg/L 5个浓度梯度,研究其对斑马鱼的急性毒性,采用酚-氯仿萃取的方法提取DNA,并进行了优化,用DNA Ladder方法观察其细胞凋亡现象,用Giemsa染色观察其外周血细胞微核率,初步探索其致毒机制。结果表明,螺虫乙酯对斑马鱼72 h的LC50值为5.898 mg/L、96 h的LC50值为3.642 mg/L,属中等毒性;各浓度梯度螺虫乙酯药剂处理后的斑马鱼DNA出现梯状条带,螺虫乙酯染毒后对斑马鱼造成一定程度上的细胞凋亡现象;处理组微核率为(7.250±1.893)~(5.500±0.577),与对照组和溶剂组差异均达显著水平。%Spirotetramat is a insecticide matricide which has a novel structure and unique mechanism of action and also has broad spectrum keto derivatives. It is widely used in agricultural production which may cause some affected on aquatic organisms with the increasing amount of spirotetramat.We adopted the method of OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) and set 5 concentrationgradients of spirotetramat like 2.5,2.97,3.54,4.20,5.00 mg/L to study its acute toxicity on zebra fishes. To preliminarily explore its toxic mechanism, we used phenol-chloroform extraction method to extract DNA which had been optimized, observed the phenomenon of apoptosis by DNA Ladder method and used Giemsa staining micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood cells. Spirotetramated zebra fish 72 h LC50 value is 5.898 mg/L and 96 h LC50 value is 3.642 mg/L. The results show that Spirotetramat is moderately toxic and occured apoptosis phenomenon to some extent on the zebra fish. After each zebrafish DNA concentration gradient Spirotetramat pharmaceutical

  18. Metabolic ageing in individual zebra finches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moe, Borge; Ronning, Bernt; Verhulst, Simon; Bech, Claus; Moe, Børge; Rønning, Bernt

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress is suggested as a contributor to the ageing process. Knowledge of the relationship between age and energy expenditure may contribute to our understanding of ageing patterns, due to the link between oxygen consumption and free radical production. However, studies on basal metabolic r

  19. 预置斑马导丝在输尿管镜处理输尿管上段病变中的作用(附1500例体会)%Presetting zebra guidewire for ureteral upper segments diseases in ureteroscopic operations(1 500 cases reported)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙伟桂; 郑奇传; 储旭; 蒋堃

    2013-01-01

    目的 总结输尿管硬镜处理输尿管上段病变的经验及输尿管常见损伤因素,并探讨预置斑马导丝的价值及意义.方法 统计1994-2012年期间经尿道输尿管硬镜手术共3 000余例,其中输尿管上段病变1 500例,均为术前已确诊的单侧输尿管上段结石或结石伴狭窄患者.其中男979例(65.27%),女521例(34.73%),平均年龄40.5(18~67)岁.结石平均长径约1.19(0.6~3.5)cm;单发结石1119例(74.60%),多发结石381例(25.40%).行气压弹道碎石652例(43.47%),钬激光碎石536例(35.73%),超声EMS清石312例(20.80%).所有病例随机分为两组,A组(912例,60.80%)在碎石前先预置斑马导丝越过狭窄和结石旁间隙达肾盂内,将斑马导丝妥善固定于会阴部,再继续完成狭窄扩张和碎石操作.B组(588例,39.20%)不预置斑马导丝直接碎石并完成所有操作.结果 A组一次性手术成功率和平均手术操作时间明显优于B组(P<0.05),分别为873例(95.72%)和31.33(15~65)min,521例(88.61%)和46.15(18~115)min.两组发生输尿管各类损伤共63例(4.20%),文章对预置斑马导丝的8个优点及有效预防输尿管损伤的9个高危因素分别作了阐述.结论 预置斑马导丝法可提高输尿管镜处理输尿管上段结石伴狭窄的手术成功率,减少输尿管损伤及二期后续治疗机率,是安全可行且有效的方法.%Objective To summarize some experiences of ureteroscopic treatments of the upper ureteral lesions and common factors of ureter injury,and to study the value of presetting zebra guidewire. Methods Since 1994 ,1 500 patients of upper ureteral calculi or stones with stenosis had undergone transurethral ureteroscopic surgeries,including 979 male patients(65. 27% ) ,521 female cases(34. 73% ) ,with an average of about 40.5 (18 ~ 67) years old. The average length of calculi was about 1. 19(0. 6 ~3.5)cm. 1119 cases(74. 60% ) had a single stone, while 381 cases (25. 40% ) had several stones. 652 cases (43. 47% ) had been

  20. 姜黄素类似物EF24对HepG2及斑马鱼胚胎发育的影响%The impact of curcumin analogs EF24 on HepG2 and the development of zebra fish embryo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐昌志; 汪宇; 袁媛; 黄蓓

    2011-01-01

    To explore the impact of curcumin analogs EF24 on HHC (hepatoma carcinoma cell)and the toxicity on vertebrate, we use EF24 to deal with HepG2 and zebra fish embryo. We found that EF24 shows fine depression effect to zebra fish embryo in lower concentration, and its IC50 is 29.38umol/L. It is the best sensitive time when fertilized ovum has developed at 6 hours. EF24 is still safe to embryos in the concentration of less than 100mg/L, while it can lead to malformation and death in high concentration for more than 400 mg/L, such as yolk diffusion, embryo death in epiboly stage, animal pole diffusion, backbone bending and hypoplasia. We conclude that FE24 is a potential drug owning good inhibition effect on tumor cells and lower toxicity.%为探讨姜黄素类似物EF24对肝癌细胞的影响以及对脊椎动物的毒性,以EF24对HepG2和斑马鱼胚胎进行处理,发现低浓度的EF24对HepG2达到较好的杀伤效果,IC50为29.38 umol/L.对斑马鱼胚胎当受精卵发育6 h为敏感期,EF24的安全浓度达100 mg/L.而从400 mg/L高浓度开始出现畸形和死亡,如卵黄弥散、胚胎在外包期死亡、囊胚期胚胎动物极弥散、脊柱弯曲、发育不全等现象.EF24是一种对肝癌细胞有较强的杀伤效果且安全的潜在药物.

  1. Adaptive molecular evolution of the Major Histocompatibility Complex genes, DRA and DQA, in the genus Equus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getz Wayne M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC genes are central to vertebrate immune response and are believed to be under balancing selection by pathogens. This hypothesis has been supported by observations of extremely high polymorphism, elevated nonsynonymous to synonymous base pair substitution rates and trans-species polymorphisms at these loci. In equids, the organization and variability of this gene family has been described, however the full extent of diversity and selection is unknown. As selection is not expected to act uniformly on a functional gene, maximum likelihood codon-based models of selection that allow heterogeneity in selection across codon positions can be valuable for examining MHC gene evolution and the molecular basis for species adaptations. Results We investigated the evolution of two class II MHC genes of the Equine Lymphocyte Antigen (ELA, DRA and DQA, in the genus Equus with the addition of novel alleles identified in plains zebra (E. quagga, formerly E. burchelli. We found that both genes exhibited a high degree of polymorphism and inter-specific sharing of allele lineages. To our knowledge, DRA allelic diversity was discovered to be higher than has ever been observed in vertebrates. Evidence was also found to support a duplication of the DQA locus. Selection analyses, evaluated in terms of relative rates of nonsynonymous to synonymous mutations (dN/dS averaged over the gene region, indicated that the majority of codon sites were conserved and under purifying selection (dN dS. However, the most likely evolutionary codon models allowed for variable rates of selection across codon sites at both loci and, at the DQA, supported the hypothesis of positive selection acting on specific sites. Conclusions Observations of elevated genetic diversity and trans-species polymorphisms supported the conclusion that balancing selection may be acting on these loci. Furthermore, at the DQA, positive selection was

  2. 速激肽1型受体(NK1 R)在斑胸草雀脑干鸣唱控制相关核团及部分听觉核团内的分布%DISTRIBUTION OF NEURONKININ-1 RECEPTOR (NK1 R) IN VOCAL CONTROL RELATED NUCLEUS AND SOME AUDITORY NUCLEUS IN THE BRAINSTEM OF MALE ZEBRA FINCHES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄丽; 徐程; 张信文; 孙颖郁

    2014-01-01

    采用免疫组织化学的方法研究了速激肽1型受体(NK1R)在斑胸草雀脑干发声控制核团和部分听觉中枢内的分布及阳性标记特征。结果显示,NK1R广泛分布于斑胸草雀发声控制核团和部分听觉中枢内;1)发声控制相关核团:中脑丘间复合体背内侧核(DM)有大量的 NK1R免疫阳性胞体标记,极少出现纤维;中脑腹侧被盖区(VTA)、黑质致密部(SNc)及周围脑区有大量的 NK1R阳性胞体和 NK1R免疫阳性纤维分布;2)听觉中枢:中脑背外侧核(MLd)和耳蜗核前庭外侧核(NM)有密集的胞体标记;而耳蜗核层状核(NL)及角核(NA)有少量 NK1R 阳性胞体分散分布,且角核可见大量密集深染纤维。本实验结果提示 NK1R可能在鸣禽的发声控制及听觉中枢内具有重要的生理功能。%Immunohistochemistry was used to characterize neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R)distribution in vocal control-related nucleus and auditory nucleus in the brain stem of adult male zebra finch.It was found that NK1R was distributed widely in vocal control-related nucleus and in auditory pathway in the brain stem of adult male zebra finch.Abundant NK1R immunopositive soma but few fibers were identified in vocal control nuclei DM (dorsomedial nucleus of intercollicular complex).Numerous NK1R-positive soma and fibers were found in vocal control nuclei VTA (ventral tegmental area)and SNc (substantia nigra compacta)as well as encephalic regions around them in midbrain.Intensive NK1R-positive soma were found in auditory center nucleus MLd (mesencephalicus lateralis pars dorsalis)and cochlear nucleus NM (nucleus magnocellularis).A few labeled soma were dispersed in cochlear nucleus NL (nucleus laminaris)and in NA (nucleus angularis),abundant strongly labeled fibers were found in NA.These data suggest that NK1R plays an important physiological role in vocal production and auditory perception.

  3. Study of the biological effects of uranium exposure on zebra fish (D. rerio). Impact on life stages; Etude des effets biologiques de l'exposition a l'uranium chez le poisson zebre (D. rerio). Impact sur les stades de vie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourrachot, St.

    2009-05-15

    This work is part of an ongoing project (ENVIRHOM) started at IRSN in 2000, which consists in studying the environmental effects of radioactive substances at chronic low level of exposure. In this general frame, our aim was two fold: (i) to identify sensitivity of different critical life stages of zebra fish (fish of fresh water frequently used for tests standards in ecotoxicology) to uranium exposure and (ii) to evaluate underlying mechanisms. Experiments were conducted with eggs, larvae and genitors exposed to uranium at environmentally relevant concentrations (from 20 to 500 {mu}g/L) in order to study survival, hatching of eggs, growth of larvae and reproduction of genitors. Bio-markers of exposure (i.e. U bioaccumulation) and bio-markers of effects at molecular level (i.e. genotoxic effects, reproductive-toxicity) were also measured. Sensitivity of fish to uranium was dependent of the life stage of development with the early life stage being the most sensitive to U either directly or maternally exposed. It underlines the relevance of including pro-larval stages for toxicity assessments in fish. Moreover drastic effects of uranium on reproductive success and DNA damages in the germ cells foretell a strong impact on the population for low concentration of exposure (20 {mu}g/L). As it is increasingly recognized that population-level effects of toxic substances are more relevant in terms of ecological risk assessment, this study points out the need to include different life stages of organisms in eco-toxicological studies, especially the sensitive early stages. Moreover, it appears, through the comparative study of the radiological effects or by another isotope of the uranium of stronger radioactivity ({sup 233}U or by an irradiation with {sup 137}Cs), that the effects of the uranium are due to its chemo-toxicity. (author)

  4. Forage patch use by grazing herbivores in a South African grazing ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venter, J.A.; Nabe-Nielsen, J.; Prins, H.H.T.; Slotow, R.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how different herbivores make forage patch use choices explains how they maintain an adequate nutritional status, which is important for effective conservation management of grazing ecosystems. Using telemetry data, we investigated nonruminant zebra (Equus burchelli) and ruminant red h

  5. The Leopard Tortoise in the Mountain Zebra National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H Grobler

    1982-11-01

    Full Text Available A total of 69 leopard tortoises Geochelone pardalis babcocki (Loveridge 1935 were captured, marked, sexed, weighed and released. The results of this exercise together with other field data are presented and discussed.

  6. The Leopard Tortoise in the Mountain Zebra National Park

    OpenAIRE

    J.H Grobler

    1982-01-01

    A total of 69 leopard tortoises Geochelone pardalis babcocki (Loveridge 1935) were captured, marked, sexed, weighed and released. The results of this exercise together with other field data are presented and discussed.

  7. Long-distance retinoid signaling in the zebra finch brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina C Roeske

    Full Text Available All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, the main active metabolite of vitamin A, is a powerful signaling molecule that regulates large-scale morphogenetic processes during vertebrate embryonic development, but is also involved post-natally in regulating neural plasticity and cognition. In songbirds, it plays an important role in the maturation of learned song. The distribution of the ATRA-synthesizing enzyme, zRalDH, and of ATRA receptors (RARs have been described, but information on the distribution of other components of the retinoid signaling pathway is still lacking. To address this gap, we have determined the expression patterns of two obligatory RAR co-receptors, the retinoid X receptors (RXR α and γ, and of the three ATRA-degrading cytochromes CYP26A1, CYP26B1, and CYP26C1. We have also studied the distribution of zRalDH protein using immunohistochemistry, and generated a refined map of ATRA localization, using a modified reporter cell assay to examine entire brain sections. Our results show that (1 ATRA is more broadly distributed in the brain than previously predicted by the spatially restricted distribution of zRalDH transcripts. This could be due to long-range transport of zRalDH enzyme between different nuclei of the song system: Experimental lesions of putative zRalDH peptide source regions diminish ATRA-induced transcription in target regions. (2 Four telencephalic song nuclei express different and specific subsets of retinoid-related receptors and could be targets of retinoid regulation; in the case of the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (lMAN, receptor expression is dynamically regulated in a circadian and age-dependent manner. (3 High-order auditory areas exhibit a complex distribution of transcripts representing ATRA synthesizing and degrading enzymes and could also be a target of retinoid signaling. Together, our survey across multiple connected song nuclei and auditory brain regions underscores the prominent role of retinoid signaling in modulating the circuitry that underlies the acquisition and production of learned vocalizations.

  8. "A Zebra in the Water": Inspiring Science in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Varela, Jorge; Cabezas-Sainz, Pablo; Yebra-Pimentel, Elena; Gutiérrez-Lovera, Carlha; Cedrón, Vanessa P; Otero Obarrio, Mónica A; Sciara, Andrés A; Rodríguez, Noemí; Araujo, Juan; Millán, Adrián; Sánchez, Laura

    2016-08-01

    The zebrafish model can play a role in education because of its suitability for manipulation and attractiveness to students compared to traditional lecture-based instruction. Furthermore, zebrafish offer advantages over other model species. Seeing as fewer and fewer students are entering science degree programs, this project has been developed to encourage scientific vocations among secondary school students. To do so, an aquarium was given to 114 schools so that they could look after adult zebrafish, mate them, and visualize embryo development. For training on more sophisticated techniques, a virtual tool was developed to simulate a real genetics laboratory on a personal computer. Results based on teachers' feedback indicate that the students were fully dedicated to the project and achieved better understanding of genetic concepts and techniques. These results demonstrate the potential of alternative teaching methods for engaging students in science learning. PMID:27140317

  9. Heritability of telomere length in the Zebra Finch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atema, Els; Mulder, Ellis; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Briga, Michael; van Noordwijk, Arie J.; Verhulst, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Telomere length predicts survival in birds, and many stressors that presumably reduce fitness have also been linked to telomere length. The response to selection of telomere length will be largely determined by the heritability of this trait; however, little is known about the genetic component of t

  10. Neuronal number in song nucleus LMAN remains high in female zebra finches throughout development and in adulthood%雌性斑胸草雀发育和成体期发声核团LMAN中神经元数量的高水平维持

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbara E. NIXDORF-BERGEILER; Viola VON Bohlen UND HALBACH

    2005-01-01

    Song learning and production in birds involve a discrete set of interconnected song nuclei in the avian brain. In species where only males sing, such as the zebra finch Taeniogygia guttata, large sex differences are present in song system nuclei and the number of neurons is much smaller in females compared to males. Whereas it is assumed that this also applies to the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (LMAN), a detailed analysis is still lacking. To close this gap and to learn more about the development of neuronal numbers in both sexes, we have quantified neuronal density and number on semithin sections in small time intervals using the disector-technique. In females, neither neuronal density nor number increased or decreased significantly between 10 days and adulthood at any time interval sampled, so that neuronal density and number remained high in adult females. In males, we found a strong decrease in neuron number very early in development as known from literature using non-stereological techniques, and an additional decrease in neuron number (57%) that lasts up to adulthood. Therefore, the total number of neurons in LMAN in adult birds was about 4 times higher in females than in males (P<0.001). The larger neuronal number in females may reflect the ability of keeping up a neuronal network that can be used throughout development and in adulthood, probably for tasks that may be related particularly to species-specific recognition tasks as it has been shown for this brain region in other passerine female birds[Acta Zoologica Sinica 51(2):257-267,2005].%鸟类的发声和发声学习涉及处于脑中不同水平的相互联系的一些发声核团.在很多鸟类中,仅雄性鸣啭,例如在斑胸草雀(Taeniogygia guttata)中, 雌雄个体间存在显著的性差异,雌性发声系统和发声核团中的神经元数量显著少于雄性.推测这种性差异也可能存在于弓状皮质前部大细胞外侧核(LMAN),但有关这方面

  11. Macrorhabdus ornithogaster in ostrich, rhea, canary, zebra finch, free range chicken, turkey, guinea-fowl, columbina pigeon, toucan, chuckar partridge and experimental infection in chicken, japanese quail and mice Macrorhabdus ornithogaster em avestruzes, ema, canário, mandarim, galinha, peru, galinha da Angola, pombo doméstico, rolinha, tucano, perdiz de chuckar e infecção experimental em galinha, codorna e camundongo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.R.S. Martins

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 2000, Macrorhabdus ornithogaster "megabacteriosis" has been diagnosed in the avian diseases laboratory in a diversity of avian species and varied spectrum of disease. The disease in some species (chickens, turkeys, guinea fowls was clinically characterized by emaciation, prostration, loss of appetite, cachexia and death, with a typically chronic course. A more acute disease was observed in finches (canary-Serinus and zebra-Taeniopygia and budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus. The large rod shaped organism, visible from 100 times magnification, with and without staining, could be detected in sick and also in reasonably normal individuals of some species, such as chickens, turkeys, quails and pigeons. In rheas (Rhea americana, ostriches (Struthio camelus, canaries, zebra-finches, guinea-fowl (Numida meleagris and budgerigars. The disease was severe, causing to up to 100% mortality. The infection could be detected in some species along with other infectious or disease problems, such as endoparasites (helminths, coccidia and ectoparasitism (order Mallophaga or/and order Acarina. The cultivation of M. ornithogaster was successfully achieved in solid and liquid media, originated from chickens (four isolates, guinea fowl (1 isolate, chuckar partridge (1 isolate and canary (1 isolate. A very interesting finding at microscopy was motility of M. ornithogaster, as detected both in cultures obtained on agar for pathogenic fungi and passaged into thioglycolate broth, as well as on samples observed in wet preparations from in vivo. Differences in colony aspects were noted among the isolates. Experimental infections were attempted in chicken and japanese quail, using a chicken isolate, allowing the detection of the organism in the proventriculus and liver in apparently normal birds. One chicken isolate was injected intraperitoneally in Balb/c mice and resulted in 100% mortality.Desde 2000, diversos casos de infecção e doença por Macrorhabdus

  12. Chromosomal assignment of six genes (EIF4G3, HSP90, RBBP6, IL8, TERT, and TERC) in four species of the genus Equus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidale, Pamela; Piras, Francesca M; Nergadze, Solomon G; Bertoni, Livia; Verini-Supplizi, Andrea; Adelson, David; Guérin, Gérard; Giulotto, Elena

    2011-01-01

    We mapped six genes (EIF4G3, HSP90, RBBP6, IL8, TERT, and TERC) on the chromosomes of Equus caballus, Equus asinus, Equus grevyi, and Equus burchelli by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Our results add six type I markers to the cytogenetic map of these species and provide new information on the comparative genomics of the genus Equus.

  13. Population viability analysis on domestic horse breeds (Equus caballus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, Janne Pia; Bach, Lars; Loeschcke, Volker;

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we performed a population viability analysis on 3 domestic horse breeds (Equus caballus) of Danish origin, namely, the Frederiksborg, the Knabstrupper, and the Jutland breeds. Because of their small population sizes, these breeds are considered endangered. The Vortex software...... available. The results of this analysis accord with other studies on the Prezwalski horse, indicating robustness in the parameter sensitivity for horses....

  14. Phylogenetic relationships of the Chinese fossil species of the genus Equus (Perissodactyla, Equidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓涛; 薛祥煦

    1999-01-01

    The Chinese fossils of Equus began to appear from the beginning of the Quaternary at 2.5 Ma B.P., and the extant species of Eqtms still live in China under natural conditions at the present, which is unique in the world. 12 valid fossil species of Equus have been discovered in China, including the stenonid, caballoid and hemione representatives of Equus. The origin and evolution of the Chinese fossil species and other relevant species of Eqnus are discussed in detail. The proposed phylogenetic relationships and temporal distribution sequences including all the Chinese fossil species of Equus are established. Some mistakes in the earlier researches about the Chinese fossils of Equus are corrected.

  15. Hard work impinges on fitness : an experimental study with zebra finches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deerenberg, C; Overkamp, GJF

    1999-01-01

    In experiments in which brood size is manipulated, it is impossible to disentangle the effects of changes in intensity and duration of parental care on parental fitness from those of changes in the parental energy budget. To determine whether a change in parental energy budget affects the costs of r

  16. The effects of rearing conditions on sexual traits and preferences in zebra finches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holveck, Marie-Jeanne

    2008-01-01

    Although theory predicts that females should prefer the highest quality male, female mating preferences within populations often show pronounced variation. What causes and maintains this variation remains poorly understood. This thesis addresses the influence of rearing conditions both on female mat

  17. Long-term effects of manipulated natal brood size on metabolic rate in zebra finches

    OpenAIRE

    Verhulst, Simon; Holveck, Marie-Jeanne; Riebel, Katharina

    2006-01-01

    Long-term effects of developmental conditions on health, longevity and other fitness components in humans are drawing increasing attention. In evolutionary ecology, such effects are of similar importance because of their role in the trade-off between quantity and quality of offspring. The central role of energy consumption is well documented for some long-term health effects in humans (e.g. obesity), but little is known of the long-term effects of rearing conditions on energy requirements lat...

  18. Long-term effects of manipulated natal brood size on metabolic rate in zebra finches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, Simon; Holveck, Marie-Jeanne; Riebel, Katharina

    2006-01-01

    Long-term effects of developmental conditions on health, longevity and other fitness components in humans are drawing increasing attention. In evolutionary ecology, such effects are of similar importance because of their role in the trade-off between quantity and quality of offspring. The central ro

  19. Prevalence of zebras in general practice: data from the Continuous Morbidity Registration Nijmegen.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, F.A. van de; Bor, H.; Lisdonk, E.H. van de

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the prevalence of rare diseases in the Continuous Morbidity Registration (CMR) Nijmegen, and to discuss methodological difficulties in the study of rare diseases in general practice. METHODS: We selected all diseases with a prevalence <0.5/1000 patients/year between 1986 and 20

  20. Species Shout-Outs From Abdul to Zebra: Encouraging Nonmajors to Communicate in the Biology Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina P. Colon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this learning activity, a simple verbal prompt was employed as a nonthreatening and engaging discussion starter for non-Biology majors in a biology class at a community college. By calling out the name of their favorite species, then relating new content to this organism, these “Species Shout-Outs” fostered enthusiasm among students by promoting engagement and creating relevance, all of which are important to improving higher education. This activity combined the elements of academic and social interaction, as well as active learning, which have been shown to be necessary to foster student retention through college.

  1. Growth of a male Caracal kitten felis Caracal in the Mountain Zebra National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H Grobler

    1982-11-01

    Full Text Available Three caracal (lynx Fells caracal kittens, two females and a male were received from the Fish River area some 50 km north of Cradock, Republic of South Africa, on the 20th March 1980. These were found at the base of a dense Rhus erosa bush on the side of a hill and estimated at 14 days old based on the findings of Cade (1968 Int. Zoo Yb. 45 and Kralik (1967 Int. Zoo Yb. 132.

  2. ["Why am I Deaf and my Vision is Blurred?" Thinking of a Horse or a Zebra?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolliana, Patrik; Nüesch, Reto

    2016-03-01

    We present the case of a 66 year old patient with a heterogeneous clinical course over ten months, particularly worsening of vision, hearing and hip pain. She finally died of multi-organ failure. The increased wear of a metal-on-metal hip implant lead to cobalt intoxication. The crucial therapy consists in removing the cobalt source. In the future, physicians need to be aware of this insidious and life-threatening disease possibly affecting thousands of patients after total hip replacement. PMID:26934012

  3. Compatibility benefits of social and extra-pair mate choice in the zebra finch

    OpenAIRE

    Ihle, Malika

    2015-01-01

    Behavioural ecologists aim at providing insights into the evolutionary and ecological processes that shape animal behaviour. Mate choice is a decision faced by most animals that can strongly affect an individual’s reproductive success, an important fitness component. This behaviour has therefore the potential to show many adaptations which have been the subject of a vivid research interest over the last decades. Studies on mate choice have typically focused on female preferences for trait...

  4. A neural circuit mechanism for regulating vocal variability during song learning in zebra finches

    OpenAIRE

    Garst-Orozco, Jonathan; Babadi, Baktash; Ölveczky, Bence P

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest ‘Practice makes perfect’ captures the essence of how we learn new skills. When learning to play a musical instrument, for example, it often takes hours of practice before we can play a single piece of music properly for the first time. And as we get better, the variability in our performance—which is an advantage during the early stages of learning—becomes less. Likewise, songbirds need lots of practice in order to master the intricate songs they need to sing to attract mates. St...

