WorldWideScience

Sample records for yeast phenylalanine transfer

  1. Fluorinated Phenylalanine Precursor Resistance in Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian S. Murdoch

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Development of a counter-selection method for phenylalanine auxotrophy could be a useful tool in the repertoire of yeast genetics. Fluorinated and sulfurated precursors of phenylalanine were tested for toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One such precursor, 4-fluorophenylpyruvate (FPP, was found to be toxic to several strains from the Saccharomyces and Candida genera. Toxicity was partially dependent on ARO8 and ARO9, and correlated with a strain’s ability to convert FPP into 4-fluorophenylalanine (FPA. Thus, strains with deletions in ARO8 and ARO9, having a mild phenylalanine auxotrophy, could be separated from a culture of wild-type strains using FPP. Tetrad analysis suggests FPP resistance in one strain is due to two genes. Strains resistant to FPA have previously been shown to exhibit increased phenylethanol production. However, FPP resistant isolates did not follow this trend. These results suggest that FPP could effectively be used for counter-selection but not for enhanced phenylethanol production.

  2. Optimization of oligomeric enzyme activity in ionic liquids using Rhodotorula glutinis yeast phenylalanine ammonia lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Christiaan C; Sponagle, Brandon J D; Arivalagan, Pugazhendhi; D'Cunha, Godwin B

    2017-01-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (E.C.4.3.1.24, PAL) activity of Rhodotorula glutinis yeast has been demonstrated in four commonly used ionic liquids. PAL forward reaction was carried out in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium methyl sulfate ([BMIM][MeSO 4 ]), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF 4 ]), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF 6 ]) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium lactate ([BMIM][lactate]). Our experiments have revealed that PAL is catalytically active in ionic liquids and the enzyme activity in ([BMIM][PF 6 ]) is comparable to that obtained in aqueous buffer medium. Different conditions were optimized for maximal PAL forward activity including time of incubation (30.0min) L -phenylalanine substrate concentration (30.0mM), nature of buffer (50.0mM Tris-HCl), pH (9.0), temperature (37°C), and speed of agitation (100 rev min -1 ). Under these optimized conditions, about 83% conversion of substrate to product was obtained for the PAL forward reaction that was determined using UV spectroscopy at 290nm. PAL reverse reaction in ([BMIM][PF 6 ]) was determined spectrophotometrically at 520nm; and about 59% substrate conversion was obtained. This data provides further knowledge in enzyme biocatalysis in non-aqueous media, and may be of importance when studying the function of other oligomeric/multimeric proteins and enzymes in ionic liquids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA))

    1988-11-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the {alpha}{sub 1} antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes.

  4. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1988-01-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human α 1 -antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the α 1 antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes

  5. Probe the Binding Mode of Aristololactam-β-D-glucoside to Phenylalanine Transfer RNA in Silico

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Xingqing; Zhao, Binwu; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interactions of drug molecules with biomacromolecules at a micro-scale level is essential to design potent drugs for the treatments of human genome diseases. To unravel the mechanism of binding of aristololactam-β-D-glucoside (ADG) and phenylalanine transfer RNA (t...... on the tRNAPhe, and atomistic MD simulations were conducted to examine the thermal stability of five predicted binding poses for the complex of ADG and the tRNAPhe. The binding free energies of the five complexes were then calculated using the molecular mechanics/generalized born surface area approach...

  6. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer of human phenylalanine hydroxylase into NIH 3T3 and hepatoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledley, F.D.; Grenett, H.E.; McGinnis-Shelnutt, M.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1986-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is caused by deficiency of the hepatic enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). A full-length human PAH cDNA sequence has been inserted into pzip-neoSV(X), which is a retroviral vector containing the bacterial neo gene. The recombinant has been transfected into Psi2 cells, which provide synthesis of the retroviral capsid. Recombinant virus was detected in the culture medium of the transfected Psi2 cells, which is capable of transmitting the human PAH gene into mouse NIH 3T3 cells by infection leading to stable incorporation of the recombinant provirus. Infected cells express PAH mRNA, immunoreactive PAH protein, and exhibit pterin-dependent phenylaline hydroxylase activity. The recombinant virus is also capable of infecting a mouse hepatoma cell line that does not normal synthesize PAH. PAH activity is present in the cellular extracts and the entire hydroxylation system is reconstituted in the hepatoma cells infected with the recombinant viruses. Thus, recombinant viruses containing human PAH cDNA provide a means for introducing functional PAH into mammalian cells of hepatic origin and can potentially be introduced into whole animals as a model for somatic gene therapy for PKU.

  7. Flavins contained in yeast extract are exploited for anodic electron transfer by Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Masaki; Freguia, Stefano; Wang, Yung-Fu; Tsujimura, Seiya; Kano, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    Cyclic voltammograms of yeast extract-containing medium exhibit a clear redox peak around -0.4V vs. Ag|AgCl. Fermentative bacterium Lactococcus lactis was hereby shown to exploit this redox compound for extracellular electron transfer towards a graphite anode using glucose as an electron donor. High performance liquid chromatography revealed that this may be a flavin-type compound. The ability of L. lactis to exploit exogenous flavins for anodic glucose oxidation was confirmed by tests where flavin-type compounds were supplied to the bacterium in well defined media. Based on its mid-point potential, riboflavin can be regarded as a near-optimal mediator for microbially catalyzed anodic electron transfer. Riboflavin derivative flavin mononucleotide (FMN) was also exploited by L. lactis as a redox shuttle, unlike flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), possibly due to the absence of a specific transporter for the latter. The use of yeast extract in microbial fuel cell media is herein discouraged based on the related unwanted artificial addition of redox mediators which may distort experimental results. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Respiration triggers heme transfer from cytochrome c peroxidase to catalase in yeast mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiresan, Meena; Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    In exponentially growing yeast, the heme enzyme, cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. When the fermentable source (glucose) is depleted, cells switch to respiration and mitochondrial H2O2 levels rise. It has long been assumed that CCP activity detoxifies mitochondrial H2O2 because of the efficiency of this activity in vitro. However, we find that a large pool of Ccp1 exits the mitochondria of respiring cells. We detect no extramitochondrial CCP activity because Ccp1 crosses the outer mitochondrial membrane as the heme-free protein. In parallel with apoCcp1 export, cells exhibit increased activity of catalase A (Cta1), the mitochondrial and peroxisomal catalase isoform in yeast. This identifies Cta1 as a likely recipient of Ccp1 heme, which is supported by low Cta1 activity in ccp1Δ cells and the accumulation of holoCcp1 in cta1Δ mitochondria. We hypothesized that Ccp1’s heme is labilized by hyperoxidation of the protein during the burst in H2O2 production as cells begin to respire. To test this hypothesis, recombinant Ccp1 was hyperoxidized with excess H2O2 in vitro, which accelerated heme transfer to apomyoglobin added as a surrogate heme acceptor. Furthermore, the proximal heme Fe ligand, His175, was found to be ∼85% oxidized to oxo-histidine in extramitochondrial Ccp1 isolated from 7-d cells, indicating that heme labilization results from oxidation of this ligand. We conclude that Ccp1 responds to respiration-derived H2O2 via a previously unidentified mechanism involving H2O2-activated heme transfer to apoCta1. Subsequently, the catalase activity of Cta1, not CCP activity, contributes to mitochondrial H2O2 detoxification. PMID:25422453

  9. Respiration triggers heme transfer from cytochrome c peroxidase to catalase in yeast mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiresan, Meena; Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M

    2014-12-09

    In exponentially growing yeast, the heme enzyme, cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. When the fermentable source (glucose) is depleted, cells switch to respiration and mitochondrial H2O2 levels rise. It has long been assumed that CCP activity detoxifies mitochondrial H2O2 because of the efficiency of this activity in vitro. However, we find that a large pool of Ccp1 exits the mitochondria of respiring cells. We detect no extramitochondrial CCP activity because Ccp1 crosses the outer mitochondrial membrane as the heme-free protein. In parallel with apoCcp1 export, cells exhibit increased activity of catalase A (Cta1), the mitochondrial and peroxisomal catalase isoform in yeast. This identifies Cta1 as a likely recipient of Ccp1 heme, which is supported by low Cta1 activity in ccp1Δ cells and the accumulation of holoCcp1 in cta1Δ mitochondria. We hypothesized that Ccp1's heme is labilized by hyperoxidation of the protein during the burst in H2O2 production as cells begin to respire. To test this hypothesis, recombinant Ccp1 was hyperoxidized with excess H2O2 in vitro, which accelerated heme transfer to apomyoglobin added as a surrogate heme acceptor. Furthermore, the proximal heme Fe ligand, His175, was found to be ∼ 85% oxidized to oxo-histidine in extramitochondrial Ccp1 isolated from 7-d cells, indicating that heme labilization results from oxidation of this ligand. We conclude that Ccp1 responds to respiration-derived H2O2 via a previously unidentified mechanism involving H2O2-activated heme transfer to apoCta1. Subsequently, the catalase activity of Cta1, not CCP activity, contributes to mitochondrial H2O2 detoxification.

  10. Occurrence, horizontal transfer and degeneration of VDE intein family in Saccharomycete yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Daisuke; Nogami, Satoru; Kaneko, Yoshinobu; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Anraku, Yasuhiro

    2003-05-01

    VDE is a homing endonuclease gene originally discovered as an intervening element in VMA1s of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There have been two independent subfamilies of VDE, one from S. cerevisiae strain X2180-1A and the other from Saccharomyces sp. DH1-1A in the host VMA1 gene, and they share the identity of 96.3%. In order to search the occurrence, intra/interspecies transfer and molecular degeneration of VDE, complete sequences of VMA1 in 10 strains of S. cerevisiae, eight species of saccharomycete yeasts, Candida glabrata and Kluyveromyces lactis were determined. We found that six of 10 S. cerevisiae strains contain VDEs 99.7-100% identical to that of the strain X2180-1A, one has no VDE, whereas the other three harbour VDEs 100% identical to that of the strain DH1-1A. S. carlsbergensis has two VMA1s, one being 99.8% identical to that of the strain X2180-1A with VDE 100% identical to that of the strain DH1-1A and the other containing the same VMA1 in S. pastorianus with no VDE. This and other evidence indicates that intra/interspecies transmissions of VDEs have occurred among saccharomycete yeasts. Phylogenetic analyses of VMA1 and VDE suggest that the S. cerevisiae VDEs had branched earlier than other VDEs from an ancestral VDE and had invaded into the host loci as relatively late events. The two VDEs seemed to degenerate in individual host loci, retaining their splicing capacity intact. The degeneration of the endonuclease domains was distinct and, if compared, its apparent rate was much faster than that of the protein-splicing domains. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. In vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance saturation transfer measurements of phosphate exchange reactions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, S.L.; Jones, K.A.; Schulman, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    31 P saturation transfer techniques have been used to measure phosphate kinetics in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The phosphate comsumption rate observed in acetate grown mid-log cells was combined with measurements of O 2 consumption to yield P/O ratios of 2.2 and 2.9, for cells respiring on glucose and ethanol, respectively. However, no phosphate consumption activity was observed in saturation transfer experiments on anaerobic glucose fed cells. The phosphate consumption rates measured by saturation transfer in cells respiring on glucose and ethanol was attributed to the unidirectional rates of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. (Auth.)

  12. Intermolecular hydrogen transfer catalyzed by a flavodehydrogenase, bakers' yeast flavocytochrome b2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, P.; Lederer, F.

    1985-01-01

    Bakers yeast flavocytochrome b2 is a flavin-dependent L-2-hydroxy acid dehydrogenase which also exhibits transhydrogenase activity. When a reaction takes place between [2- 3 H]lactate and a halogenopyruvate, tritium is found in water and at the halogenolactate C2 position. When the halogenopyruvate undergoes halide ion elimination, tritium is also found at the C3 position of the resulting pyruvate. The amount tau of this intermolecular tritium transfer depends on the initial keto acid-acceptor concentration. At infinite acceptor concentration, extrapolation yields a maximal transfer of 97 +/- 11%. This indicates that the hydroxy acid-derived hydrogen resides transiently on enzyme monoprotic heteroatoms and that exchange with bulk solvent occurs only at the level of free reduced enzyme. Using a minimal kinetic scheme, the rate constant for hydrogen exchange between Ered and solvent is calculated to be on the order of 10(2) M-1 S-1, which leads to an estimated pK approximately equal to 15 for the ionization of the substrate-derived proton while on the enzyme. It is suggested that this hydrogen could be shared between the active site base and Flred N5 anion. It is furthermore shown that some tritium is incorporated into the products when the transhydrogenation is carried out in tritiated water. Finally, with [2-2H]lactate-reduced enzyme, a deuterium isotope effect is observed on the rate of bromopyruvate disappearance. Extrapolation to infinite bromopyruvate concentration yields DV = 4.4. An apparent inverse isotope effect is determined for bromide ion elimination. These results strengthen the idea that oxidoreduction and elimination pathways involve a common carbanionic intermediate

  13. Horizontal gene transfer promoted evolution of the ability to propagate under anaerobic conditions in yeasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gojkovic, Zoran; Knecht, Wolfgang; Warneboldt, J.

    2004-01-01

    The ability to propagate under anaerobic conditions is an essential and unique trait of brewer's or baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cervisiae). To understand the evolution of facultative anaerobiosis we studied the dependence of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, more precisely the fourth enzymic...... activity catalysed by dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODase), on the enzymes of the respiratory chain in several yeast species. While the majority of yeasts possess a mitochondrial DHODase, Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a cytoplasmatic enzyme, whose activity is independent of the presence of oxygen. From....... We show that these two S. kluyveri enzymes, and their coding genes, differ in their dependence on the presence of oxygen. Only the cytoplasmic DHODase promotes growth in the absence of oxygen. Apparently a Saccharomyces yeast progenitor which had a eukaryotic-like mitochondrial DHODase acquired...

  14. Synthesis of specifically labelled L-phenylalanines using phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haedener, A.; Tamm, Ch.

    1987-01-01

    Specifically labelled L-phenylalanines have been prepared using a variety of classical synthetic methods in combination with phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) enzyme activity of the yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides ATCC 10788 or Rhodotorula glutinis IFO 0559, respectively. Thus, L-[2- 2 H]phenyl-[2- 2 H]alanine was formed from (E) -[2,2'- 2 H 2 ]cinnamic acid and ammonia in 46% yield, whereas L-phenyl-[2- 13 C, 15 N]alanine was obtained from (E)-[2- 13 C]cinnamic acid in 45% overall yield. Generally, labelled cinnamic acids were recovered in pure form from the reaction mixture, with a loss of 6-8%. Likewise, unchanged 15 NH 3 was reisolated as 15 NH 4 Cl after steam distillation with overall losses of less than 4%. Labelled cinnamic acids were prepared by Knoevenagel condensations between appropriately labelled benzaldehydes and malonic acids. [2- 2 H]Benzaldehyde was obtained from 2-bromotoluene by decomposition of the corresponding Grignard reagent with 2 H 2 O and subsequent oxidation. Since simple molecules, most of them commercially available in labelled form or otherwise easily accessible, may serve as starting material, and due to its defined stereochemistry, the reaction catalysed by PAL opens a short and attractive route to specifically labelled L-phenylalanines. (author)

  15. Synthesis of specifically labelled L-phenylalanines using phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haedener, A.; Tamm, Ch.

    1987-11-01

    Specifically labelled L-phenylalanines have been prepared using a variety of classical synthetic methods in combination with phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) enzyme activity of the yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides ATCC 10788 or Rhodotorula glutinis IFO 0559, respectively. Thus, L-(2-/sup 2/H)phenyl-(2-/sup 2/H)alanine was formed from (E) -(2,2'-/sup 2/H/sub 2/)cinnamic acid and ammonia in 46% yield, whereas L-phenyl-(2-/sup 13/C, /sup 15/N)alanine was obtained from (E)-(2-/sup 13/C)cinnamic acid in 45% overall yield. Generally, labelled cinnamic acids were recovered in pure form from the reaction mixture, with a loss of 6-8%. Likewise, unchanged /sup 15/NH/sub 3/ was reisolated as /sup 15/NH/sub 4/Cl after steam distillation with overall losses of less than 4%. Labelled cinnamic acids were prepared by Knoevenagel condensations between appropriately labelled benzaldehydes and malonic acids. (2-/sup 2/H)Benzaldehyde was obtained from 2-bromotoluene by decomposition of the corresponding Grignard reagent with /sup 2/H/sub 2/O and subsequent oxidation. Since simple molecules, most of them commercially available in labelled form or otherwise easily accessible, may serve as starting material, and due to its defined stereochemistry, the reaction catalysed by PAL opens a short and attractive route to specifically labelled L-phenylalanines.

  16. Extracellular Electron Transfer Mediated by Flavins in Gram-positive Bacillus sp. WS-XY1 and Yeast Pichia stipitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Song; Xiao, Yong; Wang, Lu; Zheng, Yue; Chang, Kenlin; Zheng, Zhiyong; Yang, Zhaohui; Varcoe, John R.; Zhao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) of microorganisms represents a communicative bridge between the interior and exterior of the cells. Most prior EET studies have focused on Gram-negative bacteria. However, fungi and Gram-positive bacteria, that contain dense cellular walls, have rarely been reported. Herein, two model dense cell wall microorganisms (Bacillus sp. WS-XY1 and the yeast Pichia stipitis) were identified to be electrochemically active. Further analysis indicated that the two microorganisms were able to secrete flavins to mediate their EET. The discovery, that dense cell wall containing microorganisms can undertake mediated EET, adds to the body of knowledge towards building a comprehensive understanding of biogeochemical and bioelectrical processes

  17. Phenylketonuria: Direct and indirect effects of phenylalanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Gudrun; Scholz, Ralf; Ullrich, Kurt; Santer, René; Rune, Gabriele M

    2016-07-01

    High phenylalanine concentrations in the brain due to dysfunctional phenylalanine hydroxylase (Pah) are considered to account for mental retardation in phenylketonuria (PKU). In this study, we treated hippocampal cultures with the amino acid in order to determine the role of elevated levels of phenylalanine in PKU-related mental retardation. Synapse density and dendritic length were dramatically reduced in hippocampal cultures treated with phenylalanine. Changes in cofilin expression and phosphorylation status, which were restored by NMDA, as well as reduced activation of the small GTPase Rac1, likely underlie these structural alterations. In the Pah(enu2) mouse, which carries a mutated Pah gene, we previously found higher synaptic density due to delayed synaptic pruning in response to insufficient microglia function. Microglia activity and C3 complement expression, both of which were reduced in the Pah(enu2) mouse, however, were unaffected in hippocampal cultures treated with phenylalanine. The lack of a direct effect of phenylalanine on microglia is the key to the opposite effects regarding synapse stability in vitro and in the Pah(enu2) mouse. Judging from our data, it appears that another player is required for the inactivation of microglia in the Pah(enu2) mouse, rather than high concentrations of phenylalanine alone. Altogether, the data underscore the necessity of a lifelong phenylalanine-restricted diet. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Phenylalanine kinetics in human adipose tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Coppack, S W; Persson, M; Miles, J M

    1996-01-01

    Very little is known about the regulation of protein metabolism in adipose tissue. In this study systemic, adipose tissue, and forearm phenylalanine kinetics were determined in healthy postabsorptive volunteers before and during a 2-h glucose infusion (7 mg.kg-1.min-1). [3H]Phenylalanine was infused and blood was sampled from a radial artery, a subcutaneous abdominal vein, and a deep forearm vein. Adipose tissue and forearm blood flow were measured with 133Xe and plethysmography, respectively...

  19. Yeast genome sequencing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold

    2004-01-01

    For decades, unicellular yeasts have been general models to help understand the eukaryotic cell and also our own biology. Recently, over a dozen yeast genomes have been sequenced, providing the basis to resolve several complex biological questions. Analysis of the novel sequence data has shown...... of closely related species helps in gene annotation and to answer how many genes there really are within the genomes. Analysis of non-coding regions among closely related species has provided an example of how to determine novel gene regulatory sequences, which were previously difficult to analyse because...... they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide...

  20. Binding interactions between yeast tRNA ligase and a precursor transfer ribonucleic acid containing two photoreactive uridine analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, N.K.; Hanna, M.M.; Abelson, J.

    1988-01-01

    Yeast tRNA ligase, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is one of the protein components that is involved in the splicing reaction of intron-containing yeast precursor tRNAs. It is an unusual protein because it has three distinct catalytic activities. It functions as a polynucleotide kinase, as a cyclic phosphodiesterase, and as an RNA ligase. We have studied the binding interactions between ligase and precursor tRNAs containing two photoreactive uridine analogues, 4-thiouridine and 5-bromouridine. When irradiated with long ultraviolet light, RNA containing these analogues can form specific covalent bonds with associated proteins. In this paper, we show that 4-thiouridine triphosphate and 5-bromouridine triphosphate were readily incorporated into a precursor tRNA(Phe) that was synthesized, in vitro, with bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. The analogue-containing precursor tRNAs were authentic substrates for the two splicing enzymes that were tested (endonuclease and ligase), and they formed specific covalent bonds with ligase when they were irradiated with long-wavelength ultraviolet light. We have determined the position of three major cross-links and one minor cross-link on precursor tRNA(Phe) that were located within the intron and near the 3' splice site. On the basis of these data, we present a model for the in vivo splicing reaction of yeast precursor tRNAs

  1. Therapeutic implication of L-phenylalanine aggregation mechanism and its modulation by D-phenylalanine in phenylketonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Virender; Rai, Ratan Kumar; Arora, Ashish; Sinha, Neeraj; Thakur, Ashwani Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of phenylalanine is linked to amyloid formation toxicity in phenylketonuria disease. We are demonstrating that L-phenylalanine self-assembles to amyloid fibrils at varying experimental conditions and transforms to a gel state at saturated concentration. Biophysical methods including nuclear magnetic resonance, resistance by alpha-phenylglycine to fibril formation and preference of protected phenylalanine to self-assemble show that this behaviour of L-phenylalanine is governed mainly by hydrophobic interactions. Interestingly, D-phenylalanine arrests the fibre formation by L-phenylalanine and gives rise to flakes. These flakes do not propagate further and prevent fibre formation by L-phenylalanine. This suggests the use of D-phenylalanine as modulator of L-phenylalanine amyloid formation and may qualify as a therapeutic molecule in phenylketonuria. PMID:24464217

  2. Gene conversion in yeast as a function of linear energy transfer (LET) for low-LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unrau, P.; Morrison, D.P.; Johnson, J.R.

    1992-05-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for low-LET radiation is known to depend on such factors as LET and dose rate. Microdosimetric calculations indicate that the biological target size could also be an important parameter, and calculations predict that the RBE for effects produced by hits in target sizes below about 100 nm should be unity for all low LET radiation. We have measured that RBE for gene conversion in yeast (a small target) for five different low LET photon sources, and the results were consistent with an RBE of unity, which agrees with microdosimetric predictions. 4 refs

  3. Binding of radiation-induced phenylalanine radicals to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schans, G.P. van der; Rijn, C.J.S. van; Bleichrodt, J.F.

    1975-11-01

    When an aqueous solution of double-stranded DNA of bacteriophage PM2 containing phenylalanine and saturated with N 2 O is irradiated with γ-rays, radiation-induced phenylalanine radicals are bound covalently. Under the conditions used about 25 phenylalanine molecules may be bound per lethal hit. Also for single-stranded PM2 DNA, most of the phenylalanine radicals bound are non-lethal. Evidence is presented that in double-stranded DNA an appreciable fraction of the single-strand breaks is induced by phenylalanine radicals. Radiation products of phenylalanine and the phenylalanine bound to the DNA decrease the sensitivity of the DNA to the induction of single-strand breaks. There are indications that the high efficiency of protection by radiation products of phenylalanine is due to their positive charge, which will result in a relatively high concentration of these compounds in the vicinity of the negatively charged DNA molecules

  4. Glycomacropeptide in children with phenylketonuria: does its phenylalanine content affect blood phenylalanine control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, A; Evans, S; Chahal, S; Santra, S; MacDonald, A

    2017-08-01

    In phenylketonuria (PKU), there are no data available for children with respect to evaluating casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP) as an alternative to phenylalanine-free protein substitutes [Phe-free L-amino acid (AA)]. CGMP contains a residual amount of phenylalanine, which may alter blood phenylalanine control. In a prospective 6-month pilot study, we investigated the effect on blood phenylalanine control of CGMP-amino acid (CGMP-AA) protein substitute in 22 PKU subjects (13 boys, nine girls), median age (range) 11 years (6-16 years). Twelve received CGMP-AA and nine received Phe-free L-AA, (1 CGMP-AA withdrawal). Subjects partially or wholly replaced Phe-free L-AA with CGMP-AA. If blood phenylalanine exceeded the target range, the CGMP-AA dose was reduced and replaced with Phe-free L-amino acids. The control group remained on Phe-free L-AAs. Phenylalanine, tyrosine and Phe : Tyr ratio concentrations were compared with the results for the previous year. In the CGMP-AA group, there was a significant increase in blood phenylalanine concentrations (pre-study, 275 μmol L -1 ; CGMP-AA, 317 μmol L -1 ; P = 0.02), a decrease in tyrosine concentrations (pre-study, 50 μmol L -1 ; CGMP-AA, 40 μmol L -1 ; P = 0.03) and an increase in Phe : Tyr ratios (pre-study, Phe : Tyr 4.9:1; CGMP-AA, Phe : Tyr 8:1; P = 0.02). In the control group there was a non-significant fall in phenylalanine concentrations (pre-study 325μmol/L: study 280μmol/L [p = 0.9], and no significant changes for tyrosine or phe/tyr ratios [p = 0.9]. Children taking the CGMP-AA found it more acceptable to L-AA. Blood phenylalanine control declined with CGMP-AA but, by titrating the dose of CGMP-AA, blood phenylalanine control remained within target range. The additional intake of phenylalanine may have contributed to the change in blood phenylalanine concentration. CGMP-AA use requires careful monitoring in children. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  5. Synthesis of d‐ and l‐Phenylalanine Derivatives by Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyases: A Multienzymatic Cascade Process†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmeggiani, Fabio; Lovelock, Sarah L.; Weise, Nicholas J.; Ahmed, Syed T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis of substituted d‐phenylalanines in high yield and excellent optical purity, starting from inexpensive cinnamic acids, has been achieved with a novel one‐pot approach by coupling phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) amination with a chemoenzymatic deracemization (based on stereoselective oxidation and nonselective reduction). A simple high‐throughput solid‐phase screening method has also been developed to identify PALs with higher rates of formation of non‐natural d‐phenylalanines. The best variants were exploited in the chemoenzymatic cascade, thus increasing the yield and ee value of the d‐configured product. Furthermore, the system was extended to the preparation of those l‐phenylalanines which are obtained with a low ee value using PAL amination. PMID:27478261

  6. Synthesis of d- and l-Phenylalanine Derivatives by Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyases: A Multienzymatic Cascade Process**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmeggiani, Fabio; Lovelock, Sarah L; Weise, Nicholas J; Ahmed, Syed T; Turner, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of substituted d-phenylalanines in high yield and excellent optical purity, starting from inexpensive cinnamic acids, has been achieved with a novel one-pot approach by coupling phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) amination with a chemoenzymatic deracemization (based on stereoselective oxidation and nonselective reduction). A simple high-throughput solid-phase screening method has also been developed to identify PALs with higher rates of formation of non-natural d-phenylalanines. The best variants were exploited in the chemoenzymatic cascade, thus increasing the yield and ee value of the d-configured product. Furthermore, the system was extended to the preparation of those l-phenylalanines which are obtained with a low ee value using PAL amination. PMID:25728350

  7. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase through evolution: A bioinformatic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Hemmati

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL is the first entry enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway that converts phenylalanine to cinnamic acid which is the precursor of various secondary metabolites. PAL is recently formulated for phenylketonuric patients in pegylated forms; therefore, screening a PAL with the highest affinity to the substrate is of a great importance. PAL exists in all higher plants and some fungi and few bacteria. Ancestors of land plants have been adopted by evolving metabolic pathways. A multi-gene family encodes PAL by gene duplication events in most plants. In this study, the taxonomic distribution and phylogeny of pal gene found in land plants, fungi and bacteria have been analyzed. It seems that the ancestor of plants acquired a pal gene via horizontal gene transfer in symbioses with bacteria and fungi. Gymnosperms have kept a diverse set of pal genes that arose from gene duplication events. In angiosperms, after the divergence of dicotyledons from monocots, pal genes were duplicated many times. The close paralogues of pal genes in some species indicate expansion of gene families after the divergence in plant pal gene evolution. Interestingly, some of the plant pals clustered by species in a way that pals within one species are more closely related to each other than to homologs in the other species which indicates this duplication event occurred more recently.

  8. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression of phenylalanine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A full-length cDNA and genomic DNA of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene, which catalyzes the first step in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway, were isolated from Ginkgo biloba for the first time (designated as GbPAL, GenBank Accession No. EU071050). The cDNA and genomic DNA sequences of GbPAL were the same, ...

  9. Study of interaction between tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine separately with silver nanoparticles by fluorescence quenching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.; Das, T.K.

    2015-01-01

    Using the spectroscopic method, the individual interaction of the three biochemically important amino acids, which are constituents of protein, namely, tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine with biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles has been investigated. The obtained UV-Vis spectra show the formation of ground-state complexes between tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine with silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles possess the ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of the aforesaid amino acids by a dynamic quenching process. The binding constant, number of binding sites, and corresponding thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG) based on the interaction system were calculated for 293, 303, and 313 K. In the case of tryptophan and phenylalanine, with increase in temperature, the binding constant K was found to decrease; conversely, it was found to increase with increase in temperature in the case of tyrosine. The thermodynamic results revealed that the binding process was spontaneous; hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interaction were the predominant forces responsible for the complex stabilization in the case of tryptophan and phenylalanine, respectively, whereas in the case of tyrosine, hydrophobic interaction was the sole force conferring stability. Moreover, the Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory has been applied to calculate the average binding distance among the above amino acids and silver nanoparticles. The results show a binding distance of <7 nm, which ensures that energy transfer does occur between the said amino acids and silver nanoparticles. (authors)

  10. Assessment of brain phenylalanine dynamics in phenylketonuria patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bik-Multanowski, M.; Pietrzyk, J. J.; Pasowicz, M.; Banys, R.P.

    2006-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is the most common inborn error of metabolism in man. Brain phenylalanine kinetics can determine neurological treatment outcome in phenylketonuria. The aim of our study wa sto test a simplified magnetic resonance spectroscopy method for assessment of brain phenylalanine dynamics in PKU patients. Brain phenylalanine concentration (measured by means of magnetic resonance spectroscopy) and blood phenylalanine concentrations changes occurring within 24 hours after oral phenylalanine loading were analyzed in 5 PKU patients. The brain/blood phenylalanine ratio in 3 persons with normal intelligence was lower than in 2 with borderline intelligence or mild mental retardation. In our opinion the proposed method could be useful for assessment of brain phenylalanine dynamics in PKU patients. (author)

  11. Enhancement of L-phenylalanine production by engineered Escherichia coli using phased exponential L-tyrosine feeding combined with nitrogen source optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peipei; Cao, Weijia; Wang, Zhen; Chen, Kequan; Li, Yan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2015-07-01

    Nitrogen source optimization combined with phased exponential L-tyrosine feeding was employed to enhance L-phenylalanine production by a tyrosine-auxotroph strain, Escherichia coli YP1617. The absence of (NH4)2SO4, the use of corn steep powder and yeast extract as composite organic nitrogen source were more suitable for cell growth and L-phenylalanine production. Moreover, the optimal initial L-tyrosine level was 0.3 g L(-1) and exponential L-tyrosine feeding slightly improved L-phenylalanine production. Nerveless, L-phenylalanine production was greatly enhanced by a strategy of phased exponential L-tyrosine feeding, where exponential feeding was started at the set specific growth rate of 0.08, 0.05, and 0.02 h(-1) after 12, 32, and 52 h, respectively. Compared with exponential L-tyrosine feeding at the set specific growth rate of 0.08 h(-1), the developed strategy obtained a 15.33% increase in L-phenylalanine production (L-phenylalanine of 56.20 g L(-1)) and a 45.28% decrease in L-tyrosine supplementation. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Copolyacrylates with phenylalanine and anthracene entities prepared by ATRP and microwave irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buruiana, E.C., E-mail: emilbur@icmpp.r [Romanian Academy, Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Grigore Ghica Voda Alley 41A, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Murariu, Mioara; Buruiana, Tinca [Romanian Academy, Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Grigore Ghica Voda Alley 41A, 700487 Iasi (Romania)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, two amino acid copolymers containing anthracene incorporated either on the one end, poly(N-acryloyl-L-phenylalanine-co-methyl methacrylate)-1 or as pendant groups, poly-(N-acryloyl-L-phenylalanine-co-methyl methacrylate)-2 were prepared directly from N-acryloyl-L-phenylalanine (APhe) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and microwave-assisted synthesis. In the first case, 9-(chloromethyl)anthracene was used as an ATRP-initiator to obtain a copolymer that contains amino acid sequences and anthracene end-capped units (0.03 molar fraction). Rapid synthesis of copolymer under microwave irradiation (250 W) in the presence of 1,1'-azobis(cyclohexanecarbonitrile) used as an initiator was followed of a functionalization of the formed copolymer with an anthracene derivative yielding copolyacrylate with pendant anthracene (0.02 molar fraction). The structure of the copolymers was verified by {sup 1}H NMR, UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence quenching process of anthracene which exists in copolymers by FeCl{sub 3}, cobalt acetate, nitrobenzene, maleic anhydride, diethylaniline and nitromethane in DMF solutions shows that this involves an electron transfer between the excited state anthracene and the present transitional metal cations, more efficiently being FeCl{sub 3} for poly-(APhe-co-MMA)-1 and cobalt acetate for the latter copolymer.

  13. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) gene activity in response to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) catalyzes the biosynthesis of rosmarinic acid (RA), tyrosine and phenylalanine are the precursors of RA, while proline drives metabolite precursors toward Shikimate and phenylpropanoid pathway ending with the production of RA. The aim of this study was to investigate the PAL gene ...

  14. [Kinetic study on inhibition effects of dansyl-L-phenylalanine and L-phenylalanine on calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Na; Wu, Yu-Qing; Buchet, René

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the inhibition effect of dansyl-L-phenylalanine on calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase (CIAP), UV-Vis spectrophotometric method was employed. It was found that dansyl-L-phenylalanine can selectively inhibit CIAP. The kinetic inhibition processes of dansyl-L-phenylalanine and L-phenylalanine were comparatively studied. The authors' finding elucidates that at the optimized alkaline pH of alkaline phosphatase (pH 10.4) and 37 degrees C, dansyl-L-phenylalanine can inhibit alkaline phosphatase activity of CIAP efficiently and specifically, similar as L-phenylalanine. Both inhibition types were uncompetitive inhibition resulting from the double reciprocal curve fitting of upsilon versus substrate concentrations, and the inhibition constants Ki of both inhibitors were determined to be 2.3 and 1.1 mmol L(-1) respectively, both of which were at millimolar level. The investigation of the inhibition effect of dansyl modified L-phenylalanine on calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase not only helped get insight into the detailed inhibition mechanism of L-phenylalanine on tissue specific alkaline phosphatase, such as in the case of intestinal alkaline phosphatase, but also provided the possibility to employ fluorescence spectroscopy by labeling the specific inhibitors of alkaline phosphatase with chromophoric groups.

  15. Formulation and PEGylation optimization of the therapeutic PEGylated phenylalanine ammonia lyase for the treatment of phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Sean M; Wendt, Dan J; Zhang, Yanhong; Taylor, Timothy W; Long, Shinong; Tsuruda, Laurie; Zhao, Bin; Laipis, Phillip; Fitzpatrick, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a genetic metabolic disease in which the decrease or loss of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) activity results in elevated, neurotoxic levels of phenylalanine (Phe). Due to many obstacles, PAH enzyme replacement therapy is not currently an option. Treatment of PKU with an alternative enzyme, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), was first proposed in the 1970s. However, issues regarding immunogenicity, enzyme production and mode of delivery needed to be overcome. Through the evaluation of PAL enzymes from multiple species, three potential PAL enzymes from yeast and cyanobacteria were chosen for evaluation of their therapeutic potential. The addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG, MW = 20,000), at a particular ratio to modify the protein surface, attenuated immunogenicity in an animal model of PKU. All three PEGylated PAL candidates showed efficacy in a mouse model of PKU (BTBR Pahenu2) upon subcutaneous injection. However, only PEGylated Anabaena variabilis (Av) PAL-treated mice demonstrated sustained low Phe levels with weekly injection and was the only PAL evaluated that maintained full enzymatic activity upon PEGylation. A PEGylated recombinant double mutant version of AvPAL (Cys503Ser/Cys565Ser), rAvPAL-PEG, was selected for drug development based on its positive pharmacodynamic profile and favorable expression titers. PEGylation was shown to be critical for rAvPAL-PEG efficacy as under PEGylated rAvPAL had a lower pharmacodynamic effect. rAvPAL and rAvPAL-PEG had poor stability at 4°C. L-Phe and trans-cinnamate were identified as activity stabilizing excipients. rAvPAL-PEG is currently in Phase 3 clinical trials to assess efficacy in PKU patients.

  16. Formulation and PEGylation optimization of the therapeutic PEGylated phenylalanine ammonia lyase for the treatment of phenylketonuria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M Bell

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU is a genetic metabolic disease in which the decrease or loss of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH activity results in elevated, neurotoxic levels of phenylalanine (Phe. Due to many obstacles, PAH enzyme replacement therapy is not currently an option. Treatment of PKU with an alternative enzyme, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, was first proposed in the 1970s. However, issues regarding immunogenicity, enzyme production and mode of delivery needed to be overcome. Through the evaluation of PAL enzymes from multiple species, three potential PAL enzymes from yeast and cyanobacteria were chosen for evaluation of their therapeutic potential. The addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG, MW = 20,000, at a particular ratio to modify the protein surface, attenuated immunogenicity in an animal model of PKU. All three PEGylated PAL candidates showed efficacy in a mouse model of PKU (BTBR Pahenu2 upon subcutaneous injection. However, only PEGylated Anabaena variabilis (Av PAL-treated mice demonstrated sustained low Phe levels with weekly injection and was the only PAL evaluated that maintained full enzymatic activity upon PEGylation. A PEGylated recombinant double mutant version of AvPAL (Cys503Ser/Cys565Ser, rAvPAL-PEG, was selected for drug development based on its positive pharmacodynamic profile and favorable expression titers. PEGylation was shown to be critical for rAvPAL-PEG efficacy as under PEGylated rAvPAL had a lower pharmacodynamic effect. rAvPAL and rAvPAL-PEG had poor stability at 4°C. L-Phe and trans-cinnamate were identified as activity stabilizing excipients. rAvPAL-PEG is currently in Phase 3 clinical trials to assess efficacy in PKU patients.

  17. A cytosolic cytochrome b 5-like protein in yeast cell accelerating the electron transfer from NADPH to cytochrome c catalyzed by Old Yellow Enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Manabu; Yamano, Toshio; Kuroda, Kiyo; Nonaka, Yasuki; Tojo, Hiromasa; Fujii, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    A 410-nm absorbing species which enhanced the reduction rate of cytochrome c by Old Yellow Enzyme (OYE) with NADPH was found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It was solubilized together with OYE by the treatment of yeast cells with 10% ethyl acetate. The purified species showed visible absorption spectra in both oxidized and reduced forms, which were the same as those of the yeast microsomal cytochrome b 5 . At least 14 amino acid residues of the N-terminal region coincided with those of yeast microsomal b 5 , but the protein had a lower molecular weight determined to be 12,600 by SDS-PAGE and 9775 by mass spectrometry. The cytochrome b 5 -like protein enhanced the reduction rate of cytochrome c by OYE, and a plot of the reduction rates against its concentration showed a sigmoidal curve with an inflexion point at 6 x 10 -8 M of the protein

  18. Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Aarkrog, Vibe

    Bogen er den første samlede indføring i transfer på dansk. Transfer kan anvendes som praksis-filosofikum. Den giver en systematisk indsigt til den studerende, der spørger: Hvordan kan teoretisk viden bruges til at reflektere over handlinger i situationer, der passer til min fremtidige arbejdsplads?...

  19. Structure and function of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR LESKOVAC

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available 1. Introduction 2. Isoenzymes of YADH 3. Substrate specificity 4. Kinetic mechanism 5. Primary structure 6. The active site 7. Mutations in the yeast enzyme 8. Chemical mechanism 9. Binding of coenzymes 10. Hydride transfer

  20. Phenylketonuria : tyrosine supplementation in phenylalanine-restricted diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsen, FJ; van Rijn, M; Bekhof, J; Koch, R; Smit, PGA

    Treatment of phenylketonuria (PKU) consists of restriction of natural protein and provision of a protein substitute that lacks phenylalanine but is enriched in tyrosine. Large and unexplained differences exist, however, in the tyrosine enrichment of the protein substitutes. Furthermore, some

  1. Analog kefir production with a low phenylalanine for Phenylketonuria

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Yari; Yousef Ramezan

    2017-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is one of the most prevalent types of hereditary metabolic disorders which is caused due to an absence or reduction of the activity of the Phenylalanine hydroxylase enzyme in the liver which in turn, inhibits the transformation of phenylalanine (Phe) to tyrosine. In clinical terms, this disorder is displayed with severe, permanent and irreversible mental retardation. This research was aimed at development of a highly nutrient and acceptable suitable analogue Kefir drink ...

  2. Influence of the composition of aqueous-alcohol solvents on the thermodynamic characteristics of L-phenylalanine dissolution at 298.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badelin, Valentin G.; Smirnov, Valeriy I.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Enthalpies of L-phenylalanine dissolution have been measured in aqueous methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol and 2-propanol. ► The measured data were reported as functions of composition of water + alcohol mixtures. ► Enthalpy coefficients of pair-wise interactions have been analyzed in terms of McMillan-Mayer theory. ► A comparative analysis of the characteristics of dissolution of L-phenylalanine and some other L-amino acids in the similar systems has been made. - Abstract: The enthalpies of L-phenylalanine dissolution in aqueous methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol and 2-propanol have been determined by calorimetry at 298.15 K and alcohol mole fractions up to x 2 ∼0.4. The standard enthalpies of solution Δ sol H° and transfer Δ tr H° from water to the mixed solvent as well as the enthalpy coefficients of L-phenylalanine–alcohol pair-wise interactions were calculated. The interrelation of the enthalpies of dissolution and transfer for L-phenylalanine with structural features of alcohols has been determined. A comparative analysis of the thermodynamic characteristics of dissolution of L-phenylalanine and some other amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-threonine and L-valine) in the mixtures studied has been made.

  3. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on further studies on long range energy transfer between curcumine as donor and another thiazine dye, thionine, which is closely related to methylene blue as energy harvester (Figure 1). Since thionine is known to have a higher quantum yield of singlet oxygen sensitization than methylene blue [8], it is ...

  4. Fluctuations in phenylalanine concentrations in phenylketonuria: a review of possible relationships with outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Maureen; Trefz, Friedrich; Muntau, Ania C; Feillet, François; van Spronsen, Francjan J; Burlina, Alberto; Bélanger-Quintana, Amaya; Giżewska, Maria; Gasteyger, Christoph; Bettiol, Esther; Blau, Nenad; MacDonald, Anita

    2013-12-01

    Fluctuations in blood phenylalanine concentrations may be an important determinant of intellectual outcome in patients with early and continuously treated phenylketonuria (PKU). This review evaluates the studies on phenylalanine fluctuations, factors affecting fluctuations, and if stabilizing phenylalanine concentrations affects outcomes, particularly neurocognitive outcome. Electronic literature searches of Embase and PubMed were performed for English-language publications, and the bibliographies of identified publications were also searched. In patients with PKU, phenylalanine concentrations are highest in the morning. Factors that can affect phenylalanine fluctuations include age, diet, timing and dosing of protein substitute and energy intake, dietary adherence, phenylalanine hydroxylase genotype, changes in dietary phenylalanine intake and protein metabolism, illness, and growth rate. Even distribution of phenylalanine-free protein substitute intake throughout 24h may reduce blood phenylalanine fluctuations. Patients responsive to and treated with 6R-tetrahydrobiopterin seem to have less fluctuation in their blood phenylalanine concentrations than controls. An increase in blood phenylalanine concentration may result in increased brain and cerebrospinal fluid phenylalanine concentrations within hours. Although some evidence suggests that stabilization of blood phenylalanine concentrations may have benefits in patients with PKU, more studies are needed to distinguish the effects of blood phenylalanine fluctuations from those of poor metabolic control. © 2013.

  5. Phenylalanine-coupled solid lipid nanoparticles for brain tumor targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharya, Parul; Jain, Ashish; Gulbake, Arvind; Shilpi, Satish; Jain, Ankit; Hurkat, Pooja [Dr. Hari Singh Gour University, Pharmaceutical Research Projects Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India); Majumdar, Subrata [Bose Institute, Division of Molecular Medicine (India); Jain, Sanjay K., E-mail: drskjainin@yahoo.com [Dr. Hari Singh Gour University, Pharmaceutical Research Projects Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the targeting potential of amino acid (phenylalanine)-coupled solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) loaded with ionically complexed doxorubicin HCl (Dox). Ionic complexation was used to enhance the loading efficiency and release characteristics of water soluble form of Dox. l-Type amino acid transporters (LAT1) are highly expressed on blood brain barrier as well as on many brain cancer cells, thus targeting LAT1 using phenylalanine improved anticancer activity of prepared nanocarrier. The phenylalanine-coupled SLN were characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and in vitro release. The particle size of the resulting SLN was found to be in the range of 163.3 ± 5.2 to 113.0 ± 2.6 nm, with a slightly negative surface charge. In ex vivo study on C6 glioma cell lines, the cellular cytotoxicity of the SLN was highly increased when coupled with phenylalanine. In addition, stealthing sheath of PEG present on the surface of the SLN enhanced the cellular uptake of the SLN on C6 glioma cell line. Results of biodistribution and fluorescence studies clearly revealed that phenylalanine-coupled SLN could deliver high amount of drug into the brain tumor cells and showed the brain-targeting potential.

  6. The rate of incorporation and degradation of phenylalanine-14C by tissue slices of roosters fed a phenylalanine-free diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Teru; Kametaka, Masao

    1975-01-01

    To investigate the reason why adult roosters maintain nitrogen equilibrium on a phenylalanine-free diet for long periods, the rates of incorporation and of degradation of phenylalanine, tyrosine- and isoleucine- 14 C by tissue slices of roosters on the control, phenylalanine-free or isoleucine-free diets were measured. The degradation rate of isoleucine by liver and muscle slices decreased significantly for the isoleucine-free diet. However, the degradation rate of phenylalanine- 14 C by liver slices for the phenylalanine-free diet was not significantly lower than that for the control diet in contrast to the previous observation in vivo. The incorporation rates of 14 C into liver and muscle proteins were not affected by the dietary conditions in this experiment except in the case of phenylalanine- 14 C by muscle slices for the phenylalanine-free diet. (auth.)

  7. Overproduction of 2-phenylethanol by industrial yeasts to improve organoleptic properties of bakers' products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas-Sánchez, Rafael; Pérez, Ana G; Codón, Antonio C; Benítez, Tahía; Rincón, Ana María

    2014-06-16

    2-Phenylethanol (PEA), an important alcohol derived from phenylalanine, is involved in aroma and flavour of bakers' products. Four spontaneous mutants of an industrial bakers' yeast, V1 strain, were isolated for their resistance to p-fluoro-DL-phenylalanine (PFP), a toxic analogue of L-phenylalanine. Mutants overproduced this amino acid and showed variations in their internal pool for several other amino acids. Moreover, a rise in PEA production after growth in industrial medium (MAB) was observed in three of the mutants, although their growth and fermentative capacities were slightly impaired. However, concentration of PEA remained higher during dough fermentation and also after baking, thus improving taste and aroma in bread. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on phenylalanine hydroxylase expression in rat liver.

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, D S; Dahl, H H; Mercer, J F; Green, A K; Fisher, M J

    1989-01-01

    The impact of experimentally induced diabetes on the expression of rat liver phenylalanine hydroxylase has been investigated. A significant elevation in maximal enzymic activity was observed in diabetes. This was associated with significant increases in the amount of enzyme, the phenylalanine hydroxylase-specific translational activity of hepatic RNA and the abundance of phenylalanine hydroxylase-specific mRNA. These changes in phenylalanine hydroxylase expression were not observed when diabe...

  9. Prions in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Bezdíčka, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The thesis describes yeast prions and their biological effects on yeast in general. It defines the basic characteristics of yeast prions, that distinguish prions from other proteins. The thesis introduces various possibilities of prion formation, and propagation as well as specific types of yeast prions, including various functions of most studied types of prions. The thesis also focuses on chaperones that affect the state of yeast prions in cells. Lastly, the thesis indicates similarities be...

  10. Elevated levels of plasma phenylalanine in schizophrenia: a guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase-1 metabolic pathway abnormality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaoluwa Okusaga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phenylalanine and tyrosine are precursor amino acids required for the synthesis of dopamine, the main neurotransmitter implicated in the neurobiology of schizophrenia. Inflammation, increasingly implicated in schizophrenia, can impair the function of the enzyme Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH; which catalyzes the conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine and thus lead to elevated phenylalanine levels and reduced tyrosine levels. This study aimed to compare phenylalanine, tyrosine, and their ratio (a proxy for PAH function in a relatively large sample of schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. METHODS: We measured non-fasting plasma phenylalanine and tyrosine in 950 schizophrenia patients and 1000 healthy controls. We carried out multivariate analyses to compare log transformed phenylalanine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine:tyrosine ratio between patients and controls. RESULTS: Compared to controls, schizophrenia patients had higher phenylalanine (p<0.0001 and phenylalanine: tyrosine ratio (p<0.0001 but tyrosine did not differ between the two groups (p = 0.596. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated phenylalanine and phenylalanine:tyrosine ratio in the blood of schizophrenia patients have to be replicated in longitudinal studies. The results may relate to an abnormal PAH function in schizophrenia that could become a target for novel preventative and interventional approaches.

  11. Polymorphism and modulation of para-substituted L-Phenylalanine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sögütoglu, Leyla-cann; Lutz, Martin; Meekes, Hugo; De Gelder, Rene; Vlieg, Elias

    2017-01-01

    The crystal structure of para-methyl-L-phenylalanine at 230 K resembles that of the para-fluorinated analogue from the literaturebut is commensurately modulated with seven molecules in the asymmetric unit (Z′ = 7). At 100 K, the superstructure loses its modulation, leading to a unit cell with Z′ =

  12. Enzymatic Preparation of Low-Phenylalanine Formula Derived from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Phenylketonuria (PKU) is one of the most common inborn errors of amino acids metabolism. WHO guidelines introduced in 1979 and revised 1988 for breast-feeding infants with PKU included a formula containing low amounts of phenylalanine as a part of dietary prescription. Mental retardation can be ...

  13. Eosin-sensitized photooxidation of substituted phenylalanines and tyrosines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzuto, F.; Spikes, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    The cosin-sensitized photooxidation of tyrosine and a number of compounds related to tyrosine (substituted phenylalanines) was studied by steady-state kinetic and flash photolysis techniques. In particular, the role of the phenolic group and the amino and carboxyl groups of the alanyl side chain in the photooxidation mechanism was investigated in detail. Several relationships between substrate structure and susceptibility to photooxidation as well as effects of substrate structure on photooxidation mechanisms were found. For example, phenylalanine is not photooxidizable, but substitution of electron-donating (activating) groups such as -OH (as in tyrosine) or -NH/sub 2/ (as in p-aminophenylalanine) results in rapidly photooxidized derivatives. However, substituting deactivating groups such as -Cl (as in p-chlorophenylalanine) or weakly activating groups such as -OCH/sub 3/ (as in 4-methoxyphenylalanine) result in non-photooxidizable derivatives. Substitution of additional activating groups to the ring of hydroxy-substituted phenylalanines results in increased rates of photooxidation, whereas additional deactivating groups result in decreased photooxidation rates. The rate-determining step in the photooxidation mechanism is shown to be dependent on the presence and position of an electron-donating substituent on the benzenoid ring. Only minor involvement of the side chain amino and carboxyl groups was found. Both singlet oxygen and hydrogen abstraction mechanisms are involved in the eosin-sensitized photooxidation of hydroxy-substituted phenylalanines (e.g., tyrosine). The hydrogen abstraction mechanism probably predominates at both pH 8 and 11.

  14. Vaginal yeast infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts ...

  15. Trans-kingdom horizontal DNA transfer from bacteria to yeast is highly plastic due to natural polymorphisms in auxiliary nonessential recipient genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Moriguchi

    Full Text Available With the rapid accumulation of genomic information from various eukaryotes in the last decade, genes proposed to have been derived from recent horizontal gene transfer (HGT events have been reported even in non-phagotrophic unicellular and multicellular organisms, but the molecular pathways underlying HGT remain to be explained. The development of in vitro HGT detection systems, which permit the molecular and genetic analyses of donor and recipient organisms and quantify HGT, are helpful in order to gain insight into mechanisms that may contribute to contemporary HGT events or may have contributed to past HGT events. We applied a horizontal DNA transfer system model based on conjugal gene transfer called trans-kingdom conjugation (TKC from the prokaryote Escherichia coli to the eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and assessed whether and to what extent genetic variations in the eukaryotic recipient affect its receptivity to TKC. Strains from a collection of 4,823 knock-out mutants of S. cerevisiae MAT-α haploids were tested for their individual TKC receptivity. Two types of mutants, an ssd1 mutant and respiratory mutants, which are also found in experimental strains and in nature widely, were identified as highly receptive mutants. The TKC efficiency for spontaneously accrued petite (rho (-/0 mutants of the functional allele (SSD1-V strain showed increased receptivity. The TKC efficiency of the ssd1Δ mutant was 36% for bacterial conjugation, while that of the petite/ssd1Δ double mutants was even higher (220% in average compared to bacterial conjugation. This increased TKC receptivity was also observed when other conjugal transfer systems were applied and the donor bacterium was changed to Agrobacterium tumefaciens. These results support the idea that the genomes of certain eukaryotes have been exposed to exogenous DNA more frequently and continuously than previously thought.

  16. Metal-Ion-Mediated Supramolecular Chirality of l-Phenylalanine Based Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Feng, Chuan-Liang

    2018-05-14

    For chiral hydrogels and related applications, one of the critical issues is how to control the chirality of supramolecular systems in an efficient way, including easy operation, efficient transfer of chirality, and so on. Herein, supramolecular chirality of l-phenylalanine based hydrogels can be effectively controlled by using a broad range of metal ions. The degree of twisting (twist pitch) and the diameter of the chiral nanostructures can also be efficiently regulated. These are ascribed to the synergic effect of hydrogen bonding and metal ion coordination. This study may develop a method to design a new class of electronically, optically, and biologically active materials. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Stabilization of Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase from Rhodotorula glutinis by Encapsulation in Polyethyleneimine-Mediated Biomimetic Silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiandong; Liang, Longhao; Han, Cong; Lin Liu, Rong

    2015-06-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) from Rhodotorula glutinis was encapsulated within polyethyleneimine-mediated biomimetic silica. The main factors in the preparation of biomimetic silica were optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). Compared to free PAL (about 2 U), the encapsulated PAL retained more than 43 % of their initial activity after 1 h of incubation time at 60 °C, whereas free PAL lost most of activity in the same conditions. It was clearly indicated that the thermal stability of PAL was improved by encapsulation. Moreover, the encapsulated PAL exhibited the excellent stability of the enzyme against denaturants and storage stability, and pH stability was improved by encapsulation. Operational stability of 7 reaction cycles showed that the encapsulated PAL was stable. Nevertheless, the K m value of encapsulated PAL in biomimetic silica was higher than that of the free PAL due to lower total surface area and increased mass transfer resistance.

  18. Biosynthesis and Metabolic Fate of Phenylalanine in Conifers

    OpenAIRE

    Pascual, María B.; El-Azaz, Jorge; de la Torre, Fernando N.; Cañas, Rafael A.; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M.

    2016-01-01

    The amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) is a critical metabolic node that plays an essential role in the interconnection between primary and secondary metabolism in plants. Phe is used as a protein building block but it is also as a precursor for numerous plant compounds that are crucial for plant reproduction, growth, development, and defense against different types of stresses. The metabolism of Phe plays a central role in the channeling of carbon from photosynthesis to the biosynthesis of pheny...

  19. Efficient preparation of enantiopure D-phenylalanine through asymmetric resolution using immobilized phenylalanine ammonia-lyase from Rhodotorula glutinis JN-1 in a recirculating packed-bed reactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longbao Zhu

    Full Text Available An efficient enzymatic process was developed to produce optically pure D-phenylalanine through asymmetric resolution of the racemic DL-phenylalanine using immobilized phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (RgPAL from Rhodotorula glutinis JN-1. RgPAL was immobilized on a modified mesoporous silica support (MCM-41-NH-GA. The resulting MCM-41-NH-GA-RgPAL showed high activity and stability. The resolution efficiency using MCM-41-NH-GA-RgPAL in a recirculating packed-bed reactor (RPBR was higher than that in a stirred-tank reactor. Under optimal operational conditions, the volumetric conversion rate of L-phenylalanine and the productivity of D-phenylalanine reached 96.7 mM h⁻¹ and 0.32 g L⁻¹ h⁻¹, respectively. The optical purity (eeD of D-phenylalanine exceeded 99%. The RPBR ran continuously for 16 batches, the conversion ratio did not decrease. The reactor was scaled up 25-fold, and the productivity of D-phenylalanine (eeD>99% in the scaled-up reactor reached 7.2 g L⁻¹ h⁻¹. These results suggest that the resolution process is an alternative method to produce highly pure D-phenylalanine.

  20. Efficient preparation of enantiopure D-phenylalanine through asymmetric resolution using immobilized phenylalanine ammonia-lyase from Rhodotorula glutinis JN-1 in a recirculating packed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Longbao; Zhou, Li; Huang, Nan; Cui, Wenjing; Liu, Zhongmei; Xiao, Ke; Zhou, Zhemin

    2014-01-01

    An efficient enzymatic process was developed to produce optically pure D-phenylalanine through asymmetric resolution of the racemic DL-phenylalanine using immobilized phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (RgPAL) from Rhodotorula glutinis JN-1. RgPAL was immobilized on a modified mesoporous silica support (MCM-41-NH-GA). The resulting MCM-41-NH-GA-RgPAL showed high activity and stability. The resolution efficiency using MCM-41-NH-GA-RgPAL in a recirculating packed-bed reactor (RPBR) was higher than that in a stirred-tank reactor. Under optimal operational conditions, the volumetric conversion rate of L-phenylalanine and the productivity of D-phenylalanine reached 96.7 mM h⁻¹ and 0.32 g L⁻¹ h⁻¹, respectively. The optical purity (eeD) of D-phenylalanine exceeded 99%. The RPBR ran continuously for 16 batches, the conversion ratio did not decrease. The reactor was scaled up 25-fold, and the productivity of D-phenylalanine (eeD>99%) in the scaled-up reactor reached 7.2 g L⁻¹ h⁻¹. These results suggest that the resolution process is an alternative method to produce highly pure D-phenylalanine.

