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Sample records for yeast mutants defective

  1. A Yeast Mutant Deleted of GPH1 Bears Defects in Lipid Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Gsell

    Full Text Available In a previous study we demonstrated up-regulation of the yeast GPH1 gene under conditions of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE depletion caused by deletion of the mitochondrial (M phosphatidylserine decarboxylase 1 (PSD1 (Gsell et al., 2013, PLoS One. 8(10:e77380. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0077380. Gph1p has originally been identified as a glycogen phosphorylase catalyzing degradation of glycogen to glucose in the stationary growth phase of the yeast. Here we show that deletion of this gene also causes decreased levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC, triacylglycerols and steryl esters. Depletion of the two non-polar lipids in a Δgph1 strain leads to lack of lipid droplets, and decrease of the PC level results in instability of the plasma membrane. In vivo labeling experiments revealed that formation of PC via both pathways of biosynthesis, the cytidine diphosphate (CDP-choline and the methylation route, is negatively affected by a Δgph1 mutation, although expression of genes involved is not down regulated. Altogether, Gph1p besides its function as a glycogen mobilizing enzyme appears to play a regulatory role in yeast lipid metabolism.

  2. Submitochondrial distributions and stabilities of subunits 4, 5, and 6 of yeast cytochrome oxidase in assembly defective mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glerum, D M; Tzagoloff, A

    1997-08-04

    The concentration and submitochondrial distribution of the subunit polypeptides of cytochrome oxidase have been studied in wild type yeast and in different mutants impaired in assembly of this respiratory complex. All the subunit polypeptides of the enzyme are associated with mitochondrial membranes of wild type cells, except for a small fraction of subunits 4 and 6 that is recovered in the soluble protein fraction of mitochondria. Cytochrome oxidase mutants consistently display a severe reduction in the steady-state concentration of subunit 1 due to its increased turnover. As a consequence, most of subunit 4, which normally is associated with subunit 1, is found in the soluble fraction. A similar shift from membrane-bound to soluble subunit 6 is seen in mutants blocked in expression of subunit 5a. In contrast, null mutations in COX6 coding for subunit 6 promote loss of subunit 5a. The absence of subunit 5a in the cox6 mutant is the result of proteolytic degradation rather than regulation of its expression by subunit 6. The possible role of the ATP-dependent proteases Rca1p and Afg3p in proteolysis of subunits 1 and 5a has been assessed in strains with combined mutations in COX6, RCA1, and/or AFG3. Immunochemical assays indicate that another protease(s) must be responsible for most of the proteolytic loss of these proteins.

  3. Suppressor Analysis of CRL4Cdt2 Defective and cdc48-353 Temperature Sensitive Mutants in Fission Yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinova, Irina Nikolaeva

    chaperone-like complex involved in numerous cellular processes, including protein degradation, cell cycle control, DNA repair, and vesicle fusion. The cdc48 gene is essential in fission yeast and mutations or changes in Cdc48/p97 protein expression have been linked to neurological disorders and cancer......SummaryPart 1CRL4Cdt2 E3 ligase is a key regulator of cellular proliferation and genome integrity, as it promotes the degradation of proteins involved in cell cycle progression, DNA replication and repair. In fission yeast the small intrinsically disordered protein Spd1 is targeted for degradation...... that these mutations alleviate the checkpoint dependency, the DNA damage sensitivity and the meiotic defects associated with Spd1 accumulation. Further analysis showed that whereas the V40G and S43L substitutions do not have a significant impact on Suc22R2 nuclear import function of Spd1, they affect the interaction...

  4. Mutant power: using mutant allele collections for yeast functional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Kaitlyn L; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-03-01

    The budding yeast has long served as a model eukaryote for the functional genomic analysis of highly conserved signaling pathways, cellular processes and mechanisms underlying human disease. The collection of reagents available for genomics in yeast is extensive, encompassing a growing diversity of mutant collections beyond gene deletion sets in the standard wild-type S288C genetic background. We review here three main types of mutant allele collections: transposon mutagen collections, essential gene collections and overexpression libraries. Each collection provides unique and identifiable alleles that can be utilized in genome-wide, high-throughput studies. These genomic reagents are particularly informative in identifying synthetic phenotypes and functions associated with essential genes, including those modeled most effectively in complex genetic backgrounds. Several examples of genomic studies in filamentous/pseudohyphal backgrounds are provided here to illustrate this point. Additionally, the limitations of each approach are examined. Collectively, these mutant allele collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans promise insights toward an advanced understanding of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Study on ionizing radiosensitivity of respiratory deficiency yeast mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Shuhong; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Jin Genming; Wei Zengquan; Xie Hongmei

    2006-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of respiratory deficiency yeast mutants has been studied in this work. The mutants which were screened from the yeasts after ionizing irradiation were irradiated with 12 C 6+ at different doses. Because of the great change in its mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA, the respiratory deficiency yeast mutants show radio-sensitivity at dose less than 1 Gy and radioresistance at doses higher than 1 Gy. (authors)

  6. Ethanol production using nuclear petite yeast mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutter, A.; Oliver, S.G. [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, UMIST, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    Two respiratory-deficient nuclear petites, FY23{Delta}pet191 and FY23{Delta}cox5a, of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were generated using polymerase-chain-reaction-mediated gene disruption, and their respective ethanol tolerance and productivity assessed and compared to those of the parental grande, FY23WT, and a mitochondrial petite, FY23{rho}{sup 0}. Batch culture studies demonstrated that the parental strain was the most tolerant to exogenously added ethanol with an inhibition constant. K{sub i}, of 2.3% (w/v) and a specific rate of ethanol production, q{sub p}, of 0.90 g ethanol g dry cells{sup -1} h{sup -1}. FY23{rho}{sup 0} was the most sensitive to ethanol, exhibiting a K{sub i} of 1.71% (w/v) and q{sub p} of 0.87 g ethanol g dry cells{sup -1} h{sup -1}. Analyses of the ethanol tolerance of the nuclear petites demonstrate that functional mitochondria are essential for maintaining tolerance to the toxin with the 100% respiratory-deficient nuclear petite, FY23{Delta}pet191, having a K{sub i} of 2.14% (w/v) and the 85% respiratory-deficient FY23{Delta}cox5a, having a K{sub i} of 1.94% (w/v). The retention of ethanol tolerance in the nuclear petites as compared to that of FY23{rho}{sup 0} is mirrored by the ethanol productivities of these nuclear mutants, being respectively 43% and 30% higher than that of the respiratory-sufficient parent strain. This demonstrates that, because of their respiratory deficiency, the nuclear petites are not subject of the Pasteur effect and so exhibit higher rates of fermentation. (orig.)

  7. An Mcm10 Mutant Defective in ssDNA Binding Shows Defects in DNA Replication Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Arnaiz, Patricia; Kaplan, Daniel L

    2016-11-20

    Mcm10 is an essential protein that functions to initiate DNA replication after the formation of the replication fork helicase. In this manuscript, we identified a budding yeast Mcm10 mutant (Mcm10-m2,3,4) that is defective in DNA binding in vitro. Moreover, this Mcm10-m2,3,4 mutant does not stimulate the phosphorylation of Mcm2 by Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) in vitro. When we expressed wild-type levels of mcm10-m2,3,4 in budding yeast cells, we observed a severe growth defect and a substantially decreased DNA replication. We also observed a substantially reduced replication protein A- chromatin immunoprecipitation signal at origins of replication, reduced levels of DDK-phosphorylated Mcm2, and diminished Go, Ichi, Ni, and San (GINS) association with Mcm2-7 in vivo. mcm5-bob1 bypasses the growth defect conferred by DDK-phosphodead Mcm2 in budding yeast. However, the growth defect observed by expressing mcm10-m2,3,4 is not bypassed by the mcm5-bob1 mutation. Furthermore, origin melting and GINS association with Mcm2-7 are substantially decreased for cells expressing mcm10-m2,3,4 in the mcm5-bob1 background. Thus, the origin melting and GINS-Mcm2-7 interaction defects we observed for mcm10-m2,3,4 are not explained by decreased Mcm2 phosphorylation by DDK, since the defects persist in an mcm5-bob1 background. These data suggest that DNA binding by Mcm10 is essential for the initiation of DNA replication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The DNA repair capability of cdc9, the saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant defective in DNA ligase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, L.H.

    1979-01-01

    The cell cycle mutant, cdc9, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is defective in DNA ligase with the consequence to be deficient in the repair of DNA damaged by methyl methane sulphonate. On the other hand survival of cdc9 after irradiation by γ-rays is little different from that of the wild-type, even after a period of stress at the restrictive temperature. The mutant cdc9 is not allelic with any known rad or mms mutants. (orig./AJ) [de

  9. Chemotaxis-defective mutants of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, D B; Sheridan, R E; Russell, R L

    1975-06-01

    The technique of countercurrent separation has been used to isolate 17 independent chemotaxis-defective mutants of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The mutants, selected to be relatively insensitive to the normally attractive salt NaCl, show varying degrees of residual sensitivity; some are actually weakly repelled by NaCl. The mutants are due to single gene defects, are autosomal and recessive, and identify at least five complementation groups.

  10. Defective Glycinergic Synaptic Transmission in Zebrafish Motility Mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Hirata, Hiromi; Carta, Eloisa; Yamanaka, Iori; Harvey, Robert J.; Kuwada, John Y.

    2010-01-01

    Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Recently, in vivo analysis of glycinergic synaptic transmission has been pursued in zebrafish using molecular genetics. An ENU mutagenesis screen identified two behavioral mutants that are defective in glycinergic synaptic transmission. Zebrafish bandoneon (beo) mutants have a defect in glrbb, one of the duplicated glycine receptor (GlyR) β subunit genes. These mutants exhibit a loss of glycinergic synaptic ...

  11. Defective thymine dimer excision in radiation-sensitive mutants rad10 and rad16 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, L [Rochester Univ., N.Y. (USA). School of Medicine and Dentistry

    1977-04-01

    Two rad mutants of yeast, rad10 and rad16, are shown to be defective in the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers since DNAs obtained from irradiated cells following a post-irradiation incubation in the dark still retain UV-endonuclease-sensitive sites. Both rad10 and rad16 mutants are in the same pathway of excision-repair as the rad1, rad2, rad3, and rad4 mutants.

  12. Defective quiescence entry promotes the fermentation performance of bottom-fermenting brewer's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomuro, Mayu; Kato, Taku; Zhou, Yan; Watanabe, Daisuke; Motoyama, Yasuo; Yamagishi, Hiromi; Akao, Takeshi; Aizawa, Masayuki

    2016-11-01

    One of the key processes in making beer is fermentation. In the fermentation process, brewer's yeast plays an essential role in both the production of ethanol and the flavor profile of beer. Therefore, the mechanism of ethanol fermentation by of brewer's yeast is attracting much attention. The high ethanol productivity of sake yeast has provided a good basis from which to investigate the factors that regulate the fermentation rates of brewer's yeast. Recent studies found that the elevated fermentation rate of sake Saccharomyces cerevisiae species is closely related to a defective transition from vegetative growth to the quiescent (G 0 ) state. In the present study, to clarify the relationship between the fermentation rate of brewer's yeast and entry into G 0 , we constructed two types of mutant of the bottom-fermenting brewer's yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus Weihenstephan 34/70: a RIM15 gene disruptant that was defective in entry into G 0 ; and a CLN3ΔPEST mutant, in which the G 1 cyclin Cln3p accumulated at high levels. Both strains exhibited higher fermentation rates under high-maltose medium or high-gravity wort conditions (20° Plato) as compared with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, G 1 arrest and/or G 0 entry were defective in both the RIM15 disruptant and the CLN3ΔPEST mutant as compared with the wild-type strain. Taken together, these results indicate that regulation of the G 0 /G 1 transition might govern the fermentation rate of bottom-fermenting brewer's yeast in high-gravity wort. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Conversion of defective molasses into alcohol and yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchev, S.

    1966-01-01

    The addition of small quantities (0.05 to 0.75%) of dried malt roots, green malt roots, green malt, yeast hydrolyzate, corn extraction, and tomato juice improved the quality and accelerated the brewing process in defective molasses. Dried malt roots and yeast hydrolyzate were the least expensive preparations.

  14. Chinese hamster ovary cell mutants defective in heparan sulfate biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bame, K.J.; Kiser, C.S.; Esko, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have isolated Chinese hamster ovary cell mutants defective in proteoglycan synthesis by radiographic screening for cells unable to incorporate 35 SO 4 into acid-precipitable material. Some mutants did not incorporate 35 SO 4 into acid-precipitable material, whereas others incorporated about 3-fold less radioactivity. HPLC anion exchange chromatographic analysis of radiolabelled glycosaminoglycans isolated from these mutants revealed many are defective in heparan sulfate biosynthesis. Mutants 803 and 677 do not synthesize heparan sulfate, although they produce chondroitin sulfate: strain 803 makes chondroitin sulfate normally, whereas 677 overaccumulates chondroitin sulfate by a factor of three. These mutants fall into the same complementation group, suggesting that the mutations are allelic. A second group of heparan sulfate biosynthetic mutants, consisting of cell lines 625, 668 and 679, produce undersulfated heparan sulfate and normal chondroitin sulfate. Treatment of the chains with nitrous acid should determine the position of the sulfate groups along the chain. These mutants may define a complementation group that is defective in the enzymes which modify the heparan sulfate chain. To increase the authors repertoire of heparan sulfate mutants, they are presently developing an in situ enzyme assay to screen colonies replica plated on filter discs for sulfotransferase defects

  15. A yeast mutant specifically sensitive to bifunctional alkylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhland, A.; Kircher, M.; Wilborn, F.; Brendel, M.

    1981-01-01

    A mutation that specifically confers sensitivity to bi- and tri-functional alkylating agents is presented. No or little cross-sensitivity to radiation or monofunctional agents could be detected. Sensitivity does not seem to be due to preferential alkylation of mutant DNA as parent and mutant strain exhibit the same amount of DNA alkylation and the same pattern of DNA lesions including interstrand crosslinks. The mutation is due to a defect in a nuclear gene which has been designated SNM1 (sensitive to nitrogen mustard); it may control an important step in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (orig.(AJ)

  16. Nonselective enrichment for yeast adenine mutants by flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, C. V.; Chuba, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of certain adenine biosynthetic mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in a red colony color. This phenomenon has historically provided an ideal genetic marker for the study of mutation, recombination, and aneuploidy in lower eukaryotes by classical genetic analysis. In this paper, it is reported that cells carrying ade1 and/or ade2 mutations exhibit primary fluorescence. Based on this observation, the nonselective enrichment of yeast cultures for viable adenine mutants by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter has been achieved. The advantages of this approach over conventional genetic analysis of mutation, recombination, and mitotic chromosomal stability include speed and accuracy in acquiring data for large numbers of clones. By using appropriate strains, the cell sorter has been used for the isolation of both forward mutations and chromosomal loss events in S. cerevisiae. The resolving power of this system and its noninvasiveness can easily be extended to more complex organisms, including mammalian cells, in which analogous metabolic mutants are available.

  17. Defective glycinergic synaptic transmission in zebrafish motility mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Hirata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Recently, in vivo analysis of glycinergic synaptic transmission has been pursued in zebrafish using molecular genetics. An ENU mutagenesis screen identified two behavioral mutants that are defective in glycinergic synaptic transmission. Zebrafish bandoneon (beo mutants have a defect in glrbb, one of the duplicated glycine receptor (GlyR β subunit genes. These mutants exhibit a loss of glycinergic synaptic transmission due to a lack of synaptic aggregation of GlyRs. Due to the consequent loss of reciprocal inhibition of motor circuits between the two sides of the spinal cord, motor neurons activate simultaneously on both sides resulting in bilateral contraction of axial muscles of beo mutants, eliciting the so-called ‘accordion’ phenotype. Similar defects in GlyR subunit genes have been observed in several mammals and are the basis for human hyperekplexia/startle disease. By contrast, zebrafish shocked (sho mutants have a defect in slc6a9, encoding GlyT1, a glycine transporter that is expressed by astroglial cells surrounding the glycinergic synapse in the hindbrain and spinal cord. GlyT1 mediates rapid uptake of glycine from the synaptic cleft, terminating synaptic transmission. In zebrafish sho mutants, there appears to be elevated extracellular glycine resulting in persistent inhibition of postsynaptic neurons and subsequent reduced motility, causing the ‘twitch once’ phenotype. We review current knowledge regarding zebrafish ‘accordion’ and ‘twitch once’ mutants, including beo and sho, and report the identification of a new α2 subunit that revises the phylogeny of zebrafish GlyRs.

  18. Defective Glycinergic Synaptic Transmission in Zebrafish Motility Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Hiromi; Carta, Eloisa; Yamanaka, Iori; Harvey, Robert J.; Kuwada, John Y.

    2009-01-01

    Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Recently, in vivo analysis of glycinergic synaptic transmission has been pursued in zebrafish using molecular genetics. An ENU mutagenesis screen identified two behavioral mutants that are defective in glycinergic synaptic transmission. Zebrafish bandoneon (beo) mutants have a defect in glrbb, one of the duplicated glycine receptor (GlyR) β subunit genes. These mutants exhibit a loss of glycinergic synaptic transmission due to a lack of synaptic aggregation of GlyRs. Due to the consequent loss of reciprocal inhibition of motor circuits between the two sides of the spinal cord, motor neurons activate simultaneously on both sides resulting in bilateral contraction of axial muscles of beo mutants, eliciting the so-called ‘accordion’ phenotype. Similar defects in GlyR subunit genes have been observed in several mammals and are the basis for human hyperekplexia/startle disease. By contrast, zebrafish shocked (sho) mutants have a defect in slc6a9, encoding GlyT1, a glycine transporter that is expressed by astroglial cells surrounding the glycinergic synapse in the hindbrain and spinal cord. GlyT1 mediates rapid uptake of glycine from the synaptic cleft, terminating synaptic transmission. In zebrafish sho mutants, there appears to be elevated extracellular glycine resulting in persistent inhibition of postsynaptic neurons and subsequent reduced motility, causing the ‘twitch-once’ phenotype. We review current knowledge regarding zebrafish ‘accordion’ and ‘twitch-once’ mutants, including beo and sho, and report the identification of a new α2 subunit that revises the phylogeny of zebrafish GlyRs. PMID:20161699

  19. A nuclear mutation defective in mitochondrial recombination in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, F; Makishima, F; Morishima, N; Shibata, T

    1995-08-15

    Homologous recombination (crossing over and gene conversion) is generally essential for heritage and DNA repair, and occasionally causes DNA aberrations, in nuclei of eukaryotes. However, little is known about the roles of homologous recombination in the inheritance and stability of mitochondrial DNA which is continuously damaged by reactive oxygen species, by-products of respiration. Here, we report the first example of a nuclear recessive mutation which suggests an essential role for homologous recombination in the stable inheritance of mitochondrial DNA. For the detection of this class of mutants, we devised a novel procedure, 'mitochondrial crossing in haploid', which has enabled us to examine many mutant clones. Using this procedure, we examined mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that showed an elevated UV induction of respiration-deficient mutations. We obtained a mutant that was defective in both the omega-intron homing and Endo.SceI-induced homologous gene conversion. We found that the mutant cells are temperature sensitive in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA. A tetrad analysis indicated that elevated UV induction of respiration-deficient mutations, recombination deficiency and temperature sensitivity are all caused by a single nuclear mutation (mhr1) on chromosome XII. The pleiotropic characteristics of the mutant suggest an essential role for the MHR1 gene in DNA repair, recombination and the maintenance of DNA in mitochondria.

  20. Isolation of glutathione-deficient mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistler, M.; Eckardt, F.; Summer, K.-H.

    1986-01-01

    Glutathione-deficient (gsh - ) mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated after UV treatment using MNNG as selective agent. For genetic and biochemical characterization 5 mutant strains were chosen which exhibited considerably decreased residual GSH contents varying from 2 to 6% of the wild-type levels. All 5 isolates showed a 2:2 segregation of the gsh - :GSH + phenotypes alluding to a monogenic recessive mutation. Complementation analysis indicates that all gsh - mutants belong to one complementation group. (Auth.)

  1. Blue ghosts: a new method for isolating amber mutants defective in essential genes of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, S; Brickman, E R; Beckwith, J

    1981-01-01

    We describe a technique which permits an easy screening for amber mutants defective in essential genes of Escherichia coli. Using this approach, we have isolated three amber mutants defective in the rho gene. An extension of the technique allows the detection of ochre mutants and transposon inser...

  2. Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    KAUST Repository

    Papsdorf, Katharina

    2015-09-03

    Background Protein aggregation and its pathological effects are the major cause of several neurodegenerative diseases. In Huntington’s disease an elongated stretch of polyglutamines within the protein Huntingtin leads to increased aggregation propensity. This induces cellular defects, culminating in neuronal loss, but the connection between aggregation and toxicity remains to be established. Results To uncover cellular pathways relevant for intoxication we used genome-wide analyses in a yeast model system and identify fourteen genes that, if deleted, result in higher polyglutamine toxicity. Several of these genes, like UGO1, ATP15 and NFU1 encode mitochondrial proteins, implying that a challenged mitochondrial system may become dysfunctional during polyglutamine intoxication. We further employed microarrays to decipher the transcriptional response upon polyglutamine intoxication, which exposes an upregulation of genes involved in sulfur and iron metabolism and mitochondrial Fe-S cluster formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative growth is impossible after intoxication with the polyglutamine protein. NMR-based metabolic analyses reveal that mitochondrial metabolism is reduced, leading to accumulation of metabolic intermediates in polyglutamine-intoxicated cells. Conclusion These data show that damages to the mitochondrial system occur in polyglutamine intoxicated yeast cells and suggest an intricate connection between polyglutamine-induced toxicity, mitochondrial functionality and iron homeostasis in this model system.

  3. Characterization of mutants of yeast sensitive to x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strike, T.L.

    1978-01-01

    This study deals with the characterization of mutants at the rad50 to rad57 loci selected on the basis of their sensitivity to x rays. They were also examined for sensitivity to uv and mms and for characteristics of mutation induction, heteroallelic reversion (gene conversion), liquid holding recovery from x rays, and sporulation. All the mutants were slightly to moderately sensitive to uv though they did not show the extreme sensitivity of the rad1 to rad22 mutations, and all demonstrated cross sensitivity to both x rays and MMS. If a mutant was very sensitive to x-rays, it was usually very sensitive to MMS also

  4. Regularities of ''rapid'' repair in radiosensitive mutants of diploid yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazunov, A.V.; Kapul'tsevich, Yu.G.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made of ''rapid'' repair in radiosensitive mutants of diploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae after irradiation with ν-quanta and α-particles. It was shown that the capacity of ''rapid'' repair does not always correlate with the ability of ''slow'' postirradiation repair of viability of yeast cells. A conclusion is made that ''rapid'' and ''slow'' repair are independent processes. It was found that ''rapid'' repair of the studied strains of diploid yeast is more effective after exposure to ν-quanta than α-particles

  5. Stress Tolerance in Doughs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Trehalase Mutants Derived from Commercial Baker’s Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Jun; Hino, Akihiro; Yamada-Iyo, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nakajima, Ryouichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Mori, Katsumi; Takano, Hiroyuki

    1999-01-01

    Accumulation of trehalose is widely believed to be a critical determinant in improving the stress tolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is commonly used in commercial bread dough. To retain the accumulation of trehalose in yeast cells, we constructed, for the first time, diploid homozygous neutral trehalase mutants (Δnth1), acid trehalase mutants (Δath1), and double mutants (Δnth1 ath1) by using commercial baker’s yeast strains as the parent strains and the gene disruption method. During fermentation in a liquid fermentation medium, degradation of intracellular trehalose was inhibited with all of the trehalase mutants. The gassing power of frozen doughs made with these mutants was greater than the gassing power of doughs made with the parent strains. The Δnth1 and Δath1 strains also exhibited higher levels of tolerance of dry conditions than the parent strains exhibited; however, the Δnth1 ath1 strain exhibited lower tolerance of dry conditions than the parent strain exhibited. The improved freeze tolerance exhibited by all of the trehalase mutants may make these strains useful in frozen dough. PMID:10388673

  6. Functional analysis of mutant human carnitine acylcarnitine translocases in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJlst, L.; van Roermund, C. W.; Iacobazzi, V.; Oostheim, W.; Ruiter, J. P.; Williams, J. C.; Palmieri, F.; Wanders, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Long chain fatty acids are translocated as carnitine esters across the mitochondrial inner membrane by carnitine acylcarnitine translocase (CACT). We report functional studies on the mutant CACT proteins from a severe and a mild patient with CACT deficiency. CACT activities in fibroblasts of both

  7. Isolation of L-methionine-enriched mutant of a methylotrophic yeast, Candida boidinii No.2201

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Y.; Lim, W.J.; Yang, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    Six strains of methylotrophic yeast were examined for production of L-methionine-enriched cells. Candida boidinii (kloeckera sp.) No. 2201,which accumulated 0.54 mg/g-dry cell weight (DCW) of free L-methionine (pool methionine), was selected as the parental strain for breeding L-methionine-rich mutants. Ethionine-resistant mutants were derived from the strain by UV irradiation. A mutant strain, E500-78,which was resistant to 500 μg/ml of DL-ethionine, accumulated 6.02 mg/g-DCW of pool methionine. The culture conditions for mutant strain E500-78 to increase pool methionine accumulation were optimized. As a result, the mutant strain accumulated 8.80 mg/g-DCW of pool methionine and contained 16.02 mg/g-DCW total methionine

  8. High-content screening of yeast mutant libraries by shotgun lipidomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarasov, Kirill; Stefanko, Adam; Casanovas, Albert

    2014-01-01

    To identify proteins with a functional role in lipid metabolism and homeostasis we designed a high-throughput platform for high-content lipidomic screening of yeast mutant libraries. To this end, we combined culturing and lipid extraction in 96-well format, automated direct infusion...... factor KAR4 precipitated distinct lipid metabolic phenotypes. These results demonstrate that the high-throughput shotgun lipidomics platform is a valid and complementary proxy for high-content screening of yeast mutant libraries....... nanoelectrospray ionization, high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry, and a dedicated data processing framework to support lipid phenotyping across hundreds of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants. Our novel approach revealed that the absence of genes with unknown function YBR141C and YJR015W, and the transcription...

  9. Identification of auxotrophic mutants of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus by non-homologous end joining-mediated integrative transformation with genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarimizu, Tohru; Nonklang, Sanom; Nakamura, Junpei; Tokuda, Shuya; Nakagawa, Takaaki; Lorreungsil, Sasithorn; Sutthikhumpha, Surasit; Pukahuta, Charida; Kitagawa, Takao; Nakamura, Mikiko; Cha-Aim, Kamonchai; Limtong, Savitree; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji

    2013-12-01

    The isolation and application of auxotrophic mutants for gene manipulations, such as genetic transformation, mating selection and tetrad analysis, form the basis of yeast genetics. For the development of these genetic methods in the thermotolerant fermentative yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, we isolated a series of auxotrophic mutants with defects in amino acid or nucleic acid metabolism. To identify the mutated genes, linear DNA fragments of nutrient biosynthetic pathway genes were amplified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomal DNA and used to directly transform the K. marxianus auxotrophic mutants by random integration into chromosomes through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The appearance of transformant colonies indicated that the specific S. cerevisiae gene complemented the K. marxianus mutant. Using this interspecific complementation approach with linear PCR-amplified DNA, we identified auxotrophic mutations of ADE2, ADE5,7, ADE6, HIS2, HIS3, HIS4, HIS5, HIS6, HIS7, LYS1, LYS2, LYS4, LYS9, LEU1, LEU2, MET2, MET6, MET17, TRP3, TRP4 and TRP5 without the labour-intensive requirement of plasmid construction. Mating, sporulation and tetrad analysis techniques for K. marxianus were also established. With the identified auxotrophic mutant strains and S. cerevisiae genes as selective markers, NHEJ-mediated integrative transformation with PCR-amplified DNA is an attractive system for facilitating genetic analyses in the yeast K. marxianus. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The yeast complex I equivalent NADH dehydrogenase rescues pink1 mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Vilain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pink1 is a mitochondrial kinase involved in Parkinson's disease, and loss of Pink1 function affects mitochondrial morphology via a pathway involving Parkin and components of the mitochondrial remodeling machinery. Pink1 loss also affects the enzymatic activity of isolated Complex I of the electron transport chain (ETC; however, the primary defect in pink1 mutants is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ETC deficiency is upstream of other pink1-associated phenotypes. We expressed Saccaromyces cerevisiae Ndi1p, an enzyme that bypasses ETC Complex I, or sea squirt Ciona intestinalis AOX, an enzyme that bypasses ETC Complex III and IV, in pink1 mutant Drosophila and find that expression of Ndi1p, but not of AOX, rescues pink1-associated defects. Likewise, loss of function of subunits that encode for Complex I-associated proteins displays many of the pink1-associated phenotypes, and these defects are rescued by Ndi1p expression. Conversely, expression of Ndi1p fails to rescue any of the parkin mutant phenotypes. Additionally, unlike pink1 mutants, fly parkin mutants do not show reduced enzymatic activity of Complex I, indicating that Ndi1p acts downstream or parallel to Pink1, but upstream or independent of Parkin. Furthermore, while increasing mitochondrial fission or decreasing mitochondrial fusion rescues mitochondrial morphological defects in pink1 mutants, these manipulations fail to significantly rescue the reduced enzymatic activity of Complex I, indicating that functional defects observed at the level of Complex I enzymatic activity in pink1 mutant mitochondria do not arise from morphological defects. Our data indicate a central role for Complex I dysfunction in pink1-associated defects, and our genetic analyses with heterologous ETC enzymes suggest that Ndi1p-dependent NADH dehydrogenase activity largely acts downstream of, or in parallel to, Pink1 but upstream of Parkin and mitochondrial remodeling.

  11. The splicing mutant of the human tumor suppressor protein DFNA5 induces programmed cell death when expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rossom, Sofie; Op de Beeck, Ken; Franssens, Vanessa; Swinnen, Erwin; Schepers, Anne; Ghillebert, Ruben; Caldara, Marina; Van Camp, Guy; Winderickx, Joris

    2012-01-01

    DFNA5 was first identified as a gene responsible for autosomal dominant deafness. Different mutations were found, but they all resulted in exon 8 skipping during splicing and premature termination of the protein. Later, it became clear that the protein also has a tumor suppression function and that it can induce apoptosis. Epigenetic silencing of the DFNA5 gene is associated with different types of cancers, including gastric and colorectal cancers as well as breast tumors. We introduced the wild-type and mutant DFNA5 allele in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression of the wild-type protein was well tolerated by the yeast cells, although the protein was subject of degradation and often deposited in distinct foci when cells entered the diauxic shift. In contrast, cells had problems to cope with mutant DFNA5 and despite an apparent compensatory reduction in expression levels, the mutant protein still triggered a marked growth defect, which in part can be ascribed to its interaction with mitochondria. Consistently, cells with mutant DFNA5 displayed significantly increased levels of ROS and signs of programmed cell death. The latter occurred independently of the yeast caspase, Mca1, but involved the mitochondrial fission protein, Fis1, the voltage-dependent anion channel protein, Por1 and the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocators, Aac1 and Aac3. Recent data proposed DFNA5 toxicity to be associated to a globular domain encoded by exon 2–6. We confirmed these data by showing that expression of solely this domain confers a strong growth phenotype. In addition, we identified a point mutant in this domain that completely abrogated its cytotoxicity in yeast as well as human Human Embryonic Kidney 293T cells (HEK293T). Combined, our data underscore that the yeast system offers a valuable tool to further dissect the apoptotic properties of DFNA5.

  12. The splicing mutant of the human tumor suppressor protein DFNA5 induces programmed cell death when expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rossom, Sofie [Department of Biology, Functional Biology, KU Leuven, Leuven-Heverlee (Belgium); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Center of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium); Op de Beeck, Ken [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Center of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium); Franssens, Vanessa; Swinnen, Erwin [Department of Biology, Functional Biology, KU Leuven, Leuven-Heverlee (Belgium); Schepers, Anne [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Center of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium); Ghillebert, Ruben; Caldara, Marina [Department of Biology, Functional Biology, KU Leuven, Leuven-Heverlee (Belgium); Van Camp, Guy [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Center of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium); Winderickx, Joris, E-mail: guy.vancamp@ua.ac.be, E-mail: joris.winderickx@bio.kuleuven.be [Department of Biology, Functional Biology, KU Leuven, Leuven-Heverlee (Belgium)

    2012-07-25

    DFNA5 was first identified as a gene responsible for autosomal dominant deafness. Different mutations were found, but they all resulted in exon 8 skipping during splicing and premature termination of the protein. Later, it became clear that the protein also has a tumor suppression function and that it can induce apoptosis. Epigenetic silencing of the DFNA5 gene is associated with different types of cancers, including gastric and colorectal cancers as well as breast tumors. We introduced the wild-type and mutant DFNA5 allele in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression of the wild-type protein was well tolerated by the yeast cells, although the protein was subject of degradation and often deposited in distinct foci when cells entered the diauxic shift. In contrast, cells had problems to cope with mutant DFNA5 and despite an apparent compensatory reduction in expression levels, the mutant protein still triggered a marked growth defect, which in part can be ascribed to its interaction with mitochondria. Consistently, cells with mutant DFNA5 displayed significantly increased levels of ROS and signs of programmed cell death. The latter occurred independently of the yeast caspase, Mca1, but involved the mitochondrial fission protein, Fis1, the voltage-dependent anion channel protein, Por1 and the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocators, Aac1 and Aac3. Recent data proposed DFNA5 toxicity to be associated to a globular domain encoded by exon 2–6. We confirmed these data by showing that expression of solely this domain confers a strong growth phenotype. In addition, we identified a point mutant in this domain that completely abrogated its cytotoxicity in yeast as well as human Human Embryonic Kidney 293T cells (HEK293T). Combined, our data underscore that the yeast system offers a valuable tool to further dissect the apoptotic properties of DFNA5.

  13. [Intragenic mitotic recombination induced by ultraviolet and gamma rays in radiosensitive mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, I A; Kasinova, G V; Koval'tsova, S V

    1983-01-01

    The effect of UV- and gamma-irradiation on the survival and intragenic mitotic recombination (gene conversion) of 5 radiosensitive mutants was studied in comparison with the wild type. The level of spontaneous conversion was similar for RAD, rad2 and rad15, mutations xrs2 and xrs4 increasing and rad54 significantly decreasing it. The frequency of conversion induced by UV-light was greater in rad2, rad15 and xrs2 mutants and lower in xrs4, as compared to RAD. Gamma-irradiation caused induction of gene conversion with an equal frequency in RAD, rad2, rad15. Xrs2 and xrs4 mutations slightly decreased gamma-induced conversion. In rad54 mutant, UV-and gamma-induced conversion was practically absent. In the wild type yeast, a diploid strain is more resistant than a haploid, whereas in rad54 a diploid strain has the same or an increased sensitivity, as compared to a haploid strain (the "inverse ploidy effect"). This effect and also the block of induced mitotic recombination caused by rad54 indicate the presence in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae of repair pathways of UV- and gamma-induced damages acting in diploid cells and realised by recombination. The data obtained as a result of many years' investigation of genetic effects in radiosensitive mutants of yeast are summarised and considered.

  14. Selfish prion of Rnq1 mutant in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurahashi, Hiroshi; Shibata, Shoichiro; Ishiwata, Masao; Nakamura, Yoshikazu

    2009-05-01

    [PIN(+)] is a prion form of Rnq1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is necessary for the de novo induction of a second prion, [PSI(+)]. We previously isolated a truncated form of Rnq1, named Rnq1Delta100, as a [PSI(+)]-eliminating factor in S. cerevisiae. Rnq1Delta100 deletes the N-terminal non-prion domain of Rnq1, and eliminates [PSI(+)] in [PIN(+)] yeast. Here we found that [PIN(+)] is transmissible to Rnq1Delta100 in the absence of full-length Rnq1, forming a novel prion variant [RNQ1Delta100(+)]. [RNQ1Delta100(+)] has similar [PIN(+)] properties as it stimulates the de novo induction of [PSI(+)] and is eliminated by the null hsp104Delta mutation, but not by Hsp104 overproduction. In contrast, [RNQ1Delta100(+)] inherits the inhibitory activity and hampers the maintenance of [PSI(+)] though less efficiently than [PIN(+)] made of Rnq1-Rnq1Delta100 co-aggregates. Interestingly, [RNQ1Delta100(+)] prion was eliminated by de novo [PSI(+)] induction. Thus, the [RNQ1Delta100(+)] prion demonstrates selfish activity to eliminate a heterologous prion in S. cerevisiae, showing the first instance of a selfish prion variant in living organisms.

  15. Lack of chemically induced mutation in repair-deficient mutants of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, L.

    1974-01-01

    Two genes, rad6 and rad9, that confer radiation sensitivity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae also greatly reduce the frequency of chemically-induced reversions of a tester mutant cyc1-131, which is a chain initiation mutant in the structural gene determining iso-1-cytochrome c. Mutations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), diethyl sulfate (DES), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), dimethyl sulfate (DMS), nitroquinoline oxide (NQO), nitrosoguanidine (NTG), nitrogen mustard (HN2), β-propiolactone, and tritiated uridine, as well as mutations induced by ultraviolet light (UV) and ionizing radiation were greatly diminished in strains homozygous for either the rad6 or rad9 gene. Nitrous acid and nitrosoimidazolidone (NIL), on the other hand, were highly mutagenic in these repair-deficient mutants, and at low doses, these mutagens acted with about the same efficiency as in the normal RAD strain. At high doses of either nitrous acid or NIL, however, reversion frequencies were significantly reduced in the two rad mutants compared to normal strains. Although both rad mutants are immutable to about the same extent, the rad9 strains tend to be less sensitive to the lethal effect of chemical mutagens than rad6 strains. It is concluded that yeast requires a functional repair system for mutation induction by chemical agents. (auth)

  16. Lack of chemically induced mutation in repair-deficient mutants of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, L

    1974-12-01

    Two genes, rad6 and rad9, that confer radiation sensitivity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae also greatly reduce the frequency of chemically-induced reversions of a tester mutant cyc1-131, which is a chain initiation mutant in the structural gene determining iso-1-cytochrome c. Mutations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), diethyl sulfate (DES), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), dimethyl sulfate (DMS), nitroquinoline oxide (NQO), nitrosoguanidine (NTG), nitrogen mustard (HN2), beta-propiolactone, and tritiated uridine, as well as mutations induced by ultraviolet light (UV) and ionizing radiation were greatly diminished in strains homozygous for either the rad6 or rad9 gene. Nitrous acid and nitrosoimidazolidone (NIL), on the other hand, were highly mutagenic in these repair-deficient mutants, and at low doses, these mutagens acted with about the same efficiency as in the normal RAD strain. At high doses of either nitrous acid or NIL, however, reversion frequencies were significantly reduced in the two rad mutants compared to normal strains. Although both rad mutants are immutable to about the same extent, the rad9 strains tend to be less sensitive to the lethal effect of chemical mutagens than rad6 strains. It is concluded that yeast requires a functional repair system for mutation induction by chemical agents.

  17. Adaptively evolved yeast mutants on galactose show trade-offs in carbon utilization on glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, Kuk-Ki; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    the molecular mechanisms. In this study, adaptively evolved yeast mutants with improved galactose utilization ability showed impaired glucose utilization. The molecular genetic basis of this trade-off was investigated using a systems biology approach. Transcriptional and metabolic changes resulting from...... the improvement of galactose utilization were found maintained during growth on glucose. Moreover, glucose repression related genes showed conserved expression patterns during growth on both sugars. Mutations in the RAS2 gene that were identified as beneficial for galactose utilization in evolved mutants...

  18. Isolation and characterization of awamori yeast mutants with L-leucine accumulation that overproduce isoamyl alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Hashida, Keisuke; Watanabe, Daisuke; Nasuno, Ryo; Ohashi, Masataka; Iha, Tomoya; Nezuo, Maiko; Tsukahara, Masatoshi

    2015-02-01

    Awamori shochu is a traditional distilled alcoholic beverage made from steamed rice in Okinawa, Japan. Although it has a unique aroma that is distinguishable from that of other types of shochu, no studies have been reported on the breeding of awamori yeasts. In yeast, isoamyl alcohol (i-AmOH), known as the key flavor of bread, is mainly produced from α-ketoisocaproate in the pathway of L-leucine biosynthesis, which is regulated by end-product inhibition of α-isopropylmalate synthase (IPMS). Here, we isolated mutants resistant to the L-leucine analog 5,5,5-trifluoro-DL-leucine (TFL) derived from diploid awamori yeast of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Some of the mutants accumulated a greater amount of intracellular L-leucine, and among them, one mutant overproduced i-AmOH in awamori brewing. This mutant carried an allele of the LEU4 gene encoding the Ser542Phe/Ala551Val variant IPMS, which is less sensitive to feedback inhibition by L-leucine. Interestingly, we found that either of the constituent mutations (LEU4(S542F) and LEU4(A551V)) resulted in the TFL tolerance of yeast cells and desensitization to L-leucine feedback inhibition of IPMS, leading to intracellular L-leucine accumulation. Homology modeling also suggested that L-leucine binding was drastically inhibited in the Ser542Phe, Ala551Val, and Ser542Phe/Ala551Val variants due to steric hindrance in the cavity of IPMS. As we expected, awamori yeast cells expressing LEU4(S542F), LEU4(A551V), and LEU4(S542F/A551V) showed a prominent increase in extracellular i-AmOH production, compared with that of cells carrying the vector only. The approach described here could be a practical method for the breeding of novel awamori yeasts to expand the diversity of awamori taste and flavor. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Induction and isolation of DNA transformation mutants in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegerich, P.A.; Bruschi, C.V.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this research was to induce and isolate mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae which have become transformable by purified plasmid DNA. Non-transformable yeast cells were mutagenized by ultraviolet light using a 65% lethal dose (480 ergs/mm 2 ). After a period of overnight liquid holding recovery, the irradiated cells were subjected to DNA transformation using our CaCl 2 protocol with the multi-marker shuttle plasmid pBB carrying the LEU 2 leucine gene. Following transformation the colonies that grew on selective leucineless medium were identified and subjected to further genetic analysis. From a total of 1 x 10 9 cells the authors have isolated 7 colonies deriving from putative mutants that have acquired the capability to uptake plasmid DNA. The transformants were cured from the plasmid by its mitotic loss on non-selective medium, then re-transformed to verify their genetic competence to give rise to a number of transformants comparable to transformable strains. We have identified and isolated one mutant, coded trs-1, which is able to reproduce a frequency of transformation comparable with the tranformable control. They, therefore, conclude that this mutant is specific for plasmid DNA transformation and that the mutation is mitotically stable

  20. Study of the plant COPII vesicle coat subunits by functional complementation of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan-Owen De Craene

    Full Text Available The formation and budding of endoplasmic reticulum ER-derived vesicles depends on the COPII coat protein complex that was first identified in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The ER-associated Sec12 and the Sar1 GTPase initiate the COPII coat formation by recruiting the Sec23-Sec24 heterodimer following the subsequent recruitment of the Sec13-Sec31 heterotetramer. In yeast, there is usually one gene encoding each COPII protein and these proteins are essential for yeast viability, whereas the plant genome encodes multiple isoforms of all COPII subunits. Here, we used a systematic yeast complementation assay to assess the functionality of Arabidopsis thaliana COPII proteins. In this study, the different plant COPII subunits were expressed in their corresponding temperature-sensitive yeast mutant strain to complement their thermosensitivity and secretion phenotypes. Secretion was assessed using two different yeast cargos: the soluble α-factor pheromone and the membranous v-SNARE (vesicle-soluble NSF (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor Snc1 involved in the fusion of the secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane. This complementation study allowed the identification of functional A. thaliana COPII proteins for the Sec12, Sar1, Sec24 and Sec13 subunits that could represent an active COPII complex in plant cells. Moreover, we found that AtSec12 and AtSec23 were co-immunoprecipitated with AtSar1 in total cell extract of 15 day-old seedlings of A. thaliana. This demonstrates that AtSar1, AtSec12 and AtSec23 can form a protein complex that might represent an active COPII complex in plant cells.

  1. Prevention of GABA reduction during dough fermentation using a baker's yeast dal81 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Akira; Nakamura, Toshihide

    2016-10-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is consumed by yeasts during fermentation. To prevent GABA reduction in bread dough, a baker's yeast mutant AY77 deficient in GABA assimilation was characterized and utilized for wheat dough fermentation. An amber mutation in the DAL81 gene, which codes for a positive regulator of multiple nitrogen degradation pathways, was found in the AY77 strain. The qPCR analyses of genes involved in nitrogen utilization showed that transcriptional levels of the UGA1 and DUR3 genes encoding GABA transaminase and urea transporter, respectively, are severely decreased in the AY77 cells. The AY77 strain cultivated by fed-batch culture using cane molasses exhibited inferior gas production during dough fermentation compared to that of wild-type strain AY13. However, when fed with molasses containing 0.5% ammonium sulfate, the mutant strain exhibited gas production comparable to that of the AY13 strain. In contrast to the AY13 strain, which completely consumed GABA in dough within 5 h, the AY77 strain consumed no GABA under either culture condition. Dough fermentation with the dal81 mutant strain should be useful for suppression of GABA reduction in breads. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhanced Adsorption and Recovery of Uranyl Ions by NikR Mutant-Displaying Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouichi Kuroda

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Uranium is one of the most important metal resources, and the technology for the recovery of uranyl ions (UO22+ from aqueous solutions is required to ensure a semi-permanent supply of uranium. The NikR protein is a Ni2+-dependent transcriptional repressor of the nickel-ion uptake system in Escherichia coli, but its mutant protein (NikRm is able to selectively bind uranyl ions in the interface of the two monomers. In this study, NikRm protein with ability to adsorb uranyl ions was displayed on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To perform the binding of metal ions in the interface of the two monomers, two metal-binding domains (MBDs of NikRm were tandemly fused via linker peptides and displayed on the yeast cell surface by fusion with the cell wall-anchoring domain of yeast α-agglutinin. The NikRm-MBD-displaying yeast cells with particular linker lengths showed the enhanced adsorption of uranyl ions in comparison to the control strain. By treating cells with citrate buffer (pH 4.3, the uranyl ions adsorbed on the cell surface were recovered. Our results indicate that the adsorption system by yeast cells displaying tandemly fused MBDs of NikRm is effective for simple and concentrated recovery of uranyl ions, as well as adsorption of uranyl ions.

  3. Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    KAUST Repository

    Papsdorf, Katharina; Kaiser, Christoph J. O.; Drazic, Adrian; Grö tzinger, Stefan W.; Haeß ner, Carmen; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative growth

  4. Improved ethanol fermentation of a yeast mutant by C-12 ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Dong; Liu Qingfang; Wu Xin; Wang Ying; Wang Jufang; Ma Shuang; Li Wenjian

    2010-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae YY was irradiated with 100 MeV/u 12 C 6+ ion beams. After screening,we obtained the mutant strain C03A of high ethanol yield. The influence of fermentation temperature, pH and concentration of sugar on ethanol fermentation were studied. The range analysis and analysis of variance were applied for the result of orthogonal experiments. The optimal ethanol fermentation conditions are: fermentation temperature 35 degree C, pH value 5.0, and sugar concentration 24%. The results of fermentation in the 10 L bioreactor showed that the ethanol fermentation of the mutant strain could be completed in 36 hours, the production of ethanol was to 13.2%(V/V), which means 12 hours faster and 1.6%(V /V) ethanol yield higher than original strain. (authors)

  5. Induction of pure and sectored mutant clones in excision-proficient and deficient strains of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, F; Haynes, R H

    1977-06-01

    We have found that UV-induced mutation frequency in a forward non-selective assay system (scoring white adex ade2 double auxotroph mutants among the red pigmented ade2 clones) increases linearly with dose up to a maximum frequency of about 3 X 10(-3) mutants per survivor and then declines in both RAD wild-type and rad2 excision deficient strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutation frequencies of the RAD and the rad2 strains plotted against survival are nearly identical over the entire survival range. On this basis we conclude that unexcised pyrimidine dimers are the predominant type of pre-mutational lesions in both strains. In the RAD wild-type strain pure mutant clones outnumber sectors in a 10:1 ratio at all doses used; in rad2 this ratio varies from 1:1 at low doses up to 10:1 at high doses. As others have concluded for wild-type strains we find also in the rad2 strain that pure clone formation cannot be accounted for quantitatively by lethal sectoring events alone. We conclude that heteroduplex repair is a crucial step in pure mutant clone formation and we examine the plausibility of certain macromolecular mechanisms according to which heteroduplex repair may be coupled with replication, repair and sister strand exchange in yeast mutagenesis.

  6. Induction of pure and sectored mutant clones in excision-proficient and deficient strains of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckardt, F.; Haynes, R.H.

    1977-01-01

    It was found that UV-induced mutation frequency in a forward non-selective assay system (scoring white adex ade2 double auxotroph mutants among the red pigmented ade2 clones) increases linearly with dose up to a maximum frequency of about 3 x 10 -3 mutants per survivor and then declines in both RAD wild-type and rad2 excision deficient strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutation frequencies of the RAD and the rad2 strains plotted against survival are nearly identical over the entire survival range. On this basis it is concluded that unexcised pyrimidine dimers are the predominant type of pre-mutational lesions in both strains. In the RAD wild-type strain pure mutant clones outnumber sectors in a 10:1 ratio at all doses used; in rad2 this ratio varies from 1:1 at low doses up to 10:1 at high doses. In agreement with conclusions of others, it was also found that for wild-type strains in the rad2 strain pure clone formation cannot be accounted for quantitatively by lethal sectoring events alone. It is concluded that heteroduplex repair is a crucial step in pure mutant clone formation and the plausibility of certain macromolecular mechanisms according to which heteroduplex repair may be coupled with replication, repair and sister strand exchange in yeast mutagenesis is examined

  7. Isolation and characterization of prophage mutants of the defective Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage PBSX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurm, P.; Garro, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis mutants with lesions in PBSX prophage genes have been isolated. One of these appears to be a regulatory mutant and is defective for mitomycin C-induced derepression of PBSX; the others are defective for phage capsid formation. All of the PBSX structural proteins are synthesized during induction of the capsid defective mutants; however, several of these proteins exhibit abnormal serological reactivity with anti-PBSX antiserum. The two head proteins X4 and X7 are not immunoprecipitable in a mutant which fails to assemble phage head structures. In the tail mutant, proteins X5 and X6 are not immunoprecipitable, tails are not assembled, and a possible tail protein precursor remains uncleaved. The noninducible mutant does not synthesize any PBSX structural proteins after exposure to mitomycin C. The mutation is specific for PBSX since phi 105 and SPO2 lysogens of the mutant are inducible. All of the known PBSX-specific mutations were shown to be clustered between argC and metC on the host chromosome. In addition, the metC marker was shown to be present in multiple copies in cells induced for PBSX replication. This suggests that the derepressed prophage replicates while still integrated and that replication extends into the adjacent regions of the host chromosome

  8. Generation and analysis of a barcode-tagged insertion mutant library in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Barcodes are unique DNA sequence tags that can be used to specifically label individual mutants. The barcode-tagged open reading frame (ORF) haploid deletion mutant collections in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe allow for high-throughput mutant phenotyping because the relative growth of mutants in a population can be determined by monitoring the proportions of their associated barcodes. While these mutant collections have greatly facilitated genome-wide studies, mutations in essential genes are not present, and the roles of these genes are not as easily studied. To further support genome-scale research in S. pombe, we generated a barcode-tagged fission yeast insertion mutant library that has the potential of generating viable mutations in both essential and non-essential genes and can be easily analyzed using standard molecular biological techniques. Results An insertion vector containing a selectable ura4+ marker and a random barcode was used to generate a collection of 10,000 fission yeast insertion mutants stored individually in 384-well plates and as six pools of mixed mutants. Individual barcodes are flanked by Sfi I recognition sites and can be oligomerized in a unique orientation to facilitate barcode sequencing. Independent genetic screens on a subset of mutants suggest that this library contains a diverse collection of single insertion mutations. We present several approaches to determine insertion sites. Conclusions This collection of S. pombe barcode-tagged insertion mutants is well-suited for genome-wide studies. Because insertion mutations may eliminate, reduce or alter the function of essential and non-essential genes, this library will contain strains with a wide range of phenotypes that can be assayed by their associated barcodes. The design of the barcodes in this library allows for barcode sequencing using next generation or standard benchtop cloning approaches. PMID:22554201

  9. Generation and analysis of a barcode-tagged insertion mutant library in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bo-Ruei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barcodes are unique DNA sequence tags that can be used to specifically label individual mutants. The barcode-tagged open reading frame (ORF haploid deletion mutant collections in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe allow for high-throughput mutant phenotyping because the relative growth of mutants in a population can be determined by monitoring the proportions of their associated barcodes. While these mutant collections have greatly facilitated genome-wide studies, mutations in essential genes are not present, and the roles of these genes are not as easily studied. To further support genome-scale research in S. pombe, we generated a barcode-tagged fission yeast insertion mutant library that has the potential of generating viable mutations in both essential and non-essential genes and can be easily analyzed using standard molecular biological techniques. Results An insertion vector containing a selectable ura4+ marker and a random barcode was used to generate a collection of 10,000 fission yeast insertion mutants stored individually in 384-well plates and as six pools of mixed mutants. Individual barcodes are flanked by Sfi I recognition sites and can be oligomerized in a unique orientation to facilitate barcode sequencing. Independent genetic screens on a subset of mutants suggest that this library contains a diverse collection of single insertion mutations. We present several approaches to determine insertion sites. Conclusions This collection of S. pombe barcode-tagged insertion mutants is well-suited for genome-wide studies. Because insertion mutations may eliminate, reduce or alter the function of essential and non-essential genes, this library will contain strains with a wide range of phenotypes that can be assayed by their associated barcodes. The design of the barcodes in this library allows for barcode sequencing using next generation or standard benchtop cloning

  10. Isolation of baker's yeast mutants with proline accumulation that showed enhanced tolerance to baking-associated stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsolmonbaatar, Ariunzaya; Hashida, Keisuke; Sugimoto, Yukiko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Furukawa, Shuhei; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2016-12-05

    During bread-making processes, yeast cells are exposed to baking-associated stresses such as freeze-thaw, air-drying, and high-sucrose concentrations. Previously, we reported that self-cloning diploid baker's yeast strains that accumulate proline retained higher-level fermentation abilities in both frozen and sweet doughs than the wild-type strain. Although self-cloning yeasts do not have to be treated as genetically modified yeasts, the conventional methods for breeding baker's yeasts are more acceptable to consumers than the use of self-cloning yeasts. In this study, we isolated mutants resistant to the proline analogue azetidine-2-carboxylate (AZC) derived from diploid baker's yeast of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Some of the mutants accumulated a greater amount of intracellular proline, and among them, 5 mutants showed higher cell viability than that observed in the parent wild-type strain under freezing or high-sucrose stress conditions. Two of them carried novel mutations in the PRO1 gene encoding the Pro247Ser or Glu415Lys variant of γ-glutamyl kinase (GK), which is a key enzyme in proline biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae. Interestingly, we found that these mutations resulted in AZC resistance of yeast cells and desensitization to proline feedback inhibition of GK, leading to intracellular proline accumulation. Moreover, baker's yeast cells expressing the PRO1 P247S and PRO1 E415K gene were more tolerant to freezing stress than cells expressing the wild-type PRO1 gene. The approach described here could be a practical method for the breeding of proline-accumulating baker's yeasts with higher tolerance to baking-associated stresses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Isolation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase-defective mutants in Chinese hamster V79 cells by tritium suicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, R.E.; Schauer, I.E.; Hatcher, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    Tritium suicide was shown to be a highly efficient method for isolating mutants defective in hypoxanthine incorporation in the Chinese hamster lung of one kill cycle were used for the next kill cycle. The kill cycles involved incorporation of ( 3 H) hypoxanthine for 5 or 10 min, followed by storage of 3 H-labelled cells at -70 0 C for 4-10 days. 12 clones that survived the 3rd kill cycle were tested for incorporation of ( 3 H)hypoxanthine and all were found to be defective. At least 6 of the clones have defective hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) activity. One mutant, H19, chosen for further characterization, had HPRT with a 13-fold elevation in apparent Ksub(m) for phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). Thin-layer chromatography of cell extracts showed that this mutant was incapable of converting intracellular hypoxanthine to IMP or to other purine metabolites. In addition, H19 was resistant to 6-thioguanine. (orig.)

  12. Screening of respiration deficiency mutants of yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) induced by ion irradiation and the mtDNA restriction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Shuhong; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Jin Genming; Wei Zengquan; Xie Hongmei; Ma Qiufeng; Gu Ying

    2005-01-01

    Screening of the respiration deficiency mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae induced by 5.19 MeV/u 22 Ne 5+ ion irradiation is reported in this paper. Some respiration deficiency mutants of white colony phenotype, in a condition of selective culture of TTC medium, were obtained. A new and simplified method based on mtDNA restriction analysis is described. The authors found that there are many obvious differences in mtDNAs between wild yeasts and the respiration deficiency mutants. The mechanism of obtaining the respiration deficiency mutants induced by heavy ion irradiation is briefly discussed. (authors)

  13. Kex1 protease is involved in yeast cell death induced by defective N-glycosylation, acetic acid, and chronological aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Peter; Lehle, Ludwig

    2008-07-04

    N-glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum is an essential protein modification and highly conserved in evolution from yeast to humans. The key step of this pathway is the transfer of the lipid-linked core oligosaccharide to the nascent polypeptide chain, catalyzed by the oligosaccharyltransferase complex. Temperature-sensitive oligosaccharyltransferase mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at the restrictive temperature, such as wbp1-1, as well as wild-type cells in the presence of the N-glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin display typical apoptotic phenotypes like nuclear condensation, DNA fragmentation, phosphatidylserine translocation, caspase-like activity, and reactive oxygen species accumulation. Since deletion of the yeast metacaspase YCA1 did not abrogate this death pathway, we postulated a different proteolytic process to be responsible. Here, we show that Kex1 protease is involved in the programmed cell death caused by defective N-glycosylation. Its disruption decreases caspase-like activity, production of reactive oxygen species, and fragmentation of mitochondria and, conversely, improves growth and survival of cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that Kex1 contributes also to the active cell death program induced by acetic acid stress or during chronological aging, suggesting that Kex1 plays a more general role in cellular suicide of yeast.

  14. Shp2 knockdown and Noonan/LEOPARD mutant Shp2-induced gastrulation defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Jopling

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Shp2 is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine phosphatase that is essential for normal development. Activating and inactivating mutations have been identified in humans to cause the related Noonan and LEOPARD syndromes, respectively. The cell biological cause of these syndromes remains to be determined. We have used the zebrafish to assess the role of Shp2 in early development. Here, we report that morpholino-mediated knockdown of Shp2 in zebrafish resulted in defects during gastrulation. Cell tracing experiments demonstrated that Shp2 knockdown induced defects in convergence and extension cell movements. In situ hybridization using a panel of markers indicated that cell fate was not affected by Shp2 knock down. The Shp2 knockdown-induced defects were rescued by active Fyn and Yes and by active RhoA. We generated mutants of Shp2 with mutations that were identified in human patients with Noonan or LEOPARD Syndrome and established that Noonan Shp2 was activated and LEOPARD Shp2 lacked catalytic protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity. Expression of Noonan or LEOPARD mutant Shp2 in zebrafish embryos induced convergence and extension cell movement defects without affecting cell fate. Moreover, these embryos displayed craniofacial and cardiac defects, reminiscent of human symptoms. Noonan and LEOPARD mutant Shp2s were not additive nor synergistic, consistent with the mutant Shp2s having activating and inactivating roles in the same signaling pathway. Our results demonstrate that Shp2 is required for normal convergence and extension cell movements during gastrulation and that Src family kinases and RhoA were downstream of Shp2. Expression of Noonan or LEOPARD Shp2 phenocopied the craniofacial and cardiac defects of human patients. The finding that defective Shp2 signaling induced cell movement defects as early as gastrulation may have implications for the monitoring and diagnosis of Noonan and LEOPARD syndrome.

  15. Iron metabolism mutant hbd mice have a deletion in Sec15l1, which has homology to a yeast gene for vesicle docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Robert A; Boydston, Leigh A; Brookshier, Terri R; McNulty, Steven G; Nsumu, Ndona N; Brewer, Brandon P; Blackmore, Krista

    2005-12-01

    Defects in iron absorption and utilization lead to iron deficiency and anemia. While iron transport by transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis is well understood, it is not completely clear how iron is transported from the endosome to the mitochondria where heme is synthesized. We undertook a positional cloning project to identify the causative mutation for the hemoglobin-deficit (hbd) mouse mutant, which suffers from a microcytic, hypochromic anemia apparently due to defective iron transport in the endocytosis cycle. As shown by previous studies, reticulocyte iron accumulation in homozygous hbd/hbd mice is deficient despite normal binding of transferrin to its receptor and normal transferrin uptake in the cell. We have identified a strong candidate gene for hbd, Sec15l1, a homologue to yeast SEC15, which encodes a key protein in vesicle docking. The hbd mice have an exon deletion in Sec15l1, which is the first known mutation of a SEC gene homologue in mammals.

  16. Mycobacterial mutants with defective control of phagosomal acidification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of mycobacterial infection is associated with an ability to interfere with maturation of the phagosomal compartment after ingestion by macrophages. Identification of the mycobacterial components that contribute to this phenomenon will allow rational design of novel approaches to the treatment and prevention of tuberculosis. Microarray-based screening of a transposon library was used to identify mutations that influence the fate of Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG following uptake by macrophages. A screen based on bacterial survival during a 3-d infection highlighted genes previously implicated in growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages and in mice, together with a number of other virulence genes including a locus encoding virulence-associated membrane proteins and a series of transporter molecules. A second screen based on separation of acidified and non-acidified phagosomes by flow cytometry identified genes involved in mycobacterial control of early acidification. This included the KefB potassium/proton antiport. Mutants unable to control early acidification were significantly attenuated for growth during 6-d infections of macrophages. Early acidification of the phagosome is associated with reduced survival of BCG in macrophages. A strong correlation exists between genes required for intracellular survival of BCG and those required for growth of M. tuberculosis in mice. In contrast, very little correlation exists between genes required for intracellular survival of BCG and those that are up-regulated during intracellular adaptation of M. tuberculosis. This study has identified targets for interventions to promote immune clearance of tuberculosis infection. The screening technologies demonstrated in this study will be useful to the study of pathogenesis in many other intracellular microorganisms.

  17. Characterization of papillomavirus E1 helicase mutants defective for interaction with the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradet-Turcotte, Amelie; Brault, Karine; Titolo, Steve; Howley, Peter M.; Archambault, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    The E1 helicase from BPV and HPV16 interacts with Ubc9 to facilitate viral genome replication. We report that HPV11 E1 also interacts with Ubc9 in vitro and in the yeast two-hybrid system. Residues in E1 involved in oligomerization (353-435) were sufficient for binding to Ubc9 in vitro, but the origin-binding and ATPase domains were additionally required in yeast. Nuclear accumulation of BPV E1 was shown previously to depend on its interaction with Ubc9 and sumoylation on lysine 514. In contrast, HPV11 and HPV16 E1 mutants defective for Ubc9 binding remained nuclear even when the SUMO pathway was inhibited. Furthermore, we found that K514 in BPV E1 and the analogous K559 in HPV11 E1 are not essential for nuclear accumulation of E1. These results suggest that the interaction of E1 with Ubc9 is not essential for its nuclear accumulation but, rather, depends on its oligomerization and binding to DNA and ATP.

  18. Adhesion defective BHK cell mutant has cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan of altered properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Austria, R; Woods, A

    1988-01-01

    In the light of accumulating data that implicate cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) with a role in cell interactions with extracellular matrix molecules such as fibronectin, we have compared the properties of these molecules in wild-type BHK cells and an adhesion-defective ricin......-resistant mutant (RicR14). Our results showed that the mutant, unlike BHK cells, cannot form focal adhesions when adherent to planar substrates in the presence of serum. Furthermore, while both cell lines possess similar amounts of cell surface HSPG with hydrophobic properties, that of RicR14 cells had decreased...... sulfation, reduced affinity for fibronectin and decreased half-life on the cell surface when compared to the normal counterpart. Our conclusions based on this data are that these altered properties may, in part, account for the adhesion defect in the ricin-resistant mutant. Whether this results from...

  19. The H159A mutant of yeast enolase 1 has significant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, J M; Holland, M J; Lebioda, L

    2000-10-05

    The function of His159 in the enolase mechanism is disputed. Recently, Vinarov and Nowak (Biochemistry (1999) 38, 12138-12149) prepared the H159A mutant of yeast enolase 1 and expressed this in Escherichia coli. They reported minimal (ca. 0.01% of the native value) activity, though the protein appeared to be correctly folded, according to its CD spectrum, tryptophan fluorescence, and binding of metal ion and substrate. We prepared H159A enolase using a multicopy plasmid and expressed the enzyme in yeast. Our preparations of H159A enolase have 0.2-0.4% of the native activity under standard assay conditions and are further activated by Mg(2+) concentrations above 1 mM to 1-1.5% of the native activity. Native enolase 1 (and enolase 2) are inhibited by such Mg(2+) concentrations. It is possible that His159 is necessary for correct folding of the enzyme and that expression in E. coli leads to largely misfolded protein. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  20. Energetics of cellular repair processes in a respiratory-deficient mutant of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.K.; Gupta, I.; Lata, K.

    1982-01-01

    Repair of potentially lethal damage induced by cytoxic agents like UV irradiation (254 nm), psorelen-plus-UVA (365 mn), and methyl methanesulfonate has been studied in the presence of a glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, in yeast cells. Simultaneously, effects of 2-deoxy-D-glucose were also investigated on parameters of energy metabolism like glucose utilization, rate of ATP production, and ATP content of cells. The following results were obtained. (i) 2-Deoxy-D-glucose is able to inhibit repair of potentially lethal damage induced by all the cytotoxic agents tested. The 2-deoxy-D-glucose-induced inhibition of repair depends upon the type of lesion and the pattern of cellular energy metabolism, the inhibition being greater in respiratory-deficient mutants than in the wild type. (ii) A continuous energy flow is necessary for repair of potentially lethal damage in yeast cells. Energy may be supplied by the glycolytic and/or the respiratory pathway; respiratory metabolism is not essential for this purpose. (iii) The magnitude of repair correlates with the rate of ATP production in a sigmoid manner

  1. The Xenopus laevis morphogenetic factor, tumorhead, causes defects in polarized growth and cytokinesis in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chuan Fen; Yang, Peirong; Traverso, Edwin E.; Etkin, Laurence D.; Marcus, Stevan

    2004-01-01

    Tumorhead (TH) is a maternally expressed gene product that regulates neural tube morphogenesis in the amphibian, Xenopus laevis. Here we describe the effects of TH expression in the rod-shaped fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Expression of TH in S. pombe resulted in severe morphological defects, including ovoid, bottle-shaped, and enlarged cells. Multi-septated cells were also observed in TH expressing cultures, indicating that TH is inhibitory to a process required for the completion of cytokinesis. TH expression caused significant actin and microtubule cytoskeletal defects, including depolarization of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton and increased microtubule formation. Immunostaining experiments showed that TH is localized to the cell cortex, cell tips, and septum in S. pombe cells. Localization of TH to the cell cortex was dependent on the S. pombe PAK homolog, Shk1. Moreover, TH expression was inhibitory to the growth of a mutant defective in Shk1 function, suggesting that TH may interact with a component(s) of a PAK-mediated morphogenetic regulatory pathway in S. pombe. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that S. pombe may be a useful model organism for identifying potential TH interacting factors

  2. Systematic screen for mutants resistant to TORC1 inhibition in fission yeast reveals genes involved in cellular ageing and growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Rallis

    2014-01-01

    Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1, which controls growth in response to nutrients, promotes ageing in multiple organisms. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe emerges as a valuable genetic model system to study TORC1 function and cellular ageing. Here we exploited the combinatorial action of rapamycin and caffeine, which inhibit fission yeast growth in a TORC1-dependent manner. We screened a deletion library, comprising ∼84% of all non-essential fission yeast genes, for drug-resistant mutants. This screen identified 33 genes encoding functions such as transcription, kinases, mitochondrial respiration, biosynthesis, intra-cellular trafficking, and stress response. Among the corresponding mutants, 5 showed shortened and 21 showed increased maximal chronological lifespans; 15 of the latter mutants showed no further lifespan increase with rapamycin and might thus represent key targets downstream of TORC1. We pursued the long-lived sck2 mutant with additional functional analyses, revealing that the Sck2p kinase functions within the TORC1 network and is required for normal cell growth, global protein translation, and ribosomal S6 protein phosphorylation in a nutrient-dependent manner. Notably, slow cell growth was associated with all long-lived mutants while oxidative-stress resistance was not.