  5. Assessment of Mercury Bioaccumulation in Zebra Cichlid (Cichlasoma Nigrofasciatum) Exposed to Sublethal Concentrations of Permethrin

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdi Banaee; Amal Beitsayah; Isar Jorabdoz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aquatic ecosystems are frequently subjected to contamination by toxic heavy metals and pesticides, yet very little is known about the influence of pesticides on bioaccumulation of heavy metals in aquatic organisms. Mercury is a toxic metal with no known biological benefit to organisms. Bioavailability of mercury in aquatic environments depends on biological and non-biological parameters including other pollutants. Therefore, the objectives of this research were to determine the ef...

  6. Tallinnas Narva mnt. 7 asuva kohviku Zebra sisekujundus / Tiiu Truus, Tiiu Prisko, Mati Veermets...[jt.

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    põhiplaan, 11 värv. vaadet; fotod: Kalle Veesaar; laes olevate dekoratiivsete lippude graafiline kujundus on Tiiu Priskolt ja Mati Veermetsalt, tualettruumi looduskivist valamu ja põrandavaasi autor on Kaido Kivi

  7. Sexual dimorphism of the zebra finch syrinx indicates adaptation for high fundamental frequencies in males.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Riede

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In many songbirds the larger vocal repertoire of males is associated with sexual dimorphism of the vocal control centers and muscles of the vocal organ, the syrinx. However, it is largely unknown how these differences are translated into different acoustic behavior. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that the sound generating structures of the syrinx, the labia and the associated cartilaginous framework, also display sexual dimorphism. One of the bronchial half rings that position and tense the labia is larger in males, and the size and shape of the labia differ between males and females. The functional consequences of these differences were explored by denervating syringeal muscles. After denervation, both sexes produced equally low fundamental frequencies, but the driving pressure generally increased and was higher in males. Denervation strongly affected the relationship between driving pressure and fundamental frequency. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The syringeal modifications in the male syrinx, in concert with dimorphisms in neural control and muscle mass, are most likely the foundation for the potential to generate an enhanced frequency range. Sexually dimorphic vocal behavior therefore arises from finely tuned modifications at every level of the motor cascade. This sexual dimorphism in frequency control illustrates a significant evolutionary step towards increased vocal complexity in birds.

  8. A CALCIUM-BASED INVASION RISK ASSESSMENT FOR ZEBRA AND QUAGGA MUSSELS (DREISSENA SPP.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used calcium concentration data from over 3000 stream and river sites across the contiguous United States to classify ecoregions relative to their risk for Dreissena species invasion. We defined risk based on calcium concentrations as: very low (< 12 mg L−1), low (12–20 mg L−1...

  9. Genotoxicity and activation of cellular defenses in transplanted zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha along the Seine river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Châtel, Amélie; Faucet-Marquis, Virginie; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Vincent-Hubert, Françoise

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to confirm the relevance of studying DNA adduct formation in a field study. In that context, freshwater mussels Dreissena polymorpha, collected in a reference station, were transplanted in different sites with a pollution gradient. After one and two months, mussels were collected and DNA adduct formation was analyzed using the (32)P post labelling technique on both gills and digestive glands. In addition, the expression of genes involved in the detoxification system (catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione S-transferase (GST), HSP70, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), P glycoprotein (PgP), metallothionein (MT)) was assessed by RT-PCR. DNA adducts were observed at amount comparable to data from literature. Increase of DNA adducts after two months of transplantation could be correlated with strong modulation of gene expression implicated in detoxification processes. Indeed, PgP and HSP70 gene expressions were similarly induced in gills and digestive glands while SOD and CAT expressions were down regulated in both tissues. AHR, GST and MT genes were differently regulated depending upon the tissue studied and the level of contamination in the different sites. We demonstrated that mussels transplanted in the different stations with pollution gradient were able to biotransform PAHs, assessed by DNA adduct formation and the high decrease of detoxification genes. Specific DNA adducts pattern obtained after one and two month mussel transplantations demonstrated the relevance of DNA adduct as biomarker of environmental pollution.

  10. A re-assessment of the avifauna of the Mountain Zebra National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J.F.K. Craig

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on all published records, together with the original data for the southern African bird atlas, the current Birds in Reserves Project and our records on field trips, 257 bird species have been reliably recorded from MZNP. We have assessed the current status of all species, in relation to the recent expansion of the park and other changes which may be a consequence of management practices. No birds of national conservation concern are breeding residents in the park, and some species are periodic or irregular visitors. Nevertheless, the park is important for the conservation of representatives of the Karoo avifauna, and the diversity of birdlife present should be highlighted to attract visitors with a special interest in birding.

  11. Lifelong consequences of early nutritional conditions on learning performance in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brust, V.; Krüger, O.; Naguib, M.; Krause, E.T.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term effects of early developmental conditions on physiological and behavioural traits are commonin animals. Yet, such lifelong effects of early life conditions on learning skills received relatively lessattention, even though they are expected to have strong fitness effects. To test the lifelo

  12. Fos Responses of Dopamine Neurons to Sociosexual Stimuli in Male Zebra Finches

    OpenAIRE

    Bharati, Ila S.; Goodson, James L.

    2006-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is produced in numerous brain areas and influences a wide variety of social behaviors, but very few data are available to establish the socially-relevant response properties of most DA populations, which comprise eight cell groups numbered A8-A15. Anatomically, these DA populations are evolutionarily conserved, and all have been identified in both birds and mammals. We now report the Fos responses of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir; putatively dopaminergic) neurons in...

  13. Does song complexity correlate with problem-solving performance in flocks of zebra finches?

    OpenAIRE

    Templeton, Christopher Neal; Laland, Kevin Neville; Boogert, Neeltje Janna

    2014-01-01

    The ‘cognitive capacity hypothesis’ states that song complexity could potentially be used by prospective mates to assess an individual's overall cognitive ability. Several recent studies have provided support for the cognitive capacity hypothesis, demonstrating that individuals with more complex songs or larger song repertoires performed better on various learning tasks. These studies all measured individuals' learning performance in social isolation. However, for gregarious species such as t...

  14. Rules of conduct for pedestrians and motorists on or near zebra crossings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraay, J.H.

    1973-01-01

    Traffic regulations which an influence the behaviour of the pedestrian as well as the driver on and near pedestrian crossings for all West-European countries and the U.S.A. are presented. (See also B 4795)

  15. Parental influence on begging call structure in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata): evidence of early vocal plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Villain, Avelyne S.; Boucaud, Ingrid C. A.; Bouchut, Colette; Vignal, Clémentine

    2015-01-01

    Begging calls are signals of need used by young birds to elicit care from adults. Different theoretical frameworks have been proposed to understand this parent–offspring communication. But relationships between parental response and begging intensity, or between begging characteristics and proxies of a young’s need remain puzzling. Few studies have considered the adjustment of nestling begging features to previous experience as a possible explanation of these discrepancies. In this study, we ...

  16. Anatomically discrete sex differences in neuroplasticity in zebra finches as reflected by perineuronal nets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornez, Gilles; ter Haar, Sita M; Cornil, Charlotte A; Balthazart, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Large morphological sex differences in the vertebrate brain were initially identified in song control nuclei of oscines. Besides gross differences between volumes of nuclei in males and females, sex differences also concern the size and dendritic arborization of neurons and various neurochemical mar

  17. Toxico-kinetic, chemical and radiological toxicity of uranium on zebra fish (Danio rerio)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis explores the toxico-kinetic and toxicological aspects of uranium in fish. Uranium, appears to be highly bio accumulated and bio concentrated in fish. It spreads all through the whole organism. Nevertheless, its distribution is heterogeneous (gills and liver being the main sites of accumulation).From a toxicological point of view, we notice perturbations of the antioxidant system (inhibitions of hepatic Sod, Cat and G Px activities; depletion of total GSH) and of the cholinergic system (inhibition/over-activation of brain AChE). Genotoxic effects also appear in red blood cells, hepatocytes and gonad cells. The kinetics of these biochemical perturbations depend on the radiological activity of uranium, responses appearing earlier with increasing delivered activity. Histological effects (differing in types depending on delivered radiological activity) are also observed (in gills and muscles). (author)

  18. Correlates of average daily metabolism of field-active zebra-tailed lizards (Callisaurus draconoides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasov, W H; Anderson, R A

    1998-01-01

    The extent of variation in reptile field metabolism, and its causal bases, are poorly understood. We studied the energetics of the insectivorous lizard Callisaurus draconoides at a site in the California Desert (Desert Center) and at a site at the southern tip of the Baja Peninsula (Cabo San Lucas; hereafter, Cabo). Reproducing Callisaurus were smaller at Cabo than at Desert Center. The allometry of metabolism with body mass can account for most differences in whole-animal metabolism. There was no significant effect of sex or source population on mass-adjusted metabolic rate in the laboratory (resting metabolism, measured by closed-system respirometry) or in the field (field metabolism, measured with doubly labeled water). The mass-adjusted resting metabolism and field metabolism of gravid females and the field metabolism of juvenile lizards were not significantly different from those of nonreproductive adults. Temperature had a significant effect on resting metabolism (Q10 = 2.7); fed lizards had resting metabolism that was 22% higher than that of fasted lizards; field metabolism was positively correlated with growth rate in juveniles; and field metabolism of adults increased from spring to late summer at Desert Center by 25%, probably because of longer activity period length and slightly higher activity period body temperature. We calculated from water influx and field metabolism that juveniles allocated 18% of their metabolizable energy intake to growth and that most energy deposited into eggs was transferred from energy stores rather than ingested in the weeks prior to laying. PMID:9472817

  19. Linguistic birds : exploring cognitive abilities in zebra finches by using artificial grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Jiani

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to shed light on whether some capacities that are considered linked to, or characteristic for, language are shared between humans and nonhuman animals, which can help to understand the basic cognitive abilities from which the evolution of human language may have arisen. The

  20. Context-dependent effects of carotenoid supplementation on reproduction in zebra finches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, Mirre J. P.; Briga, Michael; Leenknegt, Bas; Verhulst, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Carotenoid-dependent sexual coloration is one of the best-studied sexual signals, but how the honesty of such signals is maintained remains uncertain. The main hypotheses focus on acquisition limits and physiological use of carotenoids in immune function and regulating oxidative stress. A hypothesis

  1. ZebRA: An overview of retinoic acid signaling during zebrafish development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarut, Eric; Fraher, Daniel; Laudet, Vincent; Gibert, Yann

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the main active vitamin A derivative, is crucial for embryo development, regulating cellular processes, embryo patterning and organogenesis. Many studies performed in mammalian or avian models have successfully undertaken the investigation of the role played by RA during embryogenesis. Since the early 1980s, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as a powerful developmental model to study the in vivo role of RA during embryogenesis. Unlike mammalian models, zebrafish embryogenesis is external, not only allowing the observation of the translucent embryo from the earliest steps but also providing an easily accessible system for pharmacological treatment or genetic approaches. Therefore, zebrafish research largely participates in deciphering the role of RA during development. This review aims at illustrating different concepts of RA signaling based on the research performed on zebrafish. Indeed, RA action relies on a multitude of cross-talk with other signaling pathways and requires a coordinated, dynamic and fine-regulation of its level and activity in both temporal and spatial dimensions. This review also highlights major advances that have been discovered using zebrafish such as the observation of the RA gradient in vivo for the first time, the effects of RA signaling in brain patterning, its role in establishing left-right asymmetry and its effects on the development of a variety of organs and tissues including the heart, blood, bone and fat. This review demonstrates that the zebrafish is a convenient and powerful model to study retinoic acid signaling during vertebrate embryogenesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development. PMID:24928143

  2. Monitoring acute equine visceral pain with the Equine Utrecht University Scale for Composite Pain Assessment (EQUUS-COMPASS) and the Equine Utrecht University Scale for Facial Assessment of Pain (EQUUS-FAP): A scale-construction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Johannes P A M; Van Dierendonck, Machteld C

    2015-12-01

    Although recognition of equine pain has been studied extensively over the past decades there is still need for improvement in objective identification of pain in horses with acute colic. This study describes scale construction and clinical applicability of the Equine Utrecht University Scale for Composite Pain Assessment (EQUUS-COMPASS) and the Equine Utrecht University Scale for Facial Assessment of Pain (EQUUS-FAP) in horses with acute colic. A cohort follow-up study was performed using 50 adult horses (n = 25 with acute colic, n = 25 controls). Composite pain scores were assessed by direct observations, Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores were assessed from video clips. Colic patients were assessed at arrival, and on the first and second mornings after arrival. Both the EQUUS-COMPASS and EQUUS-FAP scores showed high inter-observer reliability (ICC = 0.98 for EQUUS-COMPASS, ICC = 0.93 for EQUUS-FAP, P scores was found (ICC = 0.63, P <0.001). The cut-off value for differentiation between healthy and colic horses for the EQUUS-COMPASS was 5, and for differentiation between conservatively treated and surgically treated or euthanased patients it was 11. For the EQUUS-FAP, cut-off values were 4 and 6, respectively. Internal sensitivity and specificity were good for both EQUUS-COMPASS (sensitivity 95.8%, specificity 84.0%) and EQUUS-FAP (sensitivity 87.5%, specificity 88.0%). The use of the EQUUS-COMPASS and EQUUS-FAP enabled repeated and objective scoring of pain in horses with acute colic. A follow-up study with new patients and control animals will be performed to further validate the constructed scales that are described in this study.

  3. Pleistocene horses (genus Equus in the central Balkans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forsten Ann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of the fossil horses of the genus Equus from the central Balkans, a mountainous area comprising Serbia and Montenegro, is presented in this paper. The time period covered by the finds is from the late Early to and including the Late Pleistocene, but the record is not complete: the dated finds are Late Pleistocene in age, while Early and Middle Pleistocene are poorly represented. The horses found resemble those from neighbouring countries from the same time period, probably showing the importance of river valleys as migration routes. The Morava River valley runs in a roughly south-to-north direction, connecting, via the Danube and Tisa River valleys the Hungarian Pannonian Plain in the north with northern Greece in the south, via the Vardar River valley in Macedonia. In Pleistocene, large mammals, including horses, probably used this route for dispersal.

  4. Trained Quantity Abilities in Horses (Equus caballus: A Preliminary Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elena Miletto Petrazzini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Once believed to be a human prerogative, the capacity to discriminate between quantities now has also been reported in several vertebrates. To date, only two studies investigated numerical abilities in horses (Equus caballus but reported contrasting data. To assess whether horses can be trained to discriminate between quantities, I have set up a new experimental protocol using operant conditioning. One adult female was trained to discriminate between 1 and 4 (Test 1 in three different conditions: non-controlled continuous variables (numerical and continuous quantities that co-vary with number are simultaneously available, 50% controlled continuous variables (intermediate condition, and 100% controlled continuous variables (only numerical information available. The subject learned the discrimination in all conditions, showing the capacity to process numerical information. When presented with a higher numerical ratio (2 vs. 4, Test 2, the subject still discriminated between the quantities but its performance was statistically significant only in the non-controlled condition, suggesting that the subject used multiple cues in presence of a more difficult discrimination. On the whole, the results here reported encourage the use of this experimental protocol as a valid tool to investigate the capacity to process numerical and continuous quantities in horses in future research.

  5. Termites of the Genus Odontotermes are Optionally Keratophagous

    OpenAIRE

    Freymann, Bernd P.; Visser, Sara N. de; Mayemba, Emilian P.; Olff, Han

    2007-01-01

    In this study we tested experimentally whether the consumption of mammalian hooves by termites of the genus Odontotermes is a mere incidental, previously overlooked event, or whether higher termites frequently exploit hooves of ungulates as a supplementary food source. The experiment was conducted in the open woodland savanna region of Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. In total, 88 hooves of wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) and zebra (Equus burchelli) – of two age classes – were offered to...

  6. Dietary shifts: do grazers become browsers in the Thicket Biome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Landman

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The diet of buffalo (Syncerus coffer and Burchell's zebra (Equus burchelli was investigated in the Addo Elephant National Park to test the hypothesis that the shortage of grass associated with thicket vegetation results in grazers increasing the proportion of dicotyledonous plant species in their diet. Diet composition, estimated from faecal analysis, indicated that 19 and 21 plant species were identified in the faeces of zebra and buffalo, respectively. Buffalo proved to have a higher percentage dicotyledonous (28.1 vs. 8.5 and lower percentage monocotyledonous (71.9 vs. 91.5 species in their diet than zebra. The grass Eragrostis curvula was found to be the dominant food item for both buffalo (18 of diet and zebra (39 of diet during the period of study. The present study indicated that a great proportion of the buffalo diet does in fact consist of grass, thereby refuting the perception that the Addo buffalo are primarily browsers. Both buffalo and zebra are specialised grazers and unsuited to a diet of browse. The probability of dietary shift by these grazers in the grass limited thicket vegetation is therefore challenged.

  7. Learning of Monotonic and Nonmonotonic Sequences in Domesticated Horses ("Equus Callabus") and Chickens ("Gallus Domesticus")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundey, Shannon M. A.; Strandell, Brittany; Mathis, Heather; Rowan, James D.

    2010-01-01

    (Hulse and Dorsky, 1977) and (Hulse and Dorsky, 1979) found that rats, like humans, learn sequences following a simple rule-based structure more quickly than those lacking a rule-based structure. Through two experiments, we explored whether two additional species--domesticated horses ("Equus callabus") and chickens ("Gallus domesticus")--would…

  8. Mapping Equus kiang (Tibetan Wild Ass) Habitat in Surkhang, Upper Mustang, Nepal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, B.D.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Graaf, de N.R.; Chapagain, N.R.

    2004-01-01

    The present paper describes land cover classification and habitat mapping for the Tibetan wild ass (Equus kiang), also commonly known as kiang, in the Surkhang VDC, Upper Mustang, Nepal. Remote sensing techniques were applied for this classification, employing an ASTER satellite image from October 2

  9. Monitoring acute equine visceral pain with the Equine Utrecht University Scale for Composite Pain Assessment (EQUUS-COMPASS) and the Equine Utrecht University Scale for Facial Assessment of Pain (EQUUS-FAP): A validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDierendonck, Machteld C; van Loon, Johannes P A M

    2016-10-01

    This study presents the validation of two recently described pain scales, the Equine Utrecht University Scale for Composite Pain Assessment (EQUUS-COMPASS) and the Equine Utrecht University Scale for Facial Assessment of Pain (EQUUS-FAP), in horses with acute colic. A follow-up cohort study of 46 adult horses (n = 23 with acute colic; n = 23 healthy control horses) was performed for validation and refinement of the constructed scales. Both pain scales showed statistically significant differences between horses with colic and healthy control horses, and between horses with colic that could be treated conservatively and those that required surgical treatment or were euthanased. Sensitivity and specificity were good for both EQUUS-COMPASS (87% and 71%, respectively) and EQUUS-FAP (77% and 100%, respectively) and were not substantially influenced by applying weighting factors to the individual parameters. PMID:27687948

  10. The songbird syrinx morphome: a three-dimensional, high-resolution, interactive morphological map of the zebra finch vocal organ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    During, D. N.; Ziegler, A.; Thompson, C. K.;

    2013-01-01

    neural impulses are translated into the precise motor behavior of the complex vocal organ (syrinx) to create song is poorly understood. First and foremost, we lack a detailed understanding of syringeal morphology. Results: To fill this gap we combined non-invasive (high-field magnetic resonance imaging...... in unprecedented detail. We provide interactive three-dimensional models that greatly improve the communication of complex morphological data and our understanding of syringeal function in general. Conclusions: Our results show that the syringeal skeleton is optimized for low weight driven by physiological...... constraints on song production. The present refinement of muscle organization and identity elucidates how apposed muscles actuate different syringeal elements. Our dataset allows for more precise predictions about muscle co-activation and synergies and has important implications for muscle activity...

  11. Long-term stability of grazing lawns in a small protected area, the Mountain Zebra National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Novellie

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We examined a heavily grazed plant community dominated by creeping grass species with the aim of, (1 determining its response to the exclusion of grazing and (2 its long-term persistence. This plant community was particularly favoured by wild ungulate species that prefer short grasses – blesbok (Damaliscus dorcas phillipsi, springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis and black wildebeest (Connochaetes gnou. Exclusion of grazing by large herbivores by means of fencing resulted in the virtual disappearance of the creeping grasses and their replacement by tall tufted species. On plots that remained unfenced, the plant species composition was found to be little changed after an interval of more than 20 years. The number large stock unit equivalents (LSU per ha carried by the plant community was used as a proxy for grazing intensity. Monitored for approximately 2 years at the start of the study, LSU per ha was found to greatly exceed levels recommended for commercial livestock production. This plant community conforms to a recently published definition of a grazing lawn, in that intense grazing promotes palatable, grazing-tolerant grass species.Conservation implications: The positive association between grazers and grazing-tolerant grass species evidently persisted for more than 20 years and there was no evidence of an increase in abundance of unpalatable plant species. Despite the small size of the park, which limited the extent of large herbivore movements, localised heavy grazing did not lead to range degradation.

  12. Effects of early developmental conditions on innate immunity are only evident under favourable adult conditions in zebra finches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Coster, Greet; Verhulst, Simon; Koetsier, Egbert; De Neve, Liesbeth; Briga, Michael; Lens, Luc; Thatje, Sven

    2011-01-01

    Long-term effects of unfavourable conditions during development can be expected to depend on the quality of the environment experienced by the same individuals during adulthood. Yet, in the majority of studies, long-term effects of early developmental conditions have been assessed under favourable a

  13. The Freshwater Mussels of the Lower Missisquoi River: Current Status and the Potential for a Refugium from Zebra Mussel Impacts

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The lower portion of the Missisquoi River main stem, from the delta at Lake Champlain to the principle fall line at Highgate Falls was intensively surveyed in 1998...

  14. Toxicological Effects Induced by Silver Nanoparticles in Zebra Fish (Danio Rerio) and in the Bacteria Communities Living at Their Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchetta, Carla; López, Gerardo; Pagano, Gisela; Muratt, Diana Tomazi; de Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Monserrat, José María

    2016-10-01

    The antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) makes them useful in a wide range of products although their environmental impact is still uncertain. The main goal of this study was to evaluate short-term effects induced by AgNP on gills oxidative status and bacterial communities living at the skin mucus of zebrafish. Both the number of bacteria colony forming units and bacteria growth obtained from skin mucus were lower in all concentrations tested (25, 50 and 100 µg nAg/L). Besides, AgNP exposure caused a significant decrease in bacteria growth in zebrafish exposed to 100 µg nAg/L. AgNP accumulated in zebrafish gills at both highest concentrations tested, but this accumulation did not appear to result in oxidative stress. Overall the results indicated toxicological effects of AgNP on bacteria communities living at the zebrafish mucus surface. Although silver accumulation was verified in gills, no evidence of toxicity in terms of oxidative stress was found.

  15. A newly discovered superoantero-orbital sinus connecting to the interaural canal may play a role in zebra finch hearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth Kragh; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Suthers, Roderick A.;

    The middle ears of birds are acoustically connected through an air-filled pathway, the interaural canal (IAC), which allows sound to propagate internally from one ear to the other and considerably enhance the cues for directional hearing. The enhancement of the directional cues depends on the amp......The middle ears of birds are acoustically connected through an air-filled pathway, the interaural canal (IAC), which allows sound to propagate internally from one ear to the other and considerably enhance the cues for directional hearing. The enhancement of the directional cues depends...... medium. Six out of seven individuals showed an effect of filling the SAOS or the IMT on directionality and overall auditory sensitivity. The SAOS therefore does seem to have an effect on gain and delay in the interaural canal as well as on auditory sensitivity. The effect, however, was complex and either...

  16. Short communication. Evaluation of presumptive caudal fin blastema cells as candidate donors in intra species zebra fish (Danio rerio) chimaeras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Camps, M.; Francisco Simao, M.; Cardona Costa, J.; Garcia-Ximenez, F.

    2008-07-01

    The blastema is a regenerative tissue with remarkable pluripotency. The aim of this work done on zebrafish (Danio rerio) was to define technical procedures required for obtaining and integrating blastema cells into embryos at the mid blastula transition stage (MBT) and the effect on survival, as well as the capacity to produce pigmented chimaeras. Wild type blastema cells were injected into gold type MBT embryos (E). Wild MBT blastomere cells were also injected into gold type MBT embryos as a control (C{sub 1}). A second control group, C{sub 2}, was not subjected to any manipulation. Survival was evaluated at 24, 48 and 72 h after performing the chimaerism, and the rate of adult chimaeras evaluated. The results showed significant differences in embryo survival between the E and C{sub 1} groups in embryo survival at 24 and 48 h postchimaerism (24 h: E-83.49% vs C{sub 1}-54.8%, p < 0.05; 48 h: E-98.83% vs C{sub 1}-85.13%, p < 0.05). There was no significant difference, at any time, between E and C{sub 2}. The results at 72 h for E and the controls (E-89.41%; C{sub 1}-84.12% and C{sub 2}-92.55%) indicate that insertion of blastema cells does not have a negative effect on embryo development. The results in adults (E: 0 chimaeras from 7 specimens; C{sub 1}: 5 chimaeras from 17 specimens) suggest that the dedifferentiation grade of the blastema cells may not be enough to generate germ-line chimaeras, but their condition of potentially dedifferentiating cells may be an advantage when using them as donor nuclei in somatic cloning by nuclear transplant. Additional key words: biodiversity, chimaerism, embryo, zebrafish. (Author) 19 refs.

  17. Nutrition and peer group composition in early adolescence: impacts on male song and female preference in zebra finches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honarmand, M.; Riebel, K.; Naguib, M.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that learning processes contribute to variation in sexually selected traits, but their potential condition dependence is poorly understood. Birdsong is a learned, culturally transmitted mating signal where suboptimal developmental conditions impair song development, thus

  18. Characterization of Synaptically Connected Nuclei in a Potential Sensorimotor Feedback Pathway in the Zebra Finch Song System

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Shayna M; Alexis Nast; Melissa J Coleman

    2012-01-01

    Birdsong is a learned behavior that is controlled by a group of identified nuclei, known collectively as the song system. The cortical nucleus HVC (used as a proper name) is a focal point of many investigations as it is necessary for song production, song learning, and receives selective auditory information. HVC receives input from several sources including the cortical area MMAN (medial magnocellular nucleus of the nidopallium). The MMAN to HVC connection is particularly interesting as it p...

