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Sample records for zagler geoffrey busby

  1. Geoffrey H. Hartman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schatz-Jakobsen, Claus

    1988-01-01

    Artiklen beskriver udviklingen i Geoffrey Hartmans kritik fra fænomenologi til dekonstruktion som bestemt af hans stadigt mere fascinerede beskæftigelse med den engelske romantiske digter William Wordsworth.......Artiklen beskriver udviklingen i Geoffrey Hartmans kritik fra fænomenologi til dekonstruktion som bestemt af hans stadigt mere fascinerede beskæftigelse med den engelske romantiske digter William Wordsworth....

  2. Earl Busby Hunt (1933-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Anthony G

    2017-01-01

    Presents an obituary for Earl Busby Hunt-known to family, friends, and colleagues as Buz-who died at home in Bellevue, Washington, on April 12, 2016. Buz specialized in artificial intelligence (AI) and had a main focus in cognitive psychology. In fact he was editor of Cognitive Psychology from 1974-1987. Buz's honors include the Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Society for Intelligence Research (2009) and the Cattell Award from the Association for Psychological Science (2011) for lifetime contributions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Obituary: Geoffrey R. Burbidge (1925-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Arthur

    2011-12-01

    Geoffrey R. Burbidge, one of the principal architects of 20th century astrophysics, died in La Jolla, California on January 26, 2010. Together with his wife and life-long collaborator, Margaret Burbidge and several leading astrophysicists, he originated ideas that remain at the core of current astrophysical research. He was, of course, co-author of B2FH (Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler, & Hoyle 1957), one of the most influential scientific papers ever written, which explained how elements heavier than helium are synthesized in the interiors of stars. Geoff Burbidge's research interests spanned a wide range of topics. He was the first to estimate the colossal energetics of extragalactic radio sources. Together with Margaret and Kevin Prendergast he initiated the first systematic program to measure the masses of galaxies from their rotation curves. He published research that effectively began the field of "active galactic nuclei," and he made the fundamental suggestion that galactic X-ray sources were powered by viscous transport of energy in accretion disks surrounding neutron stars or black holes in binary star systems. After the discovery of quasars in 1963, he wrote influential papers on gravitational collapse as their energy source and an excellent book summarizing research on this subject. During the latter part of his career Geoff Burbidge became known as the "great contrarian" who remained skeptical about the cosmological origin of quasar redshifts and rejected the big bang theory. He was author of 355 publications. Geoff was born in 1925 September in Chipping Norton Oxfordshire, where he grew up and developed a lifelong passion for tennis. He attended the yearly matches at Wimbledon with his father, a ritual he maintained for most of his life. In 1946 he got his undergraduate degree in physics at the University of Bristol. After graduating he was assigned for eighteen months to a government ballistics laboratory in London where he became an expert in testing

  4. Medtner. Piano concertos. Geoffrey Tozer (pf) / Bryce Morrison

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Morrison, Bryce

    1992-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Medtner. Piano concertos. Geoffrey Tozer (pf) London Philarmonic Orchestra, Neeme Järvi. Chandos CHAN 9038/9 (two discs, oas 73 and 54 minutes). Also available as a two-disc set CD CHAN 9040. CHAN 9038: Piano concertos - N2 Op. 50; N 3 Op. 60 "Ballade" CHAN 9039 Piano concerto N 1 in C minor. Sonata-Ballade in Fsharp major Op. 27"

  5. "A democrat towards knowledge": the work of Geoffrey Blainey

    OpenAIRE

    Allsop, Richard Matthew

    2017-01-01

    This thesis studies the career of Geoffrey Blainey, both as a historian and controversialist. It considers what factors contributed to his success as a writer of works of history and how he became a high-profile public figure. When he commented on the issue of Asian immigration in 1984, this profile ensured that his views made front page news and led to a situation where his historical writing was read through the prism of his political views by friend and foe alike. The thesis takes issu...

  6. [Sir Geoffrey Keynes 1887-1982. Surgical pioneer, medical historian, humanist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergljung, Lars

    2005-01-01

    Sir Geoffrey Keynes (1887 - 1982), was a pioneer in the surgery of breast cancer and thymic deseases, n.b. in patients suffering from myastenia gravis. He strongly disapproved of the longstanding dogma of so called radical mastectomy in breast cancer, and advocated a more limited surgical approach, followed by radiation therapy. This was done more than fifty years before breastconserving surgery has become the therapy of choice and against considerable opposition from the surgical establishment of his days. He also became a pioneer in the surgical treatment of myastenia gravis by thymectomy, at a time when there was no real understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and when considerable controversy existed as to the importance or non importance of concomitant tumour formation in the thymus. Besides being a busy surgeon Sir Geoffrey was a medical historian, writing the biography of among others William Harvey, a bibliographer with a special interest in the poet and artist William Blake and a bibliophil with a large book collection of great value to medical history.

  7. Commemorating Geoffrey Raisman: a great neuroscientist and one of the founders of neurorestoratology and the IANR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ying Li,1 Pawel Tabakow,2 Daqing Li,1 Hongyun Huang3 On behalf of the International Association of Neurorestoratology 1Spinal Repair Unit, Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland; 3Institute of Neurorestoratology, General Hospital of Armed Police Forces, Beijing, People’s Republic of China One year ago (January 27, 2017, the sad news that Life Honorary President of the International Association of Neurorestoratology (IANR, Geoffrey Raisman (Figure 1 had passed away shocked all our association members. We could hardly hide our grief. Besides expressing our grief and condolences to his wife, Vivian; his daughter, Ruth; and all his family, the Core Administration members communicated among each other via email and made a proposal to rename the Youth Forum of the Annual Conference, to the Raisman Youth Forum of the Annual Conference. The fourth IANR Council Board meeting in Argentina on September 29, 2017 approved this motion, and decided to establish the Raisman Neurorestoratology Foundation and to write an article commemorating him to be published in the Journal of Neurorestoratology. This commemorative article is divided into three parts: 1 his students and colleagues Daqing Li and Ying Li introduce his life and work; 2 his collaborating partner Pawel Tabakow introduces the process of their clinical trial; and 3 Hongyun Huang on behalf of the IANR introduces Geoffrey Raisman’s contribution to neurorestoratology and IANR. All individuals in the included images have provided written informed consent for the images to be published. 

  8. Geoffrey Keynes's Two-Fold Vision: Medical Savant-Connoisseur and Literary Bibliographer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutcher, Gerald

    2016-10-01

    During the 1920s and 1930s, the British surgeon Geoffrey Keynes (1887-1982) treated breast cancer with radium instead of the hegemonic radical mastectomy, while vehemently attacking the "radicalists" for mutilating women. Keynes was also a leading bibliographer of literary figures from Sir Thomas Browne to William Blake through Jane Austen. This article argues that these endeavors did not inhabit separate worlds, but rather his bibliographic methods of collecting and sorting were deeply interwoven with his therapeutic practices and medical ways of knowing. The article also examines the profound influence his engagement with the works of William Blake had on his battle against the reigning medical orthodoxy and on the humanity of his relationship with his patients. It concludes that Keynes' story sheds light on a now distant medico-cultural world where literary studies, often centered on book collecting and critique, were not only highly valued, but were influential in guiding the vision and behavior of a number of physicians. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. 60 YEARS OF NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY: The structure of the neuroendocrine hypothalamus: the neuroanatomical legacy of Geoffrey Harris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Alan G

    2015-08-01

    In November 1955, Geoffrey Harris published a paper based on the Christian A Herter Lecture he had given earlier that year at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, USA. The paper reviewed the contemporary research that was starting to explain how the hypothalamus controlled the pituitary gland. In the process of doing so, Harris introduced a set of properties that helped define the neuroendocrine hypothalamus. They included: i) three criteria that putative releasing factors for adenohypophysial hormones would have to fulfill; ii) an analogy between the representation of body parts in the sensory and motor cortices and the spatial localization of neuroendocrine function in the hypothalamus; and iii) the idea that neuroendocrine neurons are motor neurons and the pituitary stalk functions as a Sherringtonian final common pathway through which the impact of sensory and emotional events on neuroendocrine neurons must pass in order to control pituitary hormone release. Were these properties a sign that the major neuroscientific discoveries that were being made in the early 1950s were beginning to influence neuroendocrinology? This Thematic Review discusses two main points: the context and significance of Harris's Herter Lecture for how our understanding of neuroendocrine anatomy (particularly as it relates to the control of the adenohypophysis) has developed since 1955; and, within this framework, how novel and powerful techniques are currently taking our understanding of the structure of the neuroendocrine hypothalamus to new levels. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  10. Dorothy Davison (1890-1984): Manchester medical artist and her work for neurosurgeon Sir Geoffrey Jefferson (1886-1961).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Peter D

    2017-05-01

    Miss Davison was a medical artist at the Manchester Royal Infirmary and the University of Manchester from around 1918 until her retirement in 1957. She illustrated books and scientific papers on anthropology, anatomy and surgery, and became well known for her striking pictures produced by the 'Ross board technique'- a difficult process that she helped pioneer from the 1930s and which forms the bulk of the work she undertook for neurosurgeon Geoffrey Jefferson during the 1930s-1950s. His Neurosurgical Department became the main base for her work until his retirement in 1953. She was an active member of the Medical Artist Association (MAA) which she helped found in 1949.

  11. Geoffrey Chaucer: la escena de lectura como espacio de configuración de la identidad narrativa

    OpenAIRE

    Paolino, Romina

    2012-01-01

    El presente trabajo se propone analizar la importancia de la forma textual “link”, que Geoffrey Chaucer desarrolla en los Canterbury Tales, en la configuración de su identidad narrativa y autoral. Desde esta perspectiva, se intentará relevar cómo estos espacios de enlace de los relatos que son representados como escenas de lectura funcionan como una zona de puesta en tensión y posicionamiento frente a diversas problemáticas: la vinculación entre la oralidad y la escritura; la escritura desple...

  12. Geoffrey Layton Slack OBE (Mil), CBE, TD, BDS DDS, FDSRCS, FDS Glas, FFDRCSI, Dip Bact (1912-1991).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbier, Stanley

    2014-02-01

    It is with some pride that the author worked in Geoffrey Slack's department from 1963 to 1967 and even retained a working relationship with him after that time. Slack was Professor of Dental Surgery (1959-1976) and later Professor of Community Dental Health (1976-1977) at The London Hospital Medical College, within the University of London. The change in titles came about as a result of recognition of his contribution to developments in public health and community dental care and services, for many of which he was directly responsible. He was Dental Dean from 1965 until 1969. Upon retirement in 1977 he became Emeritus Professor. In addition, he was Dean of the Faculty of Dental Surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons of England from 1974 to 1977.

  13. Geoffrey Hill’s “Hard-Won Affirmation”: The Mystery of the Charity of Charles Péguy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Contino

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sir Geoffrey Hill, long hailed as Britain’s greatest living poet, was devoted to remembering the deceased, those forgotten in the debased din of mass culture—some of them worthy of our emulation, others edifying by their “folly” or “criminality” (Paris Review interview. Hill’s recent death, on 30 June 2016, presents an apt time to remember his own life-work. In its act of memorial as homage, The Mystery of the Charity of Charles Péguy marks a departure for Hill: whereas his earlier work often rests in ambiguity, Péguy labors through the ambiguity—through characteristically antiphonal tones of voice, rhythms, and images—and concludes in affirmation, a note of hope, which points in the direction of some of his later work. Through all of his complexity, Péguy’s life—like Hill’s poem—conforms to a kenotic, Christological pattern and is thus worthy of our emulation.

  14. Clarification of Eponymous Anatomical Terminology: Structures Named After Dr Geoffrey V. Osborne That Compress the Ulnar Nerve at the Elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Arvin R; Gabel, Brandon; Mitwalli, Madhawi; Tubbs, R Shane; Brown, Justin M

    2017-05-01

    In 1957, Dr Geoffrey Osborne described a structure between the medial epicondyle and the olecranon that placed excessive pressure on the ulnar nerve. Three terms associated with such structures have emerged: Osborne's band, Osborne's ligament, and Osborne's fascia. As anatomical language moves away from eponymous terminology for descriptive, consistent nomenclature, we find discrepancies in the use of anatomic terms. This review clarifies the definitions of the above 3 terms. We conducted an extensive electronic search via PubMed and Google Scholar to identify key anatomical and surgical texts that describe ulnar nerve compression at the elbow. We searched the following terms separately and in combination: "Osborne's band," "Osborne's ligament," and "Osborne's fascia." A total of 36 papers were included from 1957 to 2016. Osborne's band, Osborne's ligament, and Osborne's fascia were found to inconsistently describe the etiology of ulnar neuritis, referring either to the connective tissue between the 2 heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle as described by Dr Osborne or to the anatomically distinct fibrous tissue between the olecranon process of the ulna and the medial epicondyle of the humerus. The use of eponymous terms to describe ulnar pathology of the elbow remains common, and although these terms allude to the rich history of surgical anatomy, these nonspecific descriptions lead to inconsistencies. As Osborne's band, Osborne's ligament, and Osborne's fascia are not used consistently across the literature, this research demonstrates the need for improved terminology to provide reliable interpretation of these terms among surgeons.

  15. ARCHITECTURE BETWEEN THE CULTURE-NATURE DUALISM: A CASE STUDY OF GEOFFREY BAWA’S KANDALAMA HOTEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceridwen Owen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the relationship between architecture and natural environments through an interrogation of the culture-nature question and the possibility of operating in the space between these two polarities. The immensity of this topic is investigated through one fragment of its representation, Geoffrey Bawa’s Kandlama Hotel in Sri Lanka. Visually this building engages in a process of invisibility as the boundaries between inside and outside, architecture and landscape are dissolved. This is an approach that is common in green architecture in general and nature-based tourism destinations in particular. However, spatially the building maintains a clarity of separation, denying its connection with the ground. It is this negotiation between the visual and the spatial realm, where one is simultaneously part of and distanced from the external environment, which is the site of its potentiality. It is both literally and metaphorically a space ‘between’ inside and outside, culture and nature, home and away. The paper concludes by arguing that it is this state of dynamic tension that can challenge traditional representations of human/environment relations as alternatively undifferentiated or ontologically distinct.

  16. Walking between academia and industry to find successful solutions to biomedical challenges: an interview with Geoffrey Smith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Geoffrey; Cagan, Ross

    2015-10-01

    Geoffrey W. Smith is currently the Managing Director of Mars Ventures. He actually started his studies with a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Doctorate in Law but then, in part by chance and in part by following in his family footsteps, he stepped into the healthcare and biotech field. Since then, he has successfully contributed to the birth of a number of healthcare companies and has also held academic positions at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and at The Rockefeller University in New York, teaching about the interface between science and business. During 2014 he served as Senior Editor on Disease Models & Mechanisms, bringing to the editorial team his valuable experience in drug development and discovery. In this interview, Geoff talks to Ross Cagan, Editor-in-Chief of Disease Models & Mechanisms, about how he developed his incredibly varied career, sharing his views about industry, academia and science publishing, and discussing how academia and industry can fruitfully meet to advance bioscience, train the scientists and stakeholders of the future, and drive the successful discovery of new therapeutics to treat human disease. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Walking between academia and industry to find successful solutions to biomedical challenges: an interview with Geoffrey Smith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Geoffrey W. Smith is currently the Managing Director of Mars Ventures. He actually started his studies with a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Doctorate in Law but then, in part by chance and in part by following in his family footsteps, he stepped into the healthcare and biotech field. Since then, he has successfully contributed to the birth of a number of healthcare companies and has also held academic positions at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and at The Rockefeller University in New York, teaching about the interface between science and business. During 2014 he served as Senior Editor on Disease Models & Mechanisms, bringing to the editorial team his valuable experience in drug development and discovery. In this interview, Geoff talks to Ross Cagan, Editor-in-Chief of Disease Models & Mechanisms, about how he developed his incredibly varied career, sharing his views about industry, academia and science publishing, and discussing how academia and industry can fruitfully meet to advance bioscience, train the scientists and stakeholders of the future, and drive the successful discovery of new therapeutics to treat human disease.

  18. Um enfoque epidemiológico da promoção da saúde: as idéias de Geoffrey Rose An epidemiological approach to health promotion: the ideas of Geoffrey Rose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dóra Chor

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, apresentamos princípios sistematizados por Geoffrey Rose, raramente explicitados no debate contemporâneo sobre promoção da saúde. São enfatizadas as seguintes noções: muitos parâmetros biológicos apresentam-se ao longo de um continuum e não seguem as dicotomias expostos/não expostos ou doentes/não doentes; a relação entre determinadas exposições e seus efeitos ocorre linearmente, ao longo de toda a gama dos valores da exposição; portanto, muitos indivíduos expostos a um risco baixo podem gerar um número maior de casos do que poucos indivíduos expostos a um risco alto de adoecer. Além disso, há forte relação entre os comportamentos populacionais médios e os desviantes, como resultado da dinâmica entre forças biológicas e sociais, que favorecem ou limitam a diversidade de características individuais. Assim, o risco de alguns agravos, em populações concretas, torna-se alto ou baixo em virtude do deslocamento em bloco da distribuição populacional, e não em função do número de indivíduos na faixa de alto risco. Em conjunto, esses conceitos favorecem estratégias voltadas para o conjunto da população, em vez das que apenas visam indivíduos considerados de alto risco.In this paper, we discuss some of the ideas developed by Geoffrey Rose, which are seldom explicitly expressed in the contemporary debate on health promotion. The following notions are emphasized: many health exposures and outcomes are expressed in a continuum, and do not follow the dichotomy exposed/non-exposed or diseased/ non-diseased; there is a linear relationship between certain exposures and their effects along the range of exposure levels; thus, many individuals exposed to low risk may generate more cases of a disease than few individuals exposed to high risk. In addition, there is a strong relationship between average behaviors and the occurrence of deviance, as a result of the balance between biological and social forces

  19. Sõdurilood / Geoffrey Macnab

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Macnab, Geoffrey

    1999-01-01

    USA kirjaniku James Jonesþi (1921-1977) sõjaromaanidest ja nende alusel tehtud filmidest nagu Fred Zinnemanni "Siit igavikku" ("From Here to Eternity", USA 1953 ) ja Terrence Malickþi "Peenike punane joon" ("The Thin Red Line", USA 1998)

  20. Adjustment of the architecture to the bioclimatic conditions of the environment on case study of the monsoon modernism of architect Geoffrey Bawa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilović-Hristić Nataša

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Geoffrey Bawa (1919-2003, not well known in our ambience, was Sri Lanka's most influential architect and South Asia's leading guru of unique style, named tropical architecture. The distinction of his work is outstanding aesthetic sensitivity to site and context, especially to peculiar climatic conditions and demands. For his architectural opus he received in 2001 prestigious Aga Khan Award for Architecture, Special Chairman's Award. Although he started to engage in architecture late, in age of 38, soon he became a noted by his inventiveness in forming new canons and prototypes of modern architecture, based on traditional knowledge and perfectly fitted in local surrounding. Bawa created sustainable architecture even before the term started to be used and his masterpieces broke down the barrier between inside and outside space, designing of the interior and landscaping, reducing the building to a series of scenic spaces separated by courtyards and gardens. He is well known by his designs for private villas and hotels, but his portfolio contains public building, as schools and universities, new Sri Lanka's Parliament, sacral, office and industrial structures. Through the presentation of several projects, the paper analyzes his development path and basic characteristics of so called 'monsoon modernism' and special relationship to the bioclimatic conditions of the environment.

  1. Between the Normative and the Performative: Sex, Parody, and Other (Intractable Issues in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Miller’s Tale

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    Popescu Dan Nicolae

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article explores how Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales discusses human sexuality as a major thematic concern in both its normative and its performative dimension, and sex, an (intractable issue throughout the Middle Ages, as a core motif that helps the author to explore the extant tension between the human and the ideal. On the other hand, parody and audience/reader response are important instruments in the medieval poet’s strategy of approaching delicate matters in his pilgrims’ tales, which become readily apparent in the ‘order of play’ in which the tales come. The Miller disrupts the story-telling order because this disruption serves Chaucer’s purpose of questioning the validity of the courtly love concept through a parody of courtly romance, much like the poet’s purported distancing from the heretical views upon human sexuality expressed by the Miller can be decoded as an attempt to restore the balance of power between doctrinal inflexibility and humans’ timeless desire for the natural.

  2. « Retail the coda » : le retour au sonnet dans l’œuvre récente de Geoffrey Hill “Retail the coda”: the Return to the Sonnet in Geoffrey Hill’s Recent Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole Birkan-Berz

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Up until Tenebrae, the sonnet had been given a prominent place in Geoffrey Hill’s work. Relying on a slightly modernised form harking back to the Renaissance, Hill used it as a vehicle for metaphysical questioning on the nature of poetry, violence or religion. In more recent volumes, however, the form seemed to have disappeared, only to survive in a palimpsestic way. Surprisingly, Hill’s last two collections feature a return to the sonnet, with its twin themes of amorous discourse and political eloquence. Though for the most part shunning rhyme and rigid stanzaic format, the sonnets retain syllabic lines and a dialectical structure typical of the genre. The flexible placing of the volta, the use of a coda, as well as some of the thematics following on from The Orchards of Syon, point to Milton as Hill’s main influence, as well as to Coleridge and Wordsworth, as practitioners of the political sonnet. Moreover, the appearance of the autobiographical lyric ‘I’ in these sonnets as in recent collections points to the persistence of a Romantic ethos, of which the poet had been suspicious in his early writing. The sonnet, with a fresh autobiographical ‘I’ and a renewed political dimension, thus re-anchors Hill in a Romantic tradition.

  3. Intervjuu prof. Geoffrey Batcheniga / intervjueerinud Peeter Linnap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Batchen, Geoffrey, 1956-

    2011-01-01

    Fotograafia leiutamise ühiskondlikust vajadusest 19. sajandil - tahtest fotografeerida, et aega kas või ajutiselt fikseerida, Foucault', Derrida ja Barthes'i fotograafiat puudutavatest tekstidest, nende analüüsist ja kontekstualiseerimisest teiste kultuurinähtustega ka autori teostes, eriti raamatus "Burning with Desire"

  4. Morphisms of Extensions of C*-algebras: Pushing Forward the Busby Invariant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eilers, Søren; Loring, Terry A.; Pedersen, Gert Kjærgård

    1999-01-01

    of varying severity, on the given vertical maps and describe the solutions in terms of push-outs and pull-backs of certain diagrams. Our characterization of the universal solution to one of the diagrams yields a concrete description of various amalgamated free products. This leads to new results about the K...

  5. of Geoffrey Leech's Semantics: the Study of Meaning

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ings of units of form (e.g. 'words'), together with rules governing the semantic ... who has before him Harrap's French-English, English-French dictionary as his sale ..... The second distinction is between 'conceptual' ('literal ') and other kinds of ...

  6. Geoffrey Parker. Global Crisis: War, climate and catastrophe in the seventeenth century.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherinne Giselle Mora Pacheco

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hace más de medio siglo el historiador francés Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie empezó a llamar la atención de los historiadores agrarios hacia los fenómenos meteorológicos.[1] Su propio giro hacia la historia del clima fue motivado por la aparición recurrente en las fuentes de alusiones a buenas y malas cosechas, hambrunas, veranos lluviosos e inviernos fríos. Su interés, y el de muchos otros historiadores que han compartido su inquietud,[2] se explica por la relación estrecha que las sociedades preindustriales tenían con el clima y la imposibilidad para sortear sus fluctuaciones con el transporte de alimentos a grandes distancias, los sistemas de refrigeración y calefacción, la construcción de grandes embalses, o la manipulación genética de alimentos; herramientas que hoy en día hacen que los habitantes urbanos subestimemos lo crítico que resulta producir alimentos cuando las precipitaciones o las temperaturas se alejan de las expectativas.

  7. From pleasure machines to moral communities (Reflections on a new book by Geoffrey Hodgson)

    OpenAIRE

    Yefimov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Academic economists have a strong influence on political discourse in Russia by delivering through courses of "Economic theory" and "Institutional economics" very harmful conceptual elements for political discourse. This article proposes to change radically these courses in such a way that, instead of self-interest of the economic man, consideration of social relations exclusively through the prism of exchange, society and community as fictions, the state as a bandit and the opportunistic beh...

  8. Geoffrey Hill as Lord of Limit: the Kenosis as a Theological Context of his Poetry and Thought Note sur la kénose dans la poésie et la pensée de Geoffrey Hill

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    Adrian Grafe

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available L’hymne kénotique pré-paulinienne (cf l’épître aux Philippiens, 2: 5-11 est un contexte pertinent pour situer la poésie et la poétique de Hill. Et la poésie et la prose de Hill montrent qu’il réfléchit sur cette notion (la kénose depuis au moins les sonnets de « Lachrimae » (1978 ; en passant par le titre et certains aspects du contenu de l’ouvrage critique The Lords of Limit (1984, ainsi que par l’appendice rédigé pour Christ : The Self-Emptying of God (1997 de Lucien Richard, jusqu’à The Triumph of Love (1998 et au-delà. Dans l’appendice de l’ouvrage de Richard, Hill évoque la « poésie kénotique » de Herbert, qui marie la maîtrise (la dimension seigneuriale et l’humilité (l’aspect limité. Dans la mesure où le terme « kénotique » est théologique, cette remarque sous-tend la lecture poético-théologique de l’œuvre de Hill lui-même qui est ici proposée sous une forme brève comme son titre l’indique.

  9. Reproductive toxicity of chromium in adult bonnet monkeys (Macaca radiata Geoffrey). Reversible oxidative stress in the semen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, Senthivinayagam; Rajendiran, Gopalakrishnan; Sekhar, Pasupathi; Gowri, Chandrahasan; Govindarajulu, Pera; Aruldhas, Mariajoseph Michael

    2006-01-01

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that oxidative stress mediates chromium-induced reproductive toxicity. Monthly semen samples were collected from adult monkeys (Macaca radiata), which were exposed to varying doses (50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm) of chromium (as potassium dichromate) for 6 months through drinking water. Chromium treatment decreased sperm count, sperm forward motility and the specific activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, and the concentration of reduced glutathione in both seminal plasma and sperm in a dose- and duration-dependent manner. On the other hand, the quantum of hydrogen peroxide in the seminal plasma/sperm from monkeys exposed to chromium increased with increasing dose and duration of chromium exposure. All these changes were reversed after 6 months of chromium-free exposure period. Simultaneous supplementation of vitamin C (0.5 g/L; 1.0 g/L; 2.0 g/L) prevented the development of chromium-induced oxidative stress. Data support the hypothesis and show that chronic chromium exposure induces a reversible oxidative stress in the seminal plasma and sperm by creating an imbalance between reactive oxygen species and antioxidant system, leading to sperm death and reduced motility of live sperm

  10. The democratic experience in divided societies : the Baltic states in comparative perspective / Geoffrey Evans, Christine S Lipsmeyer

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Evans, Geoffrey

    2001-01-01

    Artiklis võrreldakse vähemusrahvuste rahulolu demokratiseerimisprotsessiga ning osalemist demokraatlikes protsessides kolmes Balti riigis ning kümnes Ida-Euroopa riigis 1990. aastail. Tabelid. Lisa: The surveys

  11. Epidemiology Without Biology: False Paradigms, Unfounded Assumptions, and Specious Statistics in Radiation Science (with Commentaries by Inge Schmitz-Feuerhake and Christopher Busby and a Reply by the Authors)

    OpenAIRE

    Sacks, Bill; Meyerson, Gregory; Siegel, Jeffry A.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation science is dominated by a paradigm based on an assumption without empirical foundation. Known as the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis, it holds that all ionizing radiation is harmful no matter how low the dose or dose rate. Epidemiological studies that claim to confirm LNT either neglect experimental and/or observational discoveries at the cellular, tissue, and organismal levels, or mention them only to distort or dismiss them. The appearance of validity in these studies rests o...