  3. Deletion map of CYC1 mutants and its correspondence to mutationally altered iso-1-cytochromes c of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, F.; Jackson, M.; Liebman, S.W.; Schweingruber, A.M.; Stewart, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    Mutants arising spontaneously from sporulated cultures of certain strains of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, contained deletions of the CYC1 gene which controls the primary structure of iso-1-cytochrome c. At least 60 different kinds of deletions were uncovered among the 104 deletions examined and these ranged in length from those encompassing only two adjacent point mutants to those encompassing at least the entire CYC1 gene. X-ray-induced recombination rates of crosses involving these deletions and cyc1 point mutants resulted in the assignment of 211 point mutants to 47 mutational sites and made it possible to unambiguously order 40 of these 47 sites. Except for one mutant, cyc1-15, there was a strict colinear relationship between the deletion map and the positions of 13 sites that were previously determined by amino acid alterations in iso-1-cytochromes c from intragenic revertants

  4. Defective processing of methylated single-stranded DNA by E. coli alkB mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinglay, Suneet; Trewick, Sarah C.; Lindahl, Tomas; Sedgwick, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    Escherichia coli alkB mutants are very sensitive to DNA methylating agents. Despite these mutants being the subject of many studies, no DNA repair or other function has been assigned to the AlkB protein or to its human homolog. Here, we report that reactivation of methylmethanesulfonate (MMS)-treated single-stranded DNA phages, M13, f1, and G4, was decreased dramatically in alkB mutants. No such decrease occurred when using methylated λ phage or M13 duplex DNA. These data show that alkB mutants have a marked defect in processing methylation damage in single-stranded DNA. Recombinant AlkB protein bound more efficiently to single- than double-stranded DNA. The single-strand damage processed by AlkB was primarily cytotoxic and not mutagenic and was induced by SN2 methylating agents, MMS, DMS, and MeI but not by SN1 agent N-methyl-N-nitrosourea or by γ irradiation. Strains lacking other DNA repair activities, alkA tag, xth nfo, uvrA, mutS, and umuC, were not defective in reactivation of methylated M13 phage and did not enhance the defect of an alkB mutant. A recA mutation caused a small but additive defect. Thus, AlkB functions in a novel pathway independent of these activities. We propose that AlkB acts on alkylated single-stranded DNA in replication forks or at transcribed regions. Consistent with this theory, stationary phase alkB cells were less MMS sensitive than rapidly growing cells. PMID:10950872

  5. The Drosophila Neurally Altered Carbohydrate Mutant Has a Defective Golgi GDP-fucose Transporter*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Christoph; Kotu, Varshika; Sharrow, Mary; Rendić, Dubravko; Pöltl, Gerald; Tiemeyer, Michael; Wilson, Iain B. H.; Jarvis, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    Studying genetic disorders in model organisms can provide insights into heritable human diseases. The Drosophila neurally altered carbohydrate (nac) mutant is deficient for neural expression of the HRP epitope, which consists of N-glycans with core α1,3-linked fucose residues. Here, we show that a conserved serine residue in the Golgi GDP-fucose transporter (GFR) is substituted by leucine in nac1 flies, which abolishes GDP-fucose transport in vivo and in vitro. This loss of function is due to a biochemical defect, not to destabilization or mistargeting of the mutant GFR protein. Mass spectrometry and HPLC analysis showed that nac1 mutants lack not only core α1,3-linked, but also core α1,6-linked fucose residues on their N-glycans. Thus, the nac1 Gfr mutation produces a previously unrecognized general defect in N-glycan core fucosylation. Transgenic expression of a wild-type Gfr gene restored the HRP epitope in neural tissues, directly demonstrating that the Gfr mutation is solely responsible for the neural HRP epitope deficiency in the nac1 mutant. These results validate the Drosophila nac1 mutant as a model for the human congenital disorder of glycosylation, CDG-IIc (also known as LAD-II), which is also the result of a GFR deficiency. PMID:22745127

  6. Reduced heme levels underlie the exponential growth defect of the Shewanella oneidensis hfq mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Brennan

    Full Text Available The RNA chaperone Hfq fulfills important roles in small regulatory RNA (sRNA function in many bacteria. Loss of Hfq in the dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 results in slow exponential phase growth and a reduced terminal cell density at stationary phase. We have found that the exponential phase growth defect of the hfq mutant in LB is the result of reduced heme levels. Both heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant can be completely restored by supplementing LB medium with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA, the first committed intermediate synthesized during heme synthesis. Increasing expression of gtrA, which encodes the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in heme biosynthesis, also restores heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant. Taken together, our data indicate that reduced heme levels are responsible for the exponential growth defect of the S. oneidensis hfq mutant in LB medium and suggest that the S. oneidensis hfq mutant is deficient in heme production at the 5-ALA synthesis step.

  7. Early transcriptional responses of internalization defective Brucella abortus mutants in professional phagocytes, RAW 264.7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Seung Bin; Lee, Won Jung; Shin, Min Kyoung; Jung, Myung Hwan; Shin, Seung Won; Yoo, An Na; Kim, Jong Wan; Yoo, Han Sang

    2013-06-27

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular zoonotic pathogen which causes undulant fever, endocarditis, arthritis and osteomyelitis in human and abortion and infertility in cattle. This bacterium is able to invade and replicate in host macrophage instead of getting removed by this defense mechanism. Therefore, understanding the interaction between virulence of the bacteria and the host cell is important to control brucellosis. Previously, we generated internalization defective mutants and analyzed the envelope proteins. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the changes in early transcriptional responses between wild type and internalization defective mutants infected mouse macrophage, RAW 264.7. Both of the wild type and mutant infected macrophages showed increased expression levels in proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, apoptosis and G-protein coupled receptors (Gpr84, Gpr109a and Adora2b) while the genes related with small GTPase which mediate intracellular trafficking was decreased. Moreover, cytohesin 1 interacting protein (Cytip) and genes related to ubiquitination (Arrdc3 and Fbxo21) were down-regulated, suggesting the survival strategy of this bacterium. However, we could not detect any significant changes in the mutant infected groups compared to the wild type infected group. In summary, it was very difficult to clarify the alterations in host cellular transcription in response to infection with internalization defective mutants. However, we found several novel gene changes related to the GPCR system, ubiquitin-proteosome system, and growth arrest and DNA damages in response to B. abortus infection. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying host-pathogen interactions and need to be studied further.

  8. A Medicago truncatula tobacco retrotransposon insertion mutant collection with defects in nodule development and symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pislariu, Catalina I; Murray, Jeremy D; Wen, JiangQi; Cosson, Viviane; Muni, RajaSekhara Reddy Duvvuru; Wang, Mingyi; Benedito, Vagner A; Andriankaja, Andry; Cheng, Xiaofei; Jerez, Ivone Torres; Mondy, Samuel; Zhang, Shulan; Taylor, Mark E; Tadege, Million; Ratet, Pascal; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Chen, Rujin; Udvardi, Michael K

    2012-08-01

    A Tnt1-insertion mutant population of Medicago truncatula ecotype R108 was screened for defects in nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Primary screening of 9,300 mutant lines yielded 317 lines with putative defects in nodule development and/or nitrogen fixation. Of these, 230 lines were rescreened, and 156 lines were confirmed with defective symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Mutants were sorted into six distinct phenotypic categories: 72 nonnodulating mutants (Nod-), 51 mutants with totally ineffective nodules (Nod+ Fix-), 17 mutants with partially ineffective nodules (Nod+ Fix+/-), 27 mutants defective in nodule emergence, elongation, and nitrogen fixation (Nod+/- Fix-), one mutant with delayed and reduced nodulation but effective in nitrogen fixation (dNod+/- Fix+), and 11 supernodulating mutants (Nod++Fix+/-). A total of 2,801 flanking sequence tags were generated from the 156 symbiotic mutant lines. Analysis of flanking sequence tags revealed 14 insertion alleles of the following known symbiotic genes: NODULE INCEPTION (NIN), DOESN'T MAKE INFECTIONS3 (DMI3/CCaMK), ERF REQUIRED FOR NODULATION, and SUPERNUMERARY NODULES (SUNN). In parallel, a polymerase chain reaction-based strategy was used to identify Tnt1 insertions in known symbiotic genes, which revealed 25 additional insertion alleles in the following genes: DMI1, DMI2, DMI3, NIN, NODULATION SIGNALING PATHWAY1 (NSP1), NSP2, SUNN, and SICKLE. Thirty-nine Nod- lines were also screened for arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis phenotypes, and 30 mutants exhibited defects in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Morphological and developmental features of several new symbiotic mutants are reported. The collection of mutants described here is a source of novel alleles of known symbiotic genes and a resource for cloning novel symbiotic genes via Tnt1 tagging.

  9. Identification of Potential Calorie Restriction-Mimicking Yeast Mutants with Increased Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain and Nitric Oxide Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Calorie restriction (CR induces a metabolic shift towards mitochondrial respiration; however, molecular mechanisms underlying CR remain unclear. Recent studies suggest that CR-induced mitochondrial activity is associated with nitric oxide (NO production. To understand the role of mitochondria in CR, we identify and study Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with increased NO levels as potential CR mimics. Analysis of the top 17 mutants demonstrates a correlation between increased NO, mitochondrial respiration, and longevity. Interestingly, treating yeast with NO donors such as GSNO (S-nitrosoglutathione is sufficient to partially mimic CR to extend lifespan. CR-increased NO is largely dependent on mitochondrial electron transport and cytochrome c oxidase (COX. Although COX normally produces NO under hypoxic conditions, CR-treated yeast cells are able to produce NO under normoxic conditions. Our results suggest that CR may derepress some hypoxic genes for mitochondrial proteins that function to promote the production of NO and the extension of lifespan.

  10. Ca2+-Signal Transduction Inhibitors, Kujiol A and Kujigamberol B, Isolated from Kuji Amber Using a Mutant Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Takeshi; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Shunya; Shimizu, Eisaku; Takahashi, Honoka; Yoshida, Jun; Shinden, Hisao; Tsujimura, Maiko; Kofujita, Hisayoshi; Uesugi, Shota; Kimura, Ken-Ichi

    2018-04-27

    A podocarpatriene and a labdatriene derivative, named kujiol A [13-methyl-8,11,13-podocarpatrien-19-ol (1)] and kujigamberol B [15,20-dinor-5,7,9-labdatrien-13-ol (2)], respectively, were isolated from Kuji amber through detection with the aid of their growth-restoring activity against a mutant yeast strain ( zds1Δ erg3Δ pdr1Δ pdr3Δ), which is known to be hypersensitive with respect to Ca 2+ -signal transduction. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic data analysis. Compounds 1 and 2 are rare organic compounds from Late Cretaceous amber, and the mutant yeast used seems useful for elucidating a variety of new compounds from Kuji amber specimens, produced before the K-Pg boundary.

  11. Isolation and Characterization of a Catabolite Repression-Insensitive Mutant of a Methanol Yeast, Candida boidinii A5, Producing Alcohol Oxidase in Glucose-Containing Medium

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Sawai, Tohru; Tani, Yoshiki

    1987-01-01

    Mutants exhibiting alcohol oxidase (EC 1.1.3.13) activity when grown on glucose in the presence of methanol were found among 2-deoxyglucose-resistant mutants derived from a methanol yeast, Candida boidinii A5. One of these mutants, strain ADU-15, showed the highest alcohol oxidase activity in glucose-containing medium. The growth characteristics and also the induction and degradation of alcohol oxidase were compared with the parent strain and mutant strain ADU-15. In the parent strain, initia...

  12. A Genetics Laboratory Module Involving Selection and Identification of Lysine Synthesis Mutants in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill B. Keeney

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a laboratory exercise, currently being used with college sophomores, which uses the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convey the concepts of amino acid biosynthesis, mutation, and gene complementation. In brief, selective medium is used to isolate yeast cells carrying a mutation in the lysine biosynthesis pathway. A spontaneous mutation in any one of three separate genetic loci will allow for growth on selective media; however, the frequency of mutations isolated from each locus differs. Following isolation of a mutated strain, students use complementation analysis to identify which gene contains the mutation. Since the yeast genome has been mapped and sequenced, students with access to the Internet can then research and develop hypotheses to explain the differences in frequencies of mutant genes obtained.

  13. Arabidopsis thaliana cdd1 mutant uncouples the constitutive activation of salicylic acid signalling from growth defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Swadhin; Roy, Shweta; Shah, Jyoti; Van Wees, Saskia; Pieterse, Corné M; Nandi, Ashis K

    2011-12-01

    Arabidopsis genotypes with a hyperactive salicylic acid-mediated signalling pathway exhibit enhanced disease resistance, which is often coupled with growth and developmental defects, such as dwarfing and spontaneous necrotic lesions on the leaves, resulting in reduced biomass yield. In this article, we report a novel recessive mutant of Arabidopsis, cdd1 (constitutive defence without defect in growth and development1), that exhibits enhanced disease resistance associated with constitutive salicylic acid signalling, but without any observable pleiotropic phenotype. Both NPR1 (NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1)-dependent and NPR1-independent salicylic acid-regulated defence pathways are hyperactivated in cdd1 mutant plants, conferring enhanced resistance against bacterial pathogens. However, a functional NPR1 allele is required for the cdd1-conferred heightened resistance against the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Salicylic acid accumulates at elevated levels in cdd1 and cdd1 npr1 mutant plants and is necessary for cdd1-mediated PR1 expression and disease resistance phenotypes. In addition, we provide data which indicate that the cdd1 mutation negatively regulates the npr1 mutation-induced hyperactivation of ethylene/jasmonic acid signalling. © 2011 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology © 2011 BSPP and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Chloroplast Dysfunction Causes Multiple Defects in Cell Cycle Progression in the Arabidopsis crumpled leaf Mutant

    KAUST Repository

    Hudik, Elodie

    2014-07-18

    The majority of research on cell cycle regulation is focused on the nuclear events that govern the replication and segregation of the genome between the two daughter cells. However, eukaryotic cells contain several compartmentalized organelles with specialized functions, and coordination among these organelles is required for proper cell cycle progression, as evidenced by the isolation of several mutants in which both organelle function and overall plant development were affected. To investigate how chloroplast dysfunction affects the cell cycle, we analyzed the crumpled leaf (crl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for a chloroplastic protein and displays particularly severe developmental defects. In the crl mutant, we reveal that cell cycle regulation is altered drastically and that meristematic cells prematurely enter differentiation, leading to reduced plant stature and early endoreduplication in the leaves. This response is due to the repression of several key cell cycle regulators as well as constitutive activation of stress-response genes, among them the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED5. One unique feature of the crl mutant is that it produces aplastidic cells in several organs, including the root tip. By investigating the consequence of the absence of plastids on cell cycle progression, we showed that nuclear DNA replication occurs in aplastidic cells in the root tip, which opens future research prospects regarding the dialogue between plastids and the nucleus during cell cycle regulation in higher plants.

  15. Indirect intergenic suppression of a radiosensitive mutant of Sordaria macrospora defective in sister-chromatid cohesiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, A D; Leblon, G; Zickler, D

    1986-01-01

    Six ultra violet (UV) mutageneses were performed on the spo76 UV-sensitive mutant of Sordaria macrospora. Spo76 shows an early centromere cleavage associated with an arrest at the first meiotic division and therefore does not form ascospores. Moreover, it exhibits altered pairing structure (synaptonemal complex), revealing a defect in the sister-chromatid cohesiveness. From 37 revertants which partially restored sporulation, 34 extragenic suppressors of spo76 were isolated. All suppressors are altered in chromosomal pairing but, unlike spo76, show a wild type centromere cleavage. The 34 suppressors were assigned to six different genes and mapped. Only one of the suppressor genes is involved in repair functions.

  16. Screening and identification of respiration deficiency mutants of yeasts (Saccharomyces Cerevisiae) induced by heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Shuhong; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Jin Genming; Wei Zengquan; Xie Hongmei; Zhang Hong

    2006-01-01

    A screen of respiration deficiency mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae induced by 5.19 MeV/u 22 Ne 5- ion irradiation is studied. Some respiration deficiency mutants, which are white colony phenotype in the selective culture of TTC medium, are obtained. The mutants are effectively identified by means of a new and simplified restriction analysis method. (authors)

  17. Study of a region on yeast chromosome XIII that complements pet G199 mutants (COX7 and carries a new non-essential gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Nobrega

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae assigned to complementation group G199 are deficient in mitochondrial respiration and lack a functional cytochrome oxidase complex. Recombinant plasmids capable of restoring respiration were cloned by transformation of mutants of this group with a yeast genomic library. Sequencing indicated that a 2.1-kb subclone encompasses the very end (last 11 amino acids of the PET111 gene, the COX7 gene and a new gene (YMR255W of unknown function that potentially codes for a polypeptide of 188 amino acids (about 21.5 kDa without significant homology to any known protein. We have shown that the respiratory defect corresponding to group G199 is complemented by plasmids carrying only the COX7 gene. The gene YMR255W was inactivated by one-step gene replacement and the disrupted strain was viable and unaffected in its ability to grow in a variety of different test media such as minimal or complete media using eight distinct carbon sources at three pH values and temperatures. Inactivation of this gene also did not affect mating or sporulation

  18. Mutant allele of rna14 in fission yeast affects pre-mRNA splicing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    transcript. Rna14 protein in budding yeast has been implicated in cleavage and ... Subsequently, genetic interaction of Rna14 with prp1 and physical .... molecular yeast techniques as described by Moreno et al. ..... To elucidate the role of Rna14 in splicing, RT-PCR analysis ..... design principles of a dynamic RNP machine.

  19. UV-induced lethal sectoring and pure mutant clones in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, M A; Duck, P; Nasim, A

    1976-08-01

    The induction of lethal sectoring and pure mutant clones by ultraviolet light has been studied in a homogeneous G1 population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in a normal growth medium. At the lowest UV dose of 250 ergs, which corresponds to a shoulder in the survival curve, all mutants appeared as pure clones. At higher doses the frequency of mosaic mutants progressively increased. These results indicate a relationship between the highest frequency of complete mutants and the maximum repair activity. In addition, the frequency of lethal sectoring at all doses tested was too low to account for the origin of pure mutant clones.

  20. Ceramides And Stress Signalling Intersect With Autophagic Defects In Neurodegenerative Drosophila blue cheese (bchs) Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbar, Sarita; Sahoo, Ishtapran; Matysik, Artur; Argudo Garcia, Irene; Osborne, Kathleen Amy; Papan, Cyrus; Torta, Federico; Narayanaswamy, Pradeep; Fun, Xiu Hui; Wenk, Markus R; Shevchenko, Andrej; Schwudke, Dominik; Kraut, Rachel

    2015-12-07

    Sphingolipid metabolites are involved in the regulation of autophagy, a degradative recycling process that is required to prevent neuronal degeneration. Drosophila blue cheese mutants neurodegenerate due to perturbations in autophagic flux, and consequent accumulation of ubiquitinated aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that blue cheese mutant brains exhibit an elevation in total ceramide levels; surprisingly, however, degeneration is ameliorated when the pool of available ceramides is further increased, and exacerbated when ceramide levels are decreased by altering sphingolipid catabolism or blocking de novo synthesis. Exogenous ceramide is seen to accumulate in autophagosomes, which are fewer in number and show less efficient clearance in blue cheese mutant neurons. Sphingolipid metabolism is also shifted away from salvage toward de novo pathways, while pro-growth Akt and MAP pathways are down-regulated, and ER stress is increased. All these defects are reversed under genetic rescue conditions that increase ceramide generation from salvage pathways. This constellation of effects suggests a possible mechanism whereby the observed deficit in a potentially ceramide-releasing autophagic pathway impedes survival signaling and exacerbates neuronal death.

  1. [Engineering of a System for the Production of Mutant Human Alpha-Fetoprotein in the Methylotrophic Yeast Pichia pastoris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozkina, E V; Vavilova, E A; Zatsepin, S S; Klyachko, E V; Yagudin, T A; Chulkin, A M; Dudich, I V; Semenkova, L N; Churilova, I V; Benevolenskii, S V

    2016-01-01

    A system for the production of mutant recombinant human alpha-fetoprotein (rhAFPO) lacking the glycosylation site has been engineered in the yeast Pichia pastoris. A strain of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris GS 115/pPICZ?A/rhAFP0, which produces unglycosylated rhAFPO and secretes it to the culture medium, has been constructed. Optimization and scale-up of the fermentation technology have resulted in an increase in the rhAFP0 yield to 20 mg/L. A scheme of isolation and purification of biologically active rhAFP0 has been developed. The synthesized protein has the antitumor activity, which is analogous to the activity of natural human embryonic alpha-fetoprotein.

  2. Supplementary Material for: Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    KAUST Repository

    Papsdorf, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein aggregation and its pathological effects are the major cause of several neurodegenerative diseases. In Huntingtonâ s disease an elongated stretch of polyglutamines within the protein Huntingtin leads to increased aggregation propensity. This induces cellular defects, culminating in neuronal loss, but the connection between aggregation and toxicity remains to be established. Results To uncover cellular pathways relevant for intoxication we used genome-wide analyses in a yeast model system and identify fourteen genes that, if deleted, result in higher polyglutamine toxicity. Several of these genes, like UGO1, ATP15 and NFU1 encode mitochondrial proteins, implying that a challenged mitochondrial system may become dysfunctional during polyglutamine intoxication. We further employed microarrays to decipher the transcriptional response upon polyglutamine intoxication, which exposes an upregulation of genes involved in sulfur and iron metabolism and mitochondrial Fe-S cluster formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative growth is impossible after intoxication with the polyglutamine protein. NMR-based metabolic analyses reveal that mitochondrial metabolism is reduced, leading to accumulation of metabolic intermediates in polyglutamine-intoxicated cells. Conclusion These data show that damages to the mitochondrial system occur in polyglutamine intoxicated yeast cells and suggest an intricate connection between polyglutamine-induced toxicity, mitochondrial functionality and iron homeostasis in this model system.

  3. Systematic Analysis of the DNA Damage Response Network in Telomere Defective Budding Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva-Maria Holstein

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Functional telomeres are critically important to eukaryotic genetic stability. Scores of proteins and pathways are known to affect telomere function. Here, we report a series of related genome-wide genetic interaction screens performed on budding yeast cells with acute or chronic telomere defects. Genetic interactions were examined in cells defective in Cdc13 and Stn1, affecting two components of CST, a single stranded DNA (ssDNA binding complex that binds telomeric DNA. For comparison, genetic interactions were also examined in cells with defects in Rfa3, affecting the major ssDNA binding protein, RPA, which has overlapping functions with CST at telomeres. In more complex experiments, genetic interactions were measured in cells lacking EXO1 or RAD9, affecting different aspects of the DNA damage response, and containing a cdc13-1 induced telomere defect. Comparing fitness profiles across these data sets helps build a picture of the specific responses to different types of dysfunctional telomeres. The experiments show that each context reveals different genetic interactions, consistent with the idea that each genetic defect causes distinct molecular defects. To help others engage with the large volumes of data, the data are made available via two interactive web-based tools: Profilyzer and DIXY. One particularly striking genetic interaction observed was that the chk1∆ mutation improved fitness of cdc13-1 exo1∆ cells more than other checkpoint mutations (ddc1∆, rad9∆, rad17∆, and rad24∆, whereas, in cdc13-1 cells, the effects of all checkpoint mutations were similar. We show that this can be explained by Chk1 stimulating resection—a new function for Chk1 in the eukaryotic DNA damage response network.

  4. Defective FANCI binding by a fanconi anemia-related FANCD2 mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Sato

    Full Text Available FANCD2 is a product of one of the genes associated with Fanconi anemia (FA, a rare recessive disease characterized by bone marrow failure, skeletal malformations, developmental defects, and cancer predisposition. FANCD2 forms a complex with FANCI (ID complex and is monoubiquitinated, which facilitates the downstream interstrand crosslink (ICL repair steps, such as ICL unhooking and nucleolytic end resection. In the present study, we focused on the chicken FANCD2 (cFANCD2 mutant harboring the Leu234 to Arg (L234R substitution. cFANCD2 L234R corresponds to the human FANCD2 L231R mutation identified in an FA patient. We found that cFANCD2 L234R did not complement the defective ICL repair in FANCD2-/- DT40 cells. Purified cFANCD2 L234R did not bind to chicken FANCI, and its monoubiquitination was significantly deficient, probably due to the abnormal ID complex formation. In addition, the histone chaperone activity of cFANCD2 L234R was also defective. These findings may explain some aspects of Fanconi anemia pathogenesis by a FANCD2 missense mutation.

  5. Study on yeast mutant with high alcohol yield fermented in sweet sorghum juice using carbon ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Yaping; Lu Dong; Wang Jufang; Dong Xicun; Gao Feng; Ma Liang; Li Wenjian

    2009-01-01

    Five mutants with high ability of producing alcohol were selected out by using TTC as an indicator after irradiation of the alcohol yeast with 100 MeV/u carbon ions. The fermentation experiment in sweet sorghum juice showed that the alcohol production ability of mutant T4 strain increased 18.6% compared to the control strain. The residual sugar content in the juice was decreased too. After that,the optimum fermentation conditions of the T4 strain in sweet sorghum juice were investigated. The results showed that the optimum temperature and pH value for fermentation were 30 degree C and 4.5, respectively. The verification experiment was fermented in a 10 l bio-reactor and the obtained data indicated that the fermentative rate and the ability of producing alcohol in T4 strain was higher than that in the control strain under the same fermentation condition. (authors)

  6. Induction of mutations by chemicals and gamma rays in mutants of yeast refractory to UV-mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasim, A.; Hannan, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation-sensitive mutants of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, known to be refractory to UV-mutagenesis, were tested for mutability caused by treatments with chemicals and gamma rays. One such mutant (rad3) was studied over a wide range of UV doses to compare the kinetics of its mutational response to that of the wild type. All such comparisons were carried out using a forward mutation system. Data show that, unlike UV, the chemical mutagens as well as gamma rays produced mutations (although at reduced frequency), in the strains of S. pombe tested, indicating the existence of an additional mechanism(s) for chemical and gamma ray induced mutations. These observations are discussed as these relate to the pathways for repair of mutational damage in yeast. (author)

  7. [Mechanism of mutant induction in the ade2 gene of diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts by ultraviolet rays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordenin, D A; Inge-Vechtomov, S G

    1981-01-01

    Ultraviolet light (UV) at 3000 ergs/mm-2 induces ade2 mutants with a frequency about 10(-4) in wild-type haploid strains of yeast and about 10(-5) in diploid wild-type strains. UV irradiation effectively induced mitotic segregation of ade2 in the heterozygous diploid (the frequency of segregation is 6%). Interallelic complementation and localization spectra are similar for mutations induced both in haploids and diploids. The occurrence of ade2 mutants in diploids correlated with mitotic segregation of the marker his8 which is situated in the same arm of XY chromosome as ade2 is, distal to the centromere. Our data about the frequency of ade2 mutants in diploids and haploids, the frequency of ade2 mitotic segregation, mitotic segregation of other markers and genetic characteristics of ade2 mutations confirm the suggestion that the major mechanism of diploid ade2 mutants appearance is mutation in one of the two ADE2 alleles and consequent mitotic homozygotisation of mutation as a result of mitotic crossingover between ade2 and the centromere.

  8. Human COQ9 Rescues a coq9 Yeast Mutant by Enhancing Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis from 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid and Stabilizing the CoQ-Synthome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuiwen H. He

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Coq9 is required for the stability of a mitochondrial multi-subunit complex, termed the CoQ-synthome, and the deamination step of Q intermediates that derive from para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA in yeast. In human, mutations in the COQ9 gene cause neonatal-onset primary Q10 deficiency. In this study, we determined whether expression of human COQ9 could complement yeast coq9 point or null mutants. We found that expression of human COQ9 rescues the growth of the temperature-sensitive yeast mutant, coq9-ts19, on a non-fermentable carbon source and increases the content of Q6, by enhancing Q biosynthesis from 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4HB. To study the mechanism for the rescue by human COQ9, we determined the steady-state levels of yeast Coq polypeptides in the mitochondria of the temperature-sensitive yeast coq9 mutant expressing human COQ9. We show that the expression of human COQ9 significantly increased steady-state levels of yeast Coq4, Coq6, Coq7, and Coq9 at permissive temperature. Human COQ9 polypeptide levels persisted at non-permissive temperature. A small amount of the human COQ9 co-purified with tagged Coq6, Coq6-CNAP, indicating that human COQ9 interacts with the yeast Q-biosynthetic complex. These findings suggest that human COQ9 rescues the yeast coq9 temperature-sensitive mutant by stabilizing the CoQ-synthome and increasing Q biosynthesis from 4HB. This finding provides a powerful approach to studying the function of human COQ9 using yeast as a model.

  9. What’s old is new again: yeast mutant screens in the era of pooled segregant analysis by genome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Curtin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available While once de-rigueur for identification of genes involved in biological processes, screening of chemically induced mutant populations is an approach that has largely been superseded for model organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Availability of single gene deletion/overexpression libraries and combinatorial synthetic genetic arrays provide yeast researchers more structured ways to probe genetic networks. Furthermore, in the age of inexpensive DNA sequencing, methodologies such as mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL by pooled segregant analysis and genome-wide association enable the identification of multiple naturally occurring allelic variants that contribute to polygenic phenotypes of interest. This is, however, contingent on the capacity to screen large numbers of individuals and existence of sufficient natural phenotypic variation within the available population. The latter cannot be guaranteed and non-selectable, industrially relevant phenotypes, such as production of volatile aroma compounds, pose severe limitations on the use of modern genetic techniques due to expensive and time-consuming downstream analyses. An interesting approach to overcome these issues can be found in Den Abt et al.[1] (this issue of Microbial Cell, where a combination of repeated rounds of chemical mutagenesis and pooled segregant analysis by whole genome sequencing was applied to identify genes involved in ethyl acetate formation, demonstrating a new path for industrial yeast strain development and bringing classical mutant screens into the 21st century.

  10. Neurophysiological defects and neuronal gene deregulation in Drosophila mir-124 mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailiang Sun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available miR-124 is conserved in sequence and neuronal expression across the animal kingdom and is predicted to have hundreds of mRNA targets. Diverse defects in neural development and function were reported from miR-124 antisense studies in vertebrates, but a nematode knockout of mir-124 surprisingly lacked detectable phenotypes. To provide genetic insight from Drosophila, we deleted its single mir-124 locus and found that it is dispensable for gross aspects of neural specification and differentiation. On the other hand, we detected a variety of mutant phenotypes that were rescuable by a mir-124 genomic transgene, including short lifespan, increased dendrite variation, impaired larval locomotion, and aberrant synaptic release at the NMJ. These phenotypes reflect extensive requirements of miR-124 even under optimal culture conditions. Comparison of the transcriptomes of cells from wild-type and mir-124 mutant animals, purified on the basis of mir-124 promoter activity, revealed broad upregulation of direct miR-124 targets. However, in contrast to the proposed mutual exclusion model for miR-124 function, its functional targets were relatively highly expressed in miR-124-expressing cells and were not enriched in genes annotated with epidermal expression. A notable aspect of the direct miR-124 network was coordinate targeting of five positive components in the retrograde BMP signaling pathway, whose activation in neurons increases synaptic release at the NMJ, similar to mir-124 mutants. Derepression of the direct miR-124 target network also had many secondary effects, including over-activity of other post-transcriptional repressors and a net incomplete transition from a neuroblast to a neuronal gene expression signature. Altogether, these studies demonstrate complex consequences of miR-124 loss on neural gene expression and neurophysiology.

  11. Characterization of yeast mutants lacking alkaline ceramidases YPC1 and YDC1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voynova, Natalia S; Mallela, Shamroop K; Vazquez, Hector M

    2014-01-01

    Humans and yeast possess alkaline ceramidases located in the early secretory pathway. Single deletions of the highly homologous yeast alkaline ceramidases YPC1 and YDC1 have very little genetic interactions or phenotypes. Here, we performed chemical-genetic screens to find deletions...... reduces chronological life span. A novel finding is that, when working backwards as a ceramide synthase in vivo, Ypc1p prefers C24 and C26 fatty acids as substrates, whereas it prefers C16:0, when solubilized in detergent and working in vitro. Therefore, its physiological activity may not only concern...... the minor ceramides containing C14 and C16. Intriguingly, so far the sole discernable benefit of conserving YPC1 for yeast resides with its ability to convey relative resistance toward H2 O2 ....

  12. Transcriptomic analysis of swarm motility phenotype of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutant defective in periplasmic glucan synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movement of food-borne pathogens on moist surfaces enables them to migrate towards more favorable niches and facilitate their survival for extended periods of time. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants defective in OPG synthesis are unable to exhibit motility on moist surfaces (swarming) ...

  13. Ultraviolet-endonuclease activity in cell extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants defective in excision of pyrimidine dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekker, M.L.; Kaboev, O.K.; Akhmedov, A.T.; Luchkina, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    Cell-free extracts of ultraviolet-sensitive mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae defective in excision of pyrimidine dimers, rad1, rad2, rad3, rad4, rad10, and rad16, as well as the extracts of the wild-type strain RAD+, display ultraviolet-endonuclease activity

  14. Quantitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in the vacuolated lens mouse mutant, a multigenic mouse model of neural tube defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstanje, Ron; Desai, Jigar; Lazar, Gloria; King, Benjamin; Rollins, Jarod; Spurr, Melissa; Joseph, Jamie; Kadambi, Sindhuja; Li, Yang; Cherry, Allison; Matteson, Paul G.; Paigen, Beverly; Millonig, James H.

    Korstanje R, Desai J, Lazar G, King B, Rollins J, Spurr M, Joseph J, Kadambi S, Li Y, Cherry A, Matteson PG, Paigen B, Millonig JH. Quantitative trait loci affecting phenotypic variation in the vacuolated lens mouse mutant, a multigenic mouse model of neural tube defects. Physiol Genomics 35:

  15. Ligase-deficient yeast cells exhibit defective DNA rejoining and enhanced gamma ray sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.W.

    1982-01-01

    Yeast cells deficient in DNA ligase were also deficient in their capacity to rejoin single-strand scissions in prelabeled nuclear DNA. After high-dose-rate gamma irradiation (10 and 25 krads), cdc9-9 mutant cells failed to rejoin single-strand scissions at the restrictive temperature of 37 0 C. In contrast, parental (CDC9) cells (incubated with mutant cells both during and after irradiation) exhibited rapid medium-independent DNA rejoining after 10 min of post-irradiation incubation and slower rates of rejoining after longer incubation. Parental cells were also more resistant than mutant cells to killing by gamma irradiation. Approximately 2.5 +- 0.07 and 5.7 +- 0.6 single-strand breaks per 10 8 daltons were detected in DNAs from either CDC9 or cdc9-9 cells converted to spheroplasts immediately after 10 and 25 krads of irradiation, respectively. At the permissive temperature of 23 0 C, the cdc9-9 cells contained 2 to 3 times the number of DNA single-strand breaks as parental cells after 10 min to 4 h of incubation after 10 krads of irradiation, and two- to eightfold more breaks after 10 min to 2.5 h of incubation after 25 krads of irradiation. Rejoining of single-strand scissions was faster in medium. After only 10 min in buffered growth medium after 10 krads of irradiation, the number of DNA single-strand breaks was reduced to 0.32 +- 0.3 (at 23 0 C) or 0.21 +- 0.05 (at 37 0 C) per 10 8 daltons in parental cells, but remained at 2.1 +- 0.06 (at 23 0 C) or 2.3 +- 0.07 (at 37 0 C) per 10 8 daltons in mutant cells. After 10 or 25 krads of irradiation plus 1 h of incubation in medium at 37 0 C, only DNA from CDC9 cells was rejoined to the size of DNA from unirradiated cells, whereas at 23 0 C, DNAs in both strains were completely rejoined

  16. Senataxin, the ortholog of a yeast RNA helicase, is mutant in ataxia-ocular apraxia 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Maria-Céu; Klur, Sandra; Watanabe, Mitsunori; Németh, Andrea H; Le Ber, Isabelle; Moniz, José-Carlos; Tranchant, Christine; Aubourg, Patrick; Tazir, Meriem; Schöls, Lüdger; Pandolfo, Massimo; Schulz, Jörg B; Pouget, Jean; Calvas, Patrick; Shizuka-Ikeda, Masami; Shoji, Mikio; Tanaka, Makoto; Izatt, Louise; Shaw, Christopher E; M'Zahem, Abderrahim; Dunne, Eimear; Bomont, Pascale; Benhassine, Traki; Bouslam, Naïma; Stevanin, Giovanni; Brice, Alexis; Guimarães, João; Mendonça, Pedro; Barbot, Clara; Coutinho, Paula; Sequeiros, Jorge; Dürr, Alexandra; Warter, Jean-Marie; Koenig, Michel

    2004-03-01

    Ataxia-ocular apraxia 2 (AOA2) was recently identified as a new autosomal recessive ataxia. We have now identified causative mutations in 15 families, which allows us to clinically define this entity by onset between 10 and 22 years, cerebellar atrophy, axonal sensorimotor neuropathy, oculomotor apraxia and elevated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Ten of the fifteen mutations cause premature termination of a large DEAxQ-box helicase, the human ortholog of yeast Sen1p, involved in RNA maturation and termination.

  17. Effects of Light Intensity on Development and Chlorophyll Content in the Arabidopsis Mutant Plants with Defects in Photosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Yu. Garnik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The developmental stages and adaptability to different light intensity (150 µmol*m-2*s-1 and 100 µmol*m-2*s-1 in Arabidopsis mutant lines with defects of photosynthetic apparatus were analyzed. Plant development in the mutant lines depended on the light intensity to varying degrees. Lines ch1-1 (lack of the chlorophyllide a oxygenase and rtn16 (decreased chlorophyll a and b amounts were the most susceptible to the light decrease. No one of the investigated lines demonstrated chlorophyll a/b rate alteration under the different light conditions. The depleted chlorophyll content has had the major effect on the mutant plants development under the different light conditions. The different chlorophyll a/b rate correlated with the different adaptability of mutant plants to low light.

  18. A spontaneous and novel Pax3 mutant mouse that models Waardenburg syndrome and neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Miura, Ikuo; Ohba, Hisako; Shimamoto, Chie; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2017-04-05

    Genes responsible for reduced pigmentation phenotypes in rodents are associated with human developmental defects, such as Waardenburg syndrome, where patients display congenital deafness along with various abnormalities mostly related to neural crest development deficiency. In this study, we identified a spontaneous mutant mouse line Rwa, which displays variable white spots on mouse bellies and white digits and tail, on a C57BL/6N genetic background. Curly tail and spina bifida were also observed, although at a lower penetrance. These phenotypes were dominantly inherited by offspring. We searched for the genetic mechanism of the observed phenotypes. We harnessed a rapid mouse gene mapping system newly developed in our laboratories to identify a responsible gene. We detected a region within chromosome 1 as a probable locus for the causal mutation. Dense mapping using interval markers narrowed the locus down to a 670-kbp region, containing four genes including Pax3, a gene known to be implicated in the types I and III Waardenburg syndrome. Extensive mutation screening of Pax3 detected an 841-bp deletion, spanning the promoter region and intron 1 of the gene. The defective allele of Pax3, named Pax3 Rwa , lacked the first coding exon and co-segregated perfectly with the phenotypes, confirming its causal nature. The genetic background of Rwa mice is almost identical to that of inbred C57BL/6N. These results highlight Pax3 Rwa mice as a beneficial tool for analyzing biological processes involving Pax3, in particular the development and migration of neural crest cells and melanocytes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxidant resistance in a yeast mutant deficient in the Sit4 phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Mirabal, H Reynaldo; Winther, Jakob R; Kielland-Brandt, Morten C

    2008-01-01

    Resistance to thiol oxidation can arise from mutations altering redox homeostasis. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae sit4-110 mutant is here described, which was isolated as resistant to the thiol-specific oxidant dipyridyl disulfide (DPS) and which contains a single-residue substitution in the SIT4 gene...

  20. Disparate peroxisome-related defects in Arabidopsis pex6 and pex26 mutants link peroxisomal retrotranslocation and oil body utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Kim L; Fleming, Wendell A; Kao, Yun-Ting; Wright, Zachary J; Venkova, Savina V; Ventura, Meredith J; Bartel, Bonnie

    2017-10-01

    Catabolism of fatty acids stored in oil bodies is essential for seed germination and seedling development in Arabidopsis. This fatty acid breakdown occurs in peroxisomes, organelles that sequester oxidative reactions. Import of peroxisomal enzymes is facilitated by peroxins including PEX5, a receptor that delivers cargo proteins from the cytosol to the peroxisomal matrix. After cargo delivery, a complex of the PEX1 and PEX6 ATPases and the PEX26 tail-anchored membrane protein removes ubiquitinated PEX5 from the peroxisomal membrane. We identified Arabidopsis pex6 and pex26 mutants by screening for inefficient seedling β-oxidation phenotypes. The mutants displayed distinct defects in growth, response to a peroxisomally metabolized auxin precursor, and peroxisomal protein import. The low PEX5 levels in these mutants were increased by treatment with a proteasome inhibitor or by combining pex26 with peroxisome-associated ubiquitination machinery mutants, suggesting that ubiquitinated PEX5 is degraded by the proteasome when the function of PEX6 or PEX26 is reduced. Combining pex26 with mutations that increase PEX5 levels either worsened or improved pex26 physiological and molecular defects, depending on the introduced lesion. Moreover, elevating PEX5 levels via a 35S:PEX5 transgene exacerbated pex26 defects and ameliorated the defects of only a subset of pex6 alleles, implying that decreased PEX5 is not the sole molecular deficiency in these mutants. We found peroxisomes clustered around persisting oil bodies in pex6 and pex26 seedlings, suggesting a role for peroxisomal retrotranslocation machinery in oil body utilization. The disparate phenotypes of these pex alleles may reflect unanticipated functions of the peroxisomal ATPase complex. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Aberrant cardiolipin metabolism in the yeast taz1 mutant: a model for Barth syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, Zhiming; Valianpour, Fredoen; Chen, Shuliang; Vaz, Frederic M.; Hakkaart, Gertjan A.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Greenberg, Miriam L.

    2004-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the acyl species of the phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) are more highly unsaturated than those of the other membrane phospholipids. Defective acylation of CL with unsaturated fatty acids and decreased total CL are associated with Barth syndrome, an X-linked cardio- and skeletal

  2. Association of methionine requirement with methyl mercury resistant mutants of yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, A.; Sherman, F.

    1974-01-25

    It has been known for several years that strains resistant to mercury can be obtained in several bacterial species. Soon after the correlation between resistance to antibiotics and to mercury was recognized, it was established that genetic elements conferring resistance to antibiotics, mercury and other heavy metals in Escherichia coli and Samonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus reside on extrachromosomal resistance transfer factors or plasmids. Among fungi, mercury resistant strains of Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium notatum, Sclerotinia fructicola, Stemphylium sarcinaeforme, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been reported. In most cases, this was accomplished by training the normal strains for growth on media supplemented with successively increasing concentrations of mercury compounds, and in some cases the resistance was lost when subcultured on mercury-free media. It is noteworthy that in none of the mercury-adapted strains of fungi has the genetic basis of resistance been determined. In this report we describe a method of isolation and characterization of methyl mercury resistant mutants of S. cerevisiae. This study was undertaken with the view that the examination of physiological changes associated with genetically defined resistant mutants will be useful in studying the mechanisms of cellular detoxification of organic mercurials.

  3. Brucellosis vaccines: assessment of Brucella melitensis lipopolysaccharide rough mutants defective in core and O-polysaccharide synthesis and export.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David González

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The brucellae are facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, one of the major neglected zoonoses. In endemic areas, vaccination is the only effective way to control this disease. Brucella melitensis Rev 1 is a vaccine effective against the brucellosis of sheep and goat caused by B. melitensis, the commonest source of human infection. However, Rev 1 carries a smooth lipopolysaccharide with an O-polysaccharide that elicits antibodies interfering in serodiagnosis, a major problem in eradication campaigns. Because of this, rough Brucella mutants lacking the O-polysaccharide have been proposed as vaccines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine the possibilities of rough vaccines, we screened B. melitensis for lipopolysaccharide genes and obtained mutants representing all main rough phenotypes with regard to core oligosaccharide and O-polysaccharide synthesis and export. Using the mouse model, mutants were classified into four attenuation patterns according to their multiplication and persistence in spleens at different doses. In macrophages, mutants belonging to three of these attenuation patterns reached the Brucella characteristic intracellular niche and multiplied intracellularly, suggesting that they could be suitable vaccine candidates. Virulence patterns, intracellular behavior and lipopolysaccharide defects roughly correlated with the degree of protection afforded by the mutants upon intraperitoneal vaccination of mice. However, when vaccination was applied by the subcutaneous route, only two mutants matched the protection obtained with Rev 1 albeit at doses one thousand fold higher than this reference vaccine. These mutants, which were blocked in O-polysaccharide export and accumulated internal O-polysaccharides, stimulated weak anti-smooth lipopolysaccharide antibodies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrate that no rough mutant is equal to Rev 1 in laboratory models and question the notion that

  4. A Medicago truncatula Tobacco Retrotransposon Insertion Mutant Collection with Defects in Nodule Development and Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pislariu, Catalina I.; D. Murray, Jeremy; Wen, JiangQi; Cosson, Viviane; Muni, RajaSekhara Reddy Duvvuru; Wang, Mingyi; A. Benedito, Vagner; Andriankaja, Andry; Cheng, Xiaofei; Jerez, Ivone Torres; Mondy, Samuel; Zhang, Shulan; Taylor, Mark E.; Tadege, Million; Ratet, Pascal; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Chen, Rujin; Udvardi, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    A Tnt1-insertion mutant population of Medicago truncatula ecotype R108 was screened for defects in nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Primary screening of 9,300 mutant lines yielded 317 lines with putative defects in nodule development and/or nitrogen fixation. Of these, 230 lines were rescreened, and 156 lines were confirmed with defective symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Mutants were sorted into six distinct phenotypic categories: 72 nonnodulating mutants (Nod−), 51 mutants with totally ineffective nodules (Nod+ Fix−), 17 mutants with partially ineffective nodules (Nod+ Fix+/−), 27 mutants defective in nodule emergence, elongation, and nitrogen fixation (Nod+/− Fix−), one mutant with delayed and reduced nodulation but effective in nitrogen fixation (dNod+/− Fix+), and 11 supernodulating mutants (Nod++Fix+/−). A total of 2,801 flanking sequence tags were generated from the 156 symbiotic mutant lines. Analysis of flanking sequence tags revealed 14 insertion alleles of the following known symbiotic genes: NODULE INCEPTION (NIN), DOESN’T MAKE INFECTIONS3 (DMI3/CCaMK), ERF REQUIRED FOR NODULATION, and SUPERNUMERARY NODULES (SUNN). In parallel, a polymerase chain reaction-based strategy was used to identify Tnt1 insertions in known symbiotic genes, which revealed 25 additional insertion alleles in the following genes: DMI1, DMI2, DMI3, NIN, NODULATION SIGNALING PATHWAY1 (NSP1), NSP2, SUNN, and SICKLE. Thirty-nine Nod− lines were also screened for arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis phenotypes, and 30 mutants exhibited defects in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Morphological and developmental features of several new symbiotic mutants are reported. The collection of mutants described here is a source of novel alleles of known symbiotic genes and a resource for cloning novel symbiotic genes via Tnt1 tagging. PMID:22679222

  5. Repair-defective mutants of Alteromonas espejiana, the host for bacteriophage PM2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerler, B.R.; Wallace, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    The in vivo repair processes of Alteromonas espejiana, the host for bacteriophage PM2, were characterized, and UV- and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-sensitive mutants were isolated. Wild-type A. espejiana cells were capable of photoreactivation, excision, recombination, and inducible repair. There was no detecttable pyrimidine dimer-DNA N-glycosylase activity, and pyrimidine dimer removal appeared to occur by a pathway analogous to the Escherichia coli Uvr pathway. The UV- and MMS-sensitive mutants of A. espejiana included three groups, each containing at least one mutation involved with excision, recombination, or inducible repair. One group that was UV sensitive but not sensitive to MMS or X rays showed a decreased ability to excise pyrimidine dimers. Mutants in this group were also sensitive to psoralen plus near-UV light and were phenotypically analogous to the E. coli uvr mutants. A second group was UV and MMS sensitive but not sensitive to X rays and appeared to contain mutations in a gene(s) involved in recombination repair. These recombination-deficient mutants differed from the E. coli rec mutants, which are MMS and X-ray sensitive. The third group of A. espejiana mutants was sensitive to UV, MMS, and X rays. These mutants were recombination deficient, lacked inducible repair, and were phenotypically similar to E. coli recA mutants

  6. Kharon1 null mutants of Leishmania mexicana are avirulent in mice and exhibit a cytokinesis defect within macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoa D Tran

    Full Text Available In a variety of eukaryotes, flagella play important roles both in motility and as sensory organelles that monitor the extracellular environment. In the parasitic protozoan Leishmania mexicana, one glucose transporter isoform, LmxGT1, is targeted selectively to the flagellar membrane where it appears to play a role in glucose sensing. Trafficking of LmxGT1 to the flagellar membrane is dependent upon interaction with the KHARON1 protein that is located at the base of the flagellar axoneme. Remarkably, while Δkharon1 null mutants are viable as insect stage promastigotes, they are unable to survive as amastigotes inside host macrophages. Although Δkharon1 promastigotes enter macrophages and transform into amastigotes, these intracellular parasites are unable to execute cytokinesis and form multinucleate cells before dying. Notably, extracellular axenic amastigotes of Δkharon1 mutants replicate and divide normally, indicating a defect in the mutants that is only exhibited in the intra-macrophage environment. Although the flagella of Δkharon1 amastigotes adhere to the phagolysomal membrane of host macrophages, the morphology of the mutant flagella is often distorted. Additionally, these null mutants are completely avirulent following injection into BALB/c mice, underscoring the critical role of the KHARON1 protein for viability of intracellular amastigotes and disease in the animal model of leishmaniasis.

  7. Further studies on a temperature-sensitive mutant of Escherichia coli with defective repair capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morfiadakis, I.; Geissler, E.; Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Molekularbiologie)

    1981-01-01

    A temperature-sensitive mutant of E. coli, WG24, was studied with respect to its sensitivity to photodynamic action, its capacity to perform host controlled reactivation, and its sensitivity to transduction at elevated temperatures. Mutant cells are much more sensitive than wild type cells to photodynamic action by thiopyronine and visible light at elevated temperatures. As well defined rec mutants, WG24 cells are less able to reactivate UV irradiated lambdac phages at elevated temperatures, while their ability to repair T1 phages is less impaired. Mutant cells cannot be transduced to T6 resistance at a detectable rate at elevated temperature. It is concluded, therefore, that some rec gene carries a ts mutation in this mutant. (author)

  8. Identification of a mutant α1 Na/K-ATPase that pumps but is defective in signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Fangfang; Madan, Namrata; Ye, Qiqi; Duan, Qiming; Li, Zhichuan; Wang, Shaomeng; Si, Shuyi; Xie, Zijian

    2013-05-10

    It has not been possible to study the pumping and signaling functions of Na/K-ATPase independently in live cells. Both cell-free and cell-based assays indicate that the A420P mutation abolishes the Src regulatory function of Na/K-ATPase. A420P mutant has normal pumping but not signaling function. Identification of Src regulation-null mutants is crucial for addressing physiological role of Na/K-ATPase. The α1 Na/K-ATPase possesses both pumping and signaling functions. However, it has not been possible to study these functions independently in live cells. We have identified a 20-amino acid peptide (Ser-415 to Gln-434) (NaKtide) from the nucleotide binding domain of α1 Na/K-ATPase that binds and inhibits Src in vitro. The N terminus of NaKtide adapts a helical structure. In vitro kinase assays showed that replacement of residues that contain a bulky side chain in the helical structure of NaKtide by alanine abolished the inhibitory effect of the peptide on Src. Similarly, disruption of helical structure by proline replacement, either single or in combination, reduced the inhibitory potency of NaKtide on Src. To identify mutant α1 that retains normal pumping function but is defective in Src regulation, we transfected Na/K-ATPase α1 knockdown PY-17 cells with expression vectors of wild type or mutant α1 carrying Ala to Pro mutations in the region of NaKtide helical structure and generated several stable cell lines. We found that expression of either A416P or A420P or A425P mutant fully restored the α1 content and consequently the pumping capacity of cells. However, in contrast to A416P, either A420P or A425P mutant was incapable of interacting and regulating cellular Src. Consequently, expression of these two mutants caused significant inhibition of ouabain-activated signal transduction and cell growth. Thus we have identified α1 mutant that has normal pumping function but is defective in signal transduction.

  9. Preparation by site-directed mutagenesis and characterization of the E211Q mutant of yeast enolase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangadala, V S; Glover, C V; Robson, R L; Holland, M J; Lebioda, L; Brewer, J M

    1995-08-16

    The published 'charge shuttle' mechanism of enolase (Lebioda, L. and Stec, B. (1991) Biochemistry 30, 2817-2822) assigns Glu-211 the task of orienting a water molecule that serves as the catalytic base which removes the proton from carbon-2 of the substrate. We prepared the E211Q mutant of yeast enolase 1 by site-directed mutagenesis. It appears to be folded correctly and to respond similarly to many of the normal ligands of enolase: it is stabilized against thermal denaturation by conformational Mg2+ and by Mg2+ and substrate and binds the chromophoric substrate analogue D-tartronate semialdehyde-2-phosphate (TSP) with affinity comparable to that of the native enzyme. However, it has only 0.01% (10(-4)) of the activity of native enolase under standard assay conditions and does not exhibit significantly more activity at various pH values or higher concentrations of substrate and Mg2+. Its ability to produce the form of enzyme-bound and reacted TSP that absorbs at shorter wavelengths is greatly slowed, while the longer wavelength absorbing form is produced rapidly. Overall, these observations are consistent with the hypothetical mechanism.

  10. uvsI mutants defective in UV mutagenesis define a fourth epistatic group of uvs genes in Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, S K; Kafer, E

    1993-01-01

    Three UV-sensitive mutations of A. nidulans, uvsI, uvsJ and uvsA, were tested for epistatic relationships with members of the previously established groups, here called the "UvsF", "UvsC", and "UvsB" groups. uvsI mutants are defective for spontaneous and induced reversion of certain point mutations and differ also for other properties from previously analyzed uvs types. They are very sensitive to the killing effects of UV-light and 4-NQO (4-nitro-quinoline-N-oxide) but not to MMS (methylmethane sulfonate). When double- and single-mutant uvs strains were compared for sensitivity to these three agents, synergistic or additive effects were found for uvsI with all members of the three groups. The uvsI gene may therefore represent a fourth epistatic group, possibly involved in mutagenic repair. On the other hand, uvsJ was clearly epistatic with members of the UvsF group and fitted well into this group also by phenotype. The uvsA gene was tentatively assigned to the UvsC group. uvsA showed epistatic interactions with uvsC in all tests, and like UvsC-group mutants is UV-sensitive mainly in dividing cells. However, the uvsA mutation does not cause the defects in recombination and UV mutagenesis typical for this group.

  11. Yeast as a model host to study replication and recombination of defective interfering RNA of Tomato bushy stunt virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panavas, Tadas; Nagy, Peter D.

    2003-01-01

    Defective interfering (DI) RNA associated with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), which is a plus-strand RNA virus, requires p33 and p92 proteins of TBSV or the related Cucumber necrosis virus (CNV), for replication in plants. To test if DI RNA can replicate in a model host, we coexpressed TBSV DI RNA and p33/p92 of CNV in yeast. We show evidence for replication of DI RNA in yeast, including (i) dependence on p33 and p92 for DI replication; (ii) presence of active CNV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in isolated membrane-containing preparations; (iii) increasing amount of DI RNA(+) over time; (iv) accumulation of (-)stranded DI RNA; (v) presence of correct 5' and 3' ends in DI RNA; (vi) inhibition of replication by mutations in the replication enhancer; and (vii) evolution of DI RNA over time, as shown by sequence heterogeneity. We also produced evidence supporting the occurrence of DI RNA recombinants in yeast. In summary, development of yeast as a host for replication of TBSV DI RNA will facilitate studies on the roles of viral and host proteins in replication/recombination

  12. Defective DNA cross-link removal in Chinese hamster cell mutants hypersensitive to bifunctional alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoy, C.A.; Thompson, L.H.; Mooney, C.L.; Salazar, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    DNA repair-deficient mutants from five genetic complementation groups isolated previously from Chinese hamster cells were assayed for survival after exposure to the bifunctional alkylating agents mitomycin C or diepoxybutane. Groups 1, 3, and 5 exhibited 1.6- to 3-fold hypersensitivity compared to the wild-type cells, whereas Groups 2 and 4 exhibited extraordinary hypersensitivity. Mutants from Groups 1 and 2 were exposed to 22 other bifunctional alkylating agents in a rapid assay that compared cytotoxicity of the mutants to the wild-type parental strain, AA8. With all but two of the compounds, the Group 2 mutant (UV4) was 15- to 60-fold more sensitive than AA8 or the Group 1 mutant (UV5). UV4 showed only 6-fold hypersensitivity to quinacrine mustard. Alkaline elution measurements showed that this compound produced few DNA interstrand cross-links but numerous strand breaks. Therefore, the extreme hypersensitivity of mutants from Groups 2 and 4 appeared specific for compounds the main cytotoxic lesions of which were DNA cross-links. Mutant UV5 was only 1- to 4-fold hypersensitive to all the compounds. Although the initial number of cross-links was similar for the three cell lines, the efficiency of removal of cross-links was lowest in UV4 and intermediate in UV5. These results suggest that the different levels of sensitivity are specifically related to different efficiencies of DNA cross-link removal. The phenotype of hypersensitivity to both UV radiation and cross-link damage exhibited by the mutants in Groups 2 and 4 appears to differ from those of the known human DNA repair syndromes

  13. Development mutants of anabaena doliolum defective in repair of UV-damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, D.N.; Singh, C.B.

    1980-01-01

    Nitrosoguanidine induced 'blue' pigment mutants of the blue-green alga anabaena doliolum were isolated. The blue-mutants on further characterization were grouped into three developmental phenotypes - (i) those forming doli-form blue-spores of heterogenous size i.e., Ad 011, (ii) those forming spheroidal cells in the stationary phase, some of which behave like spores on transfer to fresh medium i.e., Ad 012, and (iii) those showing no sporulation and conditionally producing abnormal cells in the presence of combined nitrogen only i.e., Ad 007. The former two classes of mutants showed the formation of abnormal cells irrespective of the presence or absence of combined nitrogen sources in the medium. The formation of abnormal cells in the filaments of the above mutants were distinguished by their larger size and irregular mode of division leading to true-branch formation. The comparative characterization of these mutant strains with the parental one showed sluggish growth, increased UV-sensitivity, almost unchanged photorepair capacity, a marked change in the pigment composition and relative resistance to nitrosoguanidine. Irregular cell division in both space and time in the mutant strains and their increased sensitivity to ultraviolet irradiation indicate the possible involvement of dark repair system in maintaining the precision of cell cylce in this alga. (orig.) 891 AJ/orig. 892 HIS

  14. vph6 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae require calcineurin for growth and are defective in vacuolar H(+)-ATPase assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, C S; Dolinski, K; Cardenas, M E; Hiller, M A; Jones, E W; Heitman, J

    1995-11-01

    We have characterized a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain that is hypersensitive to cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506, immunosuppressants that inhibit calcineurin, a serine-threonine-specific phosphatase (PP2B). A single nuclear mutation, designated cev1 for calcineurin essential for viability, is responsible for the CsA-FK506-sensitive phenotype. The peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases cyclophilin A and FKBP12, respectively, mediate CsA and FK506 toxicity in the cev1 mutant strain. We demonstrate that cev1 is an allele of the VPH6 gene and that vph6 mutant strains fail to assemble the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase). The VPH6 gene was mapped on chromosome VIII and is predicted to encode a 181-amino acid (21 kD) protein with no identity to other known proteins. We find that calcineurin is essential for viability in many mutant strains with defects in V-ATPase function or vacuolar acidification. In addition, we find that calcineurin modulates extracellular acidification in response to glucose, which we propose occurs via calcineurin regulation of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase PMA1. Taken together, our findings suggest calcineurin plays a general role in the regulation of cation transport and homeostasis.

  15. Apoptosis-like yeast cell death in response to DNA damage and replication defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burhans, William C.; Weinberger, Martin; Marchetti, Maria A.; Ramachandran, Lakshmi; D' Urso, Gennaro; Huberman, Joel A

    2003-11-27

    In budding (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and fission (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) yeast and other unicellular organisms, DNA damage and other stimuli can induce cell death resembling apoptosis in metazoans, including the activation of a recently discovered caspase-like molecule in budding yeast. Induction of apoptotic-like cell death in yeasts requires homologues of cell cycle checkpoint proteins that are often required for apoptosis in metazoan cells. Here, we summarize these findings and our unpublished results which show that an important component of metazoan apoptosis recently detected in budding yeast - reactive oxygen species (ROS) - can also be detected in fission yeast undergoing an apoptotic-like cell death. ROS were detected in fission and budding yeast cells bearing conditional mutations in genes encoding DNA replication initiation proteins and in fission yeast cells with mutations that deregulate cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). These mutations may cause DNA damage by permitting entry of cells into S phase with a reduced number of replication forks and/or passage through mitosis with incompletely replicated chromosomes. This may be relevant to the frequent requirement for elevated CDK activity in mammalian apoptosis, and to the recent discovery that the initiation protein Cdc6 is destroyed during apoptosis in mammals and in budding yeast cells exposed to lethal levels of DNA damage. Our data indicate that connections between apoptosis-like cell death and DNA replication or CDK activity are complex. Some apoptosis-like pathways require checkpoint proteins, others are inhibited by them, and others are independent of them. This complexity resembles that of apoptotic pathways in mammalian cells, which are frequently deregulated in cancer. The greater genetic tractability of yeasts should help to delineate these complex pathways and their relationships to cancer and to the effects of apoptosis-inducing drugs that inhibit DNA replication.

  16. Apoptosis-like yeast cell death in response to DNA damage and replication defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burhans, William C.; Weinberger, Martin; Marchetti, Maria A.; Ramachandran, Lakshmi; D'Urso, Gennaro; Huberman, Joel A.

    2003-01-01

    In budding (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and fission (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) yeast and other unicellular organisms, DNA damage and other stimuli can induce cell death resembling apoptosis in metazoans, including the activation of a recently discovered caspase-like molecule in budding yeast. Induction of apoptotic-like cell death in yeasts requires homologues of cell cycle checkpoint proteins that are often required for apoptosis in metazoan cells. Here, we summarize these findings and our unpublished results which show that an important component of metazoan apoptosis recently detected in budding yeast - reactive oxygen species (ROS) - can also be detected in fission yeast undergoing an apoptotic-like cell death. ROS were detected in fission and budding yeast cells bearing conditional mutations in genes encoding DNA replication initiation proteins and in fission yeast cells with mutations that deregulate cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). These mutations may cause DNA damage by permitting entry of cells into S phase with a reduced number of replication forks and/or passage through mitosis with incompletely replicated chromosomes. This may be relevant to the frequent requirement for elevated CDK activity in mammalian apoptosis, and to the recent discovery that the initiation protein Cdc6 is destroyed during apoptosis in mammals and in budding yeast cells exposed to lethal levels of DNA damage. Our data indicate that connections between apoptosis-like cell death and DNA replication or CDK activity are complex. Some apoptosis-like pathways require checkpoint proteins, others are inhibited by them, and others are independent of them. This complexity resembles that of apoptotic pathways in mammalian cells, which are frequently deregulated in cancer. The greater genetic tractability of yeasts should help to delineate these complex pathways and their relationships to cancer and to the effects of apoptosis-inducing drugs that inhibit DNA replication

  17. Cell lines derived from a Medaka radiation-sensitive mutant have defects in DNA double-strand break responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Masayuki; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2010-01-01

    It was reported that the radiation-sensitive Medaka mutant 'ric1' has a defect in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by γ-rays during early embryogenesis. To study the cellular response of a ric1 mutant to ionizing radiation (IR), we established the mutant embryonic cell lines RIC1-e9, RIC1-e42, RIC1-e43. Following exposure to γ-irradiation, the DSBs in wild-type cells were repaired within 1 h, while those in RIC1 cells were not rejoined even after 2 h. Cell death was induced in the wild-type cells with cell fragmentation, but only a small proportion of the RIC1 cells underwent cell death, and without cell fragmentation. Although both wild-type and RIC1 cells showed mitotic inhibition immediately after γ-irradiation, cell division was much slower to resume in the wild-type cells (20 h versus 12 h). In both wild-type and RIC1 cells, Ser139 phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci were formed after γ-irradiation, however, the γH2AX foci disappeared more quickly in the RIC1 cell lines. These results suggest that the instability of γH2AX foci in RIC1 cells cause an aberration of the DNA damage response. As RIC1 cultured cells showed similar defective DNA repair as ric1 embryos and RIC1 cells revealed defective cell death and cell cycle checkpoint, they are useful for investigating DNA damage responses in vitro. (author)

  18. Isolation and characterisation of a dwarf rice mutant exhibiting defective gibberellins biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, S H; Gururani, M A; Lee, J W; Ahn, B-O; Chun, S-C

    2014-03-01

    We have isolated a severe dwarf mutant derived from a Ds (Dissociation) insertion mutant rice (Oryza sativa var. japonica c.v. Dongjin). This severe dwarf phenotype, has short and dark green leaves, reduced shoot growth early in the seedling stage, and later severe dwarfism with failure to initiate flowering. When treated with bioactive GA3 , mutants are restored to the normal wild-type phenotype. Reverse transcription PCR analyses of 22 candidate genes related to the gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis pathway revealed that among 22 candidate genes tested, a dwarf mutant transcript was not expressed only in one OsKS2 gene. Genetic analysis revealed that the severe dwarf phenotype was controlled by recessive mutation of a single nuclear gene. The putative OsKS2 gene was a chromosome 4-located ent-kaurene synthase (KS), encoding the enzyme that catalyses an early step of the GA biosynthesis pathway. Sequence analysis revealed that osks2 carried a 1-bp deletion in the ORF region of OsKS2, which led to a loss-of-function mutation. The expression pattern of OsKS2 in wild-type cv Dongjin, showed that it is expressed in all organs, most prominently in the stem and floral organs. Morphological characteristics of the dwarf mutant showed dramatic modifications in internal structure and external morphology. We propose that dwarfism in this mutant is caused by a point mutation in OsKS2, which plays a significant role in growth and development of higher plants. Further investigation on OsKS2 and other OsKS-like proteins is underway and may yield better understanding of the putative role of OsKS in severe dwarf mutants. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  19. Characterization of a mutant of Escherichia coli B/R defective in mutation frequency decline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, D.L.

    1974-01-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli B/r designated mfd is very deficient in the ability to exhibit mutation frequency decline (MFD), the characteristic loss of potential suppressor mutations which occurs when protein synthesis is briefly inhibited after irradiation with ultraviolet light (uv). This mutant is known to excise pyrimidine dimers very slowly, although it is as uv-resistant as its mfd + B/r parent strain. We have found that the mfd mutant performs the initial incision step of excision repair normally, but repairs the resulting single-strand breaks much more slowly than the mfd + strain. In spite of the slow dimer excision in the mfd mutant, single-strand DNA breaks do not accumulate during postirradiation incubation, implying that incision and excision are well corrdinated. the prolonged postirradiation lag in cell division and DNA synthesis which accompany slow excision in the mfd strain indicates that resumption of these processes of optimal rates is linked to the timing of excision repair. The normal uv-resistance of the mfd mutant also suggests such coordination and shows that the rate of excision repair is independent of its ultimate efficiency in the removal of potentially lethal uv-induced damage. (U.S.)

  20. Homologous Recombination Defective Arabidopsis Mutants Exhibit Enhanced Sensitivity to Abscisic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Roy

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid (ABA acts as an important plant hormone in regulating various aspects of plant growth and developmental processes particularly under abiotic stress conditions. An increased ABA level in plant cells inhibits DNA replication and cell division, causing plant growth retardation. In this study, we have investigated the effects of ABA on the growth responses of some major loss-of-function mutants of DNA double-stand break (DSB repair genes in Arabidopsis during seed germination and early stages of seedling growth for understanding the role of ABA in the induction of genome instability in plants. A comparative analysis of ABA sensitivity of wild-type Arabidopsis and the knockout mutant lines related to DSB sensors, including atatm, atatr, the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ pathway genes, and mutants related to homologous recombination (HR pathway genes showed relatively enhanced sensitivity of atatr and HR-related mutants to ABA treatment. The expression levels of HR-related genes were increased in wild-type Arabidopsis (Col-0 during seed germination and early stages of seedling growth. Immunoblotting experiments detected phosphorylation of histone H2AX in wild-type (Col-0 and DSB repair gene mutants after ABA treatment, indicating the activation of DNA damage response due to ABA treatment. Analyses of DSB repair kinetics using comet assay under neutral condition have revealed comparatively slower DSB repair activity in HR mutants. Overall, our results have provided comprehensive information on the possible effect of ABA on DNA repair machinery in plants and also indicated potential functional involvement of HR pathway in repairing ABA induced DNA damage in Arabidopsis.

  1. Zebrafish bandoneon mutants display behavioral defects due to a mutation in the glycine receptor β-subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Hiromi; Saint-Amant, Louis; Downes, Gerald B.; Cui, Wilson W.; Zhou, Weibin; Granato, Michael; Kuwada, John Y.

    2005-01-01

    Bilateral alternation of muscle contractions requires reciprocal inhibition between the two sides of the hindbrain and spinal cord, and disruption of this inhibition should lead to simultaneous activation of bilateral muscles. At 1 day after fertilization, wild-type zebrafish respond to mechanosensory stimulation with multiple fast alternating trunk contractions, whereas bandoneon (beo) mutants contract trunk muscles on both sides simultaneously. Similar simultaneous contractions are observed in wild-type embryos treated with strychnine, a blocker of the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR). This result suggests that glycinergic synaptic transmission is defective in beo mutants. Muscle voltage recordings confirmed that muscles on both sides of the trunk in beo are likely to receive simultaneous synaptic input from the CNS. Recordings from motor neurons revealed that glycinergic synaptic transmission was missing in beo mutants. Furthermore, immunostaining with an antibody against GlyR showed clusters in wild-type neurons but not in beo neurons. These data suggest that the failure of GlyRs to aggregate at synaptic sites causes impairment of glycinergic transmission and abnormal behavior in beo mutants. Indeed, mutations in the GlyR β-subunit, which are thought to be required for proper localization of GlyRs, were identified as the basis for the beo mutation. These data demonstrate that GlyRβ is essential for physiologically relevant clustering of GlyRs in vivo. Because GlyR mutations in humans lead to hyperekplexia, a motor disorder characterized by startle responses, the zebrafish beo mutant should be a useful animal model for this condition. PMID:15928085

  2. Genome-scale metabolic model of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the reconciliation of in silico/in vivo mutant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the last decade, the genome-scale metabolic models have been playing increasingly important roles in elucidating metabolic characteristics of biological systems for a wide range of applications including, but not limited to, system-wide identification of drug targets and production of high value biochemical compounds. However, these genome-scale metabolic models must be able to first predict known in vivo phenotypes before it is applied towards these applications with high confidence. One benchmark for measuring the in silico capability in predicting in vivo phenotypes is the use of single-gene mutant libraries to measure the accuracy of knockout simulations in predicting mutant growth phenotypes. Results Here we employed a systematic and iterative process, designated as Reconciling In silico/in vivo mutaNt Growth (RING), to settle discrepancies between in silico prediction and in vivo observations to a newly reconstructed genome-scale metabolic model of the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, SpoMBEL1693. The predictive capabilities of the genome-scale metabolic model in predicting single-gene mutant growth phenotypes were measured against the single-gene mutant library of S. pombe. The use of RING resulted in improving the overall predictive capability of SpoMBEL1693 by 21.5%, from 61.2% to 82.7% (92.5% of the negative predictions matched the observed growth phenotype and 79.7% the positive predictions matched the observed growth phenotype). Conclusion This study presents validation and refinement of a newly reconstructed metabolic model of the yeast S. pombe, through improving the metabolic model’s predictive capabilities by reconciling the in silico predicted growth phenotypes of single-gene knockout mutants, with experimental in vivo growth data. PMID:22631437

  3. Arabidopsis thaliana cdd1 mutant uncouples the constitutive activation of salicylic acid signalling from growth defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swain, S.; Roy, S.; Shah, J.; Wees, S.C.M. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Nandi, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Arabidopsis genotypes with a hyperactive salicylic acidmediated signalling pathway exhibit enhanced disease resistance, which is often coupled with growth and developmental defects, such as dwarfing and spontaneous necrotic lesions on the leaves, resulting in reduced biomass yield. In this article,

  4. The cellular and molecular etiology of the craniofacial defects in the avian ciliopathic mutant talpid2

    Science.gov (United States)

    talpid2 is an avian autosomal recessive mutant with a myriad of congenital malformations, including polydactyly and facial clefting. Although phenotypically similar to talpid3, talpid2 has a distinct facial phenotype and an unknown cellular, molecular and genetic basis. We set out to determine the e...