  1. Analog kefir production with a low phenylalanine for Phenylketonuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Yari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU is one of the most prevalent types of hereditary metabolic disorders which is caused due to an absence or reduction of the activity of the Phenylalanine hydroxylase enzyme in the liver which in turn, inhibits the transformation of phenylalanine (Phe to tyrosine. In clinical terms, this disorder is displayed with severe, permanent and irreversible mental retardation. This research was aimed at development of a highly nutrient and acceptable suitable analogue Kefir drink for these patients. The mentioned drink is based on milk permeate, cream powder and includes glycomacropeptide (GMP as a source of protein, starter as a fermentation source, the trance glutamines (TG enzyme, dough stabilizer and modified corn starch as tissue maker, salt and water. The GMP used in this analogue drink is intended for enrichment of the product and therefore it was added by 3% to one formula. The aforementioned sample had a lower calculated amount of pH and alcohol percentage in comparison with the 16 samples which did not have GMP. The results of this study showed that the analog kefir has a low level of phenylalanine (30.40 mg/100g and in that regard, it can be considered to be useful for patients with PKU.

  2. Yeast for virus research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Richard Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) are two popular model organisms for virus research. They are natural hosts for viruses as they carry their own indigenous viruses. Both yeasts have been used for studies of plant, animal and human viruses. Many positive sense (+) RNA viruses and some DNA viruses replicate with various levels in yeasts, thus allowing study of those viral activities during viral life cycle. Yeasts are single cell eukaryotic organisms. Hence, many of the fundamental cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation or programed cell death are highly conserved from yeasts to higher eukaryotes. Therefore, they are particularly suited to study the impact of those viral activities on related cellular activities during virus-host interactions. Yeasts present many unique advantages in virus research over high eukaryotes. Yeast cells are easy to maintain in the laboratory with relative short doubling time. They are non-biohazardous, genetically amendable with small genomes that permit genome-wide analysis of virologic and cellular functions. In this review, similarities and differences of these two yeasts are described. Studies of virologic activities such as viral translation, viral replication and genome-wide study of virus-cell interactions in yeasts are highlighted. Impacts of viral proteins on basic cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation and programed cell death are discussed. Potential applications of using yeasts as hosts to carry out functional analysis of small viral genome and to develop high throughput drug screening platform for the discovery of antiviral drugs are presented. PMID:29082230

  3. Minimally invasive (13)C-breath test to examine phenylalanine metabolism in children with phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turki, Abrar; Murthy, Gayathri; Ueda, Keiko; Cheng, Barbara; Giezen, Alette; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia; Elango, Rajavel

    2015-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of hepatic phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) leading to increased levels of phenylalanine in the plasma. Phenylalanine levels and phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) activity monitoring are currently limited to conventional blood dot testing. 1-(13)C-phenylalanine, a stable isotope can be used to examine phenylalanine metabolism, as the conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine occurs in vivo via PAH and subsequently releases the carboxyl labeled (13)C as (13)CO2 in breath. Our objective was to examine phenylalanine metabolism in children with PKU using a minimally-invasive 1-(13)C-phenylalanine breath test ((13)C-PBT). Nine children (7 M: 2 F, mean age 12.5 ± 2.87 y) with PKU participated in the study twice: once before and once after sapropterin supplementation. Children were provided 6 mg/kg oral dose of 1-(13)C-phenylalanine and breath samples were collected at 20 min intervals for a period of 2h. Rate of CO2 production was measured at 60 min post-oral dose using indirect calorimetry. The percentage of 1-(13)C-phenylalanine exhaled as (13)CO2 was measured over a 2h period. Prior to studying children with PKU, we tested the study protocol in healthy children (n = 6; 4M: 2F, mean age 10.2 ± 2.48 y) as proof of principle. Production of a peak enrichment (Cmax) of (13)CO2 (% of dose) in all healthy children occurred at 20 min ranging from 17-29% of dose, with a subsequent return to ~5% by the end of 2h. Production of (13)CO2 from 1-(13)C-phenylalanine in all children with PKU prior to sapropterin treatment remained low. Following sapropterin supplementation for a week, production of (13)CO2 significantly increased in five children with a subsequent decline in blood phenylalanine levels, suggesting improved PAH activity. Sapropterin treatment was not effective in three children whose (13)CO2 production remained unchanged, and did not show a reduction in blood phenylalanine levels and improvement

  4. PKU: high plasma phenylalanine concentrations are associated with increased prevalence of mood swings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjema, Karen; van Rijn, Margreet; Verkerk, Paul H; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Heiner-Fokkema, M Rebecca; van Spronsen, Francjan J

    2011-11-01

    In phenylketonuria, knowledge about the relation between behavior and plasma phenylalanine is scarce. The aim of this study was to determine whether high phenylalanine is associated with disturbed behavior noticed by the patient and or close environment (parents or partners). 48 early treated PKU patients (median age 8.5, range 0-35 years) participated (median phenylalanine concentration in total sample 277 (range 89-1171) μmol/l; and in patients introvert or extravert behavior. The interviewer as well as the respondents were blinded with regard to the phenylalanine concentration. Patients reported less deviant behavior compared to close environment. Mood swings were positively associated with phenylalanine concentrations in the total group (P=0.039) and patients introvert and extravert behavior were not statistically significant. there is a positive association between phenylalanine concentrations and mood swings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Phenylalanine metabolism in isolated rat liver cells. Effects of glucagon and diabetes.

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, F P; Pogson, C I

    1981-01-01

    1. Methods are described for monitoring the metabolic flux through phenylalanine hydroxylase, the tyrosine catabolic pathway and phenylalanine: pyruvate transaminase in isolated liver cell incubations. 2. The relationship between hydroxylase flux and phenylalanine concentration is sigmoidal. 3. Glucagon increases hydroxylase activity at low, near-physiological, substrate concentrations only. The hormone does not affect the rate of formation of phenylpyruvate. 4. Experimental diabetes (for 10 ...

  6. Mechanistic, Mutational, and Structural Evaluation of a Taxus Phenylalanine Aminomutase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Lei; Wanninayake, Udayanga; Strom, Susan; Geiger, James; Walker, Kevin D. (MSU)

    2014-10-02

    The structure of a phenylalanine aminomutase (TcPAM) from Taxus canadensis has been determined at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. The active site of the TcPAM contains the signature 4-methylidene-1H-imidazol-5(4H)-one prosthesis, observed in all catalysts of the class I lyase-like family. This catalyst isomerizes (S)-{alpha}-phenylalanine to the (R)-{beta}-isomer by exchange of the NH{sub 2}/H pair. The stereochemistry of the TcPAM reaction product is opposite of the (S)-{beta}-tyrosine made by the mechanistically related tyrosine aminomutase (SgTAM) from Streptomyces globisporus. Since TcPAM and SgTAM share similar tertiary- and quaternary-structures and have several highly conserved aliphatic residues positioned analogously in their active sites for substrate recognition, the divergent product stereochemistries of these catalysts likely cannot be explained by differences in active site architecture. The active site of the TcPAM structure also is in complex with (E)-cinnamate; the latter functions as both a substrate and an intermediate. To account for the distinct (3R)-{beta}-amino acid stereochemistry catalyzed by TcPAM, the cinnamate skeleton must rotate the C{sub 1}-C{sub {alpha}} and C{sub ipso}-C{sub {beta}} bonds 180{sup o} in the active site prior to exchange and rebinding of the NH{sub 2}/H pair to the cinnamate, an event that is not required for the corresponding acrylate intermediate in the SgTAM reaction. Moreover, the aromatic ring of the intermediate makes only one direct hydrophobic interaction with Leu-104. A L104A mutant of TcPAM demonstrated an 1.5-fold increase in k{sub cat} and a decrease in K{sub M} values for sterically demanding 3'-methyl-{alpha}-phenylalanine and styryl-{alpha}-alanine substrates, compared to the kinetic parameters for TcPAM. These parameters did not change significantly for the mutant with 4'-methyl-{alpha}-phenylalanine compared to those for TcPAM.

  7. Different characteristics between menadione and menadione sodium bisulfite as redox mediator in yeast cell suspension

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashoji, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Menadione promoted the production of active oxygen species (AOS) in both yeast cell suspension and the crude enzymes from the cells, but menadione sodium bisulfite (MSB) had little effect on the production of AOS in the cell suspension. MSB kept the stable increase in the electron transfer from intact yeast cells to anode compared to menadione, but the electron transfer promoted by MSB was inhibited in permeabilized yeast cell suspension. Menadione promoted oxidation of NAD(P)H much faster th...

  8. Biosynthesis and metabolic fate of phenylalanine in conifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Belén Pascual

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid phenylalanine (Phe is a critical metabolic node that plays an essential role in the interconnection between primary and secondary metabolism in plants. Phe is used as a protein building block but it is also as a precursor for numerous plant compounds that are crucial for plant reproduction, growth, development and defense against different types of stresses. The metabolism of Phe plays a central role in the channeling of carbon from photosynthesis to the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. The study of this metabolic pathway is particularly relevant in trees, which divert large amounts of carbon into the biosynthesis of Phe-derived compounds, particularly lignin, an important constituent of wood. The trunks of trees are metabolic sinks that consume a considerable percentage of carbon and energy from photosynthesis, and carbon is finally immobilized in wood. This paper reviews recent advances in the biosynthesis and metabolic utilization of Phe in conifer trees. Two alternative routes have been identified: the ancient phenylpyruvate pathway that is present in microorganisms, and the arogenate pathway that possibly evolved later during plant evolution. Additionally, an efficient nitrogen recycling mechanism is required to maintain sustained growth during xylem formation. The relevance of phenylalanine metabolic pathways in wood formation, the biotic interactions and ultraviolet protection is discussed. The genetic manipulation and transcriptional regulation of the pathways are also outlined.

  9. Biosynthesis and Metabolic Fate of Phenylalanine in Conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, María B; El-Azaz, Jorge; de la Torre, Fernando N; Cañas, Rafael A; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2016-01-01

    The amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) is a critical metabolic node that plays an essential role in the interconnection between primary and secondary metabolism in plants. Phe is used as a protein building block but it is also as a precursor for numerous plant compounds that are crucial for plant reproduction, growth, development, and defense against different types of stresses. The metabolism of Phe plays a central role in the channeling of carbon from photosynthesis to the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. The study of this metabolic pathway is particularly relevant in trees, which divert large amounts of carbon into the biosynthesis of Phe-derived compounds, particularly lignin, an important constituent of wood. The trunks of trees are metabolic sinks that consume a considerable percentage of carbon and energy from photosynthesis, and carbon is finally immobilized in wood. This paper reviews recent advances in the biosynthesis and metabolic utilization of Phe in conifer trees. Two alternative routes have been identified: the ancient phenylpyruvate pathway that is present in microorganisms, and the arogenate pathway that possibly evolved later during plant evolution. Additionally, an efficient nitrogen recycling mechanism is required to maintain sustained growth during xylem formation. The relevance of phenylalanine metabolic pathways in wood formation, the biotic interactions, and ultraviolet protection is discussed. The genetic manipulation and transcriptional regulation of the pathways are also outlined.

  10. Adsorptive molecularly imprinted composite membranes for chiral separation of phenylalanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Nasrullah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two types of composite imprinted membranes, i.e., composite membrane comprised of D-Phe imprinted beads and D-Phe imprinted membrane or DCM and composite membrane comprised of L-Phe imprinted beads and L-Phe imprinted membranes or LCM, were synthesized by phase inversion technique after a uniform dispersion of beads within the polymeric solutions using simple physico-mechanical process. The assemblies of the prepared DCM, LCM and control membranes were employed in ultrafiltration for chiral separation of D, L-Phenylalanine racemate solution. DCM and LCM showed an improved adsorption capacity (0.334 mg g-1 and 0.365 mg g-1 respectively, and adsorption selectivity (2.72 and 2.98 respectively. However, the percent rejection of the template and counter enantiomer were lower than that of control membranes. Compared to control membrane, the DCM and LCM showed inverse permselectivity. These composite membranes having better adsorption and separation ability for Phenylalanine racemate solution will be suitable in the future for various other applications.

  11. Characterization of mutations at the mouse phenylalanine hydroxylase locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, J.D.; Charlton, C.K. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Two genetic mouse models for human phenylketonuria have been characterized by DNA sequence analysis. For each, a distinct mutation was identified within the protein coding sequence of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene. This establishes that the mutated locus is the same as that causing human phenylketonuria and allows a comparison between these mouse phenylketonuria models and the human disease. A genotype/phenotype relationship that is strikingly similar to the human disease emerges, underscoring the similarity of phenylketonuria in mouse and man. In PAH{sup ENU1}, the phenotype is mild. The Pah{sup enu1} mutation predicts a conservative valine to alanine amino acid substitution and is located in exon 3, a gene region where serious mutations are rare in humans. In PAH{sup ENU2} the phenotype is severe. The Pah{sup enu2} mutation predicts a radical phenylalanine to serine substitution and is located in exon 7, a gene region where serious mutations are common in humans. In PAH{sup ENU2}, the sequence information was used to devise a direct genotyping system based on the creation of a new Alw26I restriction endonuclease site. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. PKU : high plasma phenylalanine concentrations are associated with increased prevalence of mood swings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anjema, Karen; van Rijn, Margreet; Verkerk, Paul H; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; van Spronsen, Francjan J; Fokkema, Margaretha

    2011-01-01

    UNLABELLED: In phenylketonuria, knowledge about the relation between behavior and plasma phenylalanine is scarce. The aim of this study was to determine whether high phenylalanine is associated with disturbed behavior noticed by the patient and or close environment (parents or partners). 48 early

  13. PKU: High plasma phenylalanine concentrations are associated with increased prevalence of mood swings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anjema, K.; Rijn, M. van; Verkerk, P.H.; Burgerhof, J.G.M.; Heiner-Fokkema, M.R.; Spronsen, F.J. van

    2011-01-01

    In phenylketonuria, knowledge about the relation between behavior and plasma phenylalanine is scarce. The aim of this study was to determine whether high phenylalanine is associated with disturbed behavior noticed by the patient and or close environment (parents or partners). 48 early treated PKU

  14. PKU : high plasma phenylalanine concentrations are associated with increased prevalence of mood swings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anjema, Karen; van Rijn, Margreet; Verkerk, Paul H; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; van Spronsen, Francjan J; Fokkema, Margaretha

    UNLABELLED: In phenylketonuria, knowledge about the relation between behavior and plasma phenylalanine is scarce. The aim of this study was to determine whether high phenylalanine is associated with disturbed behavior noticed by the patient and or close environment (parents or partners). 48 early

  15. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopic study of UV-addressable phenylalanine sensing based on a self-assembled spirooxazine derivative monolayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, Shinae; Suh, Hee-Jung; Gun An, Won; Kim, Jae-Ho; Jin, Sung-Ho; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Gal, Yeong-Soon; Koh, Kwangnak

    2004-01-01

    Light-addressable compounds are very interesting due to the possibilities of their practical use such as optical switches and memories or variable transmission materials. For example, transportation of phenylalanine across liposomal bilayers mediated by a photoresponsive carrier like spirooxazine through electrostatic interaction between phenylalanine and spirooxazine derivative. Thus, the spirooxazine is expected to form a UV-addressable phenylalanine sensing interface. In this study, we prepared phenylalanine sensing interface of a spirooxazine derivative by self-assembly technique and evaluated interaction between a spirooxazine moiety and phenylalanine with a surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The refractive index change of monolayer caused by interaction between a spirooxazine derivative and phenylalanine led to the SPR angle shifts upon UV irradiation. The SPR angle shift increased with increasing the concentration of phenylalanine solution. These results indicated that the spirooxazine derivative self-assembled monolayer (SAM) has an application potential for UV-addressable phenylalanine sensing

  16. Determination of Phenylalanine and Tyrosine by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Judy; Garg, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Hyperphenylalaninemia/phenylketonuria (PKU) is one of the most common inborn errors of amino acid metabolism affecting about 1:15,000 infants in the United States. PKU is an autosomal recessive disorder that if untreated results in mental retardation. The most common cause of PKU is deficiency of the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase that converts phenylalanine to tyrosine. Tyrosine deficiency results in impaired synthesis of catecholamines and thyroxine. Less commonly, it can result from defects in the synthesis or regeneration of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an essential cofactor for the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. Increased phenylalanine and decreased tyrosine in blood are used in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with PKU. LC/MS/MS method is described for the quantification of phenylalanine and tyrosine.

  17. The conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine in man. Direct measurement by continuous intravenous tracer infusions of L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine and L-[1-13C] tyrosine in the postabsorptive state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.T.; Bier, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state phenylalanine and tyrosine turnover and the rate of conversion of phenylalanine of tyrosine in vivo were determined in 6 healthy postabsorptive adult volunteers. Continuous infusions of tracer amounts of L-[ring- 2 H5]phenylalanine were determined intravenously for 13-14 hr. After 9-10 hr, a priming dose followed by a continuous infusion of L-[1- 13 C]tyrosine was added and maintained, along with the [ 2 H5]phenylalanine infusion, for 4 hr. Venous plasma samples were obtained before the initiation of each infusion and every 30 min during the course of the combined [ 2 H5]phenylalanine and [ 13 C]tyrosine infusion for determination of isotopic enrichments of [ 2 H5]phenylalanine, [ 13 C]tyrosine, and [ 2 H4]tyrosine by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometric analysis of the N-trifluoroacetyl-, methyl ester derivatives of the amino acids. Calculated from the observed enrichments, free phenylalanine and tyrosine turnover rates were 36.1 +/- 5.1 mumole . kg-1 . h-1 and 39.8 +/- 3.5 mumole . kg-1 . h-1, respectively. Phenylalanine was converted to tyrosine at the rate of 5.83 +/- 0.59 mumole . kg-1 . h-1, accounting for approximately 16% of either the phenylalanine or the tyrosine flux. The results indicate that the normal basal steady state phenylalanine hydroxylase activity in vivo in man is lower than that obtained from phenylalanine loading studies. This supports the existence of some type of substance activation of the enzyme as reflected in the previously reported exponential relationship between phenylalanine concentration and phenylalanine hydroxylase activity in vitro. The use of continuous simultaneous infusions of tracer amounts of stable isotope-labeled phenylalanine and tyrosine provides a direct means for studying physiological regulation of phenylalanine hydroxylase activity in vivo

  18. Protein patterns of yeast during sporulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litske Petersen, J.G.; Kielland-Brandt, M.C.; Nilsson-Tillgren, T.

    1979-01-01

    High resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to study protein synthesis during synchronous meiosis and ascospore formation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The stained protein patterns of samples harvested at any stage between meiotic prophase and the four-spore stage in two sporulating strains showed the same approximately 250 polypeptides. Of these only a few seemed to increase or decrease in concentration during sporulation. The characteristic pattern of sporulating yeast was identical to the pattern of glucose-grown staitonary yeast cells adapted to respiration. The latter type of cells readily initiates meiosis when transferred to sporulation medium. This pattern differed from the protein patterns of exponentially growing cells in glucose or acetate presporulation medium. Five major proteins in stationary and sporulating yeast cells were not detected in either type of exponential culture. Two-dimensional autoradiograms of [ 35 S]methionine-labelled yeast proteins revealed that some proteins were preferentially labelled during sporulation, while other proteins were labelled at later stages. These patterns differed from the auroradiograms of exponentially growing yeast cells in glucose presporulation medium in a number of spots. No differences were observed when stained gels or autoradiograms of sporulating cultures and non-sporulating strains in sporulation medium were compared. (author)

  19. Molecular complexes of L-phenylalanine with substituted 1,4-benzoquinones in aqueous medium: Spectral and theoretical investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, K.; El-Mossalamy, E. H.; Satheshkumar, A.; Balraj, C.; Elango, K. P.

    2013-12-01

    Various spectral techniques such as UV-Vis, FT-IR, and fluorescence have been employed to investigate the charge transfer interaction of L-phenylalanine (LPA) with substituted 1,4-benzoquinones (MQ1-4). Kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the complexes were determined in aqueous medium at physiological condition (pH = 7). The interaction of MQ1-4 with L-phenylalanine (LPA) was found to proceed through the formation of donor-acceptor complex, yielding a radical anion. The stoichiometry of the complexes was determined by Jobs continuous variation method and was found to be 1:1 in all the cases. Fluorescence quenching studies showed that the interaction between the donor and the acceptors is spontaneous. The results indicated that the progressive replacement of chlorine atom (-I effect) by methoxy group (+M effect) in the quinone decreased the electron acceptor property of the quinone. The order of the experimentally measured association constant of these complexes was well supported by DFT/B3LYP calculations.

  20. Age–related psychophysiological vulnerability to phenylalanine in phenylketonuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo eLeuzzi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Phenylketonuria (PKU is caused by the inherited defect of the phenylalanine hydroxylase enzyme, which converts phenylalanine (Phe into tyrosine (Tyr. Neonatal screening programs and early treatment have radically changed the natural history of PKU. Nevertheless, an increased risk of neurocognitive and psychiatric problems in adulthood remains a challenging aspect of the disease. In order to assess the vulnerability of complex skills to Phe, we explored: a the effect of a rapid increase in blood Phe levels on event-related potentials (ERP in PKU subjects during their second decade of life; b the association (if existing between psychophysiological and neurocognitive features.Methods. Seventeen early-treated PKU subjects, aged 10 to 20, underwent ERP (Mismatch Negativity, auditory P300, Contingent Negative Variation (CNV, and Intensity Dependence of Auditory Evoked Potentials recording before and 2 hours after an oral loading of Phe. Neurocognitive functioning, historical and concurrent biochemical values of blood Phe, Tyr, and Phe/Tyr ratio, were all included in the statistical analysis.Results. ERP components were normally detected in all the subjects. In subjects younger than 13 CNV amplitude, W2-CNV area, P3b latency, and Reaction Times in motor responses were negatively influenced by Phe loading. Independently from the psychophysiological vulnerability, some neurocognitive skills were more impaired in younger patients. No correlation was found between biochemical alterations and neurocognitive and psychophysiological findings. Conclusion. The vulnerability of the emerging neurocognitive functions to Phe suggests a strict metabolic control in adolescents affected by PKU and a neurodevelopmental approach in the study of neurocognitive outcome in PKU.

  1. Use of deuterated tyrosine and phenylalanine in the study of catecholamine and aromatic acid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtius, H.C.; Redweik, U.; Steinmann, B.; Leimbacher, W.; Wegmann, H.

    1975-01-01

    Deuterated tyrosine and phenylalanine have been used for the study of their respective metabolism in patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) and in healthy persons. Urinary excretion of dopamine and its metabolites was studied by GC-MS after oral administration of deuterated L-tyrosine in 2 patients with PKU and in normal controls at low and high plasma phenylalanine levels. From these studies it seemed that the in vivo tyrosine 3-hydroxylase activity and thus the formation of L-dopa depend on the phenylalanine concentration in plasma and also in tissues. After loading 3 mentally retarded patients with 3,5-[ 2 H 2 ]-4-hydroxyphenylalanine, we found, among others, excretion of deuterated m-hydroxyphenyl-hydracrylic acid, p-hydroxymandelic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, p-hydroxyhippuric acid, benzoic acid and hippuric acid. An intramolecular rearrangement is postulated. Deuterated phenylalanine was used to investigate phenylalanine and dopa metabolism in PKU. In addition, one untreated person with PKU of normal intelligence and normal excretion of catecholamines at high plasma phenylalanine concentration was investigated in order to see whether there exists an alternative metabolic pathway from phenylalanine to dopa formation

  2. Highest Plasma Phenylalanine Levels in (Very Premature Infants on Intravenous Feeding; A Need for Concern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Cortés-Castell

    Full Text Available To analyse the association in newborns between blood levels of phenylalanine and feeding method and gestational age.This observational, cross-sectional study included a sample of 11,829 infants between 2008 and 2013 in a Spanish region. Data were recorded on phenylalanine values, feeding method [breast, formula, mixed (breast plus formula, or partial or fully intravenous feeding], gestational age in weeks (<32, 32-37, ≥37, gender and days since birth at the moment of blood collection. Outcomes were [phenylalanine] and [phenylalanine] ≥95th percentile. Associations were analysed using multivariate models [linear (means difference and logistic regression (adjusted odds ratios].Higher phenylalanine values were associated with lower gestational age (p<0.001 and with intravenous feeding (p<0.001.The degree of prematurity and intravenous feeding influenced the plasma concentration of phenylalanine in the newborn. Caution should be taken in [phenylalanine] for newborns with intravenous feeding, monitoring them carefully. Very preterm infants given the recommended amount of amino acids should also be strictly monitored. These findings should be taken into consideration and call for adapting the amounts to the needs of the infant.

  3. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  4. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency caused by a single base substitution in an exon of the human phenylalanine hydroxylase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichter-Konecki, U.; Konecki, D.S.; DiLella, A.G.; Brayton, K.; Marvit, J.; Hahn, T.M.; Trefz, E.K.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1988-01-01

    A novel restriction fragment length polymorphism in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus generated by the restriction endonuclease MspI was observed in a German phenylketonuria (PKU) patient. Molecular cloning and DNA sequence analyses revealed that the MspI polymorphism was created by a T to C transition in exon 9 of the human PAH gene, which also resulted in the conversion of a leucine codon to proline codon. The effect of the amino acid substitution was investigated by creating a corresponding mutation in a full-length human PAD cDNA by site-directed mutagenesis followed by expression analysis in cultured mammalian cells. Results demonstrate that the mutation in the gene causes the synthesis of an unstable protein in the cell corresponding to a CRM - phenotype. Together with the other mutations recently reported in the PAH gene,the data support previous biochemical and clinical observations that PKU is a heterogeneous disorder at the gene level

  5. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency caused by a single base substitution in an exon of the human phenylalanine hydroxylase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichter-Konecki, U.; Konecki, D.S.; DiLella, A.G.; Brayton, K.; Marvit, J.; Hahn, T.M.; Trefz, E.K.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1988-04-19

    A novel restriction fragment length polymorphism in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus generated by the restriction endonuclease MspI was observed in a German phenylketonuria (PKU) patient. Molecular cloning and DNA sequence analyses revealed that the MspI polymorphism was created by a T to C transition in exon 9 of the human PAH gene, which also resulted in the conversion of a leucine codon to proline codon. The effect of the amino acid substitution was investigated by creating a corresponding mutation in a full-length human PAD cDNA by site-directed mutagenesis followed by expression analysis in cultured mammalian cells. Results demonstrate that the mutation in the gene causes the synthesis of an unstable protein in the cell corresponding to a CRM/sup -/ phenotype. Together with the other mutations recently reported in the PAH gene,the data support previous biochemical and clinical observations that PKU is a heterogeneous disorder at the gene level.

  6. Radiosensitivity of yeast cells as a function of radiation LET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobachevskij, P.N.; Krasavin, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    A model is proposed for interpreting the radiosensitivity of yeast cells as a function of linear energy transfer (LET) of ionizing radiation. The model takes into account the role of repair processes in sensitivity of yeast cells to ionizing radiation of different LET. Two types of repair are discussed: (1) a nonspecific repair (characteristic of both haploid and diploid cells), and (2) a diploid - soecific repair (characteristic of diploid cells only)

  7. Thermodynamic and spectroscopic studies of alanine and phenylalanine in aqueous β-cyclodextrin solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic speed, u and density, ρ have been measured for dl-alanine (Ala and l-phenylalanine (Phe in aqueous β-cyclodextrin (β-CD at 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, and 313.15 K. The complexation of Ala and Phe with β-CD has been studied by means of UV–vis and thermodynamic (ultrasonic speed and density studies. Using the measured ultrasonic speed and density data the apparent molar compressibility (κS,φ, apparent molar volume (Vφ, limiting apparent molar compressibility (κS,φ0, limiting apparent molar volume (Vφ0, their constants (SK and Sv, and hydration number (nH have been obtained. The positive values of transfer properties at infinite dilution for Ala and Phe in β-CD is the outcome of the balance between released water molecules from β-CD cavity and hydrophobic groups of Ala and Phe that enter into the macrocycle β-CD cavity. The experimental results have also been discussed on the basis of UV–vis absorbance. The results indicate the formation of a more stable host–guest complex between Phe-β-CD than between Ala-β-CD.

  8. Description of Kuraishia piskuri f.a., sp. nov., a new methanol assimilating yeast and transfer of phylogenetically related Candida species to the genera Kuraishia and Nakazawaea as new combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The new anamorphic yeast Kuraishia piskuri, f.a., sp. nov. is described for three strains that were isolated from insect frass from trees growing in Florida, USA (type strain, NRRL YB-2544, CBS 13714). Species placement was based on phylogenetic analysis of nuclear gene sequences for the D1/D2 domai...

  9. Two yeast species Cystobasidium psychroaquaticum f.a. sp. nov. and Cystobasidium rietchieii f.a. sp. nov. isolated from natural environments, and the transfer of Rhodotorula minuta clade members to the genus Cystobasidium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yurkov, A M; Kachalkin, A V; Daniel, H M; Groenewald, M; Libkind, D; de Garcia, V; Zalar, P; Gouliamova, D E; Boekhout, T; Begerow, D

    Many species of dimorphic basidiomycetes are known only in their asexual phase and typically those pigmented in different hues of red have been classified in the large polyphyletic genus Rhodotorula. These yeasts are ubiquitous and include a few species of some clinical relevance. The phylogenetic

  10. Surface modification of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles by poly(L-phenylalanine) via ROP of L-phenylalanine N-carboxyanhydride (Pha-NCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Yanfeng; Xu Min; Wei Junchao; Zhang Haobin; Chen Yiwang

    2012-01-01

    The surface of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles was modified by poly(L-phenylalanine) via the ring opening polymerization (ROP) of L-phenylalanine N-carboxyanhydride. The preparation procedure was monitored by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and the modified hydroxyapatite was characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the surface grafting amounts of poly(L-phenylalanine) on HA ranging from 20.26% to 38.92% can be achieved by tuning the reaction condition. The XRD patterns demonstrated that the crystalline structure of the modified hydroxyapatite was nearly the same with that of HA, implying that the ROP was an efficient surface modification method. The MTT assay proved that the biocompatibility of modified HA was very good, which showed the potential application of modified HA in bone tissue engineering.

  11. Amino acid tolerance test using L-β-phenylalanine-125I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafiez, A.A.; Megahed, Y.M.; Ismail, A.A.; Abdel-Wahab, M.F.; Khater, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    An amino acid tolerance test is described. L-β-phenylalanine- 125 I was used as representative of L-amino acids. The change in radioactivity of the blood after giving a test dose of tagged L-β-phenylalanine was also investigated. L-β-phenylalanine- 125 I tolerance curves were found to be irreproducible when the test dose was given without a carrier. The addition of 2.5 g untagged phenylalanine as a carrier to the test dose allowed a reproducible and precise type of tolerance curves. Metformin in a dose of 0.5 g t.d.s. for three days induced an inhibitory effect on amino acid absorption in normal persons. (author)

  12. The effect of experimental diabetes on phenylalanine metabolism in isolated liver cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Santana, M A; Fisher, M J; Bate, A J; Pogson, C I

    1985-01-01

    Chronic (10-day) diabetes was associated with increased metabolic flux through phenylalanine hydroxylase in isolated liver cells. This flux was stimulated by 0.1 microM-glucagon, but not by 10 microM-noradrenaline; 0.1 microM-insulin affected neither basal nor glucagon-stimulated flux. The increased rate of phenylalanine hydroxylation in diabetes was accompanied by parallel increases in enzyme activity (as measured with artificial cofactor) and immunoreactive-enzyme-protein content. In contra...

  13. Genomic Characterization of Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase Gene in Buckwheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikeyan Thiyagarajan

    Full Text Available Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase (PAL gene which plays a key role in bio-synthesis of medicinally important compounds, Rutin/quercetin was sequence characterized for its efficient genomics application. These compounds possessing anti-diabetic and anti-cancer properties and are predominantly produced by Fagopyrum spp. In the present study, PAL gene was sequenced from three Fagopyrum spp. (F. tataricum, F. esculentum and F. dibotrys and showed the presence of three SNPs and four insertion/deletions at intra and inter specific level. Among them, the potential SNP (position 949th bp G>C with Parsimony Informative Site was selected and successfully utilised to individuate the zygosity/allelic variation of 16 F. tataricum varieties. Insertion mutations were identified in coding region, which resulted the change of a stretch of 39 amino acids on the putative protein. Our Study revealed that autogamous species (F. tataricum has lower frequency of observed SNPs as compared to allogamous species (F. dibotrys and F. esculentum. The identified SNPs in F. tataricum didn't result to amino acid change, while in other two species it caused both conservative and non-conservative variations. Consistent pattern of SNPs across the species revealed their phylogenetic importance. We found two groups of F. tataricum and one of them was closely related with F. dibotrys. Sequence characterization information of PAL gene reported in present investigation can be utilized in genetic improvement of buckwheat in reference to its medicinal value.

  14. Genetics of Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querol, Amparo; Fernández-Espinar, M. Teresa; Belloch, Carmela

    The use of yeasts in biotechnology processes dates back to ancient days. Before 7000 BC, beer was produced in Sumeria. Wine was made in Assyria in 3500 BC, and ancient Rome had over 250 bakeries, which were making leavened bread by 100 BC. And milk has been made into Kefyr and Koumiss in Asia for many centuries (Demain, Phaff, & Kurtzman, 1999). However, the importance of yeast in the food and beverage industries was only realized about 1860, when their role in food manufacturing became evident.

  15. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric; Suominen, Pirkko

    2010-12-07

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains. ##STR00001##

  16. Yeast Infection during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disrupt the pH balance of the vagina. Common yeast infection symptoms include vaginal itching and a white, thick discharge that looks ... and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/candidiasis.htm. Accessed Aug. 27, ... Vagina, Cervix, Toxic Shock Syndrome, Endometritis, and Salpingitis. In: ...

  17. Polysome Profile Analysis - Yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšek, M.; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 530, č. 2013 (2013), s. 173-181 ISSN 0076-6879 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : grow yeast cultures * polysome profile analysis * sucrose density gradient centrifugation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.194, year: 2013

  18. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2013-02-12

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  19. Circadian Rhythmicity in the Activities of Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase from Lemna perpusilla and Spirodela polyrhiza 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, William R.; Koukkari, Willard L.

    1978-01-01

    The oscillations in phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity from Spirodela polyrhiza and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and tyrosine ammonia-lyase activities from Lemna perpusilla displayed a circadian rhythm under continuous light. Rhythmicity in enzymic activity could not be detected in continuous darkness since under this condition phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity remains at a fairly constantly low level. Results from our studies of the oscillatory pattern of the respective activities of phenylalanine and tyrosine ammonia-lyase support their “inseparability.” PMID:16660569

  20. Yeast ecology of Kombucha fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Ai Leng; Heard, Gillian; Cox, Julian

    2004-09-01

    Kombucha is a traditional fermentation of sweetened tea, involving a symbiosis of yeast species and acetic acid bacteria. Despite reports of different yeast species being associated with the fermentation, little is known of the quantitative ecology of yeasts in Kombucha. Using oxytetracycline-supplemented malt extract agar, yeasts were isolated from four commercially available Kombucha products and identified using conventional biochemical and physiological tests. During the fermentation of each of the four products, yeasts were enumerated from both the cellulosic pellicle and liquor of the Kombucha. The number and diversity of species varied between products, but included Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Candida stellata, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. While these yeast species are known to occur in Kombucha, the enumeration of each species present throughout fermentation of each of the four Kombucha cultures demonstrated for the first time the dynamic nature of the yeast ecology. Kombucha fermentation is, in general, initiated by osmotolerant species, succeeded and ultimately dominated by acid-tolerant species.

  1. Phenylalanine Removal from Water by Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Functionalized with Two Different Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameneh Heidari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the application for the removal of phenylalanine by using two nano sorbents, namely, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide –Coated and BKC (benzal-conium chloride-Coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles was investigated. Solid-phase extraction (SPE and ultra violet–visible spectroscopy were used for studying the removal ability of each nano-sorbent in this study. Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier infrared were used to characterize the synthesized magnetite nanoparticles. Batch adsorption studies were carried out to study the effect of various parameters, such as contact time, solution pH and concentration of phenylalanine. The equilibrium adsorption data of phenylalanine onto Fe3O4 nanoparticles (non-functionalized sample, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide -Coated and BKC -Coated were analyzed using Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms. The results indicated that adsorption of phenylalanine increased with increasing solution pH and maximum removal of phenylalanine was obtained at pH=9.0. Correlation coefficient were determined by analyzing each isotherm. It was found that the Freundlich equation showed better correlation with the experimental data than the Langmuir.

  2. A Survey of Aspartate Phenylalanine and Glutamate Phenylalanine Interactions in the Protein Data Bank: Searching for Anion Pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip, Vivek M [ORNL; Harris, Jason B [ORNL; Adams, Rachel M [ORNL; Nguyen, Don [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Spires, Jeremy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Howell, Elizabeth E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hinde, Robert J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Protein structures are stabilized using noncovalent interactions. In addition to the traditional noncovalent interactions, newer types of interactions are thought to be present in proteins. One such interaction, an anion pair, in which the positively charged edge of an aromatic ring interacts with an anion, forming a favorable anion quadrupole interaction, has been previously proposed [Jackson, M. R., et al. (2007) J. Phys. Chem. B111, 8242 8249]. To study the role of anion interactions in stabilizing protein structure, we analyzed pairwise interactions between phenylalanine (Phe) and the anionic amino acids, aspartate (Asp) and glutamate (Glu). Particular emphasis was focused on identification of Phe Asp or Glu pairs separated by less than 7 in the high-resolution, nonredundant Protein Data Bank. Simplifying Phe to benzene and Asp or Glu to formate molecules facilitated in silico analysis of the pairs. Kitaura Morokuma energy calculations were performed on roughly 19000 benzene formate pairs and the resulting energies analyzed as a function of distance and angle. Edgewise interactions typically produced strongly stabilizing interaction energies (2 to 7.3 kcal/mol), while interactions involving the ring face resulted in weakly stabilizing to repulsive interaction energies. The strongest, most stabilizing interactions were identified as preferentially occurring in buried residues. Anion pairs are found throughout protein structures, in helices as well as strands. Numerous pairs also had nearby cation interactions as well as potential stacking. While more than 1000 structures did not contain an anion pair, the 3134 remaining structures contained approximately 2.6 anion pairs per protein, suggesting it is a reasonably common motif that could contribute to the overall structural stability of a protein.

  3. Yeast glycolipid biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezierska, Sylwia; Claus, Silke; Van Bogaert, Inge

    2017-10-25

    Various yeasts, both conventional and exotic ones, are known to produce compounds useful to mankind. Ethanol is the most known of these compounds, but more complex molecules such as amphiphilic biosurfactants can also be derived from eukaryotic microorganisms at an industrially and commercially relevant scale. Among them, glycolipids are the most promising, due to their attractive properties and high product titers. Many of these compounds can be considered as secondary metabolites with a specific function for the host. Hence, a dedicated biosynthetic process enables regulation and combines pathways delivering the lipidic moiety and the hydrophilic carbohydrate part of the glycolipid. In this Review, we will discuss the biosynthetic and regulatory aspects of the yeast-derived sophorolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids, and cellobiose lipids, with special emphasis on the relation between glycolipid synthesis and the general lipid metabolism. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  4. Genetically engineered yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprising an active fermentation pathway producing 3-HP expresses an exogenous gene expressing the aminotransferase YhxA from Bacillus cereus AH1272 catalysing a transamination reaction between beta-alanine and pyruvate to produce malonate semialde......A genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprising an active fermentation pathway producing 3-HP expresses an exogenous gene expressing the aminotransferase YhxA from Bacillus cereus AH1272 catalysing a transamination reaction between beta-alanine and pyruvate to produce malonate...... semialdehyde. The yeast may also express a 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase (HIBADH) and a 3-hydroxypropanoate dehydrogenase (3-HPDH) and aspartate 1-decarboxylase. Additionally the yeast may express pyruvate carboxylase and aspartate aminotransferase....

  5. Description of Taphrina antarctica f.a. sp. nov., a new anamorphic ascomycetous yeast species associated with Antarctic endolithic microbial communities and transfer of four Lalaria species in the genus Taphrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbmann, Laura; Turchetti, Benedetta; Yurkov, Andrey; Cecchini, Clarissa; Zucconi, Laura; Isola, Daniela; Buzzini, Pietro; Onofri, Silvano

    2014-07-01

    In the framework of a large-scale rock sampling in Continental Antarctica, a number of yeasts have been isolated. Two strains that are unable to grow above 20 °C and that have low ITS sequence similarities with available data in the public domain were found. The D1/D2 LSU molecular phylogeny placed them in an isolated position in the genus Taphrina, supporting their affiliation to a not yet described species. Because the new species is able to grow in its anamorphic state only, the species Taphrina antarctica f.a. (forma asexualis) sp. nov. has been proposed to accommodate both strains (type strain DBVPG 5268(T), DSM 27485(T) and CBS 13532(T)). Lalaria and Taphrina species are dimorphic ascomycetes, where the anamorphic yeast represents the saprotrophic state and the teleomorph is the parasitic counterpart on plants. This is the first record for this genus in Antarctica; since plants are absent on the continent, we hypothesize that the fungus may have focused on the saprotrophic part of its life cycle to overcome the absence of its natural host and adapt environmental constrains. Following the new International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi and Plants (Melbourne Code 2011) the reorganization of Taphrina-Lalaria species in the teleomorphic genus Taphrina is proposed. We emend the diagnosis of the genus Taphrina to accommodate asexual saprobic states of these fungi. Taphrina antarctica was registered in MycoBank under MB 808028.

  6. Incorporation of exogenous L-phenylalanine into C-glycosylflavones in buckwheat cotyledons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margna, U.; Margna, E.

    1978-01-01

    By tracer experiments it was demonstrated that in excised buckwheat cotyledons L-phenylalanine fed exogeneously was incorporated predominantly into the luteolinic C-glycosylflavones orientin and iso-orientin, but not into their simpler apigeninic analogues vitexin and isovitexin, as it could be expected theoretically. Evidence is presented that L-phenylalanine supplied exogenously does not mix with the endogenous pool of that precursor, and that ratios of L-phenylalanine distribution between pathways of apigeninic and luteolinic C-glycosylflavones are different depending on wether the flavonoids are synthesized from endogenous or exogenous material. This phenomenon is suggested to be caused by the differences between enzyme complexes responsible for the biosynthesis of separate C-glycosylflavones in their capability of consuming common endogenous precursors. (author)

  7. The metabolism of C14-labeled phenylalanine and tyrosine in malaria-infected Culex-females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, W.A.; Nassif-Makki, H.

    1975-01-01

    Culex females are fed on C14-phenylalanine or C14-tyrosine in sugar solution. Autoradiographic studies on homogenated females 1 or 4 days after feeding, show that the labeled amino acids are metabolized on the first day and are not detectable on the fourth day. After increase of the amino acid concentration by saturation of the sugar solution with the unlabeled amino acid, the labeled acid and its metabolites are visible over a longer period of time. Phenylalanine is metabolized to tyrosine and at least four other substances. Radioactivity on the starting point of the chromatogram can be interpreted as incorporation of tyrosine into proteins. After infection with Plasmodium cathemerium, and feeding of C14-phenylalanine C14-tyrosine is demonstrable over a longer period. (orig.) [de

  8. Tapping into yeast diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Justin C

    2012-11-01

    Domesticated organisms demonstrate our capacity to influence wild species but also provide us with the opportunity to understand rapid evolution in the context of substantially altered environments and novel selective pressures. Recent advances in genetics and genomics have brought unprecedented insights into the domestication of many organisms and have opened new avenues for further improvements to be made. Yet, our ability to engineer biological systems is not without limits; genetic manipulation is often quite difficult. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is not only one of the most powerful model organisms, but is also the premier producer of fermented foods and beverages around the globe. As a model system, it entertains a hefty workforce dedicated to deciphering its genome and the function it encodes at a rich mechanistic level. As a producer, it is used to make leavened bread, and dozens of different alcoholic beverages, such as beer and wine. Yet, applying the awesome power of yeast genetics to understanding its origins and evolution requires some knowledge of its wild ancestors and the environments from which they were derived. A number of surprisingly diverse lineages of S. cerevisiae from both primeval and secondary forests in China have been discovered by Wang and his colleagues. These lineages substantially expand our knowledge of wild yeast diversity and will be a boon to elucidating the ecology, evolution and domestication of this academic and industrial workhorse.

  9. Mapping the functional landscape of frequent phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) genotypes promotes personalised medicine in phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danecka, Marta K; Woidy, Mathias; Zschocke, Johannes; Feillet, François; Muntau, Ania C; Gersting, Søren W

    2015-03-01

    In phenylketonuria, genetic heterogeneity, frequent compound heterozygosity, and the lack of functional data for phenylalanine hydroxylase genotypes hamper reliable phenotype prediction and individualised treatment. A literature search revealed 690 different phenylalanine hydroxylase genotypes in 3066 phenylketonuria patients from Europe and the Middle East. We determined phenylalanine hydroxylase function of 30 frequent homozygous and compound heterozygous genotypes covering 55% of the study population, generated activity landscapes, and assessed the phenylalanine hydroxylase working range in the metabolic (phenylalanine) and therapeutic (tetrahydrobiopterin) space. Shared patterns in genotype-specific functional landscapes were linked to biochemical and pharmacological phenotypes, where (1) residual activity below 3.5% was associated with classical phenylketonuria unresponsive to pharmacological treatment; (2) lack of defined peak activity induced loss of response to tetrahydrobiopterin; (3) a higher cofactor need was linked to inconsistent clinical phenotypes and low rates of tetrahydrobiopterin response; and (4) residual activity above 5%, a defined peak of activity, and a normal cofactor need were associated with pharmacologically treatable mild phenotypes. In addition, we provide a web application for retrieving country-specific information on genotypes and genotype-specific phenylalanine hydroxylase function that warrants continuous extension, updates, and research on demand. The combination of genotype-specific functional analyses with biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic data of individual patients may serve as a powerful tool to enable phenotype prediction and to establish personalised medicine strategies for dietary regimens and pharmacological treatment in phenylketonuria. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of phenylalanine analog interactions with normal and sicklen hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.H.

    1985-01-01

    Several phenylalanine derivatives have been found to inhibit the gelation of deoxygenated sickle hemoglobin (deoxy HbS). Proton and 19 F-NMR techniques were used to monitor the interaction of selected phenylalanine derivatives with the Hb molecule by using fluorine containing phenylalanine derivatives, Hb labeled at the β93 position with N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) iodoacetamide (IA-F 3 ), and by monitoring the relaxation rates of the C2 and C4 histidine protons. The results show that the 19 F spin-spin relaxation times of L-phenylalanin-4-fluorobenzylamide (PheNBz1-F), which has a deoxy HbS antigelling activity comparable to that of the amino acid, tryptophan, are affected much more strongly by interaction with Hb than are those of glycin-4-fluorobenzylamide (GlyNBz1-F). In contrast, it is shown that N-(2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-1-oxy-3-carboxyl)-L-phenylalanine t-butyl ester (SL-Phe) exhibits specific binding to Hb, and an antigelling activity more than two orders of magnitude greater than that of phenylalanine. These results indicate that the fluorine nuclei strongly influenced by the presence of spin label nitroxide are located in a conformation within a few angstroms of the SL-Phe binding site. Proton NMR relaxation measurements of the C2 and C4 proton resonances from the β2, 4b143 and β146 histidine residues show significant and selective effects from the binding of SL-Phe to Hb, indicating that the SL-Phe binding site must be close to the side chains of these three residues. The strong antigelation activity of SL-Phe suggests that this binding site may be one of the intermolecular contact sites of importance to the deoxy HbS aggregation process

  11. Racemization of aspartic acid and phenylalanine in the sweetener aspartame at 100 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, M F; Bada, J L

    1984-01-01

    The racemization half-lives (i.e., the time required to reach a D/L = 0.33) at pH 6.8 for aspartic acid and phenylalanine in the sweetener aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) were determined to be 13 and 23 hours, respectively, at 100 degrees C. Racemization at this pH does not occur in aspartame but rather in its diketopiperazine decomposition product. Our results indicate that the use of aspartame to sweeten neutral pH foods and beverages that are then heated at elevated temperature could generate D-aspartic acid and D-phenylalanine. The nutritive consequences of these D-amino acids in the human diet are not well established, and thus aspartame should probably not be used as a sweetener when the exposure of neutral pH foods and beverages to elevated temperatures is required. At pH 4, a typical pH of most foods and beverages that might be sweetened with aspartame, the half-lives are 47 hours for aspartic acid and 1200 hours for phenylalanine at 100 degrees C. Racemization at pH 4 takes place in aspartame itself. Although the racemization rates at pH 4 are slow and no appreciable racemization of aspartic acid and phenylalanine should occur during the normal use of aspartame, some food and beverage components could conceivably act as catalysts. Additional studies are required to evaluate whether the use of aspartame as a sugar substitute might not in turn result in an increased human consumption of D-aspartic acid and D-phenylalanine. PMID:6591191

  12. Ultrasonic speed, densities and viscosities of xylitol in water and in aqueous tyrosine and phenylalanine solutions at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A.; Bidhuri, P.; Uzair, S.

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasonic speed u, densities ρ and viscosities η of xylitol in water and in 0.001 m aqueous l-tyrosine (Tyr) and l-phenylalanine (Phe) have been measured at different temperatures. From the density and ultrasonic speed measurements apparent molar isentropic compression κ_{φ}, apparent molar isentropic compressions at infinite dilution κ_{{S,φ}}0 , experimental slope S K , hydration number n H , transfer partial molar isentropic compressibility Δ_{tr} κ_{{S,φ}}0 of xylitol from water to aqueous Tyr and Phe have been obtained. From the viscosity data, B-coefficient and B-coefficient of transfer Δ tr B of xylitol from water to aqueous Phe and Tyr at different temperatures have also been estimated. Gibbs free energies of activation of viscous flow per mole of solvent Δ μ 1 0# and per mole of solute Δ μ 2 0# have been calculated by using Feakins transition state theory for the studied systems. The calculated parameters have been interpreted in terms of solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions and hydration behavior of xylitol.

  13. Fifteen-year follow-up of pulmonary function in individuals heterozygous for the cystic fibrosis phenylalanine-508 deletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Nordestgaard, B G; Lange, P

    2001-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study, we previously showed that cystic fibrosis phenylalanine-508 deletion (DeltaF508) heterozygosity may be overrepresented among individuals with asthma.......In a cross-sectional study, we previously showed that cystic fibrosis phenylalanine-508 deletion (DeltaF508) heterozygosity may be overrepresented among individuals with asthma....

  14. Phenylalanine tolerance can already reliably be assessed at the age of 2 years in patients with PKU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spronsen, F.J. van; Rijn, M.; Dorgelo, B.; Hoeksma, M.; Bosch, A.M.; Mulder, M.F.; Klerk, J.B.C. de; Koning, T. de; Rubio-Gozalbo, M.E.; Vries, M. de; Verkerk, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The clinical severity of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency is usually defined by either pre-treatment phenylalanine (Phe) concentration or Phe tolerance at 5 years of age. So far, little is known about the course of Phe tolerance or the ability of both pre-treatment Phe and Phe

  15. Phenylalanine tolerance can already reliably be assessed at the age of 2 years in patients with PKU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsen, F. J.; van Rijn, M.; Dorgelo, B.; Hoeksma, M.; Bosch, A. M.; Mulder, M. F.; de Klerk, J. B. C.; de Koning, T.; Rubio-Gozalbo, M. Estela; de Vries, M.; Verkerk, P. H.

    The clinical severity of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency is usually defined by either pre-treatment phenylalanine (Phe) concentration or Phe tolerance at 5 years of age. So far, little is known about the course of Phe tolerance or the ability of both pre-treatment Phe and Phe tolerance at early

  16. Phenylalanine tolerance can already reliably be assessed at the age of 2 years in patients with PKU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsen, F. J.; van Rijn, M. [=Margreet; Dorgelo, B.; Hoeksma, M.; Bosch, A. M.; Mulder, M. F.; de Klerk, J. B. C.; de Koning, T.; Rubio-Gozalbo, M. Estela; de Vries, M.; Verkerk, P. H.

    2009-01-01

    The clinical severity of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency is usually defined by either pre-treatment phenylalanine (Phe) concentration or Phe tolerance at 5 years of age. So far, little is known about the course of Phe tolerance or the ability of both pre-treatment Phe and Phe tolerance at early

  17. Chiral separation of substituted phenylalanine analogues using chiral palladium phosphine complexes with enantioselective liquid-liquid extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuijl, B.J.V.; Schuur, B.; Minnaard, A.J.; Vries, de J.G.; Feringa, B.L.

    2010-01-01

    Chiral palladium phosphine complexes have been employed in the chiral separation of amino acids and phenylalanine analogues in particular. The use of (S)-xylyl-BINAP as a ligand for the palladium complex in enantioselective liquid–liquid extraction allowed the separation of the phenylalanine

  18. What Is the Best Blood Sampling Time for Metabolic Control of Phenylalanine and Tyrosine Concentrations in Tyrosinemia Type 1 Patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, Esther; Daly, Anne; Venema-Liefaard, Gineke; van Rijn, Margreet; Derks, Terry G J; McKiernan, Patrick J; Heiner-Fokkema, Rebecca; MacDonald, Anita; van Spronsen, Francjan J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 with nitisinone and phenylalanine and tyrosine restricted diet has largely improved outcome, but the best blood sampling time for assessment of metabolic control is not known. AIM: To study diurnal and day-to-day variation of phenylalanine and

  19. Phenylalanine hydroxylase from Legionella pneumophila is a thermostable enzyme with a major functional role in pyomelanin synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marte I Flydal

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a pathogenic bacterium that can cause Legionnaires' disease and other non-pneumonic infections in humans. This bacterium produces a pyomelanin pigment, a potential virulence factor with ferric reductase activity. In this work, we have investigated the role of phenylalanine hydroxylase from L. pneumophila (lpPAH, the product of the phhA gene, in the synthesis of the pyomelanin pigment and the growth of the bacterium in defined compositions.Comparative studies of wild-type and phhA mutant corroborate that lpPAH provides the excess tyrosine for pigment synthesis. phhA and letA (gacA appear transcriptionally linked when bacteria were grown in buffered yeast extract medium at 37°C. phhA is expressed in L. pneumophila growing in macrophages. We also cloned and characterized lpPAH, which showed many characteristics of other PAHs studied so far, including Fe(II requirement for activity. However, it also showed many particular properties such as dimerization, a high conformational thermal stability, with a midpoint denaturation temperature (T(m = 79 ± 0.5°C, a high specific activity at 37°C (10.2 ± 0.3 µmol L-Tyr/mg/min and low affinity for the substrate (K(m (L-Phe = 735 ± 50 µM.lpPAH has a major functional role in the synthesis of pyomelanin and promotes growth in low-tyrosine media. The high thermal stability of lpPAH might reflect the adaptation of the enzyme to withstand relatively high survival temperatures.

  20. Sexual differentiation in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, R; Nielsen, O; Weilguny, D

    1990-01-01

    The regulation of sexual reproduction in yeast constitutes the highest level of differentiation observed in these unicellular organisms. The various ramifications of this system involve DNA rearrangement, transcriptional control, post-translational modification (such as protein phosphorylation) a......) and receptor/signal processing. A few basic similarities are common to both fission and budding yeasts. The wiring of the regulatory circuitry, however, varies considerably between these divergent yeast groups....

  1. Entropy analysis in yeast DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jongkwang; Kim, Sowun; Lee, Kunsang; Kwon, Younghun

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the language structure in yeast 16 chromosomes. In order to find it, we use the entropy analysis for codons (or amino acids) of yeast 16 chromosomes, developed in analysis of natural language by Montemurro et al. From the analysis, we can see that there exists a language structure in codons (or amino acids) of yeast 16 chromosomes. Also we find that the grammar structure of amino acids of yeast 16 chromosomes has a deep relationship with secondary structure of protein.

  2. Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hittinger, Chris Todd; Rokas, Antonis; Bai, Feng-Yan; Boekhout, Teun; Gonçalves, Paula; Jeffries, Thomas W; Kominek, Jacek; Lachance, Marc-André; Libkind, Diego; Rosa, Carlos A; Sampaio, José Paulo; Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2015-01-01

    Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces

  3. In vitro base modification of Escherichia coli glutamate 2 transfer-RNA and phenylalanine transfer-RNA gene transcripts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahan, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    Plasmids were constructed that contain an E. Coli tRNA 2 Glu or tRNA Phe gene in a system transcribable by T7 or SP6 RNA polymerase. Selectively 32 P-labeled transcripts of these plasmids were used to study tRNA base modification in vitro in crude extracts by nearest neighbor analysis. The synthesis of 5-methyl-aminomethyl-2-thiouridine (mnm 5 s 2 U) was studied. Complete synthesis of mnm 5 s 2 2U is not observed. Instead, 2-thiouridine (s 2 U) is synthesized. Synthesis requires ATP, cysteine, Mg + , and monovalent cation concentrations below 50 mM. The reaction has a pH optimum above 7.0. Sulfide ion will substitute for cysteine in the reaction but sulfate, sulfite, methionine, homocysteine, and β-mercaptopyruvate will not. Extracts from E. coli strains carrying either the asuE or asuF mutations have reduced s 2 U synthetic activity which supports in vivo evidence that the wild type genes are involved in 2-thiolation of uridine. The enzyme is shown to be unstable both upon storage at -80 degree C and during the modification reaction. A method was developed to study the synthesis of any one of four pseudouridines ψ found at different positions of the tRNA cloverleaf. Synthesis of ψ is observed at three of the four positions-positions 32, 39, and 55. The asuC mutation is shown to affect ψ synthesis only at position 39 confirming that it is an allele of hisT and that the hisT mutations do not affect ψ synthesis at position 32 in E. coli. Synthesis of ψ32, ψ39, and ψ55 does not require any prior modification. Synthesis of dihydrouridine, 7-methylguanosine, and 3(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)uridine is also observed. Synthesis of 2-methyladenosine and ψ 13 is not seen. Removal of part of the aminoacyl stem reduces synthesis of all modifications examined by 3' fold or more

  4. Processing of nonedible plant wastes to obtain furfural and yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golowin, W.W.

    1977-01-01

    The technology of furfural and yeast production from hydrolyzates of wastes from the food and wood-processing industries is detailed. For furfural manufacturing, the pentosan-containing raw material is treated with H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and steam-hydrolyzed, the furfural-containing vapors are condensed and separated from non-condensing gases, and the furfural is isolated from the condensate, purified and stabilized. After the furfural hydrolysis, the pressure is decreased from 3 to 1.2 atm, a 0.5% H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solution is added, and a hexose-containing hydrolyzate is transferred for neutralization and yeast culturing.

