WorldWideScience

Sample records for z2xz2 standard model

  1. Flavor S4xZ2 symmetry and neutrino mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang He

    2007-01-01

    We present a model of the lepton masses and flavor mixing based on the discrete group S 4 xZ 2 . In this model, all the charged leptons and neutrinos are assigned to the 3 - b arα representation of S 4 in the Yamanouchi bases. The charged lepton and neutrino masses are mainly determined by the vacuum expectation value structures of the Higgs fields. A nearly tri-bimaximal lepton flavor mixing pattern, which is in agreement with the current experimental results, can be accommodated in our model. The neutrino mass spectrum takes the nearly degenerate pattern, and thus can be well tested in the future precise experiments

  2. Z2 monopoles in the standard SU(2) lattice gauge theory model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.; Petkova, V.B.

    1979-04-01

    The standard SU(2) lattice gauge theory model without fermions may be considered as a Z 2 model with monopoles and fluctuating coupling constants. At low temperatures β -1 (= small bare coupling constant) the monopoles are confined. (orig.) [de

  3. Weak mixing angle and the SU(3)CxSU(3) model on M4xS1/(Z2xZ'2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tianjun; Wei Liao

    2002-05-01

    We show that the desirable weak mixing angle sin 2 θ W =0.2312 at m Z scale can be generated naturally in the SU(3) C xSU(3) model on M 4 xS 1 /(Z 2 x Z 2 ') where the gauge symmetry SU(3) is broken down to SU(2) L xU(1) Y by orbifold projection. For a supersymmetric model with a TeV scale extra dimension, the SU(3) unification scale is about hundreds of TeVs at which the gauge couplings for SU(3) C and SU(3) can also be equal in the mean time. For the non-supersymmetric model, SU(2) L xU(1) Y are unified at order of 10 TeV. These models may serve as good candidates for physics beyond the SM or MSSM. (author)

  4. Weinberg-Salam theory based on a Z2-graded algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, Jugoro; Morita, Katsusada; Kase, Hiromi; Okumura, Yositaka; Tanaka-Yamawaki, Mieko.

    1994-01-01

    Generalized differential calculus on discrete space M 4 xZ 2 which is an underlying space-time in the non-commutative geometry for the standard model is reformulated in terms of a Z 2 -graded algebra, even and odd elements of which being pairs of complex matrices defined over Minkowski space-time with different properties of product and involution. It is shown that the Z 2 -grading is equivalent to that of Coquereaux et al. if the pair is represented by 2x2 matrices, although our formalism has closer contact with the differential calculus on the discrete space. A graded differential algebra is then defined, in which the exterior derivative with respect to the pair is assumed to determine the pattern of symmetry breaking of the theory. On the basis of it the Weinberg-Salam theory in both bosonic and fermionic sectors is constructed. It is pointed out that, in contrast to usual assertion in non-commutative geometry, the Weinberg angle and the Higgs mass in the tree level are not fixed separately but related through m H = 22εm W sinθ W . Connes' prescription of constructing gauge-invariant Lagrangian, which is based on the assumption that there arise only logarithmic divergences from one-loop diagrams, corresponds to the case ε = 1. In principle, however, the parameter ε is arbitrary due to possible presence of Sitarz' linear term so that noncommutative geometry alone says nothing about the Higgs mass. (author)

  5. The standard model from a gauge theory in ten dimensions via CSDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farakos, K.; Kapetanakis, D.; Koutsoumbas, G.; Zoupanos, G.

    1988-01-01

    We present a gauge theory in ten dimensions based on the gauge group E 8 which is dimensionally reduced, according to the coset space dimensional reduction (CSDR) scheme, to the standard model SU 3c xSU 2L xU 1 , which breaks further to SU 3c xU 1em . We use the coset space Sp 4 /(SU 2 xU 1 )xZ 2 . The model gives similar predictions for sin 2 θ w and proton decay as the minimal SU 5 GUT. Natural choices of parameters suggest that the Higgs masses are as predicted by the Coleman-Weinberg radiative mechanism. (orig.)

  6. g-2 and α(MZ2): Status of the Standard Model predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teubner, T.; Hagiwara, K.; Liao, R.; Martin, A.D.; Nomura, D.

    2012-01-01

    We review the status of the Standard Model prediction of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon and the electromagnetic coupling at the scale M Z . Recent progress in the evaluation of the hadronic contributions have consolidated the prediction of both quantities. For g-2, the discrepancy between the measurement from BNL and the Standard Model prediction stands at a level of more than three standard deviations.

  7. Z2×Z2 generalizations of 𝒩 =2 super Schrödinger algebras and their representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, N.; Segar, J.

    2017-11-01

    We generalize the real and chiral N =2 super Schrödinger algebras to Z2×Z2-graded Lie superalgebras. This is done by D-module presentation, and as a consequence, the D-module presentations of Z2×Z2-graded superalgebras are identical to the ones of super Schrödinger algebras. We then generalize the calculus over the Grassmann number to Z2×Z2 setting. Using it and the standard technique of Lie theory, we obtain a vector field realization of Z2×Z2-graded superalgebras. A vector field realization of the Z2×Z2 generalization of N =1 super Schrödinger algebra is also presented.

  8. Overview of helium-like structure measurements: A focus on the N = 2 triplet states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, H.G.; Dunford, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of existing measurements of the 1s2s 3 S 1 - 1s2p 3 P 0,1,2 transition energies in heliumlike ions for nuclear charges Z=2 to Z=92. We find agreement with the standard unified calculations of |Drake except for the transitions from the 1s2p 3 P o state. We find a deviation equal to 2.3x(Z/10) 4 cm -1 for the most precise existing measurements

  9. Gauge-Higgs Unification Models in Six Dimensions with S2/Z2 Extra Space and GUT Gauge Symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Chiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We review gauge-Higgs unification models based on gauge theories defined on six-dimensional spacetime with S2/Z2 topology in the extra spatial dimensions. Nontrivial boundary conditions are imposed on the extra S2/Z2 space. This review considers two scenarios for constructing a four-dimensional theory from the six-dimensional model. One scheme utilizes the SO(12 gauge symmetry with a special symmetry condition imposed on the gauge field, whereas the other employs the E6 gauge symmetry without requiring the additional symmetry condition. Both models lead to a standard model-like gauge theory with the SU(3×SU(2L×U(1Y(×U(12 symmetry and SM fermions in four dimensions. The Higgs sector of the model is also analyzed. The electroweak symmetry breaking can be realized, and the weak gauge boson and Higgs boson masses are obtained.

  10. An end-to-end coupled model ROMS-N 2 P 2 Z 2 D 2 -OSMOSE of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An end-to-end coupled model ROMS-N 2 P 2 Z 2 D 2 -OSMOSE of the southern Benguela foodweb: parameterisation, calibration and pattern-oriented validation. ... We also highlight the capacity of this model for tracking indicators at various hierarchical levels. Keywords: individual-based model, model validation, ...

  11. Z2 SIMP dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, Nicolás; Chu, Xiaoyong

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter with strong self-interactions provides a compelling solution to several small-scale structure puzzles. Under the assumption that the coupling between dark matter and the Standard Model particles is suppressed, such strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs) allow for a successful thermal freeze-out through N-to-N' processes, where N dark matter particles annihilate to N' of them. In the most common scenarios, where dark matter stability is guaranteed by a Z 2 symmetry, the seemingly leading annihilating channel, i.e. 3-to-2 process, is forbidden, so the 4-to-2 one dominate the production of the dark matter relic density. Moreover, cosmological observations require that the dark matter sector is colder than the thermal bath of Standard Model particles, a condition that can be dynamically generated via a small portal between dark matter and Standard Model particles, à la freeze-in. This scenario is exemplified in the context of the Singlet Scalar dark matter model

  12. Search for γ-Z-Z' electroweak interference at e+e- collider LEP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankov, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Indirect effects of Z' bosons at the e + e - collider LEP2 in e + e - → μ + μ - through the new integrated observables σ ± were studied. It is shown that these observables provide more definite information on Z' effects with respect to canonical observables, σ μμ and A FB . It is found that the deviations Δσ ± induced by Z' bosons have the specific energy dependence mostly defined by the Standard Model parameters. It allows to provide the unambiguous model-independent predictions for the deviations. In particular, there were found two energies, √s + ≅ 78 GeV and √s - = 113 GeV, where σ + and σ - vanish both in the Standard Model and in case of Z'. These energies are quite convenient to search for phenomenological consequences of alternative new physics sources beyond the Z' [ru

  13. Elevating the Free-Fermion $Z_{2} \\times Z_{2}$ Orbifold Model to a Compactification of $F$-Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Berglund, P; Faraggi, A E; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Qiu, Z; Berglund, Per; Ellis, John; Faraggi, Alon E.; Qiu, Zongan

    2000-01-01

    We study the elliptic fibrations of some Calabi-Yau three-folds, including the $Z_2\\times Z_2$ orbifold with $(h_{1,1},h_{2,1})=(27,3)$, which is equivalent to the common framework of realistic free-fermion models, as well as related models with $(h_{1,1},h_{2,1})=(51,3)$ and $(31,7)$. Two related puzzles arise when one considers the $(h_{1,1},h_{2,1})=(27,3)$ model as an F-theory compactification to six dimensions. One is that the condition for the vanishing of the gravitational anomaly is not satisfied. This suggests that either a new feature must appear in the F-theory limit of the corresponding four-dimensional type-IIA vacuum, or that the F-theory compactification does not make sense. However, the elliptic fibration is well defined everywhere except at four singular points in the base. We speculate on the possible existence of N=1 tensor and hypermultiplets at these points which would cancel the gravitational anomaly.

  14. Reevaluation of the hadronic vacuum polarisation contributions to the Standard Model predictions of the muon g-2 and α(m{sub Z}{sup 2}) using newest hadronic cross-section data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davier, M.; Zhang, Z. [IN2P3-CNRS et Universite Paris-Sud 11, Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, Orsay (France); Hoecker, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Malaescu, B. [IN2P3-CNRS et Universites Pierre-et-Marie-Curie et Denis-Diderot, Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes Energies, Paris (France)

    2017-12-15

    We reevaluate the hadronic vacuum polarisation contributions to the muon magnetic anomaly and to the running of the electromagnetic coupling constant at the Z-boson mass. We include newest e{sup +}e{sup -} → hadrons cross-section data (among others) from the BABAR and VEPP-2000 experiments. For the muon (g-2)/2 we find for the lowest-order hadronic contribution (693.1 ± 3.4) x 10{sup -10}, improving the precision of our previous evaluation by 21%. The full Standard Model prediction differs by 3.5σ from the experimental value. The five-quark hadronic contribution to α(m{sub Z}{sup 2}) is evaluated to be (276.0 ± 0.9) x 10{sup -4}. (orig.)

  15. Membrane models and generalized Z2 gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, M.J.; Wallace, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    We consider models of (d-n)-dimensional membranes fluctuating in a d-dimensional space under the action of surface tension. We investigate the renormalization properties of these models perturbatively and in 1/n expansion. The potential relationships of these models to generalized Z 2 gauge theories are indicated. (orig.)

  16. ZNxZM orbifolds and discrete torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font, A.; Quevedo, F.

    1989-01-01

    We extend previous work on Z N -orbifolds to the general Z N xZ M abelian case for both (2, 2) and (0, 2) models. We classify the corresponding (2, 2) compactifications and show that a number of models obtained by tensoring minimal N = 2 superconformal theories can be constructed as Z N xZ M -orbifolds. Furthermore, Z N xZ M -orbifolds allow the addition of discrete torsion which leads to new (2, 2) compactifications not considered previously. Some of the latter have negative Euler characteristics and Betti numbers equal to those of some complete intersection Calabi-Yau (CICY) manifolds. This suggests the existence of a previously overlooked connection between CICY models and orbifolds. (orig.)

  17. Low-energy calculations for nuclear photodisintegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deflorian S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Standard Solar Model a central role in the nucleosynthesis is played by reactions of the kind XZ1A11+XZ2A22→YZ1+Z2A1+A2+γ${}_{{Z_1}}^{{A_1}}{X_1} + {}_{{Z_2}}^{{A_2}}{X_2} \\to {}_{{Z_1} + {Z_2}}^{{A_1} + {A_2}}Y + \\gamma $, which enter the proton-proton chains. These reactions can also be studied through the inverse photodisintegration reaction. One option is to use the Lorentz Integral Transform approach, which transforms the continuum problem into a bound state-like one. A way to check the reliability of such methods is a direct calculation, for example using the Kohn Variational Principle to obtain the scattering wave function and then directly calculate the response function of the reaction.

  18. Gauge unification, non-local breaking, open strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trapletti, M.

    2005-01-01

    The issue of non-local GUT symmetry breaking is addressed in the context of open string model building. We study Z N xZ M ' orbifolds with all the GUT-breaking orbifold elements acting freely, as rotations accompanied by translations in the internal space. We consider open strings quantized on these backgrounds, distinguishing whether the translational action is parallel or perpendicular to the D-branes. GUT breaking is impossible in the purely perpendicular case, non-local GUT breaking is instead allowed in the purely parallel case. In the latter, the scale of breaking is set by the compactification moduli, and there are no fixed points with reduced gauge symmetry, where dangerous explicit GUT-breaking terms could be located. We investigate the mixed parallel+perpendicular case in a Z 2 xZ 2 ' example, having also a simplified field theory realization. It is a new S 1 /Z 2 xZ 2 ' orbifold-GUT model, with bulk gauge symmetry SU(5)xSU(5) broken locally to the Standard Model gauge group. In spite of the locality of the GUT symmetry breaking, there is no localized contribution to the running of the coupling constants, and the unification scale is completely set by the length of S 1

  19. Z-2 Prototype Space Suit Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Amy; Rhodes, Richard; Graziosi, David; Jones, Bobby; Lee, Ryan; Haque, Bazle Z.; Gillespie, John W., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Z-2 prototype space suit is the highest fidelity pressure garment from both hardware and systems design perspectives since the Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) was developed in the late 1970's. Upon completion the Z-2 will be tested in the 11 foot human-rated vacuum chamber and the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the NASA Johnson Space Center to assess the design and to determine applicability of the configuration to micro-, low- (asteroid), and planetary- (surface) gravity missions. This paper discusses the 'firsts' that the Z-2 represents. For example, the Z-2 sizes to the smallest suit scye bearing plane distance for at least the last 25 years and is being designed with the most intensive use of human models with the suit model.

  20. Hunting the hidden standard Higgs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhundov, A.A.; Bardin, D.Yu.; Riemann, T.

    1985-01-01

    In the framework of the standard theory of electroweak interactions the Msub(Z) t(the weak neutral gauge form mass) sin sup(2)THETAsub(W) interdependence with account of radiative corrections is investigated as a function of the Higgs boson mass Msub(H) at fixed m sub(t) (mass of heavy up-type quarn). It is shown that precision measurements of Msub(XZ) and sub sup(2)THETAsub(W) at SLC and LEP will allow one to estimate Msub(H) with an accuracy of about 100 GeV

  1. Direct measurement of α_Q_E_D(m_Z"2) at the FCC-ee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janot, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    When the measurements from the FCC-ee become available, an improved determination of the standard-model “input' parameters will be needed to fully exploit the new precision data towards either constraining or fitting the parameters of beyond-the-standard-model theories. Among these input parameters is the electromagnetic coupling constant estimated at the Z mass scale, α_Q_E_D(m_Z"2). The measurement of the muon forward-backward asymmetry at the FCC-ee, just below and just above the Z pole, can be used to make a direct determination of α_Q_E_D(m_Z"2) with an accuracy deemed adequate for an optimal use of the FCC-ee precision data.

  2. Naturalness of three generations in free fermionic Z2n direct-product Z4 string models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraggi, A.E.; Nanopoulos, D.V.

    1993-01-01

    We study the construction of free fermionic spin structure models with Z 2 n direct-product Z 4 boundary-condition vectors. We argue that requiring chiral space-time fermions in the massless spectrum and the existence of a well-defined hidden gauge group severely constrain the allowed boundary-condition vectors. We show that the minimal way to obtain these requirements is given by a unique set of Z 2 5 boundary-condition vectors. We classify the possible extensions to this basic set. We argue that a result of this fundamental set is that obtaining three generations in this construction is correlated with projecting out all the enhanced gauge symmetries which arise from nonzero vacuum expectation values of background fields. We propose that this correlation and the properties of the fundamental Z 2 5 subset suggest that three generations is natural in this construction

  3. Large sample NAA of a pottery replica utilizing thermal neutron flux at AHWR critical facility and X-Z rotary scanning unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, R.; Dasari, K.B.; Pujari, P.K.; Swain, K.K.; Shinde, A.D.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2013-01-01

    Large sample neutron activation analysis (LSNAA) of a clay pottery replica from Peru was carried out using low neutron flux graphite reflector position of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) critical facility. This work was taken up as a part of inter-comparison exercise under IAEA CRP on LSNAA of archaeological objects. Irradiated large size sample, placed on an X-Z rotary scanning unit, was assayed using a 40% relative efficiency HPGe detector. The k 0 -based internal monostandard NAA (IM-NAA) in conjunction with insitu relative detection efficiency was used to calculate concentration ratios of 12 elements with respect to Na. Analyses of both small and large size samples were carried out to check homogeneity and to arrive at absolute concentrations. (author)

  4. The hidden fermions in Z(2) theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srednicki, M.

    1983-01-01

    Low dimensional Z(2) gauge theories have been rewritten in terms of locally coupled fermionic degrees of freedom by means of the Jordan-Wigner transformation. In this paper it is shown that higher dimensional Z(2) gauge theories are also fermionic theories in disguise. The SML solution to the 1+1 dimension Ising model is reviewed. Psi operators are represented pictorially as arrows, psi 1 points to the left, psi 2 to the right, each site of H a multiple of two operators. The 2+1 dimension Ising model is then considered. A fermion plaquette operator is introduced as the generator of a gauge symmetry for the fermionic H. Findings in 1+1 and 2+1 are then applied to 3+1 dimensional Z(2) gauge theory. A construction of this lattice is undertaken. Psi formalism replaces sigma formalism, as it permits extremely simple duality transformations to be made on any Z(2) Hamiltonian. It is shown that the fermionic formalism will lead to new ideas in Z(2) theories

  5. Graded algebras of the second rank and integration of nonlinear equations Ysub(z)sub(z) = exp(2Y) - exp(-2Y), Ysub(z)sub(z) = 2 exp(Y) - exp(-2Y)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leznov, A.N.; Smirnov, V.G.

    1981-01-01

    In the terms of the notions of the theory of infinite-dimensional algebras of finite growth of the second rank, we have derived solutions to the equations Ysub(z)sub(z) = exp(2Y) - exp(-2Y); Ysub(z)sub(z) = 2 exp(Y) - exp(-2Y) dependent on two arbitrary functions. (orig.)

  6. Revised photometric elements of XZ And

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuricin, G.; Mardirossian, F.; Predolin, F.

    1980-01-01

    With the aid of Wood's (1972) computer program we have reanalyzed the photoelectric lightcurves of XZ And, made by Blitzstein (1954) and by Reinhardt (1967), from which appreciably different sets of photometric elements have previously been deduced. The photometric elements that we have derived separately from different lightcurves turned out to be in good agreement. Thus XZ And, whose seondary - somewhat larger than its hotter companion - appears to be roughly a G5-type star, has well-determined photometric elements. (author)

  7. Z(2) vortices and the SU(2) string tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goepfert, M.

    1981-01-01

    Topologically determined Z(2) variables in pure SU(2) lattice gauge theory are discussed. They count the number of 'vortex souls'. The high temperature expansion for the corresponding Z(2) loops is examined. They obey an area law. The coefficient of the area is shown to be equal to the string tension to all orders of the high temperature expansion. This shows that the string tension is determined by the probability distribution of the vortex souls, at least in the high temperature region. The dependence of the string tension α(β,h) on an external field h that is coupled to the Z(2) field strength is calculated to lowest order of the high temperature expansion. In this approximation, α(β,h) is determined by the free energy of a 2-dimensional Ising model in an external magnetic field 1/2log(β/4tanhh) at an inverse temperature 1/2log3/4π = 0.429. (orig.)

  8. Constraints on reconstructed dark energy model from SN Ia and BAO/CMB observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamon, Abdulla Al [Manipal University, Manipal Centre for Natural Sciences, Manipal (India); Visva-Bharati, Department of Physics, Santiniketan (India); Bamba, Kazuharu [Fukushima University, Division of Human Support System, Faculty of Symbiotic Systems Science, Fukushima (Japan); Das, Sudipta [Visva-Bharati, Department of Physics, Santiniketan (India)

    2017-01-15

    The motivation of the present work is to reconstruct a dark energy model through the dimensionless dark energy function X(z), which is the dark energy density in units of its present value. In this paper, we have shown that a scalar field φ having a phenomenologically chosen X(z) can give rise to a transition from a decelerated to an accelerated phase of expansion for the universe. We have examined the possibility of constraining various cosmological parameters (such as the deceleration parameter and the effective equation of state parameter) by comparing our theoretical model with the latest Type Ia Supernova (SN Ia), Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation observations. Using the joint analysis of the SN Ia+BAO/CMB dataset, we have also reconstructed the scalar potential from the parametrized X(z). The relevant potential is found, a polynomial in φ. From our analysis, it has been found that the present model favors the standard ΛCDM model within 1σ confidence level. (orig.)

  9. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a standard W or a Z boson and decaying to bottom quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.,

    2014-01-21

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) decaying to b b-bar when produced in association with a weak vector boson (V) is reported for the following channels: W(mu nu)H, W(e nu)H, W(tau nu)H, Z(mu mu)H, Z(e e)H, and Z(nu nu)H. The search is performed in data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 inverse femtobarns at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and up to 18.9 inverse femtobarns at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV, recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. An excess of events is observed above the expected background with a local significance of 2.1 standard deviations for a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, consistent with the expectation from the production of the standard model Higgs boson. The signal strength corresponding to this excess, relative to that of the standard model Higgs boson, is 1.0 +/- 0.5.

  10. Pseudospin model to describe transport properties in Bi2Sr2(CazPr1-z)Cu2O8+y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastone, E.C.; Pires, A.S.T.; Silva, P.R.

    2001-01-01

    A pseudo-spin model is proposed, as a means to describe some transport properties (resistivity and Hall mobility) in Bi 2 Sr 2 (Ca z Pr 1-z )Cu 2 O 8+y . Our model is based in a double-well potential where tunneling in a given site and interaction between different lattice sites are allowed only through the excited states. Doping of the pure system by the addition of Pr increases the ratio between the activation energy and the tunneling constant. The model Hamiltonian displays some features which are present in the hydrogen-bonded ferroelectrics. Its dynamics is treated in the random phase approximation and the characteristic frequency (time) is used in a Drude formula in order to obtain some transport properties of the system, namely the electric resistivity and the Hall mobility. The quantities calculated in this work are compared with the experimental data given by Beschoten et al. (1996). (orig.)

  11. Higgs decays to Z Z and Z γ in the standard model effective field theory: An NLO analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, S.; Giardino, P. P.

    2018-05-01

    We calculate the complete one-loop electroweak corrections to the inclusive H →Z Z and H →Z γ decays in the dimension-6 extension of the Standard Model Effective Field Theory (SMEFT). The corrections to H →Z Z are computed for on-shell Z bosons and are a precursor to the physical H →Z f f ¯ calculation. We present compact numerical formulas for our results and demonstrate that the logarithmic contributions that result from the renormalization group evolution of the SMEFT coefficients are larger than the finite next-to-leading-order contributions to the decay widths. As a byproduct of our calculation, we obtain the first complete result for the finite corrections to Gμ in the SMEFT.

  12. ATLAS Z Excess in Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Terada, Takahiro

    2015-06-01

    Recently the ATLAS collaboration reported a 3 sigma excess in the search for the events containing a dilepton pair from a Z boson and large missing transverse energy. Although the excess is not sufficiently significant yet, it is quite tempting to explain this excess by a well-motivated model beyond the standard model. In this paper we study a possibility of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) for this excess. Especially, we focus on the MSSM spectrum where the sfermions are heavier than the gauginos and Higgsinos. We show that the excess can be explained by the reasonable MSSM mass spectrum.

  13. Standard-model bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Donagi, Ron; Pantev, Tony; Waldram, Dan; Donagi, Ron; Ovrut, Burt; Pantev, Tony; Waldram, Dan

    2002-01-01

    We describe a family of genus one fibered Calabi-Yau threefolds with fundamental group ${\\mathbb Z}/2$. On each Calabi-Yau $Z$ in the family we exhibit a positive dimensional family of Mumford stable bundles whose symmetry group is the Standard Model group $SU(3)\\times SU(2)\\times U(1)$ and which have $c_{3} = 6$. We also show that for each bundle $V$ in our family, $c_{2}(Z) - c_{2}(V)$ is the class of an effective curve on $Z$. These conditions ensure that $Z$ and $V$ can be used for a phenomenologically relevant compactification of Heterotic M-theory.

  14. Excitation Potentials and Shell Corrections for the Elements Z2=20 to Z2=30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.H.; Sørensen, H.; Vadja, P.

    1969-01-01

    Excitation potentials and shell corrections for the elements Z 2=20 to Z2=30 are evaluated from experimental stopping-power data for 5-12-MeV protons and deuterons. Use is made of Walske's K- and L-shell corrections and shell corrections calculated by Bonderup (1967) on the basis of the Thomas-Fe...... are found by means of Bonderup's shell corrections. Within the Z2 interval treated here, it is found that I/Z2 increases with increasing Z2, contrary to the general trend through the periodic system of elements......Excitation potentials and shell corrections for the elements Z 2=20 to Z2=30 are evaluated from experimental stopping-power data for 5-12-MeV protons and deuterons. Use is made of Walske's K- and L-shell corrections and shell corrections calculated by Bonderup (1967) on the basis of the Thomas...

  15. Type IIA string theory on T"6/(Z_2 x Z_6 x ΩR). Model building and string phenomenology with intersecting D6-branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecker, Jill

    2016-01-01

    In this doctoral thesis, various aspects of string model building and phenomenology are investigated within the framework of Type IIA string theory on the T"6/(Z_2 x Z_6 x ΩR) orbifold with discrete torsion. The aim is the reproduction of supersymmetric versions of well-known particle physics models using intersecting rigid D6-branes wrapped on fractional three-cycles. The models analyzed include the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model as well as supersymmetric Pati-Salam models, left-right symmetric models and SU(5) models. Systematic computer scans test numerous combinations of intersecting D6-branes in order to detect those that give rise to the correct chiral particle content of the considered models. For each type of the afore mentioned models, concrete examples will be found which satisfy the constraints on the particle spectrum and fulfill all consistency conditions. Finally, the thesis focuses on phenomenological aspects of the particle physics models found, including the detection of massless U(1) combinations, discrete Z_n-symmetries and cubic couplings such as the Yukawa couplings.

  16. Electroweak radiative corrections in the SU(2) x U(1) standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollik, W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper contains a discussion of the 1-loop renormalization of the standard model and applications of the radiative corrections to fermion processes. Thereby we restrict the discussion to leptonic processes since these allow the cleanest access to the more subtle parts of the theory avoiding theoretical uncertainties as far as possible. Actual measurements of the W +- ,Z masses and of sin 2 θ W already indicate the presence of higher order effects in electroweak processes between fermions. More accurate measurements in the near future colliders LEP and SLC will allow to test the standard model beyond the tree level. At the 1-loop level a big amount of work has already been done with a satisfactory agreement between the individual calculations for the standard processes: μ decays, ν-scattering, and e + e → μ + μ - . 38 refs

  17. Study of Z' {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} in full simulation with regard to discrimination between models beyond the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, M

    2004-09-01

    Although experimental results so far agree with predictions of the standard model, it is widely felt to be incomplete. Many prospective theories beyond the standard model predict extra neutral gauge bosons, denoted by Z', which might be light enough to be accessible at the LHC. Observables sensitive to the properties of these extra gauge bosons might be used to discriminate between the different theories beyond the standard model. In the present work several of these observables (total decay width, leptonic cross-section and forward-backward asymmetries) are studied at generation level and with a full simulation in the ATLAS detector. The Z' {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} decay channel was chosen and 2 values for the mass of Z': 1.5 TeV and 4 TeV. Background is studied as well and it is confirmed that a Z' boson could easily be discovered at the chosen masses. It is shown that even in full simulation the studied observables can be determined with a good precision. In a next step a discrimination strategy has to be developed given the presented methods to extract the variables and their precision. (author)

  18. Study of Z' {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} in full simulation with regard to discrimination between models beyond the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, M

    2004-09-01

    Although experimental results so far agree with predictions of the standard model, it is widely felt to be incomplete. Many prospective theories beyond the standard model predict extra neutral gauge bosons, denoted by Z', which might be light enough to be accessible at the LHC. Observables sensitive to the properties of these extra gauge bosons might be used to discriminate between the different theories beyond the standard model. In the present work several of these observables (total decay width, leptonic cross-section and forward-backward asymmetries) are studied at generation level and with a full simulation in the ATLAS detector. The Z' {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} decay channel was chosen and 2 values for the mass of Z': 1.5 TeV and 4 TeV. Background is studied as well and it is confirmed that a Z' boson could easily be discovered at the chosen masses. It is shown that even in full simulation the studied observables can be determined with a good precision. In a next step a discrimination strategy has to be developed given the presented methods to extract the variables and their precision. (author)

  19. Recognition of double-stranded DNA using energetically activated duplexes with interstrand zippers of 1-, 2-or 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2 '-alkylated RNA monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Guenther, Dale C.

    2014-01-01

    '-alkylated uridine monomers X-Z by means of thermal denaturation experiments, optical spectroscopy, force-field simulations and recognition experiments using DNA hairpins as model targets. We demonstrate that Invaders with +1 interstrand zippers of X or Y monomers efficiently recognize mixed-sequence DNA...

  20. Characterization of mussel H2A.Z.2: a new H2A.Z variant preferentially expressed in germinal tissues from Mytilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Casas, Ciro; González-Romero, Rodrigo; Vizoso-Vazquez, Ángel; Cheema, Manjinder S; Cerdán, M Esperanza; Méndez, Josefina; Ausió, Juan; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M

    2016-10-01

    Histones are the fundamental constituents of the eukaryotic chromatin, facilitating the physical organization of DNA in chromosomes and participating in the regulation of its metabolism. The H2A family displays the largest number of variants among core histones, including the renowned H2A.X, macroH2A, H2A.B (Bbd), and H2A.Z. This latter variant is especially interesting because of its regulatory role and its differentiation into 2 functionally divergent variants (H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2), further specializing the structure and function of vertebrate chromatin. In the present work we describe, for the first time, the presence of a second H2A.Z variant (H2A.Z.2) in the genome of a non-vertebrate animal, the mussel Mytilus. The molecular and evolutionary characterization of mussel H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2 histones is consistent with their functional specialization, supported on sequence divergence at promoter and coding regions as well as on varying gene expression patterns. More precisely, the expression of H2A.Z.2 transcripts in gonadal tissue and its potential upregulation in response to genotoxic stress might be mirroring the specialization of this variant in DNA repair. Overall, the findings presented in this work complement recent reports describing the widespread presence of other histone variants across eukaryotes, supporting an ancestral origin and conserved role for histone variants in chromatin.

  1. Discrete torsion in non-geometric orbifolds and their open-string descendants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, Massimo; Morales, Jose F.; Pradisi, Gianfranco

    2000-01-01

    We discuss some Z N L xZ N R orbifold compactifications of the type IIB superstring to D=4,6 dimensions and their type I descendants. Although the Z N L xZ N R generators act asymmetrically on the chiral string modes, they result into left-right symmetric models that admit sensible unorientable reductions. We carefully work out the phases that appear in the modular transformations of the chiral amplitudes and identify the possibility of introducing discrete torsion. We propose a simplifying ansatz for the construction of the open-string descendants in which the transverse-channel Klein-bottle, annulus and Moebius-strip amplitudes are numerically identical in the proper parametrization of the world-sheet. A simple variant of the ansatz for the Z 2 L xZ 2 R orbifold gives rise to models with supersymmetry breaking in the open-string sector

  2. Square well model and the functional form for the resonance integral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raina, V.; Srivastava, P.K.; Sane, K.V.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that the relation β = eta(Z 1 Z 2 )/sup 1/2/ exp/broken bracket/ -X(Z 1 + Z 2 )R/broken bracket//R can be derived by assuming that the effective potential in π-electron systems can be approximated by a three-dimensional square well form. (U.S.)

  3. Source Header List. Volume 2. L through Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    U 2-- 2- o-h 2-2 W- 1- 2- V) 2- aJ w- 2 w 22 2 - 3 - 2- 1-U.M0 .1- .1-0 IU LL. 1-W ILLJW tun wWA 1-WN 2 W U lox W -W 1W O WE CoO 0o oU- 0Co0100I C...0.4z a.U-W Z<. a-C a. a. ZAw a. a-I- a 1- UC I4 M M0 14 04 _ 4 " ( M Z 0 "( X 4 " ~ 14 < "U " 4 - 0.U_ Z1-0 1- 1- LU LU Wz z WE W z LUz Z W" ZU -J 2...34j1.4 >In >’-’ m130 >w.-Ia aW w44 40 40 <W~ <W ~ 0 41~ <W <Z <ZW 4z Z444 zaw a UI z K za Z- n I- 20 9a3 ZI aI- OIw OIm2 >- Z 2 2 Z 2 2 2 Z 2 2 Z 2 2

  4. Physical Properties and Evolution of the Eclipsing Binary System XZ Canis Minoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poochaum, R.; Komonjinda, S.; Soonthornthum, B.; Rattanasoon, S.

    2010-07-01

    This research aims to study the eclipse binary system so that its physical properties and evolution can be determined and used as an example to teach high school astronomy. The study of an eclipsing binary system XZ Canis Minoris (XZ CMi) was done at Sirindhorn Observatory, Chiang Mai University using a 0.5-meter reflecting telescope with CCD photometric system (2184×1417 pixel) in B V and R bands of UVB System. The data obtained were used to construct the light curve for each wavelength band and to compute the times of its light minima. New elements were derived using observations with linear to all available minima. As a result, linear ephemeris is HDJmin I = .578 808 948+/-0.000 000 121+2450 515.321 26+/-0.001 07 E, and the new orbital period of XZ CMi is 0.578 808 948+/-0.000 000 121 day. The values obtained were used with the previously published times of minima to get O-C curve of XZ CMi. The result revealed that the orbital period of XZ CMi is continuously decreased at a rate of 0.007 31+/-0.000 57 sec/year. This result indicates that the binary stars are moving closer continuously. From the O-C residuals, there is significant change to indicate the existence of the third body or magnetic activity cycle on the star. However, further analysis of the physical properties of XZ CMi is required.

  5. Rare decays of the Z and the standard model, 4th generation, and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiler, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Several issues in rare decays of the Z are addressed. The rate for flavor-changing Z decay grows as the fourth power of the fermion masses internal to the quantum loop, and so offers a window to the existence of ultraheavy (m > M W ) fermions. In the standard model, with three generations, BR(Z → bs) -7 and BR(Z→tc) -13 . With four generations, BR(Z → bb 4 ) may be as large as 10 -5 if m b4 Z ; and similarly for BR(Z → N 4 v), where N 4 is the possibly heavy fourth generation neutrino. In supersymmetric and other two Higgs doublet models, BR(Z → tc) may be as large as 5 x 10 -6 in the three generation scheme. With minimal supersymmetry, the reaction Z → Hγ is guaranteed to go, with a parameter-dependent branching ratio of 10 -6 ± 3 . With mirror fermions or exotic E 6 fermions, the branching ratios for Z → ct (70 GeV), Z → μτ, and Z → bb 4 (70 GeV) are typically 10 -4 , 10 -4 , and 10 -3 respectively, clearly measurable at LEP. Depending on unknown quark masses, the Z may mix with vector (b 4 bar b 4 ) and the W may mix with vector (t bar b) or (t bar s). CP violating asymmetries in flavor-changing Z decay are immeasurably small in the standard model, but may be large in supersymmetric and other nonstandard models. 28 refs

  6. Evolution of optically selected quasars with z<2.2 and B<20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    Several complete samples of optically selected quasars are combined to give details of the quasar luminosity function and its evolution for redshifts less than 2.2. Sufficient coverage of the Hubble diagram is obtained that luminosity-dependent density evolution models can be tested and compared against pure luminosity evolution models. Although luminosity-dependent evolution is indicated if the evolution function has an exponential form, the data are consistent with a power-law evolution model that is independent of luminosity. When the sample is split into halves by redshift, a better fit is obtained with a power-law evolution model than with an exponential model. Furthermore, the luminosity function is consistent with a power-law shape whose slope is independent of redshift. Pure luminosity evolution models wherein luminosities evolve as (1+z)/sup 3.5/ and the luminosity functioin is given by dN/dLproportionalL/sup -3.6/ are consistent with these results and fit the data very well. These results suggest that the same mass supply and energy generation mechanisms apply over several decades of optical luminosity and for z<2.2

  7. Site-specific strong ground motion prediction using 2.5-D modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, J. P.

    2001-08-01

    An algorithm was developed using the 2.5-D elastodynamic wave equation, based on the displacement-stress relation. One of the most significant advantages of the 2.5-D simulation is that the 3-D radiation pattern can be generated using double-couple point shear-dislocation sources in the 2-D numerical grid. A parsimonious staggered grid scheme was adopted instead of the standard staggered grid scheme, since this is the only scheme suitable for computing the dislocation. This new 2.5-D numerical modelling avoids the extensive computational cost of 3-D modelling. The significance of this exercise is that it makes it possible to simulate the strong ground motion (SGM), taking into account the energy released, 3-D radiation pattern, path effects and local site conditions at any location around the epicentre. The slowness vector (py) was used in the supersonic region for each layer, so that all the components of the inertia coefficient are positive. The double-couple point shear-dislocation source was implemented in the numerical grid using the moment tensor components as the body-force couples. The moment per unit volume was used in both the 3-D and 2.5-D modelling. A good agreement in the 3-D and 2.5-D responses for different grid sizes was obtained when the moment per unit volume was further reduced by a factor equal to the finite-difference grid size in the case of the 2.5-D modelling. The components of the radiation pattern were computed in the xz-plane using 3-D and 2.5-D algorithms for various focal mechanisms, and the results were in good agreement. A comparative study of the amplitude behaviour of the 3-D and 2.5-D wavefronts in a layered medium reveals the spatial and temporal damped nature of the 2.5-D elastodynamic wave equation. 3-D and 2.5-D simulated responses at a site using a different strike direction reveal that strong ground motion (SGM) can be predicted just by rotating the strike of the fault counter-clockwise by the same amount as the azimuth of

  8. Rare decays of the Z and the standard model, 4th generation, and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiler, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Several issues in rare decays of the Z are addressed. The rate for flavor-changing Z decay grows as the fourth power of the fermion masses internal to the quantum loop, and so offers a window to the existence of ultraheavy (m > M{sub W}) fermions. In the standard model, with three generations, BR(Z {yields} bs) < 10{sup -7} and BR(Z{yields}tc)<10{sup -13}. With four generations, BR(Z {yields} bb{sub 4}) may be as large as 10{sup -5} if m{sub b4} < M{sub Z}; and similarly for BR(Z {yields} N{sub 4}v), where N{sub 4} is the possibly heavy fourth generation neutrino. In supersymmetric and other two Higgs doublet models, BR(Z {yields} tc) may be as large as 5 {times} 10{sup -6} in the three generation scheme. With minimal supersymmetry, the reaction Z {yields} H{gamma} is guaranteed to go, with a parameter-dependent branching ratio of 10{sup -6 {plus minus} 3}. With mirror fermions or exotic E{sub 6} fermions, the branching ratios for Z {yields} ct (70 GeV), Z {yields} {mu}{tau}, and Z {yields} bb{sub 4} (70 GeV) are typically 10{sup -4}, 10{sup -4}, and 10{sup -3} respectively, clearly measurable at LEP. Depending on unknown quark masses, the Z may mix with vector (b{sub 4}{bar b}{sub 4}) and the W may mix with vector (t{bar b}) or (t{bar s}). CP violating asymmetries in flavor-changing Z decay are immeasurably small in the standard model, but may be large in supersymmetric and other nonstandard models. 28 refs.

  9. Global constraints on Z2 fluxes in two different anisotropic limits of a hypernonagon Kitaev model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yasuyuki; Kamiya, Yoshitomo; Nasu, Joji; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2018-05-01

    The Kitaev model is an exactly-soluble quantum spin model, whose ground state provides a canonical example of a quantum spin liquid. Spin excitations from the ground state are fractionalized into emergent matter fermions and Z2 fluxes. The Z2 flux excitation is pointlike in two dimensions, while it comprises a closed loop in three dimensions because of the local constraint for each closed volume. In addition, the fluxes obey global constraints involving (semi)macroscopic number of fluxes. We here investigate such global constraints in the Kitaev model on a three-dimensional lattice composed of nine-site elementary loops, dubbed the hypernonagon lattice, whose ground state is a chiral spin liquid. We consider two different anisotropic limits of the hypernonagon Kitaev model where the low-energy effective models are described solely by the Z2 fluxes. We show that there are two kinds of global constraints in the model defined on a three-dimensional torus, namely, surface and volume constraints: the surface constraint is imposed on the even-odd parity of the total number of fluxes threading a two-dimensional slice of the system, while the volume constraint is for the even-odd parity of the number of the fluxes through specific plaquettes whose total number is proportional to the system volume. In the two anisotropic limits, therefore, the elementary excitation of Z2 fluxes occurs in a pair of closed loops so as to satisfy both two global constraints as well as the local constraints.

  10. HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE HL/XZ TAU REGION: MAPPING THE 50 AU PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND HL TAU AND RESOLVING XZ TAU S INTO A 13 AU BINARY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasco-Gonzalez, Carlos; Anglada, Guillem; RodrIguez, Luis F.; Curiel, Salvador

    2009-01-01

    We present new 7 mm and archive 1.3 cm high angular resolution observations of the HL/XZ Tau region made with the Very Large Array. At 7 mm, the emission from HL Tau seems to arise in a clumpy disk with radius of the order of 25 AU. The 1.3 cm emission from XZ Tau shows the emission from a binary system with 0.''3 (42 AU) separation, known from previous optical/IR observations. However, at 7 mm, the southern radio component resolves into a binary with 0.''09 (13 AU) separation, suggesting that XZ Tau is actually a triple star system. We suggest that the remarkable ejection of gas from the XZ Tau system observed with the Hubble Space Telescope may be related to a periastron passage of this newly discovered close binary system.

  11. More supersymmetric standardlike models from intersecting D6-branes on type IIA orientifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetic, Mirjam; Papadimitriou, Ioannis

    2003-01-01

    We present new classes of supersymmetric standardlike models from a type IIA T 6 /(Z 2 xZ 2 ) orientifold with intersecting D6-branes. D6-branes can wrap general supersymmetric three-cycles of T 6 =T 2 xT 2 xT 2 , and any T 2 is allowed to be tilted. The models still suffer from additional exotics; however, we obtain solutions with fewer Higgs doublets, as well as models with all three families of left-handed quarks and leptons arising from the same intersecting sector, and examples of a genuine left-right symmetric model with three copies of left-handed and right-handed families of quarks and leptons

  12. Fermion masses and flavor mixings in a model with S4 flavor symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Guijun

    2010-01-01

    We present a supersymmetric model of quark and lepton based on S 4 xZ 3 xZ 4 flavor symmetry. The S 4 symmetry is broken down to Klein four and Z 3 subgroups in the neutrino and the charged lepton sectors, respectively. Tri-Bimaximal mixing and the charged lepton mass hierarchies are reproduced simultaneously at leading order. Moreover, a realistic pattern of quark masses and mixing angles is generated with the exception of the mixing angle between the first two generations, which requires a small accidental enhancement. It is remarkable that the mass hierarchies are controlled by the spontaneous breaking of flavor symmetry in our model. The next to leading order contributions are studied, all the fermion masses and mixing angles receive corrections of relative order λ c 2 with respect to the leading order results. The phenomenological consequences of the model are analyzed, the neutrino mass spectrum can be normal hierarchy or inverted hierarchy, and the combined measurement of the 0ν2β decay effective mass m ββ and the lightest neutrino mass can distinguish the normal hierarchy from the inverted hierarchy.

  13. A search for the standard model Higgs boson using the DELPHI detector at LEP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheridan, A.E.

    1998-11-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson is performed using the 51.59 pb -1 of data collected by the DELPHI detector at a centre-of-mass energy of 182.7 GeV. A search is made for the production of Higgs bosons with an on-shell Z boson, with the Higgs boson decaying to b-quarks and the Z to either a dielectron or dimuon pair. No significant excess is seen in the data and hence a 95% CL upper cross- section limit is set as a function of the Higgs boson mass. The results from these leptonic channels are combined with those from other Higgs and Z decay channel analyses using DELPHI data and a 95% CL lower mass limit for the Higgs boson of 87.6 GeV/c 2 is set. This limit significantly improves the limit obtained with previous data. (author)

  14. Supersymmetric composite models on intersecting D-branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Noriaki

    2004-01-01

    We construct supersymmetric composite models of quarks and leptons from type IIA T6/(Z2xZ2) orientifold with intersecting D6-branes. In case of T6=T2xT2xT2 with no tilted T2, a composite model of supersymmetric SU(5) grand unified theory with four generations is constructed. In case of that one T2 is tilted, a composite model with SU(3)cxSU(2)LxU(1)Y gauge symmetry with three generations of left-handed quarks and leptons is constructed. These models are not realistic, but contain relatively fewer additional exotic particles and U(1) gauge symmetries due to the introduction of the compositeness of quarks and leptons. The masses of some exotic particles are naturally generated through the Yukawa interactions among 'preons'

  15. Reorganization of Damaged Chromatin by the Exchange of Histone Variant H2A.Z-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishibuchi, Ikuno [Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Suzuki, Hidekazu; Kinomura, Aiko; Sun, Jiying; Liu, Ning-Ang [Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Horikoshi, Yasunori [Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Research Center for Mathematics of Chromatin Live Dynamics, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Shima, Hiroki [Department of Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Kusakabe, Masayuki; Harata, Masahiko [Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Fukagawa, Tatsuo [Department of Molecular Genetics, National Institute of Genetics and The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mishima (Japan); Ikura, Tsuyoshi [Laboratory of Chromatin Regulatory Network, Department of Mutagenesis, Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Ishida, Takafumi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Tashiro, Satoshi, E-mail: ktashiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Research Center for Mathematics of Chromatin Live Dynamics, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The reorganization of damaged chromatin plays an important role in the regulation of the DNA damage response. A recent study revealed the presence of 2 vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms, H2A.Z-1 and H2A.Z-2. However, the roles of the vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms are still unclear. Thus, in this study we examined the roles of the vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms in chromatin reorganization after the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Methods and Materials: To examine the dynamics of H2A.Z isoforms at damaged sites, we constructed GM0637 cells stably expressing each of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled H2A.Z isoforms, and performed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis and inverted FRAP analysis in combination with microirradiation. Immunofluorescence staining using an anti-RAD51 antibody was performed to study the kinetics of RAD51 foci formation after 2-Gy irradiation of wild-type (WT), H2A.Z-1- and H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells. Colony-forming assays were also performed to compare the survival rates of WT, H2A.Z-1-, and H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells with control, and H2A.Z-1- and H2A.Z-2-depleted U2OS cells after irradiation. Results: FRAP analysis revealed that H2A.Z-2 was incorporated into damaged chromatin just after the induction of DSBs, whereas H2A.Z-1 remained essentially unchanged. Inverted FRAP analysis showed that H2A.Z-2 was released from damaged chromatin. These findings indicated that H2A.Z-2 was exchanged at DSB sites immediately after the induction of DSBs. RAD51 focus formation after ionizing irradiation was disturbed in H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells but not in H2A.Z-1-deficient cells. The survival rate of H2A.Z-2-deficient cells after irradiation was lower than those of WT and H2A.Z-1- DT40 cells. Similar to DT40 cells, H2A.Z-2-depleted U2OS cells were also radiation-sensitive compared to control and H2A.Z-1-depleted cells. Conclusions: We found that vertebrate H2A.Z-2 is involved in the regulation of the DNA

  16. Reorganization of Damaged Chromatin by the Exchange of Histone Variant H2A.Z-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Kinomura, Aiko; Sun, Jiying; Liu, Ning-Ang; Horikoshi, Yasunori; Shima, Hiroki; Kusakabe, Masayuki; Harata, Masahiko; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Ishida, Takafumi; Nagata, Yasushi; Tashiro, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The reorganization of damaged chromatin plays an important role in the regulation of the DNA damage response. A recent study revealed the presence of 2 vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms, H2A.Z-1 and H2A.Z-2. However, the roles of the vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms are still unclear. Thus, in this study we examined the roles of the vertebrate H2A.Z isoforms in chromatin reorganization after the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Methods and Materials: To examine the dynamics of H2A.Z isoforms at damaged sites, we constructed GM0637 cells stably expressing each of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled H2A.Z isoforms, and performed fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis and inverted FRAP analysis in combination with microirradiation. Immunofluorescence staining using an anti-RAD51 antibody was performed to study the kinetics of RAD51 foci formation after 2-Gy irradiation of wild-type (WT), H2A.Z-1- and H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells. Colony-forming assays were also performed to compare the survival rates of WT, H2A.Z-1-, and H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells with control, and H2A.Z-1- and H2A.Z-2-depleted U2OS cells after irradiation. Results: FRAP analysis revealed that H2A.Z-2 was incorporated into damaged chromatin just after the induction of DSBs, whereas H2A.Z-1 remained essentially unchanged. Inverted FRAP analysis showed that H2A.Z-2 was released from damaged chromatin. These findings indicated that H2A.Z-2 was exchanged at DSB sites immediately after the induction of DSBs. RAD51 focus formation after ionizing irradiation was disturbed in H2A.Z-2-deficient DT40 cells but not in H2A.Z-1-deficient cells. The survival rate of H2A.Z-2-deficient cells after irradiation was lower than those of WT and H2A.Z-1- DT40 cells. Similar to DT40 cells, H2A.Z-2-depleted U2OS cells were also radiation-sensitive compared to control and H2A.Z-1-depleted cells. Conclusions: We found that vertebrate H2A.Z-2 is involved in the regulation of the DNA

  17. Testing the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, H.; Marciano, W.; Williams, H.H.

    1982-01-01

    We summarize here the results of the standard model group which has studied the ways in which different facilities may be used to test in detail what we now call the standard model, that is SU/sub c/(3) x SU(2) x U(1). The topics considered are: W +- , Z 0 mass, width; sin 2 theta/sub W/ and neutral current couplings; W + W - , Wγ; Higgs; QCD; toponium and naked quarks; glueballs; mixing angles; and heavy ions

  18. Phase stability predictions of Cr1−x, Mx)2(Al1−y, Ay)(C1−z, Xz) (M = Ti, Hf, Zr; A = Si, X = B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, Lin; Music, Denis; Baben, Moritz to; Schneider, Jochen M

    2014-01-01

    The phase stability of (Cr 1−x , M x ) 2 (Al 1−y , A y )(C 1−z , X z ) (M = Ti, Hf, Zr; A = Si, X = B, space group P6 3 /mmc, prototype Cr 2 AlC) was studied using ab initio calculations. Based on the energy of mixing data as well as the density of states (DOS) analysis, (Cr 1−x , Zr x ) 2 AlC and (Cr 1−x , Hf x ) 2 AlC are predicted to be unstable, whereas (Cr 1−x , Ti x ) 2 AlC, Cr 2 (Al 1−y , Si y )C and Cr 2 Al(C 1−z , B z ) are predicted to be stable or metastable. The density of states analysis reveals that small differences in the position of the Fermi level alters the phase stability: (Cr 1−x , Zr x ) 2 AlC and (Cr 1−x , Hf x ) 2 AlC are predicted to be unstable or metastable as the Fermi level lies at a peak position. While the Cr dominated DOS for (Cr 1−x , Ti x ) 2 AlC plateaus at the Fermi level indicating stability. Implications of these results for the vapour phase condensation of self-healing Cr 2 AlC based materials are discussed. (paper)

  19. Absence of coherent peaks in a Z2 fractionalized BCS superconducting state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yin; Lu, Han-Tao; Luo, Hong-Gang

    2015-01-01

    We explore a Z2 fractionalized Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superconducting state, which is a minimal extension of usual BCS framework. It is found that this state has similar thermal and transport properties, but its single-particle feature strongly deviates from the coherent quasiparticle behavior of the classic/conventional BCS superconducting state. The fingerprint of such Z2 BCS state is the absence of the BCS coherent peaks and instead a kink in the local density of state occurs, which in principle could be probed by scanning tunneling microscopy or point-contact spectroscopy experiments. The corresponding exactly soluble models that realize the desirable Z2 fractionalized BCS state are presented. In addition, we also study the extended t-U-J model by using Z2 slave-spin representation and find that the Z2 BCS state may exist when the paring structure is fully gapped or has nodes. The prototypical wave-function of such a Z2 BCS state is also proposed, which could be taken as trial wave-function in current numerical techniques. Furthermore, the pairing mechanism of Z2 BCS state is argued from both weak and strong coupling perspective. The present work may be helpful to further study the unconventional superconductivity and its relation to non-Fermi liquids.

  20. Lattice parameter values and phase transitions for the Cu2Cd1-zMn zGeSe4 and Cu2Cd1-zFe zGeSe4 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintero, E.; Tovar, R.; Quintero, M.; Delgado, G.E.; Morocoima, M.; Caldera, D.; Ruiz, J.; Mora, A.E.; Briceno, M.; Fernandez, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray powder diffraction measurements and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were made on polycrystalline samples of the Cu 2 Cd 1-z Mn z GeSe 4 and Cu 2 Cd 1-z Fe z GeSe 4 alloy systems. The diffraction patterns were used to show the equilibrium conditions and to derive lattice parameter values. The effect of the annealing temperature and cooling rate to room temperature are discussed. For the Cu 2 Cd 1-z Fe z GeSe 4 system, only two single solid phase fields, the tetragonal stannite α and the wurtz-stannite δ structures were found to occur in the diagram. For the Cu 2 Cd 1-z Mn z GeSe 4 system, in addition to the tetragonal stannite α and the wurtz-stannite δ phases, MnSe was found to exist in the diagram. The DTA experiments showed that the cooling curves for both systems exhibited effects of undercooling

  1. The vortex free energy in the screening phase of the Z(2) Higgs model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.

    1983-06-01

    The vortex free energy was proposed to distinguish between the confinement - and the Higgs phase (in the sense of 't Hooft) in lattice gauge theory, when matter fields are present that transform according to an arbitrary representation of the gauge group. In this paper I consider the Z(2) Higgs model and calculate the vortex free energy in the screening part of the confining/screening phase of Fradkin and Shenker. The result does not agree with the expected behavior that corresponds to the structure of the phase diagram. Therefore the vortex free energy is no longer a good indicator for confinement when matter fields transform nontrivially under the center of the gauge group (such as Z(2) Higgs scalars). (orig.)

  2. Spectral flow as a map between N=(2,0)-models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athanasopoulos, P.; Faraggi, A.E.; Gepner, D.

    2014-01-01

    The space of (2,0) models is of particular interest among all heterotic-string models because it includes the models with the minimal SO(10) unification structure, which is well motivated by the Standard Model of particle physics data. The fermionic Z 2 ×Z 2 heterotic-string models revealed the existence of a new symmetry in the space of string configurations under the exchange of spinors and vectors of the SO(10) GUT group, dubbed spinor–vector duality. In this paper we generalize this idea to arbitrary internal rational conformal field theories (RCFTs). We explain how the spectral flow operator normally acting within a general (2,2) theory can be used as a map between (2,0) models. We describe the details, give an example and propose more simple currents that can be used in a similar way

  3. Spectral flow as a map between N = (2 , 0)-models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasopoulos, P.; Faraggi, A. E.; Gepner, D.

