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Sample records for zd6474 vandetanib zactima

  1. Phase I study of cetuximab, irinotecan, and vandetanib (ZD6474 as therapy for patients with previously treated metastastic colorectal cancer.

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    Jeffrey A Meyerhardt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD and safety, and explore efficacy and biomarkers of vandetanib with cetuximab and irinotecan in second-line metastatic colorectal cancer. METHODS: Vandetanib (an orally bioavailable VEGFR-2 and EGFR tyrosine kinases inhibitor was combined at 100 mg, 200 mg, or 300 mg daily with standard dosed cetuximab and irinotecan (3+3 dose-escalation design. Ten patients were treated at the MTD and plasma angiogenesis biomarkers (VEGF, PlGF, bFGF, sVEGFR1, sVEGFR2, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, SDF1α were measured before and after treatment. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients were enrolled at 4 dose levels and the MTD. Two dose-limiting toxicities (grade 3 QTc prolongation and diarrhea were detected at 300 mg of vandetanib with cetuximab and irinotecan resulting in 200 mg being the MTD. Seven percent of patients had a partial response, 59% stable disease and 34% progressed. Median progression-free survival was 3.6 months (95% CI, 3.2-5.6 and median overall survival was 10.5 months (95% CI, 5.1-20.7. Toxicities were fairly manageable with grade 3 or 4 diarrhea being most prominent (30%. Vandetanib and cetuximab treatment induced a sustained increase in plasma PlGF and a transient decrease in plasma sVEGFR1, but no changes in plasma VEGF and sVEGFR2. CONCLUSIONS: Vandetanib can be safely combined with cetuximab and irinotecan for metastatic colorectal cancer. Exploratory biomarker analyses suggest differential effects on certain plasma biomarkers for VEGFR inhibition when combined with EGFR blockade and a potential correlation between baseline sVEGFR1 and response. However, while the primary endpoint was safety, the observed efficacy raises concern for moving forward with this combination. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00436072.

  2. Clinical utility of vandetanib in the treatment of patients with advanced medullary thyroid cancer

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    Deshpande H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hari Deshpande1,3, Vicky Marler3, Julie Ann Sosa2,31Department of Medicine, 2Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, 3Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, USAAbstract: Vandetanib (ZD6474 became the first systemic agent to be approved for the treatment of metastatic or locally advanced medullary thyroid cancer. It was a proof of principle, because it is an orally bioavailable medication that targets the growth factors felt to be important in the pathogenesis of this disease, ie, the rearranged during transfection proto-oncogene and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. It was tested initially in two Phase II studies at doses of 100 mg and 300 mg daily. Although activity was seen at both doses, the higher dose was chosen for a randomized, placebo-controlled Phase II study. This trial, which accrued more than 300 patients, showed a statistically significant benefit for the group taking vandetanib compared with those taking placebo medication. Progression-free survival for the vandetanib arm has not been reached, compared with 19 months for the placebo arm. The main toxicity appears to be diarrhea, although some patients experienced significant side effects, including torsades de pointes and sudden cardiac death. Therefore, it is now necessary for practitioners to enroll in a Risk Evaluation Mitigation Strategy before being allowed to prescribe this medication, to reduce the risk of serious side effects occurring.Keywords: ZD6474, medullary thyroid cancer, vandetanib

  3. Determination of vandetanib in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS).

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    Bai, Feng; Johnson, Jennifer; Wang, Fan; Yang, Lei; Broniscer, Alberto; Stewart, Clinton F

    2011-09-01

    A sensitive and precise LC-ESI-MS/MS method for the determination of vandetanib (ZD6474) in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using [(13)C,d(3)]-ZD6474 as an internal standard (ISTD) was developed and validated. Sample preparation consisted of a simple liquid-liquid extraction with tert-butyl methyl ether containing 0.1% or 0.5% ammonium hydroxide. ZD6474 and ISTD were separated on a Kinetex C18 column (2.6 μm, 50 mm × 2.1 mm) at ambient temperature with an isocratic mobile phase (acetonitrile/10mM ammonium formate=50/50, v/v, at pH 5.0) delivered at 0.11 mL/min. The retention time of both compounds was at 1.60 min in a runtime of three min. Detection was achieved by an API-3200 LC-MS/MS system, monitoring m/z 475.1/112.1 and m/z 479.1/116.2 for vandetanib and ISTD, respectively. The method was linear in the range of 0.25-50 ng/mL (R(2) ≥ 0.990) for the CSF curve and from 1.0 to 3000 ng/mL (R(2) ≥ 0.992) for the plasma curve. The mean recovery for vandetanib was 80%. Within-day and between-day precisions were ≤ 8.8% and ≤ 5.9% for CSF and plasma, respectively. Within-day and between-day accuracies ranged from 95.0 to 98.5% for CSF, and from 104.0 to 108.5% for plasma. Analysis of plasma from six different sources showed no matrix effect for vandetanib (MF=0.98, %CV ≤ 4.97, n=6). This method was successfully applied to the analysis of pharmacokinetic samples from children with brain tumors treated with oral vandetanib. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Vandetanib

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    ... your doctor and pharmacist if you are taking chloroquine (Aralen); clarithromycin (Biaxin, in Prevpac); haloperidol (Haldol); medications ... of plain, non-carbonated drinking water. Do not use any other liquid to dissolve the tablet. Stir ...

  5. Vandetanib in locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer

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    Leboulleux, Sophie; Bastholt, Lars; Krause, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    No effective standard treatment exists for patients with radioiodine-refractory, advanced differentiated thyroid carcinoma. We aimed to assess efficacy and safety of vandetanib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of RET, VEGFR and EGFR signalling, in this setting....

  6. Effect of an Outreach Programme on Vandetanib Safety in Medullary Thyroid Cancer

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    Bastholt, Lars; Kreissl, Michael C; Führer, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Effective management of adverse events (AEs) following vandetanib treatment is important to maximize clinical benefits. We examined whether more frequent contact with vandetanib-treated patients reduced AEs of CTCAE grade 2 or higher. STUDY DESIGN: In this open-label, multicentre, pha...

  7. Vandetanib in advanced medullary thyroid cancer: review of adverse event management strategies

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    Grande, Enrique; Kreissl, Michael C; Filetti, Sebastiano

    2013-01-01

    Vandetanib has recently demonstrated clinically meaningful benefits in patients with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Given the potential for long-term vandetanib therapy in this setting, in addition to treatment for disease-related symptoms, effective...

  8. Combination of Vandetanib, Radiotherapy, and Irinotecan in the LoVo Human Colorectal Cancer Xenograft Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachsberger, Phyllis; Burd, Randy; Ryan, Anderson; Daskalakis, Constantine; Dicker, Adam P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The tumor growth kinetics of the human LoVo colorectal xenograft model was assessed in response to vandetanib, an orally available receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, radiotherapy (RT), or irinotecan (CPT-11), as single therapies and in combination. Methods and Materials: LoVo cells were injected subcutaneously into the right hind limb (5x10 6 cells in 100μL phosphate-buffered saline) of athymic NCR NUM mice and tumors were grown to a volume of 200-300 mm 3 before treatment. Vandetanib was administered at 50 mg/kg daily orally for 14 days starting on Day 1. RT was given as three fractions (3x3 Gy) on Days 1, 2, and 3. CPT-11 was given at 15 mg/kg intraperitoneally on Days 1 and 3. Tumor volumes were measured on a daily basis and calculated by measuring tumor diameters with digital calipers in two orthogonal dimensions. Results: All three single treatments (vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation) significantly slowed LoVo colorectal tumor growth. Vandetanib significantly increased the antitumor effects of CPT-11 and radiation when given in combination with either of these treatments. These treatment combinations resulted in a slow tumor growth rate during the 2 weeks of vandetanib administration. The triple combination of vandetanib, CPT-11, and radiation produced the most marked improvement in response as observed by measurable shrinkage of tumors during the first week of treatment. Conclusions: The tumor growth delay kinetics observed in this study of the LoVo colorectal model suggest concurrent and sustained post-sequencing of vandetanib with cytotoxic therapy may be beneficial in tumors of this type.

