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Sample records for yeast metabolism control

  1. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  2. Metabolic regulation of yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiechter, A.

    1982-12-01

    Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

  3. Synthetic control of a fitness tradeoff in yeast nitrogen metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jack J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial communities are involved in many processes relevant to industrial and medical biotechnology, such as the formation of biofilms, lignocellulosic degradation, and hydrogen production. The manipulation of synthetic and natural microbial communities and their underlying ecological parameters, such as fitness, evolvability, and variation, is an increasingly important area of research for synthetic biology. Results Here, we explored how synthetic control of an endogenous circuit can be used to regulate a tradeoff between fitness in resource abundant and resource limited environments in a population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that noise in the expression of a key enzyme in ammonia assimilation, Gdh1p, mediated a tradeoff between growth in low nitrogen environments and stress resistance in high ammonia environments. We implemented synthetic control of an endogenous Gdh1p regulatory network to construct an engineered strain in which the fitness of the population was tunable in response to an exogenously-added small molecule across a range of ammonia environments. Conclusion The ability to tune fitness and biological tradeoffs will be important components of future efforts to engineer microbial communities.

  4. Applications of computational modeling in metabolic engineering of yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Lahtvee, Petri-Jaan; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    a preferred flux distribution. These methods point to strategies for altering gene expression; however, fluxes are often controlled by post-transcriptional events. Moreover, GEMs are usually not taking into account metabolic regulation, thermodynamics and enzyme kinetics. To facilitate metabolic engineering......, it is necessary to expand the modeling of metabolism to consider kinetics of individual processes. This review will give an overview about models available for metabolic engineering of yeast and discusses their applications....

  5. Regulatory aspects of methanol metabolism in yeasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotsenko, Y.A.; Bystrykh, L.V.; Ubiyvovk, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Formaldehyde is the first and key intermediate in the metabolism of methylotrophic yeasts since it stands at a branch point of pathways for methanol oxidation and assimilation. Methanol and, formaldehyde are toxic compounds which severely affect the growth rate, yield coefficient, etc., of yeasts. Two questions arise when considering regulation of methanol metabolism in yeasts how a nontoxic level of formaldehyde is maintained in the cell and how the formaldehyde flow is distributed into oxidation and assimilation. To answer these questions we studied the role of GSH, which spontaneously binds formaldehyde, yielding S-hydroxymethylglutathione; in vivo rates of formaldehyde dissimilation and assimilation by using [ 14 C]methanol; profiles of enzymes responsible for production and utilization of formaldehyde; and levels of metabolites affecting dissimilation and assimilation of formaldehyde. All of the experiments were carried out with the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii KD1. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  6. Yeast metabolic engineering for hemicellulosic ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Van Vleet; Thomas W. Jeffries

    2009-01-01

    Efficient fermentation of hemicellulosic sugars is critical for the bioconversion of lignocellulosics to ethanol. Efficient sugar uptake through the heterologous expression of yeast and fungal xylose/glucose transporters can improve fermentation if other metabolic steps are not rate limiting. Rectification of cofactor imbalances through heterologous expression of...

  7. Population FBA predicts metabolic phenotypes in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Labhsetwar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Using protein counts sampled from single cell proteomics distributions to constrain fluxes through a genome-scale model of metabolism, Population flux balance analysis (Population FBA successfully described metabolic heterogeneity in a population of independent Escherichia coli cells growing in a defined medium. We extend the methodology to account for correlations in protein expression arising from the co-regulation of genes and apply it to study the growth of independent Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in two different growth media. We find the partitioning of flux between fermentation and respiration predicted by our model agrees with recent 13C fluxomics experiments, and that our model largely recovers the Crabtree effect (the experimentally known bias among certain yeast species toward fermentation with the production of ethanol even in the presence of oxygen, while FBA without proteomics constraints predicts respirative metabolism almost exclusively. The comparisons to the 13C study showed improvement upon inclusion of the correlations and motivated a technique to systematically identify inconsistent kinetic parameters in the literature. The minor secretion fluxes for glycerol and acetate are underestimated by our method, which indicate a need for further refinements to the metabolic model. For yeast cells grown in synthetic defined (SD medium, the calculated broad distribution of growth rates matches experimental observations from single cell studies, and we characterize several metabolic phenotypes within our modeled populations that make use of diverse pathways. Fast growing yeast cells are predicted to perform significant amount of respiration, use serine-glycine cycle and produce ethanol in mitochondria as opposed to slow growing cells. We use a genetic algorithm to determine the proteomics constraints necessary to reproduce the growth rate distributions seen experimentally. We find that a core set of 51 constraints are essential but

  8. Computational Modeling of Lipid Metabolism in Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Schützhold

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipid metabolism is essential for all major cell functions and has recently gained increasing attention in research and health studies. However, mathematical modeling by means of classical approaches such as stoichiometric networks and ordinary differential equation systems has not yet provided satisfactory insights, due to the complexity of lipid metabolism characterized by many different species with only slight differences and by promiscuous multifunctional enzymes.Here, we present a object-oriented stochastic model approach as a way to cope with the complex lipid metabolic network. While all lipid species are treated objects in the model, they can be modified by the respective converting reactions based on reaction rules, a hybrid method that integrates benefits of agent-based and classical stochastic simulation. This approach allows to follow the dynamics of all lipid species with different fatty acids, different degrees of saturation and different headgroups over time and to analyze the effect of parameter changes, potential mutations in the catalyzing enzymes or provision of different precursors. Applied to yeast metabolism during one cell cycle period, we could analyze the distribution of all lipids to the various membranes in time-dependent manner.The presented approach allows to efficiently treat the complexity of cellular lipid metabolism and to derive conclusions on the time- and location-dependent distributions of lipid species and their properties such as saturation. It is widely applicable, easily extendable and will provide further insights in healthy and diseased states of cell metabolism.

  9. Recent applications of synthetic biology tools for yeast metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Krogh; Keasling, Jay

    2015-01-01

    to engineer microbial chemical factories has steadily decreased, improvement is still needed. Through the development of synthetic biology tools for key microbial hosts, it should be possible to further decrease the development times and improve the reliability of the resulting microorganism. Together...... with continuous decreases in price and improvements in DNA synthesis, assembly and sequencing, synthetic biology tools will rationalize time-consuming strain engineering, improve control of metabolic fluxes, and diversify screening assays for cellular metabolism. This review outlines some recently developed...... synthetic biology tools and their application to improve production of chemicals and fuels in yeast. Finally, we provide a perspective for the challenges that lie ahead....

  10. Reserve carbohydrates metabolism in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, J; Parrou, J L

    2001-01-01

    Glycogen and trehalose are the two glucose stores of yeast cells. The large variations in the cell content of these two compounds in response to different environmental changes indicate that their metabolism is controlled by complex regulatory systems. In this review we present information on the regulation of the activity of the enzymes implicated in the pathways of synthesis and degradation of glycogen and trehalose as well as on the transcriptional control of the genes encoding them. cAMP and the protein kinases Snf1 and Pho85 appear as major actors in this regulation. From a metabolic point of view, glucose-6-phosphate seems the major effector in the net synthesis of glycogen and trehalose. We discuss also the implication of the recently elucidated TOR-dependent nutrient signalling pathway in the control of the yeast glucose stores and its integration in growth and cell division. The unexpected roles of glycogen and trehalose found in the control of glycolytic flux, stress responses and energy stores for the budding process, demonstrate that their presence confers survival and reproductive advantages to the cell. The findings discussed provide for the first time a teleonomic value for the presence of two different glucose stores in the yeast cell.

  11. Yeast metabolic engineering--targeting sterol metabolism and terpenoid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wriessnegger, Tamara; Pichler, Harald

    2013-07-01

    Terpenoids comprise various structures conferring versatile functions to eukaryotes, for example in the form of prenyl-anchors they attach proteins to membranes. The physiology of eukaryotic membranes is fine-tuned by another terpenoid class, namely sterols. Evidence is accumulating that numerous membrane proteins require specific sterol structural features for function. Moreover, sterols are intermediates in the synthesis of steroids serving as hormones in higher eukaryotes. Like steroids many compounds of the terpenoid family do not contribute to membrane architecture, but serve as signalling, protective or attractant/repellent molecules. Particularly plants have developed a plenitude of terpenoid biosynthetic routes branching off early in the sterol biosynthesis pathway and, thereby, forming one of the largest groups of naturally occurring organic compounds. Many of these aromatic and volatile molecules are interesting for industrial application ranging from foods to pharmaceuticals. Combining the fortunate situation that sterol biosynthesis is highly conserved in eukaryotes with the amenability of yeasts to genetic and metabolic engineering, basically all naturally occurring terpenoids might be produced involving yeasts. Such engineered yeasts are useful for the study of biological functions and molecular interactions of terpenoids as well as for the large-scale production of high-value compounds, which are unavailable in sufficient amounts from natural sources due to their low abundance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Glycosylceramide modifies the flavor and metabolic characteristics of sake yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannatul Ferdouse

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In the manufacture of sake, Japanese traditional rice wine, sake yeast is fermented with koji, which is steamed rice fermented with the non-pathogenic fungus Aspergillus oryzae. During fermentation, sake yeast requires lipids, such as unsaturated fatty acids and sterols, in addition to substances provided by koji enzymes for fermentation. However, the role of sphingolipids on the brewing characteristics of sake yeast has not been studied. In this study, we revealed that glycosylceramide, one of the sphingolipids abundant in koji, affects yeast fermentation. The addition of soy, A. oryzae, and Grifola frondosa glycosylceramide conferred a similar effect on the flavor profiles of sake yeast. In particular, the addition of A. oryzae and G. frondosa glycosylceramide were very similar in terms of the decreases in ethyl caprylate and ethyl 9-decenoate. The addition of soy glycosylceramide induced metabolic changes to sake yeast such as a decrease in glucose, increases in ethanol and glycerol and changes in several amino acids and organic acids concentrations. Tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, pyruvate metabolism, starch and sucrose metabolism, and glycerolipid metabolism were overrepresented in the cultures incubated with sake yeast and soy glycosylceramide. This is the first study of the effect of glycosylceramide on the flavor and metabolic profile of sake yeast.

  13. Glycosylceramide modifies the flavor and metabolic characteristics of sake yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdouse, Jannatul; Yamamoto, Yuki; Taguchi, Seiga; Yoshizaki, Yumiko; Takamine, Kazunori; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    In the manufacture of sake, Japanese traditional rice wine, sake yeast is fermented with koji, which is steamed rice fermented with the non-pathogenic fungus Aspergillus oryzae . During fermentation, sake yeast requires lipids, such as unsaturated fatty acids and sterols, in addition to substances provided by koji enzymes for fermentation. However, the role of sphingolipids on the brewing characteristics of sake yeast has not been studied. In this study, we revealed that glycosylceramide, one of the sphingolipids abundant in koji, affects yeast fermentation. The addition of soy, A. oryzae , and Grifola frondosa glycosylceramide conferred a similar effect on the flavor profiles of sake yeast. In particular, the addition of A. oryzae and G. frondosa glycosylceramide were very similar in terms of the decreases in ethyl caprylate and ethyl 9-decenoate. The addition of soy glycosylceramide induced metabolic changes to sake yeast such as a decrease in glucose, increases in ethanol and glycerol and changes in several amino acids and organic acids concentrations. Tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, pyruvate metabolism, starch and sucrose metabolism, and glycerolipid metabolism were overrepresented in the cultures incubated with sake yeast and soy glycosylceramide. This is the first study of the effect of glycosylceramide on the flavor and metabolic profile of sake yeast.

  14. Applications of computational modeling in metabolic engineering of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhoven, Eduard J; Lahtvee, Petri-Jaan; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-02-01

    Generally, a microorganism's phenotype can be described by its pattern of metabolic fluxes. Although fluxes cannot be measured directly, inference of fluxes is well established. In biotechnology the aim is often to increase the capacity of specific fluxes. For this, metabolic engineering methods have been developed and applied extensively. Many of these rely on balancing of intracellular metabolites, redox, and energy fluxes, using genome-scale models (GEMs) that in combination with appropriate objective functions and constraints can be used to predict potential gene targets for obtaining a preferred flux distribution. These methods point to strategies for altering gene expression; however, fluxes are often controlled by post-transcriptional events. Moreover, GEMs are usually not taking into account metabolic regulation, thermodynamics and enzyme kinetics. To facilitate metabolic engineering, tools from synthetic biology have emerged, enabling integration and assembly of naturally nonexistent, but well-characterized components into a living organism. To describe these systems kinetic models are often used and to integrate these systems with the standard metabolic engineering approach, it is necessary to expand the modeling of metabolism to consider kinetics of individual processes. This review will give an overview about models available for metabolic engineering of yeast and discusses their applications. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  15. Flux control through protein phosphorylation in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yu; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important mechanisms regulating metabolism as it can directly modify metabolic enzymes by the addition of phosphate groups. Attributed to such a rapid and reversible mechanism, cells can adjust metabolism rapidly in response to temporal changes. The yeast...... as well as identify mechanisms underlying human metabolic diseases. Here we collect functional phosphorylation events of 41 enzymes involved in yeast metabolism and demonstrate functional mechanisms and the application of this information in metabolic engineering. From a systems biology perspective, we...... describe the development of phosphoproteomics in yeast as well as approaches to analysing the phosphoproteomics data. Finally, we focus on integrated analyses with other omics data sets and genome-scale metabolic models. Despite the advances, future studies improving both experimental technologies...

  16. Engineering yeast metabolism for production of fuels and chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    faster development of metabolically engineered strains that can be used for production of fuels and chemicals. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used for production of fuels, chemicals, pharmaceuticals and materials. Through metabolic engineering of this yeast a number of novel industrial...... as for metabolic design. In this lecture it will be demonstrated how the Design-Build-Test cycle of metabolic engineering has allowed for development of yeast cell factories for production of a range of different fuels and chemicals. Some examples of different technologies will be presented together with examples......Metabolic engineering relies on the Design-Build-Test cycle. This cycle includes technologies like mathematical modeling of metabolism, genome editing and advanced tools for phenotypic characterization. In recent years there have been advances in several of these technologies, which has enabled...

  17. Visible light alters yeast metabolic rhythms by inhibiting respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, James Brian; Davis, Chris R.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2013-01-01

    In some organisms, respiration fluctuates cyclically, and these rhythms can be a sensitive gauge of metabolism. Constant or pulsatile exposure of yeast to visible wavelengths of light significantly alters and/or initiates these respiratory oscillations, revealing a further dimension of the challenges to yeast living in natural environments. Our results also have implications for the use of light as research tools—e.g., for excitation of fluorescence microscopically—even in organisms such as y...