    2014-07-01

    The space of (2 , 0) models is of particular interest among all heterotic-string models because it includes the models with the minimal SO (10) unification structure, which is well motivated by the Standard Model of particle physics data. The fermionic Z2 ×Z2 heterotic-string models revealed the existence of a new symmetry in the space of string configurations under the exchange of spinors and vectors of the SO (10) GUT group, dubbed spinor-vector duality. In this paper we generalize this idea to arbitrary internal rational conformal field theories (RCFTs). We explain how the spectral flow operator normally acting within a general (2 , 2) theory can be used as a map between (2 , 0) models. We describe the details, give an example and propose more simple currents that can be used in a similar way.

  4. Copper Hugoniot measurements to 2.8 TPa on Z.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnish, Michael D.; Haill, Thomas A

    2018-04-01

    We conducted three Hugoniot and release experiments on copper on the Z machine at Hugoniot stress levels of 0.34 and 2.6 TPa, using two-layer copper/aluminum impactors travelling at 8 and 27 km/s and Z-quartz windows. Velocity histories were recorded for 4 samples of different thicknesses and 5 locations on the flyer plate (3 and 4 for the first two experiments). On-sample measurements provided Hugoniot points (via transit time) and partial release states (via Z-quartz wavespeed). Fabrication of the impactor required thick plating and several diamond-machining steps. The lower-pressure test was planned as a 2.5 TPa test, but a failure on the Z machine degraded its performance; however, these results corroborated earlier Cu data in the same stress region. The second test suffered from significant flyer plate bowing, but the third did not. The Hugoniot data are compared with the APtshuler/Nellis nuclear-driven data, other data from Z and elsewhere, and representative Sesame models.

  5. Schrödinger holography for z < 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Tomás; Peach, Alex; Ross, Simon F; Keeler, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    We investigate holography for asymptotically Schrödinger spacetimes, using a frame formalism. Our dictionary is based on the anisotropic scaling symmetry. We consider z < 2, where the holographic dictionary is cleaner; we make some comments on z = 2. We propose a definition of asymptotically locally Schrödinger spacetime where the leading components of the frame fields provide suitable geometric boundary data. We show that an asymptotic expansion exists for generic boundary data satisfying our boundary conditions for z < 2. (paper)

  6. Second Z in SO(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinett, R.W.; Rosner, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Models based on SO(10) are presented in which a second Z (''Z 2 '') can have a mass as low as 230 GeV/c 2 without appreciably distorting the lower-energy picture. In such models the lightest Z(''Z 1 '') is very close to the predicted mass in the standard picture, 1 greater than or equal to M(Z 1 )/M(Z 0 ) greater than or equal to 0.98. The major constraint preventing M(Z 2 ) from being even lower comes from experiments on parity violation in heavy atoms. Other properties of Z 2 , and ways to discover it, are discussed

  7. Non-minimal flavored S{sub 3} x Z{sub 2} left-right symmetric model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Izquierdo, Juan Carlos [Tecnologico de Monterrey, Campus Estado de Mexico, Estado de Mexico, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2017-08-15

    We propose a non-minimal left-right symmetric model with parity symmetry where the fermion mixings arise as a result of imposing an S{sub 3} x Z{sub 2} flavor symmetry, and an extra Z{sup e}{sub 2} symmetry is considered in the lepton sector. Then the neutrino mass matrix possesses approximately the μ-τ symmetry. The breaking of the μ-τ symmetry induces sizable non-zero θ{sub 13}, and the deviation of θ{sub 23} from 45 {sup circle} is strongly controlled by an ε free parameter and the neutrino masses. So, an analytic study of the CP parities in the neutrino masses is carried out to constrain the ε parameter and the lightest neutrino mass that accommodate the mixing angles. The results are: (a) the normal hierarchy is ruled out for any values of the Majorana phases; (b) for the inverted hierarchy the values of the reactor and atmospheric angles are compatible up to 2, 3 σ C.L.; (c) the degenerate ordering is the most favorable such that the reactor and atmospheric angle are compatible with the experimental data for a large set of values of the free parameters. The model predicts defined regions for the effective neutrino mass, the neutrino mass scale and the sum of the neutrino masses for the favored cases. Therefore, this model may be testable by the future experiments. (orig.)

  8. Working group 2: regulatory and standards development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunch, Chad; Lee, Shu; Peters, Mike; Parsonage, Kevin; Saad, Ziad

    2011-07-01

    This second workshop explored regulatory standards and developments in the pipeline industry. New methods of improved damage prevention for regulators and pipelines to implement were presented. First, incident trends were discussed, using incident analysis to identify the possible causes and solutions of incidents. The determination of realistic goals was attempted. Next, leak detection was discussed with the presentation of current work in annex E which will form part of the new CSA Z662 standard in a few years time. New testing methods such as external methods of leak detection were studied. A third presentation showed the recent development in overpressure protection with reference to the new annex M incorporated in the CSA Z662-11 standard. The last presentation introduced the topic of public safety issues associated with CO2 pipelines with regard to different failure scenarios and the appropriate emergency responses.

  9. Natural four-generation mass textures in MSSM brane worlds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebed, Richard F.; Mayes, Van E.

    2011-01-01

    A fourth generation of standard model fermions is usually considered unlikely due to constraints from direct searches, electroweak precision measurements, and perturbative unitarity. We show that fermion mass textures consistent with all constraints may be obtained naturally in a model with four generations constructed from intersecting D6-branes on a T 6 /(Z 2 xZ 2 ) orientifold. The Yukawa matrices of the model are rank 2, so that only the third- and fourth-generation fermions obtain masses at the trilinear level. The first two generations obtain masses via higher-order couplings and are therefore naturally lighter. In addition, we find that the third and fourth generations automatically split in mass, but do not mix at leading order. Furthermore, the standard model gauge couplings automatically unify at the string scale, and all the hidden-sector gauge groups become confining in the range 10 13 -10 16 GeV, so that the model becomes effectively a four-generation minimal supersymmetric standard model at low energies.

  10. Host composition dependent tunable multicolor emission in the single-phase Ba2(Ln(1-z)Tb(z))(BO3)2Cl:Eu phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhiguo; Zhuang, Jiaqing; Meijerink, Andries; Jing, Xiping

    2013-05-14

    A new strategy based on the host composition design has been adopted to obtain efficient color-tunable emission from Ba2Ln(0.97-z)Tb(z)(BO3)2Cl:0.03Eu (Ln = Y, Gd and Lu, z = 0-0.97) phosphors. This study reveals that the single-phase Ba2Ln(1-z)Tb(z)(BO3)2Cl compounds can be applied to use allowed Eu(2+) absorption transitions to sensitize Eu(3+) emission via the energy transfer Eu(2+) → (Tb(3+))n → Eu(3+). The powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rietveld refinement analysis shows single-phase Ba2Ln(1-z)Tb(z)(BO3)2Cl. As-prepared Ba2Ln(0.97-z)Tb(z)(BO3)2Cl:0.03Eu phosphors show intense green, yellow, orange and red emission under 377 nm near ultraviolet (n-UV) excitation due to a variation in the relative intensities of the Eu(2+), Tb(3+) and Eu(3+) emission depending on the Tb content (z) in the host composition, allowing color tuning. The variation in emission color is explained by energy transfer and has been investigated by photoluminescence and lifetime measurements and is further characterized by the Commission Internationale de l'éclairage (CIE) chromaticity indexes. The quantum efficiencies of the phosphors are high, up to 74%, and show good thermal stabilities up to 150 °C. This investigation demonstrates the possibility to sensitize Eu(3+) line emission by Eu(2+)via energy migration over Tb(3+) resulting in efficient color tunable phosphors which are promising for use in solid-state white light-emitting diodes (w-LEDs).

  11. The construction of 'realistic' four-dimensional strings through orbifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Font, A.; Quevedo, F.; Sierra, A.

    1990-01-01

    We discuss the construction of 'realistic' lower rank 4-dimensional strings, through symmetric orbifolds with background fields. We present Z 3 three-generation SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1) models as well as models incorporating a left-right SU(2) L xSU(2) R xU(1) B-L symmetry in which proton stability is automatically guaranteed. Conformal field theory selection rules are used to find the flat directions to all orders which lead to these low-rank models and to study the relevant Yukawa couplings. A hierarchical structure of quark-lepton masses appears naturally in some models. We also present a detailed study of the structure of the Z 3 xZ 3 orbifold including the generalized GSO projection, the effect of discrete torsion and the conformal field theory Yukawa coupling selection rules. All these points are illustrated with a three-generation Z 3 xZ 3 model. We have made an effort to write a self-contained presentation in order to make this material available to non-string experts interested in the phenomenological aspects of this theory. (orig.)

  12. DPF'96: the triumph of the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, S.

    1996-01-01

    I summarize some of the highlights of the 1996 DPF meeting, paying particular attention to new measurements of the W, Z, and top quark masses. Precision electroweak measurements from LEP are discussed with emphasis on recent measurements of R b and values of the coupling constants α(M Z 2 ) and α s (M Z 2 ) are presented. Taken as a whole, the data are in spectacular agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model

  13. A family 5 β-mannanase from the thermophilic fungus Thielavia arenaria XZ7 with typical thermophilic enzyme features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haiqiang; Zhang, Huitu; Shi, Pengjun; Luo, Huiying; Wang, Yaru; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2013-09-01

    A novel β-mannanase gene, man5XZ7, was cloned from thermophilic fungus Thielavia arenaria XZ7, and successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris. The gene (1,110 bp) encodes a 369-amino acid polypeptide with a molecular mass of approximately 40.8 kDa. The deduced sequence of Man5XZ7 consists of a putative 17-residue signal peptide and a catalytic module belonging to glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5, and displays 76 % identity with the experimentally verified GH 5 endo-β-1,4-mannanase from Podospora anserina. Recombinant Man5XZ7 was optimally active at 75 °C and pH 5.0 and exhibited high activity at a wide temperature range (>50.0 % activity at 50-85 °C). Moreover, it had good adaptability to acidic to basic pH (>74.1 % activity at pH 4.0-7.0 and 25.6 % even at pH 9.0) and good stability from pH 3.0 to 10.0. These enzymatic properties showed that Man5XZ7 was a new thermophilic and alkali-tolerant β-mannanase. Further amino acid composition analysis indicated that Man5XZ7 has several characteristic features of thermophilic enzymes.

  14. bantib-production on the Z resonance: a challenge to the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djouadi, A.; Renard, F.M.; Girardi, G.; Verzegnassi, C.

    1990-04-01

    We study the potentialities for exposing physics beyond the standard model that are offered by accurate measurements of the process Z → bantib in a high luminosity phase at LEP. In particular we propose a strategy by defining observables in such a way that they are separately sensitive to different kinds of New Physics. This approach enables us to show that with 10 7 - 10 8 produced bantib pairs one may either obtain very stringent bounds on the extra neutral gauge bosons sector, or identify it unambiguously. Also, it appears that Z → bantib provides under those circumstances a privileged tool to reveal clean virtual effects of supersymmetry

  15. Z-2 Architecture Description and Requirements Verification Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziosi, Dave; Jones, Bobby; Ferl, Jinny; Scarborough, Steve; Hewes, Linda; Ross, Amy; Rhodes, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Z-2 Prototype Planetary Extravehicular Space Suit Assembly is a continuation of NASA's Z series of spacesuits. The Z-2 is another step in NASA's technology development roadmap leading to human exploration of the Martian surface. The suit was designed for maximum mobility at 8.3 psid, reduced mass, and to have high fidelity life support interfaces. As Z-2 will be man-tested at full vacuum in NASA JSC's Chamber B, it was manufactured as Class II, making it the most flight-like planetary walking suit produced to date. The Z-2 suit architecture is an evolution of previous EVA suits, namely the ISS EMU, Mark III, Rear Entry I-Suit and Z-1 spacesuits. The suit is a hybrid hard and soft multi-bearing, rear entry spacesuit. The hard upper torso (HUT) is an all-composite structure and includes a 2-bearing rolling convolute shoulder with Vernier sizing mechanism, removable suit port interface plate (SIP), elliptical hemispherical helmet and self-don/doff shoulder harness. The hatch is a hybrid aluminum and composite construction with Apollo style gas connectors, custom water pass-thru, removable hatch cage and interfaces to primary and auxiliary life support feed water bags. The suit includes Z-1 style lower arms with cam brackets for Vernier sizing and government furnished equipment (GFE) Phase VI gloves. The lower torso includes a telescopic waist sizing system, waist bearing, rolling convolute waist joint, hard brief, 2 bearing soft hip thigh, Z-1 style legs with ISS EMU style cam brackets for sizing, and conformal walking boots with ankle bearings. The Z-2 Requirements Verification Plan includes the verification of more than 200 individual requirements. The verification methods include test, analysis, inspection, demonstration or a combination of methods. Examples of unmanned requirements include suit leakage, proof pressure testing, operational life, mass, isometric man-loads, sizing adjustment ranges, internal and external interfaces such as in-suit drink bag

  16. Logarithmic two-point correlation functions from a z=2 Lifshitz model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zingg, T.

    2014-01-01

    The Einstein-Proca action is known to have asymptotically locally Lifshitz spacetimes as classical solutions. For dynamical exponent z=2, two-point correlation functions for fluctuations around such a geometry are derived analytically. It is found that the retarded correlators are stable in the sense that all quasinormal modes are situated in the lower half-plane of complex frequencies. Correlators in the longitudinal channel exhibit features that are reminiscent of a structure usually obtained in field theories that are logarithmic, i.e. contain an indecomposable but non-diagonalizable highest weight representation. This provides further evidence for conjecturing the model at hand as a candidate for a gravity dual of a logarithmic field theory with anisotropic scaling symmetry

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Oligodeoxyribonucleotides Modified with 2'-Amino-α-l-LNA Adenine Monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nicolai K; Anderson, Brooke A; Wengel, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    The development of conformationally restricted nucleotide building blocks continues to attract considerable interest because of their successful use within antisense, antigene, and other gene-targeting strategies. Locked nucleic acid (LNA) and its diastereomer α-l-LNA are two interesting examples...... (ONs) modified with 2'-amino-α-l-LNA adenine monomers W-Z. The synthesis of the target phosphoramidites 1-4 is initiated from pentafuranose 5, which upon Vorbrüggen glycosylation, O2'-deacylation, O2'-activation and C2'-azide introduction yields nucleoside 8. A one-pot tandem Staudinger....... ONs modified with pyrene-functionalized 2'-amino-α-l-LNA adenine monomers X-Z display greatly increased affinity toward DNA targets (ΔTm/modification up to +14 °C). Results from absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy suggest that the duplex stabilization is a result of pyrene intercalation...

  18. A search for the standard model Higgs Boson in the neutrino channel using the DELPHI detector at LEP 2

    CERN Document Server

    McPherson, G

    1999-01-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson is performed using 51.6 pb sup - sup 1 of data collected by the DELPHI detector in 1997 at a centre-of-mass energy of 183 GeV. A search is made for Higgs bosons produced in association with a Z boson, where the Higgs decays to b-quarks and the Z to neutrinos. Different statistical search methods are investigated and compared, with 95% confidence level cross-section limits set as a function of the Higgs boson mass. No significant excess is observed in the data, allowing a lower mass limit of 73.0 GeV/c sup 2 to be set for the Higgs boson.

  19. Pair production of Z and W polarization at LEP2 determined with ALEPH detector or Prolegomena to any future apparently complete study on gauge bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayolle, David

    2002-01-01

    The start of LEP2 at centre of mass energies higher then the W-pair production threshold, has made possible for the first time to test the least bounded sector of the Standard Model, the bosonic sector. This thesis consists in three strong measurements of the validity of the Standard Model using the whole LEP2 data set recorded by the ALEPH detector: - The measurement of the ZZ cross section through the five visible decay channels of the Z-pair. The poor statistic associated to pair production of Z is a process difficult to discriminate - The measurement of the anomalous neutral gauge couplings in tile ZZ final state. These couplings are forbidden in the Standard Model and their existence would be the signature of a New Physics. The information on the cross section as well as the angular distribution of the Z is used to extract them. - The measurement of the longitudinal and transverse polarised states of the W bosons through the W + W - production in the semi-leptonic channel. The spin density matrix method is used because it introduces a 'model independent' framework. No deviation is observed with respect to the Standard Model predictions. (author)

  20. Deep absorption line studies of quiescent galaxies at z similar z ~ 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Sune; Gallazzi, Anna Rita; Zirm, Andrew Wasmuth

    2012-01-01

    the majority of its stars at z > 3 and currently has little or no ongoing star formation. We compile a sample of three other z similar to 2 quiescent galaxies with measured velocity dispersions, two of which are also post-starburst like. Their dynamical-mass-size relation is offset significantly less than...... the stellar-mass-size relation from the local early-type relations, which we attribute to a lower central dark matter fraction. Recent cosmological merger simulations agree qualitatively with the data, but cannot fully account for the evolution in the dark matter fraction. The z similar to 2 FP requires......We present dynamical and structural scaling relations of quiescent galaxies at z = 2, including the dynamical-mass-size relation and the first constraints on the fundamental plane (FP). The backbone of the analysis is a new, very deep Very Large Telescope/X-shooter spectrum of a massive, compact...

  1. ORIGIN AND KINEMATICS OF THE ERUPTIVE FLOW FROM XZ TAU REVEALED BY ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, Luis A.; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Carrasco-González, Carlos; Palau, Aina; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Kurtz, Stan E.; Tafoya, Daniel; Loinard, Laurent [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico); Curiel, Salvador [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ap. 70-264, 04510 DF, México (Mexico)

    2015-09-20

    We present high angular resolution (∼0.″94) {sup 12}CO(1-0) Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations obtained during the 2014 long baseline campaign from the eruptive bipolar flow from the multiple XZ Tau stellar system discovered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These observations reveal, for the first time, the kinematics of the molecular flow. The kinematics of the different ejections close to XZ Tau reveal a rotating and expanding structure with a southeast–northwest velocity gradient. The youngest eruptive bubbles unveiled in the optical HST images are inside of this molecular expanding structure. Additionally, we report a very compact and collimated bipolar outflow emanating from XZ Tau A, which indicates that the eruptive outflow is indeed originating from this object. The mass (3 × 10{sup −7} M{sub ⊙}) and energetics (E{sub kin} = 3 × 10{sup 37} erg) for the collimated outflow are comparable to those found in molecular outflows associated with young brown dwarfs.

  2. Testing ATLAS Z+MET excess with LHC run 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Terada, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    The ATLAS collaboration reported a 3σ excess in the search of events containing on-Z dilepton, jets, and large missing momentum (MET) in the 8 TeV LHC run. Motivated by this excess, many models of new physics have been proposed. Recently, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations reported new results for similar Z+MET channels in the 13 TeV run. In this paper, we comprehensively discuss the consistency between the proposed models and the LHC results of Run 1 and Run 2. We find that in models with heavy gluino production, there is generically some tension between the 8 TeV and 13 TeV results. On the other hand, models with light squark production provide relatively better fitting to both results.

  3. ΔI = 1/2 rule, ε'/ε and K → πν anti ν in Z'(Z) and G' models with FCNC quark couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buras, Andrzej J.; Girrbach, Jennifer [TUM Institute for Advanced Study, Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department, Garching (Germany); De Fazio, Fulvia [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bari (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    The experimental value for the isospin amplitude ReA{sub 2} in K → ππ decays has been successfully explained within the standard model (SM), both within the large N approach to QCD and by QCD lattice calculations. On the other hand within the large N approach the value of ReA{sub 0} is by at least 30% below the data. While this deficit could be the result of theoretical uncertainties in this approach and could be removed by future precise QCD lattice calculations, it cannot be excluded that the missing piece in ReA{sub 0} comes from new physics (NP). We demonstrate that this deficit can be significantly softened by tree-level FCNC transitions mediated by a heavy colourless Z' gauge boson with a flavour-violating left-handed coupling Δ{sub L}{sup sd}(Z') and an approximately universal flavour diagonal right-handed coupling Δ{sub R}{sup qq}(Z') to the quarks. The approximate flavour universality of the latter coupling assures negligible NP contributions to ReA{sub 2}. This property, together with the breakdown of the GIM mechanisms at tree level, allows one to enhance significantly the contribution of the leading QCD penguin operator Q{sub 6} to ReA{sub 0}. A large fraction of the missing piece in the ΔI = 1/2 rule can be explained in this manner for M{sub Z'} in the reach of the LHC, while satisfying the constraints from ε{sub K}, ε'/ε, ΔM{sub K}, LEP-II and the LHC. The presence of a small right-handed flavour-violating coupling Δ{sub R}{sup sd}(Z') << Δ{sub L}{sup sd}(Z') and of enhanced matrix elements of ΔS = 2 left-right operators allows one to satisfy simultaneously the constraints from ReA{sub 0} and ΔM{sub K}, although this requires some fine-tuning. We identify the quartic correlation between Z' contributions to ReA{sub 0}, ε'/ε, ε{sub K} and ΔM{sub K}. The tests of this proposal will require much improved evaluations of ReA{sub 0} and ΔM{sub K} within the SM, of left angle Q{sub 6} right

  4. Atomic form factors, incoherent scattering functions, and photon scattering cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbell, J.H.; Veigele, W.J.; Briggs, E.A.; Brown, R.T.; Cromer, D.T.; Howerton, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    Tabulations are presented of the atomic form factor, F (α,Z), and the incoherent scattering function, S (x,Z), for values of x (=sin theta/2)/lambda) from 0.005 A -1 to 10 9 A -1 , for all elements A=1 to 100. These tables are constructed from available state-of-the-art theoretical data, including the Pirenne formulas for Z=1, configuration-into action results by Brown using Brown-Fontana and Weiss correlated wavefunctions for Z=2 to 6 non-relativistic Hartree-Fock results by Cromer for Z=7 to 100 and a relativistic K-shell analytic expression for F (x,Z) by Bethe Levinger for x>10 A -1 for all elements Z=2 to 100. These tabulated values are graphically compared with available photon scattering angular distribution measurements. Tables of coherent (Rayleigh) and incoherent (Compton) total scattering cross sections obtained by nummerical integration over combinations of F 2 (x,Z) with the Thomson formula and S (x,Z) with the Klum-Nishina Formual, respectively, are presented for all elements Z=1 to 100, for photon energies 100 eV (lambda=124 A) to 100 MeV (0.000124 A). The incoherent scattering cross sections also include the radiative and double-Compton corrections as given by Mork. Similar tables are presented for the special cases of terminally-bonded hydrogen and for the H 2 molecule, interpolated and extrapolated from values calculated by Stewart et al., and by Bentley and Stewart using Kolos-Roothaan wavefunctions

  5. LHC phenomenology of composite 2-Higgs doublet models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Curtis, Stefania [University of Florence, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Moretti, Stefano; Yagyu, Kei; Yildirim, Emine [University of Southampton, School of Physics and Astronomy, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-15

    We investigate the phenomenology of Composite 2-Higgs doublet models (C2HDMs) of various Yukawa types based on the global symmetry breaking SO(6) → SO(4) x SO(2). The kinetic part and the Yukawa Lagrangian are constructed in terms of the pseudo Nambu-Goldstone Boson (pNGB) matrix and a 6-plet of fermions under SO(6). The scalar potential is assumed to be the same as that of the Elementary 2-Higgs doublet model (E2HDM) with a softly broken discrete Z{sub 2} symmetry. We then discuss the phenomenological differences between the E2HDM and C2HDM by focusing on the deviations from standard model (SM) couplings of the discovered Higgs state (h) as well as on the production cross sections and branching ratios (BRs) at the large Hadron collider (LHC) of extra Higgs bosons. We find that, even if the same deviation in the hVV (V = W,Z) coupling is assumed in the two scenarios, there appear significant differences between the E2HDM and C2HDM from the structure of the Yukawa couplings, so that production and decay features of extra Higgs bosons can be used to distinguish between the two scenarios. (orig.)

  6. Independent verification survey report for exposure units Z2-24, Z2-31, Z2-32, AND Z2-36 in zone 2 of the East Tennessee technology park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, David A. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management selected Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, to perform independent verification (IV) at Zone 2 of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORAU has concluded IV surveys, per the project-specific plan (PSP) (ORAU 2013a) covering exposure units (EUs) Z2-24, -31, -32, and -36. The objective of this effort was to verify the target EUs comply with requirements in the Zone 2 Record of Decision (ROD) (DOE 2005), as implemented by using the dynamic verification strategy presented in the dynamic work plan (DWP) (BJC 2007); and confirm commitments in the DWP were adequately implemented, as verified via IV surveys and soil sampling.

  7. Modeling thermodynamics of Fe-N phases; characterisation of e-Fe2N1-z

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pekelharing, M.I.; Böttger, A.; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    1999-01-01

    In order to arrive at modeling the thermodynamics of Fe-N phases, including long-range (LRO) and short-range ordering (SRO) of the N atoms, it is important to understand the role of N interstitially dissolved in an Fe-host lattice. The crystal structure of -Fe2N1-z consists of an h.c.p. iron...... sublattice and a hexagonal nitrogen sublattice formed by octahedral interstices of the Fe sublattice [1]. Two ground-state structures have been proposed for the ordered arrangement of the N atoms on their own sublattice [1], which were shown to be thermodynamically favourable [2]: configuration A for Fe2N1...... investigated with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy. A thermodynamic model accounting for the two configurations of LRO of the N atoms [2,3] was fitted to the N-absorption isotherm at 723 K and resulted in the occupancies of the sites of the nitrogen sublattice. A miscibility gap between...

  8. Infinite-dimensional Z2sup(k)-supermanifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molotkov, V.

    1984-10-01

    In this paper the theory of finite-dimensional supermanifolds of Berezin, Leites and Kostant is generalized in two directions. First, we introduce infinite-dimensional supermanifolds ''locally isomorphic'' to arbitrary Banach (or, more generally, locally convex) superspaces. This is achieved by considering supermanifolds as functors (equipped with some additional structure) from the category of finite-dimensional Grassman superalgebras into the category of the corresponding smooth manifolds (Banach or locally convex). As examples, flag supermanifolds of Banach superspaces as well as unitary supergroups of Hilbert superspaces are constructed. Second, we define ''generalized'' supermanifolds, graded by Abelian groups Z 2 sup(k), instead of the group Z 2 (Z 2 sup(k)-supermanifolds). The corresponding superfields, describing, potentially, particles with more general statistics than Bose + Fermi, generally speaking, turn out to have an infinite number of components. (author)

  9. Multivalent binding of PWWP2A to H2A.Z regulates mitosis and neural crest differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pünzeler, Sebastian; Link, Stephanie; Wagner, Gabriele; Keilhauer, Eva C; Kronbeck, Nina; Spitzer, Ramona Mm; Leidescher, Susanne; Markaki, Yolanda; Mentele, Edith; Regnard, Catherine; Schneider, Katrin; Takahashi, Daisuke; Kusakabe, Masayuki; Vardabasso, Chiara; Zink, Lisa M; Straub, Tobias; Bernstein, Emily; Harata, Masahiko; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Mann, Matthias; Rupp, Ralph Aw; Hake, Sandra B

    2017-08-01

    Replacement of canonical histones with specialized histone variants promotes altering of chromatin structure and function. The essential histone variant H2A.Z affects various DNA-based processes via poorly understood mechanisms. Here, we determine the comprehensive interactome of H2A.Z and identify PWWP2A as a novel H2A.Z-nucleosome binder. PWWP2A is a functionally uncharacterized, vertebrate-specific protein that binds very tightly to chromatin through a concerted multivalent binding mode. Two internal protein regions mediate H2A.Z-specificity and nucleosome interaction, whereas the PWWP domain exhibits direct DNA binding. Genome-wide mapping reveals that PWWP2A binds selectively to H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes with strong preference for promoters of highly transcribed genes. In human cells, its depletion affects gene expression and impairs proliferation via a mitotic delay. While PWWP2A does not influence H2A.Z occupancy, the C-terminal tail of H2A.Z is one important mediator to recruit PWWP2A to chromatin. Knockdown of PWWP2A in Xenopus results in severe cranial facial defects, arising from neural crest cell differentiation and migration problems. Thus, PWWP2A is a novel H2A.Z-specific multivalent chromatin binder providing a surprising link between H2A.Z, chromosome segregation, and organ development. © 2017 The Authors.

  10. Ti2FeZ (Z=Al, Ga, Ge) alloys: Structural, electronic, and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liping, Mao; Yongfan, Shi; Yu, Han

    2014-01-01

    Using the first-principle projector augmented wave potential within the generalized gradient approximation taking into account the on-site Coulomb repulsive, we investigate the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Ti 2 FeZ (Z=Al, Ga, Ge) alloys with Hg 2 CuTi-type structure. These alloys are found to be half-metallic ferrimagnets. The total magnetic moments of the Heusler alloys Ti 2 FeZ follow the µ t =Z t −18 rule and agree with the Slater–Pauling curve quite well. The band gaps are mainly determined by the bonding and antibonding states created from the hybridizations of the d states between the Ti(A)–Ti(B) coupling and Fe atom. - Highlights: • Ti 2 FeZ (Z=Al, Ga, Ge) are found to be half-metallic ferrimagnets. • The band gaps are mainly determined by the hybridizations of the d states between the Ti(A)–Ti(B) coupling and Fe atom. • The s–p elements play an important role in the half-metallicity of these Heusler alloys

  11. An Improved Design Methodology for Modeling Thick-Section Composite Structures Using a Multiscale Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    case study no. 2. The multiaxial loading combined with XZ and YZ Poisson ratio effects contributes to strains in the Z-direction of the sample. The...E. A Continuum Damage Model for Fiber Reinforced Laminates Based on Ply Failure Mechanisms, Composite Structures. Fifteenth International...output parameters, stiffness ratios , to analyze the nonlinear response and progressive failure of the composite structure is developed. These new

  12. Lyman Break Galaxies At z 2 In The GOODS Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberzettl, Lutz; Williger, G.; Lehnert, M.; Nesvadba, N.

    2009-12-01

    Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) have been the benchmarks against which other samples of high redshift galaxies have been compared for the last 2 decades. They are unique in that no other selection mechanism allows us to study galaxies selected in a consistent manner over the span of redshifts from z=0 to 7. An important remaining gap is the redshift range z ˜ 1.5-2.5, which includes near UV (NUV)-band drop-outs. We present first results of a search for LBGs at these redshifts using very sensitive multi-frequency data from the far UV to mid-IR of the GOODS CDF-S and HDF-N. We modelled colors of star-forming galaxies, and found only a small overlap with the BM/BX selection method (Adelberger et al. 2004, ApJ, 607, 226). We developed new color selection criteria using GALEX NUV and optical photometry to identify high star formation galaxies, including NUV-dropouts for 2.0methods, we identified a sample of ? z˜ 2 LBG candidates in both the GOODS CDF-S and the HDF-N. A first analysis of the mean SED of our LBG candidate sample shows results consistent with red LBGs at z ˜ 1, indicating massive galaxies with high star formation rates. Nearly 10% of our selected LBG candidates have mid-IR (IRAC+MIPS) colors comparable both to z ˜ 3 IR-luminous LBGs, which are believed to be dusty, vigorously star-forming massive progenitors of modern ellipticals.

  13. z~2: An Epoch of Disk Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Raymond C.; Kassin, Susan A.; Weiner, Benjamin; Heckman, Timothy M.; Trump, Jonathan; SIGMA, DEEP2

    2018-01-01

    At z = 0, the majority of massive star-forming galaxies contain thin, rotationally supported gas disks. It was once accepted that galaxies form thin disks early: collisional gas with high velocity dispersion should dissipate energy, conserve angular momentum, and develop strong rotational support in only a few galaxy crossing times (~few hundred Myr). However, this picture is complicated at high redshift, where the processes governing galaxy assembly tend to be violent and inhospitable to disk formation. We present results from our SIGMA survey of star-forming galaxy kinematics at z = 2. These results challenge the simple picture described above: galaxies at z = 2 are unlike local well-ordered disks. Their kinematics tend to be much more disordered, as quantified by their low ratios of rotational velocity to gas velocity dispersion (Vrot/σg): less than 35% of galaxies have Vrot/σg > 3. For comparison, nearly 100% of local star-forming galaxies meet this same threshold. We combine our high redshift sample with a similar low redshift sample from the DEEP2 survey. This combined sample covers a continuous redshift baseline over 0.1 < z < 2.5, spanning 10 Gyrs of cosmic time. Over this period, galaxies exhibit remarkably smooth kinematic evolution on average. All galaxies tend towards rotational support with time, and it is reached earlier in higher mass systems. This is due to both a significant decline in gas velocity dispersion and a mild rise in ordered rotational motions. These results indicate that z = 2 is a period of disk assembly, during which the strong rotational support present in today’s massive disk galaxies is only just beginning to emerge.

  14. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the LEP2 collider near $\\sqrt{s}$ = 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Perrodo, P; Pietrzyk, B; Alemany, R; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Morawitz, P; Pacheco, A; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Becker, U; Boix, G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Halley, A W; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Leroy, O; Maley, P; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Tournefier, E; Vreeswijk, M; Wachsmuth, H W; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Chalmers, M; Curtis, L; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Ward, J J; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Marinelli, N; Martin, E B; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Robertson, N A; Williams, M; Van Gemmeren, P; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Kröcker, M; Nürnberger, H A; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; De Vivie de Régie, J B; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Boccali, T; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Chambers, J T; Coles, J; Cowan, G D; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Faïf, G; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Przysiezniak, H; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Trabelsi, A; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Prange, G; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Mamier, G; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Vogt, M; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G

    2000-01-01

    During 1997 the ALEPH experiment at LEP gathered $57 \\pb$ of data at centre-of-mass energies near $183 ~\\G$. These data are used to look for possible signals from the production of the Standard Model Higgs boson in the reaction $\\ee\\r\\H\\Z$. No evidence of a signal is found in the data; seven events are selected, in agreement with the expectation of 7.2 events from background processes. This observation results in an improved lower limit on the mass of the Higgs boson: $\\mH > 87.9 \\Gcs$ at 95\\% confidence level.

  15. AN ULTRA-DEEP NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRUM OF A COMPACT QUIESCENT GALAXY AT z = 2.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriek, Mariska; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Marchesini, Danilo; Labbe, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; Quadri, Ryan F.; Illingworth, Garth D.

    2009-01-01

    Several recent studies have shown that about half of the massive galaxies at z2 are in a quiescent phase. Moreover, these galaxies are commonly found to be ultra-compact with half-light radii of ∼1 kpc. We have obtained a ∼29 hr spectrum of a typical quiescent, ultra-dense galaxy at z = 2.1865 with the Gemini Near-Infrared Spectrograph. The spectrum exhibits a strong optical break and several absorption features, which have not previously been detected in z > 2 quiescent galaxies. Comparison of the spectral energy distribution with stellar population synthesis models implies a low star formation rate (SFR) of 1-3 M sun yr -1 , an age of 1.3-2.2 Gyr, and a stellar mass of ∼2 x 10 11 M sun . We detect several faint emission lines, with emission-line ratios of [N II]/Hα, [S II]/Hα, and [O II]/[O III] typical of low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions. Thus, neither the stellar continuum nor the nebular emission implies active star formation. The current SFR is <1% of the past average SFR. If this galaxy is representative of compact quiescent galaxies beyond z = 2, it implies that quenching of star formation is extremely efficient and also indicates that low luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) could be common in these objects. Nuclear emission is a potential concern for the size measurement. However, we show that the AGN contributes ∼<8% to the rest-frame optical emission. A possible post-starburst population may affect size measurements more strongly; although a 0.5 Gyr old stellar population can make up ∼<10% of the total stellar mass, it could account for up to ∼40% of the optical light. Nevertheless, this spectrum shows that this compact galaxy is dominated by an evolved stellar population.

  16. Lattice parameter values and phase transitions for the Cu{sub 2}Cd{sub 1-z}Mn{sub z}SnSe{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}Cd{sub 1-z}Fe{sub z}SnSe{sub 4} alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, E. [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Quintero, M., E-mail: mquinter@ula.v [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Morocoima, M.; Quintero, E.; Grima, P.; Tovar, R.; Bocaranda, P. [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Delgado, G.E.; Contreras, J.E. [Laboratorio de Cristalografia, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Mora, A.E.; Briceno, J.M.; Avila Godoy, R.; Fernandez, J.L. [Laboratorio de Analisis Quimico y Estructural de Materiales, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Henao, J.A.; Macias, M.A. [Grupo de Investigacion en Quimica Estructural (GIQUE), Facultad de Ciencias, Escuela de Quimica, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Apartado aereo 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2009-11-03

    X-ray powder diffraction measurements and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were made on polycrystalline samples of the Cu{sub 2}Cd{sub 1-z}Mn{sub z}SnSe{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}Cd{sub 1-z}Fe{sub z}SnSe{sub 4} alloy systems. The diffraction patterns were used to show the equilibrium conditions and to derive lattice parameter values. For Cu{sub 2}Cd{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}SnSe{sub 4} as well as for Cu{sub 2}Cd{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}SnSe{sub 4} the crystal structures were refined using the Rietveld method. It was found that the internal distortion parameter sigma decreases as Cd is replaced by either Mn and/or Fe. For the Cu{sub 2}Cd{sub 1-z}Mn{sub z}SnSe{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}Cd{sub 1-z}Fe{sub z}SnSe{sub 4} alloy systems, only two single solid phase fields, the tetragonal stannite alpha(I4-bar2m) and the wurtz-stannite delta (Pmn2{sub 1}) structures were found to occur in the diagram. In addition to the tetragonal stannite alpha phase extra X-ray diffraction lines due to MnSe and/or FeSe{sub 2} were observed for as grown samples in the range 0.7 < z < 1.0. However, it was found that the amount of the extra phase decreased for the compressed samples.

  17. Analysis of angular observables of Λ_b \\to Λ (\\to pπ)μ+μ- decay in the standard and Z^' models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Aqsa; Jamil Aslam, M.; Shafaq, Saba

    2018-04-01

    In 2015, the LHCb collaboration measured the differential branching ratio d{B}/dq^2, the lepton- and hadron-side forward-backward asymmetries, denoted by A^ℓ_FB and A^{Λ}_FB, respectively, in the range 15 perform an analysis of q^2-dependent Λ_b \\to Λ (\\to p π ) μ^+μ^- angular observables at large- and low- recoil in the standard model (SM) and in a family non-universal Z^' model. The exclusive Λb\\to Λ transition is governed by the form factors, and in the present study we use the recently performed high-precision lattice QCD calculations that have well-controlled uncertainties, especially in the 15 compare their numerical values with the measurements in appropriate bins of s. In case of a possible discrepancy between the SM prediction and the measurements, we try to see if these can be accommodated though the extra neutral Z^' boson. We find that in the dimuon momentum range 15 comparing the results of these observables, we have proposed other observables such as {α}i and α^{(')}i with i =θ_{ℓ}, θ_{Λ}, φ,L, U and coefficients of different foldings P_{1, \\ldots, 9} in different bins of s in the SM and Z^' model. We illustrate that the experimental observations of the s-dependent angular observables calculated here in several bins of s can help to test the predictions of the SM and unravel new physics contributions arising due to the Z^' model in Λ_b \\to Λ (\\to p π ) μ^+μ^- decays.

  18. Anomalous Z2 antiferromagnetic topological phase in pressurized SmB6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kai-Wei; Chen, Peng-Jen

    2018-05-01

    Antiferromagnetic materials, whose time-reversal symmetry is broken, can be classified into the Z2 topology if they respect some specific symmetry. Since the theoretical proposal, however, no materials have been found to host such Z2 antiferromagnetic topological (Z2-AFT ) phase to date. Here we demonstrate that the topological Kondo insulator SmB6 can be a Z2-AFT system when pressurized to undergo an antiferromagnetic phase transition. In addition to proposing the possible candidate for a Z2-AFT material, in this work we also illustrate the anomalous topological surface states of the Z2-AFT phase which have not been discussed before. Originating from the interplay between the topological properties and the antiferromagnetic surface magnetization, the topological surface states of the Z2-AFT phase behave differently as compared with those of a topological insulator. Besides, the Z2-AFT insulators are also found promising in the generation of tunable spin currents, which is an important application in spintronics.

  19. Search for minimal supersymmetric standard model Higgs bosons H/A and for a Z{sup '} boson in the ττ final state produced in pp collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M. [Universite Mohamed Premier et LPTPM, Faculte des Sciences, Oujda (Morocco); Aad, G. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Univ. et CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Abbott, B. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Homer L. Dodge Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration; and others

    2016-11-15

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and for a heavy neutral Z{sup '} boson is performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb{sup -1} from proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The heavy resonance is assumed to decay to a τ{sup +}τ{sup -} pair with at least one τ lepton decaying to final states with hadrons and a neutrino. The search is performed in the mass range of 0.2-1.2 TeV for the MSSM neutral Higgs bosons and 0.5-2.5 TeV for the heavy neutral Z{sup '} boson. The data are in good agreement with the background predicted by the Standard Model. The results are interpreted in MSSM and Z{sup '} benchmark scenarios. The most stringent constraints on the MSSM m{sub A} tanβ space exclude at 95 % confidence level (CL) tanβ > 7.6 for m{sub A} = 200 GeV in the m{sub h}{sup mod+} MSSM scenario. For the Sequential Standard Model, a Z{sup '}{sub SSM} mass up to 1.90 TeV is excluded at 95 % CL and masses up to 1.82-2.17 TeV are excluded for a Z{sup '}{sub SFM} of the strong flavour model. (orig.)

  20. Search for minimal supersymmetric standard model Higgs Bosons H / A and for a $Z^{\\prime}$ boson in the $\\tau\\tau $ final state produced in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Verzini, M. J. Alconada; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Bella, L. Aperio; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M-S; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Baarreiro Guimrães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; De Mendizabal, J. Bilbao; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; de Renstrom, P. A. Bruckman; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, L. S.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Burr, J. T. P.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Callea, G.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvente Lopez, S.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Moursli, R. Cherkaoui El; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cueto, A.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’amen, G.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; De Sousa, M. J. Da Cunha Sargedas; Via, C. Da; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Regie, J. B. De Vivie; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Cornell, S. Díez; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudder, A. Chr.; Duffield, E. M.; Duflot, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dumancic, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; Kacimi, M. El; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Ezzi, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; de Lima, D. E. Ferreira; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gasnikova, K.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisen, M.; Geisler, M. P.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; Gentsos, C.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghneimat, M.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuli, F.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Costa, J. Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da; Gonella, G.; Gonella, L.; Gongadze, A.; de la Hoz, S. González; Parra, G. Gonzalez; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goudet, C. R.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gravila, P. M.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grevtsov, K.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Groh, S.; Grohs, J. P.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guan, W.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, R.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Hadef, A.; Hageböck, S.; Hagihara, M.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hartmann, N. M.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hayakawa, D.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J. J.; Heinrich, L.; Heinz, C.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Henkelmann, S.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Herde, H.; Herget, V.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Honda, T.; Hong, T. M.; Hooberman, B. H.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howarth, J.; Hoya, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn’ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S. -C.; Hu, Q.; Hu, S.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Huo, P.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Ishijima, N.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ito, F.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, P.; Jain, V.; Jakobi, K. B.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanneau, F.; Jeanty, L.; Jeng, G. -Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, H.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Jivan, H.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, S.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Juste Rozas, A.; Köhler, M. K.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kaji, T.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kaluza, A.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneti, S.; Kanjir, L.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Kato, C.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazanin, V. F.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Kentaro, K.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khader, M.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Kharlamova, T.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kido, S.; Kilby, C. R.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; King, M.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kiuchi, K.; Kivernyk, O.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M. H.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Kluge, E. -E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Knapik, J.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koehler, N. M.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Koi, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolb, M.; Koletsou, I.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kondrashova, N.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Köpke, L.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A. A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kosek, T.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotwal, A.; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Kowalewska, A. B.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozakai, C.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kravchenko, A.; Kretz, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kreutzfeldt, K.; Krieger, P.; Krizka, K.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M. C.; Kruskal, M.; Kubota, T.; Kucuk, H.; Kuday, S.; Kuechler, J. T.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuger, F.; Kuhl, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kukhtin, V.; Kukla, R.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kuna, M.; Kunigo, T.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; Kwan, T.; Kyriazopoulos, D.; Rosa, A. La; Navarro, J. L. La Rosa; Rotonda, L. La; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Lammers, S.; Lampl, W.; Lançon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lanfermann, M. C.; Lang, V. S.; Lange, J. C.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Manghi, F. Lasagni; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavrijsen, W.; Law, A. T.; Laycock, P.; Lazovich, T.; Lazzaroni, M.; Le, B.; Dortz, O. Le; Guirriec, E. Le; Quilleuc, E. P. Le; LeBlanc, M.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, C. A.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, B.; Lefebvre, G.; Lefebvre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehan, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leight, W. A.; Leisos, A.; Leister, A. G.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzi, B.; Leone, R.; Leone, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Leontsinis, S.; Lerner, G.; Leroy, C.; Lesage, A. A. J.; Lester, C. G.; Levchenko, M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levy, M.; Lewis, D.; Leyko, A. M.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, C.; Li, H.; Li, H. L.; Li, L.; Li, L.; Li, Q.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Liang, Z.; Liberti, B.; Liblong, A.; Lichard, P.; Lie, K.; Liebal, J.; Liebig, W.; Limosani, A.; Lin, S. C.; Lin, T. H.; Lindquist, B. E.; Lionti, A. E.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Lisovyi, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, B.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y. L.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Lleres, A.; Merino, J. Llorente; Lloyd, S. L.; Sterzo, F. Lo; Lobodzinska, E. M.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loevschall-Jensen, A. E.; Loew, K. M.; Loginov, A.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Long, B. A.; Long, J. D.; Long, R. E.; Longo, L.; Looper, K. A.; López, J. A.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lopez Paredes, B.; Lopez Paz, I.; Lopez Solis, A.; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Lösel, P. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lu, H.; Lu, N.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Luedtke, C.; Luehring, F.; Lukas, W.; Luminari, L.; Lundberg, O.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Luzi, P. M.; Lynn, D.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Lyubushkin, V.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Y.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Macdonald, C. M.; Maček, B.; Machado Miguens, J.; Madaffari, D.; Madar, R.; Maddocks, H. J.; Mader, W. F.; Madsen, A.; Maeda, J.; Maeland, S.; Maeno, T.; Maevskiy, A.; Magradze, E.; Mahlstedt, J.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maier, A. A.; Maier, T.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyukov, S.; Mamuzic, J.; Mancini, G.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Maneira, J.; Filho, L. Manhaes de Andrade; Manjarres Ramos, J.; Mann, A.; Manousos, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mansour, J. D.; Mantifel, R.; Mantoani, M.; Manzoni, S.; Mapelli, L.; Marceca, G.; March, L.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marjanovic, M.; Marley, D. E.; Marroquim, F.; Marsden, S. P.; Marshall, Z.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, B.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Latour, B. Martin dit; Martinez, M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martoiu, V. S.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massa, I.; Massa, L.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Mättig, P.; Mattmann, J.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mazini, R.; Mazza, S. M.; Fadden, N. C. Mc; Goldrick, G. Mc; Kee, S. P. Mc; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McClymont, L. I.; McDonald, E. F.; Mcfayden, J. A.; Mchedlidze, G.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Medinnis, M.; Meehan, S.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meineck, C.; Meirose, B.; Melini, D.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Melo, M.; Meloni, F.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J-P.; Meyer, J.; Theenhausen, H. Meyer Zu; Miano, F.; Middleton, R. P.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Milesi, M.; Milic, A.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Minaenko, A. A.; Minami, Y.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Minegishi, Y.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mistry, K. P.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Mlynarikova, M.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Mohapatra, S.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Monden, R.; Mondragon, M. C.; Mönig, K.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montalbano, A.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Morgenstern, S.; Mori, D.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Morinaga, M.; Morisbak, V.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Mortensen, S. S.; Morvaj, L.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, R. S. P.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Mullen, P.; Mullier, G. A.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Muškinja, M.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nachman, B. P.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nagy, E.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Narrias Villar, D. I.; Naryshkin, I.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Manh, T. Nguyen; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nooney, T.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Norjoharuddeen, N.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O’grady, F.; O’Neil, D. C.; O’Rourke, A. A.; O’Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Oleiro Seabra, L. F.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Damazio, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onogi, K.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Garzon, G. Otero y.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Pacheco Rodriguez, L.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganini, M.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palazzo, S.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Panagiotopoulou, E. St.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, A. J.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V. R.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perego, M. M.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrov, M.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M. -A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puddu, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Raine, J. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Ratti, M. G.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Ravinovich, I.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Reale, M.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reed, R. G.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reiss, A.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rimoldi, M.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Rizzi, C.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; Røhne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosien, N. -A.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryu, S.; Ryzhov, A.; Rzehorz, G. F.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; De Bruin, P. H. Sales; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sato, K.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Savic, N.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schachtner, B. M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, L.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schouwenberg, J. F. P.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schulte, A.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shirabe, S.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shope, D. R.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, I. M.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanioka, R.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Tornambe, P.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C. -L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W. -M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Nedden, M. zur; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-10-27

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and for a heavneutral Z' boson is performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb -1 from proton–proton collisions at √s=13 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The heavy resonance is assumed to decay to a τ+τ- pair with at least one τ lepton decaying to final states with hadrons and a neutrino. The search is performed in the mass range of 0.2–1.2 TeV for the MSSM neutral Higgs bosons and 0.5–2.5 TeV for the heavy neutral Z' boson. The data are in good agreement with the background predicted by the Standard Model. The results are interpreted in MSSM and Z' benchmark scenarios. The most stringent constraints on the MSSM mA – tanβ space exclude at 95 % confidence level (CL) tanβ>7.6 for mA=200 GeV in the m$mod+\\atop{h}$ MSSM scenario. For the Sequential Standard Model, a Z'SSM mass up to 1.90 TeV is excluded at 95 % CL and masses up to 1.82–2.17 TeV are excluded for a Z'SFM of the strong flavour model.

  1. Detailed Characterization of a Nanosecond-Lived Excited State: X-ray and Theoretical Investigation of the Quintet State in Photoexcited [Fe(terpy)(2)](2+)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanko, Gyoergy; Bordage, Amelie; Pápai, Mátyás Imre

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical predictions show that depending on the populations of the Fe 3d(xy), 3d(xz), and 3d(yz) orbitals two possible quintet states can exist for the high-spin state of the photoswitchable model system [Fe(terpy)(2)](2+). The differences in the structure and molecular properties of these B-5...

  2. Main: OPAQUE2ZM22Z [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available OPAQUE2ZM22Z S000017 17-May-2001 (last modified) uchi Opaque-2 (O2) target sequence...ene: maize 22-kD zein; transacting factor: 02; O2; opaque; 22-kD zein; seed; ACGT; opaque-2; maize (Zea mays) TCCACGTAGA ...

  3. Operator analysis of physical states on magnetized T{sup 2}/Z{sub N} orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Tomo-hiro, E-mail: t-abe@scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Fujimoto, Yukihiro, E-mail: Fujimoto@het.phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Kobayashi, Tatsuo, E-mail: kobayashi@particle.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Miura, Takashi, E-mail: takashi.miura@people.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Nishiwaki, Kenji, E-mail: nishiken@kias.re.kr [Regional Centre for Accelerator-based Particle Physics, Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad 211 019 (India); School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130 722 (Korea, Republic of); Sakamoto, Makoto, E-mail: dragon@kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    We discuss an effective way for analyzing the system on the magnetized twisted orbifolds in operator formalism, especially in the complicated cases T{sup 2}/Z{sub 3}, T{sup 2}/Z{sub 4} and T{sup 2}/Z{sub 6}. We can obtain the exact and analytical results which can be applicable for any larger values of the quantized magnetic flux M, and show that the (non-diagonalized) kinetic terms are generated via our formalism and the number of the surviving physical states are calculable in a rigorous manner by simply following usual procedures in linear algebra in any case. Our approach is very powerful when we try to examine properties of the physical states on (complicated) magnetized orbifolds T{sup 2}/Z{sub 3}, T{sup 2}/Z{sub 4}, T{sup 2}/Z{sub 6} (and would be in other cases on higher-dimensional torus) and could be an essential tool for actual realistic model construction based on these geometries. (Note: This article is registered under preprint number: (arXiv:1409.5421).)

  4. Top-quark loop corrections in Z+jet and Z + 2 jet production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, John M.; Keith Ellis, R.

    2017-01-01

    The sophistication of current predictions for $Z+$jet production at hadron colliders necessitates a re-evaluation of any approximations inherent in the theoretical calculations. In this paper we address one such issue, the inclusion of mass effects in top-quark loops. We ameliorate an existing calculation of $Z+1$~jet and $Z+2$~jet production by presenting exact analytic formulae for amplitudes containing top-quark loops that enter at next-to-leading order in QCD. Although approximations based on an expansion in powers of $1/m_t^2$ can lead to poor high-energy behavior, an exact treatment of top-quark loops demonstrates that their effect is small and has limited phenomenological interest.

  5. Challenging the Standard Model with the muon g − 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The discrepancy between experiment and the Standard Model prediction of ... The measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon aµ = (g−2)/2 ( ... to evaluate the leading-order hadronic term (see [3,4] for recent reviews). .... update of their previous analysis and a new preliminary one based on data collected.

  6. THE SYMMETRY BREAKING PHENOMENON IN 1,2,3-TRIOXOLENE AND C2Y3Z2 (Z= O, S, Se, Te, Z= H, F COMPOUNDS: A PSEUDO JAHN-TELLER ORIGIN STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Ilkhani

    Full Text Available 1,2,3-Trioxolene (C2O3H2 is an intermediate in the acetylene ozonolysis reaction which is called primary ozonide intermediate. The symmetry breaking phenomenon were studied in C2O3H2 and six its derivatives then oxygen atoms of the molecule are substituted by sulphur, selenium, tellurium (C2Y3H2 and hydrogen ligands are replaced with fluorine atoms (C2Y3F2. Based on calculation results, all seven C2Y3Z2 considered in the series were puckered from unstable planar configuration with C2v symmetry to a Cs symmetry stable geometry. The vibronic coupling interaction between the 1A1 ground state and the first excited state 1B1 via the (1A1+1B1 ⊗b1 pseudo Jahn-Teller effect problem is the reason of the breaking symmetry phenomenon and un-planarity of the C2Y3 ring in the C2Y3Z2 series.

  7. Histone H2A.Z is essential for estrogen receptor signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gévry, Nicolas; Hardy, Sara; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Laflamme, Liette; Svotelis, Amy; Robert, François; Gaudreau, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Incorporation of H2A.Z into the chromatin of inactive promoters has been shown to poise genes for their expression. Here we provide strong evidence that H2A.Z is incorporated into the promoter regions of estrogen receptor (ERα) target genes only upon gene induction, and that, in a cyclic pattern. Moreover, members of the human H2A.Z-depositing complex, p400, also follow the same gene recruitment kinetics as H2A.Z. Importantly, cellular depletion of H2A.Z or p400 leads to a severe defect in estrogen signaling, including loss of estrogen-specific cell proliferation. We find that incorporation of H2A.Z within TFF1 promoter chromatin allows nucleosomes to adopt preferential positions along the DNA translational axis. Finally, we provide evidence that H2A.Z is essential to allow estrogen-responsive enhancer function. Taken together, our results provide strong mechanistic insight into how H2A.Z regulates ERα-mediated gene expression and provide a novel link between H2A.Z–p400 and ERα-dependent gene regulation and enhancer function. PMID:19515975

  8. Higher derivative operators from Scherk-Schwarz supersymmetry breaking on Τ2/Z2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghilencea, D.M.