  12. Epidemiology Without Biology: False Paradigms, Unfounded Assumptions, and Specious Statistics in Radiation Science (with Commentaries by Inge Schmitz-Feuerhake and Christopher Busby and a Reply by the Authors).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Bill; Meyerson, Gregory; Siegel, Jeffry A

    Radiation science is dominated by a paradigm based on an assumption without empirical foundation. Known as the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis, it holds that all ionizing radiation is harmful no matter how low the dose or dose rate. Epidemiological studies that claim to confirm LNT either neglect experimental and/or observational discoveries at the cellular, tissue, and organismal levels, or mention them only to distort or dismiss them. The appearance of validity in these studies rests on circular reasoning, cherry picking, faulty experimental design, and/or misleading inferences from weak statistical evidence. In contrast, studies based on biological discoveries demonstrate the reality of hormesis: the stimulation of biological responses that defend the organism against damage from environmental agents. Normal metabolic processes are far more damaging than all but the most extreme exposures to radiation. However, evolution has provided all extant plants and animals with defenses that repair such damage or remove the damaged cells, conferring on the organism even greater ability to defend against subsequent damage. Editors of medical journals now admit that perhaps half of the scientific literature may be untrue. Radiation science falls into that category. Belief in LNT informs the practice of radiology, radiation regulatory policies, and popular culture through the media. The result is mass radiophobia and harmful outcomes, including forced relocations of populations near nuclear power plant accidents, reluctance to avail oneself of needed medical imaging studies, and aversion to nuclear energy-all unwarranted and all harmful to millions of people.

  13. Women in Chemistry: Their Changing Roles from Alchemical Times to the Mid-Twentieth Century (by Marelene Rayner-Canham and Geoffrey Rayner-Canham)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserio, Marjorie C.

    1999-07-01

    Women who made significant contributions in the chemical sciences prior to the 20th century do not come readily to mind. Yet, as this book relates so engagingly, women have been influential in chemistry since the earliest period of recorded history. However, Women in Chemistry is more than a dated collection of biographical sketches of notable women scientists. The book highlights the main periods of history when it was possible for women to have some measure of success in the chemical sciences and focuses on their changing roles from alchemical times to the mid-20th century. By glimpsing into the life and work of individuals in the context of the time in which they lived, the authors impart a credible and moving image of the restraints imposed on aspiring women scientists and the obstacles that confronted them-making the extent of their contributions all the more remarkable. Each chapter has a theme into which are woven selected biographical sketches. Chapter 1 offers a whirlwind tour of the centuries from Babylonian times (1200 B.C.E.) through the Middle Ages and into the 17th century, giving perspective on how the various civilizations did (or did not) consider women capable of intellectual achievement or permit such of them. This short but powerful chapter invokes appreciation for the major contributions made by women in the face of enormous obstacles of prejudice, superstition (witchcraft), monastic reprisals, pseudoscience (alchemy), and denial of education. The women featured include Maria Hebraea (around 300 C.E.famed for the water bath, bain Marie), Hypatia (mathematician, 400 C.E.), Western alchemists (de Gourney and Meudrac), and Chinese alchemists. By the 18th century, science had progressed and alchemy was at an end. Though enlightened scientifically, western society still considered women's intellect inferior. But, as Chapter 2 relates, the literary salons of France nurtured intellectual discussion in society women, and it was in this context that such women pursued higher education. The role of women as "chemical assistants" to leading chemists of the day is well illustrated in the lives of du Chatelet, Paulze-Lavoisier, Picardet, and Necker de Saussure. Sadly, all this ended with the French Revolution when the woman intellectual became unacceptable. Chapter 3 focuses on a few exceptional women of the 1800-1900s who succeeded independently in their scientific work in an era when, without access to universities and financial resources, it was almost impossible to function other than as a "chemical assistant". This chapter gives a fascinating account of the life and work of five women, including Elizabeth Fulhame, who is credited with the discovery of photoreduction and the concept of catalysis, and Agnes Pockels, who, without formal education or laboratory facilities, pioneered research in surface films. By the 1850s, access to advanced education for women began in earnest. Chapter 4 tells of this radical change and its ramifications. This most readable account of the cultural conflicts that existed in Europe and the United States over educating women, admitting them to professional societies, and gaining faculty appointments is exemplified in the biographies of four U.S. women (Ellen Swallow Richards, Rachel Lloyd, Laura Linton, Ida Freund) and two Russian women (Yulya Lermontova and Vera Bogdanovskaia). Much of the content of the book resides in the remaining chapters (5-10) and covers 20th century science through 1950. The titles, Women in: Crystallography (Chapter 5), Radioactivity (Chapter 6), Biochemistry (Chapter 7), Industrial Chemistry (Chapter 8), Analytical, Education and History (Chapter 9), suggest that women favored some areas of chemistry over others. Why did they tend to congregate in certain fields? The authors give cogent reasons why this was so. They observe that, in developing fields, there was initially a collegiality among colleagues and the support of senior mentors that established a working environment in which women felt welcome and in which they could flourish. The early success of women in crystallography, radioactivity, and biochemistry encouraged other women to follow. There also seems to have been more opportunity for women in emerging fields than in more established but more competitive areas of science. The biographies of the women chemists featured are poignant accounts of their lives, their work, and the recognition they received for it. Though short, the biographies have been well researched and are well referenced, which should enable interested readers to delve more deeply into the subject if they wish. There are common threads that run through all the accounts, which the authors point to as important factors in determining success. These include encouragement in early years, particularly through sympathetic parents or close relatives; access to formal education; and family values that stress education. The encouragement of mentors is a recurrent theme, as is a hospitable working environment. Mentoring recognized as important not only for individual success but also in creating and sustaining whole areas of research (as we see in crystallography and radioactivity). Each biography documents an impressive record of achievement even when the obstacles encountered in the woman's personal as well as professional life were almost overwhelming. Regrettably, as the authors point out, most women left no personal records (or they have since been lost or destroyed), so we are denied their perspective on their life and times. Evidently, women did not feel sufficient self-worth to record their autobiographies. In fact, a feature that appears in several of the biographies is the "awful self-doubt" about their own abilities. But it is apparent that success increased self-esteem, which fueled further achievement. Other attributes necessary for success included great determination, incredible tenacity, and almost obsessive enthusiasm for chemistry. The authors are selective in their choice of biographies. They feature women on the basis of importance and interest rather than just the most notable. The crystallography chapter reveals the paradox that outstanding work is sometimes recognized (Lonsdale and Hodgkin) and sometimes not (Franklin). Chapter 6 is a fascinating account of the roller-coaster fortunes of women in radioactivity (Curie, Gleditsch, Chamie, Joliot-Curie, Perey, Brooks, Horovitz, Meitner, Noddack, and Goeppert-Mayer) and is the strongest chapter of the book. The biochemistry chapter acknowledges the work of Hoobler, Pennington, Denis, Fuller Brown, Cori, Elion, Willcock, Menten, Wrinch, and others. Industrial Chemistry was not a haven for women during the first part of this century, but the remarkable contributions of a few (Leslie, Wall, Blodgett, and Lathbury) are described in Chapter 8. The barriers for women in industry were numerous, including policy bans on married women and perceptions that women were unskilled or incapable of chemical work, even though they proved otherwise in the urgent need of wartime. Chapter 9 is a mixed bag, beginning with analytical chemists (Cremer and Miller), including surprisingly few who became prominent in education (Emma Perry Carr of Mount Holyoke and Mary Fieser of Bryn Mawr and Harvard), and ending with the famous historian of science Helen Metzger. In the concluding chapter, we are reminded of the ups and downs for women scientists in the first half of the 20th century. Blossoming educational and job opportunities led to record numbers of women in science by the early 1900s, but the numbers declined in the aftermath of World War I and to a lesser extent after World War II, as a result of changing societal attitudes when men and women compete for the same jobs. This thought-provoking book, elegantly written, concludes with the rhetorical question: will the current "second wave" of women scientists in this century be more permanent than the first, and will they play a full role in determining the nature and culture of chemistry in the 21st century. There is much to be learned from multiple readings of this interesting book.

  14. Transitional narratives of identity among ethnic minority youth gangs in Denmark: from collectivism to individualism / Torsten Kolind, Thomas Friis Søgaard, Geoffrey Hunt, Birgitte Thylstrup

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kolind, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Kopenhaageni rahvusvähemuses olevate meeste seas läbi viidud etnograafilisest uuringust, nende võimalustest hoida eemale jõukudesse kuulumisest, kriminaalsusest, nakrootikumide tarvitamisest ja müümisest

  15. New distribution data for two species of the Neotropical genus Lathecla Robbins, 2004 (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae, Eumaeini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bálint, Zs.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The species Lathecla carolyna Busby, 2015 described recently from Ecuador is reported to occur also in Venezuela and Colombia. An additional Peruvian occurrence of L. mimula (Draudt, 1920 is also documented.

  16. 77 FR 37842 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; United States Virgin Islands...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ... via electronic mail at [email protected] . Geoffrey M. Garrison, Community Involvement Coordinator... location makes national defaults for changes like vehicle turnover problematic for estimating future...

  17. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. GEOFFREY BODENHAUSEN. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 2 June 2013 pp 189-199. Commentary: On toxic effects of scientific journals · Antoinette Molinié Geoffrey Bodenhausen · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The advent of online publishing ...

  18. Development of Optimal Stressor Scenarios for New Operational Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    OPTIMAL STRESSOR SCENARIOS FOR NEW OPERATIONAL ENERGY SYSTEMS by Geoffrey E. Fastabend December 2017 Thesis Advisor: Alejandro S... ENERGY SYSTEMS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Geoffrey E. Fastabend 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School...developed and tested simulation model for operational energy related systems in order to develop better stressor scenarios for acceptance testing

  19. AN ANALYSIS OF mE VOWEL PRODUCTION OF A PROFOUNDLY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the auditory prosthesis is not only to aid perception, but also to improve production. And indeed, postoperative improvements have been documented in SpeeCh perception, in speech production and in general language skills (Busby et al. 1989,. Osberger 1989, Kessler 1989, Roberts et al 1988, Clark et al 1987) ...

  20. Effects of substitutions at position 180 in the Escherichia coli RNA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Olga N Koroleva1 Stephen Jw Busby2 Valeriy L Drutsa3. Chemical Faculty, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow, Russia; School of Biosciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK; Belozersky Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, ...

  1. Molecular Effects of 13C/DIM in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    expression, Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 352 (1998) 59–70. [36] M.G. Busby, A.R. Jeffcoat, L.T. Bloedon, M.A. Koch, T. Black, K.J. Dix, W.D. Heizer , B.F. Thomas...the extracellular environment is implicated in the angiogenic switch. They found that MMP-9 could render normal islets angiogenic releasing VEGF

  2. Presentation to the symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodhead, D.

    1997-01-01

    A novel theory, the Second Event theory, advanced by Chris Busby, suggested that certain man-made radioisotopes could bypass cellular genetic repair mechanisms and cause cancer at very low dose. The present paper, after some introductory comments on the effects of particle tracks on cells, goes on to present the author's own perception of this Second Event theory. (UK)

  3. Post-project market review as a tool for stimulating commercialisation of knowledge creation projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bout, L.Y.; Lombaers, J.H.M.; Constantinides, E.; Weerd-Nederhof, P.C. de

    2009-01-01

    Post-Project Reviews are mainly used as a tool to improve organisational learning (Busby, 1999; von Zedtwitz, 2002). However, the concept of post-project review can also be used as a tool to identify new market potential and to hand over technical knowledge from technical to marketing personnel (von

  4. Post-Project Market Review as a Tool for Stimulating Commercialisation of Knowledge Creation Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bout, Y.; Lombaers, Jaap H.M.; Constantinides, Efthymios; Fisscher, O.A.M.; de Weerd-Nederhof, Petronella C.; Oakey, R.; Groen, A.; Cook, G.; van der Sijde, P.

    2009-01-01

    Post-Project Reviews are mainly used as a tool to improve organisational learning (Busby, 1999; von Zedtwitz, 2002). However, post-project reviews can also be used as a tool to identify new market potential and to hand over technical knowledge from technical to marketing personnel (von Zedtwitz,

  5. The Effects of Species Interaction and Pond Stocking Density on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burchell) and Heterobranchus bidorsalis (Geoffrey Saint-Hilaire) and pond stocking density on the culture of tilapia species which display different parental care strategies. In the presence of catfishes, the maternal mouth-brooder O. niloticus ...

  6. The relative contributions of climatic elements and environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SEJUP

    2013-08-01

    Aug 1, 2013 ... environmental factors to urban flooding in Awka urban area of Anambra State. Towards ... city, while Geoffrey (2001) employed time series analysis ..... Street Flooding in Calabar Municipality, Cross River State in Bisong.

  7. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geoffrey Ingram Taylor made outstanding contributions to the mechanics of fluids and solids spread ... came up with fundamental ideas and theories on the transfer of momentum and heat due to turbulence. ... to aeronautics. He learnt to fly, ...

  8. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disorders Video: The Basketball Game: An MRI Story Radiology and You Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey ...

  9. On 20 November CERN hosted a symposium to mark the 70th birthday of Chris Llewellyn Smith

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    Left to right: (back) Rolf Heuer, Peter Jenni, Lyn Evans, Chris Llewellyn Smith, Steve Cowley, Zehra Sayers, David Gross, Chris Allsopp, Robert Jaffe, Bikash Sinha; (front) Geoffrey West, Álvaro de Rújula, John Ellis.

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, I’m Dr. Geoffrey Rubin, a radiologist ... about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! Spotlight Recently posted: ...

  11. 77 FR 35417 - Center for Scientific Review; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    .... Place: St. Gregory Hotel, 2033 M Street NW., Washington, DC 20036. Contact Person: Geoffrey G Schofield... applications. Place: Hyatt Regency Bethesda, One Bethesda Metro Center, 7400 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD...

  12. Avoid the Fog (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    If pesticide instructions aren't followed closely, bugs won't be the only ones who suffer. In this podcast, Dr. Geoffrey Calvert discusses the dangers of improper use of pesticides, particularly so-called bug bombs.

  13. Discovery and Innovation - Vol 14, No 1 (2002)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Economic Development: A Framework for Change in Developing Countries · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Geoffrey E. Kiangi, Keto E. Mshigeni, 38-45 ...

  14. Portræt af litteraturkritikeren som ungt menneske

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schatz-Jakobsen, Claus

    2004-01-01

    Artiklen præsenterer den amerikanske litteraturkritiker Geoffrey Hartmans tidlige forfatterskab og fremdrager dets selvbiografiske undertekst som nødvendig effekt af den unge Hartmans fascination af den engelske romantiker William Wordsworths forfatterskab.......Artiklen præsenterer den amerikanske litteraturkritiker Geoffrey Hartmans tidlige forfatterskab og fremdrager dets selvbiografiske undertekst som nødvendig effekt af den unge Hartmans fascination af den engelske romantiker William Wordsworths forfatterskab....

  15. The Ketogenic Diet and Potassium Channel Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0463 TITLE: The Ketogenic Diet and Potassium Channel Function PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Geoffrey Murphy...NUMBER The Ketogenic Diet and Potassium Channel Function 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0463 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Geoffrey Murphy...The overall objective of this Discovery Award was to explore the hypothesis the ketogenic diet (KD) regulates neuronal excitability by influencing

  16. Fiscal Year 2013 Net Zero Energy-Water-Waste Portfolio for Fort Leonard Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    like many restaurants and food operators, throw away inedible (for humans) food scraps, such as banana peels, bones, and egg shells , without...and reseed- ing with native grasses. Application rates up to 64 tons/acre resulted in significantly enhanced plant cover and biomass production when...com- pared to sites that received no compost (Busby et al. 2006). Plant cover and biomass differences were still significantly higher five years

  17. OPAL Netlogo Land Condition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-15

    ER D C/ CE RL T R- 14 -1 2 Optimal Allocation of Land for Training and Non-training Uses ( OPAL ) OPAL Netlogo Land Condition Model...Fulton, Natalie Myers, Scott Tweddale, Dick Gebhart, Ryan Busby, Anne Dain-Owens, and Heidi Howard August 2014 OPAL team measuring above and...online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. Optimal Allocation of Land for Training and Non-training Uses ( OPAL ) ERDC/CERL TR-14-12

  18. Warner Bros. and Its First Two Great Depression Musicals:Changing the Form and Reflecting the Times

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Harvey

    2013-01-01

    This working paper analyses the production, content, public reaction and significance of the first two Warner Bros. Great Depression Musicals (this term was created by later scholars). "42nd Street" and "Gold Diggers of 1933," both released in the first half of 1933 during some of the direst months of the Great Depression, artistically and financially rejuvenated the previously failing genre of the film musical. They both featured extravagant highly cinematic dance numbers created by Busby Be...

  19. The evidence of dose response effects after radiation effects in embryos and fetuses exposed to Chernobyl fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frentzel-Beyme, R.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Questions about the safety of applying the current radiation risk model of the ICRP to the internal exposures of unborn human life rose after observations of excess infant leukemia (0-1 years age-group) following contamination by low doses from the Chernobyl accidents 1986 in five different countries (Busby, 2009). Current legal frameworks for radiation exposure limits based on the risk models of ICRP present a safe threshold dose range for up to 100 mSv for radiogenic effects from in utero exposure. Data from cumulative absorbed doses to the fetus from Belarus. Germany, Greece, Scotland and Wales, however, suggest that in addition to increased risks for leukemias also significant effects on fetal loss, malformations and infant death as well as Down's syndrome indicate that the basic assumptions for the models are incomplete, referring only to experiences of A-bomb-survivors (Busby, C., Lengfelder, E., Pflugbeil, S., Schmitz-Feuerhake, 2009). Epidemiological data on birth cohorts from Greece, Germany and the United Kingdom before and after 1986 show significantly increased leukaemia risks for those born during the defined peak exposure at low doses compared with effect from higher doses which suggests different effects on the induction of DNA-repair. This may explain the inconsistencies of the results on reproductive effects which led to criticism and denial of Chernobyl findings in this realm. The possibility that physical dosimetric models have underestimated the effective exposure as an explanation is supported by biological dosimetry carried out in the contaminated regions. Since cohorts had been chosen specifically on the basis of exposure to internal radionuclides, the assumptions about effects after in utero exposure are based on significant errors (up to 160-fold according to Busby, 2009) in the conventional modelling for such internal fetal exposures and need to be revised. (authors)

  20. Further statement on the incidence of childhood cancer in Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In March 1999 the Welsh Office asked COMARE to examine two unpublished studies. The first by Busby et al of ''Green Audit'' concluded that there was a significant excess of childhood leukaemia in North Wales associated with residential proximity to the coast. The second study, carried out by Steward et al of the Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit (WCISU), did not support this conclusion. We were asked to advise as to whether we considered that there was a real raised incidence of childhood leukaemia near the coast of North Wales and whether further study was required. To do this we initially organised a comparison of the figures quoted by both the Green Audit and WCISU with the database held by the Childhood Cancer Research Group (CCRG) in Oxford. This group maintains the National Registry of Childhood Tumours (NRCT), data for which are supplied from a variety of sources including cancer registries but also directly from medical cancer specialists as well as from death certificates. As a consequence this provides an independent check on much of the data on childhood cancer held by cancer registries in Great Britain and is clinically validated. After carrying out the independent check on the number of cases of childhood leukaemia in these Welsh counties it was immediately apparent that the data held by Green Audit, on which the analysis by Busby et al was based, were incorrect. These data were received from the Welsh Cancer Registry (WCR) in 1995. A further data set was received from WCR in 1996 but was not used in the analysis by Busby et al. In June 1999 we issued a statement to the Welsh Office. In that statement we noted that Dr Busby and his colleagues appeared to have used erroneous data in their study. On the basis of the Steward et al data, COMARE also stated that we found no evidence to support the contention that there is an increased incidence of childhood leukaemia or other childhood cancers amongst the Welsh population living close to the

  1. Rõõmsa Inglismaa jutuvestja / Lembit Liivak

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Liivak, Lembit

    2006-01-01

    Arvustus: Chaucer, Geoffrey. Canterbury lood / inglise keelest tõlkinud Votele Viidemann ; toimetanud, kommentaaride ja märkustega varustanud Lauri Pilter ; [saatesõna: Arthur Kincaid ; saatesõna tõlkinud Krista Mits]. Tartu : Tartu Ülikooli Kirjastus, 2006 (Maailmakirjanduse tõlkevaramu ; 17)

  2. Book review: Handbook of cyanobacterial monitoring and cyanotoxin analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jennifer L.; Loftin, Keith A.

    2018-01-01

    Review of Meriluoto, Jussi, Lisa Spoof, and GeoffreyA. Codd [eds.]. 2017. Handbook of Cyanobacterial Monitoring and Cyanotoxin Analysis. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.: Chichester, West Sussex, UK, ISBN 978‐1‐119‐06868‐6 (978‐1‐119‐06876‐1 eBook), DOI 10.1002/9781119068761.

  3. Google Scholar's Ghost Authors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacso, Peter

    2009-01-01

    In the journal "The Chronicle of Higher Education," an article by Geoffrey Nunberg criticizes Google's Book Search (GBS), emphasizing that disturbing errors are endemic. He recognizes that for mainstream "googling" purposes, "they don't really care about metadata provided by a library catalog." In perhaps his most discouraging point, linguistics…

  4. Machine Translation Based Data Augmentation for Cantonese Keyword Spotting (Author’s Manuscript)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Zhang, “Investi- gation of multilingual deep neural networks for spoken term detection,” in ASRU’13, 2013, pp. 138–143. [12] Jonathan Mamou, Jia Cui...8277–8281. [14] Tomas Mikolov, Wen -tau Yih, and Geoffrey Zweig, “Linguistic regularities in continuous space word rep- resentations,” in HLT-NAACL’13

  5. Students at the University of Abertay Dundee Learn Computer Hacking to Defend Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Erik

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a new cybersecurity course at the University of Abertay Dundee in Scotland. Geoffrey R. Lund, leader of the software-applications program at Abertay, says the course prepares students for a rapidly growing job market by teaching that the best defense is a good offense. Professors set up a network of 20 or so…

  6. Translational semantics: A discussion of the second edition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Translational semantics: A discussion of the second edition of Geoffrey Leech's Semantics: the Study of Meaning. N Love. Abstract. No abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.5774/11-0-106 · AJOL African Journals ...

  7. Voyage to the heart of matter

    CERN Multimedia

    Macnamara, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    In the hunt to unravel the mystery of what makes up the universe, Geoffrey Taylor feels much like a child in a large family; he is leading the Australian contingent of the ATLAS experiment to research particles that existed at the beginning of the universe, just after the big bang. (1 page)

  8. Belonging to "Chinatown": A Study of Asian Boarders in a West Australian Private Boarding School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Wee Loon

    2010-01-01

    The invaluable use of ethnography in researching educational settings has been demonstrated through many studies and furthered by many passionate researchers. One of such leading lights is Geoffrey Walford. In this paper, Walford's discussion of groups in two public schools, as depicted in his book "Life in public schools", serves as a…

  9. Avoid the Fog (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2018-02-01

    If pesticide instructions aren’t followed closely, bugs won’t be the only ones who suffer. In this podcast, Dr. Geoffrey Calvert discusses the dangers of improper use of pesticides, particularly so-called bug bombs.  Created: 2/1/2018 by MMWR.   Date Released: 2/1/2018.

  10. Book Review: Principles of Medicine in Africa | Farham | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Principles of Medicine in Africa Ed. by David Mabey, Geoffrey Gill, Eldryd Parry, Martin W Weber and. Christopher JM Whitty. 4th ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. ISBN 978-1-107-00251-7. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  11. The Accreditation of Hildegard Von Bingen as Medieval Female Technical Writer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Although scholars have acknowledged technical texts written during the Middle-Ages, there is no mention of "technical writer" as a profession except for Geoffrey Chaucer, and historically absent is the accreditation of medieval female writers who pioneered the field of medical-technical communication. In an era dominated by identifiable medieval…

  12. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 251 - 300 of 461 ... LN Wangai, M Geoffrey, S Omar, G Magoma, FT Kimani, JM Mwangi, MW ... from blood culture samples of suspected typoid patients in Warri, Nigeria, Abstract PDF ... Staphylococcus aureus in University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Abuja, ... Vol 17, No 3 (2016), Performance characteristics of enzyme ...

  13. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 10. Geoffrey Ingram Taylor (1886-1975). Featured Scientist Volume 9 Issue 10 October 2004 pp 98-98. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/10/0098-0098. Resonance – Journal of ...

  14. Stravinsky: Symphonies, Concertos, Ballets and other works / David S. Gutman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Gutman, David S.

    1994-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Stravinsky: Symphonies, Concertos, Ballets and other works. Gabriele Schnaut (sop), Peter Svensson (ten), Franz Grundheber (bar), Günther von Kannen (bass), Jean Piat (narr), Lydia Mordkovitch (vn), Geoffrey Tozer, Boris Berman (pfs), Suisse Romande Chamber Choir, Lausanne Pro Arte Choir, Brassus Choral Society, Suisse Romande Ochestra, Neeme Järvi. Chandos CD CHAN 9240

  15. Chaucer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgård, Ebbe

    En undersøgelse af reception og oversættelse af den engelske middelalderforfatter Geoffrey Chaucer i Danmark 1782-2012. Afhandlingen analyserer Chaucer i Danmark som et eksempel på engelsk i Danmark, dvs. sprog, litteratur, kultur og uddannelse, fra oplysningstiden til i dag....

  16. An Unfashionable Rhetoric in the Fifteenth Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Marjorie Curry

    1989-01-01

    Reveals the continued importance of medieval rhetorical pedagogy throughout the high Middle Ages and early Renaissance by exploring the fifteenth-century popularity, uses of, and references to Geoffrey of Vinsauf's "Poetria nova" (a thirteenth-century verse treatise on the composition of poetry according to rhetorical principles). (SR)

  17. "Fist, Stick, Knife, Gun": Getting Real in Upward Bound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Barbara G.; Adkins, Theresa A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how a teacher found literature for Upward Bound students. Presents Geoffrey Canada's "Fist, Stick, Knife, Gun: A Personal History of Violence in America" as a nonfiction work to provide clarity and connections that might not have been available in a fictional work, yet it had elements of literary fiction that made the text…

  18. South African Medical Journal - Vol 45, No 1 (1971)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HC Falkson, EJ Schulz, Geoffrey Falkson. Plastics in Pharmacy and Medicine · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. TJ McCarthy. Gonadal dysgenesis, Turner's syndrome and phenotype in the South African Bantu · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE ...

  19. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences. Antoinette Molinié. Articles written in Journal of Biosciences. Volume 38 Issue 2 June 2013 pp 189-199. Commentary: On toxic effects of scientific journals · Antoinette Molinié Geoffrey Bodenhausen · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. The advent of online publishing greatly ...

  20. 76 FR 14395 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ..., Manager/President. Application Type: QI Change. Geoffrey Au dba ABC Logistics Company (NVO), 2250 Gellert... at (202) 523-5843 or by e-mail at [email protected] . Arkman Logistics Inc. (NVO), 1001 Fargo Avenue, Elk... Type: New NVO & OFF License. BCargo Logistics, S.A. de C.V. (NVO), Av. Revolucion 725-A, Col. Jardin...

  1. Law as Focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blythe, Joan Heiges

    1989-01-01

    Shows how teachers can increase students' general appreciation of literature and improve students' writing skills by studying literature with legal issues and images of the law. Cites several examples of such literature, including Geoffrey Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales," William Shakespeare's "Measure for Measure," and Jonathan…

  2. A Conversation with William A. Fowler Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, John

    2005-06-01

    Physicist William A.Fowler initiated an experimental program in nuclear astrophysics after World War II. He recalls here the Steady State versus Big Bang controversy and his celebrated collaboration with Fred Hoyle and Geoffrey and Margaret Burbidge on nucleosynthesis in stars. He also comments on the shift away from nuclear physics in universities to large accelerators and national laboratories.