  19. THE ROLE OF SEXUAL IMPRINTING FOR SEX RECOGNITION IN ZEBRA FINCHES - A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MALES AND FEMALES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VOS, DR

    1995-01-01

    In sexually dimorphic birds, morphological characteristics are assumed to play an important role in conspecific sex recognition. In spite of the limited evidence, most studies done so far support this assumption. Less attention has been given to the question of how adult birds may have acquired the

  20. Laboratory mating trials indicate incipient speciation by sexual selection among populations of the cichlid fish Pseudotropheus zebra from Lake Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Mairi E.; Turner, George F.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that sexual selection may have played a major role in the rapid evolution of hundreds of species of cichlid fishes in Lake Malawi. We report the results of a laboratory test of assortative mating among Lake Malawi cichlid fishes from five closely related geographical populations differing in male courtship colour. Paternity of clutches was tested using microsatellite DNA typing of offspring. Out of 1955 offspring typed, 1296 (66.3%) were sired by the male from the same population as the female, which is more than three times the rate expected if females do not differentiate among males of the different populations (20%). This result indicates that mate preferences of geographical races are strongly differentiated, consistent with the races representing incipient geographical species diverging under sexual selection exerted by female preferences for different male courtship colours. PMID:15209099

  1. Toxicological Effects Induced by Silver Nanoparticles in Zebra Fish (Danio Rerio) and in the Bacteria Communities Living at Their Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchetta, Carla; López, Gerardo; Pagano, Gisela; Muratt, Diana Tomazi; de Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Monserrat, José María

    2016-10-01

    The antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) makes them useful in a wide range of products although their environmental impact is still uncertain. The main goal of this study was to evaluate short-term effects induced by AgNP on gills oxidative status and bacterial communities living at the skin mucus of zebrafish. Both the number of bacteria colony forming units and bacteria growth obtained from skin mucus were lower in all concentrations tested (25, 50 and 100 µg nAg/L). Besides, AgNP exposure caused a significant decrease in bacteria growth in zebrafish exposed to 100 µg nAg/L. AgNP accumulated in zebrafish gills at both highest concentrations tested, but this accumulation did not appear to result in oxidative stress. Overall the results indicated toxicological effects of AgNP on bacteria communities living at the zebrafish mucus surface. Although silver accumulation was verified in gills, no evidence of toxicity in terms of oxidative stress was found. PMID:27393328

  2. A Study of the Survival and Oxygen Deficiency at the Zebra Mussel (Dreissena polymorpha Treated with Zinc (Zn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan N. Nikolov

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The current paper studies the change of respiratory rate and survival of Dreissena polymorpha at short exposure to zinc under laboratory conditions. The experiment is lasted 96h and three different concentrations of ZnSO4.7H2O were used - 0.5mg/l, 1.5mg/l; 2,0 mg/l. Survival and intensity of breathing of Dreissena polymorpha decreases with the increasing concentration of zinc in the water.

  3. Sequencing and expression analysis of hepcidin mRNA in donkey (Equus asinus) liver

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira-Filho, José P; Jessica A. Marques; Paulo Henrique J. Cunha; Gildenor X. Medeiros; Franklin Riet-Correa; Machado, Vânia Maria V.; Borges, Alexandre S.

    2012-01-01

    The hypoferremia that is observed during systemic inflammatory processes is mediated by hepcidin, which is a peptide that is mainly synthesized in the livers of several mammalian species. Hepcidin plays a key role in iron metabolism and in the innate immune system. It's up-regulation is particularly useful during acute inflammation, and it restricts the iron availability that is necessary for the growth of pathogenic microorganisms. In this study, the hepcidin mRNA of Equus asinus has been ch...

  4. Immunocontraception in Wild Horses (Equus caballus) Extends Reproductive Cycling Beyond the Normal Breeding Season

    OpenAIRE

    Nuñez, Cassandra M. V.; Adelman, James S.; Rubenstein, Daniel I.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although the physiological effects of immunocontraceptive treatment with porcine zona pellucida (PZP) have been well studied, little is known about PZP's effects on the scheduling of reproductive cycling. Recent behavioral research has suggested that recipients of PZP extend the receptive breeding period into what is normally the non-breeding season. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine if this is the case, we compiled foaling data from wild horses (Equus caballus) living ...

  5. Challenges faced in the conservation of rare antelope: a case study on the northern basalt plains of the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Grant

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The conservation of rare antelope has long been one of the goals of the Kruger National Park. The roan antelope Hippotragus equinus, and to a lesser extent the tsessebe Damaliscus lunatus, represent low-density species or rare antelope in the park. Specific management approaches representing the older equilibrium approach, have been employed to conserve these antelope. Of these, the supply of artificial water over many decades was the most resource intensive. The sudden, severe drop in the roan antelope population towards the end of the 1980s was unexpected and, retrospectively, attributed to the development of a high density of perennial waterpoints. The postulated mechanism was that the perennial presence of water allowed Burchell’s zebra Equus burchelli to stay permanently in an area that was previously only seasonally accessible. The combined effect of a long, dry climatic cycle, high numbers of zebra and their associated predators was proposed to be the cause of this decline. As part of the new nature evolving or ecosystem resilience approach, twelve artificial waterpoints were closed in the prime roan antelope habitat in 1994 in an attempt to move the zebra out of this area. The zebra numbers declined as the rainfall increased. Closure of waterholes clearly led to redistribution of zebra numbers on the northern plains, zebra tending to avoid areas within several kilometres of closed waterpoints. However, at a larger scale, regional densities appeared similar in areas with and without closed waterpoints. There was an initial drop in the lion numbers in 1995, after which they stabilised. In spite of an improvement in the grass species composition and an increase in biomass the roan antelope population did not increase. The complexity of maintaining a population at the edge of their distribution and the problems associated with the conservation of such populations are discussed in terms of management options and monitoring approaches that

  6. PCR Identification for Equus przewalsrii Species%普氏野马物种的PCR鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑小龙; 王群; 岳志芹; 朱来华; 梁成珠; 邓明俊; 肖西志; 姜帆; 于业锋

    2013-01-01

    为建立鉴定普氏野马的PCR方法,根据线粒体D-Loop区序列,设计了针对普氏野马的特异性扩增引物,通过优化反应体系和扩增条件,建立了能够鉴定普氏野马的PCR方法。该方法检测灵敏度较高,可扩增10-3 ng的DNA ,与蒙古马、伊犁马、哈萨克马、阿拉伯马、驴、骡、牛和羊等动物均不发生交叉反应,具有很好的特异性。结果表明,建立的普氏野马物种鉴定的PCR方法特异性好,灵敏度较高,简单可靠,可作为普氏野马的一种有效鉴定方法,对普氏野马的保护起到重要的作用。%To develop the species-specific PCR assay for the identification of Equus przewalsrii ,primers were designed from mitochondria D-loop region after alignment of the available sequences in the GenBank database .The primers generated specific fragments of 315 bp length for Equus przewalsrii .The results showed that the PCR was established .The sensitivity analysis showed that the developed PCR could detect 10-3 ng DNA ,and no cross reaction with Mongolia horse ,Ili horse ,Kazakh horse ,Arabian horse ,Don-key ,Mule ,Bovine and Ovine .The results demonstrated that this species-specific PCR provided a useful , specific ,sensitive and simple technique to identify Equus przewalsrii .This assay could play an important role in conservation of Equus p rz ew alsrii .

  7. Perceived conflicts between pastoralism and conservation of the Kiang Equus kiang in the Ladakh Trans-Himalaya, India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhatnagar, Y.V.; Wangchuk, R.; Prins, H.H.T.; Wieren, van S.E.; Mishra, C.

    2006-01-01

    An emerging conflict with Trans-Himalayan pastoral communities in Ladakh¿s Changthang Plateau threatens the conservation prospects of the kiang (Equus kiang) in India. It is locally believed that Changthang¿s rangelands are overstocked with kiang, resulting in forage competition with livestock. Here

  8. Sequencing and expression analysis of hepcidin mRNA in donkey (Equus asinus liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José P. Oliveira-Filho

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The hypoferremia that is observed during systemic inflammatory processes is mediated by hepcidin, which is a peptide that is mainly synthesized in the livers of several mammalian species. Hepcidin plays a key role in iron metabolism and in the innate immune system. It's up-regulation is particularly useful during acute inflammation, and it restricts the iron availability that is necessary for the growth of pathogenic microorganisms. In this study, the hepcidin mRNA of Equus asinus has been characterized, and the expression of donkey hepcidin in the liver has been determined. The donkey hepcidin sequence has an open reading frame (ORF of 261 nucleotides, and the deduced corresponding protein sequence has 86 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of donkey hepcidin was most homologous to Equus caballus (98%. The mature donkey hepcidin sequence (25 amino acids was 100% homologous to the equine mature hepcidin and has eight conserved cysteine residues that are found in all of the investigated hepcidin sequences. The expression profile of donkey hepcidin in the liver was high and was similar to the reference gene expression. The donkey hepcidin sequence was deposited in GenBankTM (HQ902884 and may be useful for additional studies on iron metabolism and the inflammatory process in this species.

  9. Groundwater-level and storage-volume changes in the Equus Beds aquifer near Wichita, Kansas, predevelopment through January 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whisnant, Joshua A.; Hansen, Cristi V.; Eslick, Patrick J.

    2015-10-01

    Development of the Wichita well field began in the 1940s in the Equus Beds aquifer to provide the city of Wichita, Kansas, a new water-supply source. After development of the Wichita well field began, groundwater levels began to decline. Extensive development of irrigation wells that began in the 1970s also contributed to substantial groundwater-level declines. Groundwater-level declines likely enhance movement of brine from past oil and gas production near Burrton, Kansas, and natural saline water from the Arkansas River into the Wichita well field. Groundwater levels reached a historical minimum in 1993 because of drought conditions, irrigation, and the city of Wichita’s withdrawals from the aquifer. In 1993, the city of Wichita adopted the Integrated Local Water Supply Program to ensure that Wichita’s water needs would be met through the year 2050 and beyond as part of its efforts to manage the part of the Equus Beds aquifer Wichita uses. A key component of the Integrated Local Water Supply Program was the Equus Beds Aquifer Storage and Recovery project. The Aquifer Storage and Recovery project’s goal is to store and eventually recover groundwater and help protect the Equus Beds aquifer from oil-field brine water near Burrton, Kansas, and saline water from the Arkansas River. Since 1940, the U.S. Geological Survey has monitored groundwater levels and storage-volume changes in the Equus Beds aquifer to provide data to the city of Wichita in order to better manage its water supply.

  10. Status of groundwater levels and storage volume in the Equus Beds aquifer near Wichita, Kansas, 2012 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Cristi V.; Whisnant, Joshua A.; Lanning-Rush, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Development of the Wichita well field in the Equus Beds aquifer in southwest Harvey County and northwest Sedgwick County began in the 1940s to supply water to the city of Wichita. The decline of water levels in the Equus Beds aquifer was noted soon after the development of the Wichita well field began. Development of irrigation wells began in the 1960s. City and agricultural withdrawals led to substantial water-level declines. Water-level declines likely enhanced movement of brines from past oil and gas activities near Burrton, Kansas, as well as natural saline water from the Arkansas River into the Wichita well field area. Large chloride concentrations may limit use, or require the treatment of water from the well field for irrigation or public supply. In 1993, the city of Wichita adopted the Integrated Local Water Supply Program to ensure an adequate water supply for the city through 2050 and manage effectively the part of the Equus Beds aquifer Wichita uses. The Integrated Local Water Supply Program uses several strategies to do this, including the Equus Beds Aquifer Storage and Recovery project. The purpose of the Aquifer Storage and Recovery project is to store water in the aquifer for later recovery, and help protect the aquifer from encroachment of a known oil-field-brine plume near Burrton and saline water from the Arkansas River. Since 1940, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Wichita, has monitored changes in the Equus Beds aquifer as part of Wichita’s effort to manage this resource effectively.

  11. Characteristics of the herbaceous layer in preferred grazing areas of six herbivore species in the south-eastern Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Wentzel

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available The phytomass and species composition of the herbaceous layer in preferred grazing areas of zebra Equus burchellii, buffalo Syncerus caffer, waterbuck Kobus ellipsiprymnus, blue wildebeest Connochaetes taurinus, impala Aepyceros melampus and warthog Phacochoerusaethiopicus were investigated within the south-eastern portion of the Kruger National Park. The percentage frequency of herbaceous plants in Decreaser and Increaser categories, as determined by their reaction to different intensities of grazing, was established. The preferred grazing areas of the relevant herbivore species were compared in terms of phytomass, contribution of the Decreaser and Increaser categories, veld condition and degree of utilisation. The grazing areas of buffalo and zebra showed less utilisation than those of the other herbivore species. Warthog and impala were associated with over-utilised areas. It is clear that localised over-utilisation is an integral part of the natural grazing mosaic and should be managed as such in large African conservation areas.

  12. Inoculação experimental de Equus asinus com Leishmania chagasi Cunha & Chagas, 1937 Experimental infection of Equus asinus with Leishmania chagasi Cunha & Chagas, 1937

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elúzio José Lima Cerqueira

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Quatro Equus asinus foram inoculados com promastigotas de Leishmania chagasi Cunha & Chagas, 1937 e acompanhados durante 12 meses através de: pesquisa de amastigotas em esfregaços e culturas de sangue periférico em fragmentos de tecido do lábio inferior, medula óssea, baço e fígado e de testes de ELISA e TRALd. Estes foram positivos nos 8º, 10º e 12º meses após a inoculação. O exame histopatológico pós necropsia, demonstrou discreto número de amastigotas no fígado de dois dos eqüídeos inoculados. Apesar de desafiados com elevado número de promastigotas, os animais não desenvolveram infecções patentes e não infectaram experimentalmente a vetora Lutzomya longipalpis. Os resultados induzem a acreditar que os eqüídeos são desprovidos de importância como reservatórios na cadeia de transmissão da leishmaniose visceral, embora sirvam como boa fonte de alimentação sangüínea e proliferação da vetora Lutzomyia longipalpis.Four Equus asinus were challenged with promastigotes of Leishmania chagasi Cunha & Chagas, 1937, and followed up for 12 months. They were observed by means of direct testing for promastigotes in smears and culture of peripheral blood, fragments from inferior lip, bone marrow, spleen and liver and the immunological assays ELISA and TRALd. The post-necropsy histological examination demonstrated a small number of amastigotes in the liver of two animals. ELISA and TRALd tests were positive at the 8th, 10th and 12th month after inoculation. The results suggest that the donkeys were able to overcome the experimental leishmanial infection and did not infect the vector Lutzomyia longipalpis in the laboratory. Consequently they can not be considered an important reservoir in the epidemiological chain of transmission of visceral leishmaniasis, although they represent an important blood source for the vector and its proliferation.

  13. Presencia de Hippidion y Equus (Amerhippus (Mammalia, Perissodactyla y su distribución en el Pleistoceno superior de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frassinetti, D.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Fossil remains belonging to Equidae fram Chilean localities are described and taxonomically determined. Equus (Amerhippus and Hippidion species are identified; its geographic distribution in Chile and relations with others South American Equidae are given; a Late Pleistocene age is regarded for them. Stratigraphic and paleoecological considerations are also included.Se describen y sitúan taxonómicamente los restos de équidos de las localidades chilenas. Se identifican distintas especies de Equus (Amerhippus e Hippidion, señalando su distribución geográfica y relaciones con otros équidos sudamericanos, además de referirlos al Pleistoceno superior. Se analiza su situación estratigráfica así como consideraciones de tipo paleoecológico.

  14. Evidence of heterospecific referential communication from domestic horses (Equus caballus) to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavasi, Rachele; Huber, Ludwig

    2016-09-01

    Referential communication occurs when a sender elaborates its gestures to direct the attention of a recipient to its role in pursuit of the desired goal, e.g. by pointing or showing an object, thereby informing the recipient what it wants. If the gesture is successful, the sender and the recipient focus their attention simultaneously on a third entity, the target. Here we investigated the ability of domestic horses (Equus caballus) to communicate referentially with a human observer about the location of a desired target, a bucket of food out of reach. In order to test six operational criteria of referential communication, we manipulated the recipient's (experimenter) attentional state in four experimental conditions: frontally oriented, backward oriented, walking away from the arena and frontally oriented with other helpers present in the arena. The rate of gaze alternation was higher in the frontally oriented condition than in all the others. The horses appeared to use both indicative (pointing) and non-indicative (nods and shakes) head gestures in the relevant test conditions. Horses also elaborated their communication by switching from a visual to a tactile signal and demonstrated perseverance in their communication. The results of the tests revealed that horses used referential gestures to manipulate the attention of a human recipient so to obtain an unreachable resource. These are the first such findings in an ungulate species. PMID:27098164

  15. Horse sense: social status of horses (Equus caballus) affects their likelihood of copying other horses' behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Konstanze; Heinze, Jürgen

    2008-07-01

    Animals that live in stable social groups need to gather information on their own relative position in the group's social hierarchy, by either directly threatening or by challenging others, or indirectly and in a less perilous manner , by observing interactions among others. Indirect inference of dominance relationships has previously been reported from primates, rats, birds, and fish. Here, we show that domestic horses, Equus caballus, are similarly capable of social cognition. Taking advantage of a specific "following behavior" that horses show towards humans in a riding arena, we investigated whether bystander horses adjust their response to an experimenter according to the observed interaction and their own dominance relationship with the horse whose reaction to the experimenter they had observed before. Horses copied the "following behavior" towards an experimenter after watching a dominant horse following but did not follow after observing a subordinate horse or a horse from another social group doing so. The "following behavior," which horses show towards an experimenter, therefore appears to be affected by the demonstrator's behavior and social status relative to the observer.

  16. Evidence of heterospecific referential communication from domestic horses (Equus caballus) to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavasi, Rachele; Huber, Ludwig

    2016-09-01

    Referential communication occurs when a sender elaborates its gestures to direct the attention of a recipient to its role in pursuit of the desired goal, e.g. by pointing or showing an object, thereby informing the recipient what it wants. If the gesture is successful, the sender and the recipient focus their attention simultaneously on a third entity, the target. Here we investigated the ability of domestic horses (Equus caballus) to communicate referentially with a human observer about the location of a desired target, a bucket of food out of reach. In order to test six operational criteria of referential communication, we manipulated the recipient's (experimenter) attentional state in four experimental conditions: frontally oriented, backward oriented, walking away from the arena and frontally oriented with other helpers present in the arena. The rate of gaze alternation was higher in the frontally oriented condition than in all the others. The horses appeared to use both indicative (pointing) and non-indicative (nods and shakes) head gestures in the relevant test conditions. Horses also elaborated their communication by switching from a visual to a tactile signal and demonstrated perseverance in their communication. The results of the tests revealed that horses used referential gestures to manipulate the attention of a human recipient so to obtain an unreachable resource. These are the first such findings in an ungulate species.

  17. Pollen analysis of hyena coprolites and sediments from Equus Cave, Taung, southern Kalahari (South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Louis

    1987-07-01

    Equus Cave, in Quaternary tufa near Taung in the semiarid woodland of the southern Kalahari, yielded 2.5 m of sediment in which a rich assemblage of bones and coprolites was preserved. The fossils were accumulated mainly by hyenas during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. Pollen from coprolites reflects diet as well as vegetation over relatively large areas visited by hyenas, while pollen from sediments represents more local sources. The pollen sequence derived from coprolites and sediments demonstrates how the vegetation evolved from open grassland with small shrubs and occasional trees during the late Pleistocene, to open savanna with more small shurbs, then, during the last 7500 yr, to modern savanna. Temperatures were not more than 4°C cooler and it was slightly moister than today during the late Pleistocene phase; it became gradually warmer but relatively dry before optimal temperature and moisture conditions developed around 7500 yr B.P. Climatic conditions slightly less favorable for woodland occurred during part of the late Holocene.

  18. Optimization of Baking Process for Equus asinus%阿胶烘制工艺优选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张振凌; 汪坤

    2012-01-01

    目的:优选阿胶烘制工艺.方法:以阿胶珠中4种氨基酸的含量为指标,采用HPLC测定指标成分含量,选取烘制温度、时间及阿胶丁大小为考察因素,正交试验法优选阿胶烘制工艺.结果:阿胶最佳烘制工艺条件为1.27cm×0.88 cm×0.6 cm的阿胶丁在180℃烘制15 min.结论:该优选工艺简单可控、操作性强、适合大规模生产.%Objective: To optimize baking process of Equus asinus. Method; With the cotents of 4 kinds of amino acid as indexes, which was determined by HPLC, baking process of E. asinus was optimized by orthogonal test with baking time, baking temperature and size of E. asinus as factors. Result: Optimum baking process was; size of E. asinus 1. 27 cm xO. 88 cm x 0. 6 cm, baked 15 min at 180 癈 . Conclusion; Optimized process was simple, controllable, operable, and suitable for mass production

  19. Sex preferences in Jeju pony foals (Equus caballus) for mutual grooming and play-fighting behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Jeong Rae; Srygley, Robert Baxter; Choe, Jae Chun

    2007-08-01

    We investigated mutual grooming by Jeju pony (Equus caballus) foals to determine whether male foals preferentially interact with potential future sexual partners or competitors. We predicted that relative to female foals, male foals would exchange grooming more frequently with young mares and that in general, foals would mutually groom more frequently with the opposite sex rather than the same sex. Observing 53 foals between April and October 1998, we recorded 113 mutual grooming events. Male foals exchanged grooming with yearling mares more frequently than with their mother, while female foals exchanged grooming with their mother more frequently than with yearling mares. Contrary to the prediction, foals were not more likely to mutually groom with a foal of the opposite sex than with a foal of the same sex. In our study, 21 instances of play-fighting behavior followed mutual grooming between peers. Relative to intersexual grooming events, play-fighting was more likely to follow intrasexual mutual grooming, and male foals were much more likely to play fight than female foals. These results provide evidence that Jeju pony foals develop and maintain social relationships at the earliest stage of their lives. We suggest that early social experiences might influence social bonding later when the male foal begins to form a harem after separation from its mother.

  20. 河南灵井许昌人遗址普通马(Equus caballus)化石居群的死亡年龄曲线%Mortality Curves for Horses(Equus Caballus) from the Lingjing Site, Henan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李占扬; 张双权; 张乐; 高星

    2011-01-01

    普通马(Equus caballus)是河南灵井许昌人遗址动物群中的一个优势属种.本文基于这一动物属种牙齿材料的测量与分析,初步完成了普通马个体死亡年龄的计算及其化石居群的生命表构建,并与世界范围内多个动物群的相关材料进行了对比研究.该动物群普通马化石材料的死亡年龄曲线反映了这一时期古人类以普通马居群中的壮年个体为主要狩猎目标的选择性生存策略和狩猎能力.%Horse (Equus caballus) is one of the dominant species of the faunal assemblage from the Lingjing site, Henan Province. Based on dental remains of this animal, this paper tabulated the death ages of various individuals and further constructes the life tables for the populations of this species. Some comparative studies were also conducted between fossil materials from the site and other related faunal assemblages from around the world. The mortality curves for horses from the Lingjing Site clearly indicate that adult horses were preferentially hunted by the hominids who frequented the site.

  1. COMPARISON OF CHEMICAL AND SURGICAL VASECTOMY ON TESTICULAR ACTIVITY IN FREE-ROAMING HORSES (EQUUS CABALLUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Clare M; Lee, Rebecca L; Pielstick, Leon; Medlock, Jan; Patton, Kristin M; Collins, Gail H; Kutzler, Michelle A

    2015-12-01

    Free-roaming horse (Equus caballus) management is a complex issue incorporating social, economic, emotional, political, and environmental factors. Currently, few proven field techniques exist for managing free-roaming horse population growth, which can reach 20-25% annually. Although there are several strategies available for sterilizing mares when managing free-roaming horse populations, surgical vasectomy is the only method used in the field for stallions. Some managers believe that surgically vasectomizing dominant stallions would have significant effects on reducing horse populations. However, sterilizing only dominant harem stallions results in a relatively modest reduction in population growth as substantial reproduction may occur even when 100% of the dominant harem stallions are sterilized if other males perform as little as 10% of the breeding. The overall goal of the current project was to evaluate the efficacy of a novel nonsurgical method for sterilizing free-roaming horses (chemical vasectomy). In September of 2013, stallions that had been previously surgically vasectomized (SURG, n = 25), previously chemically vasectomized (CHEM, n = 16), or untreated (CONT, n = 32) were captured and surgically castrated in preparation for adoption. When comparing both sterilization methods to CONT, serum testosterone and estrone sulfate concentrations did not differ (P > 0.05), suggesting that these methods for sterilizing free-roaming stallions would not disrupt herd social hierarchy. However, similar to the CONT, all CHEM stallions had sperm present within the vas deferens seminal fluid samples. CHEM stallions had more morphologically abnormal sperm than did CONT stallions but it is not known if this affected the actual fertility. Additional research is needed using alternative sclerosing agents for chemical vasectomy in free-roaming horse populations. PMID:26667538

  2. Immunocontraception in wild horses (Equus caballus extends reproductive cycling beyond the normal breeding season.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra M V Nuñez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the physiological effects of immunocontraceptive treatment with porcine zona pellucida (PZP have been well studied, little is known about PZP's effects on the scheduling of reproductive cycling. Recent behavioral research has suggested that recipients of PZP extend the receptive breeding period into what is normally the non-breeding season. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine if this is the case, we compiled foaling data from wild horses (Equus caballus living on Shackleford Banks, North Carolina for 4 years pre- and 8 years post-contraception management with PZP (pre-contraception, n = 65 births from 45 mares; post-contraception, n = 97 births from 46 mares. Gestation lasts approximately 11-12 months in wild horses, placing conception at approximately 11.5 months prior to birth. Since the contraception program began in January 2000, foaling has occurred over a significantly broader range than it had before the contraception program. Foaling in PZP recipients (n = 45 births from 27 mares has consistently occurred over a broader range than has foaling in non-recipients (n = 52 births from 19 mares. In addition, current recipients of PZP foaled later in the year than did prior recipient and non-recipient mares. Females receiving more consecutive PZP applications gave birth later in the season than did females receiving fewer applications. Finally, the efficacy of PZP declined with increasing consecutive applications before reaching 100% after five consecutive applications. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: For a gregarious species such as the horse, the extension of reproductive cycling into the fall months has important social consequences, including decreased group stability and the extension of male reproductive behavior. In addition, reproductive cycling into the fall months could have long-term effects on foal survivorship. Managers should consider these factors before enacting immunocontraceptive programs in new

  3. Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence in donkeys (Equus asinus) from the U.S.A. and isolation of T. gondii from cats on donkey farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkeys (Equus asinus) are used as companion animals, in leisure activities as working animals, for onotherapy, and their meat and milk is used for human consumption in certain countries. Here we report first serological survey for Toxoplasma gondii in donkeys in the U.S.A. Serum samples were collec...