    2005-09-01

    In orbifold compactifications on Τ 2 /Z 2 with Scherk-Schwarz supersymmetry breaking, it is shown that (brane-localised) superpotential interactions and (bulk) gauge interactions generate at one-loop higher derivative counterterms to the mass of the brane (or zero-mode of the bulk) scalar field. These brane-localised operators are generated by integrating out the bulk modes of the initial theory which, although supersymmetric, is nevertheless non-renormalisable. It is argued that such operators, of non-perturbative origin and not protected by non-renormalisation theorems, are generic in orbifold compactifications and play a crucial role in the UV behaviour of the two-point Green function of the scalar field self-energy. Their presence in the action with unknown coefficients prevents one from making predictions about physics at (momentum) scales close to/above the compactification scale(s). Our results extend to the case of two dimensional orbifolds, previous findings for S 1 /Z 2 and S 1 /(Z 2 x Z 2 ') compactifications where brane-localised higher derivative operators are also dynamically generated at loop level, regardless of the details of the supersymmetry breaking mechanism. We stress the importance of these operators for the hierarchy and the cosmological constant problems in compactified theories. (orig.)

  9. Variational discussion of the Hamiltonian Z(N) spin model in 1+1 and 2+1 dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jengo, R.; Masperi, L.; Omero, C.

    1982-01-01

    We study the Z(N) spin model, as well as its limiting forms for N → infinity by means of a variational approach. We find, for 1 + 1 dimensions, the two transitions of the model separating the disordered, massless and ordered phases. In the case of 2 + 1 dimensions, we obtain only the disorder-order phase transition which implies for N → infinity single confining phase for the dual U(1) gauge theory. (orig.)

  10. THE DEAD SEQUENCE: A CLEAR BIMODALITY IN GALAXY COLORS FROM z = 0 to z = 2.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brammer, G. B.; Whitaker, K. E.; Van Dokkum, P. G.; Marchesini, D.; Lee, K.-S.; Muzzin, A.; Labbe, I.; Franx, M.; Quadri, R. F.; Kriek, M.; Illingworth, G.; Rudnick, G.

    2009-01-01

    We select 25,000 galaxies from the NEWFIRM Medium Band Survey (NMBS) to study the rest-frame U - V color distribution of galaxies at 0 < z ∼< 2.5. The five unique NIR filters of the NMBS enable the precise measurement of photometric redshifts and rest-frame colors for 9900 galaxies at 1 < z < 2.5. The rest-frame U - V color distribution at all z ∼< 2.5 is bimodal, with a red peak, a blue peak, and a population of galaxies in between (the green valley). Model fits to the optical-NIR spectral energy distributions and the distribution of MIPS-detected galaxies indicate that the colors of galaxies in the green valley are determined largely by the amount of reddening by dust. This result does not support the simplest interpretation of green valley objects as a transition from blue star forming to red quiescent galaxies. We show that correcting the rest-frame colors for dust reddening allows a remarkably clean separation between the red and blue sequences up to z2.5. Our study confirms that dusty-starburst galaxies can contribute a significant fraction to red-sequence samples selected on the basis of a single rest-frame color (i.e., U - V), so extra care must be taken if samples of truly 'red and dead' galaxies are desired. Interestingly, of galaxies detected at 24 μm, 14% remain on the red sequence after applying the reddening correction.

  11. A New Numerical Method for Z2 Topological Insulators with Strong Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Yutaka; Katsura, Hosho; Koma, Tohru

    2017-12-01

    We propose a new method to numerically compute the Z2 indices for disordered topological insulators in Kitaev's periodic table. All of the Z2 indices are derived from the index formulae which are expressed in terms of a pair of projections introduced by Avron, Seiler, and Simon. For a given pair of projections, the corresponding index is determined by the spectrum of the difference between the two projections. This difference exhibits remarkable and useful properties, as it is compact and has a supersymmetric structure in the spectrum. These properties enable highly efficient numerical calculation of the indices of disordered topological insulators. The method, which we propose, is demonstrated for the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang and Wilson-Dirac models whose topological phases are characterized by a Z2 index in two and three dimensions, respectively.

  12. VARIATIONS OF THE 10 μm SILICATE FEATURES IN THE ACTIVELY ACCRETING T TAURI STARS: DG Tau AND XZ Tau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bary, Jeffrey S.; Leisenring, Jarron M.; Skrutskie, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    Using the Infrared Spectrograph aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, we observed multiple epochs of 11 actively accreting T Tauri stars in the nearby Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. In total, 88 low-resolution mid-infrared spectra were collected over 1.5 years in Cycles 2 and 3. The results of this multi-epoch survey show that the 10 μm silicate complex in the spectra of two sources-DG Tau and XZ Tau-undergoes significant variations with the silicate feature growing both weaker and stronger over month- and year-long timescales. Shorter timescale variations on day- to week-long timescales were not detected within the measured flux errors. The time resolution coverage of this data set is inadequate for determining if the variations are periodic. Pure emission compositional models of the silicate complex in each epoch of the DG Tau and XZ Tau spectra provide poor fits to the observed silicate features. These results agree with those of previous groups that attempted to fit only single-epoch observations of these sources. Simple two-temperature, two-slab models with similar compositions successfully reproduce the observed variations in the silicate features. These models hint at a self-absorption origin of the diminution of the silicate complex instead of a compositional change in the population of emitting dust grains. We discuss several scenarios for producing such variability including disk shadowing, vertical mixing, variations in disk heating, and disk wind events associated with accretion outbursts.

  13. The Emerging JBIG2 Standard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howard, P.; Kossentini, F.; Martins, Bo

    1998-01-01

    The Joint Bi-level Image Experts Group (JBIG), an international study group affiliated with ISO/IEC and ITU-T, is in the process of drafting a new standard for lossy and lossless compression of bi-level images. The new standard, informally referred to as JBIG2, will support model-based coding...... with imperceptible loss of quality. It is expected that JBIG2 will become an International Standard by 2000....

  14. Bifurcation in Z2-symmetry quadratic polynomial systems with delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunrui; Zheng Baodong

    2009-01-01

    Z 2 -symmetry systems are considered. Firstly the general forms of Z 2 -symmetry quadratic polynomial system are given, and then a three-dimensional Z 2 equivariant system is considered, which describes the relations of two predator species for a single prey species. Finally, the explicit formulas for determining the Fold and Hopf bifurcations are obtained by using the normal form theory and center manifold argument.

  15. Global fits of the two-loop renormalized Two-Higgs-Doublet model with soft Z 2 breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Debtosh; Eberhardt, Otto

    2015-11-01

    We determine the next-to-leading order renormalization group equations for the Two-Higgs-Doublet model with a softly broken Z 2 symmetry and CP conservation in the scalar potential. We use them to identify the parameter regions which are stable up to the Planck scale and find that in this case the quartic couplings of the Higgs potential cannot be larger than 1 in magnitude and that the absolute values of the S-matrix eigenvalues cannot exceed 2 .5 at the electroweak symmetry breaking scale. Interpreting the 125 GeV resonance as the light CP -even Higgs eigenstate, we combine stability constraints, electroweak precision and flavour observables with the latest ATLAS and CMS data on Higgs signal strengths and heavy Higgs searches in global parameter fits to all four types of Z 2 symmetry. We quantify the maximal deviations from the alignment limit and find that in type II and Y the mass of the heavy CP -even ( CP -odd) scalar cannot be smaller than 340 GeV (360 GeV). Also, we pinpoint the physical parameter regions compatible with a stable scalar potential up to the Planck scale. Motivated by the question how natural a Higgs mass of 125 GeV can be in the context of a Two-Higgs-Doublet model, we also address the hierarchy problem and find that the Two-Higgs-Doublet model does not offer a perturbative solution to it beyond 5 TeV.

  16. Lattice parameter values and phase transitions for the Cu{sub 2}Cd{sub 1-z}Mn {sub z}GeSe{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}Cd{sub 1-z}Fe {sub z}GeSe{sub 4} alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintero, E. [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela); Tovar, R. [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela); Quintero, M. [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela)]. E-mail: mquinter@ula.ve; Delgado, G.E. [Laboratorio de Cristalografia, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela); Morocoima, M. [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela); Caldera, D. [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela); Ruiz, J. [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela); Mora, A.E. [Laboratorio de Analisis Quimico y Estructural de Materiales, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela); Briceno, M. [Laboratorio de Analisis Quimico y Estructural de Materiales, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela); Fernandez, J.L. [Laboratorio de Analisis Quimico y Estructural de Materiales, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela)

    2007-04-25

    X-ray powder diffraction measurements and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were made on polycrystalline samples of the Cu{sub 2}Cd{sub 1-z}Mn {sub z}GeSe{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}Cd{sub 1-z}Fe {sub z}GeSe{sub 4} alloy systems. The diffraction patterns were used to show the equilibrium conditions and to derive lattice parameter values. The effect of the annealing temperature and cooling rate to room temperature are discussed. For the Cu{sub 2}Cd{sub 1-z}Fe {sub z}GeSe{sub 4} system, only two single solid phase fields, the tetragonal stannite {alpha} and the wurtz-stannite {delta} structures were found to occur in the diagram. For the Cu{sub 2}Cd{sub 1-z}Mn {sub z}GeSe{sub 4} system, in addition to the tetragonal stannite {alpha} and the wurtz-stannite {delta} phases, MnSe was found to exist in the diagram. The DTA experiments showed that the cooling curves for both systems exhibited effects of undercooling.

  17. Lattice parameter values and phase transitions for the Cu2Cd1-zMnzSnSe4 and Cu2Cd1-zFezSnSe4 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, E.; Quintero, M.; Morocoima, M.; Quintero, E.; Grima, P.; Tovar, R.; Bocaranda, P.; Delgado, G.E.; Contreras, J.E.; Mora, A.E.; Briceno, J.M.; Avila Godoy, R.; Fernandez, J.L.; Henao, J.A.; Macias, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray powder diffraction measurements and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were made on polycrystalline samples of the Cu 2 Cd 1-z Mn z SnSe 4 and Cu 2 Cd 1-z Fe z SnSe 4 alloy systems. The diffraction patterns were used to show the equilibrium conditions and to derive lattice parameter values. For Cu 2 Cd 0.8 Fe 0.2 SnSe 4 as well as for Cu 2 Cd 0.2 Fe 0.8 SnSe 4 the crystal structures were refined using the Rietveld method. It was found that the internal distortion parameter σ decreases as Cd is replaced by either Mn and/or Fe. For the Cu 2 Cd 1-z Mn z SnSe 4 and Cu 2 Cd 1-z Fe z SnSe 4 alloy systems, only two single solid phase fields, the tetragonal stannite α(I4-bar2m) and the wurtz-stannite δ (Pmn2 1 ) structures were found to occur in the diagram. In addition to the tetragonal stannite α phase extra X-ray diffraction lines due to MnSe and/or FeSe 2 were observed for as grown samples in the range 0.7 < z < 1.0. However, it was found that the amount of the extra phase decreased for the compressed samples.

  18. Diagrams for certain quotients of PSL(2,Z[i])

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in their action on the complex plane. PSL(2, Z) is a Fuchsian group, 1 is discontinuous in C and therefore has no Fuchsian subgroups [2] of finite index. As with PSL (2, Z) and the other Euclidean Bianchi groups, many properties of 1 depends on its decomposition as a non-trivial amalgam. Real interest in Picard and Bianchi ...

  19. Flavour changing decays of Z0 in supersymmetric models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamberini, G.; Ridolfi, G.

    1987-01-01

    The possible existence of detectable flavour-changing branching modes of the Z 0 boson is examined in the context of supersymmetric models of currrent interest. An explicit calculation shows that in the so-called minimal version of the supersymmetric standard model the branching ratios for Z 0 →banti s or tanti c are not larger than in the standard model itself and are as such unobservable. On the contrary, we find that in a recently proposed extension of the supersymmetric standard model the mode Z 0 →tanti c may be at the order of being detectable. (orig.)

  20. Z-2 Suit Support Stand and MKIII Suit Center of Gravity Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuan Q.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's next generation spacesuits are the Z-Series suits, made for a range of possible exploration missions in the near future. The prototype Z-1 suit has been developed and assembled to incorporate new technologies that has never been utilized before in the Apollo suits and the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). NASA engineers tested the Z-1 suit extensively in order to developed design requirements for the new Z-2 suit. At the end of 2014, NASA will be receiving the new Z-2 suit to perform more testing and to further develop the new technologies of the suit. In order to do so, a suit support stand will be designed and fabricated to support the Z-2 suit during maintenance, sizing, and structural leakage testing. The Z-2 Suit Support Stand (Z2SSS) will be utilized for these purposes in the early testing stages of the Z-2 suit.

  1. The HER2-binding affibody molecule (Z(HER2∶342₂ increases radiosensitivity in SKBR-3 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Ekerljung

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that the HER2-specific affibody molecule (Z(HER2∶342₂ inhibits proliferation of SKBR-3 cells. Here, we continue to investigate its biological effects in vitro by studying receptor dimerization and clonogenic survival following irradiation. We found that (Z(HER2∶342₂ sensitizes the HER2-overexpressing cell line SKBR-3 to ionizing radiation. The survival after exposure to (Z(HER2∶342₂ and 8 Gy (S(8Gy 0.006 was decreased by a factor four compared to the untreated (S(8Gy 0.023. The low HER2-expressing cell line MCF-7 was more radiosensitive than SKBR-3 but did not respond to (Z(HER2∶342₂. Treatment by (Z(HER2∶342₂ strongly increased the levels of dimerized and phosphorylated HER2 even after 5 minutes of stimulation. The monomeric Z(HER2∶342 does not seem to be able to induce receptor phosphorylation and dimerization or sensitize cells to irradiation.

  2. DISCOVERING THE MISSING 2.2 < z < 3 QUASARS BY COMBINING OPTICAL VARIABILITY AND OPTICAL/NEAR-INFRARED COLORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xuebing; Wang Ran; Bian Fuyan; Jiang Linhua; Fan Xiaohui; Schmidt, Kasper B.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of quasars in the redshift range 2.2 < z < 3 is known to be very inefficient because the optical colors of such quasars are indistinguishable from those of stars. Recent studies have proposed using optical variability or near-infrared (near-IR) colors to improve the identification of the missing quasars in this redshift range. Here we present a case study combining both methods. We select a sample of 70 quasar candidates from variables in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, which are non-ultraviolet excess sources and have UKIDSS near-IR public data. They are clearly separated into two parts on the Y - K/g - z color-color diagram, and 59 of them meet or lie close to a newly proposed Y - K/g - z selection criterion for z < 4 quasars. Of these 59 sources, 44 were previously identified as quasars in SDSS DR7, and 35 of them are quasars at 2.2 < z < 3. We present spectroscopic observations of 14 of 15 remaining quasar candidates using the Bok 2.3 m telescope and the MMT 6.5 m telescope, and successfully identify all of them as new quasars at z = 2.36-2.88. We also apply this method to a sample of 643 variable quasar candidates with SDSS-UKIDSS nine-band photometric data selected from 1875 new quasar candidates in SDSS Stripe 82 given by Butler and Bloom based on the time-series selections, and find that 188 of them are probably new quasars with photometric redshifts at 2.2 < z < 3. Our results indicate that the combination of optical variability and optical/near-IR colors is probably the most efficient way to find 2.2 < z < 3 quasars and is very helpful for constructing a complete quasar sample. We discuss its implications for ongoing and upcoming large optical and near-IR sky surveys.

  3. PHOTOMETRIC, SPECTROSCOPIC, AND ORBITAL PERIOD STUDY OF THREE EARLY-TYPE SEMI-DETACHED SYSTEMS: XZ AQL, UX HER, AND AT PEG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zola, S. [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, ul. Orla 171, PL-30-244 Krakow (Poland); Baştürk, Ö.; Şenavcı, H. V.; Özavcı, İ.; Yılmaz, M. [Ankara University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, Tandoğan, TR-06100, Ankara (Turkey); Liakos, A. [Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, Penteli, Athens (Greece); Gazeas, K. [Department of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Zografos, Athens (Greece); Nelson, R. H. [1393 Garvin Street, Prince George, BC V2M 3Z1 (Canada); Zakrzewski, B., E-mail: szola@oa.uj.edu.pl [Mt Suhora Observatory, Pedagogical University, ul. Podchorazych 2, PL-30-084 Krakow (Poland)

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a combined photometric, spectroscopic, and orbital period study of three early-type eclipsing binary systems: XZ Aql, UX Her, and AT Peg. As a result, we have derived the absolute parameters of their components and, on that basis, we discuss their evolutionary states. Furthermore, we compare their parameters with those of other binary systems and with theoretical models. An analysis of all available up-to-date times of minima indicated that all three systems studied here show cyclic orbital changes; their origin is discussed in detail. Finally, we performed a frequency analysis for possible pulsational behavior, and as a result we suggest that XZ Aql hosts a δ Scuti component.

  4. Constraints on the standard model by measuring cross sections and asymmetries for Z {yields} ff-bar with Aleph detector at LEP; Contraintes du modele standard par les mesures de sections efficaces et des asymetries Z {yields} ff-bar avec le detecteur Aleph au LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucotte, A. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 74 - Annecy (France). Lab. de Physique des Particules Elementaires; Universite Claude Bernard, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1996-05-14

    This work is devoted to the precision tests of the electro-week sector of the standard model via the determination of the Z-lineshape parameters M{sub Z}, {gamma}{sub Z}, {sigma}{sub had}{sup 0} and R{sub had} extracted from the fermionic cross-sections measured on 89 to 94 data in Aleph. The first section reminds the formalism and the observables used to describe the Z-resonance physics. In a second step, the LEP collider is presented with the procedures used to determine the beam energy, this parameter being the main source of uncertainty in M{sub Z} and {gamma}{sub Z} determination. In the following part, the Aleph experimental context is described, together with the measurement of the luminosity from Bhabha counting. Then the hadronic cross section measurements are presented, emphasizing on the improvement performed on the systematic bias evaluation to the hadrons selection. This leads to a precision at the per mille level in cross-sections. Leptonic cross-sections measured in Aleph are also reported. The Z-resonance parameters are then derived. A great agreement is observed with the prediction of the standard model of the EW interactions. The interpretation of such measurements within this model leads to the determination of the number of light neutrinos species and to the constraints on the top quark mass, compatible with direct measurements from Fermilab. (author)

  5. Simulating the SU(2) sector of the standard model with dynamical fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, I. Hsiu.

    1988-01-01

    The two-generation SU(2) sector of the standard model with zero Yukawa couplings is studied on the lattice. The results from analytic studies and simulations with quenched fermions are reviewed. The methods and results of a Langevin simulation with dynamical fermions are presented. Implications for the strongly coupled standard model are mentioned. 23 refs

  6. The zeros of az2J″ν(z+bzJ′ν(z+cJν(z as functions of order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. McD. Mercer

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available If j″νk denotes the kth positive zero of the Bessel function J″ν(x, it has been shown recently by Lorch and Szego [2] that j″ν1 increases with ν in ν>0 and that (with k fixed in 2,3,… j″νk increases in 00. The present paper, by using a different kind of analysis, re-obtains these conclusions as a special case of a more general result concerning the positive zeros of the function az2J″ν(z+bzJ′ν(z+cJν(z. Here, the constants a, b and c are subject to certain mild restrictions.

  7. Stereoselective Synthesis of(Z)-4-(2-Bromovinyl)benzenesulfonyl Azide and Its Synthetic Utility for the Transformation to(2)-N-[4-(2-Bromovinyl)benzenesulfonyl]imidates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wensheng; KUANG Chunxiang; YANG Qing

    2009-01-01

    A novel method for the stereoselective synthesis of(Z)-4-(2-bromovinyl)benzenesulfonyl azide by simultaneous azidation and debrorninative decarboxylation of anti-2,3-dibromo-3-(4-chlorosulfonylphenyl)propanoic acid using NaN3 only was developed.Facile transformation of(Z)-4-(2-bromovinyl)benzenesulfonyl azide to(Z)-N-[4(2-bromovinyl)benzenesulfonyl]imidates was also achieved by Cu-catalyzed three-component coulping of (Z)-4-(2-bromovinyi)benzenesulfonyl azide,terminal alkynes and alcohols/phenols.

  8. A comprehensive model on field-effect pnpn devices (Z2-FET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taur, Yuan; Lacord, Joris; Parihar, Mukta Singh; Wan, Jing; Martinie, Sebastien; Lee, Kyunghwa; Bawedin, Maryline; Barbe, Jean-Charles; Cristoloveanu, Sorin

    2017-08-01

    A comprehensive model for field-effect pnpn devices (Z2-FET) is presented. It is based on three current continuity equations coupled to two MOS equations. The model reproduces the characteristic S-shaped I-V curve when the device is driven by a current source. The negative resistance region at intermediate currents occurs as the center junction undergoes a steep transition from reverse to forward bias. Also playing a vital role are the mix and match of the minority carrier diffusion current and the generation recombination current. Physical insights to the key mechanisms at work are gained by regional approximations of the model, from which analytical expressions for the maximum and minimum voltages at the switching points are derived. From 1981 to 2001, he was with the Silicon Technology Department of IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York, where he was Manager of Exploratory Devices and Processes. Areas in which he has worked and published include latchup-free 1-um CMOS, self-aligned TiSi2, 0.5-um CMOS and BiCMOS, shallow trench isolation, 0.25-um CMOS with n+/p + poly gates, SOI, low-temperature CMOS, and 0.1-um CMOS. Since October 2001, he has been a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego. Dr. Yuan Taur was elected a Fellow of the IEEE in 1998. He has served as Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Electron Device Letters from 1999 to 2011. He authored or co-authored over 200 technical papers and holds 14 U.S. patents. He co-authored a book, ;Fundamentals of Modern VLSI Devices,; published by Cambridge University Press in 1998. The 2nd edition was published in 2009. Dr. Yuan Taur received IEEE Electron Devices Society's J. J. Ebers Award in 2012 ;for contributions to the advancement of several generations of CMOS process technologies.;

  9. (Z-Ethyl 3-(4-chlorophenyl-2-cyano-3-(2,6-difluorobenzamidoacrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaoyan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C19H13ClF2N2O3, was prepared by the reaction of (Z-ethyl 3-amino-3-(4-chlorophenyl-2-cyanoacrylate and 2,6-difluorobenzoyl chloride. The dihedral angle between the chlorobenzene and fluorobenzene rings is 37.0 (1°. The ethyl group is disordered over two positions [occupancies = 0.52 (2:0.48 (2]. In addition to intramolecular N—H...O and N—H...F hydrogen bonds, the crystal packing shows the molecules to be connected by intermolecular C—H...O and C—H...N hydrogen bonds.

  10. Selective Synthesis of Z-1,4-Disilyl-2-butenes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šabata, Stanislav; Blechta, Vratislav; Karban, Jindřich; Pleska, A.; Včelák, Jaroslav; Hetflejš, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 11 (2009), s. 1953-1958 ISSN 0137- 5083 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/0617; GA ČR GA203/03/1566 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : Z-1,4-disilyl-2-butenes * 1,4-dilithio-2-butene * trialkylchlorosilanes Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.523, year: 2009

  11. Phenomenology of an SU(2)×SU(2)×U(1) model with lepton-flavour non-universality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucenna, Sofiane M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN,Via Enrico Fermi 40, 100044 Frascati (Italy); Celis, Alejandro [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Fakultät für Physik,Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München,Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 München (Germany); Fuentes-Martín, Javier; Vicente, Avelino [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Universitat de València - CSIC,E-46071 València (Spain); Virto, Javier [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics,Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern,CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2016-12-14

    We investigate a gauge extension of the Standard Model in light of the observed hints of lepton universality violation in b→cℓν and b→sℓ{sup +}ℓ{sup −} decays at BaBar, Belle and LHCb. The model consists of an extended gauge group SU(2){sub 1}×SU(2){sub 2}×U(1){sub Y} which breaks spontaneously around the TeV scale to the electroweak gauge group. Fermion mixing effects with vector-like fermions give rise to potentially large new physics contributions in flavour transitions mediated by W{sup ′} and Z{sup ′} bosons. This model can ease tensions in B-physics data while satisfying stringent bounds from flavour physics, and electroweak precision data. Possible ways to test the proposed new physics scenario with upcoming experimental measurements are discussed. Among other predictions, the ratios R{sub M}=Γ(B→Mμ{sup +}μ{sup −})/Γ(B→Me{sup +}e{sup −}), with M=K{sup ∗},ϕ, are found to be reduced with respect to the Standard Model expectation R{sub M}≃1.

  12. A Hierarchical Z-Scheme α-Fe2 O3 /g-C3 N4 Hybrid for Enhanced Photocatalytic CO2 Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhifeng; Wan, Weiming; Li, Huaming; Yuan, Shouqi; Zhao, Huijun; Wong, Po Keung

    2018-03-01

    The challenge in the artificial photosynthesis of fossil resources from CO 2 by utilizing solar energy is to achieve stable photocatalysts with effective CO 2 adsorption capacity and high charge-separation efficiency. A hierarchical direct Z-scheme system consisting of urchin-like hematite and carbon nitride provides an enhanced photocatalytic activity of reduction of CO 2 to CO, yielding a CO evolution rate of 27.2 µmol g -1 h -1 without cocatalyst and sacrifice reagent, which is >2.2 times higher than that produced by g-C 3 N 4 alone (10.3 µmol g -1 h -1 ). The enhanced photocatalytic activity of the Z-scheme hybrid material can be ascribed to its unique characteristics to accelerate the reduction process, including: (i) 3D hierarchical structure of urchin-like hematite and preferable basic sites which promotes the CO 2 adsorption, and (ii) the unique Z-scheme feature efficiently promotes the separation of the electron-hole pairs and enhances the reducibility of electrons in the conduction band of the g-C 3 N 4 . The origin of such an obvious advantage of the hierarchical Z-scheme is not only explained based on the experimental data but also investigated by modeling CO 2 adsorption and CO adsorption on the three different atomic-scale surfaces via density functional theory calculation. The study creates new opportunities for hierarchical hematite and other metal-oxide-based Z-scheme system for solar fuel generation. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. THE SINS/zC-SINF SURVEY of z {approx} 2 GALAXY KINEMATICS: OUTFLOW PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Sarah F.; Genzel, Reinhard [Department of Astronomy, Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Foerster-Schreiber, Natascha M.; Buschkamp, Peter; Davies, Ric; Eisenhauer, Frank; Kurk, Jaron; Lutz, Dieter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Giessenbachstr.1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Griffin, Kristen Shapiro [Space Sciences Research Group, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Mancini, Chiara; Renzini, Alvio [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dellOsservatorio 5, Padova, I-35122 (Italy); Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Peng, Yingjie [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics, Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 (Switzerland); Bouche, Nicolas [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, 14, avenue Edouard Berlin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Burkert, Andreas [Department fuer Physik, Universitaets-Sternwarte Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (USM), Scheinerstr. 1, Muenchen, D-81679 (Germany); Cresci, Giovanni [Istituto Nazionale di AstrofisicaOsservatorio Astronomico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Genel, Shy [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hicks, Erin K. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, U.W., Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Naab, Thorsten, E-mail: sfnewman@berkeley.edu [Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl Schwarzschildstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2012-12-10

    Using SINFONI H{alpha}, [N II], and [S II] AO data of 27 z {approx} 2 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from the SINS and zC-SINF surveys, we explore the dependence of outflow strength (via the broad flux fraction) on various galaxy parameters. For galaxies that have evidence for strong outflows, we find that the broad emission is spatially extended to at least the half-light radius ({approx}a few kpc). Decomposition of the [S II] doublet into broad and narrow components suggests that this outflowing gas probably has a density of {approx}10-100 cm{sup -3}, less than that of the star-forming gas (600 cm{sup -3}). There is a strong correlation of the H{alpha} broad flux fraction with the star formation surface density of the galaxy, with an apparent threshold for strong outflows occurring at 1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. Above this threshold, we find that SFGs with log m{sub *} > 10 have similar or perhaps greater wind mass-loading factors ({eta} = M-dot{sub out}/SFR) and faster outflow velocities than lower mass SFGs, suggesting that the majority of outflowing gas at z {approx} 2 may derive from high-mass SFGs. The mass-loading factor is also correlated with the star formation rate (SFR), galaxy size, and inclination, such that smaller, more star-forming, and face-on galaxies launch more powerful outflows. We propose that the observed threshold for strong outflows and the observed mass loading of these winds can be explained by a simple model wherein break-out of winds is governed by pressure balance in the disk.

  14. 3D BUILDING MODELING IN LOD2 USING THE CITYGML STANDARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Preka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, scientific research has been increasingly focused on the third dimension in all fields and especially in sciences related to geographic information, the visualization of natural phenomena and the visualization of the complex urban reality. The field of 3D visualization has achieved rapid development and dynamic progress, especially in urban applications, while the technical restrictions on the use of 3D information tend to subside due to advancements in technology. A variety of 3D modeling techniques and standards has already been developed, as they gain more traction in a wide range of applications. Such a modern standard is the CityGML, which is open and allows for sharing and exchanging of 3D city models. Within the scope of this study, key issues for the 3D modeling of spatial objects and cities are considered and specifically the key elements and abilities of CityGML standard, which is used in order to produce a 3D model of 14 buildings that constitute a block at the municipality of Kaisariani, Athens, in Level of Detail 2 (LoD2, as well as the corresponding relational database. The proposed tool is based upon the 3DCityDB package in tandem with a geospatial database (PostgreSQL w/ PostGIS 2.0 extension. The latter allows for execution of complex queries regarding the spatial distribution of data. The system is implemented in order to facilitate a real-life scenario in a suburb of Athens.

  15. Search for Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model Higgs bosons $H/A$ and for a $Z^{\\prime}$ boson in the $\\tau \\tau$ final state produced in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$~TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Aben, Rosemarie; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adachi, Shunsuke; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alshehri, Azzah Aziz; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska-Blenessy, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Billoud, Thomas Remy Victor; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bisanz, Tobias; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blue, Andrew; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bokan, Petar; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Burr, Jonathan Thomas Peter; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Callea, Giuseppe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvente Lopez, Sergio; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelijn, Remco; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Cerio, Benjamin; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cueto, Ana; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Díez Cornell, Sergio; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudder, Andreas Christian; Duffield, Emily Marie; Duflot, Laurent; Dührssen, Michael; Dumancic, Mirta; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Ezzi, Mohammed; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farina, Edoardo Maria; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gasnikova, Ksenia; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Ruchi; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Hageböck, Stephan; Hagihara, Mutsuto; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayakawa, Daiki; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herde, Hannah; Herget, Verena; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Honda, Takuya; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hoya, Joaquin; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Kentaro, Kawade; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Kharlamova, Tatyana; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kilby, Callum; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koehler, Nicolas Maximilian; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kravchenko, Anton; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Changqiao; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina Maria; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; López, Jorge Andrés; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Malone, Claire; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Minegishi, Yuji; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Mlynarikova, Michaela; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Stefanie; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganini, Michela; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palazzo, Serena; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puddu, Daniele; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Ravinovich, Ilia; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Reale, Marilea; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reed, Robert; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reiss, Andreas; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rimoldi, Marco; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosien, Nils-Arne; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sato, Koji; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Savic, Natascha; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schachtner, Balthasar Maria; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Leigh; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schier, Sheena; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian Ralf; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schott, Matthias; Schouwenberg, Jeroen; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schuh, Natascha; Schulte, Alexandra; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shirabe, Shohei; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Shope, David Richard; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sickles, Anne Marie; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smiesko, Juraj; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snyder, Ian Michael; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Hong Ye; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanioka, Ryo; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Tornambe, Peter; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tu, Yanjun; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turgeman, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tyndel, Mike; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vasquez, Gerardo; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vittori, Camilla; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallangen, Veronica; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Wenxiao; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Weber, Stephen; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Michael David; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Whallon, Nikola Lazar; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilk, Fabian; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winston, Oliver James; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wolf, Tim Michael Heinz; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Worm, Steven D; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2016-10-27

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and for a heavy neutral $Z^{\\prime}$ boson is performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2~fb$^{-1}$ from proton--proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$~TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The heavy resonance is assumed to decay to a $\\tau^+ \\tau^-$ pair with at least one $\\tau$ lepton decaying to final states with hadrons and a neutrino. The search is performed in the mass range of 0.2--1.2~TeV for the MSSM neutral Higgs bosons and 0.5--2.5~TeV for the heavy neutral $Z^{\\prime}$ boson. The data are in good agreement with the background predicted by the Standard Model and hence results are given as upper limits on the production cross section times branching fraction of the boson decay to $\\tau^+\\tau^-$ as a function of the boson mass. The results are interpreted in MSSM and $Z^{\\prime}$ benchmark scenarios. The most stringent MSSM parameter space constraints for the Higgs boso...

  16. Universality violations at the Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1990-01-01

    Universality violations (UV) in the decays of the Z would be a clear signal for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). We explore two scenarios which lead to UV in Z decays which may be observable at LEP/SLC and are easily distinguishable from each other. For simplicity, we concentrate on the leptonic decay modes of the Z and discuss present and future limits on these two models. 6 refs., 2 figs

  17. Protected Pseudohelical Edge States in Z2-Trivial Proximitized Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Tobias; Högl, Petra; Gmitra, Martin; Kochan, Denis; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2018-04-01

    We investigate topological properties of models that describe graphene on realistic substrates which induce proximity spin-orbit coupling in graphene. A Z2 phase diagram is calculated for the parameter space of (generally different) intrinsic spin-orbit coupling on the two graphene sublattices, in the presence of Rashba coupling. The most fascinating case is that of staggered intrinsic spin-orbit coupling which, despite being topologically trivial, Z2=0 , does exhibit edge states protected by time-reversal symmetry for zigzag ribbons as wide as micrometers. We call these states pseudohelical as their helicity is locked to the sublattice. The spin character and robustness of the pseudohelical modes is best exhibited on a finite flake, which shows that the edge states have zero g factor, carry a pure spin current in the cross section of the flake, and exhibit spin-flip reflectionless tunneling at the armchair edges.

  18. Constraints on the standard model by measuring cross sections and asymmetries for Z → ff-bar with Aleph detector at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucotte, A.

    1996-01-01

    This work is devoted to the precision tests of the electro-week sector of the standard model via the determination of the Z-lineshape parameters M Z , Γ Z , σ had 0 and R had extracted from the fermionic cross-sections measured on 89 to 94 data in Aleph. The first section reminds the formalism and the observables used to describe the Z-resonance physics. In a second step, the LEP collider is presented with the procedures used to determine the beam energy, this parameter being the main source of uncertainty in M Z and Γ Z determination. In the following part, the Aleph experimental context is described, together with the measurement of the luminosity from Bhabha counting. Then the hadronic cross section measurements are presented, emphasizing on the improvement performed on the systematic bias evaluation to the hadrons selection. This leads to a precision at the per mille level in cross-sections. Leptonic cross-sections measured in Aleph are also reported. The Z-resonance parameters are then derived. A great agreement is observed with the prediction of the standard model of the EW interactions. The interpretation of such measurements within this model leads to the determination of the number of light neutrinos species and to the constraints on the top quark mass, compatible with direct measurements from Fermilab. (author)

  19. The unit group of group algebra $F_qSL(2;Z_3$

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Maheshwari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Let $\\F_q$ be a finite field of characteristic $p$ having $q$ elements, where $q = p^k$ and $p\\ge 5$. Let $ SL(2,\\Z_3$ be the special linear group of $2\\times2$ matrices with determinant $1$ over $\\Z_3$. In this note we establish the structure of the unit group of $\\F_q SL(2,\\Z_3$.

  20. Direct Z-scheme TiO2/CdS hierarchical photocatalyst for enhanced photocatalytic H2-production activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Aiyun; Zhu, Bicheng; Zhong, Bo; Zhang, Liuyang; Cheng, Bei

    2017-11-01

    Photocatalytic H2 evolution, which utilizes solar energy via water splitting, is a promising route to deal with concerns about energy and environment. Herein, a direct Z-scheme TiO2/CdS binary hierarchical photocatalyst was fabricated via a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique, and photocatalytic H2 production was measured afterwards. The as-prepared TiO2/CdS hybrid photocatalyst exhibited noticeably promoted photocatalytic H2-production activity of 51.4 μmol h-1. The enhancement of photocatalytic activity was ascribed to the hierarchical structure, as well as the efficient charge separation and migration from TiO2 nanosheets to CdS nanoparticles (NPs) at their tight contact interfaces. Moreover, the direct Z-scheme photocatalytic reaction mechanism was demonstrated to elucidate the improved photocatalytic performance of TiO2/CdS composite photocatalyst. The photoluminescence (PL) analysis of hydroxyl radicals were conducted to provide clues for the direct Z-scheme mechanism. This work provides a facile route for the construction of redox mediator-free Z-scheme photocatalytic system for photocatalytic water splitting.

  1. Angular distribution of W boson pairs at a heavy Z-resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, S.; Rizzo, T.G.

    1987-05-01

    In theories with an extra U(1) gauge boson (Z 2 ) at low energies. W boson pairs may be produced copiously by the process e + e - → Z 2 → W + W - at the Z 2 -resonance. We show that the angular distribution of the W pairs (produced at the Z 2 -resonance) is very different from that in the standard model, at the same center of mass energy, where it is dominated by t-channel neutrino exchange. These distributions will also be useful in distinguishing among the various models containing an extra Z-boson

  2. (Z-3-Benzyl-2-[(2-phenylcyclohex-2-enylimino]-1,3-thiazolidin-4-one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Wei Ooi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C22H22N2OS, exists in a Z configuration with respect to the N=C bond. The cyclohexene ring adopts a distorted sofa conformation. The thiazolidine ring is essentially planar, with a maximum deviation of 0.030 (2 Å, and forms dihedral angles of 76.66 (6 and 74.55 (6° with the terminal phenyl rings. The dihedral angle between the phenyl rings is 71.55 (7°. In the crystal, a C—H...π interaction is observed.

  3. IMPACT OF H{sub 2}-BASED STAR FORMATION MODEL ON THE z {>=} 6 LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND THE IONIZING PHOTON BUDGET FOR REIONIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaacks, Jason; Thompson, Robert [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 S. Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4002 (United States); Nagamine, Kentaro, E-mail: jaacksj@physics.unlv.edu [Visiting Scientist. Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics for the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8583, Japan. (Japan)

    2013-04-01

    We present the results of a numerical study examining the effect of an H{sub 2}-based star formation (SF) model on the rest-frame UV luminosity function and star formation rate function (SFRF) of z {>=} 6 galaxies, and the implications for reionization. Using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations outfitted with an H{sub 2}-SF model, we find good agreement with our previous results (non-H{sub 2} SF model) and observations at M{sub uv} {<=} -18. However, at M{sub uv} > -18, we find that the LF deviates from both our previous work and current observational extrapolations, producing significantly fewer low-luminosity galaxies and exhibiting additional turnover at the faint end. We constrain the redshift evolution of this turnover point using a modified Schechter function that includes additional terms to quantify the turnover magnitude (M{sub uv}{sup t}) and subsequent slope ({beta}). We find that M{sub uv}{sup t} evolves from M{sub uv}{sup t}=-17.33 (at z = 8) to -15.38 (z = 6), while {beta} becomes shallower by {Delta}{beta} = 0.22 during the same epoch. This occurs in an M{sub uv} range that will be observable by James Webb Space Telescope. By integrating the SFRF, we determine that even though the H{sub 2}-SF model significantly reduces the number density of low-luminosity galaxies at M{sub uv} > -18, it does not suppress the total SFR density enough to affect the capability of SF to maintain reionization.

  4. Ethyl (Z-2-(4-chlorobenzylidene-3-oxobutanoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaaban K. Mohamed

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The C=C double-bond in the title compound, C13H13ClO3, has a Z configuration. The aliphatic substituents at one end of the double bond, i.e. the CH3CO– and C2H5O2C– groups, are aligned at 82.1 (3° with respect to each other.

  5. A DWARF TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND XZ TAU B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, Mayra; Macías, Enrique; Anglada, Guillem; Gómez, José F. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Carrasco-González, Carlos; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Zapata, Luis; Rodríguez, Luis F. [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica UNAM, Apartado Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Calvet, Nuria [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 825 Dennison Building, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Nagel, Erick [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Guanajuato, Guanajuato, Gto 36240 (Mexico); Torrelles, José M. [Institut de Ciències de l’Espai (CSIC)-Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (UB)/IEEC, Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Zhu, Zhaohuan, E-mail: osorio@iaa.es [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery of a dwarf protoplanetary disk around the star XZ Tau B that shows all the features of a classical transitional disk but on a much smaller scale. The disk has been imaged with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), revealing that its dust emission has a quite small radius of ∼3.4 au and presents a central cavity of ∼1.3 au in radius that we attribute to clearing by a compact system of orbiting (proto)planets. Given the very small radii involved, evolution is expected to be much faster in this disk (observable changes in a few months) than in classical disks (observable changes requiring decades) and easy to monitor with observations in the near future. From our modeling we estimate that the mass of the disk is large enough to form a compact planetary system.

  6. Classical Exchange Algebra of the Nonlinear Sigma Model on a Supercoset Target with Z2n Grading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke San-Min; Li Xin-Ying; Wang Chun; Yue Rui-Hong

    2011-01-01

    The classical exchange algebra satisfied by the monodromy matrix of the nonlinear sigma model on a supercoset target with Z 2n grading is derived using a first-order Hamiltonian formulation and by adding to the Lax connection terms proportional to constraints. This enables us to show that the conserved charges of the theory are in involution. When n = 2, our results coincide with the results given by Magro for the pure spinor description of AdS 5 × S 5 string theory (when the ghost terms are omitted). (the physics of elementary particles and fields)

  7. Accurate Bessel functions Jsub(n)(z), Ysub(n)(z), Hsub(n)sup((1))(z) and Hsub(n)sup((2))(z) of integer order and complex argument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardill, R.W.B.; Moriarty, K.J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The Bessel function appears in a wide range of physical applications, and in particular where there is axial symmetry. The package contains complex function routines to calculate Jsub(n)(z), Ysub(n)(z), Hsub(n)sup((1))(z) and Hsub(n)sup((2))(z) for integer n and complex z. The method of solution is based on the ascending series representations and asymptotic forms of the Bessel functions Jsub(n)(z) and Ysub(n)(z) and asymptotic forms of the modified Bessel functions Isub(n)(z) and Ksub(n)(z). The program will return results for all values of mod(z) up to machine overflows in the Bessel functions. The size of the order should not be too large (say, mod(n) -11 . For the asymptotic region, the accuracy EPS may not always be achieved (since the asymptotic series may have to be truncated at their lower terms), in which case the output parameter ISET will indicate this and an estimation of the relative error is also produced. The functions Ysub(n)(z), Hsub(n)sup((1))(z) and Hsub(n)sup((2))(z) have a branch point at the origin, together with a cut along the negative real axis. (Auth.)

  8. Muon’s (g-2): the obstinate deviation from the Standard Model

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2011-01-01

    It’s been 50 years since a small group at CERN measured the muon (g-2) for the first time. Several other experiments have followed over the years. The latest measurement at Brookhaven (2004) gave a value that obstinately remains about 3 standard deviations away from the prediction of the Standard Model. Francis Farley, one of the fathers of the (g-2) experiments, argues that a statement such as “everything we observe is accounted for by the Standard Model” is not acceptable.   Francis J. M. Farley. Francis J. M. Farley, Fellow of the Royal Society since 1972 and the 1980 winner of the Hughes Medal "for his ultra-precise measurements of the muon magnetic moment, a severe test of quantum electrodynamics and of the nature of the muon", is among the scientists who still look at the (g-2) anomaly as one of the first proofs of the existence of new physics. “Although it seems to be generally believed that all experiments agree with the Stan...

  9. Digital Quantum Simulation of Z2 Lattice Gauge Theories with Dynamical Fermionic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Erez; Farace, Alessandro; Reznik, Benni; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    We propose a scheme for digital quantum simulation of lattice gauge theories with dynamical fermions. Using a layered optical lattice with ancilla atoms that can move and interact with the other atoms (simulating the physical degrees of freedom), we obtain a stroboscopic dynamics which yields the four-body plaquette interactions, arising in models with (2 +1 ) and higher dimensions, without the use of perturbation theory. As an example we show how to simulate a Z2 model in (2 +1 ) dimensions.

  10. Digital Quantum Simulation of Z_{2} Lattice Gauge Theories with Dynamical Fermionic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Erez; Farace, Alessandro; Reznik, Benni; Cirac, J Ignacio

    2017-02-17

    We propose a scheme for digital quantum simulation of lattice gauge theories with dynamical fermions. Using a layered optical lattice with ancilla atoms that can move and interact with the other atoms (simulating the physical degrees of freedom), we obtain a stroboscopic dynamics which yields the four-body plaquette interactions, arising in models with (2+1) and higher dimensions, without the use of perturbation theory. As an example we show how to simulate a Z_{2} model in (2+1) dimensions.

  11. Domain walls and fermion scattering in grand unified models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steer, D.A.; Vachaspati, T.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by grand unification, we study the properties of domain walls formed in a model with SU(5)xZ 2 symmetry which is spontaneously broken to SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1)/Z 6 , and subsequently to SU(3)xU(1)/Z 3 . Even after the first stage of symmetry breaking, the SU(3) symmetry is broken to SU(2)xU(1)/Z 2 on the domain wall. In a certain range of parameters, flux tubes carrying color- and hyper-charge live on the domain wall and appear as 'boojums' when viewed from one side of the domain wall. Magnetic monopoles are also formed in the symmetry breaking and those carrying color and hyper-charge can be repelled from the wall due to the Meissner effect, or else their magnetic flux can penetrate the domain wall in quantized units. After the second stage of symmetry breaking, fermions can transmute when they scatter with the domain wall, providing a simpler version of fermion-monopole scattering: for example, neutrinos can scatter into d-quarks, leaving behind electric charge and color which is carried by gauge field excitations living on the domain wall

  12. GALEX-SELECTED LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2: COMPARISON WITH OTHER POPULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberzettl, L.; Williger, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Louisville, Louisville KY 20492 (United States); Lehnert, M. D. [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, UMR 8111 du CNRS, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France); Nesvadba, N. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS, Universite Paris-Sud, Bat. 120-121, 91405 Orsay (France); Davies, L. [Department of Physics, H H Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-20

    We present results of a search for bright Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at 1.5 {<=} z {<=} 2.5 in the GOODS-S field using an NUV-dropout technique in combination with color selection. We derived a sample of 73 LBG candidates. We compare our selection efficiencies to BM/BX and BzK methods (techniques solely based on ground-based data sets), and find the NUV data to provide greater efficiency for selecting star-forming galaxies. We estimate LBG candidate ages, masses, star formation rates, and extinction from fitting PEGASE synthesis evolution models. We find that about 20% of our LBG candidates are comparable to infrared-luminous LBGs or submillimeter galaxies which are thought to be precursors of massive elliptical galaxies today. Overall, we can show that although BM/BX and BzK methods do identify star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2, the sample they provide biases against those star-forming galaxies which are more massive and contain sizeable red stellar populations. A true Lyman break criterion at z {approx} 2 is therefore more directly comparable to the populations found at z {approx} 3, which does contain a red fraction.

  13. GALEX-SELECTED LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z2: COMPARISON WITH OTHER POPULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberzettl, L.; Williger, G.; Lehnert, M. D.; Nesvadba, N.; Davies, L.

    2012-01-01

    We present results of a search for bright Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at 1.5 ≤ z2.5 in the GOODS-S field using an NUV-dropout technique in combination with color selection. We derived a sample of 73 LBG candidates. We compare our selection efficiencies to BM/BX and BzK methods (techniques solely based on ground-based data sets), and find the NUV data to provide greater efficiency for selecting star-forming galaxies. We estimate LBG candidate ages, masses, star formation rates, and extinction from fitting PEGASE synthesis evolution models. We find that about 20% of our LBG candidates are comparable to infrared-luminous LBGs or submillimeter galaxies which are thought to be precursors of massive elliptical galaxies today. Overall, we can show that although BM/BX and BzK methods do identify star-forming galaxies at z2, the sample they provide biases against those star-forming galaxies which are more massive and contain sizeable red stellar populations. A true Lyman break criterion at z2 is therefore more directly comparable to the populations found at z ∼ 3, which does contain a red fraction.

  14. THE FUNDAMENTAL PLANE OF MASSIVE QUIESCENT GALAXIES OUT TO z2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Sande, Jesse; Franx, Marijn [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Kriek, Mariska [Astronomy Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bezanson, Rachel [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Van Dokkum, Pieter G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The Fundamental Plane (FP) of early-type galaxies, relating the effective radius, velocity dispersion, and surface brightness, has long been recognized as a unique tool for analyzing galaxy structure and evolution. With the discovery of distant quiescent galaxies and the introduction of high sensitivity near-infrared spectrographs, it is now possible to explore the FP out to z2. In this Letter we study the evolution of the FP out to z2 using kinematic measurements of massive quiescent galaxies (M {sub *} > 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}). We find preliminary evidence for the existence of an FP out to z2. The scatter of the FP, however, increases from z ∼ 0 to z2, even when taking into account the larger measurement uncertainties at higher redshifts. We find a strong evolution of the zero point from z2 to z ∼ 0: Δlog{sub 10} M/L{sub g} ∝(– 0.49 ± 0.03)z. In order to assess whether our spectroscopic sample is representative of the early-type galaxy population at all redshifts, we compare their rest-frame g – z colors with those from a larger mass complete sample of quiescent galaxies. At z > 1 we find that the spectroscopic sample is bluer. We use the color offsets to estimate a mass-to-light ratio (M/L) correction. The implied FP zero point evolution after correction is significantly smaller: Δlog{sub 10} M/L{sub g} ∝(– 0.39 ± 0.02)z. This is consistent with an apparent formation redshift of z{sub form}=6.62{sub −1.44}{sup +3.19} for the underlying population, ignoring the effects of progenitor bias. A more complete spectroscopic sample is required at z2 to properly measure the M/L evolution from the FP evolution.

  15. Precise determination of W anfd Z masses in UA2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefebvre, M.

    1990-01-01

    The UA2 experiment has collected large samples of W and Z events during the 1988 and 1989 runs at the CERN antipp Collider at √s = 630 GeV. These samples have been used to perform precise measurements of the masses of the W and Z bosons. After a careful analysis of systematic errors, an improved result is obtained for the mass ratio M W /M Z . This provides a new value for the weak mixing parameter sin 2 θ W . Furthermore, it can be combined with recent measurements of the Z mass from e + e - colliders to give an absolute measurement of the W mass, leading to the result m W = 80.49 ± 0.43(stat) ± 0.24(syst) GeV

  16. Symmetry fractionalization of visons in Z2 spin liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yang; Cheng, Meng; Fang, Chen

    In this work we study symmetry fractionalization of vison excitations in topological Z2 spin liquids. We show that in the presence of the full SO (3) spin-rotational symmetry and if there is an odd number of spin-1/2 per unit cell, the symmetry fractionalization of visons is completely fixed. On the other hand, visons can have different classes of symmetry fractionalization if the spin-rotational symmetry is reduced. As a concrete example, we show that visons in the Balents-Fisher-Girvin Z2 spin liquid have crystal symmetry fractionalization classes which are not allowed in SO (3) symmetric spin liquids, due to the reduced spin-rotational symmetry.

  17. R parity in standard-like superstring models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halyo, Edi.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the R symmetries of standard-like superstring models. At the level of the cubic superpotential there are three global U(1) R symmetries. These are broken explicitly by N > 3 terms in the superpotential and spontaneously by scalar Vacuum Expectation values necessary to preserve supersymmetry at Mp. A Z 2 discrete symmetry remains but is equivalent to fermion number modulo 2. These models possess an effective R parity which arises from the interplay between the gauged U(1) B-L and U(1) r j+3 . (author). 14 refs

  18. An in vivo wide bore NMR spectrometer at 2 T for human metabolic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Dinh, S.; Jehenson, P.; Chalot, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    A wide bore (53 cm diameter) superconducting magnet operating at 2 T was built by the Service des Techniques Instrumentales des Particules Elementaires at C.E.N.-Saclay (Institut de Recherche Fondamentale of the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) for NMR spectroscopic studies in humans. The magnet consists of two main components: a magnetic circuit and a cryostat. The magnetic circuit is made of a main coil (four solenoids with 23 km of niobium-titanium superconductor) and its superconducting shim coils (correcting for nine terms: Z, Z 2 , Z 3 , X, Y, XY, XZ, YZ, X 2 -Y 2 ). The current in the main coil is 200 A and the maximum current in each shim coil is 20A. The magnetic field homogeneity is about 4.10 -8 in a 20 mm diameter sphere and its time drift is less than 10 -8 /hour. The whole NMR spectrometer, including the superconducting magnet and a Bruker CXP-90 console associated with an Aspect 2000 calculator was recently installed in the Service Hospitalier Frederic-Joliot, Biology Department of the C.E.A. Preliminary results obtained by 31 P-NMR in humans using surface coils of various diameters (3,5 and 10 cm) are also presented [fr

  19. UV Continuum Slope and Dust Obscuration from z ~ 6 to z ~ 2: The Star Formation Rate Density at High Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwens, R. J.; Illingworth, G. D.; Franx, M.; Chary, R.-R.; Meurer, G. R.; Conselice, C. J.; Ford, H.; Giavalisco, M.; van Dokkum, P.

    2009-11-01

    We provide a systematic measurement of the rest-frame UV continuum slope β over a wide range in redshift (z ~ 2-6) and rest-frame UV luminosity (0.1 L* z = 3 to 2 L* z = 3) to improve estimates of the star formation rate (SFR) density at high redshift. We utilize the deep optical and infrared data (Advanced Camera for Surveys/NICMOS) over the Chandra Deep Field-South and Hubble Deep Field-North Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey fields, as well as the UDF for our primary UBVi "dropout" Lyman Break Galaxy sample. We also use strong lensing clusters to identify a population of very low luminosity, high-redshift dropout galaxies. We correct the observed distributions for both selection biases and photometric scatter. We find that the UV-continuum slope of the most luminous galaxies is substantially redder at z ~ 2-4 than it is at z ~ 5-6 (from ~-2.4 at z ~ 6 to ~-1.5 at z ~ 2). Lower luminosity galaxies are also found to be bluer than higher luminosity galaxies at z ~ 2.5 and z ~ 4. We do not find a large number of galaxies with β's as red as -1 in our dropout selections at z ~ 4, and particularly at z gsim 5, even though such sources could be readily selected from our data (and also from Balmer Break Galaxy searches at z ~ 4). This suggests that star-forming galaxies at z gsim 5 almost universally have very blue UV-continuum slopes, and that there are not likely to be a substantial number of dust-obscured galaxies at z gsim 5 that are missed in "dropout" searches. Using the same relation between UV-continuum slope and dust extinction as has been found to be appropriate at both z ~ 0 and z ~ 2, we estimate the average dust extinction of galaxies as a function of redshift and UV luminosity in a consistent way. As expected, we find that the estimated dust extinction increases substantially with cosmic time for the most UV luminous galaxies, but remains small (lsim2 times) at all times for lower luminosity galaxies. Because these same lower luminosity galaxies

  20. Crystal structure of (E-13-{4-[(Z-2-cyano-2-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenylethenyl]phenyl}parthenolide methanol hemisolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narsimha Reddy Penthala

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C33H35NO6 [systematic name: (Z-3-(4-{(E-[(E-1a,5-dimethyl-9-oxo-2,3,7,7a-tetrahydrooxireno[2′,3′:9,10]cyclodeca[1,2-b]furan-8(1aH,6H,9H,10aH,10bH-ylidene]methyl}phenyl-2-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenylacrylonitrile methanol hemisolvate], C33H35NO6·0.5CH3OH, was prepared by the reaction of (Z-3-(4-iodophenyl-2-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenylacrylonitrile with parthenolide [systematic name: (E-1a,5-dimethyl-8-methylene-2,3,6,7,7a,8,10a,10b-octahydrooxireno[2′,3′:9,10]cyclodeca[1,2-b]furan-9(1aH-one] under Heck reaction conditions. The molecule is built up from fused ten-, five- (lactone and three-membered (epoxide rings with a {4-[(Z-2-cyano-2-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenylethenyl]phenyl}methylidene group as a substituent. The 4-[(Z-2-cyano-2-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenylethenyl]phenyl group on the parthenolide exocyclic double bond is oriented in a trans position to the lactone ring to form the E isomer. The dihedral angle between the benzene ring of the phenyl moiety and the lactone ring mean plane is 21.93 (4°.