  5. Current awareness on yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-02-01

    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, this current awareness service is provided by John Wiley & Sons and contains newly-published material on yeasts. Each bibliography is divided into 10 sections. 1 Books, Reviews & Symposia; 2 General; 3 Biochemistry; 4 Biotechnology; 5 Cell Biology; 6 Gene Expression; 7 Genetics; 8 Physiology; 9 Medical Mycology; 10 Recombinant DNA Technology. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author. If, in the preceding period, no publications are located relevant to any one of these headings, that section will be omitted. (3 weeks journals - search completed 5th. Dec. 2001)

  6. Immobilization of phenylalanine-dehydrogenase on nano-sized polytaurine: a new platform for application of nano-polymeric materials on enzymatic biosensing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidinia, Eskandar; Shadjou, Nasrin; Hasanzadeh, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    A strategy of phenylalanine-dehydrogenase (PheDH) entrapment within the polytaurine matrix is demonstrated to probe the direct electrochemistry of phenylalanine (Pha). It was found that PheDH has been stably immobilized on glassy carbon electrode modified by polytaurine based on simple technique. Cyclic voltammetric study indicated that the oxidation process is irreversible and diffusion controlled. The number of exchanged electrons in the electro-oxidation process was obtained, and the data indicated that Pha is oxidized via one-electron steps. The results revealed that Pha promotes the rate of oxidation by increasing the peak current. The diffusion coefficient and electron-transfer coefficient of Pha were found to be 0.2×10(-6)cm(2)s(-1) and 0.467, respectively. A sensitive, simple and time-saving differential-pulse voltammetric procedure was developed for the analysis of Pha. The results show that by using the proposed method, Pha can be determined with a detection limit of 9 nM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Immobilization of phenylalanine-dehydrogenase on nano-sized polytaurine: A new platform for application of nano-polymeric materials on enzymatic biosensing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omidinia, Eskandar, E-mail: skandar@pasteur.ac.ir [Enzyme Technology Lab., Biochemistry Dept., Genetic and Metabolism Group, Pasteur Institute of Iran, P.O. Box 13164, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shadjou, Nasrin, E-mail: nasrin.shadjou@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hasanzadeh, Mohammad, E-mail: mhmmd_hasanzadeh@yahoo.com [Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-01

    A strategy of phenylalanine-dehydrogenase (PheDH) entrapment within the polytaurine matrix is demonstrated to probe the direct electrochemistry of phenylalanine (Pha). It was found that PheDH has been stably immobilized on glassy carbon electrode modified by polytaurine based on simple technique. Cyclic voltammetric study indicated that the oxidation process is irreversible and diffusion controlled. The number of exchanged electrons in the electro-oxidation process was obtained, and the data indicated that Pha is oxidized via one-electron steps. The results revealed that Pha promotes the rate of oxidation by increasing the peak current. The diffusion coefficient and electron-transfer coefficient of Pha were found to be 0.2 × 10{sup −6} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1} and 0.467, respectively. A sensitive, simple and time-saving differential-pulse voltammetric procedure was developed for the analysis of Pha. The results show that by using the proposed method, Pha can be determined with a detection limit of 9 nM. - Highlights: • PheDH has been stably immobilized on GCE modified by polytaurine (PT) matrix. • A sensitive PT/PheDH/glutaraldehyde/GCE was developed for the detection of Pha. • The detection limit of the PT/PheDH/GA/GCE toward Pha was 9 nM.

  8. Serum phenylalanine in preterm newborns fed different diets of human milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora M. Thomaz

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The observed results demonstrated that human milk with fortifiers derived from human milk acted as a good substratum for preterm infant feeding both in the evaporated or the lyophilized form, without significant increases in plasma phenylalanine levels in comparison to human milk with commercial fortifier.

  9. Doxycycline hinders phenylalanine fibril assemblies revealing a potential novel therapeutic approach in phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luigi, Ada; Mariani, Alessandro; De Paola, Massimiliano; Re Depaolini, Andrea; Colombo, Laura; Russo, Luca; Rondelli, Valeria; Brocca, Paola; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Gazit, Ehud; Del Favero, Elena; Cantù, Laura; Salmona, Mario

    2015-10-29

    A new paradigm for the aetiopathology of phenylketonuria suggests the presence of amyloid-like assemblies in the brains of transgenic mouse models and patients with phenylketonuria, possibly shedding light on the selective cognitive deficit associated with this disease. Paralleling the amyloidogenic route that identifies different stages of peptide aggregation, corresponding to different levels of toxicity, we experimentally address for the first time, the physico-chemical properties of phenylalanine aggregates via Small Angle, Wide Angle X-ray Scattering and Atomic Force Microscopy. Results are consistent with the presence of well-structured, aligned fibres generated by milliMolar concentrations of phenylalanine. Moreover, the amyloid-modulating doxycycline agent affects the local structure of phenylalanine aggregates, preventing the formation of well-ordered crystalline structures. Phenylalanine assemblies prove toxic in vitro to immortalized cell lines and primary neuronal cells. Furthermore, these assemblies also cause dendritic sprouting alterations and synaptic protein impairment in neurons. Doxycycline counteracts these toxic effects, suggesting an approach for the development of future innovative non-dietary preventive therapies.

  10. Formation of tyrosine isomers in aqueous phenylalanine solutions by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aflaki, F.; Salahinejad, M.; Roozbehani, A.

    2009-01-01

    Ortho-tyrosine detection method can be used for detection of irradiated protein rich foods. Tyrosine isomers produced by gamma radiation of aqueous phenylalanine solutions at wide dose levels (0.1-50 k Gy) were examined to obtain basic information for o-tyrosine detection method of irradiated foods. Determination of tyrosines produced in aqueous phenylalanine solutions were carried out by high performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. The detection limit of o-tyrosine was 0.01 ppm and the linear range of calibration and the relative standard deviation of analysis was 50 ng and 4-13%, respectively. The amounts of the tyrosines increased with the irradiation level up to 10 k Gy and no further tyrosine formation was observed when the dose level was increased. At a constant dose level, the yield of tyrosines initially increased with the phenylalanine concentration, while with further increase of phenylalanine concentration no effect on increase of tyrosine yield was observed. When the dose rate was varying from 2.3 k Gy/h to 1.2 k Gy/h with a total amount of 10 k Gy in each case, there was no significant effect on tyrosine isomers formation was observed. Also the results showed that tyrosine yield was affected by temperature, p H and the presence of oxygen

  11. Mid-IR spectra of different conformers of phenylalanine in the gas phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Helden, G.; Compagnon, I.; Blom, M. N.; Frankowski, M.; Erlekam, U.; Oomens, J.; Brauer, B.; Gerber, R. B.; Meijer, G.

    2008-01-01

    The experimental mid- and far-IR spectra of six conformers of phenylalanine in the gas phase are presented. The experimental spectra are compared to spectra calculated at the B3LYP and at the MP2 level. The differences between B3LYP and MP2 IR spectra are found to be small. The agreement between

  12. Cationized phenylalanine conformations characterized by IRMPD and computation for singly and doubly charged ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunbar, R.C.; Steill, J.D.; Oomens, J.

    2010-01-01

    Electrospray ionization produces phenylalanine (Phe) complexes of the alkali metal ion series, plus Ag+ and Ba2+. Infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy using the FELIX free electron laser light source is used to characterize the conformations of the ions, in conjunction with

  13. Resolving Phenylalanine Metabolism Sheds Light on Natural Synthesis of Penicillin G in Penicillium chrysogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veiga, T.; Solis-Escalante, D.; Romagnoli, G.; Ten Pierick, A.; Hanemaaijer, M.; Deshmuhk, A.; Wahl, A.; Pronk, J.T.; Daran, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The industrial production of penicillin G by Penicillium chrysogenum requires the supplementation of the growth medium with the side chain precursor phenylacetate. The growth of P. chrysogenum with phenylalanine as the sole nitrogen source resulted in the extracellular production of phenylacetate

  14. 1 Synthesis of Selected Phenylalanine Esters C1 to C4 and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Figure 1 Synthesis of Taxol via the Wieland Miescher Ketone. Important natural products .... ml) at 0°C. Thionyl chloride (1ml, 13.8 mmol) was added dropwise to the reaction mixture ... L-Phenylalanine propyl ester hydrochloride. (Yield: 93%).

  15. Synthesis of bradykinin labelled with tritium on the phenylalanine residue in position 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seproedi, J.; Teplan, I.; Medzihradszky, K.

    1976-01-01

    The polypeptide hormone bradykinine, labelled with tritium in the phenylalanine chain in position 5, has been prepared. The preparation method is described; the tritium atom is incorporated in the last step of the synthesis. The hormone can therefore be labelled immediately before use, which avoids autoradiolysis during storage

  16. Blood phenylalanine control in phenylketonuria : a survey of 10 European centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahring, K.; Belanger-Quintana, A.; Dokoupil, K.; Gokmen-Ozel, H.; Lammardo, A. M.; MacDonald, A.; Motzfeldt, K.; Nowacka, M.; van Rijn, M.; Robert, M.

    Background: Only limited data are available on the blood phenylalanine (Phe) concentrations achieved in European patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) on a low-Phe diet. Objective: A survey was conducted to compare blood Phe control achieved in diet-treated patients with PKU of different age groups in

  17. Inheritance of the yeast mitochondrial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast......Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast...

  18. Yeasts preservation: alternatives for lyophilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyanga, L.K.; Nout, M.J.R.; Smid, E.J.; Boekhout, T.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of two low-cost, low technology traditional methods for drying starter cultures with standard lyophilisation. Lyophilised yeast cultures and yeast cultures preserved in dry rice cakes and dry plant fibre strands were examined for viable cell counts

  19. Production of Food Grade Yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyro Bekatorou

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts have been known to humans for thousands of years as they have been used in traditional fermentation processes like wine, beer and bread making. Today, yeasts are also used as alternative sources of high nutritional value proteins, enzymes and vitamins, and have numerous applications in the health food industry as food additives, conditioners and flavouring agents, for the production of microbiology media and extracts, as well as livestock feeds. Modern scientific advances allow the isolation, construction and industrial production of new yeast strains to satisfy the specific demands of the food industry. Types of commercial food grade yeasts, industrial production processes and raw materials are highlighted. Aspects of yeast metabolism, with respect to carbohydrate utilization, nutritional aspects and recent research advances are also discussed.

  20. Evolutionary History of Ascomyceteous Yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haridas, Sajeet; Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Goker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Blackwell, Meredith; Grigoriev, Igor; Jeffries, Thomas W.

    2014-06-06

    Yeasts are important for many industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 16 ascomycete yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. A comparison of these with several other previously published yeast genomes have added increased confidence to the phylogenetic positions of previously poorly placed species including Saitoella complicata, Babjeviella inositovora and Metschnikowia bicuspidata. Phylogenetic analysis also showed that yeasts with alternative nuclear codon usage where CUG encodes serine instead of leucine are monophyletic within the Saccharomycotina. Most of the yeasts have compact genomes with a large fraction of single exon genes with Lipomyces starkeyi and the previously published Pneumocystis jirovecii being notable exceptions. Intron analysis suggests that early diverging species have more introns. We also observed a large number of unclassified lineage specific non-simple repeats in these genomes.

  1. Diversity and adaptive evolution of Saccharomyces wine yeast: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsit, Souhir; Dequin, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and related species, the main workhorses of wine fermentation, have been exposed to stressful conditions for millennia, potentially resulting in adaptive differentiation. As a result, wine yeasts have recently attracted considerable interest for studying the evolutionary effects of domestication. The widespread use of whole-genome sequencing during the last decade has provided new insights into the biodiversity, population structure, phylogeography and evolutionary history of wine yeasts. Comparisons between S. cerevisiae isolates from various origins have indicated that a variety of mechanisms, including heterozygosity, nucleotide and structural variations, introgressions, horizontal gene transfer and hybridization, contribute to the genetic and phenotypic diversity of S. cerevisiae. This review will summarize the current knowledge on the diversity and evolutionary history of wine yeasts, focusing on the domestication fingerprints identified in these strains. PMID:26205244

  2. Three Rate-Constant Kinetic Model for Permanganate Reactions Autocatalyzed by Colloidal Manganese Dioxide: The Oxidation of L-Phenylalanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Benito, Joaquin F; Ferrando, Jordi

    2014-12-26

    The reduction of permanganate ion to MnO(2)-Mn(2)O(3) soluble colloidal mixed oxide by l-phenylalanine in aqueous phosphate-buffered neutral solutions has been followed by a spectrophotometric method, monitoring the decay of permanganate ion at 525 nm and the formation of the colloidal oxide at 420 nm. The reaction is autocatalyzed by the manganese product, and three rate constants have been required to fit the experimental absorbance-time kinetic data. The reaction shows base catalysis, and the values of the activation parameters at different pHs have been determined. A mechanism including both the nonautocatalytic and the autocatalytic reaction pathways, and in agreement with the available experimental data, has been proposed. Some key features of this mechanism are the following: (i) of the two predominant forms of the amino acid, the anionic form exhibits a stronger reducing power than the zwitterionic form; (ii) the nonautocatalytic reaction pathway starts with the transfer of the hydrogen atom in the α position of the amino acid to permanganate ion; and (iii) the autocatalytic reaction pathway involves the reduction of Mn(IV) to Mn(II) by the amino acid and the posterior reoxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(IV) by permanganate ion.

  3. Genetic study on yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimer, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    Research during the past year has moved ahead on several fronts. A major compilation of all the genetic mapping data for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been completed. The map describes the location of over 300 genes on 17 chromosomes. A report on this work will appear in Microbiological Reviews in December 1980. Recombinant DNA procedures have been introduced into the experiments and RAD52 (one of the genes involved in recombination and repair damage), has been successfully cloned. This clone will be used to determine the gene product. Diploid cells homozygous for RAD52 have exceptionally high frequencies of mitotic loss of chromosomes. This loss is stimulated by ionizing radiation. This effect is a very significant finding. The effect has also been seen with certain other RAD mutants

  4. Lager Yeast Comes of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic fermentations have accompanied human civilizations throughout our history. Lager yeasts have a several-century-long tradition of providing fresh beer with clean taste. The yeast strains used for lager beer fermentation have long been recognized as hybrids between two Saccharomyces species. We summarize the initial findings on this hybrid nature, the genomics/transcriptomics of lager yeasts, and established targets of strain improvements. Next-generation sequencing has provided fast access to yeast genomes. Its use in population genomics has uncovered many more hybridization events within Saccharomyces species, so that lager yeast hybrids are no longer the exception from the rule. These findings have led us to propose network evolution within Saccharomyces species. This “web of life” recognizes the ability of closely related species to exchange DNA and thus drain from a combined gene pool rather than be limited to a gene pool restricted by speciation. Within the domesticated lager yeasts, two groups, the Saaz and Frohberg groups, can be distinguished based on fermentation characteristics. Recent evidence suggests that these groups share an evolutionary history. We thus propose to refer to the Saaz group as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and to the Frohberg group as Saccharomyces pastorianus based on their distinct genomes. New insight into the hybrid nature of lager yeast will provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:25084862

  5. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  6. Yeasts preservation: alternatives for lyophilisation

    OpenAIRE

    Nyanga, Loveness K.; Nout, Martinus J. R.; Smid, Eddy J.; Boekhout, Teun; Zwietering, Marcel H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of two low-cost, low technology traditional methods for drying starter cultures with standard lyophilisation. Lyophilised yeast cultures and yeast cultures preserved in dry rice cakes and dry plant fibre strands were examined for viable cell counts during 6 months storage at 4 and 25 °C. None of the yeast cultures showed a significant loss in viable cell count during 6 months of storage at 4 °C upon lyophilisation and preservation in dry rice cak...

  7. [Distiller Yeasts Producing Antibacterial Peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyachko, E V; Morozkina, E V; Zaitchik, B Ts; Benevolensky, S V

    2015-01-01

    A new method of controlling lactic acid bacteria contamination was developed with the use of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains producing antibacterial peptides. Genes encoding the antibacterial peptides pediocin and plantaricin with codons preferable for S. cerevisiae were synthesized, and a system was constructed for their secretory expression. Recombinant S. cerevisiae strains producing antibacterial peptides effectively inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus sakei, Pediacoccus pentasaceus, Pediacoccus acidilactici, etc. The application of distiller yeasts producing antibacterial peptides enhances the ethanol yield in cases of bacterial contamination. Recombinant yeasts producing the antibacterial peptides pediocin and plantaricin can successfully substitute the available industrial yeast strains upon ethanol production.

  8. Genetic manipulation of amylotic yeast for degradation of starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasim, A.

    1991-01-01

    The availability of a variety of techniques in Genetic Engineering has greatly facilitated the manipulation of hereditary material. These methodologies provide effective tools to utilize the existing microorganisms for creating novel combinations of hybrid strains for the degradation of substrates that can be converted into alcohol. Yeasts have several distinct advantages including the long standing industrial experience of scaling up the growth. The present report deals with the account of some experimental approaches used to obtained amylolytic yeast strains with ability to degrade starch. From among the naturally occurring yeasts schwanniomyces was found to be very efficient for this purpose. Both gene cloning and protoplast fusion were used to transfer DNA from Saccharomyces diastaticus to the bakers yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The glucoamylase gene of S. diastaticus has been successfully cloned into S. cerevisiae. The observations are discussed as there relate to the current efforts to degrade substrates for energy placing special emphasis on the tremendous potential that naturally occurring microbes may have. This emphasizes the need to examine this aspect critically before initiating attempts to genetically engineer microbes for heterologous gene transfer, which appears to have serious limitations as far as the production of the end products adequate for industrial purposes are concerned. (author)

  9. Sodium sulfite pH-buffering effect for improved xylose-phenylalanine conversion to N-(1-deoxy-d-xylulos-1-yl)-phenylalanine during an aqueous Maillard reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Heping; Duhoranimana, Emmanuel; Karangwa, Eric; Jia, Chengsheng; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2018-04-25

    The yield of the Maillard reaction intermediate (MRI), prepared in aqueous medium, is usually unsatisfactory. However, the addition of sodium sulfite could improve the conversion of xylose-phenylalanine (Xyl-Phe) to the MRI (N-(1-deoxy-d-xylulos-1-yl)-phenylalanine) in aqueous medium. Sodium sulfite (Na 2 SO 3 ) showed a significant pH-buffering effect during the Maillard reaction, which accounted for its facilitation of the N-(1-deoxy-d-xylulos-1-yl)-phenylalanine yield. The results revealed that the pH could be maintained at a relatively high level (above 7.0) for an optimized pH-buffering effect when Na 2 SO 3 (4.0%) was added before the reaction of Xyl-Phe. Thus, the conversion of Xyl-Phe to N-(1-deoxy-d-xylulos-1-yl)-phenylalanine increased from 47.23% to 74.86%. Furthermore, the addition moment of Na 2 SO 3 and corresponding solution pH were crucial factors in regulating the pH-buffering effect of Na 2 SO 3 on N-(1-deoxy-d-xylulos-1-yl)-phenylalanine yield. Based on the pH-buffering effect of Na 2 SO 3 and maintaining the optimal pH 7.4 relatively stable, the conversion of Xyl-Phe to N-(1-deoxy-d-xylulos-1-yl)-phenylalanine was successfully improved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Shape Memory Properties and Enzymatic Degradability of Poly(ε-caprolactone)-Based Polyurethane Urea Containing Phenylalanine-Derived Chain Extender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Zhang, Fanjun; Lin, Weiwei; Liu, Wenkai; Li, Jiehua; Luo, Feng; Wang, Yaning; Tan, Hong

    2018-04-24

    Biodegradable shape memory polymers are promising biomaterials for minimally invasive surgical procedures. Herein, a series of linear biodegradable shape memory poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-based polyurethane ureas (PUUs) containing a novel phenylalanine-derived chain extender is synthesized. The phenylalanine-derived chain extender, phenylalanine-hexamethylenediamine-phenylalanine (PHP), contains two chymotrypsin cleaving sites to enhance the enzymatic degradation of PUUs. The degradation rate, the crystallinity, and mechanical properties of PUUs are tailored by the content of PHP. Meanwhile, semicrystalline PCL is not only hydrolytically degradable but also vital for shape memory. Good shape memory ability under body temperature is achieved for PUUs due to the strong interactions in hard segments for permanent crosslinking and the crystallization-melt transition of PCL to switch temporary shape. The PUUs would have a great potential in application as implanting stent. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. New LASER fluorometric HPLC detection for ortho-tyrosine in gamma-irradiated phenylalanine solution and pork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Makoto; Toyoda, Masatake; Saito, Yukio; Nagasawa, Taeko; Izumi, Keiko; Kitamura, Mayumi

    1999-01-01

    New analytical procedure for o-tyrosine was studied to investigate effects of gamma irradiation on aqueous phenylalanine solution and pork. The process includes extraction and hydrolysis of protein, derivatization of the free amino acid by fluororeagent, and finally separation and detection by LASER fluorometric HPLC. The detection limit was 25ng. To study how the procedure works, irradiated phenylalanine solution and pork were analyzed. The samples were irradiated at doses up to 10 kGy at room temperature. Three tyrosine isomers were detected in phenylalanine solution, and 2 isomers (o-and p-tyrosine) were found in pork. Dose response was found in the formation of the isomers both in phenylalanine solution and in pork. O-tyrosine peak obtained from irradiated pork was separated from interference successfully. Those findings illustrate the procedure may be applicable to detection of irradiated food. (author)

  12. Rhodotorulaglutinis phenylalanine/tyrosine ammonia lyase enzyme catalyzed synthesis of the methyl ester of para-hydroxycinnamic acid and its potential antibacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marybeth C MacDonald

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biotransformation of L-tyrosine methyl ester (L-TM to the methyl ester of para- hydroxycinnamic acid (p-HCAM using Rhodotorula glutinis yeast phenylalanine/tyrosine ammonia lyase (PTAL; EC 4.3.1.26 enzyme was successfully demonstrated for the first time; progress of the reaction was followed by spectrophotometric determination at 315 nm. The following conditions were optimized for maximal formation of p-HCAM: pH (8.5, temperature (37 C, speed of agitation (50 rpm, enzyme concentration (0.080 µM, and substrate concentration (0.50 mM. Under these conditions, the yield of the reaction was ~15% in 1 h incubation period and ~63% after an overnight (~18 h incubation period. The product (p-HCAM of the reaction of PTAL with L-TM was confirmed using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (NMR. Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR was carried out to rule out potential hydrolysis of p-HCAM during overnight incubation. Potential antibacterial activity of p-HCAM was tested against several strains of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. This study describes a synthetically useful transformation, and could have future clinical and industrial applications.

  13. Yeast strains and methods of use thereof

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard, Matthew Robert; Gardner, Richard Clague; Anfang, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to yeast strains and, in particular, to yeast stains for use in fermentation processes. The invention also relates to methods of fermentation using the yeast strains of the invention either alone or in combination with other yeast strains. The invention thither relates to methods for the selection of yeast strains suitable for fermentation cultures by screening for various metabolic products and the use of specific nutrient sources.

  14. Biotechnical Microbiology, yeast and bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Ingrid Stampe

    1999-01-01

    This section contains the following single lecture notes: Eukaryotic Cell Biology. Kingdom Fungi. Cell Division. Meiosis and Recombination. Genetics of Yeast. Organisation of the Chromosome. Organization and genetics of the mitochondrial Geneme. Regulatio of Gene Expression. Intracellular Compart...

  15. Structural investigations of yeast mannans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rademacher, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    Cell wall mannans were isolated from 8 different Candida species and separated in oligosaccharides by partial acetolysis. After gel chromatography specific acetolysis patterns were obtained. The 13 C NMR spectra of mannans and oligosaccharides were recorded. Signals at delta = 93.1 - 105.4 were assigned to certain chemical structures. Both the spectral patterns and the acetolysis patterns of the yeast mannans can be used for the discrimination of related yeasts. (author)

  16. Effect of inhaled formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine on airway function.

    OpenAIRE

    Berend, N; Peters, M J; Armour, C L; Black, J L; Ward, H E

    1988-01-01

    Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), a synthetic, acylated tripeptide analogous to bacterial chemotactic factors, has been shown to cause bronchoconstriction in guinea pig, rabbit, and human airways in vitro. To determine whether FMLP causes bronchoconstriction in man in vivo, a preliminary study was undertaken in which five non-smokers (mean age 35 years, FEV1 94% (SEM 5%) predicted) and five smokers (mean age 34 years, FEV1 93% (6%) predicted) inhaled aerosols of FMLP. None of the ...

  17. No Tryptophan, Tyrosine and Phenylalanine Abnormalities in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Bergwerff, C.E.; Luman, M.; Blom, H.J.; Oosterlaan, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the current study was to explore the role of aromatic amino acids (AAAs) in blood in relation to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Given their impact on the synthesis of serotonin and dopamine, decreased concentrations of the AAAs tryptophan, tyrosine and phenylalanine in blood may contribute to the expression of ADHD symptoms. Decreased AAA blood concentrations, in turn, may be related to lowered dietary protein intake or to abnormal AAA catabolism, as ev...

  18. Influence of sample quality on phenylalanine and 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels in neonatal screening

    OpenAIRE

    del Río Fabre, Lesley; González, Ernesto C; Frómeta, Amarilys; Castells, Elisa M; Tejeda, Yileidis

    2010-01-01

    Quality of the sample and phenylalanine and 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels in neonatal screening. In the programs for neonatal screening many different analytes are quantified from dried blood on filter paper cards. Several factors affect the quality of the samples invalidating their employment in the laboratory: inadequate collection procedures, quality of the filter paper, the drying, storage and transportation under extreme environmental conditions. This article aims to show how the quality...

  19. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, R; Simões-Silva, L; Garro, S; Silva, M-J; Azevedo, Á; Sampaio-Maia, B

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with non-pregnant women. The oral yeast colonization was assessed in saliva of 30 pregnant and non-pregnant women longitudinally over a 6-months period. Demographic information was collected, a non-invasive intra-oral examination was performed and saliva flow and pH were determined. Pregnant and non-pregnant groups were similar regarding age and level of education. Saliva flow rate did not differ, but saliva pH was lower in pregnant than in non-pregnant women. Oral yeast prevalence was higher in pregnant than in non-pregnant women, either in the first or in the third trimester, but did not attain statistical significance. In individuals colonized with yeast, the total yeast quantification (Log10CFU/mL) increase from the 1st to the 3rd trimester in pregnant women, but not in non-pregnant women. Pregnancy may favour oral yeast growth that may be associated with an acidic oral environment.

  20. Biotechnological Applications of Dimorphic Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiphode, N.; Joshi, C.; Ghormade, V.; Deshpande, M. V.

    The dimorphic yeasts have the equilibrium between spherical growth (budding) and polarized (hyphal or pseudohyphal tip elongation) which can be triggered by change in the environmental conditions. The reversible growth phenomenon has made dimorphic yeasts as an useful model to understand fungal evolution and fungal differentiation, in general. In nature dimorphism is clearly evident in plant and animal fungal pathogens, which survive and most importantly proliferate in the respective hosts. However, number of organisms with no known pathogenic behaviour also show such a transition, which can be exploited for the technological applications due to their different biochemical make up under different morphologies. For instance, chitin and chitosan production using dimorphic Saccharomyces, Mucor, Rhizopus and Benjaminiella, oil degradation and biotransformation with yeast-form of Yarrowia species, bioremediation of organic pollutants, exopolysac-charide production by yeast-phase of Aureobasidium pullulans, to name a few. Myrothecium verrucaria can be used for seed dressing in its yeast form and it produces a mycolytic enzyme complex in its hyphal-form for the biocontrol of fungal pathogens, while Beauveria bassiana and other entomopathogens kill the insect pest by producing yeast- like cells in the insect body. The form-specific expression of protease, chitinase, lipase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate dehydrogenases, etc. make Benjaminiella poitrasii, Basidiobolus sp., and Mucor rouxii strains important in bioremediation, nanobiotechnology, fungal evolution and other areas.

  1. Phenylalanine-a biogenic ligand with flexible η6- and η6:κ1-coordination at ruthenium(ii) centres

    KAUST Repository

    Reiner, Thomas; Jantke, Dominik; Miao, Xiaohe; Marziale, Alexander N.; Kiefer, Florian J.; Eppinger, Jö rg

    2013-01-01

    The reaction of (S)-2,5-dihydrophenylalanine 1 with ruthenium(iii) chloride yields the μ-chloro-bridged dimeric η6-phenylalanine ethyl ester complex 3, which can be converted into the monomeric analogue, η6:κ1-phenylalanine ethyl ester complex 12, under basic conditions. Studies were carried out to determine the stability and reactivity of complexes bearing η6- and η6: κ1-chelating phenylalanine ligands under various conditions. Reaction of 3 with ethylenediamine derivatives N-p-tosylethylenediamine or 1,4-di-N-p-tosylethylenediamine results in the formation of monomeric η6:κ1-phenylalanine ethyl ester complexes 14 and 15, which could be saponified yielding complexes 16 and 17 without changing the inner coordination sphere of the metal centre. The structure of η6:κ1-phenylalanine complex 17 and an N-κ1-phenylalanine complex 13 resulting from the reaction of 3 with an excess of pyridine were confirmed by X-ray crystallography. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. Effect of template on chiral separation of phenylalanine using molecularly imprinted membrane in aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, N.U.

    2014-01-01

    Wet phase inversion method was used to prepare L-Phenylalanine (L-Phe) and D-Phenylalanine (D-Phe) imprinted poly ((acrylonitrile)-co-(acrylic acid)) membranes for chiral separation. Ultrafiltration experiments were conducted to evaluate the chiral separation ability of the prepared membrane towards racemate aqueous solution of Phenylalanine. The continuous permselectivity was observed by novel membrane. The chiral resolution ability of L-Phe imprinted membrane was much better than that of D-Phe. It was observed that both membranes simultaneously, selectively reject, selectively adsorbed and selectively permeate solute. The achieved adsorption selectivities of L-Phe imprinted membrane (AlphaAds)L and D-Phe imprinted membrane (AlphaAds)D were 2.6 and 2.40 respectively. Permselectivity of L-Phe imprinted membrane (AlphaPerm)L was 2.56 while D-Phe imprinted membrane permselectivity (AlphaPerm)D was 2.03. The rejection selectivities of L-Phe and D-Phe imprinted membranes were (AlphaRej)L=0.32 and (AlphaRej)D =0.28 respectively. (author)

  3. PpNAC1, a main regulator of phenylalanine biosynthesis and utilization in maritime pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, María Belén; Llebrés, María-Teresa; Craven-Bartle, Blanca; Cañas, Rafael A; Cánovas, Francisco M; Ávila, Concepción

    2018-05-01

    The transcriptional regulation of phenylalanine metabolism is particularly important in conifers, long-lived species that use large amounts of carbon in wood. Here, we show that the Pinus pinaster transcription factor, PpNAC1, is a main regulator of phenylalanine biosynthesis and utilization. A phylogenetic analysis classified PpNAC1 in the NST proteins group and was selected for functional characterization. PpNAC1 is predominantly expressed in the secondary xylem and compression wood of adult trees. Silencing of PpNAC1 in P. pinaster results in the alteration of stem vascular radial patterning and the down-regulation of several genes associated with cell wall biogenesis and secondary metabolism. Furthermore, transactivation and EMSA analyses showed that PpNAC1 is able to activate its own expression and PpMyb4 promoter, while PpMyb4 is able to activate PpMyb8, a transcriptional regulator of phenylalanine and lignin biosynthesis in maritime pine. Together, these results suggest that PpNAC1 is a functional ortholog of the ArabidopsisSND1 and NST1 genes and support the idea that key regulators governing secondary cell wall formation could be conserved between gymnosperms and angiosperms. Understanding the molecular switches controlling wood formation is of paramount importance for fundamental tree biology and paves the way for applications in conifer biotechnology. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Production of tyrosine through phenylalanine hydroxylation bypasses the intrinsic feedback inhibition in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin; Lin, Yuheng; Yuan, Qipeng; Yan, Yajun

    2015-04-01

    Tyrosine is a proteinogenic aromatic amino acid that is often used as a supplement of food and animal feed, as well as a (bio-)synthetic precursor to various pharmaceutically or industrially important molecules. Extensive metabolic engineering efforts have been made towards the efficient and cost-effective microbial production of tyrosine. Conventional strategies usually focus on eliminating intrinsic feedback inhibition and redirecting carbon flux into the shikimate pathway. In this study, we found that continuous conversion of phenylalanine into tyrosine by the action of tetrahydromonapterin (MH4)-utilizing phenylalanine 4-hydroxylase (P4H) can bypass the feedback inhibition in Escherichia coli, leading to tyrosine accumulation in the cultures. First, expression of the P4H from Xanthomonas campestris in combination with an MH4 recycling system in wild-type E. coli allowed the strain to accumulate tyrosine at 262 mg/L. On this basis, enhanced expression of the key enzymes associated with the shikimate pathway and the MH4 biosynthetic pathway resulted in the elevation of tyrosine production up to 401 mg/L in shake flasks. This work demonstrated a novel approach to tyrosine production and verified the possibility to alleviate feedback inhibition by creating a phenylalanine sink.

  5. Expression and properties of the highly alkalophilic phenylalanine ammonia-lyase of thermophilic Rubrobacter xylanophilus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia Kovács

    Full Text Available The sequence of a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL; EC: 4.3.1.24 of the thermophilic and radiotolerant bacterium Rubrobacter xylanophilus (RxPAL was identified by screening the genomes of bacteria for members of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase family. A synthetic gene encoding the RxPAL protein was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli TOP 10 in a soluble form with an N-terminal His6-tag and the recombinant RxPAL protein was purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The activity assay of RxPAL with l-phenylalanine at various pH values exhibited a local maximum at pH 8.5 and a global maximum at pH 11.5. Circular dichroism (CD studies showed that RxPAL is associated with an extensive α-helical character (far UV CD and two distinctive near-UV CD peaks. These structural characteristics were well preserved up to pH 11.0. The extremely high pH optimum of RxPAL can be rationalized by a three-dimensional homology model indicating possible disulfide bridges, extensive salt-bridge formation and an excess of negative electrostatic potential on the surface. Due to these properties, RxPAL may be a candidate as biocatalyst in synthetic biotransformations leading to unnatural l- or d-amino acids or as therapeutic enzyme in treatment of phenylketonuria or leukemia.

  6. Phenylalanine ammonia lyase catalyzed synthesis of amino acids by an MIO-cofactor independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Sarah L; Lloyd, Richard C; Turner, Nicholas J

    2014-04-25

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyases (PALs) belong to a family of 4-methylideneimidazole-5-one (MIO) cofactor dependent enzymes which are responsible for the conversion of L-phenylalanine into trans-cinnamic acid in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Under conditions of high ammonia concentration, this deamination reaction is reversible and hence there is considerable interest in the development of PALs as biocatalysts for the enantioselective synthesis of non-natural amino acids. Herein the discovery of a previously unobserved competing MIO-independent reaction pathway, which proceeds in a non-stereoselective manner and results in the generation of both L- and D-phenylalanine derivatives, is described. The mechanism of the MIO-independent pathway is explored through isotopic-labeling studies and mutagenesis of key active-site residues. The results obtained are consistent with amino acid deamination occurring by a stepwise E1 cB elimination mechanism. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. The flavoprotein Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Akira; Kawahara, Nobuhiro [Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Takagi, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiro@bs.naist.jp [Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NO is produced from L-arginine in response to elevated temperature in yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18 was first identified as the yeast protein involved in NO synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers tolerance to high-temperature on yeast cells. -- Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions. In the unicellular eukaryote yeast, NO may be involved in stress response pathways, but its role is poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian NO synthase (NOS) orthologues. Previously, we have proposed the oxidative stress-induced L-arginine synthesis and its physiological role under stress conditions in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, our experimental results indicated that increased conversion of L-proline into L-arginine led to NO production in response to elevated temperature. We also showed that the flavoprotein Tah18, which was previously reported to transfer electrons to the Fe-S cluster protein Dre2, was involved in NO synthesis in yeast. Gene knockdown analysis demonstrated that Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells. As it appears that such a unique cell protection mechanism is specific to yeasts and fungi, it represents a promising target for antifungal activity.

  8. The flavoprotein Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Akira; Kawahara, Nobuhiro; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► NO is produced from L-arginine in response to elevated temperature in yeast. ► Tah18 was first identified as the yeast protein involved in NO synthesis. ► Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers tolerance to high-temperature on yeast cells. -- Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions. In the unicellular eukaryote yeast, NO may be involved in stress response pathways, but its role is poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian NO synthase (NOS) orthologues. Previously, we have proposed the oxidative stress-induced L-arginine synthesis and its physiological role under stress conditions in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, our experimental results indicated that increased conversion of L-proline into L-arginine led to NO production in response to elevated temperature. We also showed that the flavoprotein Tah18, which was previously reported to transfer electrons to the Fe–S cluster protein Dre2, was involved in NO synthesis in yeast. Gene knockdown analysis demonstrated that Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells. As it appears that such a unique cell protection mechanism is specific to yeasts and fungi, it represents a promising target for antifungal activity.

  9. Yeast ribosomal proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otaka, E.; Kobata, K.

    1978-01-01

    The cytoplasmic 80s ribosomal proteins from the cells of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were analyzed by SDS two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Seventyfour proteins were identified and consecutively numbered from 1 to 74. Upon oxidation of the 80s proteins with performic acid, ten proteins (no. 15, 20, 35, 40, 44, 46, 49, 51, 54 and 55) were dislocated on the gel without change of the total number of protein spots. Five proteins (no. 8, 14, 16, 36 and 74) were phosphorylated in vivo as seen in 32 P-labelling experiments. The large and small subunits separated in low magnesium medium were analyzed by the above gel electrophoresis. At least forty-five and twenty-eight proteins were assumed to be in the large and small subunits, respectively. All proteins found in the 80s ribosomes, except for no. 3, were detected in either subunit without appearance of new spots. The acidic protein no. 3 seems to be lost during subunit dissociation. (orig.) [de

  10. Metabolic regulation of yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiechter, A.

    1982-12-01

    Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

  11. Development of a yeast cell factory for production of aromatic products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Prado, Edith Angelica; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Li, Mingji

    2014-01-01

    There is much interest in aromatic chemicals in the chemical industry as these can be used for production of dyes, anti-oxidants, nutraceuticals and food ingredients. Yeast is a widely used cell factory and it is particularly well suited for production of aromatic chemicals via complex biosynthetic...... routes involving P450 enzymes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the fluxes towards aromatic acids (L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine and L-phenylalanine) are strictly controlled on transcriptional and kinetic levels and therefore are difficult to manipulate. We engineered S. cerevisiae for increased production...... of aromatic compounds by eliminating degradation, up-regulating the key enzyme encoding genes, and removing feed-back inhibition in the pathway. In order to test the strain performance we overexpressed heterologous pathway for coumaric acid production. We obtained 4-fold higher concentrations of coumaric acid...

  12. Antihypertension and anti-cardiovascular remodeling by phenylalanine in spontaneously hypertensive rats: effectiveness and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, G; Li, Z; Gu, T

    2001-03-01

    To investigate mechanisms of anti-hypertension and anti-cardiovascular remodeling by phenylalanine (phe) in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). The comparison of blood pressure (BP) increment with the ages and cardiovascular changes of SHRs was made between the 3% phe-intervented group (SHR-phe) and the control SHRs group. Detection of the structural changes with the VIDAS digital vedio-frequency processing technique and light and electron microscopy were made. The cell growth and proliferation of cultured smooth muscle cells (CSMCs) of the thoracic aortas or myocardial fibroblasts were evaluated by measuring the 3H-thymidine counts per minute (cpm) incorporated into the new synthesized desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and determining the cell number with the crystal violet stain technique. The Ca2+ influx was measured in counts/min of 45CaCl2 after incubating it with 5 different concentrations of phenylalanine and the intracellular [Ca2+]i by Fura-II/Am indicator. The total messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) of the myocardium was extracted and Northern blot analysis was performed with the probe collagen alpha 2 (I) cDNA. The tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detector after having reacted with its substrate tyrosine and other reagents. The catecholamine contents in brain homogenat were detected by HPLC method. The comparison of pharmacokinetics of phenylalanine among SHR-phe, SHRs and control Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats was made after intravenous injection of 3H-L-phe (1 ml/kg) by PK-GRAPH Program for kinetic calculation. The 3H-L-phe uptake by CSMCs after incubating for definite intervals was also detected and compared. Phenylalanine could prevent the increase of BP with ages and the heart weight (heart/body weight index). The aortic media thickness and the collagen content in the myocardium were decreased significantly in SHR-phe. Whereas the dearranged cardiovascular structure was

  13. Yeast Flocculation—Sedimentation and Flotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham G. Stewart

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Unlike most fermentation alcohol beverage production processes, brewers recycle their yeast. This is achieved by employing a yeast culture’s: flocculation, adhesion, sedimentation, flotation, and cropping characteristics. As a consequence of yeast recycling, the quality of the cropped yeast culture’s characteristics is critical. However, the other major function of brewer’s yeast is to metabolise wort into ethanol, carbon dioxide, glycerol, and other fermentation products, many of which contribute to beer’s overall flavour characteristics. This review will only focus on brewer’s yeast flocculation characteristics.

  14. Results of a Prospective Study Concerning the Clinical Efficiency of Recent Russian-Made Specialized Foods without Phenylalanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Bushueva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Specialized foods, based on aminoacids without phenilalanin, are the main source of protein for patients with phenilketonuria of all ages. Based on modern technologies, new Russian-made foods were created. They have an optimized aminoacid and micronutrient composition, which increases their bioavailability.Objective: Our aim was to investigate the clinical efficiency of the new Russian-made specialized foods based on aminoacids without phenylalanine, in patients with phenylketonuria.Methods: Evaluating physical, somatic and neuropsychic development as well as measuring phenylalanine blood level were carried out twice: before the prescription and after 1 month of using the new Russian-made specialized foods. The chemical composition of the ration was controlled using dietology methods.Results: 57 children at the age of 14 days to 15 years with phenylketonuria (which was detected in neonatal screening were picked for this study. A hypophenylalanine diet has been prescribed for all children no later than at the age of 3 months of life. In children of the first year (I group (among which there were children with high phenylalanine blood levels phenylalanine concentration decreased from 5,5 (4,0; 21,0 to 4,4 (3,7; 4,7 mg/dl (p = 0,014 while using Russian-made specialized foods. In this group of children the psychomotor and physical indices improved. In early childhood-, preschool- and school-aged patients phenylalanine blood level remained steady. The chemical composition of the ration with Russian-made foods, based on aminoacids without phenylalanine, corresponded to the reference intake of main nutrients and energy.Conclusion: Hypophenylalanine diet with new Russian-made specialized foods without phenylalanine (which is designed for phenylketonuria patients of various age groups showed high clinical efficiency of these foods.

  15. 'Yeast mail': a novel Saccharomyces application (NSA) to encrypt messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemeyer, Helmut; Paululat, Achim; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2014-09-01

    The universal genetic code is used by all life forms to encode biological information. It can also be used to encrypt semantic messages and convey them within organisms without anyone but the sender and recipient knowing, i.e., as a means of steganography. Several theoretical, but comparatively few experimental, approaches have been dedicated to this subject, so far. Here, we describe an experimental system to stably integrate encrypted messages within the yeast genome using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based, one-step homologous recombination system. Thus, DNA sequences encoding alphabetical and/or numerical information will be inherited by yeast propagation and can be sent in the form of dried yeast. Moreover, due to the availability of triple shuttle vectors, Saccharomyces cerevisiae can also be used as an intermediate construction device for transfer of information to either Drosophila or mammalian cells as steganographic containers. Besides its classical use in alcoholic fermentation and its modern use for heterologous gene expression, we here show that baker's yeast can thus be employed in a novel Saccharomyces application (NSA) as a simple steganographic container to hide and convey messages. Copyright © 2014 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  16. Biogenesis of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Vincenzo; Conte, Laura; Trumpower, Bernard L

    2009-01-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is composed of four different protein complexes that cooperate in electron transfer and proton pumping across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The cytochrome bc1 complex, or complex III, is a component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This review will focus on the biogenesis of the bc1 complex in the mitochondria of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In wild type yeast mitochondrial membranes the major part of the cytochrome bc1 complex was found in association with one or two copies of the cytochrome c oxidase complex. The analysis of several yeast mutant strains in which single genes or pairs of genes encoding bc1 subunits had been deleted revealed the presence of a common set of bc1 sub-complexes. These sub-complexes are represented by the central core of the bc1 complex, consisting of cytochrome b bound to subunit 7 and subunit 8, by the two core proteins associated with each other, by the Rieske protein associated with subunit 9, and by those deriving from the unexpected interaction of each of the two core proteins with cytochrome c1. Furthermore, a higher molecular mass sub-complex is that composed of cytochrome b, cytochrome c1, core protein 1 and 2, subunit 6, subunit 7 and subunit 8. The identification and characterization of all these sub-complexes may help in defining the steps and the molecular events leading to bc1 assembly in yeast mitochondria.

  17. The yeast replicative aging model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chong; Zhou, Chuankai; Kennedy, Brian K

    2018-03-08

    It has been nearly three decades since the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae became a significant model organism for aging research and it has emerged as both simple and powerful. The replicative aging assay, which interrogates the number of times a "mother" cell can divide and produce "daughters", has been a stalwart in these studies, and genetic approaches have led to the identification of hundreds of genes impacting lifespan. More recently, cell biological and biochemical approaches have been developed to determine how cellular processes become altered with age. Together, the tools are in place to develop a holistic view of aging in this single-celled organism. Here, we summarize the current state of understanding of yeast replicative aging with a focus on the recent studies that shed new light on how aging pathways interact to modulate lifespan in yeast. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. [Yeast species in vulvovaginitis candidosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes-Nikodém, Éva; Tamási, Béla; Mihalik, Noémi; Ostorházi, Eszter

    2015-01-04

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is the most common mycosis, however, the available information about antifungal susceptibilities of these yeasts is limited. To compare the gold standard fungal culture with a new molecular identification method and report the incidence of yeast species in vulvovaginitis candidosa. The authors studied 370 yeasts isolated from vulvovaginal candidiasis and identified them by phenotypic and molecular methods. The most common species was Candida albicans (85%), followed by Candida glabrata, and other Candida species. At present there are no recommendations for the evaluation of antifungal susceptibility of pathogenic fungal species occurring in vulvovaginal candidiasis and the natural antifungal resistance of the different species is known only. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time of Flight identification can be used to differentiate the fluconazole resistant Candida dubliniensis and the sensitive Candida albicans strains.

  19. Metabolic profiling of yeast culture using gas chromatography coupled with orthogonal acceleration accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry: application to biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Elsuida; Marriott, Philip J; Parker, Rhiannon M; Kouremenos, Konstantinos A; Morrison, Paul; Adams, Mike

    2014-01-07

    Yeast and yeast cultures are frequently used as additives in diets of dairy cows. Beneficial effects from the inclusion of yeast culture in diets for dairy mammals have been reported, and the aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive analytical method for the accurate mass identification of the 'global' metabolites in order to differentiate a variety of yeasts at varying growth stages (Diamond V XP, Yea-Sacc and Levucell). Microwave-assisted derivatization for metabolic profiling is demonstrated through the analysis of differing yeast samples developed for cattle feed, which include a wide range of metabolites of interest covering a large range of compound classes. Accurate identification of the components was undertaken using GC-oa-ToFMS (gas chromatography-orthogonal acceleration-time-of-flight mass spectrometry), followed by principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) for data reduction and biomarker discovery. Semi-quantification (fold changes in relative peak areas) was reported for metabolites identified as possible discriminative biomarkers (p-value 2), including D-ribose (four fold decrease), myo-inositol (five fold increase), L-phenylalanine (three fold increase), glucopyranoside (two fold increase), fructose (three fold increase) and threitol (three fold increase) respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Man made disease: clinical manifestations of low phenylalanine levels in an inadequately treated phenylketonuria patient and mouse study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pode-Shakked, Ben; Shemer-Meiri, Lilach; Harmelin, Alon; Stettner, Noa; Brenner, Ori; Abraham, Smadar; Schwartz, Gerard; Anikster, Yair

    2013-01-01

    Phenylalanine (Phe) deficiency and its clinical manifestations have been previously described mostly as sporadic case reports dating back to the 1960's and 1970's. In these reports, low plasma Phe levels were associated with listlessness, eczematous eruptions and failure to gain weight, most often in infants in their first year of life. Herein we describe a 9 month old female patient with known phenylketonuria, who presented with an unusual constellation of symptoms, including severe erythema and desquamation, alopecia, keratomalacia, corneal perforation, failure to thrive and prolonged diarrhea. The diagnostic possibilities of acrodermatitis enteropathica and vitamin deficiencies were ruled out, and further investigation into her medical history led to the conclusion that during the weeks preceding the hospitalization, the patient's diet consisted of the phenylalanine-free medical formula alone, without the addition of a standard infant formula or food as recommended. Subsequently, dietary control of the blood phenylalanine levels brought swift and marked resolution of the dermatological lesions, with renewal of hair growth. Following this experience, and due to the relative paucity of data regarding the clinical manifestations of low serum phenylalanine levels in humans and their putative pathogenetic mechanisms, we sought to further investigate the effects of a phenylalanine-free diet in a mouse study. For this purpose, twenty mice were randomly allocated to receive either a phenylalanine-deficient diet (n=10) or a normal diet (n=10). Weight was measured weekly, and laboratory tests were obtained including complete blood count, electrolyte studies, and phenylalanine and tyrosine levels. Finally, necropsies and histopathological examinations of different tissues were performed in selected mice, either early after diet initiation, late after diet initiation or following re-introduction of normal diets. The study was then repeated in additional two groups of mice

  1. Plasma phenylalanine and tyrosine responses to different nutritional conditions (fasting/postprandial) in patients with phenylketonuria: effect of sample timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Spronsen, F J; van Rijn, M; van Dijk, T; Smit, G P; Reijngoud, D J; Berger, R; Heymans, H S

    1993-10-01

    To evaluate the adequacy of dietary treatment in patients with phenylketonuria, the monitoring of plasma phenylalanine and tyrosine concentrations is of great importance. The preferable time of blood sampling in relation to the nutritional condition during the day, however, is not known. It was the aim of this study to define guidelines for the timing of blood sampling with a minimal burden for the patient. Plasma concentrations of phenylalanine and tyrosine were measured in nine patients with phenylketonuria who had no clinical evidence of tyrosine deficiency. These values were measured during the day both after a prolonged overnight fast, and before and after breakfast. Phenylalanine showed a small rise during prolonged fasting, while tyrosine decreased slightly. After an individually tailored breakfast, phenylalanine remained stable, while tyrosine showed large fluctuations. It is concluded that the patient's nutritional condition (fasting/postprandial) is not important in the evaluation of the phenylalanine intake. To detect a possible tyrosine deficiency, however, a single blood sample is not sufficient and a combination of a preprandial and postprandial blood sample on the same day is advocated.

  2. Radiation stimulation of yeast crops for increasing output of alcohol and baker yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, E.; Marsheu, P.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to stimulate by gamma radiation the existing commercial types of yeast so as to obtain yeasts that would better reflect the substrate and have improved reproductive capacity. The experiments were conducted under ordinary conditions using commercial yeasts received from one factory producing alcohol and bakery yeasts and isolated as pure cultures. Irradiating yeast cultures with small doses (up to 10 krad) was found to stimulate the reproduction and fermenting activity of yeast cells as manifested in increased accumulation of yeast biomass and greater yield of ethyl alcohol. (E.T.)

  3. Serum phenylalanine in preterm newborns fed different diets of human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaz, Débora M; Serafin, Paula O; Palhares, Durval B; Tavares, Luciana V M; Grance, Thayana R S

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate phenylalanine plasma profile in preterm newborns fed different human milk diets. Twenty-four very-low weight preterm newborns were distributed randomly in three groups with different feeding types: Group I: banked human milk plus 5% commercial fortifier with bovine protein, Group II: banked human milk plus evaporated fortifier derived from modified human milk, Group III: banked human milk plus lyophilized fortifier derived from modified human milk. The newborns received the group diet when full diet was attained at 15 ± 2 days. Plasma amino acid analysis was performedon the first and last day of feeding. Comparison among groups was performed by statistical tests: one way ANOVA with Tukey's post-test using SPSS software, version 20.0 (IBM Corp, NY, USA), considering a significance level of 5%. Phenylalanine levels in the first and second analysis were, respectively, in Group I: 11.9 ± 1.22 and 29.72 ± 0.73; in Group II: 11.72 ± 1.04 and 13.44 ± 0.61; and in Group III: 11.3 ± 1.18 and 15.42 ± 0.83 μmol/L. The observed results demonstrated that human milk with fortifiers derived from human milk acted as a good substratum for preterm infant feeding both in the evaporated or the lyophilized form, without significant increases in plasma phenylalanine levels in comparison to human milk with commercial fortifier. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Nectar yeasts in the tall Larkspur Delphinium barbeyi (Ranunculaceae and effects on components of pollinator foraging behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert N Schaeffer

    Full Text Available Microorganisms frequently colonize the nectar of angiosperm species. Though capable of altering a suite of traits important for pollinator attraction, few studies exist that test the degree to which they mediate pollinator foraging behavior. The objective of our study was to fill this gap by assessing the abundance and diversity of yeasts associated with the perennial larkspur Delphinium barbeyi (Ranunculaceae and testing whether their presence affected components of pollinator foraging behavior. Yeasts frequently colonized D. barbeyi nectar, populating 54-77% of flowers examined depending on site. Though common, the yeast community was species-poor, represented by a single species, Metschnikowia reukaufii. Female-phase flowers of D. barbeyi were more likely to have higher densities of yeasts in comparison to male-phase flowers. Pollinators were likely vectors of yeasts, as virgin (unvisited flowers rarely contained yeasts compared to flowers open to pollinator visitation, which were frequently colonized. Finally, pollinators responded positively to the presence of yeasts. Bombus foragers both visited and probed more flowers inoculated with yeasts in comparison to uninoculated controls. Taken together, our results suggest that variation in the occurrence and density of nectar-inhabiting yeasts have the potential to alter components of pollinator foraging behavior linked to pollen transfer and plant fitness.

  5. Nectar Yeasts in the Tall Larkspur Delphinium barbeyi (Ranunculaceae) and Effects on Components of Pollinator Foraging Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Robert N.; Phillips, Cody R.; Duryea, M. Catherine; Andicoechea, Jonathan; Irwin, Rebecca E.

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms frequently colonize the nectar of angiosperm species. Though capable of altering a suite of traits important for pollinator attraction, few studies exist that test the degree to which they mediate pollinator foraging behavior. The objective of our study was to fill this gap by assessing the abundance and diversity of yeasts associated with the perennial larkspur Delphinium barbeyi (Ranunculaceae) and testing whether their presence affected components of pollinator foraging behavior. Yeasts frequently colonized D. barbeyi nectar, populating 54–77% of flowers examined depending on site. Though common, the yeast community was species-poor, represented by a single species, Metschnikowia reukaufii. Female-phase flowers of D. barbeyi were more likely to have higher densities of yeasts in comparison to male-phase flowers. Pollinators were likely vectors of yeasts, as virgin (unvisited) flowers rarely contained yeasts compared to flowers open to pollinator visitation, which were frequently colonized. Finally, pollinators responded positively to the presence of yeasts. Bombus foragers both visited and probed more flowers inoculated with yeasts in comparison to uninoculated controls. Taken together, our results suggest that variation in the occurrence and density of nectar-inhabiting yeasts have the potential to alter components of pollinator foraging behavior linked to pollen transfer and plant fitness. PMID:25272164

  6. A quantitative characterization of the yeast heterotrimeric G protein cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Tau-Mu; Kitano, Hiroaki; Simon, Melvin I.

    2003-01-01

    The yeast mating response is one of the best understood heterotrimeric G protein signaling pathways. Yet, most descriptions of this system have been qualitative. We have quantitatively characterized the heterotrimeric G protein cycle in yeast based on direct in vivo measurements. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to monitor the association state of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-Gα and Gβγ-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and we found that receptor-mediated G protein activation produced a loss of fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Quantitative time course and dose–response data were obtained for both wild-type and mutant cells possessing an altered pheromone response. These results paint a quantitative portrait of how regulators such as Sst2p and the C-terminal tail of α-factor receptor modulate the kinetics and sensitivity of G protein signaling. We have explored critical features of the dynamics including the rapid rise and subsequent decline of active G proteins during the early response, and the relationship between the G protein activation dose–response curve and the downstream dose–response curves for cell-cycle arrest and transcriptional induction. Fitting the data to a mathematical model produced estimates of the in vivo rates of heterotrimeric G protein activation and deactivation in yeast. PMID:12960402

  7. Surplus yeast tank failing catastrophically

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2016-01-01

    GOOD REASON FOR CAUTION I A large surplus yeast tank shot into the air leaving the floor plate and the contents behind. Although not designed for overpressure, the tank was kept at “very slight overpressure” to suppress nuisance foaming. The brewery was unaware of the hazards of compressed air...

  8. Nucleotide excision repair in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, Patrick van

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) is a conserved DNA repair pathway capable of removing a broad spectrum of DNA damage. In human cells a defect in NER leads to the disorder Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model organism to study the mechanism of NER. The

  9. Yeast genomics on food flavours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoondermark-Stolk, Sung Ah

    2005-01-01

    The appearance and concentration of the fusel alcohol 3-methyl-1-butanol is important for the flavour of fermented foods. 3-Methyl-1-butanol is formed by yeast during the conversion of L-leucine. Identification of the enzymes and genes involved in the formation of 3-methyl-1-butanol is a major

  10. Chiral speciation and determination of selenomethionine enantiomers in selenized yeast by ligand-exchange micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography after solid phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jiankun; He, Man; Hu, Bin

    2012-12-14

    A new phenylalanine derivative (L-N-(2-hydroxy-propyl)-phenylalanine, L-HP-Phe) was synthesized and its chelate with Cu(II) (Cu(II)-(L-HP-Phe)(2)) was used as the chiral selector for the ligand-exchange (LE) chiral separation of D,L-selenomethionine (SeMet) in selenized yeast samples by micelle electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MEKC). In order to improve the sensitivity of MEKC-UV, two-step preconcentration strategy was employed, off-line solid phase extraction (SPE) and on-line large volume sample stacking (LVSS). D,L-SeMet was first retained on the Cu(II) loaded mesoporous TiO(2), then eluted by 0.1 mL of 5 mol L(-1) ammonia, and finally introduced for MEKC-UV analysis by LVSS injection after evaporation of NH(3). With the enrichment factors of 1400 and 1378, the LODs of 0.44 and 0.60 ng mL(-1) for L-SeMet and D-SeMet was obtained, respectively. The developed method was applied to the analysis of D,L-SeMet in a certified reference material of SELM-1 and a commercial nutrition yeast, and the results showed that most of SeMet in the SELM-1 selenized yeast was l isomer and the recovery for L and D isomers in the spiked commercial nutrition yeast was 96.3% and 103%, respectively. This method is featured with low running cost, high sensitivity and selectivity, and exhibits application potential in chiral analysis of seleno amino acids in real world samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Heavy ion effects on yeast: Inhibition of ribosomal RNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, K.J.; Schneider, E.; Kiefer, J.; Kraft, G.

    1990-01-01

    Diploid wild-type yeast cells were exposed to beams of heavy ions covering a wide range of linear energy transfer (LET) (43-13,700 keV/microns). Synthesis of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) was assessed as a functional measure of damage produced by particle radiation. An exponential decrease of relative rRNA synthesis with particle fluence was demonstrated in all cases. The inactivation cross sections derived were found to increase with LET over the entire range of LET studied. The corresponding values for relative biological effectiveness were slightly less than unity. Maximum cross sections measured were close to 1 micron 2, implying that some larger structure within the yeast nucleus (e.g., the nucleolus) might represent the target for an impairment of synthetic activity by very heavy ions rather than the genes coding for rRNA. Where tested, an oxygen effect for rRNA synthesis could not be demonstrated

  12. Folate Biofortification in Hydroponically Cultivated Spinach by the Addition of Phenylalanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Sho; Ohtani, Yuta; Tatsukami, Yohei; Aoki, Wataru; Amemiya, Takashi; Sukekiyo, Yasunori; Kubokawa, Seiichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-06-14

    Folate is an important vitamin mainly ingested from vegetables, and folate deficiency causes various health problems. Recently, several studies demonstrated folate biofortification in plants or food crops by metabolic engineering through genetic modifications. However, the production and sales of genetically modified foods are under strict regulation. Here, we developed a new approach to achieve folate biofortification in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) without genetic modification. We hydroponically cultivated spinach with the addition of three candidate compounds expected to fortify folate. As a result of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis, we found that the addition of phenylalanine increased the folate content up to 2.0-fold (306 μg in 100 g of fresh spinach), representing 76.5% of the recommended daily allowance for adults. By measuring the intermediates of folate biosynthesis, we revealed that phenylalanine activated folate biosynthesis in spinach by increasing the levels of pteridine and p-aminobenzoic acid. Our approach is a promising and practical approach to cultivate nutrient-enriched vegetables.