  9. Vandetanib (100 mg) in patients with locally advanced or metastatic hereditary medullary thyroid cancer.

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    Robinson, Bruce G; Paz-Ares, Luis; Krebs, Annetta; Vasselli, James; Haddad, Robert

    2010-06-01

    Vandetanib is a once-daily oral inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases that also inhibits rearranged during transfection kinase activity. Vandetanib (300 mg/d) has previously demonstrated antitumor activity in patients with advanced hereditary medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). This study investigated the efficacy and safety of 100 mg/d vandetanib in patients with advanced hereditary MTC. Eligible patients with unresectable, measurable, locally advanced, or metastatic hereditary MTC received 100 mg/d vandetanib. Upon disease progression, eligible patients could enter postprogression treatment with 300 mg/d vandetanib until a withdrawal criterion was met. The primary objective was to assess the objective response rate by response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. The study comprised 19 patients (13 males, six females; mean age 45 yr). Confirmed objective partial responses were observed in three patients, yielding an objective response rate of 16% (95% confidence interval 3.4-39.6). Stable disease lasting 24 wk or longer was reported in a further 10 patients (53%); the disease control rate was therefore 68% (95% confidence interval 43.4-87.4). Serum levels of calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen showed a sustained 50% or greater decrease from baseline in 16% (three of 19) and 5% (one of 19) of patients, respectively. Adverse events were predominantly grade 1 or 2 and consistent with previous vandetanib monotherapy studies. Vandetanib at a once-daily dose of 100 mg has clinically relevant antitumor activity in patients with locally advanced or metastatic hereditary MTC and an overall acceptable safety profile.

  10. Vandetanib for the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic hereditary medullary thyroid cancer.

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    Wells, Samuel A; Gosnell, Jessica E; Gagel, Robert F; Moley, Jeffrey; Pfister, David; Sosa, Julie A; Skinner, Michael; Krebs, Annetta; Vasselli, James; Schlumberger, Martin

    2010-02-10

    PURPOSE There is no effective therapy for patients with distant metastasis of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Activating mutations in the RET proto-oncogene cause hereditary MTC, which provides a strong therapeutic rationale for targeting RET kinase activity. This open-label, phase II study assessed the efficacy of vandetanib, a selective oral inhibitor of RET, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, in patients with advanced hereditary MTC. METHODS Patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic hereditary MTC received initial treatment with once-daily oral vandetanib 300 mg. The dose was adjusted additionally in some patients on the basis of observed toxicity until disease progression or any other withdrawal criterion was met. The primary assessment was objective tumor response (by RECIST [Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors]). Results Thirty patients received initial treatment with vandetanib 300 mg/d. On the basis of investigator assessments, 20% of patients (ie, six of 30 patients) experienced a confirmed partial response (median duration of response at data cutoff, 10.2 months). An additional 53% of patients (ie, 16 of 30 patients) experienced stable disease at >/= 24 weeks, which yielded a disease control rate of 73% (ie, 22 of 30 patients). In 24 patients, serum calcitonin levels showed a 50% or greater decrease from baseline that was maintained for at least 4 weeks; 16 patients showed a similar reduction in serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels. The most common adverse events were diarrhea (70%), rash (67%), fatigue (63%), and nausea (63%). CONCLUSION In this study, vandetanib demonstrated durable objective partial responses and disease control with a manageable adverse event profile. These results demonstrate that vandetanib may provide an effective therapeutic option in patients with advanced hereditary MTC, a rare disease for which there has been no effective therapy.

  11. Vandetanib in patients with locally advanced or metastatic medullary thyroid cancer: a randomized, double-blind phase III trial.

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    Wells, Samuel A; Robinson, Bruce G; Gagel, Robert F; Dralle, Henning; Fagin, James A; Santoro, Massimo; Baudin, Eric; Elisei, Rossella; Jarzab, Barbara; Vasselli, James R; Read, Jessica; Langmuir, Peter; Ryan, Anderson J; Schlumberger, Martin J

    2012-01-10

    There is no effective therapy for patients with advanced medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Vandetanib, a once-daily oral inhibitor of RET kinase, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, has previously shown antitumor activity in a phase II study of patients with advanced hereditary MTC. Patients with advanced MTC were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive vandetanib 300 mg/d or placebo. On objective disease progression, patients could elect to receive open-label vandetanib. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS), determined by independent central Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) assessments. Between December 2006 and November 2007, 331 patients (mean age, 52 years; 90% sporadic; 95% metastatic) were randomly assigned to receive vandetanib (231) or placebo (100). At data cutoff (July 2009; median follow-up, 24 months), 37% of patients had progressed and 15% had died. The study met its primary objective of PFS prolongation with vandetanib versus placebo (hazard ratio [HR], 0.46; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.69; P < .001). Statistically significant advantages for vandetanib were also seen for objective response rate (P < .001), disease control rate (P = .001), and biochemical response (P < .001). Overall survival data were immature at data cutoff (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.65). A final survival analysis will take place when 50% of the patients have died. Common adverse events (any grade) occurred more frequently with vandetanib compared with placebo, including diarrhea (56% v 26%), rash (45% v 11%), nausea (33% v 16%), hypertension (32% v 5%), and headache (26% v 9%). Vandetanib demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in a phase III trial of patients with advanced MTC (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00410761).

  12. Novel Platinum (Pt)-Vandetanib Hybrid Compounds: Design, Synthesis and Investigation of Anti-cancer Activity and Mechanism of Action

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    Fei, Rong

    Purpose: Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for 80-85% of lung cancers. 70% of individuals with NSCLC harboring somatic mutations in exons of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene that encode tyrosine kinase domain. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are promising molecular targeted therapy for NSCLC with sensitizing EGFR mutations. However, secondary mutation of EGFR after treatment of TKIs develops resistance. Vandetanib is introduced to overcome erlotinib resistance as a multi-targeted TKI. However, its anticancer effect is still compromised by EGFR T790M mutation. Therefore, new molecular anticancer strategies are necessarily needed. In this study, vandetanib is incorporated with Pt-based anticancer agents as hybrid compounds, aiming to circumvent TKI resistance. Furthermore, hybrid compounds are investigated in cisplatin resistant problem to expect to overcome resistance by introduction of vandetanib. Methods: Three novel Pt-vandetanib hybrid compounds were synthesized and its physicochemical properties were characterized. Anticancer activity and cytotoxicity were evaluated by sulforhodamine B assay and lactate dehydrogenase release. Docking simulation was performed to investigate the interaction of compounds with EGFR harboring different mutations. Inhibition efficacy of hybrids to kinases was evaluated by kinase inhibition profiling service and cell-free kinase inhibition assay. Mechanistic studies on cytotoxicity activity of the hybrid compounds were carried out. DNA damage response of hybrid compounds was further investigated in KB cells. The cytotoxicity of hybrids was tested in cisplatin resistant KB CP20 cells. Mechanistic of anticancer activity was studied to test inhibition on oncoprotein CIP2Aand DNA damage. Results: Platinum-vandetanib hybrid compounds were synthesized and test to be stable under extracellular condition. Hybrids reacted with 5'-GMP2- and glutathione, and both

  13. Phase I study of vandetanib with radiation therapy with or without cisplatin in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Papadimitrakopoulou, Vasiliki A; Frank, Steven J; Cohen, Ezra W; Hirsch, Fred R; Myers, Jeffrey N; Heymach, John V; Lin, Heather; Tran, Hai T; Chen, Changhu R; Jimeno, Antonio; Nedzi, Lucien; Vasselli, Joseph R; Lowe, Elizabeth S; Raben, David