  1. Angle calculations for a z-axis/(2S+2D) hybrid diffractometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunk, Oliver; Nielsen, Martin Meedom

    2004-01-01

    calculations are presented for a new 'hybrid' diffractometer consisting of a base instrument that can be combined with two different detector arms. With one of the detector arms, the instrument is a standard z-axis diffractometer as commonly used in surface studies. The other detector arm is designed...... for a heavy two-dimensional detector. The calculations are formulated in a general framework making it easy to incorporate, e. g. a second sample rotation stage, whereby it is possible to perform reflectivity and standard surface-crystallography measurements in the same geometry....

  2. Z-contrast imaging of ordered structures in Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 and Ba(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Y.; Pennycook, S.J.; Xu, Z.; Viehland, D.

    1998-02-01

    Lead-based cubic perovskites such as Pb(B 1/3 2+ B 2/3 5+ )O 3 (B 2+ Mg, Co, Ni, Zn; B 5+ = Nb, Ta) are relaxor ferroelectrics. Localized order and disorder often occur in materials of this type. In the Pb(Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 )O 3 (PMN) family, previous studies have proposed two models, space-charge and charge-balance models. In the first model, the ordered regions carry a net negative charge [Pb(Mg 1/2 Nb 1/2 )O 3 ], while in the second model it does not carry a net charge [Pb((Mg 2/3 Nb 1/3 ) 1/2 Nb 1/2 )O 3 ]. However, no direct evidence for these two models has appeared in the literature yet. In this paper the authors report the first direct observations of local ordering in undoped and La-doped Pb(Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 )O 3 , using high-resolution Z-contrast imaging. Because the ordered structure in Ba(Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 )O 3 is well known, the Z-contrast image from an ordered domain is used as a reference for this study

  3. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Biological Activity of cis/trans Amide Rotomers of (Z-N′-(2-Oxoindolin-3-ylideneformohydrazide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem A. Abdel-Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available (Z-N′-(2-Oxoindolin-3-ylideneformohydrazide (2 was synthesized by the reaction of (Z-3-hydrazonoindolin-2-one (1 with formic acid under reflux. The structure of 2 was characterized by IR, Mass, 1H NMR, and X-ray crystal structure determination. Interestingly, compound 2 appeared in DMSO-d6 as cis and trans amide rotomers in 25% and 75%, respectively. The X-ray analysis showed the Z geometrical isomer of 2 around –C=N– for cis and trans amide rotomers. The crystal of 2 belongs to monoclinic, space group P21/c, with a=4.5206 (1 Å, b=22.4747 (7 Å, c=17.3637 (5 Å, β=103.752 (1°, Z=8, V=1713.57 (8 Å3, Dc=1.467 Mg m−3, μ=0.11 mm−1, F(000=784, R=0.047, and wR=0.123 for 3798 observed reflections with I>2σ(I. Compound 2 exhibited a moderate activity in its antimicrobial evaluation against E. coli and P. aeruginosa and a good activity against S. aureus close to that of the standard drug ciprofloxacin. The in vitro anticancer activity of 2 was evaluated against two human tumor cell lines, namely, HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma and MCF-7 breast cancer. HepG2 cancer cell line was more susceptible to compound 2 than MCF-7.

  4. The MOSDEF Survey: A Stellar Mass–SFR–Metallicity Relation Exists at z ∼ 2.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Ryan L.; Shapley, Alice E.; Kriek, Mariska; Freeman, William R.; Reddy, Naveen A.; Siana, Brian; Coil, Alison L.; Mobasher, Bahram; Davé, Romeel; Shivaei, Irene; Azadi, Mojegan; Price, Sedona H.; Leung, Gene; Fetherholf, Tara; de Groot, Laura; Zick, Tom; Fornasini, Francesca M.; Barro, Guillermo

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the nature of the relation among stellar mass, star formation rate, and gas-phase metallicity (the {M}* –SFR–Z relation) at high redshifts using a sample of 260 star-forming galaxies at z2.3 from the MOSDEF survey. We present an analysis of the high-redshift {M}* –SFR–Z relation based on several emission-line ratios for the first time. We show that a {M}* –SFR–Z relation clearly exists at z2.3. The strength of this relation is similar to predictions from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. By performing a direct comparison of stacks of z ∼ 0 and z2.3 galaxies, we find that z2.3 galaxies have ∼0.1 dex lower metallicity at fixed {M}* and SFR. In the context of chemical evolution models, this evolution of the {M}* –SFR–Z relation suggests an increase with redshift of the mass-loading factor at fixed {M}* , as well as a decrease in the metallicity of infalling gas that is likely due to a lower importance of gas recycling relative to accretion from the intergalactic medium at high redshifts. Performing this analysis simultaneously with multiple metallicity-sensitive line ratios allows us to rule out the evolution in physical conditions (e.g., N/O ratio, ionization parameter, and hardness of the ionizing spectrum) at fixed metallicity as the source of the observed trends with redshift and with SFR at fixed {M}* at z2.3. While this study highlights the promise of performing high-order tests of chemical evolution models at high redshifts, detailed quantitative comparisons ultimately await a full understanding of the evolution of metallicity calibrations with redshift. Based on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  5. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at D0 in the $\\mu~+~\\tau({\\rm hadrons})~+~{\\rm 2\\ jets}$ final state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Wanyu [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The Standard Model has been a successful theory in various aspects. It predicted and led to discovery of many new particles, including the Higgs boson recently found, the last missing piece of the Standard Model. The Higgs mechanism allows the vector bosons and fermions to be massive via the electroweak symmetry breaking. This dissertation presents the search of the Standard Model Higgs through the decay products: one muon, one hadronically decaying tau, and two or more jets using the full 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of Tevatron collider Run II data set collected in the Dzero detector at Fermilab. The main production channels are gluon-gluon fusion, vector boson fusion, and Higgs production associated with a $W/Z$ boson. No evidence of the Standard Model Higgs boson is observed in these channels with hypothesized Higgs mass between 105 GeV and 150 GeV, but the data do not exclude it either. We set the upper limits on the ratio of the 95% CL exclusion to the SM Higgs cross section. Combining with other analyses in Tevatron, the Higgs mass is ruled out at 95 % confidence level between 147 and 180 GeV, and a 2.9 $\\sigma$ excess of events indicates a Higgs boson possibly lies in the mass range from 115 to 140 GeV.

  6. Exact polynomial solutions of second order differential equations and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yaozhong

    2012-01-01

    We find all polynomials Z(z) such that the differential equation where X(z), Y(z), Z(z) are polynomials of degree at most 4, 3, 2, respectively, has polynomial solutions S(z) = ∏ n i=1 (zz i ) of degree n with distinct roots z i . We derive a set of n algebraic equations which determine these roots. We also find all polynomials Z(z) which give polynomial solutions to the differential equation when the coefficients of X(z) and Y(z) are algebraically dependent. As applications to our general results, we obtain the exact (closed-form) solutions of the Schrödinger-type differential equations describing: (1) two Coulombically repelling electrons on a sphere; (2) Schrödinger equation from the kink stability analysis of φ 6 -type field theory; (3) static perturbations for the non-extremal Reissner–Nordström solution; (4) planar Dirac electron in Coulomb and magnetic fields; and (5) O(N) invariant decatic anharmonic oscillator. (paper)

  7. Search for a Standard Model Higgs boson decaying to b quarks and produced in association with Z/W bosons with the CMS detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruttola Michele De

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A search for the standard model Higgs boson is performed in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.1 fb−1, recorded by the CMS detector in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with a 7 TeV center-of-mass energy. The following modes are studied: W(μνH, W(eνH, Z(μμH, Z(eeH and Z(ννH, with the Higgs decaying to bb pairs. 95% C.L. upper limits on the VH production cross section are derived for a Higgs mass between 110 and 135 GeV. The expected (observed upper limit at 115 GeV is found to be 5.7 (8.3 times the standard model expectation.

  8. The standard model and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1989-05-01

    In these lectures, my aim is to present a status report on the standard model and some key tests of electroweak unification. Within that context, I also discuss how and where hints of new physics may emerge. To accomplish those goals, I have organized my presentation as follows. I survey the standard model parameters with particular emphasis on the gauge coupling constants and vector boson masses. Examples of new physics appendages are also commented on. In addition, I have included an appendix on dimensional regularization and a simple example which employs that technique. I focus on weak charged current phenomenology. Precision tests of the standard model are described and up-to-date values for the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) mixing matrix parameters are presented. Constraints implied by those tests for a 4th generation, extra Z' bosons, and compositeness are discussed. An overview of the physics of tau decays is also included. I discuss weak neutral current phenomenology and the extraction of sin 2 θW from experiment. The results presented there are based on a global analysis of all existing data. I have chosen to concentrate that discussion on radiative corrections, the effect of a heavy top quark mass, implications for grand unified theories (GUTS), extra Z' gauge bosons, and atomic parity violation. The potential for further experimental progress is also commented on. Finally, I depart from the narrowest version of the standard model and discuss effects of neutrino masses, mixings, and electromagnetic moments. 32 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  9. CANDELS: THE PROGENITORS OF COMPACT QUIESCENT GALAXIES AT z2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barro, Guillermo; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Mozena, Mark; McGrath, Elizabeth; Cheung, Edmond; Fang, Jerome; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Williams, Christina C.; Van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn; Bell, Eric F.; Croton, Darren J.; Ceverino, Daniel; Dekel, Avishai; Ashby, M. L. N.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Fontana, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    We combine high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 images with multi-wavelength photometry to track the evolution of structure and activity of massive (M * > 10 10 M ☉ ) galaxies at redshifts z = 1.4-3 in two fields of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. We detect compact, star-forming galaxies (cSFGs) whose number densities, masses, sizes, and star formation rates (SFRs) qualify them as likely progenitors of compact, quiescent, massive galaxies (cQGs) at z = 1.5-3. At z ∼> 2, cSFGs present SFR = 100-200 M ☉ yr –1 , yet their specific star formation rates (sSFR ∼ 10 –9 yr –1 ) are typically half that of other massive SFGs at the same epoch, and host X-ray luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) 30 times (∼30%) more frequently. These properties suggest that cSFGs are formed by gas-rich processes (mergers or disk-instabilities) that induce a compact starburst and feed an AGN, which, in turn, quench the star formation on dynamical timescales (few 10 8 yr). The cSFGs are continuously being formed at z = 2-3 and fade to cQGs down to z ∼ 1.5. After this epoch, cSFGs are rare, thereby truncating the formation of new cQGs. Meanwhile, down to z = 1, existing cQGs continue to enlarge to match local QGs in size, while less-gas-rich mergers and other secular mechanisms shepherd (larger) SFGs as later arrivals to the red sequence. In summary, we propose two evolutionary tracks of QG formation: an early (z ∼> 2), formation path of rapidly quenched cSFGs fading into cQGs that later enlarge within the quiescent phase, and a late-arrival (z ∼< 2) path in which larger SFGs form extended QGs without passing through a compact state.

  10. Beyond the Standard Model (2/5)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2000-01-01

    After a critical discussion of the questions left unanswered by the Standard Model, I will review the main attemps to construct new theories. In particular, I will discuss grand unification, supersymmetry, technicolour, and theories with extra dimensions.

  11. Z flux-line lattices and self-dual equations in the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bimonte, G.; Lozano, G.

    1994-04-01

    We derive gauge covariant self-dual equations for the SU(2) x U(1) y theory of electroweak interactions and show that they admit solutions describing a periodic lattice of Z-strings. (author). 14 refs

  12. Ages of Massive Galaxies at 0.5 > z > 2.0 from 3D-HST Rest-frame Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Mattia; Franx, Marijn; van Dokkum, Pieter; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Brammer, Gabriel; Nelson, Erica; Maseda, Michael; Momcheva, Ivelina; Kriek, Mariska; Labbé, Ivo; Lundgren, Britt; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-05-01

    We present low-resolution near-infrared stacked spectra from the 3D-HST survey up to z = 2.0 and fit them with commonly used stellar population synthesis models: BC03, FSPS10 (Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis), and FSPS-C3K. The accuracy of the grism redshifts allows the unambiguous detection of many emission and absorption features and thus a first systematic exploration of the rest-frame optical spectra of galaxies up to z = 2. We select massive galaxies ({log}({M}*/{M}⊙ )\\gt 10.8), we divide them into quiescent and star-forming via a rest-frame color-color technique, and we median-stack the samples in three redshift bins between z = 0.5 and z = 2.0. We find that stellar population models fit the observations well at wavelengths below the 6500 Å rest frame, but show systematic residuals at redder wavelengths. The FSPS-C3K model generally provides the best fits (evaluated with χ 2 red statistics) for quiescent galaxies, while BC03 performs the best for star-forming galaxies. The stellar ages of quiescent galaxies implied by the models, assuming solar metallicity, vary from 4 Gyr at z ˜ 0.75 to 1.5 Gyr at z ˜ 1.75, with an uncertainty of a factor of two caused by the unknown metallicity. On average, the stellar ages are half the age of the universe at these redshifts. We show that the inferred evolution of ages of quiescent galaxies is in agreement with fundamental plane measurements, assuming an 8 Gyr age for local galaxies. For star-forming galaxies, the inferred ages depend strongly on the stellar population model and the shape of the assumed star-formation history.

  13. Electric field enhancement of electron emission rates from Z1/2 centers in 4H-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evwaraye, A. O.; Smith, S. R.; Mitchel, W. C.; Farlow, G. C.

    2009-01-01

    Z 1/2 defect centers were produced by irradiating 4H-SiC bulk samples with 1 MeV electrons at room temperature. The emission rate dependence on the electric field in the depletion region was measured using deep level transient spectroscopy and double-correlation deep level transient spectroscopy. It is found that the Z 1/2 defect level shows a strong electric field dependence with activation energy decreasing from E c -0.72 eV at zero field to E c -0.47 eV at 6.91x10 5 V/cm. The phonon assisted tunneling model of Karpus and Perel [Sov. Phys. JETP 64, 1376 (1986)] completely describes the experimental data. This model describes the dependence of the emission rate on electric field F as e n (F)=e no exp(F 2 /F c 2 ), where F c is the characteristic field that depends on the phonon assisted tunneling time τ 2 . The values of F c and τ 2 were determined and the analysis of the data leads to the suggestion that Z 1/2 may be a substitutional point defect.

  14. {sup 186}Re-maSGS-Z{sub HER2:342}, a potential affibody conjugate for systemic therapy of HER2-expressing tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlova, Anna; Tran, Thuy A. [Uppsala University, Division of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Ekblad, Torun; Karlstroem, Amelie Eriksson [Royal Institute of Technology, School of Biotechnology, Division of Molecular Biotechnology, Stockholm (Sweden); Tolmachev, Vladimir [Uppsala University, Division of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-02-15

    Affibody molecules are a novel class of tumour-targeting proteins, which combine small size (7 kDa) and picomolar affinities. The Affibody molecule Z{sub HER2:342} has been suggested for imaging of HER2 expression in order to select patients for trastuzumab therapy. When optimizing chelators for {sup 99m}Tc-labelling, we have found that synthetic Z{sub HER2:342} conjugated with mercaptoacetyl-glycyl-glycyl-glycyl (maGGG) and mercaptoacetyl-glycyl-seryl-glycyl (maGSG) chelators provides relatively low renal uptake of radioactivity and could be suitable for therapy. maGGG-Z{sub HER2:342} and maGSG-Z{sub HER2:342} were labelled with {sup 186}Re and their biodistribution was studied in normal mice. Dosimetric evaluation and tumour targeting to HER2-overexpressed xenografts (SKOV-3) by {sup 186}Re-maGSG-Z{sub HER2:342} were studied. Gluconate-mediated labelling of maGGG-Z{sub HER2:342} and maGSG-Z{sub HER2:342} with {sup 186}Re provided a yield of more than 95% within 60 min. The conjugates were stable and demonstrated specific binding to HER2-expressing SKOV-3 cells. Biodistribution in normal mice demonstrated rapid blood clearance, low accumulation of radioactivity in the kidney and other organs, accumulating free perrhenate. Both {sup 186}Re-maGGG-Z{sub HER2:342} and {sup 186}Re-maGSG-Z{sub HER2:342} demonstrated lower renal uptake than their {sup 99m}Tc-labelled counterparts. {sup 186}Re-maGSG-Z{sub HER2:342} provided the lowest uptake in healthy tissues. Biodistribution of {sup 186}Re-maGSG-Z{sub HER2:342} in nude mice bearing SKOV-3 xenografts showed specific targeting of tumours. Tumour uptake 24 h after injection (5.84{+-}0.54%ID/g) exceeded the concentration in blood by more than 500-fold, and uptake in kidneys by about 8-fold. Preliminary dosimetric evaluation showed that dose-to-tumour should exceed dose-to-kidney by approximately 5-fold. Optimization of chelators improves biodistribution properties of rhenium-labelled small scaffold proteins and enables

  15. Diastereoselective synthesis of ethyl ( Z)-3-(8-methylimidazo-[1,2- a]pyrid-2-yl)-2-phenylthioacrylate. X-ray crystal structure and conformational analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, A.; Roche, D.; Métin, J.; Carpy, A.; Madesclaire, M.

    1995-09-01

    The title compound 2, a gem vinyl sulfide ester, has been obtained diastereoselectively (de > 98%) by action of the ethyl thiophenoxyacetate carbanion on the imidazo[1,2- a]pyridinecarbaldehyde 1 in a basic medium, at low temperature. The X-ray crystal structure of 2 (C 19H 19N 2O 2S: Mr = 338.43, triclinic, P 1¯, a = 8.193(3) Å, b = 10.090(2) Å, c = 10.981(4) Å, α = 88.12(2)°, β = 78.66(4)°, γ = 78.53(2)°, V = 872.3(6) Å3, Z = 2, Dcalc = 1.29 g cm -3, λ( Mo Kα) = 0.71069 Å, μ = 0.189 mm -1, F(000) = 356, T = 293 K, R = 0.043 for 3610 observed reflections) has been determined and confirmed the Z configuration. The molecule is almost planar except for the phenyl ring situated in an approximate perpendicular plane. Despite the presence of the conjugate double bonds of the vinyl ester group (acrylate), coplanar with the imidazopyridine heterocycle, there is no evidence of π-electron delocalization over the whole structure. The crystal cohesion is ensured by a dense network of van der Waals contacts. A conformational analysis of the Z and E isomers by means of a Monte Carlo search and a stochastic dynamics simulation in CHCl 3 has shown that according to the method the Z isomer is more stable than the E isomer by about 7 to 10 kJ mol -1.

  16. Separation of toluene and heptane by liquid-liquid extraction using z-methyl-N-butylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate isomers (z = 2, 3, or 4) at T = 313.2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Julian; Garcia, Silvia; Torrecilla, Jose S.; Oliet, Mercedes; Rodriguez, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    The (liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) data for three ternary systems containing heptane, toluene, and a z-methyl-N-butylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquid ([zbmpy][BF 4 ] IL, where z = 2, 3, or 4) were determined at T = 313.2 K and atmospheric pressure. The effect of IL cation isomers on the LLE data was evaluated for the first time. The selectivity and extractive capacity from these LLE data were calculated and compared to those previously reported in the literature for the systems (heptane + toluene + [4bmpy][BF 4 ]) and (heptane + toluene + sulfolane). The results show that the LLE data for the systems comprising the ILs with the metha- and para-substituted cations do not differ significantly from isomer to isomer. On the other hand, significant differences were observed among the systems with the ortho-substituted cation and the other two cation isomers. The degree of consistency of the experimental LLE data was ascertained by applying the Othmer-Tobias correlation. In addition, the LLE data were satisfactorily correlated by means of the thermodynamic NRTL model.

  17. Standard model parameters determination and validity tests in Z{sup 0} hadronic disintegrations; Determination des parametres du modele standard et tests de sa validite dans les desintegrations hadroniques du Z{sup 0}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorov, T

    1993-05-01

    This thesis describes the determination of the electroweak parameters from the measurements of the total hadronic cross-section by the DELPHI experiment at LEP-I. The analysed data was taken in the years 1991 and 1992; a previous analysis of the data taken in 1990 is included in the final fits. The first part of the thesis describes the interest of the measurement of the Z{sup 0} resonance parameters in the framework of the Standard Model as well as their implications for alternative models. The Standard Model predictions are described in some detail, and their precision is estimated. Then follows a brief description of the LEP collider, of the measurement of the collision energy, and of the experimental setup. A chapter is devoted to the description of the luminosity measurement, essential for the determination of total cross-sections. The measurement of the hadronic cross-section (event selection, study of backgrounds, study of sources of systematic uncertainties) is described in detail in the next chapter. Then follows a description of the method of the extraction of the resonance parameters, and a discussion of the uncertainties in their determination. The values obtained are interpreted in the framework of the Standard Model, as well as in the framework of some more general theories. Finally, the event generator for hadron production in two-photon collisions is described in the appendix. (author). 69 refs., 51 figs., 9 tabs., 1 ann.

  18. THE STRIKINGLY SIMILAR RELATION BETWEEN SATELLITE AND CENTRAL GALAXIES AND THEIR DARK MATTER HALOS SINCE z = 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, Douglas F.; Conroy, Charlie

    2013-01-01

    Satellite galaxies in rich clusters are subject to numerous physical processes that can significantly influence their evolution. However, the typical L* satellite galaxy resides in much lower mass galaxy groups, where the processes capable of altering their evolution are generally weaker and have had less time to operate. To investigate the extent to which satellite and central galaxy evolution differs, we separately model the stellar mass-halo mass (M * -M h ) relation for these two populations over the redshift interval 0 peak . At z ∼ 0 the satellites, on average, have ∼10% larger stellar masses at fixed M peak compared to central galaxies of the same halo mass (although the two relations are consistent at 2σ-3σ for M peak ∼> 10 13 M ☉ ). This is required in order to reproduce the observed stellar mass-dependent 2PCF and satellite fractions. At low masses our model slightly under-predicts the correlation function at ∼1 Mpc scales. At z ∼ 1 the satellite and central galaxy M * -M h relations are consistent within the errors, and the model provides an excellent fit to the clustering data. At present, the errors on the clustering data at z2 are too large to constrain the satellite model. A simple model in which satellite and central galaxies share the same M * -M h relation is able to reproduce the extant z2 clustering data. We speculate that the striking similarity between the satellite and central galaxy M * -M h relations since z2 arises because the central galaxy relation evolves very weakly with time and because the stellar mass of the typical satellite galaxy has not changed significantly since it was accreted. The reason for this last point is not yet entirely clear, but it is likely related to the fact that the typical ∼L* satellite galaxy resides in a poor group where transformation processes are weak and lifetimes are short

  19. Transport anisotropy and electron correlations in the layered molecular compounds Z [Pd(dmit)2] 2 (Z =Me4N ,Et2Me2As ,EtMe3P ) with different interlayer coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Kato, Reizo

    2018-03-01

    In-plane resistivity ρ∥ and out-of-plane resistivity ρ⊥ were investigated across the pressure-induced Mott transition in molecular Mott insulators Z [Pd(dmit)2] 2 (Z =Et2Me2As , Me4N , and EtMe3P ) having a triangular lattice. All three compounds exhibit superconducting transition with Tc=5.5 -7.0 K in the metallic phase near the Mott insulating phase. For the β'-Et2Me2As salt, the anisotropy ρ⊥/ρ∥ exceeds 103 at low temperatures, indicating a highly two-dimensional electronic state with incoherent interlayer hopping. The β -Me4N salt has a smaller ρ⊥/ρ∥ exhibiting a weak interlayer coupling. The resistivity is dominated by electron-electron scattering in the metallic state for these two compounds, as expected in a correlated Fermi liquid. On the other hand, the EtMe3P salt with a valence bond order state becomes a nearly three-dimensional metal across the Mott transition, in which the electron correlation is strongly suppressed. Instead, the electron-phonon scattering plays a significant role in the resistivity. The different interlayer coherence is quantitatively explained by the calculated interlayer transfer integrals between Pd (dmit) 2 molecules. These results suggest that the dimensionality governs the nature of electron correlations in the Fermi liquid state.

  20. Z parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firestone, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents results of studies of the Z Boson produced in e + e - annihilations in the DELPHI detector at the CERN LEP collider. Approximately 600 nb. -1 of useful data were collected in the first LEP running period in the last half of 1989. Results are presented on the mass and width of the Z Boson, on the partial widths of the Z decays into hadrons and into lepton pairs, on comparisons with the predictions of QCD, on the number of light neutrino generations, and on the searches for new particles. The authors find that M Z = 91.171 ± 0.030 (stat.) ± 0.030 (beam) GeV, Γ Z = 2.511 ± 0.065 GeV, Γ had. = 1741 ± 61 MeV, Γ lept. = 85.1 ± 2.9 MeV, Γ inv. = 515 ± 54 MeV, and N v = 2.97 ± 0.26 generations. The authors have set limits on the mass of the charged Higgs particle, and the authors find no evidence for new quarks, new heavy leptons, or any supersymmetric partners to the known particles. All the authors' results are consistent with the Standard Model of electroweak interactions plus QCD with exactly three generations of elementary fermions

  1. Oxidation of a [Cu2S] complex by N2O and CO2: insights into a role of tetranuclearity in the CuZ site of nitrous oxide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherzadeh, Sharareh; Mankad, Neal P

    2018-01-25

    Oxidation of a [Cu 2 (μ-S)] complex by N 2 O or CO 2 generated a [Cu 2 (μ-SO 4 )] product. In the presence of a sulfur trap, a [Cu 2 (μ-O)] species also formed from N 2 O. A [Cu 2 (μ-CS 3 )] species derived from CS 2 modeled initial reaction intermediates. These observations indicate that one role of tetranuclearity in the Cu Z catalytic site of nitrous oxide reductase is to protect the crucial S 2- ligand from oxidation.

  2. Comparison of liquid crystal display monitors calibrated with gray-scale standard display function and with γ 2.2 and iPad: observer performance in detection of cerebral infarction on brain CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Kumiko; Nihashi, Takashi; Ikeda, Mitsuru; Ando, Yoshio; Kawai, Hisashi; Kawakami, Kenichi; Kimura, Reiko; Okada, Yumiko; Okochi, Yoshiyuki; Ota, Naotoshi; Tsuchiya, Kenichi; Naganawa, Shinji

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare observer performance in the detection of cerebral infarction on a brain CT using medical-grade liquid crystal display (LCD) monitors calibrated with the gray-scale standard display function and with γ 2.2 and using an iPad with a simulated screen setting. We amassed 97 sample sets, from 47 patients with proven cerebral infarction and 50 healthy control subjects. Nine radiologists independently assessed brain CT on a gray-scale standard display function LCD, a γ 2.2 LCD, and an iPad in random order over 4-week intervals. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed by using the continuous scale, and the area under the ROC curve (A(z)) was calculated for each monitor. The A(z) values for gray-scale standard display function LCD, γ 2.2 LCD, and iPad were 0.875, 0.884, and 0.839, respectively. The difference among the three monitors was very small. There was no significant difference between gray-scale standard display function LCD and γ 2.2 LCD. However, the A(z) value was statistically significantly smaller for the iPad than the γ 2.2 LCD (p iPad was poorer than that using the other LCDs, the difference was small. Therefore, the iPad could not substitute for other LCD monitors. However, owing to the promising potential advantages of tablet PCs, such as portability, further examination is needed into the clinical use of tablet PCs.

  3. UV CONTINUUM SLOPE AND DUST OBSCURATION FROM z ∼ 6 TO z2: THE STAR FORMATION RATE DENSITY AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouwens, R. J.; Illingworth, G. D.; Franx, M.; Chary, R.-R.; Meurer, G. R.; Ford, H.; Conselice, C. J.; Giavalisco, M.; Van Dokkum, P.

    2009-01-01

    We provide a systematic measurement of the rest-frame UV continuum slope β over a wide range in redshift (z2-6) and rest-frame UV luminosity (0.1 L* z = 3 to 2 L* z= 3 ) to improve estimates of the star formation rate (SFR) density at high redshift. We utilize the deep optical and infrared data (Advanced Camera for Surveys/NICMOS) over the Chandra Deep Field-South and Hubble Deep Field-North Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey fields, as well as the UDF for our primary UBVi 'dropout' Lyman Break Galaxy sample. We also use strong lensing clusters to identify a population of very low luminosity, high-redshift dropout galaxies. We correct the observed distributions for both selection biases and photometric scatter. We find that the UV-continuum slope of the most luminous galaxies is substantially redder at z2-4 than it is at z ∼ 5-6 (from ∼-2.4 at z ∼ 6 to ∼-1.5 at z2). Lower luminosity galaxies are also found to be bluer than higher luminosity galaxies at z2.5 and z ∼ 4. We do not find a large number of galaxies with β's as red as -1 in our dropout selections at z ∼ 4, and particularly at z ∼> 5, even though such sources could be readily selected from our data (and also from Balmer Break Galaxy searches at z ∼ 4). This suggests that star-forming galaxies at z ∼> 5 almost universally have very blue UV-continuum slopes, and that there are not likely to be a substantial number of dust-obscured galaxies at z ∼> 5 that are missed in 'dropout' searches. Using the same relation between UV-continuum slope and dust extinction as has been found to be appropriate at both z ∼ 0 and z2, we estimate the average dust extinction of galaxies as a function of redshift and UV luminosity in a consistent way. As expected, we find that the estimated dust extinction increases substantially with cosmic time for the most UV luminous galaxies, but remains small (∼ 4.

  4. On dark matter interactions with the Standard Model through an anomalous Z'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Katz, Andrey; Racco, Davide

    2017-10-01

    We study electroweak scale Dark Matter (DM) whose interactions with baryonic matter are mediated by a heavy anomalous Z'. We emphasize that when the DM is a Majorana particle, its low-velocity annihilations are dominated by loop suppressed annihilations into the gauge bosons, rather than by p-wave or chirally suppressed annihilations into the SM fermions. Because the Z ' is anomalous, these kinds of DM models can be realized only as effective field theories (EFTs) with a well-defined cutoff, where heavy spectator fermions restore gauge invariance at high energies. We formulate these EFTs, estimate their cutoff and properly take into account the effect of the Chern-Simons terms one obtains after the spectator fermions are integrated out. We find that, while for light DM collider and direct detection experiments usually provide the strongest bounds, the bounds at higher masses are heavily dominated by indirect detection experiments, due to strong annihilation into W + W -, ZZ, Zγ and possibly into gg and γγ. We emphasize that these annihilation channels are generically significant because of the structure of the EFT, and therefore these models are prone to strong indirect detection constraints. Even though we focus on selected Z' models for illustrative purposes, our setup is completely generic and can be used for analyzing the predictions of any anomalous Z'-mediated DM model with arbitrary charges.

  5. Our sun. I. The standard model: Successes and failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackmann, I.J.; Boothroyd, A.I.; Fowler, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    The results of computing a number of standard solar models are reported. A presolar helium content of Y = 0.278 is obtained, and a Cl-37 capture rate of 7.7 SNUs, consistently several times the observed rate of 2.1 SNUs, is determined. Thus, the solar neutrino problem remains. The solar Z value is determined primarily by the observed Z/X ratio and is affected very little by differences in solar models. Even large changes in the low-temperature molecular opacities have no effect on Y, nor even on conditions at the base of the convective envelope. Large molecular opacities do cause a large increase in the mixing-length parameter alpha but do not cause the convective envelope to reach deeper. The temperature remains too low for lithium burning, and there is no surface lithium depletion; thus, the lithium problem of the standard solar model remains. 103 refs

  6. Host composition dependent tunable multicolor emission in the single-phase Ba2(Ln1-zTbz)(BO3)2Cl:Eu phosphors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, Z.; Zhuang, J.; Meijerink, A.; Jing, X.

    2013-01-01

    A new strategy based on the host composition design has been adopted to obtain efficient color-tunable emission from Ba2Ln0.97−zTbz(BO3)2Cl:0.03Eu (Ln = Y, Gd and Lu, z = 0–0.97) phosphors. This study reveals that the single-phase Ba2Ln1−zTbz(BO3)2Cl compounds can be applied to use allowed Eu2+

  7. 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of SATURN imploding Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, J.H.; Eddleman, J.L.; Springer, P.T.

    1995-01-01

    Z-pinch implosions driven by the SATURN device at Sandia National Laboratory are modeled with a 2D radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code, showing strong growth of magneto-Rayleigh Taylor (MRT) instability. Modeling of the linear and nonlinear development of MRT modes predicts growth of bubble-spike structures that increase the time span of stagnation and the resulting x-ray pulse width. Radiation is important in the pinch dynamics keeping the sheath relatively cool during the run-in and releasing most of the stagnation energy. The calculations give x-ray pulse widths and magnitudes in reasonable agreement with experiments, but predict a radiating region that is too dense and radially localized at stagnation. We also consider peaked initial density profiles with constant imploding sheath velocity that should reduce MRT instability and improve performance. 2D krypton simulations show an output x-ray power > 80 TW for the peaked profile

  8. Comparative analyses of B{yields}K{sub 2}{sup *}l{sup +}l{sup -} in the standard model and new physics scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Run-Hui [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Physics and IPAP; Lue, Cai-Dian [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Wang, Wei [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    We analyze the B {yields} K{sub 2}{sup *}({yields} K{pi})l{sup +}l{sup -} (with l=e,{mu},{tau}) decay in the standard model and two new physics scenarios: vector-like quark model and family non-universal Z{sup '} model. We derive the differential angular distributions of the quasi-four-body decay, using the recently calculated form factors in the perturbative QCD approach. Branching ratios, polarizations, forward-backward asymmetries and transversity amplitudes are predicted, from which we find a promising prospective to observe this channel on the future experiment. We also update the constraints on effective Wilson coefficients and/or free parameters in these two new physics scenarios by making use of the experimental data of B{yields}K{sup *}l{sup +}l{sup -} and b{yields}sl{sup +}l{sup -}. Their impact on B{yields}K{sub 2}{sup *}l{sup +}l{sup -} is subsequently explored and in particular the zero-crossing point for the forward-backward asymmetry in these new physics scenarios can sizably deviate from the SM scenario. In addition we also generalize the analysis to a similar mode B{sub s}{yields}f{sup '}{sub 2}(1525)({yields}K{sup +}K{sup -})l{sup +}l{sup -}. (orig.)

  9. Gauged family-lepton-number differences and new Z' phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, X.G.; Joshi, G.C.; Lew, H.; Volkas, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    The simplest extensions of the three generation minimal standard model which feature a Z ' boson have an additional anomaly-free local U(1) symmetry generated by one of the L i (i = 1,2,3) where L 1 = L e - L μ , L 2 - L e - L τ and L 3 = L μ -L τ . Bounds on the Z i ' mass and coupling constant are derived. This analysis indicates that Z 1,2 ' effects may be observable in current e + e - colliders. 3 refs

  10. Recent Result from E821 Experiment on Muon g-2 and Unconstrained Minimal Supersymemtric Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Komine, S; Yamaguchi, M; Komine, Shinji; Moroi, Takeo; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2001-01-01

    Recently, the E821 experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory announced their latest result of their muon g-2 measurement which is about 2.6-\\sigma away from the standard model prediction. Taking this result seriously, we examine the possibility to explain this discrepancy by the supersymmetric contribution. Our analysis is performed in the framework of the unconstrained supersymmetric standard model which has free seven parameters relevant to muon g-2. We found that, in the case of large \\tan\\beta, sparticle masses are allowed to be large in the region where the SUSY contribution to the muon g-2 is large enough, and hence the conventional SUSY search may fail even at the LHC. On the contrary, to explain the discrepancy in the case of small \\tan\\beta, we found that (i) sleptons and SU(2)_L gauginos should be light, and (ii) negative search for the Higgs boson severely constrains the model in the framework of the mSUGRA and gauge-mediated model.

  11. HST/COS OBSERVATIONS OF THE QUASAR HE 2347-4342: PROBING THE EPOCH OF He II PATCHY REIONIZATION AT REDSHIFTS z = 2.4-2.9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shull, J. Michael; France, Kevin; Danforth, Charles W.; Smith, Britton; Tumlinson, Jason

    2010-01-01

    We report ultraviolet spectra of the high-redshift (z em ∼ 2.9) quasar, HE 2347 - 4342, taken by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. Spectra in the G130M (medium resolution, 1135-1440 A) and G140L (low resolution, 1030-2000 A) gratings exhibit patchy Gunn-Peterson absorption in the 303.78 A Lyα line of He II between z = 2.39-2.87 (G140L) and z = 2.74-2.90 (G130M). With COS, we obtain better spectral resolution, higher signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), and better determined backgrounds than previous studies, with sensitivity to abundance fractions x He I I ∼ 0.01 in filaments of the cosmic web. The He II optical depths from COS are higher than those with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and range from τ He I I ≤ 0.02 to τ He I I ≥ 5, with a slow recovery in mean optical depth to (τ He I I ) ≤ 2 at z abs ∼ z QSO and minimal 'proximity effect' of flux transmission at the He II edge. We propose a QSO systemic redshift z QSO = 2.904 ± 0.002, some Δz = 0.019 higher than that derived from O I λ1302 emission. Three long troughs (4-10 A or 25-60 Mpc comoving distance) of strong He II absorption between z = 2.75and2.90 are uncharacteristic of the intergalactic medium if He II reionized at z r ∼ 3. Contrary to recent indirect estimates (z r = 3.2 ± 0.2) from H I optical depths, the epoch of He II reionization may extend to z ∼< 2.7.

  12. Rest-Frame Optical Spectra of Three Strongly Lensed Galaxies at z ~ 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainline, Kevin N.; Shapley, Alice E.; Kornei, Katherine A.; Pettini, Max; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Allam, Sahar S.; Tucker, Douglas L.

    2009-08-01

    We present Keck II NIRSPEC rest-frame optical spectra for three recently discovered lensed galaxies: the Cosmic Horseshoe (z = 2.38), the Clone (z = 2.00), and SDSS J090122.37+181432.3 (z = 2.26). The boost in signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) from gravitational lensing provides an unusually detailed view of the physical conditions in these objects. A full complement of high S/N rest-frame optical emission lines is measured, spanning from rest frame 3600 to 6800 Å, including robust detections of fainter lines such as Hγ, [S II]λ6717,6732, and in one instance [Ne III]λ3869. SDSS J090122.37+181432.3 shows evidence for active galactic nucleus activity, and therefore we focus our analysis on star-forming regions in the Cosmic Horseshoe and the Clone. For these two objects, we estimate a wide range of physical properties. Current lensing models for the Cosmic Horseshoe and the Clone allow us to correct the measured Hα luminosity and calculated star formation rate. Metallicities have been estimated with a variety of indicators, which span a range of values of 12+ log(O/H) = 8.3-8.8, between ~0.4 and ~1.5 of the solar oxygen abundance. Dynamical masses were computed from the Hα velocity dispersions and measured half-light radii of the reconstructed sources. A comparison of the Balmer lines enabled measurement of dust reddening coefficients. Variations in the line ratios between the different lensed images are also observed, indicating that the spectra are probing different regions of the lensed galaxies. In all respects, the lensed objects appear fairly typical of ultraviolet-selected star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2. The Clone occupies a position on the emission-line diagnostic diagram of [O III]/Hβ versus [N II]/Hα that is offset from the locations of z ~ 0 galaxies. Our new NIRSPEC measurements may provide quantitative insights into why high-redshift objects display such properties. From the [S II] line ratio, high electron densities (~1000 cm-3) are inferred compared

  13. Structural disorder in Li{sub x}(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N){sub y}Fe{sub 2z}Se{sub 2} and Cs{sub x}Fe{sub 2z}Se{sub 2} superconductors studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komędera, K.; Jasek, A.K.; Błachowski, A. [Mössbauer Spectroscopy Laboratory, Pedagogical University, ul. Podchorążych 2, PL-30-084 Kraków (Poland); Ruebenbauer, K., E-mail: sfrueben@cyf-kr.edu.pl [Mössbauer Spectroscopy Laboratory, Pedagogical University, ul. Podchorążych 2, PL-30-084 Kraków (Poland); Żukrowski, J. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Academic Center for Materials and Nanotechnology, Av. A. Mickiewicza 30, PL-30-059 Kraków (Poland); Krztoń-Maziopa, A. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, ul. Noakowskiego 3, PL-00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Conder, K. [Laboratory for Developments and Methods, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-05-15

    Two iron-chalcogenide superconductors Li{sub x}(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N){sub y}Fe{sub 2z}Se{sub 2} and Cs{sub x}Fe{sub 2z}Se{sub 2} in the as-prepared and annealed state have been investigated by means of the Mössbauer spectroscopy versus temperature. Multi-component spectra are obtained. One can see a non-magnetic component due to iron located in the unperturbed Fe–Se sheets responsible for superconductivity. Remaining components are magnetically ordered even at room temperature. There is some magnetically ordered iron in Fe–Se sheets perturbed by presence of the iron vacancies. Additionally, one can see iron dispersed between sheets in the form of magnetically ordered high spin trivalent ions, some clusters of above ions, and in the case of pyridine intercalated compound in the form of α-Fe precipitates. Pyridine intercalated sample shows traces of superconductivity in the as-prepared state, while cesium intercalated sample in the as-prepared state does not show any superconductivity. Superconductors with transition temperatures being 40 K and 25 K, respectively, are obtained upon annealing. Annealing leads to removal/ordering of the iron vacancies within Fe–Se sheets, while clusters of α-Fe grow in the pyridine intercalated sample. - Highlights: • Secondary phases dispersed in single crystal of Cs{sub x}Fe{sub 2z}Se{sub 2}. • α-Fe precipitates between Fe–Se layers in Li{sub x}(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N){sub y}Fe{sub 2z}Se{sub 2}. • Superconductivity is obtained by removing of the iron vacancies within Fe–Se sheets.

  14. Search for massive resonances decaying into W W , W Z , Z Z , q W , and q Z with dijet final states at √{s }=13 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Ambrogi, F.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Grossmann, J.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krammer, N.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Madlener, T.; Mikulec, I.; Pree, E.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Spanring, M.; Spitzbart, D.; Waltenberger, W.; Wittmann, J.; Wulz, C.-E.; Zarucki, M.; Chekhovsky, V.; Mossolov, V.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; De Wolf, E. A.; Di Croce, D.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; De Bruyn, I.; De Clercq, J.; Deroover, K.; Flouris, G.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Python, Q.; Skovpen, K.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Vannerom, D.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Gul, M.; Khvastunov, I.; Poyraz, D.; Roskas, C.; Salva, S.; Tytgat, M.; Verbeke, W.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caputo, C.; Caudron, A.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Komm, M.; Krintiras, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Melo De Almeida, M.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, F.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Misheva, M.; Rodozov, M.; Shopova, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Gao, X.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liao, H.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Yazgan, E.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, J.; Ban, Y.; Chen, G.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Courbon, B.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Sculac, T.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Mesic, B.; Starodumov, A.; Susa, T.; Ather, M. W.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Mahrous, A.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Kadastik, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Järvinen, T.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Kucher, I.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Negro, G.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Titov, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Charlot, C.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Lobanov, A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Stahl Leiton, A. G.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Zghiche, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Jansová, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Tonon, N.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Finco, L.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Feld, L.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Preuten, M.; Schomakers, C.; Schulz, J.; Verlage, T.; Zhukov, V.; Albert, A.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hamer, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Flügge, G.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Müller, T.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Arndt, T.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Beernaert, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bermúdez Martínez, A.; Bin Anuar, A. A.; Borras, K.; Botta, V.; Campbell, A.; Connor, P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Eren, E.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grados Luyando, J. M.; Grohsjean, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Guthoff, M.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Keaveney, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Lelek, A.; Lenz, T.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Ntomari, E.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Savitskyi, M.; Saxena, P.; Shevchenko, R.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wen, Y.; Wichmann, K.; Wissing, C.; Zenaiev, O.; Bein, S.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Dreyer, T.; Garutti, E.; Gonzalez, D.; Haller, J.; Hinzmann, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Karavdina, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kurz, S.; Lapsien, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Sonneveld, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Stöver, M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baur, S.; Butz, E.; Caspart, R.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Freund, B.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Kassel, F.; Kudella, S.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Schäfer, D.; Schröder, M.; Shvetsov, I.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Karathanasis, G.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Kousouris, K.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Mallios, S.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Triantis, F. A.; Csanad, M.; Filipovic, N.; Pasztor, G.; Veres, G. I.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Horvath, D.; Hunyadi, Á.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Makovec, A.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Choudhury, S.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Bahinipati, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Dhingra, N.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Kumari, P.; Mehta, A.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Shah, Aashaq; Bhardwaj, A.; Chauhan, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Keshri, S.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Bhardwaj, R.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhawandeep, U.; Dey, S.; Dutt, S.; Dutta, S.; Ghosh, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Thakur, S.; Behera, P. K.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Dugad, S.; Mahakud, B.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Das, P.; Guchait, M.; Jain, Sa.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Sarkar, T.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Hegde, V.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Pandey, S.; Rane, A.; Sharma, S.; Chenarani, S.; Eskandari Tadavani, E.; Etesami, S. M.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Errico, F.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lezki, S.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Albergo, S.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Chatterjee, K.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Russo, L.; Sguazzoni, G.; Strom, D.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; Brianza, L.; Brivio, F.; Ciriolo, V.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malberti, M.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pauwels, K.; Pedrini, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Fienga, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Khan, W. A.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Lujan, P.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Rossin, R.; Sgaravatto, M.; Torassa, E.; Zanetti, M.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Ressegotti, M.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Cecchi, C.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Manoni, E.; Mantovani, G.; Mariani, V.; Menichelli, M.; Rossi, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiga, D.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Borrello, L.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fedi, G.; Giannini, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Manca, E.; Mandorli, G.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Cipriani, M.; Daci, N.; Del Re, D.; Di Marco, E.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Marzocchi, B.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Monteno, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Shchelina, K.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Traczyk, P.; Belforte, S.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Zanetti, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Moon, C. S.; Oh, Y. D.; Sekmen, S.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Lee, A.; Kim, H.; Moon, D. H.; Oh, G.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Goh, J.; Kim, T. J.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Ha, S.; Hong, B.; Jo, Y.; Kim, Y.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Almond, J.; Kim, J.; Kim, J. S.; Lee, H.; Lee, K.; Nam, K.; Oh, S. B.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Seo, S. h.; Yang, U. K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yu, G. B.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Choi, Y.; Hwang, C.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Reyes-Almanza, R.; Ramirez-Sanchez, G.; Duran-Osuna, M. C.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Rabadan-Trejo, R. I.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Mejia Guisao, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Saddique, A.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Pyskir, A.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Galinhas, B.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Seixas, J.; Strong, G.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Voytishin, N.; Zarubin, A.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Stepennov, A.; Toms, M.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Aushev, T.; Bylinkin, A.; Chadeeva, M.; Markin, O.; Parygin, P.; Philippov, D.; Polikarpov, S.; Rusinov, V.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Terkulov, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Blinov, V.; Skovpen, Y.; Shtol, D.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Elumakhov, D.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Dordevic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Barrio Luna, M.; Cerrada, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Moran, D.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Álvarez Fernández, A.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Cuevas, J.; Erice, C.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; González Fernández, J. R.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Sanchez Cruz, S.; Vischia, P.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chazin Quero, B.; Curras, E.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bianco, M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Botta, C.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; Chapon, E.; Chen, Y.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dobson, M.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Everaerts, P.; Fallavollita, F.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Glege, F.; Gulhan, D.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Karacheban, O.; Kieseler, J.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kornmayer, A.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Krammer, M.; Lange, C.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Meijers, F.; Merlin, J. A.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Milenovic, P.; Moortgat, F.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Selvaggi, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Sphicas, P.; Stakia, A.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Tosi, M.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Verweij, M.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Caminada, L.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Wiederkehr, S. A.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Berger, P.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Klijnsma, T.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Reichmann, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Shchutska, L.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Vesterbacka Olsson, M. L.; Wallny, R.; Zhu, D. H.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; De Cosa, A.; Del Burgo, R.; Donato, S.; Galloni, C.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Seitz, C.; Takahashi, Y.; Zucchetta, A.; Candelise, V.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Paganis, E.; Psallidas, A.; Steen, A.; Tsai, J. f.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Boran, F.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kara, O.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Kiminsu, U.; Oglakci, M.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Turkcapar, S.; Zorbakir, I. S.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Tekten, S.; Yetkin, E. A.; Agaras, M. N.; Atay, S.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Davignon, O.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Auzinger, G.; Bainbridge, R.; Breeze, S.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Di Maria, R.; Elwood, A.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; James, T.; Lane, R.; Laner, C.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Matsushita, T.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Palladino, V.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Scott, E.; Seez, C.; Shtipliyski, A.; Summers, S.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wardle, N.; Winterbottom, D.; Wright, J.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Smith, C.; Bartek, R.; Dominguez, A.; Buccilli, A.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; West, C.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Benelli, G.; Cutts, D.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Hogan, J. M.; Kwok, K. H. M.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Pazzini, J.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Yu, D.; Band, R.; Brainerd, C.; Burns, D.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Shalhout, S.; Shi, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tos, K.; Tripathi, M.; Wang, Z.; Bachtis, M.; Bravo, C.; Cousins, R.; Dasgupta, A.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Mccoll, N.; Regnard, S.; Saltzberg, D.; Schnaible, C.; Valuev, V.; Bouvier, E.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Ghiasi Shirazi, S. M. A.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Si, W.; Wang, L.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Hashemi, B.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Kole, G.; Krutelyov, V.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Masciovecchio, M.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Amin, N.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Franco Sevilla, M.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Mullin, S. D.; Ovcharova, A.; Qu, H.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Lawhorn, J. M.; Newman, H. B.; Nguyen, T.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Ferguson, T.; Mudholkar, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Weinberg, M.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Leontsinis, S.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Mcdermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Zientek, M.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Apyan, A.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Canepa, A.; Cerati, G. B.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cremonesi, M.; Duarte, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Freeman, J.; Gecse, Z.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, M.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Magini, N.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Schneider, B.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strait, J.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Joshi, Y. R.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Kolberg, T.; Martinez, G.; Perry, T.; Prosper, H.; Saha, A.; Santra, A.; Sharma, V.; Yohay, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Cavanaugh, R.; Chen, X.; Evdokimov, O.; Gerber, C. E.; Hangal, D. A.; Hofman, D. J.; Jung, K.; Kamin, J.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trauger, H.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Boren, S.; Bowen, J.; Castle, J.; Khalil, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Royon, C.; Sanders, S.; Schmitz, E.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kunkle, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Azzolini, V.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; D'Alfonso, M.; Demiragli, Z.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Maier, B.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Tatar, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Claes, D. R.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Kravchenko, I.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Nguyen, D.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Charaf, O.; Hahn, K. A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Loukas, N.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Higginbotham, S.; Lange, D.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Mei, K.; Ojalvo, I.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Malik, S.; Norberg, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Das, S.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Khatiwada, A.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Peng, C. C.; Schulte, J. F.; Sun, J.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Cheng, T.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Ciesielski, R.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Agapitos, A.; Chou, J. P.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Montalvo, R.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Delannoy, A. G.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Gurpinar, E.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Peltola, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Padeken, K.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Hirosky, R.; Joyce, M.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Sturdy, J.; Zaleski, S.; Brodski, M.; Buchanan, J.; Caillol, C.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Hussain, U.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2018-04-01

    Results are presented from a search in the dijet final state for new massive narrow resonances decaying to pairs of W and Z bosons or to a W /Z boson and a quark. Results are based on data recorded in proton-proton collisions at √{s }=13 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb-1 . The mass range investigated extends upwards from 1.2 TeV. No excess is observed above the estimated standard model background and limits are set at 95% confidence level on cross sections, which are interpreted in terms of various models that predict gravitons, heavy spin-1 bosons, and excited quarks. In a heavy vector triplet model, W' and Z' resonances, with masses below 3.2 and 2.7 TeV, respectively, and spin-1 resonances with degenerate masses below 3.8 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level. In the case of a singlet W' resonance masses between 3.3 and 3.6 TeV can be excluded additionally. Similarly, excited quark resonances, q*, decaying to q W and q Z with masses less than 5.0 and 4.7 TeV, respectively, are excluded. In a narrow-width bulk graviton model, upper limits are set on cross sections ranging from 0.6 fb for high resonance masses above 3.6 TeV, to 36.0 fb for low resonance masses of 1.3 TeV.

  15. ANSI laser standards, education (Z136.5), research, development or testing (Z136.8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barat, K.

    2014-07-01

    Several factors affect laser use in educational settings. First is the lower cost of lasers, in particular, diode have made lasers more accessible for laser classroom use (think of the hand held laser in red, green and blue). Second in the research and development, no technology has made the impact of the laser. Third the importance of introducing students to this technology. To the point no discipline is laser free. To address laser safety in the academic setting two American National Standard Institute Standards have been developed. The most recent Z136.8 Safe Use of Lasers in Research, Development and Testing Setting, published in 2012, Z136.5 Laser Safety in Education -2009 version was published. Z136.5 provides guidance for educators starting in public school and ranging into the college level. This includes classroom demonstrations and science fair demonstrations. Z136.8 is geared for the Graduate and Commercial research level. Z136.5 relies on the use of pre-approved safety lessons plans and appreciation of student maturity or lack of, Z136.8 relies heavily on cooperation between the user and the laser safety officer. The presentation will cover the contents of each and the different approaches taken.

  16. Energy of ions 3{<=}Z{<=}10 in Ilford C2 nuclear emulsions; Parcours - energie des ions 3{<=}Z{<=}10 dans les emulsions nucleaires ilford C2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papineau, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1956-07-01

    The relationship between the path and energy of ions with 3{<=}Z{<=}10 in Ilford C2 nuclear emulsions is studied. It determined the average state of charge of ions in each velocity intervals. Results are given in a table for {sub 2}He, {sub 3}Li, {sub 4}Be, {sub 5}B, {sub 6}C, {sub 7}N, {sub 8}O and {sub 10}Ne. For each velocity interval, it is possible to apply the Blackett relation which links, for the same velocity, the path {delta}R of a particle with M (mass) and Z (charge) to the path {delta}R' of a particle with M' and Z'. Results are given in tables and graphics representing the particles energy with the particles path. (M.P.)