  13. Bioactive Phenylalanine Derivatives and Cytochalasins from the Soft Coral-Derived Fungus, Aspergillus elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Ping Sun

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One new phenylalanine derivative 4′-OMe-asperphenamate (1, along with one known phenylalanine derivative (2 and two new cytochalasins, aspochalasin A1 (3 and cytochalasin Z24 (4, as well as eight known cytochalasin analogues (5–12 were isolated from the fermentation broth of Aspergillus elegans ZJ-2008010, a fungus obtained from a soft coral Sarcophyton sp. collected from the South China Sea. Their structures and the relative configurations were elucidated using comprehensive spectroscopic methods. The absolute configuration of 1 was determined by chemical synthesis and Marfey’s method. All isolated metabolites (1–12 were evaluated for their antifouling and antibacterial activities. Cytochalasins 5, 6, 8 and 9 showed strong antifouling activity against the larval settlement of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite, with the EC50 values ranging from 6.2 to 37 μM. This is the first report of antifouling activity for this class of metabolites. Additionally, 8 exhibited a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity, especially against four pathogenic bacteria Staphylococcus albus, S. aureus, Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus.

  14. Synthesizing aspartyl-phenylalanine methyl precursor by enzymatic method. Kosoho ni yoru asuparutemu zenkutai no gosei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, M. (Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan)); Hirata, A. (Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan). School of Science and Engineering)

    1991-10-01

    Demand for aspartyl-phenylalanine methyl, an amino acid based artificial sweetener, is increasing for use by people on diet. The material is manufactured by making a precursor through dehydrating and condensing N-protective{sub L}-asparagine acid and {sub L}-phenylalanine methyl ester, and then removing the protective group. While the manufacturing methods include chemical process and enzymatic process, this paper introduces various researches done mainly by the latter process. The enzymatic process is simpler and safer than the chemical process, allowing experiments to be carried out easily. However, since the reaction equilibrium is biased more on the decomposition side than the synthesis side, it should be shifted to the synthesis side. Such operations may be carried out as separating the products simultaneously with the reaction, adding organic solvents, and operating the reaction in an organic solvent. The last operation, for example, reduces the concentration of liquid produced by the reaction by use of either water soluble or slightly soluble organic solvent, and improves the yield. It also has an advantage that relatively stable fixing enzymes can be adjusted by use of hydrophilic carriers. 68 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Functions of phenylalanine residues within the beta-barrel stem of the anthrax toxin pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A key step of anthrax toxin action involves the formation of a protein-translocating pore within the endosomal membrane by the Protective Antigen (PA moiety. Formation of this transmembrane pore by PA involves interaction of the seven 2beta2-2beta3 loops of the heptameric precursor to generate a 14-strand transmembrane beta barrel.We examined the effects on pore formation, protein translocation, and cytotoxicity, of mutating two phenylalanines, F313 and F314, that lie at the tip the beta barrel, and a third one, F324, that lies part way up the barrel.Our results show that the function of these phenylalanine residues is to mediate membrane insertion and formation of stable transmembrane channels. Unlike F427, a key luminal residue in the cap of the pore, F313, F314, and F324 do not directly affect protein translocation through the pore. Our findings add to our knowledge of structure-function relationships of a key virulence factor of the anthrax bacillus.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum involvement in yeast cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicanor Austriaco, O.

    2012-01-01

    Yeast cells undergo programed cell death (PCD) with characteristic markers associated with apoptosis in mammalian cells including chromatin breakage, nuclear fragmentation, reactive oxygen species generation, and metacaspase activation. Though significant research has focused on mitochondrial involvement in this phenomenon, more recent work with both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe has also implicated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in yeast PCD. This minireview provides an overview of ER stress-associated cell death (ER-SAD) in yeast. It begins with a description of ER structure and function in yeast before moving to a discussion of ER-SAD in both mammalian and yeast cells. Three examples of yeast cell death associated with the ER will be highlighted here including inositol starvation, lipid toxicity, and the inhibition of N-glycosylation. It closes by suggesting ways to further examine the involvement of the ER in yeast cell death.

  17. Brewing characteristics of piezosensitive sake yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazuki; Hoshino, Hirofumi; Igoshi, Kazuaki; Onozuka, Haruka; Tanaka, Erika; Hayashi, Mayumi; Yamazaki, Harutake; Takaku, Hiroaki; Iguchi, Akinori; Shigematsu, Toru

    2018-04-01

    Application of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment to food processing is expected as a non-thermal fermentation regulation technology that supresses over fermentation. However, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae used for Japanese rice wine (sake) brewing shows high tolerance to HHP. Therefore, we aimed to generate pressure-sensitive (piezosensitive) sake yeast strains by mating sake with piezosensitive yeast strains to establish an HHP fermentation regulation technology and extend the shelf life of fermented foods. The results of phenotypic analyses showed that the generated yeast strains were piezosensitive and exhibited similar fermentation ability compared with the original sake yeast strain. In addition, primary properties of sake brewed using these strains, such as ethanol concentration, sake meter value and sake flavor compounds, were almost equivalent to those obtained using the sake yeast strain. These results suggest that the piezosensitive strains exhibit brewing characteristics essentially equivalent to those of the sake yeast strain.

  18. Influence of anoxia on the induction of mutations by phenylalanine radicals during gamma-irradiation of plasmid DNA in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Gitta K; Slotman, Ben J; Reitsma-Wijker, Carola A; van Andel, Rob J; Poldervaart, Hester A; Lafleur, M Vincent M

    2004-12-21

    When DNA is irradiated in aqueous solution, most of the damage is inflicted by water-derived radicals. This is called the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. However in whole cells not only the primary formed water radicals play a role, because some cellular compounds form secondary radicals which can also damage DNA. It is known that the amino acid phenylalanine is able to react with water radicals, resulting in the production of secondary phenylalanine radicals which can damage and inactivate DNA. In a previous study the influence of the presence of phenylalanine during gamma-irradiation of DNA in aqueous solution under oxic conditions was studied. Under anoxic irradiation conditions different amounts and types of reactive water-derived radicals are formed compared to oxic conditions and also different phenylalanine radicals are formed. Therefore, this study examines the influence of the presence of phenylalanine under anoxic conditions on the gamma-radiation-induced mutation spectrum. The results indicate that phenylalanine radicals are damaging to DNA, but less effective compared to primary water radicals. On the mutational level, in the presence of phenylalanine radicals under anoxic conditions, the amount of mutations on G:C base pairs was significantly decreased as compared to oxic conditions. Furthermore, the results of this study indicate that nucleotide excision repair is involved in repair of both inactivating and mutagenic damage induced by phenylalanine radicals under anoxic conditions.

  19. Quantitation of deuterated and non-deuterated phenylalanine and tyrosine in human plasma using the selective ion monitoring method with combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagalak, M.-J.; Curtius, H.-Ch.; Leimbacher, W.; Redweik, U.

    1977-01-01

    A specific method is described for the quantitative analysis of deutarated and non-deuterated phenylalanine and tyrosine in human plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using selective ion monitoring. From the several derivatives investigated, the N- or N,O-trifluoroacetyl methyl esters were found to be the most suitable for our purposes. DL-Phenylalanine-4-d 1 and L-tyrosine-d 7 were used as internal standards. The sensitivity of this method permits the measurement of amounts as small as ca. 2.5 ng/ml in plasma for both phenylalanine and tyrosine. The coefficients of variation were found to be ca. 1.6% (n=12) for phenylalanine and 3.0% (n=12) for tyrosine. Using this method, an in vivo determination of phenylalanine-4-monooxygenase activity in humans is possible by loading the subjects with deuterated L-phenylalanine-d 5 (accepted as substrate by phenylalanine-4-monooxygenase E.C. 1.14.16.1) and the subsequent measuring of deuterated L-tyrosine-d 4 formed and residual L-phenylalanine-d 5

  20. Degradation and Turnover of Peroxisomes in the Yeast Hansenula polymorpha Induced by Selective Inactivation of Peroxisomal Enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, Marten; Douma, Anneke; Harder, Willem; Osumi, Masako

    1983-01-01

    Inactivation of peroxisomal enzymes in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha was studied following transfer of cells into cultivation media in which their activity was no longer required for growth. After transfer of methanol-grown cells into media containing glucose - a substrate that fully represses

  1. TRANSFERENCE BEFORE TRANSFERENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaminio, Vincenzo

    2017-10-01

    This paper is predominantly a clinical presentation that describes the transmigration of one patient's transference to another, with the analyst functioning as a sort of transponder. It involves an apparently accidental episode in which there was an unconscious intersection between two patients. The author's aim is to show how transference from one case may affect transference in another, a phenomenon the author calls transference before transference. The author believes that this idea may serve as a tool for understanding the unconscious work that takes place in the clinical situation. In a clinical example, the analyst finds himself caught up in an enactment involving two patients in which he becomes the medium of what happens in session. © 2017 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  2. Production of 3,4-dihydroxy L-phenylalanine by a newly isolated Aspergillus niger and parameter significance analysis by Plackett-Burman design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haq I

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amino acid derivative 3,4-dihydroxy L-phenylalanine (L-dopa is gaining interest as a drug of choice for Parkinson's disease. Aspergillus oryzae is commonly used for L-dopa production; however, a slower growth rate and relatively lower tyrosinase activity of mycelia have led to an increasing interest in exploiting alternative fungal cultures. In the present investigation, we report on the microbiological transformation of L-tyrosine to L-dopa accomplished by a newly isolated filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. Results The culture A. niger (isolate GCBT-8 was propagated in 500 ml Erlenmeyer flasks and the pre-grown mycelia (48 h old were used in the reaction mixture as a source of enzyme tyrosinase. Grinded mycelia gave 1.26 fold higher L-dopa production compared to the intact at 6% glucose (pH 5.5. The rate of L-tyrosine consumption was improved from 0.198 to 0.281 mg/ml. Among the various nitrogen sources, 1.5% peptone, 1% yeast extract and 0.2% ammonium chloride were optimized. The maximal L-dopa was produced (0.365 mg/ml at 0.3% potassium dihydrogen phosphate with L-tyrosine consumption of 0.403 mg/ml. Conclusion Over ~73% yield was achieved (degree of freedom 3 when the process parameters were identified using 2k-Plackett-Burman experimental design. The results are highly significant (p ≤ 0.05 and mark the commercial utility (LSD 0.016 of the mould culture which is perhaps the first ever report on L-dopa production from A. niger.

  3. Yeast Isolation for Bioethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EKA RURIANI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have isolated 12 yeast isolates from five different rotten fruits by using a yeast glucose chloramphenicol agar (YGCA medium supplemented with tetracycline. From pre-screening assay, four isolates exhibited higher substrate (glucose-xylose consumption efficiency in the reaction tube fermentation compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae dan Saccharomyces ellipsoids as the reference strains. Based on the fermentation process in gooseneck flasks, we observed that two isolates (K and SB showed high fermentation efficiency both in sole glucose and mixed glucose-xylose substrate. Moreover, isolates K and SB produced relatively identical level of ethanol concentration compared to the reference strains. Isolates H and MP could only produce high levels of ethanol in glucose fermentation, while only half of that amount of ethanol was detected in glucose-xylose fermentation. Isolate K and SB were identified as Pichia kudriavzeevii (100% based on large sub unit (LSU ribosomal DNA D1/D2 region.

  4. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rio, Rute; Sim?es-Silva, Liliana; Garro, Sofia; Silva, M?rio-Jorge; Azevedo, ?lvaro; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with n...

  5. Yeast: A new oil producer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beopoulos Athanasios

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand of plant oils or animal fat for biodiesel and specific lipid derivatives for the oleochemical field (such as lubricants, adhesives or plastics have created price imbalance in both the alimentary and energy field. Moreover, the lack of non-edible oil feedstock has given rise to concerns on land-use practices and on oil production strategies. Recently, much attention has been paid to the exploitation of microbial oils. Most of them present lipid profiles similar in type and composition to plants and could therefore have many advantages as are no competitive with food, have short process cycles and their cultivation is independent of climate factors. Among microorganisms, yeasts seem to be very promising as they can be easily genetically enhanced, are suitable for large-scale fermentation and are devoid of endotoxins. This review will focus on the recent understanding of yeasts lipid metabolism, the succeeding genetic engineering of the lipid pathways and the recent developments on fermentation techniques that pointed out yeasts as promising alternative producers for oil or plastic.

  6. Yeast Cell Factory-Platform for the Screening and the Industrial Production of Flavonoids and other Phenolic Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehka, Beata Joanna

    Flavonoids are secondary plant metabolites derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. These bioactive compounds are of great commercial interest due to their varied properties, such as anti-oxidative, anti-tumor and/or antibacterial. However, industrial production of flavonoids based on purification...... as a model for industrial production of flavonoids. By combining a balanced heterologous expression of (phenylpropanoid) naringenin biosynthetic pathway genes and the optimisation of yeast metabolism we developed a strain producing 430 mg/L of naringenin from glucose. In this set up naringenin was produced...... from Aeromonas salmonicida with relatively high activity towards tyrosine and no activity towards phenylalanine. Production of flavonoids and stilbenoids in S. cerevisiae is challenging, partially due to carbon loss towards phloretic acid by the action of an unknown endogenous reductase. Through...

  7. Ca2+ response in neutrophils after exposure to bacterial N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine: delayed response in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vainer, Ben; Lamberth, Kasper; Brimnes, Jens

    2003-01-01

    In acute stages of ulcerative colitis (UC), neutrophils migrate from the circulation into inflamed colonic tissue, initiated by yet unknown stimuli. The bacterial peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) is a component of the surface membrane of colonic bacteria such as Escherichia ...

  8. Abnormal tyrosine and phenylalanine metabolism in patients with tyrosyluria and phenylketonuria; gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of urinary metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wadman, S.K.; Heiden, C. van der; Ketting, D.; Sprang, F.J. van

    Gas-liquid chromatographic methods have been developed for the analysis of: urinary phenylalanine metabolites (I) in patients with phenylketonuria, tyrosine metabolites (II) in patients with a disturbed tyrosine metabolism at the level of p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate hydroxylase, and homogentisic acid in

  9. Hydrolyses of alpha-naphthyl acetate, beta-naphthyl acetate, and acetyl-DL-phenylalanine beta-naphthyl ester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Moe, D

    1983-01-01

    Using simultaneous coupling azo dye techniques kidney enzymes active against alpha-naphthyl acetate, beta-naphthyl acetate, and acetyl-DL-phenylalanine beta-naphthyl ester are characterized. The enzymes show identical distribution in the section. The banding patterns in zymograms are the same after...

  10. Cooperative functioning between phenylalanine ammonia lyase and isochorishmate synthase activities contributes to salicylic acid biosynthesis in soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salicylic acid (SA), an essential regulator of plant defense, is derived from chorismate via either the phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), or the isochorishmate synthase (ICS) catalyzed steps. The ICS pathway is thought to be the primary contributor of defense-related SA, at least in Arabidopsis. We...

  11. Possible regulatory role of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase in the production of anthocyanins in asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flores, F.B.; Oosterhaven, J.; Martinez-Madrid, M.C.; Romojaro, F.

    2005-01-01

    The regulatory role of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) in the light-induced accumulation of anthocyanins in the epidermis of asparagus spears has been analysed. A correlation between the stimulation of PAL activity and the rise in total anthocyanin content has been observed. Light radiation

  12. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel phenylalanine-based amino acids as kainate receptors ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymańska, Ewa; Chałupnik, Paulina; Szczepańska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    A new series of carboxyaryl-substituted phenylalanines was designed, synthesized and pharmacologically characterized in vitro at native rat ionotropic glutamate receptors as well as at cloned homomeric kainate receptors GluK1-GluK3. Among them, six compounds bound to GluK1 receptor subtypes with ...

  13. Yeast flocculation: New story in fuel ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X Q; Bai, F W

    2009-01-01

    Yeast flocculation has been used in the brewing industry to facilitate biomass recovery for a long time, and thus its mechanism of yeast flocculation has been intensively studied. However, the application of flocculating yeast in ethanol production garnered attention mainly in the 1980s and 1990s. In this article, updated research progress in the molecular mechanism of yeast flocculation and the impact of environmental conditions on yeast flocculation are reviewed. Construction of flocculating yeast strains by genetic approach and utilization of yeast flocculation for ethanol production from various feedstocks were presented. The concept of self-immobilized yeast cells through their flocculation is revisited through a case study of continuous ethanol fermentation with the flocculating yeast SPSC01, and their technical and economic advantages are highlighted by comparing with yeast cells immobilized with supporting materials and regular free yeast cells as well. Taking the flocculating yeast SPSC01 as an example, the ethanol tolerance of the flocculating yeast was also discussed.

  14. Mutations in the Atp1p and Atp3p subunits of yeast ATP synthase differentially affect respiration and fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Brian R; White, Karen H; Thorsness, Peter E

    2007-04-01

    ATP1-111, a suppressor of the slow-growth phenotype of yme1Delta lacking mitochondrial DNA is due to the substitution of phenylalanine for valine at position 111 of the alpha-subunit of mitochondrial ATP synthase (Atp1p in yeast). The suppressing activity of ATP1-111 requires intact beta (Atp2p) and gamma (Atp3p) subunits of mitochondrial ATP synthase, but not the stator stalk subunits b (Atp4p) and OSCP (Atp5p). ATP1-111 and other similarly suppressing mutations in ATP1 and ATP3 increase the growth rate of wild-type strains lacking mitochondrial DNA. These suppressing mutations decrease the growth rate of yeast containing an intact mitochondrial chromosome on media requiring oxidative phosphorylation, but not when grown on fermentable media. Measurement of chronological aging of yeast in culture reveals that ATP1 and ATP3 suppressor alleles in strains that contain mitochondrial DNA are longer lived than the isogenic wild-type strain. In contrast, the chronological life span of yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA and containing these mutations is shorter than that of the isogenic wild-type strain. Spore viability of strains bearing ATP1-111 is reduced compared to wild type, although ATP1-111 enhances the survival of spores that lacked mitochondrial DNA.

  15. Engineering yeast for high-level production of stilbenoid antioxidants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Mingji; Schneider, Konstantin; Kristensen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    engineered the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of stilbenoids on a simple mineral medium typically used for industrial production. We applied a pull-push-block strain engineering strategy that included overexpression of the resveratrol biosynthesis pathway, optimization of the electron transfer...... to the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, increase of the precursors supply, and decrease of the pathway intermediates degradation. Fed-batch fermentation of the final strain resulted in a final titer of 800 mg l(-1) resveratrol, which is by far the highest titer reported to date for production of resveratrol from...

  16. Yeasts Diversity in Fermented Foods and Beverages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamang, Jyoti Prakash; Fleet, Graham H.

    People across the world have learnt to culture and use the essential microorganisms for production of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages. A fermented food is produced either spontaneously or by adding mixed/pure starter culture(s). Yeasts are among the essential functional microorganisms encountered in many fermented foods, and are commercially used in production of baker's yeast, breads, wine, beer, cheese, etc. In Asia, moulds are predominant followed by amylolytic and alcohol-producing yeasts in the fermentation processes, whereas in Africa, Europe, Australia and America, fermented products are prepared exclusively using bacteria or bacteria-yeasts mixed cultures. This chapter would focus on the varieties of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages produced by yeasts, their microbiology and role in food fermentation, widely used commercial starters (pilot production, molecular aspects), production technology of some common commercial fermented foods and alcoholic beverages, toxicity and food safety using yeasts cultures and socio-economy

  17. Experimental and theoretical NMR studies of interaction between phenylalanine derivative and egg yolk lecithin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wałęsa, Roksana; Ptak, Tomasz; Siodłak, Dawid; Kupka, Teobald; Broda, Małgorzata A

    2014-06-01

    The interaction of phenylalanine diamide (Ac-Phe-NHMe) with egg yolk lecithin (EYL) in chloroform was studied by (1)H and (13)C NMR. Six complexes EYL-Ac-Phe-NHMe, stabilized by N-H···O or/and C-H···O hydrogen bonds, were optimized at M06-2X/6-31G(d,p) level. The assignment of EYL and Ac-Phe-NHMe NMR signals was supported using GIAO (gauge including atomic orbital) NMR calculations at VSXC and B3LYP level of theory combined with STO-3Gmag basis set. Results of our study indicate that the interaction of peptides with lecithin occurs mainly in the polar 'head' of the lecithin. Additionally, the most probable lecithin site of H-bond interaction with Ac-Phe-NHMe is the negatively charged oxygen in phosphate group that acts as proton acceptor. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Sequence variation at the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in the British Isles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyfield, L.A. [Southmead Hospital, Bristol (United Kingdom)]|[Univ. of Bristol (United Kingdom); Stephenson, A. [Southmead Hospital, Bristol (United Kingdom); Cockburn, F. [Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Glasgow (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Using mutation and haplotype analysis, we have examined the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in the phenylketonuria populations of four geographical areas of the British Isles: the west of Scotland, southern Wales, and southwestern and southeastern England. The enormous genetic diversity of this locus within the British Isles is demonstrated in the large number of different mutations characterized and in the variety of genetic backgrounds on which individual mutations are found. Allele frequencies of the more common mutations exhibited significant nonrandom distribution in a north/south differentiation. Differences between the west of Scotland and southwestern England may be related to different events in the recent and past histories of their respective populations. Similarities between southern Wales and southeastern England are likely to reflect the heterogeneity that is seen in and around two large capital cities. Finally, comparison with more recently colonized areas of the world corroborates the genealogical origin by range expansion of several mutations. 38 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Preparation of carbon-11 labelled phenylalanine and phenylglycine by a new amino acid synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaalburg, W.; Beerling-van der Molen, H.D.; Reiffers, S; Rijskamp, A.; Woldring, M.G.; Wynberg, H.

    1976-01-01

    Of the cyclotron-produced short-lived isotopes carbon-11 (tsub(1/2) = 20.4 min;β + ) is one of the most promising as label for radiopharmaceuticals. To prepare 11 C-labelled amino acids for evaluation as pancreas scanning agents a new rapid amino acid synthesis was developed. The method is based on the carboxylation of α-lithioisocyanides with 11 CO 2 , followed by hydrolysis of the intermediate reaction product to the desired amino acid. By this method DL-α-phenylalanine-1- 11 C and DL-α-phenylglycine-1- 11 C were prepared. The precursor 11 CO 2 was produced via the 14 N(p,α) 11 C reaction by bombardment of a flow of nitrogen gas mixed with 0.1% 0 2 with 20 MeV protons. The target system is described. (author)

  20. Cloning, expression and characterization of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase from Rhodotorula glutinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Longbao; Cui, Wenjing; Fang, Yueqin; Liu, Yi; Gao, Xinxing; Zhou, Zhemin

    2013-05-01

    The industrial-scale production of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) mainly uses strains of Rhodotorula. However, the PAL gene from Rhodotorula has not been cloned. Here, the full-length gene of PAL from Rhodotorula glutinis was isolated. It was 2,121 bp, encoding a polypeptide with 706 amino acids and a calculated MW of 75.5 kDa. Though R. glutinis is an anamorph of Rhodosporium toruloides, the amino acid sequences of PALs them are not the same (about 74 % identity). PAL was expressed in E. coli and characterized. Its specific activity was 4.2 U mg(-1) and the k cat/K m was 1.9 × 10(4) mM(-1) s(-1), exhibiting the highest catalytic ability among the reported PALs. The genetic and biochemical information reported here should facilitate future application in industry.

  1. Synthesis of racemic [3-11C]phenylalanine and [3-11C] DOPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halldin, C.; Laangstroem, B.

    1984-01-01

    The synthesis of racemic [3- 11 C]phenylalanine and [3- 11 C]DOPA is reported. The [ 11 C]benzaldehyde and [ 11 C]veratraldehyde prepared in a two-step reaction from the corresponding [ 11 C]acid salt and [ 11 C]alcohol, by means of selective oxidation with tetrabutylammonium hydrogen chromate, were reacted with 2-phenyl-5-oxazolone or 2-(4-chloro)phenyl-5-oxazolone in the presence of a tertiary amine to give the corresponding [α- 11 C]-4-arylene-2-aryl-5-oxazolones. Ring opening of these olefins, hydrogenation, and removal of protecting groups was carried out in one step using hydroiodic cid/phosphorus, with the production of the racemic [3- 11 C]amino acids in 8-30% radiochemical yield (starting with 11 CO 2 ) within 52-60 min (including LC separation). (author)

  2. Exploring the biological consequences of conformational changes in aspartame models containing constrained analogues of phenylalanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Adriano; Mirzaie, Sako; Costante, Roberto; Carradori, Simone; Macedonio, Giorgia; Stefanucci, Azzurra; Dvoracsko, Szabolcs; Novellino, Ettore

    2016-12-01

    The dipeptide aspartame (Asp-Phe-OMe) is a sweetener widely used in replacement of sucrose by food industry. 2',6'-Dimethyltyrosine (DMT) and 2',6'-dimethylphenylalanine (DMP) are two synthetic phenylalanine-constrained analogues, with a limited freedom in χ-space due to the presence of methyl groups in position 2',6' of the aromatic ring. These residues have shown to increase the activity of opioid peptides, such as endomorphins improving the binding to the opioid receptors. In this work, DMT and DMP have been synthesized following a diketopiperazine-mediated route and the corresponding aspartame derivatives (Asp-DMT-OMe and Asp-DMP-OMe) have been evaluated in vivo and in silico for their activity as synthetic sweeteners.

  3. The adsorption of L-phenylalanine on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Lingyu; Liu, Quanrun; Li, Yongdan; Wang, Chen

    2009-02-01

    A simple and green approach was proceeded to obtain a stable single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)/L-phenylalanine (Phe) solution. The oxidized SWNTs (OSWNT) were used in this work. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectrometer, Fourier transform-infrared resonance (FT-IR), Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were joined together to investigate the interaction between OSWNT and Phe. The OSWNT became soluble in the water and formed a stable solution since the Phe was adsorbed. The absorbed amount of Phe on the OSWNT is around 33 wt%. Adsorption of the Phe was mainly carried out on the OSWNT with smaller diameters. The Phe molecules were absorbed on the OSWNT by conjunct interaction of the pi-pi stacking, hydrogen bond and part of covalent bond.

  4. Water-Transfer Slows Aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviv Cohen

    Full Text Available Transferring Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to water is known to extend their lifespan. However, it is unclear whether this lifespan extension is due to slowing the aging process or merely keeping old yeast alive. Here we show that in water-transferred yeast, the toxicity of polyQ proteins is decreased and the aging biomarker 47Q aggregates at a reduced rate and to a lesser extent. These beneficial effects of water-transfer could not be reproduced by diluting the growth medium and depended on de novo protein synthesis and proteasomes levels. Interestingly, we found that upon water-transfer 27 proteins are downregulated, 4 proteins are upregulated and 81 proteins change their intracellular localization, hinting at an active genetic program enabling the lifespan extension. Furthermore, the aging-related deterioration of the heat shock response (HSR, the unfolded protein response (UPR and the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD, was largely prevented in water-transferred yeast, as the activities of these proteostatic network pathways remained nearly as robust as in young yeast. The characteristics of young yeast that are actively maintained upon water-transfer indicate that the extended lifespan is the outcome of slowing the rate of the aging process.

  5. Water-Transfer Slows Aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aviv; Weindling, Esther; Rabinovich, Efrat; Nachman, Iftach; Fuchs, Shai; Chuartzman, Silvia; Gal, Lihi; Schuldiner, Maya; Bar-Nun, Shoshana

    2016-01-01

    Transferring Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to water is known to extend their lifespan. However, it is unclear whether this lifespan extension is due to slowing the aging process or merely keeping old yeast alive. Here we show that in water-transferred yeast, the toxicity of polyQ proteins is decreased and the aging biomarker 47Q aggregates at a reduced rate and to a lesser extent. These beneficial effects of water-transfer could not be reproduced by diluting the growth medium and depended on de novo protein synthesis and proteasomes levels. Interestingly, we found that upon water-transfer 27 proteins are downregulated, 4 proteins are upregulated and 81 proteins change their intracellular localization, hinting at an active genetic program enabling the lifespan extension. Furthermore, the aging-related deterioration of the heat shock response (HSR), the unfolded protein response (UPR) and the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD), was largely prevented in water-transferred yeast, as the activities of these proteostatic network pathways remained nearly as robust as in young yeast. The characteristics of young yeast that are actively maintained upon water-transfer indicate that the extended lifespan is the outcome of slowing the rate of the aging process.

  6. Acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion of phasic dopamine in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnitko, Tatiana A; Taylor, Sarah C; Stringfield, Sierra J; Zandy, Shannon L; Cofresí, Roberto U; Doherty, James M; Lynch, William B; Boettiger, Charlotte A; Gonzales, Rueben A; Robinson, Donita L

    2016-06-01

    Dopamine plays a critical role in striatal and cortical function, and depletion of the dopamine precursors phenylalanine and tyrosine is used in humans to temporarily reduce dopamine and probe the role of dopamine in behavior. This method has been shown to alter addiction-related behaviors and cognitive functioning presumably by reducing dopamine transmission, but it is unclear what specific aspects of dopamine transmission are altered. We performed this study to confirm that administration of an amino acid mixture omitting phenylalanine and tyrosine (Phe/Tyr[-]) reduces tyrosine tissue content in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc), and to test the hypothesis that Phe/Tyr[-] administration reduces phasic dopamine release in the NAc. Rats were injected with a Phe/Tyr[-] amino acid mixture, a control amino acid mixture, or saline. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to determine the concentration of tyrosine, dopamine, or norepinephrine in tissue punches from the PFC and ventral striatum. In a separate group of rats, phasic dopamine release was measured with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in the NAc core after injection with either the Phe/Tyr[-] mixture or the control amino acid solution. Phe/Tyr[-] reduced tyrosine content in the PFC and NAc, but dopamine and norepinephrine tissue content were not reduced. Moreover, Phe/Tyr[-] decreased the frequency of dopamine transients, but not their amplitude, in freely moving rats. These results indicate that depletion of tyrosine via Phe/Tyr[-] decreases phasic dopamine transmission, providing insight into the mechanism by which this method modifies dopamine-dependent behaviors in human imaging studies.

  7. Drosophila Regulate Yeast Density and Increase Yeast Community Similarity in a Natural Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Stamps, Judy A.; Yang, Louie H.; Morales, Vanessa M.; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster adults and larvae, but especially larvae, had profound effects on the densities and community structure of yeasts that developed in banana fruits. Pieces of fruit exposed to adult female flies previously fed fly-conditioned bananas developed higher yeast densities than pieces of the same fruits that were not exposed to flies, supporting previous suggestions that adult Drosophila vector yeasts to new substrates. However, larvae alone had dramatic effects on yeast densit...

  8. A survey of aspartate-phenylalanine and glutamate-phenylalanine interactions in the protein data bank: searching for anion-π pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Vivek; Harris, Jason; Adams, Rachel; Nguyen, Don; Spiers, Jeremy; Baudry, Jerome; Howell, Elizabeth E; Hinde, Robert J

    2011-04-12

    Protein structures are stabilized using noncovalent interactions. In addition to the traditional noncovalent interactions, newer types of interactions are thought to be present in proteins. One such interaction, an anion-π pair, in which the positively charged edge of an aromatic ring interacts with an anion, forming a favorable anion-quadrupole interaction, has been previously proposed [Jackson, M. R., et al. (2007) J. Phys. Chem. B111, 8242-8249]. To study the role of anion-π interactions in stabilizing protein structure, we analyzed pairwise interactions between phenylalanine (Phe) and the anionic amino acids, aspartate (Asp) and glutamate (Glu). Particular emphasis was focused on identification of Phe-Asp or -Glu pairs separated by less than 7 Å in the high-resolution, nonredundant Protein Data Bank. Simplifying Phe to benzene and Asp or Glu to formate molecules facilitated in silico analysis of the pairs. Kitaura-Morokuma energy calculations were performed on roughly 19000 benzene-formate pairs and the resulting energies analyzed as a function of distance and angle. Edgewise interactions typically produced strongly stabilizing interaction energies (-2 to -7.3 kcal/mol), while interactions involving the ring face resulted in weakly stabilizing to repulsive interaction energies. The strongest, most stabilizing interactions were identified as preferentially occurring in buried residues. Anion-π pairs are found throughout protein structures, in helices as well as β strands. Numerous pairs also had nearby cation-π interactions as well as potential π-π stacking. While more than 1000 structures did not contain an anion-π pair, the 3134 remaining structures contained approximately 2.6 anion-π pairs per protein, suggesting it is a reasonably common motif that could contribute to the overall structural stability of a protein.

  9. A Survey of Aspartate-Phenylalanine and Glutamate-Phenylalanine Interactions in the Protein Data Bank: Searching for Anion-pi Pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip, Vivek M [ORNL; Harris, Jason B [ORNL; Adams, Rachel M [ORNL; Nguyen, Don [University of Tennessee; Spiers, Jeremy D [ORNL; Baudry, Jerome Y [ORNL; Howell, Elizabeth E [ORNL; Hinde, Robert J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Protein structures are stabilized using noncovalent interactions. In addition to the traditional noncovalent interactions, newer types of interactions are thought to be present in proteins. One such interaction, an anion-{pi} pair, in which the positively charged edge of an aromatic ring interacts with an anion, forming a favorable anion-quadrupole interaction, has been previously proposed [Jackson, M. R., et al. (2007) J. Phys. Chem. B111, 8242-8249]. To study the role of anion-{pi} interactions in stabilizing protein structure, we analyzed pairwise interactions between phenylalanine (Phe) and the anionic amino acids, aspartate (Asp) and glutamate (Glu). Particular emphasis was focused on identification of Phe-Asp or -Glu pairs separated by less than 7 {angstrom} in the high-resolution, nonredundant Protein Data Bank. Simplifying Phe to benzene and Asp or Glu to formate molecules facilitated in silico analysis of the pairs. Kitaura-Morokuma energy calculations were performed on roughly 19000 benzene-formate pairs and the resulting energies analyzed as a function of distance and angle. Edgewise interactions typically produced strongly stabilizing interaction energies (-2 to -7.3 kcal/mol), while interactions involving the ring face resulted in weakly stabilizing to repulsive interaction energies. The strongest, most stabilizing interactions were identified as preferentially occurring in buried residues. Anion-{pi} pairs are found throughout protein structures, in helices as well as {beta} strands. Numerous pairs also had nearby cation-{pi} interactions as well as potential {pi}-{pi} stacking. While more than 1000 structures did not contain an anion-{pi} pair, the 3134 remaining structures contained approximately 2.6 anion-{pi} pairs per protein, suggesting it is a reasonably common motif that could contribute to the overall structural stability of a protein.

  10. The measurement of muscle protein synthesis in broilers with a flooding dose technique: use of 15N-labelled phenylalanine, GC-MS and GC-C-IRMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dänicke, S; Böttcher, W; Simon, O; Jeroch, H

    2001-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to measure fractional muscle protein synthesis rates (k(s)) in broilers with injection of a flooding dose of phenylalanine (1 ml/100 g body weight of 150 mM phenylalanine; 38 atom percent excess (APE) [15N]phenylalanine). K(s) was calculated from the [15N] enrichment in phenylalanine of tissue-free and protein-bound phenylalanine using both gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) for measurements after a 10 min isotope incorporation period. The tertiary-butyldimethylsilyl (t-BDMS) derivatives of phenylalanine were used for gas chromatographic separation in both systems. GC-MS and GC-C-IRMS were calibrated for a range of 7 to 37 [15N]APE and 0 to 0.62 [15N]APE, respectively, and for sample sizes of 0.45 to 4.5 nmol phenylalanine and 7 to 40 nmol phenylalanine, respectively. Reproducibility of standards as a measure of precision varied from 0.06 to 0.29 [15N]APE and from 0.0004 to 0.0018 [15N]APE in GC-MS and GC-C-IRMS, respectively. K(s) was measured in the m. pectoralis major of broilers fed rye based diets (56%) which were provided either unsupplemented (-) or supplemented (+) with an enzyme preparation containing xylanase. K(s) in breast muscles was significantly increased from 21.8%/d to 23.9%/d due to enzyme supplementation. It can be concluded from the study that the measurement of protein synthesis in broilers with the flooding dose technique can be carried out by using [15N]phenylalanine, GC-MS and GC-C-IRMS.

  11. YMDB: the Yeast Metabolome Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewison, Timothy; Knox, Craig; Neveu, Vanessa; Djoumbou, Yannick; Guo, An Chi; Lee, Jacqueline; Liu, Philip; Mandal, Rupasri; Krishnamurthy, Ram; Sinelnikov, Igor; Wilson, Michael; Wishart, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The Yeast Metabolome Database (YMDB, http://www.ymdb.ca) is a richly annotated ‘metabolomic’ database containing detailed information about the metabolome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Modeled closely after the Human Metabolome Database, the YMDB contains >2000 metabolites with links to 995 different genes/proteins, including enzymes and transporters. The information in YMDB has been gathered from hundreds of books, journal articles and electronic databases. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the YMDB also contains an extensive collection of experimental intracellular and extracellular metabolite concentration data compiled from detailed Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) metabolomic analyses performed in our lab. This is further supplemented with thousands of NMR and MS spectra collected on pure, reference yeast metabolites. Each metabolite entry in the YMDB contains an average of 80 separate data fields including comprehensive compound description, names and synonyms, structural information, physico-chemical data, reference NMR and MS spectra, intracellular/extracellular concentrations, growth conditions and substrates, pathway information, enzyme data, gene/protein sequence data, as well as numerous hyperlinks to images, references and other public databases. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided that support text, chemical structure, spectral, molecular weight and gene/protein sequence queries. Because of S. cervesiae's importance as a model organism for biologists and as a biofactory for industry, we believe this kind of database could have considerable appeal not only to metabolomics researchers, but also to yeast biologists, systems biologists, the industrial fermentation industry, as well as the beer, wine and spirit industry. PMID:22064855

  12. Engineering 1-Alkene Biosynthesis and Secretion by Dynamic Regulation in Yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Yongjin J.; Hu, Yating; Zhu, Zhiwei

    2018-01-01

    strategy to control the expression of membrane enzyme and 1-alkene production and cell growth by relieving the possible toxicity of overexpressed membrane proteins. With these efforts, the engineered yeast cell factory produced 35.3 mg/L 1-alkenes with more than 80% being secreted. This represents a 10...... product secretion. Here, we engineered the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce and secrete 1-alkenes by manipulation of the fatty acid metabolism, enzyme selection, engineering the electron transfer system and expressing a transporter. Furthermore, we implemented a dynamic regulation...

  13. Functional co-operation between the nuclei of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mitochondria from other yeast species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spirek, M.; Horvath, A.; Piskur, Jure

    2000-01-01

    We elaborated a simple method that allows the transfer of mitochondria from collection yeasts to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Protoplasts prepared from different yeasts were fused to the protoplasts of the ade2-1, ura3-52, kar1-1, rho (0) strain of S. cerevisiae and were selected for respiring cybrids....... italicus, S, oviformis, S. capensis and S. chevalieri) exhibited complete compatibility with S. cerevisiae nuclei. The closely related S. douglasii mitochondrial genome could also partially restore respiration-deficiency in rho (0) S. cerevisiae, whereas mitochondrial genomes from phylogenetically less...

  14. Experimental evolution in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    I will discuss our progress in analyzing evolution in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We take two basic approaches. The first is to try and examine quantitative aspects of evolution, for example by determining how the rate of evolution depends on the mutation rate and the population size or asking whether the rate of mutation is uniform throughout the genome. The second is to try to evolve qualitatively novel, cell biologically interesting phenotypes and track the mutations that are responsible for the phenotype. Our efforts include trying to alter cell morphology, evolve multicellularity, and produce a biological oscillator.

  15. Chemostat Culture for Yeast Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Emily O; Dunham, Maitreya J

    2017-07-05

    The use of chemostat culture facilitates the careful comparison of different yeast strains growing in well-defined conditions. Variations in physiology can be measured by examining gene expression, metabolite levels, protein content, and cell morphology. In this protocol, we show how a combination of sample types can be collected during harvest from a single 20-mL chemostat in a ministat array, with special attention to coordinating the handling of the most time-sensitive sample types. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Biodiesel generation from oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biodiesel generation from oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis with xylose assimilating capacity. ... Biodiesel generation from oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis with xylose assimilating capacity. C Dai, J Tao, F Xie, Y Dai, M Zhao. Abstract. This study explored a strategy to convert agricultural and forestry residues into ...

  17. Yeasts in sustainable bioethanol production: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Azhar, Siti Hajar; Abdulla, Rahmath; Jambo, Siti Azmah; Marbawi, Hartinie; Gansau, Jualang Azlan; Mohd Faik, Ainol Azifa; Rodrigues, Kenneth Francis

    2017-07-01

    Bioethanol has been identified as the mostly used biofuel worldwide since it significantly contributes to the reduction of crude oil consumption and environmental pollution. It can be produced from various types of feedstocks such as sucrose, starch, lignocellulosic and algal biomass through fermentation process by microorganisms. Compared to other types of microoganisms, yeasts especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the common microbes employed in ethanol production due to its high ethanol productivity, high ethanol tolerance and ability of fermenting wide range of sugars. However, there are some challenges in yeast fermentation which inhibit ethanol production such as high temperature, high ethanol concentration and the ability to ferment pentose sugars. Various types of yeast strains have been used in fermentation for ethanol production including hybrid, recombinant and wild-type yeasts. Yeasts can directly ferment simple sugars into ethanol while other type of feedstocks must be converted to fermentable sugars before it can be fermented to ethanol. The common processes involves in ethanol production are pretreatment, hydrolysis and fermentation. Production of bioethanol during fermentation depends on several factors such as temperature, sugar concentration, pH, fermentation time, agitation rate, and inoculum size. The efficiency and productivity of ethanol can be enhanced by immobilizing the yeast cells. This review highlights the different types of yeast strains, fermentation process, factors affecting bioethanol production and immobilization of yeasts for better bioethanol production.

  18. The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Dashko, Sofia; Ishchuk, Olena P; Piškur, Jure

    2014-09-01

    Recently, the non-conventional yeast Dekkera bruxellensis has been gaining more and more attention in the food industry and academic research. This yeast species is a distant relative of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is especially known for two important characteristics: on the one hand, it is considered to be one of the main spoilage organisms in the wine and bioethanol industry; on the other hand, it is 'indispensable' as a contributor to the flavour profile of Belgium lambic and gueuze beers. Additionally, it adds to the characteristic aromatic properties of some red wines. Recently this yeast has also become a model for the study of yeast evolution. In this review we focus on the recently developed molecular and genetic tools, such as complete genome sequencing and transformation, to study and manipulate this yeast. We also focus on the areas that are particularly well explored in this yeast, such as the synthesis of off-flavours, yeast detection methods, carbon metabolism and evolutionary history. © 2014 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Biodiesel generation from oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-09-19

    Sep 19, 2007 ... This study explored a strategy to convert agricultural and forestry residues into microbial lipid, which could be further transformed into biodiesel. Among the 250 yeast strains screened for xylose assimilating capacity, eight oleaginous yeasts were selected by Sudan Black B test. The lipid content of these 8 ...

  20. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... stabilized color additive mixture. Color additive mixtures for fish feed use made with phaffia yeast may... additive mixtures for coloring foods. (b) Specifications. Phaffia yeast shall conform to the following... § 501.4 of this chapter. (3) The presence of the color additive in salmonid fish that have been fed...

  1. Biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanotes in wildtype yeasts | Desuoky ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biosynthesis of the biodegradable polymers polyhydroxyalkanotes (PHAs) are studied extensively in wild type and genetically modified prokaryotic cells, however the content and structure of PHA in wild type yeasts are not well documented. The purpose of this study was to screen forty yeast isolates collected from different ...

  2. Virgin olive oil yeasts: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciafardini, Gino; Zullo, Biagi Angelo

    2018-04-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge on virgin olive oil yeasts. Newly produced olive oil contains solid particles and micro drops of vegetation water in which yeasts reproduce to become the typical microbiota of olive oil. To date, about seventeen yeast species have been isolated from different types of olive oils and their by-products, of which six species have been identified as new species. Certain yeast species contribute greatly to improving the sensorial characteristics of the newly produced olive oil, whereas other species are considered harmful as they can damage the oil quality through the production of unpleasant flavors and triacylglycerol hydrolysis. Studies carried out in certain yeast strains have demonstrated the presence of defects in olive oil treated with Candida adriatica, Nakazawaea wickerhamii and Candida diddensiae specific strains, while other olive oil samples treated with other Candida diddensiae strains were defect-free after four months of storage and categorized as extra virgin. A new acetic acid producing yeast species, namely, Brettanomyces acidodurans sp. nov., which was recently isolated from olive oil, could be implicated in the wine-vinegary defect of the product. Other aspects related to the activity of the lipase-producing yeasts and the survival of the yeast species in the flavored olive oils are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Yeasts in sustainable bioethanol production: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hajar Mohd Azhar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol has been identified as the mostly used biofuel worldwide since it significantly contributes to the reduction of crude oil consumption and environmental pollution. It can be produced from various types of feedstocks such as sucrose, starch, lignocellulosic and algal biomass through fermentation process by microorganisms. Compared to other types of microoganisms, yeasts especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the common microbes employed in ethanol production due to its high ethanol productivity, high ethanol tolerance and ability of fermenting wide range of sugars. However, there are some challenges in yeast fermentation which inhibit ethanol production such as high temperature, high ethanol concentration and the ability to ferment pentose sugars. Various types of yeast strains have been used in fermentation for ethanol production including hybrid, recombinant and wild-type yeasts. Yeasts can directly ferment simple sugars into ethanol while other type of feedstocks must be converted to fermentable sugars before it can be fermented to ethanol. The common processes involves in ethanol production are pretreatment, hydrolysis and fermentation. Production of bioethanol during fermentation depends on several factors such as temperature, sugar concentration, pH, fermentation time, agitation rate, and inoculum size. The efficiency and productivity of ethanol can be enhanced by immobilizing the yeast cells. This review highlights the different types of yeast strains, fermentation process, factors affecting bioethanol production and immobilization of yeasts for better bioethanol production.

  4. The essence of yeast quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Virgilio, Claudio

    2012-03-01

    Like all microorganisms, yeast cells spend most of their natural lifetime in a reversible, quiescent state that is primarily induced by limitation for essential nutrients. Substantial progress has been made in defining the features of quiescent cells and the nutrient-signaling pathways that shape these features. A view that emerges from the wealth of new data is that yeast cells dynamically configure the quiescent state in response to nutritional challenges by using a set of key nutrient-signaling pathways, which (1) regulate pathway-specific effectors, (2) converge on a few regulatory nodes that bundle multiple inputs to communicate unified, graded responses, and (3) mutually modulate their competences to transmit signals. Here, I present an overview of our current understanding of the architecture of these pathways, focusing on how the corresponding core signaling protein kinases (i.e. PKA, TORC1, Snf1, and Pho85) are wired to ensure an adequate response to nutrient starvation, which enables cells to tide over decades, if not centuries, of famine. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comet assay on tetraploid yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Jette; Syberg, Kristian; Jensen, Klara

    2009-01-01

    Tetraploid yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were used in the comet assay with the intention of developing a new, fast and easy assay for detecting environmental genotoxic agents without using higher organisms. Two DNA-damaging chemicals, H2O2 and acrylamide, together with wastewater from...... three municipal treatment plants were tested for their effect on the yeast-cell DNA. The main problem with using yeast in the comet assay is the necessity to degrade the cell wall. This was achieved by using Zymolase 100 T twice during the procedure, since Zymolase 20 T did not open the cell wall....... Analytical problems that arose due to the small amount of DNA in the yeast nuclei in haploid and diploid cells, which contain 13 Mbp and 26 Mbp DNA per cell, respectively, were solved by using tetraploid yeast cells (52 Mbp) instead. DNA damage was shown after exposure to H2O2 and acrylamide. The lowest dose...

  6. Multicenter Evaluation of the Bruker MALDI Biotyper CA System for the Identification of Clinically Important Bacteria and Yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deborah A; Young, Stephen; Timm, Karen; Novak-Weekley, Susan; Marlowe, Elizabeth M; Madisen, Neil; Lillie, Jennifer L; Ledeboer, Nathan A; Smith, Rebecca; Hyke, Josh; Griego-Fullbright, Christen; Jim, Patricia; Granato, Paul A; Faron, Matthew L; Cumpio, Joven; Buchan, Blake W; Procop, Gary W

    2017-06-01

    A report on the multicenter evaluation of the Bruker MALDI Biotyper CA System (MBT-CA; Bruker Daltonics, Billerica, MA) for the identification of clinically important bacteria and yeasts. In total, 4,399 isolates of medically important bacteria and yeasts were assessed in the MBT-CA. These included 2,262 aerobic gram-positive (AGP) bacteria, 792 aerobic gram-negative (AGN) bacteria 530 anaerobic (AnA) bacteria, and 815 yeasts (YSTs). Three processing methods were assesed. Overall, 98.4% (4,329/4,399) of all bacterial and yeast isolates were correctly identified to the genus and species/species complex level, and 95.7% of isolates were identified with a high degree of confidence. The percentage correctly identified and the percentage identified correctly with a high level of confidence, respectively, were as follows: AGP bacteria (98.6%/96.5%), AGN bacteria (98.5%/96.8%), AnA bacteria (98.5%/97.4%), and YSTs (97.8%/87.6%). The extended direct transfer method was only minimally superior to the direct transfer method for bacteria (89.9% vs 86.8%, respectively) but significantly superior for yeast isolates (74.0% vs 48.9%, respectively). The Bruker MALDI Biotyper CA System accurately identifies most clinically important bacteria and yeasts and has optional processing methods to improve isolate characterization. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. Electron transport chain in a thermotolerant yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Barajas, Jorge A; Martínez-Mora, José A; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael; Noriega-Cisneros, Ruth; Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Cortés-Rojo, Christian; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo

    2017-04-01

    Yeasts capable of growing and surviving at high temperatures are regarded as thermotolerant. For appropriate functioning of cellular processes and cell survival, the maintenance of an optimal redox state is critical of reducing and oxidizing species. We studied mitochondrial functions of the thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus SLP1 and the mesophilic OFF1 yeasts, through the evaluation of its mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ), ATPase activity, electron transport chain (ETC) activities, alternative oxidase activity, lipid peroxidation. Mitochondrial membrane potential and the cytoplasmic free Ca 2+ ions (Ca 2+ cyt) increased in the SLP1 yeast when exposed to high temperature, compared with the mesophilic yeast OFF1. ATPase activity in the mesophilic yeast diminished 80% when exposed to 40° while the thermotolerant SLP1 showed no change, despite an increase in the mitochondrial lipid peroxidation. The SLP1 thermotolerant yeast exposed to high temperature showed a diminution of 33% of the oxygen consumption in state 4. The uncoupled state 3 of oxygen consumption did not change in the mesophilic yeast when it had an increase of temperature, whereas in the thermotolerant SLP1 yeast resulted in an increase of 2.5 times when yeast were grown at 30 o , while a decrease of 51% was observed when it was exposed to high temperature. The activities of the ETC complexes were diminished in the SLP1 when exposed to high temperature, but also it was distinguished an alternative oxidase activity. Our results suggest that the mitochondria state, particularly ETC state, is an important characteristic of the thermotolerance of the SLP1 yeast strain.

  8. Structural And Biochemical Characterization of the Therapeutic A. Variabilis Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L.; Gamez, A.; Archer, H.; Abola, E.E.; Sarkissian, C.N.; Fitzpatrick, P.; Wendt, D.; Zhang, Y.; Vellard, M.; Bliesath, J.; Bell, S.; Lemont, J.; Scriver, C.R.; Stevens, R.C.

    2009-05-26

    We have recently observed promising success in a mouse model for treating the metabolic disorder phenylketonuria with phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) from Rhodosporidium toruloides and Anabaena variabilis. Both molecules, however, required further optimization in order to overcome problems with protease susceptibility, thermal stability, and aggregation. Previously, we optimized PAL from R. toruloides, and in this case we reduced aggregation of the A. variabilis PAL by mutating two surface cysteine residues (C503 and C565) to serines. Additionally, we report the structural and biochemical characterization of the A. variabilis PAL C503S/C565S double mutant and carefully compare this molecule with the R. toruloides engineered PAL molecule. Unlike previously published PAL structures, significant electron density is observed for the two active-site loops in the A. variabilis C503S/C565S double mutant, yielding a complete view of the active site. Docking studies and N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin binding studies support a proposed mechanism in which the amino group of the phenylalanine substrate is attacked directly by the 4-methylidene-imidazole-5-one prosthetic group. We propose a helix-to-loop conformational switch in the helices flanking the inner active-site loop that regulates accessibility of the active site. Differences in loop stability among PAL homologs may explain the observed variation in enzyme efficiency, despite the highly conserved structure of the active site. A. variabilis C503S/C565S PAL is shown to be both more thermally stable and more resistant to proteolytic cleavage than R. toruloides PAL. Additional increases in thermal stability and protease resistance upon ligand binding may be due to enhanced interactions among the residues of the active site, possibly locking the active-site structure in place and stabilizing the tetramer. Examination of the A. variabilis C503S/C565S PAL structure, combined with analysis of its physical properties, provides

  9. Splicing of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) exon 11 is vulnerable - Molecular pathology of mutations in PAH exon 11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heintz, Caroline; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard

    2012-01-01

    as a vulnerable exon and used patient derived lymphoblast cell lines and PAH minigenes to study the molecular defect that impacted pre-mRNA processing. We showed that the c.1144T>C and c.1066-3C>T mutations cause exon 11 skipping, while the c.1139C>T mutation is neutral or slightly beneficial. The c.1144T......In about 20-30% of phenylketonuria (PKU) patients, phenylalanine (Phe) levels can be controlled by cofactor 6R-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) administration. The phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) genotype has a predictive value concerning BH(4)-response and therefore a correct assessment of the mutation...... molecular pathology is important. Mutations that disturb the splicing of exons (e.g. interplay between splice site strength and regulatory sequences like exon splicing enhancers (ESEs)/exon splicing silencers (ESSs)) may cause different severity of PKU. In this study, we identified PAH exon 11...

  10. The metabolism of L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine by liver cells isolated from adrenalectomized rats and from streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Stanley, J C; Fisher, M J; Pogson, C I

    1985-01-01

    Flux through, and maximal activities of, key enzymes of phenylalanine and tyrosine degradation were measured in liver cells prepared from adrenalectomized rats and from streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Adrenalectomy decreased the phenylalanine hydroxylase flux/activity ratio; this was restored by steroid treatment in vivo. Changes in the phosphorylation state of the hydroxylase may mediate these effects; there was no significant change in the maximal activity of the hydroxylase. Tyrosine metabol...

  11. Distinct Domestication Trajectories in Top-Fermenting Beer Yeasts and Wine Yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Margarida; Pontes, Ana; Almeida, Pedro; Barbosa, Raquel; Serra, Marta; Libkind, Diego; Hutzler, Mathias; Gonçalves, Paula; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2016-10-24

    Beer is one of the oldest alcoholic beverages and is produced by the fermentation of sugars derived from starches present in cereal grains. Contrary to lager beers, made by bottom-fermenting strains of Saccharomyces pastorianus, a hybrid yeast, ale beers are closer to the ancient beer type and are fermented by S. cerevisiae, a top-fermenting yeast. Here, we use population genomics to investigate (1) the closest relatives of top-fermenting beer yeasts; (2) whether top-fermenting yeasts represent an independent domestication event separate from those already described; (3) whether single or multiple beer yeast domestication events can be inferred; and (4) whether top-fermenting yeasts represent non-recombinant or recombinant lineages. Our results revealed that top-fermenting beer yeasts are polyphyletic, with a main clade composed of at least three subgroups, dominantly represented by the German, British, and wheat beer strains. Other beer strains were phylogenetically close to sake, wine, or bread yeasts. We detected genetic signatures of beer yeast domestication by investigating genes previously linked to brewing and using genome-wide scans. We propose that the emergence of the main clade of beer yeasts is related with a domestication event distinct from the previously known cases of wine and sake yeast domestication. The nucleotide diversity of the main beer clade more than doubled that of wine yeasts, which might be a consequence of fundamental differences in the modes of beer and wine yeast domestication. The higher diversity of beer strains could be due to the more intense and different selection regimes associated to brewing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tracer experiment administering L-phenylalanine-U-14C and L-tyrosine-U-14C to the tissue slices of bamboo shoots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozukue, E.; Mizuno, S.

    1987-01-01

    Uniformly 14 C-labeled L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine were administered to tissue slices of both top and base sections of bamboo shoots. Alcohol soluble substances were extracted and then separated into organic acid, sugar and amino acid fractions by ion exchange chromatography. The homogentisic acid fraction among the organic acids was collected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and its radioactivity was measured, while the alcohol insoluble residue was used for the analysis of lignin aldehyde by the method of alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation. 1. The two labeled amino acids were steadily incorporated into the tissues during incubation and rapidly converted to organic acid, sugar and alcohol insoluble residue, especially the latter. 2. On determining the amount of phenylalanine converted to tyrosine, it was found that this was extremely small. 3. The incorporation of phenylalanine-U- 14 C into alcohol insoluble residue was higher than that of tyrosine in both sections. 4. Although the conversion into lignin aldehyde from phenylalanine-U- 14 C was higher than that from tyrosine-U- 14 C, it was found that tyrosine incorporated into the shoots was converted to a remarkable extent for formation of lignin aldehyde. 5. The incorporation of phenylalanine and tyrosine into homogentisic acid was very low. From these results, we assume that the conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine or of tyrosine to homogentisic acid is very small, and that a part of the high amount of tyrosine in the shoots may be used for formation of lignin

  13. Biochemical Evaluation of Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase from Endemic Plant Cyathobasis fruticulosa (Bunge Aellen. for the Dietary Treatment of Phenylketonuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Şirin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzyme substitution therapy with the phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL is a new approach to the treatment of patients with phenylketonuria (PKU. This enzyme is responsible for the conversion of phenylalanine to trans-cinnamic acid. We assessed the PAL enzyme of the endemic plant Cyathobasis fruticulosa (Bunge Aellen. for its possible role in the dietary treatment of PKU. The enzyme was found to have a high activity of (64.9±0.1 U/mg, with the optimum pH, temperature and buffer (Tris–HCl and L-phenylalanine concentration levels of pH=8.8, 37 °C and 100 mM, respectively. Optimum enzyme activity was achieved at pH=4.0 and 7.5, corresponding to pH levels of gastric and intestinal juice, and NaCl concentration of 200 mM. The purifi cation of the enzyme by 1.87-fold yielded an activity of 98.6 U/mg. PAL activities determined by HPLC analyses before and after purification were similar. Two protein bands, one at 70 and the other at 23 kDa, were determined by Western blot analysis of the enzyme. This enzyme is a potential candidate for serial production of dietary food and biotechnological products.