  18. Metabolism and Regulation of Glycerolipids in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Susan A.; Kohlwein, Sepp D.; Carman, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Due to its genetic tractability and increasing wealth of accessible data, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model system of choice for the study of the genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology of eukaryotic lipid metabolism. Glycerolipids (e.g., phospholipids and triacylglycerol) and their precursors are synthesized and metabolized by enzymes associated with the cytosol and membranous organelles, including endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and lipid droplets. Genetic and biochemical analyses have revealed that glycerolipids play important roles in cell signaling, membrane trafficking, and anchoring of membrane proteins in addition to membrane structure. The expression of glycerolipid enzymes is controlled by a variety of conditions including growth stage and nutrient availability. Much of this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level and involves the Ino2–Ino4 activation complex and the Opi1 repressor, which interacts with Ino2 to attenuate transcriptional activation of UASINO-containing glycerolipid biosynthetic genes. Cellular levels of phosphatidic acid, precursor to all membrane phospholipids and the storage lipid triacylglycerol, regulates transcription of UASINO-containing genes by tethering Opi1 to the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane and controlling its translocation into the nucleus, a mechanism largely controlled by inositol availability. The transcriptional activator Zap1 controls the expression of some phospholipid synthesis genes in response to zinc availability. Regulatory mechanisms also include control of catalytic activity of glycerolipid enzymes by water-soluble precursors, products and lipids, and covalent modification of phosphorylation, while in vivo function of some enzymes is governed by their subcellular location. Genome-wide genetic analysis indicates coordinate regulation between glycerolipid metabolism and a broad spectrum of metabolic pathways. PMID:22345606

  19. Analysis of RNA metabolism in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wise, Jo Ann; Nielsen, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Here we focus on the biogenesis and function of messenger RNA (mRNA) in fission yeast cells. Following a general introduction that also briefly touches on other classes of RNA, we provide an overview of methods used to analyze mRNAs throughout their life cycles....

  20. Homocysteine regulates fatty acid and lipid metabolism in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visram, Myriam; Radulovic, Maja; Steiner, Sabine; Malanovic, Nermina; Eichmann, Thomas O; Wolinski, Heimo; Rechberger, Gerald N; Tehlivets, Oksana

    2018-04-13

    S -Adenosyl-l-homocysteine hydrolase (AdoHcy hydrolase; Sah1 in yeast/AHCY in mammals) degrades AdoHcy, a by-product and strong product inhibitor of S -adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet)-dependent methylation reactions, to adenosine and homocysteine (Hcy). This reaction is reversible, so any elevation of Hcy levels, such as in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), drives the formation of AdoHcy, with detrimental consequences for cellular methylation reactions. HHcy, a pathological condition linked to cardiovascular and neurological disorders, as well as fatty liver among others, is associated with a deregulation of lipid metabolism. Here, we developed a yeast model of HHcy to identify mechanisms that dysregulate lipid metabolism. Hcy supplementation to wildtype cells up-regulated cellular fatty acid and triacylglycerol content and induced a shift in fatty acid composition, similar to changes observed in mutants lacking Sah1. Expression of the irreversible bacterial pathway for AdoHcy degradation in yeast allowed us to dissect the impact of AdoHcy accumulation on lipid metabolism from the impact of elevated Hcy. Expression of this pathway fully suppressed the growth deficit of sah1 mutants as well as the deregulation of lipid metabolism in both the sah1 mutant and Hcy-exposed wildtype, showing that AdoHcy accumulation mediates the deregulation of lipid metabolism in response to elevated Hcy in yeast. Furthermore, Hcy supplementation in yeast led to increased resistance to cerulenin, an inhibitor of fatty acid synthase, as well as to a concomitant decline of condensing enzymes involved in very long-chain fatty acid synthesis, in line with the observed shift in fatty acid content and composition. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Divergence of iron metabolism in wild Malaysian yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hana N; Mostovoy, Yulia; Hsu, Tiffany Y; Chang, Amanda H; Brem, Rachel B

    2013-12-09

    Comparative genomic studies have reported widespread variation in levels of gene expression within and between species. Using these data to infer organism-level trait divergence has proven to be a key challenge in the field. We have used a wild Malaysian population of S. cerevisiae as a test bed in the search to predict and validate trait differences based on observations of regulatory variation. Malaysian yeast, when cultured in standard medium, activated regulatory programs that protect cells from the toxic effects of high iron. Malaysian yeast also showed a hyperactive regulatory response during culture in the presence of excess iron and had a unique growth defect in conditions of high iron. Molecular validation experiments pinpointed the iron metabolism factors AFT1, CCC1, and YAP5 as contributors to these molecular and cellular phenotypes; in genome-scale sequence analyses, a suite of iron toxicity response genes showed evidence for rapid protein evolution in Malaysian yeast. Our findings support a model in which iron metabolism has diverged in Malaysian yeast as a consequence of a change in selective pressure, with Malaysian alleles shifting the dynamic range of iron response to low-iron concentrations and weakening resistance to extreme iron toxicity. By dissecting the iron scarcity specialist behavior of Malaysian yeast, our work highlights the power of expression divergence as a signpost for biologically and evolutionarily relevant variation at the organismal level. Interpreting the phenotypic relevance of gene expression variation is one of the primary challenges of modern genomics.

  2. Phenotypic and metabolic traits of commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Catarina; Lage, Patrícia; Vilela, Alice; Mendes-Faia, Arlete; Mendes-Ferreira, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Currently, pursuing yeast strains that display both a high potential fitness for alcoholic fermentation and a favorable impact on quality is a major goal in the alcoholic beverage industry. This considerable industrial interest has led to many studies characterizing the phenotypic and metabolic traits of commercial yeast populations. In this study, 20 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from different geographical origins exhibited high phenotypic diversity when their response to nine biotechnologically relevant conditions was examined. Next, the fermentation fitness and metabolic traits of eight selected strains with a unique phenotypic profile were evaluated in a high-sugar synthetic medium under two nitrogen regimes. Although the strains exhibited significant differences in nitrogen requirements and utilization rates, a direct relationship between nitrogen consumption, specific growth rate, cell biomass, cell viability, acetic acid and glycerol formation was only observed under high-nitrogen conditions. In contrast, the strains produced more succinic acid under the low-nitrogen regime, and a direct relationship with the final cell biomass was established. Glucose and fructose utilization patterns depended on both yeast strain and nitrogen availability. For low-nitrogen fermentation, three strains did not fully degrade the fructose. This study validates phenotypic and metabolic diversity among commercial wine yeasts and contributes new findings on the relationship between nitrogen availability, yeast cell growth and sugar utilization. We suggest that measuring nitrogen during the stationary growth phase is important because yeast cells fermentative activity is not exclusively related to population size, as previously assumed, but it is also related to the quantity of nitrogen consumed during this growth phase.

  3. Synthetic biology for engineering acetyl coenzyme a metabolism in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used cell factory for the production of fuels, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The use of this cell factory for cost-efficient production of novel fuels and chemicals requires high yields and low by-product production. Many industrially interesting...... chemicals are biosynthesized from acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), which serves as a central precursor metabolite in yeast. To ensure high yields in production of these chemicals, it is necessary to engineer the central carbon metabolism so that ethanol production is minimized (or eliminated) and acetyl...

  4. Enzymes of yeast polyphosphate metabolism: structure, enzymology and biological roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimaitė, Rūta; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is found in all living organisms. The known polyP functions in eukaryotes range from osmoregulation and virulence in parasitic protozoa to modulating blood coagulation, inflammation, bone mineralization and cellular signalling in mammals. However mechanisms of regulation and even the identity of involved proteins in many cases remain obscure. Most of the insights obtained so far stem from studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we provide a short overview of the properties and functions of known yeast polyP metabolism enzymes and discuss future directions for polyP research. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  5. Metabolic response to exogenous ethanol in yeast

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, we applied this approach to evaluate the effects of increasing concentration of exogenous ethanol on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentative metabolism. We show that the STOCSY analysis correctly identifies the different types of correlations among the enriched metabolites involved in the fermentation, ...

  6. Production of biopharmaceutical proteins by yeast: Advances through metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Production of recombinant proteins for use as pharmaceuticals, so-called biopharmaceuticals, is a multi-billion dollar industry. Many different cell factories are used for the production of biopharmaceuticals, but the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important cell factory as it is used for p...... production. The involvement of directed metabolic engineering through the integration of tools from genetic engineering, systems biology and mathematical modeling, is also discussed....... by yeast are human serum albumin, hepatitis vaccines and virus like particles used for vaccination against human papillomavirus. Here is given a brief overview of biopharmaceutical production by yeast and it is discussed how the secretory pathway can be engineered to ensure more efficient protein...

  7. Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    KAUST Repository

    Papsdorf, Katharina

    2015-09-03

    Background Protein aggregation and its pathological effects are the major cause of several neurodegenerative diseases. In Huntington’s disease an elongated stretch of polyglutamines within the protein Huntingtin leads to increased aggregation propensity. This induces cellular defects, culminating in neuronal loss, but the connection between aggregation and toxicity remains to be established. Results To uncover cellular pathways relevant for intoxication we used genome-wide analyses in a yeast model system and identify fourteen genes that, if deleted, result in higher polyglutamine toxicity. Several of these genes, like UGO1, ATP15 and NFU1 encode mitochondrial proteins, implying that a challenged mitochondrial system may become dysfunctional during polyglutamine intoxication. We further employed microarrays to decipher the transcriptional response upon polyglutamine intoxication, which exposes an upregulation of genes involved in sulfur and iron metabolism and mitochondrial Fe-S cluster formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative growth is impossible after intoxication with the polyglutamine protein. NMR-based metabolic analyses reveal that mitochondrial metabolism is reduced, leading to accumulation of metabolic intermediates in polyglutamine-intoxicated cells. Conclusion These data show that damages to the mitochondrial system occur in polyglutamine intoxicated yeast cells and suggest an intricate connection between polyglutamine-induced toxicity, mitochondrial functionality and iron homeostasis in this model system.

  8. Visible light alters yeast metabolic rhythms by inhibiting respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, James Brian; Davis, Chris R; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2013-12-24

    Exposure of cells to visible light in nature or in fluorescence microscopy often is considered to be relatively innocuous. However, using the yeast respiratory oscillation (YRO) as a sensitive measurement of metabolism, we find that non-UV visible light has a significant impact on yeast metabolism. Blue/green wavelengths of visible light shorten the period and dampen the amplitude of the YRO, which is an ultradian rhythm of cell metabolism and transcription. The wavelengths of light that have the greatest effect coincide with the peak absorption regions of cytochromes. Moreover, treating yeast with the electron transport inhibitor sodium azide has similar effects on the YRO as visible light. Because impairment of respiration by light would change several state variables believed to play vital roles in the YRO (e.g., oxygen tension and ATP levels), we tested oxygen's role in YRO stability and found that externally induced oxygen depletion can reset the phase of the oscillation, demonstrating that respiratory capacity plays a role in the oscillation's period and phase. Light-induced damage to the cytochromes also produces reactive oxygen species that up-regulate the oxidative stress response gene TRX2 that is involved in pathways that enable sustained growth in bright visible light. Therefore, visible light can modulate cellular rhythmicity and metabolism through unexpectedly photosensitive pathways.

  9. Bioactive Compounds Derived from the Yeast Metabolism of Aromatic Amino Acids during Alcoholic Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Mas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolites resulting from nitrogen metabolism in yeast are currently found in some fermented beverages such as wine and beer. Their study has recently attracted the attention of researchers. Some metabolites derived from aromatic amino acids are bioactive compounds that can behave as hormones or even mimic their role in humans and may also act as regulators in yeast. Although the metabolic pathways for their formation are well known, the physiological significance is still far from being understood. The understanding of this relevance will be a key element in managing the production of these compounds under controlled conditions, to offer fermented food with specific enrichment in these compounds or even to use the yeast as nutritional complements.

  10. Yeast vitality during cider fermentation: assessment by energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinsdale, M G; Lloyd, D; McIntyre, P; Jarvis, B

    1999-03-15

    In an apple juice-based medium, an ethanol-tolerant Australian wine-yeast used for cider manufacture produced more than 10% ethanol over a 5 week period. Growth of the inoculum (10(6) organisms ml(-1)) occurred to a population of 3.1 x 10(7) ml(-1) during the first few days; at the end of the fermentation only 5 x 10(5) yeasts ml(-1) could be recovered as colony-forming units on plates. Respiratory and fermentative activities were measured by mass spectrometric measurements (O2 consumption and CO2 and ethanol production) of washed yeast suspensions taken from the cider fermentation at intervals. Both endogenous and glucose-supported energy-yielding metabolism declined, especially during the first 20 days. Levels of adenine nucleotides also showed decreases after day 1, as did adenylate energy charge, although in a prolonged (16.5 week) fermentation the lowest value calculated was 0.55. AMP was released into the medium. 31P-NMR spectra showed that by comparison with aerobically grown yeast, that from the later stages of the cider fermentation showed little polyphosphate. However, as previously concluded from studies of 'acidification power' and fluorescent oxonol dye exclusion (Dinsdale et al., 1995), repitching of yeast indicated little loss of viability despite considerable loss of vitality.

  11. Metabolic engineering of yeast for lignocellulosic biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yong-Su; Cate, Jamie Hd

    2017-12-01

    Production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass remains an unsolved challenge in industrial biotechnology. Efforts to use yeast for conversion face the question of which host organism to use, counterbalancing the ease of genetic manipulation with the promise of robust industrial phenotypes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae remains the premier host for metabolic engineering of biofuel pathways, due to its many genetic, systems and synthetic biology tools. Numerous engineering strategies for expanding substrate ranges and diversifying products of S. cerevisiae have been developed. Other yeasts generally lack these tools, yet harbor superior phenotypes that could be exploited in the harsh processes required for lignocellulosic biofuel production. These include thermotolerance, resistance to toxic compounds generated during plant biomass deconstruction, and wider carbon consumption capabilities. Although promising, these yeasts have yet to be widely exploited. By contrast, oleaginous yeasts such as Yarrowia lipolytica capable of producing high titers of lipids are rapidly advancing in terms of the tools available for their metabolic manipulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Unraveling lipid metabolism in lipid-dependent pathogenic Malassezia yeasts

    OpenAIRE

    Celis Ramirez, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Malassezia yeasts are lipid-dependent fungal species that are common members of the human and animal skin microbiota. The lipid-dependency is a crucial trait in the adaptation process to grow on the skin but also plays a role in their pathogenic life style. Malassezia species can cause several skin infections like dandruff or seborrheic dermatitis but also bloodstream infections. Understanding the lipid metabolism in Malassezia is essential to understand its life style as skin commensal and p...