  17. Thermodynamics of {l_brace}zNaCl+(1-z)Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) from T=278.15 K to T=318.15 K, and representation with an extended ion-interaction (Pitzer) model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rard, Joseph A. E-mail: rard1@llnl.gov; Clegg, Simon L.; Platford, Robert

    2003-06-01

    In 1968, R.F. Platford reported the results from extensive isopiestic vapor-pressure measurements for the {l_brace}zNaCl+(1-z)Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) system at T=298.15 K, using NaCl(aq) as the isopiestic reference standard [R.F. Platford, J. Chem. Eng. Data 13 (1968) 46-48]. However, only derived quantities were reported, and the experimental isopiestic equilibrium molalities were not given. The complete set of original isopiestic molalities from that study is tabulated in the present report. In addition, published thermodynamic information for this system is reviewed and the isopiestic equilibrium molalities, electromotive force measurements for five different types of electrochemical cells, and enthalpies of mixing from these other studies are critically assessed and recalculated consistently. These combined results are used to evaluate at T=298.15 K the two mixing parameters of Pitzer's ion-interaction model, {sup S}{theta}(Cl,SO{sub 4})=(1.236{+-}0.032{sub 5}){center_dot}10{sup -2} kg{center_dot}mol{sup -1} and {psi}(Na,Cl,SO{sub 4})=(1.808{+-}0.086){center_dot}10{sup -3} kg{sup 2}{center_dot}mol{sup -2}, and their temperature derivatives {l_brace}{partial_derivative}{sup S}{theta}(Cl,SO{sub 4})/{partial_derivative}T{r_brace}{sub p}=(2.474{+-}0.460){center_dot}10{sup -5} kg{center_dot}mol{sup -1}{center_dot}K{sup -1} and {l_brace}{partial_derivative}{psi}(Na,Cl,SO{sub 4})/{partial_derivative}T{r_brace}{sub p}=-(6.228{+-}0.186){center_dot}10{sup -5} kg{sup 2}{center_dot}mol{sup -2}{center_dot}K{sup -1}. Also reported are parameters for an extended ion-interaction model for Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}(aq), valid from T=(273.15 to 323.15) K, that were required for this mixed electrolyte solution analysis.

  18. Standard enthalpies of formation of selected Rh2YZ Heusler compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Ming; Nash, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The standard enthalpies of formation (Δ f H°) of selected ternary Rh-based Rh 2 YZ (Y = Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Ru, Ti, V; Z = Al, Ga, In, Si, Ge, Sn) compounds were measured using high temperature direct reaction calorimetry. The measured standard enthalpies of formation (in kJ/mol of atoms) are, for the Heusler compound Rh 2 MnSn (−40.1 ± 3.6), for the B2-structured compounds: Rh 2 FeAl (−48.5 ± 2.9); Rh 2 MnAl (−72.4 ± 2.7); Rh 2 MnGa (−55.3 ± 2.0); Rh 2 MnIn (−35.3 ± 1.9), for the tetragonal compounds: Rh 2 FeSn (−28.9 ± 1.3); Rh 2 TiAl (−97.6 ± 2.2); Rh 2 TiGa (−79.0 ± 1.8); Rh 2 TiSn (−74.7 ± 3.1). Values are compared with those from first principles calculations in published papers and the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD). Lattice parameters of these compounds are determined using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). - Highlights: • Standard enthalpies of formation of Rh 2 YZ were measured using a drop calorimeter. • Measured enthalpies agree with first principles data in general. • Lattice parameters and related phase relationships were consistent with literature data. • Rh 2 TiSn of tI8 structure were reported for the first time.

  19. Generalized Lie superalgebras and superqravity with a positive cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    A modified law of Hermitian conjugation has been suggested, which permits to plot the Hermitian effect for supergravitation with a positive cosmological constant Λ. The modified conjugation is shown to result in generalized (Z 2 xZ 2 - graded) Lie superalgebras, corresconding to supergravitation With Λ > 0

  20. LBT/LUCIFER OBSERVATIONS OF THE z2 LENSED GALAXY J0900+2234

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui; Bechtold, Jill; McGreer, Ian D.; Just, Dennis W.; Sand, David J.; Green, Richard F.; Thompson, David; Peng, Chien Y.; Seifert, Walter; Ageorges, Nancy; Buschkamp, Peter; Juette, Marcus; Knierim, Volker

    2010-01-01

    We present rest-frame optical images and spectra of the gravitationally lensed, star-forming galaxy J0900+2234 (z = 2.03). The observations were performed with the newly commissioned LUCIFER1 near-infrared (NIR) instrument mounted on the Large Binocular Telescope. We fitted lens models to the rest-frame optical images and found that the galaxy has an intrinsic effective radius of 7.4 ± 0.8 kpc with a lens magnification factor of about 5 for the A and B components. We also discovered a new arc belonging to another lensed high-z source galaxy, which makes this lens system a potential double Einstein ring system. Using the high signal-to-noise ratio rest-frame spectra covered by the H + K band, we detected Hβ, [O III], Hα, [N II], and [S II] emission lines. Detailed physical properties of this high-z galaxy were derived. The extinction toward the ionized H II regions (E g (B - V)) was computed from the flux ratio of Hα and Hβ and appears to be much higher than that toward the stellar continuum (E s (B - V)), derived from the optical and NIR broadband photometry fitting. The metallicity was estimated using N2 and O3N2 indices. It is in the range of 1/5 - 1/3 solar abundance, which is much lower than for typical z2 star-forming galaxies. From the flux ratio of [S II]λ6717 and [S II]λ6732, we found that the electron number density of the H II regions in the high-z galaxy was ≅1000 cm -3 , consistent with other z2 galaxies but much higher than that in local H II regions. The star formation rate was estimated via the Hα luminosity, after correction for the lens magnification, to be about 365 ± 69 M sun yr -1 . Combining the FWHM of Hα emission lines and the half-light radius, we found that the dynamical mass of the lensed galaxy is (5.8 ± 0.9) x 10 10 M sun . The gas mass is (5.1 ± 1.1) x 10 10 M sun from the Hα flux surface density using global Kennicutt-Schmidt law, indicating a very high gas fraction of 0.79 ± 0.19 in J0900+2234.

  1. Lattice parameters values and phase diagram for the Cu{sub 2}Zn{sub 1−z}Mn{sub z}GeSe{sub 4} alloy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldera, D. [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Mérida 5101 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Quintero, M., E-mail: mquinter@ula.ve [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Mérida 5101 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Morocoima, M.; Moreno, E.; Quintero, E.; Grima-Gallardo, P.; Bocaranda, P. [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Mérida 5101 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Henao, J.A.; Macías, M.A. [Grupo de Investigación en Química Estructural (GIQUE), Facultad de Ciencias, Escuela de Química, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Apartado aéreo 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Briceño, J.M.; Mora, A.E. [Laboratorio de Análisis Químico y Estructura de Materiales, Departamento de Física, Universidad de Los Andes, Mérida 5101 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2014-11-25

    Highlights: • The samples were annealed at 500 °C for 1 month. • Samples in the ranges 0 < z < 0.375 had the tetragonal stannite α structure (I4{sup ¯}2m). • For 0.725 < z ⩽ 1 the wurtz–stannite δ structure (Pmn2{sub 1}). • Undercooling effects occur for samples in the range 0.725 < z < 0.925. - Abstract: The T(z) phase diagram of the Cu{sub 2}Zn{sub 1−z}Mn{sub z}GeSe{sub 4} alloy system is obtained from X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis DTA. At room temperature, the X-ray diffraction data showed that samples in the ranges 0 < z < 0.375 had the tetragonal stannite α structure (I4{sup ¯}2m), while for 0.725 < z ⩽ 1 the wurtz–stannite δ structure (Pmn2{sub 1}). The α and δ fields are separated by a relative wide three-phase field (α + δ + MnSe{sub 2}). The DTA thermograms were used to construct the phase diagram of the Cu{sub 2}Zn{sub 1−z}Mn{sub z}GeSe{sub 4} alloy system. It was confirmed that the Cu{sub 2}ZnGeSe{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}MnGeSe{sub 4} compounds melt incongruently. It was observed that undercooling effects occur for samples in the range 0.725 < z < 0.925.

  2. Z' boson mixings with Z-γ and charge assignments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ying; Wang Qing

    2009-01-01

    Based on the general description for Z'-Z-γ mixing as derived from the electroweak chiral Lagrangian, we characterize and classify the various new physics models involving the Z' boson that have appeared in the literature into five classes: 1. Models with minimal Z'-Z mass mixing; 2. Models with minimal Z'-Z kinetic mixing; 3. Models with general Z'-Z mixing; 4. Models with Z'-γ kinetic and Z'-Z mixing; and 5. Models with Stueckelberg-type mixing. The corresponding mixing matrices are explicitly evaluated for each of these classes. We constrain and classify the Z' boson charges with respect to quark-leptons by anomaly cancellation conditions.

  3. Orbital character of O-2p unoccupied states near the Fermi level in CrO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stagarescu, C. B.; Su, X.; Eastman, D. E.; Altmann, K. N.; Himpsel, F. J.; Gupta, A.

    2000-01-01

    The orbital character, orientation, and magnetic polarization of the O-2p unoccupied states near the Fermi level (E F ) in CrO 2 was determined using polarization-dependent x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism from high-quality, single-crystal films. A sharp peak observed just above E F is excited only by the electric-field vector (E) normal to the tetragonal c axis, characteristic of a narrow band (≅0.7 eV bandwidth) constituted from O-2p orbitals perpendicular to c (O-2p y ) hybridized with Cr 3d xz-yz t 2g states. By comparison with band-structure and configuration-interaction cluster calculations our results support a model of CrO 2 as a half-metallic ferromagnet with large exchange-splitting energy (Δ exch-split ≅3.0 eV) and substantial correlation effects. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  4. The Chloroplast Division Protein ARC6 Acts to Inhibit Disassembly of GDP-bound FtsZ2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Min Woo; Shaik, Rahamthulla; TerBush, Allan D; Osteryoung, Katherine W; Vitha, Stanislav; Holzenburg, Andreas

    2018-05-16

    Chloroplasts host photosynthesis and fulfill other metabolic functions that are essential to plant life. They have to divide by binary fission to maintain their numbers throughout cycles of cell division. Chloroplast division is achieved by a complex ring-shaped division machinery located on both the inner (stromal) and the outer (cytosolic) side of the chloroplast envelope. The inner division ring (termed the Z ring) is formed by the assembly of tubulin-like FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 proteins. ARC6 is a key chloroplast division protein that interacts with the Z ring. ARC6 spans the inner envelope membrane, is known to stabilize or maintain the Z ring, and anchors the Z ring to the inner membrane through interaction with FtsZ2. The underlying mechanism of Z-ring stabilization is not well understood. Here, biochemical and structural characterization of ARC6 was conducted using light scattering, sedimentation, and light and transmission electron microscopy. The recombinant protein was purified as a dimer. The results indicated that a truncated form of ARC6 (tARC6), representing the stromal portion of ARC6, affects FtsZ2 assembly without forming higher-order structures, and exerts its effect via FtsZ2 dynamics. tARC6 prevented GDP-induced FtsZ2 disassembly and caused a significant net increase in FtsZ2 assembly when GDP was present. Single particle analysis and 3D reconstruction were performed to elucidate the structural basis of ARC6 activity. Together, the data reveal that a dimeric form of tARC6 binds to FtsZ2 filaments and does not increase FtsZ polymerization rates but rather inhibits GDP-associated FtsZ2 disassembly. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Field Dependence of Elastic Constants in the Bilayer Manganite: (La1-z Prz )1.2Sr1.8Mn2O7 for z=0.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Matasukawa, M.; Yoshizawa, M.; Apost, M.; Suryanarayanan, R.; Revcolevischi, A.

    2003-01-01

    Elastic properties of the Pr-doped bilayer manganite: (La 1-z Pr z ) 1.2 Sr 1.8 Mn 2 O 7 for z=0.6 was investigated by means of the ultrasonic measurement. No remarkable anomaly was observed around the transition temperature in the temperature dependence of C 33 in zero field. A pronounced elastic anomaly, however, has been observed around the magnetic phase transition field Ht in the longitudinal elastic constants C 11 , indicating the phase can be induced in magnetic fields. The transition accompanies a large hysteresis, implying the ordered state to be so-called ''orbital-glass state''. The origin of observed elastic anomalies are discussed in terms of the coupling between elastic strains and magnetic moments of Mn ions, and a change of carrier numbers. (author)

  6. Search for a Vectorlike Quark with Charge 2/3 in t + Z Events from pp Collisions at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 7\\) TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2011-12-01

    A search for pair-produced heavy vector-like charge-2/3 quarks, T, in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, is performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. Events consistent with the flavor-changing-neutral-current decay of a T quark to a top quark and a Z boson are selected by requiring two leptons from the Z-boson decay, as well as an additional isolated charged lepton. In a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.14 fb-1 inverse femtobarns, the number of observed events is found to be consistent with the standard model background prediction. Assuming a branching fraction of 100% for the decay T → tZ, a T quark with a mass less than 475 GeV/c2 is excluded at the 95% confidence level.

  7. On the marginally relevant operator in z=2 Lifshitz holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holsheimer, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    We study holographic renormalization and RG flow in a strongly-coupled Lifshitz-type theory in 2+1 dimensions with dynamical exponent z=2. The bottom-up gravity dual we use is 3+1 dimensional Einstein gravity coupled to a massive vector field. This model contains a marginally relevant operator around the Lifshitz fixed point. We show how holographic renormalization works in the presence of this marginally relevant operator without the need to introduce explicitly cutoff-dependent counterterms. A simple closed-form expression is found for the renormalized on-shell action. We also discuss how asymptotically Lifshitz geometries flow to AdS in the interior due to the marginally relevant operator. We study the behavior of the renormalized entanglement entropy and confirm that it decreases monotonically along the Lifshitz-to-AdS RG flow

  8. Differential deposition of H2A.Z in rice seedling tissue during the day-night cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kang; Xu, Wenying; Wang, Chunchao; Yi, Xin; Su, Zhen

    2017-03-04

    Chromatin structure has an important role in modulating gene expression. The incorporation of histone variants into the nucleosome leads to important changes in the chromatin structure. The histone variant H2A.Z is highly conserved between different species of fungi, animals, and plants. However, dynamic changes to H2A.Z in rice have not been reported during the day-night cycle. In this study, we generated genome wide maps of H2A.Z for day and night time in harvested seedling tissues by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sequencing. The analysis results for the H2A.Z data sets detected 7099 genes with higher depositions of H2A.Z in seedling tissues harvested at night compared with seedling tissues harvested during the day, whereas 4597 genes had higher H2A.Z depositions in seedlings harvested during the day. The gene expression profiles data suggested that H2A.Z probably negatively regulated gene expression during the day-night cycle and was involved in many important biologic processes. In general, our results indicated that H2A.Z may play an important role in plant responses to the diurnal oscillation process.

  9. Discovery of a Lensed Ultrabright Submillimeter Galaxy at z = 2.0439

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Sánchez, A.; Iglesias-Groth, S.; Rebolo, R.; Dannerbauer, H.

    2017-07-01

    We report an ultrabright lensed submillimeter galaxy (SMG) at z = 2.0439, WISE J132934.18+224327.3, identified as a result of a full-sky cross-correlation of the AllWISE and Planck compact source catalogs aimed to search for bright analogs of the SMG SMM J2135, the Cosmic Eyelash. Inspection of archival SCUBA-2 observations of the candidates revealed a source with fluxes ({S}850μ {{m}}=130 mJy) consistent with the Planck measurements. The centroid of the SCUBA-2 source coincides within 1 arcsec with the position of the AllWISE mid-IR source, and, remarkably, with an arc-shaped lensed galaxy in HST images at visible wavelengths. Low-resolution rest-frame UV-optical spectroscopy of this lensed galaxy obtained with 10.4 m GTC reveals the typical absorption lines of a starburst galaxy. Gemini-N near-IR spectroscopy provided a clear detection of {{{H}}}α emission. The lensed source appears to be gravitationally magnified by a massive foreground galaxy cluster lens at z = 0.44 modeling with Lenstool indicates a lensing amplification factor of 11 ± 2. We determine an intrinsic rest-frame 8-1000 μm luminosity, {L}{IR}, of (1.3+/- 0.1)× {10}13 {L}⊙ , and a likely star formation rate (SFR) of ˜ 500{--}2000 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1. The SED shows a remarkable similarity with the Cosmic Eyelash from optical-mid/IR to submillimeter/radio, albeit at higher fluxes.

  10. Crystal structures of (Z-5-[2-(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl-1-(3,5-dimethoxyphenylethenyl]-1H-tetrazole and (Z-5-[2-(benzo[b]thiophen-3-yl-1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenylethenyl]-1H-tetrazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narsimha Reddy Penthala

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available (Z-5-[2-(Benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl-1-(3,5-dimethoxyphenylethenyl]-1H-tetrazole methanol monosolvate, C19H16N4O2S·CH3OH, (I, was prepared by the reaction of (Z-3-(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl-2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenylacrylonitrile with tributyltin azide via a [3 + 2]cycloaddition azide condensation reaction. The structurally related compound (Z-5-[2-(benzo[b]thiophen-3-yl-1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenylethenyl]-1H-tetrazole, C20H18N4O3S, (II, was prepared by the reaction of (Z-3-(benzo[b]thiophen-3-yl-2-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenylacrylonitrile with tributyltin azide. Crystals of (I have two molecules in the asymmetric unit (Z′ = 2, whereas crystals of (II have Z′ = 1. The benzothiophene rings in (I and (II are almost planar, with r.m.s deviations from the mean plane of 0.0084 and 0.0037 Å in (I and 0.0084 Å in (II. The tetrazole rings of (I and (II make dihedral angles with the mean planes of the benzothiophene rings of 88.81 (13 and 88.92 (13° in (I, and 60.94 (6° in (II. The dimethoxyphenyl and trimethoxyphenyl rings make dihedral angles with the benzothiophene rings of 23.91 (8 and 24.99 (8° in (I and 84.47 (3° in (II. In both structures, molecules are linked into hydrogen-bonded chains. In (I, these chains involve both tetrazole and methanol, and are parallel to the b axis. In (II, molecules are linked into chains parallel to the a axis by N—H...N hydrogen bonds between adjacent tetrazole rings.

  11. Strong nebular line ratios in the spectra of z2-3 star forming galaxies: first results from KBSS-MOSFIRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steidel, Charles C.; Rudie, Gwen C.; Strom, Allison L.; Trainor, Ryan F.; Konidaris, Nicholas P.; Matthews, Keith [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1216 East California Boulevard., MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Pettini, Max [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Reddy, Naveen A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Shapley, Alice E.; Kulas, Kristin R.; Mace, Gregory; McLean, Ian S. [University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Erb, Dawn K. [Center for Gravitation, Cosmology, and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 1900 East Kenwood Boulevard, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Turner, Monica L. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-11-10

    We present initial results of a deep near-IR spectroscopic survey covering the 15 fields of the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey using the recently commissioned MOSFIRE spectrometer on the Keck 1 telescope. We focus on a sample of 251 galaxies with redshifts 2.0 < z < 2.6, star formation rates (SFRs) 2 ≲ SFR ≲ 200 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, and stellar masses 8.6 < log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) < 11.4, with high-quality spectra in both H- and K-band atmospheric windows. We show unambiguously that the locus of z2.3 galaxies in the 'BPT' nebular diagnostic diagram exhibits an almost entirely disjointed, yet similarly tight, relationship between the line ratios [N II] λ6585/Hα and [O III]/Hβ as compared to local galaxies. Using photoionization models, we argue that the offset of the z2.3 BPT locus relative to that at z ∼ 0 is caused by a combination of harder stellar ionizing radiation field, higher ionization parameter, and higher N/O at a given O/H compared to most local galaxies, and that the position of a galaxy along the z2.3 star-forming BPT locus is surprisingly insensitive to gas-phase oxygen abundance. The observed nebular emission line ratios are most easily reproduced by models in which the net stellar ionizing radiation field resembles a blackbody with effective temperature T {sub eff} = 50, 000-60, 000 K, the gas-phase oxygen abundances lie in the range 0.2 < Z/Z {sub ☉} < 1.0, and the ratio of gas-phase N/O is close to the solar value. We critically assess the applicability at high redshift of commonly used strong line indices for estimating gas-phase metallicity, and consider the implications of the small intrinsic scatter of the empirical relationship between excitation-sensitive line indices and M {sub *} (i.e., the 'mass-metallicity' relation) at z2.3.

  12. Strong nebular line ratios in the spectra of z2-3 star forming galaxies: first results from KBSS-MOSFIRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steidel, Charles C.; Rudie, Gwen C.; Strom, Allison L.; Trainor, Ryan F.; Konidaris, Nicholas P.; Matthews, Keith; Pettini, Max; Reddy, Naveen A.; Shapley, Alice E.; Kulas, Kristin R.; Mace, Gregory; McLean, Ian S.; Erb, Dawn K.; Turner, Monica L.

    2014-01-01

    We present initial results of a deep near-IR spectroscopic survey covering the 15 fields of the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey using the recently commissioned MOSFIRE spectrometer on the Keck 1 telescope. We focus on a sample of 251 galaxies with redshifts 2.0 < z < 2.6, star formation rates (SFRs) 2 ≲ SFR ≲ 200 M ☉ yr –1 , and stellar masses 8.6 < log (M * /M ☉ ) < 11.4, with high-quality spectra in both H- and K-band atmospheric windows. We show unambiguously that the locus of z2.3 galaxies in the 'BPT' nebular diagnostic diagram exhibits an almost entirely disjointed, yet similarly tight, relationship between the line ratios [N II] λ6585/Hα and [O III]/Hβ as compared to local galaxies. Using photoionization models, we argue that the offset of the z2.3 BPT locus relative to that at z ∼ 0 is caused by a combination of harder stellar ionizing radiation field, higher ionization parameter, and higher N/O at a given O/H compared to most local galaxies, and that the position of a galaxy along the z2.3 star-forming BPT locus is surprisingly insensitive to gas-phase oxygen abundance. The observed nebular emission line ratios are most easily reproduced by models in which the net stellar ionizing radiation field resembles a blackbody with effective temperature T eff = 50, 000-60, 000 K, the gas-phase oxygen abundances lie in the range 0.2 < Z/Z ☉ < 1.0, and the ratio of gas-phase N/O is close to the solar value. We critically assess the applicability at high redshift of commonly used strong line indices for estimating gas-phase metallicity, and consider the implications of the small intrinsic scatter of the empirical relationship between excitation-sensitive line indices and M * (i.e., the 'mass-metallicity' relation) at z2.3.

  13. THE EVOLUTION OF THE FAR-UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND STAR FORMATION RATE DENSITY OF THE CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH FROM z = 0.2 TO 1.2 WITH SWIFT/UVOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, Lea M. Z.; Gronwall, Caryl; Wolf, Christopher; Siegel, Michael H.; Hagen, Alex [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Hoversten, Erik A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 120 E. Cameron Avenue, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Page, Mathew, E-mail: lmz5057@psu.edu [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-01

    We use deep Swift UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT) near-ultraviolet (1600–4000 Å) imaging of the Chandra Deep Field South to measure the rest-frame far-UV (FUV; 1500 Å) luminosity function (LF) in four redshift bins between z = 0.2 and 1.2. Our sample includes 730 galaxies with u < 24.1 mag. We use two methods to construct and fit the LFs: the traditional V{sub max} method with bootstrap errors, and a maximum likelihood estimator. We observe luminosity evolution such that M* fades by ∼2 mag from z ∼ 1 to z ∼ 0.3, implying that star formation activity was substantially higher at z ∼ 1 than today. We integrate our LFs to determine the FUV luminosity densities and star formation rate densities (SFRDs) from z = 0.2 to 1.2. We find evolution consistent with an increase proportional to (1 + z){sup 1.9} out to z ∼ 1. Our luminosity densities and star formation rates are consistent with those found in the literature but are, on average, a factor of ∼2 higher than previous FUV measurements. In addition, we combine our UVOT data with the MUSYC survey to model the galaxies’ ultraviolet-to-infrared spectral energy distributions and estimate the rest-frame FUV attenuation. We find that accounting for the attenuation increases the SFRDs by ∼1 dex across all four redshift bins.

  14. DB2 9 for zOS Database Administration Certification Study Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Lawson, Susan

    2008-01-01

    In order to become an IBM Certified Database Administrator - DB2 9 DBA for z/OS, you must pass two exams: DB2 9 Fundamentals Exam (Exam 730), and DB2 9 Database Administrator for z/OS (Exam 732)-the primary focus focus of this book. Written by two members of the team who participated in the actual writing of the exam, this specialized study guide covers every topic that you will need to know to pass Exam 732, including database design and implementation, operation and recovery, security and auditing, performance, as well as installation and migration/upgrade. But that is only the beginning.

  15. BPMN 2.0 introduction to the standard for business process modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Allweyer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BPMN (Business Process Model and Notation) is the established standard for business process modeling. Only a few years after its first publication, it has gained widespread adoption in practice. All important modeling tools support BPMN diagramming. It is possible to create business-oriented diagrams, but also technical models for process execution in business process management systems (BPMS). This book provides a stepwise introduction to BPMN, using many examples close to practice. Starting with the basic elements for modeling sequence flow, all BPMN 2.0 diagrams are presented and discussed in detail. You will gain a profound understanding of the complete notation, and you will be able to make correct use of the different language elements. In the second edition, a collection of useful modeling patterns has been added. These patterns provide best-practice solutions for typical problems arising in the practice of process modeling.

  16. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Produced in Association with a Z Boson in p(bar p) Collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson, using up to 7.9 fb -1 of integrated luminosity from p(bar p) collisions collected with the CDF II detector. We utilize several novel techniques, including multivariate lepton selection, multivariate trigger parametrization, and a multi-stage signal discriminant consisting of specialized functions trained to distinguish individual backgrounds. By increasing acceptance and enhancing signal discrimination, these techniques have significantly improved the sensitivity of the analysis above what was expected from a larger dataset alone. We observe no significant evidence for a signal, and we set limits on the ZH production cross section. For a Higgs boson with mass 115 GeV/c 2 , we expect (observe) a limit of 3.9 (4.8) times the standard model predicted value, at the 95% credibility level.

  17. Constraining the low-mass Slope of the star formation sequence at 0.5 < z < 2.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Henry, Alaina; Rigby, Jane R.; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Labbé, Ivo; Leja, Joel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Nelson, Erica J.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Brammer, Gabriel B.

    2014-01-01

    We constrain the slope of the star formation rate (SFR; log Ψ) to stellar mass (log M * ) relation down to log (M * /M ☉ ) = 8.4 (log (M * /M ☉ ) = 9.2) at z = 0.5 (z = 2.5) with a mass-complete sample of 39,106 star-forming galaxies selected from the 3D-HST photometric catalogs, using deep photometry in the CANDELS fields. For the first time, we find that the slope is dependent on stellar mass, such that it is steeper at low masses (log Ψ∝log M * ) than at high masses (log Ψ∝(0.3-0.6)log M * ). These steeper low-mass slopes are found for three different star formation indicators: the combination of the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR), calibrated from a stacking analysis of Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm imaging; β-corrected UV SFRs; and Hα SFRs. The normalization of the sequence evolves differently in distinct mass regimes as well: for galaxies less massive than log (M * /M ☉ ) < 10 the specific SFR (Ψ/M * ) is observed to be roughly self-similar with Ψ/M * ∝(1 + z) 1.9 , whereas more massive galaxies show a stronger evolution with Ψ/M * ∝(1 + z) 2.2-3.5 for log (M * /M ☉ ) = 10.2-11.2. The fact that we find a steep slope of the star formation sequence for the lower mass galaxies will help reconcile theoretical galaxy formation models with the observations.

  18. Search for the standard model higgs Boson in the ZH-->nunubb channel in 5.2 fb{-1} of pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Backusmayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Camacho-Pérez, E; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Devaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2010-02-19

    A search is performed for the standard model Higgs boson in 5.2 fb{-1} of pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The final state considered is a pair of b jets and large missing transverse energy, as expected from pp-->ZH-->nunubb production. The search is also sensitive to the WH-->lnubb channel when the charged lepton is not identified. For a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV, a limit is set at the 95% C.L. on the cross section multiplied by branching fraction for [pp-->(Z/W)H](H-->bb) that is a factor of 3.7 larger than the standard model value, consistent with the factor of 4.6 expected.

  19. Fiscal Year 2008 Phased Construction Completion Report for EU Z2-33 in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-09-11

    The Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2161&D2) (Zone 2 ROD) acknowledged that most of the 800 acres in Zone 2 were contaminated, but that sufficient data to confirm the levels of contamination were lacking. The Zone 2 ROD further specified that a sampling strategy for filling the data gaps would be developed. The Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2224&D3) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP) defined the sampling strategy as the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS), generally following the approach used for characterization of the Zone 1 exposure units (EUs). The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into seven geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the data quality objectives (DQOs) of the DVS process, the Zone 2 RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together and allowing identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program and remedial actions (RAs) were completed for EU Z2-33. Remedial action was also performed at two additional areas in adjacent EU Z2-42 because of their close proximity and similar nature to a small surface soil RA in EU Z2-33. Remedial actions for building slabs performed in EU Z2-33 during fiscal year (FY) 2007 were reported in the Fiscal Year 2007 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2723&D1). Recommended RAs for EU Z2-42 were described in the Fiscal Year 2006 Phased Construction

  20. Dark matter, muon g -2 , electric dipole moments, and Z →ℓi+ℓj- in a one-loop induced neutrino model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Okada, Hiroshi; Senaha, Eibun

    2017-07-01

    We study a simple one-loop induced neutrino mass model that contains both bosonic and fermionic dark matter candidates and has the capacity to explain the muon anomalous magnetic moment anomaly. We perform a comprehensive analysis by taking into account the relevant constraints of charged lepton flavor violation, electric dipole moments, and neutrino oscillation data. We examine the constraints from lepton flavor-changing Z boson decays at the one-loop level, particularly when the involved couplings contribute to the muon g -2 . It is found that BR (Z →μ τ )≃(10-7- 10-6) while BR (τ →μ γ )≲10-11 in the fermionic dark matter scenario. The former can be probed by the precision measurement of the Z boson at future lepton colliders.

  1. On the UV compactness and morphologies of typical Lyman α emitters from z ˜ 2 to z ˜ 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino-Afonso, Ana; Sobral, David; Ribeiro, Bruno; Matthee, Jorryt; Santos, Sérgio; Calhau, João; Forshaw, Alex; Johnson, Andrea; Merrick, Joanna; Pérez, Sara; Sheldon, Oliver

    2018-06-01

    We investigate the rest-frame UV morphologies of a large sample of Lyman α emitters (LAEs) from z ˜ 2 to z ˜ 6, selected in a uniform way with 16 different narrow and medium bands over the full COSMOS field. We use 3045 LAEs with Hubble Space Telescope coverage in a stacking analysis and find that they have MUV ˜ -20, below M_UV^\\ast at these redshifts. We also focus our analysis on a subsample of 780 individual galaxies with iAB < 25 for which GALFIT converges for 429 of them. The individual median size (re ˜ 1 kpc), ellipticities [slightly elongated with (b/a) ˜ 0.45], Sérsic index (disc-like with n ≲ 2), and light concentration (comparable to that of disc or irregular galaxies, with C ˜ 2.7) of LAEs show mild evolution from z ˜ 2 to z ˜ 6. LAEs with the highest rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) are the smallest/most compact (re ˜ 0.8 kpc, compared to re ˜ 1.5 kpc for the lower EW LAEs). When stacking our samples in bins of fixed Lyα luminosity and Lyα EW, we find evidence for redshift evolution in n and C, but not in galaxy sizes. The evolution seems to be stronger for LAEs with 25 < EW < 100 Å. When compared to other star-forming galaxies (SFGs), LAEs are found to be smaller at all redshifts. The difference between the two populations changes with redshift, from a factor of ˜1 at z ≳ 5 to SFGs being a factor of ˜2-4 larger than LAEs for z2. This means that at the highest redshifts, where typical sizes approach those of LAEs, the fraction of galaxies showing Lyα in emission (and with a high Lyα escape fraction) should be much higher, consistent with observations.

  2. THE SINS/zC-SINF SURVEY OF z2GALAXY KINEMATICS: THE NATURE OF DISPERSION-DOMINATED GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Sarah F.; Genzel, Reinhard; Förster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Buschkamp, Peter; Davies, Ric; Eisenhauer, Frank; Kurk, Jaron; Lutz, Dieter; Shapiro Griffin, Kristen; Mancini, Chiara; Renzini, Alvio; Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Peng, Yingjie; Bouché, Nicolas; Burkert, Andreas; Cresci, Giovanni; Genel, Shy; Hicks, Erin K. S.; Naab, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the spectra, spatial distributions, and kinematics of Hα, [N II], and [S II] emission in a sample of 38, z2.2 UV/optically selected star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from the SINS and zC-SINF surveys, 34 of which were observed in the adaptive optics mode of SINFONI and 30 of those contain data presented for the first time here. This is supplemented by kinematic data from 43 z ∼ 1-2.5 galaxies from the literature. None of these 81 galaxies is an obvious major merger. We find that the kinematic classification of high-z SFGs as ''dispersion dominated'' or ''rotation dominated'' correlates most strongly with their intrinsic sizes. Smaller galaxies are more likely ''dispersion-dominated'' for two main reasons: (1) the rotation velocity scales linearly with galaxy size but intrinsic velocity dispersion does not depend on size or may even increase in smaller galaxies, and as such, their ratio is systematically lower for smaller galaxies, and (2) beam smearing strongly decreases large-scale velocity gradients and increases observed dispersion much more for galaxies with sizes at or below the resolution. Dispersion-dominated SFGs may thus have intrinsic properties similar to ''rotation-dominated'' SFGs, but are primarily more compact, lower mass, less metal enriched, and may have higher gas fractions, plausibly because they represent an earlier evolutionary state.

  3. Clustering of High Redshift (z>2.9) Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A.; Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Fan, Xiaohui; Richards, Gordon T.; Hall, Patrick B.; Schneider, Donald P.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Thakar, Anirudda R.; Berk, Daniel E.Vanden; Anderson, Scott F.; Bahcall, Neta A.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-11-30

    We study the two-point correlation function of a uniformly selected sample of 4,428 optically selected luminous quasars with redshift 2.9 {le} z {le} 5.4 selected over 4041 deg{sup 2} from the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We fit a power-law to the projected correlation function w{sub p}(r{sub p}) to marginalize over redshift space distortions and redshift errors. For a real-space correlation function of the form {zeta}(r) = (r/r{sub 0}){sup -{gamma}}, the fitted parameters in comoving coordinates are r{sub 0} = 15.2 {+-} 2.7 h{sup -1} Mpc and {gamma} = 2.0 {+-} 0.3, over a scale range 4 {le} r{sub p} {le} 150 h{sup -1} Mpc. Thus high-redshift quasars are appreciably more strongly clustered than their z {approx} 1.5 counterparts, which have a comoving clustering length r{sub 0} {approx} 6.5 h{sup -1} Mpc. Dividing our sample into two redshift bins: 2.9 {le} z {le} 3.5 and z {ge} 3.5, and assuming a power-law index {gamma} = 2.0, we find a correlation length of r{sub 0} = 16.9 {+-} 1.7 h{sup -1} Mpc for the former, and r{sub 0} = 24.3 {+-} 2.4 h{sup -1} Mpc for the latter. Strong clustering at high redshift indicates that quasars are found in very massive, and therefore highly biased, halos. Following Martini & Weinberg, we relate the clustering strength and quasar number density to the quasar lifetimes and duty cycle. Using the Sheth & Tormen halo mass function, the quasar lifetime is estimated to lie in the range 4 {approx} 50 Myr for quasars with 2.9 {le} z {le} 3.5; and 30 {approx} 600 Myr for quasars with z {ge} 3.5. The corresponding duty cycles are 0.004 {approx} 0.05 for the lower redshift bin and 0.03 {approx} 0.6 for the higher redshift bin. The minimum mass of halos in which these quasars reside is 2-3 x 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}} for quasars with 2.9 {le} z {le} 3.5 and 4-6 x 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}} for quasars with z {ge} 3.5; the effective bias factor b{sub eff} increases with redshift, e.g., b

  4. CLASH: DISCOVERY OF A BRIGHT z {approx_equal} 6.2 DWARF GALAXY QUADRUPLY LENSED BY MACS J0329.6-0211

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitrin, A. [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Moustakas, J. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Bradley, L.; Coe, D.; Postman, M.; Koekemoer, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); Moustakas, L. A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Shu, X. [Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Zheng, W.; Ford, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Benitez, N. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), Granada (Spain); Bouwens, R. [Leiden Observatory, University of Leiden, Leiden (Netherlands); Broadhurst, T. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Basque Country, Bilbao (Spain); Host, O.; Jouvel, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Meneghetti, M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Rosati, P. [European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Donahue, M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Grillo, C. [Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Kelson, D., E-mail: adizitrin@gmail.com [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA (United States); and others

    2012-03-15

    We report the discovery of a z{sub phot} = 6.18{sup +0.05}{sub -0.07} (95% confidence level) dwarf galaxy, lensed into four images by the galaxy cluster MACS J0329.6-0211 (z{sub l} = 0.45). The galaxy is observed as a high-redshift dropout in HST/ACS/WFC3 CLASH and Spitzer/IRAC imaging. Its redshift is securely determined due to a clear detection of the Lyman break in the 18-band photometry, making this galaxy one of the highest-redshift multiply lensed objects known to date with an observed magnitude of F125W =24.00 {+-} 0.04 AB mag for its most magnified image. We also present the first strong-lensing analysis of this cluster uncovering 15 additional multiply imaged candidates of five lower-redshift sources spanning the range z{sub s} {approx_equal} 2-4. The mass model independently supports the high photometric redshift and reveals magnifications of 11.6{sup +8.9}{sub -4.1}, 17.6{sup +6.2}{sub -3.9}, 3.9{sup +3.0}{sub -1.7}, and 3.7{sup +1.3}{sub -0.2}, respectively, for the four images of the high-redshift galaxy. By delensing the most magnified image we construct an image of the source with a physical resolution of {approx}200 pc when the universe was {approx}0.9 Gyr old, where the z {approx_equal} 6.2 galaxy occupies a source-plane area of approximately 2.2 kpc{sup 2}. Modeling the observed spectral energy distribution using population synthesis models, we find a demagnified stellar mass of {approx}10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, subsolar metallicity (Z/Z{sub Sun} {approx} 0.5), low dust content (A{sub V} {approx} 0.1 mag), a demagnified star formation rate (SFR) of {approx}3.2 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and a specific SFR of {approx}3.4 Gyr{sup -1}, all consistent with the properties of local dwarf galaxies.

  5. A model of quarks with Δ(6N2) family symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimori, Hajime; King, Stephen F.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a first model of quarks based on the discrete family symmetry Δ(6N 2 ) in which the Cabibbo angle is correctly determined by a residual Z 2 ×Z 2 subgroup, and the smaller quark mixing angles may be qualitatively understood from the model. The present model of quarks may be regarded as a first step towards formulating a complete model of quarks and leptons based on Δ(6N 2 ), in which the lepton mixing matrix is fully determined by a Klein subgroup. For example, the choice N=28 provides an accurate determination of both the reactor angle and the Cabibbo angle

  6. Matrix quantum mechanics on S1/Z2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Betzios

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We study Matrix Quantum Mechanics on the Euclidean time orbifold S1/Z2. Upon Wick rotation to Lorentzian time and taking the double-scaling limit this theory provides a toy model for a big-bang/big crunch universe in two dimensional non-critical string theory where the orbifold fixed points become cosmological singularities. We derive the MQM partition function both in the canonical and grand canonical ensemble in two different formulations and demonstrate agreement between them. We pinpoint the contribution of twisted states in both of these formulations either in terms of bi-local operators acting at the end-points of time or branch-cuts on the complex plane. We calculate, in the matrix model, the contribution of the twisted states to the torus level partition function explicitly and show that it precisely matches the world-sheet result, providing a non-trivial test of the proposed duality. Finally we discuss some interesting features of the partition function and the possibility of realising it as a τ-function of an integrable hierarchy.

  7. Matrix quantum mechanics on S1 /Z2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzios, P.; Gürsoy, U.; Papadoulaki, O.

    2018-03-01

    We study Matrix Quantum Mechanics on the Euclidean time orbifold S1 /Z2. Upon Wick rotation to Lorentzian time and taking the double-scaling limit this theory provides a toy model for a big-bang/big crunch universe in two dimensional non-critical string theory where the orbifold fixed points become cosmological singularities. We derive the MQM partition function both in the canonical and grand canonical ensemble in two different formulations and demonstrate agreement between them. We pinpoint the contribution of twisted states in both of these formulations either in terms of bi-local operators acting at the end-points of time or branch-cuts on the complex plane. We calculate, in the matrix model, the contribution of the twisted states to the torus level partition function explicitly and show that it precisely matches the world-sheet result, providing a non-trivial test of the proposed duality. Finally we discuss some interesting features of the partition function and the possibility of realising it as a τ-function of an integrable hierarchy.

  8. A gamma-ray burst at a redshift of z~8.2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanvir, N.R.; Fox, D.B.; Levan, A.J.; Berger, E.; Wiersema, K.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Cucchiara, A.; Krühler, T.; Gehrels, N.; Bloom, J.S.; Greiner, J.; Evans, P.A.; Rol, E.; Olivares, F.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Farihi, J.; Willingale, R.; Starling, R.L.C.; Cenko, S.B.; Perley, D.; Maund, J.R.; Duke, J.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Adamson, A.J.; Allan, A.; Bremer, M.N.; Burrows, D.N.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Cavanagh, B.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Dopita, M.A.; Fatkhullin, T.A.; Fruchter, A.S.; Foley, R.J.; Gorosabel, J.; Kennea, J.; Kerr, T.; Klose, S.; Krimm, H.A.; Komarova, V.N.; Kulkarni, S.R.; Moskvitin, A.S.; Mundell, C.G.; Naylor, T.; Page, K.; Penprase, B.E.; Perri, M.; Podsiadlowski, P.; Roth, K.; Rutledge, R.E.; Sakamoto, T.; Schady, P.; Schmidt, B.P.; Soderberg, A.M.; Sollerman, J.; Stephens, A.W.; Stratta, G.; Ukwatta, T.N.; Watson, D.; Westra, E.; Wold, T.; Wolf, C.

    2009-01-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to result from the explosions of certain massive stars(1), and some are bright enough that they should be observable out to redshifts of z > 20 using current technology(2-4). Hitherto, the highest redshift measured for any object was z = 6.96, for a

  9. Isospin symmetry of T-z=+/- 3/2 ->+/- 1/2 Gamow-Teller transitions in A=41 nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fujita, Y; Shimbara, Y; Adachi, T; Berg, GPA; Fujita, H; Hatanaka, K; Kamiya, J; Nakanishi, K; Sakemi, Y; Sasaki, S; Shimizu, Y; Tameshige, Y; Uchida, M; Wakasa, T; Yosoi, M

    2004-01-01

    Under the assumption that isospin T is a good quantum number, isobaric analog states and various analogous transitions are expected in isobars with mass number A. The, strengths of T-z = +/-3/2 --> 1/2 analogous Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions and analogous M1 transitions within the A = 41 isobar

  10. Isospin symmetry of T-z=+/- 3/2 ->+/- 1/2 Gamow-Teller transitions in A=41 nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fujita, Y; Shimbara, Y; Adachi, T; Berg, GPA; Fujita, H; Hatanaka, K; Kamiya, J; Nakanishi, K; Sakemi, Y; Sasaki, S; Shimizu, Y; Tameshige, Y; Uchida, M; Wakasa, T; Yosoi, M

    Under the assumption that isospin T is a good quantum number, isobaric analog states and various analogous transitions are expected in isobars with mass number A. The, strengths of T-z = +/-3/2 --> 1/2 analogous Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions and analogous M1 transitions within the A = 41 isobar

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of the Spin-2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwashita, Takashi; Uragami, Kakuko; Muraoka, Yoshinori; Kinoshita, Takehiro; Idogaki, Toshihiro

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic properties of the spin S = 2 Ising system with the bilinear exchange interaction J 1 S iz S jz , the biquadratic exchange interaction J 2 S iz 2 S jz 2 and the single-ion anisotropy DS iz 2 are discussed by making use of the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for the magnetization z >, sub-lattice magnetizations z (A)> and z (B)>, the magnetic specific heat C M and spin structures. This Ising spin system of S = 2 with interactions J 1 and J 2 and with anisotropy D corresponds to the spin-2 Blume-Emery-Griffiths model. The phase diagram of this Ising spin system on a two-dimensional square lattice has been obtained for exchange parameter J 2 /J 1 and anisotropy parameter D/J 1 . The shapes of the temperature dependence of sublattice magnetizations z (A)> and z (B)> are related with abnormal behavior of temperature dependence of z > at low temperatures and affected significantly by the single-ion anisotropy D. The staggered quadrupolar (SQ) ordering turns out to be different largely between Ising systems with the single-ion anisotropy (D ≠ 0) and without the one (D 0).

  12. String flipped SO(10) model from Z4 orbifold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, H.; Shimojo, M.

    1993-01-01

    We search all possible string grand-unified-theory models obtained from heterotic superstrings compactified on a Z 4 orbifold with one Wilson line. It is shown that there is an essentially unique anomaly-free flipped SO(10) model with three generations plus one mirror conjugate generation of matter fields. We derive effective Yukawa interactions and examine the structure of mass matrices as well as a possible scenario of string coupling unification. The four-generation Z 4 orbifold model is a phenomenologically viable model beyond the minimal supersymmetric standard one

  13. The fragment ion C13H9O2 m/z 197 in the mass spectra of 2-(2'-R-phenyl)benzoic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gills, R.G.; Porter, Q.N.

    1990-01-01

    In the electron impact mass spectrum of 2-( ' -R-phenyl)benzoic acids where R = H, NO 2 , OCH 3 , COOH, or Br, and abundant fragment ion m/z 197 is formed by an ipso substitution in which R is expelled as a radical. The structure of the ion m/z 197 has been shown by collision-activated dissociation to be identical with that of the protonated molecule formed by methane chemical ionization of 6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one. 11 refs., 1 fig., ills

  14. The galaxy cluster mid-infrared luminosity function at 1.3 < z < 3.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Vernet, Joël; De Breuck, Carlos [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschildstr.2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Galametz, Audrey [INAF-Osservatorio di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040, Monteporzio (Italy); Gonzalez, Anthony H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Jarvis, Matt [Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Hatch, Nina [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Seymour, Nick [CASS, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW, 1710 (Australia); Stanford, Spencer A. [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    We present 4.5 μm luminosity functions for galaxies identified in 178 candidate galaxy clusters at 1.3 < z < 3.2. The clusters were identified as Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color-selected overdensities in the Clusters Around Radio-Loud AGN project, which imaged 420 powerful radio-loud active galactic nuclei (RLAGNs) at z > 1.3. The luminosity functions are derived for different redshift and richness bins, and the IRAC imaging reaches depths of m* + 2, allowing us to measure the faint end slopes of the luminosity functions. We find that α = –1 describes the luminosity function very well in all redshift bins and does not evolve significantly. This provides evidence that the rate at which the low mass galaxy population grows through star formation gets quenched and is replenished by in-falling field galaxies does not have a major net effect on the shape of the luminosity function. Our measurements for m* are consistent with passive evolution models and high formation redshifts (z{sub f} ∼ 3). We find a slight trend toward fainter m* for the richest clusters, implying that the most massive clusters in our sample could contain older stellar populations, yet another example of cosmic downsizing. Modeling shows that a contribution of a star-forming population of up to 40% cannot be ruled out. This value, found from our targeted survey, is significantly lower than the values found for slightly lower redshift, z ∼ 1, clusters found in wide-field surveys. The results are consistent with cosmic downsizing, as the clusters studied here were all found in the vicinity of RLAGNs—which have proven to be preferentially located in massive dark matter halos in the richest environments at high redshift—and they may therefore be older and more evolved systems than the general protocluster population.

  15. The galaxy cluster mid-infrared luminosity function at 1.3 < z < 3.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Vernet, Joël; De Breuck, Carlos; Stern, Daniel; Brodwin, Mark; Galametz, Audrey; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jarvis, Matt; Hatch, Nina; Seymour, Nick; Stanford, Spencer A.

    2014-01-01

    We present 4.5 μm luminosity functions for galaxies identified in 178 candidate galaxy clusters at 1.3 < z < 3.2. The clusters were identified as Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) color-selected overdensities in the Clusters Around Radio-Loud AGN project, which imaged 420 powerful radio-loud active galactic nuclei (RLAGNs) at z > 1.3. The luminosity functions are derived for different redshift and richness bins, and the IRAC imaging reaches depths of m* + 2, allowing us to measure the faint end slopes of the luminosity functions. We find that α = –1 describes the luminosity function very well in all redshift bins and does not evolve significantly. This provides evidence that the rate at which the low mass galaxy population grows through star formation gets quenched and is replenished by in-falling field galaxies does not have a major net effect on the shape of the luminosity function. Our measurements for m* are consistent with passive evolution models and high formation redshifts (z f ∼ 3). We find a slight trend toward fainter m* for the richest clusters, implying that the most massive clusters in our sample could contain older stellar populations, yet another example of cosmic downsizing. Modeling shows that a contribution of a star-forming population of up to 40% cannot be ruled out. This value, found from our targeted survey, is significantly lower than the values found for slightly lower redshift, z ∼ 1, clusters found in wide-field surveys. The results are consistent with cosmic downsizing, as the clusters studied here were all found in the vicinity of RLAGNs—which have proven to be preferentially located in massive dark matter halos in the richest environments at high redshift—and they may therefore be older and more evolved systems than the general protocluster population.

  16. Search for the standard model Higgs boson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Mattison, T.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Casper, D.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miotto, A.; Miguel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perlas, J. A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Veenhof, R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Orteu, S.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Levinthal, D.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Greene, A. M.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Patton, S.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Vogl, R.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Jakobs, K.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Dennis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jaffe, D. E.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Manneli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Techini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Mir, Ll. M.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Conway, J. S.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Nachtman, J. M.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I.; Sharma, V.; Shi, Z. H.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Sau Lan Wu; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1993-08-01

    Using a data sample corresponding to about 1 233 000 hadronic Z decays collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP, the reaction e+e- → HZ∗ has been used to search for the standard model Higgs boson, in association with missing energy when Z∗ → v v¯, or with a pair of energetic leptons when Z∗ → e+e-or μ +μ -. No signal was found and, at the 95% confidence level, mH exceeds 58.4 GeV/ c2.

  17. The standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1994-03-01

    In these lectures, my aim is to provide a survey of the standard model with emphasis on its renormalizability and electroweak radiative corrections. Since this is a school, I will try to be somewhat pedagogical by providing examples of loop calculations. In that way, I hope to illustrate some of the commonly employed tools of particle physics. With those goals in mind, I have organized my presentations as follows: In Section 2, renormalization is discussed from an applied perspective. The technique of dimensional regularization is described and used to define running couplings and masses. The utility of the renormalization group for computing leading logs is illustrated for the muon anomalous magnetic moment. In Section 3 electroweak radiative corrections are discussed. Standard model predictions are surveyed and used to constrain the top quark mass. The S, T, and U parameters are introduced and employed to probe for ''new physics''. The effect of Z' bosons on low energy phenomenology is described. In Section 4, a detailed illustration of electroweak radiative corrections is given for atomic parity violation. Finally, in Section 5, I conclude with an outlook for the future

  18. NuSTAR Reveals Extreme Absorption in z < 0.5 Type 2 Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansbury, G. B.; Gandhi, P.; Alexander, D. M.; Assef, R. J.; Aird, J.; Annuar, A.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Baloković, M.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Brightman, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Civano, F.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W.; Del Moro, A.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Hickox, R. C.; Koss, M.; LaMassa, S. M.; Luo, B.; Puccetti, S.; Stern, D.; Treister, E.; Vignali, C.; Zappacosta, L.; Zhang, W. W.

    2015-08-01

    The intrinsic column density (NH) distribution of quasars is poorly known. At the high obscuration end of the quasar population and for redshifts z 1.5 × 1024 cm-2) type 2 quasars (CTQSO2s); five new NuSTAR observations are reported herein, and four have been previously published. The candidate CTQSO2s lie at z < 0.5, have observed [O iii] luminosities in the range 8.4\\lt {log}({L}[{{O} {{III}}]}/{L}⊙ )\\lt 9.6, and show evidence for extreme, Compton-thick absorption when indirect absorption diagnostics are considered. Among the nine candidate CTQSO2s, five are detected by NuSTAR in the high-energy (8-24 keV) band: two are weakly detected at the ≈3σ confidence level and three are strongly detected with sufficient counts for spectral modeling (≳90 net source counts at 8-24 keV). For these NuSTAR-detected sources direct (i.e., X-ray spectral) constraints on the intrinsic active galactic nucleus properties are feasible, and we measure column densities ≈2.5-1600 times higher and intrinsic (unabsorbed) X-ray luminosities ≈10-70 times higher than pre-NuSTAR constraints from Chandra and XMM-Newton. Assuming the NuSTAR-detected type 2 quasars are representative of other Compton-thick candidates, we make a correction to the NH distribution for optically selected type 2 quasars as measured by Chandra and XMM-Newton for 39 objects. With this approach, we predict a Compton-thick fraction of {f}{CT}={36}-12+14 %, although higher fractions (up to 76%) are possible if indirect absorption diagnostics are assumed to be reliable.

  19. Derivation of mass relations for composite W* and Z* from effective Lagrangian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasue, Masaki; Oneda, Sadao.

    1985-04-01

    In an effective-Lagrangian model with gauge bosons (W,Z,γ) and their neighboring spin J=1 composites (W*,Z*), we find relations among their masses, m sub(W), m sub(Z), m sub(W*) and m sub(Z*): m sub(W) m sub(W*) = cos theta m sub(Z) m sub(Z*) (as a generalization of m sub(W) = cos theta m sub(Z)) and m sub(W) 2 + m sub(W*) 2 + tan 2 theta m sub(W0) 2 = m sub(Z) 2 + m sub(Z*) 2 with m sub(W0) being the mass of W in the standard model provided that the system respects the SU(2) sub(L) x U(1) sub(Y) symmetry. W* and Z* are taken as the lowest-lying excited states belonging to an SU(2) sub(L)-triplet in the symmetric limit. The existence of W* coupling to the V-A current modifies the relation between G sub(F) and M sub(W) and that of Z* generates a new interaction of the (Jsup(em)) 2 -type as well as the deviation of sin theta sub(W) observed at low energies from the mixing angle sin theta in neutral-current interactions. (author)

  20. Submillimeter H2O and H2O+emission in lensed ultra- and hyper-luminous infrared galaxies at z 2-4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, C.; Omont, A.; Beelen, A.; González-Alfonso, E.; Neri, R.; Gao, Y.; van der Werf, P.; Weiß, A.; Gavazzi, R.; Falstad, N.; Baker, A. J.; Bussmann, R. S.; Cooray, A.; Cox, P.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dye, S.; Guélin, M.; Ivison, R.; Krips, M.; Lehnert, M.; Michałowski, M. J.; Riechers, D. A.; Spaans, M.; Valiante, E.