  14. Evaluation of an Adsorbent Based on Agricultural Waste (Corn Cobs for Removal of Tyrosine and Phenylalanine from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele C. O. Alves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of phenolic amino acids, such as phenylalanine and tyrosine, is quite relevant for the production of protein hydrolysates used as dietary formulations for patients suffering from congenital disorders of amino acid metabolism, such as phenylketonuria. In this study, an adsorbent prepared from corn cobs was evaluated for the removal of tyrosine (Tyr from both a single component solution and a binary aqueous solution with phenylalanine (Phe. The adsorption behavior of tyrosine was similar to that of phenylalanine in single component solutions, however, with a much lower adsorption capacity (14 mg g−1 for Tyr compared to 109 mg g−1 for Phe. Tyr adsorption kinetics was satisfactorily described by a pseudosecond-order model as it was for Phe. In adsorption equilibrium studies for binary mixtures, the presence of Tyr in Phe solutions favored Phe faster adsorption whereas the opposite behavior was observed for the presence of Phe in Tyr solutions. Such results indicate that, in binary systems, Phe will be adsorbed preferably to Tyr, and this is a welcome feature when employing the prepared adsorbent for the removal of Phe from protein hydrolysates to be used in dietary formulations for phenylketonuria treatment.

  15. Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hittinger, Chris Todd; Rokas, Antonis; Bai, Feng-Yan; Boekhout, Teun; Gonçalves, Paula; Jeffries, Thomas W; Kominek, Jacek; Lachance, Marc-André; Libkind, Diego; Rosa, Carlos A; Sampaio, José Paulo; Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2015-12-01

    Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces cerevisiae; the common human commensal and opportunistic pathogen, Candida albicans; and over 1000 other known species (with more continuing to be discovered). Yeasts are found in every biome and continent and are more genetically diverse than angiosperms or chordates. Ease of culture, simple life cycles, and small genomes (∼10-20Mbp) have made yeasts exceptional models for molecular genetics, biotechnology, and evolutionary genomics. Here we discuss recent developments in understanding the genomic underpinnings of the making of yeast biodiversity, comparing and contrasting natural and human-associated evolutionary processes. Only a tiny fraction of yeast biodiversity and metabolic capabilities has been tapped by industry and science. Expanding the taxonomic breadth of deep genomic investigations will further illuminate how genome function evolves to encode their diverse metabolisms and ecologies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Yeast-based biosensors: design and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniran, Adebola; Sherer, Michael; Tyo, Keith E J

    2015-02-01

    Yeast-based biosensing (YBB) is an exciting research area, as many studies have demonstrated the use of yeasts to accurately detect specific molecules. Biosensors incorporating various yeasts have been reported to detect an incredibly large range of molecules including but not limited to odorants, metals, intracellular metabolites, carcinogens, lactate, alcohols, and sugars. We review the detection strategies available for different types of analytes, as well as the wide range of output methods that have been incorporated with yeast biosensors. We group biosensors into two categories: those that are dependent upon transcription of a gene to report the detection of a desired molecule and those that are independent of this reporting mechanism. Transcription-dependent biosensors frequently depend on heterologous expression of sensing elements from non-yeast organisms, a strategy that has greatly expanded the range of molecules available for detection by YBBs. Transcription-independent biosensors circumvent the problem of sensing difficult-to-detect analytes by instead relying on yeast metabolism to generate easily detected molecules when the analyte is present. The use of yeast as the sensing element in biosensors has proven to be successful and continues to hold great promise for a variety of applications. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  17. Accelerating Yeast Prion Biology using Droplet Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Lloyd; Rotem, Assaf; Jarosz, Daniel; Datta, Manoshi; Lindquist, Susan; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Prions are infectious proteins in a misfolded form, that can induce normal proteins to take the misfolded state. Yeast prions are relevant, as a model of human prion diseases, and interesting from an evolutionary standpoint. Prions may also be a form of epigenetic inheritance, which allow yeast to adapt to stressful conditions at rates exceeding those of random mutations and propagate that adaptation to their offspring. Encapsulation of yeast in droplet microfluidic devices enables high-throughput measurements with single cell resolution, which would not be feasible using bulk methods. Millions of populations of yeast can be screened to obtain reliable measurements of prion induction and loss rates. The population dynamics of clonal yeast, when a fraction of the cells are prion expressing, can be elucidated. Furthermore, the mechanism by which certain strains of bacteria induce yeast to express prions in the wild can be deduced. Integrating the disparate fields of prion biology and droplet microfluidics reveals a more complete picture of how prions may be more than just diseases and play a functional role in yeast.

  18. Control of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene promoters from pea by UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluskota, W.E.; Michalczyk, D.J.; Gorecki, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    The gene fusion system was used to study UV light-control of PS PAL1 and PS PAL2 genes encoding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase of pea. The induction of pea PAL promoters was analysed in transgenic tobacco plants. Binary plasmids (derivatives of pBI101.2 vector) containing 5' regulatory fragments of PS PAL1 and PS PAL2 linked to reporter genes (GUS, LUC) were constructed. The analyses were performed with the use of single constructs (containing one variant of PS PAL promoter and one reporter gene) and dual constructs (containing both PS PAL1 and PS PAL2 promoters connected with different reporter genes). The use of dual constructs enabled the evaluation of both PS PAL promoters activity in the same plant. The analyses of in vitro grown plants have shown that both PAL promoters are strongly induced in leaves subjected to UV radiation. In some cases, the UV-stimulated expression exceeded the exposed areas. This phenomenon was observed more often in the leaves of plants containing the PS PAL1::GUS than PS PAL2::GUS construct. Removal of boxes 2, 4, 5 from PS PAL1 promoter and deletion of its 5' end region (-339 to -1394) decreases the level of gene expression but does not eliminate its responsiveness to UV

  19. A phenylalanine in DGAT is a key determinant of oil content and composition in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peizhong; Allen, William B; Roesler, Keith; Williams, Mark E; Zhang, Shirong; Li, Jiming; Glassman, Kimberly; Ranch, Jerry; Nubel, Douglas; Solawetz, William; Bhattramakki, Dinakar; Llaca, Victor; Deschamps, Stéphane; Zhong, Gan-Yuan; Tarczynski, Mitchell C; Shen, Bo

    2008-03-01

    Plant oil is an important renewable resource for biodiesel production and for dietary consumption by humans and livestock. Through genetic mapping of the oil trait in plants, studies have reported multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with small effects, but the molecular basis of oil QTLs remains largely unknown. Here we show that a high-oil QTL (qHO6) affecting maize seed oil and oleic-acid contents encodes an acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT1-2), which catalyzes the final step of oil synthesis. We further show that a phenylalanine insertion in DGAT1-2 at position 469 (F469) is responsible for the increased oil and oleic-acid contents. The DGAT1-2 allele with F469 is ancestral, whereas the allele without F469 is a more recent mutant selected by domestication or breeding. Ectopic expression of the high-oil DGAT1-2 allele increases oil and oleic-acid contents by up to 41% and 107%, respectively. This work provides insights into the molecular basis of natural variation of oil and oleic-acid contents in plants and highlights DGAT as a promising target for increasing oil and oleic-acid contents in other crops.

  20. Regional mapping of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene and the phenylketonuria locus in the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidsky, A.S.; Law, M.L.; Morse, H.G.; Kao, F.T.; Rabin, M.; Ruddle, F.H.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1985-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder of amino acid metabolism caused by a deficiency of the hepatic enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. To define the regional map position of the disease locus and the PAH gene on human chromosome 12, DNA was isolated from human-hamster somatic cell hybrids with various deletions of human chromosome 12 and was analyzed by Southern blot analysis using the human cDNA PAH clone as a hybridization probe. From these results, together with detailed biochemical and cytogenetic characterization of the hybrid cells, the region on chromosome 12 containing the human PAH gene has been defined as 12q14.3..-->..qter. The PAH map position on chromosome 12 was further localized by in situ hybridization of /sup 125/I-labeled human PAH cDNA to chromosomes prepared from a human lymphoblastoid cell line. Results of these experiments demonstrated that the region on chromosome 12 containing the PAH gene and the PKU locus in man is 12q22..-->..12q24.1. These results not only provide a regionalized map position for a major human disease locus but also can serve as a reference point for linkage analysis with other DNA markers on human chromosome 12.

  1. Regional mapping of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene and the phenylketonuria locus in the human genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidsky, A.S.; Law, M.L.; Morse, H.G.; Kao, F.T.; Rabin, M.; Ruddle, F.H.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1985-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder of amino acid metabolism caused by a deficiency of the hepatic enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. To define the regional map position of the disease locus and the PAH gene on human chromosome 12, DNA was isolated from human-hamster somatic cell hybrids with various deletions of human chromosome 12 and was analyzed by Southern blot analysis using the human cDNA PAH clone as a hybridization probe. From these results, together with detailed biochemical and cytogenetic characterization of the hybrid cells, the region on chromosome 12 containing the human PAH gene has been defined as 12q14.3→qter. The PAH map position on chromosome 12 was further localized by in situ hybridization of 125 I-labeled human PAH cDNA to chromosomes prepared from a human lymphoblastoid cell line. Results of these experiments demonstrated that the region on chromosome 12 containing the PAH gene and the PKU locus in man is 12q22→12q24.1. These results not only provide a regionalized map position for a major human disease locus but also can serve as a reference point for linkage analysis with other DNA markers on human chromosome 12

  2. Gypsy Phenylketonuria: A point mutation of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in Gypsy families from Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalanin, J. [Institute for Clinical and Experical Medicine, Praha (Czechoslovakia); Takarada, Y. [Toyobo Research Center, Shiga (Japan); Kagawa, S.; Yamashita, K.; Ohtsuka, N.; Matsuoka, A. [Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan)

    1994-01-15

    A direct mutational analysis of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene (PAH) in Gypsy families with phenylketonuria (PKU) has not yet been presented. However, they obviously represent a group at high risk for this inherited disease. The authors analyzed the PAH loci of 65 Gypsies originating from Eastern Slovakia by a combination of PCR amplification, direct sequencing and ASO hybridization. These studies uncovered 10 {open_quotes}classical PKU{close_quotes} patients to be homozygous for a R252W (CGG-TGG) transition, and 29 heterozygous carriers of this mutation. Fifteen control Caucasoid PKU patients from the Czech and Slovak Republics were selected. In this group they detected R252W mutation in two subjects (6.67% of all mutant alleles). Both were compound heterozygous for two different mutations. Previous haplotype studies of Welsh Gypsies with PKU were uninformative in the determination of heterozygosity. ASO hybridization served effectively for the consequent analyses in Gypsy PKU-related families and to identify the carriers among the unrelated subjects. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Specificity of the Acute Tryptophan and Tyrosine plus Phenylalanine Depletion and Loading Tests Part II:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla A.-B. Badawy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Current formulations for acute tryptophan (Trp or tyrosine (Tyr plus phenylalanine (Phe depletion and loading cause undesirable decreases in ratios of Trp or Tyr + Phe to competing amino acids (CAA, thus undermining the specificities of these tests. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA cause these unintended decreases, and lowering their content in a new balanced control formulation in the present study led to normalization of all ratios. Four groups (n = 12 each of adults each received one of four 50 g control formulations, with 0% (traditional, 20%, 30%, or 40% less of the BCAA. The free and total [Trp]/[CAA] and [Phe + Tyr]/[BCAA+ Trp] ratios all decreased significantly during the first 5 h following the traditional formulation, but were fully normalized by the formulation containing 40% less of the BCAA. We recommend the latter as a balanced control formulation and propose adjustments in the depletion and loading formulations to enhance their specificities for 5-HT and the catecholamines.

  4. Molecularly imprinted polymer based on chemiluminescence imaging for the chiral recognition of dansyl-phenylalanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Zhujun; Huang, Lianggao

    2008-03-01

    A new molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP)-chemiluminescence (CL) imaging detection approach towards chiral recognition of dansyl-phenylalanine (Phe) is presented. The polymer microspheres were synthesized using precipitation polymerization with dansyl-L-Phe as template. Polymer microspheres were immobilized in microtiter plates (96 wells) using poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as glue. The analyte was selectively adsorbed on the MIP microspheres. After washing, the bound fraction was quantified based on peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence (PO-CL) analysis. In the presence of dansyl-Phe, bis(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl)oxalate (TCPO) reacted with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to emit chemiluminescence. The signal was detected and quantified with a highly sensitive cooled charge-coupled device (CCD). Influencing factors were investigated and optimized in detail. Control experiments using capillary electrophoresis showed that there was no significant difference between the proposed method and the control method at a confidence level of 95%. The method can perform 96 independent measurements simultaneously in 30 min and the limits of detection (LODs) for dansyl-L-Phe and dansyl-D-Phe were 0.025 micromol L(-1) and 0.075 micromol L(-1) (3sigma), respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 11 parallel measurements of dansyl-L-Phe (0.78 micromol L(-1)) was 8%. The results show that MIP-based CL imaging can become a useful analytical technology for quick chiral recognition.

  5. Exploration and pharmacokinetic profiling of phenylalanine based carbamates as novel substance p 1-7 analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Rebecca; Nordvall, Gunnar; Bylund, Johan; Carlsson-Jonsson, Anna; Kratz, Jadel M; Svensson, Richard; Artursson, Per; Hallberg, Mathias; Sandström, Anja

    2014-12-11

    The bioactive metabolite of Substance P, the heptapeptide SP1-7 (H-Arg-Pro-Lys-Pro-Gln-Gln-Phe-OH), has been shown to attenuate signs of hyperalgesia in diabetic mice, which indicate a possible use of compounds targeting the SP1-7 binding site as analgesics for neuropathic pain. Aiming at the development of drug-like SP1-7 peptidomimetics we have previously reported on the discovery of H-Phe-Phe-NH2 as a high affinity lead compound. Unfortunately, the pharmacophore of this compound was accompanied by a poor pharmacokinetic (PK) profile. Herein, further lead optimization of H-Phe-Phe-NH2 by substituting the N-terminal phenylalanine for a benzylcarbamate group giving a new type of SP1-7 analogues with good binding affinities is reported. Extensive in vitro as well as in vivo PK characterization is presented for this compound. Evaluation of different C-terminal functional groups, i.e., hydroxamic acid, acyl sulfonamide, acyl cyanamide, acyl hydrazine, and oxadiazole, suggested hydroxamic acid as a bioisosteric replacement for the original primary amide.

  6. Measurement and prediction of physical properties of aqueous sodium salt of L-phenylalanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg Sahil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical properties, such as density, refractive index and viscosity, of an aqueous sodium salt of (S-2-amino-3-phenylpropionic acid (L-phenylalanine, Na-Phe were investigated in this work. These properties were measured over a temperature range of 298.15–343.15 K at atmospheric pressure. The mass fractions (w of Na-Phe were 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25, 0.30, 0.35 and 0.40. The analysis of the experimental data showed that the values of density, refractive index and viscosity decreased with increasing temperature at any constant concentration of Na-Phe. However, these values increased with increasing concentration at any constant temperature. The density values were used to estimate the thermal expansion coefficient. The thermal expansion coefficient increased slightly with increasing temperature and concentration. The density and refractive index data were correlated using a modified Graber equation, while, the viscosity data were correlated using a modified Vogel–Tamman–Fulcher (VTF equation. In all the cases, quantitative analyses of the influence of temperature and concentration were performed.

  7. Asymmetric synthesis of L-[3-11C]phenylalanine using chiral hydrogenation catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halldin, C.; Langstroem, B.

    1984-01-01

    The seven-step synthesis of L-[3- 11 C]phenylalanine using chiral diphosphines as ligands in rhodium catalysts is reported. [ 11 C]Benzaldehyde, prepared in a three-step reaction from [ 11 C]carbon dioxide, as reported elsewhere, was reacted with 2-phenyl-5-oxazolone or 2-(4-chloro)phenyl-5-oxazolone in the presence of the tertiary amine diazabicyclooctane (DABCO). The resultant [α- 11 C]-4-arylene-2-atyl-5-oxazolones were hydrogenated after ring opening, using the chiral rhodium complex of (R)-1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane [(R)-PROPHOS] or (+)-2,3-isopropylidene-2,3-dihydroxy-1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane [(+)-DIOP]. After removal of the amino protecting group, the labelled amino acid was obtained on purification by preparative LC in 10-15% radiochemical yield, and radiochemical purity higher than 95% from [ 11 C]carbon dioxide within 60 min. The optical purity of the products determined by the tRNA method and capillary GC, was 80 and 60% e.e., respectively (i.e. L/D=90/10 and 80/20). (author)

  8. Phenotypic stability of B16-BL6 melanoma exposed to low levels of tyrosine and phenylalanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elstad, C A; Meadows, G G

    1990-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that tyrosine (Tyr) and phenylalanine (Phe) restriction suppresses metastatic heterogeneity of B16-BL6 (BL6) melanoma and selects for tumor variants with decreased metastatic potential. In this study, we investigate stability of this Tyr- and Phe-modulated tumor phenotype by sequentially transplanting BL6 in vivo into mice fed Low Tyr and Phe Diet. Metastatic potential of BL6 is suppressed after one subcutaneous passage. Suppression is unlikely to result from inhibition of tumor growth, since growth in vitro is significantly increased. The metastatic potential of the Tyr- and Phe-modulated tumor is unstable after in vivo passage, and lung colonizing ability is regenerated after ten in vivo passages. Conversely, the antimetastatic effect of Tyr and Phe restriction is stable after prolonged in vitro passage. The metastatic potential of tumors from mice fed Normal Diet is unstable after long-term in vitro culture. Sensitivity to adriamycin of BL6 from mice fed Low Tyr and Phe Diet is increased and is not altered by change in metastatic potential.

  9. Development of an electrochemical biosensor for vitamin B12 using D-phenylalanine nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazeni, Maryam; Karimzadeh, Fathallah; Kermanpur, Ahmad; Allafchian, Alireza

    2018-01-01

    In the past decades, biosensors are one of the most interesting topics among researchers and scientist. The biosensors are used in several applications such as determining food quality, control and diagnose clinical problems and metabolic control. Therefore, many efforts have been carried out to design and develop a new generation of these systems. On the other hand nanotechnology by improving the performance of sensors has created an excellent outlook. Using nanomaterials such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanowires, and nanorods in diagnostic tools has been significantly increased accuracy, sensitivity and improved detection limits in sensors. In this study, the one-dimensional morphology of the D-phenylalanine was assembled on the surface of the gold electrode. In the next step electrochemical performance of the modified electrode was investigated by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV), Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and Differential Pals Voltammograms (DPV). Finally, by measuring the different concentrations of vitamin B12, the detection limit of the biosensor was obtained 1.6 µM.

  10. Molecular Cloning and Sequence Analysis of a Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase Gene from Dendrobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yongping; Lin, Yi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) gene was cloned from Dendrobium candidum using homology cloning and RACE. The full-length sequence and catalytic active sites that appear in PAL proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum are also found: PAL cDNA of D. candidum (designated Dc-PAL1, GenBank No. JQ765748) has 2,458 bps and contains a complete open reading frame (ORF) of 2,142 bps, which encodes 713 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequence of DcPAL1 has more than 80% sequence identity with the PAL genes of other plants, as indicated by multiple alignments. The dominant sites and catalytic active sites, which are similar to that showing in PAL proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum, are also found in DcPAL1. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that DcPAL is more closely related to PALs from orchidaceae plants than to those of other plants. The differential expression patterns of PAL in protocorm-like body, leaf, stem, and root, suggest that the PAL gene performs multiple physiological functions in Dendrobium candidum. PMID:23638048

  11. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene from dendrobium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Jin

    Full Text Available In this study, a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL gene was cloned from Dendrobium candidum using homology cloning and RACE. The full-length sequence and catalytic active sites that appear in PAL proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum are also found: PAL cDNA of D. candidum (designated Dc-PAL1, GenBank No. JQ765748 has 2,458 bps and contains a complete open reading frame (ORF of 2,142 bps, which encodes 713 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequence of DcPAL1 has more than 80% sequence identity with the PAL genes of other plants, as indicated by multiple alignments. The dominant sites and catalytic active sites, which are similar to that showing in PAL proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum, are also found in DcPAL1. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that DcPAL is more closely related to PALs from orchidaceae plants than to those of other plants. The differential expression patterns of PAL in protocorm-like body, leaf, stem, and root, suggest that the PAL gene performs multiple physiological functions in Dendrobium candidum.

  12. A paradigm study for assessment of phenylalanine's damage under arc-discharge irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke Zhigang [Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Plasma Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei 230031 (China); Huang Qing, E-mail: huangq@ipp.ac.c [Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Plasma Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei 230031 (China); Su Xi; Jiang Jiang; Wang Xiangqin; Yu Zengliang [Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Plasma Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2010-05-15

    Energetic ions induce important biological effects and the research into radiolysis of amino acids can help to clarify radiolysis of proteins. For this purpose, arc-discharge induced radiolysis of the benzyl-containing aromatic amino acid phenylalanine in aqueous solution was studied and the damage was assessed quantitatively. The energetic ions were produced by arc-discharge in nitrogen and argon atmosphere. The arc-discharge induced chemical reactions of the biomolecule in aqueous solution were detected and analyzed by means of UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence, Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Based on the multiple spectroscopic approach, the damage can be evaluated in a more reliable and convenient way. The fluorescence analysis in this case appears to be a more direct indicator for the assessment of damage, where it reveals that the damage increases with the irradiation time exponentially. On the contrary, the 'plateau region' or 'saddle-shape' apparently shown both in our rough absorption analysis and ninhydrin reaction test, similar to the previously reported feature of the dose effect for low-energy-ion induced damage, may be just a consequence with varied reactions and processes involved at different stages. This work thus demonstrated that application of appropriate combination of spectroscopic tools can effectively dissect the diversity of the radiolysis reaction system and assess the biomolecular damage properly.

  13. Preparation of carbon-11 labelled phenylalanine and phenylglycine by a new amino acid synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaalburg, W; Beerling-van der Molen, H D; Reiffers, S; Rijskamp, A; Woldring, M G; Wynberg, H [Academic Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands). Central Isotope Lab.

    1976-03-01

    Of the cyclotron-produced short-lived isotopes carbon-11 (tsub(1/2) = 20.4 min;..beta../sup +/) is one of the most promising as label for radiopharmaceuticals. To prepare /sup 11/C-labelled amino acids for evaluation as pancreas scanning agents a new rapid amino acid synthesis was developed. The method is based on the carboxylation of ..cap alpha..-lithioisocyanides with /sup 11/CO/sub 2/, followed by hydrolysis of the intermediate reaction product to the desired amino acid. By this method DL-..cap alpha..-phenylalanine-1-/sup 11/C and DL-..cap alpha..-phenylglycine-1-/sup 11/C were prepared. The precursor /sup 11/CO/sub 2/ was produced via the /sup 14/N(p,..cap alpha..)/sup 11/C reaction by bombardment of a flow of nitrogen gas mixed with 0.1% 0/sub 2/ with 20 MeV protons. The target system is described.

  14. Single-dose, subcutaneous recombinant phenylalanine ammonia lyase conjugated with polyethylene glycol in adult patients with phenylketonuria: an open-label, multicentre, phase 1 dose-escalation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Nicola; Harding, Cary O; Burton, Barbara K; Grange, Dorothy K; Vockley, Jerry; Wasserstein, Melissa; Rice, Gregory M; Dorenbaum, Alejandro; Neuenburg, Jutta K; Musson, Donald G; Gu, Zhonghua; Sile, Saba

    2014-07-05

    Phenylketonuria is an inherited disease caused by impaired activity of phenylalanine hydroxylase, the enzyme that converts phenylalanine to tyrosine, leading to accumulation of phenylalanine and subsequent neurocognitive dysfunction. Phenylalanine ammonia lyase is a prokaryotic enzyme that converts phenylalanine to ammonia and trans-cinnamic acid. We aimed to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic characteristics, and efficacy of recombinant Anabaena variabilis phenylalanine ammonia lyase (produced in Escherichia coli) conjugated with polyethylene glycol (rAvPAL-PEG) in reducing phenylalanine concentrations in adult patients with phenylketonuria. In this open-label, phase 1, multicentre trial, single subcutaneous injections of rAvPAL-PEG were given in escalating doses (0·001, 0·003, 0·010, 0·030, and 0·100 mg/kg) to adults with phenylketonuria. Participants aged 18 years or older with blood phenylalanine concentrations of 600 μmol/L or higher were recruited from among patients attending metabolic disease clinics in the USA. The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability of rAvPAL-PEG. Secondary endpoints were the pharmacokinetic characteristics of the drug and its effect on concentrations of phenylalanine. Participants and investigators were not masked to assigned dose group. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00925054. 25 participants were recruited from seven centres between May 6, 2008, and April 15, 2009, with five participants assigned to each escalating dose group. All participants were included in the safety population. The most frequently reported adverse events were injection-site reactions and dizziness, which were self-limited and without sequelae. Two participants had serious adverse reactions to intramuscular medroxyprogesterone acetate, a drug that contains polyethylene glycol as an excipient. Three of five participants given the highest dose of rAvPAL-PEG (0·100 mg/kg) developed a generalised skin rash

  15. Yeast cell factories on the horizon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    For thousands of years, yeast has been used for making beer, bread, and wine. In modern times, it has become a commercial workhorse for producing fuels, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals such as insulin, human serum albumin, and vaccines against hepatitis virus and human papillomavirus. Yeast has also...... been engineered to make chemicals at industrial scale (e.g., succinic acid, lactic acid, resveratrol) and advanced biofuels (e.g., isobutanol) (1). On page 1095 of this issue, Galanie et al. (2) demonstrate that yeast can now be engineered to produce opioids (2), a major class of compounds used...

  16. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172.590... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout... prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is produced by partial hydrolysis of yeast extract (derived from...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b) The...

  18. 21 CFR 172.898 - Bakers yeast glycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast glycan. 172.898 Section 172.898 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.898 Bakers yeast glycan. Bakers yeast glycan may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast glycan is the comminuted, washed, pasteurized, and...

  19. Immobilization of yeast cells by radiation-induced polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, T.; Kaetsu, I.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation-induced polymerization method was applied to the immobilization of yeast cells. The effects of irradiation, cooling and monomer, which are neccessary for polymerization, were recovered completely by subsequent aerobical incubation of yeast cells. The ethanol productive in immobilized yeast cells increased with the increase of aerobical incubation period. The growth of yeast cells in immobilized yeast cells was indicated. The maximum ethanol productivity in immobilized yeast cell system was around three times as much as that in free yeast cell system. (orig.)

  20. High power density yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Rahul

    increase was shown to quickly saturate with cell mass attached on the electrode. Based on recent modelling data that suggested that the electrode currents might be limited by the poor electrical conductivity of the anode, the power density versus electrical conductivity of a yeast-immobilized anode was investigated. Introduction of high aspect ratio carbon fiber filaments to the immobilization matrix increased the electrical conductivity of the anode. Although a higher electrical conductivity clearly led to an increase in power densities, it was shown that the principal limitation to power density increase was coming from proton transfer limitations in the immobilized anode. Partial overcoming of the gradients lead a power density of ca. 250 microW cm-2, which is the highest reported for yeast powered MFCs. A yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cell was investigated as a power source for low power sensors using raw tree sap. It was shown that yeast can efficiently utilize the sucrose present in the raw tree sap to produce electricity when excess salt is added to the medium. Therefore the salinity of a potential energy source is an important consideration when MFCs are being considered for energy harvesting from natural sources.

  1. Fatty acids from oleaginous yeasts and yeast-like fungi and their potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Si-Jia; Chi, Zhe; Zhang, Yu; Li, Yan-Feng; Liu, Guang-Lei; Jiang, Hong; Hu, Zhong; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2018-02-01

    Oleaginous yeasts, fatty acids biosynthesis and regulation in the oleaginous yeasts and the fatty acids from the oleaginous yeasts and their applications are reviewed in this article. Oleaginous yeasts such as Rhodosporidium toruloides, Yarrowia lipolytica, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, and Aureobasidium melanogenum, which can accumulate over 50% lipid of their cell dry weight, have many advantages over other oleaginous microorganisms. The fatty acids from the oleaginous yeasts have many potential applications. Many oleaginous yeasts have now been genetically modified to over-produce fatty acids and their derivatives. The most important features of the oleaginous yeasts are that they have special enzymatic systems for enhanced biosynthesis and regulation of fatty acids in their lipid particles. Recently, some oleaginous yeasts such as R. toruloides have been found to have a unique fatty acids synthetase and other oleaginous yeasts such as A. melanogenum have a unique highly reducing polyketide synthase (HR-PKS) involved in the biosynthesis of hydroxyl fatty acids. It is necessary to further enhance lipid biosynthesis using metabolic engineering and explore new applications of fatty acids in biotechnology.

  2. Isolation and identification of radiation resistant yeasts from sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Cheon; Jeong, Yong Uk; Kim, Du Hong; Jo, Eun A

    2011-12-01

    This study was conducted to isolate radiation-resistant yeasts from sea water for development of application technology of radiation-resistant microorganism. · Isolation of 656 yeasts from sea water and selection of 2 radiation-resistant yeasts (D 10 value >3) · Identification of isolated yeasts as Filobasidium elegans sharing 99% sequence similarity · Characterization of isolated yeast with ability to repair of the DNA damage and membrane integrity to irradiation

  3. Activation of waste brewer's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for bread production

    OpenAIRE

    Popov Stevan D.; Dodić Siniša N.; Mastilović Jasna S.; Dodić Jelena M.; Popov-Raljić Jovanka V.

    2005-01-01

    The waste brewer's yeast S. cerevisiae (activated and non-activated) was compared with the commercial baker's yeast regarding the volume of developed gas in dough, volume and freshness stability of produced bread. The activation of waste brewer's yeast resulted in the increased volume of developed gas in dough by 100% compared to non-activated brewer's yeast, and the obtained bread is of more stable freshness compared to bread produced with baker's yeast. The activation of BY affects positive...

  4. Regulatory aspects of methanol metabolism in yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotsenko, Y.A.; Bystrykh, L.V.; Ubiyvovk, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Formaldehyde is the first and key intermediate in the metabolism of methylotrophic yeasts since it stands at a branch point of pathways for methanol oxidation and assimilation. Methanol and, formaldehyde are toxic compounds which severely affect the growth rate, yield coefficient, etc., of yeasts. Two questions arise when considering regulation of methanol metabolism in yeasts how a nontoxic level of formaldehyde is maintained in the cell and how the formaldehyde flow is distributed into oxidation and assimilation. To answer these questions we studied the role of GSH, which spontaneously binds formaldehyde, yielding S-hydroxymethylglutathione; in vivo rates of formaldehyde dissimilation and assimilation by using [ 14 C]methanol; profiles of enzymes responsible for production and utilization of formaldehyde; and levels of metabolites affecting dissimilation and assimilation of formaldehyde. All of the experiments were carried out with the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii KD1. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. Propagation of Mammalian Prions in Yeast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harris, David A

    2006-01-01

    ...: the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This unicellular organism offers a number of potential advantages for the study of prion biology, including rapid generation time, ease of culturing, and facile genetics...

  6. yeast transformation of Mucor circinelloides Tieghe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-05-02

    May 2, 2006 ... A nested model analysis of variance of growth data of induced yeast .... Figure 2. Mean biomass and relative growth rates of M. circinelloides cultivated in treatments in ..... Pullman B (ed) Frontiers in Physicochemical Biology.

  7. Genomic Evolution of the Ascomycete Yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Haridas, Sajeet; Salamov, Asaf; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Goker, Markus; Hittinger, Chris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lopes, Mariana; Meir-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Rokas, Antonis; Rosa, Carlos; Scheuner, Carmen; Soares, Marco; Stielow, Benjamin; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Wolfe, Ken; Blackwell, Meredith; Kurtzman, Cletus; Grigoriev, Igor; Jeffries, Thomas

    2015-03-16

    Yeasts are important for industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable metabolic and phylogenetic diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 16 ascomycete yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. Phylogenetic analysis of these and previously published yeast genomes helped resolve the placement of species including Saitoella complicata, Babjeviella inositovora, Hyphopichia burtonii, and Metschnikowia bicuspidata. Moreover, we find that alternative nuclear codon usage, where CUG encodes serine instead of leucine, are monophyletic within the Saccharomycotina. Most of the yeasts have compact genomes with a large fraction of single exon genes, and a tendency towards more introns in early-diverging species. Analysis of enzyme phylogeny gives insights into the evolution of metabolic capabilities such as methanol utilization and assimilation of alternative carbon sources.

  8. Yeasts are essential for cocoa bean fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2014-03-17

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao) are the major raw material for chocolate production and fermentation of the beans is essential for the development of chocolate flavor precursors. In this study, a novel approach was used to determine the role of yeasts in cocoa fermentation and their contribution to chocolate quality. Cocoa bean fermentations were conducted with the addition of 200ppm Natamycin to inhibit the growth of yeasts, and the resultant microbial ecology and metabolism, bean chemistry and chocolate quality were compared with those of normal (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii and Kluyveromyces marxianus, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in the control fermentation. In fermentations with the presence of Natamycin, the same bacterial species grew but yeast growth was inhibited. Physical and chemical analyses showed that beans fermented without yeasts had increased shell content, lower production of ethanol, higher alcohols and esters throughout fermentation and lesser presence of pyrazines in the roasted product. Quality tests revealed that beans fermented without yeasts were purplish-violet in color and not fully brown, and chocolate prepared from these beans tasted more acid and lacked characteristic chocolate flavor. Beans fermented with yeast growth were fully brown in color and gave chocolate with typical characters which were clearly preferred by sensory panels. Our findings demonstrate that yeast growth and activity were essential for cocoa bean fermentation and the development of chocolate characteristics. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Transcriptional Waves in the Yeast Cell Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Oliva, Anna; Rosebrock, Adam; Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Pyne, Saumyadipta; Chen, Haiying; Skiena, Steve; Futcher, Bruce; Leatherwood, Janet

    2005-01-01

    Many genes are regulated as an innate part of the eukaryotic cell cycle, and a complex transcriptional network helps enable the cyclic behavior of dividing cells. This transcriptional network has been studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) and elsewhere. To provide more perspective on these regulatory mechanisms, we have used microarrays to measure gene expression through the cell cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast). The 750 genes with the most significant oscillat...

  10. Determination of tritium in wine yeast samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotarlea, Monica-Ionela; Paunescu Niculina; Galeriu, D; Mocanu, N.; Margineanu, R.; Marin, G.

    1998-01-01

    Analytical procedures were developed to determine tritium in wine and wine yeast samples. The content of organic compounds affecting the LSC measurement is reduced by fractioning distillation for wine samples and azeotropic distillation/fractional distillation for wine yeast samples. Finally, the water samples were normally distilled with K MO 4 . The established procedures were successfully applied for wine and wine samples from Murfatlar harvests of the years 1995 and 1996. (authors)

  11. Influence of non-adherent yeast cells on electrical characteristics of diamond-based field-effect transistors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházka, Václav; Cifra, Michal; Kulha, Pavel; Ižák, Tibor; Rezek, Bohuslav; Kromka, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 395, Feb (2017), s. 214-219 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:67985882 Keywords : nanocrystalline diamond * yeast cells * field-effect transistor * transfer characteristics pH sensitivity Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  12. The growth of solar radiated yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, T.

    1995-09-01

    This researcher plans to determine if solar radiation affects the growth of yeast. The irradiated yeast was obtained from a sample exposed in space during a Space Shuttle flight of September 9-20, 1994. Further, the control groups were held at: (1) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland; and (2) South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. The procedure used was based on the fact that yeast is most often used in consumable baked goods. Therefore, the yeast was incorporated into a basic Betty Crocker bread recipe. Data was collected by placing measured amounts of dough into sample containers with fifteen minute growth in height measurements collected and recorded. This researcher assumed the viability of yeast to be relative to its ability to produce carbon dioxide gas and cause the dough to rise. As all ingredients and surroundings were equal, this researcher assumed the yeast will produce the only significant difference in data collected. This researcher noted the approximate use date on all sample packages to be prior to arrival and experiment date. All dates equal, it was then assumed each would act in a similar manner of response. This assumption will allow for equally correct data collection.

  13. The growth of solar radiated yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Tyrone

    1995-01-01

    This researcher plans to determine if solar radiation affects the growth of yeast. The irradiated yeast was obtained from a sample exposed in space during a Space Shuttle flight of September 9-20, 1994. Further, the control groups were held at: (1) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland; and (2) South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. The procedure used was based on the fact that yeast is most often used in consumable baked goods. Therefore, the yeast was incorporated into a basic Betty Crocker bread recipe. Data was collected by placing measured amounts of dough into sample containers with fifteen minute growth in height measurements collected and recorded. This researcher assumed the viability of yeast to be relative to its ability to produce carbon dioxide gas and cause the dough to rise. As all ingredients and surroundings were equal, this researcher assumed the yeast will produce the only significant difference in data collected. This researcher noted the approximate use date on all sample packages to be prior to arrival and experiment date. All dates equal, it was then assumed each would act in a similar manner of response. This assumption will allow for equally correct data collection.

  14. History of genome editing in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraczek, Marcin G; Naseeb, Samina; Delneri, Daniela

    2018-05-01

    For thousands of years humans have used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of bread and alcohol; however, in the last 30-40 years our understanding of the yeast biology has dramatically increased, enabling us to modify its genome. Although S. cerevisiae has been the main focus of many research groups, other non-conventional yeasts have also been studied and exploited for biotechnological purposes. Our experiments and knowledge have evolved from recombination to high-throughput PCR-based transformations to highly accurate CRISPR methods in order to alter yeast traits for either research or industrial purposes. Since the release of the genome sequence of S. cerevisiae in 1996, the precise and targeted genome editing has increased significantly. In this 'Budding topic' we discuss the significant developments of genome editing in yeast, mainly focusing on Cre-loxP mediated recombination, delitto perfetto and CRISPR/Cas. © 2018 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Radiodiagnosis of yeast alveolits (a clinicoexperimental study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amosov, I.S.; Smirnov, V.A.

    1984-01-01

    A clinicoroetgenological study was made of 115 workers engaged in the yeast production for different periods of time. Disorders of the respiration biomechanics were revealed depending on the period of service. These data were obtained as a result of the use of roentgenopneumopolygraphy. An experimental study was conducted to establish the nature of lesions in the bronchopulmonary system in allergic alveolitis. The effect of finely divided yeast dust on the bronchopulmonary system was studied on 132 guinea-pigs usinq microbronchography and morphological examination. As a result of the study it has been established that during the inhalation of yeast dust, notnceable dystrophy of the bronchi develops, the sizes of alveoli enlarge and part of them undergo emphysematous distension with the rupture of the interalveolar septa. In the course of the study, it has been shown that yeast dust is little agreessive, yeast alveolitis develops after many years of work. The clinical symptoms are non-specific and insignificant. X-ray and morphological changes are followed by the physical manifestations of yeast alveolitis

  16. Novel brewing yeast hybrids: creation and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogerus, Kristoffer; Magalhães, Frederico; Vidgren, Virve; Gibson, Brian

    2017-01-01

    The natural interspecies Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces eubayanus hybrid yeast is responsible for global lager beer production and is one of the most important industrial microorganisms. Its success in the lager brewing environment is due to a combination of traits not commonly found in pure yeast species, principally low-temperature tolerance, and maltotriose utilization. Parental transgression is typical of hybrid organisms and has been exploited previously for, e.g., the production of wine yeast with beneficial properties. The parental strain S. eubayanus has only been discovered recently and newly created lager yeast strains have not yet been applied industrially. A number of reports attest to the feasibility of this approach and artificially created hybrids are likely to have a significant impact on the future of lager brewing. De novo S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus hybrids outperform their parent strains in a number of respects, including, but not restricted to, fermentation rate, sugar utilization, stress tolerance, and aroma formation. Hybrid genome function and stability, as well as different techniques for generating hybrids and their relative merits are discussed. Hybridization not only offers the possibility of generating novel non-GM brewing yeast strains with unique properties, but is expected to aid in unraveling the complex evolutionary history of industrial lager yeast.

  17. Making Sense of the Yeast Sphingolipid Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megyeri, Márton; Riezman, Howard; Schuldiner, Maya; Futerman, Anthony H

    2016-12-04

    Sphingolipids (SL) and their metabolites play key roles both as structural components of membranes and as signaling molecules. Many of the key enzymes and regulators of SL metabolism were discovered using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and based on the high degree of conservation, a number of mammalian homologs were identified. Although yeast continues to be an important tool for SL research, the complexity of SL structure and nomenclature often hampers the ability of new researchers to grasp the subtleties of yeast SL biology and discover new modulators of this intricate pathway. Moreover, the emergence of lipidomics by mass spectrometry has enabled the rapid identification of SL species in yeast and rendered the analysis of SL composition under various physiological and pathophysiological conditions readily amenable. However, the complex nomenclature of the identified species renders much of the data inaccessible to non-specialists. In this review, we focus on parsing both the classical SL nomenclature and the nomenclature normally used during mass spectrometry analysis, which should facilitate the understanding of yeast SL data and might shed light on biological processes in which SLs are involved. Finally, we discuss a number of putative roles of various yeast SL species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Revaluation of Waste Yeast from Beer Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Suruceanu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Brewing yeast is an important waste product from beer production. The valorification of slurry yeast mainly consists of separation of vitamins and important nitrogen compounds. The hops compounds, one of the most important raw materials in beer technology are removed beforehand valorification. The prenylflavonoids compounds from hops are important bioactive compounds that can be revaluation with proper technology. Revaluation of prenylflavonoids from waste yeast into dietary supplement, identification and quantification of xanthohumol by HPLC method. Waste yeast from brewery pilot plant of USAMV Cluj Napoca it was dried by atomization and the powder was analyzed on xanthohumol content by HPLC method. For quantification a calibration curve it was used. The process of drying by atomisation lead to a powder product. It was used malt dextrin powder for stabilisation. The final product it was encapsulated. The xanthohumol content of powdered yeast it was 1.94 µg/ml. In conclusion the slurry yeast from beer production it is an important source of prenylflavonoids compounds.

  19. Flor Yeast: New Perspectives Beyond Wine Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Moreno-Garcia, Jaime; Zara, Severino; Zara, Giacomo; Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Mauricio, Juan C.; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Coi, Anna L.; Bou Zeidan, Marc; Dequin, Sylvie; Moreno, Juan; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-01-01

    The most important dogma in white-wine production is the preservation of the wine aroma and the limitation of the oxidative action of oxygen. In contrast, the aging of Sherry and Sherry-like wines is an aerobic process that depends on the oxidative activity of flor strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Under depletion of nitrogen and fermentable carbon sources, these yeast produce aggregates of floating cells and form an air–liquid biofilm on the wine surface, which is also known as velum or flor. This behavior is due to genetic and metabolic peculiarities that differentiate flor yeast from other wine yeast. This review will focus first on the most updated data obtained through the analysis of flor yeast with -omic tools. Comparative genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics of flor and wine yeast strains are shedding new light on several features of these special yeast, and in particular, they have revealed the extent of proteome remodeling imposed by the biofilm life-style. Finally, new insights in terms of promotion and inhibition of biofilm formation through small molecules, amino acids, and di/tri-peptides, and novel possibilities for the exploitation of biofilm immobilization within a fungal hyphae framework, will be discussed. PMID:27148192

  20. Heat transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Heat transfer. Heat conduction in solid slab. Convective heat transfer. Non-linear temperature. variation due to flow. HEAT FLUX AT SURFACE. conduction/diffusion.

  1. Heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Heat transfer takes place between material systems as a result of a temperature difference. The transmission process involves energy conversions governed by the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The heat transfer proceeds from a high-temperature region to a low-temperature region, and because of the finite thermal potential, there is an increase in entropy. Thermodynamics, however, is concerned with equilibrium states, which includes thermal equilibrium, irrespective of the time necessary to attain these equilibrium states. But heat transfer is a result of thermal nonequilibrium conditions, therefore, the laws of thermodynamics alone cannot describe completely the heat transfer process. In practice, most engineering problems are concerned with the rate of heat transfer rather than the quantity of heat being transferred. Resort then is directed to the particular laws governing the transfer of heat. There are three distinct modes of heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. Although these modes are discussed separately, all three types may occur simultaneously

  2. Structure-function analysis of human TYW2 enzyme required for the biosynthesis of a highly modified Wybutosine (yW base in phenylalanine-tRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Rodriguez

    Full Text Available Posttranscriptional modifications are critical for structure and function of tRNAs. Wybutosine (yW and its derivatives are hyper-modified guanosines found at the position 37 of eukaryotic and archaeal tRNA(Phe. TYW2 is an enzyme that catalyzes α-amino-α-carboxypropyl transfer activity at the third step of yW biogenesis. Using complementation of a ΔTYW2 strain, we demonstrate here that human TYW2 (hTYW2 is active in yeast and can synthesize the yW of yeast tRNA(Phe. Structure-guided analysis identified several conserved residues in hTYW2 that interact with S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet, and mutation studies revealed that K225 and E265 are critical residues for the enzymatic activity. We previously reported that the human TYW2 is overexpressed in breast cancer. However, no difference in the tRNA(Phe modification status was observed in either normal mouse tissue or a mouse tumor model that overexpresses Tyw2, indicating that hTYW2 may have a role in tumorigenesis unrelated to yW biogenesis.

  3. Yeast transformation mediated by Agrobacterium strains harboring an Ri plasmid: comparative study between GALLS of an Ri plasmid and virE of a Ti plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shinji; Sato, Yukari; Momota, Naoto; Tanaka, Katsuyuki; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Katsunori

    2012-07-01

    Agrobacterium strains containing a Ti plasmid can transfer T-DNA not only to plants but also to fungi, including the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, no Agrobacterium strain harboring an Ri plasmid has been evaluated in fungal transformation. Some Ri plasmids have GALLS , instead of virE1 and virE2. GALLS protein can functionally substitute in plant transformation for a structurally different protein VirE2. In this study, we compared the yeast transformation ability among Agrobacterium donors: a strain containing a Ti plasmid, strains harboring either an agropine-type or a mikimopine-type Ri plasmid, and a strain having a modified Ri plasmid supplemented with a Ti plasmid type virE operon. Agrobacterium strains possessing GALLS transformed yeast cells far less efficiently than the strain containing virE operon. Production of GALLS in recipient yeast cells improved the yeast transformation mediated by an Agrobacterium strain lacking neither GALLS nor virE operon. A reporter assay to detect mobilization of the proteins fused with Cre recombinase revealed that VirE2 protein is much more abundant in yeast cells than GALLS. Based on these results, we concluded that the low yeast transformability mediated by Agrobacterium strains having the Ri plasmid is because of low amount of mobilized GALLS in yeast cells. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. SERS study of transformation of phenylalanine to tyrosine under particle irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Huang, Qing; Yao, Guohua; Ke, Zhigang; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Yilin

    2014-08-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering or spectroscopy (SERS) is a very powerful analytical tool which has been widely applied in many scientific research and application fields. It is therefore also very intriguing for us to introduce SERS technique in the radiobiological research, where in many cases only a very few of biomolecules are subjected to changes which however can lead to significant biological effects. The radiation induced biochemical reactions are normally very sophisticated with different substances produced in the system, so currently it is still a big challenge for SERS to analyze such a mixture system which contains multiple analytes. In this context, this work aimed to establish and consolidate the feasibility of SERS as an effective tool in radiation chemistry, and this purpose, we employed SERS as a sensitive probe to a known process, namely, the oxidation of phenylalanine (Phe) under particle irradiation, where the energetic particles were obtained from either plasma discharge or electron-beam. During the irradiation, three types of tyrosine (Tyr), namely, p-Tyr, m-Tyr and o-Tyr were produced, and all these tyrosine isomers together with Phe could be identified and measured based on the SERS spectral analysis of the corresponding enhanced characteristic signals, namely, 1002 cm-1 for Phe, 1161 cm-1 for p-Tyr, 990 cm-1 for m-Tyr, and 970 cm-1 for o-Tyr, respectively. The estimation of the quantities of different tyrosine isomers were also given and verified by conventional method such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). As for comparison of different ways of particle irradiation, our results also indicated that electron-beam irradiation was more efficient for converting Phe into Tyr than plasma discharge treatment, confirming the role of hydroxyl radicals in the Phe-Tyr conformation. Therefore, our work has not only demonstrated that SERS can be successfully applied in the radiobiological study, but also given insights into the

  5. Mutations of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in patients with phenylketonuria in Shanxi, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-An Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The variation in mutations in exons 3, 6, 7, 11 and 12 of the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH gene was investigated in 59 children with phenylketonuria (PKU and 100 normal children. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected by sequence analysis. The mutational frequencies of cDNA 696, cDNA 735 and cDNA 1155 in patients were 96.2%, 76.1% and 7.6%, respectively, whereas in healthy children the corresponding frequencies were 97.0%, 77.3% and 8.3%. In addition, 81 mutations accounted for 61.0% of the mutant alleles. R111X, H64 > TfsX9 and S70 del accounted for 5.1%, 0.8% and 0.8% mutation of alleles in exon 3, whereas EX6-96A > G accounted for 10.2% mutation of alleles in exon 6. R243Q had the highest incidence in exon 7 (12.7%, followed by Ivs7 +2T>A (5.1% and T278I (2.5%. G247V, R252Q, L255S, R261Q and E280K accounted for 0.8% while Y356X and V399V accounted for 5.9% and 5.1%, respectively, in exon 11. R413P and A434D accounted for 5.9% and 2.5%, respectively, in exon 12. Seventy-two variant alleles accounted for the 16 mutations observed here. The mutation characteristics and distributions demonstrated that EX6-96A > G and R243Q were the hot regions for mutations in the PAH gene in Shanxi patients with PKU.

  6. Phenylalanine hydroxylase gene mutations in the United States: Report from the maternal PKU collaborative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guldberg, P.; Henriksen, K.F.; Guettler, F. [John F. Kennedy Inst., Glostrup (Denmark)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    The major cause of hyperphenylalaninemia is mutations in the gene encoding phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). The known mutations have been identified primarily in European patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of mutations responsible for PAH deficiency in the United States. One hundred forty-nine patients enrolled in the Maternal PKU Collaborative Study were subjects for clinical and molecular investigations. PAH gene mutations associated with phenylketonuria (PKU) or mild hyperphenylalaninemia (MHP) were identified on 279 of 294 independent mutant chromosomes, a diagnostic efficiency of 95%. The spectrum is composed of 71 different mutations, including 47 missense mutations, 11 splice mutations, 5 nonsense mutations, and 8 microdeletions. Sixteen previously unreported mutations were identified. Among the novel mutations, five were found in patients with MHP, and the remainder were found in patients with PKU. The most common mutations were R408W, IVS12nt1g{r_arrow}a, and Y414C, accounting for 18.7%, 7.8% and 5.4% of the mutant chromosomes, respectively. Thirteen mutations had relative frequencies of 1%-5%, and 55 mutations each had frequencies {le}1%. The mutational spectrum corresponded to that observed for the European ancestry of the U.S. population. To evaluate the extent of allelic variation at the PAH locus within the United States in comparison with other populations, we used allele frequencies to calculate the homozygosity for 11 populations where >90% ascertainment has been obtained. The United States was shown to contain one of the most heterogeneous populations, with homozygosity values similar to Sicily and ethnically mixed sample populations in Europe. The extent of allelic heterogeneity must be a major determining factor in the choice of mutation-detection methodology for molecular diagnosis in PAH deficiency. 47 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  7. 1H MR chemical shift imaging detection of phenylalanine in patients suffering from phenylketonuria (PKU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sijens, Paul E.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Spronsen, Francjan J. van; Leenders, Klaas L.; Valk, Harold W. de

    2004-01-01

    Short echo time single voxel methods were used in previous MR spectroscopy studies of phenylalanine (Phe) levels in phenylketonuria (PKU) patients. In this study, apparent T 2 relaxation time of the 7.3-ppm Phe multiplet signal in the brain of PKU patients was assessed in order to establish which echo time would be optimal. 1 H chemical shift imaging (CSI) examinations of a transverse plain above the ventricles of the brain were performed in 10 PKU patients and 11 persons not suffering from PKU at 1.5 T, using four echo times (TE 20, 40, 135 and 270 ms). Phe was detectable only when the signals from all CSI voxels were summarized. In patients suffering from PKU the T 2 relaxation times of choline, creatine and N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) were similar to those previously reported for healthy volunteers (between 200 and 325 ms). The T 2 of Phe in brain tissue was 215±120 ms (standard deviation). In the PKU patients the brain tissue Phe concentrations were 141±69 μM as opposed to 58±23 μM in the persons not suffering from PKU. In the detection of Phe, MR spectroscopy performed at TE 135 or 270 ms is not inferior to that performed at TE 20 or 40 ms (all previous studies). Best results were obtained at TE=135 ms, relating to the fact that at that particular TE, the visibility of a compound with a T 2 of 215 ms still is good, while interfering signals from short-TE compounds are negligible. (orig.)

  8. {sup 1}H MR chemical shift imaging detection of phenylalanine in patients suffering from phenylketonuria (PKU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sijens, Paul E.; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Hospital Groningen, Department of Radiology, Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands); Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Spronsen, Francjan J. van [University Hospital Groningen, Department of Pediatrics, Groningen (Netherlands); Leenders, Klaas L. [University Hospital Groningen, Department of Neurology, Groningen (Netherlands); Valk, Harold W. de [University Medical Centre of Utrecht, Department of Internal Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2004-10-01

    Short echo time single voxel methods were used in previous MR spectroscopy studies of phenylalanine (Phe) levels in phenylketonuria (PKU) patients. In this study, apparent T{sub 2} relaxation time of the 7.3-ppm Phe multiplet signal in the brain of PKU patients was assessed in order to establish which echo time would be optimal. {sup 1}H chemical shift imaging (CSI) examinations of a transverse plain above the ventricles of the brain were performed in 10 PKU patients and 11 persons not suffering from PKU at 1.5 T, using four echo times (TE 20, 40, 135 and 270 ms). Phe was detectable only when the signals from all CSI voxels were summarized. In patients suffering from PKU the T{sub 2} relaxation times of choline, creatine and N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) were similar to those previously reported for healthy volunteers (between 200 and 325 ms). The T{sub 2} of Phe in brain tissue was 215{+-}120 ms (standard deviation). In the PKU patients the brain tissue Phe concentrations were 141{+-}69 {mu}M as opposed to 58{+-}23 {mu}M in the persons not suffering from PKU. In the detection of Phe, MR spectroscopy performed at TE 135 or 270 ms is not inferior to that performed at TE 20 or 40 ms (all previous studies). Best results were obtained at TE=135 ms, relating to the fact that at that particular TE, the visibility of a compound with a T{sub 2} of 215 ms still is good, while interfering signals from short-TE compounds are negligible. (orig.)

  9. Associations between mutations and a VNTR in the human phenylalanine hydroxylase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goltsov, A.A.; Eisensmith, R.C.; Woo, S.L.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Konecki, D.S.; Lichter-Konecki, U.

    1992-09-01

    The HindIII RFLP in the human phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene is caused by the presence of an AT-rich (70%) minisatellite region. This region contains various multiples of 30-bp tandem repeats and is located 3 kb downstream of the final exon of the gene. PCR-mediated amplification of this region from haplotyped PAH chromosomes indicates that the previously reported 4.0-kb HindIII allele contains three of these repeats, while the 4.4-kb HindIII allele contains 12 of these repeats. The 4.2-kb HindIII fragment can contain six, seven, eight, or nine copies of this repeat. These variations permit more detailed analysis of mutant haplotypes 1, 5, 6, and, possibly, others. Kindred analysis in phenylketonuria families demonstrates Mendelian segregation of these VNTR alleles, as well as associations between theses alleles and certain PAH mutations. The R261Q mutation, associated with haplotype 1, is associated almost exclusively with an allele containing eight repeats; the R408W mutation, when occurring on a haplotype 1 background, may also be associated with the eight-repeat VNTR allele. Other PAH mutations associated with haplotype 1, R252W and P281L, do not appear to segregate with specific VNTR alleles. The IVS-10 mutation, when associated with haplotype 6, is associated exclusively with an allele containing seven repeats. The combined use of this VNTR system and the existing RFLP haplotype system will increase the performance of prenatal diagnostic tests based on haplotype analysis. In addition, this VNTR may prove useful in studies concerning the origins and distributions of PAH mutations in different human populations. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Application of SAIL phenylalanine and tyrosine with alternative isotope-labeling patterns for protein structure determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro [Nagoya University, Structural Biology Research Center, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Ono, Akira M.; Terauchi, Tsutomu [SAIL Technologies Co., Inc. (Japan); Kainosho, Masatsune, E-mail: kainosho@nmr.chem.metro-u.ac.j [Nagoya University, Structural Biology Research Center, Graduate School of Science (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    The extensive collection of NOE constraint data involving the aromatic ring signals is essential for accurate protein structure determination, although it is often hampered in practice by the pervasive signal overlapping and tight spin couplings for aromatic rings. We have prepared various types of stereo-array isotope labeled phenylalanines ({epsilon}- and {zeta}-SAIL Phe) and tyrosine ({epsilon}-SAIL Tyr) to overcome these problems (Torizawa et al. 2005), and proven that these SAIL amino acids provide dramatic spectral simplification and sensitivity enhancement for the aromatic ring NMR signals. In addition to these SAIL aromatic amino acids, we recently synthesized {delta}-SAIL Phe and {delta}-SAIL Tyr, which allow us to observe and assign {delta}-{sup 13}C/{sup 1}H signals very efficiently. Each of the various types of SAIL Phe and SAIL Tyr yields well-resolved resonances for the {delta}-, {epsilon}- or {zeta}-{sup 13}C/{sup 1}H signals, respectively, which can readily be assigned by simple and robust pulse sequences. Since the {delta}-, {epsilon}-, and {zeta}-proton signals of Phe/Tyr residues give rise to complementary NOE constraints, the concomitant use of various types of SAIL-Phe and SAIL-Tyr would generate more accurate protein structures, as compared to those obtained by using conventional uniformly {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N-double labeled proteins. We illustrated this with the case of an 18.2 kDa protein, Escherichia coli peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase b (EPPIb), and concluded that the combined use of {zeta}-SAIL Phe and {epsilon}-SAIL Tyr would be practically the best choice for protein structural determinations.

  11. Elevated phenylalanine on newborn screening: follow-up testing may reveal undiagnosed galactosaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Lynette; Downing, Melanie; Allen, Joyce; Casbolt, Ann-Marie; Ellin, Sheila; Maloney, Martin; Race, Gillian; Bonham, Jim

    2010-11-01

    Introduction Newborn screening for phenylketonuria (PKU) can reveal other conditions which lead to an increased blood spot phenylalanine (Phe) concentration. We have investigated the proportion of blood spot samples that gave a positive screen due to clinically significant conditions other than PKU, compared the positive predictive value (PPV) of our referral Phe cut-off with that recommended by the UK Newborn Screening Programme Centre (UKNSPC) (>210 and >240 μmol/L, respectively) and evaluated the effectiveness of reflex testing for galactosaemia using a lower blood spot Phe cut-off concentration of 130 μmol/L. All blood spot samples that screened positive, for an increased Phe concentration, between April 2001 and March 2008, were identified from the records of the Sheffield Newborn Screening Laboratory and the diagnoses noted. In addition, all cases of galactosaemia detected in or notified to our screening laboratory within this time were also examined and the screened Phe concentrations compared. Out of 438,674 babies who were screened, 67 had Phe concentration >210 μmol/L (15 per 100,000). Of these, 40 had PKU or persistent hyperphenylalaninaemia with a Phe concentration identified by screening between 270 and 2350 μmol/L. A further 11 were diagnosed with another clinically significant disorder: galactosaemia (n = 8), biopterin defects (n = 2), tyrosinaemia Type 1 (n = 1). In addition, 16 had transient elevations in Phe. In total, nine cases of galactosaemia were identified, of whom, three had Phe concentrations 240 μmol/L) will not affect the detection rate of classical PKU, but will improve the PPV from 76% to 80%. The use of a lower cut-off (130 μmol/L) for reflex galactosaemia testing enables the timely identification of asymptomatic cases that benefit particularly from early treatment, without prompting any unnecessary clinical referrals or delaying any referrals. This intervention may reduce mortality in this vulnerable group.