  3. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 399 ... Geoffrey R. Atelu, Nancy Duah, Michael D Wilson. Vol 44, No 3 (2010), Case control study to determine the factors associated with leprosy in the Sene ... A.I Gidwani, S.A Gidwani, A Khan, J.G Carson. Vol 44, No 2 (2010), Congenital malaria in newborn twins, Abstract PDF. DA Opare. Vol 38, No 1 ...

  4. "Fritzi" en het groteske

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oever, Annie van den

    2003-01-01

    ‘And this is the final paradox: really to understand the grotesque is to cease to regard it as grotesque.’ — Geoffrey Harpham, On the Grotesque. Strategies of Contradiction in Art and Literature (1982) This book, about a writer for whom it always remains to be seen whether she really is one, opens

  5. 78 FR 76171 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ...) Those supported by quantitative information or studies; and (2) Those that include citations to, and...: Geoffrey Ridder; Utopia, TX; PRT-00030B The applicant requests a permit to export the sport-hunted trophy... period. Multiple Applicants The following applicants each request a permit to import the sport- hunted...

  6. Kaempferol glycosides from Albizia Versicolor | M. Rukunga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geoffrey M. Rukunga, Peter G. Waterman. Abstract. Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 1996, 10(1), 47-51. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More ...

  7. Computer Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Cognitive Aspect ," AEDS Journal, 18, 3 (Spring 1985) 150. "°Geoffrey Akst, "Computer Literacy: An Interview with Dr. Michael Hoban." Journal of Develop- m...1984. Cheng, Tina T.; Plake, Barbara; and Stevens, Dorothy Jo. "A Validation Study of the Computer Literacy Examination: Cognitive Aspect ." AEDS

  8. Traveling Chaucer: Comparative Translation and Cosmopolitan Humanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, Candace

    2014-01-01

    Through the comparative study of non-Anglophone translations of Geoffrey Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales," we can achieve the progressive goals of Emily Apter's "translational transnationalism" and Edward Said's "cosmopolitan humanism." Both translation and humanism were intrinsic to Chaucer's…

  9. Reflections on the first twenty-five years of the University of Malawi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to take up this role until after having the opportunity to learn from the first holder of this post, the Australian Geoffrey. Dahlenburg. The College of Medicine opened its doors in September ... Executive Dean of the COM, first reported to the world ... Loma Linda University School of Public Health, Loma Linda, California, USA.

  10. [1012.5676] The Exoplanet Orbit Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    : The Exoplanet Orbit Database Authors: Jason T Wright, Onsi Fakhouri, Geoffrey W. Marcy, Eunkyu Han present a database of well determined orbital parameters of exoplanets. This database comprises parameters, and the method used for the planets discovery. This Exoplanet Orbit Database includes all planets

  11. Governance in Afghanistan: Context and Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    Nathaniel. Russia in Central Asia in 1889 & the Anglo-Russian Question. London: Longmans, Green , and Co., 1889. Drage, Geoffrey. Russian Affairs. New York...Richard Bentley, 1839. Gray, John Alfred. At the Court of the Amir of Afghanistan. New York: Kegan Paul, 2002. Holdich, T. Hungerford. Through Central

  12. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Nonlinear Optical Polymers for Soldier Survivability (1st), Held in Natick, Massachusetts on June 13-14, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    Film Fabrication for Optical Second Harmonic Generation * Dr. Geoffrey A. Lindsay, Naval Weapons Center, et al. Corona-Onset Poling of New Side...having the required structures: Polyanilines and derivatives, polyazobenzenes and derivatives and polypyrroles. These polymers are generally...phase polymerization of the monomers on substrates of polyvinyl alcohol or polyvinylpyrrolidone. These films will be evaluated in a facility that

  13. The Sensitivity of Precocious Child Writers: More Evidence of the Double-Edged Sword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Alan L.; Edmunds, Gail

    2014-01-01

    This article provides further evidence of the often observed sensitive nature displayed by children who are gifted. It also addresses the positive and negative effects that this sensitivity can have on these individuals. Earlier, the authors explored this concept through an analysis of the works and life experiences of Geoffrey, aged 9, a prolific…

  14. Can Rose’s paradox be useful in crime prevention?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mogens; Joshi, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Geoffrey Rose’s prevention paradox obtains when the majority of cases with an adverse outcome come from a population of low or moderate risk, and only a few from a minority ‘high risk’ group. Preventive treatment is then better targeted widely than on the ‘high risk’ minority. This study tests wh...

  15. 77 FR 64967 - Senior Executive Service; Performance Review Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... BROWN, STEPHANIE H BRYAN, WILLIAM N BURROWS, CHARLES W BUTTRESS, LARRY D CADIEUX, GENA E CALBOS, PHILIP..., CAROL J BEAMON, JOSEPH A BEARD, JEANNE M BEARD, SUSAN F BEAUSOLEIL, GEOFFREY L BEKKEDAHL, LARRY N BELL..., HENRY C KELLY, JOHN E KELLY, LARRY C KENCHINGTON, HENRY S KENDELL, JAMES M KETCHAM, TIMOTHY E KHAN...

  16. Burbidge, Eleanor Margaret Peachey (1919-)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Astrophysicist, born in Devonport, Devon, England, worked in London, Yerkes Observatory, Cambridge, the California Institute of Technology, the Royal Greenwich Observatory and University of California at San Diego. Married and collaborated with Geoffrey Burbidge, a theoretical physicist. It is said that in the days when women were not permitted to observe in their own right with the 200 in telesc...

  17. Theatre Review | Various Authors | Shakespeare in Southern Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twelfth Night: The Port Elizabeth Shakespearean Festival, February 2004; Macbeth: Directed by Geoffrey Hyland, Maynardville Open Air Theatre, January to. February 2004; The Marowitz Hamlet: Directed by Floyed de Vaal for the University of. Stellenbosch Drama Department, July 2004; Bollywood Twelfth Night: Steven ...

  18. SEAPOWER: A GUIDE FOR THE TWENTY- FIRST CENTURY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abel

    $154,37 (amazon.com hardback). With the publication of Seapower: A Guide for the Twenty-First Century. Geoffrey Till has set the standard for publications on all things maritime. The updated and expanded new edition of the book is an essential guide for students of naval history and maritime strategy and provides ...

  19. Proceedings of the Conference on the Environmental Effects of Explosives and Explosions (2nd) 13-14 October 1976

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-07-25

    of contusions on the lining of the gastrointestinal track begin to occur along with petechial lung hemorrhages, The incidence and severity of these...Maryland 20640 Attn: LCDR 3. W. McConnell Director Naval Research Laboratory Washington, D.C. 20375 Attni Geoffrey 0. Thomas, Code 8410 Kenneth N. Fever

  20. Morphormetric Measurements Of Barbels, Head And Standard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measurement of sensory barbels of five catfish species from the Osse River was undertaken to ascertain the differences between the types of barbels. The five species showed the maxillary to have the largest proportion of SL. The differential rankings of the maxillary were Heterobranchus bidorsalis Geoffrey Saint Hilaire ...

  1. Wangai et al., Afr. J. Infect. Dis. (2011) 5(1): 1 - 6 SENSITIVITY OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJTCAM

    Wangai et al., Afr. J. Infect. Dis. (2011) 5(1): 1 - 6. 1. SENSITIVITY OF MICROSCOPY COMPARED TO MOLECULAR DIAGNOSIS OF P. FALCIPARUM: IMPLICATIONS ON MALARIA TREATMENT IN EPIDEMIC AREAS IN. KENYA. Laura Nyawira Wangai 1,2, Muriira Geoffrey Karau 3, Paul Nthakanio Njiruh 4, Omar Sabah 5 ...

  2. Map Design for Computer Processing: Literature Review and DMA Product Critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    outcome. Using a program 0 Use only a narrow border of layer tint on each side called " Seurat ," gridded elevation data is processed by of the contour line...Massachusetts., unpublished. sity Cartographers 6, pp. 40-45. Dutton, Geoffrey (1981bj The Seurat Program. Computer French, Robert J. (1954). Pattern

  3. Energy efficient lighting and controls at North Lanarkshire Council: Good practice case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-11-15

    The Sir Matt Busby Sports Complex is an important local facility for the people of Bellshill, North Lanarkshire. The sports and leisure complex, a North Lanarkshire Council property, offers a combination of indoor and outdoor sporting facilities including a floodlit synthetic football pitch and a comprehensive mix of swimming, sauna, gym and sports hall facilities. The electrical demand imposed by lighting for any business can be very significant, constituting up to 30% of the electrical power consumption. At the Sir Matt Busby Sports Complex a combination of new efficient light fittings and controls has improved lighting levels, reduced overall energy consumption by nearly 10% and provided substantial cost savings. The Carbon Trust has assisted the Council by identifying and prioritising energy saving opportunities and providing a prioritised implementation plan. This partnership arrangement and the Council's access to UK Pound 930,000 of 'spend to save' funding, provided by the Scottish Executive, has allowed the rapid implementation of energy efficiency measures. (GB)

  4. Factors determining the stability, size distribution, and cellular accumulation of small, monodisperse chitosan nanoparticles as candidate vectors for anticancer drug delivery: application to the passive encapsulation of [14C]-doxorubicin [Corrigendum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masarudin MJ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Masarudin MJ, Cutts SM, Evison BJ et al. Nanotechnol Sci Appl. 2015;8:67–80The authors advise that Professor Geoffrey A Pietersz was erroneously omitted from the original author and affiliation list, the list should have been:Mas Jaffri Masarudin1Suzanne M Cutts2Geoffrey A Pietersz3Benny J Evison4Don R Phillips2Paul J Pigram51Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia; 2Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; 3Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Laboratory, Centre for Biomedical Research, Burnet Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; 4Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics, St Jude Children’s Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA; 5Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaThe Acknowledgment section should have contained the statement: This work was also supported by a research grant from Cancer Council Victoria.Read the original article

  5. The (Proper) Microfoundations of Routines and Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felin, Teppo; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2012-01-01

    Sidney Winter (2011), Brian Pentland (2011), and Geoffrey Hodgson and Thorbjørn Knudsen (2011) take issue with the arguments in Teppo Felin and Nicolai J. Foss (2011), along with more generally critiquing the ‘microfoundations project’ related to routines and capabilities. In this rejoinder we ar...... chauvinism; (3) models of mind and man; (4) levels of analysis; (5) agency and uncaused causes; and then further discuss (6) a rationalist alternative....

  6. Management strategies for fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Le Marshall KF; Littlejohn GO

    2011-01-01

    Kim Francis Le Marshall, Geoffrey Owen LittlejohnDepartments of Rheumatology and Medicine, Monash Medical Centre and Monash University, Victoria, AustraliaDate of preparation: 14 June 2011Clinical question: What are the effective, evidence-based strategies available for the management of fibromyalgia?Conclusion: There are a number of management strategies available with robust evidence to support their use in clinical practice.Definition: Fibromyalgia is a complex pain syndrome characterized ...

  7. Influence through Airpower Security Cooperation in Egypt and Pakistan: Lessons for Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    was a predictable outcome and casts doubt as to whether or not airpower security cooperation can realistically dissuade states from attempting to...in the Middle East and South Asia, ed. Shelly A. Stahl and Geoffrey Kemp (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1992) 221-227. 48 airpower security...Policy Toward Arms Transfers to the Middle East,” in Arms Control and Weapons Proliferation in the Middle East and South Asia, ed. Shelly A. Stahl and

  8. Comparison of cumulative dissipated energy between the Infiniti and Centurion phacoemulsification systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ming; Anderson, Erik; Hill, Geoffrey; Chen, John J; Patrianakos, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ming Chen,1 Erik Anderson,2 Geoffrey Hill,3 John J Chen,4 Thomas Patrianakos2 1Department of Surgery, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, 2Department of Ophthalmology, John H Stroger, Jr Hospital of Cook County, Chicago, IL, 3Department of Ophthalmology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, 4Biostatistics Core, John A Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA Purpose: To compare cumulative dissipated energy between two phacoemulsification mac...

  9. Diagnosing Autism Spectrum Disorder through Brain Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive psychology , 41(1), 49–100. Montgomery, Douglas C, Peck, Elizabeth A, & Vining, G Geoffrey. 2012. Introduction to linear regression analysis. Vol...original set of variables to a reduced set while retaining as much information as possible (Dillon & Goldstein , 1984). Principal component analysis...to ∑n j=1 c 2 m,j = 1 (Dillon & Goldstein , 1984). Murphy (2012) details how to extract the principal components. PCA would like to find the

  10. Approaches to History

    OpenAIRE

    Gervais, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    There are some photographic corpora that are difficult for the historian to grasp. In 2008, in his article on family photography, Geoffrey Batchen noted how the sheer volume of this type of production, which every second increases by 550 images in the United States alone, overwhelms the research methods developed for more finite collections. He also explained that the historian’s quandary is only compounded by the poor aesthetic quality of these images, which he deemed ‘repetitively uncreativ...

  11. A conversation with Geoff Watson

    OpenAIRE

    Beran, R. J.; Fisher, N. I.

    1998-01-01

    Geoffrey Stuart Watson, Professor Emeritus at Princeton University, celebrated his 75th birthday on December 3, 1996. A native Australian, his early education included Bendigo High School and Scotch College in Melbourne. After graduating with a B.A. (Hons.) from Melbourne University in December 1942, he spent the next few years, during and after World War II, doing research and teaching on applied mathematical topics. His wandering as a scholar began in 1947, when he became ...

  12. Energy efficiency: potentials and profits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigaud, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, Jean-Marie Bouchereau (ADEME) has presented a review of the energy efficiency profits in France during the last 20 years and the prospects from now to 2020. Then, Geoffrey Woodward (TOTAL) and Sebastien Huchette (AXENS) have recalled the stakes involved in the energy efficiency of the upstream and downstream sectors respectively and presented examples of advances approaches illustrated by concrete cases of applications. (O.M.)

  13. U.S. Military Engineering Assistance to Peru: Doing Things Right

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-05

    the history of Peruvian culture (from the Huari influence to the Inca legends), see, Geoffrey Barraclough, ed., The Times Atlas of World History...unimaginably poor; steamy jungle, sky-high mountains and a long, golden coastline, all with little in common; a centuries-old culture intact despite...with a Rich Culture Perg’s population is approximately 22 million, but census figures represent, at best, "ball-park" estimates. Almost 70% live in

  14. Field Test Data for Detecting Vibrations of a Building Using High-Speed Video Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    ARL-TR-8185 ● OCT 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Field Test Data for Detecting Vibrations of a Building Using High-Speed Video...Field Test Data for Detecting Vibrations of a Building Using High-Speed Video Cameras by Caitlin P Conn and Geoffrey H Goldman Sensors and...June 2016 – October 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Field Test Data for Detecting Vibrations of a Building Using High-Speed Video Cameras 5a. CONTRACT

  15. Role of Natural Killer T Cells in Immunogenic Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Dureta,b, Maya Hassanec, Fernando Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraesd, Geoffrey R. Hilld,e, Paul Neesona,b, David S. Ritchiea,b, François Trotteinc, Gabrielle T... conserved spectrum of cytokines to various stimuli. This pool of cells can either be rapidly expanded and/or recruited at sites of inflammation...which conserved this population in different backgrounds may also imply specialized functions in some organs. In line with this, the rapid response

  16. SHORT COMMUNICATION TRITERPENE COMPOUNDS FROM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    Grison, P.L.; McKey, M.H.; Jaco, M.G.; Jean-Marie, B. Phytochemistry 2002, 61, 61. 3. Sergio, R.P.S.; Hee, B.C.; Young, G.S.; Thawatchai, S.; Vichai, R.; Norman, R.F.; Geoffrey,. A.C.; John, M.P.; Duglas, A.K. Planta Med. 2002, 68, 186. 4. Hong, J.Z.; Pamela, A.T.; Zeynep, A.; Ghee, T.T.; Yoko, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Masaya, N.;.

  17. President Reagan’s commitment of Peacekeepers in Lebanon, 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    members of the State Department, such as Middle East special envoy Philip Habib , and the Director for Near East and South Asian affairs Geoffrey...but specified no mission parameters at that point.96 Philip Habib , Reagan’s special envoy to the Middle East, countered that other countries would...101 Habib offered assurances that U.S. forces would remain in Beirut for up to 30 days to ensure security.102 The force chosen to represent the

  18. Why Insurgents Fail: Examining Post-World War II Failed Insurgencies Utilizing the Prerequisites of Successful Insurgencies as a Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Taruc’s Born of the People and He Who Rides the Tiger : The Story of an Asian Guerilla Fighter. Good case studies of the Huk Rebellion include Lawrence... Tiger : The Story of an Asian Guerilla Fighter (London: Geoffrey Chapman, 1967), 12. 116 Molnar, “Philippines (1946-1954),” 328-329. 61 During...June 1967 the roughness of the terrain and lack of medicine and supplies resulted in Guevara becoming seriously ill. With a history of asthma it was

  19. ICASE Semiannual Report 1 October 1991 - 31 March 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    with laboratory data. A second approach was tested for the detection of bonding failures in aircraft lapjoints and in the adhesive joints between...elasticity equations. Control is implemented via piezoceramic patches which are bonded to the boundary of the acoustic cavity. In this way, we can take...Rinehard von Hanxleden at Rice; Geoffrey Fox and Alok Chuudhary at Syracuse (NSF Center for Research on Parallel Computing). Fortran and C callable

  20. Military History: A Selected Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    II. 1959. Stadelman, Rudolf . Scharnhorst: Schicksal and geistige Welt. 1952. Tarle, Eugene. Napoleon’s Invasion of Russia. 1942. Thiry, J...of Germany. 1975. *** Smith, Cecil Woodham. The Reason Why. 1965. Stadelman, Rudolf . Moltke und der Stadt. 1950. *** Wawro, Geoffrey. The Austro...Gerhard. The Sword and the Scepter, 4 vols. 1973. Steiner , Zarc S. The Foreign Office and Foreign Policy, 1898-1914. 1969. *** Stevenson, David

  1. Correlation of yield stress and microhardness in 08Cr16Ni11Mo3 stainless steel irradiated to high dose in the BN-350 fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, M.N.; Maksimkin, O.P.; Tivanova, O.V.; Silnaygina, N.S.; Garner, F.A.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between the microhardness and the engineering yield stress in 08Cr16Ni11Mo3 steel after irradiation in the BN-350 reactor has been experimentally derived and agrees with a previously published correlation developed by Toloczko for unirradiated 316 in a variety of cold-work conditions. Even more importantly, when the correlation is derived in the K Δ format where the correlation involves changes in the two properties, excellent agreement is found with a universal K Δ correlation developed by Busby and coworkers. Additionally, this report points out that microhardness measurements must take into account that sodium exposure at high temperature and neutron fluence alters the metal surface to produce ferrite, and therefore the altered layers should be removed prior to testing

  2. EXPERIENCE VERSUS AUTHORITY: THE SEARCH FOR GENDER EQUALITY IN CHAUCER'S "THE WIFE OF BATH'S PROLOGUE AND TALE"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setefanus Suprayitno

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years much interest has been put on gender equality. There has been a changing perception of the attitudes which emerges and shapes women's role in society and relationships. Formerly, social ideas and customs dictated women to be subservient. But now the changing social structure gives women space to pursue gender equality. Geoffrey Chaucer (ca. 1343-1400 had addressed this issue in his work, "The Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale." This paper discusses how Alisoun, the wife Bath, through her prologue and tale, shows the contradiction of the oppressive traditions and customs imposed on women and attempts to present the idea of gender equality.

  3. Cosmic alternatives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Ruth

    2009-04-01

    "Cosmologists are often in error but never in doubt." This pithy characterization by the Soviet physicist Lev Landau sums up the raison d'être of Facts and Speculations in Cosmology. Authors Jayant Narlikar and Geoffrey Burbidge are proponents of a "steady state" theory of cosmology, and they argue that the cosmological community has become fixated on a "Big Bang" dogma, suppressing alternative viewpoints. This book very much does what it says on the tin: it sets out what is known in cosmology, and puts forward the authors' point of view on an alternative to the Big Bang.

  4. What money does: An inquiry into the backbone of capitalist political economy

    OpenAIRE

    Koddenbrock, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The theory and critique of capitalism is back at the center of scholarly debate. With it comes a growing awareness of the analytical and political importance of money and money creation. Moving from the more systemic reflections of Karl Marx to more recent work on money theory by Geoffrey Ingham and in financial economics, the paper focuses on three of money’s “deeds.” As a social structure and process, it makes moneymaking through capital permeate all our societies. As a public-private partn...

  5. Sir Winston Churchill: treatment for pneumonia in 1943 and 1944.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, J A; Scadding, J W

    2017-12-01

    This paper reviews Churchill's illnesses in February 1943 and August/September 1944 when he developed pneumonia; on the first occasion this followed a cold and sore throat. Churchill was managed at home by Sir Charles Wilson (later Lord Moran) with the assistance of two nurses and the expert advice of Dr Geoffrey Marshall, Brigadier Lionel Whitby and Colonel Robert Drew. A sulphonamide (sulphathiazole on the first occasion) was prescribed for both illnesses. Churchill recovered, and despite his illnesses continued to direct the affairs of State from his bed. On the second occasion, Churchill's illness was not made public.

  6. Clerics and courtly love in Andreas Capellanus' The Art of Courtly Love and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Andrew

    1990-01-01

    In both The Canterbury Tales and The Art of Courtly Love Geoffrey Chaucer and Andreas Capellanus deal with various aspects of courtly love. In particular, both of them focus to some degree on the question of clerical celibacy. The use of tale telling and imaginary dialogues result in a contemporary overview of the role of the cleric in courtly love, the church rules on the subject, and the opinions of the people on a subject that is ripe for exploration. My aim is to point out some of the ...

  7. Effects of Early Acute Care on Autonomic Outcomes in SCI: Bedside to Bench and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    William Whetstone MD from Emergency Medicine and Geoffrey Manley MD, PhD who are already on the project. This team has worked together on the...Cessante LM, Cheung CR, Cullen MA, McDonald EC, Holland MC. Routine TBI screening following combat deployments. NeuroRehabilitation. 2010; 26(3):183...1,3,4 William Whetstone,2 Rajiv Saigal,3,4 Adam Ferguson,3,4 Jason Talbott,5 Jacqueline Bresnahan,3,4 Sanjay Dhall,3,4 Jonathan Pan,6 Michael Beattie

  8. APF-The Lick Observatory Automated Planet Finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    WILLIAM DEICH,1 BRIAN DUPRAW,1 WAYNE EARTHMAN,1 HARLAND EPPS,1 SANDRA FABER,1 DEBRA FISCHER ,3 ELINOR GATES,1 DAVID HILYARD,1 BRAD HOLDEN,1 KEN JOHNSTON,4...SANDY KEISER,2 DICK KANTO,1 MYRA KATSUKI,1 LEE LAITERMAN,1 KYLE LANCLOS,1 GREG LAUGHLIN,1 JEFF LEWIS,1 CHRIS LOCKWOOD,1,5 PAUL LYNAM,1 GEOFFREY MARCY,6...with S. Vogt as principal investigator, G. Marcy and D. Fischer as coinvestgators, and M. Radovan as project manager and principal engineer. A large

  9. Brand Identity, Adaptation, and Media Franchise Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marazi Katerina

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the noticeable practices within the field of Adaptation, Adaptation theory seems to be lagging behind whilst perpetuating various fallacies. Geoffrey Wagner’s types of Adaptation and Kamilla Elliott’s proposed concepts for examining adaptations have proved useful but due to their general applicability they seem to perpetuate the fallacies existing within the field of Adaptation. This article will propose a context-specific concept pertaining to Media Franchise Culture for the purpose of examining Adaptations and re-assessing long-held debates concerning the Original, the Content/Form debate and Fidelity issues that cater to the twelve fallacies discussed by Thomas Leitch.

  10. Citizen Science: Sally Shuttleworth and her Team Interviewed by Carolyn Burdett

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Belknap

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this podcast interview Carolyn Burdett joins Sally Shuttleworth, Gowan Dawson, Geoffrey Belknap, and Alison Moulds to discuss their project ‘Constructing Scientific Communities: Citizen Science in the 19th and 21st Centuries’. From Charles Darwin, nineteenth-century scientific periodicals, scientific communities, and amateur scientists to their twenty-first century virtual counterparts in digital platforms such as Zooniverse, the project illuminates the inclusive nature of science in action, and the strategies of public engagement to respond to the challenge of big data through intergenerational crowdsourcing projects extending from postgraduate research to child scientists.

  11. Insularity and communion

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwood, Hilary

    1997-01-01

    The great comic classic of middle-English literature is the Canterbury Tales of Geoffrey Chaucer, written in the last part of the fourteenth century. A party of men and women set out together on horse-back from an inn in London to make the pilgrimage to the shrine of St. Thomas Becket. By a happy coincidence their route will bring them past the very spot where we are gathered today. They are a mixed group: some of them are presented to us as virtuous characters, like the Clerk of Oxford and t...

  12. A propósito de la primera traducción en prosa francesa de la "Historia regum Britanniae"

    OpenAIRE

    Simó, Meritxell

    2007-01-01

    El ms. BNF fr. 17177 nos ha conservado la primera traducción en prosa francesa de la Historia Regum Britanniae de Geoffrey de Monmouth, interpolada en la Histoire Ancienne jusqu'à César. Tras una serie de consideraciones preliminares sobre esta traducción, el artículo se centra en el estudio de las dos secciones más interesantes del texto: la Profecía de Merlín y los capítulos consagrados al reinado de Arturo. El artículo comenta las glosas que introduce el autor en la Profe...

  13. Status and Mating Success Amongst Visual Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Helen; Nettle, Daniel; Miell, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    Geoffrey Miller has hypothesized that producing artwork functions as a mating display. Here we investigate the relationship between mating success and artistic success in a sample of 236 visual artists. Initially, we derived a measure of artistic success that covered a broad range of artistic behaviors and beliefs. As predicted by Miller’s evolutionary theory, more successful male artists had more sexual partners than less successful artists but this did not hold for female artists. Also, male artists with greater artistic success had a mating strategy based on longer term relationships. Overall the results provide partial support for the sexual selection hypothesis for the function of visual art. PMID:22059085

  14. Narratives of Arab Anglophone Women and the Articulation of a Major Discourse in a Minor Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Sarnou Dalal

    2014-01-01

    “It is important to stress that a variety of positions with respect to feminism, nation, religion and identity are to be found in Anglophone Arab women’s writings. This being the case, it is doubtful whether, in discussing this literary production, much mileage is to be extracted from over emphasis of the notion of its being a conduit of ‘Third World subaltern women.’” (Nash 35) Building on Geoffrey Nash’s statement and reflecting on Deleuze and Guattari’s conceptualization of minor literatur...

  15. Evolução darwiniana & ciências sociais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eli da Veiga

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo sintetiza os principais resultados do ciclo temático com o mesmo título que foi coordenado pelo autor em 2007 como uma das atividades públicas do Instituto de Estudos Avançados da Universidade de São Paulo. Também é uma introdução às outras três contribuições que fazem parte deste dossiê: os artigos dos professores Ricardo Waizbort, da Fiocruz, e do professor Mario Possas, da UFRJ, e a entrevista especial concedida pelo professor Geoffrey Hodgson (University of Hertfordshire, UK.This article is a synthesis of the main results obtained in a thematic cycle with the same title which was coordinated by the author during 2007 as one of the public activities of the University of Sao Paulo's Institute of Advanced Studies. It is also an introduction to the three o other contributions to this dossier: the articles from professors Ricardo Waizbort (Fiocruz and Mario Possas (UFRJ, and the especial interview with professor Geoffrey Hodgson (University of Hertfordshire, UK.