  5. Prevalence of precore-defective mutant of hepatitis B virus in HBV carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niitsuma, H; Ishii, M; Saito, Y; Miura, M; Kobayashi, K; Ohori, H; Toyota, T

    1995-08-01

    Two hundred and seventy-three serum specimens from hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers were examined for the presence of a characteristic one point mutation at nucleotide (nt) 1896 from the EcoRI site of the HBV genome in the precore region (the preC mutant) using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. This assay approach could detect preC mutants or wild-type sequences when either form constituted more than 10% of the total sample. Overall, 65.5% (76/116) of HBeAg-positive carriers had only the preC wild-type. All HBeAg-positive asymptomatic carriers (n = 14) had only the preC wild-type. In patients with chronic hepatitis B and in anti-HBe-positive asymptomatic carriers, increased prevalence of the preC mutant was associated with the development of anti-HBe antibodies and normalization of the serum alanine aminotransferase concentration. Furthermore, 27 (29.0%) of 93 HBeAg-negative carriers had unexpectedly preC wild-type sequences only. Direct sequencing of the HBV precore region of HBV specimens from 24 patients revealed no mutation at nt 1896, supporting the specificity of the RFLP analysis. These results suggest that RFLP analysis was accurate for the detection of the preC mutation and that the absence of serum HBeAg cannot be explained solely by the dominance of the preC mutant.

  6. Characterization of a Salmonella typhimurium mutant defective in phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochimsen, Bjarne; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Garber, Bruce B.

    1985-01-01

    This study describes the isolation and characterization of a mutant (strain GP122) of Salmonella typhimurium with a partial deficiency of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase activity. This strain was isolated in a purE deoD gpt purine auxotroph by a procedure designed to select guanosin...

  7. Autonomous and Non-autonomous Defects Underlie Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in BRAF-Mutant hiPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Josowitz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in BRAF cause cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS, whereby 40% of patients develop hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM. As the role of the RAS/MAPK pathway in HCM pathogenesis is unclear, we generated a human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC model for CFCS from three patients with activating BRAF mutations. By cell sorting for SIRPα and CD90, we generated a method to examine hiPSC-derived cell type-specific phenotypes and cellular interactions underpinning HCM. BRAF-mutant SIRPα+/CD90− cardiomyocytes displayed cellular hypertrophy, pro-hypertrophic gene expression, and intrinsic calcium-handling defects. BRAF-mutant SIRPα−/CD90+ cells, which were fibroblast-like, exhibited a pro-fibrotic phenotype and partially modulated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through transforming growth factor β (TGFβ paracrine signaling. Inhibition of TGFβ or RAS/MAPK signaling rescued the hypertrophic phenotype. Thus, cell autonomous and non-autonomous defects underlie HCM due to BRAF mutations. TGFβ inhibition may be a useful therapeutic option for patients with HCM due to RASopathies or other etiologies.

  8. Defective balancing ability and hyperactivity in the CLX (circling behavior linked to the X-chromosome) mutant rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, Jun-ichiro; Tanabe, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryo; Ooshima, Yojiro

    2003-12-01

    We have reported that the recently described circling behavior rat (CLX) is a hereditary mutant controlled by a single sex-linked recessive gene (gene symbol: clx). This mutant shows intermittent circle walking and/or running and head tossing with the neck twisted. The abnormal behavior begins to appear around weaning and continues throughout life. In the present study, behavioral tests were performed during the suckling and post-weaning periods and when the rats reached maturity, and the following peculiar abnormalities were revealed: (1) in the righting reflex test, the CLX young show a tendency to take a longer time to revert to normal posture; (2) in the negative geotaxis test, they had difficulty moving upward at 12 days of age; (3) in the air righting reflex test, they frequently fell on their backs or shoulders even after weaning; (4) almost none of the CLX rats showed nystagmus, which is invariably observed in normal rats after rotating stimulation, at 20 weeks of age; and (5) they showed hyperactivity in the open field test at the age of 5 or 6 weeks and a higher degree of locomotor activity in the home cage at the age of 7 and 15 weeks. These results suggest that CLX mutant rats may have some defect in vestibular function (balance sense) or abnormalities in an area of the central nervous system responsible for posture control, e.g., in the dopaminergic or GABAergic neurons.

  9. Insight into the molecular mechanism of yeast acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase mutants F510I, N485G, I69E, E477R, and K73R resistant to soraphen A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Liang, Li; Chen, Qingqing; Zhang, Ling; Huang, Tonghui

    2018-02-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylases (ACCs) is the first committed enzyme of fatty acid synthesis pathway. The inhibition of ACC is thought to be beneficial not only for diseases related to metabolism, such as type-2 diabetes, but also for infectious disease like bacterial infection disease. Soraphen A, a potent allosteric inhibitor of BC domain of yeast ACC, exhibit lower binding affinities to several yeast ACC mutants and the corresponding drug resistance mechanisms are still unknown. We report here a theoretical study of binding of soraphen A to wild type and yeast ACC mutants (including F510I, N485G, I69E, E477R, and K73R) via molecular dynamic simulation and molecular mechanics/generalized Born surface area free energy calculations methods. The calculated binding free energies of soraphen A to yeast ACC mutants are weaker than to wild type, which is highly consistent with the experimental results. The mutant F510I weakens the binding affinity of soraphen A to yeast ACC mainly by decreasing the van der Waals contributions, while the weaker binding affinities of Soraphen A to other yeast ACC mutants including N485G, I69E, E477R, and K73R are largely attributed to the decreased net electrostatic (ΔE ele + ΔG GB) interactions. Our simulation results could provide important insights for the development of more potent ACC inhibitors.

  10. Cerebrovascular defects in Foxc1 mutants correlate with aberrant WNT and VEGF-A pathways downstream of retinoic acid from the meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Swati; Choe, Youngshik; Pleasure, Samuel J; Siegenthaler, Julie A

    2016-12-01

    Growth and maturation of the cerebrovasculature is a vital event in neocortical development however mechanisms that control cerebrovascular development remain poorly understood. Mutations in or deletions that include the FOXC1 gene are associated with congenital cerebrovascular anomalies and increased stroke risk in patients. Foxc1 mutant mice display severe cerebrovascular hemorrhage at late gestational ages. While these data demonstrate Foxc1 is required for cerebrovascular development, its broad expression in the brain vasculature combined with Foxc1 mutant's complex developmental defects have made it difficult to pinpoint its function(s). Using global and conditional Foxc1 mutants, we find 1) significant cerebrovascular growth defects precede cerebral hemorrhage and 2) expression of Foxc1 in neural crest-derived meninges and brain pericytes, though not endothelial cells, is required for normal cerebrovascular development. We provide evidence that reduced levels of meninges-derived retinoic acid (RA), caused by defects in meninges formation in Foxc1 mutants, is a major contributing factor to the cerebrovascular growth defects in Foxc1 mutants. We provide data that suggests that meninges-derived RA ensures adequate growth of the neocortical vasculature via regulating expression of WNT pathway proteins and neural progenitor derived-VEGF-A. Our findings offer the first evidence for a role of the meninges in brain vascular development and provide new insight into potential causes of cerebrovascular defects in patients with FOXC1 mutations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mutant with diphtheria toxin receptor and acidification function but defective in entry of toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, Kenji; Hayes, H.; Mekada, Eisuke; Uchida, Tsuyoshi

    1987-01-01

    A mutant of Chinese hamster ovary cells, GE1, that is highly resistant to diphtheria toxin was isolated. The mutant contains 50% ADP-ribosylatable elongation factor 2, but its protein synthesis was not inhibited by the toxin even at concentrations above 100 μg/ml. 125 I-labeled diphtheria toxin was associated with GE1 cells as well as with the parent cells but did not block protein synthesis of GE1 cells even when the cells were exposed to low pH in the presence or absence of NH 4 Cl. The infections of GE1 cells and the parent cells by vesicular stomatitis virus were similar. GE1 cells were cross-resistant to Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A and so were about 1,000 times more resistant to this toxin than the parent cells. Hybrids of GE1 cells and the parent cells or mutant cells lacking a functional receptor were more sensitive to diphtheria toxin than GE1 cells. These results suggest that entry of diphtheria toxin into cells requires a cellular factor(s) in addition to those involved in receptor function and acidification of endosomes and that GE1 cells do not express this cellular factor. This character is recessive in GE1 cells

  12. Isolation of transformation-defective, replication-nondefective early region 1B mutants of adenovirus 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Y.; Saito, I.; Shiroki, K.; Shimojo, H.

    1984-01-01

    The authors isolated three adenovirus 12 early region 1B mutants (in205B, in205C, and dl205) by ligation of the cleaved DNA-protein complex and transfection of human embryo kidney cells with the ligation products. These mutants could replicate efficiently in human embryo kidney or KB cells but showed markedly reduced transforming capacities both in vitro and in vivo. In cells infected with the mutants, the early region 1B gene was transcribed efficiently. In cells infected with in205B, the products corresponding to the early region 1B-coded 19,000-molecular-weight polypeptide was detected by in vitro translation but not immunoprecipitated extract of labeled cells. In cells infected with in205C or dl205, the products corresponding to the same polypeptide were not detected by either in vitro translation or immunoprecipitation of labeled cell extracts. The results suggest that the 19,000-molecular-weight polypeptide encoded by early region 1B is required for cell transformation but not for viral propagation

  13. A patient-derived mutant form of the Fanconi anemia protein, FANCA, is defective in nuclear accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupfer, G; Naf, D; Garcia-Higuera, I; Wasik, J; Cheng, A; Yamashita, T; Tipping, A; Morgan, N; Mathew, C G; D'Andrea, A D

    1999-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive cancer susceptibility syndrome with at least eight complementation groups (A-H). Three FA genes, corresponding to complementation groups A, C, and G, have been cloned, but the function of the encoded FA proteins remains unknown. We recently demonstrated that the FANCA and FANCC proteins bind and form a nuclear complex. In the current study, we identified a homozygous mutation in the FANCA gene (3329A>C) in an Egyptian FA patient from a consanguineous family. This mutant FANCA allele is predicted to encode a mutant FANCA protein, FANCA(H1110P), in which histidine 1110 is changed to proline. Initially, we characterized the FANCA(H1110P) protein, expressed in an Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-immortalized lymphoblast line derived from the patient. Unlike wild-type FANCA protein expressed in normal lymphoblasts, FANCA(H1110P) was not phosphorylated and failed to bind to FANCC. To test directly the effect of this mutation on FANCA function, we used retroviral-mediated transduction to express either wild-type FANCA or FANCA(H1110P) protein in the FA-A fibroblast line, GM6914. Unlike wild-type FANCA, the mutant protein failed to complement the mitomycin C sensitivity of these cells. In addition, the FANCA(H1110P) protein was defective in nuclear accumulation in the transduced cells. The characteristics of this mutant protein underscore the importance of FANCA phosphorylation, FANCA/FANCC binding, and nuclear accumulation in the function of the FA pathway.

  14. Defect of Fe-S cluster binding by DNA polymerase δ in yeast suppresses UV-induced mutagenesis, but enhances DNA polymerase ζ - dependent spontaneous mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepchenkova, E I; Tarakhovskaya, E R; Siebler, H M; Pavlov, Y I

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are duplicated by a complex machinery, utilizing high fidelity replicative B-family DNA polymerases (pols) α, δ and ε. Specialized error-prone pol ζ, the fourth B-family member, is recruited when DNA synthesis by the accurate trio is impeded by replication stress or DNA damage. The damage tolerance mechanism dependent on pol ζ prevents DNA/genome instability and cell death at the expense of increased mutation rates. The pol switches occurring during this specialized replication are not fully understood. The loss of pol ζ results in the absence of induced mutagenesis and suppression of spontaneous mutagenesis. Disruption of the Fe-S cluster motif that abolish the interaction of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the catalytic subunit of pol ζ with its accessory subunits, which are shared with pol δ, leads to a similar defect in induced mutagenesis. Intriguingly, the pol3-13 mutation that affects the Fe-S cluster in the CTD of the catalytic subunit of pol δ also leads to defective induced mutagenesis, suggesting the possibility that Fe-S clusters are essential for the pol switches during replication of damaged DNA. We confirmed that yeast strains with the pol3-13 mutation are UV-sensitive and defective in UV-induced mutagenesis. However, they have increased spontaneous mutation rates. We found that this increase is dependent on functional pol ζ. In the pol3-13 mutant strain with defective pol δ, there is a sharp increase in transversions and complex mutations, which require functional pol ζ, and an increase in the occurrence of large deletions, whose size is controlled by pol ζ. Therefore, the pol3-13 mutation abrogates pol ζ-dependent induced mutagenesis, but allows for pol ζ recruitment for the generation of spontaneous mutations and prevention of larger deletions. These results reveal differential control of the two major types of pol ζ-dependent mutagenesis by the Fe-S cluster present in replicative pol δ. Copyright © 2016

  15. Strong morphological defects in conditional Arabidopsis abp1 knock-down mutants generated in absence of functional ABP1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalko, Jaroslav; Glanc, Matouš; Perrot-Rechenmann, Catherine; Friml, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    The Auxin Binding Protein 1 (ABP1) is one of the most studied proteins in plants. Since decades ago, it has been the prime receptor candidate for the plant hormone auxin with a plethora of described functions in auxin signaling and development. The developmental importance of ABP1 has recently been questioned by identification of Arabidopsis thaliana abp1 knock-out alleles that show no obvious phenotypes under normal growth conditions. In this study, we examined the contradiction between the normal growth and development of the abp1 knock-outs and the strong morphological defects observed in three different ethanol-inducible abp1 knock-down mutants ( abp1-AS, SS12K, SS12S). By analyzing segregating populations of abp1 knock-out vs. abp1 knock-down crosses we show that the strong morphological defects that were believed to be the result of conditional down-regulation of ABP1 can be reproduced also in the absence of the functional ABP1 protein. This data suggests that the phenotypes in  abp1 knock-down lines are due to the off-target effects and asks for further reflections on the biological function of ABP1 or alternative explanations for the missing phenotypic defects in the abp1 loss-of-function alleles.

  16. Supplementary Material for: Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    KAUST Repository

    Papsdorf, Katharina; Kaiser, Christoph; Drazic, Adrian; Grö tzinger, Stefan W.; Haeß ner, Carmen; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    -S cluster formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative

  17. Protein kinase CK2 mutants defective in substrate recognition. Purification and kinetic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarno, S; Vaglio, P; Meggio, F

    1996-01-01

    Five mutants of protein kinase CK2 alpha subunit in which altogether 14 basic residues were singly to quadruply replaced by alanines (K74A,K75A,K76A,K77A; K79A, R80A,K83A; R191A,R195A,K198A; R228A; and R278A, K279A,R280A) have been purified to near homogeneity either as such or after addition...... of the recombinant beta subunit. By this latter procedure five mutated tetrameric holoenzymes were obtained as judged from their subunit composition, sedimentation coefficient on sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation, and increased activity toward a specific peptide substrate as compared with the isolated alpha......191A,R195A, K198A; K79A,R80A,K83A; and K74A,K75A, K76A,K77A are assayed with the peptides RRRADDSADDDD, RRRADDSDDADD, and RRRADDSDDDAA, respectively. In contrast, the phosphorylation efficiencies of the other substituted peptides decrease more markedly with these mutants than with CK2 wild type...

  18. Neurospora crassa ASM-1 complements the conidiation defect in a stuA mutant of Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dawoon; Upadhyay, Srijana; Bomer, Brigitte; Wilkinson, Heather H; Ebbole, Daniel J; Shaw, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans StuA and Neurospora crassa ASM-1 are orthologous APSES (ASM-1, PHD1, SOK2, Efg1, StuA) transcription factors conserved across a diverse group of fungi. StuA and ASM-1 have roles in asexual (conidiation) and sexual (ascospore formation) development in both organisms. To address the hypothesis that the last common ancestor of these diverse fungi regulated conidiation with similar genes, asm-1 was introduced into the stuA1 mutant of A. nidulans. Expression of asm-1 complemented defective conidiophore morphology and restored conidia production to wild type levels in stuA1. Expression of asm-1 in the stuA1 strain did not rescue the defect in sexual development. When the conidiation regulator AbaA was tagged at its C-terminus with GFP in A. nidulans, it localized to nuclei in phialides. When expressed in the stuA1 mutant, AbaA::GFP localized to nuclei in conidiophores but no longer was confined to phialides, suggesting that expression of AbaA in specific cell types of the conidiophore was conditioned by StuA. Our data suggest that the function in conidiation of StuA and ASM-1 is conserved and support the view that, despite the great morphological and ontogenic diversity of their condiphores, the last common ancestor of A. nidulans and N. crassa produced an ortholog of StuA that was involved in conidiophore development. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  19. Carbon allocation and element composition in four Chlamydomonas mutants defective in genes related to the CO2 concentrating mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmola, Francesco; Mukherjee, Bratati; Moroney, James V; Giordano, Mario

    2014-09-01

    Four mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with defects in different components of the CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) or in Rubisco activase were grown autotrophically at high pCO2 and then transferred to low pCO2, in order to study the role of different components of the CCM on carbon allocation and elemental composition. To study carbon allocation, we measured the relative size of the main organic pools by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence was used to analyze the elemental composition of algal cells. Our data show that although the organic pools increased their size at high CO2 in all strains, their stoichiometry was highly homeostatic, i.e., the ratios between carbohydrates and proteins, lipid and proteins, and carbohydrates and lipids, did not change significantly. The only exception was the wild-type 137c, in which proteins decreased relative to carbohydrates and lipids, when the cells were transferred to low CO2. It is noticeable that the two wild types used in this study responded differently to the transition from high to low CO2. Malfunctions of the CCM influenced the concentration of several elements, somewhat altering cell elemental stoichiometry: especially the C/P and N/P ratios changed appreciably in almost all strains as a function of the growth CO2 concentration, except in 137c and the Rubisco activase mutant rca1. In strain cia3, defective in the lumenal carbonic anhydrase (CA), the cell quotas of P, S, Ca, Mn, Fe, and Zn were about 5-fold higher at low CO2 than at high CO2. A Principle Components Analysis showed that, mostly because of its elemental composition, cia3 behaved in a substantially different way from all other strains, at low CO2. The lumenal CA thus plays a crucial role, not only for the correct functioning of the CCM, but also for element utilization. Not surprisingly, growth at high CO2 attenuated differences among strains.

  20. Defective pairing and synaptonemal complex formation in a Sordaria mutant (spo44) with a translocated segment of the nucleolar organizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickler, D; de Lares, L; Moreau, P J; Leblon, G

    1985-01-01

    The recessive meiotic mutant spo44 of Sordaria macrospora, with 90% ascospore abortion, exhibits striking effects on recombination (67% decrease), irregular segregation of the almost unpaired homologues, and a decrease in chiasma frequency in the few cases where bivalents are formed. Three-dimensional reconstructions of ten prophase nuclei indicate that pairing, as judged by the absence of fully formed synaptonemal complexes (SC), is not achieved although lateral elements (LE) assemble. The pairing failure is attributable to defects in the alignment of homologous chromosomes. The leptotene alignment seen in the wild type before SC formation was not observed in the spo44 nuclei. Dense material, considered to be precursor of SC central elements, was found scattered among the LE in two nuclei. The behaviour of spo44 substantiates the hypothesis that chromosome matching and SC formation are separable events. - The total length of the LE in the mutant is the same as in the wild type, but due to variable numbers and length of the individual LE, homologues cannot be lined up. Light microscopic observations indicate that the irregular length and number of LE is due to extensive chromosome breakage. The wild-type function corresponding to spo44 is required for both LE integrity and chromosome matching. Reconstructions of heterozygous nuclei reveal the presence of a supernumerary nucleolar organizer in one arm of chromosome 7. It is suggested that rDNA has been inserted into a gene whose function is involved in pairing or into a controlling sequence that interacts with the pairing process.

  1. Epididymis response partly compensates for spermatozoa oxidative defects in snGPx4 and GPx5 double mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaïs Noblanc

    Full Text Available We report here that spermatozoa of mice lacking both the sperm nucleus glutathione peroxidase 4 (snGPx4 and the epididymal glutathione peroxidase 5 (GPx5 activities display sperm nucleus structural abnormalities including delayed and defective nuclear compaction, nuclear instability and DNA damage. We show that to counteract the GPx activity losses, the epididymis of the double KO animals mounted an antioxydant response resulting in a strong increase in the global H(2O(2-scavenger activity especially in the cauda epididymis. Quantitative RT-PCR data show that together with the up-regulation of epididymal scavengers (of the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin system as well as glutathione-S-transferases the epididymis of double mutant animals increased the expression of several disulfide isomerases in an attempt to recover normal disulfide-bridging activity. Despite these compensatory mechanisms cauda-stored spermatozoa of double mutant animals show high levels of DNA oxidation, increased fragmentation and greater susceptibility to nuclear decondensation. Nevertheless, the enzymatic epididymal salvage response is sufficient to maintain full fertility of double KO males whatever their age, crossed with young WT female mice.

  2. Structural analysis of Herbaspirillum seropedicae lipid-A and of two mutants defective to colonize maize roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Rodrigo V; Balsanelli, Eduardo; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Carlson, Russell W; Muszynski, Artur; Monteiro, Rose A; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Iacomini, Marcello

    2012-11-01

    Lipid-A was isolated by mild acid hydrolysis from lipopolysaccharides extracted from cells of Herbaspirillum seropedicae, strain SMR1, and from two mutants deficient in the biosynthesis of rhamnose (rmlB⁻ and rmlC⁻). Structural analyzes were carried out using MALDI-TOF and derivatization by per-O-trimethylsilylation followed by GC-MS in order to determine monosaccharide and fatty acid composition. De-O-acylation was also performed to determine the presence of N-linked fatty acids. Lipid-A from H. seropedicae SMR1 showed a major structure comprising 2-amino-2-deoxy-glucopyranose-(1→6)-2-amino-2-deoxy-glucopyranose phosphorylated at C4' and C1 positions, each carrying a unit of 4-amino-4-deoxy-arabinose. C2 and C2' positions were substituted by amide-linked 3-hydroxy-dodecanoic acids. Both rhamnose-defective mutants showed similar structure for their lipid-A moieties, except for the lack of 4-amino-4-deoxy-arabinose units attached to phosphoryl groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification and molecular characterization of a naturally occurring RNA virus mutant defective in the initiation of host recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin Hongwu; Ding Shouwei

    2003-01-01

    The host recovery response is characterized by the disappearance of disease symptoms and activation of the RNA silencing virus resistance in the new growth following an initial symptomatic infection. However, it is not clear what triggers the initiation of recovery, which occurs naturally only in some virus-host interactions. Here we report the identification and characterization of a spontaneous mutant of Tobacco streak virus (TSV) that became defective in triggering recovery in tobacco plants. Infectious full-length cDNA clones corresponding to the tripartite RNA genome were constructed from both the wild-type and the nonrecovery mutant of TSV (TSVnr), the first sets of infectious cDNA clones from an Ilarvirus. Genetic and molecular analyses identified an A → G mutation in the TSVnr genome that was sufficient to confer nonrecovery when introduced into TSV. The mutation was located in the intergenic region of RNA 3 upstream of the mapped transcriptional start site of the coat protein mRNA. Intriguingly, induction of recovery by TSV was not accompanied by virus clearance and TSV consistently accumulated to significantly higher levels than TSVnr did even though TSVnr-infected plants displayed severe symptoms throughout the course of infection. Thus, our findings indicate that recovery of host can be initiated by minimal genetic changes in a viral genome and may occur in the absence of virus clearance. Mechanisms possibly involved in the initiation of host recovery are discussed

  4. Chinese hamster ovary mutant UV-1 is hypomutable and defective in a postreplication recovery process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamato, T.D.; Hinkle, L.; Collins, A.R.; Waldren, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    CHO-UV-1 is a mutant of the Chinese hamster cell CHO-K1 hypersensitive to killing by ultraviolet light but with normal resistance to X-ray. It is also hypersensitive to killing by ethyl methane sulfonate. Hybrid clones formed bu fusing UV-1 and Chinese hamster lung cells display the normal ultraviolet resistance of the latter. The sensitive phenotype behaves, therefore, in a genetically recessive manner. Ultraviolet sensitivity of UV-1 is not associated with a deficiency in excision repair. Alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis of nascent DNA from ultraviolet-irradiated cells reveals that UV-1 is, however, markedly deficient in postreplication recovery. Furthermore, UV-1 has a lower rate of induced mutation to 6-thioguanine resistance than does the parental cell when treated with ultraviolet light or ethyl methane sulfonate. These results suggest that the phenotype of UV-1 is due to a mutation in a form of postreplication recovery which in normal cells is error prone

  5. Structure of a PKA RIα Recurrent Acrodysostosis Mutant Explains Defective cAMP-Dependent Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruystens, Jessica Gh; Wu, Jian; Fortezzo, Audrey; Del Rio, Jason; Nielsen, Cole; Blumenthal, Donald K; Rock, Ruth; Stefan, Eduard; Taylor, Susan S

    2016-12-04

    Most disease-related mutations that impair cAMP protein kinase A (PKA) signaling are present within the regulatory (R) PKA RI alpha-subunit (RIα). Although mutations in the PRKAR1A gene are linked to Carney complex (CNC) disease and, more recently, to acrodysostosis-1 (ACRDYS1), the two diseases show contrasting phenotypes. While CNC mutations cause increased PKA activity, ACRDYS1 mutations result in decreased PKA activity and cAMP resistant holoenzymes. Mapping the ACRDYS1 disease mutations reveals their localization to the second of two tandem cAMP-binding (CNB) domains (CNB-B), and here, we characterize a recurrent deletion mutant where the last 14 residues are missing. The crystal structure of a monomeric form of this mutant (RIα92-365) bound to the catalytic (C)-subunit reveals the dysfunctional regions of the RIα subunit. Beyond the missing residues, the entire capping motif is disordered (residues 357-379) and explains the disrupted cAMP binding. Moreover, the effects of the mutation extend far beyond the CNB-B domain and include the active site and N-lobe of the C-subunit, which is in a partially open conformation with the C-tail disordered. A key residue that contributes to this crosstalk, D267, is altered in our structure, and we confirmed its functional importance by mutagenesis. In particular, the D267 interaction with Arg241, a residue shown earlier to be important for allosteric regulation, is disrupted, thereby strengthening the interaction of D267 with the C-subunit residue Arg194 at the R:C interface. We see here how the switch between active (cAMP-bound) and inactive (holoenzyme) conformations is perturbed and how the dynamically controlled crosstalk between the helical domains of the two CNB domains is necessary for the functional regulation of PKA activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. groE mutants of Escherichia coli are defective in umuDC-dependent UV mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, C.E.; Walker, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    Overexpression of the SOS-inducible umuDC operon of Escherichia coli results in the inability of these cells to grow at 30 degrees C. Mutations in several heat shock genes suppress this cold sensitivity. Suppression of umuD+C+-dependent cold sensitivity appears to occur by two different mechanisms. We show that mutations in lon and dnaK heat shock genes suppress cold sensitivity in a lexA-dependent manner. In contrast, mutations in groES, groEL, and rpoH heat shock genes suppress cold sensitivity regardless of the transcriptional regulation of the umuDC genes. We have also found that mutations in groES and groEL genes are defective in umuDC-dependent UV mutagenesis. This defect can be suppressed by increased expression of the umuDC operon. The mechanism by which groE mutations affect umuDC gene product function may be related to the stability of the UmuC protein, since the half-life of this protein is shortened because of mutations at the groE locus

  7. Fission yeast 26S proteasome mutants are multi-drug resistant due to stabilization of the Pap1transcription factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penney, Mary; Samejima, Itaru; Wilkinson, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the result of a genetic screen for mutants resistant to the microtubule poison methyl benzimidazol-2-yl carbamate (MBC) that were also temperature sensitive for growth. In total the isolated mutants were distributed in ten complementation groups. Cloning experiments revealed...

  8. Pharmacologic Approach to Defective Protein Trafficking in the E637K-hERG Mutant with PD-118057 and Thapsigargin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Mao

    Full Text Available Treatment of LQT2 is inadequate. Many drugs which can pharmacologically rescue defective protein trafficking in LQT2 also result in potent blockade of HERG current, negating their therapeutic benefit. It is reported that PD-118057 and thapsigargin can rescue LQT2 without hERG channel blockade, but the precise mechanism of action is unknown. Furthermore, the effect of PD-118057 and thapsigargin on the dominant negative E637K-hERG mutant has not been previously investigated.IN THIS STUDY, WE INVESTIGATED: (a the effect of PD-118057 and thapsigargin on the current amplitudes of WT-hERG and WT/E637K-hERG channels; (b the effect of PD-118057 and thapsigargin on the biophysical properties of WT-hERG and WT/E637K-hERG channels; (c whether drug treatment can rescue channel processing and trafficking defects of the WT/E637K-hERG mutant.The whole-cell Patch-clamp technique was used to assess the effect of PD-118057 and thapsigargin on the electrophysiological characteristics of the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K(+ current (Ikr of the hERG protein channel. Western blot was done to investigate pharmacological rescue on hERG protein channel function.In our study, PD-118057 was shown to significantly enhance both the maximum current amplitude and tail current amplitude, but did not alter the gating and kinetic properties of the WT-hERG channel, with the exception of accelerating steady-state inactivation. Additionally, thapsigargin shows a similar result as PD-118057 for the WT-hERG channel, but with the exception of attenuating steady-state inactivation. However, for the WT/E637K-hERG channel, PD-118057 had no effect on either the current or on the gating and kinetic properties. Furthermore, thapsigargin treatment did not alter the current or the gating and kinetic properties of the WT/E637K-hERG channel, with the exception of opening at more positive voltages.Our findings illustrate that neither PD-118057 nor thapsigargin play a role in correcting

  9. Defective replication initiation results in locus specific chromosome breakage and a ribosomal RNA deficiency in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph C Sanchez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A form of dwarfism known as Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS is caused by recessive mutations in one of six different genes (ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDC6, CDT1, and MCM5. These genes encode components of the pre-replication complex, which assembles at origins of replication prior to S phase. Also, variants in two additional replication initiation genes have joined the list of causative mutations for MGS (Geminin and CDC45. The identity of the causative MGS genetic variants strongly suggests that some aspect of replication is amiss in MGS patients; however, little evidence has been obtained regarding what aspect of chromosome replication is faulty. Since the site of one of the missense mutations in the human ORC4 alleles is conserved between humans and yeast, we sought to determine in what way this single amino acid change affects the process of chromosome replication, by introducing the comparable mutation into yeast (orc4Y232C. We find that yeast cells with the orc4Y232C allele have a prolonged S-phase, due to compromised replication initiation at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA locus located on chromosome XII. The inability to initiate replication at the rDNA locus results in chromosome breakage and a severely reduced rDNA copy number in the survivors, presumably helping to ensure complete replication of chromosome XII. Although reducing rDNA copy number may help ensure complete chromosome replication, orc4Y232C cells struggle to meet the high demand for ribosomal RNA synthesis. This finding provides additional evidence linking two essential cellular pathways-DNA replication and ribosome biogenesis.

  10. Defective replication initiation results in locus specific chromosome breakage and a ribosomal RNA deficiency in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Joseph C; Kwan, Elizabeth X; Pohl, Thomas J; Amemiya, Haley M; Raghuraman, M K; Brewer, Bonita J

    2017-10-01

    A form of dwarfism known as Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is caused by recessive mutations in one of six different genes (ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDC6, CDT1, and MCM5). These genes encode components of the pre-replication complex, which assembles at origins of replication prior to S phase. Also, variants in two additional replication initiation genes have joined the list of causative mutations for MGS (Geminin and CDC45). The identity of the causative MGS genetic variants strongly suggests that some aspect of replication is amiss in MGS patients; however, little evidence has been obtained regarding what aspect of chromosome replication is faulty. Since the site of one of the missense mutations in the human ORC4 alleles is conserved between humans and yeast, we sought to determine in what way this single amino acid change affects the process of chromosome replication, by introducing the comparable mutation into yeast (orc4Y232C). We find that yeast cells with the orc4Y232C allele have a prolonged S-phase, due to compromised replication initiation at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus located on chromosome XII. The inability to initiate replication at the rDNA locus results in chromosome breakage and a severely reduced rDNA copy number in the survivors, presumably helping to ensure complete replication of chromosome XII. Although reducing rDNA copy number may help ensure complete chromosome replication, orc4Y232C cells struggle to meet the high demand for ribosomal RNA synthesis. This finding provides additional evidence linking two essential cellular pathways-DNA replication and ribosome biogenesis.

  11. Defects of mutant DNMT1 are linked to a spectrum of neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baets, Jonathan; Duan, Xiaohui; Wu, Yanhong; Smith, Gordon; Seeley, William W.; Mademan, Inès; McGrath, Nicole M.; Beadell, Noah C.; Khoury, Julie; Botuyan, Maria-Victoria; Mer, Georges; Worrell, Gregory A.; Hojo, Kaori; DeLeon, Jessica; Laura, Matilde; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Senderek, Jan; Weis, Joachim; Van den Bergh, Peter; Merrill, Shana L.; Reilly, Mary M.; Houlden, Henry; Grossman, Murray; Scherer, Steven S.; De Jonghe, Peter; Dyck, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    We report a broader than previously appreciated clinical spectrum for hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1E (HSAN1E) and a potential pathogenic mechanism for DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) mutations. The clinical presentations and genetic characteristics of nine newly identified HSAN1E kinships (45 affected subjects) were investigated. Five novel mutations of DNMT1 were discovered; p.C353F, p.T481P, p.P491L, p.Y524D and p.I531N, all within the target-sequence domain, and two mutations (p.T481P, p.P491L) arising de novo. Recently, HSAN1E has been suggested as an allelic disorder of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy. Our results indicate that all the mutations causal for HSAN1E are located in the middle part or N-terminus end of the TS domain, whereas all the mutations causal for autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy are located in the C-terminus end of the TS domain. The impact of the seven causal mutations in this cohort was studied by cellular localization experiments. The binding efficiency of the mutant DNMT proteins at the replication foci and heterochromatin were evaluated. Phenotypic characterizations included electromyography, brain magnetic resonance and nuclear imaging, electroencephalography, sural nerve biopsies, sleep evaluation and neuropsychometric testing. The average survival of HSAN1E was 53.6 years. [standard deviation = 7.7, range 43–75 years], and mean onset age was 37.7 years. (standard deviation = 8.6, range 18–51 years). Expanded phenotypes include myoclonic seizures, auditory or visual hallucinations, and renal failure. Hypersomnia, rapid eye movement sleep disorder and/or narcolepsy were identified in 11 subjects. Global brain atrophy was found in 12 of 14 who had brain MRI. EEGs showed low frequency (delta waves) frontal-predominant abnormality in five of six patients. Marked variability in cognitive deficits was observed, but the majority of patients (89%) developed

  12. Apolar Distal Pocket Mutants of Yeast Cytochrome c Peroxidase: Hydrogen Peroxide Reactivity and Cyanide Binding of the TriAla, TriVal, and TriLeu Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwai, Anil K.; Meyen, Cassandra; Kilheeney, Heather; Wroblewski, Damian; Vitello, Lidia B.; Erman, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Three yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) variants with apolar distal heme pockets have been constructed. The CcP variants have Arg48, Trp51, and His52 mutated to either all alanines, CcP(triAla), all valines, CcP(triVal), or all leucines, CcP(triLeu). The triple mutants have detectable enzymatic activity at pH 6 but the activity is less than 0.02% that of wild-type CcP. The activity loss is primarily due to the decreased rate of reaction between the triple mutants and H2O2 compared to wild-type CcP. Spectroscopic properties and cyanide binding characteristics of the triple mutants have been investigated over the pH stability region of CcP, pH 4 to 8. The absorption spectra indicate that the CcP triple mutants have hemes that are predominantly five-coordinate, high-spin at pH 5 and six-coordinate, low-spin at pH 8. Cyanide binding to the triple mutants is biphasic indicating that the triple mutants have two slowly-exchanging conformational states with different cyanide affinities. The binding affinity for cyanide is reduced at least two orders of magnitude in the triple mutants compared to wild-type CcP and the rate of cyanide binding is reduced by four to five orders of magnitude. Correlation of the reaction rates of CcP and 12 distal pocket mutants with H2O2 and HCN suggests that both reactions require ionization of the reactants within the distal heme pocket allowing the anion to bind the heme iron. Distal pocket features that promote substrate ionization (basic residues involved in base-catalyzed substrate ionization or polar residues that can stabilize substrate anions) increase the overall rate of reaction with H2O2 and HCN while features that inhibit substrate ionization slow the reactions. PMID:23022490

  13. Defects of mutant DNMT1 are linked to a spectrum of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baets, Jonathan; Duan, Xiaohui; Wu, Yanhong; Smith, Gordon; Seeley, William W; Mademan, Inès; McGrath, Nicole M; Beadell, Noah C; Khoury, Julie; Botuyan, Maria-Victoria; Mer, Georges; Worrell, Gregory A; Hojo, Kaori; DeLeon, Jessica; Laura, Matilde; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Senderek, Jan; Weis, Joachim; Van den Bergh, Peter; Merrill, Shana L; Reilly, Mary M; Houlden, Henry; Grossman, Murray; Scherer, Steven S; De Jonghe, Peter; Dyck, Peter J; Klein, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    We report a broader than previously appreciated clinical spectrum for hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1E (HSAN1E) and a potential pathogenic mechanism for DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) mutations. The clinical presentations and genetic characteristics of nine newly identified HSAN1E kinships (45 affected subjects) were investigated. Five novel mutations of DNMT1 were discovered; p.C353F, p.T481P, p.P491L, p.Y524D and p.I531N, all within the target-sequence domain, and two mutations (p.T481P, p.P491L) arising de novo. Recently, HSAN1E has been suggested as an allelic disorder of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy. Our results indicate that all the mutations causal for HSAN1E are located in the middle part or N-terminus end of the TS domain, whereas all the mutations causal for autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy are located in the C-terminus end of the TS domain. The impact of the seven causal mutations in this cohort was studied by cellular localization experiments. The binding efficiency of the mutant DNMT proteins at the replication foci and heterochromatin were evaluated. Phenotypic characterizations included electromyography, brain magnetic resonance and nuclear imaging, electroencephalography, sural nerve biopsies, sleep evaluation and neuropsychometric testing. The average survival of HSAN1E was 53.6 years. [standard deviation = 7.7, range 43-75 years], and mean onset age was 37.7 years. (standard deviation = 8.6, range 18-51 years). Expanded phenotypes include myoclonic seizures, auditory or visual hallucinations, and renal failure. Hypersomnia, rapid eye movement sleep disorder and/or narcolepsy were identified in 11 subjects. Global brain atrophy was found in 12 of 14 who had brain MRI. EEGs showed low frequency (delta waves) frontal-predominant abnormality in five of six patients. Marked variability in cognitive deficits was observed, but the majority of patients (89%) developed

  14. Breeding of a sake yeast mutant with enhanced ethyl caproate productivity in sake brewing using rice milled at a high polishing ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshinari; Ohara, Yusuke; Sueno, Kazuo

    2017-06-01

    Sake yeast produces a fruity flavor known as ginjo-ko-which is mainly attributable to ethyl caproate and isoamyl acetate-during fermentation in sake brewing. The production of these flavor components is inhibited by unsaturated fatty acids derived from the outer layer of rice as raw material. We isolated three mutants (hec2, hec3, and hec6) with enhanced ethyl caproate productivity in sake brewing using rice milled at a high polishing ratio from a cerulenin-resistant mutant derived from the hia1 strain, which shows enhanced isoamyl acetate productivity. The hec2 mutant had the homozygous FAS2 mutation Gly1250Ser, which is known to confer high ethyl caproate productivity. When the homozygous FAS2 mutation Gly1250Ser was introduced into strain hia1, ethyl caproate productivity was increased but neither this nor intracellular caproic acid content approached the levels observed in the hec2 mutant, indicating that a novel mutation was responsible for the high ethyl caproate productivity. We also found that the expression of EEB1 encoding acyl-coenzyme A:ethanol O-acyltransferase (AEATase) and enzymatic activity were increased in the hec2 mutant. These results suggest that the upregulation of EEB1 expression and AEATase activity may also have contributed to the enhancement of ethyl caproate synthesis from ethanol and caproyl-CoA. Our findings are useful for the brewing of sake with improved flavor due to high levels of isoamyl acetate and ethyl caproate. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Rescue of mutant fitness defects using in vitro reconstituted designer transposons in Mycoplasma mycoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogumil Jacek Karas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available With only hundreds of genes contained within their genomes, mycoplasmas have become model organisms for precise understanding of cellular processes, as well as platform organisms for predictable engineering of microbial functions for mission-critical applications. Despite the availability of whole genome writing in Mycoplasma mycoides, some traditional methods for genetic engineering are underdeveloped in mycoplasmas. Here we demonstrate two facile transposon-mediated approaches for introducing genes into the synthetic cell based on M. mycoides. The marker-less approach involves preparing a fragment containing only a small genomic region of interest with flanking transposase-binding sites, followed by in vitro transposase loading and introduction into the cells. The marker-driven approach involves cloning an open reading frame (ORF of interest into a vector containing a marker for mycoplasma transformation, as well as sites for transposase loading and random genomic integration. An innovative feature of this construct is to use a single promoter to express the transformation marker and the introduced ORF. The marker-driven approach can be conveniently applied to any exogenous or synthetic gene without any information on the effect of the gene on the strain, whereas the marker-less approach requires that the fragment has a recognizable effect. Using the marker-less method, we found that a region containing the nusG gene rescues a slow growth phenotype of a strain containing a larger deletion encompassing this gene. Using the marker-driven approach, we better defined this finding, thereby establishing that nusG is required for a normal growth rate in synthetic M. mycoides. These methods are suitable for complementation tests to identify genes responsible for assorted functions lacking in deletion mutants. These approaches are also expected to facilitate rapid testing of various natural and engineered genes or gene clusters from numerous sources in

  16. Transformation and radiosensitivity of human diploid skin fibroblasts transfected with SV40 T-antigen mutants defective in RB and P53 binding domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LingNah Su; Little, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    A series of human diploid fibroblast cell clones were developed by DNA transfection with either wild-type SV40 T-antigen (SV40T) or T-antigen mutants defective in its various functional domains. Cell clones expressing the wild-type SV40 T were significantly radioresistant as compared with clones transfected with the neo gene only (D o 192 ± 13 vs 127 ± 19). This radioresistance persisted in post-crisis, immortalized cell lines. A series of mutants with point or deletion mutations within each functionally active domain of SV40 T were also examined for their ability to alter radiosensitivity and induce morphological transformation. Cell clones transfected with T-antigen mutants defective in nuclear localization or origin binding showed increased radioresistance similar to clones transfected with wild-type T-antigen, and expressed morphological changes characteristic of SV40 T-transfected cells. (author)

  17. An ALS-linked mutant SOD1 produces a locomotor defect associated with aggregation and synaptic dysfunction when expressed in neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiou Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The nature of toxic effects exerted on neurons by misfolded proteins, occurring in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, is poorly understood. One approach to this problem is to measure effects when such proteins are expressed in heterologous neurons. We report on effects of an ALS-associated, misfolding-prone mutant human SOD1, G85R, when expressed in the neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. Stable mutant transgenic animals, but not wild-type human SOD1 transgenics, exhibited a strong locomotor defect associated with the presence, specifically in mutant animals, of both soluble oligomers and insoluble aggregates of G85R protein. A whole-genome RNAi screen identified chaperones and other components whose deficiency increased aggregation and further diminished locomotion. The nature of the locomotor defect was investigated. Mutant animals were resistant to paralysis by the cholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb, while exhibiting normal sensitivity to the cholinergic agonist levamisole and normal muscle morphology. When fluorescently labeled presynaptic components were examined in the dorsal nerve cord, decreased numbers of puncta corresponding to neuromuscular junctions were observed in mutant animals and brightness was also diminished. At the EM level, mutant animals exhibited a reduced number of synaptic vesicles. Neurotoxicity in this system thus appears to be mediated by misfolded SOD1 and is exerted on synaptic vesicle biogenesis and/or trafficking.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a truncated mutant of yeast nuclear thiol peroxidase, a novel atypical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jongkeun; Choi, Soonwoong [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jungwon [Department of Chemistry, The University of Suwon, Suwon 445-743 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Mee-Kyung; Kim, Il-Han [Department of Biochemistry, Paichai University, Taejon 302-735 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Whanchul, E-mail: nswcshin@plaza.snu.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    A double mutant of yeast nuclear thiol peroxidase has been crystallized in a truncated form. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 37.54, c = 83.26 Å. A diffraction data set has been collected to 1.8 Å resolution. Saccharomyces cerevisiae nTPx is a thioredoxin-dependent thiol peroxidase that is localized in the nucleus. nTPx belongs to the C-type atypical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family members, which are frequently called BCPs or PrxQs. A double mutant (C107S/C112S) of nTPx overexpressed in Escherichia coli was spontaneously degraded upon freezing and thawing and its truncated form (residues 57–215; MW = 17837 Da) was crystallized with PEG 3350 and mercury(II) acetate as precipitants using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected to 1.8 Å resolution using X-ray synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to the trigonal space group P3{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 37.54, c = 83.26 Å. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of truncated mutant nTPx, with a corresponding V{sub M} of 1.91 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 35.5%.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a truncated mutant of yeast nuclear thiol peroxidase, a novel atypical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jongkeun; Choi, Soonwoong; Choi, Jungwon; Cha, Mee-Kyung; Kim, Il-Han; Shin, Whanchul

    2005-01-01

    A double mutant of yeast nuclear thiol peroxidase has been crystallized in a truncated form. The crystal belongs to space group P3 2 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 37.54, c = 83.26 Å. A diffraction data set has been collected to 1.8 Å resolution. Saccharomyces cerevisiae nTPx is a thioredoxin-dependent thiol peroxidase that is localized in the nucleus. nTPx belongs to the C-type atypical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family members, which are frequently called BCPs or PrxQs. A double mutant (C107S/C112S) of nTPx overexpressed in Escherichia coli was spontaneously degraded upon freezing and thawing and its truncated form (residues 57–215; MW = 17837 Da) was crystallized with PEG 3350 and mercury(II) acetate as precipitants using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected to 1.8 Å resolution using X-ray synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to the trigonal space group P3 2 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 37.54, c = 83.26 Å. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of truncated mutant nTPx, with a corresponding V M of 1.91 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 35.5%

  20. Characterization of new mutants in the early part of the yeast secretory pathway isolated by a [3H]mannose suicide selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, A.P.; Ferro-Novick, S.

    1987-01-01

    We have adapted a [ 3 H]mannose suicide selection to identify mutations in additional genes which function in the early part of the yeast secretory pathway. Thus far this protocol has led to the identification of two new genes which are implicated in this process, as well as additional alleles of previously identified genes. The new mutants, bet1 and bet2, are temperature sensitive for growth and protein transport. Thin section analysis has revealed the accumulation of a network of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) at the restrictive temperature (37 0 C). Precursors of exported proteins that accumulate in the cell at 37 0 C are terminally core glycosylated. These observations suggest that the transport of precursors is blocked subsequent to translocation into the ER but before entry into the Golgi apparatus. The bet1 and bet2 mutants define two new complementation groups which have the same properties as previously identified ER-accumulating mutants. This and previous findings suggest that protein exit from the ER and entry into the Golgi apparatus is a complex process requiring at least 11 genes

  1. Liquid holding recovery kinetics in wild-type and radiosensitive mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces exposed to low- and high-LET radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petin, Vladislav G. [Biophysical Laboratory, Medical Radiological Research Center, 249036 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jkkim@kaeri.re.kr

    2005-02-15

    Three wild-type diploid yeast strains Saccharomyces ellipsoideus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae and five radiosensitive mutants of S. cerevisiae in the diploid state were irradiated with {gamma}-rays from {sup 60}Co and {alpha}-particles from {sup 239}Pu in the stationary phase of growth. Survival curves and the kinetics of the liquid holding recovery were measured. It was shown that the irreversible component was enhanced for the densely ionizing radiation in comparison to the low-LET radiation while the probability of the recovery was identical for both the low- and high-LET radiations for all the strains investigated. It means that the recovery process itself is not damaged after densely ionizing radiation and the enhanced RBE of the high-LET radiation may be caused by the increased yield of the irreversible damage. A parent diploid strain and all its radiosensitive mutants showed the same probability for recovery from radiation damage. Thus, the mechanism of the enhanced radiosensitivity of the mutant cells might not be related to the damage of the repair systems themselves but with the production of some kind of radiation damage from which cells are incapable to recover.

  2. Nucleosome structure of the yeast CHA1 promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso; Holmberg, S

    1998-01-01

    conditions. Five yeast TBP mutants defective in different steps in activated transcription abolished CHA1 expression, but failed to affect induction-dependent chromatin rearrangement of the promoter region. Progressive truncations of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain caused a progressive reduction...

  3. Synapsis-defective mutants reveal a correlation between chromosome conformation and the mode of double-strand break repair during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolikov, Sarit; Eizinger, Andreas; Hurlburt, Allison; Rogers, Eric; Villeneuve, Anne M; Colaiácovo, Mónica P

    2007-08-01

    SYP-3 is a new structural component of the synaptonemal complex (SC) required for the regulation of chromosome synapsis. Both chromosome morphogenesis and nuclear organization are altered throughout the germlines of syp-3 mutants. Here, our analysis of syp-3 mutants provides insights into the relationship between chromosome conformation and the repair of meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although crossover recombination is severely reduced in syp-3 mutants, the production of viable offspring accompanied by the disappearance of RAD-51 foci suggests that DSBs are being repaired in these synapsis-defective mutants. Our studies indicate that once interhomolog recombination is impaired, both intersister recombination and nonhomologous end-joining pathways may contribute to repair during germline meiosis. Moreover, our studies suggest that the conformation of chromosomes may influence the mode of DSB repair employed during meiosis.

  4. The Arabidopsis ppi1 Mutant Is Specifically Defective in the Expression, Chloroplast Import, and Accumulation of Photosynthetic ProteinsW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Sybille; Baldwin, Amy; Patel, Ramesh; Razzaq, Azam; Dupree, Paul; Lilley, Kathryn; Kurth, Joachim; Leister, Dario; Jarvis, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The import of nucleus-encoded proteins into chloroplasts is mediated by translocon complexes in the envelope membranes. A component of the translocon in the outer envelope membrane, Toc34, is encoded in Arabidopsis by two homologous genes, atTOC33 and atTOC34. Whereas atTOC34 displays relatively uniform expression throughout development, atTOC33 is strongly upregulated in rapidly growing, photosynthetic tissues. To understand the reason for the existence of these two related genes, we characterized the atTOC33 knockout mutant ppi1. Immunoblotting and proteomics revealed that components of the photosynthetic apparatus are deficient in ppi1 chloroplasts and that nonphotosynthetic chloroplast proteins are unchanged or enriched slightly. Furthermore, DNA array analysis of 3292 transcripts revealed that photosynthetic genes are moderately, but specifically, downregulated in ppi1. Proteome differences in ppi1 could be correlated with protein import rates: ppi1 chloroplasts imported the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit and 33-kD oxygen-evolving complex precursors at significantly reduced rates, but the import of a 50S ribosomal subunit precursor was largely unaffected. The ppi1 import defect occurred at the level of preprotein binding, which is consistent with a role for atToc33 during preprotein recognition. The data suggest that atToc33 is involved preferentially in the import of photosynthetic proteins and, by extension, that atToc34 is involved in the import of nonphotosynthetic chloroplast proteins. PMID:12897258

  5. [Mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae characterized by enhanced induced mutagenesis. III. Effect of the him mutation on the effectiveness and specificity of UF-induced mutagenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, E L; Koval'tsova, S V; Korolev, V G

    1987-09-01

    We have studied the influence of him1-1, him2-1, him3-1 and himX mutations on induction frequency and specificity of UV-induced adenine-dependent mutations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Him mutations do not render haploid cells more sensitive to the lethal action of UV-light; however, in him strains adenine-dependent mutations (ade1, ade2) were induced more frequently (1.5--2-fold), as compared to the HIM strain. An analysis of the molecular nature of ade2 mutants revealed that him1-1, him2-1 and himX mutations increase specifically the yield of transitions (AT----GC and GC----AT), whereas in the him3-1 strain the yield of transversions was enhanced as well. We suggest him mutations analysed to affect specific repair pathway for mismatch correction.

  6. Regulation of Budding Yeast CENP-A levels Prevents Misincorporation at Promoter Nucleosomes and Transcriptional Defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica M Hildebrand

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The exclusive localization of the histone H3 variant CENP-A to centromeres is essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis helps to ensure that CENP-A does not mislocalize to euchromatin, which can lead to genomic instability. Consistent with this, overexpression of the budding yeast CENP-A(Cse4 is lethal in cells lacking Psh1, the E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets CENP-A(Cse4 for degradation. To identify additional mechanisms that prevent CENP-A(Cse4 misincorporation and lethality, we analyzed the genome-wide mislocalization pattern of overexpressed CENP-A(Cse4 in the presence and absence of Psh1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing. We found that ectopic CENP-A(Cse4 is enriched at promoters that contain histone H2A.Z(Htz1 nucleosomes, but that H2A.Z(Htz1 is not required for CENP-A(Cse4 mislocalization. Instead, the INO80 complex, which removes H2A.Z(Htz1 from nucleosomes, promotes the ectopic deposition of CENP-A(Cse4. Transcriptional profiling revealed gene expression changes in the psh1Δ cells overexpressing CENP-A(Cse4. The down-regulated genes are enriched for CENP-A(Cse4 mislocalization to promoters, while the up-regulated genes correlate with those that are also transcriptionally up-regulated in an htz1Δ strain. Together, these data show that regulating centromeric nucleosome localization is not only critical for maintaining centromere function, but also for ensuring accurate promoter function and transcriptional regulation.

  7. Evaluation of Caspofungin Susceptibility Testing by the New Vitek 2 AST-YS06 Yeast Card Using a Unique Collection of FKS Wild-Type and Hot Spot Mutant Isolates, Including the Five Most Common Candida Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astvad, Karen M; Perlin, David S; Johansen, Helle K

    2013-01-01

    FKS mutant isolates associated with breakthrough or failure cases are emerging in clinical settings. Discrimination of these from wild-type (wt) isolates in a routine laboratory setting is complicated. We evaluated the ability of caspofungin MIC determination using the new Vitek 2 AST-Y06 yeast...... susceptibility card to correctly identify the fks mutants from wt isolates and compared the performance to those of the CLSI and EUCAST reference methods. A collection of 98 Candida isolates, including 31 fks hot spot mutants, were included. Performance was evaluated using the FKS genotype as the "gold standard...

  8. Comparisons of radiosensitivity and damage repair potential between mutants from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain of yeast and laboratory-bred wild yeasts with particular attention being given to giant cell formation after X-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinen, A.

    1988-01-01

    Yeast cells were exposed to X-rays at dose levels up to 10 kGy to induce damage to the DNA and investigate its effects on cellular growth patterns. For this purpose, comparisons were carried out between one diploid strain and six haploid strains of the Saccharomyces uvarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae species, which permitted the individual recovery and damage repair pathways to be described in more detail. The laboratory-bred wild strains ATCC 9080, 211 and 706 were judged to have unimpaired repair mechanisms as compared to the auxotrophs, which fact was evident from the higher radiosensitivity of the latter. A further parameter in this evaluation of growth behaviours was giant cell formation. The results here provided evidence in confirmation of deviations between wild strains and mutants. Even though the ceiling values for the formation of giant cells were similarly high in all strains, impairments of cell division and initial development were observed for the mutants already at considerably lower dose levels. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Defects in tor regulatory complexes retard aging and carbonyl/oxidative stress development in yeast Sассharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Homza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available TOR signaling pathway first described in yeast S. сerevisiae is the highly conserved regulator of eukaryotic cell growth, aging and stress resistance. The effect of nitrogen sources, in particular amino acids, on the activity of TOR signaling pathway is well studied, however its relation to carbohydrates is poor understood. The aim of the present study is expanding of our understanding of potential role of TOR regulatory complexes in development of carbonyl/oxidative stress that can result from yeast cultivation on glucose and fructose. It has been shown that the level of α-dicarbonyl compounds and protein carbonyl groups increased with time of yeast cultivation and was higher in cells grown on fructose that demonstrated their accelerated aging and carbonyl/oxidative stress development as compared with cells grown on glucose. The strains defective in TOR proteins cultivated in the presence of glucose as well as fructose demonstrated lower markers of the stress and aging than parental strain. Thus these data confirmed the previous conclusion on fructose more potent ability to cause carbonyl/oxidative stress and accelerated aging in S. cerevisiae as compared with glucose. However, defects in TOR regulatory complexes retard aging and development of the stress in yeast independent on the type of carbohydrate in the cultivation medium.

  10. UV-induced reversion of his4 frameshift mutations in rad6, rev1, and rev3 mutants of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, C W; O'Brien, T; Bond, J

    1984-01-01

    The UV-induced reversion of two his4 frameshift alleles was much reduced in rad6 mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an observation that is consistent with the hypothesis that RAD6 function is required for the induction of all types of genetic alteration in misrepair mutagenesis. The reversion of these his4 alleles, together with two others of the same type, was also reduced in rev1 and rev3 mutant strains; in these, however, the extent of the reduction varied considerably with test allele used, in a manner analogous to the results in these strains for base repair substitution test alleles. The general features of UV-induced frameshift and substitution mutagenesis therefore appear quite similar, indicating that they may depend on related processes. If this conclusion is correct, greater attention must be given to integrating models which account for the production of nucleotide additions and deletions into those concerning misrepair mutagenesis.

  11. An efficient deletion mutant packaging system for defective herpes simplex virus vectors: Potential applications to human gene therapy and neuronal physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geller, A.I.; Keyomarsi, K.; Bryan, J.; Pardee, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have previously described a defective herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) vector system that permits that introduction of virtually any gene into nonmitotic cells. pHSVlac, the prototype vector, stably expresses Escherichia coli β-galactosidase from a constitutive promoter in many human cell lines, in cultured rat neurons from throughout the nervous system, and in cells in the adult rat brain. HSV-1 vectors expressing other genes may prove useful for studying neuronal physiology or performing human gene therapy for neurological diseases, such as Parkinson disease or brain tumors. A HSV-1 temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant, ts K, has been used as helper virus; ts mutants revert to wild type. In contrast, HSV-1 deletion mutants essentially cannot revert to wild type; therefore, use of a deletion mutant as helper virus might permit human gene therapy with HSV-1 vectors. They now report an efficient packaging system for HSV-1 VECTORS USING A DELETION MUTANT, d30EBA, as helper virus; virus is grown on the complementing cell line M64A. pHSVlac virus prepared using the deletion mutant packaging system stably expresses β-galactosidase in cultured rat sympathetic neurons and glia. Both D30EBA and ts K contain a mutation in the IE3 gene of HSV-1 strain 17 and have the same phenotype; therefore, changing the helper virus from ts K to D30EBA does not alter the host range or other properties of the HSV-1 vector system

  12. Ultraviolet-induced reversion of cyc1 alleles in radiation-sensitive strains of yeast. III. rev 3 mutant strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, C.W.; Crhistensen, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    The role of rev3 gene function in uv-induced mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been examined by determining the reversion of 12 well-defined cyc1 mutations in diploid strains homozygous for the rev3-1 or rev3-3 allale. The 12 cyc1 alleles include one ochre, one amber, four initiation, two proline missense, and four frameshift mutations. We find that the rev3 mutations reduce the frequency of UV-induced reversion of all of the cyc1 alleles, though different classes of alleles respond to a different extent. These results imply that the rev3 gene function is required for the production of a wide variety of mutational events, though probably not all, and show that each of the three rev loci have different mutational phenotypes. Such diverse phenotypes are not predicted by the unitary model for bacterial mutagenes, suggesting that this is at best an incomplete description of eukaryotic mutagenesis

  13. Defective nucleolar localization and dominant interfering properties of a parafibromin L95P missense mutant causing the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panicker, Leelamma M.; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Dagur, Pradeep K.; Gastinger, Matthew J.; Simonds, William F.

    2011-01-01

    The hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome (HPT-JT) is a familial cancer syndrome that can result from germline inactivation of HRPT2/CDC73, a putative tumor suppressor gene that encodes parafibromin, a component of the transcriptional regulatory PAF1 complex with homology to the yeast protein Cdc73p. The vast majority of HRPT2/CDC73 germline mutations identified have been truncation or frameshift mutations, and loss-of-function due to missense mutation is rare. We report here a kindred with HPT-JT due to a germline L95P missense mutation in parafibromin. The mutant parafibromin was studied in vitro to understand the basis of its presumed loss-of-function. When transfected in cultured cells the L95P mutant was expressed to a lower level than wild-type parafibromin, a difference that was not overcome by inhibition of the proteasome degradation pathway. The L95P mutant parafibromin retained the ability to assemble with endogenous PAF1 complex components as evidenced by co-immunoprecipitation. Analysis of subcellular localization showed that the L95P mutant was markedly deficient in nucleolar localization compared to the wild-type, an impairment likely resulting from disruption of a putative nucleolar localization signal immediately upstream of the L95P mutation. Transfection of the L95P parafibromin mutant, but not the wild type, enhanced cell-cycle progression and increased cell survival in NIH-3T3 and HEK 293 cells, resulting apparently from dominant interference with endogenous parafibromin action. The simultaneous loss of nucleolar localization and acquisition of a growth stimulatory phenotype with the L95P mutation raise the possibility that parafibromin must interact with targets in the nucleolus to fully execute its tumor suppressor functions. PMID:20304979

  14. Genome-wide association of mediator and RNA polymerase II in wild-type and mediator mutant yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Emily; Zhu, Z Iris; Landsman, David; Morse, Randall H

    2015-01-01

    Mediator is a large, multisubunit complex that is required for essentially all mRNA transcription in eukaryotes. In spite of the importance of Mediator, the range of its targets and how it is recruited to these is not well understood. Previous work showed that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mediator contributes to transcriptional activation by two distinct mechanisms, one depending on the tail module triad and favoring SAGA-regulated genes, and the second occurring independently of the tail module and favoring TFIID-regulated genes. Here, we use chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) to show that dependence on tail module subunits for Mediator recruitment and polymerase II (Pol II) association occurs preferentially at SAGA-regulated over TFIID-regulated genes on a genome-wide scale. We also show that recruitment of tail module subunits to active gene promoters continues genome-wide when Mediator integrity is compromised in med17 temperature-sensitive (ts) yeast, demonstrating the modular nature of the Mediator complex in vivo. In addition, our data indicate that promoters exhibiting strong and stable occupancy by Mediator have a wide range of activity and are enriched for targets of the Tup1-Cyc8 repressor complex. We also identify a number of strong Mediator occupancy peaks that overlap dubious open reading frames (ORFs) and are likely to include previously unrecognized upstream activator sequences. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Genetic reconstitution of the human Adenovirus type 2 temperature-sensitive 1 mutant defective in endosomal escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastaldelli Michele

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Adenoviruses infect the upper and lower respiratory tracts, the urinary and digestive tracts, lymphoid systems and heart, and give rise to epidemic conjunctivitis. More than 51 human serotypes have been identified to-date, and classified into 6 species A-F. The species C Adenoviruses Ad2 and Ad5 (Ad2/5 cause upper and lower respiratory disease, but how viral structure relates to the selection of particular infectious uptake pathways is not known. An adenovirus mutant, Ad2-ts1 had been isolated upon chemical mutagenesis in the past, and shown to have unprocessed capsid proteins. Ad2-ts1 fails to package the viral protease L3/p23, and Ad2-ts1 virions do not efficiently escape from endosomes. It had been suggested that the C22187T point mutation leading to the substitution of the conserved proline 137 to leucine (P137L in the L3/p23 protease was at least in part responsible for this phenotype. To clarify if the C22187T mutation is necessary and sufficient for the Ad2-ts1 phenotype, we sequenced the genes encoding the structural proteins of Ad2-ts1, and confirmed that the Ad2-ts1 DNA carries the point mutation C22187T. Introduction of C22187T to the wild-type Ad2 genome in a bacterial artificial chromosome (Ad2-BAC gave Ad2-BAC46 virions with the full Ad2-ts1 phenotype. Reversion of Ad2-BAC46 gave wild-type Ad2 particles indicating that P137L is necessary and sufficient for the Ad2-ts1 phenotype. The kinetics of Ad2-ts1 uptake into cells were comparable to Ad2 suggesting similar endocytic uptake mechanisms. Surprisingly, infectious Ad2 or Ad5 but not Ad2-ts1 uptake required CALM (clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid protein, which controls clathrin-mediated endocytosis and membrane transport between endosomes and the trans-Golgi-network. The data show that no other mutations than P137L in the viral protease are necessary to give rise to particles that are defective in capsid processing and endosomal escape. This provides a basis for

  16. Sporulation-specific cell division defects in ylmE mutants of Streptomyces coelicolor are rescued by additional deletion of ylmD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le; Willemse, Joost; Hoskisson, Paul A; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2018-05-09

    Cell division during the reproductive phase of the Streptomyces life-cycle requires tight coordination between synchronous formation of multiple septa and DNA segregation. One remarkable difference with most other bacterial systems is that cell division in Streptomyces is positively controlled by the recruitment of FtsZ by SsgB. Here we show that deletion of ylmD (SCO2081) or ylmE (SCO2080), which lie in operon with ftsZ in the dcw cluster of actinomycetes, has major consequences for sporulation-specific cell division in Streptomyces coelicolor. Electron and fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that ylmE mutants have a highly aberrant phenotype with defective septum synthesis, and produce very few spores with low viability and high heat sensitivity. FtsZ-ring formation was also highly disturbed in ylmE mutants. Deletion of ylmD had a far less severe effect on sporulation. Interestingly, the additional deletion of ylmD restored sporulation to the ylmE null mutant. YlmD and YlmE are not part of the divisome, but instead localize diffusely in aerial hyphae, with differential intensity throughout the sporogenic part of the hyphae. Taken together, our work reveals a function for YlmD and YlmE in the control of sporulation-specific cell division in S. coelicolor, whereby the presence of YlmD alone results in major developmental defects.

  17. [Mutants of bacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 with Omegon insertion in mmsB or fabG genes of lipid metabolism are defective in motility and flagellation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtunov, E A; Shelud'ko, A V; Chernyshova, M P; Petrova, L P; Katsy, E I

    2013-11-01

    Bacteria Azospirillum brasilense have mixed flagellation: in addition to the polar flagellum, numerous lateral flagella are formed in their cells on medium with increased density. Flagella determine the active swimming and swarming capacities of azospirilla. Using A. brasilense Sp245 as an example, we showed that the Omegon-Km artificial transposon insertion into the chromosomal gene for 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase (mmsB) was concurrent with the appearance of significant defects in the formation of polar flagella and with the paralysis of lateral flagella. The Sp245 mutant with the Omegon insertion into the plasmid AZOBR_p1-borne gene for 3-oxoacyl-[acyl-carrier protein]-reductase (fabG) showed the complete loss of flagella and the swarming capacity, as well as significant defects in polar flagellar assembly (though some cells are still motile in liquid medium). The viability of the A. brasilense Sp245 mutants with the Omegon insertion into the mmsB or fabG gene was not reduced. No considerable differences in the fatty acid composition of whole cell lipid extracts were found for the A. brasilense Sp245 strain and its mmsB and fabG mutants.

  18. Carbon allocation and element composition in four Chlamydomonas mutants defective in genes related to the CO2 concentrating mechanism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Memmola, F.; Mukherjee, B.; Moroney, James V.; Giordano, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 121, 2-3 (2014), s. 201-211 ISSN 0166-8595 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Chlamydomonas mutants * carbon * carbon dioxide * elemental stoichiometry Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.502, year: 2014

  19. Identification of ergosterol and inhibition of sterol synthesis by Δ5-sterols in GL7, an auxotrophic mutant of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhanuka, I.C.