  13. Natural and modified promoters for tailored metabolic engineering of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubmann, Georg; Thevelein, Johan M; Nevoigt, Elke

    2014-01-01

    The ease of highly sophisticated genetic manipulations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has initiated numerous initiatives towards development of metabolically engineered strains for novel applications beyond its traditional use in brewing, baking, and wine making. In fact, baker's yeast has

  14. Sirtuins as regulators of the yeast metabolic network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eRalser

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that the metabolic network is an integral regulator of cellularphysiology. Dynamic changes in metabolite concentrations, metabolic flux, or networktopology act as reporters of biological or environmental signals, and are required for the cellto trigger an appropriate biological reaction. Changes in the metabolic network are recognizedby specific sensory macromolecules and translated into a transcriptional or translationalresponse. The protein family of sirtuins, discovered more than 30 years ago as regulators ofsilent chromatin, seems to fulfill the role of a metabolic sensor during aging and conditions ofcaloric restriction. NAD+/NADH interconverting metabolic enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase, as well as enzymes involved inNAD(H, synthesis provide or deprive NAD+ in close proximity to Sir2. This influence sirtuinactivity, and facilitates a dynamic response of the metabolic network to changes inmetabolism with effects on physiology and aging. The molecular network downstream Sir2,however, is complex. In just two orders, Sir2’s metabolism-related interactions span half ofthe yeast proteome, and are connected with virtually every physiological process. Thus,although it is fundamental to analyze single molecular mechanisms, it is at the same timecrucial to consider this genome-scale complexity when correlating single molecular eventswith phenotypes such as aging, cell growth, or stress resistance.

  15. Effect of uranium (VI) on the growth of yeast and influence of metabolism of yeast on adsorption of U (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Fuminori; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Kozai, Naofumi; Wakai, Eiichi; Francis, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out the growth experiments of 3 strains of yeast in a medium containing uranium (VI) to elucidate the effect of U (VI) on the growth of microorganisms. Hansenula fabianii J640 grew in the liquid medium containing 0.1 mM U (VI) at lower rate than the control, but Saccharomyces cerevisiae did not grow under this condition. The H. fabianii J640 pre-cultured for 21 h in the liquid medium without U (VI) grew even after the exposure to 1 mM U (VI), but did not grow without pre-cultivation. For the pre-cultured H. fabianii J640, radioactivity of U in the medium was the same as the initial one for 110 h, and then gradually decreased. TEM-EDS analysis of H. fabianii J640 exposed to 1 mM U (VI) for 165 h showed accumulation of U (VI) on the cells. When H. fabianii J640 was not pre-cultured, radioactivity of U in the medium was lower than the initial one. These results indicated that U (VI) inhibits the growth of yeast, and that the adsorption of U (VI) by the cells depends on the metabolism of yeast. (author)

  16. Sugar utilization patterns and respiro-fermentative metabolism in the baker's yeast Torulaspora delbrueckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Araújo, C; Pacheco, A; Almeida, M J; Spencer-Martins, I; Leão, C; Sousa, M J

    2007-03-01

    The highly osmo- and cryotolerant yeast species Torulaspora delbrueckii is an important case study among the non-Saccharomyces yeast species. The strain T. delbrueckii PYCC 5321, isolated from traditional corn and rye bread dough in northern Portugal, is considered particularly interesting for the baking industry. This paper reports the sugar utilization patterns of this strain, using media with glucose, maltose and sucrose, alone or in mixtures. Kinetics of growth, biomass and ethanol yields, fermentation and respiration rates, hydrolase activities and sugar uptake rates were used to infer the potential applied relevance of this yeast in comparison to a conventional baker's strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results showed that both maltase and maltose transport in T. delbrueckii were subject to glucose repression and maltose induction, whereas invertase was subject to glucose control but not dependent on sucrose induction. A comparative analysis of specific sugar consumption rates and transport capacities suggests that the transport step limits both glucose and maltose metabolism. Specific rates of CO(2) production and O(2) consumption showed a significantly higher contribution of respiration to the overall metabolism in T. delbrueckii than in S. cerevisiae. This was reflected in the biomass yields from batch cultures and could represent an asset for the large-scale production of the former species. This work contributes to a better understanding of the physiology of a non-conventional yeast species, with a view to the full exploitation of T. delbrueckii by the baking industry.

  17. Systematic inference of functional phosphorylation events in yeast metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Yonghong; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-07-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a post-translational modification that affects proteins by changing their structure and conformation in a rapid and reversible way, and it is an important mechanism for metabolic regulation in cells. Phosphoproteomics enables high-throughput identification of phosphorylation events on metabolic enzymes, but identifying functional phosphorylation events still requires more detailed biochemical characterization. Therefore, development of computational methods for investigating unknown functions of a large number of phosphorylation events identified by phosphoproteomics has received increased attention. We developed a mathematical framework that describes the relationship between phosphorylation level of a metabolic enzyme and the corresponding flux through the enzyme. Using this framework, it is possible to quantitatively estimate contribution of phosphorylation events to flux changes. We showed that phosphorylation regulation analysis, combined with a systematic workflow and correlation analysis, can be used for inference of functional phosphorylation events in steady and dynamic conditions, respectively. Using this analysis, we assigned functionality to phosphorylation events of 17 metabolic enzymes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae , among which 10 are novel. Phosphorylation regulation analysis cannot only be extended for inference of other functional post-translational modifications but also be a promising scaffold for multi-omics data integration in systems biology. Matlab codes for flux balance analysis in this study are available in Supplementary material. yhwang@ecust.edu.cn or nielsenj@chalmers.se. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. Metabolic Engineering of Oleaginous Yeasts for Fatty Alcohol Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Wei, Hui; Knoshaug, Eric; Van Wychen, Stefanie; Xu, Qi; Himmel, Michael E.; Zhang, Min

    2016-04-25

    To develop pathways for advanced biological upgrading of sugars to hydrocarbons, we are seeking biological approaches to produce high carbon efficiency intermediates amenable to separations and catalytic upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels. In this study, we successfully demonstrated fatty alcohol production by oleaginous yeasts Yarrowia lipolytica and Lipomyces starkeyi by expressing a bacteria-derived fatty acyl-CoA reductase (FAR). Moreover, we find higher extracellular distribution of fatty alcohols produced by FAR-expressing L. starkeyi strain as compared to Y. lipolytica strain, which would benefit the downstream product recovery process. In both oleaginous yeasts, long chain length saturated fatty alcohols were predominant, accounting for more than 85% of the total fatty alcohols produced. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of fatty alcohol production in L. starkeyi. Taken together, our work demonstrates that in addition to Y. lipolytica, L. starkeyi can also serve as a platform organism for production of fatty acid-derived biofuels and bioproducts via metabolic engineering. We believe strain and process development both will significantly contribute to our goal of producing scalable and cost-effective fatty alcohols from renewable biomass.

  19. Metabolic Engineering of Oleaginous Yeasts for Production of Fuels and Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuobo Shi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Oleaginous yeasts have been increasingly explored for production of chemicals and fuels via metabolic engineering. Particularly, there is a growing interest in using oleaginous yeasts for the synthesis of lipid-related products due to their high lipogenesis capability, robustness, and ability to utilize a variety of substrates. Most of the metabolic engineering studies in oleaginous yeasts focused on Yarrowia that already has plenty of genetic engineering tools. However, recent advances in systems biology and synthetic biology have provided new strategies and tools to engineer those oleaginous yeasts that have naturally high lipid accumulation but lack genetic tools, such as Rhodosporidium, Trichosporon, and Lipomyces. This review highlights recent accomplishments in metabolic engineering of oleaginous yeasts and recent advances in the development of genetic engineering tools in oleaginous yeasts within the last 3 years.

  20. Efficient protein production by yeast requires global tuning of metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Mingtao; Bao, Jichen; Hallstrom, Bjorn M.

    2017-01-01

    The biotech industry relies on cell factories for production of pharmaceutical proteins, of which several are among the top-selling medicines. There is, therefore, considerable interest in improving the efficiency of protein production by cell factories. Protein secretion involves numerous...... intracellular processes with many underlying mechanisms still remaining unclear. Here, we use RNA-seq to study the genome-wide transcriptional response to protein secretion in mutant yeast strains. We find that many cellular processes have to be attuned to support efficient protein secretion. In particular...... that by tuning metabolism cells are able to efficiently secrete recombinant proteins. Our findings provide increased understanding of which cellular regulations and pathways are associated with efficient protein secretion....

  1. Engineering of metabolic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, James C.

    2004-03-16

    The invention features a method of producing heterologous molecules in cells under the regulatory control of a metabolite and metabolic flux. The method can enhance the synthesis of heterologous polypeptides and metabolites.

  2. Yeast 5 – an expanded reconstruction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heavner Benjamin D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efforts to improve the computational reconstruction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae biochemical reaction network and to refine the stoichiometrically constrained metabolic models that can be derived from such a reconstruction have continued since the first stoichiometrically constrained yeast genome scale metabolic model was published in 2003. Continuing this ongoing process, we have constructed an update to the Yeast Consensus Reconstruction, Yeast 5. The Yeast Consensus Reconstruction is a product of efforts to forge a community-based reconstruction emphasizing standards compliance and biochemical accuracy via evidence-based selection of reactions. It draws upon models published by a variety of independent research groups as well as information obtained from biochemical databases and primary literature. Results Yeast 5 refines the biochemical reactions included in the reconstruction, particularly reactions involved in sphingolipid metabolism; updates gene-reaction annotations; and emphasizes the distinction between reconstruction and stoichiometrically constrained model. Although it was not a primary goal, this update also improves the accuracy of model prediction of viability and auxotrophy phenotypes and increases the number of epistatic interactions. This update maintains an emphasis on standards compliance, unambiguous metabolite naming, and computer-readable annotations available through a structured document format. Additionally, we have developed MATLAB scripts to evaluate the model’s predictive accuracy and to demonstrate basic model applications such as simulating aerobic and anaerobic growth. These scripts, which provide an independent tool for evaluating the performance of various stoichiometrically constrained yeast metabolic models using flux balance analysis, are included as Additional files 1, 2 and 3. Additional file 1 Function testYeastModel.m.m. Click here for file Additional file 2 Function model

  3. Early metabolic effects and mechanism of ammonium transport in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, A.; Pardo, J.P.; Ramirez, J.

    1987-01-01

    Studies were performed to define the effects and mechanism of NH+4 transport in yeast. The following results were obtained. Glucose was a better facilitator than ethanol-H 2 O 2 for ammonium transport; low concentrations of uncouplers or respiratory inhibitors could inhibit the transport with ethanol as the substrate. With glucose, respiratory inhibitors showed only small inhibitory effects, and only high concentrations of azide or trifluoromethoxy carbonylcyanide phenylhydrazone could inhibit ammonium transport. Ammonium in the free state could be concentrated approximately 200-fold by the cells. Also, the addition of ammonium produced stimulation of both respiration and fermentation; an increased rate of H+ extrusion and an alkalinization of the interior of the cell; a decrease of the membrane potential, as monitored by fluorescent cyanine; an immediate decrease of the levels of ATP and an increase of ADP, which may account for the stimulation of both fermentation and respiration; and an increase of the levels of inorganic phosphate. Ammonium was found to inhibit 86Rb+ transport much less than K+. Also, while K+ produced a competitive type of inhibition, that produced by NH4+ was of the noncompetitive type. From the distribution ratio of ammonium and the pH gradient, an electrochemical potential gradient of around -180 mV was calculated. The results indicate that ammonium is transported in yeast by a mechanism similar to that of monovalent alkaline cations, driven by a membrane potential. The immediate metabolic effects of this cation seem to be due to an increased [H+]ATPase, to which its transport is coupled. However, the carriers seem to be different. The transport system studied in this work was that of low affinity

  4. The influence of sterol metabolism upon radiation-induced aneuploidy of Drosophila melanogaster in the yeast-drosophila system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitsij, V.V.; Luchnikova, E.M.; Inge-Vechtomov, S.I.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of sterol metabolism upon induced Drosophila melanogaster mutagenesis in an ecology-genetic yeast-drosophila system has been studied. The sterol deficit in fly organism has been created for account of using as food substrate for fremales of biomass of saccharomyces cerevisiae living cells of 9-2-PZ12 train with nyssup(r1) locus mutation which blocks the ergosterol synthesis. It has been found that the Drosophila females content on mutant yeast increases the frequency of losses and non discrepancy of X-chromosomes induced by X-radiation (1000 R). Addition into yeast biomass of 0.1 % cholesterol solution in 10 %-ethanol reduces the oocytes resistance to X-radiation up to control level. Possible hormonal and membrane mechanisms of increasing radiation-induced aneuploidy of Drosophila and the role of sterol metabolism in organism resistance to damaging factors are discussed

  5. The impact of metabolism on aging and cell size in single yeast cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huberts, Daphne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to determine how metabolism affects yeast aging in single yeast cells using a novel microfluidic device. We first review how cells are able to sense nutrients in their environment and then describe the use of the microfluidic dissection platform that greatly improves our

  6. Proteins involved in flor yeast carbon metabolism under biofilm formation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Moreno, Juan; Mauricio, Juan Carlos

    2015-04-01

    A lack of sugars during the production of biologically aged wines after fermentation of grape must causes flor yeasts to metabolize other carbon molecules formed during fermentation (ethanol and glycerol, mainly). In this work, a proteome analysis involving OFFGEL fractionation prior to LC/MS detection was used to elucidate the carbon metabolism of a flor yeast strain under biofilm formation conditions (BFC). The results were compared with those obtained under non-biofilm formation conditions (NBFC). Proteins associated to processes such as non-fermentable carbon uptake, the glyoxylate and TCA cycles, cellular respiration and inositol metabolism were detected at higher concentrations under BFC than under the reference conditions (NBFC). This study constitutes the first attempt at identifying the flor yeast proteins responsible for the peculiar sensory profile of biologically aged wines. A better metabolic knowledge of flor yeasts might facilitate the development of effective strategies for improved production of these special wines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Engineering yeast metabolism for production of terpenoids for use as perfume ingredients, pharmaceuticals and biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yueping; Nielsen, Jens; Liu, Zihe

    2017-12-01

    Terpenoids represent a large class of natural products with significant commercial applications. These chemicals are currently mainly obtained through extraction from plants and microbes or through chemical synthesis. However, these sources often face challenges of unsustainability and low productivity. In order to address these issues, Escherichia coli and yeast have been metabolic engineered to produce non-native terpenoids. With recent reports of engineering yeast metabolism to produce several terpenoids at high yields, it has become possible to establish commercial yeast production of terpenoids that find applications as perfume ingredients, pharmaceuticals and advanced biofuels. In this review, we describe the strategies to rewire the yeast pathway for terpenoid biosynthesis. Recent advances will be discussed together with challenges and perspectives of yeast as a cell factory to produce different terpenoids. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A high-throughput method for quantifying metabolically active yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandy, Subir Kumar; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen; Rosenkjær, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    By redesigning the established methylene blue reduction test for bacteria and yeast, we present a cheap and efficient methodology for quantitative physiology of eukaryotic cells applicable for high-throughput systems. Validation of themethod in fermenters and highthroughput systems proved....... The drop in metabolic activity associated with the diauxic shift in yeast proved more pronounced for the MBRT-derived curve compared with OD curves, consistent with a dramatic shift in the ratio between live and dead cells at this metabolic event. This method provides a tool with numerous applications, e.......g. characterizing the death phase of stationary phase cultures, or in drug screens with pathogenic yeasts....