  16. Mother's marital satisfaction associated with the quality of mother-father-child triadic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korja, Riikka; Piha, Jorma; Otava, Riia; Lavanchy-Scaiola, Chloe; Ahlqvist-Björkroth, Sari; Aromaa, Minna; Räihä, Hannele

    2016-08-01

    Low marital satisfaction has been shown to be a risk factor for early parenthood and parent-child relationship problems (Erel & Burman, ; McHale, ). The aim of this study was to assess how parental reports of marital satisfaction related to family alliance and coordination in the observed triadic interaction. The study group included 120 families. Marital satisfaction was evaluated during pregnancy, at 4 months, and at 18 months using the Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale (RDAS; Busby, Christensen, Crane & Larsson, ) for both parents. Mother-father-child interaction was analyzed in the Lausanne Triadic Play setting and coded using the Family Alliance Assessment Scale (Favez, Lavanchy Scaiola, Tissot, Darwiche & Frascarolo, ) when the child reached 18 months of age. The mother's higher marital satisfaction at every measuring point was associated with a cooperative family alliance and/or higher family coordination at 18 months. The father's experience of marital satisfaction was not related to family interaction at any assessment point. Our study suggests that a mother's experience of lower marital satisfaction during pregnancy may be an early sign of later problems in family relationships. © 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Correlation of Yield Stress And Microhardness in 08cr16ni11mo3 Irradiated To High Dose In The Bn-350 Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimkin, O.P.; Gusev, M.N.; Tivanova, O.S.; Silnaygina, N.S.; Garner, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between values of the microhardness and the engineering yield stress in steel 08Cr16Ni11Mo3 (Russian analog of AISI 316) heavily irradiated in the BN-350 reactor has been experimentally derived. It agrees very well with the previously published correlation developed by Toloczko for unirradiated 316 in a variety of cold-work conditions. Even more importantly, when the correlation is derived in the K δ format where the correlation involves changes in the two properties, we find excellent agreement with a universal K δ correlation developed by Busby and coworkers. With this K δ correlation, one can predict the value of yield stress in irradiated material based on measured values of microhardness. The technique is particularly suitable when the material of interest is in an inconvenient location or configuration, or when significant gradients in mechanical properties are anticipated over small dimensions. This approach makes it possible to reduce the labor input and risk when conducting such work. It appears that the derived correlation is equally applicable to both Russian and Western austenitic steel, and also in both irradiated and unirradiated conditions. Additionally, this report points out that microhardness measurements must take into account that high temperature sodium exposure alters the metal surface to produce ferrite, and therefore the altered layers should be removed prior to testing

  18. Relative azimuth inversion by way of damped maximum correlation estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringler, A.T.; Edwards, J.D.; Hutt, C.R.; Shelly, F.

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal seismic data are utilized in a large number of Earth studies. Such work depends on the published orientations of the sensitive axes of seismic sensors relative to true North. These orientations can be estimated using a number of different techniques: SensOrLoc (Sensitivity, Orientation and Location), comparison to synthetics (Ekstrom and Busby, 2008), or by way of magnetic compass. Current methods for finding relative station azimuths are unable to do so with arbitrary precision quickly because of limitations in the algorithms (e.g. grid search methods). Furthermore, in order to determine instrument orientations during station visits, it is critical that any analysis software be easily run on a large number of different computer platforms and the results be obtained quickly while on site. We developed a new technique for estimating relative sensor azimuths by inverting for the orientation with the maximum correlation to a reference instrument, using a non-linear parameter estimation routine. By making use of overlapping windows, we are able to make multiple azimuth estimates, which helps to identify the confidence of our azimuth estimate, even when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is low. Finally, our algorithm has been written as a stand-alone, platform independent, Java software package with a graphical user interface for reading and selecting data segments to be analyzed.

  19. Accuracy Evaluation of The Depth of Six Kinds of Sperm Counting Chambers for both Manual and Computer-Aided Semen Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Chun Lu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the depth of the counting chamber is an important factor influencing sperm counting, no research has yet been reported on the measurement and comparison of the depth of the chamber. We measured the exact depths of six kinds of sperm counting chambers and evaluated their accuracy. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, the depths of six kinds of sperm counting chambers for both manual and computer-aided semen analyses, including Makler (n=24, Macro (n=32, Geoffrey (n=34, GoldCyto (n=20, Leja (n=20 and Cell-VU (n=20, were measured with the Filmetrics F20 Spectral Reflectance Thin-Film Measurement System, then the mean depth, the range and the coefficient of variation (CV of each chamber, and the mean depth, relative deviation and acceptability of each kind of chamber were calculated by the closeness to the nominal value. Among the 24 Makler chambers, 5 were new and 19 were used, and the other five kinds were all new chambers. Results: The depths (mean ± SD, μm of Makler (new, Macro and Geoffrey chambers were 11.07 ± 0.41, 10.19 ± 0.48 and 10.00 ± 0.28, respectively, while those of GoldCyto, Leja and Cell-VU chambers were 23.76 ± 2.15, 20.49 ± 0.22 and 24.22 ± 2.58, respectively. The acceptability of Geoffrey chambers was the highest (94.12%, followed by Macro (65.63%, Leja (35% and Makler (20%, while that of the other two kinds and the used Makler chamber was zero. Conclusion: There existed some difference between the actual depth and the corresponding nominal value for sperm counting chambers, and the overall acceptability was very low. Moreover, the abrasion caused by the long use, as of Makler chamber, for example, may result in unacceptability of the chamber. In order to ensure the accuracy and repeatability of sperm concentration results, the depth of the sperm counting chamber must be checked regularly.

  20. Does Europe have a centre? Reflections on the history of Western and Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mout, Nicolette

    2006-05-01

    Any definition of Central Europe based on geographical and/or historical facts causes difficulties. The line dividing Europe during the Cold War has a very limited use because it does not take into account Central Europe as a special part of the continent. Historians such as Geoffrey Barraclough, Hugh Seton-Watson and Oskar Halecki discussed the idea of a separate identity of Central Europe during the Cold War. Especially after the fall of the Berlin Wall, this discussion was re-opened. From a historian's point of view, the most important contributions came from Piotr Wandycz and Jeno Szucs. An imaginary centre of Europe can only be found in the continent's common history.

  1. A new kind of history? The challenges of contemporary histories of photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya'ara Gil Glazer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1970s there have been recurrent calls for a new history of photography. Geoffrey Batchen effectively summarized these calls, generally expressing a wish for separation from the historiographic model formulated by Beaumont Newhall in his classic The History of Photography from 1839 to the Present. Since the mid 1980s till today, a number of major history of photography textbooks that aimed to provide an alternative to Newhall’s have been published. These volumes fulfill, in different ways, the desire for a history that 'breaks free from an evolutionary narrative,' that 'traces the journey of an image, as well as its origin', or 'sees beyond Europe and the United States'. But do these new books really represent a 'new kind of history'?

  2. A consistent time frame for Chaucer's Canterbury Pilgrimage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummerer, K. R.

    2001-08-01

    A consistent time frame for the pilgrimage that Geoffrey Chaucer describes in The Canterbury Tales can be established if the seven celestial assertions related to the journey mentioned in the text can be reconciled with each other and the date of April 18 that is also mentioned. Past attempts to establish such a consistency for all seven celestial assertions have not been successful. The analysis herein, however, indicates that in The Canterbury Tales Chaucer accurately describes the celestial conditions he observed in the April sky above the London(Canterbury region of England in the latter half of the fourteenth century. All seven celestial assertions are in agreement with each other and consistent with the April 18 date. The actual words of Chaucer indicate that the Canterbury journey began during the 'seson' he defines in the General Prologue and ends under the light of the full Moon on the night of April 18, 1391.

  3. Loire Classics: Reviving Classicism in some Loire Poets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Verbaal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The term 'Loire poets' has come to refer to a rather undefinable group of poets that in the second half of the eleventh century distinguishes itself through its refined poetics. They are often characterized as medieval humanists thanks to their renewed interest in the classics. Sometimes their movement is labelled a 'classicist' one. But what does this 'classicism' mean? Is it even permitted to speak of medieval 'classicisms'? This contribution approaches the question of whether we can apply this modern label to pre-modern phenomena. Moreover, it explores the changes in attitude towards the classics that sets the Loire poets off from their predecessors and contemporaries. The article focuses on poems by Hildebert of Lavardin, Baudri of Bourgueil, Marbod of Rennes, and Geoffrey of Reims. They are compared with some contemporary poets, such as Reginald of Canterbury and Sigebert of Gembloux.

  4. Neuroendocrine control of the onset of puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Tony M

    2015-07-01

    This chapter is based on the Geoffrey Harris Memorial Lecture presented at the 8th International Congress of Neuroendocrinology, which was held in Sydney, August 2014. It provides the development of our understanding of the neuroendocrine control of puberty since Harris proposed in his 1955 monograph (Harris, 1955) that "a major factor responsible for puberty is an increased rate of release of pituitary gonadotrophin" and posited "that a neural (hypothalamic) stimulus, via the hypophysial portal vessels, may be involved." Emphasis is placed on the neurobiological mechanisms governing puberty in highly evolved primates, although an attempt is made to reverse translate a model for the timing of puberty in man and monkey to non-primate species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reviews of recent publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Sara Lennox. Cemetery of the Murdered Daughters: Feminism, History, and Ingeborg Bachmann by Kristin T. Vander Lugt Birgit Tautz. Reading and Seeing Ethnic Differences in the Enlightenment: From China to Africa by Susanne Kelley Patrick Greaney. Untimely Beggar. Poverty and Power from Baudelaire to Benjamin by Christine Rinne Philip Payne, Graham Bartram, and Galin Tihanov, eds. A Companion to the Works of Robert Musil by Geoffrey C. Howes Jennifer Willging. Telling Anxiety: Anxious Narration in the Work of Marguerite Duras, Annie Ernaux, Nathalie Sarraute and Anne Hébert by Natalie Edwards Michael Lucey. Never Say I: Sexuality and the First Person in Colette, Gide, and Proust by Elissa Gelfand Anthony Waine. Changing Cultural Tastes. Writers and the Popular in Modern Germany by Katrin Völkner Susan Ireland and Patrice Proulx, eds. Textualizing the Immigrant Experience in Contemporary Quebec by Amy Hubbell Cristina Peri Rossi. State of Exile . Trans. Marilyn Buck. by Reina Ruiz

  6. 《哈利·波特》作品中的人性认知解读

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈辛欣

    2014-01-01

    <正>在英国长期的文化历史过程中,出现过大量杰出的知名文学家和文学作品,像乔叟(Geoffrey Chaucer,1340—1400)、莎士比亚(William Shakespeare,1564—1616)、培根(Francis Bacon,1561—1626)等,这些作家和他们的作品以其独特的视角以及曲折而丰富的人性解读而受到了大家的喜爱。作为英国知名的女作家,J·K·罗琳以孩子的视角和审美观点出发,

  7. Goldbrick:闪光的不一定都是金砖

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜一平

    2009-01-01

    英语里有句名言:All that glitters is not gold(闪光的不一定都是金子)。据说,最早说此话的人是英国的诗歌之父乔叟(Geoffrey Chaucer,约1340~1400)。莎士比亚(William Shakespeare,1564~1616)在他的《威尼斯商人》(The Merchant of Venice)中也引用了这句话。后来,美国人给这个古老的英语成语增添了一个更为简短的相似说法:goldbrick(金砖)。

  8. An Applied Mereology of the City: Unifying Science and Philosophy for Urban Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epting, Shane

    2016-10-01

    Based on their research showing that growing cities follow basic principles, two theoretical physicists, Luis Bettencourt and Geoffrey West, call for researchers and professionals to contribute to a grand theory of urban sustainability. In their research, they develop a 'science of the city' to help urban planners address problems that arise from population increases. Although they provide valuable insights for understanding urban sustainability issues, they do not give planners a manageable way to approach such problems. I argue that developing an applied mereology to understand the concept of 'city identity' gives planners a theoretical device for addressing urban affairs, including ethical concerns. In turn, I devise a model of city identity to show how a 'philosophy of the city' contributes to a grand theory of urban sustainability.

  9. Cars on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2002-01-01

    Mars is one of the most fascinating planets in the solar system, featuring an atmosphere, water, and enormous volcanoes and canyons. The Mars Pathfinder, Global Surveyor, and Odyssey missions mark the first wave of the Planet Earth's coming invasion of the red planet, changing our views of the past and future of the planet and the possibilities of life. Scientist and science-fiction writer Geoffrey A. Landis will present experiences on the Pathfinder mission, the challenges of using solar power on the surface of Mars, and present future missions to Mars such as the upcoming Mars Twin Rovers, which will launch two highly-capable vehicles in 2003 to explore the surface of Mars.

  10. International Symposium for Thyroid Eye Disease (June 2016, London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Y. Sviridenko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In June 2016, an International Symposium dedicated to the cutting edge research and achievements in Thyroid Eye Disease (TED diagnosis and treatment was held in London. The symposium was organized by the International Thyroid Eye Disease (ITEDs. It was attended EUGOGO, North American Neuro-Ophthalmological Society (NANOS and Orbit Society members. The symposium was attended by leading experts in the field of ophthalmology, orbital surgery and endocrinology: Rebecca S. Bahn, Maarten Mourits, Claudio Marcocci, George Kahaly, Mario Salvi, Antony Weetman, Anja Eckstein, Daniel Rootman, Geoffrey Rose, Robert Goldberg and Susanne Pitz, as well as doctors, specializing in the field of endocrinology, ophthalmology, radiology and other specialties. The symposium program was focused on the discussion of TED pathogenesis, classification and new therapeutic and surgical approaches. TED problems discussed by more than 300 professionals (65% ophthalmologists, 18% ophthalmic surgeons and 17% endocrinologists. North America was represented by 50 delegates. Representation of other continents was not less impressive.

  11. Computational and Experimental Investigations of the Molecular Scale Structure and Dynamics of Gologically Important Fluids and Mineral-Fluid Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, Geoffrey [Alfred Univ., NY (United States)

    2017-04-05

    United States Department of Energy grant DE-FG02-10ER16128, “Computational and Spectroscopic Investigations of the Molecular Scale Structure and Dynamics of Geologically Important Fluids and Mineral-Fluid Interfaces” (Geoffrey M. Bowers, P.I.) focused on developing a molecular-scale understanding of processes that occur in fluids and at solid-fluid interfaces using the combination of spectroscopic, microscopic, and diffraction studies with molecular dynamics computer modeling. The work is intimately tied to the twin proposal at Michigan State University (DOE DE-FG02-08ER15929; same title: R. James Kirkpatrick, P.I. and A. Ozgur Yazaydin, co-P.I.).

  12. Construction and Validation of the Marital Justice Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Ghaffari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to construct and validate a scale for measuring marital justice. A sample of three hundred and four voluntary and unpaid married participants (194 females, 110 males, aged between 20 and 35 years old (29.01 ± 4.44 years, were selected randomly through multi-stage sampling in Isfahan, Iran; the participants included in this sample had preschool child/children, were all in the first decade of marriage, and had at least eight grades of education. All participants were asked to complete the Marital Justice Scale (MJS, the Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale (R-DAS; Busby, Christensen, Crane, & Larson, 1995, and the Marital Conflict Questionnaire (MCQ; Sanai Zaker, 2000. The exploratory factor analysis extracted two factors labelled ‘Procedural/interactional justice’ (twelve items and ‘Distributive justice’ (eight items which accounted for 66.70% of the total variance. The convergent and discriminant validity of the 20-item MJS were supported by an expected pattern of correlations between the scale and the measures of marital quality and marital conflict. All correlation coefficients between the mean scores of the MJS and the scores of the RDAS and the MCQ were statistically significant. The obtained internal consistency was markedly high (Cronbach’s α = .97. The test-retest reliability of the MJS was .87. The results suggest that the MJS is a reliable and valid measure; however, further studies should be carried out in other countries, based on different age groups and socio-economic levels, various developmental stages of family life cycles, diverse cultures and sub-cultures, and according to gender difference so as to validate the MJS.

  13. Northern Cheyenne Reservation Coal Bed Natural Resource Assessment and Analysis of Produced Water Disposal Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaochang Wo; David A. Lopez; Jason Whiteman Sr.; Bruce A. Reynolds

    2004-07-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) development in the Powder River Basin (PRB) is currently one of the most active gas plays in the United States. Monthly production in 2002 reached about 26 BCF in the Wyoming portion of the basin. Coalbed methane reserves for the Wyoming portion of the basin are approximately 25 trillion cubic feet (TCF). Although coal beds in the Powder River Basin extend well into Montana, including the area of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, the only CBM development in Montana is the CX Field, operated by the Fidelity Exploration, near the Wyoming border. The Northern Cheyenne Reservation is located on the northwest flank of the PRB in Montana with a total land of 445,000 acres. The Reservation consists of five districts, Lame Deer, Busby, Ashland, Birney, and Muddy Cluster and has a population of 4,470 according to the 2000 Census. The CBM resource represents a significant potential asset to the Northern Cheyenne Indian Tribe. Methane gas in coal beds is trapped by hydrodynamic pressure. Because the production of CBM involves the dewatering of coalbed to allow the release of methane gas from the coal matrix, the relatively large volume of the co-produced water and its potential environmental impacts are the primary concerns for the Tribe. Presented in this report is a study conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology (MBMG) in partnership with the Northern Cheyenne Tribe to assess the Tribe’s CBM resources and evaluate applicable water handling options. The project was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the Native American Initiative of the National Petroleum Technology Office, under contract DEAC07- 99ID13727. Matching funds were granted by the MBMG in supporting the work of geologic study and mapping conducted at MBMG.

  14. MOTHERS' AND FATHERS' PRENATAL REPRESENTATIONS IN RELATION TO MARITAL DISTRESS AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlqvist-Björkroth, Sari; Korja, Riikka; Junttila, Niina; Savonlahti, Elina; Pajulo, Marjukka; Räihä, Hannele; Aromaa, Minna

    2016-07-01

    Marital distress, parental depression, and weak quality of parental representations are all known risk factors for parent-child relationships. However, the relation between marital distress, depressive symptoms, and parents' prenatal representation is uncertain, especially regarding fathers. The present study aimed to explore how mothers' and fathers' prenatal experience of marital distress and depressive symptoms affects the organization of their prenatal representations in late pregnancy. Participants were 153 pregnant couples from a Finnish follow-up study called "Steps to the Healthy Development and Well-being of Children" (H. Lagström et al., ). Marital distress (Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale; D.M. Busby, C. Christensen, D. Crane, & J. Larson, 1995) and depressive symptoms (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale) were assessed at 20 gestational weeks, and prenatal representations (Working Model of the Child Interview; D. Benoit, K.C.H. Parker, & C.H. Zeanah, 1997; C.H. Zeanah, D. Benoit, M. Barton, & L. Hirshberg, 1996) were assessed between 29 and 32 gestational weeks. The mothers' risks of distorted representations increased significantly when they had at least minor depressive symptoms. Marital distress was associated with the fathers' prenatal representations, although the association was weak; fathers within the marital distress group had less balanced representations. Coexisting marital distress and depressive symptoms were only associated with the mothers' representations; lack of marital distress and depressive symptoms increased the likelihood for mothers to have balanced representations. The results imply that marital distress and depressive symptoms are differently related to the organizations of mothers' and fathers' prenatal representations. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  15. Gaimar, Wace e gli altri autori. La traduzione alle origini della letteratura anglo-normanna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Lecco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available L’articolo traccia un breve profilo del passaggio dall’impiego della lingua latina ed anglo-sassone presso le corti dei re Normanni d’Inghilterra alla lingua anglo-normanna per la stesura di opere dapprima storiche, poi propriamente letterarie. L’uso del volgare, che si avvia con Geffrei Gaimar intorno al 1140, viene mediato dalla traduzione dei testi che egli fa traendo la propria materia dalle opere degli storiografi attivi nel decennio precedente (Guillaume de Malmesbury e Geoffrey de Monmouth ma anche l’Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Da latino a volgare, e da volgare (anglo-sassone e gallese a volgare, la letteratura anglo-normanna, attraverso l’incrocio e la traduzione da più lingue, viene definendo un corpus di tradizioni e di testi davvero cospicuo nell’età medievale europea. Dalla tradizione anglo-normanna, tuttavia, una letteratura ulteriore viene ad avviarsi, quella middle-english, che riprende l’english poco praticato in età normanna, pronto a risorgere come lingua non solo popolare ma anche letteraria, benché attraverso la ripresa, con un ulteriore processo di traduzione, di temi e testi anglo-normanni. This article briefly outlines the passage from the use of Latin and Anglo-Saxon to the Anglo-Norman language for writing first historical, then also literary works, at the court of the Norman kings of England. The vernacular was first used for literary creation by Geffrei Gaimar (around 1140, who took inspiration from and translated part of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and other works of historiographers active in the previous decade (Guillaume de Malmesbury and Geoffrey de Monmouth. The corpus of texts and traditions of Anglo-Norman literature – which is rather conspicuous when compared to others of medieval European literature – generated from intersections and translations of several languages: mainly Latin, Anglo-Saxon and Welsh. The Anglo-Norman literary tradition would, in its turn, pave the way for a new

  16. Malcolm Lowry en el ocaso del imperio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair María Anaya Ferreira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo propone una lectura de Bajo el volcán, de Malcolm Lowry, centrada en la importancia de la historia moderna y la presencia del Imperio Británico en la narración del último día de Geoffrey Firmin. Siguiendo la noción de una “lectura contrapuntística” de los textos canónicos ingleses formulada por Edward Said, planteo que al haber nacido en la India, el Cónsul (británico no logra tener un sentido de pertenencia a la Gran Bretaña, sino que se encuentra en una situación intersticial y liminal que anticipa la ruptura entre una identidad imperial y una identidad nacional, una de las problemáticas mayores abordadas en los estudios teóricos actuales sobre la identidad (especialmente en los estudios poscoloniales. Desde esta perspectiva, el énfasis en situación imperial permite una lectura que rompe con las interpretaciones de México como un “paraíso infernal” que ha perpetuado el estereotipo de nuestro país incluso en estudios críticos sobre el novelista. The purpose of this article is to offer a reading of Malcolm Lowry’s Under the Volcano focused on the importance of modern history and the presence of the British Empire in the narration of the last day of Geoffrey Firmin. Following Edward Said’s notion of a “contrapuntal reading” of canonical texts, my view is that being an Anglo-Indian, the (British Consul lacks a sense of belonging in regard to a British identity. He lives, therefore, both in a interstitial and a liminar situation which anticipates the breaking up between a sense of national identity and a sense of imperial identity, which constitutes, in fact, one of the main subjects in contemporary theoretical studies about identity (especially in Postcolonial Studies. From this point of view, the current interpretation breaks with a very common reading of the novel in which Mexico is just seen as an “infernal paradise”, an image which has perpetuated a degrading stereotype of the country

  17. The Upper- to Middle-Crustal Section of the Alisitos Oceanic Arc, (Baja, Mexico): an Analog of the Izu-Bonin-Marianas (IBM) Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medynski, S.; Busby, C.; DeBari, S. M.; Morris, R.; Andrews, G. D.; Brown, S. R.; Schmitt, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    differentiated from a single mantle source, so any older crust that was remelted had the same compositional characteristics. This is similar to previous conclusion that the different parts of the Izu arc have retained their distinct compositions over the last 15 Myr2. 1Busby et al., 2006 JVGR 149, 1-46 2 Hochstaedter et al., 2000 JGR 105, 495-512

  18. 40Ar/39Ar dating and zircon chronochemistry for the Izu-Bonin rear arc, IODP site U1437

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, A. K.; Konrad, K.; Andrews, G. D.; Horie, K.; Brown, S. R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Busby, C.; Tamura, Y.

    2016-12-01

    that integrated chronochemistry is essential for achieving accurate age models in oceanic drilling. Reference: Andrews, G. D., Schmitt, A. K., Busby, C. J., Brown, S. R., Blum, P., & Harvey, J. (2016). Age and compositional data of zircon from sepiolite drilling mud to identify contamination of ocean drilling samples. G3. doi: 10.1002/2016GC006397.

  19. Very Low Dose Fetal Exposure to Chernobyl Contamination Resulted in Increases in Infant Leukemia in Europe and Raises Questions about Current Radiation Risk Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Busby

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Following contamination from the Chernobyl accident in April 1986 excess infant leukemia (0–1 y was reported from five different countries, Scotland, Greece, Germany, Belarus and Wales and Scotland combined. The cumulative absorbed doses to the fetus, as conventionally assessed, varied from 0.02 mSv in the UK through 0.06 mSv in Germany, 0.2 mSv in Greece and 2 mSv in Belarus, where it was highest. Nevertheless, the effect was real and given the specificity of the cohort raised questions about the safety of applying the current radiation risk model of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP to these internal exposures, a matter which was discussed in 2000 by Busby and Cato [7,8] and also in the reports of the UK Committee examining Radiation Risk from Internal Emitters. Data on infant leukemia in the United Kingdom, chosen on the basis of the cohorts defined by the study of Greece were supplied by the UK Childhood Cancer Research Group. This has enabled a study of leukemia in the combined infant population of 15,466,845 born in the UK, Greece, and Germany between 1980 and 1990. Results show a statistically significant excess risk RR = 1.43 (95% CI 1.13 < RR < 1.80 (2-tailed; p = 0.0025 in those born during the defined peak exposure period of 01/07/86 to 31/12/87 compared with those born between 01/01/80 and 31/12/85 and 01/01/88 and 31/12/90. The excess risks in individual countries do not increase monotonically with the conventionally calculated doses, the relation being biphasic, increasing sharply at low doses and falling at high doses. This result is discussed in relation to fetal/cell death at higher doses and also to induction of DNA repair. Since the cohort is chosen specifically on the basis of exposure to internal radionuclides, the result can be expressed as evidence for a significant error in the conventional modeling for such internal fetal exposures.

  20. 3D Numerical Rift Modeling with Application to the East African Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glerum, A.; Brune, S.; Naliboff, J.

    2017-12-01

    Sedimentary Basins: Recent Advances, Wiley, C. Busby and A. Azor (Eds.). Heister et al. (2017). Geophys. J. Int., 210, 833-851. Huismans, R. S. and Beaumont, C. (2003). J. Geophys. Res., 108, B10, 2496. Kronbichler et al. (2012). Geophys. J. Int., 191, 12-29. Pasyanos et al. (2014). J. of Geophys. Res., 119, 3, 2153-2173.

  1. The future of naval ocean science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John A.; Brink, Kenneth

    The Ocean Studies Board (OSB) of the National Research Council reviewed the changing role of basic ocean science research in the Navy at a recent board meeting. The OSB was joined by Gerald Cann, assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development, and acquisition; Geoffrey Chesbrough, oceanographer of the Navy; Arthur Bisson, deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for antisubmarine warfare; Robert Winokur, technical director of the Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy; Bruce Robinson, director of the new science directorate at the Office of Naval Research (ONR); and Paul Gaffney, commanding officer of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The past 2-3 years have brought great changes to the Navy's mission with the dissolution of the former Soviet Union and challenges presented by conflicts in newly independent states and developing nations. The new mission was recently enunciated in a white paper, “From the Sea: A New Direction for the Naval Service,” which is signed by the secretary of the Navy, the chief of naval operations, and the commandant of the Marine Corps. It departs from previous plans by proposing a heavier emphasis on amphibious operations and makes few statements about the traditional Navy mission of sea-lane control.

  2. HÁBITOS Y HABITUS EN LA TRANSFORMACIÓN CULTURAL: ESTUDIO DE UNA ORGANIZACIÓN DEL SECTOR ENERGÉTICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAIMER HIGUITA LÓPEZ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Con base en el trabajo empírico desarrollado en una organización del sector energético y en las nociones de hábito en Geoffrey Hodgson y de habitus en Pierre Bourdieu, el presente artículo parte de la pregunta: ¿cuál es el rol que juegan los habitus de los trabajadores en la formación de hábitos que reflejan una transformación de la cultura organizacional? En esa dirección, se discute la afinidad entre los habitus de los trabajadores y la gestión cultural, como factor que potencia las disposiciones de estos y que contribuye con la formación de hábitos. Asimismo se trazan algunos elementos que participan en la configuración de hábitos que se constituyen en rasgos culturales en la organización.