    1988-01-01

    Synthesis of ergosterol was demonstrated in the GL7 mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This sterol auxotroph has been thought to lack the ability to synthesize sterols due both to the absence of 2,3-oxidosqualene cyclase and to a heme deficiency eliminating cytochrome P-450 which is required in demethylation at C-14. However, when the exogenous sterol was 5α-cholestan-3β-ol, 5α-cholest-8(14)-en-3β-ol, or 24β-methyl-5α-cholest-8(14)-en-3β-ol, sterol synthesis was found to proceed yielding 1-3 fg/cell of ergosterol. Ergosterol was identified by mass spectroscopy, gas and high performance liquid chromatography, ultraviolet spectroscopy, and radioactive labelling from [ 3 H]acetate. Except for some cholest-5-en-3β-ol (cholesterol) which was derived from the 5α-cholestan-3β-ol, the stanol and the two 8(14)-stenols were not significantly metabolized confirming the absence of an isomerase for migration of the double bond from C-8(14) to C-7. Drastic reduction of ergosterol synthesis to not more than 0.06 fg/cell was observed when the exogenous sterol either had a double bond at C-5, as in the case of cholesterol, or could be metabolized to a sterol with such a bond. Thus, both 5α-cholest-8(9)-en-3β-ol and 5α-cholest-7-en-3β-ol (lathosterol) were converted to cholesta-5,7-dien-3β-ol (7-dehydrocholesterol), and the presence of the latter dienol depressed the level of ergosterol

  20. Frequency of mutant T lymphocytes defective in the expression of the T-cell antigen receptor gene among radiation-exposed people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoizumi, Seishi; Umeki, Shigeko; Akiyama, Mitoshi

    1991-06-01

    The frequency of mutant T lymphocytes defective in T-cell receptor gene (α or β) expression was measured using the two-color flow cytometric technique. Results for a total of 203 atomic bomb survivors, 78 of whom were proximally exposed (DS86 doses of ≥ 1.5 Gy) and 125 of whom were distally exposed (DS86 doses of 228 Th formerly used for radiodiagnosis. In addition, thyroid disease patients treated with 131 I showed a dose-related increase of mutant frequency. It was suggested that the present T-cell receptor mutation assay has a unique characteristic as a biological dosimeter for the measurement of recent exposures to genotoxic agents. (author)

  1. [Courtship behavior, communicative sound production and resistance to stress in Drosophila mutants with defective agnostic gene, coding for LIMK1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, A V; Kaminskaia, A N; Savvateeva-Popova, E V

    2009-01-01

    -motor circuits of the singing center) decreases, and the rate and stability of pacemakers of the pulse and the sine songs increases. So, the sharply elevated LIMK1 and p-cofilin concentrations in the cells of agn(ts3) mutants, in comparison to wild type males, leading to derangement of learning and memory (Medvedeva et al., 2008) are accompanied by decline of motivation of males but do not seriously influence the neuro-motor coordination during singing. The higher resistance of characterictics of their behavior and communicative sound signals to heat shock is in agreement with the fact that the extremely high LIMK1 and P-cofilin concentrations in their cells go down to normal values after HS. At the same time the amyloid aggregations disappear and normally defective learning and memory are restore.

  2. Identification of symbiotically defective mutants of Lotus japonicus affected in infection thread growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombardo, Fabien; Heckmann, Anne Birgitte Lau; Miwa, Hiroki

    2006-01-01

    During the symbiotic interaction between legumes and rhizobia, the host cell plasma membrane and associated plant cell wall invaginate to form a tunnel-like infection thread, a structure in which bacteria divide to reach the plant root cortex. We isolated four Lotus japonicus mutants that make...... infection pockets in root hairs but form very few infection threads after inoculation with Mesorhizobium loti. The few infection threads that did initiate in the mutants usually did not progress further than the root hair cell. These infection-thread deficient (itd) mutants were unaffected for early...... symbiotic responses such as calcium spiking, root hair deformation, and curling, as well as for the induction of cortical cell division and the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Complementation tests and genetic mapping indicate that itd2 is allelic to Ljsym7, whereas the itd1, itd3, and itd4 mutations...

  3. DCL2- and RDR6-dependent transitive silencing of SMXL4 and SMXL5 in Arabidopsis dcl4 mutants causes defective phloem transport and carbohydrate over-accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Yi; Hou, Bo-Han; Lee, Wen-Chi; Lu, Shin-Hua; Yang, Chen-Jui; Vaucheret, Hervé; Chen, Ho-Ming

    2017-06-01

    DICER-LIKE (DCL) enzymes process double-stranded RNA into small RNAs that act as regulators of gene expression. Arabidopsis DCL4 and DCL2 each allow the post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of viruses and transgenes, but primary PTGS-prone DCL4 outcompetes transitive PTGS-prone DCL2 in wild-type plants. This hierarchy likely prevents DCL2 having any detrimental effects on endogenous genes. Indeed, dcl4 mutants exhibit developmental defects and increased sensitivity to genotoxic stress. In this study, the mechanism underlying dcl4 defects was investigated using genetic, biochemical and high-throughput sequencing approaches. We show that the purple phenotype of dcl4 leaves correlates with carbohydrate over-accumulation and defective phloem transport, and depends on the activity of SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING 3, RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 6 (RDR6) and DCL2. This phenotype correlates with the downregulation of two genes expressed in the apex and the vasculature, SMAX1-LIKE 4 (SMXL4) and SMXL5, and the accumulation of DCL2- and RDR6-dependent small interfering RNAs derived from these two genes. Supporting a causal effect, smxl4 smxl5 double mutants exhibit leaf pigmentation, enhanced starch accumulation and defective phloem transport, similar to dcl4 plants. Overall, this study elucidates the detrimental action of DCL2 when DCL4 is absent, and indicates that DCL4 outcompeting DCL2 in wild-type plants is crucial to prevent the degradation of endogenous transcripts by DCL2- and RDR6-dependent transitive PTGS. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Vph6 Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Require Calcineurin for Growth and Are Defective in Vacuolar H(+)-Atpase Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Hemenway, C. S.; Dolinski, K.; Cardenas, M. E.; Hiller, M. A.; Jones, E. W.; Heitman, J.

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain that is hypersensitive to cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506, immunosuppressants that inhibit calcineurin, a serine-threonine-specific phosphatase (PP2B). A single nuclear mutation, designated cev1 for calcineurin essential for viability, is responsible for the CsA-FK506-sensitive phenotype. The peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases cyclophilin A and FKBP12, respectively, mediate CsA and FK506 toxicity in the cev1 mutant strain. We demo...

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of Hsp40 J-domain mutants identifies disruption of the critical HPD-motif as the key factor for impaired curing in vivo of the yeast prion [URE3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, You-Lin; Wang, Hao; Riedy, Michael; Roberts, Brittany-Lee; Sun, Yuna; Song, Yong-Bo; Jones, Gary W; Masison, Daniel C; Song, Youtao

    2018-05-01

    Genetic screens using Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified an array of Hsp40 (Ydj1p) J-domain mutants that are impaired in the ability to cure the yeast [URE3] prion through disrupting functional interactions with Hsp70. However, biochemical analysis of some of these Hsp40 J-domain mutants has so far failed to provide major insight into the specific functional changes in Hsp40-Hsp70 interactions. To explore the detailed structural and dynamic properties of the Hsp40 J-domain, 20 ns molecular dynamic simulations of 4 mutants (D9A, D36A, A30T, and F45S) and wild-type J-domain were performed, followed by Hsp70 docking simulations. Results demonstrated that although the Hsp70 interaction mechanism of the mutants may vary, the major structural change was targeted to the critical HPD motif of the J-domain. Our computational analysis fits well with previous yeast genetics studies regarding highlighting the importance of J-domain function in prion propagation. During the molecular dynamics simulations several important residues were identified and predicted to play an essential role in J-domain structure. Among these residues, Y26 and F45 were confirmed, using both in silico and in vivo methods, as being critical for Ydj1p function.

  6. Molecular characterization of a nuclear topoisomerase II from Nicotiana tabacum that functionally complements a temperature-sensitive topoisomerase II yeast mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B N; Mudgil, Yashwanti; Sopory, S K; Reddy, M K

    2003-07-01

    We have successfully expressed enzymatically active plant topoisomerase II in Escherichia coli for the first time, which has enabled its biochemical characterization. Using a PCR-based strategy, we obtained a full-length cDNA and the corresponding genomic clone of tobacco topoisomerase II. The genomic clone has 18 exons interrupted by 17 introns. Most of the 5' and 3' splice junctions follow the typical canonical consensus dinucleotide sequence GU-AG present in other plant introns. The position of introns and phasing with respect to primary amino acid sequence in tobacco TopII and Arabidopsis TopII are highly conserved, suggesting that the two genes are evolved from the common ancestral type II topoisomerase gene. The cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 1482 amino acids. The primary amino acid sequence shows a striking sequence similarity, preserving all the structural domains that are conserved among eukaryotic type II topoisomerases in an identical spatial order. We have expressed the full-length polypeptide in E. coli and purified the recombinant protein to homogeneity. The full-length polypeptide relaxed supercoiled DNA and decatenated the catenated DNA in a Mg(2+)- and ATP-dependent manner, and this activity was inhibited by 4'-(9-acridinylamino)-3'-methoxymethanesulfonanilide (m-AMSA). The immunofluorescence and confocal microscopic studies, with antibodies developed against the N-terminal region of tobacco recombinant topoisomerase II, established the nuclear localization of topoisomerase II in tobacco BY2 cells. The regulated expression of tobacco topoisomerase II gene under the GAL1 promoter functionally complemented a temperature-sensitive TopII(ts) yeast mutant.

  7. ATM loss leads to synthetic lethality in BRCA1 BRCT mutant mice associated with exacerbated defects in homology-directed repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chin; Kass, Elizabeth M; Yen, Wei-Feng; Ludwig, Thomas; Moynahan, Mary Ellen; Chaudhuri, Jayanta; Jasin, Maria

    2017-07-18

    BRCA1 is essential for homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA double-strand breaks in part through antagonism of the nonhomologous end-joining factor 53BP1. The ATM kinase is involved in various aspects of DNA damage signaling and repair, but how ATM participates in HDR and genetically interacts with BRCA1 in this process is unclear. To investigate this question, we used the Brca1 S1598F mouse model carrying a mutation in the BRCA1 C-terminal domain of BRCA1. Whereas ATM loss leads to a mild HDR defect in adult somatic cells, we find that ATM inhibition leads to severely reduced HDR in Brca1 S1598F cells. Consistent with a critical role for ATM in HDR in this background, loss of ATM leads to synthetic lethality of Brca1 S1598F mice. Whereas both ATM and BRCA1 promote end resection, which can be regulated by 53BP1, 53bp1 deletion does not rescue the HDR defects of Atm mutant cells, in contrast to Brca1 mutant cells. These results demonstrate that ATM has a role in HDR independent of the BRCA1-53BP1 antagonism and that its HDR function can become critical in certain contexts.

  8. Site-directed mutagenesis of HIV-1 vpu gene demonstrates two clusters of replication-defective mutants with distinct ability to down-modulate cell surface CD4 and tetherin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Nomaguchi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Vpu acts positively on viral infectivity by mediating CD4 degradation in endoplasmic reticulum and enhances virion release by counteracting a virion release restriction factor, tetherin. In order to define the impact of Vpu activity on HIV-1 replication, we have generated a series of site-specific proviral vpu mutants. Of fifteen mutants examined, seven exhibited a replication-defect similar to that of a vpu-deletion mutant in a lymphocyte cell line H9. These mutations clustered in narrow regions within transmembrane domain (TMD and cytoplasmic domain (CTD. Replication-defective mutants displayed the reduced ability to enhance virion release from a monolayer cell line HEp2 without exception. Upon transfection with Vpu expression vectors, neither TMD mutants nor CTD mutants blocked CD4 expression at the cell surface in another monolayer cell line MAGI. While TMD mutants were unable to down-modulate cell surface tetherin in HEp2 cells, CTD mutants did quite efficiently. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the difference of intracellular localization between TMD and CTD mutants. In total, replication capability of HIV-1 carrying vpu mutations correlates well with the ability of Vpu to enhance virion release and to impede the cell surface expression of CD4 but not with the ability to down-modulate cell surface tetherin. Our results here suggest that efficient viral replication requires not only down-regulation of cell surface tetherin but also its degradation.

  9. Differential gene expression in a DNA double-strand-break repair mutant XRS-5 defective in Ku80. Analysis by cDNA microarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, John Y.H.; Chen, Lung-Kun; Chang, Jui-Feng [National Yang Ming Univ., Taipei, Taiwan (China). Inst. of Radiological Sciences] (and others)

    2001-12-01

    The ability of cells to rejoin DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) usually correlates with their radiosensitivity. This correlation has been demonstrated in radiosensitive cells, including the Chinese hamster ovary mutant XRS-5. XRS-5 is defective in a DNA end-binding protein, Ku80, which is a component of a DNA-dependent protein kinase complex used for joining strand breaks. However, Ku80-deficient cells are known to be retarded in cell proliferation and growth as well as other yet to be identified defects. Using custom-made 600-gene cDNA microarray filters, we found differential gene expressions between the wild-type and XRS-5 cells. Defective Ku80 apparently affects the expression of several repair genes, including topoisomerase-I and -IIA, ERCC5, MLH1, and ATM. In contrast, other DNA repair-associated genes, such as GADD45A, EGR1 MDM2 and p53, were not affected. In addition, for large numbers of growth-associated genes, such as cyclins and clks, the growth factors and cytokines were also affected. Down-regulated expression was also found in several categories of seemingly unrelated genes, including apoptosis, angiogenesis, kinase and signaling, phosphatase, stress protein, proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors, transcription and translation factors. A RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the XRS-5 cells used were defective in Ku80 expression. The diversified groups of genes being affected could mean that Ku80, a multi-functional DNA-binding protein, not only affects DNA repair, but is also involved in transcription regulation. Our data, taken together, indicate that there are specific genes being modulated in Ku80- deficient cells, and that some of the DNA repair pathways and other biological functions are apparently linked, suggesting that a defect in one gene could have global effects on many other processes. (author)

  10. Differential gene expression in a DNA double-strand-break repair mutant XRS-5 defective in Ku80. Analysis by cDNA microarray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, John Y.H.; Chen, Lung-Kun; Chang, Jui-Feng

    2001-01-01

    The ability of cells to rejoin DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) usually correlates with their radiosensitivity. This correlation has been demonstrated in radiosensitive cells, including the Chinese hamster ovary mutant XRS-5. XRS-5 is defective in a DNA end-binding protein, Ku80, which is a component of a DNA-dependent protein kinase complex used for joining strand breaks. However, Ku80-deficient cells are known to be retarded in cell proliferation and growth as well as other yet to be identified defects. Using custom-made 600-gene cDNA microarray filters, we found differential gene expressions between the wild-type and XRS-5 cells. Defective Ku80 apparently affects the expression of several repair genes, including topoisomerase-I and -IIA, ERCC5, MLH1, and ATM. In contrast, other DNA repair-associated genes, such as GADD45A, EGR1 MDM2 and p53, were not affected. In addition, for large numbers of growth-associated genes, such as cyclins and clks, the growth factors and cytokines were also affected. Down-regulated expression was also found in several categories of seemingly unrelated genes, including apoptosis, angiogenesis, kinase and signaling, phosphatase, stress protein, proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors, transcription and translation factors. A RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the XRS-5 cells used were defective in Ku80 expression. The diversified groups of genes being affected could mean that Ku80, a multi-functional DNA-binding protein, not only affects DNA repair, but is also involved in transcription regulation. Our data, taken together, indicate that there are specific genes being modulated in Ku80- deficient cells, and that some of the DNA repair pathways and other biological functions are apparently linked, suggesting that a defect in one gene could have global effects on many other processes. (author)

  11. Acidithiobacillus caldus sulfur oxidation model based on transcriptome analysis between the wild type and sulfur oxygenase reductase defective mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linxu Chen

    Full Text Available Acidithiobacillus caldus (A. caldus is widely used in bio-leaching. It gains energy and electrons from oxidation of elemental sulfur and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (RISCs for carbon dioxide fixation and growth. Genomic analyses suggest that its sulfur oxidation system involves a truncated sulfur oxidation (Sox system (omitting SoxCD, non-Sox sulfur oxidation system similar to the sulfur oxidation in A. ferrooxidans, and sulfur oxygenase reductase (SOR. The complexity of the sulfur oxidation system of A. caldus generates a big obstacle on the research of its sulfur oxidation mechanism. However, the development of genetic manipulation method for A. caldus in recent years provides powerful tools for constructing genetic mutants to study the sulfur oxidation system.An A. caldus mutant lacking the sulfur oxygenase reductase gene (sor was created and its growth abilities were measured in media using elemental sulfur (S(0 and tetrathionate (K(2S(4O(6 as the substrates, respectively. Then, comparative transcriptome analysis (microarrays and real-time quantitative PCR of the wild type and the Δsor mutant in S(0 and K(2S(4O(6 media were employed to detect the differentially expressed genes involved in sulfur oxidation. SOR was concluded to oxidize the cytoplasmic elemental sulfur, but could not couple the sulfur oxidation with the electron transfer chain or substrate-level phosphorylation. Other elemental sulfur oxidation pathways including sulfur diooxygenase (SDO and heterodisulfide reductase (HDR, the truncated Sox pathway, and the S(4I pathway for hydrolysis of tetrathionate and oxidation of thiosulfate in A. caldus are proposed according to expression patterns of sulfur oxidation genes and growth abilities of the wild type and the mutant in different substrates media.An integrated sulfur oxidation model with various sulfur oxidation pathways of A. caldus is proposed and the features of this model are summarized.

  12. Escherichia coli ArgR mutants defective in cer/Xer recombination, but not in DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sénéchal, Hélène; Delesques, Jérémy; Szatmari, George

    2010-04-01

    The Escherichia coli arginine repressor (ArgR) is an L-arginine-dependent DNA-binding protein that controls the expression of the arginine biosynthetic genes and is required as an accessory factor for Xer site-specific recombination at cer and related recombination sites in plasmids. We used the technique of pentapeptide scanning mutagenesis to isolate a series of ArgR mutants that were considerably reduced in cer recombination, but were still able to repress an argA::lacZ fusion. DNA sequence analysis showed that all of the mutants mapped to the same nucleotide, resulting in a five amino acid insertion between residues 149 and 150 of ArgR, corresponding to the end of the alpha6 helix. A truncated ArgR containing a stop codon at residue 150 displayed the same phenotype as the protein with the five amino acid insertion, and both mutants displayed sequence-specific DNA-binding activity that was L-arginine dependent. These results show that the C-terminus of ArgR is more important in cer/Xer site-specific recombination than in DNA binding.

  13. Temperature-sensitive defects of the GSP1gene, yeast Ran homologue, activate the Tel1-dependent pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Naoyuki; Murakami, Seishi; Tsurusaki, Susumu; Nagaura, Zen-ichiro; Oki, Masaya; Nishitani, Hideo; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Shimizu, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Ken-ichi; Nishimoto, Takeharu

    2007-01-01

    RanGTPase is involved in many cellular processes. It functions in nuclear-cytosolic transport and centrosome formation. Ran also localizes to chromatin as RCC1 does, its guanine nucleotide exchange factor, but Ran's function on chromatin is not known. We found that gsp1, a temperature-sensitive mutant of GSP1, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ran homologue, suppressed the hydroxyurea (HU) and ultra violet (UV) sensitivities of the mec1 mutant. In UV-irradiated mec1 gsp1 cells, Rad53 was phosphorylated despite the lack of Mec1. This suppression depended on the TEL1 gene, given that the triple mutant, mec1 gsp1 tel1, was unable to grow. The gsp1 mutations also suppressed the HU sensitivity of the rad9 mutant in a Tel1-dependent manner, but not the HU sensitivity of the rad53 mutant. These results indicated that Rad53 was activated by the Tel1 pathway in mec1 gsp1 cells, suggesting that Gsp1 helps regulate the role switching the ATM family kinases Mec1 and Tel1

  14. A fasciclin-like arabinogalactan-protein (FLA mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, fla1, shows defects in shoot regeneration.

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    Kim L Johnson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fasciclin-like arabinogalactan-proteins (FLAs are an enigmatic class of 21 members within the larger family of arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs in Arabidopsis thaliana. Located at the cell surface, in the cell wall/plasma membrane, they are implicated in many developmental roles yet their function remains largely undefined. Fasciclin (FAS domains are putative cell-adhesion domains found in extracellular matrix proteins of organisms from all kingdoms, but the juxtaposition of FAS domains with highly glycosylated AGP domains is unique to plants. Recent studies have started to elucidate the role of FLAs in Arabidopsis development. FLAs containing a single FAS domain are important for the integrity and elasticity of the plant cell wall matrix (FLA11 and FLA12 and FLA3 is involved in microspore development. FLA4/SOS5 with two FAS domains and two AGP domains has a role in maintaining proper cell expansion under salt stressed conditions. The role of other FLAs remains to be uncovered. METHOD/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe the characterisation of a T-DNA insertion mutant in the FLA1 gene (At5g55730. Under standard growth conditions fla1-1 mutants have no obvious phenotype. Based on gene expression studies, a putative role for FLA1 in callus induction was investigated and revealed that fla1-1 has a reduced ability to regenerate shoots in an in vitro shoot-induction assay. Analysis of FLA1p:GUS reporter lines show that FLA1 is expressed in several tissues including stomata, trichomes, the vasculature of leaves, the primary root tip and in lateral roots near the junction of the primary root. CONCLUSION: The results of the developmental expression of FLA1 and characterisation of the fla1 mutant support a role for FLA1 in the early events of lateral root development and shoot development in tissue culture, prior to cell-type specification.

  15. Lipid binding defects and perturbed synaptogenic activity of a Collybistin R290H mutant that causes epilepsy and intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Theofilos; Schemm, Rudolf; Grubmüller, Helmut; Brose, Nils

    2015-03-27

    Signaling at nerve cell synapses is a key determinant of proper brain function, and synaptic defects--or synaptopathies--are at the basis of many neurological and psychiatric disorders. In key areas of the mammalian brain, such as the hippocampus or the basolateral amygdala, the clustering of the scaffolding protein Gephyrin and of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors at inhibitory neuronal synapses is critically dependent upon the brain-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor Collybistin (Cb). Accordingly, it was discovered recently that an R290H missense mutation in the diffuse B-cell lymphoma homology domain of Cb, which carries the guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, leads to epilepsy and intellectual disability in human patients. In the present study, we determined the mechanism by which the Cb(R290H) mutation perturbs inhibitory synapse formation and causes brain dysfunction. Based on a combination of biochemical, cell biological, and molecular dynamics simulation approaches, we demonstrate that the R290H mutation alters the strength of intramolecular interactions between the diffuse B-cell lymphoma homology domain and the pleckstrin homology domain of Cb. This defect reduces the phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate binding affinity of Cb, which limits its normal synaptogenic activity. Our data indicate that impairment of the membrane lipid binding activity of Cb and a consequent defect in inhibitory synapse maturation represent a likely molecular pathomechanism of epilepsy and mental retardation in humans. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. bioA mutant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows severe growth defect and imparts protection against tuberculosis in guinea pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Ritika; Nangpal, Prachi; Mathur, Shubhita; Singh, Swati

    2017-01-01

    Owing to the devastation caused by tuberculosis along with the unsatisfactory performance of the Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccine, a more efficient vaccine than BCG is required for the global control of tuberculosis. A number of studies have demonstrated an essential role of biotin biosynthesis in the growth and survival of several microorganisms, including mycobacteria, through deletion of the genes involved in de novo biotin biosynthesis. In this study, we demonstrate that a bioA mutant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbΔbioA) is highly attenuated in the guinea pig model of tuberculosis when administered aerogenically as well as intradermally. Immunization with MtbΔbioA conferred significant protection in guinea pigs against an aerosol challenge with virulent M. tuberculosis, when compared with the unvaccinated animals. Booster immunization with MtbΔbioA offered no advantage over a single immunization. These experiments demonstrate the vaccinogenic potential of the attenuated M. tuberculosis bioA mutant against tuberculosis. PMID:28658275

  17. bioA mutant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis shows severe growth defect and imparts protection against tuberculosis in guinea pigs.

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    Ritika Kar

    Full Text Available Owing to the devastation caused by tuberculosis along with the unsatisfactory performance of the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine, a more efficient vaccine than BCG is required for the global control of tuberculosis. A number of studies have demonstrated an essential role of biotin biosynthesis in the growth and survival of several microorganisms, including mycobacteria, through deletion of the genes involved in de novo biotin biosynthesis. In this study, we demonstrate that a bioA mutant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtbΔbioA is highly attenuated in the guinea pig model of tuberculosis when administered aerogenically as well as intradermally. Immunization with MtbΔbioA conferred significant protection in guinea pigs against an aerosol challenge with virulent M. tuberculosis, when compared with the unvaccinated animals. Booster immunization with MtbΔbioA offered no advantage over a single immunization. These experiments demonstrate the vaccinogenic potential of the attenuated M. tuberculosis bioA mutant against tuberculosis.

  18. Cyclopropane fatty acid synthase mutants of probiotic human-derived Lactobacillus reuteri are defective in TNF inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sara E; Whitehead, Kristi; Saulnier, Delphine; Thomas, Carissa M; Versalovic, James; Britton, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Although commensal microbes have been shown to modulate host immune responses, many of the bacterial factors that mediate immune regulation remain unidentified. Select strains of human-derived Lactobacillus reuteri synthesize immunomodulins that potently inhibit production of the inflammatory cytokine TNF. In this study, genetic and genomic approaches were used to identify and investigate L. reuteri genes required or human TNF immunomodulatory activity. Analysis of membrane fatty acids from multiple L. reuteri strains cultured in MRS medium showed that only TNF inhibitory strains produced the cyclopropane fatty acid (CFA) lactobacillic acid. The enzyme cyclopropane fatty acid synthase is required for synthesis of CFAs such as lactobacillic acid, therefore the cfa gene was inactivated and supernatants from the cfa mutant strain were assayed for TNF inhibitory activity. We found that supernatants from the wild-type strain, but not the cfa mutant, suppressed TNF production by activated THP-1 human monocytoid cells Although this suggested a direct role for lactobacillic acid in immunomodulation, purified lactobacillic acid did not suppress TNF at physiologically relevant concentrations. We further analyzed TNF inhibitory and TNF non-inhibitory strains under different growth conditions and found that lactobacillic acid production did not correlate with TNF inhibition. These results indicate that cfa indirectly contributed to L. reuter immunomodulatory activity and suggest that other mechanisms, such as decreased membrane fluidity or altered expression of immunomodulins, result in the loss of TNF inhibitory activity. By increasing our understanding of immunomodulation by probiotic species, beneficial microbes can be rationally selected to alleviate intestinal inflammation.

  19. Bruchpilot in ribbon-like axonal agglomerates, behavioral defects, and early death in SRPK79D kinase mutants of Drosophila.

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    Vanessa Nieratschker

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Defining the molecular structure and function of synapses is a central theme in brain research. In Drosophila the Bruchpilot (BRP protein is associated with T-shaped ribbons ("T-bars" at presynaptic active zones (AZs. BRP is required for intact AZ structure and normal evoked neurotransmitter release. By screening for mutations that affect the tissue distribution of Bruchpilot, we have identified a P-transposon insertion in gene CG11489 (location 79D which shows high homology to mammalian genes for SR protein kinases (SRPKs. SRPKs phosphorylate serine-arginine rich splicing factors (SR proteins. Since proteins expressed from CG11489 cDNAs phosphorylate a peptide from a human SR protein in vitro, we name CG11489 the Drosophila Srpk79D gene. We have characterized Srpk79D transcripts and generated a null mutant. Mutation of the Srpk79D gene causes conspicuous accumulations of BRP in larval and adult nerves. At the ultrastructural level, these correspond to extensive axonal agglomerates of electron-dense ribbons surrounded by clear vesicles. Basic synaptic structure and function at larval neuromuscular junctions appears normal, whereas life expectancy and locomotor behavior of adult mutants are significantly impaired. All phenotypes of the mutant can be largely or completely rescued by panneural expression of SRPK79D isoforms. Isoform-specific antibodies recognize panneurally overexpressed GFP-tagged SRPK79D-PC isoform co-localized with BRP at presynaptic active zones while the tagged -PB isoform is found in spots within neuronal perikarya. SRPK79D concentrations in wild type apparently are too low to be revealed by these antisera. We propose that the Drosophila Srpk79D gene characterized here may be expressed at low levels throughout the nervous system to prevent the assembly of BRP containing agglomerates in axons and maintain intact brain function. The discovery of an SR protein kinase required for normal BRP distribution calls for the

  20. Trehalose-6-phosphate synthase and stabilization of yeast glycolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fraenkel, Dan; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    ‘Lost in transition: Startup of glycolysis yields subpopulations of nongrowing cells…’ (‘LIT’, van Heerden et al. 2014) is a massive paper from groups in Amsterdam and Delft, which deals with broad issues in metabolism and cell heterogeneity, as addressed for the predominant metabolic pathway......, glycolysis, in the context of a long studied but incompletely understood yeast mutant which is impaired in use of glucose without evident direct defects in the pathway. The primary approach is the quite original one of predicting, for the mutant, the dynamics of metabolism upon glucose addition, based...

  1. Cell-cycle kinetics and ultraviolet light survival in UV-1, a Chinese hamster ovary cell mutant defective in post-replication recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, A.

    1982-01-01

    UV-I, an ultraviolet-sensitive mutant of CHO-KI, is abnormally slow to recover from the inhibition of DNA synthesis caused by u.v. irradiation. When synchronized UV-I cells are irradiated in G 1 , their movement into S phase is unaltered, but thymidine incorporation is depressed. When irradiated in S phase, again incorporation is more depressed, and S phase suffers a greater delay in UV-I than in the parent cell. UV-I and its parent have similar capacities for excision repair of u.v.-induced damage inflicted in G 1 , and so enter S phase with similar amounts of unrepaired damage. The single-cell survival was measured after irradiation at different points in the cell cycle. The mutant and parent cells have similar values of D 0 (mean lethal dose) except in mitosis, when the parent cell shows markedly greater resistance to u.v. irradiation. Dsub(q) (quasi-threshold dose) is fairly constant for the parent cell, but in UV-I it falls to a minimum in S phase. The responses of UV-I to u.v. irradiation are generally consistent with its known defect in post-replication recovery, i.e. the ability to join up the abnormally small DNA fragments synthesized on a u.v.-damaged template. (author)

  2. A defective mutant of Salmonella enterica Serovar Gallinarum in cobalamin biosynthesis is avirulent in chickens Mutante de Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum duplo defectivo na biossíntese de cobalamina é avirulento para aves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Boldrin de Paiva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (SG is a fowl typhoid agent in chickens and is a severe disease with worldwide economic impact as its mortality may reach up to 80%. It is one of a small group of serovars that typically produces typhoid-like infections in a narrow range of host species and which therefore represents a good model for human typhoid. The survival mechanisms are not considered to be virulent mechanisms but are essential for the life of the bacterium. Mutants of Salmonella Gallinarum containing defective genes, related to cobalamin biosynthesis and which Salmonella spp. has to be produced to survive when it is in an anaerobic environment, were produced in this study. Salmonella Gallinarum is an intracellular parasite. Therefore, this study could provide information about whether vitamin B12 biosynthesis might be essential to its survival in the host. The results showed that the singular deletion in cbiA or cobS genes did not interfere in the life of Salmonella Gallinarum in the host, perhaps because single deletion is not enough to impede vitamin B12 biosynthesis. It was noticed that diluted SG mutants with single deletion produced higher mortality than the wild strain of SG. When double mutation was carried out, the Salmonella Gallinarum mutant was unable to provoke mortality in susceptible chickens. This work showed that B12 biosynthesis is a very important step in the metabolism of Salmonella Gallinarum during the infection of the chickens. Further research on bacterium physiology should be carried out to elucidate the events described in this research and to assess the mutant as a vaccine strain.Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum (SG é o agente do tifo aviário, doença severa que provoca mortalidade em até 80% do plantel de aves. SG encontra-se entre os poucos sorotipos de Salmonella que são agentes etiológicos de enfermidade específica, à semelhança de Salmonella Typhi em seres humanos podendo, portanto, servir

  3. Mutant APP and Amyloid beta-induced defective autophagy, mitophagy, mitochondrial structural and functional changes and synaptic damage in hippocampal neurons from Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P Hemachandra; Yin, XiangLin; Manczak, Maria; Kumar, Subodh; Jangampalli Adi, Pradeepkiran; Vijayan, Murali; Reddy, Arubala P

    2018-04-25

    The purpose of our study was to determine the toxic effects of hippocampal mutant APP and amyloid beta (Aβ) in human mutant APP (mAPP) cDNA transfected with primary mouse hippocampal neurons (HT22). Hippocampal tissues are the best source of studying learning and memory functions in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy controls. However, investigating immortalized hippocampal neurons that express AD proteins provide an excellent opportunity for drug testing. Using quantitative RT-PCR, immunoblotting & immunofluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy, we assessed mRNA and protein levels of synaptic, autophagy, mitophagy, mitochondrial dynamics, biogenesis, dendritic protein MAP2, and assessed mitochondrial number and length in mAPP-HT22 cells that express Swedish/Indiana mutations. Mitochondrial function was assessed by measuring the levels of hydrogen peroxide, lipid peroxidation, cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial ATP. Increased levels of mRNA and protein levels of mitochondrial fission genes, Drp1 and Fis1 and decreased levels fusion (Mfn1, Mfn2 and Opa1) biogenesis (PGC1α, NRF1, NRF2 & TFAM), autophagy (ATG5 & LC3BI, LC3BII), mitophagy (PINK1 & TERT, BCL2 & BNIPBL), synaptic (synaptophysin & PSD95) and dendritic (MAP2) genes were found in mAPP-HT22 cells relative to WT-HT22 cells. Cell survival was significantly reduced mAPP-HT22 cells. GTPase-Dp1 enzymatic activity was increased in mAPP-HT22 cells. Transmission electron microscopy revealed significantly increased mitochondrial numbers and reduced mitochondrial length in mAPP-HT22 cells. These findings suggest that hippocampal accumulation of mutant APP and Aβ is responsible for abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and defective biogenesis, reduced MAP2, autophagy, mitophagy and synaptic proteins & reduced dendritic spines and mitochondrial structural and functional changes in mutant APP hippocampal cells. These observations strongly suggest that accumulation of mAPP and A

  4. The novel mouse mutant, chuzhoi, has disruption of Ptk7 protein and exhibits defects in neural tube, heart and lung development and abnormal planar cell polarity in the ear

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    Paudyal Anju

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The planar cell polarity (PCP signalling pathway is fundamental to a number of key developmental events, including initiation of neural tube closure. Disruption of the PCP pathway causes the severe neural tube defect of craniorachischisis, in which almost the entire brain and spinal cord fails to close. Identification of mouse mutants with craniorachischisis has proven a powerful way of identifying molecules that are components or regulators of the PCP pathway. In addition, identification of an allelic series of mutants, including hypomorphs and neomorphs in addition to complete nulls, can provide novel genetic tools to help elucidate the function of the PCP proteins. Results We report the identification of a new N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-induced mutant with craniorachischisis, which we have named chuzhoi (chz. We demonstrate that chuzhoi mutant embryos fail to undergo initiation of neural tube closure, and have characteristics consistent with defective convergent extension. These characteristics include a broadened midline and reduced rate of increase of their length-to-width ratio. In addition, we demonstrate disruption in the orientation of outer hair cells in the inner ear, and defects in heart and lung development in chuzhoi mutants. We demonstrate a genetic interaction between chuzhoi mutants and both Vangl2Lp and Celsr1Crsh mutants, strengthening the hypothesis that chuzhoi is involved in regulating the PCP pathway. We demonstrate that chuzhoi maps to Chromosome 17 and carries a splice site mutation in Ptk7. This mutation results in the insertion of three amino acids into the Ptk7 protein and causes disruption of Ptk7 protein expression in chuzhoi mutants. Conclusions The chuzhoi mutant provides an additional genetic resource to help investigate the developmental basis of several congenital abnormalities including neural tube, heart and lung defects and their relationship to disruption of PCP. The chuzhoi mutation

  5. A loss-of-function mutation in the PAS kinase Rim15p is related to defective quiescence entry and high fermentation rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Araki, Yuya; Zhou, Yan; Maeya, Naoki; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2012-06-01

    Sake yeast cells have defective entry into the quiescent state, allowing them to sustain high fermentation rates. To reveal the underlying mechanism, we investigated the PAS kinase Rim15p, which orchestrates initiation of the quiescence program in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that Rim15p is truncated at the carboxyl terminus in modern sake yeast strains as a result of a frameshift mutation. Introduction of this mutation or deletion of the full-length RIM15 gene in a laboratory strain led to a defective stress response, decreased synthesis of the storage carbohydrates trehalose and glycogen, and impaired G(1) arrest, which together closely resemble the characteristic phenotypes of sake yeast. Notably, expression of a functional RIM15 gene in a modern sake strain suppressed all of these phenotypes, demonstrating that dysfunction of Rim15p prevents sake yeast cells from entering quiescence. Moreover, loss of Rim15p or its downstream targets Igo1p and Igo2p remarkably improved the fermentation rate in a laboratory strain. This finding verified that Rim15p-mediated entry into quiescence plays pivotal roles in the inhibition of ethanol fermentation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss-of-function mutation in the RIM15 gene may be the key genetic determinant of the increased ethanol production rates in modern sake yeast strains.

  6. Imp2, the PSTPIP homolog in fission yeast, affects sensitivity to the immunosuppressant FK506 and membrane trafficking in fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Ayako; Higa, Mari; Doi, Akira; Satoh, Ryosuke; Sugiura, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinesis is a highly ordered process that divides one cell into two cells, which is functionally linked to the dynamic remodeling of the plasma membrane coordinately with various events such as membrane trafficking. Calcineurin is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein phosphatase, which regulates multiple biological functions, such as membrane trafficking and cytokinesis. Here, we isolated imp2-c3, a mutant allele of the imp2 + gene, encoding a homolog of the mouse PSTPIP1 (proline-serine-threonine phosphatase interacting protein 1), using a genetic screen for mutations that are synthetically lethal with calcineurin deletion in fission yeast. The imp2-c3 mutants showed a defect in cytokinesis with multi-septated phenotypes, which was further enhanced upon treatment with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506. Notably, electron micrographs revealed that the imp2-c3 mutant cells accumulated aberrant multi-lamella Golgi structures and putative post-Golgi secretory vesicles, and exhibited fragmented vacuoles in addition to thickened septa. Consistently, imp2-c3 mutants showed a reduced secretion of acid phosphatase and defects in vacuole fusion. The imp2-c3 mutant cells exhibited a weakened cell wall, similar to the membrane trafficking mutants identified in the same genetic screen such as ypt3-i5. These findings implicate the PSTPIP1 homolog Imp2 in Golgi/vacuole function, thereby affecting various cellular processes, including cytokinesis and cell integrity. - Highlights: • We isolated imp2-c3, in a synthetic lethal screen with calcineurin in fission yeast. • The imp2 + gene encodes a component of the actin contractile ring similar to Cdc15. • The imp2-c3 mutants showed defects in cytokinesis, which were exacerbated by FK506. • The imp2-c3 mutants were defective in membrane trafficking and cell wall integrity. • Our study revealed a novel role for Imp2 in the Golgi/vacuolar membrane trafficking

  7. Imp2, the PSTPIP homolog in fission yeast, affects sensitivity to the immunosuppressant FK506 and membrane trafficking in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, Ayako; Higa, Mari [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Doi, Akira [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 1-8 Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Satoh, Ryosuke [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Sugiura, Reiko, E-mail: sugiurar@phar.kindai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2015-02-13

    Cytokinesis is a highly ordered process that divides one cell into two cells, which is functionally linked to the dynamic remodeling of the plasma membrane coordinately with various events such as membrane trafficking. Calcineurin is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein phosphatase, which regulates multiple biological functions, such as membrane trafficking and cytokinesis. Here, we isolated imp2-c3, a mutant allele of the imp2{sup +} gene, encoding a homolog of the mouse PSTPIP1 (proline-serine-threonine phosphatase interacting protein 1), using a genetic screen for mutations that are synthetically lethal with calcineurin deletion in fission yeast. The imp2-c3 mutants showed a defect in cytokinesis with multi-septated phenotypes, which was further enhanced upon treatment with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506. Notably, electron micrographs revealed that the imp2-c3 mutant cells accumulated aberrant multi-lamella Golgi structures and putative post-Golgi secretory vesicles, and exhibited fragmented vacuoles in addition to thickened septa. Consistently, imp2-c3 mutants showed a reduced secretion of acid phosphatase and defects in vacuole fusion. The imp2-c3 mutant cells exhibited a weakened cell wall, similar to the membrane trafficking mutants identified in the same genetic screen such as ypt3-i5. These findings implicate the PSTPIP1 homolog Imp2 in Golgi/vacuole function, thereby affecting various cellular processes, including cytokinesis and cell integrity. - Highlights: • We isolated imp2-c3, in a synthetic lethal screen with calcineurin in fission yeast. • The imp2{sup +} gene encodes a component of the actin contractile ring similar to Cdc15. • The imp2-c3 mutants showed defects in cytokinesis, which were exacerbated by FK506. • The imp2-c3 mutants were defective in membrane trafficking and cell wall integrity. • Our study revealed a novel role for Imp2 in the Golgi/vacuolar membrane trafficking.

  8. Reversion by calcium of a yeast-like development to the original filamentous form, of the 10V10 5-fluorocytosine-sensitive mutant of Aspergillus niger Reversão pelo cálcio de um desenvolvimento leveduriforme para a forma filamentosa original em um mutante sensível a 5-fluorocitosina na linhagem 10V10 de Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosangela de Carvalho Goulart

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Some filamentous fungi present the phenomenon of dimorphism, their morphological structure alterations being capable of inducing metabolism changes. The Aspergillus niger strain 10v10, a producer of citric acid, was submitted to the mutagenic action of ultraviolet irradiation which respectively selects mutants sensitive or resistant to the antifungi agent 5 fluorocytosine (5-FC. 5-FC sensitive mutants presented a morphological alteration to a yeast-like form. The effects of pH changes, addition of salts (KH2PO4, NH4NO3, MgSO4 and MgCl2, the presence of osmotic stabilizers, as well as of calcium chloride, on morphological reversal and acid production were studied. Morphological reversal to the filamentous form was observed only in the presence of CaCl2 (500mM for the mutants strains 1 and 2, while the acid production occurred in both, yeast-like and filamentous forms.Alguns fungos filamentosos apresentam o fenômeno de dimorfismo, sendo que as alterações da estrutura morfológica podem induzir alterações metabólicas. A linhagem de Aspergillus niger 10v10, produtora de ácido cítrico foi submetida à ação mutagênica da radiação ultravioleta selecionando mutantes sensíveis ou resistentes ao antifúngico 5-fluorocitosina (5-FC. Os mutantes selecionados como sensíveis a 5-FC apresentaram uma alteração morfológica com desenvolvimento leveduriforme. Nestes mutantes foram avaliados o efeito da alteração de pH, a adição de sais (KH2PO4, NH4NO3, MgSO4e MnCl2, a presença de estabilizadores osmóticos, cloreto de cálcio, e o seu efeito sobre a reversão morfológica e a produção de ácido. A reversão morfológica para a forma filamentosa ocorreu apenas na presença de CaCl2 (500mM para as linhagens mutantes 1 e 2, enquanto que a produção de ácido ocorreu nas duas formas, leveduriforme e filamentosa.

  9. Characterization of yeast extracellular vesicles: evidence for the participation of different pathways of cellular traffic in vesicle biogenesis.

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    Débora L Oliveira

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles in yeast cells are involved in the molecular traffic across the cell wall. In yeast pathogens, these vesicles have been implicated in the transport of proteins, lipids, polysaccharide and pigments to the extracellular space. Cellular pathways required for the biogenesis of yeast extracellular vesicles are largely unknown.We characterized extracellular vesicle production in wild type (WT and mutant strains of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using transmission electron microscopy in combination with light scattering analysis, lipid extraction and proteomics. WT cells and mutants with defective expression of Sec4p, a secretory vesicle-associated Rab GTPase essential for Golgi-derived exocytosis, or Snf7p, which is involved in multivesicular body (MVB formation, were analyzed in parallel. Bilayered vesicles with diameters at the 100-300 nm range were found in extracellular fractions from yeast cultures. Proteomic analysis of vesicular fractions from the cells aforementioned and additional mutants with defects in conventional secretion pathways (sec1-1, fusion of Golgi-derived exocytic vesicles with the plasma membrane; bos1-1, vesicle targeting to the Golgi complex or MVB functionality (vps23, late endosomal trafficking revealed a complex and interrelated protein collection. Semi-quantitative analysis of protein abundance revealed that mutations in both MVB- and Golgi-derived pathways affected the composition of yeast extracellular vesicles, but none abrogated vesicle production. Lipid analysis revealed that mutants with defects in Golgi-related components of the secretory pathway had slower vesicle release kinetics, as inferred from intracellular accumulation of sterols and reduced detection of these lipids in vesicle fractions in comparison with WT cells.Our results suggest that both conventional and unconventional pathways of secretion are required for biogenesis of extracellular vesicles, which demonstrate the

  10. A Western Blot-based Investigation of the Yeast Secretory Pathway Designed for an Intermediate-Level Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-DeGrenier, Jennifer K.

    2008-01-01

    The movement of newly synthesized proteins through the endomembrane system of eukaryotic cells, often referred to generally as the secretory pathway, is a topic covered in most intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology courses. An article previously published in this journal described a laboratory exercise in which yeast mutants defective in…

  11. The effect of defective DNA double-strand break repair on mutations and chromosome aberrations in the Chinese hamster cell mutant XR-V15B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbig, R.; Speit, G.; Zdzienicka, M.Z.

    1995-01-01

    The radiosensitive Chinese hamster cell line XR-V15B was used to study the effect of decreased rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) on gene mutations and chromosome aberrations. XR-V15B cells are hypersensitive to the cytotoxic effects of neocarzinostatin (NCS) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Both mutagens induced more chromosome aberrations in XR-V15B cells than in the parental cell strain. The clastogenic action of NCS was characterized by the induction of predominantly chromosome-type aberrations in cells of both strains, whereas MMS induced mainly chromatid aberrations. The frequency of induced gene mutations at the hprt locus was not increased compared to the parental V79 cells when considering the same survival level. Molecular analysis by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of mutants induced by NCS revealed a high frequency of deletions in cells of both cell lines. Methyl methane-sulfonate induced mainly mutations without visible change in the PCR pattern, which probably represent point mutations. Our findings suggest a link between a defect in DNA DSB repair and increased cytotoxic and clastogenic effects. However, a decreased ability to rejoin DNA DSBs does not seem to influence the incidence and types of gene mutations at the hprt locus induced by NCS and MMS. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Phosphatidylcholine Supply to Peroxisomes of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flis, Vid V; Fankl, Ariane; Ramprecht, Claudia; Zellnig, Günther; Leitner, Erich; Hermetter, Albin; Daum, Günther

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, phosphatidylcholine (PC), the major phospholipid (PL) of all organelle membranes, is synthesized via two different pathways. Methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) catalyzed by the methyl transferases Cho2p/Pem1p and Opi3p/Pem2p as well as incorporation of choline through the CDP (cytidine diphosphate)-choline branch of the Kennedy pathway lead to PC formation. To determine the contribution of these two pathways to the supply of PC to peroxisomes (PX), yeast mutants bearing defects in the two pathways were cultivated under peroxisome inducing conditions, i.e. in the presence of oleic acid, and subjected to biochemical and cell biological analyses. Phenotype studies revealed compromised growth of both the cho20Δopi3Δ (mutations in the methylation pathway) and the cki1Δdpl1Δeki1Δ (mutations in the CDP-choline pathway) mutant when grown on oleic acid. Analysis of peroxisomes from the two mutant strains showed that both pathways produce PC for the supply to peroxisomes, although the CDP-choline pathway seemed to contribute with higher efficiency than the methylation pathway. Changes in the peroxisomal lipid pattern of mutants caused by defects in the PC biosynthetic pathways resulted in changes of membrane properties as shown by anisotropy measurements with fluorescent probes. In summary, our data define the origin of peroxisomal PC and demonstrate the importance of PC for peroxisome membrane formation and integrity.

  13. Proteolytic activities in yeast after UV irradiation. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwencke, J.; Moustacchi, E.

    1982-04-01

    When the levels of three common yeast proteinases in exponentially growing cells of mutants blocked in different repair pathways are compared to that of isogenic wild-type cells, it can be seen that the level of proteinase B is enhanced in the mutants whereas the levels of leucin aminopeptidase (Leu.AP) and lysine aminopeptidase (Lys.AP) are similar in all strains. As in its corresponding wild type, the level of proteinase B activity is further enhanced after UV-irradiation in a mutant blocked in excision-repair (rad1-3). In contrast, following the same treatment the level of proteinase B remains almost constant in a mutant blocked in a general error-prone repair system (rad6-1) and in a mutant defective in a more specific mutagenic repair pathway (pso2-1). Cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, blocks the post-UV enhancement in proteinase B activity observed in rad1-3 indicating that, as in the wild-type cells, an inducible process is involved. The levels of Lys.AP and Leu.AP are, respectively, either unaffected or only moderately increased following UV-treatment of the repair defective mutants, as in wild-type strains.

  14. Casein kinase II is required for the spindle assembly checkpoint by regulating Mad2p in fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Midori; Yamamoto, Ayumu; Murakami-Tonami, Yuko; Nakanishi, Makoto; Yoshida, Takashi; Aiba, Hirofumi; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a surveillance mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation in mitosis. Here we show that fission yeast casein kinase II (CK2) is required for this checkpoint function. In the CK2 mutants mitosis occurs in the presence of a spindle defect, and the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2p fails to localize to unattached kinetochores. The CK2 mutants are sensitive to the microtubule depolymerising drug thiabendazole, which is counteracted by ectopic expression of mad2 + . The level of Mad2p is low in the CK2 mutants. These results suggest that CK2 has a role in the spindle checkpoint by regulating Mad2p.

  15. Methanol-dependent production of dihydroxyacetone and glycerol by mutants of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha blocked in dihydroxyacetone kinase and glycerol kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, W. de; Weusthuis, R.A.; Harder, W.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    Various factors controlling dihydroxyacetone (DHA) and glycerol production from methanol by resting cell suspensions of a mutant of Hansenula polymorpha, blocked in DHA kinase and glycerol kinase, were investigated. The presence of methanol (250 mM) and an additional substrate (0.5%, w/v) to

  16. A soluble diacylglycerol acyltransferase is involved in triacylglycerol biosynthesis in the oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Sapa Hima; Saha, Saikat; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2013-01-01

    The biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (TAG) occurs in the microsomal membranes of eukaryotes. Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), a member of the 10 S cytosolic TAG biosynthetic complex (TBC) in Rhodotorula glutinis. Both a full-length and an N-terminally truncated cDNA clone of a single gene were isolated from R. glutinis. The DGAT activity of the protein encoded by RgDGAT was confirmed in vivo by the heterologous expression of cDNA in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae quadruple mutant (H1246) that is defective in TAG synthesis. RgDGAT overexpression in yeast was found to be capable of acylating diacylglycerol (DAG) in an acyl-CoA-dependent manner. Quadruple mutant yeast cells exhibit growth defects in the presence of oleic acid, but wild-type yeast cells do not. In an in vivo fatty acid supplementation experiment, RgDGAT expression rescued quadruple mutant growth in an oleate-containing medium. We describe a soluble acyl-CoA-dependent DAG acyltransferase from R. glutinis that belongs to the DGAT3 class of enzymes. The study highlights the importance of an alternative TAG biosynthetic pathway in oleaginous yeasts.

  17. Repair of UV-irradiated plasmid DNA in excision repair deficient mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikai, K.; Tano, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Nozu, K.

    1985-01-01

    The repair of UV-irradiated DNA of plasmid YEp13 was studied in the incision defective strains by measurement of cell transformation frequency. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, rad1,2,3 and 4 mutants could repair UV-damaged plasmid DNA. In Escherichia coli, uvrA mutant was unable to repair UV-damaged plasmid DNA; however, pretreatment of the plasmid with Micrococcus luteus endonuclease increased repair. It was concluded that all the mutations of yeast were probably limited only to the nuclear DNA. (author)

  18. Global gene expression analysis of fission yeast mutants impaired in Ser-2 phosphorylation of the RNA pol II carboxy terminal domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Saberianfar

    Full Text Available In Schizosaccharomyces pombe the nuclear-localized Lsk1p-Lsc1p cyclin dependent kinase complex promotes Ser-2 phosphorylation of the heptad repeats found within the RNA pol II carboxy terminal domain (CTD. Here, we first provide evidence supporting the existence of a third previously uncharacterized Ser-2 CTD kinase subunit, Lsg1p. As expected for a component of the complex, Lsg1p localizes to the nucleus, promotes Ser-2 phosphorylation of the CTD, and physically interacts with both Lsk1p and Lsc1p in vivo. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that lsg1Δ mutants--just like lsk1Δ and lsc1Δ strains--are compromised in their ability to faithfully and reliably complete cytokinesis. Next, to address whether kinase mediated alterations in CTD phosphorylation might selectively alter the expression of genes with roles in cytokinesis and/or the cytoskeleton, global gene expression profiles were analyzed. Mutants impaired in Ser-2 phosphorylation display little change with respect to the level of transcription of most genes. However, genes affecting cytokinesis--including the actin interacting protein gene, aip1--as well as genes with roles in meiosis, are included in a small subset that are differentially regulated. Significantly, genetic analysis of lsk1Δ aip1Δ double mutants is consistent with Lsk1p and Aip1p acting in a linear pathway with respect to the regulation of cytokinesis.

  19. Synapsis-Defective Mutants Reveal a Correlation Between Chromosome Conformation and the Mode of Double-Strand Break Repair During Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Smolikov, Sarit; Eizinger, Andreas; Hurlburt, Allison; Rogers, Eric; Villeneuve, Anne M.; Colaiácovo, Mónica P.

    2007-01-01

    SYP-3 is a new structural component of the synaptonemal complex (SC) required for the regulation of chromosome synapsis. Both chromosome morphogenesis and nuclear organization are altered throughout the germlines of syp-3 mutants. Here, our analysis of syp-3 mutants provides insights into the relationship between chromosome conformation and the repair of meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although crossover recombination is severely reduced in syp-3 mutants, the production of viable offspri...

  20. Ubiquitin regulates TORC1 in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kejin; Guo, Shuguang; Yan, Gonghong; Yuan, Wenjie; Zheng, Yin; Jiang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae the TOR complex 1 (TORC1) controls many growth-related cellular processes and is essential for cell growth and proliferation. Macrolide antibiotic rapamycin, in complex with a cytosol protein named FKBP12, specifically inhibits TORC1, causing growth arrest. The FKBP12-rapamycin complex interferes with TORC1 function by binding to the FRB domain of the TOR proteins. In an attempt to understand the role of the FRB domain in TOR function, we identified a single point mutation (Tor2(W2041R) ) in the FRB domain of Tor2 that renders yeast cells rapamycin resistant and temperature sensitive. At the permissive temperature, the Tor2 mutant protein is partially defective for binding with Kog1 and TORC1 is impaired for membrane association. At the restrictive temperature, Kog1 but not the Tor2 mutant protein, is rapidly degraded. Overexpression of ubiquitin stabilizes Kog1 and suppresses the growth defect associated with the tor2 mutant at the nonpremissive temperature. We find that ubiquitin binds non-covalently to Kog1, prevents Kog1 from degradation and stabilizes TORC1. Our data reveal a unique role for ubiquitin in regulation of TORC1 and suggest that Kog1 requires association with the Tor proteins for stabilization. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Effects of spermine on the detection of induced forward mutation at the CAN1 locus in yeast: evidence for selection against canavanine-resistant mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDougall, K.J.; Lemontt, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of exogenous spermine tetrahydrochloride (0.5 mg/ml) on hydrazine- and nitrous acid-induced forward mutation to canavanine resistance (CAN1 ..-->.. can1, normal to defective arginine permease) was examined in stationary-phase haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Post-treatment cell division (specifically DNA replication) is required for hydrazine mutagenesis at this locus, whereas nitrous acid mutagenesis exhibits, in addition, a significant post-treatment-independent component.

  2. DNA repair and the genetic control of radiosensitivity in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: advantages of yeasts for easily manipulated model systems for studies on molecular biology of eukaryotes; induction of x-ray-resistant mutants by radiations and chemicals; genetics of uv-sensitive mutants; loci of genes affecting radiosensitivity; gene interactions in multiple mutants; liquid-holding recovery; mitotic and meiotic recombination; and repair of yeast mitochondrial DNA

  3. Growth and sporulation defects in Bacillus subtilis mutants with a single rrn operon can be suppressed by amplification of the rrn operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Koichi; Masuda, Kenta; Akanuma, Genki; Wada, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Takashi; Shiwa, Yuh; Ishige, Taichiro; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Niki, Hironori; Inaoka, Takashi; Kawamura, Fujio

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Bacillus subtilis strain 168 encodes ten rRNA (rrn) operons. We previously reported that strains with only a single rrn operon had a decreased growth and sporulation frequency. We report here the isolation and characterization of suppressor mutants from seven strains that each have a single rrn operon (rrnO, A, J, I, E, D or B). The suppressor mutants for strain RIK656 with a single rrnO operon had a higher frequency of larger colonies. These suppressor mutants had not only increased growth rates, but also increased sporulation frequencies and ribosome levels compared to the parental mutant strain RIK656. Quantitative PCR analyses showed that all these suppressor mutants had an increased number of copies of the rrnO operon. Suppressor mutants were also isolated from the six other strains with single rrn operons (rrnA, J, I, E, D or B). Next generation and capillary sequencing showed that all of the suppressor mutants had tandem repeats of the chromosomal locus containing the remaining rrn operon (amplicon). These amplicons varied in size from approximately 9 to 179 kb. The amplifications were likely to be initiated by illegitimate recombination between non- or micro-homologous sequences, followed by unequal crossing-over during DNA replication. These results are consistent with our previous report that rrn operon copy number has a major role in cellular processes such as cell growth and sporulation.

  4. Assessment of β-carotene content, cell physiology and morphology of the yellow yeast Rhodotorula glutinis mutant 400A15 using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutzu, Raffaela; Clemente, Ana; Reis, Alberto; Nobre, Beatriz; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Roseiro, José; Lopes da Silva, Teresa

    2013-08-01

    Flow cytometry was used to assess β-carotene content, cell membrane permeability, cell size and granularity in Rhodotorula glutinis mutant 400A15 grown under different oxygen transfer coefficients (k L a) and carbon to nitrogen ratios (C/N). A Doehlert distribution was used in order to select the best conditions that induced the highest carotenoids production. The highest β-carotene content (0.79 mg g(-1) DCW) at the lowest k L a and C/N (5 × 10(-3) s(-1) and 11.3 respectively). Under these conditions, the biomass concentration attained 18.60 g L(-1). The highest ratio of cells with permeabilised membranes (2.6 %), and the highest cell size and granularity were also obtained under these conditions. It was observed that C/N showed a stronger influence than the k L a on the measured cell parameters.

  5. A microarray-based genetic screen for yeast chronological aging factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Matecic

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Model organisms have played an important role in the elucidation of multiple genes and cellular processes that regulate aging. In this study we utilized the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in a large-scale screen for genes that function in the regulation of chronological lifespan, which is defined by the number of days that non-dividing cells remain viable. A pooled collection of viable haploid gene deletion mutants, each tagged with unique identifying DNA "bar-code" sequences was chronologically aged in liquid culture. Viable mutants in the aging population were selected at several time points and then detected using a microarray DNA hybridization technique that quantifies abundance of the barcode tags. Multiple short- and long-lived mutants were identified using this approach. Among the confirmed short-lived mutants were those defective for autophagy, indicating a key requirement for the recycling of cellular organelles in longevity. Defects in autophagy also prevented lifespan extension induced by limitation of amino acids in the growth media. Among the confirmed long-lived mutants were those defective in the highly conserved de novo purine biosynthesis pathway (the ADE genes, which ultimately produces IMP and AMP. Blocking this pathway extended lifespan to the same degree as calorie (glucose restriction. A recently discovered cell-extrinsic mechanism of chronological aging involving acetic acid secretion and toxicity was suppressed in a long-lived ade4Delta mutant and exacerbated by a short-lived atg16Delta autophagy mutant. The identification of multiple novel effectors of yeast chronological lifespan will greatly aid in the elucidation of mechanisms that cells and organisms utilize in slowing down the aging process.

  6. The tumor suppressor homolog in fission yeast, myh1+, displays a strong interaction with the checkpoint gene rad1+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansson, Kristina; Warringer, Jonas; Farewell, Anne; Park, Han-Oh; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Hayles, Jacqueline; Sunnerhagen, Per

    2008-01-01

    The DNA glycosylase MutY is strongly conserved in evolution, and homologs are found in most eukaryotes and prokaryotes examined. This protein is implicated in repair of oxidative DNA damage, in particular adenine mispaired opposite 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine. Previous investigations in Escherichia coli, fission yeast, and mammalian cells show an association of mutations in MutY homologs with a mutator phenotype and carcinogenesis. Eukaryotic MutY homologs physically associate with several proteins with a role in replication, DNA repair, and checkpoint signaling, specifically the trimeric 9-1-1 complex. In a genetic investigation of the fission yeast MutY homolog, myh1 + , we show that the myh1 mutation confers a moderately increased UV sensitivity alone and in combination with mutations in several DNA repair genes. The myh1 rad1, and to a lesser degree myh1 rad9, double mutants display a synthetic interaction resulting in enhanced sensitivity to DNA damaging agents and hydroxyurea. UV irradiation of myh1 rad1 double mutants results in severe chromosome segregation defects and visible DNA fragmentation, and a failure to activate the checkpoint. Additionally, myh1 rad1 double mutants exhibit morphological defects in the absence of DNA damaging agents. We also found a moderate suppression of the slow growth and UV sensitivity of rhp51 mutants by the myh1 mutation. Our results implicate fission yeast Myh1 in repair of a wider range of DNA damage than previously thought, and functionally link it to the checkpoint pathway

  7. Isolation and characterization of a Ds-tagged rice (Oryza sativa L.) GA-responsive dwarf mutant defective in an early step of the gibberellin biosynthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Upadhyaya, Narayana M

    2005-03-01

    We have isolated a severe dwarf transposon (Ds) insertion mutant in rice (Oryza sativa L.), which could be differentiated early in the seedling stage by reduced shoot growth and dark green leaves, and later by severe dwarfism and failure to initiate flowering. These mutants, however, showed normal seed germination and root growth. One of the sequences flanking Ds, rescued from the mutant, was of a chromosome 4-located putative ent-kaurene synthase (KS) gene, encoding the enzyme catalyzing the second step of the gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis pathway. Dwarf mutants were always homozygous for this Ds insertion and no normal plants homozygous for this mutation were recovered in the segregating progeny, indicating that the Ds insertion mutation is recessive. As mutations in three recently reported rice GA-responsive dwarf mutant alleles and the dwarf mutation identified in this study mapped to the same locus, we designate the corresponding gene OsKS1. The osks1 mutant seedlings were responsive to exogenous gibberellin (GA3). OsKS1 transcripts of about 2.3 kb were detected in leaves and stem of wild-type plants, but not in germinating seeds or roots, suggesting that OsKS1 is not involved in germination or root growth. There are at least five OsKS1-like genes in the rice genome, four of which are also represented in rice expressed sequence tag (EST) databases. All OsKS1-like genes are transcribed with different expression patterns. ESTs corresponding to all six OsKS genes are represented in other cereal databases including barley, wheat and maize, suggesting that they are biologically active.

  8. Synthesis of bacteriophage-coded gene products during infection of Escherichia coli with amber mutants of T3 and T7 defective in gene 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G; Hausmann, R

    1973-01-01

    During nonpermissive infection by a T7 amber mutant in gene 1 (phage RNA polymerase-deficient), synthesis of the products of the phage genes 3 (endonuclease), 3, 5 (lysozyme), 5 (DNA polymerase), and 17 (serum blocking power) was shown to occur at about half the rate as during wild-type infection...

  9. Studies on the control of development: isolation of Bacillus subtilis mutants blocked early in sporulation and defective in synthesis of highly phosphorylated nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhaese, H J; Hoch, J A; Groscurth, R

    1977-03-01

    To test our model on the mechanism of initiation of differentiation in Bacillus subtilis, we tested early blocked (stage 0) sporulation mutants for their ability to synthesize highly phosphorylated nucleotides. We also isolated early blocked asporogenous mutants with the aid of the intercalating drug tilorone. Among all mutants tested we found that the spo0F-bearing strain was unable to synthesize adenosine 3'(2')-triphosphate 5'-triphosphate, pppAppp. A revertant of this mutant regained the ability to both sporulate and synthesize pppAppp. Ribosomes of the asporogenous mutant isolated at T2 (2 hr after the end of logarithmic growth) of sporulation, in contrast to the wild type, do not synthesize adenosine 3'(2')-diphosphate 5'-diphosphate, ppApp, or adenosine 3'(2')-diphosphate 5'-triphosphate, pppApp, but synthesize guanosine 3'(2')-diphosphate 5'-diphosphate, ppGpp, and guanosine 3'(2')-diphosphate 5'-triphosphate, pppGpp. This behavior is characteristic of ribosomes from vegetative, not sporulating, cells. Ribosomes from the sporogenous revertant behave like those of the wild type. The results suggest that the spo0F mutation may be a mutation in the structural gene for pppAppp synthetase. The inability to synthesize pppAppp in this strain also prevents the formation of "sporulation-specific ribosomes," i.e., ribosomes that synthetize ppApp and pppApp. The present experiments suggest that the nucleotide pppAppp participates in the initiation of sporulation by triggering a sequencies of events required for the production of heat-resistant spores.

  10. S-nitrosoglutathione promotes cell wall remodelling, alters the transcriptional profile and induces root hair formation in the hairless root hair defective 6 (rhd6) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Camila Fernandes; Gaspar, Marilia; da Silva, Felipe Rodrigues; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G; Salgado, Ione; Braga, Marcia Regina

    2017-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) exerts pleiotropic effects on plant development; however, its involvement in cell wall modification during root hair formation (RHF) has not yet been addressed. Here, mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered root hair phenotypes were used to assess the involvement of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), the primary NO source, in cell wall dynamics and gene expression in roots induced to form hairs. GSNO and auxin restored the root hair phenotype of the hairless root hair defective 6 (rhd6) mutant. A positive correlation was observed between increased NO production and RHF induced by auxin in rhd6 and transparent testa glabra (ttg) mutants. Deposition of an epitope within rhamnogalacturonan-I recognized by the CCRC-M2 antibody was delayed in root hair cells (trichoblasts) compared with nonhair cells (atrichoblasts). GSNO, but not auxin, restored the wild-type root glycome and transcriptome profiles in rhd6, modulating the expression of a large number of genes related to cell wall composition and metabolism, as well as those encoding ribosomal proteins, DNA and histone-modifying enzymes and proteins involved in post-translational modification. Our results demonstrate that NO plays a key role in cell wall remodelling in trichoblasts and suggest that it also participates in chromatin modification in root cells of A. thaliana. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus β-Toxin Mutants Are Defective in Biofilm Ligase and Sphingomyelinase Activity, and Causation of Infective Endocarditis and Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Alfa; Vu, Bao G; Stach, Christopher S; Merriman, Joseph A; Horswill, Alexander R; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-05-03

    β-Toxin is an important virulence factor of Staphylococcus aureus, contributing to colonization and development of disease [Salgado-Pabon, W., et al. (2014) J. Infect. Dis. 210, 784-792; Huseby, M. J., et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 14407-14412; Katayama, Y., et al. (2013) J. Bacteriol. 195, 1194-1203]. This cytotoxin has two distinct mechanisms of action: sphingomyelinase activity and DNA biofilm ligase activity. However, the distinct mechanism that is most important for its role in infective endocarditis is unknown. We characterized the active site of β-toxin DNA biofilm ligase activity by examining deficiencies in site-directed mutants through in vitro DNA precipitation and biofilm formation assays. Possible conformational changes in mutant structure compared to that of wild-type toxin were assessed preliminarily by trypsin digestion analysis, retention of sphingomyelinase activity, and predicted structures based on the native toxin structure. We addressed the contribution of each mechanism of action to producing infective endocarditis and sepsis in vivo in a rabbit model. The H289N β-toxin mutant, lacking sphingomyelinase activity, exhibited lower sepsis lethality and infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to those of the wild-type toxin. β-Toxin mutants with disrupted biofilm ligase activity did not exhibit decreased sepsis lethality but were deficient in infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to the wild-type protein. Our study begins to characterize the DNA biofilm ligase active site of β-toxin and suggests β-toxin functions importantly in infective endocarditis through both of its mechanisms of action.

  12. Partial suppression of the respiratory defect of qrs1/her2 glutamyl-tRNA amidotransferase mutants by overexpression of the mitochondrial pentatricopeptide Msc6p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Bruno S; Ferreira-Júnior, José Ribamar; Barros, Mario H

    2016-08-01

    Recently, a large body of evidences indicates the existence in the mitochondrial matrix of foci that contain different proteins involved in mitochondrial RNA metabolism. Some of these proteins have a pentatricopeptide repeat motif that constitutes their RNA-binding structures. Here we report that MSC6, a mitochondrial pentatricopeptide protein of unknown function, is a multi copy suppressor of mutations in QRS1/HER2 a component of the trimeric complex that catalyzes the transamidation of glutamyl-tRNAQ to glutaminyl-tRNAQ. This is an essential step in mitochondrial translation because of the lack of a specific mitochondrial aminoacyl glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase. MSC6 over-expression did not abolish translation of an aberrant variant form of Cox2p detected in QRS1/HER2 mutants, arguing against a suppression mechanism that bypasses Qrs1p function. A slight decrement of the mitochondrial translation capacity as well as diminished growth on respiratory carbon sources media for respiratory activity was observed in the msc6 null mutant. Additionally, the msc6 null mutant did not display any impairment in RNA transcription, processing or turnover. We concluded that Msc6p is a mitochondrial matrix protein and further studies are required to indicate the specific function of Msc6p in mitochondrial translation.