  9. Dynamic Metabolic Footprinting Reveals the Key Components of Metabolic Network in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chumnanpuen, Pramote; Hansen, Michael Adsetts Edberg; Smedsgaard, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    relies on analysis at a single time point. Using direct infusion-mass spectrometry (DI-MS), we could observe the dynamic metabolic footprinting in yeast S. cerevisiae BY4709 (wild type) cultured on 3 different C-sources (glucose, glycerol, and ethanol) and sampled along 10 time points with 5 biological...... replicates. In order to analyze the dynamic mass spectrometry data, we developed the novel analysis methods that allow us to perform correlation analysis to identify metabolites that significantly correlate over time during growth on the different carbon sources. Both positive and negative electrospray...... reconstructed an interaction map that provides information of how different metabolic pathways have correlated patterns during growth on the different carbon sources....

  10. Metabolic engineering of yeast for fermentative production of flavonoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Prado, Edith Angelica; Strucko, Tomas; Stahlhut, Steen Gustav

    2017-01-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered for de novo production of six different flavonoids (naringenin, liquiritigenin, kaempferol, resokaempferol, quercetin, and fisetin) directly from glucose, without supplementation of expensive intermediates. This required reconstruction of long...... demonstrates the potential of flavonoid-producing yeast cell factories....

  11. Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    KAUST Repository

    Papsdorf, Katharina; Kaiser, Christoph J. O.; Drazic, Adrian; Grö tzinger, Stefan W.; Haeß ner, Carmen; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative growth

  12. Network Thermodynamic Curation of Human and Yeast Genome-Scale Metabolic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Verónica S.; Quek, Lake-Ee; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-scale models are used for an ever-widening range of applications. Although there has been much focus on specifying the stoichiometric matrix, the predictive power of genome-scale models equally depends on reaction directions. Two-thirds of reactions in the two eukaryotic reconstructions Homo sapiens Recon 1 and Yeast 5 are specified as irreversible. However, these specifications are mainly based on biochemical textbooks or on their similarity to other organisms and are rarely underpinned by detailed thermodynamic analysis. In this study, a to our knowledge new workflow combining network-embedded thermodynamic and flux variability analysis was used to evaluate existing irreversibility constraints in Recon 1 and Yeast 5 and to identify new ones. A total of 27 and 16 new irreversible reactions were identified in Recon 1 and Yeast 5, respectively, whereas only four reactions were found with directions incorrectly specified against thermodynamics (three in Yeast 5 and one in Recon 1). The workflow further identified for both models several isolated internal loops that require further curation. The framework also highlighted the need for substrate channeling (in human) and ATP hydrolysis (in yeast) for the essential reaction catalyzed by phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase in purine metabolism. Finally, the framework highlighted differences in proline metabolism between yeast (cytosolic anabolism and mitochondrial catabolism) and humans (exclusively mitochondrial metabolism). We conclude that network-embedded thermodynamics facilitates the specification and validation of irreversibility constraints in compartmentalized metabolic models, at the same time providing further insight into network properties. PMID:25028891

  13. Cell organisation, sulphur metabolism and ion transport-related genes are differentially expressed in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis mycelium and yeast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passos Geraldo AS

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycelium-to-yeast transition in the human host is essential for pathogenicity by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and both cell types are therefore critical to the establishment of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, a systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. The infected population is of about 10 million individuals, 2% of whom will eventually develop the disease. Previously, transcriptome analysis of mycelium and yeast cells resulted in the assembly of 6,022 sequence groups. Gene expression analysis, using both in silico EST subtraction and cDNA microarray, revealed genes that were differential to yeast or mycelium, and we discussed those involved in sugar metabolism. To advance our understanding of molecular mechanisms of dimorphic transition, we performed an extended analysis of gene expression profiles using the methods mentioned above. Results In this work, continuous data mining revealed 66 new differentially expressed sequences that were MIPS(Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences-categorised according to the cellular process in which they are presumably involved. Two well represented classes were chosen for further analysis: (i control of cell organisation – cell wall, membrane and cytoskeleton, whose representatives were hex (encoding for a hexagonal peroxisome protein, bgl (encoding for a 1,3-β-glucosidase in mycelium cells; and ags (an α-1,3-glucan synthase, cda (a chitin deacetylase and vrp (a verprolin in yeast cells; (ii ion metabolism and transport – two genes putatively implicated in ion transport were confirmed to be highly expressed in mycelium cells – isc and ktp, respectively an iron-sulphur cluster-like protein and a cation transporter; and a putative P-type cation pump (pct in yeast. Also, several enzymes from the cysteine de novo biosynthesis pathway were shown to be up regulated in the yeast form, including ATP sulphurylase, APS kinase and also PAPS reductase. Conclusion Taken

  14. Metabolic diversification of cells during the development of yeast colonies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Váchová, Libuše; Kučerová, Helena; Devaux, F.; Úlehlová, M.; Palková, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2009), s. 494-504 ISSN 1462-2912 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/05/0294; GA ČR GA204/08/0718; GA MŠk(CZ) LC531 Grant - others:GB(GB) Howard Hughes Medical Institute International Research Award Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : yeast * yeast colonies * saccharomyces cerevisiae Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.909, year: 2009

  15. Advances in metabolic engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up the development of yeast cell factories. We also present an overview of metabolic engineering strategies for developing yeast strains for production of polymer monomers: lactic, succinic, and cis,cis-muconic acids. S. cerevisiae has already firmly established itself as a cell factory in industrial biotechnology and the advances in yeast strain engineering will stimulate development of novel yeast-based processes for chemicals production. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Dietary live yeast alters metabolic profiles, protein biosynthesis and thermal stress tolerance of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colinet, Hervé; Renault, David

    2014-04-01

    The impact of nutritional factors on insect's life-history traits such as reproduction and lifespan has been excessively examined; however, nutritional determinant of insect's thermal tolerance has not received a lot of attention. Dietary live yeast represents a prominent source of proteins and amino acids for laboratory-reared drosophilids. In this study, Drosophila melanogaster adults were fed on diets supplemented or not with live yeast. We hypothesized that manipulating nutritional conditions through live yeast supplementation would translate into altered physiology and stress tolerance. We verified how live yeast supplementation affected body mass characteristics, total lipids and proteins, metabolic profiles and cold tolerance (acute and chronic stress). Females fed with live yeast had increased body mass and contained more lipids and proteins. Using GC/MS profiling, we found distinct metabolic fingerprints according to nutritional conditions. Metabolite pathway enrichment analysis corroborated that live yeast supplementation was associated with amino acid and protein biosyntheses. The cold assays revealed that the presence of dietary live yeast greatly promoted cold tolerance. Hence, this study conclusively demonstrates a significant interaction between nutritional conditions and thermal tolerance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Regulation of the yeast metabolic cycle by transcription factors with periodic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pellegrini Matteo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When growing budding yeast under continuous, nutrient-limited conditions, over half of yeast genes exhibit periodic expression patterns. Periodicity can also be observed in respiration, in the timing of cell division, as well as in various metabolite levels. Knowing the transcription factors involved in the yeast metabolic cycle is helpful for determining the cascade of regulatory events that cause these patterns. Results Transcription factor activities were estimated by linear regression using time series and genome-wide transcription factor binding data. Time-translation matrices were estimated using least squares and were used to model the interactions between the most significant transcription factors. The top transcription factors have functions involving respiration, cell cycle events, amino acid metabolism and glycolysis. Key regulators of transitions between phases of the yeast metabolic cycle appear to be Hap1, Hap4, Gcn4, Msn4, Swi6 and Adr1. Conclusions Analysis of the phases at which transcription factor activities peak supports previous findings suggesting that the various cellular functions occur during specific phases of the yeast metabolic cycle.

  18. Ask yeast how to burn your fats: lessons learned from the metabolic adaptation to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Ahuir, Amparo; Manzanares-Estreder, Sara; Timón-Gómez, Alba; Proft, Markus

    2018-02-01

    Here, we review and update the recent advances in the metabolic control during the adaptive response of budding yeast to hyperosmotic and salt stress, which is one of the best understood signaling events at the molecular level. This environmental stress can be easily applied and hence has been exploited in the past to generate an impressively detailed and comprehensive model of cellular adaptation. It is clear now that this stress modulates a great number of different physiological functions of the cell, which altogether contribute to cellular survival and adaptation. Primary defense mechanisms are the massive induction of stress tolerance genes in the nucleus, the activation of cation transport at the plasma membrane, or the production and intracellular accumulation of osmolytes. At the same time and in a coordinated manner, the cell shuts down the expression of housekeeping genes, delays the progression of the cell cycle, inhibits genomic replication, and modulates translation efficiency to optimize the response and to avoid cellular damage. To this fascinating interplay of cellular functions directly regulated by the stress, we have to add yet another layer of control, which is physiologically relevant for stress tolerance. Salt stress induces an immediate metabolic readjustment, which includes the up-regulation of peroxisomal biomass and activity in a coordinated manner with the reinforcement of mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. Our recent findings are consistent with a model, where salt stress triggers a metabolic shift from fermentation to respiration fueled by the enhanced peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids. We discuss here the regulatory details of this stress-induced metabolic shift and its possible roles in the context of the previously known adaptive functions.

  19. 1H NMR-based metabolic profiling reveals inherent biological variation in yeast and nematode model systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeto, Samuel S. W.; Reinke, Stacey N.; Lemire, Bernard D.

    2011-01-01

    The application of metabolomics to human and animal model systems is poised to provide great insight into our understanding of disease etiology and the metabolic changes that are associated with these conditions. However, metabolomic studies have also revealed that there is significant, inherent biological variation in human samples and even in samples from animal model systems where the animals are housed under carefully controlled conditions. This inherent biological variability is an important consideration for all metabolomics analyses. In this study, we examined the biological variation in 1 H NMR-based metabolic profiling of two model systems, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Using relative standard deviations (RSD) as a measure of variability, our results reveal that both model systems have significant amounts of biological variation. The C. elegans metabolome possesses greater metabolic variance with average RSD values of 29 and 39%, depending on the food source that was used. The S. cerevisiae exometabolome RSD values ranged from 8% to 12% for the four strains examined. We also determined whether biological variation occurs between pairs of phenotypically identical yeast strains. Multivariate statistical analysis allowed us to discriminate between pair members based on their metabolic phenotypes. Our results highlight the variability of the metabolome that exists even for less complex model systems cultured under defined conditions. We also highlight the efficacy of metabolic profiling for defining these subtle metabolic alterations.

  20. {sup 1}H NMR-based metabolic profiling reveals inherent biological variation in yeast and nematode model systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeto, Samuel S. W.; Reinke, Stacey N.; Lemire, Bernard D., E-mail: bernard.lemire@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry, School of Molecular and Systems Medicine (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    The application of metabolomics to human and animal model systems is poised to provide great insight into our understanding of disease etiology and the metabolic changes that are associated with these conditions. However, metabolomic studies have also revealed that there is significant, inherent biological variation in human samples and even in samples from animal model systems where the animals are housed under carefully controlled conditions. This inherent biological variability is an important consideration for all metabolomics analyses. In this study, we examined the biological variation in {sup 1}H NMR-based metabolic profiling of two model systems, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Using relative standard deviations (RSD) as a measure of variability, our results reveal that both model systems have significant amounts of biological variation. The C. elegans metabolome possesses greater metabolic variance with average RSD values of 29 and 39%, depending on the food source that was used. The S. cerevisiae exometabolome RSD values ranged from 8% to 12% for the four strains examined. We also determined whether biological variation occurs between pairs of phenotypically identical yeast strains. Multivariate statistical analysis allowed us to discriminate between pair members based on their metabolic phenotypes. Our results highlight the variability of the metabolome that exists even for less complex model systems cultured under defined conditions. We also highlight the efficacy of metabolic profiling for defining these subtle metabolic alterations.

  1. Unraveling lipid metabolism in lipid-dependent pathogenic Malassezia yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celis Ramirez, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Malassezia yeasts are lipid-dependent fungal species that are common members of the human and animal skin microbiota. The lipid-dependency is a crucial trait in the adaptation process to grow on the skin but also plays a role in their pathogenic life style. Malassezia species can cause several skin

  2. Gis1 and Rph1 regulate glycerol and acetate metabolism in glucose depleted yeast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Orzechowski Westholm

    Full Text Available Aging in organisms as diverse as yeast, nematodes, and mammals is delayed by caloric restriction, an effect mediated by the nutrient sensing TOR, RAS/cAMP, and AKT/Sch9 pathways. The transcription factor Gis1 functions downstream of these pathways in extending the lifespan of nutrient restricted yeast cells, but the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. We have used gene expression microarrays to study the targets of Gis1 and the related protein Rph1 in different growth phases. Our results show that Gis1 and Rph1 act both as repressors and activators, on overlapping sets of genes as well as on distinct targets. Interestingly, both the activities and the target specificities of Gis1 and Rph1 depend on the growth phase. Thus, both proteins are associated with repression during exponential growth, targeting genes with STRE or PDS motifs in their promoters. After the diauxic shift, both become involved in activation, with Gis1 acting primarily on genes with PDS motifs, and Rph1 on genes with STRE motifs. Significantly, Gis1 and Rph1 control a number of genes involved in acetate and glycerol formation, metabolites that have been implicated in aging. Furthermore, several genes involved in acetyl-CoA metabolism are downregulated by Gis1.

  3. Genome and metabolic engineering in non-conventional yeasts: Current advances and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Kathrin Löbs

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial production of chemicals and proteins from biomass-derived and waste sugar streams is a rapidly growing area of research and development. While the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent host for the conversion of glucose to ethanol, production of other chemicals from alternative substrates often requires extensive strain engineering. To avoid complex and intensive engineering of S. cerevisiae, other yeasts are often selected as hosts for bioprocessing based on their natural capacity to produce a desired product: for example, the efficient production and secretion of proteins, lipids, and primary metabolites that have value as commodity chemicals. Even when using yeasts with beneficial native phenotypes, metabolic engineering to increase yield, titer, and production rate is essential. The non-conventional yeasts Kluyveromyces lactis, K. marxianus, Scheffersomyces stipitis, Yarrowia lipolytica, Hansenula polymorpha and Pichia pastoris have been developed as eukaryotic hosts because of their desirable phenotypes, including thermotolerance, assimilation of diverse carbon sources, and high protein secretion. However, advanced metabolic engineering in these yeasts has been limited. This review outlines the challenges of using non-conventional yeasts for strain and pathway engineering, and discusses the developed solutions to these problems and the resulting applications in industrial biotechnology.

  4. Genome and metabolic engineering in non-conventional yeasts: Current advances and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löbs, Ann-Kathrin; Schwartz, Cory; Wheeldon, Ian

    2017-09-01

    Microbial production of chemicals and proteins from biomass-derived and waste sugar streams is a rapidly growing area of research and development. While the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisia e is an excellent host for the conversion of glucose to ethanol, production of other chemicals from alternative substrates often requires extensive strain engineering. To avoid complex and intensive engineering of S. cerevisiae, other yeasts are often selected as hosts for bioprocessing based on their natural capacity to produce a desired product: for example, the efficient production and secretion of proteins, lipids, and primary metabolites that have value as commodity chemicals. Even when using yeasts with beneficial native phenotypes, metabolic engineering to increase yield, titer, and production rate is essential. The non-conventional yeasts Kluyveromyces lactis, K. marxianus, Scheffersomyces stipitis, Yarrowia lipolytica, Hansenula polymorpha and Pichia pastoris have been developed as eukaryotic hosts because of their desirable phenotypes, including thermotolerance, assimilation of diverse carbon sources, and high protein secretion. However, advanced metabolic engineering in these yeasts has been limited. This review outlines the challenges of using non-conventional yeasts for strain and pathway engineering, and discusses the developed solutions to these problems and the resulting applications in industrial biotechnology.