  4. Plasma reactive oxygen metabolites and non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity are not affected by an acute increase of metabolic rate in zebra finches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beamonte Barrientos, Rene; Verhulst, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the sources of variation in oxidative stress level is a challenging issue due to the implications of oxidative stress for late age diseases, longevity and life-history trade-offs. Reactive oxygen species that cause oxidative stress are mostly a by-product of energy metabolism and it is

  5. Testing of five methods for the control of zebra mussels in cooling circuits of power plants located on the Moselle river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioassays have been conducted on site at the Cattenom nuclear power plant located on the Moselle River (in northeast France) to control mussels in auxiliary plant circuits. During the course of a two-year program, five methods were tested: - thermal treatment (33 deg to 40 deg C), - high dosage chlorination (> 50 ppm), - low dosage chlorine dioxide, - potassium salt (KCI > 100 ppm), - one organic compound (Mexel 432). This note presents a comparison of the treatments shown to be most effective, on the basis of technical feasibility, cost and environmental acceptability. (author). 8 figs., 10 refs., 3 tabs

  6. 午夜斑马线 杭州环球MUSE酒吧%APPLYING ZEBRA STRIPE INTO DESIGN, MUSE CLUB IN HANGZHOU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐岭啸(设计); 汤浩隽(设计); 顾原涌(设计); 孙桢(设计); 缪菁

    2012-01-01

    杭州环球MUSE酒吧坐落于杭州CBD中心,西湖文化广场环球中心的四楼。宽敞的广场入口,漂亮的观光电梯,超大的停车场,优越的外环境奠定了它成为杭城一流夜店的资本。1500m2的空间内设有时尚酒吧、VIP包厢、私人会所等多个营业区域,

  7. The Case of a Zebra That Was Misdiagnosed as a Horse: Pulmonary Tumor Thrombotic Microangiopathy, a New Paraneoplastic Syndrome, Mimicking PD-1-Induced Pneumonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Corey A.; Browning, Robert; Oronsky, Bryan T.; Scicinski, Jan J.; Brzezniak, Christina

    2016-01-01

    A case report of a 47-year-old woman with triple-negative breast cancer on a clinical trial called PRIMETIME (NCT02518958) who received the anti-PD-1 inhibitor nivolumab and the experimental anticancer agent RRx-001 is presented. Although initially diagnosed and treated for anti-PD-1-induced pneumonitis, clinical and radiological abnormalities triggered further investigation, leading to the diagnosis of pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM). This example highlights the importance of exercising due diligence in determining immune-related adverse events and suggests that PD-1-induced pneumonitis should be a diagnosis of exclusion rather than a diagnosis by default. A case history and review of the literature are presented for PTTM, which we propose to define as a paraneoplastic syndrome. PMID:26933422

  8. Hippocampal Lesions Impair Spatial Memory Performance, but Not Song-A Developmental Study of Independent Memory Systems in the Zebra Finch

    OpenAIRE

    David J. Bailey; Wade, Juli; Saldanha, Colin J.

    2009-01-01

    Songbirds demonstrate song- and spatial-learning, forms of memory that appear distinct in formal characteristics and fitting the descriptions and criteria of procedural and episodic-like memory function, respectively. As in other vertebrates, the neural pathways underlying these forms of memory may also be dissociable, and include the corresponding song circuit and hippocampus (HP). Whether (or not) these two memory systems interact is unknown. Interestingly, the HP distinguishes itself as a ...

  9. From Aardvark to Zebra: A New Millennium Analysis of Theory Development in Public Relations Academic Journals. A Top Faculty/Student Research Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallot, Lynne M.; Lyon, Lisa J.; Acosta-Alzuru, Carolina; Jones, Karyn Ogata

    In a replication and extension of a 1984 study by M. A. Ferguson to investigate the status of theory building by public relations scholars, 748 abstracts and/or articles published in "Public Relations Review,""Journal of Public Relations Research," and its predecessor "Public Relations Research Annual," since their inceptions through the year…

  10. Young and intense: FoxP2 immunoreactivity in Area X varies with age, song stereotypy, and singing in male zebra finches

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    Christopher Kirk Thompson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available FOXP2 is a transcription factor functionally relevant for learned vocalizations in humans and songbirds. In songbirds, FoxP2 mRNA expression in the medium spiny neurons of the basal ganglia song nucleus Area X is developmentally regulated and varies with singing conditions in different social contexts. How individual neurons in Area X change FoxP2 expression across development and in social contexts is not known, however. Here we address this critical gap in our understanding of FoxP2 as a link between neuronal networks and behavior. We used a statistically unbiased analysis of FoxP2-immunoreactivity (IR on a neuron-by-neuron basis and found a bimodal distribution of FoxP2-IR neurons in Area X: weakly-stained and intensely-stained. The density of intensely-stained FoxP2-IR neurons was 10 times higher in juveniles than in adults, exponentially decreased with age, and was negatively correlated with adult song stability. Three-week old neurons labeled with BrdU were more than five times as likely to be intensely-stained than weakly-stained. The density of FoxP2-IR putative migratory neurons with fusiform-shaped nuclei substantially decreased as birds aged. The density of intensely-stained FoxP2-IR neurons was not affected by singing whereas the density of weakly-stained FoxP2-IR neurons was. Together, these data indicate that young Area X medium spiny neurons express FoxP2 at high levels and decrease expression as they become integrated into existing neural circuits. Once integrated, levels of FoxP2 expression correlate with singing behavior. Together, these findings raise the possibility that FoxP2 levels may orchestrate song learning and song stereotypy in adults by a common mechanism.

  11. Activity in a premotor cortical nucleus of zebra finches is locally organized and exhibits auditory selectivity in neurons but not in glia

    OpenAIRE

    Graber, M H; Helmchen, F.; Hahnloser, R. H. R.

    2013-01-01

    Motor functions are often guided by sensory experience, most convincingly illustrated by complex learned behaviors. Key to sensory guidance in motor areas may be the structural and functional organization of sensory inputs and their evoked responses. We study sensory responses in large populations of neurons and neuron-assistive cells in the songbird motor area HVC, an auditory-vocal brain area involved in sensory learning and in adult song production. HVC spike responses to auditory stimulat...

  12. Effects of Nanosilver Exposure on Cholinesterase Activities, CD41, and CDF/LIF-Like Expression in ZebraFish (Danio rerio Larvae

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    Marzhan Myrzakhanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal nanosolicoparticles are suspected to cause diseases in a number of organisms, including man. In this paper, we report the effects of nanosilver (Ag, 1–20 nm particles on the early development of the zebrafish, a well-established vertebrate model. Embryos at the midgastrula stage were exposed to concentrations ranging from 100 to 0.001 mg/L to verify the effects on different endpoints: lethality, morphology, expression of cholinergic molecules, and development of the immune system. (1 Relative risk of mortality was exponential in the range between 0.001 and 10 mg/L. Exposure to 100 mg/L caused 100% death of embryos before reaching the tail-bud stage. (2 Developmental anomalies were present in the 72 h larvae obtained from embryos exposed to nanosilver: whole body length, decreased eye dimension, and slow response to solicitation by gentle touch with a needle tip, with a significant threshold at 0.1 mg/L. (3 Dose-dependent inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity was significant among the exposures, except between 1 mg/L and 10 mg/L. (4 The distribution of CD41+ cells and of CDF/LIF-like immunoreactivity was altered according to the Ag concentration. The possible effect of nanosilver in impairing immune system differentiation through the inhibition of molecules related to the cholinergic system is discussed.

  13. Injection-Site Reactions in Wild Horses (Equus caballus) Receiving an Immunocontraceptive Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelle, James E.; Ransom, Jason I.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Bureau of Land Management are conducting research on the efficacy of the immunocontraceptive agent porcine zona pellucida (PZP) in reducing fertility of wild horses (Equus caballus). As an antigen, PZP stimulates antibody production when injected into many mammalian species. These antibodies bind to the external surface of the ovum, preventing fertilization. By itself, PZP is only weakly immunogenic and is therefore delivered with an adjuvant, most commonly one of the Freund adjuvants, designed to further stimulate antibody production. Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) in particular is known to be very effective, but may also be associated with undesirable side effects such as formation of abscesses at injection sites. Such reactions may be exacerbated when accompanied by the additional trauma of a remotely delivered dart. Because horses in our three study herds were individually identifiable by color markings and harem association, we were able to monitor mares for injection-site reactions (abscesses, nodules, swelling, and stiffness) following inoculation with PZP. In 100 injections delivered by hand we observed a single nodule, two instances of swelling, and no other reactions. In two herds that received remotely delivered (dart) injections, the frequency of reactions was about 1 and 6 percent for abscesses, 25 percent for nodules (both herds), 11 and 33 percent for swelling, and 1 and 12 percent for stiffness. Abscesses were too infrequent to allow meaningful analysis of the relation to covariates, but for the other types of reactions we used logistic regression to examine the relation of occurrence to the delivery method (rifle or CO2-powered blowgun), adjuvant (FCA, Freund's modified adjuvant, and Freund's incomplete adjuvant), dart trauma (normal or abnormal), and age of mare. Abnormal dart trauma included cases where the dart hit bone or the needle broke off. We found strong evidence (odds ratio = 5.023, P = 0.001) for a

  14. Antibodies to Neospora caninum in wild animals from Kenya, East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroglio, E; Wambwa, E; Castiello, M; Trisciuoglio, A; Prouteau, A; Pradere, E; Ndungu, S; De Meneghi, D

    2003-12-01

    The prevalence of antibodies to Neospora caninum was examined in six wild Artiodactyla species, and in five wild Carnivora species from Kenya. Blood sera (104 wild ungulates from Marula Estates (MEs), and 31 wild carnivores from Masai-Mara reserve and from other wildlife areas in northern and Southern Kenya), were screened using a Neospora agglutination test (NAT), with a twofold dilution (1:40-1:320 titres). Presence of NAT antibodies to N. caninun is reported here for the first time in zebra (Equus burchelli), eland (Taurotragus oryx), African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), Thompson gazelle (Gazella thompsoni), impala (Aepyceros melampus), warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus), spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) and in free-ranging cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus). At 1:80 dilution, prevalence was 61.5% in eland, 58.5% in zebra, 19.2% in Thompson gazelle, 33.3% in warthog, 50% in African buffalo, 30% in lion (Panthera leo), 20% in cheetah, and 33.3% in spotted hyena. Antibodies up to 1:320 titre were detected in eland (38.4%), zebra (19.5%), Thompson gazelle (3.8%) and lion (5%). Amongst herbivores, sero-prevalence was significantly (P<0.05) higher, at all dilutions, in "grazer/digger" species (e.g. eland and zebra) than in non-"grazer/digger" species (e.g. impala and Thompson gazelle). No antibodies to N. caninum were found in two leopards (Panthera pardus) and one serval (Felis serval). Our results indicates a steady presence of N. caninum in wild mammals from Kenya. The hypothesis of a sylvatic cycle of N. caninum could be suggested, but more data are needed to verify the hypothesis, as to evaluate the role of N. caninum infection on the dynamics of wild animals population in the study area. PMID:14651874

  15. Identificación de Especímenes de Equus grevyi en el Parque Zoológico Nacional de Cuba

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    Irina Fermin-Morales

    2014-07-01

    Identification of Specimens in Equus grevyi in the Cuba National Zoo Park Abstract. Equus grevyi has managed through the extraction and the reintroduction of individuals from your entrance to the collection of animals of the Cuba National Zoo Park. To improve the handling of this species it is necessary the individual identification through morphological characters for those who proposed us demonstrate the differences in the owner of facial existent stripes between the individuals and between both patrons of a same individual. The outstanding method naturals were used for the identification of these animals through the photo. The taken images compared visual and it is observed the existent difference in the owner of facial stripes between individual and between the facial patrons of a same individual.

  16. A new record of Equus (Mammalia: Equidae from the Late Pleistocene of central-south Chile Un nuevo registro de Equus (Mammalia: Equidae para el Pleistoceno Superior de Osorno, Chile

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    OMAR P RECABARREN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen dental and bone parts of a horse excavated from the Pilauco paleontological site, Osorno (40°39' S-73°07' W are analysed and interpreted. This site was formed in association with a peat bog located on the banks of the old Damas River and has conserved abundant late Pleistocene mammalian fauna and flora materials. A date of 11457 ± 140 14C yrs B.P. was obtained from a molar and agrees with our stratigraphic age model. We have identified the fossils as pertaining to the species Equus (Amerhippus andium, which confirms its presence in central-south Chile. Furthermore, the recorded geographic location indicate that the metapodial adaptations of the specimens previously described agree with the reconstructed late Pleistocene landscape of Pilauco, dominated by soft volcanic soils and isolated forest patches over large extensions of grasslands.Se analizan e interpretan 14 fósiles correspondientes a dientes y huesos de caballo registrados en el sitio Pilauco, Osorno (40°39' S-73°07' W. El sitio se formó asociado a un pantano en un borde del antiguo río Damas; en él se ha conservado abundante material de mastofauna y flora pleistocénica. Una fecha radiocarbónica de 11457 ± 140 A.P obtenida de un molar, es concordante con el modelo de edad del sitio. La identificación taxonómica permite asociar a los fósiles a la especie Equus (Amerhippus andium, lo que confirma la presencia de la especie en el centro-sur de Chile. Por otra parte, la posición geográfica de los hallazgos y la reconstrucción del paisaje indicarían que se trata de ejemplares cuyas adaptaciones en los metapodios son concordantes para el paisaje pleistocénico de Pilauco dominado por suelos volcánicos blandos, con presencia de bosquetes dispersos en grandes extensiones de praderas de gramíneas.

  17. Status of Ground-Water Levels and Storage Volume in the Equus Beds Aquifer Near Wichita, Kansas, July 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Cristi V.

    2009-01-01

    The Equus Beds aquifer in southwestern Harvey County and northwestern Sedgwick County was developed to supply water to the city of Wichita and for irrigation in south-central Kansas. Water-level and storage-volume decreases that began with the development of the aquifer in the 1940s reached record to near-record lows in January 1993. Since 1993, the aquifer has been experiencing higher water levels and a partial recovery of storage volume previously lost during August 1940 to January 1993. Measured water-level changes for August 1940 to July 2008 ranged from a decline of 23.41 feet to a rise of 3.58 feet. The change in storage volume in the study area from August 1940 to July 2008 was a decrease of about 134,000 acre-feet. This represents a recovery of about 121,000 acre-feet, or about 47 percent of the storage volume previously lost between August 1940 and January 1993. The change in storage volume from August 1940 to July 2008 in the central part of the study area, where city pumpage occurs, was a decrease of about 71,200 acre-feet. This represents a recovery of about 82,800 acre-feet, or about 54 percent of the storage volume previously lost between August 1940 and January 1993 in the central part of the study area. The recovery in the central part of the study area probably was greater and more consistently maintained than in the study area as a whole because city pumpage has remained less than pre-1993 levels, whereas agricultural irrigation pumpage has been as much or more than pre-1993 levels in some years.

  18. Arterial pH and Blood Lactate Levels of Anesthetized Mongolian Khulan ( Equus hemionus hemionus) in the Mongolian Gobi Correlate with Induction Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsmann, Hanno; Stalder, Gabrielle L; Kaczensky, Petra; Buuveibaatar, Bayarbaatar; Payne, John; Boldbaatar, Sukhbaatar; Walzer, Chris

    2016-07-01

    Research and conservation of wide-ranging wild equids in most cases necessitate capture and handling of individuals. For free-roaming Mongolian khulan ( Equus hemionus hemionus), also known as the khulan, capture involves a strenuous, high-speed chase, and physiologic responses have yet to be elucidated. We analyzed sequential arterial blood gas (ABG) samples as a proxy for respiratory and metabolic status of khulan during capture-related anesthesia. We recorded precise chase and induction times and monitored vital parameters and ABG from free-ranging khulan during anesthesia performed for GPS collaring. At the initiation of anesthesia, animals had ABG values similar to those recorded for thoroughbred horses ( Equus caballus ) after maximal exercise. Longer induction times resulted in higher arterial pH (P<0.001) and lower blood lactate (P<0.002). This trend of improvement continued over the course of anesthesia. The most important factor explaining pH and lactate was the time that elapsed between cessation of the chase and obtaining the first ABG sample, which, under field conditions, is tightly linked to induction time. All animals recovered uneventfully. Our data show that khulan recover and shift their metabolic status back toward expected normal values during opioid-based field anesthesia. PMID:27243152

  19. Geochemical Effects of Induced Stream-Water and Artificial Recharge on the Equus Beds Aquifer, South-Central Kansas, 1995-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Heather C. Ross; Ziegler, Andrew C.; Parkhurst, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Artificial recharge of the Equus Beds aquifer is part of a strategy implemented by the city of Wichita, Kansas, to preserve future water supply and address declining water levels in the aquifer of as much as 30 feet caused by withdrawals for water supply and irrigation since the 1940s. Water-level declines represent a diminished water supply and also may accelerate migration of saltwater from the Burrton oil field to the northwest and the Arkansas River to the southwest into the freshwater of the Equus Beds aquifer. Artificial recharge, as a part of the Equus Beds Ground-Water Recharge Project, involves capturing flows larger than base flow from the Little Arkansas River and recharging the water to the Equus Beds aquifer by means of infiltration or injection. The geochemical effects on the Equus Beds aquifer of induced stream-water and artificial recharge at the Halstead and Sedgwick sites were determined through collection and analysis of hydrologic and water-quality data and the application of statistical, mixing, flow and solute-transport, and geochemical model simulations. Chloride and atrazine concentrations in the Little Arkansas River and arsenic concentrations in ground water at the Halstead recharge site frequently exceeded regulatory criteria. During 30 percent of the time from 1999 through 2004, continuous estimated chloride concentrations in the Little Arkansas River at Highway 50 near Halstead exceeded the Secondary Drinking-Water Regulation of 250 milligrams per liter established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Chloride concentrations in shallow monitoring wells located adjacent to the stream exceeded the drinking-water criterion five times from 1995 through 2004. Atrazine concentrations in water sampled from the Little Arkansas River had large variability and were at or near the drinking-water Maximum Contaminant Level of 3.0 micrograms per liter as an annual average established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Atrazine

  20. Effects of aquifer storage and recovery activities on water quality in the Little Arkansas River and Equus Beds Aquifer, south-central Kansas, 2011-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Mandy L.; Garrett, Jessica D.; Poulton, Barry C.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2016-07-18

    The Equus Beds aquifer in south-central Kansas is aprimary water source for the city of Wichita. The Equus Beds aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project was developed to help the city of Wichita meet increasing current (2016) and future water demands. The Equus Beds ASR project pumps water out of the Little Arkansas River during above-base flow conditions, treats it using drinking-water quality standards as a guideline, and recharges it into the Equus Beds aquifer for later use. Phase II of the Equus Beds ASR project currently (2016) includes a river intake facility and a surface-water treatment facility with a 30 million gallon per day capacity. Water diverted from the Little Arkansas River is delivered to an adjacent presedimentation basin for solids removal. Subsequently, waste from the surface-water treatment facility and the presedimentation basin is returned to the Little Arkansas River through a residuals return line. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Wichita, developed and implemented a hydrobiological monitoring program as part of the ASR project to characterize and quantify the effects of aquifer storage and recovery activities on the Little Arkansas River and Equus Beds aquifer water quality.Data were collected from 2 surface-water sites (one upstream and one downstream from the residuals return line), 1 residuals return line site, and 2 groundwater well sites (each having a shallow and deep part): the Little Arkansas River upstream from the ASR facility near Sedgwick, Kansas (upstream surface-water site 375350097262800), about 0.03 mile (mi) upstream from the residuals return line site; the Little Arkansas River near Sedgwick, Kans. (downstream surface-water site 07144100), about 1.68 mi downstream from the residuals return line site; discharge from the Little Arkansas River ASR facility near Sedgwick, Kansas (residuals return line site 375348097262800); 25S 01 W 07BCCC01 SMW–S11 near CW36 (MW–7 shallow groundwater well

  1. Spotted hyaenas Crocuta crocuta prey on new-born elephant calves in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Salnicki

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Spotted hyaena Crocuta crocuta are known to be opportunists and to have a varied diet including mammals, reptiles and birds. Prey most often hunted are medium sized ungulates but spotted hyaenas will on occasion take larger species such as giraffe Giraffa camelopardalis and zebra Equus burchellii. They are also known to hunt whichever species are most abundant and will vary their prey seasonally. In this study spotted hyaenas were observed to take an unusual prey species in the form of elephant calves (Loxodonta africana. On a number of occasions hyaenas were observed feeding on or killing newborn and very young elephant calves. These observations were made whilst the authors were conducting research on spotted hyaena ecology in the woodlands of Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe and were made during the dry season between September and November 1999.

  2. A useful marking method for free living mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Young

    1971-05-01

    Full Text Available A paint-spraying device was employed for marking wild African mammals without capture. This relatively inexpensive marking technique, which had originally been used for the marking of American desert bighorn sheep at drinking places, was also successfully applied in the marking of impala, Aepyceros melampus, blue wildebeest, Connochaetes taurinus, Burchell's zebra, Equus burchellii antiquorum aud the African elephant, Loxodonta africana. The apparatus used differs in some respects from that originally described by Hanson (1964. It was also used for the marking of animals from a mobile unit and away from fixed drinking places. This paper is based on a part of a thesis, submitted to the University of Pretoria in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of D.Sc. (Wildlife Management.

  3. Trypanosoma brucei Infection in asymptomatic greater Kudus (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) on a game ranch in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang'andu, Hetron Mweemba; Siamudaala, Victor; Munyeme, Musso; Nambota, Andrew; Mutoloki, Stephen; Matandiko, Wigganson

    2010-03-01

    Trypomastogotes of Trypanosoma brucei were detected from 4 asymptomatic kudus (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) on a game ranch located approximately 45 km north east of Lusaka, Zambia. Blood smears examined from 14 wildlife species comprising of the impala (Aepyceros melampus), Kafue lechwe (kobus leche kafuensis), sable antelope (Hippotragus niger), tsessebe (Damaliscus lunatus), warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus), puku (Kobus vardoni), zebra (Equus burchelli), waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus), bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus), reedbuck (Redunca arundinum), wilderbeest (Connochaetes taurinus), hartebeest (Alcephelus lichtensteini), African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), and kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) showed that only the kudu had T. brucei. Although game ranching has emerged to be a successful ex-situ conservation strategy aimed at saving the declining wildlife population in the National Parks, our findings suggest that it has the potential of aiding the re-distribution of animal diseases. Hence, there is a need for augmenting wildlife conservation with disease control strategies aimed at reducing the risk of disease transmission between wildlife and domestic animals. PMID:20333288

  4. Status of Ground-Water Levels and Storage Volume in the Equus Beds Aquifer Near Wichita, Kansas, January 2003-January 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Cristi V.