    2016-01-01

    We report rest-frame submillimeter H2O emission line observations of 11 ultra- or hyper-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs or HyLIRGs) at z 2-4 selected among the brightest lensed galaxies discovered in the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS). Using the IRAM NOrthern

  1. Search for Minimal Standard Model and Minimal Supersymmetric Model Higgs Bosons in e+ e- Collisions with the OPAL detector at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganel, Ofer

    1993-06-01

    When LEP machine was turned on in August 1989, a new era had opened. For the first time, direct, model-independent searches for Higgs boson could be carried out. The Minimal Standard Model Higgs boson is expected to be produced in e + e - collisions via the H o Z o . The Minimal Supersymmetric Model Higgs boson are expected to be produced in the analogous e + e - -> h o Z o process or in pairs via the process e + e - -> h o A o . In this thesis we describe the search for Higgs bosons within the framework of the Minimal Standard Model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Model, using the data accumulated by the OPAL detector at LEP in the 1989, 1990, 1991 and part of the 1992 running periods at and around the Z o pole. An MInimal Supersymmetric Model Higgs boson generator is described as well as its use in several different searches. As a result of this work, the Minimal Standard Model Higgs boson mass is bounded from below by 54.2 GeV/c 2 at 95% C.L. This is, at present, the highest such bound. A novel method of overcoming the m τ and m s dependence of Minimal Supersymmetric Higgs boson production and decay introduced by one-loop radiative corrections is used to obtain model-independent exclusion. The thesis describes also an algorithm for off line identification of calorimeter noise in the OPAL detector. (author)

  2. Limited predictive value of achieving beneficial plasma (Z)-endoxifen threshold level by CYP2D6 genotyping in tamoxifen-treated Polish women with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, Ewa E.; Piatkowska, Magdalena; Karczmarski, Jakub; Goryca, Krzysztof; Brewczynska, Elzbieta; Jazwiec, Radoslaw; Kluska, Anna; Omiotek, Robert; Paziewska, Agnieszka; Dadlez, Michal; Ostrowski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen, the most frequently used drug for treating estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, must be converted into active metabolites to exert its therapeutic efficacy, mainly through CYP2D6 enzymes. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of CYP2D6 polymorphisms on (Z)-endoxifen-directed tamoxifen metabolism and to assess the usefulness of CYP2D6 genotyping for identifying patients who are likely to have insufficient (Z)-endoxifen concentrations to benefit from standard therapy. Blood samples from 279 Polish women with breast cancer receiving tamoxifen 20 mg daily were analyzed for CYP2D6 genotype and drug metabolite concentration. Steady-state plasma levels of tamoxifen and its 14 metabolites were measured by using the ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method. In nearly 60 % of patients, including over 30 % of patients with fully functional CYP2D6, (Z)-endoxifen concentration was below the predefined threshold of therapeutic efficacy. The most frequently observed CYP2D6 genotype was EM/PM (34.8 %), among which 83.5 % of patients had a combination of wild-type and *4 alleles. Plasma concentration of five metabolites was significantly correlated with CYP2D6 genotype. For the first time, we identified an association between decreased (E/Z)-4-OH-N-desmethyl-tamoxifen-β-D-glucuronide levels (r 2 = 0.23; p < 10 −16 ) and increased CYP2D6 functional impairment. The strongest correlation was observed for (Z)-endoxifen, whose concentration was significantly lower in groups of patients carrying at least one CYP2D6 null allele, compared with EM/EM patients. The CYP2D6 genotype accounted for plasma level variability of (Z)-endoxifen by 27 % (p < 10 −16 ) and for the variability of metabolic ratio indicating (Z)-endoxifen-directed metabolism of tamoxifen by 51 % (p < 10 −43 ). The majority of breast cancer patients in Poland may not achieve a therapeutic level of (Z)-endoxifen upon receiving a standard

  3. (2Z,2Z-Diethyl 3,3′-[butane-1,4-diylbis(azanediyl]bis(but-2-enoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Anouar Harrad

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The whole molecule of the title β-enaminoester, C16H28N2O4, is generated by a crystallographic inversion center, situated at the mid-point of the central C—C bond of the 1,4-diaminobutane segment. There are two intramolecular N—H...O hydrogen bonds that generate S(6 ring motifs. This leads to the Z conformation about the C=C bonds [1.3756 (17 Å]. The molecule is S-shaped with the planar central 1,4-diaminobutane segment [maximum deviation for non H-atoms = 0.0058 (13 Å] being inclined to the ethyl butylenonate fragment [C—C—O—C—C=C—C; maximum deviation = 0.0710 (12 Å] by 15.56 (10°. In the crystal, molecules are linked via C—H...O interactions, leading to the formation of an undulating two-dimensional network lying parallel to the bc plane.

  4. THE SINS/zC-SINF SURVEY OF z {approx} 2GALAXY KINEMATICS: THE NATURE OF DISPERSION-DOMINATED GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Sarah F.; Genzel, Reinhard [Department of Astronomy, Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Buschkamp, Peter; Davies, Ric; Eisenhauer, Frank; Kurk, Jaron; Lutz, Dieter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Shapiro Griffin, Kristen [Space Sciences Research Group, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Mancini, Chiara; Renzini, Alvio [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, Padova I-35122 (Italy); Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Peng, Yingjie [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics, Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, ETH Zuerich CH-8093 (Switzerland); Bouche, Nicolas [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Burkert, Andreas [Universitaets-Sternwarte Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (USM), Scheinerstr. 1, Muenchen D-81679 (Germany); Cresci, Giovanni [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica Osservatorio Astronomico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Genel, Shy [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hicks, Erin K. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Naab, Thorsten, E-mail: sfnewman@berkeley.edu [Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl Schwarzschildstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2013-04-20

    We analyze the spectra, spatial distributions, and kinematics of H{alpha}, [N II], and [S II] emission in a sample of 38, z {approx} 2.2 UV/optically selected star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from the SINS and zC-SINF surveys, 34 of which were observed in the adaptive optics mode of SINFONI and 30 of those contain data presented for the first time here. This is supplemented by kinematic data from 43 z {approx} 1-2.5 galaxies from the literature. None of these 81 galaxies is an obvious major merger. We find that the kinematic classification of high-z SFGs as ''dispersion dominated'' or ''rotation dominated'' correlates most strongly with their intrinsic sizes. Smaller galaxies are more likely ''dispersion-dominated'' for two main reasons: (1) the rotation velocity scales linearly with galaxy size but intrinsic velocity dispersion does not depend on size or may even increase in smaller galaxies, and as such, their ratio is systematically lower for smaller galaxies, and (2) beam smearing strongly decreases large-scale velocity gradients and increases observed dispersion much more for galaxies with sizes at or below the resolution. Dispersion-dominated SFGs may thus have intrinsic properties similar to ''rotation-dominated'' SFGs, but are primarily more compact, lower mass, less metal enriched, and may have higher gas fractions, plausibly because they represent an earlier evolutionary state.

  5. Residual Z{sub 2} symmetries and leptonic mixing patterns from finite discrete subgroups of U(3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshipura, Anjan S. [Physical Research Laboratory,Navarangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India); Patel, Ketan M. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Mohali,Knowledge City, Sector 81, S A S Nagar, Manauli 140 306 (India)

    2017-01-30

    We study embedding of non-commuting Z{sub 2} and Z{sub m}, m≥3 symmetries in discrete subgroups (DSG) of U(3) and analytically work out the mixing patterns implied by the assumption that Z{sub 2} and Z{sub m} describe the residual symmetries of the neutrino and the charged lepton mass matrices respectively. Both Z{sub 2} and Z{sub m} are assumed to be subgroups of a larger discrete symmetry group G{sub f} possessing three dimensional faithful irreducible representation. The residual symmetries predict the magnitude of a column of the leptonic mixing matrix U{sub PMNS} which are studied here assuming G{sub f} as the DSG of SU(3) designated as type C and D and large number of DSG of U(3) which are not in SU(3). These include the known group series Σ(3n{sup 3}), T{sub n}(m), Δ(3n{sup 2},m), Δ(6n{sup 2},m) and Δ{sup ′}(6n{sup 2},j,k). It is shown that the predictions for a column of |U{sub PMNS}| in these group series and the C and D types of groups are all contained in the predictions of the Δ(6N{sup 2}) groups for some integer N. The Δ(6N{sup 2}) groups therefore represent a sufficient set of G{sub f} to obtain predictions of the residual symmetries Z{sub 2} and Z{sub m}.

  6. STRUCTURAL EVOLUTION OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES TO z = 2.5 IN CANDELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yu-Yen; Van der Wel, Arjen; Rix, Hans-Walter [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Holden, Bradford; Faber, S. M.; Mozena, Mark; Guo Yicheng; Kocevski, Dale D. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); McGrath, Elizabeth J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Colby College, Waterville, ME 04901 (United States); Wuyts, Stijn [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, Giessenbachstr., D-85741 Garching (Germany); Haeussler, Boris [Schools of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Barden, Marco [Institute of Astro- and Particle Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Huang, Kuang-Han [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Galametz, Audrey [INAF-Osservatorio di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy); Dekel, Avishai [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Hathi, Nimish P., E-mail: chang@mpia.de [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA (United States); and others

    2013-08-20

    Projected axis ratio measurements of 880 early-type galaxies at redshifts 1 < z < 2.5 selected from CANDELS are used to reconstruct and model their intrinsic shapes. The sample is selected on the basis of multiple rest-frame colors to reflect low star-formation activity. We demonstrate that these galaxies as an ensemble are dust-poor and transparent and therefore likely have smooth light profiles, similar to visually classified early-type galaxies. Similar to their present-day counterparts, the z > 1 early-type galaxies show a variety of intrinsic shapes; even at a fixed mass, the projected axis ratio distributions cannot be explained by the random projection of a set of galaxies with very similar intrinsic shapes. However, a two-population model for the intrinsic shapes, consisting of a triaxial, fairly round population, combined with a flat (c/a {approx} 0.3) oblate population, adequately describes the projected axis ratio distributions of both present-day and z > 1 early-type galaxies. We find that the proportion of oblate versus triaxial galaxies depends both on the galaxies' stellar mass, and-at a given mass-on redshift. For present-day and z < 1 early-type galaxies the oblate fraction strongly depends on galaxy mass. At z > 1, this trend is much weaker over the mass range explored here (10{sup 10} < M{sub *}/M{sub Sun} < 10{sup 11}), because the oblate fraction among massive (M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) was much higher in the past: 0.59 {+-} 0.10 at z > 1, compared to 0.20 {+-} 0.02 at z {approx} 0.1. When combined with previous findings that the number density and sizes of early-type galaxies substantially increase over the same redshift range, this can be explained by the gradual emergence of merger-produced elliptical galaxies, at the expense of the destruction of pre-existing disks that were common among their high-redshift progenitors. In contrast, the oblate fraction among low-mass early-type galaxies (log (M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 10

  7. First observation of the nuclei {sup 45}Fe and {sup 49}Ni (T{sub Z} = - 7/2) and {sup 42}Cr (T{sub Z} = - 3); Premiere observation des noyaux {sup 45}Fe et {sup 49}Ni (T{sub Z} = - 7/2) et {sup 42}Cr (T{sub Z} = - 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, B.; Czajkowski, S.; Davi, F.; Del Moral, R.; Fleury, A.; Marchand, C.; Pravikoff, M.S. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires, Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 Gradignan (France); Dufour, J.P. [URA 451, Gradignan (France); Benlliure, J.; Boue, F.; Collatz, R.; Heinz, A.; Hellstroem, M.; Hu, Z.; Roeckl, E.; Shibata, M.; Suemmerer, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; Pfuetzner, M. [Institute of Experimental Physics, University of Warsaw, PL-00 681 Warszawa (Poland); Lewitowicz, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France)

    1997-06-01

    The two-proton radioactivity from the ground states was predicted by V.I. Goldanskii; it can take place either by {sup 2}He emission or by the simultaneous emission of two spatially non-correlated protons. For the nuclei liable to this type of radioactivity the single proton emission is energetically forbidden. The two-proton decay was observed for {sup 6}Be{sup 2} and {sup 12}O{sup 3} but the Q-value of the reaction is high above the Coulomb barrier and as such does not permit a decay process of a sufficient long lifetime. Theoretical calculations by B.A. Brawn predict {sup 39}Ti, {sup 45}Fe and {sup 48}Ni as the best candidates with the 2p emission lifetime within 1{mu}s to 150 ms. Only {sup 39}Ti decay has been observed so far. As candidate for 2p radioactivity nuclei we studied {sup 38}Ti, {sup 42}Cr, {sup 45}Fe and {sup 48`49}Ni. A primary beam of {sup 58}Ni at 600 MeV/nucleon from the SIS synchrotron at GSI was used to produce proton-rich isotopes in the titanium-to-nickel region by projectile fragmentation on a beryllium target. The fragment were separated by the projectile-fragment separator FRS and unambiguously identified by means of its standard detection set-up using a ToF-{Delta}E-B{rho} analysis. We report here the first observation of the T{sub Z} = - 7/2 nuclei {sup 45}Fe and {sup 49}Ni, the most proton-rich nuclei ever synthesized with an excess and seven protons. In addition, the new isotope {sup 42}Cr (T{sub Z} -3) was also identified. These isotopes are, according to commonly used mass predictions, all unbound with respect to two-proton emission from their ground states. However, we did not observe any count corresponding to {sup 38}Ti (T{sub Z} -3) although we expected about 5 counts in a setting optimized for this isotope 6 refs.

  8. Study of the di-nuclear system $^{A}$Rb + $^{209}$Bi (Z$_{1}$ + Z$_{2}$ = 120)

    CERN Multimedia

    The exact location of the next spherical shell closures beyond Z = 82, N = 126 is still an open question. According to model predictions shell closures are expected at Z = 114 or 120 or 126 and N = 184. Also experimental data cannot yet give a definite answer. Known nuclei with Z = 114 are too neutron‐deficient with respect to the N = 184 shell and nuclei with Z = 120 and beyond are still unknown. An option for studying reactions of super-heavy systems at Z = 120 and neutron numbers up to 184 becomes possible with the use of $^{209}$Bi targets and neutron‐rich beams. By studying quasi-fission and fusion‐fission reactions, which have significantly larger production cross‐sections than the evaporation residues, a possible influence of shell closures at Z = 120, N = 184 can be explored. Well suitable for such studies will be neutron‐rich rubidium beams at energies of about 5 MeV/u delivered by the HIE‐ISOLDE facility.

  9. On the SLq(2) extension of the standard model and the concept of charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Our SLq(2) extension of the standard model is constructed by replacing the elementary field operators, Ψ(x), of the standard model by Ψ̂mm‧j(x)D mm‧j where Dmm‧j is an element of the (2j + 1)-dimensional representation of the SLq(2) algebra, which is also the knot algebra. The allowed quantum states (j,m,m‧) are restricted by the topological conditions (j,m,m‧) = 1 2(N,w,r + o) postulated between the states of the quantum knot (j,m,m‧) and the corresponding classical knot (N,w,r + o) where the (N,w,r) are (the number of crossings, the writhe, the rotation) of the 2d projection of the corresponding oriented classical knot. Here, o is an odd number that is required by the difference in parity between w and r. There is also the empirical restriction on the allowed states (j,m,m‧) = 3(t,-t 3,-t0)L that holds at the j = 3 2 level, connecting quantum trefoils 3 2,m,m‧ with leptons and quarks 1 2,-t3,-t0L. The so-constructed knotted leptons and quarks turn out to be composed of three j = 1 2 particles which unexpectedly agree with the preon models of Harrari and Shupe. The j = 0 particles, being electroweak neutral, are dark and plausibly greatly outnumber the quarks and leptons. The SLq(2) or (j,m,m‧) measure of charge has a direct physical interpretation since 2j is the total number of preonic charges while 2m and 2m‧ are the numbers of writhe and rotation sources of preonic charge. The total SLq(2) charge of a particle, measured by writhe and rotation and composed of preons, sums the signs of the counterclockwise turns (+1) and clockwise turns (-1) that any energy-momentum current makes in going once around the knot. In this way, the handedness of the knot reduces charge to a geometric concept similar to the way that curvature of space-time encodes mass and energy. According to this model, the leptons and quarks are j = 3 2 particles, the preons are j = 1 2 particles, and the j = 0 particles are candidates for dark matter. It is possible to

  10. Overexpressing CYP71Z2 enhances resistance to bacterial blight by suppressing auxin biosynthesis in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqi Li

    Full Text Available The hormone auxin plays an important role not only in the growth and development of rice, but also in its defense responses. We've previously shown that the P450 gene CYP71Z2 enhances disease resistance to pathogens through regulation of phytoalexin biosynthesis in rice, though it remains unclear if auxin is involved in this process or not.The expression of CYP71Z2 was induced by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo inoculation was analyzed by qRT-PCR, with GUS histochemical staining showing that CYP71Z2 expression was limited to roots, blades and nodes. Overexpression of CYP71Z2 in rice durably and stably increased resistance to Xoo, though no significant difference in disease resistance was detected between CYP71Z2-RNA interference (RNAi rice and wild-type. Moreover, IAA concentration was determined using the HPLC/electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry system. The accumulation of IAA was significantly reduced in CYP71Z2-overexpressing rice regardless of whether plants were inoculated or not, whereas it was unaffected in CYP71Z2-RNAi rice. Furthermore, the expression of genes related to IAA, expansin and SA/JA signaling pathways was suppressed in CYP71Z2-overexpressing rice with or without inoculation.These results suggest that CYP71Z2-mediated resistance to Xoo may be via suppression of IAA signaling in rice. Our studies also provide comprehensive insight into molecular mechanism of resistance to Xoo mediated by IAA in rice. Moreover, an available approach for understanding the P450 gene functions in interaction between rice and pathogens has been provided.

  11. Measurement of αs(MZ2) from hadronic event observables at the Z0 resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Bacchetta, N.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D'Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Dasu, S.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell'Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Pescara, L.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; Russell, J.J.; Saxton, O.H.; Schalk, T.

    1995-01-01

    The strong coupling α s (M Z 2 ) has been measured using hadronic decays of Z 0 bosons collected by the SLD experiment at SLAC. The data were compared with QCD predictions both at fixed order O(α s 2 ) and including resummed analytic formulas based on the next-to-leading logarithm approximation. In this comprehensive analysis we studied event shapes, jet rates, particle correlations, and angular energy flow, and checked the consistency between α s (M Z 2 ) values extracted from these different measures. Combining all results we obtain α s (M Z 2 )= 0.1200±0.0025 (expt) ±0.0078 (theor), where the dominant uncertainty is from uncalculated higher order contributions

  12. Determination of sin$^{2}\\vartheta^{eff}_{W}$ using jet charge measurements in hadronic Z decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Palla, Fabrizio; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Wildish, T; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Büscher, V; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Aleppo, M; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    The electroweak mixing angle is determined with high precision from measurements of the mean difference between forward and backward hemisphere charges in hadronic decays of the Z. A data sample of 2.5 million hadronic Z decays recorded over the period 1990 to 1994 in the ALEPH detector at LEP is used. The mean charge separation between event hemispheres containing the original quark and antiquark is measured for b-bbar and c-cbar events in subsamples selected by their long lifetimes or using fast D*'s. The corresponding average charge separation for light quarks is measured in an inclusive sample from the anticorrelation between charges of opposite hemispheres and agrees with predictions of hadronisation models with a precision of 2%. It is shown that differences between light quark charge separations and the measured average can be determined using hadronisation models, with systematic uncertainties constrained by measurements of inclusive production of kaons, protons and lambda's. The separations are used ...

  13. Dissecting the intensely star-forming clumps in a z ~ 2 Einstein Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rujopakarn, Wiphu

    2013-10-01

    Clumps of star formation spreading widely in galactic disks are common features of star-forming galaxies at 1 test cases to study the mechanism that drives intense star formation at z ~ 2. We propose WFC3 near-IR imaging and spatially-resolved spectroscopy of a gravitationally lensed, kinematically ordered, vigorously star-forming galaxy at z = 1.885 with physical resolutions up to 40 pc. This galaxy contains two luminous clumps that are forming stars at the rates of 100 solar mass/yr/clump. Spatially-resolved map of star formation from HST provides the most critical missing piece to interpret our existing observations of this galaxy in far-IR, CO emission lines, and radio continuum. We will probe the frontier research areas in z ~ 2 star formation, particularly the spatially-resolved star formation laws and dynamics of cold and ionized gases, which have never been probed at this spatial resolution. Our proposed observations will provide a benchmark against which to interpret the structures of vigorous star-forming clumps in general. This object can therefore have a unique impact on our understanding of the star-forming modes that dominate at z ~ 2.

  14. Search for physics beyond the standard model in dilepton mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Heister, Arno; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Horton, Dean; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Novgorodova, Olga; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferretti, Roberta; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Grassi, Marco; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ortona, Giacomo; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Wolszczak, Weronika; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Nägeli, Christoph; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Taroni, Silvia; Verzetti, Mauro; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarli, Fuat Ilkehan; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Searle, Matthew; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Nguyen, Harold; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Evans, David; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kaadze, Ketino; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Cheng, Tongguang; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kurt, Pelin; Moon, Dong Ho; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Duru, Firdevs; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Shrestha, Shruti; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Bauer, Gerry; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malik, Sudhir; Meier, Frank; Snow, Gregory R; Zvada, Marian; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Smith, Geoffrey; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Lopes Pegna, David; Maroussov, Vassili; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Kaplan, Steven; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Verwilligen, Piet; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-04-07

    Dimuon and dielectron mass spectra, obtained from data resulting from proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV and recorded by the CMS experiment, are used to search for both narrow resonances and broad deviations from standard model predictions. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.6 (19.7) fb$^{-1}$ for the dimuon (dielectron) channel. No evidence for non-standard-model physics is observed and 95% confidence level limits are set on parameters from a number of new physics models. The narrow resonance analyses exclude a Sequential Standard Model $\\mathrm{Z'_{SSM}}$ resonance lighter than 2.90 TeV, a superstring-inspired $\\mathrm{Z'_{\\psi}}$ lighter than 2.57 TeV and Randall--Sundrum Kaluza--Klein gravitons with masses below 2.73, 2.35, and 1.27 TeV for couplings of 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01, respectively. A notable feature is that the limits have been calculated in a model-independent way to enable straightforward reinterpretation in any model predicting a resonance structure. The observed events are als...

  15. THE ORIGIN AND EVOLUTION OF METALLICITY GRADIENTS: PROBING THE MODE OF MASS ASSEMBLY AT z2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Tucker; Ellis, Richard S.; Richard, Johan; Jullo, Eric

    2013-01-01

    We present and discuss measurements of the gas-phase metallicity gradient in four gravitationally lensed galaxies at z = 2.0-2.4 based on adaptive optics-assisted imaging spectroscopy with the Keck II telescope. Three galaxies with well-ordered rotation reveal metallicity gradients with lower gas-phase metallicities at larger galactocentric radii. Two of these display gradients much steeper than found locally, while a third has one similar to that seen in local disk galaxies. The fourth galaxy exhibits complex kinematics indicative of an ongoing merger and reveals an 'inverted' gradient with lower metallicity in the central regions. By comparing our sample to similar data in the literature for lower redshift galaxies, we determine that, on average, metallicity gradients must flatten by a factor of 2.6 ± 0.9 between z = 2.2 and the present epoch. This factor is in rough agreement with the size growth of massive galaxies, suggesting that inside-out growth can account for the evolution of metallicity gradients. Since the addition of our new data provides the first indication of a coherent picture of this evolution, we develop a simple model of chemical evolution to explain the collective data. We find that metallicity gradients and their evolution can be explained by the inward radial migration of gas together with a radial variation in the mass loading factor governing the ratio of outflowing gas to the local star formation rate. Average mass loading factors of ∼< 2 are inferred from our model in good agreement with direct measurements of outflowing gas in z2 galaxies.

  16. METing SUSY on the Z peak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, G.; Bernabeu, J.; Vives, O. [Universitat de Valencia, Departament de Fisica Teorica, Burjassot (Spain); Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Parc Cientific U.V., IFIC, Paterna (Spain); Mitsou, V.A.; Romero, E. [Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Parc Cientific U.V., IFIC, Paterna (Spain)

    2016-02-15

    Recently the ATLAS experiment announced a 3 σ excess at the Z-peak consisting of 29 pairs of leptons together with two or more jets, E{sub T}{sup miss} > 225 GeV and HT > 600 GeV, to be compared with 10.6 ± 3.2 expected lepton pairs in the Standard Model. No excess outside the Z-peak was observed. By trying to explain this signal with SUSY we find that only relatively light gluinos, m{sub g} 2 TeV, together with a heavy neutralino NLSP of m{sub χ} >or similar 400 GeV decaying predominantly to Z-boson plus a light gravitino, such that nearly every gluino produces at least one Z-boson in its decay chain, could reproduce the excess. We construct an explicit general gauge mediation model able to reproduce the observed signal overcoming all the experimental limits. Needless to say, more sophisticated models could also reproduce the signal, however, any model would have to exhibit the following features: light gluinos, or heavy particles with a strong production cross section, producing at least one Z-boson in its decay chain. The implications of our findings for the Run II at LHC with the scaling on the Z peak, as well as for the direct search of gluinos and other SUSY particles, are pointed out. (orig.)

  17. METing SUSY on the Z peak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barenboim, G.; Bernabeu, J.; Vives, O.; Mitsou, V.A.; Romero, E.

    2016-01-01

    Recently the ATLAS experiment announced a 3 σ excess at the Z-peak consisting of 29 pairs of leptons together with two or more jets, E T miss > 225 GeV and HT > 600 GeV, to be compared with 10.6 ± 3.2 expected lepton pairs in the Standard Model. No excess outside the Z-peak was observed. By trying to explain this signal with SUSY we find that only relatively light gluinos, m g 2 TeV, together with a heavy neutralino NLSP of m χ >or similar 400 GeV decaying predominantly to Z-boson plus a light gravitino, such that nearly every gluino produces at least one Z-boson in its decay chain, could reproduce the excess. We construct an explicit general gauge mediation model able to reproduce the observed signal overcoming all the experimental limits. Needless to say, more sophisticated models could also reproduce the signal, however, any model would have to exhibit the following features: light gluinos, or heavy particles with a strong production cross section, producing at least one Z-boson in its decay chain. The implications of our findings for the Run II at LHC with the scaling on the Z peak, as well as for the direct search of gluinos and other SUSY particles, are pointed out. (orig.)

  18. Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to a pair of $\\tau$ leptons and produced in association with a W or a Z boson in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    1900-01-01

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or a Z boson decaying leptonically is performed using a data sample of proton-proton collisions collected at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb$^{-1}$. The Higgs boson is sought in its decay to a pair of $\\tau$ leptons. A significance of 2.3 standard deviations is observed (1.0 expected) for a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV. The signal strength, $\\mu = 2.5 ^{+1.4} _{-1.3}$, is measured relative to the expectation for the standard model Higgs boson. These results are combined with a previous analysis performed on the same data set targeting the gluon fusion and vector boson fusion production modes with the Higgs boson decaying to a pair of $\\tau$ leptons. The combined results provide increased sensitivity to the Higgs boson couplings to fermions and vector bosons, which are measured to be compatible with standard model predictions within one standard deviation.

  19. Lattice parameters values and phase diagram for the Cu{sub 2}Zn{sub 1-z}Fe{sub z}GeSe{sub 4} alloy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldera, D. [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela); Quintero, M. [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela)], E-mail: mquinter@ula.ve; Morocoima, M.; Quintero, E.; Grima, P.; Marchan, N.; Moreno, E.; Bocaranda, P. [Centro de Estudios de Semiconductores, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela); Delgado, G.E. [Laboratorio de Cristalografia, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela); Mora, A.E.; Briceno, J.M.; Fernandez, J.L. [Laboratorio de Analisis Quimico y Estructura de Materiales, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela)

    2008-06-12

    X-ray powder diffraction and differential thermal analysis (DTA) measurements were made on polycrystalline samples of the Cu{sub 2}Zn{sub 1-z}Fe{sub z}GeSe{sub 4} alloy system. The diffraction patterns were used to show the equilibrium conditions and to estimate crystalline parameter values. It was found that, at room temperature, a single phase solid solution with the tetragonal stannite {alpha} structure (I4-bar2m) occurs across the whole composition range. The DTA thermograms were used to construct the phase diagram of the Cu{sub 2}Zn{sub 1-z}Fe{sub z}GeSe{sub 4} alloy system. It was confirmed that the Cu{sub 2}ZnGeSe{sub 4} compound melts incongruently. It was observed that undercooling effects occur for samples with z > 0.9.

  20. Search for physics beyond the standard model in events with a Z boson, jets, and missing transverse energy in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2012-09-01

    A search is presented for physics beyond the standard model (BSM) in events with a Z boson, jets, and missing transverse energy (MET). This signature is motivated by BSM physics scenarios, including supersymmetry. The study is performed using a sample of proton-proton collision data collected at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.98 inverse femtobarns. The contributions from the dominant standard model backgrounds are estimated from data using two complementary strategies, the jet-Z balance technique and a method based on modeling MET with data control samples. In the absence of evidence for BSM physics, we set limits on the non-standard-model contributions to event yields in the signal regions and interpret the results in the context of simplified model spectra. Additional information is provided to facilitate tests of other BSM physics models.

  1. The Wk structure of the Zk(3/2) models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, P

    2009-01-01

    Generalized Z k (r/2) parafermionic theories-characterized by the dimension (r/2)(1 - 1/k) of the basic parafermionic field-provide potentially interesting quantum-Hall trial wavefunctions. Such wavefunctions reveal a W k structure. This suggests the equivalence of (a subclass of) the Z k (r/2) models and the W k (k+1,k+r) ones. This is demonstrated here for r = 3 (the Gaffnian series). The agreement of the parafermionic and the W spectra relies on the prior determination of the field identifications in the parafermionic case.

  2. Supersymmetry in Z' decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcella, G.

    2014-01-01

    I study the phenomenology of new heavy neutral gauge bosons Z', predicted by Grand Unification Theories-driven U(1)' gauge groups and by the sequential standard model. BSM (Beyond Standard Model) decays into supersymmetric final states are accounted for, besides the SM (Standard Model) modes usually investigated. I give an estimate of the number of supersymmetric events in Z' decays possibly expected at LHC, as well as of the product of the Z' cross section times the branching fraction into electron and muon pairs. (author)

  3. A thermoluminescence study of Z2-centres in terbium-doped NaCl crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, K.N.; Ahmed, I.M.; Pandaraiah, N.; Rao, U.V.S.; Babu, V.H.

    1983-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL), optical absorption are used to correlate thermal annealing of Z 2 -centres with TL peak occurring around 110 0 C in terbium-doped NaCl crystals. The TL glow peak occurring around 190 0 C is attributed to the thermal annealing of F-centres. The thermal activation parameters are calculated for both Z 2 - and F-centre peaks. (author)

  4. Dark revelations of the [SU(3)]3 and [SU(3)]4 gauge extensions of the standard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kownacki, Corey; Ma, Ernest; Pollard, Nicholas; Popov, Oleg; Zakeri, Mohammadreza

    2018-02-01

    Two theoretically well-motivated gauge extensions of the standard model are SU(3)C × SU(3)L × SU(3)R and SU(3)q × SU(3)L × SU(3)l × SU(3)R, where SU(3)q is the same as SU(3)C and SU(3)l is its color leptonic counterpart. Each has three variations, according to how SU(3)R is broken. It is shown here for the first time that a built-in dark U(1)D gauge symmetry exists in all six versions. However, the corresponding symmetry breaking pattern does not reduce properly to that of the standard model, unless an additional Z2‧ symmetry is defined, so that U(1)D ×Z2‧ is broken to Z2 dark parity. The available dark matter candidates in each case include fermions, scalars, as well as vector gauge bosons. This work points to the possible unity of matter with dark matter, the origin of which may not be ad hoc.

  5. Dark revelations of the [SU(3]3 and [SU(3]4 gauge extensions of the standard model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Kownacki

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Two theoretically well-motivated gauge extensions of the standard model are SU(3C×SU(3L×SU(3R and SU(3q×SU(3L×SU(3l×SU(3R, where SU(3q is the same as SU(3C and SU(3l is its color leptonic counterpart. Each has three variations, according to how SU(3R is broken. It is shown here for the first time that a built-in dark U(1D gauge symmetry exists in all six versions. However, the corresponding symmetry breaking pattern does not reduce properly to that of the standard model, unless an additional Z2′ symmetry is defined, so that U(1D×Z2′ is broken to Z2 dark parity. The available dark matter candidates in each case include fermions, scalars, as well as vector gauge bosons. This work points to the possible unity of matter with dark matter, the origin of which may not be ad hoc.

  6. Exploring the supersymmetric U(1 ) B -L×U(1 ) R model with dark matter, muon g - 2 , and Z' mass limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Mariana; Özdal, Özer

    2018-01-01

    We study the low scale predictions of the supersymmetric standard model extended by U (1 )B -L×U (1 )R symmetry, obtained from S O (10 ) breaking via a left-right supersymmetric model, imposing universal boundary conditions. Two singlet Higgs fields are responsible for the radiative U (1 )B -L×U (1 )R symmetry breaking, and a singlet fermion S is introduced to generate neutrino masses through an inverse seesaw mechanism. The lightest neutralino or sneutrino emerge as dark matter candidates, with different low scale implications. We find that the composition of the neutralino lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) changes considerably depending on the neutralino LSP mass, from roughly half U (1 )R bino, half minimal supersymmetric model (MSSM) bino, to a singlet higgsino, or completely dominated by the MSSM higgsino. The sneutrino LSP is statistically much less likely, and when it occurs it is a 50-50 mixture of right-handed sneutrino and the scalar S ˜. Most of the solutions consistent with the relic density constraint survive the XENON 1T exclusion curve for both LSP cases. We compare the two scenarios and investigate parameter space points and find consistency with the muon anomalous magnetic moment only at the edge of a 2 σ deviation from the measured value. However, we find that the sneutrino LSP solutions could be ruled out completely by the strict reinforcement of the recent Z' mass bounds. We finally discuss collider prospects for testing the model.

  7. Near-horizon states of black holes and Calogero models -2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Theory Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, ... We find self-adjoint extensions of the rational Calogero model in the presence .... positive integer, corresponding to the choice of z = z1 = π + 2η1. similarly, when.

  8. The mass-metallicity and fundamental metallicity relations at z > 2 using very large telescope and Subaru near-infrared spectroscopy of zCOSMOS galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, C.; Ziegler, B. L. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Lilly, S. J.; Peng, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Contini, T. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, CNRS, 14 avenue Édouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Pérez Montero, E. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucia, CSIC, Apartado de Correos 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Balestra, I., E-mail: christian.maier@univie.ac.at [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85741 Garching b. München (Germany)

    2014-09-01

    In the local universe, there is good evidence that, at a given stellar mass M, the gas-phase metallicity Z is anti-correlated with the star formation rate (SFR) of the galaxies. It has also been claimed that the resulting Z(M, SFR) relation is invariant with redshift—the so-called 'fundamental metallicity relation' (FMR). Given a number of difficulties in determining metallicities, especially at higher redshifts, the form of the Z(M, SFR) relation and whether it is really independent of redshift is still very controversial. To explore this issue at z > 2, we used VLT-SINFONI and Subaru-MOIRCS near-infrared spectroscopy of 20 zCOSMOS-deep galaxies at 2.1 < z < 2.5 to measure the strengths of up to five emission lines: [O II] λ3727, Hβ, [O III] λ5007, Hα, and [N II] λ6584. This near-infrared spectroscopy enables us to derive O/H metallicities, and also SFRs from extinction corrected Hα measurements. We find that the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) of these star-forming galaxies at z2.3 is lower than the local Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) MZR by a factor of three to five, a larger change than found by Erb et al. using [N II]/Hα-based metallicities from stacked spectra. We discuss how the different selections of the samples and metallicity calibrations used may be responsible for this discrepancy. The galaxies show direct evidence that the SFR is still a second parameter in the MZR at these redshifts. However, determining whether the Z(M, SFR) relation is invariant with epoch depends on the choice of extrapolation used from local samples, because z > 2 galaxies of a given mass have much higher SFRs than the local SDSS galaxies. We find that the zCOSMOS galaxies are consistent with a non-evolving FMR if we use the physically motivated formulation of the Z(M, SFR) relation from Lilly et al., but not if we use the empirical formulation of Mannucci et al.

  9. Identifying Two-Dimensional Z 2 Antiferromagnetic Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bègue, F.; Pujol, P.; Ramazashvili, R.

    2018-01-01

    We revisit the question of whether a two-dimensional topological insulator may arise in a commensurate Néel antiferromagnet, where staggered magnetization breaks the symmetry with respect to both elementary translation and time reversal, but retains their product as a symmetry. In contrast to the so-called Z 2 topological insulators, an exhaustive characterization of antiferromagnetic topological phases with the help of topological invariants has been missing. We analyze a simple model of an antiferromagnetic topological insulator and chart its phase diagram, using a recently proposed criterion for centrosymmetric systems [13]. We then adapt two methods, originally designed for paramagnetic systems, and make antiferromagnetic topological phases manifest. The proposed methods apply far beyond the particular examples treated in this work, and admit straightforward generalization. We illustrate this by two examples of non-centrosymmetric systems, where no simple criteria have been known to identify topological phases. We also present, for some cases, an explicit construction of edge states in an antiferromagnetic topological insulator.

  10. Standard enthalpies of formation of selected Rh{sub 2}YZ Heusler compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Ming, E-mail: myin1@hawk.iit.edu; Nash, Philip

    2015-11-25

    The standard enthalpies of formation (Δ{sub f}H°) of selected ternary Rh-based Rh{sub 2}YZ (Y = Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Ru, Ti, V; Z = Al, Ga, In, Si, Ge, Sn) compounds were measured using high temperature direct reaction calorimetry. The measured standard enthalpies of formation (in kJ/mol of atoms) are, for the Heusler compound Rh{sub 2}MnSn (−40.1 ± 3.6), for the B2-structured compounds: Rh{sub 2}FeAl (−48.5 ± 2.9); Rh{sub 2}MnAl (−72.4 ± 2.7); Rh{sub 2}MnGa (−55.3 ± 2.0); Rh{sub 2}MnIn (−35.3 ± 1.9), for the tetragonal compounds: Rh{sub 2}FeSn (−28.9 ± 1.3); Rh{sub 2}TiAl (−97.6 ± 2.2); Rh{sub 2}TiGa (−79.0 ± 1.8); Rh{sub 2}TiSn (−74.7 ± 3.1). Values are compared with those from first principles calculations in published papers and the Open Quantum Materials Database (OQMD). Lattice parameters of these compounds are determined using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). - Highlights: • Standard enthalpies of formation of Rh{sub 2}YZ were measured using a drop calorimeter. • Measured enthalpies agree with first principles data in general. • Lattice parameters and related phase relationships were consistent with literature data. • Rh{sub 2}TiSn of tI8 structure were reported for the first time.

  11. GOODS-HERSCHEL AND CANDELS: THE MORPHOLOGIES OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES AT z2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Dickinson, Mark; Alexander, David M.; Bell, Eric F.; Dahlen, Tomas; Lotz, Jennifer; Elbaz, David; Wiklind, Tommy; Faber, S. M.; Aussel, Herve; Bethermin, Matthieu; Bournaud, Frederic; Dannerbauer, Helmut; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Altieri, Bruno; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Conselice, Christopher J.; Cooray, Asantha; Davé, Romeel; Dunlop, James

    2012-01-01

    Using deep 100 and 160 μm observations in GOODS-South from GOODS-Herschel, combined with high-resolution HST/WFC3 near-infrared imaging from CANDELS, we present the first detailed morphological analysis of a complete, far-infrared (FIR) selected sample of 52 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs; L IR > 10 12 L ☉ ) at z2. We also make use of a comparison sample of galaxies with lower IR luminosities but with the same redshift and H-band magnitude distribution. Our visual classifications of these two samples indicate that the fractions of objects with disk and spheroid morphologies are roughly the same but that there are significantly more mergers, interactions, and irregular galaxies among the ULIRGs (72 +5 –7 % versus 32 ± 3%). The combination of disk and irregular/interacting morphologies suggests that early-stage interactions, minor mergers, and disk instabilities could play an important role in ULIRGs at z2. We compare these fractions with those of a z ∼ 1 sample selected from GOODS-H and COSMOS across a wide luminosity range and find that the fraction of disks decreases systematically with L IR while the fraction of mergers and interactions increases, as has been observed locally. At comparable luminosities, the fraction of ULIRGs with various morphological classifications is similar at z2 and z ∼ 1, though there are slightly fewer mergers and slightly more disks at higher redshift. We investigate the position of the z2 ULIRGs, along with 70 z2 LIRGs, on the specific star formation rate versus redshift plane, and find 52 systems to be starbursts (i.e., they lie more than a factor of three above the main-sequence relation). We find that many of these systems are clear interactions and mergers (∼50%) compared to only 24% of systems on the main sequence relation. If irregular disks are included as potential minor mergers, then we find that up to ∼73% of starbursts are involved in a merger or interaction at some level

  12. GOODS-HERSCHEL AND CANDELS: THE MORPHOLOGIES OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Dickinson, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Alexander, David M. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Dahlen, Tomas; Lotz, Jennifer [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Elbaz, David; Wiklind, Tommy [Joing ALMA Observatory, ESO, Santiago (Chile); Faber, S. M.; Aussel, Herve; Bethermin, Matthieu; Bournaud, Frederic; Dannerbauer, Helmut [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, CE-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); McIntosh, Daniel H. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Altieri, Bruno [Herschel Science Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre, Villanueva de la Canada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain); Charmandaris, Vassilis [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Conselice, Christopher J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Dave, Romeel [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Dunlop, James, E-mail: jeyhan@noao.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-09-20

    Using deep 100 and 160 {mu}m observations in GOODS-South from GOODS-Herschel, combined with high-resolution HST/WFC3 near-infrared imaging from CANDELS, we present the first detailed morphological analysis of a complete, far-infrared (FIR) selected sample of 52 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs; L{sub IR} > 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }) at z {approx} 2. We also make use of a comparison sample of galaxies with lower IR luminosities but with the same redshift and H-band magnitude distribution. Our visual classifications of these two samples indicate that the fractions of objects with disk and spheroid morphologies are roughly the same but that there are significantly more mergers, interactions, and irregular galaxies among the ULIRGs (72{sup +5}{sub -7}% versus 32 {+-} 3%). The combination of disk and irregular/interacting morphologies suggests that early-stage interactions, minor mergers, and disk instabilities could play an important role in ULIRGs at z {approx} 2. We compare these fractions with those of a z {approx} 1 sample selected from GOODS-H and COSMOS across a wide luminosity range and find that the fraction of disks decreases systematically with L{sub IR} while the fraction of mergers and interactions increases, as has been observed locally. At comparable luminosities, the fraction of ULIRGs with various morphological classifications is similar at z {approx} 2 and z {approx} 1, though there are slightly fewer mergers and slightly more disks at higher redshift. We investigate the position of the z {approx} 2 ULIRGs, along with 70 z {approx} 2 LIRGs, on the specific star formation rate versus redshift plane, and find 52 systems to be starbursts (i.e., they lie more than a factor of three above the main-sequence relation). We find that many of these systems are clear interactions and mergers ({approx}50%) compared to only 24% of systems on the main sequence relation. If irregular disks are included as potential minor mergers, then we find that up to {approx

  13. Ground based THz Spectroscopy of Obscured Starbursts in the Early Universe enabled by the 2nd generation Redshift (z) & Early Universe Spectrometer (ZEUS-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwas, Amit; Stacey, Gordon; Nikola, Thomas; Ferkinhoff, Carl; Parshley, Stephen; Schoenwald, Justin; Lamarche, Cody James; Higdon, James; Higdon, Sarah; Brisbin, Drew; Güesten, Rolf; Weiss, Axel; Menten, Karl; Irwin, Kent; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Niemack, Michael; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Amiri, Mandana; Halpern, Mark; Wiebe, Donald; Hasselfield, Matthew; Ade, Peter; Tucker, Carole

    2018-01-01

    Galaxies were surprisingly dusty in the early Universe, with more than half of the light emitted from stars being absorbed by dust within the system and re-radiated into far infrared (FIR, ~50-150μm) wavelengths. Dusty star forming galaxies (DSFGs) dominate the co-moving star formation rate density of the Universe that peaks around redshift, z~2, making it compelling to study them in rest frame FIR bands. From galaxies at z > 1, the FIR line emission from abundant ions like [O III], [C II] and [N II], are redshifted into the short sub-mm telluric windows. My thesis work is based on building and deploying the 2nd Generation Redshift (z) and Early Universe Spectrometer (ZEUS-2), a long-slit, echelle grating spectrometer optimized to study broad (Δv = 300km/s) spectral lines from galaxies in the 200-650µm telluric windows using TES bolometers. These far-IR lines being extinction free and major coolants of the gas heated by (young) massive stars, are powerful probes of the physical conditions of the gas and the stellar radiation field. I present results from our survey of the [O III] 88µm line in galaxies at redshift, z ~ 2.8 to 4.6, with ZEUS-2 at the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) Telescope. To interpret our observations along with ancillary data from optical to radio facilities, we apply photoionization models for HII regions and Photo Dissociation Region (PDR) models and confirm that the galaxies host substantial ongoing obscured star formation. The presence of doubly ionized oxygen suggests hard radiation fields and hence, elevated ionization parameters that can only be accounted for by a large population of massive stars formed during the ongoing starburst, that contribute a large fraction of the infrared luminosity. This study highlights the use of FIR line emission to trace the assembly of current day massive galaxies, conditions of star formation and details of their stellar populations. The construction and operation of ZEUS-2 were funded by NSF ATI

  14. Systematic study of hyperfine fields in Rh2 Y Z type Heusler alloys with 119 Sn impurity using Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, S.M.M.

    1985-01-01

    The magnetic hyperfine fields in the Heusler alloys Rh 2 Mn .98 Ge Sn 02 , Rh 2 Mn Ge .98 Sn .02 , Rh 2 Mn Pb .98 Sn .02 and Rh 2 Mn Sn has been studied by 119 Sn Moessbauer spectroscopy at 293 K, 77 K, 4.2 K and 293 K with applied external magnetic field. The results show that when one compare the magnetic hyperfine fields systematic with the Heusler alloys X 2 Mn Z (X = Co, Ni, Cu, Pd, and Z = s p metal), this systematic is similar to the Co alloys, although can not explained by the currents models for the Heusler alloys. (author)

  15. A minimal spontaneous CP violation model with small neutrino mass and SU(2) x U(1) x Z3 symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, C.Q.; Ng, J.N.

    1988-04-01

    It is shown that spontaneous CP violation and natural flavor conservation can occur in the SU(2) L x U(1) Y model based on two Higgs doublet and one Higgs singlet fields with a Z 3 discrete symmetry. Physical CP nonconservation is purely due to scalar-pseudoscalar mixings. In order for this to be a major source of CP violation a light spin-O boson of mass less than 10 GeV is required. The see-saw mechanism can be implemented to generate small neutrino masses. The model implies a relatively large electric dipole moment for charged leptons and small value for ε'/ε

  16. Monte Carlo Generators for the Production of a $W$ or $Z/\\gamma^*$ Boson in Association with Jets at ATLAS in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This note documents the Monte Carlo generators used by the ATLAS collaboration at the start of Run 2 for processes where a $W$ or $Z/\\gamma^*$ boson is produced in association with jets. The available event generators are briefly described and comparisons are made with ATLAS measurements of $W$ or $Z/\\gamma^*$+jets performed with Run 1 data, collected at the centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The model predictions are then compared at the Run 2 centre-of-mass energy of 13~TeV. A comparison is also made with an early Run 2 ATLAS $Z/\\gamma^*$+jets data measurement. Investigations into tuning the parameters of the models and evaluating systematic uncertainties on the Monte Carlo predictions are also presented.

  17. Density functional theory study of interactions between carbon monoxide and iron tetraaza macrocyclic complexes, FeTXTAA (X = -Cl, -OH, -OCH3, -NH2, and -NO2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos Mourão Neto, Isaias; Silva, Adilson Luís Pereira; Tanaka, Auro Atsushi; de Jesus Gomes Varela, Jaldyr

    2017-02-01

    This work describes a DFT level theoretical quantum study using the B3LYP functional with the Lanl2TZ(f)/6-31G* basis set to calculate parameters including the bond distances and angles, electronic configurations, interaction energies, and vibrational frequencies of FeTClTAA (iron-tetrachloro-tetraaza[14]annulene), FeTOHTAA (iron-tetrahydroxy-tetraaza[14]annulene), FeTOCH 3 TAA (iron- tetramethoxy-tetraaza[14]annulene), FeTNH 2 TAA (iron-tetraamino-tetraaza[14]annulene), and FeTNO 2 TAA (iron-tetranitro-tetraaza[14]annulene) complexes, as well as their different spin multiplicities. The calculations showed that the complexes were most stable in the triplet spin state (S = 1), while, after interaction with carbon monoxide, the singlet state was most stable. The reactivity of the complexes was evaluated using HOMO-LUMO gap calculations. Parameter correlations were performed in order to identify the best complex for back bonding (3d xz Fe → 2p x C and 3d yz Fe → 2p z C) with carbon monoxide, and the degree of back bonding increased in the order: FeTNO 2 TAA < FeTClTAA < FeTOHTAA < FeTOCH 3 TAA < FeTNH 2 TAA.

  18. Evolution of the dusty infrared luminosity function from z = 0 to z = 2.3 using observations from Spitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnelli, B.; Elbaz, D.; Chary, R. R.; Dickinson, M.; Le Borgne, D.; Frayer, D. T.; Willmer, C. N. A.

    2011-04-01

    Aims: We derive the evolution of the infrared luminosity function (LF) over the last 4/5ths of cosmic time using deep 24 and 70 μm imaging of the GOODS North and South fields. Methods: We use an extraction technique based on prior source positions at shorter wavelengths to build the 24 and 70 μm source catalogs. The majority (93%) of the sources have a spectroscopic (39%) or a photometric redshift (54%) and, in our redshift range of interest (i.e., 1.3 conversion between the infrared luminosity and star-formation rate (SFR) of a galaxy, we study the evolution of the SFR density of the Universe from z = 0 to z = 2.3. We find that the SFR density of the Universe strongly increased with redshift from z = 0 to z = 1.3, but is nearly constant at higher redshift out to z = 2.3. As part of the online material accompanying this article, we present source catalogs at 24 μm and 70 μm for both the GOODS-North and -South fields. Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFull Tables B1-B4 are only available in electronic form at CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/528/A35

  19. Mapping the surface of MNKr2 and CopZ - identification of residues critical for metallotransfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.E.; Cobine, P.A.; Dameron, C.T.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Cells utilise a network of proteins that include CPx-type ATPases and metallochaperones to balance intracellular copper concentration. The Menkes ATPase has six N-terminal domains which bind Cu(I) and are critical for ATPase function. The NMR solution structure of the second domain (MNKr2) shows that the structure adopts an 'open-faced β-sandwich' fold, in which two α-helices lie over a single four stranded β-sheet. The global fold is identical to the bacterial copper chaperone CopZ MNKr2 is unable to substitute for CopZ in copper transfer to the cop operon represser, CopY. To investigate how structure affects function we have analysed the surface features of MNKr2 and CopZ Despite having the same global fold, MNKr2 and CopZ have contrasting electrostatic surfaces, which may partially explain the inability of MNKr2 to transfer copper to CopY

  20. 3D-HST emission line galaxies at z2: discrepancies in the optical/UV star formation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gebhardt, Henry; Gronwall, Caryl; Schneider, Donald P.; Hagen, Alex; Bridge, Joanna S.; Trump, Jonathan R. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Feldmeier, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope near-IR grism spectroscopy to examine the Hβ line strengths of 260 star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 1.90 < z < 2.35. We show that at these epochs, the Hβ star formation rate (SFR) is a factor of ∼1.8 higher than what would be expected from the systems' rest-frame UV flux density, suggesting a shift in the standard conversion between these quantities and SFR. We demonstrate that at least part of this shift can be attributed to metallicity, as Hβ is more enhanced in systems with lower oxygen abundance. This offset must be considered when measuring the SFR history of the universe. We also show that the relation between stellar and nebular extinction in our z2 sample is consistent with that observed in the local universe.

  1. 3D-HST emission line galaxies at z2: discrepancies in the optical/UV star formation rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gebhardt, Henry; Gronwall, Caryl; Schneider, Donald P.; Hagen, Alex; Bridge, Joanna S.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Feldmeier, John

    2014-01-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope near-IR grism spectroscopy to examine the Hβ line strengths of 260 star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 1.90 < z < 2.35. We show that at these epochs, the Hβ star formation rate (SFR) is a factor of ∼1.8 higher than what would be expected from the systems' rest-frame UV flux density, suggesting a shift in the standard conversion between these quantities and SFR. We demonstrate that at least part of this shift can be attributed to metallicity, as Hβ is more enhanced in systems with lower oxygen abundance. This offset must be considered when measuring the SFR history of the universe. We also show that the relation between stellar and nebular extinction in our z2 sample is consistent with that observed in the local universe.

  2. Fixed point and anomaly mediation in partial {\\boldsymbol{N}}=2 supersymmetric standard models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wen

    2018-01-01

    Motivated by the simple toroidal compactification of extra-dimensional SUSY theories, we investigate a partial N = 2 supersymmetric (SUSY) extension of the standard model which has an N = 2 SUSY sector and an N = 1 SUSY sector. We point out that below the scale of the partial breaking of N = 2 to N = 1, the ratio of Yukawa to gauge couplings embedded in the original N = 2 gauge interaction in the N = 2 sector becomes greater due to a fixed point. Since at the partial breaking scale the sfermion masses in the N = 2 sector are suppressed due to the N = 2 non-renormalization theorem, the anomaly mediation effect becomes important. If dominant, the anomaly-induced masses for the sfermions in the N = 2 sector are almost UV-insensitive due to the fixed point. Interestingly, these masses are always positive, i.e. there is no tachyonic slepton problem. From an example model, we show interesting phenomena differing from ordinary MSSM. In particular, the dark matter particle can be a sbino, i.e. the scalar component of the N = 2 vector multiplet of {{U}}{(1)}Y. To obtain the correct dark matter abundance, the mass of the sbino, as well as the MSSM sparticles in the N = 2 sector which have a typical mass pattern of anomaly mediation, is required to be small. Therefore, this scenario can be tested and confirmed in the LHC and may be further confirmed by the measurement of the N = 2 Yukawa couplings in future colliders. This model can explain dark matter, the muon g-2 anomaly, and gauge coupling unification, and relaxes some ordinary problems within the MSSM. It is also compatible with thermal leptogenesis.

  3. Standard model from a gauge theory in ten dimensions via CSDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farakos, K.; Kapetanakis, D.; Koutsoumbas, G.; Zoupanos, G.

    1988-09-01

    We present a gauge theory in ten dimensions based on the gauge group E/sub 8/ which is dimensionally reduced, according to the coset space dimensional reduction (CSDR) scheme, to the standard model SU/sub 3c/xSU/sub 2L/xU/sub 1/, which breaks further to SU/sub 3c/xU/sub 1em/. We use the coset space Sp/sub 4//(SU/sub 2/xU/sub 1/)xZ/sub 2/. The model gives similar predictions for sin /sup 2/theta/sub w/ and proton decay as the minimal SU/sub 5/ GUT. Natural choices of parameters suggest that the Higgs masses are as predicted by the Coleman-Weinberg radiative mechanism.

  4. Z2 vortex strings in grand unified theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, D.; Turok, N.

    1982-01-01

    Spontaneously broken gauge theories may display distinct vortex string solutions for the disconnected components of the exact gauge symmetry group. A type of Higgs mechanism thought to apply in grand unified theories as being responsible for fermion masses yields Z 2 vortex lines, irrespectively of the group. These could seed galaxy formation if the corresponding fermion masses are superheavy. More generally a Higgs mechanism producing Zsub(n) vortex strings is presented. (orig.)

  5. The evolution of interstellar medium mass probed by dust emission: Alma observations at z = 0.3-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoville, N.; Manohar, S.; Aussel, H.; Sheth, K.; Scott, K. S.; Sanders, D.; Ivison, R.; Pope, A.; Capak, P.; Vanden Bout, P.; Kartaltepe, J.; Robertson, B.; Lilly, S.