  13. Deletion of the cardiolipin-specific phospholipase Cld1 rescues growth and life span defects in the tafazzin mutant: implications for Barth syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Cunqi; Lou, Wenjia; Li, Yiran; Chatzispyrou, Iliana A.; Hüttemann, Maik; Lee, Icksoo; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Vaz, Frédéric M.; Chen, Shuliang; Greenberg, Miriam L.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) that is synthesized de novo is deacylated to monolysocardiolipin (MLCL), which is reacylated by tafazzin. Remodeled CL contains mostly unsaturated fatty acids. In eukaryotes, loss of tafazzin leads to growth and respiration defects, and in humans, this results in the

  14. An ion-current mutant of Paramecium tetraurelia with defects in the primary structure and post-translational N-methylation of calmodulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallen-Friedman, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    My work on pantophobiac A 2 (pntA 2 ), a behavioral mutant of Paramecium tetraurelia, suggest that the Ca ++ -binding protein calmodulin (CaM), and post-translation N-methylation of CaM, are important for Ca ++ -related ion-current function. Calmodulin from wild-type Paramecium has two sites of lysine-N-methylation. Both of these sites are almost fully methylated in vivo; thus wild-type calmodulin is a poor substrate for N-methylation in vitro. In contrast, pntA/ 2 CaM can be heavily N-methylated in vitro, suggesting that the mutant calmodulin is under-methylated in vivo. Amino-acid composition analysis showed that CaM lysine 115 is undermethylated in pntA 2 . Once pntA 2 CaM is N-methylated, the [methyl- 3 H] group does not turn over in either wild-type or pntA 2 cytoplasmic fractions. The methylating enzymes in pntA 2 high-speed supernatant fractions are active, but may be less robust than those of the wild type, suggesting a possible control of these enzymes by CaM

  15. Evolved osmotolerant Escherichia coli mutants frequently exhibit defective N-acetylglucosamine catabolism and point mutations in cell shape-regulating protein MreB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, James D; Garcia, Carlos; Olson, Michelle; Callaway, Emily; Kao, Katy C

    2014-06-01

    Biocatalyst robustness toward stresses imposed during fermentation is important for efficient bio-based production. Osmotic stress, imposed by high osmolyte concentrations or dense populations, can significantly impact growth and productivity. In order to better understand the osmotic stress tolerance phenotype, we evolved sexual (capable of in situ DNA exchange) and asexual Escherichia coli strains under sodium chloride (NaCl) stress. All isolates had significantly improved growth under selection and could grow in up to 0.80 M (47 g/liter) NaCl, a concentration that completely inhibits the growth of the unevolved parental strains. Whole genome resequencing revealed frequent mutations in genes controlling N-acetylglucosamine catabolism (nagC, nagA), cell shape (mrdA, mreB), osmoprotectant uptake (proV), and motility (fimA). Possible epistatic interactions between nagC, nagA, fimA, and proV deletions were also detected when reconstructed as defined mutations. Biofilm formation under osmotic stress was found to be decreased in most mutant isolates, coupled with perturbations in indole secretion. Transcriptional analysis also revealed significant changes in ompACGL porin expression and increased transcription of sulfonate uptake systems in the evolved mutants. These findings expand our current knowledge of the osmotic stress phenotype and will be useful for the rational engineering of osmotic tolerance into industrial strains in the future. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. The Heterologous Expression of the p22 RNA Silencing Suppressor of the Crinivirus Tomato Chlorosis Virus from Tobacco Rattle Virus and Potato Virus X Enhances Disease Severity but Does Not Complement Suppressor-Defective Mutant Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeo-Ríos, Yazmín; Navas-Castillo, Jesús; Moriones, Enrique; Cañizares, M. Carmen

    2017-11-24

    To counteract host antiviral RNA silencing, plant viruses express suppressor proteins that function as pathogenicity enhancers. The genome of the Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV) (genus Crinivirus , family Closteroviridae ) encodes an RNA silencing suppressor, the protein p22, that has been described as having one of the longest lasting local suppressor activities when assayed in Nicotiana benthamiana . Since suppression of RNA silencing and the ability to enhance disease severity are closely associated, we analyzed the effect of expressing p22 in heterologous viral contexts. Thus, we studied the effect of the expression of ToCV p22 from viral vectors Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) and Potato virus X (PVX), and from attenuated suppressor mutants in N. benthamiana plants. Our results show that although an exacerbation of disease symptoms leading to plant death was observed in the heterologous expression of ToCV p22 from both viruses, only in the case of TRV did increased viral accumulation occur. The heterologous expression of ToCV p22 could not complement suppressor-defective mutant viruses.

  17. The defective phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthase in a temperature-sensitive prs-2 mutant of Escherichia coli is compensated by increased enzyme synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Post, David A.; Switzer, Robert L.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1996-01-01

    An Escherichia coli strain which is temperature-sensitive for growth due to a mutation (prs-2) causing a defective phosphoribosyl diphosphate (PRPP) synthase has been characterized. The temperature-sensitive mutation was mapped to a 276 bp HindIII-BssHII DNA fragment located within the open reading...... temperature shift to 42 degrees C. The other mutation was a C -> T transition located 39 bp upstream of the G -> A mutation, i.e. outside the coding sequence and close to the Shine-Dalgarno sequence. Cells harbouring only the C -> T mutation in a plasmid contained approximately three times as much PRPP...

  18. Novel mutants of Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora defective in the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes generated by Mu transpososome-mediated insertion mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laasik, Eve; Ojarand, Merli; Pajunen, Maria; Savilahti, Harri; Mäe, Andres

    2005-02-01

    As in Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora the regulation details of the main virulence factors, encoding extracellular enzymes that degrade the plant cell wall, is only rudimentally understood, we performed a genetic screen to identify novel candidate genes involved in the process. Initially, we used Mu transpososome-mediated mutagenesis approach to generate a comprehensive transposon insertion mutant library of ca. 10000 clones and screened the clones for the loss of extracellular enzyme production. Extracellular enzymes production was abolished by mutations in the chromosomal helEcc, trkAEcc yheLEcc, glsEcc, igaAEcc and cysQEcc genes. The findings reported here demonstrate that we have isolated six new representatives that belong to the pool of genes modulating the production of virulence factors in E. carotovora.

  19. Isolation of a novel cell wall architecture mutant of rice with defective Arabidopsis COBL4 ortholog BC1 required for regulated deposition of secondary cell wall components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kanna; Suzuki, Ryu; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Takenouchi, Sachi; Ito, Sachiko; Nakano, Yoshimi; Nakaba, Satoshi; Sano, Yuzou; Funada, Ryo; Kajita, Shinya; Kitano, Hidemi; Katayama, Yoshihiro

    2010-06-01

    The plant secondary cell wall is a highly ordered structure composed of various polysaccharides, phenolic components and proteins. Its coordinated regulation of a number of complex metabolic pathways and assembly has not been resolved. To understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate secondary cell wall synthesis, we isolated a novel rice mutant, cell wall architecture1 (cwa1), that exhibits an irregular thickening pattern in the secondary cell wall of sclerenchyma, as well as culm brittleness and reduced cellulose content in mature internodes. Light and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the cwa1 mutant plant has regions of local aggregation in the secondary cell walls of the cortical fibers in its internodes, showing uneven thickness. Ultraviolet microscopic observation indicated that localization of cell wall phenolic components was perturbed and that these components abundantly deposited at the aggregated cell wall regions in sclerenchyma. Therefore, regulation of deposition and assembly of secondary cell wall materials, i.e. phenolic components, appear to be disturbed by mutation of the cwa1 gene. Genetic analysis showed that cwa1 is allelic to brittle culm1 (bc1), which encodes the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored COBRA-like protein specifically in plants. BC1 is known as a regulator that controls the culm mechanical strength and cellulose content in the secondary cell walls of sclerenchyma, but the precise function of BC1 has not been resolved. Our results suggest that CWA1/BC1 has an essential role in assembling cell wall constituents at their appropriate sites, thereby enabling synthesis of solid and flexible internodes in rice.

  20. Evidence that the synthesis of glucosylphosphodolichol in yeast involves a 35-kDa membrane protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palamarczyk, G.; Drake, R.; Haley, B.; Lennarz, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    In an effort to identify the polypeptide chain of glucosylphosphodolichol synthase, yeast microsomal membranes were allowed to react with 5-azido[β- 32 P]UDPGlc, a photoactive analogue of UDPGlc, which is a substrate for this enzyme. Upon photolysis the 32 P-labeled probe was shown to link covalently to a 35-kDa protein present in microsomal membranes prepared from several wild-type yeast strains. Binding was either reduced or absent in the microsomal membranes from two yeast mutants (alg5 and dpg1) that are known to be defective in the synthesis of glucosylphosphodolichol. The microsomes isolated from a heterozygous diploid strain alg5::dpg1 generated from these two mutants exhibited partial restoration of both the ability to photolabel the 35-kDa protein and the ability to catalyze the synthesis of glucosylphosphodolichol. Microsomal membranes from a mutant strain that synthesized glucosylphosphodolichol but lacked the ability to transfer the glucosyl residue to the growing lipid-linked oligosaccharide (alg6) exhibited labeling with 5-azido[β- 32 P]UDPGlc comparable to that found in microsomes from the wild-type strain. In all cases photoinsertion of the probe into the 35-kDa protein correlated with the level of synthase assayed in the microsomal membranes. These results strongly support the conclusion that the 35-kDa protein labeled in these experiments is a component of glucosylphosphodolichol synthase

  1. Molecular analysis of mutants of the Neurospora adenylosuccinate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-08-07

    Aug 7, 2012 ... and mutants induced with X-ray, UV or chemical mutagens. ... We have sequenced the ad-8 locus from 13 of these mutants and identified the molecular nature ..... mutants in yeast by selection for constitutive behavior in pig-.

  2. Mutant RBL mast cells defective in Fc epsilon RI signaling and lipid raft biosynthesis are reconstituted by activated Rho-family GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, K A; Apgar, J R; Hong-Geller, E; Siraganian, R P; Baird, B; Holowka, D

    2000-10-01

    Characterization of defects in a variant subline of RBL mast cells has revealed a biochemical event proximal to IgE receptor (Fc epsilon RI)-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation that is required for multiple functional responses. This cell line, designated B6A4C1, is deficient in both Fc epsilon RI-mediated degranulation and biosynthesis of several lipid raft components. Agents that bypass receptor-mediated Ca(2+) influx stimulate strong degranulation responses in these variant cells. Cross-linking of IgE-Fc epsilon RI on these cells stimulates robust tyrosine phosphorylation but fails to mobilize a sustained Ca(2+) response. Fc epsilon RI-mediated inositol phosphate production is not detectable in these cells, and failure of adenosine receptors to mobilize Ca(2+) suggests a general deficiency in stimulated phospholipase C activity. Antigen stimulation of phospholipases A(2) and D is also defective. Infection of B6A4C1 cells with vaccinia virus constructs expressing constitutively active Rho family members Cdc42 and Rac restores antigen-stimulated degranulation, and active Cdc42 (but not active Rac) restores ganglioside and GPI expression. The results support the hypothesis that activation of Cdc42 and/or Rac is critical for Fc epsilon RI-mediated signaling that leads to Ca(2+) mobilization and degranulation. Furthermore, they suggest that Cdc42 plays an important role in the biosynthesis and expression of certain components of lipid rafts.

  3. Defect in the GTPase activating protein (GAP) function of eIF5 causes repression of GCN4 translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony A, Charles; Alone, Pankaj V

    2017-05-13

    In eukaryotes, the eIF5 protein plays an important role in translation start site selection by providing the GAP (GTPase activating protein) function. However, in yeast translation initiation fidelity defective eIF5 G31R mutant causes preferential utilization of UUG as initiation codon and is termed as Suppressor of initiation codon (Sui - ) phenotype due to its hyper GTPase activity. The eIF5 G31R mutant dominantly represses GCN4 expression and confers sensitivity to 3-Amino-1,2,4-Trizole (3AT) induced starvation. The down-regulation of the GCN4 expression (Gcn - phenotype) in the eIF5 G31R mutant was not because of leaky scanning defects; rather was due to the utilization of upUUG initiation codons at the 5' regulatory region present between uORF1 and the main GCN4 ORF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The RNA-binding protein Spo5 promotes meiosis II by regulating cyclin Cdc13 in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Mayumi; Sato, Masamitsu; Yamashita, Akira; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2014-03-01

    Meiosis comprises two consecutive nuclear divisions, meiosis I and II. Despite this unique progression through the cell cycle, little is known about the mechanisms controlling the sequential divisions. In this study, we carried out a genetic screen to identify factors that regulate the initiation of meiosis II in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We identified mutants deficient in meiosis II progression and repeatedly isolated mutants defective in spo5, which encodes an RNA-binding protein. Using fluorescence microscopy to visualize YFP-tagged protein, we found that spo5 mutant cells precociously lost Cdc13, the major B-type cyclin in fission yeast, before meiosis II. Importantly, the defect in meiosis II was rescued by increasing CDK activity. In wild-type cells, cdc13 transcripts increased during meiosis II, but this increase in cdc13 expression was weaker in spo5 mutants. Thus, Spo5 is a novel regulator of meiosis II that controls the level of cdc13 expression and promotes de novo synthesis of Cdc13. We previously reported that inhibition of Cdc13 degradation is necessary to initiate meiosis II; together with the previous information, the current findings indicate that the dual control of Cdc13 by de novo synthesis and suppression of proteolysis ensures the progression of meiosis II. © 2014 The Authors Genes to Cells © 2014 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Polymorphic human (CTAT)n microsatellite provides a conserved linkage marker for mouse mutants causing cleft palate, vestibular defects, obesity and ataxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, A.J.; Burgess, D.L.; Kohrman, D. [Univ. of MIchigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Twirler mutation (Tw) causing cleft palate {plus_minus} cleft lip, vestibular defects and obesity is located within 0.5 cM of an ataxia locus (ax) on mouse chromosome 18. We identified a transgene-induced insertional mutation with vestibular and craniofacial defects that appears to be a new allele of Twirler. Mouse DNA flanking the transgene insertion site was isolated from a cosmid library. An evolutionarily conserved, zoo blot positive cosmid subclone was used to probe a human {lambda} genomic library. From the sequence of a highly homologous human {lambda} clone, we designed STS primers and screened a human P1 library. DNA from two positive P1 clones was hybridized with simple sequence probes, and a (CTAT){sub 12} repeat was detected. Analysis of 62 CEPH parents with primers flanking the repeat identified six alleles containing 9 to 14 copies of the repeat, at frequencies of 0.17, 0.17, 0.17, 0.27, 0.15 and 0.07, respectively. The observed heterozygosity was 49/62 with a calculated PIC value of 0.76. This polymorphic microsatellite marker, designated Umi3, was mapped to the predicted conserved human linkage group by analysis of somatic cell hybrid panels. The anticipated short distance between Umi3 and the disease genes will facilitate detection of linkage in small families. We would like to type appropriate human pedigrees with Umi3 in order to identify patients with inherited disorders homologous to the mouse mutations Twirler and ataxia.

  6. Comparison Between Several Integrase-defective Lentiviral Vectors Reveals Increased Integration of an HIV Vector Bearing a D167H Mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Qamar Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 derived vectors are among the most efficient for gene transduction in mammalian tissues. As the parent virus, they carry out vector genome insertion into the host cell chromatin. Consequently, their preferential integration in transcribed genes raises several conceptual and safety issues. To address part of these questions, HIV-derived vectors have been engineered to be nonintegrating. This was mainly achieved by mutating HIV-1 integrase at functional hotspots of the enzyme enabling the development of streamlined nuclear DNA circles functional for transgene expression. Few integrase mutant vectors have been successfully tested so far for gene transfer. They are cleared with time in mitotic cells, but stable within nondividing retina cells or neurons. Here, we compared six HIV vectors carrying different integrases, either wild type or with different mutations (D64V, D167H, Q168A, K186Q+Q214L+Q216L, and RRK262-264AAH shown to modify integrase enzymatic activity, oligomerization, or interaction with key cellular cofactor of HIV DNA integration as LEDGF/p75 or TNPO3. We show that these mutations differently affect the transduction efficiency as well as rates and patterns of integration of HIV-derived vectors suggesting their different processing in the nucleus. Surprisingly and most interestingly, we report that an integrase carrying the D167H substitution improves vector transduction efficiency and integration in both HEK-293T and primary CD34+ cells.

  7. Extracellular esterases of phylloplane yeast Pseudozyma antarctica induce defect on cuticle layer structure and water-holding ability of plant leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Hirokazu; Mitsuhara, Ichiro; Tabata, Jun; Kugimiya, Soichi; Watanabe, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Kitamoto, Hiroko

    2015-08-01

    Aerial plant surface (phylloplane) is a primary key habitat for many microorganisms but is generally recognized as limited in nutrient resources. Pseudozyma antarctica, a nonpathogenic yeast, is commonly isolated from plant surfaces and characterized as an esterase producer with fatty acid assimilation ability. In order to elucidate the biological functions of these esterases, culture filtrate with high esterase activity (crude enzyme) of P. antarctica was applied onto leaves of tomato and Arabidopsis. These leaves showed a wilty phenotype, which is typically associated with water deficiency. Furthermore, we confirmed that crude enzyme-treated detached leaves clearly lost their water-holding ability. In treated leaves of both plants, genes associated to abscisic acid (ABA; a plant stress hormone responding osmotic stress) were activated and accumulation of ABA was confirmed in tomato plants. Microscopic observation of treated leaf surfaces revealed that cuticle layer covering the aerial epidermis of leaves became thinner. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis exhibited that fatty acids with 16 and 18 carbon chains were released in larger amounts from treated leaf surfaces, indicating that the crude enzyme has ability to degrade lipid components of cuticle layer. Among the three esterases detected in the crude enzyme, lipase A, lipase B, and P. antarctica esterase (PaE), an in vitro enzyme assay using para-nitrophenyl palmitate as substrate demonstrated that PaE was the most responsible for the degradation. These results suggest that PaE has a potential role in the extraction of fatty acids from plant surfaces, making them available for the growth of phylloplane yeasts.

  8. Transcriptional response to deletion of the phosphatidylserine decarboxylase Psd1p in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gsell, Martina; Mascher, Gerald; Schuiki, Irmgard; Ploier, Birgit; Hrastnik, Claudia; Daum, Günther

    2013-01-01

    In the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the synthesis of the essential phospholipid phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is accomplished by a network of reactions which comprises four different pathways. The enzyme contributing most to PE formation is the mitochondrial phosphatidylserine decarboxylase 1 (Psd1p) which catalyzes conversion of phosphatidylserine (PS) to PE. To study the genome wide effect of an unbalanced cellular and mitochondrial PE level and in particular the contribution of Psd1p to this depletion we performed a DNA microarray analysis with a ∆psd1 deletion mutant. This approach revealed that 54 yeast genes were significantly up-regulated in the absence of PSD1 compared to wild type. Surprisingly, marked down-regulation of genes was not observed. A number of different cellular processes in different subcellular compartments were affected in a ∆psd1 mutant. Deletion mutants bearing defects in all 54 candidate genes, respectively, were analyzed for their growth phenotype and their phospholipid profile. Only three mutants, namely ∆gpm2, ∆gph1 and ∆rsb1, were affected in one of these parameters. The possible link of these mutations to PE deficiency and PSD1 deletion is discussed.

  9. Identification of eight new mutations in familial neurogenic diabetes insipidus supports the concept that defective folding of the mutant provasopressin-neurophysin causes the disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittig, S.; Siggaard, C.; Pedersen, E.B. [University Hospital in Aarhus (Denmark)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Familial neurogenic diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is an autosomal dominant disorder with a uniform phenotype characterized by polyuria, polydipsia and a severe deficiency of arginine vasopressin (AVP). These abnormalities develop postnatally and appear to be due to progressive degeneration of AVP producing neurons. Previous studies in 8 FNDI kindreds have identified 5 different mutations in the gene that codes for the AVP-neurophysin (NP) precursor, AVP-NP. Four kindreds had the same missense mutation in the part of exon 1 that codes for the C-terminal amino acid of the signal peptide (SP). The other 4 had different missense mutations or a codon deletion in exon 2 which codes for the highly conserved part of NP. In the present study, the AVP-NP genes from 8 other kindreds with FNDI were sequenced bidirectionally using sequence and single-stranded DNA amplified by PCR with biotinylated primers flanking each of the 3 exons. We find that each of the 8 kindreds has a different, previously unreported mutation in either the SP coding part of exon 1, in exon 2 or in the variable, NP-coding part of exon 3. Combining these 8 new mutations with the 5 described previously reveals a distribution pattern that corresponds closely to the domains involved in the mutually interactive processes of AVP binding, folding and dimerization of NP. Based on these findings and the clinical features of FNDI, we postulate that the precursors produced by the mutant alleles are cytotoxic because they do not fold or dimerize properly for subsequent packaging and processing.

  10. Yeast lipids can phase separate into micrometer-scale membrane domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Christian; Ejsing, Christer S; Garcia-Saez, Ana J

    2010-01-01

    The lipid raft concept proposes that biological membranes have the potential to form functional domains based on a selective interaction between sphingolipids and sterols. These domains seem to be involved in signal transduction and vesicular sorting of proteins and lipids. Although there is bioc......The lipid raft concept proposes that biological membranes have the potential to form functional domains based on a selective interaction between sphingolipids and sterols. These domains seem to be involved in signal transduction and vesicular sorting of proteins and lipids. Although...... there is biochemical evidence for lipid raft-dependent protein and lipid sorting in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, direct evidence for an interaction between yeast sphingolipids and the yeast sterol ergosterol, resulting in membrane domain formation, is lacking. Here we show that model membranes formed from yeast...... total lipid extracts possess an inherent self-organization potential resulting in Ld-Lo phase coexistence at physiologically relevant temperature. Analyses of lipid extracts from mutants defective in sphingolipid metabolism as well as reconstitution of purified yeast lipids in model membranes of defined...

  11. Genetic analysis of yeast RPA1 reveals its multiple functions in DNA metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezu, K.; Sugawara, N.; Chen, C.; Haber, J.E.; Kolodner, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA-binding protein identified as an essential factor for SV40 DNA replication in vitro. To understand the in vivo functions of RPA, we mutagenized the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RFA1 gene and identified 19 ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation- and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-sensitive mutants and 5 temperature-sensitive mutants. The UV- and MMS-sensitive mutants showed up to 10 4 to 10 5 times increased sensitivity to these agents. Some of the UV- and MMSsensitive mutants were killed by an HO-induced double-strand break atMAT. Physical analysis of recombination in one UV- and MMS-sensitive rfa1 mutant demonstrated that it was defective for mating type switching and single-strand annealing recombination. Two temperature-sensitive mutants were characterized in detail, and at the restrictive temperature were found to have an arrest phenotype and DNA content indicative of incomplete DNA replication. DNA sequence analysis indicated that most of the mutations altered amino acids that were conserved between yeast, human, and Xenopus RPA1. Taken together, we conclude that RPA1 has multiple roles in vivo and functions in DNA replication, repair, and recombination, like the single-stranded DNA-binding proteins of bacteria and phages. (author)

  12. A bovine herpesvirus 5 recombinant defective in the thymidine kinase (TK gene and a double mutant lacking TK and the glycoprotein E gene are fully attenuated for rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C. Silva

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Bovine herpesvirus 5 (BoHV-5, the agent of herpetic meningoencephalitis in cattle, is an important pathogen of cattle in South America and several efforts have been made to produce safer and more effective vaccines. In the present study, we investigated in rabbits the virulence of three recombinant viruses constructed from a neurovirulent Brazilian BoHV-5 strain (SV507/99. The recombinants are defective in glycoprotein E (BoHV-5gEΔ, thymidine kinase (BoHV-5TKΔ and both proteins (BoHV-5gEΔTKΔ. Rabbits inoculated with the parental virus (N = 8 developed neurological disease and died or were euthanized in extremis between days 7 and 13 post-infection (pi. Infectivity was detected in several areas of their brains. Three of 8 rabbits inoculated with the recombinant BoHV-5gEΔ developed neurological signs between days 10 and 15 pi and were also euthanized. A more restricted virus distribution was detected in the brain of these animals. Rabbits inoculated with the recombinants BoHV-5TKΔ (N = 8 or BoHV-5gEΔTKΔ (N = 8 remained healthy throughout the experiment in spite of variable levels of virus replication in the nose. Dexamethasone (Dx administration to rabbits inoculated with the three recombinants at day 42 pi did not result in viral reactivation, as demonstrated by absence of virus shedding and/or increase in virus neutralizing titers. Nevertheless, viral DNA was detected in the trigeminal ganglia or olfactory bulbs of all animals at day 28 post-Dx, demonstrating they were latently infected. These results show that recombinants BoHV-5TKΔ and BoHV-5gEΔTKΔ are attenuated for rabbits and constitute potential vaccine candidates upon the confirmation of this phenotype in cattle.

  13. AarF Domain Containing Kinase 3 (ADCK3 Mutant Cells Display Signs of Oxidative Stress, Defects in Mitochondrial Homeostasis and Lysosomal Accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason K Cullen

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive ataxias are a clinically diverse group of syndromes that in some cases are caused by mutations in genes with roles in the DNA damage response, transcriptional regulation or mitochondrial function. One of these ataxias, known as Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia Type-2 (ARCA-2, also known as SCAR9/COQ10D4; OMIM: #612016, arises due to mutations in the ADCK3 gene. The product of this gene (ADCK3 is an atypical kinase that is thought to play a regulatory role in coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 biosynthesis. Although much work has been performed on the S. cerevisiae orthologue of ADCK3, the cellular and biochemical role of its mammalian counterpart, and why mutations in this gene lead to human disease is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that ADCK3 localises to mitochondrial cristae and is targeted to this organelle via the presence of an N-terminal localisation signal. Consistent with a role in CoQ10 biosynthesis, ADCK3 deficiency decreased cellular CoQ10 content. In addition, endogenous ADCK3 was found to associate in vitro with recombinant Coq3, Coq5, Coq7 and Coq9, components of the CoQ10 biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, cell lines derived from ARCA-2 patients display signs of oxidative stress, defects in mitochondrial homeostasis and increases in lysosomal content. Together, these data shed light on the possible molecular role of ADCK3 and provide insight into the cellular pathways affected in ARCA-2 patients.

  14. Role of recombination in repair and UV-mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae : studies with mutants defective in X-ray and UV-induced intragenic mitotic recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vashishat, R.K.; Kakar, S.N.

    1977-01-01

    In order to study the role of recombination in repair of radiation damage and damage caused by chemical mutagens, studies were conducted on two recombination deficient strains 2c r(rec 5) and 2c 8(rec 4) isolated from Z140-51C. These strains are disomic for chromosome VIII and defective in X-ray and UV-induced intragenic mitotic recombination. The strain 2c 4 was sensitive to UV, HNO 2 , EMS and NG but it was as resistant to X-rays as the wild-type strain. Strain 2c 8 was sensitive to NG and showed more or less wild-type resistance to other mutagens. All the strains showed a decrease in UV-survival when caffeine (1g/1) was present in the post-irradiation medium. There was an increase in viability by photoreactivation. A comparison of UV-induced reversion at ade 2 and his 5 loci in rec strains and parental strain showed that total frequency of UV-induced revertants for ade 2 in all the strains was less than that for his 5. The frequency of total revertants for ade 2 was same in wild-type and 2c 8 but it was higher for his 5 in strain 2c 8. The total frequency of UV-induced revertants for both loci was less in 2c 4 as compared to wild-type. It is concluded that recombination is involved in repair of damage caused by UV light and chemical mutagens and in UV-induced mutations. (author)

  15. Construction of ectoine absorption defective mutant for efficient ectoine production%四氢嘧啶吸收缺陷突变株高效制备四氢嘧啶

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐蕊; 张苓花

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] To further enhance ectoine (1, 4, 5, 6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4- pyrimidinecarboxylic acid) synthesis efficiency. [Methods] We cloned Halomonas salina DSM 5928T teaABC gene of ectoine-specific transporter TeaABC by walking PCR and constructed ectoine absorption defective mutant H. salina DSM 5928 (teaABC) by Red recombination technology. [Results] The total concentration of ectoine and productivity in a 10 L fennentor were 9. 10 (±0.08) g/L and 9.93 (±0.09) g/L. d. [Conclusion] The ectoine absorption defect mutant H. salina DSM 5928T (teaABC-) compromised the negative feedback regulation of ectoine synthesis, which can significantly improve the efficiency of ectoine production.%[目的]为进一步提高四氢嘧啶(1,4,5,6-四氢-2-甲基-4-嘧啶羧酸;1,4,5,6-tetrahydro-2-methyl-4-pyrimidinecarboxylic acid;ectoine)合成效率,[方法]利用步移PCR方法克隆了Halomonas salinaDSM 5928T四氢嘧啶特异性转运蛋白(ectoine-specific transporter; TeaABC)编码基因teaABC,Red重组技术构建了四氢嘧啶吸收缺陷突变株H.salina DSM 5928T(teaABC -).[结果]H.salina DSM 5928T(teaABC -)10 L发酵罐的四氢嘧啶发酵,四氢嘧啶总浓度9.10(±0.08) g/L,合成效率为9.93(±0.09) g/L.d.[结论]四氢嘧啶吸收缺陷突变株H.salina DSM 5928T(teaABC-),解除了四氢嘧啶吸收对其合成的负反馈调节,从而显著提高了四氢嘧啶合成效率.

  16. Casein kinase II is required for the spindle assembly checkpoint by regulating Mad2p in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Midori [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Yamamoto, Ayumu [Department of Chemistry, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Sizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Murakami-Tonami, Yuko; Nakanishi, Makoto; Yoshida, Takashi [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Aiba, Hirofumi [Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, School of Agriculture, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Murakami, Hiroshi, E-mail: hmura@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan)

    2009-10-23

    The spindle checkpoint is a surveillance mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation in mitosis. Here we show that fission yeast casein kinase II (CK2) is required for this checkpoint function. In the CK2 mutants mitosis occurs in the presence of a spindle defect, and the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2p fails to localize to unattached kinetochores. The CK2 mutants are sensitive to the microtubule depolymerising drug thiabendazole, which is counteracted by ectopic expression of mad2{sup +}. The level of Mad2p is low in the CK2 mutants. These results suggest that CK2 has a role in the spindle checkpoint by regulating Mad2p.

  17. Modulation of intracellular protein degradation by SSB1-SIS1 chaperon system in yeast S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, M

    1997-06-09

    In prokaryotes, DnaK-DnaJ chaperon is involved in the protein degradation catalyzed by proteases La and ClpA/B complex as shown in E. coli. To extend this into eukaryotic cells, we examined the effects of hsp70 genes, SSA1 and SSB1, and DnaJ genes, SIS1 and YDJ1, on the growth of proteasome subunit mutants of the yeast S. cerevisiae. The results identified SSB1 and SIS1 as a pair of chaperon genes specifically involved in efficient protein turnover in the yeast, whose overexpression suppressed the growth defects caused by the proteasome mutations. Moreover, a single amino acid substitution in the putative peptide-binding site of SSB1 protein profoundly enhanced the suppression activity, indicating that the activity is mediated by the peptide-binding activity of this chaperon. Thus SSB1, with its partner DnaJ, SIS1, modulates the efficiency of protein turnover through its chaperon activity.

  18. Nucleotide excision repair in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, Patrick van

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) is a conserved DNA repair pathway capable of removing a broad spectrum of DNA damage. In human cells a defect in NER leads to the disorder Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model organism to study the mechanism of NER. The

  19. MTO1 mutations are associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and lactic acidosis and cause respiratory chain deficiency in humans and yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruffini, Enrico; Dallabona, Cristina; Invernizzi, Federica; Yarham, John W; Melchionda, Laura; Blakely, Emma L; Lamantea, Eleonora; Donnini, Claudia; Santra, Saikat; Vijayaraghavan, Suresh; Roper, Helen P; Burlina, Alberto; Kopajtich, Robert; Walther, Anett; Strom, Tim M; Haack, Tobias B; Prokisch, Holger; Taylor, Robert W; Ferrero, Ileana; Zeviani, Massimo; Ghezzi, Daniele

    2013-11-01

    We report three families presenting with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and multiple defects of mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) activities. By direct sequencing of the candidate gene MTO1, encoding the mitochondrial-tRNA modifier 1, or whole exome sequencing analysis, we identified novel missense mutations. All MTO1 mutations were predicted to be deleterious on MTO1 function. Their pathogenic role was experimentally validated in a recombinant yeast model, by assessing oxidative growth, respiratory activity, mitochondrial protein synthesis, and complex IV activity. In one case, we also demonstrated that expression of wt MTO1 could rescue the respiratory defect in mutant fibroblasts. The severity of the yeast respiratory phenotypes partly correlated with the different clinical presentations observed in MTO1 mutant patients, although the clinical outcome was highly variable in patients with the same mutation and seemed also to depend on timely start of pharmacological treatment, centered on the control of lactic acidosis by dichloroacetate. Our results indicate that MTO1 mutations are commonly associated with a presentation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and MRC deficiency, and that ad hoc recombinant yeast models represent a useful system to test the pathogenic potential of uncommon variants, and provide insight into their effects on the expression of a biochemical phenotype. © 2013 The Authors. *Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. nitrosoguanidine-induced cadmium resistant mutants of Aspergillus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    nitrosoguanidine-induced cadmium resistant mutants of. Aspergillus niger. SAMAR ... gens and UV irradiation to study transportation of cad- mium ion through cell ..... Rowley W S 1993 Yeast bZib proteins mediate pleiotropic drug and metal ...

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction increases oxidative stress and decreases chronological life span in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Zuin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress is a probable cause of aging and associated diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS originate mainly from endogenous sources, namely the mitochondria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed the effect of aerobic metabolism on oxidative damage in Schizosaccharomyces pombe by global mapping of those genes that are required for growth on both respiratory-proficient media and hydrogen-peroxide-containing fermentable media. Out of a collection of approximately 2700 haploid yeast deletion mutants, 51 were sensitive to both conditions and 19 of these were related to mitochondrial function. Twelve deletion mutants lacked components of the electron transport chain. The growth defects of these mutants can be alleviated by the addition of antioxidants, which points to intrinsic oxidative stress as the origin of the phenotypes observed. These respiration-deficient mutants display elevated steady-state levels of ROS, probably due to enhanced electron leakage from their defective transport chains, which compromises the viability of chronologically-aged cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Individual mitochondrial dysfunctions have often been described as the cause of diseases or aging, and our global characterization emphasizes the primacy of oxidative stress in the etiology of such processes.

  2. Virgin olive oil yeasts: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciafardini, Gino; Zullo, Biagi Angelo

    2018-04-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge on virgin olive oil yeasts. Newly produced olive oil contains solid particles and micro drops of vegetation water in which yeasts reproduce to become the typical microbiota of olive oil. To date, about seventeen yeast species have been isolated from different types of olive oils and their by-products, of which six species have been identified as new species. Certain yeast species contribute greatly to improving the sensorial characteristics of the newly produced olive oil, whereas other species are considered harmful as they can damage the oil quality through the production of unpleasant flavors and triacylglycerol hydrolysis. Studies carried out in certain yeast strains have demonstrated the presence of defects in olive oil treated with Candida adriatica, Nakazawaea wickerhamii and Candida diddensiae specific strains, while other olive oil samples treated with other Candida diddensiae strains were defect-free after four months of storage and categorized as extra virgin. A new acetic acid producing yeast species, namely, Brettanomyces acidodurans sp. nov., which was recently isolated from olive oil, could be implicated in the wine-vinegary defect of the product. Other aspects related to the activity of the lipase-producing yeasts and the survival of the yeast species in the flavored olive oils are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional genomics indicates yeast requires Golgi/ER transport, chromatin remodeling, and DNA repair for low dose DMSO tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon David Gaytán

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO is frequently utilized as a solvent in toxicological and pharmaceutical investigations. It is therefore important to establish the cellular and molecular targets of DMSO in order to differentiate its intrinsic effects from those elicited by a compound of interest. We performed a genome-wide functional screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify deletion mutants exhibiting sensitivity to 1% DMSO, a concentration standard to yeast chemical profiling studies. We report that mutants defective in Golgi/ER transport are sensitive to DMSO, including those lacking components of the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG complex. Moreover, strains deleted for members of the SWR1 histone exchange complex are hypersensitive to DMSO, with additional chromatin remodeling mutants displaying a range of growth defects. We also identify DNA repair genes important for DMSO tolerance. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of histone H2A.Z, which replaces chromatin-associated histone H2A in a SWR1-catalyzed reaction, confers resistance to DMSO. Many yeast genes described in this study have homologs in more complex organisms, and the data provided is applicable to future investigations into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of DMSO toxicity.

  4. Distinct roles for key karyogamy proteins during yeast nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melloy, Patricia; Shen, Shu; White, Erin; Rose, Mark D

    2009-09-01

    During yeast mating, cell fusion is followed by the congression and fusion of the two nuclei. Proteins required for nuclear fusion are found at the surface (Prm3p) and within the lumen (Kar2p, Kar5p, and Kar8p) of the nuclear envelope (NE). Electron tomography (ET) of zygotes revealed that mutations in these proteins block nuclear fusion with different morphologies, suggesting that they act in different steps of fusion. Specifically, prm3 zygotes were blocked before formation of membrane bridges, whereas kar2, kar5, and kar8 zygotes frequently contained them. Membrane bridges were significantly larger and occurred more frequently in kar2 and kar8, than in kar5 mutant zygotes. The kinetics of NE fusion in prm3, kar5, and kar8 mutants, measured by live-cell fluorescence microscopy, were well correlated with the size and frequency of bridges observed by ET. However the kar2 mutant was defective for transfer of NE lumenal GFP, but not diffusion within the lumen, suggesting that transfer was blocked at the NE fusion junction. These observations suggest that Prm3p acts before initiation of outer NE fusion, Kar5p may help dilation of the initial fusion pore, and Kar2p and Kar8p act after outer NE fusion, during inner NE fusion.

  5. Squalene epoxidase as a target for manipulation of squalene levels in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaiová, Martina; Zambojová, Veronika; Simová, Zuzana; Griač, Peter; Hapala, Ivan

    2014-03-01

    Squalene is a valuable natural substance with several biotechnological applications. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it is produced in the isoprenoid pathway as the first precursor dedicated to ergosterol biosynthesis. The aim of this study was to explore the potential of squalene epoxidase encoded by the ERG1 gene as the target for manipulating squalene levels in yeast. Highest squalene levels (over 1000 μg squalene per 10(9)  cells) were induced by specific point mutations in ERG1 gene that reduced activity of squalene epoxidase and caused hypersensitivity to terbinafine. This accumulation of squalene in erg1 mutants did not significantly disturb their growth. Treatment with squalene epoxidase inhibitor terbinafine revealed a limit in squalene accumulation at 700 μg squalene per 10(9)  cells which was associated with pronounced growth defects. Inhibition of squalene epoxidase activity by anaerobiosis or heme deficiency resulted in relatively low squalene levels. These levels were significantly increased by ergosterol depletion in anaerobic cells which indicated feedback inhibition of squalene production by ergosterol. Accumulation of squalene in erg1 mutants and terbinafine-treated cells were associated with increased cellular content and aggregation of lipid droplets. Our results prove that targeted genetic manipulation of the ERG1 gene is a promising tool for increasing squalene production in yeast. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Biological effectiveness of pulsed and continuous neutron radiation for cells of yeast Saccharomyces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsyb, T.S.; Komarova, E.V.; Potetnya, V.I.; Obaturov, G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Data are presented on biological effectiveness of fast neutrons generated by BR-10 reactor (dose rate up to 3.8 Gy/s) in comparison with neutrons of pulsed BARS-6 reactor (dose rate ∼6x10 6 Gy/s) for yeast Saccharomyces vini cells of a wild type Menri 139-B and radiosensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae (rad52/rad52; rad54/rad54) mutants which are defective over different systems of DNA reparation. Value of relative biological efficiency (RBE) of continuous radiation for wild stam is from 3.5 up to 2.5 when survival level being 75-10 %, and RBE of pulsed neutron radiation is in the limits of 2.0-1.7 at the same levels. For mutant stam the value of RBE (1.4-1.6) of neutrons is constant at all survival levels and does not depend on dose rate [ru

  7. Autophagy is required for efficient meiosis progression and proper meiotic chromosome segregation in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuhara, Hirotada; Yamamoto, Ayumu

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved intracellular degradation system, which contributes to development and differentiation of various organisms. Yeast cells undergo meiosis under nitrogen-starved conditions and require autophagy for meiosis initiation. However, the precise roles of autophagy in meiosis remain unclear. Here, we show that autophagy is required for efficient meiosis progression and proper meiotic chromosome segregation in fission yeast. Autophagy-defective strains bearing a mutation in the autophagy core factor gene atg1, atg7, or atg14 exhibit deformed nuclear structures during meiosis. These mutant cells require an extracellular nitrogen supply for meiosis progression following their entry into meiosis and show delayed meiosis progression even with a nitrogen supply. In addition, they show frequent chromosome dissociation from the spindle together with spindle overextension, forming extra nuclei. Furthermore, Aurora kinase, which regulates chromosome segregation and spindle elongation, is significantly increased at the centromere and spindle in the mutant cells. Aurora kinase down-regulation eliminated delayed initiation of meiosis I and II, chromosome dissociation, and spindle overextension, indicating that increased Aurora kinase activity may cause these aberrances in the mutant cells. Our findings show a hitherto unrecognized relationship of autophagy with the nuclear structure, regulation of cell cycle progression, and chromosome segregation in meiosis. © 2015 The Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. [The regulation of peroxisomal matrix enzymes (alcohol oxidase and catalase) formation by the product of the gene Mth1 in methylotrophic yeast Pichia methanolica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonovich, O A; Kurales, Iu A; Dutova, T A; Isakova, E P; Deriabina, Iu I; Rabinovich, Ia M

    2009-01-01

    Two independent mutant strains of methylotrophic yeast Pichia methanolica (mth1 arg1 and mth2 arg4) from the initial line 616 (ade1 ade5) were investigated. The mutant strains possessed defects in genes MTH1 and MTH2 which resulted in the inability to assimilate methanol as a sole carbon source and the increased activity of alcohol oxidase (AO). The function of the AUG2 gene encoding one of the subunits of AO and CTA1, a probable homolog of peroxisomal catalase of Saccharomyces cereviseae, was investigated by analyses of the molecular forms of isoenzymes. It was shown that optimal conditions for the expression of the AUG2 gene on a medium supplemented with 3% of methanol leads to an increasing synthesis of peroxisomal catalase. The mutant mth1 possessed a dominant formation of AO isoform with electrophoretic mobility which is typical for isogenic form 9, the product of the AUG2 gene, and a decreased level of peroxisomal catalase. The restoration of growth of four spontaneous revertants of the mutant mth1 (Rmth1) on the methanol containing medium was accompanied by an increase in activity of AO isogenic form 9 and peroxisomal catalase. The obtained results confirmed the functional continuity of the structural gene AUG2 in mutant mth1. The correlation of activity of peroxisomal catalase and AO isogenic form 1 in different conditions evidenced the existence of common regulatory elements for genes AUG2 and CTA1 in methilotrophic yeast Pichia methanolica.

  9. Strain improvement in dye decolourising mutants of Mucor mucedo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... M. mucedo {MMM1-U.V. irradiated mutant and MMM2-EMS (ethyl methyl sulfonate) treated ... tions were induced and two positive mutants (MMM1, .... yeast biofilter for the treatment of a Nigerian fertilizer plant effluent. World J.

  10. Characterization of Human and Yeast Mitochondrial Glycine Carriers with Implications for Heme Biosynthesis and Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunetti, Paola; Damiano, Fabrizio; De Benedetto, Giuseppe; Siculella, Luisa; Pennetta, Antonio; Muto, Luigina; Paradies, Eleonora; Marobbio, Carlo Marya Thomas; Dolce, Vincenza; Capobianco, Loredana

    2016-09-16

    Heme is an essential molecule in many biological processes, such as transport and storage of oxygen and electron transfer as well as a structural component of hemoproteins. Defects of heme biosynthesis in developing erythroblasts have profound medical implications, as represented by sideroblastic anemia. The synthesis of heme requires the uptake of glycine into the mitochondrial matrix where glycine is condensed with succinyl coenzyme A to yield δ-aminolevulinic acid. Herein we describe the biochemical and molecular characterization of yeast Hem25p and human SLC25A38, providing evidence that they are mitochondrial carriers for glycine. In particular, the hem25Δ mutant manifests a defect in the biosynthesis of δ-aminolevulinic acid and displays reduced levels of downstream heme and mitochondrial cytochromes. The observed defects are rescued by complementation with yeast HEM25 or human SLC25A38 genes. Our results identify new proteins in the heme biosynthetic pathway and demonstrate that Hem25p and its human orthologue SLC25A38 are the main mitochondrial glycine transporters required for heme synthesis, providing definitive evidence of their previously proposed glycine transport function. Furthermore, our work may suggest new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of congenital sideroblastic anemia. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. New vectors in fission yeast: application for cloning the his2 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weilguny, D; Praetorius, M; Carr, Alan

    1991-01-01

    of transforming Sc. pombe ura4 strains, as well as ura 3 strains of the distantly related budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have used pON163 for the construction of two fission yeast genomic libraries. From these gene banks clones were isolated that were able to complement fission yeast his2 mutants...

  12. Condensin HEAT subunits required for DNA repair, kinetochore/centromere function and ploidy maintenance in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingya Xu

    Full Text Available Condensin, a central player in eukaryotic chromosomal dynamics, contains five evolutionarily-conserved subunits. Two SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes subunits contain ATPase, hinge, and coiled-coil domains. One non-SMC subunit is similar to bacterial kleisin, and two other non-SMC subunits contain HEAT (similar to armadillo repeats. Here we report isolation and characterization of 21 fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutants for three non-SMC subunits, created using error-prone mutagenesis that resulted in single-amino acid substitutions. Beside condensation, segregation, and DNA repair defects, similar to those observed in previously isolated SMC and cnd2 mutants, novel phenotypes were observed for mutants of HEAT-repeats containing Cnd1 and Cnd3 subunits. cnd3-L269P is hypersensitive to the microtubule poison, thiabendazole, revealing defects in kinetochore/centromere and spindle assembly checkpoints. Three cnd1 and three cnd3 mutants increased cell size and doubled DNA content, thereby eliminating the haploid state. Five of these mutations reside in helix B of HEAT repeats. Two non-SMC condensin subunits, Cnd1 and Cnd3, are thus implicated in ploidy maintenance.

  13. Genetic study on yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimer, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    Research during the past year has moved ahead on several fronts. A major compilation of all the genetic mapping data for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been completed. The map describes the location of over 300 genes on 17 chromosomes. A report on this work will appear in Microbiological Reviews in December 1980. Recombinant DNA procedures have been introduced into the experiments and RAD52 (one of the genes involved in recombination and repair damage), has been successfully cloned. This clone will be used to determine the gene product. Diploid cells homozygous for RAD52 have exceptionally high frequencies of mitotic loss of chromosomes. This loss is stimulated by ionizing radiation. This effect is a very significant finding. The effect has also been seen with certain other RAD mutants

  14. The tumor suppressor homolog in fission yeast, myh1{sup +}, displays a strong interaction with the checkpoint gene rad1{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Kristina; Warringer, Jonas; Farewell, Anne [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Lundberg Laboratory, Goeteborg University, P.O. Box 462, Goeteborg SE-405 30 (Sweden); Park, Han-Oh [Bioneer Corporation, 49-3, Munpyeong-dong, Daedeok-gu, Daejon 306-220 (Korea, Republic of); Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk [Functional Genomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), Yusong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hayles, Jacqueline [Cell Cycle Laboratory, Cancer Research UK, London Research Institute, 44 Lincoln' s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PX (United Kingdom); Sunnerhagen, Per [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Lundberg Laboratory, Goeteborg University, P.O. Box 462, Goeteborg SE-405 30 (Sweden)], E-mail: per.sunnerhagen@cmb.gu.se

    2008-09-26

    The DNA glycosylase MutY is strongly conserved in evolution, and homologs are found in most eukaryotes and prokaryotes examined. This protein is implicated in repair of oxidative DNA damage, in particular adenine mispaired opposite 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine. Previous investigations in Escherichia coli, fission yeast, and mammalian cells show an association of mutations in MutY homologs with a mutator phenotype and carcinogenesis. Eukaryotic MutY homologs physically associate with several proteins with a role in replication, DNA repair, and checkpoint signaling, specifically the trimeric 9-1-1 complex. In a genetic investigation of the fission yeast MutY homolog, myh1{sup +}, we show that the myh1 mutation confers a moderately increased UV sensitivity alone and in combination with mutations in several DNA repair genes. The myh1 rad1, and to a lesser degree myh1 rad9, double mutants display a synthetic interaction resulting in enhanced sensitivity to DNA damaging agents and hydroxyurea. UV irradiation of myh1 rad1 double mutants results in severe chromosome segregation defects and visible DNA fragmentation, and a failure to activate the checkpoint. Additionally, myh1 rad1 double mutants exhibit morphological defects in the absence of DNA damaging agents. We also found a moderate suppression of the slow growth and UV sensitivity of rhp51 mutants by the myh1 mutation. Our results implicate fission yeast Myh1 in repair of a wider range of DNA damage than previously thought, and functionally link it to the checkpoint pathway.

  15. Photorepair mutants of Arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, C.Z.; Yee, J.; Mitchell, D.L.; Britt, A.B.

    1997-01-01

    UV radiation induces two major DNA damage products, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and, at a lower frequency, the pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidinone dimer (6-4 product). Although Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae produce a CPD-specific photolyase that eliminates only this class of dimer, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Crotalus atrox, and Xenopus laevis have recently been shown to photoreactivate both CPDs and 6-4 products. We describe the isolation and characterization of two new classes of mutants of Arabidopsis, termed uvr2 and uvr3, that are defective in the photoreactivation of CPDs and 6-4 products, respectively. We demonstrate that the CPD photolyase mutation is genetically linked to a DNA sequence encoding a type II (metazoan) CPD photolyase. In addition, we are able to generate plants in which only CPDs or 6-4 products are photoreactivated in the nuclear genome by exposing these mutants to UV light and then allowing them to repair one or the other class of dimers. This provides us with a unique opportunity to study the biological consequences of each of these two major UV-induced photoproducts in an intact living system

  16. Expression of a Human Cytochrome P450 in Yeast Permits Analysis of Pathways for Response to and Repair of Aflatoxin-Induced DNA Damage†

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yingying; Breeden, Linda L.; Zarbl, Helmut; Preston, Bradley D.; Eaton, David L.

    2005-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a human hepatotoxin and hepatocarcinogen produced by the mold Aspergillus flavus. In humans, AFB1 is primarily bioactivated by cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) and 3A4 to a genotoxic epoxide that forms N7-guanine DNA adducts. A series of yeast haploid mutants defective in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints were transformed with human CYP1A2 to investigate how these DNA adducts are repaired. Cell survival and mutagenesis following aflatoxin B1 treatment was assayed in str...

  17. Haploinsufficiency of the Sec7 guanine nucleotide exchange factor gea1 impairs septation in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M Eckler

    Full Text Available Membrane trafficking is essential to eukaryotic life and is controlled by a complex network of proteins that regulate movement of proteins and lipids between organelles. The GBF1/GEA family of Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factors (GEFs regulates trafficking between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi by catalyzing the exchange of GDP for GTP on ADP Ribosylation Factors (Arfs. Activated Arfs recruit coat protein complex 1 (COP-I to form vesicles that ferry cargo between these organelles. To further explore the function of the GBF1/GEA family, we have characterized a fission yeast mutant lacking one copy of the essential gene gea1 (gea1+/-, the Schizosaccharomyces pombe ortholog of GBF1. The haploinsufficient gea1+/- strain was shown to be sensitive to the GBF1 inhibitor brefeldin A (BFA and was rescued from BFA sensitivity by gea1p overexpression. No overt defects in localization of arf1p or arf6p were observed in gea1+/- cells, but the fission yeast homolog of the COP-I cargo sac1 was mislocalized, consistent with impaired COP-I trafficking. Although Golgi morphology appeared normal, a slight increase in vacuolar size was observed in the gea1+/- mutant strain. Importantly, gea1+/- cells exhibited dramatic cytokinesis-related defects, including disorganized contractile rings, an increased septation index, and alterations in septum morphology. Septation defects appear to result from altered secretion of enzymes required for septum dynamics, as decreased secretion of eng1p, a β-glucanase required for septum breakdown, was observed in gea1+/- cells, and overexpression of eng1p suppressed the increased septation phenotype. These observations implicate gea1 in regulation of septum breakdown and establish S. pombe as a model system to explore GBF1/GEA function in cytokinesis.

  18. Ribosomal Stalk Protein Silencing Partially Corrects the ΔF508-CFTR Functional Expression Defect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Veit

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The most common cystic fibrosis (CF causing mutation, deletion of phenylalanine 508 (ΔF508 or Phe508del, results in functional expression defect of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR at the apical plasma membrane (PM of secretory epithelia, which is attributed to the degradation of the misfolded channel at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Deletion of phenylalanine 670 (ΔF670 in the yeast oligomycin resistance 1 gene (YOR1, an ABC transporter of Saccharomyces cerevisiae phenocopies the ΔF508-CFTR folding and trafficking defects. Genome-wide phenotypic (phenomic analysis of the Yor1-ΔF670 biogenesis identified several modifier genes of mRNA processing and translation, which conferred oligomycin resistance to yeast. Silencing of orthologues of these candidate genes enhanced the ΔF508-CFTR functional expression at the apical PM in human CF bronchial epithelia. Although knockdown of RPL12, a component of the ribosomal stalk, attenuated the translational elongation rate, it increased the folding efficiency as well as the conformational stability of the ΔF508-CFTR, manifesting in 3-fold augmented PM density and function of the mutant. Combination of RPL12 knockdown with the corrector drug, VX-809 (lumacaftor restored the mutant function to ~50% of the wild-type channel in primary CFTRΔF508/ΔF508 human bronchial epithelia. These results and the observation that silencing of other ribosomal stalk proteins partially rescue the loss-of-function phenotype of ΔF508-CFTR suggest that the ribosomal stalk modulates the folding efficiency of the mutant and is a potential therapeutic target for correction of the ΔF508-CFTR folding defect.

  19. Colletotrichum orbiculare WHI2, a Yeast Stress-Response Regulator Homolog, Controls the Biotrophic Stage of Hemibiotrophic Infection Through TOR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harata, Ken; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Kubo, Yasuyuki

    2016-06-01

    The hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum orbiculare first establishes a biotrophic infection stage in cucumber (Cucumber sativus) epidermal cells and subsequently transitions to a necrotrophic stage. Here, we found that C. orbiculare established hemibiotrophic infection via C. orbiculare WHI2, a yeast stress regulator homolog, and TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling. Plant defense responses such as callose deposition, H2O2, and antimicrobial proteins were strongly induced by the C. orbiculare whi2Δ mutant, resulting in defective pathogenesis. Expression analysis of biotrophy-specific genes evaluated by the promoter VENUS fusion gene indicated weaker VENUS signal intensity in the whi2Δ mutant, thereby suggesting that C. orbiculare WHI2 plays a key role in regulating biotrophic infection of C. orbiculare. The involvement of CoWHI2 in biotrophic infection was further explored with a DNA microarray. In the Cowhi2Δ mutant, TOR-dependent ribosomal protein-related genes were strikingly upregulated compared with the wild type. Moreover, callose deposition in the host plant after inoculation with the Cowhi2Δ mutant treated with rapamycin, which inhibits TOR activity, was reduced, and the mutant remained biotrophic in contrast to the untreated mutant. Thus, regulation of TOR by Whi2 is apparently crucial to the biotrophic stage of hemibiotrophic infection in C. orbiculare.

  20. Nuclear inner membrane fusion facilitated by yeast Jem1p is required for spindle pole body fusion but not for the first mitotic nuclear division during yeast mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi; Hirata, Aiko; Endo, Toshiya

    2008-11-01

    During mating of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two haploid nuclei fuse to produce a diploid nucleus. The process of nuclear fusion requires two J proteins, Jem1p in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen and Sec63p, which forms a complex with Sec71p and Sec72p, in the ER membrane. Zygotes of mutants defective in the functions of Jem1p or Sec63p contain two haploid nuclei that were closely apposed but failed to fuse. Here we analyzed the ultrastructure of nuclei in jem1 Delta and sec71 Delta mutant zygotes using electron microscope with the freeze-substituted fixation method. Three-dimensional reconstitution of nuclear structures from electron microscope serial sections revealed that Jem1p facilitates nuclear inner-membrane fusion and spindle pole body (SPB) fusion while Sec71p facilitates nuclear outer-membrane fusion. Two haploid SPBs that failed to fuse could duplicate, and mitotic nuclear division of the unfused haploid nuclei started in jem1 Delta and sec71 Delta mutant zygotes. This observation suggests that nuclear inner-membrane fusion is required for SPB fusion, but not for SPB duplication in the first mitotic cell division.

  1. Cth2 Protein Mediates Early Adaptation of Yeast Cells to Oxidative Stress Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Castells-Roca

    Full Text Available Cth2 is an mRNA-binding protein that participates in remodeling yeast cell metabolism in iron starvation conditions by promoting decay of the targeted molecules, in order to avoid excess iron consumption. This study shows that in the absence of Cth2 immediate upregulation of expression of several of the iron regulon genes (involved in high affinity iron uptake and intracellular iron redistribution upon oxidative stress by hydroperoxide is more intense than in wild type conditions where Cth2 is present. The oxidative stress provokes a temporary increase in the levels of Cth2 (itself a member of the iron regulon. In such conditions Cth2 molecules accumulate at P bodies-like structures when the constitutive mRNA decay machinery is compromised. In addition, a null Δcth2 mutant shows defects, in comparison to CTH2 wild type cells, in exit from α factor-induced arrest at the G1 stage of the cell cycle when hydroperoxide treatment is applied. The cell cycle defects are rescued in conditions that compromise uptake of external iron into the cytosol. The observations support a role of Cth2 in modulating expression of diverse iron regulon genes, excluding those specifically involved in the reductive branch of the high-affinity transport. This would result in immediate adaptation of the yeast cells to an oxidative stress, by controlling uptake of oxidant-promoting iron cations.

  2. The uvsI gene of Aspergillus nidulans required for UV-mutagenesis encodes a homolog to REV3, a subunit of the DNA polymerase zeta of yeast involved in translesion DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, K Y; Chae, S K; Han, D M

    1998-07-01

    Defects in the uvsI gene of Aspergillus nidulans resulted in high UV sensitivity and reductions of spontaneous and UV-induced reversion of certain alleles, uvsl;uvsA double mutants exhibited high methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-sensitivity in contrast to the slight sensitivity of the component single mutants. Using such a double mutant as recipient, a clone complementing uvsI501 has been isolated from a chromosome III specific library. The deduced amino acid sequence from the 1.1-kb sequenced region, a part of the 5.2-kb DNA fragment showing uvsI-complementing activity, had a 62% identity with REV3 of yeast. Disruptants of the cloned gene demonstrated the same level of sensitivity to UV light as uvsI and failed to complement uvsI501 in heterozygous diploids.

  3. Mutational analysis of the yeast TRAPP subunit Trs20p identifies roles in endocytic recycling and sporulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hichem Mahfouz

    Full Text Available Trs20p is a subunit of the evolutionarily conserved TRAPP (TRAnsport Protein Particle complex that mediates various aspects of membrane trafficking. Three TRAPP complexes have been identified in yeast with roles in ER-to-Golgi trafficking, post-Golgi and endosomal-to-Golgi transport and in autophagy. The role of Trs20p, which is essential for viability and a component of all three complexes, and how it might function within each TRAPP complex, has not been clarified to date. To begin to address the role of Trs20p we generated different mutants by random mutagenesis but, surprisingly, no defects were observed in diverse anterograde transport pathways or general secretion in Trs20 temperature-sensitive mutants. Instead, mutation of Trs20 led to defects in endocytic recycling and a block in sporulation/meiosis. The phenotypes of different mutants appear to be separable suggesting that the mutations affect the function of Trs20 in different TRAPP complexes.

  4. Prions in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Bezdíčka, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The thesis describes yeast prions and their biological effects on yeast in general. It defines the basic characteristics of yeast prions, that distinguish prions from other proteins. The thesis introduces various possibilities of prion formation, and propagation as well as specific types of yeast prions, including various functions of most studied types of prions. The thesis also focuses on chaperones that affect the state of yeast prions in cells. Lastly, the thesis indicates similarities be...

  5. Phenotypic Analysis and Virulence of Candida albicans LIG4 Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andaluz, Encarnación; Calderone, Richard; Reyes, Guadalupe; Larriba, Germán

    2001-01-01

    In previous studies, we reported the isolation and preliminary characterization of a DNA ligase-encoding gene of Candida albicans. This gene (LIG4) is the structural and functional homologue of both yeast and human ligase IV, which is involved in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks. In the present study, we have shown that there are no other LIG4 homologues in C. albicans. In order to study the function of LIG4 in morphogenesis and virulence, we constructed gene deletions. LIG4 transcript levels were reduced in the heterozygote and were completely absent in null strains. Concomitantly, the heterozygote showed a pronounced defect in myceliation, which was slightly greater in the null strain. This was true with several solid and liquid media, such as Spider medium, medium 199, and 2% glucose–1% yeast extract–2% Bacto Peptone, at several pHs. Reintroduction of the wild-type allele into the null mutant partially restored the ability of cells to form hyphae. In agreement with the positive role of LIG4 in morphogenesis, we detected a significant rise in mRNA levels during the morphological transition. LIG4 is not essential for DNA replication or for the repair of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation or UV light, indicating that these lesions are repaired primarily by homologous recombination. However, our data show that the NHEJ apparatus of C. albicans may control morphogenesis in this diploid organism. In addition, deletion of one or both copies of LIG4 resulted in attenuation of virulence in a murine model of candidiasis. PMID:11119499

  6. Identification of Rbd2 as a candidate protease for sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) cleavage in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinsil; Ha, Hye-Jeong [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sujin [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Functional Genomics, University of Science and Technology (UST), 217 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ah-Reum [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sook-Jeong [Department of New Drug Discovery and Development, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Hoe, Kwang-Lae, E-mail: kwanghoe@cnu.ac.kr [Department of New Drug Discovery and Development, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Uk, E-mail: kimdongu@kribb.re.kr [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-25

    Lipid homeostasis in mammalian cells is regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors that are activated through sequential cleavage by Golgi Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. Fission yeast SREBP, Sre1, engages a different mechanism involving the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase complex, but it is not clearly understood exactly how Sre1 is proteolytically cleaved and activated. In this study, we screened the Schizosaccharomyces pombe non-essential haploid deletion collection to identify missing components of the Sre1 cleavage machinery. Our screen identified an additional component of the SREBP pathway required for Sre1 proteolysis named rhomboid protein 2 (Rbd2). We show that an rbd2 deletion mutant fails to grow under hypoxic and hypoxia-mimetic conditions due to lack of Sre1 activity and that this growth phenotype is rescued by Sre1N, a cleaved active form of Sre1. We found that the growth inhibition phenotype under low oxygen conditions is specific to the strain with deletion of rbd2, not any other fission yeast rhomboid-encoding genes. Our study also identified conserved residues of Rbd2 that are required for Sre1 proteolytic cleavage. All together, our results suggest that Rbd2 is a functional SREBP protease with conserved residues required for Sre1 cleavage and provide an important piece of the puzzle to understand the mechanisms for Sre1 activation and the regulation of various biological and pathological processes involving SREBPs. - Highlights: • An rbd2-deleted yeast strain shows defects in growth in response to low oxygen levels. • rbd2-deficient cells fail to generate cleaved Sre1 (Sre1N) under hypoxic conditions. • Expression of Sre1N rescues the rbd2 deletion mutant growth phenotype. • Rbd2 contains conserved residues potentially critical for catalytic activity. • Mutation of the conserved Rbd2 catalytic residues leads to defects in Sre1 cleavage.

  7. Chemical Genomic Screening of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genomewide Mutant Collection Reveals Genes Required for Defense against Four Antimicrobial Peptides Derived from Proteins Found in Human Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Sanjay; Schoenly, Nathan E.; Lee, Anna Y.; Nislow, Corey; Bobek, Libuse A.

    2013-01-01

    To compare the effects of four antimicrobial peptides (MUC7 12-mer, histatin 12-mer, cathelicidin KR20, and a peptide containing lactoferricin amino acids 1 to 11) on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we employed a genomewide fitness screen of combined collections of mutants with homozygous deletions of nonessential genes and heterozygous deletions of essential genes. When an arbitrary fitness score cutoffs of 1 (indicating a fitness defect, or hypersensitivity) and −1 (indicating a fitness gain, or resistance) was used, 425 of the 5,902 mutants tested exhibited altered fitness when treated with at least one peptide. Functional analysis of the 425 strains revealed enrichment among the identified deletions in gene groups associated with the Gene Ontology (GO) terms “ribosomal subunit,” “ribosome biogenesis,” “protein glycosylation,” “vacuolar transport,” “Golgi vesicle transport,” “negative regulation of transcription,” and others. Fitness profiles of all four tested peptides were highly similar, particularly among mutant strains exhibiting the greatest fitness defects. The latter group included deletions in several genes involved in induction of the RIM101 signaling pathway, including several components of the ESCRT sorting machinery. The RIM101 signaling regulates response of yeasts to alkaline and neutral pH and high salts, and our data indicate that this pathway also plays a prominent role in regulating protective measures against all four tested peptides. In summary, the results of the chemical genomic screens of S. cerevisiae mutant collection suggest that the four antimicrobial peptides, despite their differences in structure and physical properties, share many interactions with S. cerevisiae cells and consequently a high degree of similarity between their modes of action. PMID:23208710

  8. MMS2, Encoding a ubiquitin-conjugating-enzyme-like protein, is a member of the yeast error-free postreplication repair pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broomfield, S.; Chow, B.L.; Xiao, W.

    1998-01-01

    Among the three Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair epistasis groups, the RAD6 group is the most complicated and least characterized, primarily because it consists of two separate repair pathways: an error-free postreplication repair pathway, and a mutagenesis pathway. The rad6 and rad18 mutants are defective in both pathways, and the rev3 mutant affects only the mutagenesis pathway, but a yeast gene that is involved only in error-free postreplication repair has not been reported. We cloned the MMS2 gene from a yeast genomic library by functional complementation of the mms2-1 mutant [Prakash, L. and Prakash, S. (1977) Genetics 86, 33-55]. MMS2 encodes a 137-amino acid, 15.2-kDa protein with significant sequence homology to a conserved family of ubiquitin-conjugating (Ubc) proteins. However, Mms2 does not appear to possess Ubc activity. Genetic analyses indicate that the mms2 mutation is hypostatic to rad6 and rad18 but is synergistic with the rev3 mutation, and the mms2 mutant is proficient in UV-induced mutagenesis. These phenotypes are reminiscent of a pol30-46 mutant known to be impaired in postreplication repair. The mms2 mutant also displayed a REV3-dependent mutator phenotype, strongly suggesting that the MMS2 gene functions in the error-free postreplication repair pathway, parallel to the REV3 mutagenesis pathway. Furthermore, with respect to UV sensitivity, mms2 was found to be hypostatic to the rad6 delta 1-9 mutation, which results in the absence of the first nine amino acids of Rad6. On the basis of these collective results, we propose that the mms2 null mutation and two other allele-specific mutations, rad6 delta 1-9 and pol30-46, define the error-free mode of DNA postreplication repair, and that these mutations may enhance both spontaneous and DNA damage-induced mutagenesis

  9. Centromere replication timing determines different forms of genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae checkpoint mutants during replication stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenyi; Bachant, Jeff; Collingwood, David; Raghuraman, M K; Brewer, Bonita J

    2009-12-01

    Yeast replication checkpoint mutants lose viability following transient exposure to hydroxyurea, a replication-impeding drug. In an effort to understand the basis for this lethality, we discovered that different events are responsible for inviability in checkpoint-deficient cells harboring mutations in the mec1 and rad53 genes. By monitoring genomewide replication dynamics of cells exposed to hydroxyurea, we show that cells with a checkpoint deficient allele of RAD53, rad53K227A, fail to duplicate centromeres. Following removal of the drug, however, rad53K227A cells recover substantial DNA replication, including replication through centromeres. Despite this recovery, the rad53K227A mutant fails to achieve biorientation of sister centromeres during recovery from hydroxyurea, leading to secondary activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), aneuploidy, and lethal chromosome segregation errors. We demonstrate that cell lethality from this segregation defect could be partially remedied by reinforcing bipolar attachment. In contrast, cells with the mec1-1 sml1-1 mutations suffer from severely impaired replication resumption upon removal of hydroxyurea. mec1-1 sml1-1 cells can, however, duplicate at least some of their centromeres and achieve bipolar attachment, leading to abortive segregation and fragmentation of incompletely replicated chromosomes. Our results highlight the importance of replicating yeast centromeres early and reveal different mechanisms of cell death due to differences in replication fork progression.

  10. The deoxyhypusine synthase mutant dys1-1 reveals the association of eIF5A and Asc1 with cell wall integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Carrilho Galvão

    Full Text Available The putative eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A is a highly conserved protein among archaea and eukaryotes that has recently been implicated in the elongation step of translation. eIF5A undergoes an essential and conserved posttranslational modification at a specific lysine to generate the residue hypusine. The enzymes deoxyhypusine synthase (Dys1 and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (Lia1 catalyze this two-step modification process. Although several Saccharomyces cerevisiae eIF5A mutants have importantly contributed to the study of eIF5A function, no conditional mutant of Dys1 has been described so far. In this study, we generated and characterized the dys1-1 mutant, which showed a strong depletion of mutated Dys1 protein, resulting in more than 2-fold decrease in hypusine levels relative to the wild type. The dys1-1 mutant demonstrated a defect in total protein synthesis, a defect in polysome profile indicative of a translation elongation defect and a reduced association of eIF5A with polysomes. The growth phenotype of dys1-1 mutant is severe, growing only in the presence of 1 M sorbitol, an osmotic stabilizer. Although this phenotype is characteristic of Pkc1 cell wall integrity mutants, the sorbitol requirement from dys1-1 is not associated with cell lysis. We observed that the dys1-1 genetically interacts with the sole yeast protein kinase C (Pkc1 and Asc1, a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit. The dys1-1 mutant was synthetically lethal in combination with asc1Δ and overexpression of TIF51A (eIF5A or DYS1 is toxic for an asc1Δ strain. Moreover, eIF5A is more associated with translating ribosomes in the absence of Asc1 in the cell. Finally, analysis of the sensitivity to cell wall-perturbing compounds revealed a more similar behavior of the dys1-1 and asc1Δ mutants in comparison with the pkc1Δ mutant. These data suggest a correlated role for eIF5A and Asc1 in coordinating the translational control of a subset of m

  11. The yeast cell fusion protein Prm1p requires covalent dimerization to promote membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Engel

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Prm1p is a multipass membrane protein that promotes plasma membrane fusion during yeast mating. The mechanism by which Prm1p and other putative regulators of developmentally controlled cell-cell fusion events facilitate membrane fusion has remained largely elusive. Here, we report that Prm1p forms covalently linked homodimers. Covalent Prm1p dimer formation occurs via intermolecular disulfide bonds of two cysteines, Cys-120 and Cys-545. PRM1 mutants in which these cysteines have been substituted are fusion defective. These PRM1 mutants are normally expressed, retain homotypic interaction and can traffic to the fusion zone. Because prm1-C120S and prm1-C545S mutants can form covalent dimers when coexpressed with wild-type PRM1, an intermolecular C120-C545 disulfide linkage is inferred. Cys-120 is adjacent to a highly conserved hydrophobic domain. Mutation of a charged residue within this hydrophobic domain abrogates formation of covalent dimers, trafficking to the fusion zone, and fusion-promoting activity. The importance of intermolecular disulfide bonding informs models regarding the mechanism of Prm1-mediated cell-cell fusion.