    2007-01-01

    The Equus Beds aquifer northwest of Wichita, Kansas, was developed to supply water to Wichita residents and for irrigation in south-central Kansas. Ground-water pumping for city and agricultural use from the aquifer caused water levels to decline in a large part of the aquifer northwest of Wichita. Irrigation pumpage in the area increased substantially during the 1970s and 1980s and accelerated water-level declines. A period of water-level rises associated with greater-than-average precipitation and decreased city pumpage from the area began in 1993. An important factor in the decreased city pumpage was increased use of Cheney Reservoir as a water-supply source by the city of Wichita; as a result, city pumpage from the Equus Beds aquifer during 1993-2005 decreased to quantities similar to those pumped in the 1940s and went from being about 60 percent to about 40 percent of Wichita's water usage. Since 1995, the city also has been investigating the use of artificial recharge in the study area to meet future water-supply needs and to protect the aquifer from the intrusion of saltwater from sources to the west. During January 2006, the direction of ground-water flow in the Equus Beds aquifer in the area was generally from west to east, similar to the direction prior to development of the aquifer. Water-level changes since 1940 for the period January 2003-January 2006 ranged from a decline of more than 36 feet to a rise of more than 2 feet. Almost all wells in the area had small cumulative water-level rises from January 2003 to January 2006 and larger rises from October 1992 (period of maximum storage loss) to January 2006. The water-level rises from October 1992 to January 2006 probably are due principally to decreases in city pumpage, with increases in recharge due to increased precipitation during the period also a contributing factor. Irrigation pumpage increased during the period, so irrigation did not contribute to the rises in water levels between the beginning

  5. Nuclear translocation and regulation of intranuclear distribution of cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein are distinct processes mediated by two Epstein Barr virus proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Richard; El-Guindy, Ayman; Heston, Lee; Lin, Su-Fang; Yu, Kuan-Ping; Nagy, Mate; Borah, Sumit; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Steitz, Joan; Miller, George

    2014-01-01

    Many viruses target cytoplasmic polyA binding protein (PABPC) to effect widespread inhibition of host gene expression, a process termed viral host-shutoff (vhs). During lytic replication of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) we observed that PABPC was efficiently translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Translocated PABPC was diffusely distributed but was excluded from viral replication compartments. Vhs during EBV infection is regulated by the viral alkaline nuclease, BGLF5. Transfection of BGLF5 alone into BGLF5-KO cells or uninfected 293 cells promoted translocation of PAPBC that was distributed in clumps in the nucleus. ZEBRA, a viral bZIP protein, performs essential functions in the lytic program of EBV, including activation or repression of downstream viral genes. ZEBRA is also an essential replication protein that binds to viral oriLyt and interacts with other viral replication proteins. We report that ZEBRA also functions as a regulator of vhs. ZEBRA translocated PABPC to the nucleus, controlled the intranuclear distribution of PABPC, and caused global shutoff of host gene expression. Transfection of ZEBRA alone into 293 cells caused nuclear translocation of PABPC in the majority of cells in which ZEBRA was expressed. Co-transfection of ZEBRA with BGLF5 into BGLF5-KO cells or uninfected 293 cells rescued the diffuse intranuclear pattern of PABPC seen during lytic replication. ZEBRA mutants defective for DNA-binding were capable of regulating the intranuclear distribution of PABPC, and caused PABPC to co-localize with ZEBRA. One ZEBRA mutant, Z(S186E), was deficient in translocation yet was capable of altering the intranuclear distribution of PABPC. Therefore ZEBRA-mediated nuclear translocation of PABPC and regulation of intranuclear PABPC distribution are distinct events. Using a click chemistry-based assay for new protein synthesis, we show that ZEBRA and BGLF5 each function as viral host shutoff factors. PMID:24705134

  6. Nuclear translocation and regulation of intranuclear distribution of cytoplasmic poly(A-binding protein are distinct processes mediated by two Epstein Barr virus proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Park

    Full Text Available Many viruses target cytoplasmic polyA binding protein (PABPC to effect widespread inhibition of host gene expression, a process termed viral host-shutoff (vhs. During lytic replication of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV we observed that PABPC was efficiently translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Translocated PABPC was diffusely distributed but was excluded from viral replication compartments. Vhs during EBV infection is regulated by the viral alkaline nuclease, BGLF5. Transfection of BGLF5 alone into BGLF5-KO cells or uninfected 293 cells promoted translocation of PAPBC that was distributed in clumps in the nucleus. ZEBRA, a viral bZIP protein, performs essential functions in the lytic program of EBV, including activation or repression of downstream viral genes. ZEBRA is also an essential replication protein that binds to viral oriLyt and interacts with other viral replication proteins. We report that ZEBRA also functions as a regulator of vhs. ZEBRA translocated PABPC to the nucleus, controlled the intranuclear distribution of PABPC, and caused global shutoff of host gene expression. Transfection of ZEBRA alone into 293 cells caused nuclear translocation of PABPC in the majority of cells in which ZEBRA was expressed. Co-transfection of ZEBRA with BGLF5 into BGLF5-KO cells or uninfected 293 cells rescued the diffuse intranuclear pattern of PABPC seen during lytic replication. ZEBRA mutants defective for DNA-binding were capable of regulating the intranuclear distribution of PABPC, and caused PABPC to co-localize with ZEBRA. One ZEBRA mutant, Z(S186E, was deficient in translocation yet was capable of altering the intranuclear distribution of PABPC. Therefore ZEBRA-mediated nuclear translocation of PABPC and regulation of intranuclear PABPC distribution are distinct events. Using a click chemistry-based assay for new protein synthesis, we show that ZEBRA and BGLF5 each function as viral host shutoff factors.

  7. Frequent and seasonally variable sublethal anthrax infections are accompanied by short-lived immunity in an endemic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizauskas, Carrie A; Bellan, Steven E; Turner, Wendy C; Vance, Russell E; Getz, Wayne M

    2014-09-01

    Few studies have examined host-pathogen interactions in wildlife from an immunological perspective, particularly in the context of seasonal and longitudinal dynamics. In addition, though most ecological immunology studies employ serological antibody assays, endpoint titre determination is usually based on subjective criteria and needs to be made more objective. Despite the fact that anthrax is an ancient and emerging zoonotic infectious disease found world-wide, its natural ecology is not well understood. In particular, little is known about the adaptive immune responses of wild herbivore hosts against Bacillus anthracis. Working in the natural anthrax system of Etosha National Park, Namibia, we collected 154 serum samples from plains zebra (Equus quagga), 21 from springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) and 45 from African elephants (Loxodonta africana) over 2-3 years, resampling individuals when possible for seasonal and longitudinal comparisons. We used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to measure anti-anthrax antibody titres and developed three increasingly conservative models to determine endpoint titres with more rigourous, objective mensuration. Between 52 and 87% of zebra, 0-15% of springbok and 3-52% of elephants had measurable anti-anthrax antibody titres, depending on the model used. While the ability of elephants and springbok to mount anti-anthrax adaptive immune responses is still equivocal, our results indicate that zebra in ENP often survive sublethal anthrax infections, encounter most B. anthracis in the wet season and can partially booster their immunity to B. anthracis. Thus, rather than being solely a lethal disease, anthrax often occurs as a sublethal infection in some susceptible hosts. Though we found that adaptive immunity to anthrax wanes rapidly, subsequent and frequent sublethal B. anthracis infections cause maturation of anti-anthrax immunity. By triggering host immune responses, these common sublethal infections may act as

  8. Simulation of groundwater flow, effects of artificial recharge, and storage volume changes in the Equus Beds aquifer near the city of Wichita, Kansas well field, 1935–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian P.; Pickett, Linda L.; Hansen, Cristi V.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    The Equus Beds aquifer is a primary water-supply source for Wichita, Kansas and the surrounding area because of shallow depth to water, large saturated thickness, and generally good water quality. Substantial water-level declines in the Equus Beds aquifer have resulted from pumping groundwater for agricultural and municipal needs, as well as periodic drought conditions. In March 2006, the city of Wichita began construction of the Equus Beds Aquifer Storage and Recovery project to store and later recover groundwater, and to form a hydraulic barrier to the known chloride-brine plume near Burrton, Kansas. In October 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Wichita, began a study to determine groundwater flow in the area of the Wichita well field, and chloride transport from the Arkansas River and Burrton oilfield to the Wichita well field. Groundwater flow was simulated for the Equus Beds aquifer using the three-dimensional finite-difference groundwater-flow model MODFLOW-2000. The model simulates steady-state and transient conditions. The groundwater-flow model was calibrated by adjusting model input data and model geometry until model results matched field observations within an acceptable level of accuracy. The root mean square (RMS) error for water-level observations for the steady-state calibration simulation is 9.82 feet. The ratio of the RMS error to the total head loss in the model area is 0.049 and the mean error for water-level observations is 3.86 feet. The difference between flow into the model and flow out of the model across all model boundaries is -0.08 percent of total flow for the steady-state calibration. The RMS error for water-level observations for the transient calibration simulation is 2.48 feet, the ratio of the RMS error to the total head loss in the model area is 0.0124, and the mean error for water-level observations is 0.03 feet. The RMS error calculated for observed and simulated base flow gains or losses for the

  9. Mollusk Distribution and Habitat, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) animal distribution in Wisconsin - Zebra mussels, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Mollusk Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2009....

  10. El pez zebra (Danio rerio) como modelo de estudio in vivo del papel de la telomerasa en la hematopoyesis= The zebrafish (Danio rerio)as a model to stydy in vivo the role of telomerase in hematopoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    Alcaraz Pérez, Francisca

    2014-01-01

    - Objetivos. En el presente trabajo se han cumplido dos objetivos concretos: 1. Desarrollo de un nuevo sistema chivato basado en la luciferasa para el estudio de promotores tanto constitutivos como inducibles en el contexto de un organismo completo. 2. Estudio del papel extracurricular del componente de ARN de la telomerasa (TR) en la hematopoyesis usando el pez cebra como modelo. - Metodología. Embriones de pez cebra han sido manipulados genéticamente mediante la microinye...

  11. Toxico-kinetic, chemical and radiological toxicity of uranium on zebra fish (Danio rerio); Toxicocinetique, toxicite chimique et radiologique de l'uranium chez le poisson zebre (Danio rerio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barillet, S

    2007-06-15

    This thesis explores the toxico-kinetic and toxicological aspects of uranium in fish. Uranium, appears to be highly bio accumulated and bio concentrated in fish. It spreads all through the whole organism. Nevertheless, its distribution is heterogeneous (gills and liver being the main sites of accumulation).From a toxicological point of view, we notice perturbations of the antioxidant system (inhibitions of hepatic Sod, Cat and G Px activities; depletion of total GSH) and of the cholinergic system (inhibition/over-activation of brain AChE). Genotoxic effects also appear in red blood cells, hepatocytes and gonad cells. The kinetics of these biochemical perturbations depend on the radiological activity of uranium, responses appearing earlier with increasing delivered activity. Histological effects (differing in types depending on delivered radiological activity) are also observed (in gills and muscles). (author)

  12. Effect of sox19b gene knockdown on the eyes development in zebra fish%sox19b在斑马鱼胚胎眼睛发育中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高明; 杨阳; 陈学冉; 史玮; 林浴霜; 郝爱军

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the function of sox19b on the eye development in zebrafish by knockdown of sox19b. Methods To inhibit the expression of sox196 by microinjection of soxl9b morpholinos( MO)and then observe the effect of the development of the eyes in zebrafish by RT-PCR and the whole-mount in situ hybridization. Results The development of the eyes was abnormal after knockdown of sox 196, mainly showed small eyes or eye deficiency and the abnormal retina and lens( n = 57/93 ) . The expression of some important genes during the development of the eyes, such as rx3, pax2a and vsx2, was decreased apparently in the sox19b morphant. Conclusion The transcription factor, sox196 is critical for the development of the eyes via the regulation of the important eye-field transcription factors, EFTEs in early zebrafish embryos.%目的 通过抑制sox19b基因的表达,探讨sox19b基因在斑马鱼胚胎眼睛发育和形成中的作用.方法 通过显微注射sox19b吗啉寡聚核苷酸(MO)抑制sox19b基因的表达,观察胚胎发育过程中表型的变化;采用石蜡包埋组织切片及HE染色、RT-PCR和整封原位杂交等方法探讨敲除sox19b后对斑马鱼胚胎眼睛发育的调控机制.结果 敲除sox19b基因后,斑马鱼胚胎眼睛发育受到影响,表现为眼睛变小或缺失,视网膜及晶状体结构发育异常(n=57/93);眼睛发育过程中重要调控基因rx3、pax2a及vsx2等表达明显降低,进而影响眼睛的发育和形成.结论 sox19b基因作为转录调控因子,可以通过调节眼区转录因子的表达进而影响斑马鱼胚胎早期眼睛的发育和形成.

  13. Status of ground-water levels and storage volume in the Equus Beds aquifer near Wichita, Kansas, January 2000-January 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Cristi V.; Aucott, Walter R.

    2004-01-01

    The Equus Beds aquifer northwest of Wichita, Kansas, was developed to supply water to Wichita residents and for irrigation in south-central Kansas beginning on September 1, 1940. Ground-water pumping for city and agricultural use from the aquifer caused water levels to decline in a large part of the area. Irrigation pumpage in the area increased substantially during the 1970s and 1980s and accelerated water-level declines. A period of water-level rises associated with greater-than-average precipitation and decreased city pumpage from the study area began in 1993. An important factor in the decreased city pumpage was increased use of Cheney Reservoir as a water-supply source by the city of Wichita; as a result, city pumpage from the Equus Beds aquifer during 1993-2002 went from being greater than one-half to slightly less than one-third of Wichita's water usage. Since 1995, the city also has been investigating the use of artificial recharge in the study area to meet future water-supply needs and to protect the aquifer from the intrusion of saltwater from natural and human-related sources to the west. During January 2003, the direction of ground-water flow in the Equus Beds aquifer in the area was generally from west to east similar to predevelopment of the aquifer. The maximum water-level decline since 1940 for the period January 2000 to January 2003 was 29.54 feet in July 2002 at well 3 in the northern part of the area. Cumulative water-level changes from January 2000 to January 2003 typically were less than 4 feet with rises of less than 4 feet common in the central part of the area; however, declines of more than 4 feet occurred in the northwestern and southern parts of the area. The recovery of water levels and aquifer storage volumes from record low levels in October 1992 generally continued to April 2000. The recovery of about 182,000 acre-feet of storage volume in the area from October 1992 to April 2000 represents about a 64-percent recovery of the storage

  14. Effects of aquifer storage and recovery activities on water quality in the Little Arkansas River and Equus Beds Aquifer, south-central Kansas, 2011-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Mandy L.; Garrett, Jessica D.; Poulton, Barry C.; Ziegler, Andrew C.

    2016-07-18

    The Equus Beds aquifer in south-central Kansas is aprimary water source for the city of Wichita. The Equus Beds aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) project was developed to help the city of Wichita meet increasing current (2016) and future water demands. The Equus Beds ASR project pumps water out of the Little Arkansas River during above-base flow conditions, treats it using drinking-water quality standards as a guideline, and recharges it into the Equus Beds aquifer for later use. Phase II of the Equus Beds ASR project currently (2016) includes a river intake facility and a surface-water treatment facility with a 30 million gallon per day capacity. Water diverted from the Little Arkansas River is delivered to an adjacent presedimentation basin for solids removal. Subsequently, waste from the surface-water treatment facility and the presedimentation basin is returned to the Little Arkansas River through a residuals return line. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Wichita, developed and implemented a hydrobiological monitoring program as part of the ASR project to characterize and quantify the effects of aquifer storage and recovery activities on the Little Arkansas River and Equus Beds aquifer water quality.Data were collected from 2 surface-water sites (one upstream and one downstream from the residuals return line), 1 residuals return line site, and 2 groundwater well sites (each having a shallow and deep part): the Little Arkansas River upstream from the ASR facility near Sedgwick, Kansas (upstream surface-water site 375350097262800), about 0.03 mile (mi) upstream from the residuals return line site; the Little Arkansas River near Sedgwick, Kans. (downstream surface-water site 07144100), about 1.68 mi downstream from the residuals return line site; discharge from the Little Arkansas River ASR facility near Sedgwick, Kansas (residuals return line site 375348097262800); 25S 01 W 07BCCC01 SMW–S11 near CW36 (MW–7 shallow groundwater well

  15. Fundamental studies of the reproductive biology of the endangered persian onager (Equus hemionus onager) result in first wild equid offspring from artificial insemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schook, Mandi W; Wildt, David E; Weiss, Rachael B; Wolfe, Barbara A; Archibald, Kate E; Pukazhenthi, Budhan S

    2013-08-01

    We studied the Persian onager (Equus hemionus onager), an endangered equid subspecies. The objective was to characterize endocrine patterns and ovarian follicular dynamics of females as well as seminal traits and sperm sensitivity to cryopreservation in males as a prerequisite to testing the feasibility of artificial insemination (AI). Urinary progesterone and estrogen metabolite profiles were determined by enzyme immunoassay in 11 females. Serial ultrasonography of ovarian activity was performed for 2 mo in a subset of four females. Females were seasonally polyestrous (June-November). Ovarian morphometry via ultrasonography and urinary progesterone profiles were more reflective of reproductive events than urinary estrogen patterns, and preovulatory follicle size was smaller than reported for other equid species. There was evidence for lactational suppression of estrus for up to 1.5 yr in nursing dams. Electroejaculation allowed recovery of highly motile sperm from 7, anesthetized males on 57% of occasions. Spermatozoa, including motility and acrosomal integrity, were resilient to freeze-thawing. Artificial insemination was successful in 2 of 3 females following detection of a dominant follicle and deslorelin administration, resulting in births of a healthy female and male foal by using fresh/chilled and frozen/thawed sperm, respectively. PMID:23863403

  16. Datación por racemización de aminoácidos del yacimiento de Equus caballus eaensis Torres 1970 de la ría de Ea (Vizcaya)

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Pérez-Hidalgo, Trinidad José de

    2006-01-01

    En este trabajo se contempla la datación del yacimiento de Equus caballus eaensis de la ría de Ea (Vizcaya). Una acumulación monoespecífica de restos de caballo ligada a una trampa natural. El análisis de la racemización del ácido aspártico de la dentina y el uso de algoritmos de cálculo de edad calibrados ha permitido situar el yacimiento al comienzo del Pleistoceno superior, en el episodio 5 del oxígeno marino o Eemiense.

  17. Next Generation Semiconductor Based Sequencing of the Donkey (Equus asinus Genome Provided Comparative Sequence Data against the Horse Genome and a Few Millions of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bertolini

    Full Text Available Few studies investigated the donkey (Equus asinus at the whole genome level so far. Here, we sequenced the genome of two male donkeys using a next generation semiconductor based sequencing platform (the Ion Proton sequencer and compared obtained sequence information with the available donkey draft genome (and its Illumina reads from which it was originated and with the EquCab2.0 assembly of the horse genome. Moreover, the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Analyzer was used to sequence reduced representation libraries (RRL obtained from a DNA pool including donkeys of different breeds (Grigio Siciliano, Ragusano and Martina Franca. The number of next generation sequencing reads aligned with the EquCab2.0 horse genome was larger than those aligned with the draft donkey genome. This was due to the larger N50 for contigs and scaffolds of the horse genome. Nucleotide divergence between E. caballus and E. asinus was estimated to be ~ 0.52-0.57%. Regions with low nucleotide divergence were identified in several autosomal chromosomes and in the whole chromosome X. These regions might be evolutionally important in equids. Comparing Y-chromosome regions we identified variants that could be useful to track donkey paternal lineages. Moreover, about 4.8 million of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the donkey genome were identified and annotated combining sequencing data from Ion Proton (whole genome sequencing and Ion Torrent (RRL runs with Illumina reads. A higher density of SNPs was present in regions homologous to horse chromosome 12, in which several studies reported a high frequency of copy number variants. The SNPs we identified constitute a first resource useful to describe variability at the population genomic level in E. asinus and to establish monitoring systems for the conservation of donkey genetic resources.

  18. Practical Bias Correction in Aerial Surveys of Large Mammals: Validation of Hybrid Double-Observer with Sightability Method against Known Abundance of Feral Horse (Equus caballus) Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Reliably estimating wildlife abundance is fundamental to effective management. Aerial surveys are one of the only spatially robust tools for estimating large mammal populations, but statistical sampling methods are required to address detection biases that affect accuracy and precision of the estimates. Although various methods for correcting aerial survey bias are employed on large mammal species around the world, these have rarely been rigorously validated. Several populations of feral horses (Equus caballus) in the western United States have been intensively studied, resulting in identification of all unique individuals. This provided a rare opportunity to test aerial survey bias correction on populations of known abundance. We hypothesized that a hybrid method combining simultaneous double-observer and sightability bias correction techniques would accurately estimate abundance. We validated this integrated technique on populations of known size and also on a pair of surveys before and after a known number was removed. Our analysis identified several covariates across the surveys that explained and corrected biases in the estimates. All six tests on known populations produced estimates with deviations from the known value ranging from -8.5% to +13.7% and <0.7 standard errors. Precision varied widely, from 6.1% CV to 25.0% CV. In contrast, the pair of surveys conducted around a known management removal produced an estimated change in population between the surveys that was significantly larger than the known reduction. Although the deviation between was only 9.1%, the precision estimate (CV = 1.6%) may have been artificially low. It was apparent that use of a helicopter in those surveys perturbed the horses, introducing detection error and heterogeneity in a manner that could not be corrected by our statistical models. Our results validate the hybrid method, highlight its potentially broad applicability, identify some limitations, and provide insight and guidance

  19. Space-Use Patterns of the Asiatic Wild Ass (Equus hemionus: Complementary Insights from Displacement, Recursion Movement and Habitat Selection Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Giotto

    Full Text Available The way in which animals move and use the landscape is influenced by the spatial distribution of resources, and is of importance when considering species conservation. We aimed at exploring how landscape-related factors affect a large herbivore's space-use patterns by using a combined approach, integrating movement (displacement and recursions and habitat selection analyses. We studied the endangered Asiatic wild ass (Equus hemionus in the Negev Desert, Israel, using GPS monitoring and direct observation. We found that the main landscape-related factors affecting the species' space-use patterns, on a daily and seasonal basis, were vegetation cover, water sources and topography. Two main habitat types were selected: high-elevation sites during the day (specific microclimate: windy on warm summer days and streambed surroundings during the night (coupled with high vegetation when the animals were active in summer. Distribution of recursion times (duration between visits revealed a 24-hour periodicity, a pattern that could be widespread among large herbivores. Characterizing frequently revisited sites suggested that recursion movements were mainly driven by a few landscape features (water sources, vegetation patches, high-elevation points, but also by social factors, such as territoriality, which should be further explored. This study provided complementary insights into the space-use patterns of E. hemionus. Understanding of the species' space-use patterns, at both large and fine spatial scale, is required for developing appropriate conservation protocols. Our approach could be further applied for studying the space-use patterns of other species in heterogeneous landscapes.

  20. Present situation of eco-biological studv on Equus hemionus.%亚洲野驴生态生物学研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林杰; 徐文轩; 杨维康; 刘伟; 夏参军; 徐峰

    2011-01-01

    Asiatic wild ass (Equus hemionus) ranks the grade I key protected wildlife in China , and the endangered animal species on the IUCN Red List in 2008. Because of the human interferences since the mid 19th century, the distribution area of E. Hemionus has reduced increasingly, and fallen into an endangered condition around the world. In order to effectively conserve this species, numerous researches have been made on its ecology and biology. This paper summarized the main results of these researches from the aspects of morphology, taxology, distribution, population quantity, social structure and territorial behavior, habitat selection, feeding e-cology, reproduction ecology, behavior day-time budget and activity rhythm, endangered causes, and conservation strategy. Three suggestions were put forward for the further study on E. Hemionus.%亚洲野驴为国家一级保护动物,2008年《IUCN红色名录》将其列为濒危物种.自19世纪中期,由于人类活动干扰,分布区日益缩小,全球范围内亚洲野驴均处于濒危状态.为有效保护该物种,众多学者针对亚洲野驴生态生物学开展了大量研究.本文从形态描述与分类、分布与种群数量、社群和领域行为、栖息地选择、觅食生态、繁殖生态、行为时间分配与活动节律、濒危原因与保护对策等方面对亚洲野驴的研究成果进行了综述,并就亚洲野驴下一步的研究工作提出3个建议.

  1. The albinism of the feral Asinara white donkeys (Equus asinus) is determined by a missense mutation in a highly conserved position of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene deduced protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzeri, V J; Bertolini, F; Ribani, A; Schiavo, G; Dall'Olio, S; Fontanesi, L

    2016-02-01

    A feral donkey population (Equus asinus), living in the Asinara National Park (an island north-west of Sardinia, Italy), includes a unique white albino donkey subpopulation or colour morph that is a major attraction of this park. Disrupting mutations in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene are known to cause recessive albinisms in humans (oculocutaneous albinism Type 1; OCA1) and other species. In this study, we analysed the donkey TYR gene as a strong candidate to identify the causative mutation of the albinism of these donkeys. The TYR gene was sequenced from 13 donkeys (seven Asinara white albino and six coloured animals). Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. A missense mutation (c.604C>G; p.His202Asp) in a highly conserved amino acid position (even across kingdoms), which disrupts the first copper-binding site (CuA) of functional protein, was identified in the homozygous condition (G/G or D/D) in all Asinara white albino donkeys and in the albino son of a trio (the grey parents had genotype C/G or H/D), supporting the recessive mode of inheritance of this mutation. Genotyping 82 donkeys confirmed that Asinara albino donkeys had genotype G/G whereas all other coloured donkeys had genotype C/C or C/G. Across-population association between the c.604C>G genotypes and the albino coat colour was highly significant (P = 6.17E-18). The identification of the causative mutation of the albinism in the Asinara white donkeys might open new perspectives to study the dynamics of this putative deleterious allele in a feral population and to manage this interesting animal genetic resource.

  2. Characterization of a Full-Length Endogenous Beta-Retrovirus, EqERV-Beta1, in the Genome of the Horse (Equus caballus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinette C. van der Kuyl

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Information on endogenous retroviruses fixed in the horse (Equus caballus genome is scarce. The recent availability of a draft sequence of the horse genome enables the detection of such integrated viruses by similarity search. Using translated nucleotide fragments from gamma-, beta-, and delta-retroviral genera for initial searches, a full-length beta-retrovirus genome was retrieved from a horse chromosome 5 contig. The provirus, tentatively named EqERV-beta1 (for the first equine endogenous beta-retrovirus, was 10434 nucleotide (nt in length with the usual retroviral genome structure of 5’LTR-gag-pro-pol-env-3’LTR. The LTRs were 1361 nt long, and differed approximately 1% from each other, suggestive of a relatively recent integration. Coding sequences for gag, pro and pol were present in three different reading-frames, as common for beta-retroviruses, and the reading frames were completely open, except that the env gene was interrupted by a single stopcodon. No reading frame was apparent downstream of the env gene, suggesting that EqERV-beta1 does not encode a superantigen like mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV. A second proviral genome of EqERV-beta1, with no stopcodon in env, is additionally integrated on chromosome 5 downstream of the first virus. Single EqERV-beta1 LTRs were abundantly present on all chromosomes except chromosome 24. Phylogenetically, EqERV-beta1 most closely resembles an unclassified retroviral sequence from cattle (Bos taurus, and the murine beta-retrovirus MMTV.

  3. Towards an adaptive management approach for the conservation of rare antelope in the Kruger National Park - outcome of a workshop held in May 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Grant

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available A precipitous drop in rare antelope numbers specifically roan (Hippotragus equinis sable (Hippotragus niger and tsessebe (Damaliscus lunatus since 1986 has become one of the main concerns of management. The zebra (Equus burchelli population in the preferred habitats of these species had increased with the development of artificial waterpoints especially in the areas occupied by roan and tsessebe, and these events are hypothesised to be the main cause of the decline. Closure of artificial waterpoints resulted in moving the high-density, water-dependent zebra from the northern basalt plains, the preferred roan habitat. However, the expected responding increase in the rare antelope populations did not materialise. This lack of response over six years necessitated a critical re-evaluation of the management of rare antelope in the Kruger National Park. Subsequently, a workshop was held at Skukuza during May 2000. The options for adaptive management of the declining rare antelope populations, which was discussed at the workshop, is the subject of this manuscript. The participants felt that the removal/closure of artificial waterpoints was the most unintrusive management tool available to move high density grazers from the habitats preferred by rare antelope. Waterpoints to be closed should be carefully evaluated, and time allowed for rare antelope to respond to habitat changes. Boosting populations of roan and tsessebe by supplementing animals was seriously considered, with the proviso that it should be done under favourable circumstances. Small patch fires that could provide green grazing over extended periods were recommended. Predator control was discussed but could not obtain general support as a viable option in the Kruger National Park.