    2014-01-01

    The use of submillimeter dust continuum emission to probe the mass of interstellar dust and gas in galaxies is empirically calibrated using samples of local star-forming galaxies, Planck observations of the Milky Way, and high-redshift submillimeter galaxies. All of these objects suggest a similar calibration, strongly supporting the view that the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the dust emission can be used as an accurate and very fast probe of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies. We present ALMA Cycle 0 observations of the Band 7 (350 GHz) dust emission in 107 galaxies from z = 0.2 to 2.5. Three samples of galaxies with a total of 101 galaxies were stellar-mass-selected from COSMOS to have M * ≅ 10 11 M ☉ : 37 at z ∼ 0.4, 33 at z ∼ 0.9, and 31 at z = 2. A fourth sample with six infrared-luminous galaxies at z = 2 was observed for comparison with the purely mass-selected samples. From the fluxes detected in the stacked images for each sample, we find that the ISM content has decreased by a factor ∼6 from 1 to 2 × 10 10 M ☉ at both z = 2 and 0.9 down to ∼2 × 10 9 M ☉ at z = 0.4. The infrared-luminous sample at z = 2 shows a further ∼4 times increase in M ISM compared with the equivalent non-infrared-bright sample at the same redshift. The gas mass fractions are ∼2% ± 0.5%, 12% ± 3%, 14% ± 2%, and 53% ± 3% for the four subsamples (z = 0.4, 0.9, and 2 and infrared-bright galaxies).

  6. Hohlraum-driven mid-Z (SiO2) double-shell implosions on the omega laser facility and their scaling to NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H F; Amendt, P A; Milovich, J L; Park, H-S; Hamza, A V; Bono, M J

    2009-10-02

    High-convergence, hohlraum-driven implosions of double-shell capsules using mid-Z (SiO2) inner shells have been performed on the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. These experiments provide an essential extension of the results of previous low-Z (CH) double-shell implosions [P. A. Amendt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 065004 (2005)] to materials of higher density and atomic number. Analytic modeling, supported by highly resolved 2D numerical simulations, is used to account for the yield degradation due to interfacial atomic mixing. This extended experimental database from OMEGA enables a validation of the mix model, and provides a means for quantitatively assessing the prospects for high-Z double-shell implosions on the National Ignition Facility [Paisner, Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)].

  7. Review of Current Standard Model Results in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Gerhard; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This talk highlights results selected from the Standard Model research programme of the ATLAS Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider. Results using data from $p-p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7,8$~TeV in LHC Run-1 as well as results using data at $\\sqrt{s}=13$~TeV in LHC Run-2 are covered. The status of cross section measurements from soft QCD processes and jet production as well as photon production are presented. The presentation extends to vector boson production with associated jets. Precision measurements of the production of $W$ and $Z$ bosons, including a first measurement of the mass of the $W$ bosons, $m_W$, are discussed. The programme to measure electroweak processes with di-boson and tri-boson final states is outlined. All presented measurements are compatible with Standard Model descriptions and allow to further constrain it. In addition they allow to probe new physics which would manifest through extra gauge couplings, or Standard Model gauge couplings deviating from their predicted value.

  8. Low-loss Z-type hexaferrite (Ba3Co2Fe24O41) for GHz antenna applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woncheol; Hong, Yang-Ki; Park, Jihoon; LaRochelle, Gatlin; Lee, Jaejin

    2016-09-01

    We report a low magnetic loss Ba3Co2Fe24O41 (Co2Z) hexaferrite for use in gigahertz (GHz) antennas. Acid-etching was very effective in removal of unwanted Y-type hexaferrite (Ba2Co2Fe12O22) from calcined Co2Z powder. It is found that the calcined and acid etched (AE) Co2Z hexaferrite shows a low magnetic loss tangent (tan δμ) of 0.012 and 0.037 at 1 and 2 GHz, respectively. These low tan δμ are attributed to removal of Y-type hexaferrite, which possesses a lower anisotropy field (Hk) than W-type hexaferrite (BaCo2Fe16O27). The figure of merit (FOM) of the AE Co2Z hexaferrite is 141.7 and 48.7 at 1 and 2 GHz, respectively. These FOM are much higher than the FOM of previously reported low-loss magnetic materials. Therefore, the AE Co2Z hexaferrite can be a good candidate for GHz antenna application in the ultra-high frequency (UHF) band.

  9. The cos2φ azimuthal asymmetry of unpolarized dilepton production at the Z pole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Zhun; Schmidt, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the Boer-Mulders effect contribution to the cos2φ azimuthal asymmetry of unpolarized dilepton production near the Z-pole. Based on the tree-level expression in the transverse momentum dependent factorization framework, we show that the corresponding asymmetry near the Z-pole is negative, which is opposite to the asymmetry in the low Q 2 region, dominated by the production via a virtual photon. We calculate the asymmetry generated by the Boer-Mulders effect near the Z-pole at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), with √(s)=500 GeV. We find that the magnitude of the asymmetry is several percent, and therefore it is measurable. The experimental confirmation of this sign change of the asymmetry from the low Q 2 region to the Z-pole provides direct evidence of the chiral-odd structure of quarks inside an unpolarized nucleon.

  10. Constraints on running vacuum model with H ( z ) and f σ{sub 8}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang [Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing, 400065 (China); Lee, Chung-Chi [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Yin, Lu, E-mail: geng@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: lee.chungchi16@gmail.com, E-mail: yinlumail@foxmail.com [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, 300 Taiwan (China)

    2017-08-01

    We examine the running vacuum model with Λ ( H ) = 3 ν H {sup 2} + Λ{sub 0}, where ν is the model parameter and Λ{sub 0} is the cosmological constant. From the data of the cosmic microwave background radiation, weak lensing and baryon acoustic oscillation along with the time dependent Hubble parameter H ( z ) and weighted linear growth f ( z )σ{sub 8}( z ) measurements, we find that ν=(1.37{sup +0.72}{sub −0.95})× 10{sup −4} with the best fitted χ{sup 2} value slightly smaller than that in the ΛCDM model.

  11. The SINS/zC-SINF survey of z2 galaxy kinematics: Evidence for gravitational quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genzel, R.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Lang, P.; Tacconi, L. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bandara, K.; Burkert, A.; Buschkamp, P.; Davies, R.; Eisenhauer, F.; Kurk, J.; Lutz, D.; Tacchella, S.; Carollo, C. M.; Lilly, S. J.; Cresci, G.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Mancini, C.; Naab, T.; Newman, S.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the SINS/zC-SINF surveys of high-z galaxy kinematics, we derive the radial distributions of Hα surface brightness, stellar mass surface density, and dynamical mass at ∼2 kpc resolution in 19 z2 star-forming disks with deep SINFONI adaptive optics spectroscopy at the ESO Very Large Telescope. From these data we infer the radial distribution of the Toomre Q-parameter for these main-sequence star-forming galaxies (SFGs), covering almost two decades of stellar mass (10 9.6 -10 11.5 M ☉ ). In more than half of our SFGs, the Hα distributions cannot be fit by a centrally peaked distribution, such as an exponential, but are better described by a ring, or the combination of a ring and an exponential. At the same time the kinematic data indicate the presence of a mass distribution more centrally concentrated than a single exponential distribution for 5 of the 19 galaxies. The resulting Q-distributions are centrally peaked for all, and significantly exceed unity there for three-quarters of the SFGs. The occurrence of Hα rings and of large nuclear Q-values appears to be more common for the more massive SFGs. While our sample is small and biased to larger SFGs, and there remain uncertainties and caveats, our observations are consistent with a scenario in which cloud fragmentation and global star formation are secularly suppressed in gas-rich high-z disks from the inside out, as the central stellar mass density of the disks grows.

  12. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the $Z^+ H \\to \\mu + \\mu + b \\bar{b}$ Channel in $p \\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hui-shi [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2007-05-01

    This dissertation describes a search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) produced in association with a Z boson at the DØ experiment. This analysis is based on an integrated luminosity of L = 370 pb-1 of data. The p$\\bar{p}$ → ZH → µ+µ- + b$\\bar{b}$ channel is studied where the Z boson decays to µ+µ- and the H decays to b$\\bar{b}$. In order to boost the the signal rate we first introduce the optimized di-muon isolation probability for separating the Z + 2j signal from the multi-jet background, then use the optimized b-jet identifier to enhance the double b-tag signal significance. The upper limits on the σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → ZH) × Br(H → b$\\bar{b}$) for Higgs masses between 105 GeV and 145 GeV are set at 95% C.L.

  13. TWOTRAN-2, 2-D Multigroup Transport in X-Y, R-Z, R-Theta Geometry with Anisotropic Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lathrop, K.D.; Brinkley, F.W.

    1995-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: TWOTRAN2 solves the two-dimensional multigroup transport equation in (x,y), (r,theta), and (r,z) geometries. Both regular and adjoint, inhomogeneous and homogeneous (k eff and eigenvalue searches) problems subject to vacuum, reflective, periodic, white or input-specified boundary flux conditions are solved. General anisotropic scattering is allowed and anisotropic inhomogeneous sources are permitted. 2 - Method of solution: The discrete ordinates approximation for the angular variable is used in finite difference form which is solved with the central (diamond) difference approximation. Negative fluxes are eliminated by a local set-to zero and correct algorithm. Standard inner (within-group) and outer iterative cycles are accelerated by a coarse-mesh re-balancing on a coarse mesh which may be independent of the material mesh. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Variable dimensioning is used so that any combination of problem parameters leading to a container array less than MAXLEN can be accommodated. On IBM machines, TWOTRAN2 will execute in the 4-byte mode so that any combination of problem parameters leading to a container array less than MAXLEN can be accommodated. MAXLEN can be several hundred thousand and most problems can be core-contained. On the CDC machines MAXLEN can be slightly greater than 40,000 words and peripheral storage is used for most group-dependent data

  14. Family nonuniversal Z' models with protected flavor-changing interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis, Alejandro; Fuentes-Martín, Javier; Jung, Martin; Serôdio, Hugo

    2015-07-01

    We define a new class of Z' models with neutral flavor-changing interactions at tree level in the down-quark sector. They are related in an exact way to elements of the quark mixing matrix due to an underlying flavored U(1)' gauge symmetry, rendering these models particularly predictive. The same symmetry implies lepton-flavor nonuniversal couplings, fully determined by the gauge structure of the model. Our models allow us to address presently observed deviations from the standard model and specific correlations among the new physics contributions to the Wilson coefficients C9,10' ℓ can be tested in b →s ℓ+ℓ- transitions. We furthermore predict lepton-universality violations in Z' decays, testable at the LHC.

  15. Yukawa couplings in SO(10) heterotic M-theory vacua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraggi, Alon E.; Garavuso, Richard S.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate the existence of a class of N=1 supersymmetric nonperturbative vacua of Horava-Witten M-theory compactified on a torus fibered Calabi-Yau 3-fold Z with first homotopy group π 1 (Z)=Z 2 , having the following properties: (1) SO(10) grand unification group, (2) net number of three generations of chiral fermions in the observable sector, and (3) potentially viable matter Yukawa couplings. These vacua correspond to semistable holomorphic vector bundles V Z over Z having structure group SU(4) C , and generically contain M5-branes in the bulk space. The nontrivial first homotopy group allows Wilson line breaking of the SO(10) symmetry. Additionally, we propose how the 11-dimensional Horava-Witten M-theory framework may be used to extend the perturbative calculation of the top quark Yukawa coupling in the realistic free-fermionic models to the nonperturbative regime. The basic argument being that the relevant coupling couples twisted-twisted-untwisted states and can be calculated at the level of the Z 2 xZ 2 orbifold without resorting to the full three generation models

  16. Search for Higgs Boson of Minimal Standard Model in the hadronic final states with the detector ALEPH at LEP 2; Recherche du boson de Higgs du Modele Standard Minimal dans les etats finals hadroniques avec le detecteur ALEPH a LEP 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschamps, Olivier [Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France)

    1999-04-16

    In the Standard Model framework of the particle physics the mass of fermions and electroweak gauge boson mass is related to a scalar sector. In the Minimal Version of the Standard Model, a neutral scalar particle is predicted: the Higgs boson. Its mass is a free parameter of the model. The search for this boson has been actively performed at the LEP collider and it has been extended by the recent increase of its energy (LEP 2). In addition, due to the increase of the signal to background ratio at LEP 2, the data analysis has been extended to new channels. This is particularly the case of the dominant, HZ {yields} hadrons, channel leading to 65% of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} HZ production process final states at LEP. The aim of the work presented in this document, is the search of the Minimal Standard Model Higgs boson in the fully hadronic final state data recorded by the ALEPH detector at LEP 2 energies. A selection tool based on an artificial neural network multi-variate method, has been developed in order to separate the signal process from known Standard Model background processes. The neural network method allows to combine non-linearly the information describing the signal, and to reach performances better than those obtained by classical method based on cuts. No evidence of signal has been seen in the data collected by ALEPH up to {radical}s = 189 GeV. Thirty-two candidates has been selected in agreement with the 26.3 events expected for the background processes. Combining all channels from Higgs boson search, the limit m{sub H} > 90.2 GeV/c{sup 2} is obtained with a 95% confidence level. (author)

  17. Sequence of cDNAs for mammalian H2A. Z, an evolutionarily diverged but highly conserved basal histone H2A isoprotein species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatch, C L; Bonner, W M

    1988-02-11

    The nucleotide sequences of cDNAs for the evolutionarily diverged but highly conserved basal H2A isoprotein, H2A.Z, have been determined for the rat, cow, and human. As a basal histone, H2A.Z is synthesized throughout the cell cycle at a constant rate, unlinked to DNA replication, and at a much lower rate in quiescent cells. Each of the cDNA isolates encodes the entire H2A.Z polypeptide. The human isolate is about 1.0 kilobases long. It contains a coding region of 387 nucleotides flanked by 106 nucleotides of 5'UTR and 376 nucleotides of 3'UTR, which contains a polyadenylation signal followed by a poly A tail. The bovine and rat cDNAs have 97 and 94% nucleotide positional identity to the human cDNA in the coding region and 98% in the proximal 376 nucleotides of the 3'UTR which includes the polyadenylation signal. A potential stem-forming sequence imbedded in a direct repeat is found centered at 261 nucleotides into the 3'UTR. Each of the cDNA clones could be transcribed and translated in vitro to yield H2A.Z protein. The mammalian H2A.Z cDNA coding sequences are approximately 80% similar to those in chicken and 75% to those in sea urchin.

  18. Implementation and automated validation of the minimal Z' model in FeynRules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basso, L.; Christensen, N.D.; Duhr, C.; Fuks, B.; Speckner, C.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a well-known class of U(1) gauge models, the 'minimal' Z' models, in FeynRules. We also describe a new automated validation tool for FeynRules models which is controlled by a web interface and allows the user to run a complete set of 22 processes on different matrix element generators, different gauges, and compare between them all. If existing, the comparison with independent implementations is also possible. This tool has been used to validate our implementation of the 'minimal' Z' models. (authors)

  19. Application of Z-Number Based Modeling in Psychological Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafik Aliev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilates exercises have been shown beneficial impact on physical, physiological, and mental characteristics of human beings. In this paper, Z-number based fuzzy approach is applied for modeling the effect of Pilates exercises on motivation, attention, anxiety, and educational achievement. The measuring of psychological parameters is performed using internationally recognized instruments: Academic Motivation Scale (AMS, Test of Attention (D2 Test, and Spielberger’s Anxiety Test completed by students. The GPA of students was used as the measure of educational achievement. Application of Z-information modeling allows us to increase precision and reliability of data processing results in the presence of uncertainty of input data created from completed questionnaires. The basic steps of Z-number based modeling with numerical solutions are presented.

  20. Determination of sin2 θ {w/eff} using jet charge measurements in hadronic Z decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J. P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M. N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Palla, F.; Pater, J. R.; Pusztaszeri, J. F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Wildish, T.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J. M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Ten Have, I.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H. G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H. G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J. F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A. M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M. H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J. J.; Videau, I.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J. F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J. P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Aleppo, M.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Ragusa, F.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.

    1996-03-01

    The electroweak mixing angle is determined with high precision from measurements of the mean difference between forward and backward hemisphere charges in hadronic decays of the Z. A data sample of 2.5 million hadronic Z decays recorded over the period 1990 to 1994 in the ALEPH detector at LEP is used. The mean charge separation between event hemispheres containing the original quark and antiquark is measured forbbar b andcbar c events in subsamples selected by their long lifetimes or using fast D*’s. The corresponding average charge separation for light quarks is measured in an inclusive sample from the anticorrelation between charges of opposite hemispheres and agrees with predictions of hadronisation models with a precision of 2%. It is shown that differences between light quark charge separations and the measured average can be determined using hadronisation models, with systematic uncertainties constrained by measurements of inclusive production of kaons, protons and Λ’s. The separations are used to measure the electroweak mixing angle precisely as sin2 ϑ {w/eff}=0.2322±0.0008(exp.stat.) ±0.0007(exp.syst.)±0.0008(sep.). The first two errors are due to purely experimental sources whereas the third stems from uncertainties in the quark charge separations.

  1. GoSam 2.0. Automated one loop calculations within and beyond the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, Nicolas; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron

    2014-10-01

    We present GoSam 2.0, a fully automated framework for the generation and evaluation of one loop amplitudes in multi leg processes. The new version offers numerous improvements both on generational aspects as well as on the reduction side. This leads to a faster and more stable code for calculations within and beyond the Standard Model. Furthermore it contains the extended version of the standardized interface to Monte Carlo programs which allows for an easy combination with other existing tools. We briefly describe the conceptual innovations and present some phenomenological results.

  2. An investigation of semiconducting behavior in the minority spin of Co2CrZ (Z = Ga, Ge, As): LSDA and LSDA + U method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, D.P.; Thapa, R.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Volume optimization was done to find the theoretical lattice parameters. ► LSDA was performed to calculate electronic and magnetic properties of Co 2 CrZ. ► The result shows the half-metal ferromagnetic behavior of Co 2 CrGa and Co 2 CrGe. ► Co 2 CrAs fails to give HMF within LSDA thus treated with LSDA + U, to obtain HMF. - Abstract: We have calculated the electronic and magnetic properties of 3d transition metal based full Heusler compounds Co 2 CrZ (Z = Ga, Ge, As), by using full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. The calculated density of states (DOS) and band structure for Co 2 CrZ shows the existence of band gap in their minority-spin channel. The respective energy gaps of Co 2 CrGe and Co 2 CrGa are 0.24 and 0.38 eV with their Fermi energies (E F s) lie exactly at the gap. The compound Co 2 CrAs when treated with local spin density approximation (LSDA) does not show half metallic ferromagnetism (HMF) even though there exist a gap this is because the E F does not lie at the middle of the gap. We have considered Co 2 CrAs as strongly correlated system as Cr-d states at E F are strongly localized thus the system was treated in terms of the LSDA + U. The total magnetic moment of Co 2 CrAs was found to be an exact integer value 5.00 μ B within LSDA + U. We have also found that the total magnetic moments increase as the Z goes from Ga to As.

  3. EPISODIC ACTIVITIES OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AT REDSHIFT z2: DRIVEN BY MERGERS?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanrong; Wang Jianmin; Hu Chen; Zhang Shu; Yuan Yefei

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested for quite a long time that galaxy mergers trigger activities of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) on the grounds of imaging observations of individual galaxies. To quantitatively examine this hypothesis, we calculate quasar luminosity functions (LFs) by manipulating the observed galaxy LFs (z ∼ maj ∼ 0.2 at z2 to f maj → 0 at z ∼ 0. As a consequence, the newly formed SMBHs from major mergers at z2 may acquire a maximal spin due to the orbital angular momentum of the merging holes. Subsequently, random accretion led by minor mergers rapidly drives the SMBHs to spin down. Such an evolutionary trend of the SMBH spins is consistent with the fact that radiative efficiency of accreting SMBHs strongly declines with cosmic time, reported by Wang et al. This suggests that minor mergers are important in triggering activities of SMBHs at low redshift, while major mergers may dominate at high redshift.

  4. Heterojunction interface double layer and consequences for photovoltaic cells, specifically Cdsub(z)Znsub(1-z)S/Cu2S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeer, K.W.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that an interface dislocation field at a heterojunction with substantial lattice mismatch needs charge compensation which can cause a double layer producing a potential spike at the interface. Tunneling through such a spike reduces the current through the interface. Reasonable agreement between theory and experiment is obtained for Cdsub(z)Znsub(1-z)S/Cu 2 S photovoltaic cells. (author)

  5. High-resolution TNG spectra of T Tauri stars. Near-IR GIANO observations of the young variables XZ Tauri and DR Tauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniucci, S.; Nisini, B.; Biazzo, K.; Giannini, T.; Lorenzetti, D.; Sanna, N.; Harutyunyan, A.; Origlia, L.; Oliva, E.

    2017-10-01

    Aims: We aim to characterise the star-disk interaction region in T Tauri stars that show photometric and spectroscopic variability. Methods: We used the GIANO instrument at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo to obtain near-infrared high-resolution spectra (R 50 000) of XZ Tau and DR Tau, which are two actively accreting T Tauri stars classified as EXors. Equivalent widths and profiles of the observed features are used to derive information on the properties of the inner disk, the accretion columns, and the winds. Results: Both sources display composite H I line profiles, where contributions from both accreting gas and high-velocity winds can be recognised. These lines are progressively more symmetric and narrower with increasing upper energy which may be interpreted in terms of two components with different decrements or imputed to self-absorption effects. XZ Tau is observed in a relatively high state of activity with respect to literature observations. The variation of the He I 1.08 μm line blue-shifted absorption, in particular, suggests that the inner wind has undergone a dramatic change in its velocity structure, connected with a recent accretion event. DR Tau has a more stable wind as its He I 1.08 μm absorption does not show variations with time in spite of strong variability of the emission component. The IR veiling in the two sources can be interpreted as due to blackbody emission at temperatures of 1600 K and 2300 K for XZ Tau and DR Tau, respectively, with emitting areas 30 times larger than the central star. While for XZ Tau these conditions are consistent with emission from the inner rim of the dusty disk, the fairly high temperature inferred for DR Tau might suggest that its veiling originates from a thick gaseous disk located within the dust sublimation radius. Strong and broad metallic lines, mainly from C I and Fe I, are detected in XZ Tau, similar to those observed in other EXor sources during burst phases. At variance, DR Tau shows weaker and

  6. Measurement of the Z boson resonance parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, G.J.

    1989-11-01

    Using the Mark II detector at the SLC, we measure the Z mass and width to be 91.17 ± 0.18 GeV/c 2 and 1.95 +0. 40 -0.30 GeV, respectively. From a fit in which the visible Z width is constrained to its Standard Model value, the number of neutrino species is determined to be 3.0 ± or <4.4 at the 95% confidence level. 13 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Investigation of electronic, magnetic and thermoelectric properties of Zr{sub 2}NiZ (Z = Al,Ga) ferromagnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousuf, Saleem, E-mail: nengroosaleem17@gmail.com; Gupta, Dinesh C., E-mail: sosfizix@gmail.com

    2017-05-01

    Systematic investigation of impact of electronic structure and magnetism, on the thermoelectric properties of new Zr{sub 2}NiZ (Z = Al, Ga) Heusler alloys are determined using density functional theory calculations. Half-metallicity with ferromagnetic character is supported by their 100% spin polarizations at the Fermi level. Magnetic moment of ∼3 μ{sub B} is according to the Slater-Puling rule, enables their practical applications. Electron density plots are used to analyse the nature of bonding and chemical composition. Boltzmann's theory is conveniently employed to investigate the thermoelectric properties of these compounds. The analysis of the thermal transport properties specifies the Seebeck coefficient as 25.6 μV/K and 18.6 μV/K at room temperature for Zr{sub 2}NiAl and Zr{sub 2}NiGa, respectively. The half-metallic nature with efficient thermoelectric coefficients suggests the likelihood of these materials to have application in designing spintronic devices and imminent thermoelectric materials. - Highlights: • The compounds are half-metallic ferromagnets. • 100% spin-polarized compounds for spintronics. • Increasing Seebeck coefficient over a wide temperature range. • Zr{sub 2}NiAl is efficient thermoelectric material than Zr{sub 2}NiGa.

  8. Characterization of excitation beam on second-harmonic generation in fibrillous type I collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying; Deng, Xiaoyuan

    2010-09-01

    Following our established theoretical model to deal with the second-harmonic generation (SHG) excited by a linearly polarized focused beam in type I collagen, in this paper, we further quantitatively characterize the differences between SHG emissions in type I collagen excited by collimated and focused beams. The effects of the linear polarization angle (α) and the fibril polarity characterized by the hyperpolarizability ratio ρ on SHG emission has been compared under collimated and focused beam excitation, respectively. In particular, SHG emission components along the i axis [Formula: see text] (i = x,y,z), the induced SHG emission deviation angle γ(ij), and the detected SHG signals (I(2ω,ij)) in the ij plane by rotating the applied polarizer angle φ(ij) have been investigated (i = x, x, y; j = y, z, z). Results show that under our simulation model, SHG emission in the xy plane, such as I(2ω,x) ,I(2ω,y) ,γ(xy) and I(2ω,xy) varying as polarization angle (α) under collimated and focused light, presents no significant difference. The reverse of the fibril polarity has induced great impact on I(2ω,x) ,γ(xy) and I(2ω,xy) in both collimated and focused light. I(2ω,x) and γ(xy) show similarity, but I(2ω,xy) at α = 30° demonstrates a slight difference in focused light to that in collimated light. Under focused light, the reverse of fibril polarity causes obvious changes of the collected SHG intensity I(2ω,xz) and I(2ω,yz) at a special polarization angle α = 60° and γ(xz), γ(yz) along α.

  9. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES AT z2: THE MYSTERY OF NEON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gebhardt, Henry; Gronwall, Caryl; Hagen, Alex; Trump, Jonathan R.; Bridge, Joanna S.; Luo, Bin; Schneider, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    We use near-infrared grism spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope to examine the strength of [Ne III] λ3869 relative to Hβ, [O II] λ3727, and [O III] λ5007 in 236 low-mass (7.5 ≲ log (M * /M ☉ ) ≲ 10.5) star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 1.90 < z < 2.35. By stacking the data by stellar mass, we show that the [Ne III]/[O II] ratios of the z2 universe are marginally higher than those seen in a comparable set of local Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies, and that [Ne III]/[O III] is enhanced by ∼0.2 dex. We consider the possible explanations for this ∼4σ result, including higher oxygen depletion out of the gas phase, denser H II regions, higher production of 22 Ne via Wolf-Rayet stars, and the existence of a larger population of X-ray obscured active galactic nuclei at z2 compared to z ∼ 0. None of these simple scenarios, alone, are favored to explain the observed line ratios. We conclude by suggesting several avenues of future observations to further explore the mystery of enhanced [Ne III] emission

  10. GALAXY STRUCTURE AND MODE OF STAR FORMATION IN THE SFR-MASS PLANE FROM z {approx} 2.5 TO z {approx} 0.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuyts, Stijn; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Magnelli, Benjamin; Genzel, Reinhard; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Gracia-Carpio, Javier; Nordon, Raanan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Van der Wel, Arjen [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Guo, Yicheng [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, 710 N. Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Aussel, Herve; Le Floc' h, Emeric [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d' Astrophysique, Bat. 709, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Barro, Guillermo; Kocevski, Dale D.; McGrath, Elizabeth J. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Cava, Antonio [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Hathi, Nimish P. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Huang, Kuang-Han [Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lee, Kyoung-Soo [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); and others

    2011-12-01

    We analyze the dependence of galaxy structure (size and Sersic index) and mode of star formation ({Sigma}{sub SFR} and SFR{sub IR}/SFR{sub UV}) on the position of galaxies in the star formation rate (SFR) versus mass diagram. Our sample comprises roughly 640,000 galaxies at z {approx} 0.1, 130,000 galaxies at z {approx} 1, and 36,000 galaxies at z {approx} 2. Structural measurements for all but the z {approx} 0.1 galaxies are based on Hubble Space Telescope imaging, and SFRs are derived using a Herschel-calibrated ladder of SFR indicators. We find that a correlation between the structure and stellar population of galaxies (i.e., a 'Hubble sequence') is already in place since at least z {approx} 2.5. At all epochs, typical star-forming galaxies on the main sequence are well approximated by exponential disks, while the profiles of quiescent galaxies are better described by de Vaucouleurs profiles. In the upper envelope of the main sequence, the relation between the SFR and Sersic index reverses, suggesting a rapid buildup of the central mass concentration in these starbursting outliers. We observe quiescent, moderately and highly star-forming systems to co-exist over an order of magnitude or more in stellar mass. At each mass and redshift, galaxies on the main sequence have the largest size. The rate of size growth correlates with specific SFR, and so does {Sigma}{sub SFR} at each redshift. A simple model using an empirically determined star formation law and metallicity scaling, in combination with an assumed geometry for dust and stars, is able to relate the observed {Sigma}{sub SFR} and SFR{sub IR}/SFR{sub UV}, provided a more patchy dust geometry is assumed for high-redshift galaxies.

  11. GALAXY STRUCTURE AND MODE OF STAR FORMATION IN THE SFR-MASS PLANE FROM z2.5 TO z ∼ 0.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuyts, Stijn; Förster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Magnelli, Benjamin; Genzel, Reinhard; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Graciá-Carpio, Javier; Nordon, Raanan; Van der Wel, Arjen; Guo, Yicheng; Aussel, Hervé; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Barro, Guillermo; Kocevski, Dale D.; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Cava, Antonio; Hathi, Nimish P.; Huang, Kuang-Han; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lee, Kyoung-Soo

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the dependence of galaxy structure (size and Sérsic index) and mode of star formation (Σ SFR and SFR IR /SFR UV ) on the position of galaxies in the star formation rate (SFR) versus mass diagram. Our sample comprises roughly 640,000 galaxies at z ∼ 0.1, 130,000 galaxies at z ∼ 1, and 36,000 galaxies at z2. Structural measurements for all but the z ∼ 0.1 galaxies are based on Hubble Space Telescope imaging, and SFRs are derived using a Herschel-calibrated ladder of SFR indicators. We find that a correlation between the structure and stellar population of galaxies (i.e., a 'Hubble sequence') is already in place since at least z2.5. At all epochs, typical star-forming galaxies on the main sequence are well approximated by exponential disks, while the profiles of quiescent galaxies are better described by de Vaucouleurs profiles. In the upper envelope of the main sequence, the relation between the SFR and Sérsic index reverses, suggesting a rapid buildup of the central mass concentration in these starbursting outliers. We observe quiescent, moderately and highly star-forming systems to co-exist over an order of magnitude or more in stellar mass. At each mass and redshift, galaxies on the main sequence have the largest size. The rate of size growth correlates with specific SFR, and so does Σ SFR at each redshift. A simple model using an empirically determined star formation law and metallicity scaling, in combination with an assumed geometry for dust and stars, is able to relate the observed Σ SFR and SFR IR /SFR UV , provided a more patchy dust geometry is assumed for high-redshift galaxies.

  12. High Resolution Studies Of Lensed z2 Galaxies: Kinematics And Metal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leethochawalit, Nicha

    2016-09-01

    We use the OSIRIS integral field unit (IFU) spectograph to secure spatially-resolved strong emission lines of 15 gravitationally-lensed star-forming galaxies at redshift z2. With the aid of gravitational lensing and Keck laser-assisted adaptive optics, the spatial resolution of these sub-luminous galaxies is at a few hundred parsecs. First, we demonstrate that high spatial resolution is crucial in diagnosing the kinematic properties and dynamical maturity of z2 galaxies. We observe a significantly lower fraction of rotationally-supported systems than what has been claimed in lower spatial resolution surveys. Second, we find a much larger fraction of z2 galaxies with weak metallicity gradients, contrary to the simple picture suggested by earlier studies that well-ordered rotation develops concurrently with established steep metal gradients in all but merging systems. Comparing our observations with the predictions of hydronamical simulations, strong feedback is likely to play a key role in flattening metal gradients in early star-forming galaxies.

  13. Production of $f_{0}(980), f_{2}(1270)$ and $\\phi(1020)$ in hadronic $Z^{0}$ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; List, B.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rembser, C.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    Inclusive production of the f_0(980), f_2(1270) and \\phi(1020) resonances has been studied in a sample of 4.3 million hadronic Z^0 decays from the OPAL experiment at LEP. A coupled channel analysis has been used for the f_0 in simultaneous fits to the resonances in inclusive \\pi+\\pi- and K+K- mass spectra. Fragmentation functions are reported for the three states. Total inclusive rates are measured to be 0.141 +/- 0.007 +/- 0.011 f_0, 0.155 +/- 0.011 +/- 0.018 f_2, and 0.091 +/- 0.002 +/- 0.003 \\phi mesons per hadronic Z^0 decay. The production properties of the f_0, including those in three-jet events, are compared with those of the f_2 and \\phi, and with the Lund string model of hadron production. All measurements are consistent with the hypothesis that the f_0 is a conventional qq(bar) scalar meson.

  14. Expression of P. falciparum var Genes Involves Exchange of the Histone Variant H2A.Z at the Promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petter, Michaela; Lee, Chin Chin; Byrne, Timothy J.; Boysen, Katja E.; Volz, Jennifer; Ralph, Stuart A.; Cowman, Alan F.; Brown, Graham V.; Duffy, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum employs antigenic variation to evade the human immune response by switching the expression of different variant surface antigens encoded by the var gene family. Epigenetic mechanisms including histone modifications and sub-nuclear compartmentalization contribute to transcriptional regulation in the malaria parasite, in particular to control antigenic variation. Another mechanism of epigenetic control is the exchange of canonical histones with alternative variants to generate functionally specialized chromatin domains. Here we demonstrate that the alternative histone PfH2A.Z is associated with the epigenetic regulation of var genes. In many eukaryotic organisms the histone variant H2A.Z mediates an open chromatin structure at promoters and facilitates diverse levels of regulation, including transcriptional activation. Throughout the asexual, intraerythrocytic lifecycle of P. falciparum we found that the P. falciparum ortholog of H2A.Z (PfH2A.Z) colocalizes with histone modifications that are characteristic of transcriptionally-permissive euchromatin, but not with markers of heterochromatin. Consistent with this finding, antibodies to PfH2A.Z co-precipitate the permissive modification H3K4me3. By chromatin-immunoprecipitation we show that PfH2A.Z is enriched in nucleosomes around the transcription start site (TSS) in both transcriptionally active and silent stage-specific genes. In var genes, however, PfH2A.Z is enriched at the TSS only during active transcription in ring stage parasites. Thus, in contrast to other genes, temporal var gene regulation involves histone variant exchange at promoter nucleosomes. Sir2 histone deacetylases are important for var gene silencing and their yeast ortholog antagonises H2A.Z function in subtelomeric yeast genes. In immature P. falciparum parasites lacking Sir2A or Sir2B high var transcription levels correlate with enrichment of PfH2A.Z at the TSS. As Sir2A knock out parasites mature the var genes are

  15. Recognition Memory zROC Slopes for Items with Correct versus Incorrect Source Decisions Discriminate the Dual Process and Unequal Variance Signal Detection Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starns, Jeffrey J.; Rotello, Caren M.; Hautus, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the dual process and unequal variance signal detection models by jointly modeling recognition and source confidence ratings. The 2 approaches make unique predictions for the slope of the recognition memory zROC function for items with correct versus incorrect source decisions. The standard bivariate Gaussian version of the unequal…

  16. Progress in Z-pinch research driven by the mega-ampere device SPEED2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo; Moreno, Jose; Sylvester, Gustavo; Tarifeno, Ariel

    2008-01-01

    Several pinch configurations have being studied at the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission using the SPEED2 generator: plasma focus, gas embedded z-pinch and wire arrays. SPEED2 is a generator based on Marx technology (4.1 μF equivalent Marx generator capacity, 300 kV, 4 MA in short circuit, 187 kJ, 400 ns rise time, dI/dt∼10 13 A/s). Currently the device is being operated at 70kJ stored energy producing a peak current of 2.4 MA in short circuit. In this work results related to studies in gas embedded z-pinch in deuterium and studies in wire arrays are presented.

  17. Progress in Z-pinch research driven by the mega-ampere device SPEED2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo; Moreno, Jose; Tarifeno, Ariel; Sylvester, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    Several pinch configurations have being studied at the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission using the SPEED2 generator: plasma focus, gas embedded z-pinch and wire arrays. SPEED2 is a generator based on Marx technology (4.1 μF equivalent Marx generator capacity, 300 kV, 4 MA in short circuit, 187 kJ, 400 ns rise time, dI/dt∼10 13 A/s). Currently the device is being operated at 70kJ stored energy producing a peak current of 2.4 MA in short circuit. In this work results related to studies in gas embedded z-pinch in deuterium and studies in wire arrays are presented

  18. What kind of galaxies dominate the cosmic SFR density at z~2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Rieke, George; Gonzalez, Anthony; Gallego, Jesus; Guzman, Rafael; Pello, Roser; Egami, Eiichi; Marcillac, D.; Pascual, S.

    2006-08-01

    We propose to obtain near-infrared (JHK-bands) spectroscopy with GEM-S+GNIRS for a sample of 12 galaxies representative of the 3 types of spitzer/MIPS 24 micron detections at 2.0≲z≲2.6: power-law galaxies, star-forming galaxies with prominent 1.6 micron bumps, and Distant Red Galaxies. These sources are located in the Chandra Deep Field South, a unique field for the study of galaxy evolution, given the top quality data available at all wavelengths. Our main goal is to characterize the mid-IR selected galaxy population at this epoch by measuring H(alpha), H(beta), [NII], and [OIII] fluxes and profiles, and combining these observations with the already merged x-ray, ultraviolet, optical, near- and mid-infrared imaging data, to obtain the most reliable estimations of the SFRs, metallicities, stellar and dynamical masses, AGN activity, and extinction properties of the luminous infrared galaxies detected by MIPS, which dominate the SFR density of the Universe at z≳2. Our targets are complementary to others selected in the rest-frame UV/optical at high-z, and they extend the H(alpha) observations of galaxies selected with ISO from z~1 to z~2.6. The work proposed here will help to interpret the results obtained by the spitzer surveys at z≳2, thus substantially improving our understanding of the formation of massive galaxies and their connection to AGN.

  19. Search for standard and non-minimal Higgs boson at LEP2 with the L3 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teyssier, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    This thesis worked out in the frame of L3 collaboration - Higgs working group refers to the search for a Higgs signature, for center-of-mass energies between 192 and 209 GeV, one of the main goals of LEP2. It consists of a contribution to the analyses looking for the Standard Model Higgs boson, especially in the so-called 'two jets plus missing energy' channel. The final state of this channel, denoted H νν -bar, is characterized by the production of a pair of b quarks, from the decay of the Higgs particle, and a neutrino pair from that of the Z particle, for the prevalent Higgs-Strahlung process. The lower observed mass limit, obtained with the H νν -bar channel alone, is 96 GeV at a 95% confidence level. In addition, searches for neutral scalar particle production are presented, in the context of general two-Higgs-doublet models of type II, by means of a so-called 'flavor independent' analysis. Searches for 'invisible' Higgs bosons are presented as well, with the Z boson decaying into a pair of fermions while the Higgs boson decays into undetectable particles. These results permit constraining the parameters of the minimal non-universal supersymmetric models (without gaugino mass unification). (author)

  20. String flipped SO(10) model from [ital Z][sub 4] orbifold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, H. (Department of Physics, Hyogo University of Education, Yashiro-cho, Hyogo 673-14 (Japan)); Shimojo, M. (Department of Electronics and Information Engineering, Fukui National College of Technology, Sabae, Fukui 916 (Japan))

    1993-12-15

    We search all possible string grand-unified-theory models obtained from heterotic superstrings compactified on a [ital Z][sub 4] orbifold with one Wilson line. It is shown that there is an essentially unique anomaly-free flipped SO(10) model with three generations plus one mirror conjugate generation of matter fields. We derive effective Yukawa interactions and examine the structure of mass matrices as well as a possible scenario of string coupling unification. The four-generation [ital Z][sub 4] orbifold model is a phenomenologically viable model beyond the minimal supersymmetric standard one.

  1. A gamma-ray burst at a redshift of z approximately 8.2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanvir, N R; Fox, D B; Levan, A J; Berger, E; Wiersema, K; Fynbo, J P U; Cucchiara, A; Krühler, T; Gehrels, N; Bloom, J S; Greiner, J; Evans, P A; Rol, E; Olivares, F; Hjorth, J; Jakobsson, P; Farihi, J; Willingale, R; Starling, R L C; Cenko, S B; Perley, D; Maund, J R; Duke, J; Wijers, R A M J; Adamson, A J; Allan, A; Bremer, M N; Burrows, D N; Castro-Tirado, A J; Cavanagh, B; de Ugarte Postigo, A; Dopita, M A; Fatkhullin, T A; Fruchter, A S; Foley, R J; Gorosabel, J; Kennea, J; Kerr, T; Klose, S; Krimm, H A; Komarova, V N; Kulkarni, S R; Moskvitin, A S; Mundell, C G; Naylor, T; Page, K; Penprase, B E; Perri, M; Podsiadlowski, P; Roth, K; Rutledge, R E; Sakamoto, T; Schady, P; Schmidt, B P; Soderberg, A M; Sollerman, J; Stephens, A W; Stratta, G; Ukwatta, T N; Watson, D; Westra, E; Wold, T; Wolf, C

    2009-10-29

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to result from the explosions of certain massive stars, and some are bright enough that they should be observable out to redshifts of z > 20 using current technology. Hitherto, the highest redshift measured for any object was z = 6.96, for a Lyman-alpha emitting galaxy. Here we report that GRB 090423 lies at a redshift of z approximately 8.2, implying that massive stars were being produced and dying as GRBs approximately 630 Myr after the Big Bang. The burst also pinpoints the location of its host galaxy.

  2. Thermal transport in a two-dimensional Z2 spin liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metavitsiadis, Alexandros; Pidatella, Angelo; Brenig, Wolfram

    2017-11-01

    We study the dynamical thermal conductivity of the two-dimensional Kitaev spin model on the honeycomb lattice. We find a strongly temperature dependent low-frequency spectral intensity as a direct consequence of fractionalization of spins into mobile Majorana matter and a static Z2 gauge field. The latter acts as an emergent thermally activated disorder, leading to the appearance of a pseudogap which closes in the thermodynamic limit, indicating a dissipative heat conductor. Our analysis is based on complementary calculations of the current correlation function, comprising exact diagonalization by means of a complete summation over all gauge sectors, as well as a phenomenological mean-field treatment of thermal gauge fluctuations, valid at intermediate and high temperatures. The results will also be contrasted against the conductivity discarding gauge fluctuations.

  3. L1 and L2 sub-shell fluorescence yields for elements with 64 ≤ Z ≤ 70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Anil; Puri, Sanjiv

    2010-01-01

    The L 1 and L 2 sub-shell fluorescence yields have been deduced for elements with 64 ≤ Z ≤ 70 from the L k (k = l, α, β 1,4 , β 3,6 , β 2,15,9,10,7 , γ 1,5 and γ 2,3,4 ) X-ray production cross sections measured at 22.6 keV incident photon energy using a spectrometer involving a disc type radioisotope of Cd 109 as a photon source and a Peltier cooled X-ray detector. The incident photon intensity, detector efficiency and geometrical factor have been determined from the K X-ray yields emitted from elemental targets with 20 ≤ Z ≤ 42 in the same geometrical setup and from knowledge of the K shell cross sections. The present deduced ω 1 (exp) values, for elements with 64 ≤ Z ≤ 70, are found to be in good agreement with those tabulated by Campbell (J.L. Campbell, Atom. Data Nucl. Data Tables 95 (2009) 115), where as these are, on an average, higher by 19% and 24% than those based on the Dirac-Hartree-Slater model (S. Puri et al., X-ray Spectrometry 22 (1993) 358) and the semi-empirical values compiled by Krause (M.O. Krause, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8 (1979) 307), respectively. The present deduced ω 2 (exp) values are found to be in good agreement with those based on the Dirac-Hartree-Slater model and are higher by up to ∼13% than the semi-empirical values for the elements under investigation.

  4. L 1 and L 2 sub-shell fluorescence yields for elements with 64 ⩽ Z ⩽ 70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Puri, Sanjiv

    2010-05-01

    The L 1 and L 2 sub-shell fluorescence yields have been deduced for elements with 64 ⩽ Z ⩽ 70 from the L k( k = l, α, β1,4, β3,6, β2,15,9,10,7, γ1,5 and γ2,3,4) X-ray production cross sections measured at 22.6 keV incident photon energy using a spectrometer involving a disc type radioisotope of Cd 109 as a photon source and a Peltier cooled X-ray detector. The incident photon intensity, detector efficiency and geometrical factor have been determined from the K X-ray yields emitted from elemental targets with 20 ⩽ Z ⩽ 42 in the same geometrical setup and from knowledge of the K shell cross sections. The present deduced ω1(exp) values, for elements with 64 ⩽ Z ⩽ 70, are found to be in good agreement with those tabulated by Campbell (J.L. Campbell, Atom. Data Nucl. Data Tables 95 (2009) 115), where as these are, on an average, higher by 19% and 24% than those based on the Dirac-Hartree-Slater model (S. Puri et al., X-ray Spectrometry 22 (1993) 358) and the semi-empirical values compiled by Krause (M.O. Krause, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8 (1979) 307), respectively. The present deduced ω2(exp) values are found to be in good agreement with those based on the Dirac-Hartree-Slater model and are higher by up to ˜13% than the semi-empirical values for the elements under investigation.

  5. Electroweak processes at Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Spalla, Margherita; Sestini, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    We present a summary of the studies of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model at LHC after the first year of data taking of Run2, focusing on possible results to be achieved with the analysis of full 2015 and 2016 data. We discuss the measurements of W and Z boson production, with particular attention to the precision determination of basic Standard Model parameters, and the study of multi-boson interactions through the analysis of boson-boson final states. This work is the result of the collaboration between scientists from the ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments.

  6. On the construction of SL(2,Z) type IIB 5-branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, J.X.; Roy, S.

    1999-01-01

    This talk reviews our recent work on the construction of SL(2,Z) multiplets of type lIB superfivebranes. We here pay particular attention to the methods employed and some salient features of the solutions. (author)

  7. N=2→0 super no-scale models and moduli quantum stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas Kounnas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider a class of heterotic N=2→0 super no-scale Z2-orbifold models. An appropriate stringy Scherk–Schwarz supersymmetry breaking induces tree level masses to all massless bosons of the twisted hypermultiplets and therefore stabilizes all twisted moduli. At high supersymmetry breaking scale, the tachyons that occur in the N=4→0 parent theories are projected out, and no Hagedorn-like instability takes place in the N=2→0 models (for small enough marginal deformations. At low supersymmetry breaking scale, the stability of the untwisted moduli is studied at the quantum level by taking into account both untwisted and twisted contributions to the 1-loop effective potential. The latter depends on the specific branch of the gauge theory along which the background can be deformed. We derive its expression in terms of all classical marginal deformations in the pure Coulomb phase, and in some mixed Coulomb/Higgs phases. In this class of models, the super no-scale condition requires having at the massless level equal numbers of untwisted bosonic and twisted fermionic degrees of freedom. Finally, we show that N=1→0 super no-scale models are obtained by implementing a second Z2 orbifold twist on N=2→0 super no-scale Z2-orbifold models.

  8. Gtl2lacZ, an insertional mutation on mouse chromosome 12 with parental origin-dependent phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster-Gossler, K; Simon-Chazottes, D; Guenet, J L; Zachgo, J; Gossler, A

    1996-01-01

    We have produced a transgenic mouse line, Gtl2lacZ (Gene trap locus 2), that carries an insertional mutation with a dominant modified pattern of inheritance:heterozygous Gtl2lacZ mice that inherited the transgene from the father show a proportionate dwarfism phenotype, whereas the penetrance and expressivity of the phenotype is strongly reduced in Gtl2lacZ mice that inherited the transgene from the mother. On a mixed genetic background this pattern of inheritance was reversible upon transmission of the transgene through the germ line of the opposite sex. On a predominantly 129/Sv genetic background, however, transgene passage through the female germ line modified the transgene effect, such that the penetrance of the mutation was drastically reduced and the phenotype was no longer obvious after subsequent male germ line transmission. Expression of the transgene, however, was neither affected by genetic background nor by parental legacy. Gtl2lacZ maps to mouse Chromosome 12 in a region that displays imprinting effects associated with maternal and paternal disomy. Our results suggest that the transgene insertion in Gtl2lacZ mice affects an endogenous gene(s) required for fetal and postnatal growth and that this gene(s) is predominantly paternally expressed.

  9. LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z ∼ 1.8-2.8: GALEX/NUV IMAGING OF THE SUBARU DEEP FIELD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ly, Chun; Malkan, Matthew A.; Woo, Jong-Hak; Treu, Tommaso; Currie, Thayne; Hayashi, Masao; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Makiko; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Motohara, Kentaro

    2009-01-01

    A photometric sample of ∼8000 V C i'z' optical data with deep GALEX/NUV imaging of the Subaru Deep Field. Follow-up spectroscopy confirmed 24 LBGs at 1.5 ∼< z ∼< 2.7. Among the optical spectra, 12 have Lyα emission with rest-frame equivalent widths of ∼5-60 A. The success rate for identifying LBGs as NUV-dropouts at 1.5 < z < 2.7 is 86%. The rest-frame UV (1700 A) luminosity function (LF) is constructed from the photometric sample with corrections for stellar contamination and z < 1.5 interlopers (lower limits). The LF is 1.7 ± 0.1 (1.4 ± 0.1 with a hard upper limit on stellar contamination) times higher than those of z2 BXs and z ∼ 3 LBGs. Three explanations were considered, and it is argued that significantly underestimating low-z contamination or effective comoving volume is unlikely: the former would be inconsistent with the spectroscopic sample at 93% confidence, and the second explanation would not resolve the discrepancy. The third scenario is that different photometric selection of the samples yields nonidentical galaxy populations, such that some BX galaxies are LBGs and vice versa. This argument is supported by a higher surface density of LBGs at all magnitudes while the redshift distribution of the two populations is nearly identical. This study, when combined with other star formation rate (SFR) density UV measurements from LBG surveys, indicates that there is a rise in the SFR density: a factor of 3-6 (3-10) increase from z ∼ 5 (z ∼ 6) to z2, followed by a decrease to z ∼ 0. This result, along with past sub-mm studies that find a peak at z2 in their redshift distribution, suggests that z2 is the epoch of peak star formation.

  10. NOVOSIBIRSK: VEPP-2M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The VEPP-2M electron-positron collider at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk began a new life after completion of the booster BEP and construction of two new detectors - CMD-2 and SND. The collider covers a collision energy range from the threshold of pion pair production up to 1.4 GeV. Although this energy range is far below the summits needed to produce Z and W bosons or the top quark, it can nevertheless provide important information for a better understanding of the Standard Model and beyond

  11. Production of glutaminase(E.C. 3.2.1.5) from Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in solid-state fermentation and modeling the growth of Z. rouxii therein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Padma; Singhal, Rekha S

    2010-04-01

    Glutaminase production in Zygosacchromyces rouxii by solid-state fermentation (SSF) is detailed. Substrates screening showed best results with oatmeal (OM) and wheatbran (WB). Further, a 1:1 combination of OM: WB gave 0.614units/gds with artificial sea water (ASW) as moistening agent. Evaluation of additional carbon, nitrogen, aminoacids and minerals supplementation was done. A central composite design was employed to investigate effects of four variables, viz. moisture content, glucose, corn steep liquor and glutamine on production. A 4-fold increase in enzyme production was obtained. Studies were undertaken to analyze the time course model the microbial growth and nutrient utilization during SSF. Logistic equation (R2=0.8973), describing the growth model of Z.rouxii was obtained, with maximum values of micronm and Xm at 0.326h-1 and 7.35% of dry matter weight loss, respectively. A good-fit model to describe utilization of total carbohydrate (R2=0.9906) nitrogen concentration (R2=0.9869) with time was obtained. The model was used successfully to predict enzyme production (R2=0.7950).

  12. Conceptual Design of Simulation Models in an Early Development Phase of Lunar Spacecraft Simulator Using SMP2 Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoon Hee; Koo, Cheol Hea; Moon, Sung Tae; Han, Sang Hyuck; Ju, Gwang Hyeok

    2013-08-01

    The conceptual study for Korean lunar orbiter/lander prototype has been performed in Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI). Across diverse space programs around European countries, a variety of simulation application has been developed using SMP2 (Simulation Modelling Platform) standard related to portability and reuse of simulation models by various model users. KARI has not only first-hand experience of a development of SMP compatible simulation environment but also an ongoing study to apply the SMP2 development process of simulation model to a simulator development project for lunar missions. KARI has tried to extend the coverage of the development domain based on SMP2 standard across the whole simulation model life-cycle from software design to its validation through a lunar exploration project. Figure. 1 shows a snapshot from a visualization tool for the simulation of lunar lander motion. In reality, a demonstrator prototype on the right-hand side of image was made and tested in 2012. In an early phase of simulator development prior to a kick-off start in the near future, targeted hardware to be modelled has been investigated and indentified at the end of 2012. The architectural breakdown of the lunar simulator at system level was performed and the architecture with a hierarchical tree of models from the system to parts at lower level has been established. Finally, SMP Documents such as Catalogue, Assembly, Schedule and so on were converted using a XML(eXtensible Mark-up Language) converter. To obtain benefits of the suggested approaches and design mechanisms in SMP2 standard as far as possible, the object-oriented and component-based design concepts were strictly chosen throughout a whole model development process.

  13. Characterization of polar organosulfates in secondary organic aerosol from the unsaturated aldehydes 2-E-pentenal, 2-E-hexenal, and 3-Z-hexenal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Shalamzari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We show in the present study that the unsaturated aldehydes 2-E-pentenal, 2-E-hexenal, and 3-Z-hexenal are biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC precursors for polar organosulfates with molecular weights (MWs 230 and 214, which are also present in ambient fine aerosol from a forested site, i.e., K-puszta, Hungary. These results complement those obtained in a previous study showing that the green leaf aldehyde 3-Z-hexenal serves as a precursor for MW 226 organosulfates. Thus, in addition to isoprene, the green leaf volatiles (GLVs 2-E-hexenal and 3-Z-hexenal, emitted due to plant stress (mechanical wounding or insect attack, and 2-E-pentenal, a photolysis product of 3-Z-hexenal, should be taken into account for secondary organic aerosol and organosulfate formation. Polar organosulfates are of climatic relevance because of their hydrophilic properties and cloud effects. Extensive use was made of organic mass spectrometry (MS and detailed interpretation of MS data (i.e., ion trap MS and accurate mass measurements to elucidate the chemical structures of the MW 230, 214 and 170 organosulfates formed from 2-E-pentenal and indirectly from 2-E-hexenal and 3-Z-hexenal. In addition, quantum chemical calculations were performed to explain the different mass spectral behavior of 2,3-dihydroxypentanoic acid sulfate derivatives, where only the isomer with the sulfate group at C-3 results in the loss of SO3. The MW 214 organosulfates formed from 2-E-pentenal are explained by epoxidation of the double bond in the gas phase and sulfation of the epoxy group with sulfuric acid in the particle phase through the same pathway as that proposed for 3-sulfooxy-2-hydroxy-2-methylpropanoic acid from the isoprene-related α,β-unsaturated aldehyde methacrolein in previous work (Lin et al., 2013. The MW 230 organosulfates formed from 2-E-pentenal are tentatively explained by a novel pathway, which bears features of the latter pathway but introduces an additional hydroxyl

  14. THE CFHTLS-DEEP CATALOG OF INTERACTING GALAXIES. I. MERGER RATE EVOLUTION TO z = 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridge, C. R.; Carlberg, R. G.; Sullivan, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present the rest-frame optical galaxy merger fraction between 0.2 vega ≤ 22.2 (∼27,000 galaxies) over 2 square degrees, we have compiled the CFHTLS-Deep Catalog of Interacting Galaxies, with ∼ 1600 merging galaxies. We find the merger fraction to be 4.3% ± 0.3% at z ∼ 0.3 and 19.0% ± 2.5% at z ∼ 1, implying evolution of the merger fraction going as (1 + z) m , with m = 2.25 ± 0.24. This result is inconsistent with a mild or non-evolving (m 4σ level of confidence. A mild trend, where by massive galaxies with M * >10 10.7 M sun are undergoing fewer mergers than less massive systems (M * ∼ 10 10 M sun ), consistent with the expectations of galaxy assembly downsizing is observed. Our results also show that interacting galaxies have on average SFRs double that found in non-interacting field galaxies. We conclude that (1) the optical galaxy merger fraction does evolve with redshift, (2) the merger fraction depends mildly on stellar mass, with lower mass galaxies having higher merger fractions at z < 1, and (3) star formation is triggered at all phases of a merger, with larger enhancements at later stages, consistent with N-body simulations.