  5. Advances in metabolic engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up the deve......Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up...... the development of yeast cell factories. We also present an overview of metabolic engineering strategies for developing yeast strains for production of polymer monomers: lactic, succinic, and cis,cis-muconic acids. S. cerevisiae has already firmly established itself as a cell factory in industrial biotechnology...

  6. Engineering strategy of yeast metabolism for higher alcohol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu Hiroshi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a promising host for cost-effective biorefinary processes due to its tolerance to various stresses during fermentation, the metabolically engineered S. cerevisiae strains exhibited rather limited production of higher alcohols than that of Escherichia coli. Since the structure of the central metabolism of S. cerevisiae is distinct from that of E. coli, there might be a problem in the structure of the central metabolism of S. cerevisiae. In this study, the potential production of higher alcohols by S. cerevisiae is compared to that of E. coli by employing metabolic simulation techniques. Based on the simulation results, novel metabolic engineering strategies for improving higher alcohol production by S. cerevisiae were investigated by in silico modifications of the metabolic models of S. cerevisiae. Results The metabolic simulations confirmed that the high production of butanols and propanols by the metabolically engineered E. coli strains is derived from the flexible behavior of their central metabolism. Reducing this flexibility by gene deletion is an effective strategy to restrict the metabolic states for producing target alcohols. In contrast, the lower yield using S. cerevisiae originates from the structurally limited flexibility of its central metabolism in which gene deletions severely reduced cell growth. Conclusions The metabolic simulation demonstrated that the poor productivity of S. cerevisiae was improved by the introduction of E. coli genes to compensate the structural difference. This suggested that gene supplementation is a promising strategy for the metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae to produce higher alcohols which should be the next challenge for the synthetic bioengineering of S. cerevisiae for the efficient production of higher alcohols.

  7. Energy metabolism after U.V.-irradiation in a sensitive yeast strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, J.

    1976-01-01

    Stationary-phase cells of an excision-repair deficient diploid yeast (strain 2094) were UV-irradiated at exposures of up to 440 erg mm -2 and then resuspended in fresh medium. Measurements of energy metabolism per cell at periods of up to 6 hours after irradiation showed that cellular respiration was increased for all doses tested from about 3 hours after exposure, whereas fermentation did not start before about 2 hours after irradiation, never significantly exceeded control values and was markedly inhibited by the higher doses. The results suggest that respiration is under nuclear control, since a mutation in one gene is thought to be the only difference between this strain and the wild-type. The D 0 value of about 360 erg mm -2 found for the relative cellular fermentation at 2 hours after irradiation was used to give an estimate of the size of the structural gene involved, of about 3000 nucleotides, or a protein with 1000 amino-acid residues, compatible with the molecular weight of alcohol dehydrogenase. Fermentation can therefore be inhibited in this sensitive strain by lesions in the structural gene of a key enzyme. Since respiration was increased even more in repair-deficient than in repair-proficient strains, it must be assumed that higher energy metabolism is not linked to the repair process, but rather reflects a general disturbance in cellular regulation. (U.K.)

  8. Network thermodynamic curation of human and yeast genome-scale metabolic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Verónica S; Quek, Lake-Ee; Nielsen, Lars K

    2014-07-15

    Genome-scale models are used for an ever-widening range of applications. Although there has been much focus on specifying the stoichiometric matrix, the predictive power of genome-scale models equally depends on reaction directions. Two-thirds of reactions in the two eukaryotic reconstructions Homo sapiens Recon 1 and Yeast 5 are specified as irreversible. However, these specifications are mainly based on biochemical textbooks or on their similarity to other organisms and are rarely underpinned by detailed thermodynamic analysis. In this study, a to our knowledge new workflow combining network-embedded thermodynamic and flux variability analysis was used to evaluate existing irreversibility constraints in Recon 1 and Yeast 5 and to identify new ones. A total of 27 and 16 new irreversible reactions were identified in Recon 1 and Yeast 5, respectively, whereas only four reactions were found with directions incorrectly specified against thermodynamics (three in Yeast 5 and one in Recon 1). The workflow further identified for both models several isolated internal loops that require further curation. The framework also highlighted the need for substrate channeling (in human) and ATP hydrolysis (in yeast) for the essential reaction catalyzed by phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase in purine metabolism. Finally, the framework highlighted differences in proline metabolism between yeast (cytosolic anabolism and mitochondrial catabolism) and humans (exclusively mitochondrial metabolism). We conclude that network-embedded thermodynamics facilitates the specification and validation of irreversibility constraints in compartmentalized metabolic models, at the same time providing further insight into network properties. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Methanol Metabolism in Yeasts : Regulation of the Synthesis of Catabolic Enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egli, Th.; Dijken, J.P. van; Veenhuis, M.; Harder, W.; Fiechter, A.

    1980-01-01

    The regulation of the synthesis of four dissimilatory enzymes involved in methanol metabolism, namely alcohol oxidase, formaldehyde dehydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase and catalase was investigated in the yeasts Hansenula polymorpha and Kloeckera sp. 2201. Enzyme profiles in cell-free extracts of

  10. How to survive within a yeast colony?: Change metabolism or cope with stress?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čáp, M.; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 2 (2010), s. 198-200 ISSN 1942-0889 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/08/0718; GA MŠk(CZ) LC531 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : yeast colonies * stress defense and metabolic adaption * differentiation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  11. Metabolism of 2-deoxyglyconic acid in plants and bakers yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gakhokidze, R.A.; Beriashvili, L.T.; Chigvinadze, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    During photosynthesis in Phaseolus vulgaris haricot bean and Zea mays leaves, assimilated carbon 14 CO 2 is rapidly incorporated into aldonic acids including 2-deoxygluconic acid whose radioactivity was relatively high. In these plants, radioactive carbon of 2-deoxy-D-gluconic acid prepared from 1-6 14 C-D-glucose is actively involved in the formation of sugars, organic acids, and amino acids. In baking yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the rate of respiration-dependent oxidation of 2-deoxy-D-gluconic acid differs versus the rate of D-glucose oxidation [ru

  12. Metabolic link between phosphatidylethanolamine and triacylglycerol metabolism in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Susanne E; Wagner, Andrea; Steyrer, Ernst; Daum, Günther

    2011-12-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae triacylglycerols (TAG) are synthesized by the acyl-CoA dependent acyltransferases Dga1p, Are1p, Are2p and the acyl-CoA independent phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (PDAT) Lro1p which uses phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) as a preferred acyl donor. In the present study we investigated a possible link between TAG and PE metabolism by analyzing the contribution of the four different PE biosynthetic pathways to TAG formation, namely de novo PE synthesis via Psd1p and Psd2p, the CDP-ethanolamine (CDP-Etn) pathway and lyso-PE acylation by Ale1p. In cells grown on the non-fermentable carbon source lactate supplemented with 5mM ethanolamine (Etn) the CDP-Etn pathway contributed most to the cellular TAG level, whereas mutations in the other pathways displayed only minor effects. In cki1∆dpl1∆eki1∆ mutants bearing defects in the CDP-Etn pathway both the cellular and the microsomal levels of PE were markedly decreased, whereas in other mutants of PE biosynthetic routes depletion of this aminoglycerophospholipid was less pronounced in microsomes. This observation is important because Lro1p similar to the enzymes of the CDP-Etn pathway is a component of the ER. We conclude from these results that in cki1∆dpl1∆eki1∆ insufficient supply of PE to the PDAT Lro1p was a major reason for the strongly reduced TAG level. Moreover, we found that Lro1p activity was markedly decreased in cki1∆dpl1∆eki1∆, although transcription of LRO1 was not affected. Our findings imply that (i) TAG and PE syntheses in the yeast are tightly linked; and (ii) TAG formation by the PDAT Lro1p strongly depends on PE synthesis through the CDP-Etn pathway. Moreover, it is very likely that local availability of PE in microsomes is crucial for TAG synthesis through the Lro1p reaction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. High-throughput metabolic state analysis: The missing link in integrated functional genomics of yeasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villas-Bôas, Silas Granato; Moxley, Joel. F; Åkesson, Mats Fredrik

    2005-01-01

    that achieve comparable throughput, effort and cost compared with DNA arrays. Our sample workup method enables simultaneous metabolite measurements throughout central carbon metabolism and amino acid biosynthesis, using a standard GC-MS platform that was optimized for this Purpose. As an implementation proof......-of-concept, we assayed metabolite levels in two yeast strains and two different environmental conditions in the context of metabolic pathway reconstruction. We demonstrate that these differential metabolite level data distinguish among sample types, such as typical metabolic fingerprinting or footprinting. More...

  14. Metabolic engineering of oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica for limonene overproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xuan; Lv, Yu-Bei; Chen, Jun; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Wei, Liu-Jing; Hua, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Limonene, a monocyclic monoterpene, is known for its using as an important precursor of many flavoring, pharmaceutical, and biodiesel products. Currently, d-limonene has been produced via fractionation from essential oils or as a byproduct of orange juice production, however, considering the increasing need for limonene and a certain amount of pesticides may exist in the limonene obtained from the citrus industry, some other methods should be explored to produce limonene. To construct the limonene synthetic pathway in Yarrowia lipolytica , two genes encoding neryl diphosphate synthase 1 (NDPS1) and limonene synthase (LS) were codon-optimized and heterologously expressed in Y. lipolytica . Furthermore, to maximize limonene production, several genes involved in the MVA pathway were overexpressed, either in different copies of the same gene or in combination. Finally with the optimized pyruvic acid and dodecane concentration in flask culture, a maximum limonene titer and content of 23.56 mg/L and 1.36 mg/g DCW were achieved in the final engineered strain Po1f-LN-051, showing approximately 226-fold increase compared with the initial yield 0.006 mg/g DCW. This is the first report on limonene biosynthesis in oleaginous yeast Y. lipolytica by heterologous expression of codon-optimized tLS and tNDPS1 genes. To our knowledge, the limonene production 23.56 mg/L, is the highest limonene production level reported in yeast. In short, we demonstrate that Y. lipolytica provides a compelling platform for the overproduction of limonene derivatives, and even other monoterpenes.

  15. Linking high-resolution metabolic flux phenotypes and transcriptional regulation in yeast modulated by the global regulator Gcn4p

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moxley, Joel F.; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.

    2009-01-01

    . However, the potential of systems biology approaches is limited by difficulties in integrating metabolic measurements across the functional levels of the cell despite their being most closely linked to cellular phenotype. To address this limitation, we developed a model-based approach to correlate m......RNA and metabolic flux data that combines information from both interaction network models and flux determination models. We started by quantifying 5,764 mRNAs, 54 metabolites, and 83 experimental C-13-based reaction fluxes in continuous cultures of yeast under stress in the absence or presence of global regulator...... of metabolic flux (i.e., use of different reaction pathways) by transcriptional regulation and metabolite interaction density (i.e., level of pairwise metabolite-protein interactions) as a key biosynthetic control determinant. Furthermore, this model predicted flux rewiring in studies of follow...

  16. Metabolism related toxicity of diclofenac in yeast as model system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, J.S.; Vredenburg, G.; Dragovic, S.; Tjong, T.F.; Vos, J.C.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.

    2010-01-01

    Diclofenac is a widely used drug that can cause serious hepatotoxicity, which has been linked to metabolism by cytochrome P450s (P450). To investigate the role of oxidative metabolites in diclofenac toxicity, a model for P450-related toxicity was set up in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We expressed a

  17. Systematic inference of functional phosphorylation events in yeast metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Yonghong; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Motivation: Protein phosphorylation is a post-translational modification that affects proteins by changing their structure and conformation in a rapid and reversible way, and it is an important mechanism for metabolic regulation in cells. Phosphoproteomics enables high-throughput identification o...

  18. Increased heme synthesis in yeast induces a metabolic switch from fermentation to respiration even under conditions of glucose repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Bu, Pengli; Zeng, Joey; Vancura, Ales

    2017-10-13

    Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is a complex process that involves several signaling pathways and transcription factors as well as communication between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Under aerobic conditions, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolizes glucose predominantly by glycolysis and fermentation. We have recently shown that altered chromatin structure in yeast induces respiration by a mechanism that requires transport and metabolism of pyruvate in mitochondria. However, how pyruvate controls the transcriptional responses underlying the metabolic switch from fermentation to respiration is unknown. Here, we report that this pyruvate effect involves heme. We found that heme induces transcription of HAP4 , the transcriptional activation subunit of the Hap2/3/4/5p complex, required for growth on nonfermentable carbon sources, in a Hap1p- and Hap2/3/4/5p-dependent manner. Increasing cellular heme levels by inactivating ROX1 , which encodes a repressor of many hypoxic genes, or by overexpressing HEM3 or HEM12 induced respiration and elevated ATP levels. Increased heme synthesis, even under conditions of glucose repression, activated Hap1p and the Hap2/3/4/5p complex and induced transcription of HAP4 and genes required for the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, electron transport chain, and oxidative phosphorylation, leading to a switch from fermentation to respiration. Conversely, inhibiting metabolic flux into the TCA cycle reduced cellular heme levels and HAP4 transcription. Together, our results indicate that the glucose-mediated repression of respiration in budding yeast is at least partly due to the low cellular heme level. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Supplementary Material for: Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    KAUST Repository

    Papsdorf, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein aggregation and its pathological effects are the major cause of several neurodegenerative diseases. In Huntingtonâ s disease an elongated stretch of polyglutamines within the protein Huntingtin leads to increased aggregation propensity. This induces cellular defects, culminating in neuronal loss, but the connection between aggregation and toxicity remains to be established. Results To uncover cellular pathways relevant for intoxication we used genome-wide analyses in a yeast model system and identify fourteen genes that, if deleted, result in higher polyglutamine toxicity. Several of these genes, like UGO1, ATP15 and NFU1 encode mitochondrial proteins, implying that a challenged mitochondrial system may become dysfunctional during polyglutamine intoxication. We further employed microarrays to decipher the transcriptional response upon polyglutamine intoxication, which exposes an upregulation of genes involved in sulfur and iron metabolism and mitochondrial Fe-S cluster formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative growth is impossible after intoxication with the polyglutamine protein. NMR-based metabolic analyses reveal that mitochondrial metabolism is reduced, leading to accumulation of metabolic intermediates in polyglutamine-intoxicated cells. Conclusion These data show that damages to the mitochondrial system occur in polyglutamine intoxicated yeast cells and suggest an intricate connection between polyglutamine-induced toxicity, mitochondrial functionality and iron homeostasis in this model system.