  4. Some avian and mammalian hosts of Amblyomma hebraeum and Amblyomma marmoreum (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, I G; MacIvor, K M; Petney, T N; De Vos, V

    1987-09-01

    Large numbers of birds, wild mammals and domestic stock from a variety of localities within the Republic of South Africa were examined for infestation with the ixodid ticks Amblyomma hebraeum and Amblyomma marmoreum. Every warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus), Burchell's zebra (Equus burchelli), impala (Aepyceros melampus) and kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) from the Kruger National Park in the north-eastern Transvaal Lowveld was infested with A. hebraeum. In the eastern Cape Province every helmeted guinea fowl (Numida meleagris), scrub hare (Lepus saxatilis) and kudu from the Andries Vosloo Kudu Reserve; all but 1 of the 22 domestic cattle examined on the farm "Bucklands"; and all Angora goats plus nearly all Boer goats examined on the farm "Brakhill" were infested with this tick. Most animals examined appeared to be good hosts of the immature stages, and the larger the host species the greater the chances of it harbouring large numbers of adult ticks. The largest animals examined, such as eland, buffalo, giraffe and rhinoceros, harboured very large numbers of adult A. hebraeum. No adult A. marmoreum was recovered from any host. However, 50% or more of helmeted guinea fowl and kudu from the Andries Vosloo Kudu Reserve; helmeted guinea fowl, scrub hares and eland (Taurotragus oryx) from the Mountain Zebra National Park; helmeted guinea fowl, kudu, domestic sheep, goats and cattle on the farm "Bucklands", and caracal (Felis caracal) from the Cradock and Southwell areas of the eastern Cape Province were infested with immature A. marmoreum. In the Bontebok National Park in the south-western Cape Province more than 35% of scrub hares, vaal ribbok (Pelea capreolus) and bontebok (Damaliscus dorcas dorcas) were infested with immature ticks. PMID:3329327

  5. Rainfall influences on ungulate population abundance in the Mara-Serengeti ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogutu, J O; Piepho, H-P; Dublin, H T; Bhola, N; Reid, R S

    2008-07-01

    1. Rainfall is the prime climatic factor underpinning the dynamics of African savanna ungulates, but no study has analysed its influence on the abundance of these ungulates at monthly to multiannual time scales. 2. We report relationships between rainfall and changes in age- and sex-structured abundances of seven ungulate species monitored monthly for 15 years using vehicle ground counts in the Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya. 3. Abundance showed strong and curvilinear relationships with current and cumulative rainfall, with older topi, Damaliscus korrigum (Ogilby); warthog, Phacochoerus aethiopicus (Pallas); waterbuck, Kobus ellipsyprimnus (Ogilby); and impala, Aepyceros melampus (Lichtenstein) responding to longer lags than younger animals, portraying carryover effects of prior habitat conditions. 4. The abundances of newborn calves were best correlated with monthly rainfall averaged over the preceding 5-6 months for topi, waterbuck, warthog, and 2 months for the migratory zebra Equus burchelli (Gray), but with seasonal rainfall averaged over 2-5 years for giraffe, Giraffa camelopardalis (L.); impala; and kongoni, Alcelaphus busephalus (Pallas). The cumulative late wet-season rainfall was the best predictor of abundance for quarter- to full-grown animals for most species. Monthly rainfall exerted both negative and positive effects on the abundances of zebra, impala and waterbuck. Ignoring age, both sexes responded similarly to rainfall. 5. Births were strongly seasonal only for warthog and topi, but peaked between August and December for most species. Hence abundance was strongly seasonal for young topi and warthog and the migratory zebra. Pronounced seasonality in births for warthog and topi obliterated otherwise strong relationships between abundance and rainfall when both month and rainfall were included in the same model. Aggregated density produced relationships with rainfall similar to those for fully grown animals, emphasizing the necessity of

  6. 卡拉麦里山自然保护区蒙古野驴的食性%Food habits of Kulan (Equus hemionus hemionus)in Kalamaili Mountain Nature Reserve,Xinjiang,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐文轩; 杨维康; 乔建芳

    2009-01-01

    We quantified food habits of Kulan (Equus hemionus hemionus) at Kalamaili Mountain Nature Reserve (KNR) in northern Xinjiang, September 2006 - August 2007, using faecal microscopic methods. We identified 46 plant species in Kulan fecal samples, representing 17 families. Diets veried seasonally: in autumn, we documented 25 plant species from 8 families consumed by Kulans; in winter, Kulan consumed 13 plant species from 5 families; 30 plant species from 14 families were used by Kulan in spring; and 26 plant species from 13 families were used by Kulan in summer. Chenopodiaceae and Gramineae were major foods of Kulan, comprising 64. 7% -84. 1% of their diet, and forbs were very important to Kulan in spring. Stipa glareosa was a major food of Kulan in spring and summer, of lesser but significant importance were Haloxylon ammodendron and Ceratoides latens. Similar to the summer, grasses like Stipa glareosa also played an important role in autumn, but shrubs became of more importance. In winter, Anabasis spp. and Reaumuria soongonica were the major food of Kulan. We believe that the Kulan in KNR occupied a grazer-mixed feeder continuum, and the change of the Kulan food habits through the year were due to the seasonal changes in plant nutrient quality and human interferences. Anabasis spp. , which played a major role in winter, was utilized as a strategy for energy metabolism.%@@ 蒙古野驴(Equus hemionus hemionus),国家一级保护动物.由于人类活动的加剧,分布范围缩小,加之过度狩猎,目前已处于濒危状态.

  7. Decreasing a-synuclein aggregation by methanolic extract of Centella asiatica in zebrafish Parkinson’s model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Husnul; Khotimah; Mulyohadi; Ali; Sutiman; Bambang; Sumitro; Mochamad; Aris; Widodo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of Centella asiatica(C. asiatica) methanolic extract on a-synuclein aggregation and its expression in rotenone-exposed zebra fish.Methods: Zebra fish(Danio rerio) were exposed to 5 m g/L rotenone for 28 days and coincubated with 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 m g/mL of C. asiatica methanolic extract. The medium was changed every 48 h for maintain the concentration of rotenone and extract. After 28 days zebra fish were sacrificed on the ice block and protein was isolated from zebra fish brain for ELISA of dopamine and Western blotting of a-synuclein. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to observe the a-synuclein expressions from histopathological preparation of zebra fish brain. The head were soaked in 10% formaline for less than 24 h and embedded onto paraffin block, then sliced for immunohistochemistry using anti a-synuclein antibody. We also measured zebra fish motility for 5 min in each week.Results: C. asiatica has important bioactive compounds such as asiaticoside that has antiin flammatory and antioxidant properties. It may inhibit cascade reaction due to oxidative stress induced by rotenone. Decreasing reactive oxygen species proposed probability of radical attack to a-synuclein protein that caused aggregation and increase of its expression.The motility of zebra fish was also maintained in C. asiatica groups due to the increasing dopamine level in rotenone-induced zebra fish. High level of reactive oxygen species inactivated enzyme for dopamine synthesis such as tyrosine hydroxylase, and oxidized dopamine itself. Oxidized dopamine increased a-synuclein aggregation. Thus, the dopamine level decreased in rotenone-induced zebra fish, but C. asiatica increased dopamine level.Conclusions: C. asiatica has a potential to be developed as an anti-Parkinson’s disease treatment due to its capability for minimized the sign of Parkinson’s such as a-synuclein aggregation and expression, increasing motility and dopamine as well.

  8. INLUÊNCIA DO TEMPO DE DESCANSO “ANTE MORTEM” E DIETA DE MELAÇO SOBRE OS NÍVEIS DE GLICOGÊNIO MUSCULAR NA CARNE DE EQÜINOS (Equus caballus INFLUENCE OF “ANTE MORTEM” RESTING TIME AND MOLASSES DIET UPON MUSCULAR GLYCOGEN LEVELS IN EQUINES MEAT (Equus caballus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Garcia

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Foram coletadas 48 amostras de músculos tríceps braquial e bíceps femural de vinte e quatro eqüinos machos, sem raça definida, adultos e com pesos aproximadamente iguais. Antes do abate, os animais foram divididos em seis lotes que tiveram descanso ante mortem de zero, seis, quatorze, dezoito e vinte e quatro horas respectivamente. O lote de animais que descansou por dezoito horas foi subdividido em dois sublotes, sendo que um deles recebeu dieta de solução aquosa a 5% de melaço. Todos os outros animais só receberam água e ficaram em jejum. Não se observou influência sobre o pH. O glicogênio foi dosado pelos métodos de Pfluger e Nelson. O lote que apresentou menores índices de glicogênio foi o que descansou por zero hora, enquanto que o lote que apresentou maiores índices de glicogênio foi o que descansou por vinte e quatro horas.

    Influence of “ante mortem” resting time and molasses diet upon muscular glycogen levels in equines meat (Equus caballus were studied. Forty-eight samples of triceps brachial and biceps femoral muscles of twenty-four adults and hybrids equines with approximately the same weights were analyzed. The animals were divided before death, in six groups with “ante mortem” resting time of zero, six, fourteen, eighteen and twenty-four hours, respectively. The animal groups with eighteen hours of rest were divided in two sub-groups and one received water solution with 5% of molasses. Alteration in pH levels were not observed. The glycogen was measured by Pfluger and Nelson’s methods. The group with smaller glycogen level was the group with zero hour of “ante mortem” rest, while the group with higher glycogen levels was the group with twenty-four hours of rest.

  9. 蒙古野驴(Equus hemionus)昼间行为时间分配初探%Diurnal time budgets and activity rhythm of the Khulan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟; 杨维康; 黄怡; 徐文轩; 林杰; 夏参军; 徐峰; David Blank

    2012-01-01

    于2007年和2010年采用焦点动物取样法研究了新疆卡拉麦里山有蹄类野生动物保护区蒙古野驴昼间行为时间分配和活动节律,共采集行为数据460 h,观察蒙古野驴2 760头次,将蒙古野驴昼间行为分为采食、移动、警戒、休息和“其他”5类.采用卡方检验分析不同季节各种行为时间分配,结果表明:季节因素对蒙古野驴行为时间分配存在极显著影响(X2=79.06,df=12,P<0.01).采用ANOVA分析同季节不同行为间差异,结果表明,春季:移动、警戒、“其他”两两间无显著差异(P>0.05),其余两两间差异显著(P<0.05);夏季:仅移动与“其他”间无显著差异(P>0.05);秋冬季:仅警戒与“其他”间无显著差异(P>0.05).对蒙古野驴昼间活动节律研究结果表明,蒙古野驴采食时间比例在春季各时段均较高(>45%),仅中午(14:00 ~ 15:00)有1个低谷(27.62%),夏秋季则为晨昏采食模式,冬季采食峰值(87.85%)在中午时段( 13:00 ~ 14:00).休息和采食高峰在各季节交叉出现,呈现此消彼长的趋势.各季节移动主要发生在晨昏时段.蒙古野驴以特定的行为时间分配模式和活动节律适应环境条件季节性变化,如气候条件、食物资源、人为干扰、生理期、昼间长度、捕食风险等.%The diurnal behaviors (including foraging, moving, vigilance, resting, and "others" ) of Khulan (Equus hemionus) were observed in the Kalamaili Mountain Nature Reserve in 2007 and 2010. The diurnal behavioral time budgets and activity rhythm were studied by focal-sampling method. A total of 460 hours worth of data was collect- ed. The paper used Chi-square tests to evaluate differences in the diurnal behaviors of in each season. The results indicated that all behaviors differed (χ2 = 79.06,df=12,P0. 05) , the rest combinations were extremely significant ( P 0. 05) , the rest combinations were significant (P 0. 05) in autumn and winter, the rest

  10. Descripción y significado biostratigráfico y climático del Equus e Hippopotamus. en el yacimiento de Venta Micena (Granada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberdi, M. T.

    1985-08-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Hippopotamus antiquus and Equus stenonis granatensis nov. ssp. indicates for the Venta Micena locality an approximate age near the Lower-Middle Pleistocene boundary and very near that of the Sainzelles bed, dated 1.3 m. y. Ecologicaly this period representa, during the Pleistocene, one of the ages in whi.ch the lacustrine surface had the largest extension in the Baza basin (Guadix-Baza Depression.

    La presencia de Hippopotamus antiquus y de E. stenonis granatensis nov. ssp. indican para la localidad de Venta Micena una edad próxima al límite Pleistoceno inferior-medio y muy próxima a la del yacimiento de Sainzelles datado con 1.3 m. a. Ecológicamente este período significa durante el Pleistoceno una de las épocas de mayor extensión de la superficie lacustre en la Subcuenca de Baza (Depresión de Guadix-Baza.

  11. Nõela all : Igakuine vinüülitutvustus / Ninja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ninja

    1999-01-01

    Heliplaatide The Ram Trilogy "Chapter Three EP", JMJ & Richie "Zebra 3/Temporal Mechanics", USG feat. Monica Elam "Life Is 4 Living", Shy FX "bambaata ", Bloefield "Nexus", Leon Thomas "The Antology" tutvustus

  12. Sequence analysis of Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (Lso-C) isolated from carrot psyllids collected in Scandinavia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fastidious prokaryote Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (Lso), transmitted by the tomato potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli), is associated with the Zebra Chip disease of potato. Plants infected with Liberibacter may experience significant yield losses and these plants also serve as pote...

  13. Comparison of Candiatus Liberibacter solanacearum genomic sequences isolated from carrot psyllids in Scandinavia and potato psyllids from Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fastidious prokaryote Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (Lso), transmitted by the tomato potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli), is associated with the Zebra Chip disease of potato. Plants infected with Liberibacter may experience significant yield losses and these plants also serve as poten...

  14. 9 CFR 75.1-75.3 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS COMMUNICABLE DISEASES IN HORSES, ASSES, PONIES, MULES, AND ZEBRAS Dourine in Horses and Asses §§ 75.1-75.3 Equine Infectious Anemia (Swamp Fever)...

  15. A Ploidy Difference Represents an Impassable Barrier for Hybridisation in Animals. Is There an Exception among Botiid Loaches (Teleostei: Botiidae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Bohlen

    Full Text Available One of the most efficient mechanisms to keep animal lineages separate is a difference in ploidy level (number of whole genome copies, since hybrid offspring from parents with different ploidy level are functionally sterile. In the freshwater fish family Botiidae, ploidy difference has been held responsible for the separation of its two subfamilies, the evolutionary tetraploid Botiinae and the diploid Leptobotiinae. Diploid and tetraploid species coexist in the upper Yangtze, the Pearl River and the Red River basins in China. Interestingly, the species 'Botia' zebra from the Pearl River basin combines a number of morphological characters that otherwise are found in the diploid genus Leptobotia with morphological characters of the tetraploid genus Sinibotia, therefore the aim of the present study is to test weather 'B.' zebra is the result of a hybridisation event between species from different subfamilies with different ploidy level. A closer morphological examination indeed demonstrates a high similarity of 'B.' zebra to two co-occurring species, the diploid Leptobotia guilinensis and the tetraploid Sinibotia pulchra. These two species thus could have been the potential parental species in case of a hybrid origin of 'B.' zebra. The morphologic analysis further reveals that 'B.' zebra bears even the diagnostic characters of the genera Leptobotia (Leptobotiinae and Sinibotia (Botiinae. In contrast, a comparison of six allozyme loci between 'B.' zebra, L. guilinensis and S. pulchra showed only similarities between 'B.' zebra and S. pulchra, not between 'B.' zebra and L. guilinensis. Six specimens of 'B.' zebra that were cytogenetically analysed were tetraploid with 4n = 100. The composition of the karyotype (18% metacentric, 18% submetacentric, 36% subtelocentric and 28% acrocentric chromosomes differs from those of L. guilinensis (12%, 24%, 20% and 44% and S. pulchra (20%, 26%, 28% and 26%, and cannot be obtained by any combination of genomes from

  16. A Ploidy Difference Represents an Impassable Barrier for Hybridisation in Animals. Is There an Exception among Botiid Loaches (Teleostei: Botiidae)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlen, Jörg; Šlechtová, Vendula; Šlechta, Vlastimil; Šlechtová, Vera; Sember, Alexandr; Ráb, Petr

    2016-01-01

    One of the most efficient mechanisms to keep animal lineages separate is a difference in ploidy level (number of whole genome copies), since hybrid offspring from parents with different ploidy level are functionally sterile. In the freshwater fish family Botiidae, ploidy difference has been held responsible for the separation of its two subfamilies, the evolutionary tetraploid Botiinae and the diploid Leptobotiinae. Diploid and tetraploid species coexist in the upper Yangtze, the Pearl River and the Red River basins in China. Interestingly, the species 'Botia' zebra from the Pearl River basin combines a number of morphological characters that otherwise are found in the diploid genus Leptobotia with morphological characters of the tetraploid genus Sinibotia, therefore the aim of the present study is to test weather 'B.' zebra is the result of a hybridisation event between species from different subfamilies with different ploidy level. A closer morphological examination indeed demonstrates a high similarity of 'B.' zebra to two co-occurring species, the diploid Leptobotia guilinensis and the tetraploid Sinibotia pulchra. These two species thus could have been the potential parental species in case of a hybrid origin of 'B.' zebra. The morphologic analysis further reveals that 'B.' zebra bears even the diagnostic characters of the genera Leptobotia (Leptobotiinae) and Sinibotia (Botiinae). In contrast, a comparison of six allozyme loci between 'B.' zebra, L. guilinensis and S. pulchra showed only similarities between 'B.' zebra and S. pulchra, not between 'B.' zebra and L. guilinensis. Six specimens of 'B.' zebra that were cytogenetically analysed were tetraploid with 4n = 100. The composition of the karyotype (18% metacentric, 18% submetacentric, 36% subtelocentric and 28% acrocentric chromosomes) differs from those of L. guilinensis (12%, 24%, 20% and 44%) and S. pulchra (20%, 26%, 28% and 26%), and cannot be obtained by any combination of genomes from L

  17. Comparing responses of four ungulate species to playbacks of baboon alarm calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Dawn M; Bergman, Thore J; Cheney, Dorothy L; Nicholson, James R; Seyfarth, Robert M

    2010-11-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that a wide range of animals can recognize and respond appropriately to calls produced by other species. Social learning has been implicated as a possible mechanism by which heterospecific call recognition might develop. To examine whether familiarity and/or shared vulnerability with the calling species might influence the ability of sympatric species to distinguish heterospecific alarm calls, we tested whether four ungulate species (impala: Aepyceros melampus; tsessebe: Damaliscus lunatus; zebra: Equus burchelli; wildebeest: Connochaetes taurinus) could distinguish baboon (Papio hamadryas ursinus) alarm calls from other loud baboon calls produced during intra-specific aggressive interactions ('contest' calls). Overall, subjects' responses were stronger following playback of alarm calls than contest calls. Of the species tested, impala showed the strongest responses and the greatest difference in composite response scores, suggesting they were best able to differentiate call types. Compared with the other ungulate species, impala are the most frequent associates of baboons. Moreover, like baboons, they are susceptible to both lion and leopard attacks, whereas leopards rarely take the larger ungulates. Although it seems possible that high rates of association and/or shared vulnerability may influence impala's greater ability to distinguish among baboon call types, our results point to a stronger influence of familiarity. Ours is the first study to compare such abilities among several community members with variable natural histories, and we discuss future experiments that would more systematically examine development of these skills in young ungulates.

  18. Influence of social upbringing on the activity pattern of captive lion Panthera leo cubs: Benefits of behavior enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibonokuhle NCUBE, Hilton Garikai Taambuka NDAGURWA

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The influence of social upbringing on the activity pattern of lion Panthera leo cubs was investigated at three sites. In this study, stimulus objects such as sticks, grass, fresh dung (elephant Loxondota africana, zebra Equus quagga, impala Aepyceros melampus, duiker Sylvicapra grimmia, kudu Tragelaphus strepsiceros, giraffe Giraffa camelopardalis and wildebeest Connochaetes taurinus and cardboard boxes, were utilized in an enrichment program aimed at encouraging active behaviors of captive lion cubs at Antelope Park and Masuwe. Lion cubs at Chipangali were not behaviorally enriched. Activity patterns were recorded for 10 days at each site. We recorded moving, resting, playing, grooming, visual exploration and display of hunting instincts. We found that behavioral enrichment enhanced the active behaviors of captive lion cubs. Orphan-raised cubs spent more time moving, playing and displaying hunting instincts than mother-raised cubs, but the time spent grooming was similar across areas and suggests that grooming is not influenced by enrichment. Mother-raised cubs spent more time engaged in visual exploration than orphan-raised cubs and this could be a behavior acquired from mothers or a result of confidence to explore because of their presence. Activity patterns were different among time treatments across our three study sites. Based on these findings, we suggest that lion cubs raised in captivity could benefit from behavioral enrichment to encourage active behaviors essential for eventual reintroduction into the wild [Current Zoology 56 (4: 389–394, 2010].

  19. Piano Crossing - Generating music using computer vision

    OpenAIRE

    Lipanje, Matevž

    2010-01-01

    Piano Crossing is an interactive art installation which transforms the zebra crossing into a working piano keyboard where pedestrians generate music by walking across it. Installation consists of the zeboard - zebra crossing turned keyboard - by adding black stripes to the existing white ones, serving as keys, a digital camera overlooking the zeboard and of a laptop computer with speakers. The computer runs a specially designed software, which recognizes pedestrian's contacts with the keys by...

  20. Hymenopteran parasitoids associated with the banana-skipper Erionota thrax L. (Insecta: Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae) in Java, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    ERNIWATI; ROSICHON UBAIDILLAH

    2011-01-01

    Erniwati, Ubaidillah R (2011) Hymenopteran parasitoids associated with the banana-skipper Erionota thrax L. (Insecta: Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae) in Java, Indonesia. Biodiversitas 12: 76-85. Hymenopteran parasitoids of banana-skipper Erionota thrax L. (Insecta: Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae) from Java, Indonesia are reviewed and an illustrated key to 12 species is presented to include Theronia zebra zebra, Xanthopimpla gamsura, Casinaria sp., Charops sp., Cotesia (Apanteles) erionotae, Brachymeria l...

  1. Lionfish predators use flared fin displays to initiate cooperative hunting

    OpenAIRE

    Lönnstedt, Oona M; Ferrari, Maud C. O.; Chivers, Douglas P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable study, mystery surrounds the use of signals that initiate cooperative hunting in animals. Using a labyrinth test chamber, we examined whether a lionfish, Dendrochirus zebra, would initiate cooperative hunts with piscine partners. We found that D. zebra uses a stereotyped flared fin display to alert conspecific and heterospecific lionfish species Pterois antennata to the presence of prey. Per capita success rate was significantly higher for cooperative hunters when compare...

  2. Trophic Niche Width and Overlap of Equus przewalskii, E. hemionusand Gazella subgutturosain Autumn%重引入普氏野马、蒙古野驴和鹅喉羚的秋季营养生态位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄艳; 初红军; 兰文旭; 时坤; 陶永善; 邵长亮

    2011-01-01

    In this study,the fresh excrements of Equus przewalskii,E.hemionus and Gazella subgutturosa were systematically collected from the Qiaomuxibai of Karamori Natue Reserve in Xinjiang in autumn 2009.Fecal microscopic means were used to analyze the habitats of the abovementioned three species and their food niche.The results show that the 3 species have similar diet in terms of types,but different in terms of proportion,where Stipa spp.are the main food sources of these species,and their diet percentages are 43.63%,49% and 44.65% respectively.The nutritional niche breadths of E.przewalskii,E.hemionus and G.subgutturosa are 0.634,0.619 and 0.539 respectively.The nutritional niche overlap values of E.przewalskii and E.hemionus,E.przewalskii and G.subgutturosa,E.hemionus and G.subgutturosa are 0.98,0.986 and 0.962 respectively,and the extent of nutritional niche overlap between the three species is 0.477.The three species are very similar in terms of consuming food resources.%2009年秋季在新疆卡拉麦里山自然保护区乔木西拜,系统采集了重引入普氏野马(Equus przewalskii)、蒙古野驴(E.hemionus)和鹅喉羚(Gazella subgutturosa)的新鲜粪便,运用粪便显微分析法研究三者的秋季食性及其食物生态位。结果显示:普氏野马、鹅喉羚和蒙古野驴采食的植物种类基本相似,但在食谱中所占的比例各不相同,针茅属植物是3个物种的主要采食种类,在食谱中所占比例分别为43.63%,49.00%和44.65%。普氏野马、鹅喉羚和蒙古野驴的营养生态位宽度分别为0.634,0.619和0.539。普氏野马和鹅喉羚,普氏野马和蒙古野驴,鹅喉羚和蒙古野驴的营养生态位重叠值分别为0.980,0.986和0.962,3个物种间的营养生态位重叠度为0.477,三者之间存在很高的食物资源利用的相似性。

  3. 卡拉麦里山有蹄类自然保护区蒙古野驴生境适宜性评价%Habitat suitability assessment of Equus hemionus hemionus in Kalamaili Mountain Nature Reserve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林杰; 徐文轩; 杨维康; 夏参军; 刘伟

    2012-01-01

    为加强蒙古野驴(Equus hemionus hemionus)的生境保护及管理工作,作者以2005年以来在卡拉麦里山有蹄类自然保护区的野外调查数据为基础,在地理信息系统(GIS)支持下,以距水源点距离、坡度、植被类型和人类活动为评价因子,采用生境评价模型,对蒙古野驴的生境进行了适宜性评价.不考虑人类活动影响下,春、夏、秋、冬四季潜在总适宜生境面积分别为9,784 km2、8,090 km2、9,379 km2和10,856 km2,分别占保护区总面积的54.4%、44.9%、52.1%和60.3%.由于受到国道、矿产开采、冬季放牧等人类活动的强烈影响,研究区内适宜生境大量丧失,冬季丧失面积最多,为6,629 km2,占冬季潜在总适宜面积的61.1%.基于评价结果作者提出了相应的蒙古野驴种群保护措施:(1)加强水源地的保护;(2)限制冬季进入保护区内家畜的数量,并为蒙古野驴划定预留适宜生境;(3)严格制定进入保护区的制度;(4)拆除迁移路线上的边境围栏或建设野生动物通道,以保障蒙古野驴正常的迁徙活动,恢复其种群基因交流.%To improve habitat conservation and management of the Khulan {Equus hemiomus hemionus), we assessed the habitat suitability of this species in the Kalamaili Mountain Nature Reserve. Distance from water point, slope, vegetation type and human activities were selected as factors for habitat suitability assessment, and the habitat evaluation model for the assessment was conducted with GIS. In the absence of human activities, the total area of potential suitable habitat was 9,784 km2, 8,090 km2, 9,379 km2 and 10,856 km2 during the four seasons, accounting for 54.4%, 44.9%, 52.1% and 60.3% of the total reserve area, respectively. However, the reserve was negatively affected by a national highway, mine exploration, and grazing livestock. As a result, a large amount of suitable habitats were lost in the reserve. Especially in winter, nearly 6,629 km2 of

  4. 三硝基甲苯对斑马鱼组织ATP酶·乳酸脱氢酶和谷胱甘肽活性的影响%Effects of Trinitrotoluene on Activities of ATP Enzyme, Lactate Dehydrogenase and Glutathione from Zebra Fish Tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢松; 付兴亮; 曲瑾; 王佳; 卢胜涛; 柳峰松

    2013-01-01

    [目的]探讨三硝基甲苯(TNT)对斑马鱼(Danio rerio)组织中酶活性的影响,为评价TNT的毒性效应提供参考.[方法]采用毒性试验方法研究了不同浓度(0.5、1.0、2.0、4.0mg/L)的TNT对斑马鱼肝和鳃中ATP酶、头中乳酸脱氢酶(LDH)和肝中谷胱甘肽(GSH)活性的影响.[结果]肝和腮组织中的ATP酶活性随浓度的升高而降低;肝中GSH的活性随浓度的升高而升高;头中LDH活性随浓度的升高而降低.酶活随时间的变化规律和随不同浓度的变化规律相同,但变化缓慢.[结论]用斑马鱼肝和腮组织中酶活性作为毒理学指标能较好地评价TNT的毒性效应.%[Objective] The aim was to explore effects of Trinitrotoluene ( TNT) on activities of ATP enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glutathione (GSH ) of Danio rerio tissue so as to provide reference for evaluation on toxicity effect of TNT. [Method] Effects of TNT of different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/L) on activities of ATP enzyme from liver and gill tissues, LDH from head tissue and GSH from liver tissue of D. rerio were determined by using toxicity test method. [Result] The activity of ATP enzyme from liver and gill tissues decreased with the increase of TNT mass concentration; the activity of GSH from liver tissue increased with the increase of TNT mass concentration ; the activity of LDH from head tissue decreased with the increase of TNT mass concentration. The variation of enzyme activity over time was the same as different concentration but changed slowly. [Conclusion] It can better evaluate the toxic effects of TNT to use the activities of enzymes from D. rerio liver and gills as loxicological indicators.