    2016-03-01

    Vandetanib, added to cisplatin and radiation therapy (RT) overcomes chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) lines and models. Patients with previously untreated HNSCC received vandetanib daily for 14 days (starting dose 100 mg) and then vandetanib + RT (2.2 Gy/day, 5 days/week) for 6 weeks (regimen 1) or vandetanib + RT (2 Gy/day, 5 days/week) + cisplatin (30 mg/m(2) weekly) for 7 weeks (regimen 2). The primary objective was the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of vandetanib with RT +/- cisplatin. Of 33 treated patients, 30 completed therapy (regimen 1, n = 12; regimen 2, n = 18). MTD in regimen 2 was 100 mg (3 dose limiting toxicities [DLTs] at 200 mg), whereas regimen 1 was stopped because of poor recruitment (1 DLT at 200 mg). Most common grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs) were dysphagia (30%), stomatitis (33%), and mucosal inflammation (27%). Five patients discontinued vandetanib because of AEs. Vandetanib with CRT was feasible. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Incidence and risk of QTc interval prolongation among cancer patients treated with vandetanib: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajie Zang

    Full Text Available Vandetanib is a multikinase inhibitor that is under assessment for the treatment of various cancers. QTc interval prolongation is one of the major adverse effects of this drug, but the reported incidence varies substantially among clinical trials. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to obtain a better understanding in the risk of QTc interval prolongation among cancer patients administered vandetanib.Eligible studies were phase II and III prospective clinical trials that involved cancer patients who were prescribed vandetanib 300 mg/d and that included data on QTc interval prolongation. The overall incidence and risk of QTc interval prolongation were calculated using random-effects or fixed-effects models, depending on the heterogeneity of the included studies. Nine trials with 2,188 patients were included for the meta-analysis. The overall incidence of all-grade and high-grade QTc interval prolongation was 16.4% (95% CI, 8.1-30.4% and 3.7% (8.1-30.4%, respectively, among non-thyroid cancer patients, and 18.0% (10.7-28.6% and 12.0% (4.5-28.0%, respectively, among thyroid cancer patients. Patients with thyroid cancer who had longer treatment duration also had a higher incidence of high-grade events, with a relative risk of 3.24 (1.57-6.71, than patients who had non-thyroid cancer. Vandetanib was associated with a significantly increased risk of all-grade QTc interval prolongation with overall Peto odds ratios of 7.26 (4.36-12.09 and 5.70 (3.09-10.53 among patients with non-thyroid cancer and thyroid cancer, respectively, compared to the controls.Treatment with vandetanib is associated with a significant increase in the overall incidence and risk of QTc interval prolongation. Different cancer types and treatment durations may affect the risk of developing high-grade QTc interval prolongation.

  15. A retrospective analysis of RET translocation, gene copy number gain and expression in NSCLC patients treated with vandetanib in four randomized Phase III studies.

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    Platt, Adam; Morten, John; Ji, Qunsheng; Elvin, Paul; Womack, Chris; Su, Xinying; Donald, Emma; Gray, Neil; Read, Jessica; Bigley, Graham; Blockley, Laura; Cresswell, Carl; Dale, Angela; Davies, Amanda; Zhang, Tianwei; Fan, Shuqiong; Fu, Haihua; Gladwin, Amanda; Harrod, Grace; Stevens, James; Williams, Victoria; Ye, Qingqing; Zheng, Li; de Boer, Richard; Herbst, Roy S; Lee, Jin-Soo; Vasselli, James

    2015-03-23

    To determine the prevalence of RET rearrangement genes, RET copy number gains and expression in tumor samples from four Phase III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) trials of vandetanib, a selective inhibitor of VEGFR, RET and EGFR signaling, and to determine any association with outcome to vandetanib treatment. Archival tumor samples from the ZODIAC ( NCT00312377 , vandetanib ± docetaxel), ZEAL ( NCT00418886 , vandetanib ± pemetrexed), ZEPHYR ( NCT00404924 , vandetanib vs placebo) and ZEST ( NCT00364351 , vandetanib vs erlotinib) studies were evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 944 and 1102 patients. The prevalence of RET rearrangements by FISH was 0.7% (95% CI 0.3-1.5%) among patients with a known result. Seven tumor samples were positive for RET rearrangements (vandetanib, n = 3; comparator, n = 4). 2.8% (n = 26) of samples had RET amplification (innumerable RET clusters, or ≥7 copies in > 10% of tumor cells), 8.1% (n = 76) had low RET gene copy number gain (4-6 copies in ≥40% of tumor cells) and 8.3% (n = 92) were RET expression positive (signal intensity ++ or +++ in >10% of tumor cells). Of RET-rearrangement-positive patients, none had an objective response in the vandetanib arm and one patient responded in the comparator arm. Radiologic evidence of tumor shrinkage was observed in two patients treated with vandetanib and one treated with comparator drug. The objective response rate was similar in the vandetanib and comparator arms for patients positive for RET copy number gains or RET protein expression. We have identified prevalence for three RET biomarkers in a population predominated by non-Asians and smokers. RET rearrangement prevalence was lower than previously reported. We found no evidence of a differential benefit for efficacy by IHC and RET gene copy number gains. The low prevalence of RET rearrangements (0.7%) prevents firm conclusions regarding association of vandetanib treatment with

  16. The anti-neoplastic activity of Vandetanib against high-risk medulloblastoma variants is profoundly enhanced by additional PI3K inhibition.

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    Craveiro, Rogerio B; Ehrhardt, Michael; Velz, Julia; Olschewski, Martin; Goetz, Barbara; Pietsch, Torsten; Dilloo, Dagmar

    2017-07-18

    Medulloblastoma is comprised of at least four molecular subgroups with distinct clinical outcome (WHO classification 2016). SHH-TP53-mutated as well as MYC-amplified Non-WNT/Non-SHH medulloblastoma show the worst prognosis.Here we present evidence that single application of the multi-kinase inhibitor Vandetanib displays anti-neoplastic efficacy against cell lines derived from high-risk SHH-TP53-mutated and MYC-amplified Non-WNT/Non-SHH medulloblastoma. The narrow target spectrum of Vandetanib along with a favourable toxicity profile renders this drug ideal for multimodal treatment approaches. In this context our investigation documents that Vandetanib in combination with the clinically available PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941 leads to enhanced cytotoxicity against MYC-amplified and SHH-TP53-mutated medulloblastoma. In line with these findings we show for MYC-amplified medulloblastoma a profound reduction in activity of the oncogenes STAT3 and AKT. Furthermore, we document that Vandetanib and the standard chemotherapeutic Etoposide display additive anti-neoplastic efficacy in the investigated medulloblastoma cell lines that could be further enhanced by PI3K inhibition. Of note, the combination of Vandetanib, GDC-0941 and Etoposide results in MYC-amplified and SHH-TP53-mutated cell lines in complete loss of cell viability. Our findings therefore provide a rational to further evaluate Vandetanib in combination with PI3K inhibitors as well as standard chemotherapeutics in vivo for the treatment of most aggressive medulloblastoma variants.