  20. Effect of sterol metabolism in the yeast-Drosophila system on the frequency of radiation-induced aneuploidy in the Drosophila melanogaster oocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitskii, V.V.; Luchnikova, E.M.; Inge-Vechtomov, S.G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of sterol metabolism on induced mutagenesis of Drosophila melanogaster was studied in the ecogenetic system of yeast-Drosophila. Sterol deficiency was created in Drosophila by using the biomass of live cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 9-2-P712 till mutation in locus nys/sup r1/ blocking the synthesis of ergosterol as the food. It was found that rearing of Drosophila females on the mutant yeast increases the frequency of loss and nondisjunction of X chromosomes induced in mature oocytes by X rays (1000 R). Addition of 0.1% of cholesterol solution in 10% ethanol to the yeast biomass restores the resistance of oocyte to X irradiation to the control level. The possible hormonal effect on membrane leading to increased radiation-induced aneuploidy in Drosophila and the role of sterol metabolism in determining the resistance to various damaging factors are discussed

  1. The rate of metabolism as a factor determining longevity of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molon, Mateusz; Szajwaj, Monika; Tchorzewski, Marek; Skoczowski, Andrzej; Niewiadomska, Ewa; Zadrag-Tecza, Renata

    2016-02-01

    Despite many controversies, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae continues to be used as a model organism for the study of aging. Numerous theories and hypotheses have been created for several decades, yet basic mechanisms of aging have remained unclear. Therefore, the principal aim of this work is to propose a possible mechanism leading to increased longevity in yeast. In this paper, we suggest for the first time that there is a link between decreased metabolic activity, fertility and longevity expressed as time of life in yeast. Determination of reproductive potential and total lifespan with the use of fob1Δ and sfp1Δ mutants allows us to compare the "longevity" presented as the number of produced daughters with the longevity expressed as the time of life. The results of analyses presented in this paper suggest the need for a change in the definition of longevity of yeast by taking into consideration the time parameter. The mutants that have been described as "long-lived" in the literature, such as the fob1Δ mutant, have an increased reproductive potential but live no longer than their standard counterparts. On the other hand, the sfp1Δ mutant and the wild-type strain produce a similar number of daughter cells, but the former lives much longer. Our results demonstrate a correlation between the decreased efficiency of the translational apparatus and the longevity of the sfp1Δ mutant. We suggest that a possible factor regulating the lifespan is the rate of cell metabolism. To measure the basic metabolism of the yeast cells, we used the isothermal microcalorimetry method. In the case of sfp1Δ, the flow of energy, ATP concentration, polysome profile and translational fitness are significantly lower in comparison with the wild-type strain and the fob1Δ mutant.

  2. Lipid Metabolic Versatility in Malassezia spp. Yeasts Studied through Metabolic Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triana, Sergio; de Cock, Hans; Ohm, Robin A; Danies, Giovanna; Wösten, Han A B; Restrepo, Silvia; González Barrios, Andrés F; Celis Ramirez, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    Malassezia species are lipophilic and lipid-dependent yeasts belonging to the human and animal microbiota. Typically, they are isolated from regions rich in sebaceous glands. They have been associated with dermatological diseases such as seborrheic dermatitis, pityriasis versicolor, atopic

  3. Topological analysis of metabolic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, A K

    1990-12-01

    A topological approach is presented for the analysis of control and regulation in metabolic pathways. In this approach, the control structure of a metabolic pathway is represented by a weighted directed graph. From an inspection of the topology of the graph, the control coefficients of the enzymes are evaluated in a heuristic manner in terms of the enzyme elasticities. The major advantage of the topological approach is that it provides a visual framework for (1) calculating the control coefficients of the enzymes, (2) analyzing the cause-effect relationships of the individual enzymes, (3) assessing the relative importance of the enzymes in metabolic regulation, and (4) simplifying the structure of a given pathway, from a regulatory viewpoint. Results are obtained for (a) an unbranched pathway in the absence of feedback the feedforward regulation and (b) an unbranched pathway with feedback inhibition. Our formulation is based on the metabolic control theory of Kacser and Burns (1973) and Heinrich and Rapoport (1974).

  4. Sterol composition of yeast organelle membranes and subcellular distribution of enzymes involved in sterol metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Zinser, E; Paltauf, F; Daum, G

    1993-01-01

    Organelles of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were isolated and analyzed for sterol composition and the activity of three enzymes involved in sterol metabolism. The plasma membrane and secretory vesicles, the fractions with the highest sterol contents, contain ergosterol as the major sterol. In other subcellular membranes, which exhibit lower sterol contents, intermediates of the sterol biosynthetic pathway were found at higher percentages. Lipid particles contain, in addition to ergostero...

  5. Transcriptional Regulation and the Diversification of Metabolism in Wine Yeast Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossouw, Debra; Jacobson, Dan; Bauer, Florian F.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factors and their binding sites have been proposed as primary targets of evolutionary adaptation because changes to single transcription factors can lead to far-reaching changes in gene expression patterns. Nevertheless, there is very little concrete evidence for such evolutionary changes. Industrial wine yeast strains, of the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are a geno- and phenotypically diverse group of organisms that have adapted to the ecological niches of industrial winemaking environments and have been selected to produce specific styles of wine. Variation in transcriptional regulation among wine yeast strains may be responsible for many of the observed differences and specific adaptations to different fermentative conditions in the context of commercial winemaking. We analyzed gene expression profiles of wine yeast strains to assess the impact of transcription factor expression on metabolic networks. The data provide new insights into the molecular basis of variations in gene expression in industrial strains and their consequent effects on metabolic networks important to wine fermentation. We show that the metabolic phenotype of a strain can be shifted in a relatively predictable manner by changing expression levels of individual transcription factors, opening opportunities to modify transcription networks to achieve desirable outcomes. PMID:22042577

  6. Metabolic Trade-offs in Yeast are Caused by F1F0-ATP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Avlant; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    of intermediary metabolism and consequently metabolic trade-offs may take place. One such trade-off, aerobic fermentation, occurs in both yeast (the Crabtree effect) and cancer cells (the Warburg effect) and has been a scientific challenge for decades. Here we show, using flux balance analysis combined...... with in vitro measured enzyme specific activities, that fermentation is more catalytically efficient than respiration, i.e. it produces more ATP per protein mass. And that the switch to fermentation at high growth rates therefore is a consequence of a high ATP production rate, provided by a limited pool...

  7. A Kinetic Modelling of Enzyme Inhibitions in the Central Metabolism of Yeast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasbawati; Kalondeng, A.; Aris, N.; Erawaty, N.; Azis, M. I.

    2018-03-01

    Metabolic regulation plays an important role in the metabolic engineering of a cellular process. It is conducted to improve the productivity of a microbial process by identifying the important regulatory nodes of a metabolic pathway such as fermentation pathway. Regulation of enzymes involved in a particular pathway can be held to improve the productivity of the system. In the central metabolism of yeast cell, some enzymes are known as regulating enzymes that can be inhibited to increase the production of ethanol. In this research we study the kinetic modelling of the enzymes in the central pathway of yeast metabolism by taking into consideration the enzyme inhibition effects to the ethanol production. The existence of positive steady state solution and the stability of the system are also analysed to study the property and dynamical behaviour of the system. One stable steady state of the system is produced if some conditions are fulfilled. The conditions concern to the restriction of the maximum reactions of the enzymes in the pyruvate and acetaldehyde branch points. There exists a certain time of fermentation reaction at which a maximum and a minimum ethanol productions are attained after regulating the system. Optimal ethanol concentration is also produced for a certain initial concentration of inhibitor.

  8. Impact of Fungicide Residues on Polymerase Chain Reaction and on Yeast Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gildo Almeida da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The indiscriminate use of pesticides on grape crops is harmful for consumers´ healthin “in natura” consumption and in the ingestion of wine and grape juice. During winemaking, a rapid and efficient fermentation stage is critical to avoid proliferation of contaminating microorganisms and to guarantee the product´s quality. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR has the advantage of detecting these contaminants in the early stages of fermentation. However,this enzymatic reaction may also be susceptible to specific problems, reducing its efficiency. Agricultural practices, such as fungicide treatments, may be a source of PCR inhibiting factors and may also interfere in the normal course of fermentation.The action of the pesticides captan and folpet on PCR and on yeast metabolism was evaluated, once these phthalimide compounds are widely employed in Brazilian vineyards. DNA amplification was only observed at 75 and 37.5 µg/mL of captan concentrations, whereas with folpet, amplification was observed only in the two lowest concentrations tested (42.2 and 21.1µg/mL.Besides the strong inhibition on Taq polymerase activity, phthalimides also inhibited yeast metabolism at all concentrations analyzed.Grape must containing captan and folpet residues could not be transformed into wine due to stuck fermentation caused by the inhibition of yeast metabolism. Non-compliance with the waiting period for phthalimide fungicides may result in financial liabilities to the viticulture sector.The use of yeasts with high fungicide sensitivity should be selected for must fermentation as a strategy for sustainable wine production and to assure that products comply with health and food safety standards.

  9. Bioethanol a Microbial Biofuel Metabolite; New Insights of Yeasts Metabolic Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled A. Selim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Scarcity of the non-renewable energy sources, global warming, environmental pollution, and raising the cost of petroleum are the motive for the development of renewable, eco-friendly fuels production with low costs. Bioethanol production is one of the promising materials that can subrogate the petroleum oil, and it is considered recently as a clean liquid fuel or a neutral carbon. Diverse microorganisms such as yeasts and bacteria are able to produce bioethanol on a large scale, which can satisfy our daily needs with cheap and applicable methods. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia stipitis are two of the pioneer yeasts in ethanol production due to their abilities to produce a high amount of ethanol. The recent focus is directed towards lignocellulosic biomass that contains 30–50% cellulose and 20–40% hemicellulose, and can be transformed into glucose and fundamentally xylose after enzymatic hydrolysis. For this purpose, a number of various approaches have been used to engineer different pathways for improving the bioethanol production with simultaneous fermentation of pentose and hexoses sugars in the yeasts. These approaches include metabolic and flux analysis, modeling and expression analysis, followed by targeted deletions or the overexpression of key genes. In this review, we highlight and discuss the current status of yeasts genetic engineering for enhancing bioethanol production, and the conditions that influence bioethanol production.

  10. Improving the phenotype predictions of a yeast genome-scale metabolic model by incorporating enzymatic constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, Benjamin J.; Zhang, Xi-Cheng; Nilsson, Avlant

    2017-01-01

    , which act as limitations on metabolic fluxes, are not taken into account. Here, we present GECKO, a method that enhances a GEM to account for enzymes as part of reactions, thereby ensuring that each metabolic flux does not exceed its maximum capacity, equal to the product of the enzyme's abundance...... and turnover number. We applied GECKO to a Saccharomyces cerevisiae GEM and demonstrated that the new model could correctly describe phenotypes that the previous model could not, particularly under high enzymatic pressure conditions, such as yeast growing on different carbon sources in excess, coping...... with stress, or overexpressing a specific pathway. GECKO also allows to directly integrate quantitative proteomics data; by doing so, we significantly reduced flux variability of the model, in over 60% of metabolic reactions. Additionally, the model gives insight into the distribution of enzyme usage between...

  11. Compounds from Terminalia mantaly L. (Combretaceae Stem Bark Exhibit Potent Inhibition against Some Pathogenic Yeasts and Enzymes of Metabolic Significance

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    Marthe Aimée Tchuente Tchuenmogne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathogenic yeasts resistance to current drugs emphasizes the need for new, safe, and cost-effective drugs. Also, new inhibitors are needed to control the effects of enzymes that are implicated in metabolic dysfunctions such as cancer, obesity, and epilepsy. Methods: The anti-yeast extract from Terminalia mantaly (Combretaceae was fractionated and the structures of the isolated compounds established by means of spectroscopic analysis and comparison with literature data. Activity was assessed against Candida albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. krusei using the microdilution method, and against four enzymes of metabolic significance: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, human erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase I and II, and glutathione S-transferase. Results: Seven compounds, 3,3′-di-O-methylellagic acid 4′-O-α-rhamnopyranoside; 3-O-methylellagic acid; arjungenin or 2,3,19,23-tetrahydroxyolean-12-en-28-oïc acid; arjunglucoside or 2,3,19,23-tetrahydroxyolean-12-en-28-oïc acid glucopyranoside; 2α,3α,24-trihydroxyolean-11,13(18-dien-28-oïc acid; stigmasterol; and stigmasterol 3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside were isolated from the extract. Among those, 3,3′-di-O-methylellagic acid 4′-O-α-rhamnopyranoside, 3-O-methylellagic acid, and arjunglucoside showed anti-yeast activity comparable to that of reference fluconazole with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC below 32 µg/mL. Besides, Arjunglucoside potently inhibited the tested enzymes with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50 below 4 µM and inhibitory constant (Ki <3 µM. Conclusions: The results achieved indicate that further SAR studies will likely identify potent hit derivatives that should subsequently enter the drug development pipeline.

  12. Metabolic Engineering of Yeast to Produce Fatty Acid-derived Biofuels: Bottlenecks and Solutions

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    Jiayuan eSheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid-derived biofuels can be a better solution than bioethanol to replace petroleum fuel, since they have similar energy content and combustion properties as current transportation fuels. The environmentally friendly microbial fermentation process has been used to synthesize advanced biofuels from renewable feedstock. Due to their robustness as well as the high tolerance to fermentation inhibitors and phage contamination, yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Yarrowia lipolytica have attracted tremendous attention in recent studies regarding the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, including fatty acids, fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols, and fatty alkanes. However, the native yeast strains cannot produce fatty acids and fatty acid-derived biofuels in large quantities. To this end, we have summarized recent publications in this review on metabolic engineering of yeast strains to improve the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels, identified the bottlenecks that limit the productivity of biofuels, and categorized the appropriate approaches to overcome these obstacles.

  13. A Yeast Mutant Deleted of GPH1 Bears Defects in Lipid Metabolism.

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    Martina Gsell

    Full Text Available In a previous study we demonstrated up-regulation of the yeast GPH1 gene under conditions of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE depletion caused by deletion of the mitochondrial (M phosphatidylserine decarboxylase 1 (PSD1 (Gsell et al., 2013, PLoS One. 8(10:e77380. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0077380. Gph1p has originally been identified as a glycogen phosphorylase catalyzing degradation of glycogen to glucose in the stationary growth phase of the yeast. Here we show that deletion of this gene also causes decreased levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC, triacylglycerols and steryl esters. Depletion of the two non-polar lipids in a Δgph1 strain leads to lack of lipid droplets, and decrease of the PC level results in instability of the plasma membrane. In vivo labeling experiments revealed that formation of PC via both pathways of biosynthesis, the cytidine diphosphate (CDP-choline and the methylation route, is negatively affected by a Δgph1 mutation, although expression of genes involved is not down regulated. Altogether, Gph1p besides its function as a glycogen mobilizing enzyme appears to play a regulatory role in yeast lipid metabolism.