  5. EFFECTS OF SHORT-TERM PHENANTHRENE EXPOSURE ON REPRODUCTIVE BEHAVIOR, SPAWNING, FERTILIZATION,INCUBATION AND LARVA MORTALITY OF THE ZEBRA FISH (BRANCHYDANIO RERIO)%菲(PHE)短期暴露对斑马鱼(Branchydanio rerio)繁殖行为及产卵、受精、孵化和仔鱼死亡率的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄菲; 胡莹莹; 焦艳; 牛翠娟

    2010-01-01

    研究了菲(PHE)短期暴露对斑马鱼(Branchydanio rerio)繁殖行为及其产卵量、受精率、孵化率和仔鱼死亡率的影响.将性成熟的斑马鱼分别暴露于PHE质量浓度ρ(PHE)为0、0.05、0.5、5、50 μg·L~(-1)的水中7 d后,将其配对进行繁殖,录制配对次日光照开始0.5 h内的繁殖行为,统计产卵量、受精率、受精卵3 d内的孵化率以及仔鱼7 d内的死亡率.与对照组相比,高ρ(PHE)(>0.5 μg·L~(-1))对斑马鱼的繁殖行为抑制作用显著(P0.05).ρ(PHE)>0.05 μg·L~(-1)的能够显著降低斑马鱼的产卵量和受精率(P<0.01).PHE对斑马鱼孵化率的影响,表现出低ρ(PHE)促进卵的孵化,但这种作用随着ρ(PHE)的升高而逐渐降低,高ρ(PHE)反而抑制卵的孵化.ρ(PHE)对仔鱼死亡率的影响,则没有表现出明显的相关性.

  6. 普氏野马与两种新疆地方品种马的ELA-DRA*exon2的多态性分析%Polymorphisms of the Gene ELA-DRA * exon 2 in Przewalski's Horse (Equus Przewalskii) and Two Kinds of Xinjiang Local Breeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于丽娟; 恩特马克; 凌英会; 马月辉; 马合木提·哈力克

    2011-01-01

    To understand the polymorphism and allele frequency distribution of ELA-DRA * exon2 in Przewalski,s horse(Equus PrzewaLskii) , Kazakh and Yanqi horse, ELA-DRA * exon2 in three types of horses was genotyped by PCR-SSCP methods. Both the nucleotide and the amino acid sequences of the different alleles were analyzed in these horses. The results showed that seven genotypes were detected in 127 horses: three homozygotes named AA, BB and CC, four heterozygotes named AB, BC, AC and AD. AA genotype was dominant in Kazakh and Yanqi horses.CC was the dominant genotype in Przewalski's horse(Equus Przewalskii). The chi-square analysis suggested that the allele and genotype frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the three horse types. The analysis of PIC and He showed that the three horse types belonged to intermediate polymorphism. The values of PIC and He in Przewalski's horse(Equus Przewalskii)were lower than that in Kazakh and Yanqi horses.%为了解普氏野马、哈萨克马与焉耆马的ELA-DRA*exon2的多态性以及等位基因频率分布.本研究采用PCR-SSCP技术对普氏野马、哈萨克马与焉耆马的ELA-DRA*exon2进行分型,并对不同等位基因进行核苷酸与氨基酸分析.结果显示:127匹马中共出现7种基因型,3种纯合子分别记为AA、BB、CC;4种杂合子分别记为AB、AC、BC、AD.AA基因型为哈萨克马与焉耆马的优势基因型,普氏野马以CC基因型为主.经x2检验后,3种类型马的等位基因频率和基因型频率均处于Hardy-Weinberg平衡状态.PIC值与He值分析表明,3种类型马均属于中度多态,且普氏野马的PIC值与He值比哈萨克马与焉耆马低.

  7. Preliminary characterization of digestive enzymes in freshwater mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauey, Blake W.; Amberg, Jon J.; Cooper, Scott T.; Grunwald, Sandra K.; Newton, Teresa J.; Haro, Roger J.

    2015-01-01

    Resource managers lack an effective chemical tool to control the invasive zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha. Zebra mussels clog water intakes for hydroelectric companies, harm unionid mussel species, and are believed to be a reservoir of avian botulism. Little is known about the digestive physiology of zebra mussels and unionid mussels. The enzymatic profile of the digestive glands of zebra mussels and native threeridge (Amblema plicata) and plain pocketbook mussels (Lampsilis cardium) are characterized using a commercial enzyme kit, api ZYM, and validated the kit with reagent-grade enzymes. A linear correlation was shown for only one of nineteen enzymes, tested between the api ZYM kit and a specific enzyme kit. Thus, the api ZYM kit should only be used to make general comparisons of enzyme presence and to observe trends in enzyme activities. Enzymatic trends were seen in the unionid mussel species, but not in zebra mussels sampled 32 days apart from the same location. Enzymatic classes, based on substrate, showed different trends, with proteolytic and phospholytic enzymes having the most change in relative enzyme activity.

  8. Manila clam Venerupis philippinarum as a biomonitor to metal pollution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Huifeng; JI Chenglong; WANG Qing; LIU Xiaoli; ZHAO Jianmin; FENG Jianghua

    2013-01-01

    The Manila clam Venerupis philippinarum is a good biomonitor/bioindicator to marine metal pollution and is frequently used in aquatic toxicology.Two dominant pedigrees (white and zebra) of clam are distributed in the Bohai Sea; however,little attention has been paid to potential biological differences between these two pedigrees.In this study,we tested the sensitivity of both pedigrees to marine metal (cadmium and zinc) pollution biomonitoring and marine environmental toxicology.Results demonstrate significant biological differences in gills of white and zebra clams based on metabolic profiles and antioxidant enzyme activities.In addition,we found that hypotaurine,malonate and homarine were relatively high in white clam gills,while alanine,arginine,glutamate,succinate,4-aminobutyrate,taurine and betaine were high in zebra clam gills.Zebra clam gills were also more sensitive to a mixture of Cd and Zn,as shown by antioxidant enzyme activities and metabolic profiles,but white clam gills could accumulate more Zn.Therefore,we suggest that the white pedigree can be used as a biomonitor to marine Zn pollution,whereas the zebra pedigree can be used for toxicology studies on Cd and Zn mixed pollution.

  9. Keeper-Animal Interactions: Differences between the Behaviour of Zoo Animals Affect Stockmanship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Samantha J; Melfi, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    Stockmanship is a term used to describe the management of animals with a good stockperson someone who does this in a in a safe, effective, and low-stress manner for both the stock-keeper and animals involved. Although impacts of unfamiliar zoo visitors on animal behaviour have been extensively studied, the impact of stockmanship i.e familiar zoo keepers is a new area of research; which could reveal significant ramifications for zoo animal behaviour and welfare. It is likely that different relationships are formed dependant on the unique keeper-animal dyad (human-animal interaction, HAI). The aims of this study were to (1) investigate if unique keeper-animal dyads were formed in zoos, (2) determine whether keepers differed in their interactions towards animals regarding their attitude, animal knowledge and experience and (3) explore what factors affect keeper-animal dyads and ultimately influence animal behaviour and welfare. Eight black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis), eleven Chapman's zebra (Equus burchellii), and twelve Sulawesi crested black macaques (Macaca nigra) were studied in 6 zoos across the UK and USA. Subtle cues and commands directed by keepers towards animals were identified. The animals latency to respond and the respective behavioural response (cue-response) was recorded per keeper-animal dyad (n = 93). A questionnaire was constructed following a five-point Likert Scale design to record keeper demographic information and assess the job satisfaction of keepers, their attitude towards the animals and their perceived relationship with them. There was a significant difference in the animals' latency to appropriately respond after cues and commands from different keepers, indicating unique keeper-animal dyads were formed. Stockmanship style was also different between keepers; two main components contributed equally towards this: "attitude towards the animals" and "knowledge and experience of the animals". In this novel study, data demonstrated unique dyads

  10. Keeper-Animal Interactions: Differences between the Behaviour of Zoo Animals Affect Stockmanship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J Ward

    Full Text Available Stockmanship is a term used to describe the management of animals with a good stockperson someone who does this in a in a safe, effective, and low-stress manner for both the stock-keeper and animals involved. Although impacts of unfamiliar zoo visitors on animal behaviour have been extensively studied, the impact of stockmanship i.e familiar zoo keepers is a new area of research; which could reveal significant ramifications for zoo animal behaviour and welfare. It is likely that different relationships are formed dependant on the unique keeper-animal dyad (human-animal interaction, HAI. The aims of this study were to (1 investigate if unique keeper-animal dyads were formed in zoos, (2 determine whether keepers differed in their interactions towards animals regarding their attitude, animal knowledge and experience and (3 explore what factors affect keeper-animal dyads and ultimately influence animal behaviour and welfare. Eight black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis, eleven Chapman's zebra (Equus burchellii, and twelve Sulawesi crested black macaques (Macaca nigra were studied in 6 zoos across the UK and USA. Subtle cues and commands directed by keepers towards animals were identified. The animals latency to respond and the respective behavioural response (cue-response was recorded per keeper-animal dyad (n = 93. A questionnaire was constructed following a five-point Likert Scale design to record keeper demographic information and assess the job satisfaction of keepers, their attitude towards the animals and their perceived relationship with them. There was a significant difference in the animals' latency to appropriately respond after cues and commands from different keepers, indicating unique keeper-animal dyads were formed. Stockmanship style was also different between keepers; two main components contributed equally towards this: "attitude towards the animals" and "knowledge and experience of the animals". In this novel study, data demonstrated

  11. A high density SNP array for the domestic horse and extant Perissodactyla: utility for association mapping, genetic diversity, and phylogeny studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly E McCue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An equine SNP genotyping array was developed and evaluated on a panel of samples representing 14 domestic horse breeds and 18 evolutionarily related species. More than 54,000 polymorphic SNPs provided an average inter-SNP spacing of ∼43 kb. The mean minor allele frequency across domestic horse breeds was 0.23, and the number of polymorphic SNPs within breeds ranged from 43,287 to 52,085. Genome-wide linkage disequilibrium (LD in most breeds declined rapidly over the first 50-100 kb and reached background levels within 1-2 Mb. The extent of LD and the level of inbreeding were highest in the Thoroughbred and lowest in the Mongolian and Quarter Horse. Multidimensional scaling (MDS analyses demonstrated the tight grouping of individuals within most breeds, close proximity of related breeds, and less tight grouping in admixed breeds. The close relationship between the Przewalski's Horse and the domestic horse was demonstrated by pair-wise genetic distance and MDS. Genotyping of other Perissodactyla (zebras, asses, tapirs, and rhinoceros was variably successful, with call rates and the number of polymorphic loci varying across taxa. Parsimony analysis placed the modern horse as sister taxa to Equus przewalski. The utility of the SNP array in genome-wide association was confirmed by mapping the known recessive chestnut coat color locus (MC1R and defining a conserved haplotype of ∼750 kb across all breeds. These results demonstrate the high quality of this SNP genotyping resource, its usefulness in diverse genome analyses of the horse, and potential use in related species.

  12. Investigating determinants of yawning in the domestic (Equus caballus) and Przewalski (Equus ferus przewalskii) horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górecka-Bruzda, Aleksandra; Fureix, Carole; Ouvrard, Anne; Bourjade, Marie; Hausberger, Martine

    2016-10-01

    Yawning is rare in herbivores which therefore may be an interesting group to disentangle the potential function(s) of yawning behaviour. Horses provide the opportunity to compare not only animals living in different conditions but also wild versus domestic species. Here, we tested three hypotheses by observing both domestic and Przewalski horses living in semi-natural conditions: (i) that domestic horses may show an elevated rate of yawning as a result of the domestication process (or as a result of life conditions), (ii) that individuals experiencing a higher level of social stress would yawn more than individuals with lower social stress and (iii) that males would yawn more often than females. The study involved 19 Przewalski horses (PHs) and 16 domestic horses (DHs) of different breeds living in large outdoor enclosures. The results showed that there was no difference between the PH and DH in yawning frequency (YF). PHs exhibited much higher levels of social interactions than DHs. There was a positive correlation between yawning frequency and aggressive behaviours in PHs, especially males, supporting the idea that yawning may be associated with more excitatory/stressful social situations. A correlation was found between yawning frequency and affiliative behaviours in DHs, which supports the potential relationship between yawning and social context. Finally, the entire males, but not castrated males, showed much higher levels of yawning than females in both species. The intensity (rather than the valence) of the interaction may be important in triggering yawning, which could therefore be a displacement activity that helps reduce tension. PMID:27542092

  13. Investigating determinants of yawning in the domestic ( Equus caballus) and Przewalski ( Equus ferus przewalskii) horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górecka-Bruzda, Aleksandra; Fureix, Carole; Ouvrard, Anne; Bourjade, Marie; Hausberger, Martine

    2016-10-01

    Yawning is rare in herbivores which therefore may be an interesting group to disentangle the potential function(s) of yawning behaviour. Horses provide the opportunity to compare not only animals living in different conditions but also wild versus domestic species. Here, we tested three hypotheses by observing both domestic and Przewalski horses living in semi-natural conditions: (i) that domestic horses may show an elevated rate of yawning as a result of the domestication process (or as a result of life conditions), (ii) that individuals experiencing a higher level of social stress would yawn more than individuals with lower social stress and (iii) that males would yawn more often than females. The study involved 19 Przewalski horses (PHs) and 16 domestic horses (DHs) of different breeds living in large outdoor enclosures. The results showed that there was no difference between the PH and DH in yawning frequency (YF). PHs exhibited much higher levels of social interactions than DHs. There was a positive correlation between yawning frequency and aggressive behaviours in PHs, especially males, supporting the idea that yawning may be associated with more excitatory/stressful social situations. A correlation was found between yawning frequency and affiliative behaviours in DHs, which supports the potential relationship between yawning and social context. Finally, the entire males, but not castrated males, showed much higher levels of yawning than females in both species. The intensity (rather than the valence) of the interaction may be important in triggering yawning, which could therefore be a displacement activity that helps reduce tension.

  14. NMR-Based Metabolomic Investigations on the Differential Responses in Adductor Muscles from Two Pedigrees of Manila Clam Ruditapes philippinarum to Cadmium and Zinc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbao Yu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum is one of the most important economic species in shellfishery in China due to its wide geographic distribution and high tolerance to environmental changes (e.g., salinity, temperature. In addition, Manila clam is a good biomonitor/bioindicator in “Mussel Watch Programs” and marine environmental toxicology. However, there are several pedigrees of R. philippinarum distributed in the marine environment in China. No attention has been paid to the biological differences between various pedigrees of Manila clams, which may introduce undesirable biological variation in toxicology studies. In this study, we applied NMR-based metabolomics to detect the biological differences in two main pedigrees (White and Zebra of R. philippinarum and their differential responses to heavy metal exposures (Cadmium and Zinc using adductor muscle as a target tissue to define one sensitive pedigree of R. philippinarum as biomonitor for heavy metals. Our results indicated that there were significant metabolic differences in adductor muscle tissues between White and Zebra clams, including higher levels of alanine, glutamine, hypotaurine, phosphocholine and homarine in White clam muscles and higher levels of branched chain amino acids (valine, leucine and isoleucine, succinate and 4-aminobutyrate in Zebra clam muscles, respectively. Differential metabolic responses to heavy metals between White and Zebra clams were also found. Overall, we concluded that White pedigree of clam could be a preferable bioindicator/biomonitor in marine toxicology studies and for marine heavy metals based on the relatively high sensitivity to heavy metals.

  15. Body cooling and its energetic implications for feeding and diving of tufted ducks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, JJ; Butler, PJ; Woakes, AJ; Zegwaard, F

    1998-01-01

    Wintering in a temperate climate with low water temperatures is energetically expensive for diving ducks. The energy costs associated with body cooling due to diving and ingesting large amounts of cold food were measured in tufted ducks (Aythya fuligula) feeding on zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorph

  16. Vector ecology of equine piroplasmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equine piroplasmosis (EP) is a disease of equidae including horses, donkeys, mules and zebras caused by either of two protozoan parasites, Theileria equi or Babesia caballi. These parasites are biologically transmitted between hosts via tick-vectors and although they have inherent differences, they ...

  17. Functions in Biological Kind Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombrozo, Tania; Rehder, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Biological traits that serve functions, such as a zebra's coloration (for camouflage) or a kangaroo's tail (for balance), seem to have a special role in conceptual representations for biological kinds. In five experiments, we investigate whether and why functional features are privileged in biological kind classification. Experiment 1…

  18. Identification and characterization of tandem repeats in exon III of dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) genes from different mammalian species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Svend Arild; Mogensen, Line; Dietz, Rune;

    2005-01-01

    composed of 15- and 12- bp modules. Tandem repeats composed of 18-bp modules were found in sequences from the horse, zebra, onager, and donkey, Asiatic bear, polar bear, common raccoon, dolphin, harbor porpoise, and domestic cat. Several of these sequences have been analyzed previously without a tandem...

  19. Behavioral Relevance of Species-Specific Vasotocin Anatomy in Gregarious Finches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aubrey M Kelly

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite substantial species differences in the vasotocin/vasopressin (VT/VP circuitry of the medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTm and lateral septum (LS; a primary projection target of BSTm VT/VP cells, functional consequences of this variation are poorly known. Previous experiments in the highly gregarious zebra finch (Estrildidae: Taeniopygia guttata demonstrate that BSTm VT neurons promote gregariousness in a male-specific manner and reduce anxiety in both sexes. However, in contrast to the zebra finch, the less gregarious Angolan blue waxbill (Estrildidae: Uraeginthus angolensis exhibits fewer VT-immunoreactive cells in the BSTm as well as differences in receptor distribution across the LS subnuclei, suggesting that knockdown of VT production in the BSTm would produce behavioral effects in Angolan blue waxbills that are distinct from zebra finches. Thus, we here quantified social contact, gregariousness (i.e. preference for the larger of two groups, and anxiety-like behavior following bilateral antisense knockdown of VT production in the BSTm of male and female Angolan blue waxbills. We find that BSTm VT neurons promote social contact, but not gregariousness (as in male zebra finches, and that antisense effects on social contact are significantly stronger in male waxbills than in females. Knockdown of BSTm VT production has no effect on anxiety-like behavior. These data provide novel evidence that species differences in the VT/VP circuitry arising in the BSTm are accompanied by species-specific effects on affiliation behaviors.

  20. Võrguäri Eestis kiratseb / Indrek Kald

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kald, Indrek, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    Autor otsib põhjusi, miks tänavuse Interneti-kaupluste edetabeli koostamiseks saatis oma äritulemused vaid viis võrgukauplust. Zebra Infosüsteemide tegevjuhi Peeter Tamme arvamus e-äri kiratsemise põhjuste kohta

  1. Gene : CBRC-TGUT-25-0005 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TED: hypothetical protein [Rattus norvegicus] 2e-06 39% gnl|UG|Tgu#S33892735 SB010025000C03 JUWNL1 Normalize...d Zebra Finch Juvenile Telencephalon cDNA Library SB01 Taeniopygia guttata cDNA clone SB010025000C03 5', mRN

  2. Assessing transmission of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ haplotypes through seed potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conflicting data has previously been reported concerning the impact of zebra chip disease transmission through seed tubers. These discrepancies may be due to the experimental design of each study, whereby different pathogen haplotypes, insect vector haplotypes, and potato plant varieties were used....

  3. A new problem and old questions: potato psyllid in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managing zebra chip disease in the potato growing regions of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho is complicated by confusion about the geographic source of the insect vector (potato psyllid) as it colonizes potato fields in these growing regions. Not knowing the source of the vector makes it difficult fo...

  4. Non-potato host plants of potato psyllid in the Pacific Northwest: a year-round complication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managing zebra chip disease in the potato growing regions of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho is complicated by confusion about the source of the insect vector (potato psyllid) as it colonizes potato fields in these growing regions. Not knowing where the psyllid is before arriving in Washington potato...

  5. 76 FR 63945 - White River National Wildlife Refuge, AR; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ... terrestrial and aquatic plant species; and nuisance and exotic aquatic animal species, such as Asian carp, northern snakeheads, zebra mussels, and Asian clams. We would continue to provide a permit to the U.S. Army... January 21, 2009 (74 FR 3628). Please see that notice for more about the refuge and its...

  6. Non-traumatic hypertrophic callus of the fibula mimicking osteosarcoma in osteogenesis imperfecta type V: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Arnold; Kanza, Rene Epunza; Barabas, Dezso; Lessard, Michel; Berube, Michel

    2014-09-01

    We report a case of hyperplastic callus mimicking osteosarcoma in the fibula of a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta type V. Among the various imaging modalities, computed tomography was the most useful in distinguishing this rare process from a malignant entity. In addition, simple radiographs demonstrated the presence of characteristic "zebra lines", a manifestation of cyclic bisphosphonate therapy during childhood. PMID:24733362

  7. The Jared Dimond thesis about the role of animals

    OpenAIRE

    Dugan, David

    2004-01-01

    In answer to David Dugan, Joel Mokyr in the American mid-west reflects on the theory that the ability to domesticate only certain animals may have led to the huge divergence in civilizations. The zebra and horse thesis, and the clash of civilizations.

  8. Birdsong memory and the brain : In search of the template

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Johan J; Moorman, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    In his pioneering research on the neural mechanisms of filial imprinting, Gabriel Horn has gone a long way to fulfilling Karl Lashley's dream of finding the 'engram' or memory trace in the brain. Here we review recent research into the engram(s) of song learning in songbirds, particularly zebra finc

  9. Interspecies avian brain chimeras reveal that large brain size differences are influenced by cell-interdependent processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chun; Balaban, Evan; Jarvis, Erich D

    2012-01-01

    Like humans, birds that exhibit vocal learning have relatively delayed telencephalon maturation, resulting in a disproportionately smaller brain prenatally but enlarged telencephalon in adulthood relative to vocal non-learning birds. To determine if this size difference results from evolutionary changes in cell-autonomous or cell-interdependent developmental processes, we transplanted telencephala from zebra finch donors (a vocal-learning species) into Japanese quail hosts (a vocal non-learning species) during the early neural tube stage (day 2 of incubation), and harvested the chimeras at later embryonic stages (between 9-12 days of incubation). The donor and host tissues fused well with each other, with known major fiber pathways connecting the zebra finch and quail parts of the brain. However, the overall sizes of chimeric finch telencephala were larger than non-transplanted finch telencephala at the same developmental stages, even though the proportional sizes of telencephalic subregions and fiber tracts were similar to normal finches. There were no significant changes in the size of chimeric quail host midbrains, even though they were innervated by the physically smaller zebra finch brain, including the smaller retinae of the finch eyes. Chimeric zebra finch telencephala had a decreased cell density relative to normal finches. However, cell nucleus size differences between each species were maintained as in normal birds. These results suggest that telencephalic size development is partially cell-interdependent, and that the mechanisms controlling the size of different brain regions may be functionally independent. PMID:22860132

  10. Interspecies avian brain chimeras reveal that large brain size differences are influenced by cell-interdependent processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available Like humans, birds that exhibit vocal learning have relatively delayed telencephalon maturation, resulting in a disproportionately smaller brain prenatally but enlarged telencephalon in adulthood relative to vocal non-learning birds. To determine if this size difference results from evolutionary changes in cell-autonomous or cell-interdependent developmental processes, we transplanted telencephala from zebra finch donors (a vocal-learning species into Japanese quail hosts (a vocal non-learning species during the early neural tube stage (day 2 of incubation, and harvested the chimeras at later embryonic stages (between 9-12 days of incubation. The donor and host tissues fused well with each other, with known major fiber pathways connecting the zebra finch and quail parts of the brain. However, the overall sizes of chimeric finch telencephala were larger than non-transplanted finch telencephala at the same developmental stages, even though the proportional sizes of telencephalic subregions and fiber tracts were similar to normal finches. There were no significant changes in the size of chimeric quail host midbrains, even though they were innervated by the physically smaller zebra finch brain, including the smaller retinae of the finch eyes. Chimeric zebra finch telencephala had a decreased cell density relative to normal finches. However, cell nucleus size differences between each species were maintained as in normal birds. These results suggest that telencephalic size development is partially cell-interdependent, and that the mechanisms controlling the size of different brain regions may be functionally independent.