  17. RADVAN: a randomised phase 2 trial of WBRT plus vandetanib for melanoma brain metastases – results and lessons learnt

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    Gupta, Avinash; Roberts, Corran; Tysoe, Finn; Goff, Matthew; Nobes, Jenny; Lester, James; Marshall, Ernie; Corner, Carie; Wolstenholme, Virginia; Kelly, Charles; Wise, Adelyn; Collins, Linda; Love, Sharon; Woodward, Martha; Salisbury, Amanda; Middleton, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases occur in up to 75% of patients with advanced melanoma. Most are treated with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), with limited effectiveness. Vandetanib, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor and rearranged during transfection tyrosine kinases, is a potent radiosensitiser in xenograft models. We compared WBRT with WBRT plus vandetanib in the treatment of patients with melanoma brain metastases. Methods: In this double-blind, multi-centre, phase 2 trial patients with melanoma brain metastases were randomised to receive WBRT (30 Gy in 10 fractions) plus 3 weeks of concurrent vandetanib 100 mg once daily or placebo. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival in brain (PFS brain). The main study was preceded by a safety run-in phase to confirm tolerability of the combination. A post-hoc analysis and literature review considered barriers to recruiting patients with melanoma brain metastases to clinical trials. Results: Twenty-four patients were recruited, six to the safety phase and 18 to the randomised phase. The study closed early due to poor recruitment. Median PFS brain was 3.3 months (90% confidence interval (CI): 1.6–5.6) in the vandetanib group and 2.5 months (90% CI: 0.2–4.8) in the placebo group (P=0.34). Median overall survival (OS) was 4.6 months (90% CI: 1.6–6.3) and 2.5 months (90% CI: 0.2–7.2), respectively (P=0.54). The most frequent adverse events were fatigue, alopecia, confusion and nausea. The most common barrier to study recruitment was availability of alternative treatments. Conclusions: The combination of WBRT plus vandetanib was well tolerated. Compared with WBRT alone, there was no significant improvement in PFS brain or OS, although we are unable to provide a definitive result due to poor accrual. A review of barriers to trial accrual identified several factors that affect study recruitment in this difficult disease area. PMID:27711083

  18. RADVAN: a randomised phase 2 trial of WBRT plus vandetanib for melanoma brain metastases - results and lessons learnt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Avinash; Roberts, Corran; Tysoe, Finn; Goff, Matthew; Nobes, Jenny; Lester, James; Marshall, Ernie; Corner, Carie; Wolstenholme, Virginia; Kelly, Charles; Wise, Adelyn; Collins, Linda; Love, Sharon; Woodward, Martha; Salisbury, Amanda; Middleton, Mark R

    2016-11-08

    Brain metastases occur in up to 75% of patients with advanced melanoma. Most are treated with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), with limited effectiveness. Vandetanib, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor and rearranged during transfection tyrosine kinases, is a potent radiosensitiser in xenograft models. We compared WBRT with WBRT plus vandetanib in the treatment of patients with melanoma brain metastases. In this double-blind, multi-centre, phase 2 trial patients with melanoma brain metastases were randomised to receive WBRT (30 Gy in 10 fractions) plus 3 weeks of concurrent vandetanib 100 mg once daily or placebo. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival in brain (PFS brain). The main study was preceded by a safety run-in phase to confirm tolerability of the combination. A post-hoc analysis and literature review considered barriers to recruiting patients with melanoma brain metastases to clinical trials. Twenty-four patients were recruited, six to the safety phase and 18 to the randomised phase. The study closed early due to poor recruitment. Median PFS brain was 3.3 months (90% confidence interval (CI): 1.6-5.6) in the vandetanib group and 2.5 months (90% CI: 0.2-4.8) in the placebo group (P=0.34). Median overall survival (OS) was 4.6 months (90% CI: 1.6-6.3) and 2.5 months (90% CI: 0.2-7.2), respectively (P=0.54). The most frequent adverse events were fatigue, alopecia, confusion and nausea. The most common barrier to study recruitment was availability of alternative treatments. The combination of WBRT plus vandetanib was well tolerated. Compared with WBRT alone, there was no significant improvement in PFS brain or OS, although we are unable to provide a definitive result due to poor accrual. A review of barriers to trial accrual identified several factors that affect study recruitment in this difficult disease area.

  19. Randomized phase II study of vandetanib alone or with paclitaxel and carboplatin as first-line treatment for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

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    Heymach, John V; Paz-Ares, Luis; De Braud, Filippo; Sebastian, Martin; Stewart, David J; Eberhardt, Wilfried E E; Ranade, Anantbhushan A; Cohen, Graham; Trigo, Jose Manuel; Sandler, Alan B; Bonomi, Philip D; Herbst, Roy S; Krebs, Annetta D; Vasselli, James; Johnson, Bruce E

    2008-11-20

    Vandetanib is a once-daily, oral inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling. The antitumor activity of vandetanib monotherapy or vandetanib with paclitaxel and carboplatin (VPC) was compared with paclitaxel and carboplatin (PC) in previously untreated patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). All NSCLC histologies and previously treated CNS metastases were permitted in this partially blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized phase II study. Patients were randomly assigned 2:1:1 to receive vandetanib, VPC, or PC. Progression-free survival (PFS) was the primary end point, and the study was powered to detect a reduced risk of progression with VPC versus PC (hazard ratio = 0.70; one-sided P 1.33 v PC). Overall survival was not significantly different between patients receiving VPC or PC. Rash, diarrhea, and hypertension were common adverse events; no pulmonary or CNS hemorrhage events required intervention. VPC could be safely administered to patients with NSCLC, including those with squamous cell histology and treated brain metastases. Compared with the PC control arm, patients receiving VPC had longer PFS, meeting the prespecified study end point, whereas those receiving vandetanib monotherapy had shorter PFS.

  20. Assessment of vandetanib as an inhibitor of various human renal transporters: inhibition of multidrug and toxin extrusion as a possible mechanism leading to decreased cisplatin and creatinine clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hong; Yang, Zheng; Zhao, Weiping; Zhang, Yueping; Rodrigues, A David

    2013-12-01

    Vandetanib was evaluated as an inhibitor of human organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1), OAT3, organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2), and multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE1 and MATE2K) transfected (individually) into human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293). Although no inhibition of OAT1 and OAT3 was observed, inhibition of OCT2-mediated uptake of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) and metformin was evident (IC(50) of 73.4 ± 14.8 and 8.8 ± 1.9 µM, respectively). However, vandetanib was an even more potent inhibitor of MATE1- and MATE2K-mediated uptake of MPP(+) (IC(50) of 1.23 ± 0.05 and 1.26 ± 0.06 µM, respectively) and metformin (IC(50) of 0.16 ± 0.05 and 0.30 ± 0.09 µM, respectively). Subsequent cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that transport inhibition by vandetanib (2.5 µM) significantly decreased the sensitivity [right shift in concentration of cisplatin giving rise to 50% cell death; IC(50(CN))] of MATE1-HEK and MATE2K-HEK cells to cisplatin [IC(50(CN)) of 1.12 ± 0.13 versus 2.39 ± 0.44 µM; 0.85 ± 0.09 versus 1.99 ± 0.16 µM; P cisplatin nephrotoxicity (reduced cisplatin clearance), in some subjects receiving vandetanib therapy.

  1. Rapid response of hypercortisolism to vandetanib treatment in a patient with advanced medullary thyroid cancer and ectopic Cushing syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitoia Fabian; Bueno, Fernanda; Schmidt, Angelica; Lucas, Sabrina; Cross, Graciela, E-mail: fpitoia@intramed.net [Division de Endocrinologia, Hospital de Clinicas, Universidad de Buenos Aires Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-08-15

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) may rarely present with paraneoplastic syndromes. Among the most frequent ones are the appearance of diarrhea and ectopic Cushing syndrome (ECS). The ECS in the context of MTC is usually present in patients with distant metastatic disease. The use of drugs such as ketoconazole, metyrapone, somatostatin analogs and etomidate have been ineffective alternatives to control hypercortisolism in these patients. Bilateral adrenalectomy is often required to manage this situation. Recently, the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has been shown to be a useful tool to achieve eucortisolism in patients with metastatic MTC and ECS. We present a patient with sporadic advanced persistent and progressive MTC with lymph node and liver metastases, which after 16 years of followup developed an ECS. After one month of 300 mg/day vandetanib treatment, a biochemical and clinical response of the ECS was achieved but it did not result in significant reduction of tumor burden. However the patient reached criteria for stable disease according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST 1.1) after 8 months of follow-up. (author)