  14. Regulation of NAD+ metabolism, signaling and compartmentalization in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Kato, Michiko; Lin, Su-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Pyridine nucleotides are essential coenzymes in many cellular redox reactions in all living systems. In addition to functioning as a redox carrier, NAD+ is also a required co-substrate for the conserved sirtuin deacetylases. Sirtuins regulate transcription, genome maintenance and metabolism and function as molecular links between cells and their environment. Maintaining NAD+ homeostasis is essential for proper cellular function and aberrant NAD+ metabolism has been implicated in a number of metabolic- and age-associated diseases. Recently, NAD+ metabolism has been linked to the phosphate-responsive signaling pathway (PHO pathway) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Activation of the PHO pathway is associated with the production and mobilization of the NAD+ metabolite nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is mediated in part by PHO-regulated nucleotidases. Cross-regulation between NAD+ metabolism and the PHO pathway has also been reported; however, detailed mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The PHO pathway also appears to modulate the activities of common downstream effectors of multiple nutrient-sensing pathways (Ras-PKA, TOR, Sch9/AKT). These signaling pathways were suggested to play a role in calorie restriction-mediated beneficial effects, which have also been linked to Sir2 function and NAD+ metabolism. Here, we discuss the interactions of these pathways and their potential roles in regulating NAD+ metabolism. In eukaryotic cells, intracellular compartmentalization facilitates the regulation of enzymatic functions and also concentrates or sequesters specific metabolites. Various NAD+-mediated cellular functions such as mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are compartmentalized. Therefore, we also discuss several key players functioning in mitochondrial, cytosolic and vacuolar compartmentalization of NAD+ intermediates, and their potential roles in NAD+ homeostasis. To date, it remains unclear how NAD+ and NAD+ intermediates shuttle between different

  15. Regulation of NAD+ metabolism, signaling and compartmentalization in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Michiko; Lin, Su-Ju

    2014-11-01

    Pyridine nucleotides are essential coenzymes in many cellular redox reactions in all living systems. In addition to functioning as a redox carrier, NAD(+) is also a required co-substrate for the conserved sirtuin deacetylases. Sirtuins regulate transcription, genome maintenance and metabolism and function as molecular links between cells and their environment. Maintaining NAD(+) homeostasis is essential for proper cellular function and aberrant NAD(+) metabolism has been implicated in a number of metabolic- and age-associated diseases. Recently, NAD(+) metabolism has been linked to the phosphate-responsive signaling pathway (PHO pathway) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Activation of the PHO pathway is associated with the production and mobilization of the NAD(+) metabolite nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is mediated in part by PHO-regulated nucleotidases. Cross-regulation between NAD(+) metabolism and the PHO pathway has also been reported; however, detailed mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The PHO pathway also appears to modulate the activities of common downstream effectors of multiple nutrient-sensing pathways (Ras-PKA, TOR, Sch9/AKT). These signaling pathways were suggested to play a role in calorie restriction-mediated beneficial effects, which have also been linked to Sir2 function and NAD(+) metabolism. Here, we discuss the interactions of these pathways and their potential roles in regulating NAD(+) metabolism. In eukaryotic cells, intracellular compartmentalization facilitates the regulation of enzymatic functions and also concentrates or sequesters specific metabolites. Various NAD(+)-mediated cellular functions such as mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are compartmentalized. Therefore, we also discuss several key players functioning in mitochondrial, cytosolic and vacuolar compartmentalization of NAD(+) intermediates, and their potential roles in NAD(+) homeostasis. To date, it remains unclear how NAD(+) and NAD(+) intermediates

  16. The proline metabolism intermediate Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate directly inhibits the mitochondrial respiration in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Akira; Nasuno, Ryo; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2012-07-30

    The proline metabolism intermediate Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) induces cell death in animals, plants and yeasts. To elucidate how P5C triggers cell death, we analyzed P5C metabolism, mitochondrial respiration and superoxide anion generation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Gene disruption analysis revealed that P5C-mediated cell death was not due to P5C metabolism. Interestingly, deficiency in mitochondrial respiration suppressed the sensitivity of yeast cells to P5C. In addition, we found that P5C inhibits the mitochondrial respiration and induces a burst of superoxide anions from the mitochondria. We propose that P5C regulates cell death via the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Reconstruction and in silico analysis of metabolic network for an oleaginous yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica.

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    Pengcheng Pan

    Full Text Available With the emergence of energy scarcity, the use of renewable energy sources such as biodiesel is becoming increasingly necessary. Recently, many researchers have focused their minds on Yarrowia lipolytica, a model oleaginous yeast, which can be employed to accumulate large amounts of lipids that could be further converted to biodiesel. In order to understand the metabolic characteristics of Y. lipolytica at a systems level and to examine the potential for enhanced lipid production, a genome-scale compartmentalized metabolic network was reconstructed based on a combination of genome annotation and the detailed biochemical knowledge from multiple databases such as KEGG, ENZYME and BIGG. The information about protein and reaction associations of all the organisms in KEGG and Expasy-ENZYME database was arranged into an EXCEL file that can then be regarded as a new useful database to generate other reconstructions. The generated model iYL619_PCP accounts for 619 genes, 843 metabolites and 1,142 reactions including 236 transport reactions, 125 exchange reactions and 13 spontaneous reactions. The in silico model successfully predicted the minimal media and the growing abilities on different substrates. With flux balance analysis, single gene knockouts were also simulated to predict the essential genes and partially essential genes. In addition, flux variability analysis was applied to design new mutant strains that will redirect fluxes through the network and may enhance the production of lipid. This genome-scale metabolic model of Y. lipolytica can facilitate system-level metabolic analysis as well as strain development for improving the production of biodiesels and other valuable products by Y. lipolytica and other closely related oleaginous yeasts.

  18. The control of translational accuracy is a determinant of healthy ageing in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Haar, Tobias; Leadsham, Jane E; Sauvadet, Aimie; Tarrant, Daniel; Adam, Ilectra S; Saromi, Kofo; Laun, Peter; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Breitenbach-Koller, Hannelore; Breitenbach, Michael; Tuite, Mick F; Gourlay, Campbell W

    2017-01-01

    Life requires the maintenance of molecular function in the face of stochastic processes that tend to adversely affect macromolecular integrity. This is particularly relevant during ageing, as many cellular functions decline with age, including growth, mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. Protein synthesis must deliver functional proteins at all times, implying that the effects of protein synthesis errors like amino acid misincorporation and stop-codon read-through must be minimized during ageing. Here we show that loss of translational accuracy accelerates the loss of viability in stationary phase yeast. Since reduced translational accuracy also reduces the folding competence of at least some proteins, we hypothesize that negative interactions between translational errors and age-related protein damage together overwhelm the cellular chaperone network. We further show that multiple cellular signalling networks control basal error rates in yeast cells, including a ROS signal controlled by mitochondrial activity, and the Ras pathway. Together, our findings indicate that signalling pathways regulating growth, protein homeostasis and energy metabolism may jointly safeguard accurate protein synthesis during healthy ageing. © 2017 The Authors.

  19. Functional analysis of lipid metabolism genes in wine yeasts during alcoholic fermentation at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Malo, María; García-Ríos, Estéfani; Chiva, Rosana; Guillamon, José M

    2014-10-29

    Wine produced by low-temperature fermentation is mostly considered to have improved sensory qualities. However few commercial wine strains available on the market are well-adapted to ferment at low temperature (10 - 15°C). The lipid metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a central role in low temperature adaptation. One strategy to modify lipid composition is to alter transcriptional activity by deleting or overexpressing the key genes of lipid metabolism. In a previous study, we identified the genes of the phospholipid, sterol and sphingolipid pathways, which impacted on growth capacity at low temperature. In the present study, we aimed to determine the influence of these genes on fermentation performance and growth during low-temperature wine fermentations. We analyzed the phenotype during fermentation at the low and optimal temperature of the lipid mutant and overexpressing strains in the background of a derivative commercial wine strain. The increase in the gene dosage of some of these lipid genes, e.g., PSD1 , LCB3, DPL1 and OLE1, improved fermentation activity during low-temperature fermentations, thus confirming their positive role during wine yeast adaptation to cold. Genes whose overexpression improved fermentation activity at 12°C were overexpressed by chromosomal integration into commercial wine yeast QA23. Fermentations in synthetic and natural grape must were carried out by this new set of overexpressing strains. The strains overexpressing OLE1 and DPL1 were able to finish fermentation before commercial wine yeast QA23. Only the OLE1 gene overexpression produced a specific aroma profile in the wines produced with natural grape must.

  20. Functional analysis of lipid metabolism genes in wine yeasts during alcoholic fermentation at low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María López-Malo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Wine produced by low-temperature fermentation is mostly considered to have improved sensory qualities. However few commercial wine strains available on the market are well-adapted to ferment at low temperature (10 – 15°C. The lipid metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a central role in low temperature adaptation. One strategy to modify lipid composition is to alter transcriptional activity by deleting or overexpressing the key genes of lipid metabolism. In a previous study, we identified the genes of the phospholipid, sterol and sphingolipid pathways, which impacted on growth capacity at low temperature. In the present study, we aimed to determine the influence of these genes on fermentation performance and growth during low-temperature wine fermentations. We analyzed the phenotype during fermentation at the low and optimal temperature of the lipid mutant and overexpressing strains in the background of a derivative commercial wine strain. The increase in the gene dosage of some of these lipid genes, e.g., PSD1, LCB3, DPL1 and OLE1, improved fermentation activity during low-temperature fermentations, thus confirming their positive role during wine yeast adaptation to cold. Genes whose overexpression improved fermentation activity at 12°C were overexpressed by chromosomal integration into commercial wine yeast QA23. Fermentations in synthetic and natural grape must were carried out by this new set of overexpressing strains. The strains overexpressing OLE1 and DPL1 were able to finish fermentation before commercial wine yeast QA23. Only the OLE1 gene overexpression produced a specific aroma profile in the wines produced with natural grape must.

  1. Understanding bistability in yeast glycolysis using general properties of metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planqué, Robert; Bruggeman, Frank J; Teusink, Bas; Hulshof, Josephus

    2014-09-01

    Glycolysis is the central pathway in energy metabolism in the majority of organisms. In a recent paper, van Heerden et al. showed experimentally and computationally that glycolysis can exist in two states, a global steady state and a so-called imbalanced state. In the imbalanced state, intermediary metabolites accumulate at low levels of ATP and inorganic phosphate. It was shown that Baker's yeast uses a peculiar regulatory mechanism--via trehalose metabolism--to ensure that most yeast cells reach the steady state and not the imbalanced state. Here we explore the apparent bistable behaviour in a core model of glycolysis that is based on a well-established detailed model, and study in great detail the bifurcation behaviour of solutions, without using any numerical information on parameter values. We uncover a rich suite of solutions, including so-called imbalanced states, bistability, and oscillatory behaviour. The techniques employed are generic, directly suitable for a wide class of biochemical pathways, and could lead to better analytical treatments of more detailed models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Yeast cell metabolism investigated by CO{_2} production and soft X-ray irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, A.; Batani, D.; Previdi, F.; Milani, M.; Pozzi, A.; Turcu, E.; Huntington, S.; Takeyasu, H.

    1999-01-01

    Results obtained using a new technique for studying cell metabolism are presented. The technique, consisting in CO2 production monitoring, has been applied to Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells. Also the cells were irradiated using the soft X-ray laser-plasma source at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory with the aim of producing a damage of metabolic processes at the wall level, responsible for fermentation, without great interference with respiration, taking place in mitochondria, and DNA activity. The source was calibrated with PIN diodes and X-ray spectrometers and used Teflon stripes as target, emitting X-rays at about 0.9 keV, with a very low penetration in biological material. X-ray doses delivered to the different cell compartments were calculated following a Lambert-Bouguet-Beer law. Immediately after irradiation, the damage to metabolic activity was measured again by monitoring CO2 production. Results showed a general reduction in gas production by irradiated samples, together with non-linear and non-monotone response to dose. There was also evidence of oscillations in cell metabolic activity and of X-ray induced changes in oscillation frequency.

  3. Metabolic engineering of a haploid strain derived from a triploid industrial yeast for producing cellulosic ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Rin; Skerker, Jeffrey M; Kong, In Iok; Kim, Heejin; Maurer, Matthew J; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Peng, Dairong; Wei, Na; Arkin, Adam P; Jin, Yong-Su

    2017-03-01

    Many desired phenotypes for producing cellulosic biofuels are often observed in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. However, many industrial yeast strains are polyploid and have low spore viability, making it difficult to use these strains for metabolic engineering applications. We selected the polyploid industrial strain S. cerevisiae ATCC 4124 exhibiting rapid glucose fermentation capability, high ethanol productivity, strong heat and inhibitor tolerance in order to construct an optimal yeast strain for producing cellulosic ethanol. Here, we focused on developing a general approach and high-throughput screening method to isolate stable haploid segregants derived from a polyploid parent, such as triploid ATCC 4124 with a poor spore viability. Specifically, we deleted the HO genes, performed random sporulation, and screened the resulting segregants based on growth rate, mating type, and ploidy. Only one stable haploid derivative (4124-S60) was isolated, while 14 other segregants with a stable mating type were aneuploid. The 4124-S60 strain inherited only a subset of desirable traits present in the parent strain, same as other aneuploids, suggesting that glucose fermentation and specific ethanol productivity are likely to be genetically complex traits and/or they might depend on ploidy. Nonetheless, the 4124-60 strain did inherit the ability to tolerate fermentation inhibitors. When additional genetic perturbations known to improve xylose fermentation were introduced into the 4124-60 strain, the resulting engineered strain (IIK1) was able to ferment a Miscanthus hydrolysate better than a previously engineered laboratory strain (SR8), built by making the same genetic changes. However, the IIK1 strain showed higher glycerol and xylitol yields than the SR8 strain. In order to decrease glycerol and xylitol production, an NADH-dependent acetate reduction pathway was introduced into the IIK1 strain. By consuming 2.4g/L of acetate, the resulting strain (IIK1A

  4. Proteolytic regulation of metabolic enzymes by E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes: lessons from yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Okumura, Fumihiko; Kamura, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic organisms use diverse mechanisms to control metabolic rates in response to changes in the internal and/or external environment. Fine metabolic control is a highly responsive, energy-saving process that is mediated by allosteric inhibition/activation and/or reversible modification of preexisting metabolic enzymes. In contrast, coarse metabolic control is a relatively long-term and expensive process that involves modulating the level of metabolic enzymes. Coarse metabolic control can be achieved through the degradation of metabolic enzymes by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), in which substrates are specifically ubiquitinated by an E3 ubiquitin ligase and targeted for proteasomal degradation. Here, we review select multi-protein E3 ligase complexes that directly regulate metabolic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The first part of the review focuses on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated Hrd1 and Doa10 E3 ligase complexes. In addition to their primary roles in the ER-associated degradation pathway that eliminates misfolded proteins, recent quantitative proteomic analyses identified native substrates of Hrd1 and Doa10 in the sterol synthesis pathway. The second part focuses on the SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein) complex, an abundant prototypical multi-protein E3 ligase complex. While the best-known roles of the SCF complex are in the regulation of the cell cycle and transcription, accumulating evidence indicates that the SCF complex also modulates carbon metabolism pathways. The increasing number of metabolic enzymes whose stability is directly regulated by the UPS underscores the importance of the proteolytic regulation of metabolic processes for the acclimation of cells to environmental changes.