  12. Economic impact of feeding a phenylalanine-restricted diet to adults with previously untreated phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M C; Guest, J F

    1999-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the direct healthcare cost of managing adults with previously untreated phenylketonuria (PKU) for one year before any dietary restrictions and for the first year after a phenylalanine- (PHE-) restricted diet was introduced. The resource use and corresponding costs were estimated from medical records and interviews with health care professionals experienced in caring for adults with previously untreated PKU. The mean annual cost of caring for a client being fed an unrestricted diet was estimated to be 83 996 pound silver. In the first year after introducing a PHE-restricted diet, the mean annual cost was reduced by 20 647 pound silver to 63 348 pound silver as a result of a reduction in nursing time, hospitalizations, outpatient clinic visits and medications. However, the economic benefit of the diet depended on whether the clients were previously high or low users of nursing care. Nursing time was the key cost-driver, accounting for 79% of the cost of managing high users and 31% of the management cost for low users. In contrast, the acquisition cost of a PHE-restricted diet accounted for up to 6% of the cost for managing high users and 15% of the management cost for low users. Sensitivity analyses showed that introducing a PHE-restricted diet reduces the annual cost of care, provided that annual nursing time was reduced by more than 8% or more than 5% of clients respond to the diet. The clients showed fewer negative behaviours when being fed a PHE-restricted diet, which may account for the observed reduction in nursing time needed to care for these clients. In conclusion, feeding a PHE-restricted diet to adults with previously untreated PKU leads to economic benefits to the UK's National Health Service and society in general.

  13. Effect of inhaled formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine on airway function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berend, N; Peters, M J; Armour, C L; Black, J L; Ward, H E

    1988-01-01

    Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), a synthetic, acylated tripeptide analogous to bacterial chemotactic factors, has been shown to cause bronchoconstriction in guinea pig, rabbit, and human airways in vitro. To determine whether FMLP causes bronchoconstriction in man in vivo, a preliminary study was undertaken in which five non-smokers (mean age 35 years, FEV1 94% (SEM 5%) predicted) and five smokers (mean age 34 years, FEV1 93% (6%) predicted) inhaled aerosols of FMLP. None of the subjects showed airway hyperresponsiveness to histamine (the provocative concentrations of histamine causing a fall of greater than or equal to 20% in FEV1 (PC20) were over 8 mg/ml). FMLP dissolved in 50% dimethylsulphoxide and 50% saline in concentrations of 0, 0.06, 0.12, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mg/ml was administered to the subjects by means of a French-Rosenthal dosimeter, FEV1 being recorded after inhalation of each concentration. Dose dependent falls in FEV1 occurred in five non-smokers (geometric mean 1.76, 95% confidence limits 0.87-3.53 mg/ml) and three smokers (0.23, 0.07-0.78 mg/ml), with two smokers not responding by 20% to the highest concentration of FMLP. On a separate day the FMLP dose-response curves were repeated after nebulisation of 500 micrograms of ipratropium bromide. The PC20 FMLP in the responders more than doubled. In six additional normal subjects a histamine inhalation test was performed before and four and 24 hours after inhalation of FMLP. All subjects remained unresponsive to histamine. These results show that FMLP is a potent bronchoconstrictor in some non-asthmatic individuals in vivo and this may be important in bronchoconstriction related to infection in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease.

  14. No Tryptophan, Tyrosine and Phenylalanine Abnormalities in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina Elisabeth Bergwerff

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to explore the role of aromatic amino acids (AAAs in blood in relation to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Given their impact on the synthesis of serotonin and dopamine, decreased concentrations of the AAAs tryptophan, tyrosine and phenylalanine in blood may contribute to the expression of ADHD symptoms. Decreased AAA blood concentrations, in turn, may be related to lowered dietary protein intake or to abnormal AAA catabolism, as evidenced by increased urinary AAA concentrations.Eighty-three children with ADHD (75% males and 72 typically developing (TD children (51% males, aged 6 to 13 years, participated in the study. AAA concentrations were assessed in blood spots and an 18-hour urinary sample. A nutritional diary was filled out by parents to calculate dietary protein intake. Parent and teacher questionnaires assessed symptoms of ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, and autism spectrum disorder.Children with ADHD showed normal AAA concentrations in blood spots and urine, as well as normal protein intake compared to controls. No associations between AAA concentrations and symptoms of ADHD or comorbid psychiatric disorders were found.This study is the first to explore AAA metabolism in children with ADHD using a well-defined and relatively large sample. We found that AAA deficiencies are not related to ADHD. The results do not support treatment with AAA supplements in children with ADHD. Future studies regarding the cause of serotonin and dopamine alterations in ADHD should focus on other explanations, such as effects of altered transport of AAAs.

  15. Application of SAIL phenylalanine and tyrosine with alternative isotope-labeling patterns for protein structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Ono, Akira M; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2010-01-01

    The extensive collection of NOE constraint data involving the aromatic ring signals is essential for accurate protein structure determination, although it is often hampered in practice by the pervasive signal overlapping and tight spin couplings for aromatic rings. We have prepared various types of stereo-array isotope labeled phenylalanines (epsilon- and zeta-SAIL Phe) and tyrosine (epsilon-SAIL Tyr) to overcome these problems (Torizawa et al. 2005), and proven that these SAIL amino acids provide dramatic spectral simplification and sensitivity enhancement for the aromatic ring NMR signals. In addition to these SAIL aromatic amino acids, we recently synthesized delta-SAIL Phe and delta-SAIL Tyr, which allow us to observe and assign delta-(13)C/(1)H signals very efficiently. Each of the various types of SAIL Phe and SAIL Tyr yields well-resolved resonances for the delta-, epsilon- or zeta-(13)C/(1)H signals, respectively, which can readily be assigned by simple and robust pulse sequences. Since the delta-, epsilon-, and zeta-proton signals of Phe/Tyr residues give rise to complementary NOE constraints, the concomitant use of various types of SAIL-Phe and SAIL-Tyr would generate more accurate protein structures, as compared to those obtained by using conventional uniformly (13)C, (15)N-double labeled proteins. We illustrated this with the case of an 18.2 kDa protein, Escherichia coli peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase b (EPPIb), and concluded that the combined use of zeta-SAIL Phe and epsilon-SAIL Tyr would be practically the best choice for protein structural determinations.

  16. Application of SAIL phenylalanine and tyrosine with alternative isotope-labeling patterns for protein structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Ono, Akira M.; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2010-01-01

    The extensive collection of NOE constraint data involving the aromatic ring signals is essential for accurate protein structure determination, although it is often hampered in practice by the pervasive signal overlapping and tight spin couplings for aromatic rings. We have prepared various types of stereo-array isotope labeled phenylalanines (ε- and ζ-SAIL Phe) and tyrosine (ε-SAIL Tyr) to overcome these problems (Torizawa et al. 2005), and proven that these SAIL amino acids provide dramatic spectral simplification and sensitivity enhancement for the aromatic ring NMR signals. In addition to these SAIL aromatic amino acids, we recently synthesized δ-SAIL Phe and δ-SAIL Tyr, which allow us to observe and assign δ- 13 C/ 1 H signals very efficiently. Each of the various types of SAIL Phe and SAIL Tyr yields well-resolved resonances for the δ-, ε- or ζ- 13 C/ 1 H signals, respectively, which can readily be assigned by simple and robust pulse sequences. Since the δ-, ε-, and ζ-proton signals of Phe/Tyr residues give rise to complementary NOE constraints, the concomitant use of various types of SAIL-Phe and SAIL-Tyr would generate more accurate protein structures, as compared to those obtained by using conventional uniformly 13 C, 15 N-double labeled proteins. We illustrated this with the case of an 18.2 kDa protein, Escherichia coli peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase b (EPPIb), and concluded that the combined use of ζ-SAIL Phe and ε-SAIL Tyr would be practically the best choice for protein structural determinations.

  17. Genome-wide characterization of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase gene family in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chun-Juan; Shang, Qing-Mao

    2013-07-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), the first enzyme in the phenylpropanoid pathway, plays a critical role in plant growth, development, and adaptation. PAL enzymes are encoded by a gene family in plants. Here, we report a genome-wide search for PAL genes in watermelon. A total of 12 PAL genes, designated ClPAL1-12, are identified . Nine are arranged in tandem in two duplication blocks located on chromosomes 4 and 7, and the other three ClPAL genes are distributed as single copies on chromosomes 2, 3, and 8. Both the cDNA and protein sequences of ClPALs share an overall high identity with each other. A phylogenetic analysis places 11 of the ClPALs into a separate cucurbit subclade, whereas ClPAL2, which belongs to neither monocots nor dicots, may serve as an ancestral PAL in plants. In the cucurbit subclade, seven ClPALs form homologous pairs with their counterparts from cucumber. Expression profiling reveals that 11 of the ClPAL genes are expressed and show preferential expression in the stems and male and female flowers. Six of the 12 ClPALs are moderately or strongly expressed in the fruits, particularly in the pulp, suggesting the potential roles of PAL in the development of fruit color and flavor. A promoter motif analysis of the ClPAL genes implies redundant but distinctive cis-regulatory structures for stress responsiveness. Finally, duplication events during the evolution and expansion of the ClPAL gene family are discussed, and the relationships between the ClPAL genes and their cucumber orthologs are estimated.

  18. A Three-Dimensional Model of the Yeast Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, William; Duan, Zhi-Jun; Andronescu, Mirela; Schutz, Kevin; McIlwain, Sean; Kim, Yoo Jung; Lee, Choli; Shendure, Jay; Fields, Stanley; Blau, C. Anthony

    Layered on top of information conveyed by DNA sequence and chromatin are higher order structures that encompass portions of chromosomes, entire chromosomes, and even whole genomes. Interphase chromosomes are not positioned randomly within the nucleus, but instead adopt preferred conformations. Disparate DNA elements co-localize into functionally defined aggregates or factories for transcription and DNA replication. In budding yeast, Drosophila and many other eukaryotes, chromosomes adopt a Rabl configuration, with arms extending from centromeres adjacent to the spindle pole body to telomeres that abut the nuclear envelope. Nonetheless, the topologies and spatial relationships of chromosomes remain poorly understood. Here we developed a method to globally capture intra- and inter-chromosomal interactions, and applied it to generate a map at kilobase resolution of the haploid genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The map recapitulates known features of genome organization, thereby validating the method, and identifies new features. Extensive regional and higher order folding of individual chromosomes is observed. Chromosome XII exhibits a striking conformation that implicates the nucleolus as a formidable barrier to interaction between DNA sequences at either end. Inter-chromosomal contacts are anchored by centromeres and include interactions among transfer RNA genes, among origins of early DNA replication and among sites where chromosomal breakpoints occur. Finally, we constructed a three-dimensional model of the yeast genome. Our findings provide a glimpse of the interface between the form and function of a eukaryotic genome.

  19. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Bo

    2014-01-01

    Against a background of rather mixed evidence about transfer pricing practices in multinational enterprises (MNEs) and varying attitudes on the part of tax authorities, this paper explores how multiple aims in transfer pricing can be pursued across four different transfer pricing regimes. A MNE h...

  20. Spermidine cures yeast of prions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun H. Speldewinde

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Prions are self-perpetuating amyloid protein aggregates which underlie various neurodegenerative diseases in mammals. The molecular basis underlying their conversion from a normally soluble protein into the prion form remains largely unknown. Studies aimed at uncovering these mechanism(s are therefore essential if we are to develop effective therapeutic strategies to counteract these disease-causing entities. Autophagy is a cellular degradation system which has predominantly been considered as a non-selective bulk degradation process which recycles macromolecules in response to starvation conditions. We now know that autophagy also serves as a protein quality control mechanism which selectively degrades protein aggregates and damaged organelles. These are commonly accumulated in various neurodegenerative disorders including prion diseases. In our recent study [Speldewinde et al. Mol. Biol. Cell. (2015] we used the well-established yeast [PSI+]/Sup35 and [PIN­+]/Rnq1 prion models to show that autophagy prevents sporadic prion formation. Importantly, we found that spermidine, a polyamine that has been used to increase autophagic flux, acts as a protective agent which prevents spontaneous prion formation.

  1. Influence of non-adherent yeast cells on electrical characteristics of diamond-based field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procházka, Václav, E-mail: prochazkav@fzu.cz [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technická 2, 16627 Prague (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Cifra, Michal [Institute of Photonics and Electronics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Chaberská 57, 182 51 Prague (Czech Republic); Kulha, Pavel [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technická 2, 16627 Prague (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Ižák, Tibor [Institute of Physics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Rezek, Bohuslav [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technická 2, 16627 Prague (Czech Republic); Institute of Physics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Kromka, Alexander [Institute of Physics, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Cukrovarnická 10/112, 162 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Civil Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Thákurova 7, 16629 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Interaction of non-adherent yeast cells with H-terminated diamond described. • Effect of cell culture solutions on H-diamond SGFET (positive potential shifts). • H-diamond sensitive to metabolic activity of yeast cells (negative potential shift). - Abstract: Diamond thin films provide unique features as substrates for cell cultures and as bio-electronic sensors. Here we employ solution-gated field effect transistors (SGFET) based on nanocrystalline diamond thin films with H-terminated surface which exhibits the sub-surface p-type conductive channel. We study an influence of yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on electrical characteristics of the diamond SGFETs. Two different cell culture solutions (sucrose and yeast peptone dextrose–YPD) are used, with and without the cells. We have found that transfer characteristics of the SGFETs exhibit a negative shift of the gate voltage by −26 mV and −42 mV for sucrose and YPD with cells in comparison to blank solutions without the cells. This effect is attributed to a local pH change in close vicinity of the H-terminated diamond surface due to metabolic processes of the yeast cells. The pH sensitivity of the diamond-based SGFETs, the role of cell and protein adhesion on the gate surface and the role of negative surface charge of yeast cells on the SGFETs electrical characteristics are discussed as well.

  2. Influence of non-adherent yeast cells on electrical characteristics of diamond-based field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procházka, Václav; Cifra, Michal; Kulha, Pavel; Ižák, Tibor; Rezek, Bohuslav; Kromka, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Interaction of non-adherent yeast cells with H-terminated diamond described. • Effect of cell culture solutions on H-diamond SGFET (positive potential shifts). • H-diamond sensitive to metabolic activity of yeast cells (negative potential shift). - Abstract: Diamond thin films provide unique features as substrates for cell cultures and as bio-electronic sensors. Here we employ solution-gated field effect transistors (SGFET) based on nanocrystalline diamond thin films with H-terminated surface which exhibits the sub-surface p-type conductive channel. We study an influence of yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on electrical characteristics of the diamond SGFETs. Two different cell culture solutions (sucrose and yeast peptone dextrose–YPD) are used, with and without the cells. We have found that transfer characteristics of the SGFETs exhibit a negative shift of the gate voltage by −26 mV and −42 mV for sucrose and YPD with cells in comparison to blank solutions without the cells. This effect is attributed to a local pH change in close vicinity of the H-terminated diamond surface due to metabolic processes of the yeast cells. The pH sensitivity of the diamond-based SGFETs, the role of cell and protein adhesion on the gate surface and the role of negative surface charge of yeast cells on the SGFETs electrical characteristics are discussed as well.

  3. The genome of wine yeast Dekkera bruxellensis provides a tool to explore its food-related properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piskur, Jure; Ling, Zhihao; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Ishchuk, Olena P.; Aerts, Andrea; LaButti, Kurt; Copeland, Alex; Lindquist, Erika; Barry, Kerrie; Compagno, Concetta; Bisson, Linda; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Gabaldon, Toni; Phister, Trevor

    2012-03-14

    The yeast Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis can cause enormous economic losses in wine industry due to production of phenolic off-flavor compounds. D. bruxellensis is a distant relative of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nevertheless, these two yeasts are often found in the same habitats and share several food-related traits, such as production of high ethanol levels and ability to grow without oxygen. In some food products, like lambic beer, D. bruxellensis can importantly contribute to flavor development. We determined the 13.4 Mb genome sequence of the D. bruxellensis strain Y879 (CBS2499) and deduced the genetic background of several ?food-relevant? properties and evolutionary history of this yeast. Surprisingly, we find that this yeast is phylogenetically distant to other food-related yeasts and most related to Pichia (Komagataella) pastoris, which is an aerobic poor ethanol producer. We further show that the D. bruxellensis genome does not contain an excess of lineage specific duplicated genes nor a horizontally transferred URA1 gene, two crucial events that promoted the evolution of the food relevant traits in the S. cerevisiae lineage. However, D. bruxellensis has several independently duplicated ADH and ADH-like genes, which are likely responsible for metabolism of alcohols, including ethanol, and also a range of aromatic compounds.

  4. NetPhosYeast: prediction of protein phosphorylation sites in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingrell, C.R.; Miller, Martin Lee; Jensen, O.N.

    2007-01-01

    sites compared to those in humans, suggesting the need for an yeast-specific phosphorylation site predictor. NetPhosYeast achieves a correlation coefficient close to 0.75 with a sensitivity of 0.84 and specificity of 0.90 and outperforms existing predictors in the identification of phosphorylation sites...

  5. Differences between flocculating yeast and regular industrial yeast in transcription and metabolite profiling during ethanol fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To improve ethanolic fermentation performance of self-flocculating yeast, difference between a flocculating yeast strain and a regular industrial yeast strain was analyzed by transcriptional and metabolic approaches. Results: The number of down-regulated (industrial yeast YIC10 vs. flocculating yeast GIM2.71 and up-regulated genes were 4503 and 228, respectively. It is the economic regulation for YIC10 that non-essential genes were down-regulated, and cells put more “energy” into growth and ethanol production. Hexose transport and phosphorylation were not the limiting-steps in ethanol fermentation for GIM2.71 compared to YIC10, whereas the reaction of 1,3-disphosphoglycerate to 3-phosphoglycerate, the decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and its subsequent reduction to ethanol were the most limiting steps. GIM2.71 had stronger stress response than non-flocculating yeast and much more carbohydrate was distributed to other bypass, such as glycerol, acetate and trehalose synthesis. Conclusions: Differences between flocculating yeast and regular industrial yeast in transcription and metabolite profiling will provide clues for improving the fermentation performance of GIM2.71.

  6. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YFR015C, YFR015C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yeast homolog; expression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entr...ression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entry into stationary ...tion, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entry into stationary phase Rows with this bait as bait..., the more highly expressed yeast homolog; expression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental

  7. Yeast viability and concentration analysis using lens-free computational microscopy and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizi, Alborz; Zhang, Yibo; Greenbaum, Alon; Guziak, Alex; Luong, Michelle; Chan, Raymond Yan Lok; Berg, Brandon; Ozkan, Haydar; Luo, Wei; Wu, Michael; Wu, Yichen; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-03-01

    Research laboratories and the industry rely on yeast viability and concentration measurements to adjust fermentation parameters such as pH, temperature, and pressure. Beer-brewing processes as well as biofuel production can especially utilize a cost-effective and portable way of obtaining data on cell viability and concentration. However, current methods of analysis are relatively costly and tedious. Here, we demonstrate a rapid, portable, and cost-effective platform for imaging and measuring viability and concentration of yeast cells. Our platform features a lens-free microscope that weighs 70 g and has dimensions of 12 × 4 × 4 cm. A partially-coherent illumination source (a light-emitting-diode), a band-pass optical filter, and a multimode optical fiber are used to illuminate the sample. The yeast sample is directly placed on a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor chip, which captures an in-line hologram of the sample over a large field-of-view of >20 mm2. The hologram is transferred to a touch-screen interface, where a trained Support Vector Machine model classifies yeast cells stained with methylene blue as live or dead and measures cell viability as well as concentration. We tested the accuracy of our platform against manual counting of live and dead cells using fluorescent exclusion staining and a bench-top fluorescence microscope. Our regression analysis showed no significant difference between the two methods within a concentration range of 1.4 × 105 to 1.4 × 106 cells/mL. This compact and cost-effective yeast analysis platform will enable automatic quantification of yeast viability and concentration in field settings and resource-limited environments.

  8. A Comparison of Two Yeast MnSODs: Mitochondrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae versus Cytosolic Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng, Y.; Cabelli, D.; Stich, T.A.; Barnese, K.; Gralla, E.B.; Cascio, D.; Britt, R.D.; Valentine, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Human MnSOD is significantly more product-inhibited than bacterial MnSODs at high concentrations of superoxide (O 2 - ). This behavior limits the amount of H 2 O 2 produced at high [O 2 - ]; its desirability can be explained by the multiple roles of H 2 O 2 in mammalian cells, particularly its role in signaling. To investigate the mechanism of product inhibition in MnSOD, two yeast MnSODs, one from Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria (ScMnSOD) and the other from Candida albicans cytosol (CaMnSODc), were isolated and characterized. ScMnSOD and CaMnSODc are similar in catalytic kinetics, spectroscopy, and redox chemistry, and they both rest predominantly in the reduced state (unlike most other MnSODs). At high [O 2 - ], the dismutation efficiencies of the yeast MnSODs surpass those of human and bacterial MnSODs, due to very low level of product inhibition. Optical and parallel-mode electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra suggest the presence of two Mn 3+ species in yeast Mn 3+ SODs, including the well-characterized 5-coordinate Mn 3+ species and a 6-coordinate L-Mn 3+ species with hydroxide as the putative sixth ligand (L). The first and second coordination spheres of ScMnSOD are more similar to bacterial than to human MnSOD. Gln154, an H-bond donor to the Mn-coordinated solvent molecule, is slightly further away from Mn in yeast MnSODs, which may result in their unusual resting state. Mechanistically, the high efficiency of yeast MnSODs could be ascribed to putative translocation of an outer-sphere solvent molecule, which could destabilize the inhibited complex and enhance proton transfer from protein to peroxide. Our studies on yeast MnSODs indicate the unique nature of human MnSOD in that it predominantly undergoes the inhibited pathway at high [O 2 - ].

  9. The in vivo anti-fibrotic function of calcium sensitive receptor (CaSR) modulating poly(p-dioxanone-co-l-phenylalanine) prodrug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Wen, Aiping; Feng, Chengmin; Niu, Lijing; Xiao, Xin; Luo, Le; Shen, Chengyi; Zhu, Jiang; Lei, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2018-04-13

    In present study, the apoptosis induction and proliferation suppression effects of l-phenylalanine (l-Phe) on fibroblasts were confirmed. The action sites of l-Phe on fibroblasts suppression were deduced to be calcium sensitive receptor (CaSR) which could cause the release of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca 2+ stores; disruption of intracellular Ca 2+ homeostasis triggers cell apoptosis via the ER or mitochondrial pathways. The down-regulation of CaSR were observed after the application of l-Phe, and the results those l-Phe triggered the increasing of intracellular Ca 2+ concentration and calcineurin expression, and then the apoptosis and increasing G1 fraction of fibroblasts have verified our deduction. Hence, l-Phe could be seen as a kind of anti-fibrotic drugs for the crucial participation of fibroblast in the occurrence of fibrosis. And then, poly(p-dioxanone-co-l-phenylalanine) (PDPA) which could prolong the in-vivo anti-fibrotic effect of l-Phe for the sustained release of l-Phe during its degradation could be treated as anti-fibrotic polymer prodrugs. Based on the above, the in vivo anti-fibrotic function of PDPA was evaluated in rabbit ear scarring, rat peritoneum lipopolysaccharide, and rat sidewall defect/cecum abrasion models. PDPA reduced skin scarring and suppressed peritoneal fibrosis and post operation adhesion as well as secretion of transforming growth factor-β1 in injured tissue. These results indicate that PDPA is an effective agent for preventing fibrosis following tissue injury. We have previously demonstrated that poly(p-dioxanone-co-l-phenylalanine) (PDPA) could induce apoptosis to fibroblast and deduced that the inhibitory effect comes from l-phenylalanine. In present study, the inhibition mechanism of l-phenylalanine on fibroblast proliferation was demonstrated. The calcium sensitive receptor (CaSR) was found to be the action site. The CaSR was downregulated after the application of l-phenylalanine, and then the ER Ca 2+ stores were released

  10. Low cost production of perdeuterated biomass using methylotrophic yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haon, S.; Auge, S.; Tropis, M.; Milon, A.; Lindley, N.D.

    1993-01-01

    Three strains of methylotropic yeasts, Candida boidinii, Pichia angusta (previously Hansenula polymorpha) and Pichia pastoris, were studied for their capacity to grow on methanol in deuterated media. Growth rates, determined relative to the extent of deuteration of water and/or methanol, showed that water deuteration was the major limiting factor. After adaptation to deuterium by progressive transfer through media of increasing deuteration, growth rates were diminished relative to those obtained on hydrogenated media of identical salts composition: the two Pichia species retained the highest growth rates in the full deuterated medium. Perdeuterated biomass (16 g) was obtained in a 1 liter fed-batch fermentation and the extent of deuteration of isolated ergosterol has been shown to be 97.5% by mass spectrometric analysis. (Author)

  11. Homology of yeast photoreactivating gene fragment with human genomic digests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meechan, P.J.; Milam, K.M.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Enzymatic photoreactivation of UV-induced DNA lesions has been demonstrated for a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Its presence in placental mammals, however, has not been clearly established. The authors attempted to resolve this question by assaying for the presence (or absence) of sequences in human DNA complimentary to a fragment of the photoreactivating gene from S. cerevisiae that has recently been cloned. In another study, DNA from human, chick E. coli and yeast cells was digested with either HindIII of BglII, electrophoresed on a 0.5% agarose gel, transferred (Southern blot) to a nylon membrane and probed for homology against a Sau3A restriction fragment from S. cerevisiae that compliments phr/sup -/ cells. Hybridization to human DNA digests was observed only under relatively non-stringent conditions indicating the gene is not conserved in placental mammals. These results are correlated with current literature data concerning photoreactivating enzymes

  12. Increasing the yeast yield in alcohol fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelc, A; Vamos, E; Varga, L; Gavalya, S; Dolanszky, F

    1964-02-01

    The yeast and ethanol yields (the latter being based on the substrate) are enhanced by adding the substrate (molasses) gradually to the suspension of inoculating yeast during the main fermentation period, passing air through the mash, ceasing both substrate addition and aeration at the end of the main period, and allowing the process to come to an end. This way 12 to 14 kg yeast (dry weight)/100 l ethanol could be obtained within 16 to 24 hours and the yeast obtained could be used as the inoculum for the next charge. For example: 11 to 16 kg yeast (or 18 to 25 l yeast suspension from the preceding charge, containing 18 to 20% dry matter) is kept in 30 to 35 l H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (0.74 g/100 ml) for 1 hour, diluted with H/sub 2/O and 30 kg sterile molasses to 300 l, kept at 30 to 32/sup 0/ with mild aeration for 2 hours, 1900 l 30/sup 0/ H/sub 2/O added, then 1 m/sup 3/ air/m/sup 2//hour is passed through the mixture, with the addition of 270 kg sterile molasses, and a solution of 8 kg superphosphate and 5 kg (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in 100 l H/sub 2/O, the latter being added in 5 portions over 2 hours. Molasses (600 kg) is added during the main period, maintaining the pH at 5 (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/), and the temperature at 30/sup 0/, then aeration is ceased and the mixture kept until fermentation proceeds. The 3000 l medium contains 9.6% ethanol and 1.38% yeast, respectively.

  13. Schizosaccharomyces japonicus: the fission yeast is a fusion of yeast and hyphae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niki, Hironori

    2014-03-01

    The clade of Schizosaccharomyces includes 4 species: S. pombe, S. octosporus, S. cryophilus, and S. japonicus. Although all 4 species exhibit unicellular growth with a binary fission mode of cell division, S. japonicus alone is dimorphic yeast, which can transit from unicellular yeast to long filamentous hyphae. Recently it was found that the hyphal cells response to light and then synchronously activate cytokinesis of hyphae. In addition to hyphal growth, S. japonicas has many properties that aren't shared with other fission yeast. Mitosis of S. japonicas is referred to as semi-open mitosis because dynamics of nuclear membrane is an intermediate mode between open mitosis and closed mitosis. Novel genetic tools and the whole genomic sequencing of S. japonicas now provide us with an opportunity for revealing unique characters of the dimorphic yeast. © 2013 The Author. Yeast Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Terroir of yeasts? – Application of FTIR spectroscopy and molecular methods for strain typing of yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhards Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The site specific influence on wine (Terroir is an often by wine producers, consumers and scientists discussed topic in the world of wine. A study on grapes and (spontaneous fermentations from six different vineyards was done to investigate the biodiversity of yeasts and to answer the question if there is a terroir of yeast and how it could be influenced. Randomly isolated yeasts were identified by FTIR-spectroscopy and molecular methods on species and strain level. Vineyard specific yeast floras would be observed but they are not such important as expected. Only a few overlapping strain patterns would be identified during both vintages. The yeast flora of the winery had a huge impact on the spontaneous fermentations, but is not really constant and influenced by different factors from outside.

  15. Synthesis, uptake mechanism characterization and biological evaluation of {sup 18}F labeled fluoroalkyl phenylalanine analogs as potential PET imaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Limin [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Qu Wenchao; Lieberman, Brian P.; Ploessl, Karl [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, Hank F., E-mail: kunghf@gmail.co [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Introduction: Amino acids based tracers represent a promising class of tumor metabolic imaging agents with successful clinical applications. Two new phenylalanine derivatives, p-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-phenylalanine (FEP, [{sup 18}F]2) and p-(3-[{sup 18}F]fluoropropyl)-L-phenylalanine (FPP, [{sup 18}F]3) were synthesized and evaluated in comparison to clinically utilized O-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET, [{sup 18}F]1). Methods: FEP ([{sup 18}F]2) and FPP ([{sup 18}F]3) were successfully synthesized by a rapid and efficient two-step nucleophilic fluorination of tosylate precursors and deprotection reaction. In vitro cell uptake studies were carried out in 9L glioma cells. In vivo studies, 9L tumor xenografts were implanted in Fisher 344 rats. Results: FEP ([{sup 18}F]2) and FPP ([{sup 18}F]3) could be efficiently labeled within 90 min with good enantiomeric purity (>95%), good yield (11-37%) and high specific activity (21-69 GBq/{mu}mol). Cell uptake studies showed FEP had higher uptake than FPP as well as reference ligand FET ([{sup 18}F]1). Uptake mechanism studies suggested that FEP is a selective substrate for system L and prefers its subtype LAT1. In vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated FEP had specific accumulation in tumor cells and tumor to background ratio reached 1.45 at 60 min. Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies showed FEP was comparable to FET for imaging rats bearing 9L tumor model. FEP had high uptake in 9L tumor compared to surrounding tissue and was quickly excreted through urinary tract. Conclusion: Biological evaluations indicate that FEP ([{sup 18}F]2) is a potential useful tracer for tumor imaging with PET.

  16. Fasting Increases Human Skeletal Muscle Net Phenylalanine Release and This Is Associated with Decreased mTOR Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Møller, Andreas Buch; Christensen, Britt; Nellemann, Birgitte; Clasen, Berthil Frederik Forrest; Nair, K. Sreekumaran; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Jessen, Niels; Møller, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Aim Fasting is characterised by profound changes in energy metabolism including progressive loss of body proteins. The underlying mechanisms are however unknown and we therefore determined the effects of a 72-hour-fast on human skeletal muscle protein metabolism and activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a key regulator of cell growth. Methods Eight healthy male volunteers were studied twice: in the postabsorptive state and following 72 hours of fasting. Regional muscle amino acid kinetics was measured in the forearm using amino acid tracers. Signaling to protein synthesis and breakdown were assessed in skeletal muscle biopsies obtained during non-insulin and insulin stimulated conditions on both examination days. Results Fasting significantly increased forearm net phenylalanine release and tended to decrease phenylalanine rate of disappearance. mTOR phosphorylation was decreased by ∼50% following fasting, together with reduced downstream phosphorylation of 4EBP1, ULK1 and rpS6. In addition, the insulin stimulated increase in mTOR and rpS6 phosphorylation was significantly reduced after fasting indicating insulin resistance in this part of the signaling pathway. Autophagy initiation is in part regulated by mTOR through ULK1 and fasting increased expression of the autophagic marker LC3B-II by ∼30%. p62 is degraded during autophagy but was increased by ∼10% during fasting making interpretation of autophagic flux problematic. MAFbx and MURF1 ubiquitin ligases remained unaltered after fasting indicating no change in protesomal protein degradation. Conclusions Our results show that during fasting increased net phenylalanine release in skeletal muscle is associated to reduced mTOR activation and concomitant decreased downstream signaling to cell growth. PMID:25020061

  17. One-Pot Enzymatic Synthesis of D-Arylalanines Using Phenylalanine Ammonia Lyase and L-Amino Acid Deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Longbao; Feng, Guoqiang; Ge, Fei; Song, Ping; Wang, Taotao; Liu, Yi; Tao, Yugui; Zhou, Zhemin

    2018-06-08

    The phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (AvPAL) from Anabaena variabilis catalyzes the amination of substituent trans-cinnamic acid (t-CA) to produce racemic D,L-enantiomer arylalanine mixture owing to its low stereoselectivity. To produce high optically pure D-arylalanine, a modified AvPAL with high D-selectivity is expected. Based on the analyses of catalytic mechanism and structure, the Asn347 residue in the active site was proposed to control stereoselectivity. Therefore, Asn347 was mutated to construct mutant AvPAL-N347A, the stereoselectivity of AvPAL-N347A for D-enantiomer arylalanine was 2.3-fold higher than that of wild-type AvPAL (WtPAL). Furthermore, the residual L-enantiomer product in reaction solution could be converted into the D-enantiomer product through stereoselective oxidation by PmLAAD and nonselective reduction by reducing agent NH 3 BH 3 . At optimal conditions, the conversion rate of t-CA and optical purity (enantiomeric excess (ee D )) of D-phenylalanine reached 82% and exceeded 99%, respectively. The two enzymes displayed activity toward a broad range of substrate and could be used to efficiently synthesize D-arylalanine with different groups on the phenyl ring. Among these D-arylalanines, the yield of m-nitro-D-phenylalanine was highest and reached 96%, and the ee D exceeded 99%. This one-pot synthesis using AvPAL and PmLAAD has prospects for industrial application.

  18. Fasting increases human skeletal muscle net phenylalanine release and this is associated with decreased mTOR signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel Holm Vendelbo

    Full Text Available Fasting is characterised by profound changes in energy metabolism including progressive loss of body proteins. The underlying mechanisms are however unknown and we therefore determined the effects of a 72-hour-fast on human skeletal muscle protein metabolism and activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, a key regulator of cell growth.Eight healthy male volunteers were studied twice: in the postabsorptive state and following 72 hours of fasting. Regional muscle amino acid kinetics was measured in the forearm using amino acid tracers. Signaling to protein synthesis and breakdown were assessed in skeletal muscle biopsies obtained during non-insulin and insulin stimulated conditions on both examination days.Fasting significantly increased forearm net phenylalanine release and tended to decrease phenylalanine rate of disappearance. mTOR phosphorylation was decreased by ∼50% following fasting, together with reduced downstream phosphorylation of 4EBP1, ULK1 and rpS6. In addition, the insulin stimulated increase in mTOR and rpS6 phosphorylation was significantly reduced after fasting indicating insulin resistance in this part of the signaling pathway. Autophagy initiation is in part regulated by mTOR through ULK1 and fasting increased expression of the autophagic marker LC3B-II by ∼30%. p62 is degraded during autophagy but was increased by ∼10% during fasting making interpretation of autophagic flux problematic. MAFbx and MURF1 ubiquitin ligases remained unaltered after fasting indicating no change in protesomal protein degradation.Our results show that during fasting increased net phenylalanine release in skeletal muscle is associated to reduced mTOR activation and concomitant decreased downstream signaling to cell growth.

  19. The GPR139 reference agonists 1a and 7c, and tryptophan and phenylalanine share a common binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shehata, Mohamed A.; Jensen, Anne Cathrine Nøhr; Jespers, Willem

    2017-01-01

    for GPR139. Two series published by Shi et al. and Dvorak et al. included agonists 1a and 7c respectively, with potencies in the ten-nanomolar range. Furthermore, Isberg et al. and Liu et al. have previously shown that tryptophan (Trp) and phenylalanine (Phe) can activate GPR139 in the hundred...... important for the activation of GPR139 as predicted by the receptor model. The initial ligand-receptor complex was optimized through free energy perturbation simulations, generating a refined GPR139 model in agreement with experimental data. In summary, the GPR139 reference surrogate agonists 1a and 7c...

  20. Dynamics in electron transfer protein complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Bashir, Qamar

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have provided experimental evidence for the existence of an encounter complex, a transient intermediate in the formation of protein complexes. We have used paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR spectroscopy in combination with Monte Carlo simulations to characterize and visualize the ensemble of encounter orientations in the short-lived electron transfer complex of yeast Cc and CcP. The complete conformational space sampled by the protein molecules during the dynamic part of ...

  1. Validation of brain tumour imaging with p-[123I]iodo-l-phenylalanine and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellwig, Dirk; Sell, Nadja; Schaefer, Andrea; Kirsch, Carl-Martin; Samnick, Samuel; Ketter, Ralf; Moringlane, Jean R.; Romeike, Bernd F.M.

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this prospective study were to validate single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with p-[ 123 I]iodo-l-phenylalanine (IPA) in brain tumours and to evaluate its potential for the characterisation of indeterminate brain lesions. In 45 patients with indeterminate brain lesions or suspected progression of glioma, amino acid uptake was studied using IPA-SPECT and compared with the final diagnosis established by biopsy or serial imaging. After image fusion of IPA-SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging, the presence of tumour was visually determined by two independent observers. IPA uptake was quantified as the ratio between maximum uptake in the suspicious lesion and mean uptake in unaffected brain. Primary brain tumours were present in 35 cases (12 low-grade and 23 high-grade gliomas). Non-neoplastic brain lesions were confirmed in seven cases (three dysplasias, three inflammatory lesions, one lesion after effective therapy). Visual analysis showed a high concordance between the two observers (kappa=0.90, p<0.001), with sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 100% for the discrimination of primary brain tumours and non-neoplastic lesions. At 30 min p.i., IPA uptake in primary brain tumours was higher than that in non-neoplastic lesions (1.70±0.36 vs 1.14±0.18, p<0.05). Brain metastases showed no increased uptake (1.13±0.22, n=3). The persistent retention of IPA in low-grade gliomas without disruption of the blood-brain barrier was visualised up to 24 h p.i. Low-grade and high-grade gliomas showed equivalent IPA uptake (1.72±0.37 vs 1.67±0.36 at 30 min, p=0.745). IPA shows long and specific retention in gliomas. IPA is a promising and safe radiopharmaceutical for the visualisation of gliomas and the characterisation of indeterminate brain lesions. (orig.)

  2. Metabolic transcription analysis of engineered Escherichia coli strains that overproduce L-phenylalanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosset Guillermo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rational design of L-phenylalanine (L-Phe overproducing microorganisms has been successfully achieved by combining different genetic strategies such as inactivation of the phosphoenolpyruvate: phosphotransferase transport system (PTS and overexpression of key genes (DAHP synthase, transketolase and chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydratase, reaching yields of 0.33 (g-Phe/g-Glc, which correspond to 60% of theoretical maximum. Although genetic modifications introduced into the cell for the generation of overproducing organisms are specifically targeted to a particular pathway, these can trigger unexpected transcriptional responses of several genes. In the current work, metabolic transcription analysis (MTA of both L-Phe overproducing and non-engineered strains using Real-Time PCR was performed, allowing the detection of transcriptional responses to PTS deletion and plasmid presence of genes related to central carbon metabolism. This MTA included 86 genes encoding enzymes of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, pentoses phosphate, tricarboxylic acid cycle, fermentative and aromatic amino acid pathways. In addition, 30 genes encoding regulatory proteins and transporters for aromatic compounds and carbohydrates were also analyzed. Results MTA revealed that a set of genes encoding carbohydrate transporters (galP, mglB, gluconeogenic (ppsA, pckA and fermentative enzymes (ldhA were significantly induced, while some others were down-regulated such as ppc, pflB, pta and ackA, as a consequence of PTS inactivation. One of the most relevant findings was the coordinated up-regulation of several genes that are exclusively gluconeogenic (fbp, ppsA, pckA, maeB, sfcA, and glyoxylate shunt in the best PTS- L-Phe overproducing strain (PB12-ev2. Furthermore, it was noticeable that most of the TCA genes showed a strong up-regulation in the presence of multicopy plasmids by an unknown mechanism. A group of genes exhibited transcriptional responses to

  3. Study of the effects of proline, phenylalanine, and urea foliar application to Tempranillo vineyards on grape amino acid content. Comparison with commercial nitrogen fertilisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde-Cerdán, T; López, R; Portu, J; González-Arenzana, L; López-Alfaro, I; Santamaría, P

    2014-11-15

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of foliar application of different nitrogen sources on grape amino acid content. The nitrogen sources applied to Tempranillo grapevines were proline, phenylalanine, urea, and two commercial nitrogen fertilisers, both without and with amino acids in their formulations. All treatments were applied at veraison and one week later. Proline treatment did not affect the must nitrogen composition. However, phenylalanine and urea foliar application enhanced the plants' synthesis of most of the amino acids, producing similar effects. In addition, the spray of commercial nitrogen fertilisers over leaves also induced a rise in grape amino acid concentrations regardless of the presence or absence of amino acids in their formulation. The most effective treatments were phenylalanine and urea followed by nitrogen fertilisers. This finding is of oenological interest for improved must nitrogen composition, ensuring better fermentation kinetics and most likely enhancing wine quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of additive L-phenylalanine on stabilization of metastable α-form of L-glutamic acid in cooling crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quang, Khuu Chau; Nhan, Le Thi Hong; Huyen, Trinh Thi Thanh; Tuan, Nguyen Anh

    2017-09-01

    The influence of additive amino acid L-phenylalanine on stabilization of metastable α-form of L-glutamic acid was investigated in cooling crystallization. The present study found that the additive L-phenylalanine could be used to stabilize the pure metastable α-form in L-glutamic acid crystallization, where the additive concentration of 0.05-0.1 (g/L) was sufficient to stabilize the 100% wt metastable α-form in solid product at L-glutamic acid concentration of 30-45 (g/L). Additionally, the present results indicated that the adsorption of additive L-phenylalanine on the (001) surface of α-form was more favorable than that of the β-form molecular, so the nucleation sites of stable β-form was occupied by additive molecular, which resulted in inhibition of nucleation and growth of β-form, allowing stabilization of metastable α-form.

  5. Transfer Pricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Carsten; Rossing, Christian Plesner

    trade internally as the units have to decide what prices should be paid for such inter-unit transfers. One important challenge is to uncover the consequences that different transfer prices have on the willingness in the organizational units to coordinate activities and trade internally. At the same time...... the determination of transfer price will affect the size of the profit or loss in the organizational units and thus have an impact on the evaluation of managers‟ performance. In some instances the determination of transfer prices may lead to a disagreement between coordination of the organizational units...

  6. Effect of carbon source on the accumulation of cytochrome P-450 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärenlampi, S O; Marin, E; Hänninen, O O

    1981-02-15

    The appearance of cytochrome P-450 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae depended on the substrate supporting growth. Cytochrome P-450 was apparent in yeast cells grown on a strongly fermentable sugar such as D-glucose, D-fructose or sucrose. When yeast was grown on D-galactose, D-mannose or maltose, where fermentation and respiration occurred concomitantly, cytochrome P-450 was also formed. The cytochrome P-450 concentration was maximal at the beginning of the stationary phase of the culture. Thereafter the concentration decreased, reaching zero at a late-stationary phase. When the yeast was grown on a medium that contained lactose or pentoses (L-arabinose, L-rhamnose, D-ribose and D-xylose), cytochrome P-450 did not occur. When a non-fermentable energy source (glycerol, lactate or ethanol) was used, no cytochrome P-450 was detectable. Transfer of cells from D-glucose medium to ethanol medium caused a slow disappearance of cytochrome P-450, although the amount of the haemoprotein still continued to increase in the control cultures. Cytochrome P-450 appeared thus to accumulate in conditions where the rate of growth was fast and fermentation occurred. Occurrence of this haemoprotein is not necessarily linked, however, with the repression of mitochondrial haemoprotein synthesis.

  7. Yeast genetics. A manual of methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J.F.T.; Spencer, D.M.; Bruce, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    This is a bench-top manual of methods needed both for classical genetics as related to yeasts, such as mating, sporulation, isolation of hybrids, microdissection of asci for the isolation of single-spore clones, as well as for mapping of genes and the construction of new strains by protoplast fusion. Special emphasis is on mutations in general, and on methods of isolating a number of important classes of mutants in particular. Basic techniques for the separation of chromosomes by electrophoresis, such as OFAGE, FIGE, and CHEF, are discussed, with detailed protocols for the first two. Furthermore, new methods, e.g. for the isolation of high molecular weight DNA from yeast, isolation of RNA, and techniques for transformation of yeasts, are also described in detail. (orig.) With 10 figs.

  8. Modeling diauxic glycolytic oscillations in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Sørensen, Preben Graae

    2010-01-01

    for investigations of central metabolism dynamics of yeast cells. We have previously proposed a model for the open system comprised of the primary fermentative reactions in yeast that quantitatively describes the oscillatory dynamics. However, this model fails to describe the transient behavior of metabolic......Glycolytic oscillations in a stirred suspension of starved yeast cells is an excellent model system for studying the dynamics of metabolic switching in living systems. In an open-flow system the oscillations can be maintained indefinitely at a constant operating point where they can....... Experimental and computational results strongly suggest that regulation of acetaldehyde explains the observed behavior. We have extended the original model with regulation of pyruvate decarboxylase, a reversible alcohol dehydrogenase, and drainage of pyruvate. Using the method of time rescaling in the extended...

  9. [Urinary infection by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Emerging yeast?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhihal, B; Elhalimi, M; Ghfir, B; Mostachi, A; Lyagoubi, M; Aoufi, S

    2015-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a commensal yeast of the digestive, respiratory and genito-urinary tract. It is widely used as a probiotic for the treatment of post-antibiotic diarrhea. It most often occurs in immunocompromised patients frequently causing fungemia. We report the case of an adult diabetic patient who had a urinary tract infection due to S. cerevisiae. The disease started with urination associated with urinary frequency burns without fever. The diagnosis was established by the presence of yeasts on direct examination and positivity of culture on Sabouraud-chloramphenicol three times. The auxanogramme gallery (Auxacolor BioRad(®)) allowed the identification of S. cerevisiae. The patient was put on fluconazole with good outcome. This observation points out that this is an opportunistic yeast in immunocompromised patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Structural Studies of the Yeast Mitochondrial Degradosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feddersen, Ane; Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Brodersen, Ditlev Egeskov

    The yeast mitochondrial degradosome/exosome (mtExo) is responsible for most RNA turnover in mitochondria and has been proposed to form a central part of a mitochondrial RNA surveillance system responsible for degradation of aberrant and unprocessed RNA ([1], [2]). In contrast to the cytoplasmic...... and nuclear exosome complexes, which consist of 10-12 different nuclease subunits, the mitochondrial degradosome is composed of only two large subunits - an RNase (Dss1p) and a helicase (Suv3p), belonging the Ski2 class of DExH box RNA helicases. Both subunits are encoded on the yeast nuclear genome...... and and Suv3p from the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, have been cloned for heterologous expression in E. coli. Of the two, we have succeeded in purifying the 73kDa Suv3p by Ni2+-affinity chromatography followed by cleavage of the N-terminal His-tag, cation exchange, and gel filtration. Crystals...

  11. Flux control through protein phosphorylation in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yu; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important mechanisms regulating metabolism as it can directly modify metabolic enzymes by the addition of phosphate groups. Attributed to such a rapid and reversible mechanism, cells can adjust metabolism rapidly in response to temporal changes. The yeast...... as well as identify mechanisms underlying human metabolic diseases. Here we collect functional phosphorylation events of 41 enzymes involved in yeast metabolism and demonstrate functional mechanisms and the application of this information in metabolic engineering. From a systems biology perspective, we...... describe the development of phosphoproteomics in yeast as well as approaches to analysing the phosphoproteomics data. Finally, we focus on integrated analyses with other omics data sets and genome-scale metabolic models. Despite the advances, future studies improving both experimental technologies...

  12. Biofuels. Altered sterol composition renders yeast thermotolerant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspeta, Luis; Chen, Yun; Ghiaci, Payam

    2014-01-01

    adaptive laboratory evolution to select yeast strains with improved growth and ethanol production at ≥40°C. Sequencing of the whole genome, genome-wide gene expression, and metabolic-flux analyses revealed a change in sterol composition, from ergosterol to fecosterol, caused by mutations in the C-5 sterol......Ethanol production for use as a biofuel is mainly achieved through simultaneous saccharification and fermentation by yeast. Operating at ≥40°C would be beneficial in terms of increasing efficiency of the process and reducing costs, but yeast does not grow efficiently at those temperatures. We used...... desaturase gene, and increased expression of genes involved in sterol biosynthesis. Additionally, large chromosome III rearrangements and mutations in genes associated with DNA damage and respiration were found, but contributed less to the thermotolerant phenotype....

  13. Probiotic Properties of Non-Saccharomyces Yeasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Ida Mosbech

    to harmless luminal substances is a key feature of the intestinal immune system. In this context, dendritic cells (DCs) present in the tissues lining the human gut are central players involved in microbial sensing and shaping of appropriate adaptive immune responses. Probiotics are live microorganisms which...... when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. While the majority of probiotic microorganisms studied to date are lactic acid bacteria, research in yeasts with potentially beneficial influences on human health has mainly revolved around Saccharomyces boulardii. This yeast...... has shown a positive impact on disease outcome in clinical studies of inflammatory bowel disease, indicating an ability of S. boulardii to influence human immune responses underlying intestinal inflammation. Consequent to this focus on S. boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little...

  14. Metallic Biosorption Using Yeasts in Continuous Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Miriam Hernández Mata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mining effluents were found to be the main source of pollution by heavy metals of the surface water in the San Pedro River in Sonora, Mexico. The overall objective of this study was to determine the biosorption of Zn, Cu, Mn, and Fe with yeasts isolated from San Pedro River in a continuous system. The tests conducted in two reactors packed with zeolite connected in series. The first reactor was inoculated mixing two yeasts species, and the effluent of the first reactor was fed to second reactor. Subsequently, the first reactor was fed with contaminated water of San Pedro River and effluent from this was the second reactor influent. After 40 days of the experiment a reduction of 81.5% zinc, 76.5% copper, manganese 95.5%, and 99.8% of iron was obtained. These results show that the selected yeasts are capable of biosorbing zinc, copper, manganese, and iron under these conditions.

  15. Yeasts and yeast-like organisms associated with fruits and blossoms of different fruit trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadkertiová, Renáta; Molnárová, Jana; Vránová, Dana; Sláviková, Elena

    2012-12-01

    Yeasts are common inhabitants of the phyllosphere, but our knowledge of their diversity in various plant organs is still limited. This study focused on the diversity of yeasts and yeast-like organisms associated with matured fruits and fully open blossoms of apple, plum, and pear trees, during 2 consecutive years at 3 localities in southwest Slovakia. The occurrence of yeasts and yeast-like organisms in fruit samples was 2½ times higher and the yeast community more diverse than that in blossom samples. Only 2 species (Aureobasidium pullulans and Metschnikowia pulcherrima) occurred regularly in the blossom samples, whereas Galactomyces candidus, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Hanseniaspora uvarum, M. pulcherrima, Pichia kluyveri, Pichia kudriavzevii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were the most frequently isolated species from the fruit samples. The ratio of the number of samples where only individual species were present to the number of samples where 2 or more species were found (consortium) was counted. The occurrence of individual species in comparison with consortia was much higher in blossom samples than in fruit samples. In the latter, consortia predominated. Aureobasidium pullulans, M. pulcherrima, and S. cerevisiae, isolated from both the fruits and blossoms, can be considered as resident yeast species of various fruit tree species cultivated in southwest Slovakia localities.

  16. New yeasts-new brews: modern approaches to brewing yeast design and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, B; Geertman, J-M A; Hittinger, C T; Krogerus, K; Libkind, D; Louis, E J; Magalhães, F; Sampaio, J P

    2017-06-01

    The brewing industry is experiencing a period of change and experimentation largely driven by customer demand for product diversity. This has coincided with a greater appreciation of the role of yeast in determining the character of beer and the widespread availability of powerful tools for yeast research. Genome analysis in particular has helped clarify the processes leading to domestication of brewing yeast and has identified domestication signatures that may be exploited for further yeast development. The functional properties of non-conventional yeast (both Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces) are being assessed with a view to creating beers with new flavours as well as producing flavoursome non-alcoholic beers. The discovery of the psychrotolerant S. eubayanus has stimulated research on de novo S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus hybrids for low-temperature lager brewing and has led to renewed interest in the functional importance of hybrid organisms and the mechanisms that determine hybrid genome function and stability. The greater diversity of yeast that can be applied in brewing, along with an improved understanding of yeasts' evolutionary history and biology, is expected to have a significant and direct impact on the brewing industry, with potential for improved brewing efficiency, product diversity and, above all, customer satisfaction. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Tracer experiment administering L-phenylalanine-U-{sup 14}C and L-tyrosine-U-{sup 14}C to the tissue slices of bamboo shoots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozukue, E. [Kenmei Women' s Junior Coll., Himeji, Hyogo (Japan); Mizuno, S.

    1987-09-15

    Uniformly {sup 14}C-labeled L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine were administered to tissue slices of both top and base sections of bamboo shoots. Alcohol soluble substances were extracted and then separated into organic acid, sugar and amino acid fractions by ion exchange chromatography. The homogentisic acid fraction among the organic acids was collected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and its radioactivity was measured, while the alcohol insoluble residue was used for the analysis of lignin aldehyde by the method of alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation. 1. The two labeled amino acids were steadily incorporated into the tissues during incubation and rapidly converted to organic acid, sugar and alcohol insoluble residue, especially the latter. 2. On determining the amount of phenylalanine converted to tyrosine, it was found that this was extremely small. 3. The incorporation of phenylalanine-U-{sup 14}C into alcohol insoluble residue was higher than that of tyrosine in both sections. 4. Although the conversion into lignin aldehyde from phenylalanine-U-{sup 14}C was higher than that from tyrosine-U-{sup 14}C, it was found that tyrosine incorporated into the shoots was converted to a remarkable extent for formation of lignin aldehyde. 5. The incorporation of phenylalanine and tyrosine into homogentisic acid was very low. From these results, we assume that the conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine or of tyrosine to homogentisic acid is very small, and that a part of the high amount of tyrosine in the shoots may be used for formation of lignin.

  18. Muscle-directed gene therapy for phenylketonuria (PKU): Development of transgenic mice with muscle-specific phenylalanine hydroxylase expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, C.O.; Messing, A.; Wolff, J.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an attractive target for gene therapy because of shortcomings in current therapy including lifelong commitment to a difficult and expensive diet, persistent mild cognitive deficits in some children despite adequate dietary therapy, and maternal PKU syndrome. Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is normally expressed only in liver, but we propose to treat PKU by introducing the gene for PAH into muscle. In order to evaluate both the safety and efficacy of this approach, we have a developed a trangenic mouse which expresses PAH in both cardiac and skeletal muscle. The transgene includes promoter and enhancer sequences from the mouse muscle creatine kinase (MCK) gene fused to the mouse liver PAH cDNA. Mice which have inherited the transgene are healthy, active, and do not exhibit any signs of muscle weakness or wasting. Ectopic PAH expression in muscle is not detrimental to the health, neurologic function, or reproduction of the mice. Pah{sup enu2} hyperphenylalaninemic mice, a model of human PAH deficiency, bred to carry the transgene have substantial PAH expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle but none in liver. Muscle PAH expression alone does not complement the hyperphenylalaninemic phenotype of Pah{sup enu2} mice. However, administration of reduced tetrahydrobiopterin to transgenic Pah{sup enu2} mice is associated with a 25% mean decrease in serum phenylalanine levels. We predict that ectopic expression of PAH in muscle along with adequate muscle supplies of reduced biopterin cofactor will decrease hyperphenylalaninemia in PKU.

  19. The Fas/Fas ligand death receptor pathway contributes to phenylalanine-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Huang

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU, an autosomal recessive disorder of amino acid metabolism caused by mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH gene, leads to childhood mental retardation by exposing neurons to cytotoxic levels of phenylalanine (Phe. A recent study showed that the mitochondria-mediated (intrinsic apoptotic pathway is involved in Phe-induced apoptosis in cultured cortical neurons, but it is not known if the death receptor (extrinsic apoptotic pathway and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress-associated apoptosis also contribute to neurodegeneration in PKU. To answer this question, we used specific inhibitors to block each apoptotic pathway in cortical neurons under neurotoxic levels of Phe. The caspase-8 inhibitor Z-IETD-FMK strongly attenuated apoptosis in Phe-treated neurons (0.9 mM, 18 h, suggesting involvement of the Fas receptor (FasR-mediated cell death receptor pathway in Phe toxicity. In addition, Phe significantly increased cell surface Fas expression and formation of the Fas/FasL complex. Blocking Fas/FasL signaling using an anti-Fas antibody markedly inhibited apoptosis caused by Phe. In contrast, blocking the ER stress-induced cell death pathway with salubrinal had no effect on apoptosis in Phe-treated cortical neurons. These experiments demonstrate that the Fas death receptor pathway contributes to Phe-induced apoptosis and suggest that inhibition of the death receptor pathway may be a novel target for neuroprotection in PKU patients.

  20. The effect of cadmium on phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity and lipid peroxidation in pepper (Capsicum annuum L. seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Koç

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect on differrent concentrations (20, 40, 80µM ve 100 µM CdCl2 of cadmium (CdCl2 on the activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL and lipid peroxidation amount in leaf and stem of Kahramanmaraş- Hot (Capsicum annum L. pepper seedlings were researched. Activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, the first enzyme in the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway, was increased at 2 and 4 days in KM-Hot plants exposed to CdCl2 stress. The highest PAL activity was detected in 20 μM CdCl2 application, on the four day after the application in the leaves of KM-Hot pepper. Moreover, it was observed that treatment of pepper with Cd led to an increased the rate of lipid peroxidation (which is indicated by increasing MDA content in the leaf and stem tissues. The highest MDA content was detected in 80 μM CdCl2 application, on the four day after the application in the leaf tissues. These results suggest that the activation of PAL may be associated with increased production of MDA

  1. Differential metabolism of L-phenylalanine in the formation of aromatic volatiles in melon (Cucumis melo L.) fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Itay; Davidovich-Rikanati, Rachel; Bar, Einat; Lev, Shery; Jhirad, Pliaa; Meshulam, Yuval; Wissotsky, Guy; Portnoy, Vitaly; Burger, Joseph; Schaffer, Arthur A; Tadmor, Yaakov; Giovannoni, James J; Fei, Zhangjun; Fait, Aaron; Katzir, Nurit; Lewinsohn, Efraim

    2018-04-01

    Studies on the active pathways and the genes involved in the biosynthesis of L-phenylalanine-derived volatiles in fleshy fruits are sparse. Melon fruit rinds converted stable-isotope labeled L-phe into more than 20 volatiles. Phenylpropanes, phenylpropenes and benzenoids are apparently produced via the well-known phenylpropanoid pathway involving phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and being (E)-cinnamic acid a key intermediate. Phenethyl derivatives seemed to be derived from L-phe via a separate biosynthetic route not involving (E)-cinnamic acid and PAL. To explore for a biosynthetic route to (E)-cinnamaldehyde in melon rinds, soluble protein cell-free extracts were assayed with (E)-cinnamic acid, CoA, ATP, NADPH and MgSO 4 , producing (E)-cinnamaldehyde in vitro. In this context, we characterized CmCNL, a gene encoding for (E)-cinnamic acid:coenzyme A ligase, inferred to be involved in the biosynthesis of (E)-cinnamaldehyde. Additionally we describe CmBAMT, a SABATH gene family member encoding a benzoic acid:S-adenosyl-L-methionine carboxyl methyltransferase having a role in the accumulation of methyl benzoate. Our approach leads to a more comprehensive understanding of L-phe metabolism into aromatic volatiles in melon fruit. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Yeast Infection Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cheese-like discharge Painful urination Redness in the vagina Yeast infection of the penis may cause: Redness Scaling Rash ... on the location of your symptoms: If a vaginal yeast infection is suspected , your health care provider will perform ...