  2. Rapid response of hypercortisolism to vandetanib treatment in a patient with advanced medullary thyroid cancer and ectopic Cushing syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitoia Fabian; Bueno, Fernanda; Schmidt, Angelica; Lucas, Sabrina; Cross, Graciela

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) may rarely present with paraneoplastic syndromes. Among the most frequent ones are the appearance of diarrhea and ectopic Cushing syndrome (ECS). The ECS in the context of MTC is usually present in patients with distant metastatic disease. The use of drugs such as ketoconazole, metyrapone, somatostatin analogs and etomidate have been ineffective alternatives to control hypercortisolism in these patients. Bilateral adrenalectomy is often required to manage this situation. Recently, the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has been shown to be a useful tool to achieve eucortisolism in patients with metastatic MTC and ECS. We present a patient with sporadic advanced persistent and progressive MTC with lymph node and liver metastases, which after 16 years of followup developed an ECS. After one month of 300 mg/day vandetanib treatment, a biochemical and clinical response of the ECS was achieved but it did not result in significant reduction of tumor burden. However the patient reached criteria for stable disease according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST 1.1) after 8 months of follow-up. (author)

  3. Interaction of the EGFR inhibitors gefitinib, vandetanib, pelitinib and neratinib with the ABCG2 multidrug transporter: implications for the emergence and reversal of cancer drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedüs, Csilla; Truta-Feles, Krisztina; Antalffy, Géza; Várady, György; Német, Katalin; Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Kéri, György; Orfi, László; Szakács, Gergely; Settleman, Jeffrey; Váradi, András; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2012-08-01

    Human ABCG2 is a plasma membrane glycoprotein that provides physiological protection against xenobiotics. ABCG2 also significantly influences biodistribution of drugs through pharmacological tissue barriers and confers multidrug resistance to cancer cells. Moreover, ABCG2 is the molecular determinant of the side population that is characteristically enriched in normal and cancer stem cells. Numerous tumors depend on unregulated EGFR signaling, thus inhibition of this receptor by small molecular weight inhibitors such as gefitinib, and the novel second generation agents vandetanib, pelitinib and neratinib, is a promising therapeutic option. In the present study, we provide detailed biochemical characterization regarding the interaction of these EGFR inhibitors with ABCG2. We show that ABCG2 confers resistance to gefitinib and pelitinib, whereas the intracellular action of vandetanib and neratinib is unaltered by the presence of the transporter. At higher concentrations, however, all these EGFR inhibitors inhibit ABCG2 function, thereby promoting accumulation of ABCG2 substrate drugs. We also report enhanced expression of ABCG2 in gefitinib-resistant non-small cell lung cancer cells, suggesting potential clinical relevance of ABCG2 in acquired drug resistance. Since ABCG2 has important impact on both the pharmacological properties and anti-cancer efficiencies of drugs, our results regarding the novel EGFR inhibitors should provide useful information about their therapeutic applicability against ABCG2-expressing cancer cells depending on EGFR signaling. In addition, the finding that these EGFR inhibitors efficiently block ABCG2 function may help to design novel drug-combination therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A new spectrofluorimetric assay method for vandetanib in tablets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    556. 7. Balwani G, Joseph E, Reddi S, Nagpal V, Saha RN. Rapid, Simple, and Sensitive Spectrofluorimetric Method for the Estimation of Ganciclovir in Bulk and. Pharmaceutical Formulations. J Spectrosc 2013;. 2013:1-5. 8. Bai F, Johnson J, ...

  5. Targeting the EGFR pathway for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnston, JB; Navaratnam, S; Pitz, MW

    2006-01-01

    .g.: Trastuzumab/Herceptin, Pertuzumab/Omnitarg/rhuMab-2C4, Cetuximab/Erbitux/IMC-C225, Panitumumab/Abenix/ABX-EGF, and also ZD6474). In addition, we summarize, both current therapy development driven by antibody-based targeting of the EGFR-dependent signaling pathways, and furthermore, we provide a background...

  6. Targeted Therapy Shows Benefit in Rare Type of Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treatment with the multitargeted agent vandetanib (Caprelsa) improved progression-free survival in patients with medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), according to findings from a randomized clinical trial.

  7. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer Cabozantinib-S-Malate Caprelsa (Vandetanib) Cometriq (Cabozantinib-S-Malate) Doxorubicin ...

  8. Enhanced effects by 4-phenylbutyrate in combination with RTK inhibitors on proliferation in brain tumor cell models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, Ana-Maria; Sofiadis, Anastasios; Baryawno, Ninib; Johnsen, John Inge; Larsson, Catharina; Vukojevic, Vladana; Ekstroem, Tomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The histone deacetylase inhibitor 4-phenylbutyrate substantially enhance efficacy of the receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib or vandetanib in glioma and medulloblastoma cell lines. → Cell death increases and clonogenic survival is reduced in the combination treatments, over mono-therapy. → Combination treatments with these drugs may improve clinical outcome for cancer therapy. -- Abstract: We have investigated in vitro effects of anticancer therapy with the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PB) combined with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKi) gefitinib or vandetanib on the survival of glioblastoma (U343MGa) and medulloblastoma (D324Med) cells. In comparison with individual effects of these drugs, combined treatment with gefitinib/4-PB or vandetanib/4-PB resulted in enhanced cell killing and reduced clonogenic survival in both cell lines. Our results suggest that combined treatment using HDACi and RTKi may beneficially affect the outcome of cancer therapy.

  9. Management of treatment-related toxicities in advanced medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brose, Marcia S; Bible, Keith C; Chow, Laura Q M; Gilbert, Jill; Grande, Carolyn; Worden, Francis; Haddad, Robert

    2018-04-22

    Progress in the treatment of advanced medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) has resulted from the approval of 2 drugs within the past 5 years, vandetanib and cabozantinib. These multikinase inhibitors (MKIs) possess overlapping specificities for multiple kinase targets implicated in the progression of MTC. Both drugs are associated with toxicities, including hypertension, hemorrhage/perforation, diarrhea and other gastrointestinal events, several dermatologic events, and hypothyroidism. In addition, vandetanib is uniquely associated with QTc prolongation through interaction with myocardial potassium channels, and cabozantinib is uniquely associated with hand-foot skin reaction. Treatment-related toxicities occur frequently and can be severe or life-threatening, and patients undergoing long-term treatment will likely experience adverse events (AEs). Here we offer specific practical recommendations for managing AEs commonly occurring with vandetanib and cabozantinib. The recommended approach relies on early recognition and palliation of symptoms, dose interruption, and dose reduction as necessary in order for the patient to maintain the highest tolerable dose for as long as possible and optimal quality of life. Treatment guidelines do not specify a recommended sequence for treating with vandetanib and cabozantinib; however, most patients will receive both drugs during their lifetime. The choice for first-line therapy is individualized after a risk-benefit assessment and depends on physician preference and patient-related factors, such as comorbid conditions. Because most generalist practices may not be familiar with the intricacies of agents such as vandetanib and cabozantinib, we commend that patients with advanced MTC be managed and treated by a thyroid cancer specialist with coordination of care within a multidisciplinary team. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Mitochondria-Targeted Nitroxide, Mito-CP, Suppresses Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma Cell Survival In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starenki, Dmytro