  12. Characterization of TRZ1, a yeast homolog of the human candidate prostate cancer susceptibility gene ELAC2 encoding tRNase Z

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yuan

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In humans, mutation of ELAC2 is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. ELAC2 has been shown to have tRNase Z activity and is associated with the γ-tubulin complex. Results In this work, we show that the yeast homolog of ELAC2, encoded by TRZ1 (tRNase Z 1, is involved genetically in RNA processing. The temperature sensitivity of a trz1 mutant can be rescued by multiple copies of REX2, which encodes a protein with RNA 3' processing activity, suggesting a role of Trz1p in RNA processing in vivo. Trz1p has two putative nucleotide triphosphate-binding motifs (P-loop and a conserved histidine motif. The histidine motif and the putative nucleotide binding motif at the C-domain are important for Trz1p function because mutant proteins bearing changes to the critical residues in these motifs are unable to rescue deletion of TRZ1. The growth defect exhibited by trz1 yeast is not complemented by the heterologous ELAC2, suggesting that Trz1p may have additional functions in yeast. Conclusion Our results provide genetic evidence that prostate cancer susceptibility gene ELAC2 may be involved in RNA processing, especially rRNA processing and mitochondrial function.

  13. Characterization of an MMS sensitive mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.S.

    1979-01-01

    We have characterized a methyl methanesulfonate sensitive mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in order to learn more about DNA repair and mutagenesis in this organism. The mutation, designated mms3-1, also confers sensitivity to ultraviolet light and to ethyl methanesulfonate in both haploids and homozygous diploids. Its effect on γ-ray sensitivity, however, is a function of the ploidy of the cell and its effect on induced mutation is a function of both the ploidy of the cell and the nature of the inducing agent. Our major findings are discussed. Our data indicate that: (1) Saccharomyces cerevisiae has an error prone pathway for the repair of uv damage controlled by the MMS3 gene product operating in and only in, and possibly induced by conditions present only in, a/α diploids; (2) in diploids, at least, there exists at least one step in the error prone repair of uv induced damage which is different from a step in the error prone repair of EMS induced damage; (3) a/α mms3-1/mms3-1 diploids may be defective in a step common to the repair of mutagenic lesions following uv irradiation and lethal lesions following γ irradiation; and (4) there are steps in the repair of MMS induced lethal damage that are different from steps in the repair of EMS induced lethal damage

  14. Contribution of the C-terminal region within the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase to yeast lethality, chromatin binding and viral replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belhumeur Pierre

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 integrase (IN is a key viral enzymatic molecule required for the integration of the viral cDNA into the genome. Additionally, HIV-1 IN has been shown to play important roles in several other steps during the viral life cycle, including reverse transcription, nuclear import and chromatin targeting. Interestingly, previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of HIV-1 IN induces the lethal phenotype in some strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we performed mutagenic analyses of the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN in order to delineate the critical amino acid(s and/or motif(s required for the induction of the lethal phenotype in the yeast strain HP16, and to further elucidate the molecular mechanism which causes this phenotype. Results Our study identified three HIV-1 IN mutants, V165A, A179P and KR186,7AA, located in the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of IN that do not induce the lethal phenotype in yeast. Chromatin binding assays in yeast and mammalian cells demonstrated that these IN mutants were impaired for the ability to bind chromatin. Additionally, we determined that while these IN mutants failed to interact with LEDGF/p75, they retained the ability to bind Integrase interactor 1. Furthermore, we observed that VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 containing these IN mutants was unable to replicate in the C8166 T cell line and this defect was partially rescued by complementation with the catalytically inactive D64E IN mutant. Conclusion Overall, this study demonstrates that three mutations located in the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN inhibit the IN-induced lethal phenotype in yeast by inhibiting the binding of IN to the host chromatin. These results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN is important for binding to host chromatin and is crucial for both viral replication and the promotion of

  15. VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Non; Miyoshi, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Takanori; Nakazono, Toshimitsu; Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2015-12-15

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is synthesized through decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine (PS), catalysed by PS decarboxylase 1 (Psd1p) and 2 (Psd2p) and the cytidine 5'-diphosphate (CDP)-ethanolamine (CDP-Etn) pathway. PSD1 null (psd1Δ) and PSD2 null (psd2Δ) mutants are viable in a synthetic minimal medium, but a psd1Δ psd2Δ double mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy, which is incorporated into PE through the CDP-Etn pathway. We have previously shown that psd1Δ is synthetic lethal with deletion of VID22 (vid22Δ) [Kuroda et al. (2011) Mol. Microbiol. 80: , 248-265]. In the present study, we found that vid22Δ mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy under PSD1-depressed conditions. Deletion of VID22 in wild-type and PSD1-depressed cells caused partial defects in PE formation through decarboxylation of PS. The enzyme activity of PS decarboxylase in an extract of vid22Δ cells was ∼70% of that in wild-type cells and similar to that in psd2Δ cells and the PS decarboxylase activity remaining in the PSD1-depressed cells became almost negligible with deletion of VID22. Thus, the vid22Δ mutation was suggested to cause a defect in the Psd2p activity. Furthermore, vid22Δ cells were shown to be defective in expression of the PSD2 gene tagged with 6×HA, the defect being ameliorated by replacement of the native promoter of the PSD2 gene with a CYC1 promoter. In addition, an α-galactosidase reporter assay revealed that the activity of the promoter of the PSD2 gene in vid22Δ cells was ∼5% of that in wild-type cells. These results showed that VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  16. Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  17. Checkpoint independence of most DNA replication origins in fission yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Mickle, Katie L; Ramanathan, Sunita; Rosebrock, Adam; Oliva, Anna; Chaudari, Amna; Yompakdee, Chulee; Scott, Donna; Leatherwood, Janet; Huberman, Joel A

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In budding yeast, the replication checkpoint slows progress through S phase by inhibiting replication origin firing. In mammals, the replication checkpoint inhibits both origin firing and replication fork movement. To find out which strategy is employed in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we used microarrays to investigate the use of origins by wild-type and checkpoint-mutant strains in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which limits the pool of deoxyribonucleo...

  18. Yeast genetics. A manual of methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J.F.T.; Spencer, D.M.; Bruce, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    This is a bench-top manual of methods needed both for classical genetics as related to yeasts, such as mating, sporulation, isolation of hybrids, microdissection of asci for the isolation of single-spore clones, as well as for mapping of genes and the construction of new strains by protoplast fusion. Special emphasis is on mutations in general, and on methods of isolating a number of important classes of mutants in particular. Basic techniques for the separation of chromosomes by electrophoresis, such as OFAGE, FIGE, and CHEF, are discussed, with detailed protocols for the first two. Furthermore, new methods, e.g. for the isolation of high molecular weight DNA from yeast, isolation of RNA, and techniques for transformation of yeasts, are also described in detail. (orig.) With 10 figs.

  19. Genetic control of radiosensitivity modification of some yeast strons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petin, V.G.; Zhurakovskaya, I.P.

    1982-01-01

    The genetic determination of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of densely ionizing particles and cysteamine's radioprotective effect on irradiated cells, demonstrated earlier on yeast cells of different genotype, has been proved on diploid wild-type cells of Saccharomyces cerevisial yeasts, solitary mutants, homozygous with respect to rad 2 and rad 54, and double mutant containing both locuses in homozygous state. It is shown that RBE of α-particles and radioprotector's efficiency depend on repair system's activity. A possible mechanism of the participation of postirradiation recovery processes in the modification of cell radiosensitivity is discussed [ru

  20. Defining the pathogenesis of the human Atp12p W94R mutation using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulemans, Ann; Seneca, Sara; Pribyl, Thomas; Smet, Joel; Alderweirldt, Valerie; Waeytens, Anouk; Lissens, Willy; Van Coster, Rudy; De Meirleir, Linda; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Gatti, Domenico L; Ackerman, Sharon H

    2010-02-05

    Studies in yeast have shown that a deficiency in Atp12p prevents assembly of the extrinsic domain (F(1)) of complex V and renders cells unable to make ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. De Meirleir et al. (De Meirleir, L., Seneca, S., Lissens, W., De Clercq, I., Eyskens, F., Gerlo, E., Smet, J., and Van Coster, R. (2004) J. Med. Genet. 41, 120-124) have reported that a homozygous missense mutation in the gene for human Atp12p (HuAtp12p), which replaces Trp-94 with Arg, was linked to the death of a 14-month-old patient. We have investigated the impact of the pathogenic W94R mutation on Atp12p structure/function. Plasmid-borne wild type human Atp12p rescues the respiratory defect of a yeast ATP12 deletion mutant (Deltaatp12). The W94R mutation alters the protein at the most highly conserved position in the Pfam sequence and renders HuAtp12p insoluble in the background of Deltaatp12. In contrast, the yeast protein harboring the corresponding mutation, ScAtp12p(W103R), is soluble in the background of Deltaatp12 but not in the background of Deltaatp12Deltafmc1, a strain that also lacks Fmc1p. Fmc1p is a yeast mitochondrial protein not found in higher eukaryotes. Tryptophan 94 (human) or 103 (yeast) is located in a positively charged region of Atp12p, and hence its mutation to arginine does not alter significantly the electrostatic properties of the protein. Instead, we provide evidence that the primary effect of the substitution is on the dynamic properties of Atp12p.

  1. Repair of pyrimidine dimers in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA of yeast irradiated with low doses of ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, L [Rochester Univ., N.Y. (USA). Dept. of Radiation Biology and Biophysics

    1975-01-01

    The repair of damage induced by ultraviolet light has been examined in both the nuclear and mitochondrial DNA of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The sensitive assay used in this study is based on the capacity of the bacteriophage T4 u.v. endonuclease to produce single-strand breaks in DNA that contains pyrimidine dimers, thus permitting the use of low fluences (doses) of u.v. The results demonstrate that virtually all of the dimers induced in the nuclear DNA of a repair-proficient strain (RAD+) are removed following dark incubation for four hours in growth medium. In contrast, the dimers induced in mitochondrial DNA by the same u.v. fluence are retained under the same conditions. In the excision-deficient mutant, rad1-2, no evidence was obtained for removal of pyrimidine dimers from nuclear DNA. Photoreactivation of both RAD + and rad1-2 cultures resulted in decreases of dimers from both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. It is concluded that an excision-repair mechanism operates on nuclear but not mitochondrial DNA in repair-proficient yeast, and that the rad1-2 mutant is defective in this process.

  2. The essential DNA polymerases δ and ε are involved in repair of UV-damaged DNA in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halas, A.; Policinska, Z.; Baranowska, H.; Jachymczyk, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the ability of yeast DNA polymerases to carry out repair of lesions caused by UV irradiation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By the analysis of postirradiation relative molecular mass changes in cellular DNA of different DNA polymerases mutant strains, it was established that mutations in DNA polymerases δ and ε showed accumulation of single-strand breaks indicating defective repair. Mutations in other DNA polymerase genes exhibited no defects in DNA repair. Thus, the data obtained suggest that DNA polymerases δ and ε are both necessary for DNA replication and for repair of lesions caused by UV irradiation. The results are discussed in the light of current concepts concerning the specificity of DNA polymerases in DNA repair. (author)

  3. The relationship between reaction kinetics and mutagenic action of monofunctional alkylating agents in higher eukaryotic systems. IV. The effects of the excision-defective mei-9L1 and mus(2)201D1 mutants on alkylation-induced genetic damage in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, E W; Dusenbery, R L; Smith, P D

    1985-04-01

    Repair-defective mutants of Drosophila melanogaster which identify two major DNA excision repair loci have been examined for their effects on alkylation-induced mutagenesis using the sex-linked recessive lethal assay as a measure of genotoxic endpoint. The alkylating agents (AAs) chosen for comparative analysis were selected on the basis of their reaction kinetics with DNA and included MMS, EMS, MNU, DMN, ENU, DEN and ENNG. Repair-proficient males were treated with the AAs and mated with either excision-defective mei-9L1 or mus(2)201D1 females or appropriate excision-proficient control females. The results of the present work suggest that a qualitative and quantitative relationship exists between the nature and the extent of chemical modification of DNA and the induction of of genetic alterations. The presence of either excision-defective mutant can enhance the frequency of mutation (hypermutability) and this hypermutability can be correlated with the Swain-Scott constant S of specific AAs such that as the SN1 character of the DNA alkylation reaction increases, the difference in response between repair-deficient and repair-proficient females decreases. The order of hypermutability of AAs with mei-9L1 relative to mei-9+ is MMS greater than MNU greater than DMN = EMS greater than iPMS = ENU = DEN = ENNG. When the percentage of lethal mutations induced in mei-9L1 females are plotted against those determined for control females, straight lines of different slopes are obtained. These mei-9L1/mei-9+ indices are: MMS = 7.6, MNU = 5.4, DMN = 2.4, EMS = 2.4 and iPMS = ENU = DEN = ENNG = 1. An identical order of hypermutability with similar indices is obtained for the mus(2)201 mutants: MMS(7.3) greater than MNU (5.4) greater than EMS(2.0) greater than ENU(1.1). Thus, absence of excision repair function has a significant effect on mutation production by AAs efficient in alkylating N-atoms in DNA but no measurable influence on mutation production by AAs most efficient in

  4. Characterization of the ptr5+ gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Nobuyoshi; Ikeda, Terumasa; Mizuki, Fumitaka; Tani, Tokio

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We cloned the ptr5 + gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast. ► The ptr5 + gene was found to encode nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). ► Seh1p and Mlo3p are multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5 mutation. ► Ptr5p/Nup85p functions in nuclear mRNA export through the mRNA export factor Rae1p. ► Ptr5p/Nup85p interacts genetically with pre-mRNA splicing factors. -- Abstract: To analyze the mechanisms of mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, we have isolated eleven mutants, ptr [poly(A) + RNA transport] 1 to 11, which accumulate poly(A) + RNA in the nucleus at a nonpermissive temperature in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Of those, the ptr5–1 mutant shows dots- or a ring-like accumulation of poly(A) + RNA at the nuclear periphery after shifting to the nonpermissive temperature. We cloned the ptr5 + gene and found that it encodes a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). The ptr5–1 mutant shows no defects in protein transport, suggesting the specific involvement of Ptr5p/Nup85p in nuclear mRNA export in S. pombe. We identified Seh1p, a nucleoporin interacting with Nup85p, an mRNA-binding protein Mlo3p, and Sac3p, a component of the TREX-2 complex involved in coupling of nuclear mRNA export with transcription, as multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5–1 mutation. In addition, we found that the ptr5–1 mutation is synthetically lethal with a mutation of the mRNA export factor Rae1p, and that the double mutant exaggerates defective nuclear mRNA export, suggesting that Ptr5p/Nup85p is involved in nuclear mRNA export through Rae1p. Interestingly, the ptr5–1 mutation also showed synthetic effects with several prp pre-mRNA splicing mutations, suggesting a functional linkage between the NPCs and the splicing apparatus in the yeast nucleus.

  5. Vaginal yeast infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts ...

  6. Mutants of Aspergillus nidulans affected in asexual development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. nidulans mutants by inducing base transitions and transversions ... tone 2, yeast extract 2, hydrolysed casein 1, and (in /g/l) in- ositol 4000, choline .... carbon sources; flu, fluffy mutation; uvsH, sensitivity to UV radiation. Gene symbols ...

  7. Trehalose-6-phosphate synthesis controls yeast gluconeogenesis downstream and independent of SNF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroover, Sofie; Ghillebert, Ruben; Broeckx, Tom; Winderickx, Joris; Rolland, Filip

    2016-06-01

    Trehalose-6-P (T6P), an intermediate of trehalose biosynthesis, was identified as an important regulator of yeast sugar metabolism and signaling. tps1Δ mutants, deficient in T6P synthesis (TPS), are unable to grow on rapidly fermentable medium with uncontrolled influx in glycolysis, depletion of ATP and accumulation of sugar phosphates. However, the exact molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. We show that SNF1 deletion restores the tps1Δ growth defect on glucose, suggesting that lack of TPS hampers inactivation of SNF1 or SNF1-regulated processes. In addition to alternative, non-fermentable carbon metabolism, SNF1 controls two major processes: respiration and gluconeogenesis. The tps1Δ defect appears to be specifically associated with deficient inhibition of gluconeogenesis, indicating more downstream effects. Consistently, Snf1 dephosphorylation and inactivation on glucose medium are not affected, as confirmed with an in vivo Snf1 activity reporter. Detailed analysis shows that gluconeogenic Pck1 and Fbp1 expression, protein levels and activity are not repressed upon glucose addition to tps1Δ cells, suggesting a link between the metabolic defect and persistent gluconeogenesis. While SNF1 is essential for induction of gluconeogenesis, T6P/TPS is required for inactivation of gluconeogenesis in the presence of glucose, downstream and independent of SNF1 activity and the Cat8 and Sip4 transcription factors. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Conditions of activation of yeast plasma membrane ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychrová, H; Kotyk, A

    1985-04-08

    The in vivo activation of the H+-ATPase of baker's yeast plasma membrane found by Serrano in 1983 was demonstrated with D-glucose aerobically and anaerobically (as well as in a respiration-deficient mutant) and, after suitable induction, with maltose, trehalose, and galactose. The activated but not the control ATPase was sensitive to oligomycin. No activation was possible in a cell-free extract with added glucose. The ATPase was not activated in yeast protoplasts which may account for the absence of glucose-stimulated secondary active transports in these wall-less cells and provide support for a microscopic coupling between ATPase activity and these transports in yeast cells.

  9. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suppressor mutants devoid of the membrane lipid phosphatidylcholine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, X.

    2018-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the most abundant membrane lipid in most eukaryotes and considered essential. The yeast double deletion mutant cho2opi3 lacks the methyltransferases converting phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) to PC. As a consequence, the cho2opi3 mutant is a choline auxotroph that relies on

  10. Enhancement of ethanol fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast by disrupting mitophagy function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroma, Shodai; Jayakody, Lahiru Niroshan; Horie, Kenta; Okamoto, Koji; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strain Kyokai no. 7 has one of the highest fermentation rates among brewery yeasts used worldwide; therefore, it is assumed that it is not possible to enhance its fermentation rate. However, in this study, we found that fermentation by sake yeast can be enhanced by inhibiting mitophagy. We observed mitophagy in wild-type sake yeast during the brewing of Ginjo sake, but not when the mitophagy gene (ATG32) was disrupted. During sake brewing, the maximum rate of CO2 production and final ethanol concentration generated by the atg32Δ laboratory yeast mutant were 7.50% and 2.12% higher than those of the parent strain, respectively. This mutant exhibited an improved fermentation profile when cultured under limiting nutrient concentrations such as those used during Ginjo sake brewing as well as in minimal synthetic medium. The mutant produced ethanol at a concentration that was 2.76% higher than the parent strain, which has significant implications for industrial bioethanol production. The ethanol yield of the atg32Δ mutant was increased, and its biomass yield was decreased relative to the parent sake yeast strain, indicating that the atg32Δ mutant has acquired a high fermentation capability at the cost of decreasing biomass. Because natural biomass resources often lack sufficient nutrient levels for optimal fermentation, mitophagy may serve as an important target for improving the fermentative capacity of brewery yeasts.

  11. Defect modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norgett, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations, drawing principally on developments at AERE Harwell, of the relaxation about lattice defects are reviewed with emphasis on the techniques required for such calculations. The principles of defect modelling are outlined and various programs developed for defect simulations are discussed. Particular calculations for metals, ionic crystals and oxides, are considered. (UK)

  12. Yeast for virus research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Richard Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) are two popular model organisms for virus research. They are natural hosts for viruses as they carry their own indigenous viruses. Both yeasts have been used for studies of plant, animal and human viruses. Many positive sense (+) RNA viruses and some DNA viruses replicate with various levels in yeasts, thus allowing study of those viral activities during viral life cycle. Yeasts are single cell eukaryotic organisms. Hence, many of the fundamental cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation or programed cell death are highly conserved from yeasts to higher eukaryotes. Therefore, they are particularly suited to study the impact of those viral activities on related cellular activities during virus-host interactions. Yeasts present many unique advantages in virus research over high eukaryotes. Yeast cells are easy to maintain in the laboratory with relative short doubling time. They are non-biohazardous, genetically amendable with small genomes that permit genome-wide analysis of virologic and cellular functions. In this review, similarities and differences of these two yeasts are described. Studies of virologic activities such as viral translation, viral replication and genome-wide study of virus-cell interactions in yeasts are highlighted. Impacts of viral proteins on basic cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation and programed cell death are discussed. Potential applications of using yeasts as hosts to carry out functional analysis of small viral genome and to develop high throughput drug screening platform for the discovery of antiviral drugs are presented. PMID:29082230

  13. Characterization of a null allelic mutant of the rice NAL1 gene reveals its role in regulating cell division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Jiang

    Full Text Available Leaf morphology is closely associated with cell division. In rice, mutations in Narrow leaf 1 (NAL1 show narrow leaf phenotypes. Previous studies have shown that NAL1 plays a role in regulating vein patterning and increasing grain yield in indica cultivars, but its role in leaf growth and development remains unknown. In this report, we characterized two allelic mutants of NARROW LEAF1 (NAL1, nal1-2 and nal1-3, both of which showed a 50% reduction in leaf width and length, as well as a dwarf culm. Longitudinal and transverse histological analyses of leaves and internodes revealed that cell division was suppressed in the anticlinal orientation but enhanced in the periclinal orientation in the mutants, while cell size remained unaltered. In addition to defects in cell proliferation, the mutants showed abnormal midrib in leaves. Map-based cloning revealed that nal1-2 is a null allelic mutant of NAL1 since both the whole promoter and a 404-bp fragment in the first exon of NAL1 were deleted, and that a 6-bp fragment was deleted in the mutant nal1-3. We demonstrated that NAL1 functions in the regulation of cell division as early as during leaf primordia initiation. The altered transcript level of G1- and S-phase-specific genes suggested that NAL1 affects cell cycle regulation. Heterogeneous expression of NAL1 in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe further supported that NAL1 affects cell division. These results suggest that NAL1 controls leaf width and plant height through its effects on cell division.

  14. Checkpoint independence of most DNA replication origins in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickle, Katie L; Ramanathan, Sunita; Rosebrock, Adam; Oliva, Anna; Chaudari, Amna; Yompakdee, Chulee; Scott, Donna; Leatherwood, Janet; Huberman, Joel A

    2007-12-19

    In budding yeast, the replication checkpoint slows progress through S phase by inhibiting replication origin firing. In mammals, the replication checkpoint inhibits both origin firing and replication fork movement. To find out which strategy is employed in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we used microarrays to investigate the use of origins by wild-type and checkpoint-mutant strains in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which limits the pool of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) and activates the replication checkpoint. The checkpoint-mutant cells carried deletions either of rad3 (which encodes the fission yeast homologue of ATR) or cds1 (which encodes the fission yeast homologue of Chk2). Our microarray results proved to be largely consistent with those independently obtained and recently published by three other laboratories. However, we were able to reconcile differences between the previous studies regarding the extent to which fission yeast replication origins are affected by the replication checkpoint. We found (consistent with the three previous studies after appropriate interpretation) that, in surprising contrast to budding yeast, most fission yeast origins, including both early- and late-firing origins, are not significantly affected by checkpoint mutations during replication in the presence of HU. A few origins (approximately 3%) behaved like those in budding yeast: they replicated earlier in the checkpoint mutants than in wild type. These were located primarily in the heterochromatic subtelomeric regions of chromosomes 1 and 2. Indeed, the subtelomeric regions defined by the strongest checkpoint restraint correspond precisely to previously mapped subtelomeric heterochromatin. This observation implies that subtelomeric heterochromatin in fission yeast differs from heterochromatin at centromeres, in the mating type region, and in ribosomal DNA, since these regions replicated at least as efficiently in wild-type cells as in checkpoint-mutant

  15. Checkpoint independence of most DNA replication origins in fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickle, Katie L; Ramanathan, Sunita; Rosebrock, Adam; Oliva, Anna; Chaudari, Amna; Yompakdee, Chulee; Scott, Donna; Leatherwood, Janet; Huberman, Joel A

    2007-01-01

    Background In budding yeast, the replication checkpoint slows progress through S phase by inhibiting replication origin firing. In mammals, the replication checkpoint inhibits both origin firing and replication fork movement. To find out which strategy is employed in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we used microarrays to investigate the use of origins by wild-type and checkpoint-mutant strains in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU), which limits the pool of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) and activates the replication checkpoint. The checkpoint-mutant cells carried deletions either of rad3 (which encodes the fission yeast homologue of ATR) or cds1 (which encodes the fission yeast homologue of Chk2). Results Our microarray results proved to be largely consistent with those independently obtained and recently published by three other laboratories. However, we were able to reconcile differences between the previous studies regarding the extent to which fission yeast replication origins are affected by the replication checkpoint. We found (consistent with the three previous studies after appropriate interpretation) that, in surprising contrast to budding yeast, most fission yeast origins, including both early- and late-firing origins, are not significantly affected by checkpoint mutations during replication in the presence of HU. A few origins (~3%) behaved like those in budding yeast: they replicated earlier in the checkpoint mutants than in wild type. These were located primarily in the heterochromatic subtelomeric regions of chromosomes 1 and 2. Indeed, the subtelomeric regions defined by the strongest checkpoint restraint correspond precisely to previously mapped subtelomeric heterochromatin. This observation implies that subtelomeric heterochromatin in fission yeast differs from heterochromatin at centromeres, in the mating type region, and in ribosomal DNA, since these regions replicated at least as efficiently in wild-type cells as in

  16. Checkpoint independence of most DNA replication origins in fission yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Donna

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In budding yeast, the replication checkpoint slows progress through S phase by inhibiting replication origin firing. In mammals, the replication checkpoint inhibits both origin firing and replication fork movement. To find out which strategy is employed in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we used microarrays to investigate the use of origins by wild-type and checkpoint-mutant strains in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU, which limits the pool of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs and activates the replication checkpoint. The checkpoint-mutant cells carried deletions either of rad3 (which encodes the fission yeast homologue of ATR or cds1 (which encodes the fission yeast homologue of Chk2. Results Our microarray results proved to be largely consistent with those independently obtained and recently published by three other laboratories. However, we were able to reconcile differences between the previous studies regarding the extent to which fission yeast replication origins are affected by the replication checkpoint. We found (consistent with the three previous studies after appropriate interpretation that, in surprising contrast to budding yeast, most fission yeast origins, including both early- and late-firing origins, are not significantly affected by checkpoint mutations during replication in the presence of HU. A few origins (~3% behaved like those in budding yeast: they replicated earlier in the checkpoint mutants than in wild type. These were located primarily in the heterochromatic subtelomeric regions of chromosomes 1 and 2. Indeed, the subtelomeric regions defined by the strongest checkpoint restraint correspond precisely to previously mapped subtelomeric heterochromatin. This observation implies that subtelomeric heterochromatin in fission yeast differs from heterochromatin at centromeres, in the mating type region, and in ribosomal DNA, since these regions replicated at least as efficiently in wild

  17. Breeding research on sake yeasts in Japan: history, recent technological advances, and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagaki, Hiroshi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Sake is an alcoholic beverage of Japan, with a tradition lasting more than 1,300 years; it is produced from rice and water by fermenting with the koji mold Aspergillus oryzae and sake yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Breeding research on sake yeasts was originally developed in Japan by incorporating microbiological and genetic research methodologies adopted in other scientific areas. Since the advent of a genetic paradigm, isolation of yeast mutants has been a dominant approach for the breeding of favorable sake yeasts. These sake yeasts include (a) those that do not form foams (produced by isolating a mutant that does not stick to foams, thus decreasing the cost of sake production); (b) those that do not produce urea, which leads to the formation of ethyl carbamate, a possible carcinogen (isolated by positive selection in a canavanine-, arginine-, and ornithine-containing medium); (c) those that produce an increased amount of ethyl caproate, an apple-like flavor (produced by isolating a mutant resistant to cerulenin, an inhibitor of fatty-acid synthesis); and (d) those that produce a decreased amount of pyruvate (produced by isolating a mutant resistant to an inhibitor of mitochondrial transport, thus decreasing the amount of diacetyl). Given that sake yeasts perform sexual reproduction, sporulation and mating are potent approaches for their breeding. Recently, the genome sequences of sake yeasts have been determined and made publicly accessible. By utilizing this information, the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the brewing characteristics of sake yeasts have been identified, which paves a way to DNA marker-assisted selection of the mated strains. Genetic engineering technologies for experimental yeast strains have recently been established by academic groups, and these technologies have also been applied to the breeding of sake yeasts. Sake yeasts whose genomes have been modified with these technologies correspond to genetically modified organisms (GMOs

  18. The ATM homologue MEC1 is required for phosphorylation of replication protein A in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brush, G.S.; Morrow, D.M.; Hieter, P.; Kelly, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a highly conserved single-stranded DNA-binding protein, required for cellular DNA replication, repair, and recombination. In human cells, RPA is phosphorylated during the S and G2 phases of the cell cycle and also in response to ionizing or ultraviolet radiation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits a similar pattern of cell cycle-regulated RPA phosphorylation, and our studies indicate that the radiation-induced reactions occur in yeast as well. We have examined yeast RPA phosphorylation during the normal cell cycle and in response to environmental insult, and have demonstrated that the checkpoint gene MEC1 is required for the reaction under all conditions tested. Through examination of several checkpoint mutants, we have placed RPA phosphorylation in a novel pathway of the DNA damage response. MEC1 is similar in sequence to human ATM, the gene mutated in patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T). A-T cells are deficient in multiple checkpoint pathways and are hypersensitive to killing by ionizing radiation. Because A-T cells exhibit a delay in ionizing radiation-induced RPA phosphorylation, our results indicate a functional similarity between MEC1 and ATM, and suggest that RPA phosphorylation is involved in a conserved eukaryotic DNA damage-response pathway defective in A-T

  19. Preferential binding of yeast Rad4-Rad23 complex to damaged DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, L.E.T.; Verhage, R.A.; Brouwer, J.

    1998-01-01

    The yeast Rad4 and Rad23 proteins form a complex that is involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER). Their function in this process is not known yet, but genetic data suggest that they act in an early step in NER. We have purified an epitope-tagged Rad4.Rad23 (tRad4. Rad23) complex from yeast cells, using a clone overproducing Rad4 with a hemagglutinin-tag at its C terminus. tRad4.Rad23 complex purified by both conventional and immuno-affinity chromatography complements the in vitro repair defect of rad4 and rad23 mutant extracts, demonstrating that these proteins are functional in NER. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we show preferential binding of the tRad4.Rad23 complex to damaged DNA in vitro. UV-irradiated, as well as N-acetoxy-2-(acetylamino)fluorene-treated DNA, is efficiently bound by the protein complex. These data suggest that Rad4.Rad23 interacts with DNA damage during NER and may play a role in recognition of the damage

  20. CSL protein regulates transcription of genes required to prevent catastrophic mitosis in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Převorovský, Martin; Oravcová, Martina; Zach, Róbert; Jordáková, Anna; Bähler, Jürg; Půta, František; Folk, Petr

    2016-11-16

    For every eukaryotic cell to grow and divide, intricately coordinated action of numerous proteins is required to ensure proper cell-cycle progression. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been instrumental in elucidating the fundamental principles of cell-cycle control. Mutations in S. pombe 'cut' (cell untimely torn) genes cause failed coordination between cell and nuclear division, resulting in catastrophic mitosis. Deletion of cbf11, a fission yeast CSL transcription factor gene, triggers a 'cut' phenotype, but the precise role of Cbf11 in promoting mitotic fidelity is not known. We report that Cbf11 directly activates the transcription of the acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase gene cut6, and the biotin uptake/biosynthesis genes vht1 and bio2, with the former 2 implicated in mitotic fidelity. Cbf11 binds to a canonical, metazoan-like CSL response element (GTGGGAA) in the cut6 promoter. Expression of Cbf11 target genes shows apparent oscillations during the cell cycle using temperature-sensitive cdc25-22 and cdc10-M17 block-release experiments, but not with other synchronization methods. The penetrance of catastrophic mitosis in cbf11 and cut6 mutants is nutrient-dependent. We also show that drastic decrease in biotin availability arrests cell proliferation but does not cause mitotic defects. Taken together, our results raise the possibility that CSL proteins play conserved roles in regulating cell-cycle progression, and they could guide experiments into mitotic CSL functions in mammals.

  1. V-ATPase-dependent luminal acidification is required for endocytic recycling of a yeast cell wall stress sensor, Wsc1p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Kazuma; Saito, Mayu; Nagashima, Makiko; Kojima, Ai; Nishinoaki, Show [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Niijuku 6-3-1, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); Toshima, Junko Y., E-mail: yama_jun@aoni.waseda.jp [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Wakamatsu-cho 2-2, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan); Research Center for RNA Science, RIST, Tokyo University of Science, Niijuku 6-3-1, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); Toshima, Jiro, E-mail: jtosiscb@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Niijuku 6-3-1, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan); Research Center for RNA Science, RIST, Tokyo University of Science, Niijuku 6-3-1, Katsushika-ku, Tokyo 125-8585 (Japan)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •A targeted genome screen identified 5 gene groups affecting Wsc1p recycling. •V-ATPase-dependent luminal acidification is required for Wsc1p recycling. •Activity of V-ATPase might be required for cargo recognition by the retromer complex. -- Abstract: Wsc1p is a major cell wall sensor protein localized at the polarized cell surface. The localization of Wsc1p is maintained by endocytosis and recycling from endosomes back to the cell surface, but changes to the vacuole when cells are subjected to heat stress. Exploiting this unique property of Wsc1p, we screened for yeast single-gene deletion mutants exhibiting defects in Wsc1p trafficking. By expressing 3GFP-tagged Wsc1p in mutants with deleted genes whose function is related to intracellular trafficking, we identified 5 gene groups affecting Wsc1p trafficking, impaired respectively in endocytic internalization, multivesicular body sorting, the GARP complex, endosomal maturation/vacuolar fusion, and V-ATPase. Interestingly, deletion of the VPH1 gene, encoding the V{sub o} subunit of vacuolar-type H{sup +}-ATPase (V-ATPase), led to mis-localization of Wsc1p from the plasma membrane to the vacuole. In addition, disruption of other V-ATPase subunits (vma mutants) also caused defects of Wsc1p trafficking and vacuolar acidification similar to those seen in the vph1Δ mutant. Moreover, we found that deletion of the VPS26 gene, encoding a subunit of the retromer complex, also caused a defect in Wsc1p recycling and mis-localization of Wsc1p to the vacuole. These findings clarified the previously unidentified Wsc1p recycling pathway and requirement of V-ATPase-dependent luminal acidification for Wsc1p recycling.

  2. V-ATPase-dependent luminal acidification is required for endocytic recycling of a yeast cell wall stress sensor, Wsc1p

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Kazuma; Saito, Mayu; Nagashima, Makiko; Kojima, Ai; Nishinoaki, Show; Toshima, Junko Y.; Toshima, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •A targeted genome screen identified 5 gene groups affecting Wsc1p recycling. •V-ATPase-dependent luminal acidification is required for Wsc1p recycling. •Activity of V-ATPase might be required for cargo recognition by the retromer complex. -- Abstract: Wsc1p is a major cell wall sensor protein localized at the polarized cell surface. The localization of Wsc1p is maintained by endocytosis and recycling from endosomes back to the cell surface, but changes to the vacuole when cells are subjected to heat stress. Exploiting this unique property of Wsc1p, we screened for yeast single-gene deletion mutants exhibiting defects in Wsc1p trafficking. By expressing 3GFP-tagged Wsc1p in mutants with deleted genes whose function is related to intracellular trafficking, we identified 5 gene groups affecting Wsc1p trafficking, impaired respectively in endocytic internalization, multivesicular body sorting, the GARP complex, endosomal maturation/vacuolar fusion, and V-ATPase. Interestingly, deletion of the VPH1 gene, encoding the V o subunit of vacuolar-type H + -ATPase (V-ATPase), led to mis-localization of Wsc1p from the plasma membrane to the vacuole. In addition, disruption of other V-ATPase subunits (vma mutants) also caused defects of Wsc1p trafficking and vacuolar acidification similar to those seen in the vph1Δ mutant. Moreover, we found that deletion of the VPS26 gene, encoding a subunit of the retromer complex, also caused a defect in Wsc1p recycling and mis-localization of Wsc1p to the vacuole. These findings clarified the previously unidentified Wsc1p recycling pathway and requirement of V-ATPase-dependent luminal acidification for Wsc1p recycling

  3. New approaches for improving the production of the 1st and 2nd generation ethanol by yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylenko, Olena; Semkiv, Marta; Ruchala, Justyna; Hryniv, Orest; Kshanovska, Barbara; Abbas, Charles; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn; Sibirny, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Increase in the production of 1st generation ethanol from glucose is possible by the reduction in the production of ethanol co-products, especially biomass. We have developed a method to reduce biomass accumulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the manipulation of the intracellular ATP level due to overexpression of genes of alkaline phosphatase, apyrase or enzymes involved in futile cycles. The strains constructed accumulated up to 10% more ethanol on a cornmeal hydrolysate medium. Similar increase in ethanol accumulation was observed in the mutants resistant to the toxic inhibitors of glycolysis like 3-bromopyruvate and others. Substantial increase in fuel ethanol production will be obtained by the development of new strains of yeasts that ferment sugars of the abundant lignocellulosic feedstocks, especially xylose, a pentose sugar. We have found that xylose can be fermented under elevated temperatures by the thermotolerant yeast, Hansenula polymorpha. We combined protein engineering of the gene coding for xylose reductase (XYL1) along with overexpression of the other two genes responsible for xylose metabolism in yeast (XYL2, XYL3) and the deletion of the global transcriptional activator CAT8, with the selection of mutants defective in utilizing ethanol as a carbon source using the anticancer drug, 3-bromopyruvate. Resulted strains accumulated 20-25 times more ethanol from xylose at the elevated temperature of 45°C with up to 12.5 g L(-1) produced. Increase in ethanol yield and productivity from xylose was also achieved by overexpression of genes coding for the peroxisomal enzymes: transketolase (DAS1) and transaldolase (TAL2), and deletion of the ATG13 gene.

  4. Chronological Lifespan in Yeast Is Dependent on the Accumulation of Storage Carbohydrates Mediated by Yak1, Mck1 and Rim15 Kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yingzhi; Quan, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Zhe; Oliver, Stephen G.; Zhang, Nianshu

    2016-01-01

    Upon starvation for glucose or any other macronutrient, yeast cells exit from the mitotic cell cycle and acquire a set of characteristics that are specific to quiescent cells to ensure longevity. Little is known about the molecular determinants that orchestrate quiescence entry and lifespan extension. Using starvation-specific gene reporters, we screened a subset of the yeast deletion library representing the genes encoding ‘signaling’ proteins. Apart from the previously characterised Rim15, Mck1 and Yak1 kinases, the SNF1/AMPK complex, the cell wall integrity pathway and a number of cell cycle regulators were shown to be necessary for proper quiescence establishment and for extension of chronological lifespan (CLS), suggesting that entry into quiescence requires the integration of starvation signals transmitted via multiple signaling pathways. The CLS of these signaling mutants, and those of the single, double and triple mutants of RIM15, YAK1 and MCK1 correlates well with the amount of storage carbohydrates but poorly with transition-phase cell cycle status. Combined removal of the glycogen and trehalose biosynthetic genes, especially GSY2 and TPS1, nearly abolishes the accumulation of storage carbohydrates and severely reduces CLS. Concurrent overexpression of GSY2 and TSL1 or supplementation of trehalose to the growth medium ameliorates the severe CLS defects displayed by the signaling mutants (rim15Δyak1Δ or rim15Δmck1Δ). Furthermore, we reveal that the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species are cooperatively controlled by Yak1, Rim15 and Mck1, and the three kinases mediate the TOR1-regulated accumulation of storage carbohydrates and CLS extension. Our data support the hypothesis that metabolic reprogramming to accumulate energy stores and the activation of anti-oxidant defence systems are coordinated by Yak1, Rim15 and Mck1 kinases to ensure quiescence entry and lifespan extension in yeast. PMID:27923067

  5. Vascular defects in gain-of-function fps/fes transgenic mice correlate with PDGF- and VEGF-induced activation of mutant Fps/Fes kinase in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangrar, W; Mewburn, J D; Vincent, S G; Fisher, J T; Greer, P A

    2004-05-01

    Fps/Fes is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that is abundantly expressed in the myeloid, endothelial, epithelial, neuronal and platelet lineages. Genetic manipulation in mice has uncovered potential roles for this kinase in hematopoiesis, innate immunity, inflammation and angiogenesis. We have utilized a genetic approach to explore the role of Fps/Fes in angiogenesis. A hypervascular line of mice generated by expression of a 'gain-of-function' human fps/fes transgene (fps(MF)) encoding a myristoylated variant of Fps (MFps) was used in these studies. The hypervascular phenotype of this line was extensively characterized by intravital microscopy and biochemical approaches. fps(MF) mice exhibited 1.6-1.7-fold increases in vascularity which was attributable to increases in the number of secondary vessels. Vessels were larger, exhibited varicosities and disorganized patterning, and were found to have defects in histamine-induced permeability. Biochemical characterization of endothelial cell (EC) lines derived from fps(MF) mice revealed that MFps was hypersensitive to activation by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). MFps mediates enhanced sensitization to VEGF and PDGF signaling in ECs. We propose that this hypersensitization contributes to excessive angiogenic signaling and that this underlies the observed hypervascular phenotype of fps(MF) mice. These phenotypes recapitulate important aspects of the vascular defects observed in both VEGF and angiopoietin-1 transgenic mice. The fps/fes proto-oncogene product therefore represents a novel player in the regulation of angiogenesis, and the fps(MF) line of mice constitutes a unique new murine model for the study of this process.

  6. Effect of ion implantation on apple wine yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Andong; Chen Hongge; Zhang Shimin; Jia Cuiying

    2004-01-01

    The wild type apple wine yeast Y 02 was treated by ion implantation with the dose of 8 x 10 15 ion/cm 2 . As results, a special mutant strain, ION II -11 dry, was obtained. The morphology characters, partial biochemistry characters, mycelium protein of the mutant strain were distinctively changed compared with original strain Y 02 . After the fermentation test ,the apple wine producing rate of the mutant strain increased 22.4% compared with original strain. These results showed that ion implantation was an effective method for mutagenesis

  7. Autoactivation of proteinase A initiates activation of yeast vacuolar zymogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Hazel, H B; Kielland-Brandt, Morten; Winther, Jakob R.

    1992-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae PEP4 gene encodes proteinase A, an aspartyl protease. pep4 mutants are defective in the activation of many vacuolar hydrolases, including proteinase B. We have expressed a pep4 mutation which directs the accumulation of pro-proteinase A with a defective active site. Co...

  8. Global translational impacts of the loss of the tRNA modification t6A in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Thiaville

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The universal tRNA modification t6A is found at position 37 of nearly all tRNAs decoding ANN codons. The absence of t6A37 leads to severe growth defects in baker’s yeast, phenotypes similar to those caused by defects in mcm5s2U34 synthesis. Mutants in mcm5s2U34 can be suppressed by overexpression of tRNALysUUU, but we show t6A phenotypes could not be suppressed by expressing any individual ANN decoding tRNA, and t6A and mcm5s2U are not determinants for each other’s formation. Our results suggest that t6A deficiency, like mcm5s2U deficiency, leads to protein folding defects, and show that the absence of t6A led to stress sensitivities (heat, ethanol, salt and sensitivity to TOR pathway inhibitors. Additionally, L-homoserine suppressed the slow growth phenotype seen in t6A-deficient strains, and proteins aggregates and Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs were increased in the mutants. The global consequences on translation caused by t6A absence were examined by ribosome profiling. Interestingly, the absence of t6A did not lead to global translation defects, but did increase translation initiation at upstream non-AUG codons and increased frame-shifting in specific genes. Analysis of codon occupancy rates suggests that one of the major roles of t6A is to homogenize the process of elongation by slowing the elongation rate at codons decoded by high abundance tRNAs and I34:C3 pairs while increasing the elongation rate of rare tRNAs and G34:U3 pairs. This work reveals that the consequences of t6A absence are complex and multilayered and has set the stage to elucidate the molecular basis of the observed phenotypes.

  9. Caloric Restriction-Induced Extension of Chronological Lifespan Requires Intact Respiration in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young-Yon; Lee, Sung-Keun; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2017-04-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to extend lifespan and prevent cellular senescence in various species ranging from yeast to humans. Many effects of CR may contribute to extend lifespan. Specifically, CR prevents oxidative damage from reactive oxygen species (ROS) by enhancing mitochondrial function. In this study, we characterized 33 single electron transport chain (ETC) gene-deletion strains to identify CR-induced chronological lifespan (CLS) extension mechanisms. Interestingly, defects in 17 of these 33 ETC gene-deleted strains showed loss of both respiratory function and CR-induced CLS extension. On the contrary, the other 16 respiration-capable mutants showed increased CLS upon CR along with increased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels, with decreased mitochondrial superoxide generation. We measured the same parameters in the 17 non-respiratory mutants upon CR. CR simultaneously increased MMP and mitochondrial superoxide generation without altering intracellular ATP levels. In conclusion, respiration is essential for CLS extension by CR and is important for balancing MMP, ROS, and ATP levels.

  10. Promising rice mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakim, L.; Azam, M.A.; Miah, A.J.; Mansur, M.A.; Akanda, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    Two induced mutants namely, Mut NS 1 (tall) and Mut NS 5 (semi-dwarf) derived from rice variety Nizersail were evaluated for various agronomic characters at four locations in Bangladesh. Both the mutants matured about three weeks earlier and yielded significantly higher than the parent variety Nizersail. (author). 3 tabs., 9 refs

  11. TRIM37 defective in mulibrey nanism is a novel RING finger ubiquitin E3 ligase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallijaervi, Jukka; Lahtinen, Ulla; Haemaelaeinen, Riikka; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Palvimo, Jorma J.; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina

    2005-01-01

    Mulibrey nanism is an autosomal recessive prenatal-onset growth disorder characterized by dysmorphic features, cardiomyopathy, and hepatomegaly. Mutations in TRIM37 encoding a tripartite motif (TRIM, RING-B-box-coiled-coil)-family protein underlie mulibrey nanism. We investigated the ubiquitin ligase activity predicted for the RING domain of TRIM37 by analyzing its autoubiquitination. Full-length TRIM37 and its TRIM domain were highly polyubiquitinated when co-expressed with ubiquitin. Polyubiquitination was decreased in a mutant protein with disrupted RING domain (Cys35Ser;Cys36Ser) and in the Leu76Pro mutant protein, a disease-associated missense mutation affecting the TRIM domain of TRIM37. Bacterially produced GST-TRIM domain fusion protein, but not its Cys35Ser;Cys36Ser or Leu76Pro mutants, were polyubiquitinated in cell-free conditions, implying RING-dependent modification. Ubiquitin was also identified as an interaction partner for TRIM37 in a yeast two-hybrid screen. Ectopically expressed TRIM37 rapidly formed aggregates that were ubiquitin-, proteasome subunit-, and chaperone-positive in immunofluorescence analysis, defining them as aggresomes. The Cys35Ser;Cys36Ser mutant and the Leu76Pro and Gly322Val patient mutant proteins were markedly less prone to aggregation, implying that aggresomal targeting reflects a physiological function of TRIM37. These findings suggest that TRIM37 acts as a TRIM domain-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase and imply defective ubiquitin-dependent degradation of an as-yet-unidentified target protein in the pathogenesis of mulibrey nanism

  12. Mutant heterosis in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    In the variety TKM6 a high yielding semidwarf mutant has been induced. This TKM6 mutant was used in test crosses with a number of other varieties and mutants to examine the extent of heterosis of dwarfs in rice and to select superior crosses. An excerpt of the published data is given. It appears from the backcross of the mutant with its original variety, that an increase in number of productive tillers occurs in the hybrid, leading to a striking grain yield increase, while the semi-dwarf culm length (the main mutant character) reverts to the normal phenotype. In the cross with IR8 on the other hand, there is only a minimal increase in tiller number but a substantial increase in TGW leading to more than 30% yield increase over the better parent

  13. Reconstitution in yeast of the Arabidopsis SOS signaling pathway for Na+ homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Quintero, Francisco J.; Ohta, Masaru; Shi, Huazhong; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Pardo, José M.

    2002-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana SOS1 protein is a putative Na H antiporter that functions in Na extrusion and is essential for the NaCl tolerance of plants. sos1 mutant plants share phenotypic similarities with mutants lacking the protein kinase SOS2 and the Ca2 sensor SOS3. To investigate whether the three SOS proteins function in the same response pathway, we have reconstituted the SOS system in yeast cells. Expression of SOS1 improved the Na tolerance of yeast mutants la...

  14. Dicholesteroyl diselenide: cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and mutagenicity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Iuri Marques; Degrandi, Tiago Hoerbe; Jorge, Patrícia Mendes; Saffi, Jenifer; Rosa, Renato Moreira; Guecheva, Temenouga Nikolova; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas

    2014-03-15

    The organoselenium compound, dicholesteroyl diselenide (DCDS) is a structural analogue of diphenyl diselenide (DPDS) and may be considered as a promising antioxidant drug in vivo. Nevertheless, little is known about the toxicological properties of DCDS. In the present study we evaluated the cytotoxic, genotoxic and mutagenic properties of DCDS in Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79) and in strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, proficient and deficient in several DNA-repair pathways. The results with V79 cells show that DCDS induced cytotoxicity, GSH depletion and elevation of lipid peroxidation at lower concentrations than did DPDS. DCDS also generated single- and double-strand DNA breaks in V79 cells, both in the presence and in the absence of metabolic activation, as revealed by alkaline and neutral comet assays. Moreover, the induction of oxidative DNA base-damage was demonstrated by means of a modified comet assay with formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase and endonuclease III. Treatment with DCDS also induced micronucleus formation in V79 cells as well as point and frame-shift mutations in a haploid wild-type strain of S. cerevisiae. Yeast mutants defective in base excision-repair proteins were the most sensitive to DCDS. Pre-incubation with N-acetylcysteine reduced DCDS's oxidative, genotoxic and mutagenic effects in yeast and in V79 cells. Our findings indicate that the presence of cholesteroyl substituents in DCDS results in elevation of its cytotoxic and genotoxic potential compared with that of DPDS in yeast and in V79 cells. However, due to dose-dependent contrasting behaviour of organoselenium compounds and differences in their toxicity in in vitro and in vivo systems, further studies are needed in order to establish the non-toxic concentration range for treatment in mammals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Screening of effective pharmacological treatments for MELAS syndrome using yeasts, fibroblasts and cybrid models of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D; Moñino, Irene Domínguez; Pereira-Arenas, Sheila; Lechuga-Vieco, Ana V; Cotán, David; De la Mata, Mario; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; De Miguel, Manuel; Bautista Lorite, Juan; Rivas Infante, Eloy; Alvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Navas, Plácido; Jackson, Sandra; Francisci, Silvia; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2012-11-01

    MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) is a mitochondrial disease most usually caused by point mutations in tRNA genes encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Approximately 80% of cases of MELAS syndrome are associated with a m.3243A > G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene, which encodes the mitochondrial tRNALeu (UUR). Currently, no effective treatments are available for this chronic progressive disorder. Treatment strategies in MELAS and other mitochondrial diseases consist of several drugs that diminish the deleterious effects of the abnormal respiratory chain function, reduce the presence of toxic agents or correct deficiencies in essential cofactors. We evaluated the effectiveness of some common pharmacological agents that have been utilized in the treatment of MELAS, in yeast, fibroblast and cybrid models of the disease. The yeast model harbouring the A14G mutation in the mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR) gene, which is equivalent to the A3243G mutation in humans, was used in the initial screening. Next, the most effective drugs that were able to rescue the respiratory deficiency in MELAS yeast mutants were tested in fibroblasts and cybrid models of MELAS disease. According to our results, supplementation with riboflavin or coenzyme Q(10) effectively reversed the respiratory defect in MELAS yeast and improved the pathologic alterations in MELAS fibroblast and cybrid cell models. Our results indicate that cell models have great potential for screening and validating the effects of novel drug candidates for MELAS treatment and presumably also for other diseases with mitochondrial impairment. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Molecular analysis of human argininosuccinate lyase: Mutant characterization and alternative splicing of the coding region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.C.; McCloskey, D.A.; Simard, L.R.; McInnes, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    Argininosuccinic acid lyase (ASAL) deficiency is a clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive urea cycle disorder. The authors previously established by complementation analysis that 29 ASAL-deficient patients have heterogeneous mutations in a single gene. To prove that the ASAL structural gene is the affected locus, they sequenced polymerase chain reaction-amplified ASAL cDNA of a representative mutant from the single complementation group. Fibroblast strain 944 from a late-onset patient who was the product of a consanguineous mating, had only a single base-pair change in the coding region, a C-283→ T transition at a CpG dinucleotide in exon 3. This substitution converts Arg-95 to Cys (R95C), occurs in a stretch of 13 residues that is identical in yeast and human ASAL, and was present in both of the patient's alleles but not in 14 other mutant or 10 normal alleles. They observed that amplified cDNA from mutant 944 and normal cells (liver, keratinocytes, lymphoblasts, and fibroblasts) contained, in addition to the expected 5' 513-base-pair band, a prominent 318-base-pair ASAL band formed by the splicing of exon 2 from the transcript. The short transcript maintains the ASAL reading frame but removes Lys-51, a residue that may be essential for catalysis, since it binds the argininosuccinate substrate. They conclude (i) that the identification of the R95C mutation in strain 944 demonstrates that virtually all ASAL deficiency results from defects in the ASAL structural gene and (ii) that minor alternative splicing of the coding region occurs at the ASAL locus

  17. Characterization of a Weak Allele of Zebrafish cloche Mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Huang, Zhibin; Chen, Xiaohui; He, Fei; Wang, Kun; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Linfeng; Xu, Xiangmin; Liao, Wangjun; Ruan, Hua; Luo, Shenqiu; Zhang, Wenqing

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is a complicated and dynamic process about which the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Danio rerio (zebrafish) is an excellent vertebrate system for studying hematopoiesis and developmental mechanisms. In the previous study, we isolated and identified a cloche 172 (clo 172) mutant, a novel allele compared to the original cloche (clo) mutant, through using complementation test and initial mapping. Here, according to whole mount in-situ hybridization, we report that the endothelial cells in clo 172 mutant embryos, although initially developed, failed to form the functional vascular system eventually. In addition, further characterization indicates that the clo 172 mutant exhibited weaker defects instead of completely lost in primitive erythroid cells and definitive hematopoietic cells compared with the clo s5 mutant. In contrast, primitive myeloid cells were totally lost in clo 172 mutant. Furthermore, these reappeared definitive myeloid cells were demonstrated to initiate from the remaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in clo 172 mutant, confirmed by the dramatic decrease of lyc in clo 172 runx1w84x double mutant. Collectively, the clo 172 mutant is a weak allele compared to the clo s5 mutant, therefore providing a model for studying the early development of hematopoietic and vascular system, as well as an opportunity to further understand the function of the cloche gene. PMID:22132109

  18. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cellular robustness conferred by genetic crosstalk underlies resistance against chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoey Tay

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin is an anthracycline antibiotic that is among one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agents in the clinical setting. The usage of doxorubicin is faced with many problems including severe side effects and chemoresistance. To overcome these challenges, it is important to gain an understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms with regards to the mode of action of doxorubicin. To facilitate this aim, we identified the genes that are required for doxorubicin resistance in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We further demonstrated interplay between factors controlling various aspects of chromosome metabolism, mitochondrial respiration and membrane transport. In the nucleus we observed that the subunits of the Ino80, RSC, and SAGA complexes function in the similar epistatic group that shares significant overlap with the homologous recombination genes. However, these factors generally act in synergistic manner with the chromosome segregation regulator DASH complex proteins, possibly forming two major arms for regulating doxorubicin resistance in the nucleus. Simultaneous disruption of genes function in membrane efflux transport or the mitochondrial respiratory chain integrity in the mutants defective in either Ino80 or HR function resulted in cumulative upregulation of drug-specific growth defects, suggesting a rewiring of pathways that synergize only when the cells is exposed to the cytotoxic stress. Taken together, our work not only identified factors that are required for survival of the cells in the presence of doxorubicin but has further demonstrated that an extensive molecular crosstalk exists between these factors to robustly confer doxorubicin resistance.

  20. Characterization of the ptr5{sup +} gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Nobuyoshi; Ikeda, Terumasa; Mizuki, Fumitaka [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Tani, Tokio, E-mail: ttani@sci.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We cloned the ptr5{sup +} gene involved in nuclear mRNA export in fission yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ptr5{sup +} gene was found to encode nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Seh1p and Mlo3p are multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5 mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr5p/Nup85p functions in nuclear mRNA export through the mRNA export factor Rae1p. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr5p/Nup85p interacts genetically with pre-mRNA splicing factors. -- Abstract: To analyze the mechanisms of mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, we have isolated eleven mutants, ptr [poly(A){sup +} RNA transport] 1 to 11, which accumulate poly(A){sup +} RNA in the nucleus at a nonpermissive temperature in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Of those, the ptr5-1 mutant shows dots- or a ring-like accumulation of poly(A){sup +} RNA at the nuclear periphery after shifting to the nonpermissive temperature. We cloned the ptr5{sup +} gene and found that it encodes a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), nucleoporin 85 (Nup85). The ptr5-1 mutant shows no defects in protein transport, suggesting the specific involvement of Ptr5p/Nup85p in nuclear mRNA export in S. pombe. We identified Seh1p, a nucleoporin interacting with Nup85p, an mRNA-binding protein Mlo3p, and Sac3p, a component of the TREX-2 complex involved in coupling of nuclear mRNA export with transcription, as multi-copy suppressors for the ptr5-1 mutation. In addition, we found that the ptr5-1 mutation is synthetically lethal with a mutation of the mRNA export factor Rae1p, and that the double mutant exaggerates defective nuclear mRNA export, suggesting that Ptr5p/Nup85p is involved in nuclear mRNA export through Rae1p. Interestingly, the ptr5-1 mutation also showed synthetic effects with several prp pre-mRNA splicing mutations, suggesting a functional linkage between the NPCs and the splicing apparatus in the yeast nucleus.

  1. Characterization of MMS-sensitive mutants of Neurospora crassa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLange, A.M.; Mishra, N.C.

    1982-01-01

    Several MMS-sensitive mutants of Neurospora crassa were compared with the wild-type strain for their relative sensitivities to UV, X-ray, and histidine. They were also compared for the frequency of spontaneous mutation at the loci which confer resistance to p-fluorophenylalanine. The mutants were also examined for possible defects in meiotic behavior in homozygous crosses and for any change in the inducible DNA salvage pathways. On the basis of these characterizations, the present MMS-sensitive mutants of Neurospora can be placed into three groups. On the basis of data presented, the MMS sensitivity of the first group mutants cannot be ascertained to arise from a defect in the DNA repair pathways; instead, it may stem from altered cell permeability or other pleotropic effects of the mus mutations. However, it can be suggested that the second and third group of mus mutants may indeed result from a defect in the DNA repair pathways controlled by the mus genes; this conclusion is based on their cross-sensitivity to a number of DNA-damaging agents such as MMS, UV and/or X-rays, high frequencies of spontaneous mutation and defects in meiotic behavior.

  2. Direct and indirect control of the initiation of meiotic recombination by DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Argunhan

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination plays an essential role in the proper segregation of chromosomes at meiosis I in many sexually reproducing organisms. Meiotic recombination is initiated by the scheduled formation of genome-wide DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. The timing of DSB formation is strictly controlled because unscheduled DSB formation is detrimental to genome integrity. Here, we investigated the role of DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms in the control of meiotic DSB formation using budding yeast. By using recombination defective mutants in which meiotic DSBs are not repaired, the effect of DNA damage checkpoint mutations on DSB formation was evaluated. The Tel1 (ATM pathway mainly responds to unresected DSB ends, thus the sae2 mutant background in which DSB ends remain intact was employed. On the other hand, the Mec1 (ATR pathway is primarily used when DSB ends are resected, thus the rad51 dmc1 double mutant background was employed in which highly resected DSBs accumulate. In order to separate the effect caused by unscheduled cell cycle progression, which is often associated with DNA damage checkpoint defects, we also employed the ndt80 mutation which permanently arrests the meiotic cell cycle at prophase I. In the absence of Tel1, DSB formation was reduced in larger chromosomes (IV, VII, II and XI whereas no significant reduction was found in smaller chromosomes (III and VI. On the other hand, the absence of Rad17 (a critical component of the ATR pathway lead to an increase in DSB formation (chromosomes VII and II were tested. We propose that, within prophase I, the Tel1 pathway facilitates DSB formation, especially in bigger chromosomes, while the Mec1 pathway negatively regulates DSB formation. We also identified prophase I exit, which is under the control of the DNA damage checkpoint machinery, to be a critical event associated with down-regulating meiotic DSB formation.

  3. An ortholog of farA of Aspergillus nidulans is implicated in the transcriptional activation of genes involved in fatty acid utilization in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poopanitpan, Napapol; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Fukuda, Ryouichi; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Akinori

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → POR1 is a Yarrowia lipolytica ortholog of farA involved in fatty acid response in A. nidulans. → Deletion of POR1 caused growth defects on fatty acids. → Δpor1 strain exhibited defects in the induction of genes involved in fatty acid utilization. -- Abstract: The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica effectively utilizes hydrophobic substrates such as fatty acids and n-alkanes. To identify a gene(s) regulating fatty acid utilization in Y. lipolytica, we first studied homologous genes to OAF1 and PIP2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but their disruption did not change growth on oleic acid at all. We next characterized a Y. lipolytica gene, POR1 (primary oleate regulator 1), an ortholog of farA encoding a transcriptional activator that regulates fatty acid utilization in Aspergillus nidulans. The deletion mutant of POR1 was defective in the growth on various fatty acids, but not on glucose, glycerol, or n-hexadecane. It exhibited slight defect on n-decane. The transcriptional induction of genes involved in β-oxidation and peroxisome proliferation by oleate was distinctly diminished in the Δpor1 strains. These data suggest that POR1 encodes a transcriptional activator widely regulating fatty acid metabolism in Y. lipolytica.

  4. Defects and defect processes in nonmetallic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, W

    2004-01-01

    This extensive survey covers defects in nonmetals, emphasizing point defects and point-defect processes. It encompasses electronic, vibrational, and optical properties of defective solids, plus dislocations and grain boundaries. 1985 edition.

  5. mlh3 mutations in baker's yeast alter meiotic recombination outcomes by increasing noncrossover events genome-wide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najla Al-Sweel

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mlh1-Mlh3 is an endonuclease hypothesized to act in meiosis to resolve double Holliday junctions into crossovers. It also plays a minor role in eukaryotic DNA mismatch repair (MMR. To understand how Mlh1-Mlh3 functions in both meiosis and MMR, we analyzed in baker's yeast 60 new mlh3 alleles. Five alleles specifically disrupted MMR, whereas one (mlh3-32 specifically disrupted meiotic crossing over. Mlh1-mlh3 representatives for each class were purified and characterized. Both Mlh1-mlh3-32 (MMR+, crossover- and Mlh1-mlh3-45 (MMR-, crossover+ displayed wild-type endonuclease activities in vitro. Msh2-Msh3, an MSH complex that acts with Mlh1-Mlh3 in MMR, stimulated the endonuclease activity of Mlh1-mlh3-32 but not Mlh1-mlh3-45, suggesting that Mlh1-mlh3-45 is defective in MSH interactions. Whole genome recombination maps were constructed for wild-type and MMR+ crossover-, MMR- crossover+, endonuclease defective and null mlh3 mutants in an S288c/YJM789 hybrid background. Compared to wild-type, all of the mlh3 mutants showed increases in the number of noncrossover events, consistent with recombination intermediates being resolved through alternative recombination pathways. Our observations provide a structure-function map for Mlh3 that reveals the importance of protein-protein interactions in regulating Mlh1-Mlh3's enzymatic activity. They also illustrate how defective meiotic components can alter the fate of meiotic recombination intermediates, providing new insights for how meiotic recombination pathways are regulated.

  6. The YJR127C/ZMS1 gene product is involved in glycerol-based respiratory growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lin; Roberts, George G; Oszust, Cynthia; Hudson, Alan P

    2005-10-01

    A putative yeast mitochondrial upstream activating sequence (UAS) was used in a one-hybrid screening procedure that identified the YJR127C ORF on chromosome X. This gene was previously designated ZMS1 and is listed as a transcription factor on the SGD website. Real time RT-PCR assays showed that expression of YJR127C/ZMS1 was glucose-repressible, and a deletion mutant for the gene showed a growth defect on glycerol-based but not on glucose- or ethanol-based medium. Real time RT-PCR analyses identified severely attenuated transcript levels from GUT1 and GUT2 to be the source of that growth defect, the products of GUT1 and GUT2 are required for glycerol utilization. mRNA levels from a large group of mitochondria- and respiration-related nuclear genes also were shown to be attenuated in the deletion mutant. Importantly, transcript levels from the mitochondrial OLI1 gene, which has an associated organellar UAS, were attenuated in the DeltaYJR127C mutant during glycerol-based growth, but those from COX3 (OXI2), which lacks an associated mitochondrial UAS, were not. Transcriptome analysis of the glycerol-grown deletion mutant showed that genes in several metabolic and other categories are affected by loss of this gene product, including protein transport, signal transduction, and others. Thus, the product of YJR127C/ZMS1 is involved in transcriptional control for genes in both cellular genetic compartments, many of which specify products required for glycerol-based growth, respiration, and other functions.

  7. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: cell wall mannoproteins are important for yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistance to dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovikova, Diana; Teparić, Renata; Mrša, Vladimir; Rapoport, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The state of anhydrobiosis is linked with the reversible delay of metabolism as a result of strong dehydration of cells, and is widely distributed in nature. A number of factors responsible for the maintenance of organisms' viability in these conditions have been revealed. This study was directed to understanding how changes in cell wall structure may influence the resistance of yeasts to dehydration-rehydration. Mutants lacking various cell wall mannoproteins were tested to address this issue. It was revealed that mutants lacking proteins belonging to two structurally and functionally unrelated groups (proteins non-covalently attached to the cell wall, and Pir proteins) possessed significantly lower cell resistance to dehydration-rehydration than the mother wild-type strain. At the same time, the absence of the GPI-anchored cell wall protein Ccw12 unexpectedly resulted in an increase of cell resistance to this treatment; this phenomenon is explained by the compensatory synthesis of chitin. The results clearly indicate that the cell wall structure/composition relates to parameters strongly influencing yeast viability during the processes of dehydration-rehydration, and that damage to cell wall proteins during yeast desiccation can be an important factor leading to cell death. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Human liver cell trafficking mutants: characterization and whole exome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yuan

    Full Text Available The HuH7 liver cell mutant Trf1 is defective in membrane trafficking and is complemented by the casein kinase 2α subunit CK2α''. Here we identify characteristic morphologies, trafficking and mutational changes in six additional HuH7 mutants Trf2-Trf7. Trf1 cells were previously shown to be severely defective in gap junction functions. Using a Lucifer yellow transfer assay, remarkable attenuation of gap junction communication was revealed in each of the mutants Trf2-Trf7. Electron microscopy and light microscopy of thiamine pyrophosphatase showed that several mutants exhibited fragmented Golgi apparatus cisternae compared to parental HuH7 cells. Intracellular trafficking was investigated using assays of transferrin endocytosis and recycling and VSV G secretion. Surface binding of transferrin was reduced in all six Trf2-Trf7 mutants, which generally correlated with the degree of reduced expression of the transferrin receptor at the cell surface. The mutants displayed the same transferrin influx rates as HuH7, and for efflux rate, only Trf6 differed, having a slower transferrin efflux rate than HuH7. The kinetics of VSV G transport along the exocytic pathway were altered in Trf2 and Trf5 mutants. Genetic changes unique to particular Trf mutants were identified by exome sequencing, and one was investigated in depth. The novel mutation Ile34Phe in the GTPase RAB22A was identified in Trf4. RNA interference knockdown of RAB22A or overexpression of RAB22AI34F in HuH7 cells caused phenotypic changes characteristic of the Trf4 mutant. In addition, the Ile34Phe mutation reduced both guanine nucleotide binding and hydrolysis activities of RAB22A. Thus, the RAB22A Ile34Phe mutation appears to contribute to the Trf4 mutant phenotype.