  11. Development and application of a NaNiCl{sub 2}-battery for industrial trucks regarding the requirements cycle life, safety and reliability. Final report; Entwicklung und Erprobung einer NaNiCl{sub 2}-Batterie fuer Flurfoerderzeuge unter besonderer Beruecksichtigung der Aspekte Lebensdauer, Sicherheit und Zuverlaessigkeit. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, H.; Beyermann, G.; Bulling, M.

    1996-07-01

    Two NaNiCl{sub 2}-battery types including the battery controller and peripheral equipment have been developed for the application in fork lift trucks and driverless transportation. The batteries have been tested and evaluated on bench testing as well as in fork lift trucks and driverless trucks in practical application. The field tests have been performed by the subcontractors Still, Mercedes-Benz and Indumat. All test results have shown that the NaNiCl{sub 2}-battery (ZEBRA-battery) is well suited for the application in industrial traction. A series development together with a cost reduction programme have to be performed ahead of the introduction of the ZEBRA-battery into the market for industrial traction batteries. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen des Vorhabens wurden zwei NaNiCl{sub 2}-Batterietypen, eine fuer die Anwendung in Gabelstaplern, die andere fuer den Einsatz in fahrerlosen Transportsystemen (FTS), einschliesslich des Batteriesteuergeraetes und der Batterieperipherie entwickelt. Die Batterien wurden auf Teststaenden im Labor sowie in Gabelstaplern und FTS unter Praxisbedingungen erprobt. Der praktische Einsatz erfolgte bei den Unterauftragnehmern Still, Mercedes-Benz und Indumat. Die Ergebnisse haben gezeigt, dass die NaNiCl{sub 2}-Batterie (ZEBRA-Batterie) fuer die Anwendung in Gabelstaplern und FTS geeignet ist. Insbesondere wurde nachgewiesen, dass die NaNiCl{sub 2}-Batterie im Gegensatz zu anderen Batteriesystemen einen Zweischichtbetrieb von Gabelstaplern ohne Batteriewechsel ermoeglicht. Vor Einfuehrung der ZEBRA-Batterie in den Flurfoerdermarkt muss die Serienentwicklung bei gleichzeitiger Senkung der Herstellkosten durchgefuehrt werden. (orig.)

  12. Speciation with gene flow in equids despite extensive chromosomal plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jáónsson, Hákon; Schubert, Mikkel; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine;

    2014-01-01

    Significance Thirty years after the first DNA fragment from the extinct quagga zebra was sequenced, we set another milestone in equine genomics by sequencing its entire genome, along with the genomes of the surviving equine species. This extensive dataset allows us to decipher the genetic makeup ...

  13. Methods for detection of environmental agents that produce congenital defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, T.H.; Miller, J.R.; Marois, M. (eds.)

    1975-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: current methods for teratogenicity testing in animals and suggestion for improvement; use of zebra fish for screening of teratogens; chemical structure and teratogenic mechanism of action; somatic cell genetics and teratogenesis; studies on mammalian embryos during organogenesis; infectious agents as teratogens; and pharmacogenetics and teratogenesis. (HLW)

  14. Variation in susceptibility to potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Triozidae),among Solanum verrucosum germplasm accessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae) is a key pest of potato and the vector of "Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum," the pathogen associated with zebra chip disease. Development of potato cultivars with genetic resistance to potato psyllid would enable cost-effecti...

  15. Relationship between plant vascular architecture and within-plant distribution of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' in potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” is an important pathogen of Solanaceous crops that causes zebra chip disease of potato. This pathogen is transmitted among plants by the potato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli. Within-plant variability in Liberibacter infection impedes the ability to detect Lib...

  16. The Status of Benthos in Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    The benthic community of Lake Ontario was dominated by an amphipod (Diporeia spp.) prior to the 1990’s. Two dreissenid mussel species D. polymorpha (zebra) and D. bugensis (quagga) were introduced in 1989 and 1991 via ballast water exchange. D. bugensis was observed as deep as 85...

  17. Metaphyseal bands in osteogenesis imperfecta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An increasing number of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta are undergoing pamidronate therapy to prevent the incidence of fragility fractures. The authors herein report a child aged 3 years who received five cycles of pamidronate, resulting in metaphyseal bands, known as “zebra lines.”

  18. Matrimony vine and potato psyllid in the Pacific Northwest: a worrisome marriage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managing zebra chip disease in the potato growing regions of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho is complicated by confusion about the source of the insect vector (potato psyllid) as it colonizes potato fields in these growing regions. Not knowing where the psyllid is before arriving in Washington potato...

  19. 9 CFR 160.1 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., asses, mules, zebras, birds, and poultry. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. The Animal and... this subchapter based on completion of an APHIS-approved orientation or training program. Regular.... Category II animals. Food and fiber animal species; horses; birds; farm-raised aquatic animals; all...

  20. Wildlife dynamics : an analysis of change in the Masai Mara ecosystem of Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottichilo, W.K.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis deals with the dynamics of large herbivores in the Masai Mara ecosystem in Kenya. The study area is famous for the annual migration of wildebeest and common zebra from and back to the Serengeti in Tanzania. In this study we made a distinction between these two migratory species and the o

  1. Indirect trophic interactions with an invasive species affect phenotypic divergence in a top consumer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, P E; Eklöv, P; Svanbäck, R

    2013-05-01

    While phenotypic responses to direct species interactions are well studied, we know little about the consequences of indirect interactions for phenotypic divergence. In this study we used lakes with and without the zebra mussel to investigate effects of indirect trophic interactions on phenotypic divergence between littoral and pelagic perch. We found a greater phenotypic divergence between littoral and pelagic individuals in lakes with zebra mussels and propose a mussel-mediated increase in pelagic and benthic resource availability as a major factor underlying this divergence. Lakes with zebra mussels contained higher densities of large plankton taxa and large invertebrates. We suggest that this augmented resource availability improved perch foraging opportunities in both the littoral and pelagic zones. Perch in both habitats could hence express a more specialized foraging morphology, leading to an increased divergence of perch forms in lakes with zebra mussels. As perch do not prey on mussels directly, we conclude that the increased divergence results from indirect interactions with the mussels. Our results hence suggest that species at lower food web levels can indirectly affect phenotypic divergence in species at the top of the food chain. PMID:23463242

  2. Performance Evaluation and Software Design for EVA Robotic Assistant Stereo Vision Heads

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaolo, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to aid the EVA Robotic Assistant project by evaluating and designing the necessary interfaces for two stereo vision heads - the TracLabs Biclops pan-tilt-verge head, and the Helpmate Zebra pan-tilt-verge head. The first half of the project consisted of designing the necessary software interface so that the other modules of the EVA Robotic Assistant had proper access to all of the functionalities offered by each of the stereovision heads. This half took most of the project time, due to a lack of ready-made CORBA drivers for either of the heads. Once this was overcome, the evaluation stage of the project began. The second half of the project was to take these interfaces and to evaluate each of the stereo vision heads in terms of usefulness to the project. In the key project areas such as stability and reliability, the Zebra pan-tilt-verge head came out on top. However, the Biclops did have many more advantages over the Zebra, such as: lower power consumption, faster communications, and a simpler, cleaner API. Overall, the Biclops pan-tilt-verge head outperformed the Zebra pan-tilt-verge head.

  3. Use of Electrical Penetration Graph Technology to Examine Transmission of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ to Potato by Three Haplotypes of Potato Psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli; Hemiptera: Triozidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae), is a vector of the phloem-limited bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso), the putative causal agent of zebra chip disease of potato. Little is known about how potato psyllid transmits Lso to potato. We used ele...

  4. Toxicological evaluation of two pedigrees of clam Ruditapes philippinarum as bioindicators of heavy metal contaminants using metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chenglong; Cao, Lulu; Li, Fei

    2015-03-01

    Heavy metal pollution has been of great concern in the Bohai marine environment. Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum has been used as a bioindicator in marine toxicology. In this study, NMR-based metabolomics was used to ascertain whether there were significant biological differences between two dominant pedigrees (White and Zebra) of clam and evaluate the suitability of two pedigrees for marine environmental toxicology, together with antioxidant enzymatic analysis. Our results indicated that there were significant biological differences between White and Zebra clams based on the metabolic profiles and antioxidant enzyme activities. In details, the metabolic profiles showed higher levels of amino acids and succinate in Zebra clam digestive glands and higher levels of ATP in White clam digestive glands, respectively. The superoxide dismutase activities in control White and Zebra clam samples were significantly different. Additionally, White clam was more sensitive to Cd based on the significant accumulation of Cd, antioxidant enzymatic alterations and sensitive metabolic changes. Overall, we concluded that White clam could be a preferable bioindicator for marine environmental toxicology. PMID:25681705

  5. Simultaneous selection for yield-related traits and susceptibility to Fusarium head blight in spring wheat RIL population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewska, Halina; Surma, Maria; Krystkowiak, Karolina; Adamski, Tadeusz; Kuczyńska, Anetta; Ogrodowicz, Piotr; Mikołajczak, Krzysztof; Belter, Jolanta; Majka, Maciej; Kaczmarek, Zygmunt; Krajewski, Paweł; Sawikowska, Aneta; Lenc, Leszek; Baturo-Cieśniewska, Anna; Łukanowski, Aleksander; Góral, Tomasz; Sadowski, Czesław

    2016-03-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused by the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium, is a fungal disease that occurs in wheat and can cause significant yield and grain quality losses. The present paper examines variation in the resistance of spring wheat lines derived from a cross between Zebra and Saar cultivars. Experiments covering 198 lines and parental cultivars were conducted in three years, in which inoculation with Fusarium culmorum was applied. Resistance levels were estimated by scoring disease symptoms on kernels. In spite of a similar reaction of parents to F. culmorum infection, significant differentiation between lines was found in all the analyzed traits. Seven molecular markers selected as linked to FHB resistance QTLs gave polymorphic products for Zebra and Saar: Xgwm566, Xgwm46, Xgwm389, Xgwm533, Xgwm156, Xwmc238, and Xgwm341. Markers Xgwm389 and Xgwm533 were associated with the rate of Fusarium-damaged kernels (FDK) as well as with kernel weight per spike and thousand kernel weight in control plants. Zebra allele of marker Xwmc238 increased kernel weight per spike and thousand kernel weight both in control and infected plants, whereas Zebra allele of marker Xgwm566 reduced the percentage of FDK and simultaneously reduced the thousand kernel weight in control and infected plants. PMID:27162499

  6. The re-introduction of springbok Antidorcas marsupialis into South African National Parks – A documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. de Graaff

    1976-08-01

    Full Text Available The introduction and establishment of springbok populations in four South African National Parks are discussed. Springbok have failed to establish themselves in the Addo Elephant National Park but are thriving in the Mountain Zebra, Golden Gate Highlands and Bontebok National Parks, although the latter Park is extralimital to their original range.

  7. 9 CFR 92.1 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., zebras, dogs, poultry, and birds that are susceptible to communicable diseases of livestock and poultry or capable of being carriers of those diseases or their arthropod vectors. Communicable disease. Any contagious or infectious disease of animals. It can be transmitted either directly or indirectly to...

  8. Identifying Space Use at Foraging Arena Scale within the Home Ranges of Large Herbivores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Owen-Smith

    Full Text Available An intermediate spatiotemporal scale of food procurement by large herbivores is evident within annual or seasonal home ranges. It takes the form of settlement periods spanning several days or weeks during which foraging activity is confined to spatially discrete foraging arenas, separated by roaming interludes. Extended by areas occupied for other activities, these foraging arenas contribute towards generating the home range structure. We delineated and compared the foraging arenas exploited by two African large herbivores, sable antelope (a ruminant and plains zebra (a non-ruminant, using GPS-derived movement data. We developed a novel approach to specifically delineate foraging arenas based on local change points in distance relative to adjoining clusters of locations, and compared its output with modifications of two published methods developed for home range estimation and residence time estimation respectively. We compared how these herbivore species responded to seasonal variation in food resources and how they differed in their spatial patterns of resource utilization. Sable antelope herds tended to concentrate their space use locally, while zebra herds moved more opportunistically over a wider set of foraging arenas. The amalgamated extent of the foraging arenas exploited by sable herds amounted to 12-30 km2, compared with 22-100 km2 for the zebra herds. Half-day displacement distances differed between settlement periods and roaming interludes, and zebra herds generally shifted further over 12h than sable herds. Foraging arenas of sable herds tended to be smaller than those of zebra, and were occupied for period twice as long, and hence exploited more intensively in days spent per unit area than the foraging arenas of zebra. For sable both the intensity of utilization of foraging arenas and proportion of days spent in foraging arenas relative to roaming interludes declined as food resources diminished seasonally, while zebra showed no

  9. Quality assurance of proton beams using a multilayer ionization chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanesar, Sandeep; Sahoo, Narayan; Kerr, Matthew; Taylor, M. Brad; Summers, Paige; Zhu, X. Ronald; Poenisch, Falk; Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics and Proton Therapy Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 94, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics and Proton Therapy Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 94, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas at Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 6767 Bertner Avenue, S3.8344, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics and Proton Therapy Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 94, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics and Proton Therapy Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Unit 94, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas at Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 6767 Bertner Avenue, S3.8344, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The measurement of percentage depth-dose (PDD) distributions for the quality assurance of clinical proton beams is most commonly performed with a computerized water tank dosimetry system with ionization chamber, commonly referred to as water tank. Although the accuracy and reproducibility of this method is well established, it can be time-consuming if a large number of measurements are required. In this work the authors evaluate the linearity, reproducibility, sensitivity to field size, accuracy, and time-savings of another system: the Zebra, a multilayer ionization chamber system.Methods: The Zebra, consisting of 180 parallel-plate ionization chambers with 2 mm resolution, was used to measure depth-dose distributions. The measurements were performed for scattered and scanned proton pencil beams of multiple energies delivered by the Hitachi PROBEAT synchrotron-based delivery system. For scattered beams, the Zebra-measured depth-dose distributions were compared with those measured with the water tank. The principal descriptors extracted for comparisons were: range, the depth of the distal 90% dose; spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) length, the region between the proximal 95% and distal 90% dose; and distal-dose fall off (DDF), the region between the distal 80% and 20% dose. For scanned beams, the Zebra-measured ranges were compared with those acquired using a Bragg peak chamber during commissioning.Results: The Zebra demonstrated better than 1% reproducibility and monitor unit linearity. The response of the Zebra was found to be sensitive to radiation field sizes greater than 12.5 × 12.5 cm; hence, the measurements used to determine accuracy were performed using a field size of 10 × 10 cm. For the scattered proton beams, PDD distributions showed 1.5% agreement within the SOBP, and 3.8% outside. Range values agreed within −0.1 ± 0.4 mm, with a maximum deviation of 1.2 mm. SOBP length values agreed within 0 ± 2 mm, with a maximum deviation of 6 mm. DDF

  10. Chemical analysis and genotoxicity of high molecular mass PAH in sediment samples and biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A normal phase liquid chromatography (NPLC) method was used to fractionate the organic extracts of prepared from coal tar-contaminated sediments from hamilton Harbor in Ontario and from Sydney Harbor in Nova Scotia into molecular mass classes. Each PAH fraction up to 302 amu was analyzed by GC-MS and fractions containing PAH with molecular masses greater than 302 amu were analyzed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) LC-MS.Each fraction was also subjected to Ames bioassays using a TA100-like strain of Salmonella typhimurium (YG1025 + S9). The 300/302 amu, 326/328 and 350/352 amu PAH fractions accounted for 25% of the total genotoxic response of the extract; these PAH constitute a substantial genotoxic burden. A number of 300, 302, 326, 350, 374 and 400 amu PAH were identified using APCI LC-MS and comparison with authentic standards. The non-polar aromatic extracts of bottom sediments, suspended sediments and zebra mussels from Hamilton Harbor were also examined by GC-MS, APCI LC-MS and genotoxicity bioassays. The profiles of the priority and high mass PAH in these samples were identical showing that all PAH up to and exceeding 400 amu were readily bioavailable to biota such as Zebra mussels. In addition, the pseudo faeces of the Zebra mussels and amphipod detritivores which fed on the pseudo faeces had chemical profiles identical to the Zebra mussels. Since many sport fish prize amphipods as food, this observation demonstrates a pathway for organic contaminants adsorbed to suspended sediments to enter the food chain of non-bottom-feeding fish in areas infested by Zebra mussels

  11. Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence in donkeys (Equus asinus) from Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is an increasing interest on donkeys due to their use in leisure activities, as pets, as working animals, for onotherapy, use of their milk for children affected with cow milk allergy, and consumption of donkey milk and meat for human consumption. Toxoplasmosis, important zoonosis, can be tran...

  12. Xenogenous Intrafallopian Transfer of Horse (Equus caballus) Gametes

    OpenAIRE

    Wirtu, Gemechu G

    1999-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate fertilization and early embryo development of in vitro matured (IVM) horse oocytes following transfer with homologous sperm to the oviduct of estrous ewes. A total of 1023 follicles (5.1 per ovary) were found after processing 202 slaughterhouse ovaries by aspiration and subsequent slicing. Most follicles (79%) were less than 20-mm in diameter. Six hundred sixty-seven oocytes were recovered (3.3 per ovary; recovery rate, 65%). About two-thirds of oocytes w...

  13. Arthroscopy of septic carpitis in donkeys (Equus asinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Elkasapy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Experimental septic arthritis was induced in the radiocarpal joint of 18 donkeys by intra-articular injection of Staphylococcus aureus (3-4X106 CFU. The inoculated animals were divided into three groups (6 donkeys in each group. The arthroscopic examination was carried out before induction of septic carpitis and 3 days (group I, 14 days (group II, and 28 days (group III after induction of infection. The arthroscopic examination of group I revealed hyperemia of synovial membrane and hypertrophied villi. In group II, severe hyperemia of synovial membrane, hypertrophied villi, pannus in the joint cavity and beginning of articular cartilage erosion were found. In group III, severe hyperemia of synovial membrane, hypertrophied villi and more prominent articular cartilage erosion were present.

  14. Neonatal development of the diaphragm of the horse, Equus caballus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, M A; Schutt, W A; Petrie, J L; Hermanson, J W

    1994-03-01

    The diaphragm of neonatal horses is significantly different from the diaphragm of adult horses in terms of histochemical fiber type composition, myosin heavy chain isoform, and native myosin isoform composition. There is a significant increase in the percentage of type I fibers present in the diaphragm with increasing age from birth through about seven months postnatal age. A possible lack of postural tone in the hiatal region of the neonatal diaphragm is suggested to account for increased incidence of vomiting or aspiration pneumonia in younger horses. The isoform data lead to rejection of the hypothesis that the diaphragm of the horse should, as an ungulate, be relatively precocial in its rate of maturation relative to other non-ungulate mammals that have been studied.

  15. Molecular evolution of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA in Ungulata (mammalia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douzery, E; Catzeflis, F M

    1995-11-01

    The complete 12S rRNA gene has been sequenced in 4 Ungulata (hoofed eutherians) and 1 marsupial and compared to 38 available mammalian sequences in order to investigate the molecular evolution of the mitochondrial small-subunit ribosomal RNA molecule. Ungulata were represented by one artiodactyl (the collared peccary, Tayassu tajacu, suborder Suiformes), two perissodactyls (the Grevy's zebra, Equus grevyi, suborder Hippomorpha; the white rhinoceros, Ceratotherium simum, suborder Ceratomorpha), and one hyracoid (the tree hyrax, Dendrohyrax dorsalis). The fifth species was a marsupial, the eastern gray kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). Several transition/transversion biases characterized the pattern of changes between mammalian 12S rRNA molecules. A bias toward transitions was found among 12S rRNA sequences of Ungulata, illustrating the general bias exhibited by ribosomal and protein-encoding genes of the mitochondrial genome. The derivation of a mammalian 12S rRNA secondary structure model from the comparison of 43 eutherian and marsupial sequences evidenced a pronounced bias against transversions in stems. Moreover, transversional compensatory changes were rare events within double-stranded regions of the ribosomal RNA. Evolutionary characteristics of the 12S rRNA were compared with those of the nuclear 18S and 28S rRNAs. From a phylogenetic point of view, transitions, transversions and indels in stems as well as transversional and indels events in loops gave congruent results for comparisons within orders. Some compensatory changes in double-stranded regions and some indels in single-stranded regions also constituted diagnostic events. The 12S rRNA molecule confirmed the monophyly of infraorder Pecora and order Cetacea and demonstrated the monophyly of the suborder Ruminantia was not supported and the branching pattern between Cetacea and the artiodacytyl suborders Ruminantia and Suiformes was not established. The monophyly of the order Perissodactyla was evidenced

  16. The importance of Zebrafish in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Bárbara; Santos Lopes, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: O peixe-zebra (Danio rerio) é um excelente organismo modelo para o estudo do desenvolvimento dos vertebrados. Este facto deve-se às grandes ninhadas que cada casal produz, que podem atingir 200 embriões a cada sete dias, e ao facto dos embriões serem pequenos, transparentes e com um rápido desenvolvimento externo.Material e Métodos: Usando ferramentas de pesquisa bibliográfica científica disponíveis online e utilizando e as palavras-chave “Zebrafish”, “biomedical research”, “human disease” e “drug screening”, avaliámos estudos originais e revisões indexadas na PubMed.Resultados: Neste artigo de revisão fazemos um resumo do trabalho realizado com este modelo no melhoramento doconhecimento de várias doenças humanas. Fizemos ainda um breve relato da investigação biomédica realizada em Portugal com o modelo de peixe-zebra.Discussão: Têm sido desenvolvidas poderosas ferramentas genéticas e de microscopia in vivo, que também tornaram o peixe-zebra num modelo valioso em investigação biomédica. A conjugação destes atributos com a optimização de sistemas automatizados de triagem de medicamentos, transformaram o peixe-zebra num top model da investigação em biomedicina, nomeadamente na triagem de compostos químicos com efeitos terapêuticos e em testes de toxicidade. Além disso, com a otimização da tecnologia dos xenografos, será possível usar o peixe-zebra na escolha de uma terapia personalizada.Conclusão: O peixe-zebra é um excelente organismo modelo na pesquisa biomédica, em screens de medicamentos e na terapia clinica.

  17. Use of CYBER 203 and CYBER 205 computers for three-dimensional transonic flow calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melson, N. D.; Keller, J. D.

    1983-04-01

    Experiences are discussed for modifying two three-dimensional transonic flow computer programs (FLO 22 and FLO 27) for use on the CDC CYBER 203 computer system. Both programs were originally written for use on serial machines. Several methods were attempted to optimize the execution of the two programs on the vector machine: leaving the program in a scalar form (i.e., serial computation) with compiler software used to optimize and vectorize the program, vectorizing parts of the existing algorithm in the program, and incorporating a vectorizable algorithm (ZEBRA I or ZEBRA II) in the program. Comparison runs of the programs were made on CDC CYBER 175. CYBER 203, and two pipe CDC CYBER 205 computer systems.

  18. 斑马鱼的种类与饲养管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈思行

    2003-01-01

    斑马鱼的学名为Brachydanio rerio,又称印度斑马鱼。隶属于鲤科鱼类。固体侧有象斑马样的纵向条纹,故称斑马鱼。其俗名很多,如蓝斑马鱼、孟加拉斑马鱼、蓝条鱼和短丹鱼等。其英文名有Zebra damo、Zebra fish、Striped danio。原产于南亚的印度东部(由基斯特内河至恒河流域)、孟加拉和缅甸。

  19. Mercury uptake and accumulation by four species of aquatic plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Kathleen [Department of Biology, Russell Sage College, 45 Ferry Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)]. E-mail: skinnk@sage.edu; Wright, Nicole [NEIWPCC-NYSDEC, 625 Broadway, 4th Floor, Albany, NY 12233-3502 (United States)]. E-mail: ndwright@gw.dec.state.ny.us; Porter-Goff, Emily [Department of Biology, Russell Sage College, 45 Ferry Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2007-01-15

    The effectiveness of four aquatic plants including water hyacinth (Eichornia crassipes), water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes), zebra rush (Scirpus tabernaemontani) and taro (Colocasia esculenta) were evaluated for their capabilities in removing mercury from water. The plants were exposed to concentrations of 0 mg/L, 0.5 mg/L or 2 mg/L of mercury for 30 days. Assays were conducted using both Microtox[reg] (water) and cold vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) (roots and water). The Microtox[reg] results indicated that the mercury induced acute toxicity had been removed from the water. AAS confirmed an increase of mercury within the plant root tissue and a corresponding decrease of mercury in the water. All species of plants appeared to reduce mercury concentrations in the water via root uptake and accumulation. Water lettuce and water hyacinth appeared to be the most effective, followed by taro and zebra rush, respectively. - Four species of aquatic plants reduced mercury in water.

  20. Social learning in nest-building birds: a role for familiarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillette, Lauren M; Scott, Alice C Y; Healy, Susan D

    2016-03-30

    It is becoming apparent that birds learn from their own experiences of nest building. What is not clear is whether birds can learn from watching conspecifics build. As social learning allows an animal to gain information without engaging in costly trial-and-error learning, first-time builders should exploit the successful habits of experienced builders. We presented first-time nest-building male zebra finches with either a familiar or an unfamiliar conspecific male building with material of a colour the observer did not like. When given the opportunity to build, males that had watched a familiar male build switched their material preference to that used by the familiar male. Males that observed unfamiliar birds did not. Thus, first-time nest builders use social information and copy the nest material choices when demonstrators are familiar but not when they are strangers. The relationships between individuals therefore influence how nest-building expertise is socially transmitted in zebra finches.