    2013-01-01

    Context: Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a neuroendocrine tumor mainly caused by mutations in the RET proto-oncogene. For MTC therapy, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved vandetanib and cabozantinib, multikinase inhibitors targeting RET and other tyrosine kinase receptors of vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor, or hepatocyte growth factor. Nevertheless, not all patients with the progressive MTC respond to these drugs, requiring the development of additional therapeutic modalities that have distinct activity. Objective: We aimed to evaluate mitochondria-targeted carboxy-proxyl (Mito-CP), a mitochondria-targeted redox-sensitive agent, for its tumor-suppressive efficacy against MTC. Design: In vitro cultures of 2 human MTC cell lines, TT and MZ-CRC-1, and TT xenografts in mice were treated with Mito-CP in comparison with vandetanib. The effects on cell survival/death, RET expression, mitochondrial integrity, and oxidative stress were determined. Results: Contrary to vandetanib, Mito-CP induced RET downregulation and strong cytotoxic effects in both cell lines in vitro, including caspase-dependent apoptosis. These effects were accompanied by mitochondrial membrane depolarization, decreased oxygen consumption, and increased oxidative stress in cells. Intriguingly, Mito-CP–induced cell death, but not RET downregulation, was partially inhibited by the reactive oxygen species scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine, indicating that Mito-CP mediates tumor-suppressive effects via redox-dependent as well as redox-independent mechanisms. Orally administered Mito-CP effectively suppressed TT xenografts in mice, with an efficacy comparable to vandetanib and relatively low toxicity to animals. Conclusion: Our results suggest that Mito-CP can effectively suppress MTC cell growth/survival via a mechanism distinct from vandetanib effects. Mitochondrial targeting may be a potential strategy for MTC therapy. PMID:23509102

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling is necessary for expansion of medullary microvessels during postnatal kidney development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robdrup Tinning, Anne; Jensen, Boye L; Johnsen, Iben

    2016-01-01

    Postnatal inhibition or deletion of angiotensin II (ANG II) AT1 receptors impairs renal medullary mircrovascular development through a mechanism that may include vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The present study was designed to test if VEGF/VEGF receptor signaling is necessary....... In human fetal kidney tissue, immature vascular bundles appeared early in the third trimester (GA27-28) and expanded in size until term. Rat pups treated with the VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2) inhibitor vandetanib (100 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) from P7 to P12 or P10 to P16 displayed growth retardation and proteinuria...... for the development of the renal medullary microcirculation. Endothelial cell-specific immunolabeling of kidney sections from rats showed immature vascular bundles at postnatal day (P) 10 with subsequent expansion of bundles until P21. Medullary VEGF protein abundance coincided with vasa recta bundle formation...

  12. Cushing Disease in a patient with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasturi, Kannan; Fernandes, Lucas; Quezado, Martha; Eid, Mary; Marcus, Leigh; Chittiboina, Prashant; Rappaport, Mark; Stratakis, Constantine A; Widemann, Brigitte; Lodish, Maya

    2017-06-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN2B) is a rare autosomal-dominant cancer syndrome characterized in part by metastatic medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) and pheochromocytoma. Cushing disease is a rare cause of endogenous hypercortisolism in children. We describe a 21-year-old African-American male who was diagnosed at age 10 with an ACTH-secreting pituitary microadenoma. At age 16 he developed medullary thyroid cancer and was found to have multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B with the characteristic M918T mutation of the RET proto-oncogene. Following thyroidectomy, he was initiated on Vandetanib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and has since had stable disease over the last 5 years. Our patient is the first individual with MEN2B to be described with Cushing disease. The RET oncogene may play a role in pituitary tumorigenesis; alternatively, the coexistence of these two entities may represent an extremely rare coincidence.

  13. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  14. Targeted Therapy for Medullary Thyroid Cancer: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Priya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Medullary thyroid cancers (MTCs constitute between 2 and 5% of all thyroid cancers. The 10-year overall survival (OS rate of patients with localized disease is around 95% while that of patients with regional stage disease is about 75%. Only 20% of patients with distant metastases at diagnosis survive 10 years which is significantly lower than for differentiated thyroid cancers. Cases with regional metastases at presentation have high recurrence rates. Adjuvant external radiation confers local control but not improved OS. The management of residual, recurrent, or metastatic disease till a few years ago was re-surgery with local measures such as radiation. Chemotherapy was used with marginal benefit. The development of targeted therapy has brought in a major advantage in management of such patients. Two drugs—vandetanib and cabozantinib—have been approved for use in progressive or metastatic MTC. In addition, several drugs acting on other steps of the molecular pathway are being investigated with promising results. Targeted radionuclide therapy also provides an effective treatment option with good quality of life. This review covers the rationale of targeted therapy for MTC, present treatment options, drugs and methods under investigation, as well as an outline of the adverse effects and their management.

  15. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors directed against the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) have distinct cutaneous toxicity profiles: a meta-analysis and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Paul R; Okman, Jonathan S; Wilkerson, Julia; Cowen, Edward W

    2015-06-01

    Inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is associated with cutaneous adverse effects that increase patient morbidity. Our objective was to examine the skin toxicity profile of anti-VEGFR TKIs and determine the changing incidence in clinical trials. PubMed was queried for phase II or III trials of anti-VEGFR TKIs between 2000 and 2013 involving ≥50 patients. Adverse events were abstracted, with results presented in both fixed and random effects models. Odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for studies with at least two arms. Across 82 included studies, all grades rash (OR, 2.68; 95 % CI, 2.45-2.94), hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) (OR, 2.70; 95 % CI, 2.43-3.00), and pruritus (OR, 1.25; 95 % CI, 1.12-1.39) were associated with anti-VEGFR TKIs. Vandetanib had the highest incidence of rash (41 %), while sorafenib was most commonly associated with HFSR (37 %) and pruritus (14 %). The incidence of HFSR from 2000 to 2013 showed an upward trend (r (2) = 0.042, p = 0.10) and in sunitinib therapy increased significantly (r (2) = 0.237, p = 0.04). The incidence of HFSR, rash, and pruritus varies considerably by drug. Our data suggest a continued need to address skin toxicities and improve reporting strategies.

  16. Advances and controversies in the management of medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Ana Luiza; Wajner, Simone Magagnin; Vargas, Carla Vaz Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) comprises approximately 4% of all malignant thyroid neoplasms. Although the majority of patients have a good prognosis, a subgroup of patients develops progressive disease and requires systemic therapy. Here, we focused on the current MTC therapeutic approaches and discussed the advantages and disadvantages of molecular targeted therapies. Targeted molecular therapies that inhibit RET and other tyrosine kinase receptors involved in angiogenesis have been shown to improve progression-free survival in patients with advanced MTC. Two drugs, vandetanib and cabozantinib, have been approved for the treatment of progressive or symptomatic MTC, and several others have exhibited variable efficacy. No tyrosine kinase inhibitor has been shown to improve survival. Although no definitive recommendation can currently be made, cumulative data indicate that knowledge of the tumor mutational profile may facilitate improvements in targeted therapy for MTC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are effective therapeutic agents for the treatment of progressive MTC. Nevertheless, it is not clear who will benefit the most from therapy, and the decision regarding when and how to initiate the treatment should be made based on the patient's medical history and tumor behavior. Hopefully, in the near future, molecular profiling of MTC can be used to determine the most effective molecular therapeutic target.

  17. Identification of selective inhibitors of RET and comparison with current clinical candidates through development and validation of a robust screening cascade [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J. Watson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available RET (REarranged during Transfection is a receptor tyrosine kinase, which plays pivotal roles in regulating cell survival, differentiation, proliferation, migration and chemotaxis. Activation of RET is a mechanism of oncogenesis in medullary thyroid carcinomas where both germline and sporadic activating somatic mutations are prevalent.   At present, there are no known specific RET inhibitors in clinical development, although many potent inhibitors of RET have been opportunistically identified through selectivity profiling of compounds initially designed to target other tyrosine kinases. Vandetanib and cabozantinib, both multi-kinase inhibitors with RET activity, are approved for use in medullary thyroid carcinoma, but additional pharmacological activities, most notably inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor - VEGFR2 (KDR, lead to dose-limiting toxicity. The recent identification of RET fusions present in ~1% of lung adenocarcinoma patients has renewed interest in the identification and development of more selective RET inhibitors lacking the toxicities associated with the current treatments.   In an earlier publication [Newton et al, 2016; 1] we reported the discovery of a series of 2-substituted phenol quinazolines as potent and selective RET kinase inhibitors. Here we describe the development of the robust screening cascade which allowed the identification and advancement of this chemical series.  Furthermore we have profiled a panel of RET-active clinical compounds both to validate the cascade and to confirm that none display a RET-selective target profile.