  3. Autophagy: one more Nobel Prize for yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Zimmermann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent announcement of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, awarded to Yoshinori Ohsumi for the discoveries of mechanisms governing autophagy, underscores the importance of intracellular degradation and recycling. At the same time, it further cements yeast, in which this field decisively developed, as a prolific model organism. Here we provide a quick historical overview that mirrors both the importance of autophagy as a conserved and essential process for cellular life and death as well as the crucial role of yeast in its mechanistic characterization.

  4. Characterization of wine yeasts for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, J.; Benitez, T.

    1986-11-01

    Selected wine yeasts were tested for their ethanol and sugar tolerance, and for their fermentative capacity. Growth (..mu..) and fermentation rates (..nu..) were increasingly inhibited by increasing ethanol and glucose concentrations, ''flor'' yeasts being the least inhibited. Except in the latter strains, the ethanol production rate was accelerated by adding the glucose stepwise. The best fermenting strains selected in laboratory medium were also the best at fermenting molasses. Invertase activity was not a limiting step in ethanol production, ..nu.. being accelerated by supplementing molasses with ammonia and biotine, and by cell recycle.

  5. Occurrence of Killer Yeast Strains in Fruit and Berry Wine Yeast Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintare Gulbiniene

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Apple, cranberry, chokeberry and Lithuanian red grape wine yeast populations were used for the determination of killer yeast occurrence. According to the tests of the killer characteristics and immunity the isolated strains were divided into seven groups. In this work the activity of killer toxins purified from some typical strains was evaluated. The analysed strains produced different amounts of active killer toxin and some of them possessed new industrially significant killer properties. Total dsRNA extractions in 11 killer strains of yeast isolated from spontaneous fermentations revealed that the molecular basis of the killer phenomenon was not only dsRNAs, but also unidentified genetic determinants.

  6. Adsorption and Interfacial Electron Transfer of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Boisen, Anja; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption and electron-transfer dynamics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) iso-l-cytochrome c adsorbed on Au(lll) electrodes in aqueous phosphate buffer media. This cytochrome possesses a thiol group dos e to the protein surface (Cysl02) suitable for linking the protein...

  7. Guidelines and recommendations on yeast cell death nomenclature

    OpenAIRE

    Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Bauer, Maria Anna; Zimmermann, Andreas; Aguilera, Andres; Austriaco, Nicanor; Sigrist, Stephan J.

    2018-01-01

    Elucidating the biology of yeast in its full complexity has major implications for science, medicine and industry. One of the most critical processes determining yeast life and physiology is cellular demise. However, the investigation of yeast cell death is a relatively young field, and a widely accepted set of concepts and terms is still missing. Here, we propose unified criteria for the definition of accidental, regulated, and programmed forms of cell death in yeast based on a series of mor...

  8. Effect of increasing growth temperature on yeast fermentation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of increasing growth temperature on yeast fermentation was studied at approximately 5 oC intervals over a range of 18 – 37 oC, using one strain each of ale, lager and wine yeast. The ale and wine yeasts grew at all the temperatures tested, but lager yeast failed to grow at 37 oC. All these strains gave lower ...

  9. Guidelines and recommendations on yeast cell death nomenclature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Bauer, Maria Anna; Zimmermann, Andreas; Aguilera, Andrés; Austriaco, Nicanor; Ayscough, Kathryn; Balzan, Rena; Bar-Nun, Shoshana; Barrientos, Antonio; Belenky, Peter; Blondel, Marc; Braun, Ralf J; Breitenbach, Michael; Burhans, William C; Büttner, Sabrina; Cavalieri, Duccio; Chang, Michael; Cooper, Katrina F; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Costa, Vítor; Cullin, Christophe; Dawes, Ian; Dengjel, Jörn; Dickman, Martin B; Eisenberg, Tobias; Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Fasel, Nicolas; Fröhlich, Kai-Uwe; Gargouri, Ali; Giannattasio, Sergio; Goffrini, Paola; Gourlay, Campbell W; Grant, Chris M; Greenwood, Michael T; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Heger, Thomas; Heinisch, Jürgen; Herker, Eva; Herrmann, Johannes M; Hofer, Sebastian; Jiménez-Ruiz, Antonio; Jungwirth, Helmut; Kainz, Katharina; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Ludovico, Paula; Manon, Stéphen; Martegani, Enzo; Mazzoni, Cristina; Megeney, Lynn A; Meisinger, Chris; Nielsen, Jens; Nyström, Thomas; Osiewacz, Heinz D; Outeiro, Tiago F; Park, Hay-Oak; Pendl, Tobias; Petranovic, Dina; Picot, Stephane; Polčic, Peter; Powers, Ted; Ramsdale, Mark; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Schaffrath, Raffael; Segovia, Maria; Severin, Fedor F; Sharon, Amir; Sigrist, Stephan J; Sommer-Ruck, Cornelia; Sousa, Maria João; Thevelein, Johan M; Thevissen, Karin; Titorenko, Vladimir; Toledano, Michel B; Tuite, Mick; Vögtle, F-Nora; Westermann, Benedikt; Winderickx, Joris; Wissing, Silke; Wölfl, Stefan; Zhang, Zhaojie J; Zhao, Richard Y; Zhou, Bing; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido; Madeo, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Elucidating the biology of yeast in its full complexity has major implications for science, medicine and industry. One of the most critical processes determining yeast life and physiology is cel-lular demise. However, the investigation of yeast cell death is a relatively young field, and a widely

  10. Selection of oleaginous yeasts for fatty acid production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, Dennis; Biezen, van Nick; Martens, Dirk; Peters, Linda; Zilver, van de Eric; Jacobs-van Dreumel, Nicole; Wijffels, René H.; Lokman, Christien

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oleaginous yeast species are an alternative for the production of lipids or triacylglycerides (TAGs). These yeasts are usually non-pathogenic and able to store TAGs ranging from 20 % to 70 % of their cell mass depending on culture conditions. TAGs originating from oleaginous yeasts

  11. Performance of baker's yeast produced using date syrup substrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Baker's yeast was produced from three selected baker's yeast strains using date syrup as a substrate at low and high flow rate compared to those produced using molasses substrates. Performance of the produced baker's yeasts on Arabic bread quality was investigated. Baking tests showed a positive relationship between ...

  12. Triacetic acid lactone production in industrial Saccharomyces yeast strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triacetic acid lactone (TAL) is a potential platform chemical that can be produced in yeast. To evaluate the potential for industrial yeast strains to produce TAL, the g2ps1 gene encoding 2-pyrone synthase was transformed into thirteen industrial yeast strains of varied genetic background. TAL produ...

  13. 21 CFR 573.750 - Pichia pastoris dried yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pichia pastoris dried yeast. 573.750 Section 573... Food Additive Listing § 573.750 Pichia pastoris dried yeast. (a) Identity. The food additive Pichia pastoris dried yeast may be used in feed formulations of broiler chickens as a source of protein not to...

  14. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YFR015C, YJL137C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yeast homolog; expression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entr...pression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entry into stationary

  15. "Transfer Shock" or "Transfer Ecstasy?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickens, John M.

    The alleged characteristic drop in grade point average (GPA) of transfer students and the subsequent rise in GPA was investigated in this study. No statistically significant difference was found in first term junior year GPA between junior college transfers and native Florida State University students after the variance accounted for by the…

  16. Yeast mother cell-specific aging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Breitenbach, M.; Laun, P.; Pichová, Alena; Madeo, F.; Heeren, G.; Kohlwein, S. D.; Froehlich, K. U.; Dawes, I.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 18, - (2001), s. 21 ISSN 0749-503X. [International Conference on Yeast Genetics and Molecular Biology /20./. 26.08.2001-31.08.2001, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  17. Xylitol production from colombian native yeast strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isleny Andrea Vanegas Córdoba

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Xylitol is an alternative sweetener with similar characteristics to sucrose that has become of great interest, due mainly to its safe use in diabetic patients and those deficient in glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase. Its chemical production is expensive and generates undesirable by-products, whereas biotechnological process, which uses different yeasts genera, is a viable production alternative because it is safer and specific. Colombia has a privilege geographic location and offers a great microbial variety, this can be taken advantage of with academic and commercial goals. Because of this, some native microorganisms with potential to produce xylitol were screened in this work. It were isolated 25 yeasts species, from which was possible to identify 84% by the kit API 20C-AUX. Three yeasts: Candida kefyr, C. tropicalis y C. parapsilosis presented greater capacity to degrade xylose compared to the others, therefore they were selected for the later evaluation of its productive capacity. Discontinuous cellular cultures were developed in shaken flasks at 200 rpm and 35°C by 30 hours, using synthetic media with xylose as carbon source. Xylose consumption and xylitol production were evaluated by thin layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. The maximal efficiency were obtained with Candida kefyr and C. tropicalis (Yp/s 0.5 y 0.43 g/g, respectively, using an initial xylose concentration of 20 g/L. Key words: Xylitol, xylose, yeasts, Candida kefyr, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis.

  18. Yeast metabolic engineering for hemicellulosic ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Van Vleet; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2009-01-01

    Efficient fermentation of hemicellulosic sugars is critical for the bioconversion of lignocellulosics to ethanol. Efficient sugar uptake through the heterologous expression of yeast and fungal xylose/glucose transporters can improve fermentation if other metabolic steps are not rate limiting. Rectification of cofactor imbalances through heterologous expression of...

  19. Uncommon opportunistic yeast bloodstream infections from Qatar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taj-Aldeen, S.J.; AbdulWahab, A.; Kolecka, A.; Deshmukh, A.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Boekhout, T.

    2014-01-01

    Eleven uncommon yeast species that are associated with high mortality rates irrespective of antifungal therapy were isolated from 17/187 (201 episodes) pediatric and elderly patients with fungemia from Qatar. The samples were taken over a 6-year period (January 2004-December 2010). Isolated species

  20. Ethanol fermentation with a flocculating yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Admassu, W; Korus, R A; Heimsch, R C

    1985-08-01

    A 100 cm x 5.7 cm internal diameter tower fermentor was fabricated and operated continuously for 11 months using the floc-forming yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (American Type Culture Collection 4097). Steady state operation of the system was characterized at 32/sup 0/C and pH 4.0 for glucose concentrations ranging from 105 to 215 g l/sup -1/. The height of the yeast bed in the tower was maintained at 80 cm. The high yeast density, ethanol concentration and low pH prevented bacterial contamination in the reactor. The concentration profiles of glucose and ethanol within the bed were described by a dispersion model. Modeling parameters were determined for the yeast by batch kinetics and tracer experiments. The kinetic model included ethanol inhibition and substrate limitation. A tracer study with step input of D-xylose (a non-metabolizable sugar for S. cerevisiae) determined the dispersion number (D/uL=0.16) and liquid voidage (epsilonsub(L)=0.25). Measurements taken after 6 months of continuous operation indicated that there was no significant change in fermentor performance.

  1. Analysis of RNA metabolism in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wise, Jo Ann; Nielsen, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Here we focus on the biogenesis and function of messenger RNA (mRNA) in fission yeast cells. Following a general introduction that also briefly touches on other classes of RNA, we provide an overview of methods used to analyze mRNAs throughout their life cycles....

  2. UBA domain containing proteins in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Semple, Colin A M; Ponting, Chris P

    2003-01-01

    characterised on both the functional and structural levels. One example of a widespread ubiquitin binding module is the ubiquitin associated (UBA) domain. Here, we discuss the approximately 15 UBA domain containing proteins encoded in the relatively small genome of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe...

  3. Vaginal yeast infections in diabetic women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    could we implicate either trichomoniasis or candidiasis as causes ofthese symptoms (Table I). It is possible that in some instances yeasts may have been missed on cul- ture since it has been estimated that at least 10' cfu/m! are required for a culture to be positive.15 Gardnerella vaginalis was not sought in this study and ...

  4. Phosphorylation site on yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlinger, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Yeast cells were disrupted in a Manton-Gaulin laboratory homogenizer. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified by fractionation with polyethylene glycol, isoelectric precipitation, ultracentrifugation and chromatography on hydroxylapatite. Final purification of the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was achieved by cation-exchange high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). No endogenous pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity was detected during the purification. However, the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was phosphorylated and inactivated with purified pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase from bovine kidney. Tryptic digestion of the 32 P-labeled complex yielded a single phosphopeptide which was purified to homogeniety. The tryptic digest was subjected to chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. Radioactive fractions were pooled, concentrated, and subjected to anion-exchange HPLC. The column was developed with a linear gradient of ammonium acetate. Final purification of the phosphopeptide was achieved by chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column developed with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. The amino acid sequence of the homogeneous peptide was determined by manual modified Edman degradation

  5. Functional differences in yeast protein disulfide isomerases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, P; Westphal, V; Tachibana, C

    2001-01-01

    PDI1 is the essential gene encoding protein disulfide isomerase in yeast. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, however, contains four other nonessential genes with homology to PDI1: MPD1, MPD2, EUG1, and EPS1. We have investigated the effects of simultaneous deletions of these genes. In several...

  6. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2014-01-01

    45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal...

  7. Hybridization of Palm Wine Yeasts ( Saccharomyces Cerevisiae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haploid auxotrophic strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were selected from palm wine and propagated by protoplast fusion with Brewers yeast. Fusion resulted in an increase in both ethanol production and tolerance against exogenous ethanol. Mean fusion frequencies obtained for a mating types ranged between 8 x ...

  8. Actin and Endocytosis in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Bruce L.; Eskin, Julian A.; Wendland, Beverly

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis, the process whereby the plasma membrane invaginates to form vesicles, is essential for bringing many substances into the cell and for membrane turnover. The mechanism driving clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) involves > 50 different protein components assembling at a single location on the plasma membrane in a temporally ordered and hierarchal pathway. These proteins perform precisely choreographed steps that promote receptor recognition and clustering, membrane remodeling, and force-generating actin-filament assembly and turnover to drive membrane invagination and vesicle scission. Many critical aspects of the CME mechanism are conserved from yeast to mammals and were first elucidated in yeast, demonstrating that it is a powerful system for studying endocytosis. In this review, we describe our current mechanistic understanding of each step in the process of yeast CME, and the essential roles played by actin polymerization at these sites, while providing a historical perspective of how the landscape has changed since the preceding version of the YeastBook was published 17 years ago (1997). Finally, we discuss the key unresolved issues and where future studies might be headed. PMID:25657349

  9. Cell biology of homologous recombination in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway for error-free repair of DNA lesions, such as single- and double-strand breaks, and for rescue of collapsed replication forks. Here, we describe protocols for live cell imaging of single-lesion recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces...

  10. Effect of yeast storage temperature and flour composition on fermentative activities of baker's yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejin Dušanka J.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Baker's yeast is a set of living cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It contains around 70-72% of water, 42-45% of proteins, around 40% of carbohydrates, around 7.5% of lipids (based on dry matter, and vitamin B-complex. On the basis of yeast cell analysis it can be concluded that yeast is a complex biological system which changes in time. The intensity of the changes depends on temperature. Yeast sample was stored at 4°C i 24°C for 12 days. During storage at 4°C, the content of total carbohydrates decreased from 48.81% to 37.50% (dry matter, whereas carbohydrate loss ranged from 40.81% to 29.28% at 24°C. The content of trehalose was 12.33% in the yeast sample stored at 4°C and 0.24% at 24°C. Loss of fermentative activity was 81.76% in the sample stored at 24°C for 12 days. The composition of five samples of 1st category flour was investigated. It was found that flours containing more reducing sugars and maltose enable higher fermentation activities. The flours with higher ash content (in the range 0.5-0.94% had higher contents of phytic acid. Higher ash and phytic contents in flour increased the yeast fermentative efficiency. In bakery industry, a range of ingredients has been applied to improve the product's quality such as surface active substances (emulsifiers, enzymes, sugars and fats. In the paper, the effect of some ingredients added to dough (margarine, saccharose, sodium chloride and malted barley on the yeast fermentative activity was studied. The mentioned ingredients were added to dough at different doses: 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0%, flour basis. It was found that the investigated ingredients affected the fermentative activity of yeast and improved the bread quality.

  11. Distinct roles for key karyogamy proteins during yeast nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melloy, Patricia; Shen, Shu; White, Erin; Rose, Mark D

    2009-09-01

    During yeast mating, cell fusion is followed by the congression and fusion of the two nuclei. Proteins required for nuclear fusion are found at the surface (Prm3p) and within the lumen (Kar2p, Kar5p, and Kar8p) of the nuclear envelope (NE). Electron tomography (ET) of zygotes revealed that mutations in these proteins block nuclear fusion with different morphologies, suggesting that they act in different steps of fusion. Specifically, prm3 zygotes were blocked before formation of membrane bridges, whereas kar2, kar5, and kar8 zygotes frequently contained them. Membrane bridges were significantly larger and occurred more frequently in kar2 and kar8, than in kar5 mutant zygotes. The kinetics of NE fusion in prm3, kar5, and kar8 mutants, measured by live-cell fluorescence microscopy, were well correlated with the size and frequency of bridges observed by ET. However the kar2 mutant was defective for transfer of NE lumenal GFP, but not diffusion within the lumen, suggesting that transfer was blocked at the NE fusion junction. These observations suggest that Prm3p acts before initiation of outer NE fusion, Kar5p may help dilation of the initial fusion pore, and Kar2p and Kar8p act after outer NE fusion, during inner NE fusion.

  12. Yeast cell differentiation: Lessons from pathogenic and non-pathogenic yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palková, Zdena; Váchová, Libuše

    2016-09-01

    Yeasts, historically considered to be single-cell organisms, are able to activate different differentiation processes. Individual yeast cells can change their life-styles by processes of phenotypic switching such as the switch from yeast-shaped cells to filamentous cells (pseudohyphae or true hyphae) and the transition among opaque, white and gray cell-types. Yeasts can also create organized multicellular structures such as colonies and biofilms, and the latter are often observed as contaminants on surfaces in industry and medical care and are formed during infections of the human body. Multicellular structures are formed mostly of stationary-phase or slow-growing cells that diversify into specific cell subpopulations that have unique metabolic properties and can fulfill specific tasks. In addition to the development of multiple protective mechanisms, processes of metabolic reprogramming that reflect a changed environment help differentiated individual cells and/or community cell constituents to survive harmful environmental attacks and/or to escape the host immune system. This review aims to provide an overview of differentiation processes so far identified in individual yeast cells as well as in multicellular communities of yeast pathogens of the Candida and Cryptococcus spp. and the Candida albicans close relative, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Molecular mechanisms and extracellular signals potentially involved in differentiation processes are also briefly mentioned. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Oligomerisation of C. elegans Olfactory Receptors, ODR-10 and STR-112, in Yeast

    KAUST Repository

    Tehseen, Muhammad

    2014-09-25

    It is widely accepted that vertebrate G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) associate with each other as homo- or hetero-dimers or higher-order oligomers. The C. elegans genome encodes hundreds of olfactory GPCRs, which may be expressed in fewer than a dozen chemosensory neurons, suggesting an opportunity for oligomerisation. Here we show, using three independent lines of evidence: co-immunoprecipitation, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and a yeast two-hybrid assay that nematode olfactory receptors (ORs) oligomerise when heterologously expressed in yeast. Specifically, the nematode receptor ODR-10 is able to homo-oligomerise and can also form heteromers with the related nematode receptor STR-112. ODR-10 also oligomerised with the rat I7 OR but did not oligomerise with the human somatostatin receptor 5, a neuropeptide receptor. In this study, the question of functional relevance was not addressed and remains to be investigated.

  14. Oligomerisation of C. elegans Olfactory Receptors, ODR-10 and STR-112, in Yeast

    KAUST Repository

    Tehseen, Muhammad; Liao, Chunyan; Dacres, Helen; Dumancic, Mira; Trowell, Stephen; Anderson, Alisha

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that vertebrate G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) associate with each other as homo- or hetero-dimers or higher-order oligomers. The C. elegans genome encodes hundreds of olfactory GPCRs, which may be expressed in fewer than a dozen chemosensory neurons, suggesting an opportunity for oligomerisation. Here we show, using three independent lines of evidence: co-immunoprecipitation, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and a yeast two-hybrid assay that nematode olfactory receptors (ORs) oligomerise when heterologously expressed in yeast. Specifically, the nematode receptor ODR-10 is able to homo-oligomerise and can also form heteromers with the related nematode receptor STR-112. ODR-10 also oligomerised with the rat I7 OR but did not oligomerise with the human somatostatin receptor 5, a neuropeptide receptor. In this study, the question of functional relevance was not addressed and remains to be investigated.

  15. Thermotolerant yeasts selected by adaptive evolution express heat stress response at 30ºC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspeta, Luis; Chen, Yun; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    to grow at increased temperature, activated a constitutive heat stress response when grown at the optimal ancestral temperature, and that this is associated with a reduced growth rate. This preventive response was perfected by additional transcriptional changes activated when the cultivation temperature...... is increased. Remarkably, the sum of global transcriptional changes activated in the thermotolerant strains when transferred from the optimal to the high temperature, corresponded, in magnitude and direction, to the global changes observed in the ancestral strain exposed to the same transition....... This demonstrates robustness of the yeast transcriptional program when exposed to heat, and that the thermotolerant strains streamlined their path to rapidly and optimally reach post-stress transcriptional and metabolic levels. Thus, long-term adaptation to heat improved yeasts ability to rapidly adapt to increased...

  16. Station Transfers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — ixed rail transit external system transfers for systems within the Continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. The modes of...

  17. Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    On the base of technological opportunities and of the environmental target of the various sectors of energy system this paper intend to conjugate the opportunity/objective with economic and social development through technology transfer and information dissemination [it

  18. Human phenylalanine hydroxylase is activated by H2O2: a novel mechanism for increasing the L-tyrosine supply for melanogenesis in melanocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schallreuter, Karin U.; Wazir, Umar; Kothari, Sonal; Gibbons, Nicholas C.J.; Moore, Jeremy; Wood, John M.

    2004-01-01

    Epidermal phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) produces L-tyrosine from the essential amino acid L-phenylalanine supporting melanogenesis in human melanocytes. Those PAH activities increase linearly in the different skin phototypes I-VI (Fitzpatrick classification) and also increase up to 24 h after UVB light with only one minimal erythemal dose. Since UVB generates also H 2 O 2 , we here asked the question whether this reactive oxygen species could influence the activity of pure recombinant human PAH. Under saturating conditions with the substrate L-phenylalanine (1 x 10 -3 M), the V max for enzyme activity increased 4-fold by H 2 O 2 (>2.0 x 10 -3 M). Lineweaver-Burk analysis identified a mixed activation mechanism involving both the regulatory and catalytic domains of PAH. Hyperchem molecular modelling and Deep View analysis support oxidation of the single Trp 120 residue to 5-OH-Trp 120 by H 2 O 2 causing a conformational change in the regulatory domain. PAH was still activated by H 2 O 2 in the presence of the electron donor/cofactor 6(R)-L-erythro-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin despite slow oxidation of this cofactor. In vivo FT-Raman spectroscopy confirmed decreased epidermal phenylalanine in association with increased tyrosine after UVB exposure. Hence, generation of H 2 O 2 by UVB can activate epidermal PAH leading to an increased L-tyrosine pool for melanogenesis

  19. Manipulation of [C-11]-5-hydroxytryptophan and 6-[F-18]fluoro-3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine accumulation in neuroendocrine tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neels, Oliver C.; Koopmans, Klaas P.; Jager, Pieter L.; Vercauteren, Laya; van Waarde, Aren; Doorduin, Janine; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Kema, Ido P.; Elsinga, Philip H.

    2008-01-01

    [C-11]-5-Hydroxytryptophan ([C-11]HTP) and 6-[F-18]fluoro-3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine [F-18]FDOPA) are used to image neuroendocrine tumors with positron emission tomography. The precise mechanism by which these tracers accumulate in tumor cells is unknown. We aimed to study tracer uptake via large

  20. Event-related potential correlates of selective processing in early- and continuously-treated children with phenylketonuria : Effects of concurrent phenylalanine level and dietary control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Sonneville, Leo M. J.; Huijbregts, Stephan C. J.; van Spronsen, Francjan J.; Verkerk, Paul H.; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Licht, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This Study focused on important characteristics of attentional (selective) processing in children with early-treated phenylketonuria (PKU). Seven to 14-year-old children with PKU were allocated to high phenylalanine (Phe) and low Phe groups and compared with control children on amplitudes and

  1. Event-related potential correlates of selective processing in early- and continuously-treated children with phenylketonuria: Effects of concurrent phenylalanine level and dietary control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneville, L.M.J. de; Huijbregts, S.C.J.; Spronsen, F.J. van; Verkerk, P.H.; Sergeant, J.A.; Licht, R.

    2009-01-01

    This study focused on important characteristics of attentional (selective) processing in children with early-treated phenylketonuria (PKU). Seven to 14-year-old children with PKU were allocated to high phenylalanine (Phe) and low Phe groups and compared with control children on amplitudes and

  2. Photoinduced Intramolecular Tryptophan Oxidation and Excited-State Behavior of [Re(L-AA)(CO)3(r-diimine)] þ (L = Pyridine or Imidazole, AA = Tryptophan, Tyrosine, Phenylalanine)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blanco-Rodríguez, A. M.; Towrie, M.; Sýkora, Jan; Záliš, Stanislav; Vlček, Antonín

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 13 (2011), s. 6122-6134 ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD11082 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : tryptophan * tyrosine * phenylalanine Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.601, year: 2011

  3. Costs and Outcomes over 36 Years of Patients with Phenylketonuria Who Do and Do Not Remain on a Phenylalanine-Restricted Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, J. F.; Bai, J. J.; Taylor, R. R.; Sladkevicius, E.; Lee, P. J.; Lachmann, R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: To quantify the costs and consequences of managing phenylketonuria (PKU) in the UK and to estimate the potential implications to the UK's National Health Service (NHS) of keeping patients on a phenylalanine-restricted diet for life. Methods: A computer-based model was constructed depicting the management of PKU patients over the first…

  4. A highly conserved phenylalanine in the alpha, beta-T cell receptor (TCR) constant region determines the integrity of TCR/CD3 complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspar-Bauguil, S; Arnaud, J; Huchenq, A

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the importance of a phenylalanine (phe195) in the Tcr-C alpha region on Tcr-alpha,beta/CD3 membrane expression. An exchange of phe195 with a tyrosine residue does not affect Tcr/CD3 membrane expression; however, exchange with aspartic acid, histidine or ...

  5. 21 CFR 201.21 - Declaration of presence of phenylalanine as a component of aspartame in over-the-counter and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... component of aspartame in over-the-counter and prescription drugs for human use. 201.21 Section 201.21 Food... component of aspartame in over-the-counter and prescription drugs for human use. (a) Aspartame is the... acids are so combined to form aspartame (1-methyl N-L-α-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine), they produce an...

  6. Simultaneous determination of tyrosine, phenylalanine and deoxyguanosine oxidation products by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry as non-invasive biomarkers for oxidative damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orhan, Hilmi; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Tump, Cornelis; Zappey, Herman; Meerman, John H N

    2004-01-01

    We developed an isotope dilution HPLC-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-APCI-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of p-tyrosine, phenylalanine, o,o'-dityrosine, m-tyrosine, o-tyrosine, 3-chlorotyrosine and 3-nitrotyrosine and

  7. Baker's yeast: production of D- and L-3-hydroxy esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Allan Carsten; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1998-01-01

    harvested while growing. In contrast, the stereoselectivity was shifted towards L-hydroxy esters when the oxo esters were added slowly to ordinary baker's yeast supplied with gluconolactone as co-substrate. The reduction rate with gluconolactone was increased by active aeration. Ethyl L-(S)-3......Baker's yeast grown under oxygen limited conditions and used in the reduction of 3-oxo esters results in a shift of the stereoselectivity of the yeast towards D-hydroxy esters as compared with ordinary baker's yeast. The highest degree of stereoselectivity was obtained with growing yeast or yeast......-hydroxybutanoate was afforded in >99% ee. Both enantiomers of ethyl 3-hydroxypentanoate, D-(R) in 96% ee and L-(S) in 93% ee, and of ethyl 4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate, D-(S) in 98% ee and L-(R) in 94% ee, were obtained. The results demonstrate that the stereoselectivity of baker's yeast can be controlled...

  8. Between science and industry-applied yeast research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhola, Matti

    2018-03-01

    I was fortunate to enter yeast research at the Alko Research Laboratories with a strong tradition in yeast biochemistry and physiology studies. At the same time in the 1980s there was a fundamental or paradigm change in molecular biology research with discoveries in DNA sequencing and other analytical and physical techniques for studying macromolecules and cells. Since that time biotechnological research has expanded the traditional fermentation industries to efficient production of industrial and other enzymes and specialty chemicals. Our efforts were directed towards improving the industrial production organisms: minerals enriched yeasts (Se, Cr, Zn) and high glutathione content yeast, baker´s, distiller´s, sour dough and wine yeasts, and the fungal Trichoderma reesei platform for enzyme production. I am grateful for the trust of my colleagues in several leadership positions at the Alko Research Laboratories, Yeast Industry Platform and at the international yeast community.

  9. Full Data of Yeast Interacting Proteins Database (Original Version) - Yeast Interacting Proteins Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Yeast Interacting Proteins Database Full Data of Yeast Interacting Proteins Database (Origin...al Version) Data detail Data name Full Data of Yeast Interacting Proteins Database (Original Version) DOI 10....18908/lsdba.nbdc00742-004 Description of data contents The entire data in the Yeast Interacting Proteins Database...eir interactions are required. Several sources including YPD (Yeast Proteome Database, Costanzo, M. C., Hoga...ematic name in the SGD (Saccharomyces Genome Database; http://www.yeastgenome.org /). Bait gene name The gen

  10. Behavioural effects of phenylalanine-free amino acid tablet supplementation in intellectually disabled adults with untreated phenylketonuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalkanoğlu, H Serap; Ahring, Kirsten K; Sertkaya, Durdu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of phenylalanine (Phe)-free essential amino acid (AA) tablets enriched in tyrosine and tryptophan on the performance of intellectually disabled adult patients with untreated phenylketonuria (PKU). METHODS: Phe-free AA tablets and placebo tablets were administered to 19....... The statistical significance of the results was tested by means of the Fisher's exact and Wilcoxon tests. RESULTS: The most significant changes were an improved concentration and the development of a meaningful smile, which were observed in 44% and 43% of the patients on AA tablet treatment, respectively......, but not patients on placebo. Other important but less significant changes included increased awareness of external stimuli (63%) and less self-injury (43%), and 40% were smiling and laughing occasionally. The mean overall rating increased from an initial value of 6.3 to 10.1 in patients when on AA tablet treatment...

  11. Impact of phenylalanine and urea applications to Tempranillo and Monastrell vineyards on grape amino acid content during two consecutive vintages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde-Cerdán, Teresa; Gutiérrez-Gamboa, Gastón; Portu, Javier; Fernández-Fernández, José Ignacio; Gil-Muñoz, Rocío

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen plays a key role in the fermentation and secondary metabolites formation. The aim was to study the influence of vine nitrogen applications on grape amino acid composition. Nitrogen sources applied to Tempranillo and Monastrell grapevines were phenylalanine and urea, during two seasons. Results showed that the application of these compounds had little effect on grape amino acid composition, regardless of variety and vintage. This could be due to the fact that vineyards did not present nitrogenous requirements. Thus, variety was the determining factor in Asp, Glu, Gln, Cit, Met, Gly, Gaba, Val, Ile, and Leu while season was the factor that most affected Thr, Arg, Ala, and Lys due its implication on berry ripening. The concentration of the remaining amino acids was influenced by two or three of the factors studied. Therefore, when the vineyard has adequate nitrogen nutritional status, grape amino acid content was determined by variety and vintage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of a Whole Blood Paper-Based Device for Phenylalanine Detection in the Context of PKU Therapy Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Robinson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-based testing does not allow for the sufficiently rapid return of data to enable optimal therapeutic monitoring of patients with metabolic diseases such as phenylketonuria (PKU. The typical turn-around time of several days for current laboratory-based testing is too slow to be practically useful for effective monitoring or optimizing therapy. This report describes the development of a rapid, paper-based, point-of-care device for phenylalanine detection using a small volume (40 μL of whole blood. The quantitative resolution and reproducibility of this device with instrumented readout are described, together with the potential use of this device for point-of-care monitoring by PKU patients.

  13. Strategies for Successful Long-Term Engagement of Adults With Phenylalanine Hydroxylase Deficiency Returning to the Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Thomas MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Nearly half of all patients diagnosed with phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH deficiency, also known as phenylketonuria, are lost to follow-up (LTFU; most are adults who stopped attending clinic after the age of 18 years. To understand why adult patients with PAH deficiency disengage from their clinic, a focus group of 8 adults with PAH deficiency who had been LTFU for 2 or more years was held in March 2016. Ten clinicians observed the focus group and discussed strategies for successfully reengaging adult patients and encouraging lifelong management of PAH deficiency. Four strategies were proposed: (1 create a safe, supportive environment, (2 acknowledge patients as partners in their care, (3 develop individualized management plans, and (4 provide patients with additional resources. These strategies provide a framework to motivate change in clinical practice to meet the unique needs of adults with PAH deficiency.

  14. Effects of a common worldwide drink (Beer) on L-Phenylalanine and L-Tyrosine fibrillar assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Debasis; Banerjee, Pavel; Sabeehuddin, Ghazi; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2017-11-01

    In this letter, small amount of beer [0.42-2.08% (v/v)] is employed to investigate the fibril inhibition kinetics of 1 mM L-Phenylalanine and L-Tyrosine (relevant to disease condition) using Fluorescence Lifetime imaging Microscopy (FLIM), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic (HR-TEM) techniques. Our results indicate that 1.67 and 0.42% of beer is sufficient for effective breakdown of L-Phe and L-Tyr assemblies, respectively. Quantitative information about fibril inhibition is obtained from Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopic (FCS) measurements. We have shown that the morphology of L-Phe changes to L-Tyr in presence of 2,2‧-Bipyridine-3,3‧-diol (BP(OH)2).

  15. Experimental study on L-[1-13C] phenylalanine breath test for quantitative assessment of liver function with animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Weili; Fudan Univ., Shanghai; Lin Xiangtong; Sun Dayu; Jiang Yibin; Sun Xu; Rong Lan; Liang Qi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Using a small animal breath test model we designed and L-[1- 13 C] phenylalanine breath test ( 13 C-PheBT) of rats, the authors investigated its feasibility and validity and determined effective parameter of the test. Methods: Twenty male Sprague-Dawley (SD) weighting 280-290 g rats randomized into two groups acute hepatitis rats (n=10) and control rats (n=10). Hepatitis was induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) olive oil administration through intragastric gavage. PheBT was assisted by small mechanical ventilator improved and air samples were collected discontinuously, 20 mg/kg body weight L-[1- 13 C] phenylalanine ( 13 C-Phe) was administered intravenously. Twenty-nine breath samples were taken before and different intervals within sixty minutes after administration. 13 Cenrichment was measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Results: All time phase curves of 13 C enrichment in rat breath reached a peak almost at 2 min after the intravenous administration of 13 C-Phe. The PheBT parameters, 13 C excretion rate constant (PheBT-K), of CCl 4 hepatitis rats were significantly lower than that of normal control rats [(2.45 ± 0.25) x 10 -2 min -1 vs (2.98 ± 0.19) x 10 -2 min -1 , t = 5.40, P 13 C fast phase disposition constant did not statistically differ between the two groups (t=0.58, P>0.05). PheBT-K had significant negative cor-relation with serum ALT, AKP, TBA and total bilirum TBIL (the correlation coefficient r is -0.74, -0.73, -0.82 and -0.67 respectively, P 0.05). Conclusions: It was indicated that the small animal breath test model we designed was a virtual tool to use in experimental study on breath test and PheBT-K was a sensitive index. (authors)

  16. Phenylalanine tolerance can already reliably be assessed at the age of 2 years in patients with PKU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Spronsen, F J; van Rijn, M; Dorgelo, B; Hoeksma, M; Bosch, A M; Mulder, M F; de Klerk, J B C; de Koning, T; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela; de Vries, M; Verkerk, P H

    2009-02-01

    The clinical severity of phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency is usually defined by either pre-treatment phenylalanine (Phe) concentration or Phe tolerance at 5 years of age. So far, little is known about the course of Phe tolerance or the ability of both pre-treatment Phe and Phe tolerance at early age to predict Phe tolerance at later age. This study was conducted to investigate the course of the individual Phe tolerance and to assess the predictive value of both the pre-treatment Phe concentration and Phe tolerance at 1 and 6 months and 1, 2, 3 and 5 years for Phe tolerance at 10 years of age. Data on blood Phe concentration, prescribed Phe intake and weight of 213 early and continuously treated Dutch PKU patients up to 10 years of age were collected. Data acquired under good metabolic control were used in the study. Tolerance was expressed in mg/day and mg/kg per day. Data at 1 and 6 months and at 1, 2, 3 and 5 years of 61, 58, 59, 57, 56 and 59 patients were included for comparison with the Phe tolerance at 10 years. Phe tolerances (mg/kg per day) at 2, 3 and 5 years showed a clear correlation with the tolerance at 10 years of age (r = 0.608, r = 0.725 and r = 0.661). Results for tolerance expressed as mg/day were comparable. Pre-treatment Phe concentrations did not correlate significantly with the tolerance. Pre-treatment Phe is unreliable but Phe tolerance is a reliable predictor of the tolerance at 10 years of age, starting at 2 years of age.

  17. Mutation analysis of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in Azerbaijani population, a report from West Azerbaijan province of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Bagheri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Phenylketonuria (PKU is a genetic inborn error of phenylalanine (Phe metabolism resulting from insufficiency in the hepatic enzyme, phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH, which leads to elevated levels of Phe in the blood. The present study was carried out for mutation analysis of the PAH gene in West Azerbaijan province of Iran. Materials and Methods:A total of 218 alleles from 40 PKU families were studied using restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR method. Results:The frequencies of IVS10-11, S67P, R261Q, R252W, IVS11nt-1 g>c, R408Q, and Q232Q mutations were 28(35, 17(21.25, 15(18.75, 3(3.75, 3(3.75, 2(2.5, and 1(1.25, in cases group, and 51(23.4, 31(14.2, 27(12.4, 6(2.75, 6(2.75, 4(1.83, and 2(0.92 in total group, respectively. The mutations of R243Q, 364delG, L333F, 261X, I65T, and R408W were not detected in our samples. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the IVS10-11 mutation has the highest frequency in the tested population. To our knowledge, this report is the first in its own kind and provides better understanding of the genetic heterogeneity, the origin and distributions of PAH mutations in West Azerbaijan province of Iran.

  18. On the near UV photophysics of a phenylalanine residue: conformation-dependent ππ* state deactivation revealed by laser spectroscopy of isolated neutral dipeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loquais, Yohan; Gloaguen, Eric; Alauddin, Mohammad; Brenner, Valérie; Tardivel, Benjamin; Mons, Michel

    2014-10-28

    The primary step of the near UV photophysics of a phenylalanine residue is investigated in one- and two-color pump-probe R2PI nanosecond experiments carried out on specific conformers of the Ac-Gly-Phe-NH2 molecule and related neutral compounds isolated in a supersonic expansion. Compared to toluene, whose ππ* state photophysics is dominated by intersystem crossing with a lifetime of ∼80 ns at the origin, the first ππ* state of Phe in the peptide environment is systematically found to be shorter-lived. The lifetime at the origin of transition is found to be significantly shortened in the presence of a primary amide (-CONH2) group (20-60 ns, depending on the conformer considered), demonstrating the existence of an additional non-radiative relaxation channel related to this chemical group. The quenching effect induced by the peptide environment is still more remarkable beyond the origin of the ππ* state, since vibronic bands of one of the 4 conformers observed (the 27-ribbon conformation) become barely detectable in the ns R2PI experiment, suggesting a significant conformer-selective lifetime shortening (below 100 ps). These results on dipeptides, which extend previous investigations on shorter Phe-containing molecules (N-Ac-Phe-NH2 and N-Ac-Phe-NH-Me), confirm the existence of conformer-dependent non-radiative deactivation processes, whose characteristic timescales range from tens of ns down to hundreds of ps or below. This dynamics is assigned to two distinct mechanisms: a first one, consistent with an excitation energy transfer from the optically active ππ* state to low-lying amide nπ* excited states accessed through conical intersections, especially in the presence of a C-terminal primary amide group (-CONH2); a second one, responsible for the short lifetimes in 2(7) ribbon structures, would be more specifically triggered by phenyl ring vibrational excitations. Implications in terms of spectroscopic probing of Phe in a peptide environment, especially

  19. Yeast Biodiversity from DOQ Priorat Uninoculated Fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Beatriz; García-Fernández, David; González, Beatriz; Izidoro, Iara; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Beltran, Gemma; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Climate, soil, and grape varieties are the primary characteristics of terroir and lead to the definition of various appellations of origin. However, the microbiota associated with grapes are also affected by these conditions and can leave a footprint in a wine that will be part of the characteristics of terroir. Thus, a description of the yeast microbiota within a vineyard is of interest not only to provide a better understanding of the winemaking process, but also to understand the source of microorganisms that maintain a microbial footprint in wine from the examined vineyard. In this study, two typical grape varieties, Grenache and Carignan, have been sampled from four different vineyards in the DOQ Priorat winegrowing region. Afterward, eight spontaneous alcoholic fermentations containing only grapes from one sampling point and of one variety were conducted at laboratory scale. The fermentation kinetics and yeast population dynamics within each fermentation experiment were evaluated. Yeast identification was performed by RFLP-PCR of the 5.8S-ITS region and by sequencing D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene of the isolates. The fermentation kinetics did not indicate clear differences between the two varieties of grapes or among vineyards. Approximately 1,400 isolates were identified, exhibiting high species richness in some fermentations. Of all the isolates studied, approximately 60% belong to the genus Hanseniaspora, 16% to Saccharomyces, and 11% to Candida. Other minor genera, such as Hansenula, Issatchenkia, Kluyveromyces, Saccharomycodes, and Zygosaccharomyces, were also found. The distribution of the identified yeast throughout the fermentation process was studied, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to be present mainly at the end of the fermentation process, while Aureobasidium pullulans was isolated primarily during the first days of fermentation in three of the eight spontaneous fermentations. This work highlights the complexity and diversity of the vineyard

  20. Effect of site-directed mutagenesis of His373 of yeast enolase on some of its physical and enzymatic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, J M; Glover, C V; Holland, M J; Lebioda, L

    1997-06-20

    The X-ray structure of yeast enolase shows His373 interacting with a water molecule also held by residues Glu168 and Glu211. The water molecule is suggested to participate in the catalytic mechanism (Lebioda, L. and Stec, B. (1991) Biochemistry 30, 2817-2822). Replacement of His373 with asparagine (H373N enolase) or phenylalanine (H373F enolase) reduces enzymatic activity to ca. 10% and 0.0003% of the native enzyme activity, respectively. H373N enolase exhibits a reduced Km for the substrate, 2-phosphoglycerate, and produces the same absorbance changes in the chromophoric substrate analogues TSP1 and AEP1, relative to native enolase. H373F enolase binds AEP less strongly, producing a smaller absorbance change than native enolase, and reacts very little with TSP. H373F enolase dissociates to monomers in the absence of substrate; H373N enolase subunit dissociation is less than H373F enolase but more than native enolase. Substrate and Mg2+ increase subunit association in both mutants. Differential scanning calorimetric experiments indicate that the interaction with substrate that stabilizes enolase to thermal denaturation involves His373. We suggest that the function of His373 in the enolase reaction may involve hydrogen bonding rather than acid/base catalysis, through interaction with the Glu168/Glu211/H2O system, which produces removal or addition of hydroxyl at carbon-3 of the substrate.

  1. Game dynamic model for yeast development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Wu, Zhijun

    2012-07-01

    Game theoretic models, along with replicator equations, have been applied successfully to the study of evolution of populations of competing species, including the growth of a population, the reaching of the population to an equilibrium state, and the evolutionary stability of the state. In this paper, we analyze a game model proposed by Gore et al. (Nature 456:253-256, 2009) in their recent study on the co-development of two mixed yeast strains. We examine the mathematical properties of this model with varying experimental parameters. We simulate the growths of the yeast strains and compare them with the experimental results. We also compute and analyze the equilibrium state of the system and prove that it is asymptotically and evolutionarily stable.

  2. Mapping replication origins in yeast chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, B J; Fangman, W L

    1991-07-01

    The replicon hypothesis, first proposed in 1963 by Jacob and Brenner, states that DNA replication is controlled at sites called origins. Replication origins have been well studied in prokaryotes. However, the study of eukaryotic chromosomal origins has lagged behind, because until recently there has been no method for reliably determining the identity and location of origins from eukaryotic chromosomes. Here, we review a technique we developed with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that allows both the mapping of replication origins and an assessment of their activity. Two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization with total genomic DNA are used to determine whether a particular restriction fragment acquires the branched structure diagnostic of replication initiation. The technique has been used to localize origins in yeast chromosomes and assess their initiation efficiency. In some cases, origin activation is dependent upon the surrounding context. The technique is also being applied to a variety of eukaryotic organisms.

  3. Stochasticity in the yeast mating pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong-Li, Wang; Zheng-Ping, Fu; Xin-Hang, Xu; Qi, Ouyang

    2009-01-01

    We report stochastic simulations of the yeast mating signal transduction pathway. The effects of intrinsic and external noise, the influence of cell-to-cell difference in the pathway capacity, and noise propagation in the pathway have been examined. The stochastic temporal behaviour of the pathway is found to be robust to the influence of inherent fluctuations, and intrinsic noise propagates in the pathway in a uniform pattern when the yeasts are treated with pheromones of different stimulus strengths and of varied fluctuations. In agreement with recent experimental findings, extrinsic noise is found to play a more prominent role than intrinsic noise in the variability of proteins. The occurrence frequency for the reactions in the pathway are also examined and a more compact network is obtained by dropping most of the reactions of least occurrence

  4. [Invasive yeast infections in neutropenic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Camps, Isabel; Jarque, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal diseases caused by yeasts still play an important role in the morbidity and mortality in neutropenic patients with haematological malignancies. Although the overall incidence of invasive candidiasis has decreased due to widespread use of antifungal prophylaxis, the incidence of non-Candida albicans Candida species is increasing compared with that of C.albicans, and mortality of invasive candidiasis continues to be high. In addition, there has been an increase in invasive infections caused by an array of uncommon yeasts, including species of the genus Malassezia, Rhodotorula, Trichosporon and Saprochaete, characterised by their resistance to echinocandins and poor prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Isolation and characterization of phenol degrading yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Riddhi; Rajkumar, Shalini

    2009-04-01

    A phenol degrading yeast isolate was identified and characterized from the soil sample collected from a landfill site, in Ahmedabad, India, by plating the soil dilutions on Sabouraud's Dextrose Agar. The microscopic studies and biochemical tests indicated the isolate to be Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The phenol degrading potential of the isolate was measured by inoculation of pure culture in the mineral medium containing various phenol concentrations ranging from 100 to 800 mg l(-1 )and monitoring phenol disappearance rate at regular intervals of time. Growth of the isolate in mineral medium with various phenol concentrations was monitored by measuring the turbidity (OD(600) nm). The results showed that the isolated yeast was tolerant to phenol up to 800 mg(-1). The phenol degradation ranged from 8.57 to 100% for the concentration of phenol from 800 mg l(-1 )to 200 mg l(-1), respectively. ((c) 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim).

  6. Made for Each Other: Ascomycete Yeasts and Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Meredith

    2017-06-01

    Fungi and insects live together in the same habitats, and many species of both groups rely on each other for success. Insects, the most successful animals on Earth, cannot produce sterols, essential vitamins, and many enzymes; fungi, often yeast-like in growth form, make up for these deficits. Fungi, however, require constantly replenished substrates because they consume the previous ones, and insects, sometimes lured by volatile fungal compounds, carry fungi directly to a similar, but fresh, habitat. Yeasts associated with insects include Ascomycota (Saccharomycotina, Pezizomycotina) and a few Basidiomycota. Beetles, homopterans, and flies are important associates of fungi, and in turn the insects carry yeasts in pits, specialized external pouches, and modified gut pockets. Some yeasts undergo sexual reproduction within the insect gut, where the genetic diversity of the population is increased, while others, well suited to their stable environment, may never mate. The range of interactions extends from dispersal of yeasts on the surface of insects (e.g., cactus- Drosophila -yeast and ephemeral flower communities, ambrosia beetles, yeasts with holdfasts) to extremely specialized associations of organisms that can no longer exist independently, as in the case of yeast-like symbionts of planthoppers. In a few cases yeast-like fungus-insect associations threaten butterflies and other species with extinction. Technical advances improve discovery and identification of the fungi but also inform our understanding of the evolution of yeast-insect symbioses, although there is much more to learn.

  7. Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nanette R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can

  8. De novo biosynthesis of vanillin in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Esben H; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Kock, Gertrud R; Bünner, Camilla M; Kristensen, Charlotte; Jensen, Ole R; Okkels, Finn T; Olsen, Carl E; Motawia, Mohammed S; Hansen, Jørgen

    2009-05-01

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor compounds, with a global market of 180 million dollars. Natural vanillin is derived from the cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia), but most of the world's vanillin is synthesized from petrochemicals or wood pulp lignins. We have established a true de novo biosynthetic pathway for vanillin production from glucose in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, also known as fission yeast or African beer yeast, as well as in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Productivities were 65 and 45 mg/liter, after introduction of three and four heterologous genes, respectively. The engineered pathways involve incorporation of 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase from the dung mold Podospora pauciseta, an aromatic carboxylic acid reductase (ACAR) from a bacterium of the Nocardia genus, and an O-methyltransferase from Homo sapiens. In S. cerevisiae, the ACAR enzyme required activation by phosphopantetheinylation, and this was achieved by coexpression of a Corynebacterium glutamicum phosphopantetheinyl transferase. Prevention of reduction of vanillin to vanillyl alcohol was achieved by knockout of the host alcohol dehydrogenase ADH6. In S. pombe, the biosynthesis was further improved by introduction of an Arabidopsis thaliana family 1 UDP-glycosyltransferase, converting vanillin into vanillin beta-D-glucoside, which is not toxic to the yeast cells and thus may be accumulated in larger amounts. These de novo pathways represent the first examples of one-cell microbial generation of these valuable compounds from glucose. S. pombe yeast has not previously been metabolically engineered to produce any valuable, industrially scalable, white biotech commodity.

  9. MALDI-TOF MS as a tool to identify foodborne yeasts and yeast-like fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintilla, Raquel; Kolecka, Anna; Casaregola, Serge; Daniel, Heide M; Houbraken, Jos; Kostrzewa, Markus; Boekhout, Teun; Groenewald, Marizeth

    2018-02-02

    Since food spoilage by yeasts causes high economic losses, fast and accurate identifications of yeasts associated with food and food-related products are important for the food industry. In this study the efficiency of the matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify food related yeasts was evaluated. A CBS in-house MALDI-TOF MS database was created and later challenged with a blinded test set of 146 yeast strains obtained from food and food related products. Ninety eight percent of the strains were correctly identified with log score values>1.7. One strain, Mrakia frigida, gained a correct identification with a score value1.7. Ambiguous identifications were observed due to two incorrect reference mass spectra's found in the commercial database BDAL v.4.0, namely Candida sake DSM 70763 which was re-identified as Candida oleophila, and Candida inconspicua DSM 70631 which was re-identified as Pichia membranifaciens. MALDI-TOF MS can distinguish between most of the species, but for some species complexes, such as the Kazachstania telluris and Mrakia frigida complexes, MALDI-TOF MS showed limited resolution and identification of sibling species was sometimes problematic. Despite this, we showed that the MALDI-TOF MS is applicable for routine identification and validation of foodborne yeasts, but a further update of the commercial reference databases is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Phyllosphere yeasts rapidly break down biodegradable plastics

    OpenAIRE

    Kitamoto, Hiroko K; Shinozaki, Yukiko; Cao, Xiao-hong; Morita, Tomotake; Konishi, Masaaki; Tago, Kanako; Kajiwara, Hideyuki; Koitabashi, Motoo; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Watanabe, Takashi; Sameshima-Yamashita, Yuka; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Tsushima, Seiya

    2011-01-01

    The use of biodegradable plastics can reduce the accumulation of environmentally persistent plastic wastes. The rate of degradation of biodegradable plastics depends on environmental conditions and is highly variable. Techniques for achieving more consistent degradation are needed. However, only a few microorganisms involved in the degradation process have been isolated so far from the environment. Here, we show that Pseudozyma spp. yeasts, which are common in the phyllosphere and are easily ...

  11. An engineered yeast efficiently secreting penicillin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loknath Gidijala

    Full Text Available This study aimed at developing an alternative host for the production of penicillin (PEN. As yet, the industrial production of this beta-lactam antibiotic is confined to the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. As such, the yeast Hansenula polymorpha, a recognized producer of pharmaceuticals, represents an attractive alternative. Introduction of the P. chrysogenum gene encoding the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl-L-cysteinyl-D-valine synthetase (ACVS in H. polymorpha, resulted in the production of active ACVS enzyme, when co-expressed with the Bacillus subtilis sfp gene encoding a phosphopantetheinyl transferase that activated ACVS. This represents the first example of the functional expression of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase in yeast. Co-expression with the P. chrysogenum genes encoding the cytosolic enzyme isopenicillin N synthase as well as the two peroxisomal enzymes isopenicillin N acyl transferase (IAT and phenylacetyl CoA ligase (PCL resulted in production of biologically active PEN, which was efficiently secreted. The amount of secreted PEN was similar to that produced by the original P. chrysogenum NRRL1951 strain (approx. 1 mg/L. PEN production was decreased over two-fold in a yeast strain lacking peroxisomes, indicating that the peroxisomal localization of IAT and PCL is important for efficient PEN production. The breakthroughs of this work enable exploration of new yeast-based cell factories for the production of (novel beta-lactam antibiotics as well as other natural and semi-synthetic peptides (e.g. immunosuppressive and cytostatic agents, whose production involves NRPS's.

  12. Chronological aging-induced apoptosis in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Fabrizio, Paola; Longo, Valter D.

    2008-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the simplest among the major eukaryotic model organisms for aging and diseases. Longevity in the chronological life span paradigm is measured as the mean and maximum survival period of populations of non-dividing yeast. This paradigm has been used successfully to identify several life-regulatory genes and three evolutionary conserved pro-aging pathways. More recently, Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been shown to age chronologically in a manner that resembles that of...

  13. Environmental influences on organotin-yeast interactions

    OpenAIRE

    White, Jane S.

    2002-01-01

    As a consequence of the widespread industrial and agricultural applications of organotin compounds, contamination of various ecosystems has occurred in recent decades. Understanding how these compounds interact with cellular membranes is essential in assessing the risks of organotin pollution. The organotins, tributyltin (TBT) and trimethyltin (TMT) and inorganic tin, Sn(IV), were investigated for their physical interactions with non-metabolising cells and protoplasts of the yeast, Candida ma...

  14. Beneficial properties of probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii

    OpenAIRE

    Tomičić Zorica M.; Čolović Radmilo R.; Čabarkapa Ivana S.; Vukmirović Đuro M.; Đuragić Olivera M.; Tomičić Ružica M.

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii is unique probiotic and biotherapeutic yeast, known to survive in gastric acidity and it is not adversely affected or inhibited by antibiotics or does not alter or adversely affect the normal microbiota. S. boulardii has been utilized worldwide as a probiotic supplement to support gastrointestinal health. The multiple mechanisms of action of S. boulardii and its properties may explain its efficacy and beneficial effects in acute and chronic gastrointestinal diseases th...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: fission yeast [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Schizosaccharomyces_pombe_L.png Schizosaccharomyce...s_pombe_NL.png Schizosaccharomyces_pombe_S.png Schizosaccharomyces_pombe_NS.png http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomyces+pombe&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomyce...s+pombe&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomyce...s+pombe&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomyces+pombe&t=NS

  16. Pentose utilization in yeasts: Physiology and biochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeppson, H.

    1996-04-01

    The fermentive performance of bacteria, yeasts, and filamentous fungi was investigated in a pentose (xylose)-rich lignocellulosic hydrolyzate. The filamentous fungus Fusarium oxysporum and the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis were found to be very sensitive to the inhibiting hydrolyzate. Recombinant xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed very poor ethanol formation from xylose; xylitol being the major product formed. The highest ethanol yields were obtained with recombinant Escherichia coli KO11, however, for maximal ethanol yield detoxification of the hydrolyzate was required. The influence of oxygen on the regulation of carbohydrate metabolism in the xylose-fermenting yeast P. stipitis CBS 6054 was investigated. A low and well-controlled level of oxygenation has been found to be required for efficient ethanol formation from xylose by the xylose-fermenting yeasts. The requirement of oxygen is frequently ascribed to the apparent redox imbalance which develops under anaerobic conditions due to the difference in co-factor utilization of the two first enzymes in the xylose metabolism, further reflected in xylitol excretion. However, a low and well controlled level of oxygenation for maximal ethanol production from glucose was also demonstrated, suggesting that the oxygen requirement is not only due to the dual co-factor utilization, but also serves other purposes. Cyanide-insensitive and salicyl hydroxamic acid-sensitive respiration (CIR) was found in P. stipitis. CIR is suggested to act as a redox sink preventing xylitol formation in P. stipitis under oxygen-limited xylose fermentations. Xylitol metabolism by P. stipitis CBS 6054 was strictly respiratory and ethanol was not formed under any conditions. The absence of ethanol formation was not due to a lack of fermentative enzymes, since the addition of glucose to xylitol-pregrown cells resulted in ethanol formation. 277 refs, 5 figs, 7 tabs

  17. Yeast Biodiversity from DOQ Priorat Uninoculated Fermentations

    OpenAIRE

    Padilla, Beatriz; Garc?a-Fern?ndez, David; Gonz?lez, Beatriz; Izidoro, Iara; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; Beltran, Gemma; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Climate, soil, and grape varieties are the primary characteristics of terroir and lead to the definition of various appellations of origin. However, the microbiota associated with grapes are also affected by these conditions and can leave a footprint in a wine that will be part of the characteristics of terroir. Thus, a description of the yeast microbiota within a vineyard is of interest not only to provide a better understanding of the winemaking process, but also to understand the source of...

  18. Raman Microspectroscopy of the Yeast Vacuoles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednárová, Lucie; Palacký, J.; Bauerová, Václava; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Pichová, Iva; Mojzeš, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, 5-6 (2012), s. 503-507 ISSN 0712-4813 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/0376; GA ČR GA310/09/1945 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Raman microspectroscopy * living cell * yeast * vacuole * chemical composition * polyphospate * Candida albicans Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2012

  19. Development of Industrial Yeast Platform Strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergdahl, Basti; Dato, Laura; Förster, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Most of the current metabolic engineering projects are carried out using laboratory strains as the starting host. Although such strains are easily manipulated genetically, their robustness does not always meet the requirements set by industrial fermentation conditions. In such conditions, the cells...... screening of the 36 industrial and laboratory yeast strains. In addition, progress in the development of molecular biology methods for generating the new strains will be presented....