  9. Target of rapamycin complex 2 signals to downstream effector yeast protein kinase 2 (Ypk2) through adheres-voraciously-to-target-of-rapamycin-2 protein 1 (Avo1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hsien-Ching; Chen, Mei-Yu

    2012-02-24

    The conserved Ser/Thr kinase target of rapamycin (TOR) serves as a central regulator in controlling cell growth-related functions. There exist two distinct TOR complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, each coupling to specific downstream effectors and signaling pathways. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, TORC2 is involved in regulating actin organization and maintaining cell wall integrity. Ypk2 (yeast protein kinase 2), a member of the cAMP-dependent, cGMP-dependent, and PKC (AGC) kinase family, is a TORC2 substrate known to participate in actin and cell wall regulation. Employing avo3(ts) mutants with defects in TORC2 functions that are suppressible by active Ypk2, we investigated the molecular interactions involved in mediating TORC2 signaling to Ypk2. GST pulldown assays in yeast lysates demonstrated physical interactions between Ypk2 and components of TORC2. In vitro binding assays revealed that Avo1 directly binds to Ypk2. In avo3(ts) mutants, the TORC2-Ypk2 interaction was reduced and could be restored by AVO1 overexpression, highlighting the important role of Avo1 in coupling TORC2 to Ypk2. The interaction was mapped to an internal region (amino acids 600-840) of Avo1 and a C-terminal region of Ypk2. Ypk2(334-677), a truncated form of Ypk2 containing the Avo1-interacting region, was able to interfere with Avo1-Ypk2 interaction in vitro. Overexpressing Ypk2(334-677) in yeast cells resulted in a perturbation of TORC2 functions, causing defective cell wall integrity, aberrant actin organization, and diminished TORC2-dependent Ypk2 phosphorylation evidenced by the loss of an electrophoretic mobility shift. Together, our data support the conclusion that the direct Avo1-Ypk2 interaction is crucial for TORC2 signaling to the downstream Ypk2 pathway.

  10. Yeast genome sequencing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold

    2004-01-01

    For decades, unicellular yeasts have been general models to help understand the eukaryotic cell and also our own biology. Recently, over a dozen yeast genomes have been sequenced, providing the basis to resolve several complex biological questions. Analysis of the novel sequence data has shown...... of closely related species helps in gene annotation and to answer how many genes there really are within the genomes. Analysis of non-coding regions among closely related species has provided an example of how to determine novel gene regulatory sequences, which were previously difficult to analyse because...... they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide...

  11. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  12. A Western blot-based investigation of the yeast secretory pathway designed for an intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-Degrenier, Jennifer K

    2008-01-01

    The movement of newly synthesized proteins through the endomembrane system of eukaryotic cells, often referred to generally as the secretory pathway, is a topic covered in most intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology courses. An article previously published in this journal described a laboratory exercise in which yeast mutants defective in two distinct steps of protein secretion were differentiated using a genetic reporter designed specifically to identify defects in the first step of the pathway, the insertion of proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum (Vallen, 2002). We have developed two versions of a Western blotting assay that serves as a second way of distinguishing the two secretory mutants, which we pair with the genetic assay in a 3-wk laboratory module. A quiz administered before and after students participated in the lab activities revealed significant postlab gains in their understanding of the secretory pathway and experimental techniques used to study it. A second survey administered at the end of the lab module assessed student perceptions of the efficacy of the lab activities; the results of this survey indicated that the experiments were successful in meeting a set of educational goals defined by the instructor.

  13. Bacterio-opsin mutants of Halobacterium halobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betlach, Mary; Pfeifer, Felicitas; Friedman, James; Boyer, Herbert W.

    1983-01-01

    The bacterio-opsin (bop) gene of Halobacterium halobium R1 has been cloned with about 40 kilobases of flanking genomic sequence. The 40-kilobase segment is derived from the (G+C)-rich fraction of the chromosome and is not homologous to the major (pHH1) or minor endogenous covalently closed circular DNA species of H. halobium. A 5.1-kilobase Pst I fragment containing the bop gene was subcloned in pBR322 and a partial restriction map was determined. Defined restriction fragments of this clone were used as probes to analyze the defects associated with the bop gene in 12 bacterio-opsin mutants. Eleven out of 12 of the mutants examined had inserts ranging from 350 to 3,000 base pairs either in the bop gene or up to 1,400 base pairs upstream. The positions of the inserts were localized to four regions in the 5.1-kilobase genomic fragment: within the gene (one mutant), in a region that overlaps the 5′ end of the gene (seven mutants), and in two different upstream regions (three mutants). Two revertants of the mutant with the most distal insert had an additional insert in the same region. The polar effects of these inserts are discussed in terms of inactivation of a regulatory gene or disruption of part of a coordinately expressed operon. Given the defined nature of the bop mRNA—i.e., it has a 5′ leader sequence of three ribonucleotides—these observations indicate that the bop mRNA might be processed from a large mRNA transcript. Images PMID:16593291

  14. Productive mutants of niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    Seeds of six niger (Guizotia abyssinica Cass.) varieties ('GA-10', 'ONS-8', 'IGP-72', 'N-71', 'NB-9' and 'UN-4') were treated with 0.5, 0.75 and 1% ethyl methanesulphonate. After four generations of selection, 29 mutant lines were developed and those were evaluated from 1990-92 during Kharif (July to October) and Rabi (December to March) seasons. Average plant characteristics and yield data of four high yielding mutants along with 'IGP-76' (National Check), GA-10 (Zonal Check) and 'Semiliguda Local' (Local Check) are presented

  15. The study of mutability of RYS2 gene in diploid yeast Saccharomyces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, Yu.O.; Gordenin, D.A.; Soldatov, S.P.; Glazer, V.M.

    1985-01-01

    More than 3000 spontaneous X-ray and ultraviolet-radiation induced mutants have been obtained by LYSD gene in haploid and diploid yeast Saccharcomyces. Mutants were selected using Chattu et cet. method. Comparison of mutant frequency in haploidy and diploidy and analysis of pho 1 marker closely related with LYS2 gene allow to conclude that the main mechanism causing spontaneous and induced mutants in diploidy is mutation of LYS2 gene in one of homologues and the following mitotic homozygotization of originating mutation

  16. The Yeast Deletion Collection: A Decade of Functional Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2014-01-01

    The yeast deletion collections comprise >21,000 mutant strains that carry precise start-to-stop deletions of ∼6000 open reading frames. This collection includes heterozygous and homozygous diploids, and haploids of both MATa and MATα mating types. The yeast deletion collection, or yeast knockout (YKO) set, represents the first and only complete, systematically constructed deletion collection available for any organism. Conceived during the Saccharomyces cerevisiae sequencing project, work on the project began in 1998 and was completed in 2002. The YKO strains have been used in numerous laboratories in >1000 genome-wide screens. This landmark genome project has inspired development of numerous genome-wide technologies in organisms from yeast to man. Notable spinoff technologies include synthetic genetic array and HIPHOP chemogenomics. In this retrospective, we briefly describe the yeast deletion project and some of its most noteworthy biological contributions and the impact that these collections have had on the yeast research community and on genomics in general. PMID:24939991

  17. Improved inhibitor tolerance in xylose-fermenting yeast Spathaspora passalidarum by mutagenesis and protoplast fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaoru; Yao, Shuo

    2012-01-01

    The xylose-fermenting yeast Spathaspora passalidarum showed excellent fermentation performance utilizing glucose and xylose under anaerobic conditions. But this yeast is highly sensitive to the inhibitors such as furfural present in the pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. In order to improve...... from fusion of the protoplasts of S. passalidarum M7 and a robust yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 96581, were able to grow in 75% WSLQ and produce around 0.4 g ethanol/g consumed xylose. Among the selected hybrid strains, the hybrid FS22 showed the best fermentation capacity in 75% WSLQ...... the inhibitor tolerance of this yeast, a combination of UV mutagenesis and protoplast fusion was used to construct strains with improved performance. Firstly, UVinduced mutants were screened and selected for improved tolerance towards furfural. The most promised mutant, S. passalidarum M7, produced 50% more...

  18. The fission yeast minichromosome maintenance (MCM)-binding protein (MCM-BP), Mcb1, regulates MCM function during prereplicative complex formation in DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, Venny; Martha, Sabrina; Hirose, Noriaki; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2013-03-08

    The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex is a replicative helicase, which is essential for chromosome DNA replication. In recent years, the identification of a novel MCM-binding protein (MCM-BP) in most eukaryotes has led to numerous studies investigating its function and its relationship to the MCM complex. However, the mechanisms by which MCM-BP functions and associates with MCM complexes are not well understood; in addition, the functional role of MCM-BP remains controversial and may vary between model organisms. The present study aims to elucidate the nature and biological function of the MCM-BP ortholog, Mcb1, in fission yeast. The Mcb1 protein continuously interacts with MCM proteins during the cell cycle in vivo and can interact with any individual MCM subunit in vitro. To understand the detailed characteristics of mcb1(+), two temperature-sensitive mcb1 gene mutants (mcb1(ts)) were isolated. Extensive genetic analysis showed that the mcb1(ts) mutants were suppressed by a mcm5(+) multicopy plasmid and displayed synthetic defects with many S-phase-related gene mutants. Moreover, cyclin-dependent kinase modulation by Cig2 repression or Rum1 overproduction suppressed the mcb1(ts) mutants, suggesting the involvement of Mcb1 in pre-RC formation during DNA replication. These data are consistent with the observation that Mcm7 loading onto replication origins is reduced and S-phase progression is delayed in mcb1(ts) mutants. Furthermore, the mcb1(ts) mutation led to the redistribution of MCM subunits to the cytoplasm, and this redistribution was dependent on an active nuclear export system. These results strongly suggest that Mcb1 promotes efficient pre-RC formation during DNA replication by regulating the MCM complex.

  19. The Fission Yeast Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM)-binding Protein (MCM-BP), Mcb1, Regulates MCM Function during Prereplicative Complex Formation in DNA Replication*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, Venny; Martha, Sabrina; Hirose, Noriaki; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2013-01-01

    The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex is a replicative helicase, which is essential for chromosome DNA replication. In recent years, the identification of a novel MCM-binding protein (MCM-BP) in most eukaryotes has led to numerous studies investigating its function and its relationship to the MCM complex. However, the mechanisms by which MCM-BP functions and associates with MCM complexes are not well understood; in addition, the functional role of MCM-BP remains controversial and may vary between model organisms. The present study aims to elucidate the nature and biological function of the MCM-BP ortholog, Mcb1, in fission yeast. The Mcb1 protein continuously interacts with MCM proteins during the cell cycle in vivo and can interact with any individual MCM subunit in vitro. To understand the detailed characteristics of mcb1+, two temperature-sensitive mcb1 gene mutants (mcb1ts) were isolated. Extensive genetic analysis showed that the mcb1ts mutants were suppressed by a mcm5+ multicopy plasmid and displayed synthetic defects with many S-phase-related gene mutants. Moreover, cyclin-dependent kinase modulation by Cig2 repression or Rum1 overproduction suppressed the mcb1ts mutants, suggesting the involvement of Mcb1 in pre-RC formation during DNA replication. These data are consistent with the observation that Mcm7 loading onto replication origins is reduced and S-phase progression is delayed in mcb1ts mutants. Furthermore, the mcb1ts mutation led to the redistribution of MCM subunits to the cytoplasm, and this redistribution was dependent on an active nuclear export system. These results strongly suggest that Mcb1 promotes efficient pre-RC formation during DNA replication by regulating the MCM complex. PMID:23322785

  20. Bacterial Signaling Nucleotides Inhibit Yeast Cell Growth by Impacting Mitochondrial and Other Specifically Eukaryotic Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, Andy; Vergnano, Marta; Wan, Chris; Oliver, Stephen G

    2017-07-25

    We have engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inducibly synthesize the prokaryotic signaling nucleotides cyclic di-GMP (cdiGMP), cdiAMP, and ppGpp in order to characterize the range of effects these nucleotides exert on eukaryotic cell function during bacterial pathogenesis. Synthetic genetic array (SGA) and transcriptome analyses indicated that, while these compounds elicit some common reactions in yeast, there are also complex and distinctive responses to each of the three nucleotides. All three are capable of inhibiting eukaryotic cell growth, with the guanine nucleotides exhibiting stronger effects than cdiAMP. Mutations compromising mitochondrial function and chromatin remodeling show negative epistatic interactions with all three nucleotides. In contrast, certain mutations that cause defects in chromatin modification and ribosomal protein function show positive epistasis, alleviating growth inhibition by at least two of the three nucleotides. Uniquely, cdiGMP is lethal both to cells growing by respiration on acetate and to obligately fermentative petite mutants. cdiGMP is also synthetically lethal with the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor hydroxyurea. Heterologous expression of the human ppGpp hydrolase Mesh1p prevented the accumulation of ppGpp in the engineered yeast and restored cell growth. Extensive in vivo interactions between bacterial signaling molecules and eukaryotic gene function occur, resulting in outcomes ranging from growth inhibition to death. cdiGMP functions through a mechanism that must be compensated by unhindered RNR activity or by functionally competent mitochondria. Mesh1p may be required for abrogating the damaging effects of ppGpp in human cells subjected to bacterial infection. IMPORTANCE During infections, pathogenic bacteria can release nucleotides into the cells of their eukaryotic hosts. These nucleotides are recognized as signals that contribute to the initiation of defensive immune responses that help the infected

  1. Promotion of mitochondrial membrane complex assembly by a proteolytically inactive yeast Lon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rep, M; van Dijl, J M; Suda, K; Schatz, G; Grivell, L A; Suzuki, C K

    1996-01-01

    Afg3p and Rca1p are adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent metalloproteases in yeast mitochondria. Cells lacking both proteins exhibit defects in respiration-dependent growth, degradation of mitochondrially synthesized proteins, and assembly of inner-membrane complexes. Defects in growth and protein

  2. Csm4, in collaboration with Ndj1, mediates telomere-led chromosome dynamics and recombination during yeast meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J Wanat

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome movements are a general feature of mid-prophase of meiosis. In budding yeast, meiotic chromosomes exhibit dynamic movements, led by nuclear envelope (NE-associated telomeres, throughout the zygotene and pachytene stages. Zygotene motion underlies the global tendency for colocalization of NE-associated chromosome ends in a "bouquet." In this study, we identify Csm4 as a new molecular participant in these processes and show that, unlike the two previously identified components, Ndj1 and Mps3, Csm4 is not required for meiosis-specific telomere/NE association. Instead, it acts to couple telomere/NE ensembles to a force generation mechanism. Mutants lacking Csm4 and/or Ndj1 display the following closely related phenotypes: (i elevated crossover (CO frequencies and decreased CO interference without abrogation of normal pathways; (ii delayed progression of recombination, and recombination-coupled chromosome morphogenesis, with resulting delays in the MI division; and (iii nondisjunction of homologs at the MI division for some reason other than absence of (the obligatory CO(s. The recombination effects are discussed in the context of a model where the underlying defect is chromosome movement, the absence of which results in persistence of inappropriate chromosome relationships that, in turn, results in the observed mutant phenotypes.

  3. ER-associated SNAREs and Sey1p mediate nuclear fusion at two distinct steps during yeast mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jason V; Arlow, Tim; Inkellis, Elizabeth R; Koo, Timothy S; Rose, Mark D

    2013-12-01

    During yeast mating, two haploid nuclei fuse membranes to form a single diploid nucleus. However, the known proteins required for nuclear fusion are unlikely to function as direct fusogens (i.e., they are unlikely to directly catalyze lipid bilayer fusion) based on their predicted structure and localization. Therefore we screened known fusogens from vesicle trafficking (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors [SNAREs]) and homotypic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fusion (Sey1p) for additional roles in nuclear fusion. Here we demonstrate that the ER-localized SNAREs Sec20p, Ufe1p, Use1p, and Bos1p are required for efficient nuclear fusion. In contrast, Sey1p is required indirectly for nuclear fusion; sey1Δ zygotes accumulate ER at the zone of cell fusion, causing a block in nuclear congression. However, double mutants of Sey1p and Sec20p, Ufe1p, or Use1p, but not Bos1p, display extreme ER morphology defects, worse than either single mutant, suggesting that retrograde SNAREs fuse ER in the absence of Sey1p. Together these data demonstrate that SNAREs mediate nuclear fusion, ER fusion after cell fusion is necessary to complete nuclear congression, and there exists a SNARE-mediated, Sey1p-independent ER fusion pathway.

  4. Implication of Ca2+ in the Regulation of Replicative Life Span of Budding Yeast*

    OpenAIRE

    Tsubakiyama, Ryohei; Mizunuma, Masaki; Gengyo, Anri; Yamamoto, Josuke; Kume, Kazunori; Miyakawa, Tokichi; Hirata, Dai

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca2+-triggered signaling pathways are used to regulate a wide variety of cellular processes. Calcineurin, a highly conserved Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, plays key roles in the regulation of diverse biological processes in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. We isolated a mutant of the SIR3 gene, implicated in the regulation of life span, as a suppressor of the Ca2+ sensitivity of zds1Δ cells in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, ...

  5. Homocysteine regulates fatty acid and lipid metabolism in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visram, Myriam; Radulovic, Maja; Steiner, Sabine; Malanovic, Nermina; Eichmann, Thomas O; Wolinski, Heimo; Rechberger, Gerald N; Tehlivets, Oksana

    2018-04-13

    S -Adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase (AdoHcy hydrolase; Sah1 in yeast/AHCY in mammals) degrades AdoHcy, a by-product and strong product inhibitor of S -adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet)-dependent methylation reactions, to adenosine and homocysteine (Hcy). This reaction is reversible, so any elevation of Hcy levels, such as in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), drives the formation of AdoHcy, with detrimental consequences for cellular methylation reactions. HHcy, a pathological condition linked to cardiovascular and neurological disorders, as well as fatty liver among others, is associated with a deregulation of lipid metabolism. Here, we developed a yeast model of HHcy to identify mechanisms that dysregulate lipid metabolism. Hcy supplementation to wildtype cells up-regulated cellular fatty acid and triacylglycerol content and induced a shift in fatty acid composition, similar to changes observed in mutants lacking Sah1. Expression of the irreversible bacterial pathway for AdoHcy degradation in yeast allowed us to dissect the impact of AdoHcy accumulation on lipid metabolism from the impact of elevated Hcy. Expression of this pathway fully suppressed the growth deficit of sah1 mutants as well as the deregulation of lipid metabolism in both the sah1 mutant and Hcy-exposed wildtype, showing that AdoHcy accumulation mediates the deregulation of lipid metabolism in response to elevated Hcy in yeast. Furthermore, Hcy supplementation in yeast led to increased resistance to cerulenin, an inhibitor of fatty acid synthase, as well as to a concomitant decline of condensing enzymes involved in very long-chain fatty acid synthesis, in line with the observed shift in fatty acid content and composition. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Chemical Excitation and Inactivation in Photoreceptors of the Fly Mutants trp and nss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suss, E.; Barash, S.; Stavenga, D.G.; Stieve, H.; Selinger, Z.; Minke, B.

    1989-01-01

    The Drosophila and Lucilia photoreceptor mutants, trp and nss, respond like wild-type flies to a short pulse of intense light or prolonged dim light; however, upon continuous intense illumination, the trp and nss mutants are unable to maintain persistent excitation. This defect manifests itself by a

  7. Yeast screens identify the RNA polymerase II CTD and SPT5 as relevant targets of BRCA1 interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig B Bennett

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1 has been implicated in numerous DNA repair pathways that maintain genome integrity, however the function responsible for its tumor suppressor activity in breast cancer remains obscure. To identify the most highly conserved of the many BRCA1 functions, we screened the evolutionarily distant eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae for mutants that suppressed the G1 checkpoint arrest and lethality induced following heterologous BRCA1 expression. A genome-wide screen in the diploid deletion collection combined with a screen of ionizing radiation sensitive gene deletions identified mutants that permit growth in the presence of BRCA1. These genes delineate a metabolic mRNA pathway that temporally links transcription elongation (SPT4, SPT5, CTK1, DEF1 to nucleopore-mediated mRNA export (ASM4, MLP1, MLP2, NUP2, NUP53, NUP120, NUP133, NUP170, NUP188, POM34 and cytoplasmic mRNA decay at P-bodies (CCR4, DHH1. Strikingly, BRCA1 interacted with the phosphorylated RNA polymerase II (RNAPII carboxy terminal domain (P-CTD, phosphorylated in the pattern specified by the CTDK-I kinase, to induce DEF1-dependent cleavage and accumulation of a RNAPII fragment containing the P-CTD. Significantly, breast cancer associated BRCT domain defects in BRCA1 that suppressed P-CTD cleavage and lethality in yeast also suppressed the physical interaction of BRCA1 with human SPT5 in breast epithelial cells, thus confirming SPT5 as a relevant target of BRCA1 interaction. Furthermore, enhanced P-CTD cleavage was observed in both yeast and human breast cells following UV-irradiation indicating a conserved eukaryotic damage response. Moreover, P-CTD cleavage in breast epithelial cells was BRCA1-dependent since damage-induced P-CTD cleavage was only observed in the mutant BRCA1 cell line HCC1937 following ectopic expression of wild type BRCA1. Finally, BRCA1, SPT5 and hyperphosphorylated RPB1 form a complex that was rapidly degraded following MMS treatment in wild type but not BRCA1

  8. A compromised yeast RNA polymerase II enhances UV sensitivity in the absence of global genome nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J M; Ingles, C J

    2001-02-01

    Nucleotide excision repair is the major pathway responsible for removing UV-induced DNA damage, and is therefore essential for cell survival following exposure to UV radiation. In this report, we have assessed the contributions of some components of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription machinery to UV resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletion of the gene encoding the Pol II elongation factor TFIIS (SII) resulted in enhanced UV sensitivity, but only in the absence of global genome repair dependent on the RAD7 and RAD16 genes, a result seen previously with deletions of RAD26 and RAD28, yeast homologs of the human Cockayne syndrome genes CSB and CSA, respectively. A RAD7/16-dependent reduction in survival after UV irradiation was also seen in the presence of mutations in RNA Pol II that confer a defect in its response to SII, as well as with other mutations which reside in regions of the largest subunit of Pol II not involved in SII interactions. Indeed, an increase in UV sensitivity was achieved by simply decreasing the steadystate level of RNA Pol II. Truncation of the C-terminal domain and other RNA Pol II mutations conferred sensitivity to the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor hydroxyurea and induction of RNR1 and RNR2 mRNAs after UV irradiation was attenuated in these mutant cells. That UV sensitivity can be a consequence of mutations in the RNA Pol II machinery in yeast cells suggests that alterations in transcriptional programs could underlie some of the pathophysiological defects seen in the human disease Cockayne syndrome.

  9. Genetic control of yeast cell radiosensitivity modification by oxygen and hypoxic sensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuranovskaya, G.P.; Petin, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    Diploid yeast cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae ''of the wild type'', individual mutants, homozygous in rad 2 and rad 54 and double mutants, containing both these loci in homozygous state are considered to prove genetic determination of radiosensitivity modification of hypoxic cells by oxygen and electron acceptor compounds previously demonstrated on yeast cells of other genotypes. It is shown that both ''oxygen effect'' and the effect of hypoxic sensitizers depend on the activity of repair systems. The possible mechanism of participation of post-radiation restoration processes in the modification of cell radiosensitivity, is discussed

  10. Functional heterologous protein expression by genetically engineered probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E Hudson

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested the potential of probiotic organisms to be adapted for the synthesis and delivery of oral therapeutics. The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii would be especially well suited for this purpose due to its ability, in contrast to probiotic prokaryotes, to perform eukaryotic post translational modifications. This probiotic yeast thus has the potential to express a broad array of therapeutic proteins. Currently, however, use of wild type (WT S. boulardii relies on antibiotic resistance for the selection of transformed yeast. Here we report the creation of auxotrophic mutant strains of S. boulardii that can be selected without antibiotics and demonstrate that these yeast can express functional recombinant protein even when recovered from gastrointestinal immune tissues in mice. A UV mutagenesis approach was employed to generate three uracil auxotrophic S. boulardii mutants that show a low rate of reversion to wild type growth. These mutants can express recombinant protein and are resistant in vitro to low pH, bile acid salts, and anaerobic conditions. Critically, oral gavage experiments using C57BL/6 mice demonstrate that mutant S. boulardii survive and are taken up into gastrointestinal immune tissues on a similar level as WT S. boulardii. Mutant yeast recovered from gastrointestinal immune tissues furthermore retain expression of functional recombinant protein. These data show that auxotrophic mutant S. boulardii can safely express recombinant protein without antibiotic selection and can deliver recombinant protein to gastrointestinal immune tissues. These auxotrophic mutants of S. boulardii pave the way for future experiments to test the ability of S. boulardii to deliver therapeutics and mediate protection against gastrointestinal disorders.

  11. Functional heterologous protein expression by genetically engineered probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Lauren E; Fasken, Milo B; McDermott, Courtney D; McBride, Shonna M; Kuiper, Emily G; Guiliano, David B; Corbett, Anita H; Lamb, Tracey J

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested the potential of probiotic organisms to be adapted for the synthesis and delivery of oral therapeutics. The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii would be especially well suited for this purpose due to its ability, in contrast to probiotic prokaryotes, to perform eukaryotic post translational modifications. This probiotic yeast thus has the potential to express a broad array of therapeutic proteins. Currently, however, use of wild type (WT) S. boulardii relies on antibiotic resistance for the selection of transformed yeast. Here we report the creation of auxotrophic mutant strains of S. boulardii that can be selected without antibiotics and demonstrate that these yeast can express functional recombinant protein even when recovered from gastrointestinal immune tissues in mice. A UV mutagenesis approach was employed to generate three uracil auxotrophic S. boulardii mutants that show a low rate of reversion to wild type growth. These mutants can express recombinant protein and are resistant in vitro to low pH, bile acid salts, and anaerobic conditions. Critically, oral gavage experiments using C57BL/6 mice demonstrate that mutant S. boulardii survive and are taken up into gastrointestinal immune tissues on a similar level as WT S. boulardii. Mutant yeast recovered from gastrointestinal immune tissues furthermore retain expression of functional recombinant protein. These data show that auxotrophic mutant S. boulardii can safely express recombinant protein without antibiotic selection and can deliver recombinant protein to gastrointestinal immune tissues. These auxotrophic mutants of S. boulardii pave the way for future experiments to test the ability of S. boulardii to deliver therapeutics and mediate protection against gastrointestinal disorders.

  12. Embedded defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriola, M.; Vachaspati, T.; Bucher, M.

    1994-01-01

    We give a prescription for embedding classical solutions and, in particular, topological defects in field theories which are invariant under symmetry groups that are not necessarily simple. After providing examples of embedded defects in field theories based on simple groups, we consider the electroweak model and show that it contains the Z string and a one-parameter family of strings called the W(α) string. It is argued that although the members of this family are gauge equivalent when considered in isolation, each member becomes physically distinct when multistring configurations are considered. We then turn to the issue of stability of embedded defects and demonstrate the instability of a large class of such solutions in the absence of bound states or condensates. The Z string is shown to be unstable for all values of the Higgs boson mass when θ W =π/4. W strings are also shown to be unstable for a large range of parameters. Embedded monopoles suffer from the Brandt-Neri-Coleman instability. Finally, we connect the electroweak string solutions to the sphaleron

  13. Yeast DNA-repair gene RAD14 encodes a zinc metalloprotein with affinity for ultraviolet-damaged DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzder, S.N.; Sung, P.; Prakash, S.; Prakash, L.

    1993-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers due to a defect in excision repair of UV light-damaged DNA. Of the seven XP complementation groups, A--G, group A represents a severe and frequent form of the disease. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD14 gene is a homolog of the XP-A correcting (XPAC) gene. Like XP-A cells, rad14-null mutants are defective in the incision step of excision repair of UV-damaged DNA. The authors have purified RAD14 protein to homogeneity from extract of a yeast strain genetically tailored to overexpress RAD14. As determined by atomic emission spectroscopy, RAD14 contains one zinc atom. They also show in vitro that RAD14 binds zinc but does not bind other divalent metal ions. In DNA mobility-shift assays, RAD14 binds specifically to UV-damaged DNA. Removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from damaged DNA by enzymatic photoreactivation has no effect on binding, strongly suggesting that RAD14 recognizes pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproduct sites. These findings indicate that RAD14 functions in damage recognition during excision repair. 37 refs., 4 figs

  14. Genetics of Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querol, Amparo; Fernández-Espinar, M. Teresa; Belloch, Carmela

    The use of yeasts in biotechnology processes dates back to ancient days. Before 7000 BC, beer was produced in Sumeria. Wine was made in Assyria in 3500 BC, and ancient Rome had over 250 bakeries, which were making leavened bread by 100 BC. And milk has been made into Kefyr and Koumiss in Asia for many centuries (Demain, Phaff, & Kurtzman, 1999). However, the importance of yeast in the food and beverage industries was only realized about 1860, when their role in food manufacturing became evident.

  15. Investigating the effects of statins on cellular lipid metabolism using a yeast expression system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Leszczynska

    Full Text Available In humans, defects in lipid metabolism are associated with a number of severe diseases such as atherosclerosis, obesity and type II diabetes. Hypercholesterolemia is a primary risk factor for coronary artery disease, the major cause of premature deaths in developed countries. Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR, the key enzyme of the sterol synthesis pathway. Since yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae harbours many counterparts of mammalian enzymes involved in lipid-synthesizing pathways, conclusions drawn from research with this single cell eukaryotic organism can be readily applied to higher eukaryotes. Using a yeast strain with deletions of both HMG1 and HMG2 genes (i.e. completely devoid of HMGR activity with introduced wild-type or mutant form of human HMGR (hHMGR gene we investigated the effects of statins on the lipid metabolism of the cell. The relative quantification of mRNA demonstrated a different effect of simvastatin on the expression of the wild-type and mutated hHMGR gene. GC/MS analyses showed a significant decrease of sterols and enhanced conversion of squalene and sterol precursors into ergosterol. This was accompanied by the mobilization of ergosterol precursors localized in lipid particles in the form of steryl esters visualized by confocal microscopy. Changes in the level of ergosterol and its precursors in cells treated with simvastatin depend on the mutation in the hHMGR gene. HPLC/MS analyses indicated a reduced level of phospholipids not connected with the mevalonic acid pathway. We detected two significant phenomena. First, cells treated with simvastatin develop an adaptive response compensating the lower activity of HMGR. This includes enhanced conversion of sterol precursors into ergosterol, mobilization of steryl esters and increased expression of the hHMGR gene. Second, statins cause a substantial drop in the level of glycerophospholipids.

  16. Bacterial Signaling Nucleotides Inhibit Yeast Cell Growth by Impacting Mitochondrial and Other Specifically Eukaryotic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Hesketh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inducibly synthesize the prokaryotic signaling nucleotides cyclic di-GMP (cdiGMP, cdiAMP, and ppGpp in order to characterize the range of effects these nucleotides exert on eukaryotic cell function during bacterial pathogenesis. Synthetic genetic array (SGA and transcriptome analyses indicated that, while these compounds elicit some common reactions in yeast, there are also complex and distinctive responses to each of the three nucleotides. All three are capable of inhibiting eukaryotic cell growth, with the guanine nucleotides exhibiting stronger effects than cdiAMP. Mutations compromising mitochondrial function and chromatin remodeling show negative epistatic interactions with all three nucleotides. In contrast, certain mutations that cause defects in chromatin modification and ribosomal protein function show positive epistasis, alleviating growth inhibition by at least two of the three nucleotides. Uniquely, cdiGMP is lethal both to cells growing by respiration on acetate and to obligately fermentative petite mutants. cdiGMP is also synthetically lethal with the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR inhibitor hydroxyurea. Heterologous expression of the human ppGpp hydrolase Mesh1p prevented the accumulation of ppGpp in the engineered yeast and restored cell growth. Extensive in vivo interactions between bacterial signaling molecules and eukaryotic gene function occur, resulting in outcomes ranging from growth inhibition to death. cdiGMP functions through a mechanism that must be compensated by unhindered RNR activity or by functionally competent mitochondria. Mesh1p may be required for abrogating the damaging effects of ppGpp in human cells subjected to bacterial infection.

  17. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric; Suominen, Pirkko

    2010-12-07

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains. ##STR00001##

  18. Defects of the Glycinergic Synapse in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Kazutoyo; Hirata, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Glycine mediates fast inhibitory synaptic transmission. Physiological importance of the glycinergic synapse is well established in the brainstem and the spinal cord. In humans, the loss of glycinergic function in the spinal cord and brainstem leads to hyperekplexia, which is characterized by an excess startle reflex to sudden acoustic or tactile stimulation. In addition, glycinergic synapses in this region are also involved in the regulation of respiration and locomotion, and in the nociceptive processing. The importance of the glycinergic synapse is conserved across vertebrate species. A teleost fish, the zebrafish, offers several advantages as a vertebrate model for research of glycinergic synapse. Mutagenesis screens in zebrafish have isolated two motor defective mutants that have pathogenic mutations in glycinergic synaptic transmission: bandoneon (beo) and shocked (sho). Beo mutants have a loss-of-function mutation of glycine receptor (GlyR) β-subunit b, alternatively, sho mutant is a glycinergic transporter 1 (GlyT1) defective mutant. These mutants are useful animal models for understanding of glycinergic synaptic transmission and for identification of novel therapeutic agents for human diseases arising from defect in glycinergic transmission, such as hyperekplexia or glycine encephalopathy. Recent advances in techniques for genome editing and for imaging and manipulating of a molecule or a physiological process make zebrafish more attractive model. In this review, we describe the glycinergic defective zebrafish mutants and the technical advances in both forward and reverse genetic approaches as well as in vivo visualization and manipulation approaches for the study of the glycinergic synapse in zebrafish. PMID:27445686

  19. New mutations affecting induced mutagenesis in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, C W; Krauss, B R; Christensen, R B

    1985-01-01

    Previously isolated mutations in baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that impair induced mutagenesis were all identified with the aid of tests that either exclusively or predominantly detect base-pair substitutions. To avoid this bias, we have screened 11 366 potentially mutant clones for UV-induced reversion of the frameshift allele, his4-38, and have identified 10 mutants that give much reduced yields of revertants. Complementation and recombination tests show that 6 of these carry mutations at the previously known REV1, REV1 and REV3 loci, while the remaining 4 define 3 new genes, REV4 (2 mutations), REV5 and REV6. The rev4 mutations are readily suppressed in many genetic backgrounds and, like the rev5 mutation, impart only a limited deficiency for induced mutagenesis: it is likely, therefore that the REV4+ and REV5+ gene functions are only remotely concerned with this process. The rev6 mutants have a more general deficiency, however, as well as marked sensitivity to UV and an increased spontaneous mutation rate, properties that suggest the REV6 gene is directly involved in mutation induction. The REV5 gene is located about 1 cM proximal to CYC1 on chromosome X.

  20. Connexin mutants and cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Beyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The lens is a multicellular, but avascular tissue that must stay transparent to allow normal transmission of light and focusing of it on the retina. Damage to lens cells and/or proteins can cause cataracts, opacities that disrupt these processes. The normal survival of the lens is facilitated by an extensive network of gap junctions formed predominantly of connexin46 and connexin50. Mutations of the genes that encode these connexins (GJA3 and GJA8 have been identified and linked to inheritance of cataracts in human families and mouse lines. In vitro expression studies of several of these mutants have shown that they exhibit abnormalities that may lead to disease. Many of the mutants reduce or modify intercellular communication due to channel alterations (including loss of function or altered gating or due to impaired cellular trafficking which reduces the number of gap junction channels within the plasma membrane. However, the abnormalities detected in studies of other mutants suggest that they cause cataracts through other mechanisms including gain of hemichannel function (leading to cell injury and death and formation of cytoplasmic accumulations (that may act as light scattering particles. These observations and the anticipated results of ongoing studies should elucidate the mechanisms of cataract development due to mutations of lens connexins and abnormalities of other lens proteins. They may also contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of disease due to connexin mutations in other tissues.

  1. Yeast redoxyendonuclease, a DNA repair enzyme similar to Escherichia coli endonuclease III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossett, J.; Lee, K.; Cunningham, R.P.; Doetsch, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    A DNA repair endonuclease (redoxyendonuclease) was isolated from bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The enzyme has been purified by a series of column chromatography steps and cleaves OsO 4 -damaged, double-stranded DNA at sites of thymine glycol and heavily UV-irradiated DNA at sites of cytosine, thymine, and guanine photoproducts. The base specificity and mechanism of phosphodiester bond cleavage for the yeast redoxyendonuclease appear to be identical with those of Escherichia coli endonuclease III when thymine glycol containing, end-labeled DNA fragments of defined sequence are employed as substrates. Yeast redoxyendonuclease has an apparent molecular size of 38,000-42,000 daltons and is active in the absence of divalent metal cations. The identification of such an enzyme in yeast may be of value in the elucidation of the biochemical basis for radiation sensitivity in certain yeast mutants

  2. Optimization of culture medium for heavy-ion irradiation bread yeast design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Liang; Wang Jufang; Lu Dong; Li Wenjian; Xiao Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    A mutant bread yeast strain with high protein content of 55% was gained by use of "1"2C"6"+ ions. The MINITAB 16.0 software, Plackett-Burman experimental design and response surface methodology were applied to optimize the culture medium for the irradiated yeast. The most important three factors which influenced the culture results were identified as glucose, magnesium sulphate and yeast extract. The path of the steepest ascent was undertaken to approach the optimal region of the three significant factors. Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology were used for the regression analysis. Finally, the optimal fermentation conditions were identified as glucose 11.03 g/L, yeast extract 6.53 g/L and magnesium sulphate 5.59 g/L by the regression analysis. It was found that the biomass of the bread yeasts reached 4.84 g/L and increased by 15% compared to original conditions. (authors)

  3. Production of mutants of Candida utilis with increased resistence against furfural

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehlik, G.; Baron, M.; Turanitz, K.; Schneider, F.

    1978-01-01

    By repeated γ-irradiation treatments and following selections a mutant of Candida utilis weissenbachii was isolated showing increased resistance against furfural as compared to its wild type. Growing and radiation survival behavior of these yeasts are compared. Analysis of furfural was done by gaschromatography on Porapak Q. (author)

  4. Phenotypic characterization of glucose repression mutants of Saccharomyce cerevisiae usinge experiments with C-13-labelled glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayendran, Raghevendran; Gombert, A.K.; Christensen, B.

    2004-01-01

    techniques, which do not provide information about the integrated response a specific genetic modification has on the cellular function. In this study we have performed phenotypic characterization of several mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae through the use of experiments with C-13-labelled...

  5. Yeast Infection during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disrupt the pH balance of the vagina. Common yeast infection symptoms include vaginal itching and a white, thick discharge that looks ... and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/candidiasis.htm. Accessed Aug. 27, ... Vagina, Cervix, Toxic Shock Syndrome, Endometritis, and Salpingitis. In: ...

  6. Polysome Profile Analysis - Yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšek, M.; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 530, č. 2013 (2013), s. 173-181 ISSN 0076-6879 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : grow yeast cultures * polysome profile analysis * sucrose density gradient centrifugation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.194, year: 2013

  7. Evidence that yeast SGS1, DNA2, SRS2, and FOB1 interact to maintain rDNA stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Weitao; Budd, Martin; Campbell, Judith L.

    2003-01-01

    We and others have proposed that faulty processing of arrested replication forks leads to increases in recombination and chromosome instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Now we use the ribosomal DNA locus, which is a good model for all stages of DNA replication, to test this hypothesis. We showed previously that DNA replication pausing at the ribosomal DNA replication fork barrier (RFB) is accompanied by the occurrence of double-strand breaks near the RFB. Both pausing and breakage are elevated in the hypomorphic dna2-2 helicase mutant. Deletion of FOB1 suppresses the elevated pausing and DSB formation. Our current work shows that mutation inactivating Sgs1, the yeast RecQ helicase ortholog, also causes accumulation of stalled replication forks and DSBs at the rDNA RFB. Either deletion of FOB1, which suppresses fork blocking and certain types of rDNA recombination, or an increase in SIR2 gene dosage, which suppresses rDNA recombination, reduces the number of forks persisting at the RFB. Although dna2-2 sgs1Δ double mutants are conditionally lethal, they do not show enhanced rDNA defects compared to sgs1Δ alone. However, surprisingly, the dna2-2 sgs1Δ lethality is suppressed by deletion of FOB1. On the other hand, the dna2-2 sgs1Δ lethality is only partially suppressed by deletion of rad51Δ. We propose that the replication-associated defects that we document in the rDNA are characteristic of similar events occurring either stochastically throughout the genome or at other regions where replication forks move slowly or stall, such as telomeres, centromeres, or replication slow zones

  8. Evidence that yeast SGS1, DNA2, SRS2, and FOB1 interact to maintain rDNA stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Weitao; Budd, Martin; Campbell, Judith L

    2003-11-27

    We and others have proposed that faulty processing of arrested replication forks leads to increases in recombination and chromosome instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Now we use the ribosomal DNA locus, which is a good model for all stages of DNA replication, to test this hypothesis. We showed previously that DNA replication pausing at the ribosomal DNA replication fork barrier (RFB) is accompanied by the occurrence of double-strand breaks near the RFB. Both pausing and breakage are elevated in the hypomorphic dna2-2 helicase mutant. Deletion of FOB1 suppresses the elevated pausing and DSB formation. Our current work shows that mutation inactivating Sgs1, the yeast RecQ helicase ortholog, also causes accumulation of stalled replication forks and DSBs at the rDNA RFB. Either deletion of FOB1, which suppresses fork blocking and certain types of rDNA recombination, or an increase in SIR2 gene dosage, which suppresses rDNA recombination, reduces the number of forks persisting at the RFB. Although dna2-2 sgs1{delta} double mutants are conditionally lethal, they do not show enhanced rDNA defects compared to sgs1{delta} alone. However, surprisingly, the dna2-2 sgs1{delta} lethality is suppressed by deletion of FOB1. On the other hand, the dna2-2 sgs1{delta} lethality is only partially suppressed by deletion of rad51{delta}. We propose that the replication-associated defects that we document in the rDNA are characteristic of similar events occurring either stochastically throughout the genome or at other regions where replication forks move slowly or stall, such as telomeres, centromeres, or replication slow zones.

  9. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2013-02-12

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  10. Tolerance of yeast biofilm cells towards systemic antifungals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth

    was the only tested drug with activity against both growth arrested biofilm and planktonic cells but was found to only kill ~95 % of the cells. By using a collection of barcode tagged deletion mutants, we were identified that defects in protein synthesis, intracellular transport, cell cycle and lipid...

  11. Yeast ecology of Kombucha fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Ai Leng; Heard, Gillian; Cox, Julian

    2004-09-01

    Kombucha is a traditional fermentation of sweetened tea, involving a symbiosis of yeast species and acetic acid bacteria. Despite reports of different yeast species being associated with the fermentation, little is known of the quantitative ecology of yeasts in Kombucha. Using oxytetracycline-supplemented malt extract agar, yeasts were isolated from four commercially available Kombucha products and identified using conventional biochemical and physiological tests. During the fermentation of each of the four products, yeasts were enumerated from both the cellulosic pellicle and liquor of the Kombucha. The number and diversity of species varied between products, but included Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Candida stellata, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. While these yeast species are known to occur in Kombucha, the enumeration of each species present throughout fermentation of each of the four Kombucha cultures demonstrated for the first time the dynamic nature of the yeast ecology. Kombucha fermentation is, in general, initiated by osmotolerant species, succeeded and ultimately dominated by acid-tolerant species.

  12. Normal aging modulates the neurotoxicity of mutant huntingtin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Diguet

    Full Text Available Aging likely plays a role in neurodegenerative disorders. In Huntington's disease (HD, a disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of a polyglutamine tract in the protein huntingtin (Htt, the role of aging is unclear. For a given tract length, the probability of disease onset increases with age. There are mainly two hypotheses that could explain adult onset in HD: Either mutant Htt progressively produces cumulative defects over time or "normal" aging renders neurons more vulnerable to mutant Htt toxicity. In the present study, we directly explored whether aging affected the toxicity of mutant Htt in vivo. We studied the impact of aging on the effects produced by overexpression of an N-terminal fragment of mutant Htt, of wild-type Htt or of a beta-Galactosidase (beta-Gal reporter gene in the rat striatum. Stereotaxic injections of lentiviral vectors were performed simultaneously in young (3 week and old (15 month rats. Histological evaluation at different time points after infection demonstrated that the expression of mutant Htt led to pathological changes that were more severe in old rats, including an increase in the number of small Htt-containing aggregates in the neuropil, a greater loss of DARPP-32 immunoreactivity and striatal neurons as assessed by unbiased stereological counts.The present results support the hypothesis that "normal" aging is involved in HD pathogenesis, and suggest that age-related cellular defects might constitute potential therapeutic targets for HD.

  13. A nuclear mutation defective in mitochondrial recombination in yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, F; Makishima, F; Morishima, N; Shibata, T

    1995-01-01

    Homologous recombination (crossing over and gene conversion) is generally essential for heritage and DNA repair, and occasionally causes DNA aberrations, in nuclei of eukaryotes. However, little is known about the roles of homologous recombination in the inheritance and stability of mitochondrial DNA which is continuously damaged by reactive oxygen species, by-products of respiration. Here, we report the first example of a nuclear recessive mutation which suggests an essential role for homolo...

  14. Chemical genomic guided engineering of gamma-valerolactone tolerant yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoms, Scott; Dickinson, Quinn; McGee, Mick; Hinchman, Li; Higbee, Alan; Hebert, Alex; Serate, Jose; Xie, Dan; Zhang, Yaoping; Coon, Joshua J; Myers, Chad L; Landick, Robert; Piotrowski, Jeff S

    2018-01-12

    Gamma valerolactone (GVL) treatment of lignocellulosic bomass is a promising technology for degradation of biomass for biofuel production; however, GVL is toxic to fermentative microbes. Using a combination of chemical genomics with the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) deletion collection to identify sensitive and resistant mutants, and chemical proteomics to monitor protein abundance in the presence of GVL, we sought to understand the mechanism toxicity and resistance to GVL with the goal of engineering a GVL-tolerant, xylose-fermenting yeast. Chemical genomic profiling of GVL predicted that this chemical affects membranes and membrane-bound processes. We show that GVL causes rapid, dose-dependent cell permeability, and is synergistic with ethanol. Chemical genomic profiling of GVL revealed that deletion of the functionally related enzymes Pad1p and Fdc1p, which act together to decarboxylate cinnamic acid and its derivatives to vinyl forms, increases yeast tolerance to GVL. Further, overexpression of Pad1p sensitizes cells to GVL toxicity. To improve GVL tolerance, we deleted PAD1 and FDC1 in a xylose-fermenting yeast strain. The modified strain exhibited increased anaerobic growth, sugar utilization, and ethanol production in synthetic hydrolysate with 1.5% GVL, and under other conditions. Chemical proteomic profiling of the engineered strain revealed that enzymes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis were more abundant in the presence of GVL compared to the background strain. The engineered GVL strain contained greater amounts of ergosterol than the background strain. We found that GVL exerts toxicity to yeast by compromising cellular membranes, and that this toxicity is synergistic with ethanol. Deletion of PAD1 and FDC1 conferred GVL resistance to a xylose-fermenting yeast strain by increasing ergosterol accumulation in aerobically grown cells. The GVL-tolerant strain fermented sugars in the presence of GVL levels that were inhibitory to the unmodified strain

  15. Mechanisms of uv mutagenesis in yeast and E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, C.; Christensen, R.; Christensen, J.R.; O'Brien, T.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments investigating ultraviolet light mutagenesis in either bakers' yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or E. coli have led to the following conclusions. First, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers cause most mutations in both organisms; pyrimidine adducts, such as PyC, can account at best for only a small proportion. 86 percent of forward mutations induced at the E. coli lacI locus can be abolished by photoreactivation under conditions which do not alter the level of recA induction. About 75 percent of the forward mutations induced at the CAN1 locus of yeast could be removed by photoreactivation, a value that lies within the range observed previously for the reversion of CYC1 alleles (60 percent - 97 percent). Second, about 10 percent of the lacI forward mutations are untargeted, a smaller fraction than found previously for cycl-91 reversion in yeast. It is not yet clear whether the two species are really different in this respect, of whether the cycl-91 reversion site is a typical of the yeast genome at large. Third, analysis of reversion frequencies of 20 mutant alleles suggests that about 10 to 25 percent of all replication errors produced by mutagenic mechanisms in uv-irradiated yeast involve additions or deletions of base-pairs, indicating that error-prone repair does not just produce substitutions. Last, the REV1 locus in yeast is concerned with the induction of frameshift mutations at some, but not all, genetic sites, just as found previously for substitution mutations. The function of the REV3 gene is more widely, though not universally, required while the function of the RAD6 gene, like that of the recA locus in E. coli, appears to be necessary for all kinds of uv mutagenesis. E coli genes comparable to REV1 and REV3 have not yet been described; conversely, there does not yet appear to be a yeast equivalent of umuC

  16. Mechanisms of uv mutagenesis in yeast and E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, C.; Christensen, R.; Christensen, J.R.; O'Brien, T.

    1983-01-01

    Experiments investigating ultraviolet light mutagenesis in either bakers' yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or E. coli have led to the following conclusions. First, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers cause most mutations in both organisms; pyrimidine adducts, such as PyC, can account at best for only a small proportion. Eighty-six percent of forward mutations induced at the E. coli lacI locus can be abolished by photoreactivation under conditions which do not alter the level of recA induction. About 75 percent of the forward mutations induced at the CAN1 locus of yeast could be removed by photoreactivation, a value that lies within the range observed previously for the reversion of CYC1 alleles (60 percent - 97 percent). Second, about 10 percent of the lacI forward mutations are untargeted, a smaller fraction than found previously for cycl1-91 reversion in yeast. It is not yet clear whether the two species are really different in this respect, or whether the cyc1-91 reversion site is atypical of the yeast genome at large. Third, analysis of reversion frequencies of 20 mutant alleles suggests that about 10 - 25 percent of all replication errors produced by mutagenic mechanisms in UV-irradiated yeast involve additions or deletions of base-pairs, indicating that error-prone repair does not just produce substitutions. Last, the REV1 locus in yeast is concerned with the induction of frameshift mutations at some, but not all, genetic sites, just as found previously for substitution mutations. The function of the REV3 gene is more widely, though not universally, required while the function of the RAD6 gene, like that of the recA locus in E. coli, appears to be necessary for all kinds of UV mutagenesis. E. coli genes comparable to REV1 and REV3 have not yet been described, conversely, there does not yet appear to be a yeast equivalent of umuC. 13 references, 4 tables

  17. The rate of metabolism as a factor determining longevity of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molon, Mateusz; Szajwaj, Monika; Tchorzewski, Marek; Skoczowski, Andrzej; Niewiadomska, Ewa; Zadrag-Tecza, Renata

    2016-02-01

    Despite many controversies, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to be used as a model organism for the study of aging. Numerous theories and hypotheses have been created for several decades, yet basic mechanisms of aging have remained unclear. Therefore, the principal aim of this work is to propose a possible mechanism leading to increased longevity in yeast. In this paper, we suggest for the first time that there is a link between decreased metabolic activity, fertility and longevity expressed as time of life in yeast. Determination of reproductive potential and total lifespan with the use of fob1Δ and sfp1Δ mutants allows us to compare the "longevity" presented as the number of produced daughters with the longevity expressed as the time of life. The results of analyses presented in this paper suggest the need for a change in the definition of longevity of yeast by taking into consideration the time parameter. The mutants that have been described as "long-lived" in the literature, such as the fob1Δ mutant, have an increased reproductive potential but live no longer than their standard counterparts. On the other hand, the sfp1Δ mutant and the wild-type strain produce a similar number of daughter cells, but the former lives much longer. Our results demonstrate a correlation between the decreased efficiency of the translational apparatus and the longevity of the sfp1Δ mutant. We suggest that a possible factor regulating the lifespan is the rate of cell metabolism. To measure the basic metabolism of the yeast cells, we used the isothermal microcalorimetry method. In the case of sfp1Δ, the flow of energy, ATP concentration, polysome profile and translational fitness are significantly lower in comparison with the wild-type strain and the fob1Δ mutant.

  18. Fission Yeast Apc15 Stabilizes MCC-Cdc20-APC/C Complexes, Ensuring Efficient Cdc20 Ubiquitination and Checkpoint Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Karen M; Paldi, Flora; Hardwick, Kevin G

    2017-04-24

    During mitosis, cells must segregate the replicated copies of their genome to their daughter cells with extremely high fidelity. Segregation errors lead to an abnormal chromosome number (aneuploidy), which typically results in disease or cell death [1]. Chromosome segregation and anaphase onset are initiated through the action of the multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase known as the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C [2]). The APC/C is inhibited by the spindle checkpoint in the presence of kinetochore attachment defects [3, 4]. Here we demonstrate that two non-essential APC/C subunits (Apc14 and Apc15) regulate association of spindle checkpoint proteins, in the form of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), with the APC/C. apc14Δ mutants display increased MCC association with the APC/C and are unable to silence the checkpoint efficiently. Conversely, apc15Δ mutants display reduced association between the MCC and APC/C, are defective in poly-ubiquitination of Cdc20, and are checkpoint defective. In vitro reconstitution studies have shown that human MCC-APC/C can contain two molecules of Cdc20 [5-7]. Using a yeast strain expressing two Cdc20 genes with different epitope tags, we show by co-immunoprecipitation that this is true in vivo. MCC binding to the second molecule of Cdc20 is mediated via the C-terminal KEN box in Mad3. Somewhat surprisingly, complexes containing both molecules of Cdc20 accumulate in apc15Δ cells, and the implications of this observation are discussed. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. A chemical genetic screen for modulators of asymmetrical 2,2'-dimeric naphthoquinones cytotoxicity in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Emadi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dimeric naphthoquinones (BiQ were originally synthesized as a new class of HIV integrase inhibitors but have shown integrase-independent cytotoxicity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines suggesting their use as potential anti-neoplastic agents. The mechanism of this cytotoxicity is unknown. In order to gain insight into the mode of action of binaphthoquinones we performed a systematic high-throughput screen in a yeast isogenic deletion mutant array for enhanced or suppressed growth in the presence of binaphthoquinones. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Exposure of wild type yeast strains to various BiQs demonstrated inhibition of yeast growth with IC(50s in the microM range. Drug sensitivity and resistance screens were performed by exposing arrays of a haploid yeast deletion mutant library to BiQs at concentrations near their IC(50. Sensitivity screens identified yeast with deletions affecting mitochondrial function and cellular respiration as having increased sensitivity to BiQs. Corresponding to this, wild type yeast grown in the absence of a fermentable carbon source were particularly sensitive to BiQs, and treatment with BiQs was shown to disrupt the mitochondrial membrane potential and lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, baseline ROS production in BiQ sensitive mutant strains was increased compared to wild type and could be further augmented by the presence of BiQ. Screens for resistance to BiQ action identified the mitochondrial external NAD(PH dehydrogenase, NDE1, as critical to BiQ toxicity and over-expression of this gene resulted in increased ROS production and increased sensitivity of wild type yeast to BiQ. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In yeast, binaphthoquinone cytotoxicity is likely mediated through NAD(PH:quonine oxidoreductases leading to ROS production and dysfunctional mitochondria. Further studies are required to validate this mechanism in mammalian cells.

  20. Deletion of Smgpi1 encoding a GPI-anchored protein suppresses sterility of the STRIPAK mutant ΔSmmob3 in the filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Stefan; Lahmann, Yasmine; Hartmann, Thomas; Seiler, Stephan; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2015-08-01

    The striatin interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, which is composed of striatin, protein phosphatase PP2A and kinases, is required for fruiting-body development and cell fusion in the filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora. Here, we report on the interplay of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein SmGPI1 with the kinase activator SmMOB3, a core component of human and fungal STRIPAK complexes. SmGPI1 is conserved among filamentous ascomycetes and was first identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen using SmMOB3 as bait. The physical interaction of SmMOB3 and SmGPI1 was verified by co-immunoprecipitation. In vivo localization and differential centrifugation revealed that SmGPI1 is predominantly secreted and attached to the cell wall but is also associated with mitochondria and appears to be a dual-targeted protein. Deletion of Smgpi1 led to an increased number of fruiting bodies that were normally shaped but reduced in size. In addition, Smmob3 and Smgpi1 genetically interact. In the sterile ΔSmmob3 background deletion of Smgpi1 restores fertility, vegetative growth as well as hyphal-fusion defects. The suppression effect was specific for the ΔSmmob3 mutant as deletion of Smgpi1 in other STRIPAK mutants does not restore fertility. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. GAMETOPHYTE DEFECTIVE 1, a putative subunit of RNases P/MRP, is essential for female gametogenesis and male competence in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Si-Qi; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Long, Yan-Ping; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2012-01-01

    RNA biogenesis, including biosynthesis and maturation of rRNA, tRNA and mRNA, is a fundamental process that is critical for cell growth, division and differentiation. Previous studies showed that mutations in components involved in RNA biogenesis resulted in abnormalities in gametophyte and leaf development in Arabidopsis. In eukaryotes, RNases P/MRP (RNase mitochondrial RNA processing) are important ribonucleases that are responsible for processing of tRNA, and transcription of small non-coding RNAs. Here we report that Gametophyte Defective 1 (GAF1), a gene encoding a predicted protein subunit of RNases P/MRP, AtRPP30, plays a role in female gametophyte development and male competence. Embryo sacs were arrested at stages ranging from FG1 to FG7 in gaf1 mutant, suggesting that the progression of the gametophytic division during female gametogenesis was impaired in gaf1 mutant. In contrast, pollen development was not affected in gaf1. However, the fitness of the mutant pollen tube was weaker than that of the wild-type, leading to reduced transmission through the male gametes. GAF1 is featured as a typical RPP30 domain protein and interacts physically with AtPOP5, a homologue of RNases P/MRP subunit POP5 of yeast. Together, our data suggest that components of the RNases P/MRP family, such as RPP30, play important roles in gametophyte development and function in plants.

  2. GAMETOPHYTE DEFECTIVE 1, a putative subunit of RNases P/MRP, is essential for female gametogenesis and male competence in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Qi Wang

    Full Text Available RNA biogenesis, including biosynthesis and maturation of rRNA, tRNA and mRNA, is a fundamental process that is critical for cell growth, division and differentiation. Previous studies showed that mutations in components involved in RNA biogenesis resulted in abnormalities in gametophyte and leaf development in Arabidopsis. In eukaryotes, RNases P/MRP (RNase mitochondrial RNA processing are important ribonucleases that are responsible for processing of tRNA, and transcription of small non-coding RNAs. Here we report that Gametophyte Defective 1 (GAF1, a gene encoding a predicted protein subunit of RNases P/MRP, AtRPP30, plays a role in female gametophyte development and male competence. Embryo sacs were arrested at stages ranging from FG1 to FG7 in gaf1 mutant, suggesting that the progression of the gametophytic division during female gametogenesis was impaired in gaf1 mutant. In contrast, pollen development was not affected in gaf1. However, the fitness of the mutant pollen tube was weaker than that of the wild-type, leading to reduced transmission through the male gametes. GAF1 is featured as a typical RPP30 domain protein and interacts physically with AtPOP5, a homologue of RNases P/MRP subunit POP5 of yeast. Together, our data suggest that components of the RNases P/MRP family, such as RPP30, play important roles in gametophyte development and function in plants.

  3. Construindo Marcas Mutantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizete De Azevedo Kreutz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo é o resultado de estudos realizados desde 2000 e busca instrumentalizar os proñssionals para a construção de Marcas Mutantes, que é   uma tendência contemporânea nas estratégias comunicacionais e de branding. Embora esta estratégia ainda não esteja consolidada, observamos que a mesma tem obtido um crescimento constante e tem sido adotadas pelas mais diferentes categorias de marcas e não apenas por aquelas direcionadas aos jovens, ao esporte, ao entretenimento, como era no principia. Com base na Hermenêutica de Profundidade de Thompson (1995, alicerçada nas pesquisas bibliográficas, de intemet, entrevistas e análise semiótica, desenhamos um método de construção de Marcas Mutantes dividido em sete fases. Como resultado, esperamos que este estudo possa auxiliar na compreensão dos processos envolvidos, ao mesmo tempo que provoque a discussão sobreo mesmo e, por consequência, o seu aprimoramento.

  4. Uvm mutants of Escherichia coli K 12 deficient in UV mutagenesis. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinborn, G.

    1978-01-01

    Selection for defective reversion induction, after UV treatment of E. coli K 12, yielded uvm mutants. These mutants exhibited highly reduced or no UV mutability for all loci tested although they were moderately and normally mutable by X-rays and EMS, respectively. Uvm mutations confer only a slight sensitivity to killing by UV and X-rays and no clear sensitivity to the lethal effect of HN2, EMS or MMS. Growth and viability of untreated uvm cells were normal. The properties of uvm mutants are discussed in relation to those of other relevant mutant types and to some actual problems of induced mutagenesis. (orig.) 891 AJ [de

  5. Metabolic link between phosphatidylethanolamine and triacylglycerol metabolism in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Susanne E; Wagner, Andrea; Steyrer, Ernst; Daum, Günther

    2011-12-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae triacylglycerols (TAG) are synthesized by the acyl-CoA dependent acyltransferases Dga1p, Are1p, Are2p and the acyl-CoA independent phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (PDAT) Lro1p which uses phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) as a preferred acyl donor. In the present study we investigated a possible link between TAG and PE metabolism by analyzing the contribution of the four different PE biosynthetic pathways to TAG formation, namely de novo PE synthesis via Psd1p and Psd2p, the CDP-ethanolamine (CDP-Etn) pathway and lyso-PE acylation by Ale1p. In cells grown on the non-fermentable carbon source lactate supplemented with 5mM ethanolamine (Etn) the CDP-Etn pathway contributed most to the cellular TAG level, whereas mutations in the other pathways displayed only minor effects. In cki1∆dpl1∆eki1∆ mutants bearing defects in the CDP-Etn pathway both the cellular and the microsomal levels of PE were markedly decreased, whereas in other mutants of PE biosynthetic routes depletion of this aminoglycerophospholipid was less pronounced in microsomes. This observation is important because Lro1p similar to the enzymes of the CDP-Etn pathway is a component of the ER. We conclude from these results that in cki1∆dpl1∆eki1∆ insufficient supply of PE to the PDAT Lro1p was a major reason for the strongly reduced TAG level. Moreover, we found that Lro1p activity was markedly decreased in cki1∆dpl1∆eki1∆, although transcription of LRO1 was not affected. Our findings imply that (i) TAG and PE syntheses in the yeast are tightly linked; and (ii) TAG formation by the PDAT Lro1p strongly depends on PE synthesis through the CDP-Etn pathway. Moreover, it is very likely that local availability of PE in microsomes is crucial for TAG synthesis through the Lro1p reaction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Preparation of Total RNA from Fission Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähler, Jürg; Wise, Jo Ann

    2017-04-03

    Treatment with hot phenol breaks open fission yeast cells and begins to strip away bound proteins from RNA. Deproteinization is completed by multiple extractions with chloroform/isoamyl alcohol and separation of the aqueous and organic phases using MaXtract gel, an inert material that acts as a physical barrier between the phases. The final step is concentration of the RNA by ethanol precipitation. The protocol can be used to prepare RNA from several cultures grown in parallel, but it is important not to process too many samples at once because delays can be detrimental to RNA quality. A reasonable number of samples to process at once would be three to four for microarray or RNA sequencing analyses and six for preliminary investigations of mutants implicated in RNA metabolism. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Regularities of radiorace formation in yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korogodin, V.I.; Bliznik, K.M.; Kapul'tsevich, Yu.G.; Petin, V.G.; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Obninsk. Nauchno-Issledovatel'skij Inst. Meditsinskoj Radiologii)

    1977-01-01

    Two strains of diploid yeast, namely, Saccharomyces ellipsoides, Megri 139-B, isolated under natural conditions, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae 5a x 3Bα, heterozygous by genes ade 1 and ade 2, were exposed to γ-quanta of Co 60 . The content of cells-saltants forming colonies with changed morphology, that of the nonviable cells, cells that are respiration mutants, and cells-recombinants by gene ade 1 and ade 2, has been determined. A certain regularity has been revealed in the distribution among the colonies of cells of the four types mentioned above: the higher the content of cells of some one of the types, the higher that of the cells having other hereditary changes

  8. Studies on the process of attachment of diazotroph alcaligenes faecalis and its Tn5 mutants to rice roots using 15N-labelling technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Xuanjun; Lin Min; You Chongbiao

    1993-09-01

    By using 15 N-labelling technique and Tn5-induced mutants the attachment of associative diazotroph Alcaligenes faecalis to intact rice plants was examined in vitro. Three distinguished modes of attachment of Alcaligenes faecalis: adsorption, anchoring and colonization were proposed by using 15 N-labelling bacterial cells and Tn5-induced mutants. Che - mutants affected on adsorption, but not on anchoring. Exo - Che - mutant is defective in both adsorption and anchoring. Exo - or exo ++ mutants are only defective in anchoring. Effective colonization is benefit for establishment on the associative system. The data also indicated that EPS (exopolysaccharide) play rather important roles in the association between the host plant and bacteria

  9. Yeast glycolipid biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezierska, Sylwia; Claus, Silke; Van Bogaert, Inge

    2017-10-25

    Various yeasts, both conventional and exotic ones, are known to produce compounds useful to mankind. Ethanol is the most known of these compounds, but more complex molecules such as amphiphilic biosurfactants can also be derived from eukaryotic microorganisms at an industrially and commercially relevant scale. Among them, glycolipids are the most promising, due to their attractive properties and high product titers. Many of these compounds can be considered as secondary metabolites with a specific function for the host. Hence, a dedicated biosynthetic process enables regulation and combines pathways delivering the lipidic moiety and the hydrophilic carbohydrate part of the glycolipid. In this Review, we will discuss the biosynthetic and regulatory aspects of the yeast-derived sophorolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids, and cellobiose lipids, with special emphasis on the relation between glycolipid synthesis and the general lipid metabolism. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. Genetically engineered yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprising an active fermentation pathway producing 3-HP expresses an exogenous gene expressing the aminotransferase YhxA from Bacillus cereus AH1272 catalysing a transamination reaction between beta-alanine and pyruvate to produce malonate semialde......A genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprising an active fermentation pathway producing 3-HP expresses an exogenous gene expressing the aminotransferase YhxA from Bacillus cereus AH1272 catalysing a transamination reaction between beta-alanine and pyruvate to produce malonate...... semialdehyde. The yeast may also express a 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase (HIBADH) and a 3-hydroxypropanoate dehydrogenase (3-HPDH) and aspartate 1-decarboxylase. Additionally the yeast may express pyruvate carboxylase and aspartate aminotransferase....

  11. Global analysis of the yeast lipidome by quantitative shotgun mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing, Christer S.; Sampaio, Julio L; Surendranath, Vineeth

    2009-01-01

    95% coverage of the yeast lipidome achieved with 125-fold improvement in sensitivity compared with previous approaches. Comparative lipidomics demonstrated that growth temperature and defects in lipid biosynthesis induce ripple effects throughout the molecular composition of the yeast lipidome....... This work serves as a resource for molecular characterization of eukaryotic lipidomes, and establishes shotgun lipidomics as a powerful platform for complementing biochemical studies and other systems-level approaches....

  12. Tapping into yeast diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Justin C

    2012-11-01

    Domesticated organisms demonstrate our capacity to influence wild species but also provide us with the opportunity to understand rapid evolution in the context of substantially altered environments and novel selective pressures. Recent advances in genetics and genomics have brought unprecedented insights into the domestication of many organisms and have opened new avenues for further improvements to be made. Yet, our ability to engineer biological systems is not without limits; genetic manipulation is often quite difficult. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is not only one of the most powerful model organisms, but is also the premier producer of fermented foods and beverages around the globe. As a model system, it entertains a hefty workforce dedicated to deciphering its genome and the function it encodes at a rich mechanistic level. As a producer, it is used to make leavened bread, and dozens of different alcoholic beverages, such as beer and wine. Yet, applying the awesome power of yeast genetics to understanding its origins and evolution requires some knowledge of its wild ancestors and the environments from which they were derived. A number of surprisingly diverse lineages of S. cerevisiae from both primeval and secondary forests in China have been discovered by Wang and his colleagues. These lineages substantially expand our knowledge of wild yeast diversity and will be a boon to elucidating the ecology, evolution and domestication of this academic and industrial workhorse.

  13. Mechanisms of uv mutagenesis in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, C.W.; Christensen, R.; Schwartz, A.

    1982-01-01

    The uv mutagenesis in yeast depends on the function of the RAD6 locus, a gene that is also responsible for a substantial fraction of wild-type resistance, suggesting that this eukaryote may possess a misrepair mechanism analogous to that proposed for Escherichia coli. The molecular mechanism responsible for RAD6 repair or recovery is not yet known, but it is different from either excision or recombination-dependent repair, processes carried out by the other two main repair pathways in yeast. RAD6-dependent mutagenesis has been found to have the following characteristics. It is associated at best with only a small fraction of RAD6-dependent repair, the majority of the sensitivity of rad6 mutants being due to their lack of nonmutagenic repair. SRS2 metabolic suppressors restore a substantial fraction of uv resistance to rad6 mutants but do not restore their uv mutability. Strains containing mutations at loci (rev, umr) that are probably more directly involved in mutagenesis are only mildly sensitive, and there is a poor correlation between their sensitivity and mutational deficiency. The uv mutagenesis appears to require a large number of gene functions, perhaps ten or more. Where examined in detail, these genes have been found to be concerned in the production of only a specific range of mutational events, not all of them. Mating experiments have shown that a substantial fraction, probably 40% or more, of uv-induced mutations are untargeted, that is, occur in lesion-free regions of DNA. The uv irradiation, therefore, produces a general reduction in the normally high fidelity with which DNA is replicated on undamaged templates. It does not appear to be necessary for the causal lesion to be present in the same chromosome as the mutation it induces. The reduction in fidelity may be the consequence of the production of a diffusible factor in uv-irradiated cells, but definite evidence supporting this proposal has not yet been obtained

  14. Analysis of Protein Localization and Secretory Pathway Function Using the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallen, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of mutants has been crucial in understanding a number of processes in the field of cell biology. In this exercise, students examine the effects of mutations in the secretory pathway on protein localization. Yeast strains deficient for synthesis of histidinol dehydrogenase are transformed with a plasmid encoding a…

  15. Enhancing and accelarating flavour formation by salt-tolerant yeasts in Japanese soy-sauce processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, van der C.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    In soy-sauce processes salt-tolerant yeasts are very important for the flavour formation. This flavour formation is, however, slow and poorly understood. In the last decades, a concerted research effort has increased the understanding and resulted in the derivation of mutants with an enhanced

  16. Drugs, ionophoric peptides, and steroids as substrates of the yeast multidrug transporter Pdr5p

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolaczkowski, M; vanderRest, M; CybularzKolaczkowska, A; Soumillion, JP; Konings, WN; Goffeau, A

    1996-01-01

    Pdr5p is the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATP-binding cassette transporter conferring resistance to several unrelated drugs. Its high overproduction in Pdr1p transcription factor mutants allows us to study the molecular mechanism of multidrug transport and substrate specificity. We have developed

  17. The smt-0 mutation which abolishes mating-type switching in fission yeast is a deletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Styrkársdóttir, U; Egel, R; Nielsen, O

    1993-01-01

    Mating-type switching in the fission yeast, S. pombe, is initiated by a DNA double-strand break (DSB) between the mat1 cassette and the H1 homology box. The mat1-cis-acting mutant, smt-0, abolishes mating-type switching and is shown here to be a 263-bp deletion. This deletion starts in the middle...