  18. The evolving field of kinase inhibitors in thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, V; Sciammarella, C; Vitale, M; Colao, A; Faggiano, A

    2015-01-01

    Most of the genetic events implicated in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer (TC) involve genes with kinase activity. Thus, kinase inhibitors (KIs) are very relevant in this field. KIs are considered the most suitable treatment for patients with iodine-refractory differentiated TC; these patients comprise the subgroup with the poorer prognosis. To date, only sorafenib has been approved for this indication, but promising results have been reported with several other KIs. In particular, lenvatinib has demonstrated excellent efficacy, with both progression-free survival and objective tumour response being better than with sorafenib. Despite being considered to be well tolerated, both sorafenib and lenvatinib have shown a remarkable toxicity, which has led to dose reductions in the majority of patients and to treatment discontinuation in a significant proportion of cases. The role of KIs in differentiated TC may be revolutionised by the finding that selumetinib may restore a clinical response to radioactive iodine (RAI). Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of advanced, progressive medullary TC (MTC). Nevertheless, the toxicity of both compounds suggests their selective use in those patients with strong disease progression. Treatment with the mTOR-inhibitor everolimus, alone or in combination with somatostatin analogues, should be studied in metastatic MTC patients with slow progression of disease, these representing the vast majority of patients. KIs did not significantly impact on the clinical features of anaplastic TC (ATC). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-angiogenic Therapy in Patients with Advanced Gastric and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Tzong; Oh, Do-Youn; Ryu, Min-Hee; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Yeo, Winnie; Carlesi, Roberto; Cheng, Rebecca; Kim, Jongseok; Orlando, Mauro; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2017-10-01

    Despite advancements in therapy for advanced gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancers, their prognosis remains dismal. Tumor angiogenesis plays a key role in cancer growth and metastasis, and recent studies indicate that pharmacologic blockade of angiogenesis is a promising approach to therapy. In this systematic review, we summarize current literature on the clinical benefit of anti-angiogenic agents in advanced gastric cancer. We conducted a systematic search of PubMed and conference proceedings including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the European Society for Medical Oncology, and the European Cancer Congress. Included studies aimed to prospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of anti-angiogenic agents in advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer. Each trial investigated at least one of the following endpoints: overall survival, progression-free survival/time to progression, and/or objective response rate. Our search yielded 139 publications. Forty-two met the predefined inclusion criteria. Included studies reported outcomes with apatinib, axitinib, bevacizumab, orantinib, pazopanib, ramucirumab, regorafenib, sorafenib, sunitinib, telatinib, and vandetanib. Second-line therapy with ramucirumab and third-line therapy with apatinib are the only anti-angiogenic agents so far shown to significantly improve survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer. Overall, agents that specifically target the vascular endothelial growth factor ligand or receptor have better safety profile compared to multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  20. In vitro drug response and efflux transporters associated with drug resistance in pediatric high grade glioma and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna J E Veringa

    Full Text Available Pediatric high-grade gliomas (pHGG, including diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG, are the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. While it is clear that surgery (if possible, and radiotherapy are beneficial for treatment, the role of chemotherapy for these tumors is still unclear. Therefore, we performed an in vitro drug screen on primary glioma cells, including three DIPG cultures, to determine drug sensitivity of these tumours, without the possible confounding effect of insufficient drug delivery. This screen revealed a high in vitro cytotoxicity for melphalan, doxorubicine, mitoxantrone, and BCNU, and for the novel, targeted agents vandetanib and bortezomib in pHGG and DIPG cells. We subsequently determined the expression of the drug efflux transporters P-gp, BCRP1, and MRP1 in glioma cultures and their corresponding tumor tissues. Results indicate the presence of P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP1 in the tumor vasculature, and expression of MRP1 in the glioma cells themselves. Our results show that pediatric glioma and DIPG tumors per se are not resistant to chemotherapy. Treatment failure observed in clinical trials, may rather be contributed to the presence of drug efflux transporters that constitute a first line of drug resistance located at the blood-brain barrier or other resistance mechanism. As such, we suggest that alternative ways of drug delivery may offer new possibilities for the treatment of pediatric high-grade glioma patients, and DIPG in particular.

  1. Fatigue associated with newly approved vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in cancer patients: an up-to-date meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Gu, Jian

    2017-10-01

    The fatigue associated with five newly approved vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR-TKIs) (regorafenib, vandetanib, cabozantinib, lenvatinib, axitinib) is poorly understood. We conducted this systematic review to fully investigate the fatigue associated with these VEGFR-TKIs in cancer patients. Relevant studies of randomized controlled trials in cancer patients treated with the five VEGFR-TKIs were retrieved and a systematic evaluation was conducted. EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PubMed were searched for articles published until March 2017. Thirteen randomized controlled trials and 4395 patients were included. The current analysis suggested that the use of five newly approved VEGFR-TKIs increased the risk of all-grade fatigue (1.43; 95% CI 1.23-1.66; p fatigue (1.97; 95% CI1.44-2.70; p fatigue varied significantly within drug type, but high-grade fatigue did not. The RR of all-grade and high-grade fatigue did not vary significantly according to cancer type, treatment line, and treatment duration. The risk of high-grade fatigue may vary with treatment duration, whereas all-grade fatigue may not. The available data suggest that the use of the five newly approved VEGFR-TKIs is associated with a significantly increased risk of fatigue in cancer patients. Physicians should be aware of this adverse effect and should monitor cancer patients receiving these drugs.

  2. Cellular Signaling Pathway Alterations and Potential Targeted Therapies for Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Giunti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parafollicular C-cell-derived medullary thyroid cancer (MTC comprises 3% to 4% of all thyroid cancers. While cytotoxic treatments have been shown to have limited efficacy, targeted molecular therapies that inhibit rearranged during transfection (RET and other tyrosine kinase receptors that are mainly involved in angiogenesis have shown great promise in the treatment of metastatic or locally advanced MTC. Multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as vandetanib, which is already approved for the treatment of progressive MTC, and cabozantinib have shown distinct advantages with regard to rates of disease response and control. However, these types of tyrosine kinase inhibitor compounds are able to concurrently block several types of targets, which limits the understanding of RET as a specific target. Moreover, important resistances to tyrosine kinase inhibitors can occur, which limit the long-term efficacy of these treatments. Deregulated cellular signaling pathways and genetic alterations in MTC, particularly the activation of the RAS/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR cascades and RET crosstalk signaling, are now emerging as novel and potentially promising therapeutic treatments for aggressive MTC.

  3. The treatment landscape in thyroid cancer: a focus on cabozantinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitzman SP

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Steven P Weitzman, Maria E Cabanillas Department of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Although patients with thyroid cancer generally fare well, there is a subset for which this is not necessarily true. Progress in understanding the molecular aberrations in thyroid cancer has led to a change in the management of these cases. Since 2011, four multikinase inhibitors (MKIs have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for thyroid cancer – cabozantinib and vandetanib for medullary thyroid cancer and sorafenib and lenvatinib for differentiated thyroid cancer. This change in the treatment landscape has raised challenges for practitioners who may not be familiar with the use of MKIs or with the treatment and natural history of advanced thyroid cancer in general. This article reviews the epidemiology, molecular drivers, and initial treatment of patients with thyroid cancer and offers practical guidance to assist with the determination of when to appropriately start an MKI. As an example, cabozantinib and its efficacy are discussed in detail. Close monitoring is required for all patients on targeted agents to assess for adverse effects and response to therapy. An approach to managing drug-related adverse events is detailed. Since these drugs are not curative and have not yet proven to prolong overall survival, it is critical to weigh the risks and benefits of treatment at every visit. The potential value of changing to a different agent following failure of an MKI is also addressed. Keywords: chemotherapy, adverse event, targeted therapy, kinase inhibitor, VEGF, RET

  4. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-12-01

    , Uracil, Ustekinumab; V-260, Vandetanib, Vatalanib succinate, Vernakalant hydrochloride, Vorinostat; YM-155; Zileuton, Zoledronic acid monohydrate.