  20. Cyanohydrin reactions enhance glycolytic oscillations in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Nielsen, Astrid Gram; Tortzen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous metabolic oscillations can be induced in yeast by addition of glucose and removal of extracellular acetaldehyde (ACAx). Compared to other means of ACAx removal, cyanide robustly induces oscillations, indicating additional cyanide reactions besides ACA to lactonitrile conversion. Here......: a) by reducing [ACAx] relative to oscillation amplitude, b) by targeting multiple intracellular carbonyl compounds during fermentation, and c) by acting as a phase resetting stimulus....

  1. Enzymes of Candida tropicalis yeast biodegrading phenol

    OpenAIRE

    Koubková, Zuzana

    2011-01-01

    Effluents of industrial wastewaters from oil refineries, paper mills, dyes, ceramic factories, resins, textiles and plastic contain high concentrations of aromatic compounds, which are toxic to organisms. Degradation of these compounds to tolerant limits before releasing them into the environment is an urgent requirement. Candida tropicalis yeast is an important representative of eucaryotic microorganisms that are able to utilize phenol. During the first phase of phenol biodegradation, cytopl...

  2. Biotechnology of non-Saccharomyces yeasts-the basidiomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric A

    2013-09-01

    Yeasts are the major producer of biotechnology products worldwide, exceeding production in capacity and economic revenues of other groups of industrial microorganisms. Yeasts have wide-ranging fundamental and industrial importance in scientific, food, medical, and agricultural disciplines (Fig. 1). Saccharomyces is the most important genus of yeast from fundamental and applied perspectives and has been expansively studied. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts (non-conventional yeasts) including members of the Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes also have substantial current utility and potential applicability in biotechnology. In an earlier mini-review, "Biotechnology of non-Saccharomyces yeasts-the ascomycetes" (Johnson Appl Microb Biotechnol 97: 503-517, 2013), the extensive biotechnological utility and potential of ascomycetous yeasts are described. Ascomycetous yeasts are particularly important in food and ethanol formation, production of single-cell protein, feeds and fodder, heterologous production of proteins and enzymes, and as model and fundamental organisms for the delineation of genes and their function in mammalian and human metabolism and disease processes. In contrast, the roles of basidiomycetous yeasts in biotechnology have mainly been evaluated only in the past few decades and compared to the ascomycetous yeasts and currently have limited industrial utility. From a biotechnology perspective, the basidiomycetous yeasts are known mainly for the production of enzymes used in pharmaceutical and chemical synthesis, for production of certain classes of primary and secondary metabolites such as terpenoids and carotenoids, for aerobic catabolism of complex carbon sources, and for bioremediation of environmental pollutants and xenotoxicants. Notwithstanding, the basidiomycetous yeasts appear to have considerable potential in biotechnology owing to their catabolic utilities, formation of enzymes acting on recalcitrant substrates, and through the production of unique primary

  3. Spectroscopic analyses on interaction of o-Vanillin- D-Phenylalanine, o-Vanillin- L-Tyrosine and o-Vanillin- L-Levodopa Schiff Bases with bovine serum albumin (BSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jingqun; Guo, Yuwei; Wang, Jun; Wang, Zhiqiu; Jin, Xudong; Cheng, Chunping; Li, Ying; Li, Kai

    2011-04-01

    In this work, three o-Vanillin Schiff Bases (o-VSB: o-Vanillin- D-Phenylalanine (o-VDP), o-Vanillin- L-Tyrosine (o-VLT) and o-Vanillin- L-Levodopa (o-VLL)) with alanine constituent were synthesized by direct reflux method in ethanol solution, and then were used to study the interaction to bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules by fluorescence spectroscopy. Based on the fluorescence quenching calculation, the bimolecular quenching constant ( Kq), apparent quenching constant ( Ksv), effective binding constant ( KA) and corresponding dissociation constant ( KD) as well as binding site number ( n) were obtained. In addition, the binding distance ( r) was also calculated according to Foster's non-radioactive energy transfer theory. The results show that these three o-VSB can efficiently bind to BSA molecules, but the binding array order is o-VDP-BSA > o-VLT-BSA > o-VLL-BSA. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that the o-VDP is more accessibility to tryptophan (Trp) residues of BSA molecules than to tyrosine (Tyr) residues. Nevertheless, the o-VLT and o-VLL are more accessibility to Tyr residues than to Trp residues.

  4. In situ rheology of yeast biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnoni, Lorena I; Tarifa, María C; Lozano, Jorge E; Genovese, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the in situ rheological behavior of yeast biofilms growing on stainless steel under static and turbulent flow. The species used (Rhodototula mucilaginosa, Candida krusei, Candida kefyr and Candida tropicalis) were isolated from a clarified apple juice industry. The flow conditions impacted biofilm composition over time, with a predominance of C. krusei under static and turbulent flow. Likewise, structural variations occurred, with a tighter appearance under dynamic flow. Under turbulent flow there was an increase of 112 μm in biofilm thickness at 11 weeks (p < 0.001) and cell morphology was governed by hyphal structures and rounded cells. Using the in situ growth method introduced here, yeast biofilms were determined to be viscoelastic materials with a predominantly solid-like behavior, and neither this nor the G'0 values were significantly affected by the flow conditions or the growth time, and at large deformations their weak structure collapsed beyond a critical strain of about 1.5-5%. The present work could represent a starting point for developing in situ measurements of yeast rheology and contribute to a thin body of knowledge about fungal biofilm formation.

  5. Determination of Proteinaceous Selenocysteine in Selenized Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bierla

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A method for the quantitation of proteinaceous selenocysteine (SeCys in Se-rich yeast was developed. The method is based on the reduction of the Se-Se and S-Se bridges with dithiotretiol, derivatization with iodoacetamide (carbamidomethylation, followed by HPLC-ICP MS. The chromatographic conditions were optimized for the total recovery of the proteinaceous selenocysteine, the minimum number of peaks in the chromatogram (reduction of derivatization products of other Se-species present and the baseline separation. A typical chromatogram of a proteolytic digest of selenized yeast protein consisted of up to five peaks (including SeMet, carbamidomethylated (CAM-SeCys, and Se(CAM2 identified by retention time matching with available standards and electrospray MS. Inorganic selenium non-specifically attached to proteins and selenomethionine could be quantified (in the form of Se(CAM2 along with SeCys. Selenocysteine, selenomethionine, inorganic selenium, and the water soluble-metabolite fraction accounted for the totality of selenium species in Se-rich yeast.

  6. How do yeast sense mitochondrial dysfunction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A. Knorre

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Apart from energy transformation, mitochondria play important signaling roles. In yeast, mitochondrial signaling relies on several molecular cascades. However, it is not clear how a cell detects a particular mitochondrial malfunction. The problem is that there are many possible manifestations of mitochondrial dysfunction. For example, exposure to the specific antibiotics can either decrease (inhibitors of respiratory chain or increase (inhibitors of ATP-synthase mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Moreover, even in the absence of the dysfunctions, a cell needs feedback from mitochondria to coordinate mitochondrial biogenesis and/or removal by mitophagy during the division cycle. To cope with the complexity, only a limited set of compounds is monitored by yeast cells to estimate mitochondrial functionality. The known examples of such compounds are ATP, reactive oxygen species, intermediates of amino acids synthesis, short peptides, Fe-S clusters and heme, and also the precursor proteins which fail to be imported by mitochondria. On one hand, the levels of these molecules depend not only on mitochondria. On the other hand, these substances are recognized by the cytosolic sensors which transmit the signals to the nucleus leading to general, as opposed to mitochondria-specific, transcriptional response. Therefore, we argue that both ways of mitochondria-to-nucleus communication in yeast are mostly (if not completely unspecific, are mediated by the cytosolic signaling machinery and strongly depend on cellular metabolic state.

  7. [Mitochondria inheritance in yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizikova, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    The review is devoted to the main mechanisms of mitochondria inheritance in yeast Saccharonmyces cerevisiae. The genetic mechanisms of functionally active mitochondria inheritance in eukaryotic cells is one of the most relevant in modem researches. A great number of genetic diseases are associated with mitochondria dysfunction. Plasticity of eukaryotic cell metabolism according to the environmental changes is ensured by adequate mitochondria functioning by means of ATP synthesis coordination, reactive oxygen species accumulation, apoptosis regulation and is an important factor of cell adaptation to stress. Mitochondria participation in important for cell vitality processes masters the presence of accurate mechanisms of mitochondria functions regulation according to environment fluctuations. The mechanisms of mitochondria division and distribution are highly conserved. Baker yeast S. cerevisiae is an ideal model object for mitochondria researches due to energetic metabolism lability, ability to switch over respiration to fermentation, and petite-positive phenotype. Correction of metabolism according to the environmental changes is necessary for cell vitality. The influence of respiratory, carbon, amino acid and phosphate metabolism on mitochondria functions was shown. As far as the mechanisms that stabilize functions of mitochondria and mtDNA are highly conserve, we can project yeast regularities on higher eukaryotes systems. This makes it possible to approximate understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of a great number of human diseases.

  8. Biomedical applications of yeast- a patent view, part one: yeasts as workhorses for the production of therapeutics and vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohvand, Farzin; Shokri, Mehdi; Abdollahpour-Alitappeh, Meghdad; Ehsani, Parastoo

    2017-08-01

    Yeasts, as Eukaryotes, offer unique features for ease of growth and genetic manipulation possibilities, making it an exceptional microbial host. Areas covered: This review provides general and patent-oriented insights into production of biopharmaceuticals by yeasts. Patents, wherever possible, were correlated to the original or review articles. The review describes applications of major GRAS (generally regarded as safe) yeasts for the production of therapeutic proteins and subunit vaccines; additionally, immunomodulatory properties of yeast cell wall components were reviewed for use of whole yeast cells as a new vaccine platform. The second part of the review will discuss yeast- humanization strategies and innovative applications. Expert opinion: Biomedical applications of yeasts were initiated by utilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for production of leavened (fermented) products, and advanced to serve to produce biopharmaceuticals. Higher biomass production and expression/secretion yields, more similarity of glycosylation patterns to mammals and possibility of host-improvement strategies through application of synthetic biology might enhance selection of Pichia pastoris (instead of S. cerevisiae) as a host for production of biopharmaceutical in future. Immunomodulatory properties of yeast cell wall β-glucans and possibility of intracellular expression of heterologous pathogen/tumor antigens in yeast cells have expanded their application as a new platform, 'Whole Yeast Vaccines'.

  9. Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boury, C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper emphasizes in the specific areas of design, engineering and component production. This paper presents what Framatome has to offer in these areas and its export oriented philosophy. Then, a typical example of this technology transfer philosophy is the collaboration with the South Korean firm, Korea Heavy Industries Corporation (KHIC) for the supply of KNU 9 and KNU 10 power stations

  10. Taming wild yeast: potential of conventional and nonconventional yeasts in industrial fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensels, Jan; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are the main driving force behind several industrial food fermentation processes, including the production of beer, wine, sake, bread, and chocolate. Historically, these processes developed from uncontrolled, spontaneous fermentation reactions that rely on a complex mixture of microbes present in the environment. Because such spontaneous processes are generally inconsistent and inefficient and often lead to the formation of off-flavors, most of today's industrial production utilizes defined starter cultures, often consisting of a specific domesticated strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, or S. pastorianus. Although this practice greatly improved process consistency, efficiency, and overall quality, it also limited the sensorial complexity of the end product. In this review, we discuss how Saccharomyces yeasts were domesticated to become the main workhorse of food fermentations, and we investigate the potential and selection of nonconventional yeasts that are often found in spontaneous fermentations, such as Brettanomyces, Hanseniaspora, and Pichia spp.

  11. Engineering the Substrate Specificity of the DhbE Adenylation Domain by Yeast Cell Surface Display

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Keya; Nelson, Kathryn M.; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Grimes, Kimberly D.; Zhao, Bo; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Yin, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The adenylation (A) domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) activate aryl acids or amino acids to launch their transfer through the NRPS assembly line for the biosynthesis of many medicinally important natural products. In order to expand the substrate pool of NRPSs, we developed a method based on yeast cell surface display to engineer the substrate specificities of the A-domains. We acquired A-domain mutants of DhbE that have 11- and 6-fold increases in kcat/Km with nonnative sub...

  12. Not your ordinary yeast: non-Saccharomyces yeasts in wine production uncovered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Neil P; Varela, Cristian; Pretorius, Isak S

    2014-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and grape juice are 'natural companions' and make a happy wine marriage. However, this relationship can be enriched by allowing 'wild' non-Saccharomyces yeast to participate in a sequential manner in the early phases of grape must fermentation. However, such a triangular relationship is complex and can only be taken to 'the next level' if there are no spoilage yeast present and if the 'wine yeast' - S. cerevisiae - is able to exert its dominance in time to successfully complete the alcoholic fermentation. Winemakers apply various 'matchmaking' strategies (e.g. cellar hygiene, pH, SO2 , temperature and nutrient management) to keep 'spoilers' (e.g. Dekkera bruxellensis) at bay, and allow 'compatible' wild yeast (e.g. Torulaspora delbrueckii, Pichia kluyveri, Lachancea thermotolerans and Candida/Metschnikowia pulcherrima) to harmonize with potent S. cerevisiae wine yeast and bring the best out in wine. Mismatching can lead to a 'two is company, three is a crowd' scenario. More than 40 of the 1500 known yeast species have been isolated from grape must. In this article, we review the specific flavour-active characteristics of those non-Saccharomyces species that might play a positive role in both spontaneous and inoculated wine ferments. We seek to present 'single-species' and 'multi-species' ferments in a new light and a new context, and we raise important questions about the direction of mixed-fermentation research to address market trends regarding so-called 'natural' wines. This review also highlights that, despite the fact that most frontier research and technological developments are often focussed primarily on S. cerevisiae, non-Saccharomyces research can benefit from the techniques and knowledge developed by research on the former. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prequels to Synthetic Biology: From Candidate Gene Identification and Validation to Enzyme Subcellular Localization in Plant and Yeast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foureau, E; Carqueijeiro, I; Dugé de Bernonville, T; Melin, C; Lafontaine, F; Besseau, S; Lanoue, A; Papon, N; Oudin, A; Glévarec, G; Clastre, M; St-Pierre, B; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, N; Courdavault, V

    2016-01-01

    Natural compounds extracted from microorganisms or plants constitute an inexhaustible source of valuable molecules whose supply can be potentially challenged by limitations in biological sourcing. The recent progress in synthetic biology combined to the increasing access to extensive transcriptomics and genomics data now provide new alternatives to produce these molecules by transferring their whole biosynthetic pathway in heterologous production platforms such as yeasts or bacteria. While the generation of high titer producing strains remains per se an arduous field of investigation, elucidation of the biosynthetic pathways as well as characterization of their complex subcellular organization are essential prequels to the efficient development of such bioengineering approaches. Using examples from plants and yeasts as a framework, we describe potent methods to rationalize the study of partially characterized pathways, including the basics of computational applications to identify candidate genes in transcriptomics data and the validation of their function by an improved procedure of virus-induced gene silencing mediated by direct DNA transfer to get around possible resistance to Agrobacterium-delivery of viral vectors. To identify potential alterations of biosynthetic fluxes resulting from enzyme mislocalizations in reconstituted pathways, we also detail protocols aiming at characterizing subcellular localizations of protein in plant cells by expression of fluorescent protein fusions through biolistic-mediated transient transformation, and localization of transferred enzymes in yeast using similar fluorescence procedures. Albeit initially developed for the Madagascar periwinkle, these methods may be applied to other plant species or organisms in order to establish synthetic biology platform. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Black yeast-like fungi in skin and nail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunte, D M; Tarazooie, B; Arendrup, M C

    2011-01-01

    Black yeast-like fungi are rarely reported from superficial infections. We noticed a consistent prevalence of these organisms as single isolations from mycological routine specimens. To investigate the prevalence of black yeast-like fungi in skin, hair and nail specimens and to discuss...... the probability of these species to be involved in disease. Slow-growing black yeast-like fungi in routine specimens were prospectively collected and identified. A questionnaire regarding patient information was sent to physicians regarding black yeast-like fungus positive patients. A total of 20 746...... dermatological specimens were examined by culture. Black yeast-like fungi accounted for 2.2% (n = 108) of the positive cultures. Only 31.0% of the samples, culture positive for black yeast-like fungi were direct microscopy positive when compared with overall 68.8% of the culture positive specimens. The most...

  15. Yeast Genomics for Bread, Beer, Biology, Bucks and Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharkar, Kishore R.; Sakharkar, Meena K.

    The rapid advances and scale up of projects in DNA sequencing dur ing the past two decades have produced complete genome sequences of several eukaryotic species. The versatile genetic malleability of the yeast, and the high degree of conservation between its cellular processes and those of human cells have made it a model of choice for pioneering research in molecular and cell biology. The complete sequence of yeast genome has proven to be extremely useful as a reference towards the sequences of human and for providing systems to explore key gene functions. Yeast has been a ‘legendary model’ for new technologies and gaining new biological insights into basic biological sciences and biotechnology. This chapter describes the awesome power of yeast genetics, genomics and proteomics in understanding of biological function. The applications of yeast as a screening tool to the field of drug discovery and development are highlighted and the traditional importance of yeast for bakers and brewers is discussed.

  16. A new methodology to obtain wine yeast strains overproducing mannoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós, Manuel; Gonzalez-Ramos, Daniel; Tabera, Laura; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2010-04-30

    Yeast mannoproteins are highly glycosylated proteins that are covalently bound to the beta-1,3-glucan present in the yeast cell wall. Among their outstanding enological properties, yeast mannoproteins contribute to several aspects of wine quality by protecting against protein haze, reducing astringency, retaining aroma compounds and stimulating growth of lactic-acid bacteria. The development of a non-recombinant method to obtain enological yeast strains overproducing mannoproteins would therefore be very useful. Our previous experience on the genetic determinants of the release of these molecules by Saccharomyces cerevisiae has allowed us to propose a new methodology to isolate and characterize wine yeast that overproduce mannoproteins. The described methodology is based on the resistance of the killer 9 toxin produced by Williopsis saturnus, a feature linked to an altered biogenesis of the yeast cell wall. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Yeast hulls: effect on spontaneous fermentation in different vinification conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa López

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the addition of yeast hulls in vinification was investigated during three consecutive years. The study was carried out in the experimental winery of C.I.D.A in La Rioja (Spain with free running white grape juice of the Viura variety. Four different vinifications were studied. In two of these vinifications, stuck fermentations were detected. In all the studies, the addition of yeast hulls (yeast ghosts improved the fermentation kinetics, increasing the number of viable yeasts at the end of the exponential stage and decreasing the final content of reducing sugars. This work revealed a new effect of yeast hull addition which had not been identified previously; their selection effect on the wild yeast strain in spontaneous fermentation.

  18. Regulatory mechanism of the flavoprotein Tah18-dependent nitric oxide synthesis and cell death in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Yuki; Nasuno, Ryo; Kawahara, Nobuhiro; Nishimura, Akira; Watanabe, Daisuke; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions. The regulatory mechanism of NO generation in unicellular eukaryotic yeast cells is poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian and bacterial NO synthase (NOS) orthologues, even though yeast produces NO under oxidative stress conditions. Recently, we reported that the flavoprotein Tah18, which was previously shown to transfer electrons to the iron-sulfur cluster protein Dre2, is involved in NOS-like activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. On the other hand, Tah18 was reported to promote apoptotic cell death after exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here, we showed that NOS-like activity requiring Tah18 induced cell death upon treatment with H2O2. Our experimental results also indicate that Tah18-dependent NO production and cell death are suppressed by enhancement of the interaction between Tah18 and its molecular partner Dre2. Our findings indicate that the Tah18-Dre2 complex regulates cell death as a molecular switch via Tah18-dependent NOS-like activity in response to environmental changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence that the synthesis of glucosylphosphodolichol in yeast involves a 35-kDa membrane protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palamarczyk, G.; Drake, R.; Haley, B.; Lennarz, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    In an effort to identify the polypeptide chain of glucosylphosphodolichol synthase, yeast microsomal membranes were allowed to react with 5-azido[β- 32 P]UDPGlc, a photoactive analogue of UDPGlc, which is a substrate for this enzyme. Upon photolysis the 32 P-labeled probe was shown to link covalently to a 35-kDa protein present in microsomal membranes prepared from several wild-type yeast strains. Binding was either reduced or absent in the microsomal membranes from two yeast mutants (alg5 and dpg1) that are known to be defective in the synthesis of glucosylphosphodolichol. The microsomes isolated from a heterozygous diploid strain alg5::dpg1 generated from these two mutants exhibited partial restoration of both the ability to photolabel the 35-kDa protein and the ability to catalyze the synthesis of glucosylphosphodolichol. Microsomal membranes from a mutant strain that synthesized glucosylphosphodolichol but lacked the ability to transfer the glucosyl residue to the growing lipid-linked oligosaccharide (alg6) exhibited labeling with 5-azido[β- 32 P]UDPGlc comparable to that found in microsomes from the wild-type strain. In all cases photoinsertion of the probe into the 35-kDa protein correlated with the level of synthase assayed in the microsomal membranes. These results strongly support the conclusion that the 35-kDa protein labeled in these experiments is a component of glucosylphosphodolichol synthase

  20. Screening of high-yield GTF yeast by N+-implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yanhong; Lv Jiaping; Liu Lu; Li Shurong

    2009-01-01

    In this study, one of the highest chromium-resistant strain was screened from 12 tested brewer's yeast. N + ion implantation was used to mutate this yeast and screened high-yield GTF yeast strains with Chromium tolerance method. The mutagenesis was conducted by 50 KeV N + ion implantation with the doses of 1 x 2.6 x 10 13 , 2 x 2.6 x 10 13 , 3 x 2.6 x 10 13 , 4 x 2.6 x 10 13 , 5 x 2.6 x 10 13 and 6 x 2.6 x 10 13 ion/cm 2 . Results showed that the optimum dose was 4 x 2.6 x 10 13 ion/cm 2 , and a strain M11-1A11 of high-producing GTF was obtained. Its organic Cr content was increased by 22.4% than the original strain. Its fermentation property was stable after 5 generation transfer inoculation. (authors)

  1. Differentiation of enzymatic activity of yeasts and yeast-like microorganisms isolated from various environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Bogusławska-Wąs

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to determinate enzymatic activity of yeast-like organisms - Candida lipolytica, Rhodotorula rubra, Trichosporon beigelii, Zygosaccharomyces sp. - isolated from the Szczecin Lagoon and herring salads. We have shown that lipolytic activity was higher than protcolytic for every strain tested. The lowest activity level was found out for amylolytic hydrolases. The results also demonstrated that yeast-like organisms isolated from the Szczecin Lagoon revealed much higher average enzymatic activity compared to tbe same species isolated from herring salads, excepting C. lipolytica.

  2. Determination of the autolysis of champagne yeast by using 14C-labelled yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, I.; Oura, E.; Suomalainen, H.

    1980-01-01

    The degree of autolysis of 14 C-labelled Champagne Hautvillers yeast was studied in the function of different temperatures of storage. A linear relationship was found between the length of the storage and the degree of autolysis. The rate of autolysis increased with raising the temperature of storage. The raising of the temperature by 10 deg C was followed by a 6-7% increase in the rate of autolysis. Shaking up the yeast sediment at 20-day intervals raised the rate of autolysis by 1.5-4.2%. (author)

  3. Determination of the autolysis of champagne yeast by using /sup 14/C-labelled yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnar, I [Orszagos Szoeleszeti es Boraszati Kutatointezet, Budapest (Hungary); Oura, E; Suomalainen, H [Research Laboratories of the State Alcohol Monopoly, Helsinki (Finland)

    1980-01-01

    The degree of autolysis of /sup 14/C-labelled Champagne Hautvillers yeast was studied in the function of different temperatures of storage. A linear relationship was found between the length of the storage and the degree of autolysis. The rate of autolysis increased with raising the temperature of storage. The raising of the temperature by 10 deg C was followed by a 6-7% increase in the rate of autolysis. Shaking up the yeast sediment at 20-day intervals raised the rate of autolysis by 1.5-4.2%.

  4. Noroviruses Co-opt the Function of Host Proteins VAPA and VAPB for Replication via a Phenylalanine-Phenylalanine-Acidic-Tract-Motif Mimic in Nonstructural Viral Protein NS1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCune, Broc T; Tang, Wei; Lu, Jia; Eaglesham, James B; Thorne, Lucy; Mayer, Anne E; Condiff, Emily; Nice, Timothy J; Goodfellow, Ian; Krezel, Andrzej M; Virgin, Herbert W

    2017-07-11

    The Norovirus genus contains important human pathogens, but the role of host pathways in norovirus replication is largely unknown. Murine noroviruses provide the opportunity to study norovirus replication in cell culture and in small animals. The human norovirus nonstructural protein NS1/2 interacts with the host protein VAMP-associated protein A (VAPA), but the significance of the NS1/2-VAPA interaction is unexplored. Here we report decreased murine norovirus replication in VAPA- and VAPB-deficient cells. We characterized the role of VAPA in detail. VAPA was required for the efficiency of a step(s) in the viral replication cycle after entry of viral RNA into the cytoplasm but before the synthesis of viral minus-sense RNA. The interaction of VAPA with viral NS1/2 proteins is conserved between murine and human noroviruses. Murine norovirus NS1/2 directly bound the major sperm protein (MSP) domain of VAPA through its NS1 domain. Mutations within NS1 that disrupted interaction with VAPA inhibited viral replication. Structural analysis revealed that the viral NS1 domain contains a mimic of the phenylalanine-phenylalanine-acidic-tract (FFAT) motif that enables host proteins to bind to the VAPA MSP domain. The NS1/2-FFAT mimic region interacted with the VAPA-MSP domain in a manner similar to that seen with bona fide host FFAT motifs. Amino acids in the FFAT mimic region of the NS1 domain that are important for viral replication are highly conserved across murine norovirus strains. Thus, VAPA interaction with a norovirus protein that functionally mimics host FFAT motifs is important for murine norovirus replication. IMPORTANCE Human noroviruses are a leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide, but host factors involved in norovirus replication are incompletely understood. Murine noroviruses have been studied to define mechanisms of norovirus replication. Here we defined the importance of the interaction between the hitherto poorly studied NS1/2 norovirus protein and the

  5. Outward electron transfer by Saccharomyces cerevisiae monitored with a bi-cathodic microbial fuel cell-type activity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducommun, Raphaël; Favre, Marie-France; Carrard, Delphine; Fischer, Fabian

    2010-03-01

    A Janus head-like bi-cathodic microbial fuel cell was constructed to monitor the electron transfer from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to a woven carbon anode. The experiments were conducted during an ethanol cultivation of 170 g/l glucose in the presence and absence of yeast-peptone medium. First, using a basic fuel-cell type activity sensor, it was shown that yeast-peptone medium contains electroactive compounds. For this purpose, 1% solutions of soy peptone and yeast extract were subjected to oxidative conditions, using a microbial fuel cell set-up corresponding to a typical galvanic cell, consisting of culture medium in the anodic half-cell and 0.5 M K(3)Fe(CN)(6) in the cathodic half-cell. Second, using a bi-cathodic microbial fuel cell, it was shown that electrons were transferred from yeast cells to the carbon anode. The participation of electroactive compounds in the electron transport was separated as background current. This result was verified by applying medium-free conditions, where only glucose was fed, confirming that electrons are transferred from yeast cells to the woven carbon anode. Knowledge about the electron transfer through the cell membrane is of importance in amperometric online monitoring of yeast fermentations and for electricity production with microbial fuel cells. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Effect of heat treatment on brewer's yeast fermentation activity

    OpenAIRE

    Kharandiuk, Tetiana; Kosiv, Ruslana; Palianytsia, Liubov; Berezovska, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    The influence of temperature treatment of brewer's yeast strain Saflager W-34/70 at temperatures of -17, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 °C on their fermentative activity was studied. It was established that the freezing of yeast leads to a decrease of fermentation activity in directly proportional to the duration way. Fermentative activity of yeast samples can be increased by 20-24% by heat treatment at 35 °C during 15-30 minutes.

  7. Using Microsatellites to Identify Yeast Strains in Beer

    OpenAIRE

    Bruke, Alexandria; Van Brocklin, Jennifer; Rivest, Jason; Prenni, Jessica E.; Ibrahim, Hend

    2012-01-01

    Yeast is an integral part of the brewing process and is responsible for much of the taste and characteristics of beer. During the brewing process, yeast is subject to ageing and stress factors that can result in growth inhibition, decreased genetic stability, and changes in cell membrane stability. Characterization of yeast species used in industrial fermentation (e.g. S. cerevisiae) is of great importance to the brewing industry. The objective of this study was to develop an assay to identif...

  8. Yeast replicative aging: a paradigm for defining conserved longevity interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Wasko, Brian M.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2013-01-01

    The finite replicative life span of budding yeast mother cells was demonstrated as early as 1959, but the idea that budding yeast could be used to model aging of multicellular eukaryotes did not enter the scientific mainstream until relatively recently. Despite continued skepticism by some, there are now abundant data that several interventions capable of extending yeast replicative life span have a similar effect in multicellular eukaryotes including nematode worms, fruit flies, and rodents....

  9. Yeast species associated with the spontaneous fermentation of cider.

    OpenAIRE

    Suárez, Belén; Pando, Rosa; Fernández, Norman; Querol, Amparo; Rodríguez, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of cider-making technology (pneumatic and traditional pressing) on the dynamics of wild yeast populations. Yeast colonies isolated from apple juice before and throughout fermentation at a cider cellar of Asturias (Spain), during two consecutive years were studied. The yeast strains were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the 5.8S rRNA gene and the two flanking internal transcribed sequences (ITS). The musts obtained by ...

  10. Probiotic properties of yeasts occurring in fermented food and beverages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Lene

    Besides being able to improve the quality and safety of many fermented food and beverages some yeasts offer a number of probiotic traits. Especially a group of yeast referred to as "Saccharomyces boulardii", though taxonomically belonging to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been claimed to have...... probiotic properties. Besides, yeasts naturally occurring globally in food and beverages will have traits that might have a positive impact on human health....

  11. Study on ionizing radiosensitivity of respiratory deficiency yeast mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Shuhong; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Jin Genming; Wei Zengquan; Xie Hongmei

    2006-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of respiratory deficiency yeast mutants has been studied in this work. The mutants which were screened from the yeasts after ionizing irradiation were irradiated with 12 C 6+ at different doses. Because of the great change in its mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA, the respiratory deficiency yeast mutants show radio-sensitivity at dose less than 1 Gy and radioresistance at doses higher than 1 Gy. (authors)

  12. Aboveground Deadwood Deposition Supports Development of Soil Yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Wehde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Unicellular saprobic fungi (yeasts inhabit soils worldwide. Although yeast species typically occupy defined areas on the biome scale, their distribution patterns within a single type of vegetation, such as forests, are more complex. In order to understand factors that shape soil yeast communities, soils collected underneath decaying wood logs and under forest litter were analyzed. We isolated and identified molecularly a total of 25 yeast species, including three new species. Occurrence and distribution of yeasts isolated from these soils provide new insights into ecology and niche specialization of several soil-borne species. Although abundance of typical soil yeast species varied among experimental plots, the analysis of species abundance and community composition revealed a strong influence of wood log deposition and leakage of organic carbon. Unlike soils underneath logs, yeast communities in adjacent areas harbored a considerable number of transient (phylloplane-related yeasts reaching 30% of the total yeast quantity. We showed that distinguishing autochthonous community members and species transient in soils is essential to estimate appropriate effects of environmental factors on soil fungi. Furthermore, a better understanding of species niches is crucial for analyses of culture-independent data, and may hint to the discovery of unifying patterns of microbial species distribution.

  13. The ecology of the Drosophila-yeast mutualism in wineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is preferentially found on fermenting fruits. The yeasts that dominate the microbial communities of these substrates are the primary food source for developing D. melanogaster larvae, and adult flies manifest a strong olfactory system-mediated attraction for the volatile compounds produced by these yeasts during fermentation. Although most work on this interaction has focused on the standard laboratory yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a wide variety of other yeasts naturally ferment fallen fruit. Here we address the open question of whether D. melanogaster preferentially associates with distinct yeasts in different, closely-related environments. We characterized the spatial and temporal dynamics of Drosophila-associated fungi in Northern California wineries that use organic grapes and natural fermentation using high-throughput, short-amplicon sequencing. We found that there is nonrandom structure in the fungal communities that are vectored by flies both between and within vineyards. Within wineries, the fungal communities associated with flies in cellars, fermentation tanks, and pomace piles are distinguished by varying abundances of a small number of yeast species. To investigate the origins of this structure, we assayed Drosophila attraction to, oviposition on, larval development in, and longevity when consuming the yeasts that distinguish vineyard microhabitats from each other. We found that wild fly lines did not respond differentially to the yeast species that distinguish winery habitats in habitat specific manner. Instead, this subset of yeast shares traits that make them attractive to and ensure their close association with Drosophila. PMID:29768432

  14. Effect of fungicides on epiphytic yeasts associated with strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debode, Jane; Van Hemelrijck, Wendy; Creemers, Piet; Maes, Martine

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effect of two commonly used fungicides on the epiphytic yeast community of strawberry. Greenhouse and field experiments were conducted applying Switch (cyprodinil plus fludioxonil) or Signum (boscalid plus pyraclostrobin) to strawberry plants. Yeasts on leaves and fruits were assessed on treated and untreated plants at several time points via plating and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. The yeast counts on plates of the treated plants were similar to the control plants. Unripe fruits had 10 times larger yeast concentrations than ripe fruits or leaves. Some dominant yeast types were isolated and in vitro tests showed that they were at least 10 times less sensitive to Switch and Signum as compared with two important fungal strawberry pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum acutatum, which are the targets for the fungicide control. DGGE analysis showed that the applied fungicides had no effect on the composition of the yeast communities, while the growing system, strawberry tissue, and sampling time did affect the yeast communities. The yeast species most commonly identified were Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, and Sporobolomyces. These results point toward the potential applicability of natural occurring yeast antagonists into an integrated disease control strategy for strawberry diseases.

  15. Electricity production from microbial fuel cell by using yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorasingha, A.; Souvakon, C.; Boonchom, K.

    2006-01-01

    The continuous search for methods to generate electricity from renewable sources such as water, solar energy, wind, nuclear or chemicals was discussed with particular focus on attaining the full power of the microbial fuel cell (MFC). Under ideal environmental conditions, the only byproducts of a biofuel cell would be water and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The production of energy from renewables such as biomass is important for sustainable development and reducing global emissions of CO 2 . Hydrogen can also be an important component of an energy infrastructure that reduces CO 2 emissions if the hydrogen is produced from renewable sources and used in fuel cells. Hydrogen gas can be biologically produced at high concentration from the fermentation of high sugar substrates such as glucose and sucrose. Some of the issues of MFC design were addressed, including the use of cheap substrates to derive microbial electricity. In the MFC, yeast donates electrons to a chemical electron mediator, which in turn transfers the electrons to an electrode, producing electricity. Experimental results showed that glucose yielded the highest peak voltage, but a semi-processed sugar and molasses were similar to glucose in the electricity production pattern. It was noted that this technology is only at the research stages, and more research is needed before household microbial fuel cells can be made available for producing power for prolonged periods of time. Future research efforts will focus on increasing the efficiency, finding alternatives to hazardous electron mediators and finding new microbes. 12 refs., 6 figs

  16. Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Illustrated by the example of the FRG's nuclear energy exports, it is shown that the nuclear technology transfer leads to new dimensions of intergovernmental relations, which hold within themselves on account of multiple state-to-state, scientific, industrial and - last but not least - personal contacts the chance of far-reaching friendships between countries and people. If the chance is taken, this can also be seen as an important contribution towards maintaining the peace. (orig.) [de

  17. Unravel lipid accumulation mechanism in oleaginous yeast through single cell systems biology study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Shiyou; Xiaoliang, Xie

    2017-12-18

    transcriptional profiles at the single-cell level, as follows: 1) We developed hyperspectral Stimulated Raman Scattering (hsSRS) microscope tailored for fast chemical imaging in complex biological systems. It features high numerical aperture of 1.4 for better spatial resolution and reduced cross-phase modulation. The femtosecond infrared laser was selected for deeper penetration and less photodamage for longer in-situ imaging time. hsSRS was achieved through spectral focusing where two femtosecond laser beams were linearly chirped to create overlapping pulses in time domain. We achieved transformed limited spectral resolution of ~15cm for superior clarity in identifying different types of lipids. A set of sophisticated algorithms based on Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR) was developed to analyze yeast images and track droplets. 2) Lipid production was carried out on selected oleaginous yeast strains. Lipid accumulation was studied in R. glutinis and Y. lipolytica grown in regular and nitrogen starvation media. hsSRS imaging of lipid droplets showed considerable variation among individual Y. lipolytica cells regarding volume and composition, while the R. glutins lipid droplet showed similar Raman response representing more homogenous lipid production. hsSRS analysis revealed the spatial distribution of two major lipids-TAG and sterol ester (SE)- where TAG formed cores were surrounded by SE shells. Significantly elevated level of SE/TAG was observed at cellular and sub-cellular levels which could be attributed to epigenetic variation in cell development. 3) Yeast growth conditions were studied based on their lipid droplets formation. Optimal condition was found in two-stage grown media where the yeast was grown in regular YEPD and transferred to nitrogen starvation media after maturation. The volume and composition of lipid droplets vary significantly depending on the availability of nitrogen source. Large number of cells have been fast screened and analyzed by custom

  18. Phenylalanine 445 within oxidosqualene-lanosterol cyclase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae influences C-Ring cyclization and deprotonation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tung-Kung; Liu, Yuan-Ting; Chiu, Feng-Hsuan; Chang, Cheng-Hsiang

    2006-10-12

    [reaction: see text] We describe the Saccharomyces cerevisiae oxidosqualene-lanosterol cyclase Phe445 site-saturated mutants that generate truncated tricyclic and altered deprotonation product profiles. Among these mutants, only polar side-chain group substitutions genetically complemented yeast viability and produced spatially related product diversity, supporting the Johnson model that cation-pi interactions between a carbocationic intermediate and an enzyme can be replaced by an electrostatic or polar side chain to stabilize the cationic intermediate, but with product differentiation.

  19. Development of a Widely Usable Amino Acid Tracer: ⁷⁶Br-α-Methyl-Phenylalanine for Tumor PET Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Yurika; Yamaguchi, Aiko; Watanabe, Shigeki; Uehara, Tomoya; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Ishioka, Noriko S; Tsushima, Yoshito; Endo, Keigo; Arano, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    Radiolabeled amino acids are superior PET tracers for the imaging of malignant tumors, and amino acids labeled with (76)Br, an attractive positron emitter because of its relatively long half-life (16.2 h), could potentially be a widely usable tumor imaging tracer. In this study, in consideration of its stability and tumor specificity, we designed two (76)Br-labeled amino acid derivatives, 2-(76)Br-bromo-α-methyl-l-phenylalanine (2-(76)Br-BAMP) and 4-(76)Br-bromo-α-methyl-l-phenylalanine (4-(76)Br-BAMP), and investigated their potential as tumor imaging agents. Both (76)Br- and (77)Br-labeled amino acid derivatives were prepared. We performed in vitro and in vivo stability studies and cellular uptake studies using the LS180 colon adenocarcinoma cell line. Biodistribution studies in normal mice and in LS180 tumor-bearing mice were performed, and the tumors were imaged with a small-animal PET scanner. Both (77)Br-BAMPs were stable in the plasma and in the murine body. Although both (77)Br-BAMPs were taken up by LS180 cells and the uptake was inhibited by L-type amino acid transporter 1 inhibitors, 2-(77)Br-BAMP exhibited higher uptake than 4-(77)Br-BAMP. In the biodistribution studies, 2-(77)Br-BAMP showed more rapid blood clearance and lower renal accumulation than 4-(77)Br-BAMP. More than 90% of the injected radioactivity was excreted in the urine by 6 h after the injection of 2-(77)Br-BAMP. High tumor accumulation of 2-(77)Br-BAMP was observed in tumor-bearing mice, and PET imaging with 2-(76)Br-BAMP enabled clear visualization of the tumors. 2-(77)Br-BAMP exhibited preferred pharmacokinetics and high LS180 tumor accumulation, and 2-(76)Br-BAMP enabled clear visualization of the tumors by PET imaging. These findings suggest that 2-(76)Br-BAMP could constitute a potential new PET tracer for tumor imaging and may eventually enable the wider use of amino acid tracers. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  20. Identification of a highly conserved valine-glycine-phenylalanine amino acid triplet required for HIV-1 Nef function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meuwissen Pieter J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Nef protein of HIV facilitates virus replication and disease progression in infected patients. This role as pathogenesis factor depends on several genetically separable Nef functions that are mediated by interactions of highly conserved protein-protein interaction motifs with different host cell proteins. By studying the functionality of a series of nef alleles from clinical isolates, we identified a dysfunctional HIV group O Nef in which a highly conserved valine-glycine-phenylalanine (VGF region, which links a preceding acidic cluster with the following proline-rich motif into an amphipathic surface was deleted. In this study, we aimed to study the functional importance of this VGF region. Results The dysfunctional HIV group O8 nef allele was restored to the consensus sequence, and mutants of canonical (NL4.3, NA-7, SF2 and non-canonical (B2 and C1422 HIV-1 group M nef alleles were generated in which the amino acids of the VGF region were changed into alanines (VGF→AAA and tested for their capacity to interfere with surface receptor trafficking, signal transduction and enhancement of viral replication and infectivity. We found the VGF motif, and each individual amino acid of this motif, to be critical for downregulation of MHC-I and CXCR4. Moreover, Nef’s association with the cellular p21-activated kinase 2 (PAK2, the resulting deregulation of cofilin and inhibition of host cell actin remodeling, and targeting of Lck kinase to the trans-golgi-network (TGN were affected as well. Of particular interest, VGF integrity was essential for Nef-mediated enhancement of HIV virion infectivity and HIV replication in peripheral blood lymphocytes. For targeting of Lck kinase to the TGN and viral infectivity, especially the phenylalanine of the triplet was essential. At the molecular level, the VGF motif was required for the physical interaction of the adjacent proline-rich motif with Hck. Conclusion Based on these findings, we

  1. Transfer Zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Daniel; Wilson, Karl A; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The technique described here, transfer zymography, was developed to overcome two limitations of conventional zymography. When proteolytic enzymes are resolved by nonreducing SDS-PAGE into a polyacrylamide gel with copolymerized protein substrate, the presence of the protein substrate can result in anomalous, often slower, migration of the protease and an estimated mass higher than its actual mass. A further drawback is that the presence of a high background of substrate protein interferes with proteomic analysis of the protease band by excision, tryptic digestion, and LC-MS/MS analysis. In transfer zymography, the proteolytic enzymes are resolved by conventional nonreducing SDS-PAGE, without protein substrate in the gel. The proteins in the resolving gel are then electrophoretically transferred to a receiving gel that contains the protein substrate, by a process similar to western blotting. The receiving gel is then processed in a manner similar to conventional zymography. SDS is removed by Triton X-100 and incubated in conditions suitable for the proteolytic activity. After protein staining, followed by destaining, bands representing regions with active protease are visualized as clear bands in a darkly stained background. For proteomic analysis, electrophoresis is carried out simultaneously on a second resolving gel, and the bands corresponding to the clear regions in the receiving gel after zymogram development are excised for proteomic analysis.

  2. Liquid holding recovery kinetics in yeast cells with regard to radiation quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Byoung Hun; Petin, Vladislav G.

    2004-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the RBE of ionizing radiation with a high linear energy transfer (LET) is dependent both on the increased probability of primary damage production (physical events) and the reduced ability of a cell for post-irradiation recovery (biological events). A relatively unexpected role of the specific repair pathways in the RBE of high-LET radiation was demonstrated for bacterial, yeast and mammalian cells. It seems to exist a common agreement that high-LET radiations produce more portion of damage that are considered to be irreversible compared with low-LET radiation such as photons. Cellular recovery and repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) could be also dependent upon radiation quality. Studies concerning the rate of the recovery and repair from radiation damage produced with low- and high-LET radiations in cells of various origins on the survival and macromolecular level have also revealed that in general at a high ionization density, these processes may be reduced or even absent. When irradiated yeast cells are held in a liquid non-nutrient media at 30 .deg. C before planting on to a growth medium, their survival increases. This phenomena is known as liquid holding recovery (LHR). A quantitative approach describing the LHR kinetics of the yeast cells was described, which enables the estimation of the probability of the recovery per unit time and the fraction of the irreversible damage. The main goals of this study were (i) to answer the question whether or not high-LET radiation affects the recovery process itself or if it only produces a higher level of severe irreversible damage that cannot be repaired at all; (ii) to elucidate the role of irreversible damage and the probability of recovery in some rad mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, the liquid-holing recovery will serve as an indicator of the cellular repair activity

  3. The number and transmission of [PSI] prion seeds (Propagons in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee J Byrne

    Full Text Available Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae prions are efficiently propagated and the on-going generation and transmission of prion seeds (propagons to daughter cells during cell division ensures a high degree of mitotic stability. The reversible inhibition of the molecular chaperone Hsp104p by guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl results in cell division-dependent elimination of yeast prions due to a block in propagon generation and the subsequent dilution out of propagons by cell division.Analysing the kinetics of the GdnHCl-induced elimination of the yeast [PSI+] prion has allowed us to develop novel statistical models that aid our understanding of prion propagation in yeast cells. Here we describe the application of a new stochastic model that allows us to estimate more accurately the mean number of propagons in a [PSI+] cell. To achieve this accuracy we also experimentally determine key cell reproduction parameters and show that the presence of the [PSI+] prion has no impact on these key processes. Additionally, we experimentally determine the proportion of propagons transmitted to a daughter cell and show this reflects the relative cell volume of mother and daughter cells at cell division.While propagon generation is an ATP-driven process, the partition of propagons to daughter cells occurs by passive transfer via the distribution of cytoplasm. Furthermore, our new estimates of n(0, the number of propagons per cell (500-1000, are some five times higher than our previous estimates and this has important implications for our understanding of the inheritance of the [PSI+] and the spontaneous formation of prion-free cells.

  4. Specificity of the Acute Tryptophan and Tyrosine Plus Phenylalanine Depletion and Loading Tests I. Review of Biochemical Aspects and Poor Specificity of Current Amino Acid Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla A.-B. Badawy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The acute tryptophan or tyrosine plus phenylalanine depletion and loading tests are powerful tools for studying the roles of serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline in normal subjects and those with behavioural disorders. The current amino acid formulations for these tests, however, are associated with undesirable decreases in ratios of tryptophan or tyrosine plus phenylalanine to competing amino acids resulting in loss of specificity. This could confound biochemical and behavioural findings. Compositions of current formulations are reviewed, the biochemical principles underpinning the tests are revisited and examples of unintended changes in the above ratios and their impact on monoamine function and behaviour will be demonstrated from data in the literature. The presence of excessive amounts of the 3 branched-chain amino acids Leu, Ile and Val is responsible for these unintended decreases and the consequent loss of specificity. Strategies for enhancing the specificity of the different formulations are proposed.

  5. Specificity of the Acute Tryptophan and Tyrosine plus Phenylalanine Depletion and Loading Tests I. Review of Biochemical Aspects and Poor Specificity of Current Amino Acid Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla A.-B. Badawy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The acute tryptophan or tyrosine plus phenylalanine depletion and loading tests are powerful tools for studying the roles of serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline in normal subjects and those with behavioural disorders. The current amino acid formulations for these tests, however, are associated with undesirable decreases in ratios of tryptophan or tyrosine plus phenylalanine to competing amino acids resulting in loss of specificity. This could confound biochemical and behavioural findings. Compositions of current formulations are reviewed, the biochemical principles underpinning the tests are revisited and examples of unintended changes in the above ratios and their impact on monoamine function and behaviour will be demonstrated from data in the literature. The presence of excessive amounts of the 3 branched-chain amino acids Leu, Ile and Val is responsible for these unintended decreases and the consequent loss of specificity. Strategies for enhancing the specificity of the different formulations are proposed.

  6. Specificity of the Acute Tryptophan and Tyrosine Plus Phenylalanine Depletion and Loading Tests Part II: Normalisation of the Tryptophan and the Tyrosine Plus Phenylalanine to Competing Amino Acid Ratios in a New Control Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla A.-B. Badawy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Current formulations for acute tryptophan (Trp or tyrosine (Tyr plus phenylalanine (Phe depletion and loading cause undesirable decreases in ratios of Trp or Tyr + Phe to competing amino acids (CAA, thus undermining the specificities of these tests. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA cause these unintended decreases, and lowering their content in a new balanced control formulation in the present study led to normalization of all ratios. Four groups (n = 12 each of adults each received one of four 50 g control formulations, with 0% (traditional, 20%, 30%, or 40% less of the BCAA. The free and total [Trp]/[CAA] and [Phe + Tyr]/[BCAA + Trp] ratios all decreased significantly during the first 5 h following the traditional formulation, but were fully normalized by the formulation containing 40% less of the BCAA. We recommend the latter as a balanced control formulation and propose adjustments in the depletion and loading formulations to enhance their specificities for 5-HT and the catecholamines.

  7. Genetically modified yeast species and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajgarhia, Vineet [Kingsport, TN; Koivuranta, Kari [Helsinki, FI; Penttila, Merja [Helsinki, FI; Ilmen, Marja [Helsinki, FI; Suominen, Pirkko [Maple Grove, MN; Aristidou, Aristos [Maple Grove, MN; Miller, Christopher Kenneth [Cottage Grove, MN; Olson, Stacey [St. Bonifacius, MN; Ruohonen, Laura [Helsinki, FI

    2011-05-17

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications', include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  8. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YFR015C, YLR258W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yeast homolog; expression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entr...n synthase, similar to Gsy1p; expression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen ...; expression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, environmental stress, and entry into statio...ogen synthase, similar to Gsy1p; expression induced by glucose limitation, nitrogen starvation, heat shock,

  9. Yeast cell differentiation: Lessons from pathogenic and non-pathogenic yeasts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pálková, Z.; Váchová, Libuše

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 57, SEP (2016), s. 110-119 ISSN 1084-9521 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-08605S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Pathogenic yeasts * Biofilms and colonies * Cell differentiation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 6.614, year: 2016

  10. Genetically modified yeast species, and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajgarhia, Vineet [Kingsport, TN; Koivuranta, Kari [Helsinki, FI; Penttila, Merja [Helsinki, FI; Ilmen, Marja [Helsinki, FI; Suominen, Pirkko [Maple Grove, MN; Aristidou, Aristos [Maple Grove, MN; Miller, Christopher Kenneth [Cottage Grove, MN; Olson, Stacey [St. Bonifacius, MN; Ruohonen, Laura [Helsinki, FI

    2014-01-07

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications include deletion of non-specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  11. Genetically modified yeast species, and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajgarhia, Vineet; Koivuranta, Kari; Penttila, Merja; Ilmen, Marja; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Miller, Christopher Kenneth; Olson, Stacey; Ruohonen, Laura

    2017-09-12

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  12. Genetically modified yeast species, and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajgarhia, Vineet; Koivuranta, Kari; Penttila, Merja; Ilmen, Marja; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Miller, Christopher Kenneth; Olson, Stacey; Ruohonen, Laura

    2016-08-09

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  13. Genetically modified yeast species and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajgarhia, Vineet [Kingsport, TN; Koivuranta, Kari [Helsinki, FI; Penttila, Merja [Helsinki, FI; Ilmen, Marja [Helsinki, FI; Suominen, Pirkko [Maple Grove, MN; Aristidou, Aristos [Maple Grove, MN; Miller, Christopher Kenneth [Cottage Grove, MN; Olson, Stacey [St. Bonifacius, MN; Ruohonen, Laura [Helsinki, FI

    2011-05-17

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications', include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  14. Genetically modified yeast species, and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajgarhia, Vineet; Koivuranta, Kari; Penttila, Merja; Ilmen, Marja; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Miller, Christopher Kenneth; Olson, Stacey; Ruohonen, Laura

    2013-05-14

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  15. Yeast production from cellulase hydrolyzed furfural industrial waste. II. Conditions for the cultivation of yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Three yeast strains, Candida AS 2-121, C. utilis AS 2-1180, and C. tropicalis AS 2-637 were selected as being capable of growing on cellulase-hydrolyzed furfural industrial waste. Cell mass yields with respect to C source were approximately 50%. Fermentation conditions are given.

  16. Utilization of spent brewer’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of yeast enzymatic hydrolysate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bayarjargal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spent brewer’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a rich source of protein, vitamins and widely used as a raw material for production of food supplements. The autolysis and enzymatic treatment of spent brewer’s yeast using Pancreatin (2.5% and Flavourzyme (2.5% were performed at 45 °C and 50 °C, respectively. The autolysis and hydrolysis processes were evaluated by determining a soluble solids, soluble protein concentration and α-amino nitrogen content in a reaction mixture. The yield of pancreatic digest and α-amino nitrogen content was high in comparison with autolysis and Flavourzyme treatment. The total solids recovery in dry Yeast hydrolysate was about 50%, a protein and α-amino nitrogen content was 55.9 and 4.8%, respectively. These results show the possibility of utilizing the spent brewer’s yeast as hydrolysate using hydrolytic enzymes and use it as a food supplement after biological experiments.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5564/mjc.v12i0.179 Mongolian Journal of Chemistry Vol.12 2011: 88-91

  17. Studying Functions of All Yeast Genes Simultaneously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor; Eason, Robert G.; Poumand, Nader; Herman, Zelek S.; Davis, Ronald W.; Anthony Kevin; Jejelowo, Olufisayo

    2006-01-01

    A method of studying the functions of all the genes of a given species of microorganism simultaneously has been developed in experiments on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (commonly known as baker's or brewer's yeast). It is already known that many yeast genes perform functions similar to those of corresponding human genes; therefore, by facilitating understanding of yeast genes, the method may ultimately also contribute to the knowledge needed to treat some diseases in humans. Because of the complexity of the method and the highly specialized nature of the underlying knowledge, it is possible to give only a brief and sketchy summary here. The method involves the use of unique synthetic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences that are denoted as DNA bar codes because of their utility as molecular labels. The method also involves the disruption of gene functions through deletion of genes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a particularly powerful experimental system in that multiple deletion strains easily can be pooled for parallel growth assays. Individual deletion strains recently have been created for 5,918 open reading frames, representing nearly all of the estimated 6,000 genetic loci of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Tagging of each deletion strain with one or two unique 20-nucleotide sequences enables identification of genes affected by specific growth conditions, without prior knowledge of gene functions. Hybridization of bar-code DNA to oligonucleotide arrays can be used to measure the growth rate of each strain over several cell-division generations. The growth rate thus measured serves as an index of the fitness of the strain.

  18. How does yeast respond to pressure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes P.M.B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The brewing and baking yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used as a model for stress response studies of eukaryotic cells. In this review we focus on the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP on S. cerevisiae. HHP exerts a broad effect on yeast cells characteristic of common stresses, mainly associated with protein alteration and lipid bilayer phase transition. Like most stresses, pressure induces cell cycle arrest. Below 50 MPa (500 atm yeast cell morphology is unaffected whereas above 220 MPa wild-type cells are killed. S. cerevisiae cells can acquire barotolerance if they are pretreated with a sublethal stress due to temperature, ethanol, hydrogen peroxide, or pressure. Nevertheless, pressure only leads to protection against severe stress if, after pressure pretreatment, the cells are also re-incubated at room pressure. We attribute this effect to the inhibition of the protein synthesis apparatus under HHP. The global genome expression analysis of S. cerevisiae cells submitted to HHP revealed a stress response profile. The majority of the up-regulated genes are involved in stress defense and carbohydrate metabolism while most repressed genes belong to the cell cycle progression and protein synthesis categories. However, the signaling pathway involved in the pressure response is still to be elucidated. Nitric oxide, a signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions, confers baroprotection. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae cells in the early exponential phase submitted to 50-MPa pressure show induction of the expression level of the nitric oxide synthase inducible isoform. As pressure becomes an important biotechnological tool, studies concerning this kind of stress in microorganisms are imperative.

  19. Specificity of transmembrane protein palmitoylation in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelén González Montoro

    Full Text Available Many proteins are modified after their synthesis, by the addition of a lipid molecule to one or more cysteine residues, through a thioester bond. This modification is called S-acylation, and more commonly palmitoylation. This reaction is carried out by a family of enzymes, called palmitoyltransferases (PATs, characterized by the presence of a conserved 50- aminoacids domain called "Asp-His-His-Cys- Cysteine Rich Domain" (DHHC-CRD. There are 7 members of this family in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and each of these proteins is thought to be responsible for the palmitoylation of a subset of substrates. Substrate specificity of PATs, however, is not yet fully understood. Several yeast PATs seem to have overlapping specificity, and it has been proposed that the machinery responsible for palmitoylating peripheral membrane proteins in mammalian cells, lacks specificity altogether.Here we investigate the specificity of transmembrane protein palmitoylation in S. cerevisiae, which is carried out predominantly by two PATs, Swf1 and Pfa4. We show that palmitoylation of transmembrane substrates requires dedicated PATs, since other yeast PATs are mostly unable to perform Swf1 or Pfa4 functions, even when overexpressed. Furthermore, we find that Swf1 is highly specific for its substrates, as it is unable to substitute for other PATs. To identify where Swf1 specificity lies, we carried out a bioinformatics survey to identify amino acids responsible for the determination of specificity or Specificity Determination Positions (SDPs and showed experimentally, that mutation of the two best SDP candidates, A145 and K148, results in complete and partial loss of function, respectively. These residues are located within the conserved catalytic DHHC domain suggesting that it could also be involved in the determination of specificity. Finally, we show that modifying the position of the cysteines in Tlg1, a Swf1 substrate, results in lack of palmitoylation, as

  20. Population FBA predicts metabolic phenotypes in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Labhsetwar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Using protein counts sampled from single cell proteomics distributions to constrain fluxes through a genome-scale model of metabolism, Population flux balance analysis (Population FBA successfully described metabolic heterogeneity in a population of independent Escherichia coli cells growing in a defined medium. We extend the methodology to account for correlations in protein expression arising from the co-regulation of genes and apply it to study the growth of independent Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in two different growth media. We find the partitioning of flux between fermentation and respiration predicted by our model agrees with recent 13C fluxomics experiments, and that our model largely recovers the Crabtree effect (the experimentally known bias among certain yeast species toward fermentation with the production of ethanol even in the presence of oxygen, while FBA without proteomics constraints predicts respirative metabolism almost exclusively. The comparisons to the 13C study showed improvement upon inclusion of the correlations and motivated a technique to systematically identify inconsistent kinetic parameters in the literature. The minor secretion fluxes for glycerol and acetate are underestimated by our method, which indicate a need for further refinements to the metabolic model. For yeast cells grown in synthetic defined (SD medium, the calculated broad distribution of growth rates matches experimental observations from single cell studies, and we characterize several metabolic phenotypes within our modeled populations that make use of diverse pathways. Fast growing yeast cells are predicted to perform significant amount of respiration, use serine-glycine cycle and produce ethanol in mitochondria as opposed to slow growing cells. We use a genetic algorithm to determine the proteomics constraints necessary to reproduce the growth rate distributions seen experimentally. We find that a core set of 51 constraints are essential but