  3. A Population Approach to Transportation Planning: Reducing Exposure to Motor-Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fuller

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transportation planning and public health have important historical roots. To address common challenges, including road traffic fatalities, integration of theories and methods from both disciplines is required. This paper presents an overview of Geoffrey Rose's strategy of preventive medicine applied to road traffic fatalities. One of the basic principles of Rose's strategy is that a large number of people exposed to a small risk can generate more cases than a small number exposed to a high risk. Thus, interventions should address the large number of people exposed to the fundamental causes of diseases. Exposure to moving vehicles could be considered a fundamental cause of road traffic deaths and injuries. A global reduction in the amount of kilometers driven would result in a reduction of the likelihood of collisions for all road users. Public health and transportation research must critically appraise their practice and engage in informed dialogue with the objective of improving mobility and productivity while simultaneously reducing the public health burden of road deaths and injuries.

  4. Did the ancient Egyptians migrate to ancient Nigeria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jock M. Agai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Literatures concerning the history of West African peoples published from 1900 to 1970 debate�the possible migrations of the Egyptians into West Africa. Writers like Samuel Johnson and�Lucas Olumide believe that the ancient Egyptians penetrated through ancient Nigeria but Leo�Frobenius and Geoffrey Parrinder frowned at this opinion. Using the works of these early�20th century writers of West African history together with a Yoruba legend which teaches�about the origin of their earliest ancestor(s, this researcher investigates the theories that the�ancient Egyptians had contact with the ancient Nigerians and particularly with the Yorubas.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: There is an existing ideology�amongst the Yorubas and other writers of Yoruba history that the original ancestors of�the Yorubas originated in ancient Egypt hence there was migration between Egypt and�Yorubaland. This researcher contends that even if there was migration between Egypt and�Nigeria, such migration did not take place during the predynastic and dynastic period as�speculated by some scholars. The subject is open for further research.

  5. 60 YEARS OF NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY: Celebrating the brain's other output-input system and the monograph that defined neuroendocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coen, Clive W

    2015-08-01

    The brain's unimaginably complex operations are expressed in just two types of output: muscle activity and hormone release. These are the means by which the brain acts beyond its bony casing. Muscle-mediated actions (such as speaking, writing, pupillary reflexes) send signals to the outside world that may convey thoughts, emotions or evidence of neurological disorder. The outputs of the brain as a hormone secreting gland are usually less evident. Their discovery required several paradigm shifts in our understanding of anatomy. The first occurred in 1655. Exactly 300 years later, Geoffrey Harris' monograph Neural control of the pituitary gland launched the scientific discipline that is now known as neuroendocrinology. His hypotheses have stood the test of time to a remarkable degree. A key part of his vision concerned the two-way 'interplay between the central nervous system and endocrine glands'. Over the past 60 years, the importance of this reciprocity and the degree to which cerebral functions are influenced by the endocrine environment have become increasingly clear. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  6. Assessing cultural validity in standardized tests in stem education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassant, Lunes

    This quantitative ex post facto study examined how race and gender, as elements of culture, influence the development of common misconceptions among STEM students. Primary data came from a standardized test: the Digital Logic Concept Inventory (DLCI) developed by Drs. Geoffrey L. Herman, Michael C. Louis, and Craig Zilles from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The sample consisted of a cohort of 82 STEM students recruited from three universities in Northern Louisiana. Microsoft Excel and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) were used for data computation. Two key concepts, several sub concepts, and 19 misconceptions were tested through 11 items in the DLCI. Statistical analyses based on both the Classical Test Theory (Spearman, 1904) and the Item Response Theory (Lord, 1952) yielded similar results: some misconceptions in the DLCI can reliably be predicted by the Race or the Gender of the test taker. The research is significant because it has shown that some misconceptions in a STEM discipline attracted students with similar ethnic backgrounds differently; thus, leading to the existence of some cultural bias in the standardized test. Therefore the study encourages further research in cultural validity in standardized tests. With culturally valid tests, it will be possible to increase the effectiveness of targeted teaching and learning strategies for STEM students from diverse ethnic backgrounds. To some extent, this dissertation has contributed to understanding, better, the gap between high enrollment rates and low graduation rates among African American students and also among other minority students in STEM disciplines.

  7. Joseph Clover and the cobra: a tale of snake envenomation and attempted resuscitation with bellows in London, 1852.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, C

    2010-07-01

    The Industrial Revolution saw the creation of many new jobs, but probably none more curious than that of zookeeper. The London Zoological Gardens, established for members in 1828, was opened to the general public in 1847. In 1852 the "Head Keeper in the Serpent Room", Edward Horatio Girling, spent a night farewelling a friend departing for Australia. He arrived at work in an inebriated state and was bitten on the face by a cobra that he was handling in a less than sensible manner. He was taken by cab to University College Hospital where he was resuscitated by a number of doctors, including Joseph Clover then the resident medical officer to the hospital and later to become the leading anaesthetist in London. Clover recorded this event in his diary along with the resuscitation method used. The patient eventually died but his treatment created a flurry of correspondence in the medical and lay press. Interestingly, the attempted resuscitation was with bellows, which had been abandoned by the Royal Humane Society twenty years earlier Clover records other cases of resuscitation with bellows at University College Hospital during his time as a resident medical officer there (1848 to 1853). There is a casebook belonging to Joseph Clover in the Geoffrey Kaye Museum, in Melbourne. This story is one of the many interesting stories uncovered during a study of this book and Clover's other personal papers.

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury: At the Crossroads of Neuropathology and Common Metabolic Endocrinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Building on the seminal work by Geoffrey Harris in the 1970s, the neuroendocrinology field, having undergone spectacular growth, has endeavored to understand the mechanisms of hormonal connectivity between the brain and the rest of the body. Given the fundamental role of the brain in the orchestration of endocrine processes through interactions among neurohormones, it is thus not surprising that the structural and/or functional alterations following traumatic brain injury (TBI can lead to endocrine changes affecting the whole organism. Taking into account that systemic hormones also act on the brain, modifying its structure and biochemistry, and can acutely and chronically affect several neurophysiological endpoints, the question is to what extent preexisting endocrine dysfunction may set the stage for an adverse outcome after TBI. In this review, we provide an overview of some aspects of three common metabolic endocrinopathies, e.g., diabetes mellitus, obesity, and thyroid dysfunction, and how these could be triggered by TBI. In addition, we discuss how the complex endocrine networks are woven into the responses to sudden changes after TBI, as well as some of the potential mechanisms that, separately or synergistically, can influence outcomes after TBI.

  9. Transaction Analysis of Interactions at the Reference Desk of a Small Academic Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Empey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As discussions continue about the changing nature of reference service in academic libraries, the Geoffrey R. Weller Library determined that more detailed information on what was happening at the Reference Desk was needed. During the 2006/07 academic year, transactions at the Reference Desk were analyzed to determine when they occurred (both during the week and during the academic year, the length of time the transactions took, the categories of the transactions, what sources were used and whether or not instruction was provided as part of the transaction. Another round of data was gathered in September 2009 to determine if use patterns had changed. Transactions at the Reference Desk were generally conducted in person, took either <1 min. or between 1-5 min. to answer, and occurred most often on Mon-Thurs between 11am-5pm. Between September 2006 and September 2009, specific title and research categories of questions decreased by 6% and directional and technical help categories of questions increased by 9%. There was also a decrease in the level of instruction being given. As a result of this research, service hours have been reduced and the on-going data collection at the Reference Desk has become more detailed to allow for ongoing analysis.

  10. Management strategies for fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Marshall KF

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Kim Francis Le Marshall, Geoffrey Owen LittlejohnDepartments of Rheumatology and Medicine, Monash Medical Centre and Monash University, Victoria, AustraliaDate of preparation: 14 June 2011Clinical question: What are the effective, evidence-based strategies available for the management of fibromyalgia?Conclusion: There are a number of management strategies available with robust evidence to support their use in clinical practice.Definition: Fibromyalgia is a complex pain syndrome characterized by widespread, chronic muscular pain and tenderness, disordered sleep, emotional distress, cognitive disturbance, and fatigue. Its prevalence is estimated to be 3%–5% in the population and higher yet in patients with comorbid rheumatic diseases.Level of evidence: Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials (RCTs.Search sources: PubMed, Cochrane Library, manual searchConsumer summary: Key messages for patients and clinicians are:1. There are many effective pharmacological management strategies available for fibromyalgia.2. A nonpharmacological, multicomponent approach utilizing education, aerobic exercise, psychological therapy, and other strategies is also effective for fibromyalgia.3. Despite the significant and, at times, disabling physical and psychological symptoms, fibromyalgia can be a manageable condition with a potentially good outcome.Keywords: fibromyalgia, pain, treatment, management, evidence 

  11. Citation metrics of excellence in sports biomechanics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Duane

    2017-11-13

    This study extended research on key citation metrics of winners of two career scholar awards in sports biomechanics. Google Scholar (GS) was searched using Harzing's Publish or Perish software for the 13 most recent winners of the ISBS Geoffrey Dyson Award and the ASB Jim Hay Memorial Award. Returned records were corrected for author, and publications excluded for all but peer-reviewed journal articles, proceedings articles, chapters and books in English. These recent award winners had published about 150 publications that had been cited typically 4,082 and 6,648 times over a 26- and 28-year period before receiving these career awards for sports biomechanics research. Estimated median citations at time of their awards were 2,927 and 4,907 for the Dyson and Hay awards, respectively. Award winners had mean Hirsh indexes of 32-45 and mean h i of 19-28. Their mean g indexes (59-84) and their numerous citation classics (C > 100) indicated that they had many influential publications. The citation metrics of these scholars were outstanding and consistent with recent studies of top scholars in biomechanics and kinesiology/exercise science. Careful searching, cleaning and interpretation of several scholar-level citation metrics may provide useful confirmatory evidence for evaluations of awards committees.

  12. Closeout for U.S. Department of Energy Final Technical Report for University of Arizona grant DOE Award Number DE-FG03-95ER40906 From 1 February 1995 to 31 January 2004 Grant title: Theory and Phenomenology of Strong and Weak High Energy Physics (Task A) and Experimental Elementary Particle Physics (Task B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherfoord, John; Toussaint, Doug; Sarcevic, Ina

    2005-03-03

    The following pages describe the high energy physics program at the University of Arizona which was funded by DOE grant DE-FG03-95ER40906, for the period 1 February 1995 to 31 January 2004. In this report, emphasis was placed on more recent accomplishments. This grant was divided into two tasks, a theory task (Task A) and an experimental task (Task B but called Task C early in the grant period) with separate budgets. Faculty supported by this grant, for at least part of this period, include, for the theory task, Adrian Patrascioiu (now deceased), Ina Sarcevic, and Douglas Toussaint., and, for the experimental task, Elliott Cheu, Geoffrey Forden, Kenneth Johns, John Rutherfoord, Michael Shupe, and Erich Varnes. Grant monitors from the Germantown DOE office, overseeing our grant, changed over the years. Dr. Marvin Gettner covered the first years and then he retired from the DOE. Dr. Patrick Rapp worked with us for just a few years and then left for a position at the University of Puerto Rico. Dr. Kathleen Turner took his place and continues as our grant monitor. The next section of this report covers the activities of the theory task (Task A) and the last section the activities of the experimental task (Task B).

  13. Blood transfusion at the time of the First World War--practice and promise at the birth of transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, F; Roberts, D J

    2014-12-01

    The centenary of the start of the First World War has stirred considerable interest in the political, social, military and human factors of the time and how they interacted to produce and sustain the material and human destruction in the 4 years of the war and beyond. Medical practice may appear distant and static and perhaps seems to have been somewhat ineffectual in the face of so much trauma and in the light of the enormous advances in medicine and surgery over the last century. However, this is an illusion of time and of course medical, surgical and psychiatric knowledge and procedures were developing rapidly at the time and the war years accelerated implementation of many important advances. Transfusion practice lay at the heart of resuscitation, and although direct transfusion from donor to recipient was still used, Geoffrey Keynes from Britain, Oswald Robertson from America and his namesake Lawrence Bruce Robertson from Canada, developed methods for indirect transfusion from donor to recipient by storing blood in bottles and also blood-banking that laid the foundation of modern transfusion medicine. This review explores the historical setting behind the development of blood transfusion up to the start of the First World War and on how they progressed during the war and afterwards. A fresh look may renew interest in how a novel medical speciality responded to the needs of war and of post-war society. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  14. Telling Lives in Science: Essays on Scientific Biography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman, Peter

    1997-01-01

    This collection of ten essays by historians of science, several of them biographers, is concerned with the role of scientific biography in forming conceptions of science and scientists. The essays include studies of the biographies of individual scientists, assessments of the aims and style of scientific portraits in different historical contexts, examinations of changing biographical interpretations of scientists, and much discussion of the methodological issues involved in the writing of scientific biographies. Many historians consider biography to be an ambiguous genre, its appeal based on nostalgia rather than history, with a focus on personality rather than historical context, but the biographer can reply that scientific biography reveals the practice of science at its most fundamental level. Indeed, scientific biography has provided a powerful medium in which public conceptions of science have been established. Einstein observed that 'the essential being of a man of my type lies in what he thinks and how he thinks', and his Autobiographical Notes suppress personality in favour of physics. But the biographer may see matters differently, and wish to integrate the public and the private life of the scientist. In their substantial introduction the editors discuss these and other problems, and the book is directed to the professional concerns of historians of science. While there is little here on the history of physics, Geoffrey Cantor's essay on public images of Faraday as constructed in popular biographies, a discussion of conflicting portraits of Faraday as romantic genius or hard-working slogger, may interest readers of this journal. (book review)

  15. Crossing the chasm marketing and selling disruptive products to mainstream customers

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Geoffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    The bible for bringing cutting-edge products to larger markets—now revised and updated with new insights into the realities of high-tech marketing In Crossing the Chasm, Geoffrey A. Moore shows that in the Technology Adoption Life Cycle—which begins with innovators and moves to early adopters, early majority, late majority, and laggards—there is a vast chasm between the early adopters and the early majority. While early adopters are willing to sacrifice for the advantage of being first, the early majority waits until they know that the technology actually offers improvements in productivity. The challenge for innovators and marketers is to narrow this chasm and ultimately accelerate adoption across every segment. This third edition brings Moore's classic work up to date with dozens of new examples of successes and failures, new strategies for marketing in the digital world, and Moore's most current insights and findings. He also includes two new appendices, the first connecting the ideas in Crossing t...

  16. Artists and the mind in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey eKoetsch

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2008, Lesley University Professors Geoffrey Koetsch and Ellen Schön conducted an informal survey of New England artists to ascertain the degree to which recent work in neuroscience had impacted the visual arts. The two curators mounted an exhibition (MINDmatters May-June, 2008 at the Laconia Gallery in Boston in which they showcased the work of artists who had chosen mental processes as their primary subject. These artists were reacting to the new vision of the mind revealed by science; their inquiry was subjective, sensory, and existential, not empirical. They approached consciousness from several vantage points. Some of the artists had had personal experience with pathologies of the brain such as dementia or cancer and were puzzling out the phenomenon consuming the mind of a loved one. They looked to neuroscience for clarity and understanding. Some artists were personally involved with new techniques of cognitive psychotherapy. Others were inspired by the sheer physical beauty of the brain as revealed by new imaging technologies. Two of the artists explored the links between meditation, mindfulness practice and neuroscience. Issues such as the boundary and binding problems were approached, as well as the challenge of creating visual metaphors for neural processes. One artist visualized the increasing transparency of the body as researchers introduce more and more invasive technologies.

  17. Artists and the mind in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koetsch, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, Lesley University Professors Geoffrey Koetsch and Ellen Schön conducted an informal survey of New England artists to ascertain the degree to which recent work in neuroscience had impacted the visual arts. The two curators mounted an exhibition (MINDmatters May-June, 2008) at the Laconia Gallery in Boston in which they showcased the work of artists who had chosen mental processes as their primary subject. These artists were reacting to the new vision of the mind revealed by science; their inquiry was subjective, sensory, and existential, not empirical. They approached consciousness from several vantage points. Some of the artists had had personal experience with pathologies of the brain such as dementia or cancer and were puzzling out the phenomenon consuming the mind of a loved one. They looked to neuroscience for clarity and understanding. Some artists were personally involved with new techniques of cognitive psychotherapy. Others were inspired by the sheer physical beauty of the brain as revealed by new imaging technologies. Two of the artists explored the links between meditation, mindfulness practice and neuroscience. Issues such as the "boundary" and "binding" problems were approached, as well as the challenge of creating visual metaphors for neural processes. One artist visualized the increasing transparency of the body as researchers introduce more and more invasive technologies.

  18. NEGATION AFFIXES IN ENGLISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedy Subandowo -

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This research entitled "Negation Affixes in English". This study is aimed to describe the various negation affixes in English, morphological process, morphophonemic and meaning. The research data were taken from various sources of English grammar book, morphology, research journal and the book which relatees to the research. English grammar books used in this study are written by Otto Jesperson, Marcella Frank, Greenbaum and Geoffrey Leech.  The method used in this research is the descriptive-qualitative method. While the data collection techniques are performed by using jot-down method. And the results of analysis are presented in tabular form and descriptive method. The result of the research shows that English has six types of negative affixes which are categorized by the intensity of its appearance, such as dis-, in-, non-, un-, anti- and -less. Based on the function, negation affixes are divided into several categories such as adjectives, nouns, verbs, and adverbs. The morphophonemic affix in- has four allomorphs, they are in-, im-, il- and ir- . While the analysis revealed that negation affixes have some basic meanings, such as ‘not’, ‘without’, and ‘anti’.

  19. Narratives of Arab Anglophone Women and the Articulation of a Major Discourse in a Minor Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarnou Dalal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available “It is important to stress that a variety of positions with respect to feminism, nation, religion and identity are to be found in Anglophone Arab women’s writings. This being the case, it is doubtful whether, in discussing this literary production, much mileage is to be extracted from over emphasis of the notion of its being a conduit of ‘Third World subaltern women.’” (Nash 35 Building on Geoffrey Nash’s statement and reflecting on Deleuze and Guattari’s conceptualization of minor literature and Gloria Anzaldua’s Borderland(s, we will discuss in this paper how the writings of Arab Anglophone women are specific minor and borderland narratives within minor literature(s through a tentative (relocalization of Arab women’s English literature into distinct and various categories. By referring to various bestselling English works produced by Arab British and Arab American women authors, our aim is to establish a new taxonomy that may fit the specificity of these works

  20. Closeout for U.S. Department of Energy Final Technical Report for University of Arizona grant DOE Award Number DE-FG03-95ER40906 From 1 February 1995 to 31 January 2004 Grant title: Theory and Phenomenology of Strong and Weak High Energy Physics (Task A) and Experimental Elementary Particle Physics (Task B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherfoord, John; Toussaint, Doug; Sarcevic, Ina

    2005-01-01

    The following pages describe the high energy physics program at the University of Arizona which was funded by DOE grant DE-FG03-95ER40906, for the period 1 February 1995 to 31 January 2004. In this report, emphasis was placed on more recent accomplishments. This grant was divided into two tasks, a theory task (Task A) and an experimental task (Task B but called Task C early in the grant period) with separate budgets. Faculty supported by this grant, for at least part of this period, include, for the theory task, Adrian Patrascioiu (now deceased), Ina Sarcevic, and Douglas Toussaint., and, for the experimental task, Elliott Cheu, Geoffrey Forden, Kenneth Johns, John Rutherfoord, Michael Shupe, and Erich Varnes. Grant monitors from the Germantown DOE office, overseeing our grant, changed over the years. Dr. Marvin Gettner covered the first years and then he retired from the DOE. Dr. Patrick Rapp worked with us for just a few years and then left for a position at the University of Puerto Rico. Dr. Kathleen Turner took his place and continues as our grant monitor. The next section of this report covers the activities of the theory task (Task A) and the last section the activities of the experimental task (Task B)

  1. Stable isotope stratigraphy and larger benthic foraminiferal extinctions in the Melinau Limestone, Sarawak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Laura J.; Pearson, Paul N.; Renema, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Important long-ranging groups of larger benthic foraminifera (LBF) are known to have become extinct during a period of global cooling and climate disruption at the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT) but the precise timing and mechanisms are uncertain. Recent study showed unexpectedly that the LBF extinction in Tanzania occurs very close to the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, as recognised by the extinction of the planktonic foraminiferal Family Hantkeninidae, rather than at the later period of maximum global ice growth and sea-level fall, as previously thought. Here we investigate the same phase of extinction in the Melinau Limestone of Sarawak, on the island of Borneo, Malaysia one of the most complete carbonate successions spanning the Eocene to Lower Miocene. Assemblages of LBF from the Melinau Limestone were studied extensively by Geoffrey Adams during the 1960s-80s, confirming a major extinction during the EOT, but the section lacked independent means of correlation. By analysing rock samples originally studied by Adams and now in the Natural History Museum, London, we provide new bulk stable isotope (δ13C and δ18O) records. This enables us to identify, albeit tentatively, the level of maximum stable isotope excursion and show that the LBF extinction event in the Melinau Limestone occurs below this isotope excursion, supporting the results from Tanzania and indicating that the extinction of LBF close to the Eocene/Oligocene boundary may be a global phenomenon.

  2. 60 YEARS OF NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY: MEMOIR: Harris' neuroendocrine revolution: of portal vessels and self-priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, George

    2015-08-01

    Geoffrey Harris, while still a medical student at Cambridge, was the first researcher (1937) to provide experimental proof for the then tentative view that the anterior pituitary gland was controlled by the CNS. The elegant studies carried out by Harris in the 1940s and early 1950s, alone and in collaboration with John Green and Dora Jacobsohn, established that this control was mediated by a neurohumoral mechanism that involved the transport by hypophysial portal vessel blood of chemical substances from the hypothalamus to the anterior pituitary gland. The neurohumoral control of anterior pituitary secretion was proved by the isolation and characterisation of the 'chemical substances' (mainly neuropeptides) and the finding that these substances were released into hypophysial portal blood in a manner consistent with their physiological functions. The new discipline of neuroendocrinology - the way that the brain controls endocrine glands and vice versa - revolutionised the treatment of endocrine disorders such as growth and pubertal abnormalities, infertility and hormone-dependent tumours, and it underpins our understanding of the sexual differentiation of the brain and key aspects of behaviour and mental disorder. Neuroendocrine principles are illustrated in this Thematic Review by way of Harris' major interest: hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal control. Attention is focussed on the measurement of GnRH in hypophysial portal blood and the role played by the self-priming effect of GnRH in promoting the onset of puberty and enabling the oestrogen-induced surge or pulses of GnRH to trigger the ovulatory gonadotrophin surge in humans and other spontaneously ovulating mammals. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. Telling Lives in Science: Essays on Scientific Biography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, Peter

    1997-09-01

    This collection of ten essays by historians of science, several of them biographers, is concerned with the role of scientific biography in forming conceptions of science and scientists. The essays include studies of the biographies of individual scientists, assessments of the aims and style of scientific portraits in different historical contexts, examinations of changing biographical interpretations of scientists, and much discussion of the methodological issues involved in the writing of scientific biographies. Many historians consider biography to be an ambiguous genre, its appeal based on nostalgia rather than history, with a focus on personality rather than historical context, but the biographer can reply that scientific biography reveals the practice of science at its most fundamental level. Indeed, scientific biography has provided a powerful medium in which public conceptions of science have been established. Einstein observed that 'the essential being of a man of my type lies in what he thinks and how he thinks', and his Autobiographical Notes suppress personality in favour of physics. But the biographer may see matters differently, and wish to integrate the public and the private life of the scientist. In their substantial introduction the editors discuss these and other problems, and the book is directed to the professional concerns of historians of science. While there is little here on the history of physics, Geoffrey Cantor's essay on public images of Faraday as constructed in popular biographies, a discussion of conflicting portraits of Faraday as romantic genius or hard-working slogger, may interest readers of this journal. (book review)

  4. Books Noted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Edward J.

    1999-09-01

    Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Change Guy P. Brasseur, John J. Orlando, and Geoffrey S. Tyndall, Eds. Oxford University Press: New York, 1999. xviii + 654 pp. ISBN 0-19-510521-4. 70.00. Advances in Supramolecular Chemistry, Vol. 5 George W. Gokel, Ed. JAI Press: Stamford, CT, 1999. ix + 654 pp. ISBN 1-7623-0447-2. 109.50. Advances in Cycloaddition, Vol. 5 Michael Harmata, Ed. JAI Press: Stamford, CT, 1999. ix + 172 pp. ISBN 0-7623-0346-8. 109.50. Characterization of Powders and Aerosols Brian H. Kaye. Wiley-VCH: New York, 1999. xi + 312 pp. ISBN 3-527-28853-8. 205.00. Chemometrics M. Otto. Wiley-VCH: New York, 1999. xvi + 314 pp. ISBN 3-527-29628-x. 69.95. Flow Measurement Methods and Applications Jim E. Hardy, Jim O. Hylton, Tim E. McKnight, C. J. Remenyik, and Frances R. Ruppel. Wiley-Interscience: New York, 1999. ix + 254 pp. ISBN 0-471-24509-7. 79.95. Tailored Polymeric Materials for Controlled Delivery Systems Iain McCulloch and Shalaby W. Shalaby, Eds. ACS Symposium Series 709. Oxford University Press: New York, 1998. xi + 324 pp. ISBN 0-8412-3585-6. 115.00. Chemistry, 7th Edition Karen C. Timberlake. Addison Wesley Longman: Menlo Park, CA, 1999. xxviii + 740 pp. ISBN 0-321-03767-7. 72.19. General Chemistry, 2nd Edition John W. Hill and Ralph H. Petrucci. Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River, NJ. 1999. xxvi + 1088 pp + appendix and index. ISBN 0-13-010318-7. $97.00.

  5. Pykrete is the frozen composite material of the World War II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kovalev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the war, government of the allies considered the construction of ice structures converted from artificial icebergs into aircraft carriers. The idea to use ice for construction of floating aerodromes, or giant aircraft carriers, was launched by Geoffrey Pyke, and then was developed in a project called «Habbakuk». Aircraft carriers, made of ice, had to work for a long period of time at temperatures of water and air, resulting in rapid destruction of the structure of ordinary ice. The ice in its pure form is unsuitable for any engineering form therefore the experiments on reinforcement of ice were undertaken. New form of ice engineering was based on the type of reinforcement patterns of ice and coating it with an insulating material, which would greatly reduce the influence of melting due to the temperature of the ambient air. After tests with different substances and proportions, it was found that the mixture of ice with wood pulp, amounting to about 14%, gives the best result of reinforcement. Proposed dimensions of «Habbakuk» were 610 m (2000 ft long, 90 m (300 feet in width and a height of 60 m (200 ft. In 1943, on the surface of the lake Patricia a reduced model to test the viability of the project was constructed. Development of improved long-range aviation, the airbase in Iceland and other technological advances contributed to the successful elimination of the threat from submarines, so the project had been suspended. The technology of strong ice structures invented during the World War II time can still have practical applications today.