  5. Molecular targeted therapies of aggressive thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Martina eFerrari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTC that arise from follicular cells account > 90% of thyroid cancer (TC [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC accounts < 5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts towards the development of new drugs.Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the last decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the above-mentioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds, and to personalize

  6. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomillero, A; Moral, M A

    2010-01-01

    , Tiotropium bromide, TIV, Trabectedin, Tremelimumab, TRU-016; Vadimezan, Val8-GLP-1(7-37)OH, Vandetanib, Vernakalant hydrochloride, Voreloxin, Voriconazole, Vorinostat, Yttrium 90 (90Y) ibritumomab tiuxetan; Zeaxanthin, Ziprasidone hydrochloride, Zosuquidar trihydrochloride. Copyright 2010 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  7. Validated LC-MS/MS Method for the Quantification of Ponatinib in Plasma: Application to Metabolic Stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan A Kadi

    Full Text Available In the current work, a rapid, specific, sensitive and validated liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometric method was developed for the quantification of ponatinib (PNT in human plasma and rat liver microsomes (RLMs with its application to metabolic stability. Chromatographic separation of PNT and vandetanib (IS were accomplished on Agilent eclipse plus C18 analytical column (50 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.8 μm particle size maintained at 21±2°C. Flow rate was 0.25 mLmin-1 with run time of 4 min. Mobile phase consisted of solvent A (10 mM ammonium formate, pH adjusted to 4.1 with formic acid and solvent B (acetonitrile. Ions were generated by electrospray (ESI and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM was used as basis for quantification. The results revealed a linear calibration curve in the range of 5-400 ngmL-1 (r2 ≥ 0.9998 with lower limit of quantification (LOQ and lower limit of detection (LOD of 4.66 and 1.53 ngmL-1 in plasma, 4.19 and 1.38 ngmL-1 in RLMs. The intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy in plasma ranged from1.06 to 2.54% and -1.48 to -0.17, respectively. Whereas in RLMs ranged from 0.97 to 2.31% and -1.65 to -0.3%. The developed procedure was applied for quantification of PNT in human plasma and RLMs for study metabolic stability of PNT. PNT disappeared rapidly in the 1st 10 minutes of RLM incubation and the disappearance plateaued out for the rest of the incubation. In vitro half-life (t1/2 was 6.26 min and intrinsic clearance (CLin was 15.182± 0.477.

  8. Three-dimensional susceptibility-weighted imaging and two-dimensional T2*-weighted gradient-echo imaging of intratumoral hemorrhages in pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loebel, Ulrike; Sedlacik, Jan; Sabin, Noah D.; Hillenbrand, Claudia M.; Patay, Zoltan; Kocak, Mehmet; Broniscer, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    We compared the sensitivity and specificity of T2*-weighted gradient-echo imaging (T2*-GRE) and susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) in determining prevalence and cumulative incidence of intratumoral hemorrhages in children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) undergoing antiangiogenic and radiation therapy. Patients were recruited from an institutional review board-approved prospective phase I trial of vandetanib administered in combination with radiation therapy. Patient consent was obtained before enrollment. Consecutive T2*-GRE and SWI exams of 17 patients (F/M: 9/8; age 3-17 years) were evaluated. Two reviewers (R1 and R2) determined the number and size of hemorrhages at baseline and multiple follow-ups (92 scans, mean 5.4/patient). Statistical analyses were performed using descriptive statistics, graphical tools, and mixed-effects Poisson regression models. Prevalence of hemorrhages at diagnosis was 41% and 47%; the cumulative incidences of hemorrhages at 6 months by T2*-GRE and SWI were 82% and 88%, respectively. Hemorrhages were mostly petechial; 9.7% of lesions on T2*-GRE and 5.2% on SWI were hematomas (>5 mm). SWI identified significantly more hemorrhages than T2*-GRE did. Lesions were missed or misinterpreted in 36/39 (R1/R2) scans by T2*-GRE and 9/3 scans (R1/R2) by SWI. Hemorrhages had no clinically significant neurological correlates in patients. SWI is more sensitive than T2*-GRE in detecting hemorrhages and differentiating them from calcification, necrosis, and artifacts. Also, petechial hemorrhages are more common in DIPG at diagnosis than previously believed and their number increases during the course of treatment; hematomas are rare. (orig.)

  9. Identification of cellular targets involved in cardiac failure caused by PKI in oncology: an approach combining pharmacovigilance and pharmacodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patras de Campaigno, Emilie; Bondon-Guitton, Emmanuelle; Laurent, Guy; Montastruc, Francois; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Despas, Fabien

    2017-07-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate the risk of cardiac failure (CF) associated with 15 anticancer protein kinase inhibitors (PKIs) through a case/noncase analysis and to identify which PK(s) and pathways are involved in PKI-induced CF. In order to evaluate the risk of CF, adjusted reporting odds ratios (aRORs) were calculated for the 15 anticancer PKIs in the World Health Organization safety report database (VigiBase®). We realised a literature review to identify 21 protein kinases (PKs) that were possibly involved in CF caused by PKIs. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) between aRORs and affinity data of the 15 PKIs for the 21 PKs were calculated to identify the cellular target most likely to be involved in PKI-induced CF. A total of 141 601 individual case safety reports (ICSRs) were extracted from VigiBase® for the following PKIs: afatinib, axitinib, bosutinib, crizotinib, dasatinib, erlotinib, gefitinib, imatinib, lapatinib, nilotinib, pazopanib, ruxolitinib, sorafenib, sunitinib and vandetanib. Among them, 2594 ICSRs concerned CF. The disproportionality analysis revealed that, for dasatinib, imatinib, bosutinib, sunitinib and nilotinib, disproportionality for CF was significantly higher than for other PKIs, with aRORs of 2.52 [95% CI 2.26, 2.82], 1.79 (95% CI 1.57, 2.03), 1.73 (95% CI 1.18, 2.54), 1.67 (95% CI 1.51, 1.84) and 1.38 (95% CI 1.18, 1.61), respectively. Significant values for correlation coefficients between the product of dissociation constant (pKd) and aROR were observed for two non-receptor protein kinases: ABL1 (non-phosphorylated and phosphorylated forms) and ABL2 protein kinases, with values of r = 0.83 (P = 0.0001), r = 0.75 (P = 0.0014) and r = 0.78 (P = 0.0006), respectively. We observed a higher disproportionality for CF with dasatinib, imatinib, bosutinib, sunitinib and nilotinib than with other PKIs. In addition, the study highlighted the role of ABL tyrosine kinases in CF caused by anticancer PKIs. © 2017 The British

  10. Tyrosine and aurora kinase inhibitors diminish transport function of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP 4 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiannon N. Hardwick

    2016-12-01

    BCRP was much more extensive and included alisertib, barasertib, danusertib, enzastaurin, erlotinib, gefitinib, imatinib, neratinib, nilotinib, pazopanib, selumetinib, sorafenib, sunitinib, tozasertib, and vandetanib. These findings indicate the significant potential for TKI/AKIs to inhibit multiple ABC efflux transporters. The resulting inhibition data could provide insight regarding the clinical interpretation of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic outcomes when TKI/AKIs are administered concomitantly with additional chemotherapeutic agents.