  18. Isolation and characterization of X-linked mutants of Drosophila melanogaster which are sensitive to mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.B.; Golino, M.D.; Nguyen, T.D.; Green, M.M.

    1976-01-01

    Thirteen X-linked mutants have been isolated in Drosophila melanogaster which render male and homozygous female larvae sensitive to the mutagen methyl methanesulfonate. Their characterization and preliminary assignment to functional groups is described. Four of these mutants are alleles of mei-41. Like previously isolated alleles of this locus, these mutants reduce fertility and increase loss and nondisjunction of the X-chromosome in homozygous females. The remaining mutants have been tentatively assigned to six functional groups (two mutants to the mus(1)101 locus, two to mus(1)102, two to mus(1)103, and one each to mus(1)104, mus(1)105, and mus(1)106. Several of the complementation groups can be distinguished on the basis of nondisjunction and cross sensitivity to mutagens. Females homozygous for the mei-41, mus(1)101 and mus(1)102 mutants exhibit elevated levels of nondisjunction. Mutants belonging to complementation groups mei-41, mus(1)101, and mus(1)104 are sensitive to nitrogen mustard (HN2) in addition to their MMS sensitivity. Among these mutants there is currently a direct correlation between sensitivity to HN2, sensitivity to 2-acetylaminofluorene and a deficiency in post-replication repair. Only the mei-41 mutants are hypersensitive to uv radiation, although several of the mutants exhibit sensitivity to γ-rays. Semidominance is observed in female larvae of the mei-41, mus(1)104, and mus(1)103 mutants after exposure to high concentrations of MMS. The properties of the mutants generally conform to a pattern which has been established for related mutants in yeast

  19. Purkinje Cell Compartmentation in the Cerebellum of the Lysosomal Acid Phosphatase 2 Mutant Mouse (Nax - Naked-Ataxia Mutant Mouse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Karen; Rahimi Balaei, Maryam; Mannan, Ashraf; Del Bigio, Marc R.; Marzban, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    The Acp2 gene encodes the beta subunit of lysosomal acid phosphatase, which is an isoenzyme that hydrolyzes orthophosphoric monoesters. In mice, a spontaneous mutation in Acp2 results in severe cerebellar defects. These include a reduced size, abnormal lobulation, and an apparent anterior cerebellar disorder with an absent or hypoplastic vermis. Based on differential gene expression in the cerebellum, the mouse cerebellar cortex can normally be compartmentalized anteroposteriorly into four transverse zones and mediolaterally into parasagittal stripes. In this study, immunohistochemistry was performed using various Purkinje cell compartmentation markers to examine their expression patterns in the Acp2 mutant. Despite the abnormal lobulation and anterior cerebellar defects, zebrin II and PLCβ4 showed similar expression patterns in the nax mutant and wild type cerebellum. However, fewer stripes were found in the anterior zone of the nax mutant, which could be due to a lack of Purkinje cells or altered expression of the stripe markers. HSP25 expression was uniform in the central zone of the nax mutant cerebellum at around postnatal day (P) 18–19, suggesting that HSP25 immunonegative Purkinje cells are absent or delayed in stripe pattern expression compared to the wild type. HSP25 expression became heterogeneous around P22–23, with twice the number of parasagittal stripes in the nax mutant compared to the wild type. Aside from reduced size and cortical disorganization, both the posterior zone and nodular zone in the nax mutant appeared less abnormal than the rest of the cerebellum. From these results, it is evident that the anterior zone of the nax mutant cerebellum is the most severely affected, and this extends beyond the primary fissure into the rostral central zone/vermis. This suggests that ACP2 has critical roles in the development of the anterior cerebellum and it may regulate anterior and central zone compartmentation. PMID:24722417

  20. Methods to Measure Lipophagy in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristobal-Sarramian, A; Radulovic, M; Kohlwein, S D

    2017-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular and organismal lipid homeostasis is critical for life, and any deviation from a balanced equilibrium between fat uptake and degradation may have deleterious consequences, resulting in severe lipid-associated disorders. Excess fat is typically stored in cytoplasmic organelles termed "lipid droplets" (LDs); to adjust for a constantly fluctuating supply of and demand for cellular fat, these organelles are metabolically highly dynamic and subject to multiple levels of regulation. In addition to a well-described cytosolic lipid degradation pathway, recent evidence underscores the importance of "lipophagy" in cellular lipid homeostasis, i.e., the degradation of LD by autophagy in the lysosome/vacuole. Pioneering work in yeast mutant models has unveiled the requirement of key components of the autophagy machinery, providing evidence for a highly conserved process of lipophagy from yeast to man. However, further work is required to unveil the intricate metabolic interaction between LD metabolism and autophagy to sustain membrane homeostasis and cellular survival. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of the Small GTPase Rho3 in Golgi/Endosome trafficking through functional interaction with adaptin in Fission Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Kita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We had previously identified the mutant allele of apm1(+ that encodes a homolog of the mammalian µ1A subunit of the clathrin-associated adaptor protein-1 (AP-1 complex, and we demonstrated the role of Apm1 in Golgi/endosome trafficking, secretion, and vacuole fusion in fission yeast. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we isolated rho3(+, which encodes a Rho-family small GTPase, an important regulator of exocystosis, as a multicopy-suppressor of the temperature-sensitive growth of the apm1-1 mutant cells. Overexpression of Rho3 suppressed the Cl(- sensitivity and immunosuppressant sensitivity of the apm1-1 mutant cells. Overexpression of Rho3 also suppressed the fragmentation of vacuoles, and the accumulation of v-SNARE Syb1 in Golgi/endosomes and partially suppressed the defective secretion associated with apm1-deletion cells. Notably, electron microscopic observation of the rho3-deletion cells revealed the accumulation of abnormal Golgi-like structures, vacuole fragmentation, and accumulation of secretory vesicles; these phenotypes were very similar to those of the apm1-deletion cells. Furthermore, the rho3-deletion cells and apm1-deletion cells showed very similar phenotypic characteristics, including the sensitivity to the immunosuppressant FK506, the cell wall-damaging agent micafungin, Cl(-, and valproic acid. Green fluorescent protein (GFP-Rho3 was localized at Golgi/endosomes as well as the plasma membrane and division site. Finally, Rho3 was shown to form a complex with Apm1 as well as with other subunits of the clathrin-associated AP-1 complex in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our findings reveal a novel role of Rho3 in the regulation of Golgi/endosome trafficking and suggest that clathrin-associated adaptor protein-1 and Rho3 co-ordinate in intracellular transport in fission yeast. To the best of our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence

  2. Isozyme differences in barley mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AI-Jibouri, A A.M.; Dham, K M [Department of Botany, Nuclear Research Centre, Baghdad (Iraq)

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Thirty mutants (M{sub 11}) of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) induced by physical and chemical mutagens were analysed for isozyme composition using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results show that these mutants were different in the isozymes leucine aminopeptidase, esterase and peroxidase. The differences included the number of forms of each enzyme, relative mobility value and their intensity on the gel. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase isozyme was found in six molecular forms and these forms were similar in all mutants. (author)

  3. Isozyme differences in barley mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AI-Jibouri, A.A.M.; Dham, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Thirty mutants (M 11 ) of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) induced by physical and chemical mutagens were analysed for isozyme composition using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results show that these mutants were different in the isozymes leucine aminopeptidase, esterase and peroxidase. The differences included the number of forms of each enzyme, relative mobility value and their intensity on the gel. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase isozyme was found in six molecular forms and these forms were similar in all mutants. (author)

  4. Characterisation of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Katrine M; Semple, Colin A; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    with other cell proteins, but has also been found to associate with DNA junctions, and to be involved in other processes including transcription regulation and mitochondrial protein import.Here, we characterize NAC in fission yeast. We find that NAC is associated with ribosomes, while a significant fraction...... defects in protein degradation. Accordingly, we find that the NAC UBA domain belongs to an ancient and distinct subgroup of the UBA family. In contrast to the situation with budding yeast, fission yeast cells devoid of NAC were not temperature sensitive. However, they displayed resistance to the amino...

  5. Isolation of new gravitropic mutants under hypergravity conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Mori

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Forward genetics is a powerful approach used to link genotypes and phenotypes, and mutant screening/analysis has provided deep insights into many aspects of plant physiology. Gravitropism is a tropistic response in plants, in which hypocotyls and stems sense the direction of gravity and grow upwards. Previous studies of gravitropic mutants have suggested that shoot endodermal cells in Arabidopsis stems and hypocotyls are capable of sensing gravity (i.e., statocytes. In the present study, we report a new screening system using hypergravity conditions to isolate enhancers of gravitropism mutants, and we also describe a rapid and efficient genome mapping method, using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP-based markers. Using the endodermal-amyloplast less 1 (eal1 mutant, which exhibits defective development of endodermal cells and gravitropism, we found that hypergravity (10 g restored the reduced gravity responsiveness in eal1 hypocotyls and could, therefore, be used to obtain mutants with further reduction in gravitropism in the eal1 background. Using the new screening system, we successfully isolated six ene (enhancer of eal1 mutants that exhibited little or no gravitropism under hypergravity conditions, and using NGS and map-based cloning with SNP markers, we narrowed down the potential causative genes, which revealed a new genetic network for shoot gravitropism in Arabidopsis.

  6. Isolation of New Gravitropic Mutants under Hypergravity Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Akiko; Toyota, Masatsugu; Shimada, Masayoshi; Mekata, Mika; Kurata, Tetsuya; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo T

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetics is a powerful approach used to link genotypes and phenotypes, and mutant screening/analysis has provided deep insights into many aspects of plant physiology. Gravitropism is a tropistic response in plants, in which hypocotyls and stems sense the direction of gravity and grow upward. Previous studies of gravitropic mutants have suggested that shoot endodermal cells in Arabidopsis stems and hypocotyls are capable of sensing gravity (i.e., statocytes). In the present study, we report a new screening system using hypergravity conditions to isolate enhancers of gravitropism mutants, and we also describe a rapid and efficient genome mapping method, using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based markers. Using the endodermal-amyloplast less 1 ( eal1 ) mutant, which exhibits defective development of endodermal cells and gravitropism, we found that hypergravity (10 g) restored the reduced gravity responsiveness in eal1 hypocotyls and could, therefore, be used to obtain mutants with further reduction in gravitropism in the eal1 background. Using the new screening system, we successfully isolated six ene ( enhancer of eal1 ) mutants that exhibited little or no gravitropism under hypergravity conditions, and using NGS and map-based cloning with SNP markers, we narrowed down the potential causative genes, which revealed a new genetic network for shoot gravitropism in Arabidopsis .

  7. Divergence of iron metabolism in wild Malaysian yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hana N; Mostovoy, Yulia; Hsu, Tiffany Y; Chang, Amanda H; Brem, Rachel B

    2013-12-09

    Comparative genomic studies have reported widespread variation in levels of gene expression within and between species. Using these data to infer organism-level trait divergence has proven to be a key challenge in the field. We have used a wild Malaysian population of S. cerevisiae as a test bed in the search to predict and validate trait differences based on observations of regulatory variation. Malaysian yeast, when cultured in standard medium, activated regulatory programs that protect cells from the toxic effects of high iron. Malaysian yeast also showed a hyperactive regulatory response during culture in the presence of excess iron and had a unique growth defect in conditions of high iron. Molecular validation experiments pinpointed the iron metabolism factors AFT1, CCC1, and YAP5 as contributors to these molecular and cellular phenotypes; in genome-scale sequence analyses, a suite of iron toxicity response genes showed evidence for rapid protein evolution in Malaysian yeast. Our findings support a model in which iron metabolism has diverged in Malaysian yeast as a consequence of a change in selective pressure, with Malaysian alleles shifting the dynamic range of iron response to low-iron concentrations and weakening resistance to extreme iron toxicity. By dissecting the iron scarcity specialist behavior of Malaysian yeast, our work highlights the power of expression divergence as a signpost for biologically and evolutionarily relevant variation at the organismal level. Interpreting the phenotypic relevance of gene expression variation is one of the primary challenges of modern genomics.

  8. Auxotrophy-stimulated sensitivity to quaternary ammonium salts and its relation to active transport in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachowicz, T.M.; Oblak, E.; Piatkowski, J.

    1992-01-01

    In previous studies we have observed that auxotrophic mutants of yeast were much more sensitive to quaternary ammonium salts than the corresponding isogenic wild type strains. The super sensitivity of the auxotrophs seems to be a characteristic feature of yeast and yeast-like microorganisms: the level of sensitivity of the quaternary ammonium salts of the bacterial auxotrophs and their original prototrophic forms appeared to be the same. The super sensitivity of yeast auxotrophs disappeared on minimal media with ammonium as a nitrogen source. In this report there are presented the data indicating that enrichment of the minimal medium with arginine restores the super sensitivity of auxotrophic yeast mutants to the quaternary ammonium salts. The results of amino-acid transport into the auxotrophic yeast cells treated with a quaternary ammonium salt in the presence and absence of arginine are given. A working hypothesis of the mechanism of these salts action as a specific inhibition of nutrient transport is discussed. (author). 19 refs, 3 figs, 8 figs

  9. Sexual differentiation in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, R; Nielsen, O; Weilguny, D

    1990-01-01

    The regulation of sexual reproduction in yeast constitutes the highest level of differentiation observed in these unicellular organisms. The various ramifications of this system involve DNA rearrangement, transcriptional control, post-translational modification (such as protein phosphorylation) a......) and receptor/signal processing. A few basic similarities are common to both fission and budding yeasts. The wiring of the regulatory circuitry, however, varies considerably between these divergent yeast groups....

  10. The Candida albicans stress response gene Stomatin-Like Protein 3 is implicated in ROS-induced apoptotic-like death of yeast phase cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A Conrad

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous presence of SPFH (Stomatin, Prohibitin, Flotillin, HflK/HflC proteins in all domains of life suggests that their function would be conserved. However, SPFH functions are diverse with organism-specific attributes. SPFH proteins play critical roles in physiological processes such as mechanosensation and respiration. Here, we characterize the stomatin ORF19.7296/SLP3 in the opportunistic human pathogen Candida albicans. Consistent with the localization of stomatin proteins, a Slp3p-Yfp fusion protein formed visible puncta along the plasma membrane. We also visualized Slp3p within the vacuolar lumen. Slp3p primary sequence analyses identified four putative S-palmitoylation sites, which may facilitate membrane localization and are conserved features of stomatins. Plasma membrane insertion sequences are present in mammalian and nematode SPFH proteins, but are absent in Slp3p. Strikingly, Slp3p was present in yeast cells, but was absent in hyphal cells, thus categorizing it as a yeast-phase specific protein. Slp3p membrane fluorescence significantly increased in response to cellular stress caused by plasma membrane, cell wall, oxidative, or osmotic perturbants, implicating SLP3 as a general stress-response gene. A slp3Δ/Δ homozygous null mutant had no detected phenotype when slp3Δ/Δ mutants were grown in the presence of a variety of stress agents. Also, we did not observe a defect in ion accumulation, filamentation, endocytosis, vacuolar structure and function, cell wall structure, or cytoskeletal structure. However, SLP3 over-expression triggered apoptotic-like death following prolonged exposure to oxidative stress or when cells were induced to form hyphae. Our findings reveal the cellular localization of Slp3p, and for the first time associate Slp3p function with the oxidative stress response.

  11. Awa1p on the cell surface of sake yeast inhibits biofilm formation and the co-aggregation between sake yeasts and Lactobacillus plantarum ML11-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Satoru; Shimizu, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Noriko; Furukawa, Soichi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Shimoi, Hitoshi; Takagi, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    We examined mixed-species biofilm formation between Lactobacillus plantarum ML11-11 and both foaming and non-foaming mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeasts. Wild-type strains showed significantly lower levels of biofilm formation compared with the non-foaming mutants. Awa1p, a protein involved in foam formation during sake brewing, is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein and is associated with the cell wall of sake yeasts. The AWA1 gene of the non-foaming mutant strain Kyokai no. 701 (K701) has lost the C-terminal sequence that includes the GPI anchor signal. Mixed-species biofilm formation and co-aggregation of wild-type strain Kyokai no. 7 (K7) were significantly lower than K701 UT-1 (K701 ura3/ura3 trp1/trp1), while the levels of strain K701 UT-1 carrying the AWA1 on a plasmid were comparable to those of K7. The levels of biofilm formation and co-aggregation of the strain K701 UT-1 harboring AWA1 with a deleted GPI anchor signal were similar to those of K701 UT-1. These results clearly demonstrate that Awa1p present on the surface of sake yeast strain K7 inhibits adhesion between yeast cells and L. plantarum ML11-11, consequently impeding mixed-species biofilm formation. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Cloning of cDNA for RNA polymerase subunit from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe by heterospecific complementation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakovskiĭ, G V; Lebedenko, E N; Thuriaux, P

    1997-02-01

    The rpb10 cDNA of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, encoding one of the five small subunits common to all three nuclear DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, was isolated from an expression cDNA library by two independent approaches: PCR-based screening and direct suppression by means of heterospecific complementation of a temperature-sensitive mutant defective in the corresponding gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cloned Sz. pombe cDNA encodes a protein Rpb10 of 71 amino acids with an M of 8,275 Da, sharing 51 amino acids (71% identity) with the subunit ABC10 beta of RNA polymerases I-III from S. cerevisiae. All eukaryotic members of this protein family have the same general organization featuring two highly conserved motifs (RCFT/SCGK and RYCCRRM) around an atypical zinc finger and an additional invariant HVDLIEK motif toward the C-terminal end. The last motif is only characteristics for homologs from eukaryotes. In keeping with this remarkable structural conservation, the Sz. pombe cDNA also fully complemented a S. cerevisiae deletion mutant lacking subunit ABC10 beta (null allele rpb10-delta 1::HIS3).

  13. Transcriptomic profiling of chemical exposure reveals roles of Yap1 in protecting yeast cells from oxidative and other types of stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Zhouquan; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Li; Dai, Heping; Xiao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptomic profiles are generated by comparing wild-type and the yeast yap1 mutant to various chemicals in an attempt to establish a correlation between this gene mutation and chemical exposure. Test chemicals include ClonNAT as a non-genotoxic agent, methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) as an alkylating agent, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) as an oxidative agent and the mixture of t-BHP and MMS to reflect complex natural exposure. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified and specific DEGs were obtained by excluding overlapping DEGs with the control group. In the MMS exposure group, deoxyribonucleotide biosynthetic processes were upregulated, while oxidation-reduction processes were downregulated. In the t-BHP exposure group, metabolic processes were upregulated while peroxisome and ion transport pathways were downregulated. In the mixture exposure group, the proteasome pathway was upregulated, while the aerobic respiration was downregulated. Homologue analysis of DEGs related to human diseases showed that many of DEGs were linked to cancer, ageing and neuronal degeneration. These observations confirm that the yap1 mutant is more sensitive to chemicals than wild-type cells and that the susceptible individuals carrying the YAP1-like gene defect may enhance risk to chemical exposure. Hence, this study offers a novel approach to environmental risk assessment, based on the genetic backgrounds of susceptible individuals. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Entropy analysis in yeast DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jongkwang; Kim, Sowun; Lee, Kunsang; Kwon, Younghun

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the language structure in yeast 16 chromosomes. In order to find it, we use the entropy analysis for codons (or amino acids) of yeast 16 chromosomes, developed in analysis of natural language by Montemurro et al. From the analysis, we can see that there exists a language structure in codons (or amino acids) of yeast 16 chromosomes. Also we find that the grammar structure of amino acids of yeast 16 chromosomes has a deep relationship with secondary structure of protein.

  15. The freeze-thaw stress response of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is growth phase specific and is controlled by nutritional state via the RAS-cyclic AMP signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J I; Grant, C M; Attfield, P V; Dawes, I W

    1997-10-01

    The ability of cells to survive freezing and thawing is expected to depend on the physiological conditions experienced prior to freezing. We examined factors affecting yeast cell survival during freeze-thaw stress, including those associated with growth phase, requirement for mitochondrial functions, and prior stress treatment(s), and the role played by relevant signal transduction pathways. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was frozen at -20 degrees C for 2 h (cooling rate, less than 4 degrees C min-1) and thawed on ice for 40 min. Supercooling occurred without reducing cell survival and was followed by freezing. Loss of viability was proportional to the freezing duration, indicating that freezing is the main determinant of freeze-thaw damage. Regardless of the carbon source used, the wild-type strain and an isogenic petite mutant ([rho 0]) showed the same pattern of freeze-thaw tolerance throughout growth, i.e., high resistance during lag phase and low resistance during log phase, indicating that the response to freeze-thaw stress is growth phase specific and not controlled by glucose repression. In addition, respiratory ability and functional mitochondria are necessary to confer full resistance to freeze-thaw stress. Both nitrogen and carbon source starvation led to freeze-thaw tolerance. The use of strains affected in the RAS-cyclic AMP (RAS-cAMP) pathway or supplementation of an rca1 mutant (defective in the cAMP phosphodiesterase gene) with cAMP showed that the freeze-thaw response of yeast is under the control of the RAS-cAMP pathway. Yeast did not adapt to freeze-thaw stress following repeated freeze-thaw treatment with or without a recovery period between freeze-thaw cycles, nor could it adapt following pretreatment by cold shock. However, freeze-thaw tolerance of yeast cells was induced during fermentative and respiratory growth by pretreatment with H2O2, cycloheximide, mild heat shock, or NaCl, indicating that cross protection between freeze-thaw stress

  16. Facts about Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... label> Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Birth Defects Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... having a baby born without a birth defect. Birth Defects Are Common Every 4 ½ minutes, a ...

  17. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the ... that she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In ...

  18. Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hittinger, Chris Todd; Rokas, Antonis; Bai, Feng-Yan; Boekhout, Teun; Gonçalves, Paula; Jeffries, Thomas W; Kominek, Jacek; Lachance, Marc-André; Libkind, Diego; Rosa, Carlos A; Sampaio, José Paulo; Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2015-01-01

    Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces

  19. Evaluation of tall rice mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakim, L.; Azam, M.A.; Miah, A.J.; Mansur, M.A.; Akanda, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    One tall mutant (Mut NS1) of rice variety Nizersail was put to multilocation on-farm trial. It showed improvement over the parent in respect of by earlier maturity and higher grain yield at all locations and thus it appears as an improved mutant of Nizersail. (author). 6 refs

  20. Current awareness on yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-02-01

    In order to keep subscribers up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, this current awareness service is provided by John Wiley & Sons and contains newly-published material on yeasts. Each bibliography is divided into 10 sections. 1 Books, Reviews & Symposia; 2 General; 3 Biochemistry; 4 Biotechnology; 5 Cell Biology; 6 Gene Expression; 7 Genetics; 8 Physiology; 9 Medical Mycology; 10 Recombinant DNA Technology. Within each section, articles are listed in alphabetical order with respect to author. If, in the preceding period, no publications are located relevant to any one of these headings, that section will be omitted. (3 weeks journals - search completed 5th. Dec. 2001)

  1. Analysis of Lysophospholipid Content in Low Phytate Rice Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Chuan; Chen, Yaling; Tan, Yuanyuan; Liu, Lei; Waters, Daniel L E; Rose, Terry J; Shu, Qingyao; Bao, Jinsong

    2017-07-05

    As a fundamental component of nucleic acids, phospholipids, and adenosine triphosphate, phosphorus (P) is critical to all life forms, however, the molecular mechanism of P translocation and distribution in rice grains are still not understood. Here, with the use of five different low phytic acid (lpa) rice mutants, the redistribution in the main P-containing compounds in rice grain, phytic acid (PA), lysophospholipid (LPL), and inorganic P (Pi), was investigated. The lpa mutants showed a significant decrease in PA and phytate-phosphorus (PA-P) concentration with a concomitant increase in Pi concentration. Moreover, defects in the OsST and OsMIK genes result in a great reduction of specific LPL components and LPL-phosphorus (LPL-P) contents in rice grain. In contrast, defective OsMRP5 and Os2-PGK genes led to a significant increase in individual LPL components. The effect of the Os2-PGK gene on the LPL accumulation was validated using breeding lines derived from a cross between KBNT-lpa (Os2-PGK mutation) and Jiahe218. This study demonstrates that these rice lpa mutants lead to the redistribution of Pi in endosperm and modify LPL biosynthesis. Increase LPLs in the endosperm in the lpa mutants may have practical applications in rice breeding to produce "healthier" rice.

  2. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Sordaria macrospora Mutants Identifies Developmental Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowrousian, Minou; Teichert, Ines; Masloff, Sandra; Kück, Ulrich

    2012-02-01

    The study of mutants to elucidate gene functions has a long and successful history; however, to discover causative mutations in mutants that were generated by random mutagenesis often takes years of laboratory work and requires previously generated genetic and/or physical markers, or resources like DNA libraries for complementation. Here, we present an alternative method to identify defective genes in developmental mutants of the filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora through Illumina/Solexa whole-genome sequencing. We sequenced pooled DNA from progeny of crosses of three mutants and the wild type and were able to pinpoint the causative mutations in the mutant strains through bioinformatics analysis. One mutant is a spore color mutant, and the mutated gene encodes a melanin biosynthesis enzyme. The causative mutation is a G to A change in the first base of an intron, leading to a splice defect. The second mutant carries an allelic mutation in the pro41 gene encoding a protein essential for sexual development. In the mutant, we detected a complex pattern of deletion/rearrangements at the pro41 locus. In the third mutant, a point mutation in the stop codon of a transcription factor-encoding gene leads to the production of immature fruiting bodies. For all mutants, transformation with a wild type-copy of the affected gene restored the wild-type phenotype. Our data demonstrate that whole-genome sequencing of mutant strains is a rapid method to identify developmental genes in an organism that can be genetically crossed and where a reference genome sequence is available, even without prior mapping information.

  3. The morphogenesis of herpes simplex virus type 1 in infected parental mouse L fibroblasts and mutant gro29 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle Lone; Norrild, Bodil

    2003-01-01

    Mutants of cell lines and viruses are important biological tools. The pathway of herpesvirus particle maturation and egress are contentious issues. The mutant gro29 line of mouse L cells is defective for egress of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) virions, and a candidate for studies of virus...

  4. Mutants of Yarrowia lipolytica NCIM 3589 grown on waste cooking oil as a biofactory for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katre, Gouri; Ajmera, Namasvi; Zinjarde, Smita; RaviKumar, Ameeta

    2017-10-24

    Oleaginous yeasts are fast emerging as a possible feedstock for biodiesel production. Yarrowia lipolytica, a model oleaginous yeast is known to utilize a variety of hydrophobic substrates for lipid accumulation including waste cooking oil (WCO). Approaches to increase lipid content in this yeast include metabolic engineering which requires manipulation of multiple genes in the lipid biosynthesis pathway. A classical and cost-effective approach, namely, random chemical mutagenesis on the yeast can lead to increased production of biodiesel as is explored here. In this study, chemical mutagenesis using the alkylating agent, N- methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) as well as an additional treatment with cerulenin, a fatty acid synthase inhibitor generated 800 mutants of Y. lipolytica NCIM 3589 (761 MNNG treated and 39 MNNG + cerulenin treated). A three-stage screening using Sudan Black B plate technique, Nile red fluorimetry and total lipid extraction using solvent was performed, which enabled selection of ten high lipid yielding mutants. Time course studies of all the ten mutants were further undertaken in terms of biomass, lipid yield and lipid content to select three stable mutants (YlB6, YlC7 and YlE1) capable of growing and accumulating lipid on WCO, with lipid contents of 55, 60 and 67% as compared to 45% for the wild type. The mutants demonstrated increased volumetric lipid productivities (0.062, 0.044 and 0.041 g L -1  h -1 ) as compared to the wild type (0.033 g L -1  h -1 ). The fatty acid profile of the three mutants consisted of a high content of C16 and C18 saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids and was found to be suitable for biodiesel production. The fuel properties, namely, density, kinematic viscosity, total acid number, iodine value of the three mutants were evaluated and found to lie within the limits specified by internationally accepted standards. Additionally, it was noted that the mutants demonstrated better cetane numbers and

  5. Biogenesis of the yeast cytochrome bc1 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Vincenzo; Conte, Laura; Trumpower, Bernard L

    2009-01-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is composed of four different protein complexes that cooperate in electron transfer and proton pumping across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The cytochrome bc1 complex, or complex III, is a component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This review will focus on the biogenesis of the bc1 complex in the mitochondria of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In wild type yeast mitochondrial membranes the major part of the cytochrome bc1 complex was found in association with one or two copies of the cytochrome c oxidase complex. The analysis of several yeast mutant strains in which single genes or pairs of genes encoding bc1 subunits had been deleted revealed the presence of a common set of bc1 sub-complexes. These sub-complexes are represented by the central core of the bc1 complex, consisting of cytochrome b bound to subunit 7 and subunit 8, by the two core proteins associated with each other, by the Rieske protein associated with subunit 9, and by those deriving from the unexpected interaction of each of the two core proteins with cytochrome c1. Furthermore, a higher molecular mass sub-complex is that composed of cytochrome b, cytochrome c1, core protein 1 and 2, subunit 6, subunit 7 and subunit 8. The identification and characterization of all these sub-complexes may help in defining the steps and the molecular events leading to bc1 assembly in yeast mitochondria.

  6. Activation of Rab GTPase Sec4 by its GEF Sec2 is required for prospore membrane formation during sporulation in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Yasuyuki; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Ichiro; Kurita, Tomokazu; Saito, Chieko; Kurokawa, Kazuo; Nakano, Akihiko; Irie, Kenji

    2018-02-01

    Sec2 activates Sec4 Rab GTPase as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the recruitment of downstream effectors to facilitate tethering and fusion of post-Golgi vesicles at the plasma membrane. During the meiosis and sporulation of budding yeast, post-Golgi vesicles are transported to and fused at the spindle pole body (SPB) to form a de novo membrane, called the prospore membrane. Previous studies have revealed the role of the SPB outer surface called the meiotic outer plaque (MOP) in docking and fusion of post-Golgi vesicles. However, the upstream molecular machinery for post-Golgi vesicular fusion that facilitates prospore membrane formation remains enigmatic. Here, we demonstrate that the GTP exchange factor for Sec4, Sec2, participates in the formation of the prospore membrane. A conditional mutant in which the SEC2 expression is shut off during sporulation showed sporulation defects. Inactivation of Sec2 caused Sec4 targeting defects along the prospore membranes, thereby causing insufficient targeting of downstream effectors and cargo proteins to the prospore membrane. These results suggest that the activation of Sec4 by Sec2 is required for the efficient supply of post-Golgi vesicles to the prospore membrane and thus for prospore membrane formation/extension and subsequent deposition of spore wall materials. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Inheritance of the yeast mitochondrial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast......Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast...

  8. Yeasts preservation: alternatives for lyophilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyanga, L.K.; Nout, M.J.R.; Smid, E.J.; Boekhout, T.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of two low-cost, low technology traditional methods for drying starter cultures with standard lyophilisation. Lyophilised yeast cultures and yeast cultures preserved in dry rice cakes and dry plant fibre strands were examined for viable cell counts

  9. Isonicotinamide Enhances Sir2 Protein-mediated Silencing and Longevity in Yeast by Raising Intracellular NAD+ Concentration*

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Julie M.; Wierman, Margaret B.; Maqani, Nazif; Smith, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Sirtuins are an evolutionarily conserved family of NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases that function in the regulation of gene transcription, cellular metabolism, and aging. Their activity requires the maintenance of an adequate intracellular NAD+ concentration through the combined action of NAD+ biosynthesis and salvage pathways. Nicotinamide (NAM) is a key NAD+ precursor that is also a byproduct and feedback inhibitor of the deacetylation reaction. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nicotinamidase Pnc1 converts NAM to nicotinic acid (NA), which is then used as a substrate by the NAD+ salvage pathway enzyme NA phosphoribosyltransferase (Npt1). Isonicotinamide (INAM) is an isostere of NAM that stimulates yeast Sir2 deacetylase activity in vitro by alleviating the NAM inhibition. In this study, we determined that INAM stimulates Sir2 through an additional mechanism in vivo, which involves elevation of the intracellular NAD+ concentration. INAM enhanced normal silencing at the rDNA locus but only partially suppressed the silencing defects of an npt1Δ mutant. Yeast cells grown in media lacking NA had a short replicative life span, which was extended by INAM in a SIR2-dependent manner and correlated with increased NAD+. The INAM-induced increase in NAD+ was strongly dependent on Pnc1 and Npt1, suggesting that INAM increases flux through the NAD+ salvage pathway. Part of this effect was mediated by the NR salvage pathways, which generate NAM as a product and require Pnc1 to produce NAD+. We also provide evidence suggesting that INAM influences the expression of multiple NAD+ biosynthesis and salvage pathways to promote homeostasis during stationary phase. PMID:22539348

  10. Isonicotinamide enhances Sir2 protein-mediated silencing and longevity in yeast by raising intracellular NAD+ concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Julie M; Wierman, Margaret B; Maqani, Nazif; Smith, Jeffrey S

    2012-06-15

    Sirtuins are an evolutionarily conserved family of NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases that function in the regulation of gene transcription, cellular metabolism, and aging. Their activity requires the maintenance of an adequate intracellular NAD(+) concentration through the combined action of NAD(+) biosynthesis and salvage pathways. Nicotinamide (NAM) is a key NAD(+) precursor that is also a byproduct and feedback inhibitor of the deacetylation reaction. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nicotinamidase Pnc1 converts NAM to nicotinic acid (NA), which is then used as a substrate by the NAD(+) salvage pathway enzyme NA phosphoribosyltransferase (Npt1). Isonicotinamide (INAM) is an isostere of NAM that stimulates yeast Sir2 deacetylase activity in vitro by alleviating the NAM inhibition. In this study, we determined that INAM stimulates Sir2 through an additional mechanism in vivo, which involves elevation of the intracellular NAD(+) concentration. INAM enhanced normal silencing at the rDNA locus but only partially suppressed the silencing defects of an npt1Δ mutant. Yeast cells grown in media lacking NA had a short replicative life span, which was extended by INAM in a SIR2-dependent manner and correlated with increased NAD(+). The INAM-induced increase in NAD(+) was strongly dependent on Pnc1 and Npt1, suggesting that INAM increases flux through the NAD(+) salvage pathway. Part of this effect was mediated by the NR salvage pathways, which generate NAM as a product and require Pnc1 to produce NAD(+). We also provide evidence suggesting that INAM influences the expression of multiple NAD(+) biosynthesis and salvage pathways to promote homeostasis during stationary phase.

  11. RNA interference regulates the cell cycle checkpoint through the RNA export factor, Ptr1, in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, Tetsushi, E-mail: tiida@nig.ac.jp [Division of Cytogenetics, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sokendai, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (PRESTO), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8, Honcho, Kawaguchi-shi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Iida, Naoko [Division of Mutagenesis, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); Tsutsui, Yasuhiro [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuda-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Yamao, Fumiaki [Division of Mutagenesis, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sokendai, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); Kobayashi, Takehiko [Division of Cytogenetics, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Sokendai, Mishima, 1111 Yata, Mishima 411-8540 (Japan)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNAi is linked to the cell cycle checkpoint in fission yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ptr1 co-purifies with Ago1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ptr1-1 mutation impairs the checkpoint but does not affect gene silencing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ago1{sup +} and ptr1{sup +} regulate the cell cycle checkpoint via the same pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations in ago1{sup +} and ptr1{sup +} lead to the nuclear accumulation of poly(A){sup +} RNAs. -- Abstract: Ago1, an effector protein of RNA interference (RNAi), regulates heterochromatin silencing and cell cycle arrest in fission yeast. However, the mechanism by which Ago1 controls cell cycle checkpoint following hydroxyurea (HU) treatment has not been elucidated. In this study, we show that Ago1 and other RNAi factors control cell cycle checkpoint following HU treatment via a mechanism independent of silencing. While silencing requires dcr1{sup +}, the overexpression of ago1{sup +} alleviated the cell cycle defect in dcr1{Delta}. Ago1 interacted with the mRNA export factor, Ptr1. The ptr1-1 mutation impaired cell cycle checkpoint but gene silencing was unaffected. Genetic analysis revealed that the regulation of cell cycle checkpoint by ago1{sup +} is dependent on ptr1{sup +}. Nuclear accumulation of poly(A){sup +} RNAs was detected in mutants of ago1{sup +} and ptr1{sup +}, suggesting there is a functional link between the cell cycle checkpoint and RNAi-mediated RNA quality control.

  12. Production of Food Grade Yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyro Bekatorou

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts have been known to humans for thousands of years as they have been used in traditional fermentation processes like wine, beer and bread making. Today, yeasts are also used as alternative sources of high nutritional value proteins, enzymes and vitamins, and have numerous applications in the health food industry as food additives, conditioners and flavouring agents, for the production of microbiology media and extracts, as well as livestock feeds. Modern scientific advances allow the isolation, construction and industrial production of new yeast strains to satisfy the specific demands of the food industry. Types of commercial food grade yeasts, industrial production processes and raw materials are highlighted. Aspects of yeast metabolism, with respect to carbohydrate utilization, nutritional aspects and recent research advances are also discussed.

  13. Evolutionary History of Ascomyceteous Yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haridas, Sajeet; Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Goker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kurtzman, Cletus P.; Blackwell, Meredith; Grigoriev, Igor; Jeffries, Thomas W.

    2014-06-06

    Yeasts are important for many industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 16 ascomycete yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. A comparison of these with several other previously published yeast genomes have added increased confidence to the phylogenetic positions of previously poorly placed species including Saitoella complicata, Babjeviella inositovora and Metschnikowia bicuspidata. Phylogenetic analysis also showed that yeasts with alternative nuclear codon usage where CUG encodes serine instead of leucine are monophyletic within the Saccharomycotina. Most of the yeasts have compact genomes with a large fraction of single exon genes with Lipomyces starkeyi and the previously published Pneumocystis jirovecii being notable exceptions. Intron analysis suggests that early diverging species have more introns. We also observed a large number of unclassified lineage specific non-simple repeats in these genomes.

  14. Improved vanillin production in baker's yeast through in silico design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochado, Ana Rita; Matos, Claudia; Møller, Birger L; Hansen, Jørgen; Mortensen, Uffe H; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2010-11-08

    Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavouring agents, originally obtained from cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid Vanilla planifolia. Currently vanillin is mostly produced via chemical synthesis. A de novo synthetic pathway for heterologous vanillin production from glucose has recently been implemented in baker's yeast, Saccharamyces cerevisiae. In this study we aimed at engineering this vanillin cell factory towards improved productivity and thereby at developing an attractive alternative to chemical synthesis. Expression of a glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana in the vanillin producing S. cerevisiae strain served to decrease product toxicity. An in silico metabolic engineering strategy of this vanillin glucoside producing strain was designed using a set of stoichiometric modelling tools applied to the yeast genome-scale metabolic network. Two targets (PDC1 and GDH1) were selected for experimental verification resulting in four engineered strains. Three of the mutants showed up to 1.5 fold higher vanillin β-D-glucoside yield in batch mode, while continuous culture of the Δpdc1 mutant showed a 2-fold productivity improvement. This mutant presented a 5-fold improvement in free vanillin production compared to the previous work on de novo vanillin biosynthesis in baker's yeast. Use of constraints corresponding to different physiological states was found to greatly influence the target predictions given minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA) as biological objective function. In vivo verification of the targets, selected based on their predicted metabolic adjustment, successfully led to overproducing strains. Overall, we propose and demonstrate a framework for in silico design and target selection for improving microbial cell factories.

  15. Improved vanillin production in baker's yeast through in silico design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavouring agents, originally obtained from cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid Vanilla planifolia. Currently vanillin is mostly produced via chemical synthesis. A de novo synthetic pathway for heterologous vanillin production from glucose has recently been implemented in baker's yeast, Saccharamyces cerevisiae. In this study we aimed at engineering this vanillin cell factory towards improved productivity and thereby at developing an attractive alternative to chemical synthesis. Results Expression of a glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana in the vanillin producing S. cerevisiae strain served to decrease product toxicity. An in silico metabolic engineering strategy of this vanillin glucoside producing strain was designed using a set of stoichiometric modelling tools applied to the yeast genome-scale metabolic network. Two targets (PDC1 and GDH1) were selected for experimental verification resulting in four engineered strains. Three of the mutants showed up to 1.5 fold higher vanillin β-D-glucoside yield in batch mode, while continuous culture of the Δpdc1 mutant showed a 2-fold productivity improvement. This mutant presented a 5-fold improvement in free vanillin production compared to the previous work on de novo vanillin biosynthesis in baker's yeast. Conclusion Use of constraints corresponding to different physiological states was found to greatly influence the target predictions given minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA) as biological objective function. In vivo verification of the targets, selected based on their predicted metabolic adjustment, successfully led to overproducing strains. Overall, we propose and demonstrate a framework for in silico design and target selection for improving microbial cell factories. PMID:21059201

  16. Improved vanillin production in baker's yeast through in silico design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Jørgen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavouring agents, originally obtained from cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid Vanilla planifolia. Currently vanillin is mostly produced via chemical synthesis. A de novo synthetic pathway for heterologous vanillin production from glucose has recently been implemented in baker's yeast, Saccharamyces cerevisiae. In this study we aimed at engineering this vanillin cell factory towards improved productivity and thereby at developing an attractive alternative to chemical synthesis. Results Expression of a glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana in the vanillin producing S. cerevisiae strain served to decrease product toxicity. An in silico metabolic engineering strategy of this vanillin glucoside producing strain was designed using a set of stoichiometric modelling tools applied to the yeast genome-scale metabolic network. Two targets (PDC1 and GDH1 were selected for experimental verification resulting in four engineered strains. Three of the mutants showed up to 1.5 fold higher vanillin β-D-glucoside yield in batch mode, while continuous culture of the Δpdc1 mutant showed a 2-fold productivity improvement. This mutant presented a 5-fold improvement in free vanillin production compared to the previous work on de novo vanillin biosynthesis in baker's yeast. Conclusion Use of constraints corresponding to different physiological states was found to greatly influence the target predictions given minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA as biological objective function. In vivo verification of the targets, selected based on their predicted metabolic adjustment, successfully led to overproducing strains. Overall, we propose and demonstrate a framework for in silico design and target selection for improving microbial cell factories.

  17. Separating genetic and hemodynamic defects in neuropilin 1 knockout embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth A V; Yuan, Li; Breant, Christine; Watts, Ryan J; Eichmann, Anne

    2008-08-01

    Targeted inactivation of genes involved in murine cardiovascular development frequently leads to abnormalities in blood flow. As blood fluid dynamics play a crucial role in shaping vessel morphology, the presence of flow defects generally prohibits the precise assignment of the role of the mutated gene product in the vasculature. In this study, we show how to distinguish between genetic defects caused by targeted inactivation of the neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) receptor and hemodynamic defects occurring in homozygous knockout embryos. Our analysis of a Nrp1 null allele bred onto a C57BL/6 background shows that vessel remodeling defects occur concomitantly with the onset of blood flow and cause death of homozygous mutants at E10.5. Using mouse embryo culture, we establish that hemodynamic defects are already present at E8.5 and continuous circulation is never established in homozygous mutants. The geometry of yolk sac blood vessels is altered and remodeling into yolk sac arteries and veins does not occur. To separate flow-induced deficiencies from those caused by the Nrp1 mutation, we arrested blood flow in cultured wild-type and mutant embryos and followed their vascular development. We find that loss of Nrp1 function rather than flow induces the altered geometry of the capillary plexus. Endothelial cell migration, but not replication, is altered in Nrp1 mutants. Gene expression analysis of endothelial cells isolated from freshly dissected wild-type and mutants and after culture in no-flow conditions showed down-regulation of the arterial marker genes connexin 40 and ephrin B2 related to the loss of Nrp1 function. This method allows genetic defects caused by loss-of-function of a gene important for cardiovascular development to be isolated even in the presence of hemodynamic defects.

  18. The Swedish mutant barley collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Full text: The Swedish mutation research programme in barley began about 50 years ago and has mainly been carried out at Svaloev in co-operation with the institute of Genetics at the University of Lund. The collection has been produced from different Swedish high-yielding spring barley varieties, using the following mutagens: X-rays, neutrons, several organic chemical compounds such as ethyleneimine, several sulfonate derivatives and the inorganic chemical mutagen sodium azide. Nearly 10,000 barley mutants are stored in the Nordic Gene Bank and documented in databases developed by Udda Lundquist, Svaloev AB. The collection consists of the following nine categories with 94 different types of mutants: 1. Mutants with changes in the spike and spikelets; 2. Changes in culm length and culm composition; 3. Changes in growth types; 4. Physiological mutants; 5. Changes in awns; 6. Changes in seed size and shape; 7. Changes in leaf blades; 8. Changes in anthocyanin and colour; 9. Resistance to barley powdery mildew. Barley is one of the most thoroughly investigated crops in terms of induction of mutations and mutation genetics. So far, about half of the mutants stored at the Nordic Gene Bank, have been analysed genetically; They constitute, however, only a minority of the 94 different mutant types. The genetic analyses have given valuable insights into the mutation process but also into the genetic architecture of various characters. A number of mutants of two-row barley have been registered and commercially released. One of the earliest released, Mari, an early maturing, daylength neutral, straw stiff mutant, is still grown in Iceland. The Swedish mutation material has been used in Sweden, but also in other countries, such as Denmark, Germany, and USA, for various studies providing a better understanding of the barley genome. The collection will be immensely valuable for future molecular genetical analyses of clone mutant genes. (author)

  19. The Swedish mutant barley collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-07-01

    Full text: The Swedish mutation research programme in barley began about 50 years ago and has mainly been carried out at Svaloev in co-operation with the institute of Genetics at the University of Lund. The collection has been produced from different Swedish high-yielding spring barley varieties, using the following mutagens: X-rays, neutrons, several organic chemical compounds such as ethyleneimine, several sulfonate derivatives and the inorganic chemical mutagen sodium azide. Nearly 10,000 barley mutants are stored in the Nordic Gene Bank and documented in databases developed by Udda Lundquist, Svaloev AB. The collection consists of the following nine categories with 94 different types of mutants: 1. Mutants with changes in the spike and spikelets; 2. Changes in culm length and culm composition; 3. Changes in growth types; 4. Physiological mutants; 5. Changes in awns; 6. Changes in seed size and shape; 7. Changes in leaf blades; 8. Changes in anthocyanin and colour; 9. Resistance to barley powdery mildew. Barley is one of the most thoroughly investigated crops in terms of induction of mutations and mutation genetics. So far, about half of the mutants stored at the Nordic Gene Bank, have been analysed genetically; They constitute, however, only a minority of the 94 different mutant types. The genetic analyses have given valuable insights into the mutation process but also into the genetic architecture of various characters. A number of mutants of two-row barley have been registered and commercially released. One of the earliest released, Mari, an early maturing, daylength neutral, straw stiff mutant, is still grown in Iceland. The Swedish mutation material has been used in Sweden, but also in other countries, such as Denmark, Germany, and USA, for various studies providing a better understanding of the barley genome. The collection will be immensely valuable for future molecular genetical analyses of clone mutant genes. (author)

  20. A detailed study of gerJ mutants of Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburg, R J; Buchanan, C E; Parent, K; Halvorson, H O

    1986-08-01

    A total of nine gerJ mutants have now been isolated in Bacillus subtilis. All are defective in their spore germination properties, being blocked at an intermediate (phase grey) stage. The dormant spores are sensitive to heating at 90 degrees C and two of the mutants (generated by transposon insertion) produce spores sensitive at 80 degrees C. The spores of these two more extreme mutants had a visibly defective cortex when studied by electron microscopy, as did some of the other mutants. During sporulation, the acquisition of spore resistance properties and the appearance of the sporulation-specific penicillin-binding protein PBP5* were delayed. A strain probably carrying a lacZ fusion to the gerJ promoter demonstrated increased expression between t2 and t4. We propose that the gerJ locus is involved in the control of one or more sporulation-specific genes.

  1. Improvement of fermentation ability under baking-associated stress conditions by altering the POG1 gene expression in baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasano, Yu; Haitani, Yutaka; Hashida, Keisuke; Oshiro, Satoshi; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    During the bread-making process, yeast cells are exposed to many types of baking-associated stress. There is thus a demand within the baking industry for yeast strains with high fermentation abilities under these stress conditions. The POG1 gene, encoding a putative transcription factor involved in cell cycle regulation, is a multicopy suppressor of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae E3 ubiquitin ligase Rsp5 mutant. The pog1 mutant is sensitive to various stresses. Our results suggested that the POG1 gene is involved in stress tolerance in yeast cells. In this study, we showed that overexpression of the POG1 gene in baker's yeast conferred increased fermentation ability in high-sucrose-containing dough, which is used for sweet dough baking. Furthermore, deletion of the POG1 gene drastically increased the fermentation ability in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress, which would be a useful characteristic for frozen dough baking. Thus, the engineering of yeast strains to control the POG1 gene expression level would be a novel method for molecular breeding of baker's yeast. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mitotic chromosome transmission fidelity mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, F.; Gerring, S.L.; Connelly, C.; Hieter, P.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have isolated 136 independent EMS-induced mutations in haploid yeast strains that exhibit decreased chromosome transmission fidelity in mitosis. Eight-five percent of the mutations are recessive and 15% are partially dominant. Complementation analysis between MATa and MATα isolates identifies 11 chromosome transmission fidelity (CTF) complementation groups, the largest of which is identical to CHL1. For 49 independent mutations, no corresponding allele has been recovered in the opposite mating type. The initial screen monitored the stability of a centromere-linked color marker on a nonessential yeast chromosome fragment; the mitotic inheritance of natural yeast chromosome III is also affected by the ctf mutations. Of the 136 isolates identified, seven were inviable at 37 degree and five were inviable at 11 degree. In all cases tested, these temperature conditional lethalities cosegregated with the chromosome instability phenotype. Five additional complementation groups (ctf12 through ctf16) have been defined by complementation analysis of the mutations causing inviability at 37 degree. All of the mutant strains showed normal sensitivity to ultraviolet and γ-irradiation

  3. Rif1 acts through Protein Phosphatase 1 but independent of replication timing to suppress telomere extension in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedziora, Sylwia; Gali, Vamsi K; Wilson, Rosemary H C; Clark, Kate R M; Nieduszynski, Conrad A; Hiraga, Shin-Ichiro; Donaldson, Anne D

    2018-05-04

    The Rif1 protein negatively regulates telomeric TG repeat length in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but how it prevents telomere over-extension is unknown. Rif1 was recently shown to control DNA replication by acting as a Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1)-targeting subunit. Therefore, we investigated whether Rif1 controls telomere length by targeting PP1 activity. We find that a Rif1 mutant defective for PP1 interaction causes a long-telomere phenotype, similar to that of rif1Δ cells. Tethering PP1 at a specific telomere partially substitutes for Rif1 in limiting TG repeat length, confirming the importance of PP1 in telomere length control. Ablating Rif1-PP1 interaction is known to cause precocious activation of telomere-proximal replication origins and aberrantly early telomere replication. However, we find that Rif1 still limits telomere length even if late replication is forced through deletion of nearby replication origins, indicating that Rif1 can control telomere length independent of replication timing. Moreover we find that, even at a de novo telomere created after DNA synthesis during a mitotic block, Rif1-PP1 interaction is required to suppress telomere lengthening and prevent inappropriate recruitment of Tel1 kinase. Overall, our results show that Rif1 controls telomere length by recruiting PP1 to directly suppress telomerase-mediated TG repeat lengthening.

  4. A mycobacterial smc null mutant is proficient in DNA repair and long-term survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güthlein, Carolin; Wanner, Roger M; Sander, Peter; Böttger, Erik C; Springer, Burkhard

    2008-01-01

    SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) proteins play fundamental roles in various aspects of chromosome organization and dynamics, including repair of DNA damage. Mutant strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis defective in SMC were constructed. Surprisingly, inactivation of smc did not result in recognizable phenotypes in hallmark assays characteristic for the function of these genes. This is in contrast to data for smc null mutants in other species.

  5. A Mycobacterial smc Null Mutant Is Proficient in DNA Repair and Long-Term Survival▿

    OpenAIRE

    Güthlein, Carolin; Wanner, Roger M.; Sander, Peter; Böttger, Erik C.; Springer, Burkhard

    2007-01-01

    SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) proteins play fundamental roles in various aspects of chromosome organization and dynamics, including repair of DNA damage. Mutant strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis defective in SMC were constructed. Surprisingly, inactivation of smc did not result in recognizable phenotypes in hallmark assays characteristic for the function of these genes. This is in contrast to data for smc null mutants in other species.

  6. Mutation of a Broadly Conserved Operon (RL3499-RL3502) from Rhizobium leguminosarum Biovar viciae Causes Defects in Cell Morphology and Envelope Integrity▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlinde, Elizabeth M.; Magnus, Samantha A.; Tambalo, Dinah D.; Koval, Susan F.; Yost, Christopher K.

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial cell envelope is of critical importance to the function and survival of the cell; it acts as a barrier against harmful toxins while allowing the flow of nutrients into the cell. It also serves as a point of physical contact between a bacterial cell and its host. Hence, the cell envelope of Rhizobium leguminosarum is critical to cell survival under both free-living and symbiotic conditions. Transposon mutagenesis of R. leguminosarum strain 3841 followed by a screen to isolate mutants with defective cell envelopes led to the identification of a novel conserved operon (RL3499-RL3502) consisting of a putative moxR-like AAA+ ATPase, a hypothetical protein with a domain of unknown function (designated domain of unknown function 58), and two hypothetical transmembrane proteins. Mutation of genes within this operon resulted in increased sensitivity to membrane-disruptive agents such as detergents, hydrophobic antibiotics, and alkaline pH. On minimal media, the mutants retain their rod shape but are roughly 3 times larger than the wild type. On media containing glycine or peptides such as yeast extract, the mutants form large, distorted spheres and are incapable of sustained growth under these culture conditions. Expression of the operon is maximal during the stationary phase of growth and is reduced in a chvG mutant, indicating a role for this sensor kinase in regulation of the operon. Our findings provide the first functional insight into these genes of unknown function, suggesting a possible role in cell envelope development in Rhizobium leguminosarum. Given the broad conservation of these genes among the Alphaproteobacteria, the results of this study may also provide insight into the physiological role of these genes in other Alphaproteobacteria, including the animal pathogen Brucella. PMID:21357485

  7. Lager Yeast Comes of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic fermentations have accompanied human civilizations throughout our history. Lager yeasts have a several-century-long tradition of providing fresh beer with clean taste. The yeast strains used for lager beer fermentation have long been recognized as hybrids between two Saccharomyces species. We summarize the initial findings on this hybrid nature, the genomics/transcriptomics of lager yeasts, and established targets of strain improvements. Next-generation sequencing has provided fast access to yeast genomes. Its use in population genomics has uncovered many more hybridization events within Saccharomyces species, so that lager yeast hybrids are no longer the exception from the rule. These findings have led us to propose network evolution within Saccharomyces species. This “web of life” recognizes the ability of closely related species to exchange DNA and thus drain from a combined gene pool rather than be limited to a gene pool restricted by speciation. Within the domesticated lager yeasts, two groups, the Saaz and Frohberg groups, can be distinguished based on fermentation characteristics. Recent evidence suggests that these groups share an evolutionary history. We thus propose to refer to the Saaz group as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and to the Frohberg group as Saccharomyces pastorianus based on their distinct genomes. New insight into the hybrid nature of lager yeast will provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:25084862

  8. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  9. Strategy for Adapting Wine Yeasts for Bioethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R. Lankford

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast strains 71B-1122 and K1-V1116 were used to derive strains that could tolerate and produce higher ethanol yields. Respiratory-deficient mutants resistant to 500 mg/mL lycorine were isolated. Two mutants, 71B-1122 YEBr L3 and K1-V1116 YEBr L4, were shown to achieve about 10% and 18% improvement in their glucose-to-ethanol conversion efficiency compared to their respective parent strains. The K1-V1116 YEBr L4 in particular can tolerate an ethanol yield of 18.8 ± 0.8% at 3.5 weeks of fermentation and continued to consume most of the sugar until less than 1% glucose was left.

  10. Implication of Ca2+ in the regulation of replicative life span of budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubakiyama, Ryohei; Mizunuma, Masaki; Gengyo, Anri; Yamamoto, Josuke; Kume, Kazunori; Miyakawa, Tokichi; Hirata, Dai

    2011-08-19

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca(2+)-triggered signaling pathways are used to regulate a wide variety of cellular processes. Calcineurin, a highly conserved Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, plays key roles in the regulation of diverse biological processes in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. We isolated a mutant of the SIR3 gene, implicated in the regulation of life span, as a suppressor of the Ca(2+) sensitivity of zds1Δ cells in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, we investigated a relationship between Ca(2+) signaling and life span in yeast. Here we show that Ca(2+) affected the replicative life span (RLS) of yeast. Increased external and intracellular Ca(2+) levels caused a reduction in their RLS. Consistently, the increase in calcineurin activity by either the zds1 deletion or the constitutively activated calcineurin reduced RLS. Indeed, the shortened RLS of zds1Δ cells was suppressed by the calcineurin deletion. Further, the calcineurin deletion per se promoted aging without impairing the gene silencing typically observed in short-lived sir mutants, indicating that calcineurin plays an important role in a regulation of RLS even under normal growth condition. Thus, our results indicate that Ca(2+) homeostasis/Ca(2+) signaling are required to regulate longevity in budding yeast.

  11. A rice tonoplastic calcium exchanger, OsCCX2 mediates Ca2+/cation transport in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Akhilesh K.; Shankar, Alka; Jha, Saroj K.; Kanwar, Poonam; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2015-01-01

    In plant cell, cations gradient in cellular compartments is maintained by synergistic action of various exchangers, pumps and channels. The Arabidopsis exchanger family members (AtCCX3 and AtCCX5) were previously studied and belong to CaCA (calcium cation exchangers) superfamily while none of the rice CCXs has been functionally characterized for their cation transport activities till date. Rice genome encode four CCXs and only OsCCX2 transcript showed differential expression under abiotic stresses and Ca2+ starvation conditions. The OsCCX2 localized to tonoplast and suppresses the Ca2+ sensitivity of K667 (low affinity Ca2+ uptake deficient) yeast mutant under excess CaCl2 conditions. In contrast to AtCCXs, OsCCX2 expressing K667 yeast cells show tolerance towards excess Na+, Li+, Fe2+, Zn2+ and Co2+ and suggest its ability to transport both mono as well as divalent cations in yeast. Additionally, in contrast to previously characterized AtCCXs, OsCCX2 is unable to complement yeast trk1trk2 double mutant suggesting inability to transport K+ in yeast system. These finding suggest that OsCCX2 having distinct metal transport properties than previously characterized plant CCXs. OsCCX2 can be used as potential candidate for enhancing the abiotic stress tolerance in plants as well as for phytoremediation of heavy metal polluted soil. PMID:26607171

  12. Phenotypic and epistatic grouping of hypo- and hyper-rec mus mutants in Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafer, E; Chae, S K

    1994-03-01

    The mutants musK to musS of Aspergillus nidulans are sensitive to methyl-methanesulfonate (MMS) and several of them are meiotic-defective and alter mitotic recombination frequencies. All were found to be cross-sensitive to 4-nitro-quinoline-N-oxide (4-NQO) but unexpectedly none of them was hypersensitive to gamma-rays and few to UV light. Double mus; uvs mutants were constructed to test for interactions with uvs mutations of the four epistatic groups of Aspergillus, "UvsF", "UvsC", "UvsI", and "UvsB". All meiotic-defective mus mutations caused some lethal interactions, usually with uvsF. None of them showed epistasis with UvsF or UvsB group mutants and one, musO, may represent a new group. Three mus mutations that affect recombination were assigned to the UvsC group, namely musN and K, and also musL which is recombination-defective and closely resembles uvsC. While uvsC mutants are mutators and lack UV-mutagenesis, most mus mutants had no effects on mutation. Only musR, which appeared epistatic with uvsI, showed reduced UV-reversion frequencies similar to uvsI. The recombination-proficient mus mutants appeared to be epistatic with more than one group, but in several cases sensitivities were slight and overlaps insufficient to obtain corroborating results with MMS and 4-NQO.

  13. Impaired cholesterol esterification in primary brain cultures of the lysosomal cholesterol storage disorder (LCSD) mouse mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, S.C.; Suresh, S.; Weintroub, H.; Brady, R.O.; Pentchev, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Esterification of cholesterol was investigated in primary neuroglial cultures obtained from newborn lysosomal cholesterol storage disorder (LCSD) mouse mutants. An impairment in 3 H-oleic acid incorporation into cholesteryl esters was demonstrated in cultures of homozygous LCSD brain. Primary cultures derived from other phenotypically normal pups of the carrier breeders esterified cholesterol at normal levels or at levels which were intermediary between normal and deficient indicating a phenotypic expression of the LCSD heterozygote genotype. These observations on LCSD mutant brain cells indicate that the defect in cholesterol esterification is closely related to the primary genetic defect and is expressed in neuroglial cells in culture

  14. Yeasts preservation: alternatives for lyophilisation

    OpenAIRE

    Nyanga, Loveness K.; Nout, Martinus J. R.; Smid, Eddy J.; Boekhout, Teun; Zwietering, Marcel H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of two low-cost, low technology traditional methods for drying starter cultures with standard lyophilisation. Lyophilised yeast cultures and yeast cultures preserved in dry rice cakes and dry plant fibre strands were examined for viable cell counts during 6 months storage at 4 and 25 °C. None of the yeast cultures showed a significant loss in viable cell count during 6 months of storage at 4 °C upon lyophilisation and preservation in dry rice cak...

  15. [Distiller Yeasts Producing Antibacterial Peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyachko, E V; Morozkina, E V; Zaitchik, B Ts; Benevolensky, S V

    2015-01-01

    A new method of controlling lactic acid bacteria contamination was developed with the use of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains producing antibacterial peptides. Genes encoding the antibacterial peptides pediocin and plantaricin with codons preferable for S. cerevisiae were synthesized, and a system was constructed for their secretory expression. Recombinant S. cerevisiae strains producing antibacterial peptides effectively inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus sakei, Pediacoccus pentasaceus, Pediacoccus acidilactici, etc. The application of distiller yeasts producing antibacterial peptides enhances the ethanol yield in cases of bacterial contamination. Recombinant yeasts producing the antibacterial peptides pediocin and plantaricin can successfully substitute the available industrial yeast strains upon ethanol production.

  16. Mutants of alfalfa mosaic virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roosien, J.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis the isolation and characterization of a number of mutants of alfalfa mosaic virus, a plant virus with a coat protein dependent genome, is described. Thermo-sensitive (ts) mutants were selected since, at least theoretically, ts mutations can be present in all virus coded functions. It was found that a high percentage of spontaneous mutants, isolated because of their aberrant symptoms, were ts. The majority of these isolates could grow at the non-permissive temperature in the presence of a single wild type (wt) component. To increase the mutation rate virus preparations were treated with several mutagens. After nitrous acid treatment or irradiation with ultraviolet light, an increase in the level of mutations was observed. UV irradiation was preferred since it did not require large amounts of purified viral components. During the preliminary characterization of potential ts mutants the author also obtained one structural and several symptom mutants which were analysed further (chapter 7, 8 and 9). The properties of the ts mutants are described in chapter 3-7. (Auth.)

  17. Root hair mutants of barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engvild, K.C.; Rasmussen, K.

    2005-01-01

    Barley mutants without root hairs or with short or reduced root hairs were isolated among M 2 seeds of 'Lux' barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) after acidified sodium azide mutagenesis. Root hair mutants are investigated intensively in Arabidopsis where about 40 genes are known. A few root hair mutants are known in maize, rice, barley and tomato. Many plants without root hairs grow quite well with good plant nutrition, and mutants have been used for investigations of uptake of strongly bound nutrients like phosphorus, iron, zinc and silicon. Seed of 'Lux' barley (Sejet Plant Breeding, Denmark) were soaked overnight, and then treated with 1.5-millimolarsodium azide in 0.1 molar sodium phosphate buffer, pH 3, for 2.5 hours according to the IAEA Manual on Mutation Breeding (2nd Ed.). After rinsing in tap water and air-drying, the M 2 seeds were sown in the field the same day. Spikes, 4-6 per M 1 plant, were harvested. The mutation frequency was similar to that obtained with other barley cultivars from which low-phytate mutants were isolated [5]. Seeds were germinated on black filter paper in tap water for 3 or 4 days before scoring for root hair mutants

  18. Improvement of lipid production by the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides through UV mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Ryosuke; Kashihara, Tomomi; Ogino, Hiroyasu

    2017-05-01

    Oleaginous yeasts are considered a promising alternative lipid source for biodiesel fuel production. In this study, we attempted to improve the lipid productivity of the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides through UV irradiation mutagenesis and selection based on ethanol and H 2 O 2 tolerance or cerulenin, a fatty acid synthetase inhibitor. Glucose consumption, cell growth, and lipid production of mutants were evaluated. The transcription level of genes involved in lipid production was also evaluated in mutants. The ethanol and H 2 O 2 tolerant strain 8766 2-31M and the cerulenin resistant strain 8766 3-11C were generated by UV mutagenesis. The 8766 2-31M mutant showed a higher lipid production rate, and the 8766 3-11C mutant produced a larger amount of lipid and had a higher lipid production rate than the wild type strain. Transcriptional analysis revealed that, similar to the wild type strain, the ACL1 and GND1 genes were expressed at significantly low levels, whereas IDP1 and ME1 were highly expressed. In conclusion, lipid productivity in the oleaginous yeast R. toruloides was successfully improved via UV mutagenesis and selection. The study also identified target genes for improving lipid productivity through gene recombination.

  19. Accumulation of linear mitochondrial DNA fragments in the nucleus shortens the chronological life span of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xin; Ivessa, Andreas S

    2012-10-01

    Translocation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) fragments to the nucleus and insertion of those fragments into nuclear DNA has been observed in several organisms ranging from yeast to plants and mammals. Disruption of specific nuclear genes by de novo insertions of mtDNA fragments has even been linked to the initiation of several human diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that baker's yeast strains with high rates of mtDNA fragments migrating to the nucleus (yme1-1 mutant) exhibit short chronological life spans (CLS). The yeast CLS is determined by the survival of non-dividing cell populations. Here, we show that lack of the non-homologous-end-joining enzyme DNA ligase IV (DNL4) can rescue the short CLS of the yme1-1 mutant. In fission yeast, DNA ligase IV has been shown to be required for the capture of mtDNA fragments during the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks in nuclear DNA. In further analyses using pulse field gel and 2D gel electrophoresis we demonstrate that linear mtDNA fragments with likely nuclear localization accumulate in the yme1-1 mutant. The accumulation of the linear mtDNA fragments in the yme1-1 mutant is suppressed when Dnl4 is absent. We propose that the linear nuclear mtDNA fragments accelerate the aging process in the yme1-1 mutant cells by possibly affecting nuclear processes including DNA replication, recombination, and repair as well as transcription of nuclear genes. We speculate further that Dnl4 protein has besides its function as a ligase also a role in DNA protection. Dnl4 protein may stabilize the linear mtDNA fragments in the nucleus by binding to their physical ends. In the absence of Dnl4 protein the linear fragments are therefore unprotected and possibly degraded by nuclear nucleases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutants of Pachysolen tannophilus with Improved Production of Ethanol from d-Xylose †

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hung; James, Allen P.; Zahab, Diana M.; Mahmourides, George; Maleszka, Ryszard; Schneider, Henry

    1986-01-01

    The conversion of d-xylose to ethanol by the yeast Pachysolen tannophilus is relatively inefficient in batch culture. The inefficiency has been attributed in part to concurrent utilization of ethanol in the presence of appreciable concentrations of d-xylose and to the formation of xylitol and other by-products. To increase the concentration of ethanol accumulated in batch cultures, UV-induced mutants of P. tannophilus were selected on the basis of diminished growth on ethanol. Eleven independ...

  1. Yeast strains and methods of use thereof

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard, Matthew Robert; Gardner, Richard Clague; Anfang, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to yeast strains and, in particular, to yeast stains for use in fermentation processes. The invention also relates to methods of fermentation using the yeast strains of the invention either alone or in combination with other yeast strains. The invention thither relates to methods for the selection of yeast strains suitable for fermentation cultures by screening for various metabolic products and the use of specific nutrient sources.

  2. Mutants induced in winter rye (Secale cereale L.): Short straw-mutant No. 2714 and late-senescence mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muszynski, S; Darlewska, M [Department of Plant Breeding and Seed Science, Warsaw Agricultural University, Warsaw (Poland)

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutants were induced by treating dormant seeds with ionizing radiation (fast neutrons) or chemicals (N-nitroso-N-ethyl urea or sodium azide). Among several mutants obtained, of special value is the short-straw mutant No. 2714 and a late senescent mutant. (author)

  3. Biotechnical Microbiology, yeast and bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Ingrid Stampe

    1999-01-01

    This section contains the following single lecture notes: Eukaryotic Cell Biology. Kingdom Fungi. Cell Division. Meiosis and Recombination. Genetics of Yeast. Organisation of the Chromosome. Organization and genetics of the mitochondrial Geneme. Regulatio of Gene Expression. Intracellular Compart...

  4. Production and characterization of radiation-sensitive meiotic mutants of Coprinus cinereus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolan, M.E.; Tremel, C.J.; Pukkila, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    We have isolated four gamma-sensitive mutants of the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus. When homozygous, two of these (rad 3-1 and rad 9-1) produce fruiting bodies with very few viable basidiospores, the products of meiosis in this organism. A less radiation-sensitive allele of RAD 3, rad 3-2, causes no apparent meiotic defect in homozygous strains. Qua