  6. Impact abroad of the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant: March-September 1979. Prepared for the Subcommittee on Energy, Nuclear Proliferation and Federal Services of the Committee on Governmental Affairs, United States Senate by the Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    On March 28, 1979, an accident occurred in a nuclear power plant at Three Mile Island, near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. It caused widespread fears of catastrophe and raised doubts as to the adequacy of what some nuclear utilities and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission have done to assure safe operation of nuclear power plants. Now, some ten months after the accident, its effects on Federal regulation and upon the public's attitude toward nuclear power are still evolving. The final effects remain hidden in the future. They can be expected to have an impact on the development of nuclear power in the United States and also abroad. The accident at Three Mile island has been investigated and analyzed exhaustively by the NRC, by the nuclear industry, by a Presidential commission (the Kemeny Commission), and by two committees of Congress. Some of these studies are still in progress. Many foreign governments sent teams to analyze and report on the accident and reactions to it. Because the future of nuclear power abroad seems likely to bear imprint of the accident, and because of the inescapable interconnection between nuclear power in the United States and in other countries, Senator John Glenn's Subcommittee on Energy, Nu-Proliferation and Federal Services of the Senate Committee on Government Affairs, asked the Congressional Research Service (CRS) to arrange for reviews of the impacts abroad. The CRS contracted for this review with two well-situated analysts. One is Geoffrey Greenhalgh, an Englishman who has had a long association with the nuclear power industry in Europe and is a support of it. The other is Walter C. Patterson, who is one of the leading articulate critics of nuclear power and has long been associated with Friends of the Earth, in London

  7. Role of the domestic dog as a reservoir host of Leishmania donovani in eastern Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schallig Henk DFH

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study aims to determine the role of domestic dogs in transmission of visceral leishmaniasis in eastern Sudan. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 10 villages along the River Rahad in eastern Sudan to elucidate the role of domestic dogs (Canis familiaris, Linnaeus, 1758 as a reservoir host of Leishmania donovani. In this study, 87 dogs were screened for infection by Leishmania donovani. Blood and lymph node samples were taken from 87 and 33 dogs respectively and subsequently screened by the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR and Direct Agglutination Test (DAT test. Additional lymph node smears were processed for microscopy and parasite culture. Host preference of the visceral leishmaniasis (VL vector in the area, Phlebotomus orientalis, and other sandflies for the Nile rat (Arvicanthis niloticus, É. Geoffrey, 1803, the genet (Genetta genetta, Linnaeus, 1758, the mongoose (Herpeistes ichneumon, Linnaeus, 1758, and the domestic dog were determined by counting numbers of sand flies attracted to CDC traps that were baited by these animals. Results DAT on blood samples detected anti-Leishmania antibodies in 6 samples (6.9%. Two out of 87 (2.3% blood samples tested were PCR positive, giving an amplification product of 560 bp. The two positive samples by PCR were also positive by DAT. However, none of the 33 lymph nodes aspirates were Leishmania positive when screened by microscopy, culture and genus-specific PCR. The dog-baited trap significantly attracted the highest number of P. orientalis and sand fly species (P Conclusion It is concluded that the results obtained from host attraction studies indicate that dog is more attractive for P. orientalis than Egyptian mongoose, common genet and Nile rat.

  8. Is it real? Can we win? Is it worth doing? Managing risk and reward in an innovation portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, George S

    2007-12-01

    Minor innovations make up most of a company's development portfolio, on average, but they never generate the growth companies seek. The solution, says Day--the Geoffrey T. Boisi Professor of Marketing and a codirector of the Mack Center for Technological Innovation at Wharton--is for companies to undertake a systematic, disciplined review of their innovation portfolios and increase the number of major innovations at an acceptable level of risk. Two tools can help them do this. The first, called the risk matrix, graphically reveals the distribution of risk across a company's entire innovation portfolio. The matrix allows companies to estimate each project's probability of success or failure, based on how big a stretch it is for the firm to undertake. The less familiar the product or technology and the intended market, the higher the risk. The second tool, dubbed the R-W-W (real-win-worth it) screen, allows companies to evaluate the risks and potential of individual projects by answering six fundamental questions about each one: Is the market real? Explores customers' needs, their willingness to buy, and the size of the potential market. Is the product real? Looks at the feasibility of producing the innovation. Can the product be competitive? and Can our company be competitive? Investigate how well suited the company's resources and management are to compete in the marketplace with the product. Will the product be profitable at an acceptable risk? Explores the financial analysis needed to assess an innovation's commercial viability. Last, Does launching the product make strategic sense? examines the project's fit with company strategy and whether management supports it.

  9. Naqoyqatsi entre liberdade e necessidade: uma análise temática e modal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Migliore

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A proposta deste artigo refere-se à análise de conteúdo do filme documental Nagoyqatsi (2002, na qual inevitavelmente, é preciso abordar também questões estéticas peculiares da linguagem cinematográfica, com ênfase em noções e conceitos próprios da teoria do documentário. Algumas questões norteadoras podem auxiliar neste ofício, entre as quais: o quê o realizador Geoffrey Reggio quer comunicar com esta obra não-ficcional? Qual o tema do filme? Quais os subtemas? Qual a relação entre as partes? Qual a relação entre a música de Philip Glass e as imagens? E principalmente, qual conceito subjacente ocupa uma posição central para o entendimento deste que pode ser considerado um poema audiovisual? E ainda, qual a justificativa quanto ao uso constante de computação gráfica e efeitos especiais? Qual sua relação com a temática do filme? Nestes termos, é útil começar com uma reflexão sobre o título, que em língua Hopi significa “a vida como uma guerra” e por meio das questões acima, procura-se entender qual o conflito aqui considerado, sendo que é nele que encontra-se a chave para a compreensão desta obra monumental, a qual de fato é muito mais do que um amontoado de imagens temperadas com efeitos digitais.

  10. Acesso ao cuidado na Estratégia Saúde da Família: equilíbrio entre demanda espontânea e prevenção/promoção da saúde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Henrique Norman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo propõe algumas diretrizes para a organização do trabalho na Atenção Primária à Saúde (APS e na Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF, relacionadas aos desafios de prover acesso e equilibrar no cotidiano dos serviços ações de prevenção de agravos e promoção da saúde com o cuidado ao adoecimento. Primeiramente, apresenta algumas ideias específicas sobre a importância do acesso para a qualidade dos serviços de saúde, seguidas de uma crítica sintética - fundamentada nos conceitos de Geoffrey Rose - à estratégia preventiva de alto risco, que tem tido alto impacto na organização das rotinas assistenciais. A seguir, contextualiza a promoção da saúde relacionada ao cuidado individual na APS/ESF, discutindo o potencial sinérgico do cuidado e da promoção da saúde, em suas dimensões individuais e coletivas, para transcender o modelo biomédico/mecanicista. Finalmente, apoiado nos tópicos anteriores, no que tange aos seus desdobramentos operacionais e utilizando um exemplo concreto, propõe algumas diretrizes para a organização do trabalho e das agendas de médicos e enfermeiros da ESF, de modo a viabilizar equilíbrio e sinergia entre acesso ao cuidado e prevenção/promoção, com vistas ao fortalecimento da ESF como coordenadora local do cuidado e principal porta de entrada do Sistema Único de Saúde.

  11. Comparison of cumulative dissipated energy between the Infiniti and Centurion phacoemulsification systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen M

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ming Chen,1 Erik Anderson,2 Geoffrey Hill,3 John J Chen,4 Thomas Patrianakos2 1Department of Surgery, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, 2Department of Ophthalmology, John H Stroger, Jr Hospital of Cook County, Chicago, IL, 3Department of Ophthalmology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, 4Biostatistics Core, John A Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA Purpose: To compare cumulative dissipated energy between two phacoemulsification machines. Setting: An ambulatory surgical center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. Design: Retrospective chart review. Methods: A total of 2,077 consecutive cases of cataract extraction by phacoemulsification performed by five surgeons from November 2012 to November 2014 were included in the study; 1,021 consecutive cases were performed using the Infiniti Vision System, followed by 1,056 consecutive cases performed using the Centurion Vision System. Results: The Centurion phacoemulsification system required less energy to remove a cataractous lens with an adjusted average energy reduction of 38% (5.09 percent-seconds (P<0.001 across all surgeons in comparison to the Infiniti phacoemulsification system. The reduction in cumulative dissipated energy was statistically significant for each surgeon, with a range of 29%–45% (2.25–12.54 percent-seconds (P=0.005–<0.001. Cumulative dissipated energy for both the Infiniti and Centurion systems varied directly with patient age, increasing an average of 2.38 percent-seconds/10 years. Conclusion: The Centurion phacoemulsification system required less energy to remove a cataractous lens in comparison to the Infiniti phacoemulsification system. Keywords: phacoemulsification, cumulative dissipated energy, Centurion Vision System, Infiniti Vision System

  12. Placebo effect of an inert gel on experimentally induced leg muscle pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G Hopker

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available James G Hopker1, Abigail J Foad2, Christopher J Beedie2, Damian A Coleman2, Geoffrey Leach11Centre for Sports Studies, University of Kent, Chatham, Kent, UK; 2Department of Sports Science, Tourism and Leisure, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent, UKPurpose: This study examined the therapeutic effects of an inert placebo gel on experimentally induced muscle pain in a sports therapy setting. It aimed to investigate the degree to which conditioned analgesia, coupled with an expectation of intervention, was a factor in subsequent analgesia.Methods: Participants were sixteen male and eight female sports therapy students at a UK University. With institutional ethics board approval and following informed consent procedures, each was exposed to pain stimulus in the lower leg in five conditions, ie, conditioning, prebaseline, experimental (two placebo gel applications, and postbaseline. In conditioning trials, participants identified a level of pain stimulus equivalent to a perceived pain rating of 6/10. An inert placebo gel was then applied to the site with the explicit instruction that it was an analgesic. Participants were re-exposed to the pain stimulus, the level of which, without their knowledge, had been decreased, creating the impression of an analgesic effect resulting from the gel. In experimental conditions, the placebo gel was applied and the level of pain stimulus required to elicit a pain rating of 6/10 recorded.Results: Following application of the placebo gel, the level of pain stimulus required to elicit a pain rating of 6/10 increased by 8.2%. Application of the placebo gel significantly decreased participant’s perceptions of muscle pain (P = 0.001.Conclusion: Subjects’ experience and expectation of pain reduction may be major factors in the therapeutic process. These factors should be considered in the sports therapeutic environment.Keywords: conditioning, expectation, perception, positive belief, sports therapy

  13. Who speaks for extinct nations? The Beothuk and narrative voice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Leggo

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available The Beothuk of Newfoundland were among the first inhabitants of North America to encounter European explorers and settlers. By the first part of the nineteenth century the Beothuk were extinct, exterminated by the fishers and soldiers and settlers of western Europe. The last Beothuk was a woman named Shanadithit. She was captured and lived with white settlers for a few years before she died in 1829. Today all that remains of the Beothuk nation, which once numbered seven hundred to one thousand people, are some bones, arrowheads, tools, written records of explorers and settlers, and copies of drawings by Shanadithit in the Newfoundland Museum. In recent years several writers (all are white and male have written fiction and poetry and drama about the Beothuk, including Peter Such (Riverrun, 1973, Paul O'Neill (Legends of a Lost Tribe, 1976, Sid Stephen (Beothuk Poems, 1976, Al Pittman ("Shanadithit," 1978, Geoffrey Ursell (The Running of the Deer; A Play, 1981, Donald Gale (Sooshewan: A Child of the Beothuk, 1988, and Kevin Major (Blood Red Ochre, 1990. A recurring theme in all these narratives is the theme of regret and guilt. These narrative accounts of the Beothuk raise significant questions about voice and narrative, including: Who can speak for Native peoples? Who can speak for extinct peoples? Are there peoples without voices? How is voice historically determined? What is the relationship between voice and power? How are the effects of voice generated? What is an authentic voice? How is voice related to the illusion of presence? What is the relation between voice and silence? In examining contemporary narrative accounts of the Beothuk my goal is to reveal the rhetorical ways in which the Beothuk are given voice(s and to interrogate the ethical and pedagogical implications of contemporary authors revisiting and revisioning and re-voicing a nation of people long extinct.

  14. Ó Chéitinn go Conradh: Rising the Revivalists to 1916

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uí Chollatáin, Regina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Was the Gaelic League the ‘breeding ground’ for the IRB? Was the Irish language the Language of the Revolution? These parting words from the O’Rahilly (Ua Rathghaille border on absurd black humour but like so many other Gaelic Leaguers their journey to the Rising, which will be reviewed in this paper was anything but humorous. This title reflects the long heritage from which the Gaelic League and Language Movement emerged, emanating from Geoffrey Keating’s (Seathrún Céitinn seventeenth century comprehensive history of Ireland, Foras Feasa ar Éirinn (c.1634 and resulting in a language and literary revival in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It was in the spirit of this heritage that the Keating Branch of the Gaelic League was founded in Dublin by Seán Ó Ceallaigh in 1901, following on the inspiration of Father Peter Yorke’s rising speech entitled ‘The Turning of the Tide’ in 1899. The Branch title links the Gaelic League with this strong scholarly heritage but the Keating Branch would also take on another role in the run up to the Easter Rising in 1916, as it became known as a recruiting ground for Volunteers and IRB. However after the Rising the Gaelic League and Language Movement renewed the focus on Irish heritage and culture taking a new role in Irish society, forming the basis for a new Irish identity in twentieth century Ireland. This approach acknowledged the need for action linking the work of Keating with a new approach to literary practice and processes.

  15. Art as an indicator of male fitness: does prenatal testosterone influence artistic ability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocchiola, Danae

    2014-05-28

    In his groundbreaking research, Geoffrey Miller (1999) suggests that artistic and creative displays are male-predominant behaviors and can be considered to be the result of an evolutionary advantage. The outcomes of several surveys conducted on jazz and rock musicians, contemporary painters, English writers (Miller, 1999), and scientists (Kanazawa, 2000) seem to be consistent with the Millerian hypothesis, showing a predominance of men carrying out these activities, with an output peak corresponding to the most fertile male period and a progressive decline in late maturity. One way to evaluate the sex-related hypothesis of artistic and cultural displays, considered as sexual indicators of male fitness, is to focus on sexually dimorphic traits. One of them, within our species, is the 2nd to 4th digit length (2D:4D), which is a marker for prenatal testosterone levels. This study combines the Millerian theories on sexual dimorphism in cultural displays with the digit ratio, using it as an indicator of androgen exposure in utero. If androgenic levels are positively correlated with artistic exhibition, both female and male artists should show low 2D:4D ratios. In this experiment we tested the association between 2D:4D and artistic ability by comparing the digit ratios of 50 artists (25 men and 25 women) to the digit ratios of 50 non-artists (25 men and 25 women). Both male and female artists had significantly lower 2D:4D ratios (indicating high testosterone) than male and female controls. These results support the hypothesis that art may represent a sexually selected, typically masculine behavior that advertises the carrier's good genes within a courtship context.

  16. The Florey turns 50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghlan, John P

    2014-06-01

    The origins of the Howard Florey Laboratories of Experimental Physiology, Department of Physiology, The University of Melbourne, are tied to the ground-breaking clinical work of Derek A Denton in 1947 and to the investigations of the initial scientific team into the control of salt and water balance in health and disease over the period 1947-1963 were Professor RD Wright, Drs JR Goding, IR McDonald, John P Coghlan, E Marelyn Wintour and John R Blair-West. An Act of Parliament in 1971 by the Victorian State Government formally established the Institute named after Howard Florey, the Australian Nobel Prize winner who isolated penicillin. The Howard Florey Laboratories/Institute quickly became an international leader in the scientific areas of the physiological control of body fluids and electrolyte balance, especially sodium regulation and the regulation of the secretion of aldosterone, the adrenal salt-retaining hormone; the micro measurement of hormones, in particular steroids and peptides; instinctive ingestive behaviour; fetal fluid regulation; hybridization histochemistry, and the hormone relaxin. Subsequently, the senior staff included, inter alia, Bruce Scoggins, Richard Weisinger, John McDougall, Brian Oldfield, Michael McKinley, Robin McAllen, Hugh Niall, Geoff Tregear and Felix Beck. During the 1990s, an explosion occurred in neuroscience and, in 1997, the Board made the strategic decision to change the focus of the Institute to brain disorders. From 1997 to 2007, Fred Mendelsohn steered the Florey to become one of Australia's premier brain research institutes and, under the current director (the eminent clinician and neuroscientist Geoffrey Donnan), this reputation has been further enhanced. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Book reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redactie KITLV

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Andrea Acri, Helen Creese, and Arlo Griffiths (eds, From Laṅkā Eastwards: The Rāmāyaṇa in the literature and visual arts of Indonesia (Dick van der Meij Michael Arthur Aung-Thwin and Kenneth R. Hall (eds, New perspectives on the history and historiography of Southeast Asia: Continuing explorations (David Henley Steven Farram, A short-lived enthusiasm: The Australian consulate in Portuguese Timor (Hans Hägerdal R. Michael Feener, Patrick Daly and Anthony Reid (eds, Mapping the Acehnese past (William Bradley Horton Geoffrey C. Gunn, History without borders: The making of an Asian world region, 1000-1800 (Craig A. Lockard Andrew Hardy, Mauro Cucarzi and Patrizia Zolese, (eds, Champa and the archaeology of Mỹ Sơn (Vietnam (William A. Southworth Jac. Hoogerbrugge, Asmat: Arts, crafts and people; A photographic diary, 1969-1974 (Karen Jacobs Felicia Katz-Harris, Inside the puppet box: A performance of wayang kulit at the Museum of international folk art (Sadiah Boonstra Douglas Lewis, The Stranger-Kings of Sikka (Keng We Koh Jennifer Lindsay and Maya H.T. Liem (eds, Heirs to world culture: Being Indonesian 1950-1965 (Manneke Budiman Trần Kỳ Phương and Bruce M. Lockhart, The Cham of Vietnam: History, society and art (Arlo Griffiths Krishna Sen and David T. Hill (eds, Politics and the media in twenty-first century Indonesia: Decade of democracy (E.P. Wieringa Andrew N. Weintraub (ed., Islam and popular culture in Indonesia and Malaysia (Andy Fuller Meredith L. Weiss, Student activism in Malaysia: Crucible, mirror, sideshow (Richard Baxstrom Widjojo Nitisastro, The Indonesian development experience: A collection of writings and speeches of Widjojo Nitisastro (J. Thomas Lindblad

  18. The characteristics of the winegrowing and wine–production in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Kudová

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on characteristic of winegrowing and wine-production in New Zealand, country, which together with Australia, Chile, Argentina, California, and South Africa belongs to the countries of the so-called New World, and these countries become very important producers of wine in the world. Thus, they become a part of the competitive environment in winegrowing and wine-production of the Czech Republic. One of the necessary premises for determination of the competitive position is a detailed analysis of competition. This was also dealt with by Černíková, Žufan (2004, Duda (2004, Hrabalová (2004, Kudová (2005, Lišková (2004, Tomšík, Chládková (2005. Winegrowing regions of New Zealand are located in the areas of higher average temperature than the European regions. This climate suits mostly for blue grapes. The beginning of winegrowing is connected with the name of a Scot James Busby, who produced the first wine in 1836. In the middle of the 19th century, two winegrowing regions were known worldwide – Auckland, and Hawkes Bay. Currently, there are 14 winegrowing regions with the area of 18.112 ha of fertile vineyards, and in 2006 the area of fertile vineyards should grow by 15% (to 20.877 ha. The area with the largest area of vineyards is Marlbourough (8.194 ha, where there are 275 growers of vine being processed by 84 wine-producers. The total number of wine producers in New Zealand in 2004 was 471, only four of them producing more than 2 mil. l (the biggest company is Montana.The harvest in 2004 was 162.100 tons of grapes, in New Zealand, which means 123% growth in comparison with 1995. The highest growth of harvested grapes was in the region of Hawkes Bay – by 181%. Wine production is changing from year to year, but for the 2004 a growth is expected due to the volume of harvested grapes. The exports of New Zealand’s wine have grown almost 3.5-times in the period of 1995–2003 in terms of its volume, and

  19. Slides with no attached paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warin, Dominique; Wallenius, Janne; Ouzounian, Gerald; Wikberg, Peter; Todd, Terry A.; Kormilitsyn, Mikhael V.; Osipenko, Alexander G.; Mayorshin, A.A.; McLachlan, Fiona; Nash, Ken L.; Nilsson, M.; Grimes, T.; Braley, J.C.; TAKESHITA, Kenji; Babain, Vasiliy A.; Spendlikova, I.; Distler, P.; John, J.; Sebesta, F.; VU, Trong-Hung; SIMONIN, Jean-Pierre; PAULENOVA, Alena; PRECEK, Martin; HARTIG, Kyle; KNAPP, Nathan; Vidick, Geoffrey; Bouslimani, Nouri; Desreux, Jean F.; Lewis, F.W.; Hudson, M.J.; Harwood, L.M.; Nunez, Ana; Nagarajan, K.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.; Raj, Baldev; Ignatiev, Victor; Surenkov, Alexander; Pouchon, Manuel A.; Skarnemark, Gunnar; Allard, Stefan; Ekberg, Christian; Retegan, Teodora; Nordlund, Anders; John, Jan; Maershin, Alexander; Zakirov, R.; Panov, A.; Toropov, Andrey

    2010-01-01

    This document brings together the different presentations (slides) given at the workshop but with no attached paper. These slides refer to the following presentations: - Presentation of ITN (Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear); - Minor Actinide Partitioning (Dominique Warin); - Transmutation (Janne Wallenius); - Radioactive Waste Management, IGD-TP (Gerald Ouzounian); - Present status of the Swedish nuclear waste management programme (Peter Wikberg); - The U.S. Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program - Separations Research and Development (Terry Todd); - Strategies and national programs of closed fuel cycles - Russian Expert Vision (Mikhael Kormilitsyn) - Extraction Studies Of Potential Solvent Formulations For The GANEX Process (Fiona MacLachlan); - Investigations of The Fundamental Chemistry of the TALSPEAK Process (Ken Nash); - Extraction Separation of Trivalent Minor Actinides and Lanthanides by Hexa-dentate Nitrogen-donor Extractant, TPEN, and its Analogs (Kenji Takeshita); - Fluorinated Diluents for HLW Processing - technological point of view (Vasiliy Babain); - Extraction properties of some new pyridine molecules and search for better diluents (Irena Spendlikova); - Kinetics of extraction of Eu 3+ ion by TODGA and CyMe 4 -BTBP studied using the RMC technique (Trong Hung Vu); - Redox Chemistry of Neptunium in Solutions of Nitric Acid (Alena Paulenova); - NMR applied to actinide ions and their complexes. In search of covalency effects (Geoffrey Vidick); - Towards 'Stability Rules' for Radiolysis of bis-DGA compounds (Ana Nunez); - Pyroprocess Research Activities at IGCAR, Kalpakkam, India (K. Nagarajan); - Critical issues of nuclear energy systems employing molten salt fluorides: from ISTC No. 1606 to No. 3749 (1. year of project activity) and MARS/EVOL cooperation (Victor Ignatiev); - Conversion processes: Internal Gelation and the Sphere-pac concept (Manuel Pouchon); - A Combined Nuclear Technology and Nuclear Chemistry Master. A Unique

  20. The burden of family caregiving in the United States: work productivity, health care resource utilization, and mental health among employed adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopps M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Markay Hopps, Laura Iadeluca, Margaret McDonald, Geoffrey T MakinsonPfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA Background: Family caregiving is an increasingly important component of care for patients and the elderly. Objective: The aim of this study is to characterize the burden of family caregiving among employed adults. Methods: Employed adults (≥18 years from the 2013 US National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS were classified as family caregivers if they reported currently caring for at least one adult relative. Chi-square tests and one-way analyses of variance assessed whether employed caregivers, weighted to the US population, differed from employed non-caregivers on behavioral characteristics, workplace productivity, and health care resource utilization. Results: Eight million workers were family caregivers in the United States, more often female than male (51% vs. 49%, P < 0.05, and 53% were between 40 and 64 years of age. Eighteen percent of caregivers were Hispanic compared with 15% of non-caregivers (P < 0.05. Similar behavioral characteristics between caregivers and non-caregivers included daily alcohol consumption (6% vs. 5% and lack of vigorous exercise (25% vs. 29%, but caregivers had a higher prevalence of smoking (26% vs. 19%, P < 0.05. Caregivers reported a higher mean percentage of work time missed (8% vs. 4%, P < 0.05 and greater productivity impairment (24% vs. 14%, P < 0.05. Some form of depression was reported by 53% of caregivers compared with 32% of non-caregivers (P < 0.05, and more caregivers had self-reported insomnia than non-caregivers (46% vs. 37%, P < 0.05. The number of self-reported diagnosed comorbidities was higher among caregivers compared with that of non-caregivers (5.0 vs. 3.1, P < 0.05, as was the mean number of outpatient visits in the previous 6 months (4.1 vs. 2.7, P < 0.05. Conclusion: Family caregiving is associated with a multidimensional burden that impacts caregivers and has implications for

  1. Tailored lighting intervention improves measures of sleep, depression, and agitation in persons with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia living in long-term care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiro MG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mariana G Figueiro,1 Barbara A Plitnick,1 Anna Lok,1 Geoffrey E Jones,1 Patricia Higgins,2,3 Thomas R Hornick,3,4 Mark S Rea1 1Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA; 2School of Nursing, 3School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 4Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USABackground: Light therapy has shown great promise as a nonpharmacological method to improve symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD, with preliminary studies demonstrating that appropriately timed light exposure can improve nighttime sleep efficiency, reduce nocturnal wandering, and alleviate evening agitation. Since the human circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue light, lower, more targeted lighting interventions for therapeutic purposes, can be used. Methods: The present study investigated the effectiveness of a tailored lighting intervention for individuals with ADRD living in nursing homes. Low-level “bluish-white” lighting designed to deliver high circadian stimulation during the daytime was installed in 14 nursing home resident rooms for a period of 4 weeks. Light–dark and rest–activity patterns were collected using a Daysimeter. Sleep time and sleep efficiency measures were obtained using the rest–activity data. Measures of sleep quality, depression, and agitation were collected using standardized questionnaires, at baseline, at the end of the 4-week lighting intervention, and 4 weeks after the lighting intervention was removed. Results: The lighting intervention significantly (P<0.05 decreased global sleep scores from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and increased total sleep time and sleep efficiency. The lighting intervention also increased phasor magnitude, a measure of the 24-hour resonance between light–dark and rest–activity patterns, suggesting an increase

  2. Quantum Theory and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Ted

    2009-07-01

    List of participants; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. The function of the colloquium - editorial; 2. The conceptual problem of quantum theory from the experimentalist's point of view O. R. Frisch; Part II. Niels Bohr and Complementarity: The Place of the Classical Language: 3. The Copenhagen interpretation C. F. von Weizsäcker; 4. On Bohr's views concerning the quantum theory D. Bohm; Part III. The Measurement Problem: 5. Quantal observation in statistical interpretation H. J. Groenewold; 6. Macroscopic physics, quantum mechanics and quantum theory of measurement G. M. Prosperi; 7. Comment on the Daneri-Loinger-Prosperi quantum theory of measurement Jeffrey Bub; 8. The phenomenology of observation and explanation in quantum theory J. H. M. Whiteman; 9. Measurement theory and complex systems M. A. Garstens; Part IV. New Directions within Quantum Theory: What does the Quantum Theoretical Formalism Really Tell Us?: 10. On the role of hidden variables in the fundamental structure of physics D. Bohm; 11. Beyond what? Discussion: space-time order within existing quantum theory C. W. Kilmister; 12. Definability and measurability in quantum theory Yakir Aharonov and Aage Petersen; 13. The bootstrap idea and the foundations of quantum theory Geoffrey F. Chew; Part V. A Fresh Start?: 14. Angular momentum: an approach to combinatorial space-time Roger Penrose; 15. A note on discreteness, phase space and cohomology theory B. J. Hiley; 16. Cohomology of observations R. H. Atkin; 17. The origin of half-integral spin in a discrete physical space Ted Bastin; Part VI. Philosophical Papers: 18. The unity of physics C. F. von Weizsäcker; 19. A philosophical obstacle to the rise of new theories in microphysics Mario Bunge; 20. The incompleteness of quantum mechanics or the emperor's missing clothes H. R. Post; 21. How does a particle get from A to B?; Ted Bastin; 22. Informational generalization of entropy in physics Jerome Rothstein; 23. Can life explain quantum mechanics? H. H