  15. Commentary on CSA Standard Z662-99, oil and gas pipeline systems : Special Publication Z622.1-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalra, S; Burford, G; Adragna, M; Coyle, S; Hawryn, S; Martin, A; McConnell, J [eds.; Kumaralagan, I; Hassan, H

    2001-04-01

    CSA Standard Z662 presents the requirements for oil and gas pipeline systems and describes what has been accepted as good safety practice. This special publication is not part of the Standard and has not been formally reviewed by the Technical Committee responsible for the Standard, therefore it does not provide formal interpretations of the Standard. This special publication should be considered as an informal annotation of portions of the Standard. This paper presents background information regarding certain clauses and requirements in the Standard. Revisions to this first edition of CSA Special Publication Z662.1 are likely to be made whenever new information needs to be released. This publication discussed some of the standards for oil and gas pipelines in terms of design, materials, installation, joining, pressure testing, corrosion control, as well as operation, maintenance and upgrading. The report also referred to offshore gas and oil distribution systems including steel, plastic and aluminum piping. refs., figs.

  16. Standard Model CP-violation and baryon asymmetry; 2, finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Gavela-Legazpi, Maria Belen; Orloff, J; Pène, O; Quimbay, C

    1994-01-01

    We consider the scattering of quasi-particles off the boundary created during a first order electroweak phase transition. Spatial coherence is lost due to the quasi-quark damping rate, and we show that reflection on the boundary is suppressed, even at tree-level. Simply on CP considerations, we argue against electroweak baryogenesis in the Standard Model via the charge transport mechanism. A CP asymmetry is produced in the reflection properties of quarks and antiquarks hitting the phase boundary. An effect is present at order \\alpha_W^2 in rate and a regular GIM behaviour is found, which can be expressed in terms of two unitarity triangles. A crucial role is played by the damping rate of quasi-particles in a hot plasma, which is a relevant scale together with M_W and the temperature. The effect is many orders of magnitude below what observation requires.

  17. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES AT z2: THE MYSTERY OF NEON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gebhardt, Henry; Gronwall, Caryl; Hagen, Alex; Trump, Jonathan R.; Bridge, Joanna S.; Luo, Bin; Schneider, Donald P., E-mail: grzeimann@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We use near-infrared grism spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope to examine the strength of [Ne III] λ3869 relative to Hβ, [O II] λ3727, and [O III] λ5007 in 236 low-mass (7.5 ≲ log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ≲ 10.5) star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 1.90 < z < 2.35. By stacking the data by stellar mass, we show that the [Ne III]/[O II] ratios of the z2 universe are marginally higher than those seen in a comparable set of local Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies, and that [Ne III]/[O III] is enhanced by ∼0.2 dex. We consider the possible explanations for this ∼4σ result, including higher oxygen depletion out of the gas phase, denser H II regions, higher production of {sup 22}Ne via Wolf-Rayet stars, and the existence of a larger population of X-ray obscured active galactic nuclei at z2 compared to z ∼ 0. None of these simple scenarios, alone, are favored to explain the observed line ratios. We conclude by suggesting several avenues of future observations to further explore the mystery of enhanced [Ne III] emission.

  18. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in the ZH->vvbb channel in 5.2 fb-1 of p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, B.S.; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, E.; /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, A.; /Michigan State U.; Alverson, G.; /Northeastern U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2009-12-01

    A search is performed for the standard model Higgs boson in 5.2 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The final state considered is a pair of b jets and large missing transverse energy, as expected from p{bar p} {yields} ZH {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}}b{bar b} production. The search is also sensitive to the WH {yields} {ell}{nu}b{bar b} channel when the charged lepton is not identified. For a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV, a limit is set at the 95% C.L. on the cross section multiplied by branching fraction for (p{bar p} {yields} (Z/W)H) x (H {yields} b{bar b}) that is a factor of 3.7 larger than the standard model value, consistent with the factor of 4.6 expected.

  19. CANDELS: CONSTRAINING THE AGN-MERGER CONNECTION WITH HOST MORPHOLOGIES AT z {approx} 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocevski, Dale D.; Faber, S. M.; Mozena, Mark; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Koekemoer, Anton M.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Dahlen, Tomas; Donley, Jennifer L. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Nandra, Kirpal; Brusa, Marcella; Wuyts, Stijn [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Rangel, Cyprian; Laird, Elise S. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Alexander, David M. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Bournaud, Frederic [CEA, IRFU, SAp and Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Conselice, Christopher J. [Centre for Astronomy and Particle Theory, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Dekel, Avishai, E-mail: kocevski@ucolick.org [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); and others

    2012-01-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 imaging taken as part of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, we examine the role that major galaxy mergers play in triggering active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity at z {approx} 2. Our sample consists of 72 moderate-luminosity (L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 42-44} erg s{sup -1}) AGNs at 1.5 < z < 2.5 that are selected using the 4 Ms Chandra observations in the Chandra Deep Field South, the deepest X-ray observations to date. Employing visual classifications, we have analyzed the rest-frame optical morphologies of the AGN host galaxies and compared them to a mass-matched control sample of 216 non-active galaxies at the same redshift. We find that most of the AGNs reside in disk galaxies (51.4{sup +5.8}{sub -5.9}%), while a smaller percentage are found in spheroids (27.8{sup +5.8}{sub -4.6}%). Roughly 16.7{sup +5.3}{sub -3.5}% of the AGN hosts have highly disturbed morphologies and appear to be involved in a major merger or interaction, while most of the hosts (55.6{sup +5.6}{sub -5.9}%) appear relatively relaxed and undisturbed. These fractions are statistically consistent with the fraction of control galaxies that show similar morphological disturbances. These results suggest that the hosts of moderate-luminosity AGNs are no more likely to be involved in an ongoing merger or interaction relative to non-active galaxies of similar mass at z {approx} 2. The high disk fraction observed among the AGN hosts also appears to be at odds with predictions that merger-driven accretion should be the dominant AGN fueling mode at z {approx} 2, even at moderate X-ray luminosities. Although we cannot rule out that minor mergers are responsible for triggering these systems, the presence of a large population of relatively undisturbed disk-like hosts suggests that the stochastic accretion of gas plays a greater role in fueling AGN activity at z {approx} 2 than previously thought.

  20. Leptophobic Z' in models with multiple Higgs doublet fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Nomura, Takaaki; Yagyu, Kei

    2015-05-01

    We study the collider phenomenology of the leptophobic Z' boson from an extra U(1)' gauge symmetry in models with N -Higgs doublet fields. We assume that the Z' boson at tree level has (i) no Z- Z' mixing, (ii) no interaction with the charged leptons, and (iii) no flavour-changing neutral current. Under such a setup, it is shown that in the N = 1 case, all the U(1)' charges of left-handed quark doublets and right-handed up- and down- type quarks are required to be the same, while in the N ≥ 3 case one can take different charges for the three types of quarks. The N = 2 case is not well-defined under the above three requirements. We study the processes ( V = γ , Z and W ±) with the leptonic decays of Z and W ± at the LHC. The most promising discovery channel or the most stringent constraint on the U(1)' gauge coupling constant comes from the Z'γ process below the threshold and from the process above the threshold. Assuming the collision energy of 8 TeV and integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb-1, we find that the constraint from the Z'γ search in the lower mass regime can be stronger than that from the UA2 experiment. In the N ≥ 3 case, we consider four benchmark points for the Z' couplings with quarks. If such a Z' is discovered, a careful comparison between the Z'γ and Z' W signals is crucial to reveal the nature of Z' couplings with quarks. We also present the discovery reach of the Z' boson at the 14-TeV LHC in both N = 1 and N ≥ 3 cases.

  1. The Curious Molecular Gas Conditions in a z=2.6 Radio-loud Quasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Chelsea; Riechers, Dominik A.; Kuk Leung, Tsz; Weiss, Axel; Walter, Fabian; Carilli, Chris; Kraiburg Knudsen, Kirsten; Hodge, Jacqueline

    2018-01-01

    Theoretical work suggests that AGN play an important role in quenching star formation in massive galaxies. In addition to molecular outflows observed in the local universe, emission from very high-J CO rotational transitions has been one of the key pieces of evidence for AGN directly affecting the molecular gas reservoirs that fuel star formation. However, very few observations of Jupper>9 transitions exist for galaxies in the early universe. Here we will present the peculiar molecular gas conditions in MG 0414+0534 (MG 0414 hereafter), one of the few high-z galaxies with very high-J CO detections. MG 0414 is a strongly lensed IR-bright radio-loud quasar with broad Hα emission at z=2.6390. We recently confirmed the CO(3–2) detection from Barvainis et al. (1998), but were unable to detect the CO(1–0) line. The 3σ lower limit on the 3–2/1–0 line ratio (in units of brightness temperature) is r3,1>5.72, which is significantly higher than the r3,1≤1 typical for thermalized optically thick emission in other z˜2–3 AGN host galaxies. In addition, the CO(11–10) line was detected to high significance using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, and the CO(11–10) line FWHM is nearly double that of the CO(3–2) line. We will discuss possible explanations for the peculiar line ratios in MG 0414 (such as optically thin emission, molecular outflows, and differential lensing) and what the origin of these ratios imply for molecular gas observations of other high-z AGN host galaxies.

  2. CO2 emission standards and investment in carbon capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eide, Jan; Sisternes, Fernando J. de; Herzog, Howard J.; Webster, Mort D.

    2014-01-01

    Policy makers in a number of countries have proposed or are considering proposing CO 2 emission standards for new fossil fuel-fired power plants. The proposed standards require coal-fired power plants to have approximately the same carbon emissions as an uncontrolled natural gas-fired power plant, effectively mandating the adoption of carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies for new coal plants. However, given the uncertainty in the capital and operating costs of a commercial scale coal plant with CCS, the impact of such a standard is not apparent a priori. We apply a stochastic generation expansion model to determine the impact of CO 2 emission standards on generation investment decisions, and in particular for coal plants with CCS. Moreover, we demonstrate how the incentive to invest in coal-CCS from emission standards depends on the natural gas price, the CO 2 price, and the enhanced oil recovery price, as well as on the level of the emission standard. This analysis is the first to consider the entire power system and at the same time allow the capture percentage for CCS plants to be chosen from a continuous range to meet the given standard at minimum cost. Previous system level studies have assumed that CCS plants capture 90% of the carbon, while studies of individual units have demonstrated the costs of carbon capture over a continuous range. We show that 1) currently proposed levels of emission standards are more likely to shift fossil fuel generation from coal to natural gas rather than to incentivize investment in CCS; 2) tighter standards that require some carbon reductions from natural gas-fired power plants are more likely than proposed standards to incentivize investments in CCS, especially on natural gas plants, but also on coal plants at high gas prices; and 3) imposing a less strict emission standard (emission rates higher than natural gas but lower than coal; e.g., 1500 lbs/MWh) is more likely than current proposals to incentivize

  3. Determination of the strong coupling constant αs(MZ2) under regardment of completely resummed leading and next-to-leading logarithms. Analysis of global event variables measured in hadronic Z decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehr, A.

    1994-06-01

    The value of the strong coupling constant α s is determined from a combined analysis of the global event shape variables thrust, heavy jet mass and total and wide jet broadening. The extraction of α s includes the full calculation of O(α s 2 ) terms and leading and next-to-leading logarithms resummed to all orders of α s . The analysis is based on data taken with the DELPHI detector at LEP during 1991 and 1992. The dependence of the result on the detailed matching of the resummed and fixed order terms is studied. The result from the combined theory is compared with values coming from a pure NLLA analysis and as pure O(α s 2 ) analysis, respectively. It is found that the inclusion of the resummed logarithms allows the description of the data in the two jet range and reduces the scale dependence of α s (M Z 2 ) compared to pure O(α s 2 ) theory. The value using the combined NLLA+O(α s 2 ) theory at the scale μ 2 =M Z 2 is α S (M Z 2 )=0.118±0.007. The running of α s is measured from the 1991 data in an energy range from 88.5 to 93.7 GeV. The slope of α s obtained at the Z peak is dα s /dQ/ Q=Mz =-(2.9±2.8)x10 -4 GeV -1 . This value is compatible with QCD and exludes an abelian gluon model with more than two standard deviations. (orig.)

  4. Preparation of human Melanocortin-4 receptor agonist libraries: linear peptides X-Y-DPhe7-Arg8-Trp(or 2-Nal)9-Z-NH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Adrian Wai-Hing; Qi, Lida; Gore, Vijay; Chu, Xin-Jie; Bartkovitz, David; Kurylko, Grazyna; Swistok, Joseph; Danho, Waleed; Chen, Li; Yagaloff, Keith

    2005-12-15

    Two libraries of hMC4R agonists, X-Y-DPhe(7)-Arg(8)-2-Nal(9)-Z-NH(2) and X-Y-DPhe(7)-Arg(8)-Trp(9)-Z-NH(2), totaling 185 peptides were prepared using Irori radiofrequency tagging technology and Argonaut Quest 210 Synthesizer, where X stands for N-caps, Y for His(6) surrogates and Z for Gly(10) surrogates. As a result of this study, His-modified pentapeptides with Trp were found to be more hMC4R potent than the corresponding 2-Nal analogs, novel N-caps and Gly surrogates were identified and 19 new peptides which are potent hMC4R agonists (EC(50) 1-15nM) and selective against hMC1R were discovered.

  5. Discovering hidden sectors with monophoton Z' searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershtein, Yuri; Petriello, Frank; Quackenbush, Seth; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2008-01-01

    In many theories of physics beyond the standard model, from extra dimensions to Hidden Valleys and models of dark matter, Z ' bosons mediate between standard model particles and hidden sector states. We study the feasibility of observing such hidden states through an invisibly decaying Z ' at the LHC. We focus on the process pp→γZ ' →γXX † , where X is any neutral, (quasi-) stable particle, whether a standard model neutrino or a new state. This complements a previous study using pp→ZZ ' →l + l - XX † . Only the Z ' mass and two effective charges are needed to describe this process. If the Z ' decays invisibly only to standard model neutrinos, then these charges are predicted by observation of the Z ' through the Drell-Yan process, allowing discrimination between Z ' decays to standard model ν's and invisible decays to new states. We carefully discuss all backgrounds and systematic errors that affect this search. We find that hidden sector decays of a 1 TeV Z ' can be observed at 5σ significance with 50 fb -1 at the LHC. Observation of a 1.5 TeV state requires super-LHC statistics of 1 ab -1 . Control of the systematic errors, in particular, the parton distribution function uncertainty of the dominant Zγ background, is crucial to maximize the LHC search reach.

  6. Weinberg-Salam theory in non-commutative geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Katsusada; Okumura, Yoshitaka.

    1994-01-01

    Ordinary differential calculus on smooth manifold is generalized so as to construct gauge theory coupled to fermions on discrete space M 4 xZ 2 which is an underlying space-time in the non-commutative geometry for the standard model. We can reproduce not only the bosonic sector but also the fermionic sector of the Weinberg-Salam theory without recourse to the Dirac operator at the outset. Treatment of the fermionic sector is based on the generalized spinor one-forms from which the Dirac lagrangian is derived through taking the inner product. Two model constructions are presented using our formalism, both giving the classical mass relation m H = √2m w . The first model leaves the Weinberg angle arbitrary as usual, while the second one predicts sin 2 θ w = 1/4 in the tree level. This prediction is the same as that of Connes but we obtain it from correct hypercharge assignment of 2x2 matrix-valued Higgs field and from vanishing photon mass, thereby dispensing with Connes' 0-trace condition or the equivalent. (author)

  7. Systematic metabolic engineering of Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z for 2,3-butanediol production from methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh Duc; Hwang, In Yeub; Lee, Ok Kyung; Kim, Donghyuk; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Mariyana, Rina; Hadiyati, Susila; Kim, Min Sik; Lee, Eun Yeol

    2018-04-16

    Methane is considered a next-generation feedstock, and methanotrophic cell-based biorefinery is attractive for production of a variety of high-value compounds from methane. In this work, we have metabolically engineered Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z for 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BDO) production from methane. The engineered strain 20Z/pBudK.p, harboring the 2,3-BDO synthesis gene cluster (budABC) from Klebsiella pneumoniae, accumulated 2,3-BDO in methane-fed shake flask cultures with a titer of 35.66 mg/L. Expression of the most efficient gene cluster was optimized using selection of promoters, translation initiation rates (TIR), and the combination of 2,3-BDO synthesis genes from different sources. A higher 2,3-BDO titer of 57.7 mg/L was measured in the 20Z/pNBM-Re strain with budA of K. pneumoniae and budB of Bacillus subtilis under the control of the Tac promoter. The genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction of M. alcaliphilum 20Z enabled in silico gene knockout predictions using an evolutionary programming method to couple growth and 2,3-BDO production. The ldh, ack, and mdh genes in M. alcaliphilum 20Z were identified as potential knockout targets. Pursuing these targets, a triple-mutant strain ∆ldh ∆ack ∆mdh was constructed, resulting in a further increase of the 2,3-BDO titer to 68.8 mg/L. The productivity of this optimized strain was then tested in a fed-batch stirred tank bioreactor, where final product concentrations of up to 86.2 mg/L with a yield of 0.0318 g-(2,3-BDO) /g-CH 4 were obtained under O 2 -limited conditions. This study first demonstrates the strategy of in silico simulation-guided metabolic engineering and represents a proof-of-concept for the production of value-added compounds using systematic approaches from engineered methanotrophs. Copyright © 2018 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. synthesis and structural characterization of n-(2-{[(2e)-2-(2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E.J. Research Institute of Chemistry, International Center for Chemical and Biological ... Benzamide and its analogues have various application in synthesis of ..... Symmetry codes: (i) x+3/2, y+1/2, z; (ii) −x+1/2, −y+1/2, −z; (iii) x, y−1, z.

  9. Grand unified models including extra Z bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tiezhong

    1989-01-01

    The grand unified theories (GUT) of the simple Lie groups including extra Z bosons are discussed. Under authors's hypothesis there are only SU 5+m SO 6+4n and E 6 groups. The general discussion of SU 5+m is given, then the SU 6 and SU 7 are considered. In SU 6 the 15+6 * +6 * fermion representations are used, which are not same as others in fermion content, Yukawa coupling and broken scales. A conception of clans of particles, which are not families, is suggested. These clans consist of extra Z bosons and the corresponding fermions of the scale. The all of fermions in the clans are down quarks except for the standard model which consists of Z bosons and 15 fermions, therefore, the spectrum of the hadrons which are composed of these down quarks are different from hadrons at present

  10. 78 FR 35559 - Updating OSHA Standards Based on National Consensus Standards; Signage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    ...; Signage AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Department of Labor. ACTION: Direct... signage standards by adding references to the latest versions of the American National Standards Institute... earlier ANSI standards, ANSI Z53.1-1967, Z35.1-1968 and Z35.2-1968, in its signage standards, thereby...

  11. Development of the 2nd generation z(Redshift) and early universe spectrometer & the study of far-IR fine structure emission in high-z galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkinhoff, Carl

    The 2nd generation z (Redshift) and Early Universe Spectrometer (ZEUS-2), is a long-slit echelle-grating spectrometer (R~1000) for observations at submillimeter wavelengths from 200 to 850 microm. Its design is optimized for the detection of redshifted far-infrared spectral lines from galaxies in the early universe. Combining exquisite sensitivity, broad wavelength coverage, and large (˜2.5%) instantaneous bandwidth, ZEUS-2 is uniquely suited for studying galaxies between z˜0.2 and 5---spanning the peaks in both the star formation rate and number of AGN in the universe. ZEUS-2 saw first light at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) in the Spring of 2012 and was commissioned on the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) in November 2012. Here we detail the design and performance of ZEUS-2, first however we discuss important science results that are examples of the science enabled by ZEUS-2. Using the first generation z (Redshift) and Early Universe Spectrometer (ZEUS-1) we made the first high-z detections of the [NII] 122 microm and [OIII] 88 microm lines. We detect these lines from starburst galaxies between z ˜2.5 and 4 demonstrating the utility of these lines for characterizing the properties of early galaxies. Specifically we are able to determine the most massive star still on the main sequence, the number of those stars and a lower limit on the mass of ionized gas in the source. Next we present ZEUS-2's first science result. Using ZEUS-2 on APEX we have detected the [CII] 158 microm line from the z = 1.78 galaxy H-ATLAS J091043.1-000322 with a line flux of (6.44 +/- 0.42) ˜ 10-18 W m-2. Combined with its far-infrared luminosity and a new Herschel-PACS detection of the [OI] 63 microm line we are able to conclude that H-ATLAS J091043.1-000322 is a high redshift analogue of a local ultra-luminous infrared galaxy, i.e. it is likely the site of a compact starburst due to a major merger. This detection, combined with the ZEUS-1 observations of the [NII

  12. Comparison of collisional radiative models for edge electron density reconstruction from Li I (2s-2p) emission profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoschus, H.; Hudson, B.; Munoz Burgos, J. M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 (United States); Thomas, D. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Schweinzer, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Four collisional radiative models (CRMs) for reconstruction of the edge electron density profile from the measured Li I (2s-2p) emission profile of an accelerated lithium beam are compared using experimental data from DIII-D. It is shown for both L- and H-mode plasmas that edge density profiles reconstructed with the CRMs DDD2, ABSOLUT, [Sasaki et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1699 (1993)] and a new model developed at DIII-D agree in a density scan from n{sub e}{sup ped}= (2.0-6.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} within 20%, 20%, <5%, and 40%, respectively, of the pedestal density measured with Thomson scattering. Profile shape and absolute density vary in a scan of the effective ion charge Z{sub eff}= 1-6 up to a factor of two but agree with Thomson data for Z{sub eff}= 1-2 within the error bars.

  13. Crystal and molecular structure of (2Z,5Z-3-(2-methoxyphenyl-2-[(2-methoxyphenylimino]-5-(4-nitrobenzylidenethiazolidin-4-one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Djafri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C24H19N3O5S, the thiazole ring (r.m.s. deviation = 0.012 Å displays a planar geometry and is surrounded by three fragments, two methoxyphenyl and one nitrophenyl. The thiazole ring is almost in the same plane as the nitrophenyl ring, making a dihedral angle of 20.92 (6°. The two methoxyphenyl groups are perpendicular to the thiazole ring [dihedral angles of 79.29 (6 and 71.31 (7° and make a dihedral angle of 68.59 (7°. The molecule exists in an Z,Z conformation with respect to the C=N imine bond. In the crystal, a series of C—H...N, C—H...O and C—H...S hydrogen bonds, augmented by several π–π(ring interactions, produce a three-dimensional architecture of molecules stacked along the b-axis direction. The experimentally derived structure is compered with that calculated theoretically using DFT(B3YLP methods.

  14. Higgs boson production via Z, W bosons and toponium in the E6 superstring model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barger, V.; Whisnant, K.

    1988-01-01

    The authors examine the production of light Higgs bosons associated with electroweak symmetry-breaking in an E 6 superstring model in Z ω HZ * decays, in e + e - annihilation and in toponium decays. They find that the couplings of the lightest scalar Higgs boson H 1 0 in these models are very similar to those of the standard Higgs boson unless the pseudoscalar P 0 in the model has mass ≤ M z . Possible new modes for Higgs boson production not found in the standard model are presented. The authors give simple analytic expressions for the Higgs boson masses and mixing angles in the limit that the extra Z' gauge boson is heavy which clearly shows the production mechanisms that are favored for a given set of model parameters

  15. Masses of T/sub z/ = +5/2 nuclei in the s--d shell from β--decay measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alburger, D.E.; Goosman, D.R.; Davids, C.N.; Hardy, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    In this work the existence of five new T/sub z/ = + 5 / 2 nuclides, 23 F, 29 Mg, 31 Al, 33 Si, and 35 P, was established; their properties, including mass values, were determined, along with those of 25 Ne and 27 Na. Two experimental techniques were used, the ''rabbit'' transfer of a solid target and the gas transfer system; some novel features of these are described. A β spectrum of 33 Si observed in coincidence with 1848-keV γ rays is shown; a mass excess of -20569 +- 50 keV was derived for 33 Si. Attempts to produce 21 O were unsuccessful. Comparisons of the measured masses of the T/sub z/ = + 5 / 2 nuclides in the 2s--1d shell with predictions of the Garvey--Kelson mass formulation and with shell-model calculations are shown. The latter produce considerably better agreement with experiment. (3 figures, 1 table) (U.S.)

  16. Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Concentrations, Co-spectra and Fluxes from Latest Standardized Automated CO2/H2O Flux Systems versus Established Analyzer Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, G. G.; Kathilankal, J. C.; Begashaw, I.; Franzen, D.; Welles, J.; McDermitt, D. K.

    2017-12-01

    Spatial and temporal flux data coverage have improved significantly in recent years, due to standardization, automation and management of data collection, and better handling of the generated data. With more stations and networks, larger data streams from each station, and smaller operating budgets, modern tools are required to effectively and efficiently handle the entire process.These tools should produce standardized verifiable datasets, and provide a way to cross-share the standardized data with external collaborators to leverage available funding, and promote data analyses and publications. In 2015, new open-path and enclosed flux measurement systems1 were developed, based on established gas analyzer models2,3, with the goal of improving stability in the presence of contamination, refining temperature control and compensation, and providing more accurate gas concentration measurements. In 2017, the new open-path system was further refined to simplify hardware configuration, and to reduce power consumption and cost. Additionally, all new systems incorporate complete automated on-site flux calculations using EddyPro® Software4 run by a weatherized remotely-accessible microcomputer to provide standardized traceable data sets for fluxes and supporting variables. This presentation will describe details and results from the field tests of the new flux systems, in comparison to older models and reference instruments. References:1 Burba G., W. Miller, I. Begashaw, G. Fratini, F. Griessbaum, J. Kathilankal, L. Xu, D. Franz, E. Joseph, E. Larmanou, S. Miller, D. Papale, S. Sabbatini, T. Sachs, R. Sakai, D. McDermitt, 2017. Comparison of CO2 Concentrations, Co-spectra and Flux Measurements between Latest Standardized Automated CO2/H2O Flux Systems and Older Gas Analysers. 10th ICDC Conference, Switzerland: 21-25/08 2 Metzger, S., G. Burba, S. Burns, P. Blanken, J. Li, H. Luo, R. Zulueta, 2016. Optimization of an enclosed gas analyzer sampling system for measuring eddy

  17. Star Formation at z = 2.481 in the Lensed Galaxy SDSS J1110 = 6459. I. Lens Modeling and Source Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Traci L.; Sharon, Keren; Gladders, Michael D.; Rigby, Jane R.; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Wuyts, Eva; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Florian, Michael; Murray, Katherine T.

    2017-07-01

    Using the combined resolving power of the Hubble Space Telescope and gravitational lensing, we resolve star-forming structures in a z˜ 2.5 galaxy on scales much smaller than the usual kiloparsec diffraction limit of HST. SGAS J111020.0+645950.8 is a clumpy, star-forming galaxy lensed by the galaxy cluster SDSS J1110+6459 at z=0.659, with a total magnification ˜ 30× across the entire arc. We use a hybrid parametric/non-parametric strong lensing mass model to compute the deflection and magnification of this giant arc, reconstruct the light distribution of the lensed galaxy in the source plane, and resolve the star formation into two dozen clumps. We develop a forward-modeling technique to model each clump in the source plane. We ray-trace the model to the image plane, convolve with the instrumental point-spread function (PSF), and compare with the GALFIT model of the clumps in the image plane, which decomposes clump structure from more extended emission. This technique has the advantage, over ray-tracing, of accounting for the asymmetric lensing shear of the galaxy in the image plane and the instrument PSF. At this resolution, we can begin to study star formation on a clump-by-clump basis, toward the goal of understanding feedback mechanisms and the buildup of exponential disks at high redshift. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program # 13003.

  18. orbital selective correlation reduce in collapse tetragonal phase of CaFe2(As0.935P0.065)2 and electronic structure reconstruction studied by angel resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lingkun

    We performed an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) study of the CaFe2(As0.935P0.065)2 in the collapse tetragonal(CT) phase and uncollapse tetragonal(UCT) phase. We find in the CT phase the electronic correlation dramatically reduces respective to UCT phase. Meanwhile, the reduction of correlation in CT phase show an orbital selective effect: correlation in dxy reduces the most, and then dxz/yz, while the one in dz2-r2 almost keeps the same. In CT phase, almost all bands sink downwards to higher binding energy, leading to the hole like bands around Brillouin zone(BZ) center sink below EF compared with UCT phase. However, the electron pocket around Brillouin Zone(BZ) corner(M) in UCT phase, forms a hole pocket around BZ center(Z point) in CT phase. Moreover, the dxy exhibits larger movement down to higher binding energy, resulting in farther away from dyz/xz and closer to dxy.We propose the electron filling ,namely high spin state in UCT phase to low spin state in CT phase(due to competing between crystal structure field and Hund's coupling), other than the Fermi surface nesting might be responsible for the absent of magnetic ordering.

  19. 1,2-Dichlorohexafluoro-Cyclobutane (1,2-c-C4F6Cl2, R-316c) a Potent Ozone Depleting Substance and Greenhouse Gas: Atmospheric Loss Processes, Lifetimes, and Ozone Depletion and Global Warming Potentials for the (E) and (Z) stereoisomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Vassileios C.; McGillen, Max R.; Smith, Shona C.; Jubb, Aaron M.; Portmann, Robert W.; Hall, Bradley D.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2013-01-01

    The atmospheric processing of (E)- and (Z)-1,2-dichlorohexafluorocyclobutane (1,2-c-C4F6Cl2, R-316c) was examined in this work as the ozone depleting (ODP) and global warming (GWP) potentials of this proposed replacement compound are presently unknown. The predominant atmospheric loss processes and infrared absorption spectra of the R-316c isomers were measured to provide a basis to evaluate their atmospheric lifetimes and, thus, ODPs and GWPs. UV absorption spectra were measured between 184.95 to 230 nm at temperatures between 214 and 296 K and a parametrization for use in atmospheric modeling is presented. The Cl atom quantum yield in the 193 nm photolysis of R- 316c was measured to be 1.90 +/- 0.27. Hexafluorocyclobutene (c-C4F6) was determined to be a photolysis co-product with molar yields of 0.7 and 1.0 (+/-10%) for (E)- and (Z)-R-316c, respectively. The 296 K total rate coefficient for the O(1D) + R-316c reaction, i.e., O(1D) loss, was measured to be (1.56 +/- 0.11) × 10(exp -10)cu cm/ molecule/s and the reactive rate coefficient, i.e., R-316c loss, was measured to be (1.36 +/- 0.20) × 10(exp -10)cu cm/molecule/s corresponding to a approx. 88% reactive yield. Rate coefficient upper-limits for the OH and O3 reaction with R-316c were determined to be model to be 74.6 +/- 3 and 114.1 +/-10 years, respectively, where the estimated uncertainties are due solely to the uncertainty in the UV absorption spectra. Stratospheric photolysis is the predominant atmospheric loss process for both isomers with the O(1D) reaction making a minor, approx. 2% for the (E) isomer and 7% for the (Z) isomer, contribution to the total atmospheric loss. Ozone depletion potentials for (E)- and (Z)-R-316c were calculated using the 2-D model to be 0.46 and 0.54, respectively. Infrared absorption spectra for (E)- and (Z)-R-316c were measured at 296 K and used to estimate their radiative efficiencies (REs) and GWPs; 100-year time-horizon GWPs of 4160 and 5400 were obtained for (E)- and (Z

  20. The symplectic fermion ribbon quasi-Hopf algebra and the SL(2,Z)-action on its centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farsad, Vanda

    2017-06-14

    This thesis is concerned with ''N pairs of symplectic fermions'' which are examples of logarithmic conformal field theories in two dimensions. The mathematical language of two-dimensional conformal field theories (on Riemannian surfaces of genus zero) are vertex operator algebras. The representation category of the even part of the symplectic fermion vertex operator super-algebra Rep V{sub ev} is conjecturally a factorisable finite ribbon tensor category. This determines an isomorphism of projective representations between two SL(2,Z)-actions associated to V{sub ev}. The first action is obtained by modular transformations on the space of so-called pseudo-trace functions of a vertex operator algebra. For V{sub ev} this was developed by A.M.Gaberdiel and I. Runkel. For the action one uses that Rep V{sub ev} is conjecturally a factorisable finite ribbon tensor category and thus carries a projective SL(2,Z)-action on a certain Hom-space [Ly1,Ly2,KL]. To do so we calculate the SL(2,Z)-action on the representation category of a general factorisable quasi-Hopf algebras. Then we show that Rep V{sub ev} is conjecturally ribbon equivalent to Rep Q, for Q a factorisable quasi-Hopf algebra, and calculate the SL(2,Z)-action explicitly on Rep Q. The result is that the two SL(2,Z)-action indeed agree. This poses the first example of such comparison for logarithmic conformal field theories.

  1. Searches for new quarks and leptons in Z boson decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Kooten, R.J.

    1990-06-01

    Searches for the decay of Z bosons into pairs of new quarks and leptons in a data sample including 455 hadronic Z decays are presented. The Z bosons were produced in electon-positron annihilations at the SLAC Linear Collider operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 89.2 to 93.0 GeV. The Standard Model provides no prediction for fermion masses and does not exclude new generations of fermions. The existence and masses of these new particles may provide valuable information to help understand the pattern of fermion masses, and physics beyond the Standard Model. Specific searches for top quarks and sequential fourth generation charge--1/3(b') quarks are made considering a variety of possible standard and non-standard decay modes. In addition, searches for sequential fourth generation massive neutrinos ν 4 and their charged lepton partners L - are pursued. The ν 4 may be stable or decay through mixing to the lighter generations. The data sample is examined for new particle topologies of events with high-momentum isolated tracks, high-energy isolated photons, spherical event shapes, and detached vertices. No evidence is observed for the production of new quarks and leptons. 95% confidence lower mass limits of 40.7 GeV/c 2 for the top quark and 42.0 GeV/c 2 for the b'-quark mass are obtained regardless of the branching fractions to the considered decay modes. A significant range of mixing matrix elements of ν 4 to other generation neutrinos for a ν 4 mass from 1 GeV/c 2 to 43 GeV/c 2 is excluded at 95% confidence level. Measurements of the upper limit of the invisible width of the Z exclude additional values of the ν 4 mass and mixing matrix elements, and also permit the exclusion of a region in the L - mass versus ν 4 mass plane

  2. Cosmic Microwave Background as a Thermal Gas of SU(2 Photons: Implications for the High-z Cosmological Model and the Value of H0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Hahn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Presently, we are facing a 3σ tension in the most basic cosmological parameter, the Hubble constant H0. This tension arises when fitting the Lambda-cold-dark-matter model (ΛCDM to the high-precision temperature-temperature (TT power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB and to local cosmological observations. We propose a resolution of this problem by postulating that the thermal photon gas of the CMB obeys an SU(2 rather than U(1 gauge principle, suggesting a high-z cosmological model which is void of dark-matter. Observationally, we rely on precise low-frequency intensity measurements in the CMB spectrum and on a recent model independent (low-z extraction of the relation between the comoving sound horizon rs at the end of the baryon drag epoch and H0 (rsH0=const. We point out that the commonly employed condition for baryon-velocity freeze-out is imprecise, judged by a careful inspection of the formal solution to the associated Euler equation. As a consequence, the above-mentioned 3σ tension actually transforms into a 5σ discrepancy. To make contact with successful low-z  ΛCDM cosmology we propose an interpolation based on percolated/depercolated vortices of a Planck-scale axion condensate. For a first consistency test of such an all-z model we compute the angular scale of the sound horizon at photon decoupling.

  3. String derived exophobic SU(6)×SU(2) GUTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, Laura; Faraggi, Alon E.; Glasser, Ivan; Rizos, John; Sonmez, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    With the apparent discovery of the Higgs boson, the Standard Model has been confirmed as the theory accounting for all sub-atomic phenomena. This observation lends further credence to the perturbative unification in Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) and string theories. The free fermionic formalism yielded fertile ground for the construction of quasi-realistic heterotic-string models, which correspond to toroidal Z 2 ×Z 2 orbifold compactifications. In this paper we study a new class of heterotic-string models in which the GUT group is SU(6)×SU(2) at the string level. We use our recently developed fishing algorithm to extract an example of a three generation SU(6)×SU(2) GUT model. We explore the phenomenology of the model and show that it contains the required symmetry breaking Higgs representations. We show that the model admits flat directions that produce a Yukawa coupling for a single family. The novel feature of the SU(6)×SU(2) string GUT models is that they produce an additional family universal anomaly free U(1) symmetry, and may remain unbroken below the string scale. The massless spectrum of the model is free of exotic states.

  4. TIP48/Reptin and H2A.Z requirement for initiating chromatin remodeling in estrogen-activated transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Dalvai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Histone variants, including histone H2A.Z, are incorporated into specific genomic sites and participate in transcription regulation. The role of H2A.Z at these sites remains poorly characterized. Our study investigates changes in the chromatin environment at the Cyclin D1 gene (CCND1 during transcriptional initiation in response to estradiol in estrogen receptor positive mammary tumour cells. We show that H2A.Z is present at the transcription start-site and downstream enhancer sequences of CCND1 when the gene is poorly transcribed. Stimulation of CCND1 expression required release of H2A.Z concomitantly from both these DNA elements. The AAA+ family members TIP48/reptin and the histone variant H2A.Z are required to remodel the chromatin environment at CCND1 as a prerequisite for binding of the estrogen receptor (ERα in the presence of hormone. TIP48 promotes acetylation and exchange of H2A.Z, which triggers a dissociation of the CCND1 3' enhancer from the promoter, thereby releasing a repressive intragenic loop. This release then enables the estrogen receptor to bind to the CCND1 promoter. Our findings provide new insight into the priming of chromatin required for transcription factor access to their target sequence. Dynamic release of gene loops could be a rapid means to remodel chromatin and to stimulate transcription in response to hormones.

  5. Face centered cubic SnSe as a Z2 trivial Dirac nodal line material

    OpenAIRE

    Tateishi, Ikuma; Matsuura, Hiroyasu

    2018-01-01

    The presence of Dirac nodal line in the time-reversal and inversion symmetric system is dictated by Z2 index when spin-orbit interaction is absent. With the first principles calculation, we show that the Dirac nodal line can emerge in Z2 trivial material by calculating the band structure of SnSe of face centered cubic lattice as an example and it becomes a topological crystalline insulator when spin-orbit interaction is taken into account. We clarify the origin of the Dirac nodal line by obta...

  6. Tests of the Standard Model and Constraints on New Physics from Measurements of Fermion-Pair Production at 189-209 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2004-01-01

    Cross-section and angular distributions for hadronic and lepton-pair final states in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies between 189 GeV and 209 GeV, measured with the OPAL detector at LEP, are presented and compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. The measurements are used to determine the electromagnetic coupling constant alphaem at LEP2 energies. In addition, the results are used together with OPAL measurements at 91-183 GeV within the S-matrix formalism to determine the gamma-Z interference term and to make an almost model-independent measurement of the Z mass. Limits on extensions to the Standard Model described by effective four-fermion contact interactions or the addition of a heavy Z boson are also presented.

  7. Large Scale Structures in the GOODS-SOUTH Field up to z~2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevese, D.; Castellano, M.; Salimbeni, S.; Pentericci, L.; Fiore, F.

    2009-05-01

    We apply a density evaluation technique based on photometric redshifts, developed by our group, to estimate galaxy space density on the deep (z450~26) multi-wavelength GOODS-MUSIC catalogue. We find several groups and clusters in the redshift range 0.4-2.5. We present here an outline of the X-ray properties of our cluster sample as computed from the Chandra 2Ms data. A group at z = 0.96 could be associated to an extended X-ray source, while two clusters with masses of few times 1014Msolar have upper limits on their X-ray emission significantly lower than expected from their optical properties.

  8. The Role of the Most Luminous Obscured AGNs in Galaxy Assembly at z2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrah, Duncan [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Petty, Sara [Green Science Policy Institute, Berkeley, CA 94709 (United States); Connolly, Brian [Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Blain, Andrew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Efstathiou, Andreas [School of Sciences, European University Cyprus, Diogenes Street, Engomi, 1516 Nicosia (Cyprus); Lacy, Mark [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Bridge, Carrie; Eisenhardt, Peter; Moustakas, Leonidas [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Lake, Sean; Tsai, Chao-Wei [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jarrett, Tom [Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, 7700 Rondebosch, Capetown 7700 (South Africa); Benford, Dominic [Observational Cosmology Lab., Code 665, NASA at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jones, Suzy [Department of Space, Earth, and Environment, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-43992 Onsala (Sweden); Assef, Roberto [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército Libertador 441, Santiago (Chile); Wu, Jingwen [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100012 (China)

    2017-08-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 F160W imaging and infrared spectral energy distributions for 12 extremely luminous, obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at 1.8 < z < 2.7 selected via “hot, dust-obscured” mid-infrared colors. Their infrared luminosities span (2–15) × 10{sup 13} L {sub ⊙}, making them among the most luminous objects in the universe at z2. In all cases, the infrared emission is consistent with arising at least for the most part from AGN activity. The AGN fractional luminosities are higher than those in either submillimeter galaxies or AGNs selected via other mid-infrared criteria. Adopting the G , M {sub 20}, and A morphological parameters, together with traditional classification boundaries, infers that three-quarters of the sample are mergers. Our sample does not, however, show any correlation between the considered morphological parameters and either infrared luminosity or AGN fractional luminosity. Moreover, the asymmetries and effective radii of our sample are distributed identically to those of massive galaxies at z2. We conclude that our sample is not preferentially associated with mergers, though a significant merger fraction is still plausible. Instead, we propose that our sample includes examples of the massive galaxy population at z2 that harbor a briefly luminous, “flickering” AGN and in which the G and M {sub 20} values have been perturbed due to either the AGN and/or the earliest formation stages of a bulge in an inside-out manner. Furthermore, we find that the mass assembly of the central black holes in our sample leads the mass assembly of any bulge component. Finally, we speculate that our sample represents a small fraction of the immediate antecedents of compact star-forming galaxies at z2.

  9. The properties of Hα emission-line galaxies at z = 2.24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Fang Xia; Zheng, Xian Zhong; Wang, Wei-Hao; Huang, Jia-Sheng; Kong, Xu; Wang, Jun-Xian; Zhu, Feifan; Fang, Guan Wen; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Wu, Hong; Hao, Lei; Xia, Xiao-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Using deep narrowband H 2 S1 and K s -band imaging data obtained with CFHT/WIRCam, we identify a sample of 56 Hα emission-line galaxies (ELGs) at z = 2.24 with the 5σ depths of H 2 S1 = 22.8 and K s = 24.8 (AB) over a 383 arcmin 2 area in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. A detailed analysis is carried out with existing multi-wavelength data in this field. Three of the 56 Hα ELGs are detected in Chandra 4 Ms X-ray observations and two of them are classified as active galactic nuclei. The rest-frame UV and optical morphologies revealed by HST/ACS and WFC3 deep images show that nearly half of the Hα ELGs are either merging systems or have a close companion, indicating that the merging/interacting processes play a key role in regulating star formation at cosmic epoch z = 2-3. About 14% are too faint to be resolved in the rest-frame UV morphology due to high dust extinction. We estimate dust extinction from spectral energy distributions. We find that dust extinction is generally correlated with Hα luminosity and stellar mass. Our results suggest that Hα ELGs are representative of star-forming galaxies. Applying extinction corrections to individual objects, we examine the intrinsic Hα luminosity function (LF) at z = 2.24, obtaining a best-fit Schechter function characterized by a faint-end slope of α = – 1.3. This is shallower than the typical slope of α ≅ –1.6 in previous works based on constant extinction correction. We demonstrate that this difference is mainly due to the different extinction corrections. The proper extinction correction is thus the key to recovering the intrinsic LF as the extinction globally increases with Hα luminosity. Moreover, we find that our Hα LF mirrors the stellar mass function of star-forming galaxies at the same cosmic epoch. This finding indeed reflects the tight correlation between star formation rate and stellar mass for star-forming galaxies, i.e., the so-called main sequence.

  10. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF z2 DUST-OBSCURED GALAXIES AND SUBMILLIMETER-SELECTED GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussmann, R. S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, B. T.; Armus, L.; Desai, V.; Soifer, B. T.; Brown, M. J. I.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Melbourne, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope has identified a population of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z2 that may play an important role in the evolution of massive galaxies. We measure the stellar masses (M * ) of two populations of Spitzer-selected ULIRGs that have extremely red R – [24] colors (dust-obscured galaxies, or DOGs) and compare our results with submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs). One set of 39 DOGs has a local maximum in their mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectral energy distribution (SED) at rest frame 1.6 μm associated with stellar emission ( b ump DOGs ) , while the other set of 51 DOGs have power-law mid-IR SEDs that are typical of obscured active galactic nuclei ( p ower-law DOGs ) . We measure M * by applying Charlot and Bruzual stellar population synthesis models to broadband photometry in the rest-frame ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared of each of these populations. Assuming a simple stellar population and a Chabrier initial mass function, we find that power-law DOGs and bump DOGs are on average a factor of 2 and 1.5 more massive than SMGs, respectively (median and inter-quartile M * values for SMGs, bump DOGs, and power-law DOGs are log(M * /M ☉ ) = 10.42 +0.42 –0.36 , 10.62 +0.36 –0.32 , and 10.71 +0.40 –0.34 , respectively). More realistic star formation histories drawn from two competing theories for the nature of ULIRGs at z2 (major merger versus smooth accretion) can increase these mass estimates by up to 0.5 dex. A comparison of our stellar masses with the instantaneous star formation rate (SFR) in these z2 ULIRGs provides a preliminary indication supporting high SFRs for a given M * , a situation that arises more naturally in major mergers than in smooth accretion-powered systems.

  11. Ferro and antiferro orbital ordering in Fe{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.5}V{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Dibyendu, E-mail: dibyendu@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in; Taraphder, A. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Maitra, T. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Using density functional theory calculations, we have investigated the orbital ordering in Fe{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.5}V{sub 2}O{sub 4} where Fe and V sites are orbitally active. Our first principles study within GGA+U and GGA+U+SO shows ferro-orbital ordering of d{sub x2−y2} orbital at all Fe sites, whereas A-type antiferro-orbital ordering at V sites where one 3d electron occupies d{sub xy} orbital at every V site and another electron occupies either 1/√2 (d{sub xz} + d{sub yz}) or 1/√2 (d{sub xz} - d{sub yz}) orbital alternatively along c axis. Insulating nature and the orbital ordering of this compound are found to be correlation driven while the effect of spin-orbit interaction on orbital ordering is not significant.

  12. Clustering of galaxies near damped Lyman-alpha systems with (z) = 2.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, A. M

    1993-01-01

    The galaxy two-point correlation function, xi, at (z) = 2.6 is determined by comparing the number of Ly-alpha-emitting galaxies in narrowband CCD fields selected for the presence of damped L-alpha absorption to their number in randomly selected control fields. Comparisons between the presented determination of (xi), a density-weighted volume average of xi, and model predictions for (xi) at large redshifts show that models in which the clustering pattern is fixed in proper coordinates are highly unlikely, while better agreement is obtained if the clustering pattern is fixed in comoving coordinates. Therefore, clustering of Ly-alpha-emitting galaxies around damped Ly-alpha systems at large redshifts is strong. It is concluded that the faint blue galaxies are drawn from a parent population different from normal galaxies, the presumed offspring of damped Ly-alpha systems.

  13. Angular Baryon Acoustic Oscillation measure at z=2.225 from the SDSS quasar survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, E.; Bernui, A.; Carvalho, G. C.; Novaes, C. P.; Xavier, H. S.

    2018-04-01

    Following a quasi model-independent approach we measure the transversal BAO mode at high redshift using the two-point angular correlation function (2PACF). The analyses done here are only possible now with the quasar catalogue from the twelfth data release (DR12Q) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, because it is spatially dense enough to allow the measurement of the angular BAO signature with moderate statistical significance and acceptable precision. Our analyses with quasars in the redshift interval z in [2.20,2.25] produce the angular BAO scale θBAO = 1.77° ± 0.31° with a statistical significance of 2.12 σ (i.e., 97% confidence level), calculated through a likelihood analysis performed using the theoretical covariance matrix sourced by the analytical power spectra expected in the ΛCDM concordance model. Additionally, we show that the BAO signal is robust—although with less statistical significance—under diverse bin-size choices and under small displacements of the quasars' angular coordinates. Finally, we also performed cosmological parameter analyses comparing the θBAO predictions for wCDM and w(a)CDM models with angular BAO data available in the literature, including the measurement obtained here, jointly with CMB data. The constraints on the parameters ΩM, w0 and wa are in excellent agreement with the ΛCDM concordance model.

  14. One-dimensional Z-scheme TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3}/Pt heterostructures for enhanced hydrogen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Hongqing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); State Centre for International Cooperation on Designer Low-carbon and Environmental Materials (SCICDLCEM), Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001, Henan (China); Zhang, Peng, E-mail: Zhangp@zzu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); State Centre for International Cooperation on Designer Low-carbon and Environmental Materials (SCICDLCEM), Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001, Henan (China); Hu, Junhua, E-mail: Hujh@zzu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); State Centre for International Cooperation on Designer Low-carbon and Environmental Materials (SCICDLCEM), Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001, Henan (China); Pan, Jimin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Fan, Jiajie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); State Centre for International Cooperation on Designer Low-carbon and Environmental Materials (SCICDLCEM), Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001, Henan (China); Shao, Guosheng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); State Centre for International Cooperation on Designer Low-carbon and Environmental Materials (SCICDLCEM), Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001, Henan (China); Institute for Renewable Energy and Environmental Technologies, University of Bolton, Bolton BL35AB (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: We reported one-dimensional solid-state Z-scheme photosynthetic heterojunction system with Pt nanoparticle as an electron collector and WO{sub 3} as a hole collector, leading to effective charge separation. - Highlights: • The composite nanofibers were fabricated by facile electrospinning technique. • The composite nanofibers exhibited enhanced activity for H{sub 2} evolution. • Enhanced activity is due to the formation of Z-scheme TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3}/Pt heterojunction. - Abstract: One-dimensional Z-scheme TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3}/Pt heterostructures were fabricated by integrating a facile electrospinning technique and subsequent annealing in air. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, were used to characterize the as-fabricated samples. The results showed that the H{sub 2}-generation of the as-fabricated one-dimensional Z-scheme TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3}/Pt heterostructures (S2) was greatly enhanced compared with pure TiO{sub 2} nanofibers (S0) and TiO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3} nanofibers (S1). The enhanced photocatalyst activities were mainly attributed to the solid-state Z-scheme photosynthetic heterojunction system with Pt nanoparticle as an electron collector and WO{sub 3} as a hole collector, leading to effective charge separation on these semiconductors, which were evidenced by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and photocurrent analysis.

  15. Molecular hydrogen in the z = 2.811 absorbing material toward the quasar PKS 0528-250

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levshakov, S.A.; Varshalovich, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Among the previously unidentified absorbtion features in the spectrum of the quasar PKS 0528-250 obtained by previous authors tentative evidence has been found for H 2 lines at the same redshift (z = 2.811) as that of the well-known absorption-line system. The column density of molecules has been estimated from the curve of growth; the fraction of H 2 appears to be about 2 x 10 -5 . The ortho- to para-H 2 ratio corresponds to the excitation temperature of Tsub(ex)(H 2 ) = 300 +- 150 K, though the upper rotational levels J >= 3 turn out be overpopulated. The results obtained seem to provide substantial evidence for the existence of molecular hydrogen at the early cosmological epoch with z approx. 3. (author)

  16. HST/WFC3 CONFIRMATION OF THE INSIDE-OUT GROWTH OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT 0 < z < 2 AND IDENTIFICATION OF THEIR STAR-FORMING PROGENITORS AT z {approx} 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Shannon G.; Franx, Marijn; Muzzin, Adam [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 AA Leiden (Netherlands); Van Dokkum, Pieter G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Quadri, Ryan F.; Williams, Rik J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Marchesini, Danilo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Holden, Bradford P. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Stefanon, Mauro, E-mail: patel@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Observatori Astronomic de la Universitat de Valencia, E-46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain)

    2013-03-20

    We study the structural evolution of massive galaxies by linking progenitors and descendants at a constant cumulative number density of n{sub c} = 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3} to z {approx} 3. Structural parameters were measured by fitting Sersic profiles to high-resolution CANDELS HST WFC3 J{sub 125} and H{sub 160} imaging in the UKIDSS-UDS at 1 < z < 3 and ACS I{sub 814} imaging in COSMOS at 0.25 < z < 1. At a given redshift, we selected the HST band that most closely samples a common rest-frame wavelength so as to minimize systematics from color gradients in galaxies. At fixed n{sub c}, galaxies grow in stellar mass by a factor of {approx}3 from z {approx} 3 to z {approx} 0. The size evolution is complex: galaxies appear roughly constant in size from z {approx} 3 to z {approx} 2 and then grow rapidly to lower redshifts. The evolution in the surface mass density profiles indicates that most of the mass at r < 2 kpc was in place by z {approx} 2, and that most of the new mass growth occurred at larger radii. This inside-out mass growth is therefore responsible for the larger sizes and higher Sersic indices of the descendants toward low redshift. At z < 2, the effective radius evolves with the stellar mass as r{sub e} {proportional_to}M {sup 2.0}, consistent with scenarios that find dissipationless minor mergers to be a key driver of size evolution. The progenitors at z {approx} 3 were likely star-forming disks with r{sub e} {approx} 2 kpc, based on their low Sersic index of n {approx} 1, low median axis ratio of b/a {approx} 0.52, and typical location in the star-forming region of the U - V versus V - J diagram. By z {approx} 1.5, many of these star-forming disks disappeared, giving rise to compact quiescent galaxies. Toward lower redshifts, these galaxies continued to assemble mass at larger radii and became the local ellipticals that dominate the high-mass end of the mass function at the present epoch.

  17. New metallicity calibration for Seyfert 2 galaxies based on the N2O2 index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, C. S.; Dors, O. L.; Cardaci, M. V.; Hägele, G. F.

    2017-05-01

    We derive a new relation between the metallicity of Seyfert 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and the intensity of the narrow emission-lines ratio N2O2 = log([N II] λ6584/[O II] λ3727). The calibration of this relation was performed by determining the metallicity (Z) of a sample of 58 AGNs through a diagram containing the observational data and the results of a grid of photoionization models obtained with the cloudy code. We find the new Z/Z⊙-N2O2 relation using the obtained metallicity values and the corresponding observational emission-line intensities for each object of the sample. Estimations derived through the use of this new calibration indicate that the narrow-line regions of Seyfert 2 galaxies exhibit a large range of metal