  3. The burden of selected cancers in the US: health behaviors and health care resource utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iadeluca L

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Laura Iadeluca,1 Jack Mardekian,1 Pratibha Chander,2 Markay Hopps,1 Geoffrey T Makinson1 1Pfizer Inc., 2Atrium Staffing, New York, NY, USA Objective: To characterize the disease burden among survivors of those cancers having the highest incidence in the US.Methods: Adult (≥18 years survivors of the 11 most frequently diagnosed cancers were identified from publically available data sources, including the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results 9 1973–2012, National Health Interview Survey 2013, and the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2011. Chi-square tests and one-way analyses of variance were utilized to assess differences between cancer survivors and non-cancer controls in behavioral characteristics, symptoms and functions, preventative screenings, and health care costs.Results: Hematologic malignancies, melanoma, and breast, prostate, lung, colon/rectal, bladder, kidney/renal, uterine, thyroid, and pancreatic cancers had the highest incidence rates. Breast cancer had the highest incidence among women (156.4 per 100,000 and prostate cancer among men (167.2 per 100,000. The presence of pain (P=0.0003, fatigue (P=0.0005, and sadness (P=0.0012 was consistently higher in cancer survivors 40–64 years old vs. non-cancer controls. Cancer survivors ≥65 years old had higher rates of any functional limitations (P=0.0039 and reported a lack of exercise (P<0.0001 compared with the non-cancer controls. However, obesity rates were similar between cancer survivors and non-cancer controls. Among cancer survivors, an estimated 13.5 million spent $169.4 billion a year on treatment, with the highest direct expenditures for breast cancer ($39 billion, prostate cancer ($37 billion, and hematologic malignancies ($25 billion. Prescription medications and office-based visits contributed equally as the cost drivers of direct medical spending for breast cancer, while inpatient hospitalization was the driver for prostate (52.8% and lung (38.6% cancers

  4. Development of a lauric acid/albumin hybrid iron oxide nanoparticle system with improved biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaloga J

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Jan Zaloga,1 Christina Janko,1 Johannes Nowak,2 Jasmin Matuszak,1 Sabine Knaup,1 Dietmar Eberbeck,3 Rainer Tietze,1 Harald Unterweger,1 Ralf P Friedrich,1 Stephan Duerr,1 Ralph Heimke-Brinck,4 Eva Baum,4 Iwona Cicha,1 Frank Dörje,4 Stefan Odenbach,2 Stefan Lyer,1 Geoffrey Lee,5 Christoph Alexiou1 1Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine (SEON, Else Kröner-Fresenius-Stiftung-Professorship, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany; 2Measuring and Automation Technology, Technical University Dresden, Dresden, Germany; 3Physikalisch-Technische-Bundesanstalt, Berlin, Germany; 4Pharmacy Department, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany; 5Division of Pharmaceutics, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: The promising potential of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs in various nanomedical applications has been frequently reported. However, although many different synthesis methods, coatings, and functionalization techniques have been described, not many core-shell SPION drug delivery systems are available for clinicians at the moment. Here, bovine serum albumin was adsorbed onto lauric acid-stabilized SPIONs. The agglomeration behavior, zeta potential, and their dependence on the synthesis conditions were characterized with dynamic light scattering. The existence and composition of the core-shell-matrix structure was investigated by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and zeta potential measurements. We showed that the iron oxide cores form agglomerates in the range of 80 nm. Moreover, despite their remarkably low tendency to aggregate even in a complex media like whole blood, the SPIONs still maintained their magnetic properties and were well attractable with a magnet. The magnetic properties were quantified by vibrating sample magnetometry and a superconducting quantum

  5. Pre Cold War British Spy Fiction, the “albatross of self” and lines of flight in Gravity’s Rainbow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Wishart Smith

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In his introduction to 'Slow Learner' Thomas Pynchon suggests that an influence in his short story ‘Under the Rose’ was the spy fiction he had read as a child.  What he takes from the form, he says, is an enjoyment of  “lurking, spying, false identities, psychological games.” I hope to show that this youthful reading has interesting things to tell us about Pynchon’s writing beyond ‘Under the Rose’ and in more complex ways than his quote suggests. To do this I want to focus on that perennial issue of spy fiction - the maintenance and manipulation of identity. Negotiating ideas of subjectivity is a core concern in Pynchon’s work and to consider it I want to use the four spy novelists he mentions in the 'Slow Learner' introduction - John Buchan, E. Phillips Oppenheim, Helen MacInnes and Geoffrey Household. This is a more disparate quartet of authors than Pynchon’s grouping suggests and I want to employ them to consider a variety of strategies used to ‘build character’ and the way Pynchon’s work approaches these strategies.  This allows a reflection on questions of disguise, doubles, animals and the nomad within the context of a variety of postcolonial theories and aspects of Deleuze and Guattari’s “nomadology”. 'V 'would appear an obvious place to see connections to spy fiction, but, though I touch on some aspects of this novel, my focus will be very much on 'Gravity’s Rainbow' because it has a much more concerted focus on the subject of Empire. Some intriguing echoes are to be found in the work of Pynchon in these authors and I hope to show how Pynchon’s attempts to formulate US “superimperialism” (Aijaz Ahmad are reflected in the imperial concerns of what I would term the pre-Cold War British Spy fiction that engaged Pynchon in his youth.

  6. Detrital K-feldspar thermochronology of the Nanaimo Group: Characterization of Basement and Extraregional Basin Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isava, V.; Grove, M.; Mahoney, J. B.; Kimbrough, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    The Late Cretaceous-Early Paleogene Nanaimo Group covers the contact between Triassic basement Wrangellia terrane and the Jurassic-Cretaceous Coast Plutonic Complex (CPC) in southern British Columbia. Prior detrital zircon U-Pb and Hf studies indicate a change in sediment source for the Nanaimo basin, from the primitive CPC in Santonian-Early Campanian time to an isotopically evolved continental extraregional source during the late Campanian/Maastrictian. Two notably different areas have been proposed as potential source regions: (1) the Idaho/Boulder batholith and Belt Supergroup, and (2) the Mojave/Salinia segment of structurally disrupted late Cretaceous southern California margin. Single crystal 40Ar/39Ar laser fusion of ca. 100-200 grains apiece from seven detrital K-feldspar samples from Santonian-Maastrichtian strata of the northern Nanaimo Group constrain the history of the sediments' source regions. The two oldest samples, from the K-feldspar poor Comox and Extension Fms., display a monotonic increasing distribution of cooling ages 80-125 Ma that reflects shallow erosion of the CPC. In contrast, Late Campanian strata of the Cedar District and De Courcy Fms. exhibit a more pronounced cluster of cooling ages 80-95 Ma as well as a greater proportion of Jurassic ages that represent progressively deeper erosion of the CPC. Evidence for an extraregional sediment source appears abruptly in the Geoffrey Fm. by 72 Ma, matching the time of local-to-extraregional shift indicated in detrital zircon U-Pb studies. Over 90% of the detrital K-feldspars from these arkosic sandstones yield cooling ages of 70-80 Ma, with sparse older ages associated with the CPC. Samples from the successively younger Spray and Gabriola Fms. also yield >90% K-feldspar ages younger than 80 Ma and exhibit age maxima of 68 Ma and 65 Ma, respectively. These results are distinct from detrital zircon U-Pb and K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar ages of the southern Sierra Nevada, Mojave/Salina, and northern

  7. Preparation, characterization, and optimization of primaquine-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omwoyo WN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wesley Nyaigoti Omwoyo,1,2 Bernhards Ogutu,3,4 Florence Oloo,3,5 Hulda Swai,6 Lonji Kalombo,6 Paula Melariri,6 Geoffrey Maroa Mahanga,2 Jeremiah Waweru Gathirwa3,4 1Department of Chemistry, Maasai Mara University, Narok, Kenya; 2Department of Chemistry, Jaramogi Oginga Odinga University of Science and Technology, Bondo, Kenya; 3Center for Research in Therapeutic Sciences, Strathmore University, Nairobi, Kenya; 4Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya; 5Department of Chemical Sciences and Technology, Technical University of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya; 6Department of Polymers and Composites, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, South Africa Abstract: Primaquine (PQ is one of the most widely used antimalarial drugs and is the only available drug that combats the relapsing form of malaria. PQ use in higher doses is limited by severe tissue toxicity including hematological- and gastrointestinal-related side effects. Nanoformulation of drugs in an appropriate drug carrier system has been extensively studied and shown to have the potential to improve bioavailability, thereby enhancing activity, reducing dose frequency, and subsequently reducing toxicity. The aim of this work was to design, synthesize, and characterize PQ-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs (PQ-SLNs as a potential drug-delivery system. SLNs were prepared by a modified solvent emulsification evaporation method based on a water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w double emulsion. The mean particle size, zeta potential, drug loading, and encapsulation efficiency of the PQ-SLNs were 236 nm, +23 mV, 14%, and 75%, respectively. The zeta potential of the SLNs changed dramatically, from -6.54 mV to +23.0 mV, by binding positively charged chitosan as surface modifier. A spherical morphology of PQ-SLNs was seen by scanning electron microscope. In vitro, release profile depicted a steady drug release over 72 hours. Differential scanning calorimeter thermograms demonstrated presence

  8. MO-B-BRB-02: 3D Dosimetry in the Clinic: IMRT Technique Validation in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceberg, S.

    2016-01-01

    irradiated volume can help understand interplay effects during TomoTherapy or VMAT. Titania Juang: Special techniques in the clinic and research Understand the potential for 3D dosimetry in validating dose accumulation in deformable systems, and Observe the benefits of high resolution measurements for precision therapy in SRS and in MicroSBRT for small animal irradiators Geoffrey S. Ibbott: 3D Dosimetry in end-to-end dosimetry QA Understand the potential for 3D dosimetry for end-to-end radiation therapy process validation in the in-house and external credentialing setting. Canadian Institutes of Health Research; L. Schreiner, Modus QA, London, ON, Canada; T. Juang, NIH R01CA100835

  9. MO-B-BRB-01: 3D Dosimetry in the Clinic: Background and Motivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, L.

    2016-01-01

    irradiated volume can help understand interplay effects during TomoTherapy or VMAT. Titania Juang: Special techniques in the clinic and research Understand the potential for 3D dosimetry in validating dose accumulation in deformable systems, and Observe the benefits of high resolution measurements for precision therapy in SRS and in MicroSBRT for small animal irradiators Geoffrey S. Ibbott: 3D Dosimetry in end-to-end dosimetry QA Understand the potential for 3D dosimetry for end-to-end radiation therapy process validation in the in-house and external credentialing setting. Canadian Institutes of Health Research; L. Schreiner, Modus QA, London, ON, Canada; T. Juang, NIH R01CA100835

  10. MO-B-BRB-03: 3D Dosimetry in the Clinic: Validating Special Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juang, T.

    2016-01-01

    irradiated volume can help understand interplay effects during TomoTherapy or VMAT. Titania Juang: Special techniques in the clinic and research Understand the potential for 3D dosimetry in validating dose accumulation in deformable systems, and Observe the benefits of high resolution measurements for precision therapy in SRS and in MicroSBRT for small animal irradiators Geoffrey S. Ibbott: 3D Dosimetry in end-to-end dosimetry QA Understand the potential for 3D dosimetry for end-to-end radiation therapy process validation in the in-house and external credentialing setting. Canadian Institutes of Health Research; L. Schreiner, Modus QA, London, ON, Canada; T. Juang, NIH R01CA100835

  11. MO-B-BRB-03: 3D Dosimetry in the Clinic: Validating Special Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juang, T. [Stanford Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    irradiated volume can help understand interplay effects during TomoTherapy or VMAT. Titania Juang: Special techniques in the clinic and research Understand the potential for 3D dosimetry in validating dose accumulation in deformable systems, and Observe the benefits of high resolution measurements for precision therapy in SRS and in MicroSBRT for small animal irradiators Geoffrey S. Ibbott: 3D Dosimetry in end-to-end dosimetry QA Understand the potential for 3D dosimetry for end-to-end radiation therapy process validation in the in-house and external credentialing setting. Canadian Institutes of Health Research; L. Schreiner, Modus QA, London, ON, Canada; T. Juang, NIH R01CA100835.

  12. MO-B-BRB-04: 3D Dosimetry in End-To-End Dosimetry QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibbott, G. [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    irradiated volume can help understand interplay effects during TomoTherapy or VMAT. Titania Juang: Special techniques in the clinic and research Understand the potential for 3D dosimetry in validating dose accumulation in deformable systems, and Observe the benefits of high resolution measurements for precision therapy in SRS and in MicroSBRT for small animal irradiators Geoffrey S. Ibbott: 3D Dosimetry in end-to-end dosimetry QA Understand the potential for 3D dosimetry for end-to-end radiation therapy process validation in the in-house and external credentialing setting. Canadian Institutes of Health Research; L. Schreiner, Modus QA, London, ON, Canada; T. Juang, NIH R01CA100835.

  13. MO-B-BRB-00: Three Dimensional Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    irradiated volume can help understand interplay effects during TomoTherapy or VMAT. Titania Juang: Special techniques in the clinic and research Understand the potential for 3D dosimetry in validating dose accumulation in deformable systems, and Observe the benefits of high resolution measurements for precision therapy in SRS and in MicroSBRT for small animal irradiators Geoffrey S. Ibbott: 3D Dosimetry in end-to-end dosimetry QA Understand the potential for 3D dosimetry for end-to-end radiation therapy process validation in the in-house and external credentialing setting. Canadian Institutes of Health Research; L. Schreiner, Modus QA, London, ON, Canada; T. Juang, NIH R01CA100835.

  14. MO-B-BRB-01: 3D Dosimetry in the Clinic: Background and Motivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiner, L. [Cancer Center of Southeastern Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    irradiated volume can help understand interplay effects during TomoTherapy or VMAT. Titania Juang: Special techniques in the clinic and research Understand the potential for 3D dosimetry in validating dose accumulation in deformable systems, and Observe the benefits of high resolution measurements for precision therapy in SRS and in MicroSBRT for small animal irradiators Geoffrey S. Ibbott: 3D Dosimetry in end-to-end dosimetry QA Understand the potential for 3D dosimetry for end-to-end radiation therapy process validation in the in-house and external credentialing setting. Canadian Institutes of Health Research; L. Schreiner, Modus QA, London, ON, Canada; T. Juang, NIH R01CA100835.

  15. MO-B-BRB-02: 3D Dosimetry in the Clinic: IMRT Technique Validation in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceberg, S. [Lund University (Sweden)

    2016-06-15

    irradiated volume can help understand interplay effects during TomoTherapy or VMAT. Titania Juang: Special techniques in the clinic and research Understand the potential for 3D dosimetry in validating dose accumulation in deformable systems, and Observe the benefits of high resolution measurements for precision therapy in SRS and in MicroSBRT for small animal irradiators Geoffrey S. Ibbott: 3D Dosimetry in end-to-end dosimetry QA Understand the potential for 3D dosimetry for end-to-end radiation therapy process validation in the in-house and external credentialing setting. Canadian Institutes of Health Research; L. Schreiner, Modus QA, London, ON, Canada; T. Juang, NIH R01CA100835.

  16. Linguistic Modality and Female Identity in Chaucer’s Clerk’s Tale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadnik Katarzyna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available While exploring the situated nature of conceptual knowledge, the paper investigates the linguistic construction of identity relative to the language user’s sociocultural situatedness, which is regarded as a derivative of the continuity of language and culture. In this functionally-oriented study, we examine how the situatedness of the language user affects their expression of the selves, which in the article we construe in terms of social roles performed by men and women in a specific cultural community. Importantly, we claim that, although the data are historical in nature, they nevertheless help us address the problem of the elusive nature of human identity, a theme recurring in the linguistic study of subjectivity. We seek to explore the general question of experiential motivation behind the frequency patterns of linguistic usage. We illustrate the issue by referring to the historical data taken from Geoffrey Chaucer’s Clerk’s Tale. The poet’s use of selected modal verbs is contextualized in relation to the late medieval community of his present. We account for the poet’s usage of shul, mot- (in the sense ‘must’, o(ught(e, as well as mouen ‘may’, and willen, indicating the need for a more nuanced approach to the way in which the key modal notions of NECESSITY/OBLIGATION are applied in the study of linguistic modality. We thus advocate the adoption of a situated view of the abstract concepts. Furthermore, we argue that the usage patterns concerning the frequency with which the selected modal verbs are used in specific contexts of Chaucer’s narrative might be indicative of the ways in which the identity of a community member was negotiated in the late medieval society of the poet’s present. In conclusion, we indicate the challenges to present-day pragmatic research into the linguistic construction of identity. Specifically, the emphasis is laid on how findings from recent research into situated and social cognition can

  17. Guidelines for Authors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Demir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines for Authors cumhuriyet theology journal  reguires writers to use the The Chicago Manual of Style “notes and bibliography” system of referencing.First citation: author(s first name and last name, title, (if applicable first and last name of translator or editor, place of publication, publisher, date of publication, page number.Subsequent citations: author’s last name, the short title, and the page number should be indicated in all subsequent citations. Footnote citations should conform to the following examples.References: References should be placed at the end of the text in alphabetical order. If a source has more than one author, the surname and name of the first author should be written, and the other authors should be indicated by et.al. The titles of books and journals should be italicized; article titles and book chapters should be placed in quotation marks. Translator’s and editor’s names (if there are any should follow the title of the work: BOOKa One Author: 
1. Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals (New York: Penguin, 2006, 99–100.2. Pollan, Omnivore’s Dilemma, 3.Bibliography: Pollan, Michael. The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals. New York: Penguin, 2006.  b Two Authors1. Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns, The War: An Intimate History 1941–1945 (New York: Knopf, 2007, 52.2. Ward and Burns, War, 59–61. Bibliography: Ward, Geoffrey C., and Ken Burns. The War: An Intimate History 1941–1945. New York: Knopf, 2007.c Three or More Authors
For three or more authors, list all of the authors in the bibliography; in the note, list only the first author, followed by et al. (“and others”:1. Mitchell L. Eisen, Jodi A. Quas, and Gail S. Goodman, eds., Memory and Suggestibility in the Forensic Interview (Mahwah, NJ: L. Erlbaum Assoicates, 2002, 65.2. Eisen and et al., Memory and Suggestibility in the Forensic Interview, 67.Bibliography: Eisen, Mitchell

  18. Pions to Quarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laurie Mark; Dresden, Max; Hoddeson, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    neutrino Frederick Reines; 25. Recollections on the establishment of the weak-interaction notion Bruno M. Pontecorvo; 26. Symmetry and conservation laws in particle physics in the fifties Louis Michel; 27. A connection between the strong and weak interactions Sam B. Treiman; Part VII. Weak interactions and parity nonconservation; 29. The nondiscovery of parity nonconservation Allan Franklin; 30. K-meson decays and parity violation Richard H. Dalitz; 31. An Experimentalist's Perspective Val L. Fitch; 32. The early experiments leading to the V - A interaction Valentine L. Telegdi; 33. Midcentury adventures in particles physics E. C. G. Sudarshan; Part VIII. The particle physics community; 34. The postwar political economy of high-energy physics Robert Seidel; 35. The history of CERN during the early 1950s Edoardo Amaldi; 36. Arguments pro and contra the European laboratory in the participating countries Armin Hermann; 37. Physics and excellences of the life it brings Abdus Salam; 38. Social aspects of Japanese particle physics in the 1950s Michiji Konuma; Part IX. Theories of hadrons; 39. The early S-matrix theory and its propagation (1942-1952) Helmut Rechenberg; 40. From field theory to phenomenology: the history of dispersion relations Andy Pickering; 41. Particles as S-matrix poles: hadron democracy Geoffrey F. Chew; 42. The general theory of quantised fields in the 1950s Arthur S. Wrightman; 43. The classification and structure of hadrons Yuval Ne'eman; 44. Gauge principle, vector-meson dominance and spontaneous symmetry breaking Yoichiro Nambu; Part X. Personal overviews; 45. Scientific impact of the first decade of the Rochester conferences (1950-1960) Robert E. Marshak; 46. Some reflections on the history of particle physics in the 1950s Silvan S. Schweber; 47. Progress in elementary particle theory 1950-1964 Murray Gell-Mann.

  19. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry (IC3DDose)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwaites, David; Baldock, Clive

    2013-06-01

    radiation therapy treatment through improved clinical dosimetry to investigate and understand the dosimetric challenges of modern radiation treatments to provide a forum to discuss the latest research and developments in 3D and advanced radiation dosimetry to energise and diversify dosimetry research and clinical practice by encouraging interaction and synergy between advanced, 3D and semi-3D dosimetry techniques We believe the conference program, with its excellent range of expert and specialist speakers, met these objectives. Thanks are due to all invited speakers for their participation, to the Local Organising Committee members for all their hard work in making the conference happen, particularly the small core administrative support group, and to the range of academic, organisation and commercial sponsors who generously supported the meeting. The Scientific Committee members are also thanked for reviewing the submitted manuscripts and for assisting in the editorial process. Finally, all who travelled to Sydney, Australia for the meeting are acknowledged for choosing to attend and contribute to making this a successful conference. Local Conference Organising Committee David Thwaites (Conference Convener) Clive Baldock Leanne Price Elizabeth Starkey May Whitaker Peter Greer Lois Holloway Phil Vial Robin Hill Conference Scientific Committee Sven Back (Sweden) Clive Baldock (Australia) Cheng-Shie Wuu (USA) Yves de Deene (Belgium) Simon Doran (UK) Geoffrey Ibbott (USA) Andrew Jirasek (Canada) Kevin Jordan (Canada) Martin Lepage (Canada) Mark Oldham (USA) Evangelos Pappas (Greece) John Schreiner (Canada) David Thwaites (Australia) David ThwaitesClive Baldock DirectorExecutive Dean Institute of Medical PhysicsFaculty of Science School of PhysicsMacquarie University University of SydneyNorth Ryde NSW 2006NSW 2109 AustraliaAustralia The PDF also contains the conference program.

  20. Efficacy of a Web-Based Guided Recommendation Service for a Curated List of Readily Available Mental Health and Well-Being Mobile Apps for Young People: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidargaddi, Niranjan; Musiat, Peter; Winsall, Megan; Vogl, Gillian; Blake, Victoria; Quinn, Stephen; Orlowski, Simone; Antezana, Gaston; Schrader, Geoffrey

    2017-05-12

    effect of "The Toolbox" intervention on participant well-being at 4 weeks compared with the control group (P=.66). There were also no significant differences between the intervention and control groups at 4 weeks on any of the subscales of the MHC-SF (psychological: P=.95, social: P=.42, emotional: P=.95). Repeat engagement with the study platform resulted in a significant difference in mood, energy, rest, and sleep trajectories between intervention and control groups as measured by EMAs (Pmental health and well-being apps may not lead to improvements in the well-being of a nonclinical sample of young people, but might halt a decline in mood, energy, rest, and sleep. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12614000710628; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366145 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/ 6pWDsnKme). ©Niranjan Bidargaddi, Peter Musiat, Megan Winsall, Gillian Vogl, Victoria Blake, Stephen Quinn, Simone Orlowski, Gaston Antezana, Geoffrey Schrader. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 12.05.2017.

  1. 9th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    ) LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE Geoffrey Ibbott (Chair) Dana Garrison Kayla White Hannah Lee Yvonne Roed Mitchell Carroll Sam Beddar (paper)

  2. The Virtual Care Climate Questionnaire: Development and Validation of a Questionnaire Measuring Perceived Support for Autonomy in a Virtual Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Eline Suzanne; Dima, Alexandra Lelia; Immerzeel, Stephanie Annette Maria; van den Putte, Bas; Williams, Geoffrey Colin

    2017-05-08

    and relationships with relevant concepts, and the studies presented suggest this first version of the virtual climate care questionnaire to be reasonably valid and reliable. As a result, the current version may cautiously be used in future research and practice to measure perceived support for autonomy within a virtual care climate. Future research efforts are required that focus on further investigating the virtual climate care questionnaire's divergent validity, on determining the virtual climate care questionnaire's validity and reliability when used in the context of Web-based interventions aimed at improving nonaddictive or other health behaviors, and on developing and validating a short form virtual climate care questionnaire. ©Eline Suzanne Smit, Alexandra Lelia Dima, Stephanie Annette Maria Immerzeel, Bas van den Putte, Geoffrey Colin Williams. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 08.05.2017.

  3. FINAL REPORT (MILESTONE DATE 9/30/11) FOR SUBCONTRACT NO. B594099 NUMERICAL METHODS FOR LARGE-SCALE DATA FACTORIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Sterck, H

    2011-10-18

    The following work has been performed by PI Hans De Sterck and graduate student Manda Winlaw for the required tasks 1-5 (as listed in the Statement of Work). Graduate student Manda Winlaw has visited LLNL January 31-March 11, 2011 and May 23-August 19, 2010, working with Van Henson and Mike O'Hara on non-negative matrix factorizations (NMF). She has investigated the dense subgraph clustering algorithm from 'Finding Dense Subgraphs for Sparse Undirected, Directed, and Bipartite Graphs' by Chen and Saad, testing this method on several term-document matrices and adapting it to cluster based on the rank of the subgraphs instead of the density. Manda Winlaw was awarded a first prize in the annual LLNL summer student poster competition for a poster on her NMF research. PI Hans De Sterck has developed a new adaptive algebraic multigrid algorithm for computing a few dominant or minimal singular triplets of sparse rectangular matrices. This work builds on adaptive algebraic multigrid methods that were further developed by the PI and collaborators (including Sanders and Henson) for Markov chains. The method also combines and extends existing multigrid algorithms for the symmetric eigenproblem. The PI has visited LLNL February 22-25, 2011, and has given a CASC seminar 'Algebraic Multigrid for the Singular Value Problem' on this work on February 23, 2011. During his visit, he has discussed this work and related topics with Van Henson, Geoffrey Sanders, Panayot Vassilevski, and others. He has tested the algorithm on PDE matrices and on a term-document matrix, with promising initial results. Manda Winlaw has also started to work, with O'Hara, on estimating probability distributions over undirected graph edges. The goal is to estimate probabilistic models from sets of undirected graph edges for the purpose of prediction, anomaly detection and support to supervised learning. Graduate student Manda Winlaw is writing a paper on the results obtained with

  4. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Kemp

    1993-04-01

    S, Canberra, 1988, xxiii + 370 pp., maps, tables, figures, appendices. - Anton Ploeg, Maureen A. MacKenzie, Androgenous objects: String bags and gender in central New Guinea. Chur, Switzerland, Harwood Academic Publishers, 1991, xv + 256 pp., maps, figures, bibliography, index. - Nico G. Schulte Nordholt, Jeremy Kemp, Peasants and cities; Cities and peasants; Rethinking Southeast Asian models, Overveen, ACASEA, 1990, 126 pp. - Rudiger Schumacher, Clara Brakel-Papenhuijzen, The Bedhaya court dances of central Java, Leiden/New York/Köln: Brill, 1992, xvi + 349 pp. - Corry M.I. van der Sluys, Carol Laderman, Taming the wind of desire; Psychology, medicine, and aesthetics in Malay Shamanistic performance. University of California Press, 1991, 382 pp. - J.H.F. Sollewijn Gelpke, Geoffrey Irwin, The prehistoric exploration and colonisation of the Pacific. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1992, viii + 240 pp. - R.G. Tol, Burhan Magenda, East Kalimantan; The decline of a commercial aristocracy. Ithaca, Cornell University (Cornell Modern Indonesia Project, Monograph Series (publication no. 70, 1991, viii + 113 pp., maps.

  5. An institutional approach to the history of wine in brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavalcante Carolina Miranda

    2016-01-01

    the late nineteenth century, reworked by new institutionalists like Douglass North, and continued today by authors like Geoffrey Hodgson and others. I suggest three institutional dimensions that are usually considered by the seminal authors of Institutional Economics: (i rules of the game, they are the formal and informal rules that structure human interaction; (ii mental models, consistent of ideologies, habits of thought and all the internalized rules of the game; (iii organizations, that are groups of individuals acting together with an at least temporary common purpose. The objective of this article is to tell the history of wine in Brazil and to compare the different motives for wine production in those two Brazilian regions. The question proposed in this article is: which institutional dimension was more important for the emergence of a wine industry in Serra Gaucha and São Francisco Valley? The hypothesis is that not only government policies in the São Francisco Valley were important for the emergence of a wine industry in Brazilian backcountry, but also the know-how acquired in winegrowing in Serra Gaucha. This article is divided in five parts. The first section introduces the topics proposed in the article. In the second section, the institutionalist theory will be presented, based on the idea of the three institutional dimensions. In the third section, the history of wine in the Serra Gaucha will be told. In the fourth section, the motives for a wine industry in São Francisco Valley will be presented. Finally, the fifth section concludes the article.

  6. Comparative Effectiveness of a Technology-Facilitated Depression Care Management Model in Safety-Net Primary Care Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: 6-Month Outcomes of a Large Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shinyi; Ell, Kathleen; Jin, Haomiao; Vidyanti, Irene; Chou, Chih-Ping; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Gross-Schulman, Sandra; Sklaroff, Laura Myerchin; Belson, David; Nezu, Arthur M; Hay, Joel; Wang, Chien-Ju; Scheib, Geoffrey; Di Capua, Paul; Hawkins, Caitlin; Liu, Pai; Ramirez, Magaly; Wu, Brian W; Richman, Mark; Myers, Caitlin; Agustines, Davin; Dasher, Robert; Kopelowicz, Alex; Allevato, Joseph; Roybal, Mike; Ipp, Eli; Haider, Uzma; Graham, Sharon; Mahabadi, Vahid; Guterman, Jeffrey

    2018-04-23

    .16; P value: supported care vs usual care=.02, technology-facilitated care vs usual care=.02); decreased prevalence of major depression (odds ratio, OR: supported care vs usual care=0.45, technology-facilitated care vs usual care=0.33; P value: supported care vs usual care=.02, technology-facilitated care vs usual care=.007); and reduced functional disability as measured by Sheehan Disability Scale scores (LSE: usual care=3.21, supported care=2.61, technology-facilitated care=2.59; P value: supported care vs usual care=.04, technology-facilitated care vs usual care=.03). Technology-facilitated care was significantly associated with depression remission (technology-facilitated care vs usual care: OR=2.98, P=.04); increased satisfaction with care for emotional problems among depressed patients (LSE: usual care=3.20, technology-facilitated care=3.70; P=.05); reduced total cholesterol level (LSE: usual care=176.40, technology-facilitated care=160.46; P=.01); improved satisfaction with diabetes care (LSE: usual care=4.01, technology-facilitated care=4.20; P=.05); and increased odds of taking an glycated hemoglobin test (technology-facilitated care vs usual care: OR=3.40, PSklaroff, David Belson, Arthur M Nezu, Joel Hay, Chien-Ju Wang, Geoffrey Scheib, Paul Di Capua, Caitlin Hawkins, Pai Liu, Magaly Ramirez, Brian W Wu, Mark Richman, Caitlin Myers, Davin Agustines, Robert Dasher, Alex Kopelowicz, Joseph Allevato, Mike Roybal, Eli Ipp, Uzma Haider, Sharon Graham, Vahid Mahabadi, Jeffrey Guterman. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 23.04.2018.

  7. Descriptive Metaphysics, Natural Language Metaphysics, Sapir-Whorf, and All That Stuff: Evidence from the Mass-Count Distinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Jeffry Pelletier

    2010-12-01

    Institute of Generative Linguistics. Chapter 2: “Mass and Count Properties of Nouns and Verbs”.Dölling, Johannes. 1993. ‘Commonsense Ontology and Semantics of Natural Language’. Sprachtypologie und Universalienforschung 46: 133–141.Durst, Uwe. 2003. ‘The Natural Semantic Metalanguage Approach to Linguistic Meaning’. Theoretical Linguistics 29: 157–200.http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/thli.29.3.157Goddard, Cliff. 1994. ‘Semantic Theory and Semantic Universals’. In ‘Semantic and Lexical Universals’, 7–29. Philadelphia: J. Benjamins.Goddard, Cliff. 1998. Semantic Analysis: A Practical Introduction. Oxford: Oxford UP.Goddard, Cliff. 2002. ‘The Search for the Shared Semantic Core of All Languages’. In Goddard & Wierzbicka (2002, volume 1, pp. 5–40.Goddard, Cliff. 2009. ‘A Piece of Cheese, A Grain of Sand: The Semantics of Mass Nouns and Unitizers’. In Francis Jeffry Pelletier (ed. ‘Kinds, Things and Stuff’, 132–165. New York: Oxford UP.Goddard, Cliff & Wierzbicka, Anna. 2002. Meaning and Universal Grammar: Theory and Empirical Findings, Vols 1 & 2. Philadelphia: John Benjamins.Hansen, Chad. 1976. ‘Mass Nouns and ‘A White Horse Is Not a Horse”. Philosophy East and West 26: 189–209.http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/1398188Huddleston, Rodney & Pullum, Geoffrey. 2002. The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language. Cambridge: Cambridge UP.Iwasaki, Noriko, Vinson, David & Vigliocco, Gabriella. 2010. ‘Does the Grammatical Count/Mass Distiinction Affect Semantic Representations? Evidence from Experiments in English and Japanese’. Language and Cognitive Processes 25: 189–223.http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01690960902978517Katz, Jerrold. 1981. Language and other Abstract Objects. Oxford: Blackwell.Krifka, Manfred. 1995. ‘Common Nouns: A Contrastive Analysis of English and Chinese’. In Gregory Carlson & Francis Jeffry Pelletier (eds. ‘The Generic Book’, 398–411. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Latour. 1987. Science in Action: How to

  8. XXXI LIAC Meeting on Vascular Research - Proceedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Monteiro Rodrigues et al.

    2015-12-01

    ência Keynote Speaker | Prelector Livia Visai Free Comunications | Comunicações livres Speakers | Prelectores Gabriele Corsaro Michel Spina Ricardo Moreira Keynote lecture 5 | 5ª Conferência Keynote Speaker | Prelector Antonio D'Amore 4st Session |Sessão 4 Innovation and Technology from Diagnostics to Therapeutics | Inovação e Tecnologia de Diagnóstico à Terapêutica Charmain | Moderador - Philippe Charpiot Keynote lecture 6 | 6ª Conferência Keynote Speaker | Prelector Laurent Riou Free Comunications | Comunicações livres Speakers | Prelectores Carlota Saldanha Eduardo Vilela Hugo Ferreira Keynote lecture 7 | 7ª Conferência Keynote Speaker | Prelecto Geoffrey Mitchell 12 September | 12 de Setembro 5st Session |Sessão 4 Clinical Applications | Aplicações Clínicas Charmain | Moderador - Vicenta Llorente-Cortés Free Comunications | Comunicações livres Speakers | Prelectores Antonio Leppeda Henrique Silva Diogo Fonseca Open Session ANTONIO TAMBURRO Conference 1st Session | Sessão 1 Molecular and Supramolecular Structure | Estrutura Molecular e Supramolecular Chairman / Moderador Alain Pierre Gadeau C.01 - Molecular and Supramolecular Structure of glycopeptides as scaffolds in tissue engineering (U Basilicata Speaker / Prelector Brigida Bochicchio C.02 - Domain CR9 of Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 1 (LRP1 Is Critical for Aggregated LDL-Induced Foam Cell Formation from Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (CSIC-ICCC, Barcelona Speaker / Prelector Vicenta Llorente-Cortés 1st Session | Sessão 1 Molecular and Supramolecular Structure | Estrutura Molecular e Supramolecular C.03 - Beneficial effects of physical training on the vascular dysfunction induced by intermittent hypoxia (U Grenoble - U Libanaise Speaker / Prelector Zeinab El Dirani C.04 - Protocols for studying Pelvic Venous Pathology (Hospital Rúber Internacional, Madrid Speaker / Prelector Leal Monedero 1st Session | Sessão 1 Molecular and Supramolecular Structure | Estrutura

  9. Potential Geophysical Field Transformations and Combined 3D Modelling for Estimation the Seismic Site Effects on Example of Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppelbaum, Lev; Meirova, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    , EGU2014-2424, Vienna, Austria, 1-5. Eppelbaum, L.V. and Katz, Y.I., 2014b. First Maps of Mesozoic and Cenozoic Structural-Sedimentation Floors of the Easternmost Mediterranean and their Relationship with the Deep Geophysical-Geological Zonation. Proceed. of the 19th Intern. Congress of Sedimentologists, Geneva, Switzerland, 1-3. Eppelbaum, L.V. and Katz, Yu.I., 2015a. Newly Developed Paleomagnetic Map of the Easternmost Mediterranean Unmasks Geodynamic History of this Region. Central European Jour. of Geosciences, 6, No. 4 (in Press). Eppelbaum, L.V. and Katz, Yu.I., 2015b. Application of Integrated Geological-Geophysical Analysis for Development of Paleomagnetic Maps of the Easternmost Mediterranean. In: (Eppelbaum L., Ed.), New Developments in Paleomagnetism Research, Nova Publisher, NY (in Press). Eppelbaum, L.V. and Khesin, B.E., 2004. Advanced 3-D modelling of gravity field unmasks reserves of a pyrite-polymetallic deposit: A case study from the Greater Caucasus. First Break, 22, No. 11, 53-56. Eppelbaum, L.V., Nikolaev, A.V. and Katz, Y.I., 2014. Space location of the Kiama paleomagnetic hyperzone of inverse polarity in the crust of the eastern Mediterranean. Doklady Earth Sciences (Springer), 457, No. 6, 710-714. Haase, J.S., Park, C.H., Nowack, R.L. and Hill, J.R., 2010. Probabilistic seismic hazard estimates incorporating site effects - An example from Indiana, U.S.A. Environmental and Engineering Geoscience, 16, No. 4, 369-388. Hough, S.E., Borcherdt, R. D., Friberg, P. A., Busby, R., Field, E. and Jacob, K. N., 1990. The role of sediment-induced amplification in the collapse of the Nimitz freeway. Nature, 344, 853-855. Khesin, B.E. Alexeyev, V.V. and Eppelbaum, L.V., 1996. Interpretation of Geophysical Fields in Complicated Environments. Kluwer Academic Publ., Ser.: Advanced Appr. in Geophysics, Dordrecht - London - Boston. Klokočník, J., Kostelecký, J., Eppelbaum, L. and Bezděk, A., 2014. Gravity Disturbances, the Marussi Tensor, Invariants and

  10. A more rapid approach to systematically assessing published associations of genetic polymorphisms and disease risk: type 2 diabetes as a test case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho AH

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alex H Cho1, Xiaolei Jiang2, Devin M Mann3, Kensaku Kawamoto4, Timothy J Robinson5, Nancy Wang6, Jeanette J McCarthy2, Mark Woodward7, Geoffrey S Ginsburg1,21Center for Personalized Medicine and Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, 2Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, 3Section of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, 4Department of Biomedical Informatics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 5Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA, 6School of Medicine, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 7George Institute for Global Health and University of Sydney, AustraliaBackground: Comparative effectiveness research and research in genomic medicine are not orthogonal pursuits. Both require a robust evidence base, and each stands to benefit from applying the methods of the other. There is an exponentially growing literature reporting associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and increased risk for diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Literature-based meta-analysis is an important method of assessing the validity of published gene-disease associations, but a traditional emphasis on exhaustiveness makes it difficult to study multiple polymorphisms efficiently. Here we describe a novel two-step search method for broadly yet systematically reviewing the literature to identify the "most-studied" gene-disease associations, thereby selecting those with a high possibility of replication on which to conduct abbreviated, simultaneous meta-analyses. This method was then applied to identify and evaluate the validity of SNPs reported to be associated with increased type 2 diabetes risk, to demonstrate proof of principle.Methods: A two-step MEDLINE search (1950 to present was conducted in September 2007 for published genetic association data related to SNPs associated with risk of type 2 diabetes. The

  11. Ethnicity and Power in the Soviet Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Wierzbicki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty years have passed since the dissolution of the Soviet Union. Up until the point of dissolution, the Soviet authorities and intellectual elite had attempted to build a community in order to unite all Soviet citizens in the spirit of socialist modernisation. Although it is difficult to demonstrate that ‘a Soviet nation’ was successfully created [1], the attempt to build such a nation can serve as a case study through which to examine nation-building processes for constructivists as well as modernists . In addition to socialist modernisation, the Soviet nation aimed to be identified as a state, which would make it similar to the political nations dominant in western countries. Contrary to western tradition, however, it was not a nation state that provided full rights for all its citizens, but rather a socialist state that was ‘ruled by workers and peasantry’. Nevertheless, the authorities aimed to give the Soviet nation the characteristics of a specific nation state. “It was a nation that in historical terms strived, or more accurately part of which strived, to form or proclaim a particular state” [2]. While at the time of proclaiming the USSR there was no such thing as the Soviet nation, it can be assumed that it was intended to become a constructed titular nation. The majority of national communities, even created ones, have an ethnic core. However academics cannot agree on the kind of state the USSR was, to what extent it took into account the ethnicity of its multinational population, how much it reflected the values, culture, and interests of its largest population group (i.e., the Russians or even whether it was a Russian national state despite the strong influence of Russian ideology and politics. Some Russian academics, especially those in nationalistic circles (e.g., Valerij Solovej as well as western scholars such as Terry Martin and Geoffrey Hosking stressed that Russians dominated demographically and politically

  12. Super-Sharp Radio 'Eye' Remeasuring the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    by the planet's gravity. A four-year program, started in 2007, is nearing its completion. "This study tracks stars smaller than our Sun, seeking evidence of planets the size of Jupiter or smaller," said Geoffrey Bower, of the University of California, Berkeley. "We want to learn how common it is for these low-mass stars to have planets orbiting them at relatively large distances," he added. The project uses the VLBA along with NRAO's Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia, the largest fully-steerable dish antenna in the world. Together, these telescopes can detect the faint radio emission from the stars to track their motion over time. Early results have ruled out any companions the size of brown dwarfs for three of the stars, and the astronomers are analyzing their data as the observations continue. The VLBA -- A System of Superlatives The VLBA, dedicated in 1993, uses ten, 25-meter-diameter dish antennas distributed from Hawaii to St. Croix in the Caribbean. It is operated from the NRAO's Domenici Science Operations Center in Socorro, NM. All ten antennas work together as a single telescope with the greatest resolving power available to astronomy. This unique capability has produced landmark contributions to numerous scientific fields, ranging from Earth tectonics, climate research, and spacecraft navigation to cosmology. Ongoing upgrades in electronics and computing have enhanced the VLBA's capabilities. With improvements now nearing completion, the VLBA will be as much as 5,000 times more powerful as a scientific tool than the original VLBA of 1993. "The VLBA has unmatched capabilities for making unique contributions to many fundamental areas of science. It has a proven track record of enabling transformational research and its new technical enhancements promise a rich harvest of discovery in the coming years," said NRAO Director Fred K.Y. Lo. Astronomers reported on the new measurements and ongoing projects at the American Association for the Advancement of

  13. Obituary: Ronald Cecil Stone, 1946-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monet, Alice Kay Babcock

    2006-12-01

    his Ph.D. in 1978 from Chicago, Ron held a number of research and postdoctoral positions. These included a few months at the Venezuelan National Observatory in Merida, where he helped to set up an astrometric program. This work was unfortunately cut short because of difficulties obtaining the requisite work visa. He also had a two year postdoc at Northwestern University, where he did spectroscopy of massive stars and studied various open clusters. Ron and Ellen's first child, Heather, was born on 9 June 1981 in Evanston, IL. Ron and Ellen moved to Washington, DC, in 1981, where Ron joined the staff of the U.S. Naval Observatory Transit Circle Division. Their son, Geoffrey, was born on 10 May 1983. The marriage ended in divorce in 2001. During the three years that he spent at the USNO headquarters, Ron received training in observing and data reduction with the 6-inch transit circle. When in 1984 the observatory opened the Black Birch Station in New Zealand for surveying the southern sky with the 7-inch transit circle, Ron joined the first group of astronomers to transfer. There he became involved in developing software for the 7-inch, particularly with the image dissector and the acquisition and reduction of planetary observations. Together with Ellis Holdenreid, he worked on some aspects of the real time control software for the 7-inch. He also continued to work on his earlier interest in runaway OB stars. When Ron's tour at the Black Birch Station was coming to an end, he requested a transfer to the USNO Flagstaff Station in northern Arizona. There was a transit circle at the Flagstaff Station being fitted with a CCD camera, and Ron's experience with transit circles in Washington and Black Birch made him well-qualified to help with the modernization of this instrument. Ron worked with David and Alice Monet to automate the 8-inch and develop astrometric software for reducing and analyzing its observations. This telescope came to be known as the FASTT, for Flagstaff

  14. Book Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Antlöv

    1996-04-01

    village. Canberra: Department of Anthropology, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, The Australian National University, 1995, xiv + 150 pp. - Henk Schulte Nordholt, Geoffrey Robinson, The dark side of paradise; Political violence in Bali. Ithaca/London: Cornell University Press, 1995, xxii + 341 pp. - Herman A.O. de Tollenaere, Th. Stevens, Vrijmetselarij en samenleving in Nederlands-Indië en Indonesië 1764-1962. Hilversum: Verloren, 1994, 400 pp. - Donald E. Weatherbee, Mpu Prapañca, Desawarnana (Nagarakrtagama by Mpu Prapañca, translated and edited by Stuart Robson. Leiden: KITLV Press, 1995, viii + 158 pp. [Verhandelingen 169]. - E.P. Wieringa, Jennifer Lindsay, Kraton Yogyakarta. Diterjemahkan oleh R.M. Soetanto dan T.E. Behrend. Jakarta: Yayasan Obor Indonesia, 1994, xvi + 330 pp. [Seri katalog Induk Naskah-Naskah Nusantara 2]., R.M. Soetanto, Alan Feinstein (eds. - E.P. Wieringa, Wouter Smit, De islam binnen de horizon; Een missiologische studie over de benadering van de islam door vier Nederlandse zendingscorporaties (1797-1951. Zoetermeer: Boekencentrum, 1995, xix + 312 pp. [MISSION 11].

  15. People

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    the war Hoyle returned to Cambridge, but kept in close contact with his collaborators. Fred Hoyle was a canny and media-savvy scientist, 40 years before such things were recognized. Martin Rees said after his death '[He] also had other dimensions to his career, his inventiveness and skill as a communicator'. It is hard to realize now the impact that Hoyle's broadcasts had in post-war Britain. His programmes for the BBC on The Nature of the Universe won greater audiences than such unlikely rivals as Bertrand Russell and Tommy Handley. Even today many people recall how they were affected by listening to these broadcasts. Hoyle used one of his broadcasts to ridicule the hot explosion theory. He referred to the idea of a 'big bang as fanciful'. Unfortunately the name stuck, much to Hoyle's chagrin. In the 1950s Hoyle began a fruitful collaboration with Willy Fowler of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Hoyle was interested in the origin of the chemical elements. Hans Bethe, Charles Critchfield and Karl-Frederich von Weizsäcker had calculated in 1939 how stars could turn protons into helium nuclei by nuclear fusion. Part of the Vela supernova remmant, the debris left after the type of massive explosion in which Hoyle predicted that heavy nuclei were formed. (© Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Anglo-Australian Observatory.) Building on earlier collaboration with Ed Saltpeter, Hoyle used data supplied by Geoffrey and Margaret Burbidge and, working with Fowler, began to piece together how the elements were formed. By looking at very large stars near the end of their lives and examining their chemical composition, they noticed that the abundances of elements almost exactly corresponded to those with a low nuclear capture cross section. Hoyle argued that all of the elements in our bodies had been formed in stars that had been and gone before our solar system had even formed. In their classic paper the elements are produced by three basic methods. The

  16. PREFACE: Galactic Center Workshop 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schödel, Rainer; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Muno, Michael P.; Nayakshin, Sergei; Ott, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    The Galactic Center Newsletter, who helped with their know-how from previous GC workshops. GCNEWS is a newsletter that appears several times each year with articles and news on the Galactic Center, including abstracts of recently published papers. Please see http://www.aoc.nrao.edu/~gcnews for further information. GCNEWS is a communication platform for the steadily increasing community of GC researchers and is the backbone behind the GC Workshops. We acknowledge financial support for the conference by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)Sonderforschungsbereich project number SFB 494. Finally, we would like to thank the more than 100 participants of the GC Workshop 2006 for their enthusiasm and the numerous active contributions which made this conference such a success. Rainer Schödel, Geoffrey C Bower, Michael P Muno, Sergei Nayakshin and Thomas Ott Editors The PDF file contains various photographs taken at the conference and the conference schedule.

  17. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    spin-transfer torque threshold current density in coupled vortex domain wallsS Lepadatu, A P Mihai, J S Claydon, F Maccherozzi, S S Dhesi, C J Kinane, S Langridge and C H Marrows Large RF susceptibility of transverse domain wallsO Rousseau, S Petit-Watelot and M Viret Expansion and relaxation of magnetic mirror domains in a Pt/Co/Pt/Co/Pt multilayer with antiferromagnetic interlayer couplingP J Metaxas, R L Stamps, J-P Jamet, J Ferré, V Baltz and B Rodmacq Current-induced domain wall motion and magnetization dynamics in CoFeB/Cu/Co nanostripesV Uhlíř, J Vogel, N Rougemaille, O Fruchart, Z Ishaque, V Cros, J Camarero, J C Cezar, F Sirotti and S Pizzini Roles of the magnetic field and electric current in thermally activated domain wall motion in a submicrometer magnetic strip with perpendicular magnetic anisotropySatoru Emori and Geoffrey S D Beach Electrical domain morphologies in compositionally graded ferroelectric filmsM B Okatan, A L Roytburd, V Nagarajan and S P Alpay Domain-wall pinning by local control of anisotropy in Pt/Co/Pt strips J H Franken, M Hoeijmakers, R Lavrijsen and H J M Swagten Experimental detection of domain wall propagation above the Walker field Kouta Kondou, Norikazu Ohshima, Daichi Chiba, Shinya Kasai, Kensuke Kobayashi and Teruo Ono Enhanced functionality in magnonics by domain walls and inhomogeneous spin configurationsG Duerr, R Huber and D Grundler Domain wall motion in perpendicular anisotropy nanowires with edge roughness Maximilian Albert, Matteo Franchin, Thomas Fischbacher, Guido Meier and Hans Fangohr Determination of the spin torque non-adiabaticity in perpendicularly magnetized nanowiresJ Heinen, D Hinzke, O Boulle, G Malinowski, H J M Swagten, B Koopmans, C Ulysse, G Faini, B Ocker, J Wrona and M Kläui Domain wall dynamics driven by spin transfer torque and the spin-orbit field Masamitsu Hayashi, Yoshinobu Nakatani, Shunsuke Fukami, Michihiko Yamanouchi, Seiji Mitani and Hideo Ohno Dynamic propagation and nucleation in domain

  18. Radio Astronomers Lift "Fog" on Milky Way's Dark Heart: Black Hole Fits Inside Earth's Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Thirty years after astronomers discovered the mysterious object at the exact center of our Milky Way Galaxy, an international team of scientists has finally succeeded in directly measuring the size of that object, which surrounds a black hole nearly four million times more massive than the Sun. This is the closest telescopic approach to a black hole so far and puts a major frontier of astrophysics within reach of future observations. The scientists used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope to make the breakthrough. Milky Way Nucleus The Milky Way's nucleus, as seen with the VLA. Sagittarius A* is the bright white dot at center. CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF, Jun-Hui Zhao, W.M. Goss (Click on Image for Larger Version) "This is a big step forward," said Geoffrey Bower, of the University of California-Berkeley. "This is something that people have wanted to do for 30 years," since the Galactic center object, called Sagittarius A* (pronounced "A-star"), was discovered in 1974. The astronomers reported their research in the April 1 edition of Science Express. "Now we have a size for the object, but the mystery about its exact nature still remains," Bower added. The next step, he explained, is to learn its shape, "so we can tell if it is jets, a thin disk, or a spherical cloud." The Milky Way's center, 26,000 light-years from Earth, is obscured by dust, so visible-light telescopes cannot study the object. While radio waves from the Galaxy's central region can penetrate the dust, they are scattered by turbulent charged plasma in the space along the line of sight to Earth. This scattering had frustrated earlier attempts to measure the size of the central object, just as fog blurs the glare of distant lighthouses. "After 30 years, radio telescopes finally have lifted the fog and we can see what is going on," said Heino Falcke, of the Westerbork Radio Observatory in the Netherlands, another member of the research team. The bright, radio

  19. PREFACE: XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akchurin, Nural

    2012-12-01

    The XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics, CALOR2012, was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico from 4-8 June 2012. The series of conferences on calorimetry started in 1990 at Fermilab, and they have been the premier event for calorimeter aficionados, a trend that CALOR2012 upheld. This year, several presentations focused on the status of the major calorimeter systems, especially at the LHC. Discussions on new and developing techniques in calorimetry took a full day. Excellent updates on uses of calorimeters or about ideas that are deeply rooted in particle physics calorimetry in astrophysics and neutrino physics were followed by talks on algorithms and special triggers that rely on calorimeters. Finally, discussions of promising current developments and ongoing R&D work for future calorimeters capped the conference. The field of calorimetry is alive and well, as evidenced by the more than 100 attendees and the excellent quality of over 80 presentations. You will find the written contributions in this volume. The presentations can be found at calor2012.ttu.edu. The first day of the conference was dedicated to the LHC. In two invited talks, Guillaume Unal (CERN) and Tommaso Tabarelli de Fatis (Universita' & INFN Milano Bicocca) discussed the critical role electromagnetic calorimeters play in the hunt for the Standard Model Higgs boson in ATLAS and CMS, respectively. The enhanced sensitivity for light Higgs in the two-gamma decay channel renders electromagnetic calorimeters indispensible. Much of the higher mass region was already excluded for the SM Higgs by the time of this conference, and after less than a month, on 4 July, CERN announced the discovery of a new boson at 125 GeV, a particle that seems consistent with the Higgs particle so far. Once again, without the electromagnetic calorimeters, this would not have been possible. Professor Geoffrey West from the Santa Fe Institute gave the keynote address. His talk, 'Universal Scaling Laws

  20. Obituary: Brian Marsden (1937-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gareth; Marsden, Cynthia

    2011-12-01

    Brian Geoffrey Marsden was born on 1937 August 5 in Cambridge, England. His father, Thomas, was the senior mathematics teacher at a local high school. It was his mother, Eileen (nee West), however, who introduced him to the study of astronomy, when he returned home on the Thursday during his first week in primary school in 1942 and found her sitting in the back yard watching an eclipse of the sun. Using now frowned-upon candle-smoked glass, they sat watching the changing bite out of the sun. What most impressed the budding astronomer, however, was not that the eclipse could be seen, but the fact that it had been predicted in advance, and it was the idea that one could make successful predictions of events in the sky that eventually led him to his career. When, at the age of 11, he entered the Perse School in Cambridge he was developing primitive methods for calculating the positions of the planets. He soon realized that earlier astronomers had come up with more accurate procedures for doing this over the centuries, and during the next couple of years this led to his introduction to the library of the Cambridge University Observatories and his study of how eclipses, for example, could be precisely computed. Together with a couple of other students he formed a school Astronomical Society, of which he served as the secretary. At the age of 16 he joined and began regularly attending the monthly London meetings of the British Astronomical Association. He quickly became involved with the Association's Computing Section, which was known specifically for making astronomical predictions other than those that were routinely being prepared by professional astronomers for publication in almanacs around the world. Under the watchful eyes of the director and assistant director of the Computing Section, this led him to prepare and publish predictions of the occasions when one of Jupiter's moons could be seen to pass directly in front of another. He also calculated the