  5. Obese and anorexic yeasts: experimental models to understand the metabolic syndrome and lipotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlwein, Sepp D

    2010-03-01

    Lipotoxicity is the pathological consequence of lipid overflow in non-adipose tissue, mediated through reactive lipid moieties which may even lead to lipid-induced cell death (lipoapoptosis). This derailment of cellular and organismal fat homeostasis is the consequence of obesity due to continued over-feeding, and contributes substantially to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, which are all components of the metabolic syndrome. Now, does yeast, a single-celled eukaryote, ever suffer from the metabolic syndrome and what can we potentially learn from studies in this organism about the underlying molecular mechanism that lead to lipid-associated pathologies in human cells? In this review I will summarize the remarkably conserved metabolic and regulatory processes relevant to establishing cellular energy and lipid homeostasis, as well as recent findings that provide detailed insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying fat-induced cellular malfunction and cell death, with potential implications also for mammalian cells. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Nicotinamide supplementation phenocopies SIR2 inactivation by modulating carbon metabolism and respiration during yeast chronological aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, Ivan; Pellegrino Coppola, Damiano; Strippoli, Maurizio; Ronzulli, Rossella; Vai, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinamide (NAM), a form of vitamin B 3 , is a byproduct and noncompetitive inhibitor of the deacetylation reaction catalyzed by Sirtuins. These represent a family of evolutionarily conserved NAD + -dependent deacetylases that are well-known critical regulators of metabolism and aging and whose founding member is Sir2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the effects of NAM supplementation in the context of yeast chronological aging, the established model for studying aging of postmitotic quiescent mammalian cells. Our data show that NAM supplementation at the diauxic shift results in a phenocopy of chronologically aging sir2Δ cells. In fact, NAM-supplemented cells display the same chronological lifespan extension both in expired medium and extreme Calorie Restriction. Furthermore, NAM allows the cells to push their metabolism toward the same outcomes of sir2Δ cells by elevating the level of the acetylated Pck1. Both these cells have the same metabolic changes that concern not only anabolic pathways such as an increased gluconeogenesis but also respiratory activity in terms both of respiratory rate and state of respiration. In particular, they have a higher respiratory reserve capacity and a lower non-phosphorylating respiration that in concert with a low burden of superoxide anions can affect positively chronological aging. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantitative elementary mode analysis of metabolic pathways: the example of yeast glycolysis

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    Kanehisa Minoru

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elementary mode analysis of metabolic pathways has proven to be a valuable tool for assessing the properties and functions of biochemical systems. However, little comprehension of how individual elementary modes are used in real cellular states has been achieved so far. A quantitative measure of fluxes carried by individual elementary modes is of great help to identify dominant metabolic processes, and to understand how these processes are redistributed in biological cells in response to changes in environmental conditions, enzyme kinetics, or chemical concentrations. Results Selecting a valid decomposition of a flux distribution onto a set of elementary modes is not straightforward, since there is usually an infinite number of possible such decompositions. We first show that two recently introduced decompositions are very closely related and assign the same fluxes to reversible elementary modes. Then, we show how such decompositions can be used in combination with kinetic modelling to assess the effects of changes in enzyme kinetics on the usage of individual metabolic routes, and to analyse the range of attainable states in a metabolic system. This approach is illustrated by the example of yeast glycolysis. Our results indicate that only a small subset of the space of stoichiometrically feasible steady states is actually reached by the glycolysis system, even when large variation intervals are allowed for all kinetic parameters of the model. Among eight possible elementary modes, the standard glycolytic route remains dominant in all cases, and only one other elementary mode is able to gain significant flux values in steady state. Conclusion These results indicate that a combination of structural and kinetic modelling significantly constrains the range of possible behaviours of a metabolic system. All elementary modes are not equal contributors to physiological cellular states, and this approach may open a direction toward a

  8. Transcriptional, proteomic, and metabolic responses to lithium in galactose-grown yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, Christoffer; Regenberg, Birgitte; Lagniel, G.

    2003-01-01

    Lithium is highly toxic to yeast when grown in galactose medium mainly because phosphoglucomutase, a key enzyme of galactose metabolism, is inhibited. We studied the global protein and gene expression profiles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in galactose in different time intervals after addition...... of lithium. These results were related to physiological studies where both secreted and intracellular metabolites were determined. Microarray analysis showed that 664 open reading frames were down-regulated and 725 up-regulated in response to addition of lithium. Genes involved in transcription, translation......-regulated proteins were also identified as being changed on the mRNA level. Functional clusters obtained from proteome data were coincident with transcriptional clusters. Physiological studies showed that acetate, glycerol, and glycogen accumulate in response to lithium, as reflected in expression data, whereas...

  9. Key role of lipid management in nitrogen and aroma metabolism in an evolved wine yeast strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollero, Stéphanie; Mouret, Jean-Roch; Sanchez, Isabelle; Camarasa, Carole; Ortiz-Julien, Anne; Sablayrolles, Jean-Marie; Dequin, Sylvie

    2016-02-09

    Fermentative aromas play a key role in the organoleptic profile of young wines. Their production depends both on yeast strain and fermentation conditions. A present-day trend in the wine industry consists in developing new strains with aromatic properties using adaptive evolution approaches. An evolved strain, Affinity™ ECA5, overproducing esters, was recently obtained. In this study, dynamics of nitrogen consumption and of the fermentative aroma synthesis of the evolved and its ancestral strains were compared and coupled with a transcriptomic analysis approach to better understand the metabolic reshaping of Affinity™ ECA5. Nitrogen assimilation was different between the two strains, particularly amino acids transported by carriers regulated by nitrogen catabolite repression. We also observed differences in the kinetics of fermentative aroma production, especially in the bioconversion of higher alcohols into acetate esters. Finally, transcriptomic data showed that the enhanced bioconversion into acetate esters by the evolved strain was associated with the repression of genes involved in sterol biosynthesis rather than an enhanced expression of ATF1 and ATF2 (genes coding for the enzymes responsible for the synthesis of acetate esters from higher alcohols). An integrated approach to yeast metabolism-combining transcriptomic analyses and online monitoring data-showed differences between the two strains at different levels. Differences in nitrogen source consumption were observed suggesting modifications of NCR in the evolved strain. Moreover, the evolved strain showed a different way of managing the lipid source, which notably affected the production of acetate esters, likely because of a greater availability of acetyl-CoA for the evolved strain.

  10. Investigating the effects of statins on cellular lipid metabolism using a yeast expression system.

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    Agata Leszczynska

    Full Text Available In humans, defects in lipid metabolism are associated with a number of severe diseases such as atherosclerosis, obesity and type II diabetes. Hypercholesterolemia is a primary risk factor for coronary artery disease, the major cause of premature deaths in developed countries. Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR, the key enzyme of the sterol synthesis pathway. Since yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae harbours many counterparts of mammalian enzymes involved in lipid-synthesizing pathways, conclusions drawn from research with this single cell eukaryotic organism can be readily applied to higher eukaryotes. Using a yeast strain with deletions of both HMG1 and HMG2 genes (i.e. completely devoid of HMGR activity with introduced wild-type or mutant form of human HMGR (hHMGR gene we investigated the effects of statins on the lipid metabolism of the cell. The relative quantification of mRNA demonstrated a different effect of simvastatin on the expression of the wild-type and mutated hHMGR gene. GC/MS analyses showed a significant decrease of sterols and enhanced conversion of squalene and sterol precursors into ergosterol. This was accompanied by the mobilization of ergosterol precursors localized in lipid particles in the form of steryl esters visualized by confocal microscopy. Changes in the level of ergosterol and its precursors in cells treated with simvastatin depend on the mutation in the hHMGR gene. HPLC/MS analyses indicated a reduced level of phospholipids not connected with the mevalonic acid pathway. We detected two significant phenomena. First, cells treated with simvastatin develop an adaptive response compensating the lower activity of HMGR. This includes enhanced conversion of sterol precursors into ergosterol, mobilization of steryl esters and increased expression of the hHMGR gene. Second, statins cause a substantial drop in the level of glycerophospholipids.

  11. Pyruvate Kinase Triggers a Metabolic Feedback Loop that Controls Redox Metabolism in Respiring Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grüning, N.M.; Rinnerthaler, M.; Bluemlein, K.; Mulleder, M.; Wamelink, M.M.C.; Lehrach, H.; Jakobs, C.A.J.M.; Breitenbach, M.; Ralser, M.

    2011-01-01

    In proliferating cells, a transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism is known as the Warburg effect, whose reversal inhibits cancer cell proliferation. Studying its regulator pyruvate kinase (PYK) in yeast, we discovered that central metabolism is self-adapting to synchronize redox metabolism

  12. A Mutation in PGM2 Causing Inefficient Galactose Metabolism in the Probiotic Yeast Saccharomyces boulardii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Kong, In Iok; Yun, Eun Ju; Zheng, Jia-Qi; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk; Jin, Yong-Su

    2018-05-15

    The probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii has been extensively studied for the prevention and treatment of diarrheal diseases, and it is now commercially available in some countries. S. boulardii displays notable phenotypic characteristics, such as a high optimal growth temperature, high tolerance against acidic conditions, and the inability to form ascospores, which differentiate S. boulardii from Saccharomyces cerevisiae The majority of prior studies stated that S. boulardii exhibits sluggish or halted galactose utilization. Nonetheless, the molecular mechanisms underlying inefficient galactose uptake have yet to be elucidated. When the galactose utilization of a widely used S. boulardii strain, ATCC MYA-796, was examined under various culture conditions, the S. boulardii strain could consume galactose, but at a much lower rate than that of S. cerevisiae While all GAL genes were present in the S. boulardii genome, according to analysis of genomic sequencing data in a previous study, a point mutation (G1278A) in PGM2 , which codes for phosphoglucomutase, was identified in the genome of the S. boulardii strain. As the point mutation resulted in the truncation of the Pgm2 protein, which is known to play a pivotal role in galactose utilization, we hypothesized that the truncated Pgm2 might be associated with inefficient galactose metabolism. Indeed, complementation of S. cerevisiae PGM2 in S. boulardii restored galactose utilization. After reverting the point mutation to a full-length PGM2 in S. boulardii by Cas9-based genome editing, the growth rates of wild-type (with a truncated PGM2 gene) and mutant (with a full-length PGM2 ) strains with glucose or galactose as the carbon source were examined. As expected, the mutant (with a full-length PGM2 ) was able to ferment galactose faster than the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the mutant showed a lower growth rate than that of the wild-type strain on glucose at 37°C. Also, the wild-type strain was enriched in the

  13. Synthetic Biology and Metabolic Engineering Approaches and Its Impact on Non-Conventional Yeast and Biofuel Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhavan, Aravind [Biotechnology Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Trivandrum (India); Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology, Trivandrum (India); Jose, Anju Alphonsa; Binod, Parameswaran; Sindhu, Raveendran, E-mail: sindhurgcb@gmail.com; Sukumaran, Rajeev K. [Biotechnology Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Trivandrum (India); Pandey, Ashok [Biotechnology Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Trivandrum (India); Center for Innovative and Applied Bioprocessing, Mohali, Punjab (India); Castro, Galliano Eulogio [Dpt. Ingeniería Química, Ambiental y de los Materiales Edificio, Universidad de Jaén, Jaén (Spain)

    2017-04-25

    The increasing fossil fuel scarcity has led to an urgent need to develop alternative fuels. Currently microorganisms have been extensively used for the production of first-generation biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. Yeast is the efficient producer of bioethanol among all existing biofuels option. Tools of synthetic biology have revolutionized the field of microbial cell factories especially in the case of ethanol and fatty acid production. Most of the synthetic biology tools have been developed for the industrial workhorse Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The non-conventional yeast systems have several beneficial traits like ethanol tolerance, thermotolerance, inhibitor tolerance, genetic diversity, etc., and synthetic biology have the power to expand these traits. Currently, synthetic biology is slowly widening to the non-conventional yeasts like Hansenula polymorpha, Kluyveromyces lactis, Pichia pastoris, and Yarrowia lipolytica. Herein, we review the basic synthetic biology tools that can apply to non-conventional yeasts. Furthermore, we discuss the recent advances employed to develop efficient biofuel-producing non-conventional yeast strains by metabolic engineering and synthetic biology with recent examples. Looking forward, future synthetic engineering tools’ development and application should focus on unexplored non-conventional yeast species.

  14. Synthetic Biology and Metabolic Engineering Approaches and Its Impact on Non-Conventional Yeast and Biofuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raveendran Sindhu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing fossil fuel scarcity has led to an urgent need to develop alternative fuels. Currently microorganisms have been extensively used for the production of first-generation biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. Yeast is the efficient producer of bioethanol among all existing biofuels option. Tools of synthetic biology have revolutionized the field of microbial cell factories especially in the case of ethanol and fatty acid production. Most of the synthetic biology tools have been developed for the industrial workhorse Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The non-conventional yeast systems have several beneficial traits like ethanol tolerance, thermotolerance, inhibitor tolerance, genetic diversity, etc., and synthetic biology have the power to expand these traits. Currently, synthetic biology is slowly widening to the non-conventional yeasts like Hansenula polymorpha, Kluyveromyces lactis, Pichia pastoris, and Yarrowia lipolytica. Herein, we review the basic synthetic biology tools that can apply to non-conventional yeasts. Furthermore, we discuss the recent advances employed to develop efficient biofuel-producing non-conventional yeast strains by metabolic engineering and synthetic biology with recent examples. Looking forward, future synthetic engineering tools’ development and application should focus on unexplored non-conventional yeast species.

  15. Synthetic Biology and Metabolic Engineering Approaches and Its Impact on Non-Conventional Yeast and Biofuel Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhavan, Aravind; Jose, Anju Alphonsa; Binod, Parameswaran; Sindhu, Raveendran; Sukumaran, Rajeev K.; Pandey, Ashok; Castro, Galliano Eulogio

    2017-01-01

    The increasing fossil fuel scarcity has led to an urgent need to develop alternative fuels. Currently microorganisms have been extensively used for the production of first-generation biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. Yeast is the efficient producer of bioethanol among all existing biofuels option. Tools of synthetic biology have revolutionized the field of microbial cell factories especially in the case of ethanol and fatty acid production. Most of the synthetic biology tools have been developed for the industrial workhorse Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The non-conventional yeast systems have several beneficial traits like ethanol tolerance, thermotolerance, inhibitor tolerance, genetic diversity, etc., and synthetic biology have the power to expand these traits. Currently, synthetic biology is slowly widening to the non-conventional yeasts like Hansenula polymorpha, Kluyveromyces lactis, Pichia pastoris, and Yarrowia lipolytica. Herein, we review the basic synthetic biology tools that can apply to non-conventional yeasts. Furthermore, we discuss the recent advances employed to develop efficient biofuel-producing non-conventional yeast strains by metabolic engineering and synthetic biology with recent examples. Looking forward, future synthetic engineering tools’ development and application should focus on unexplored non-conventional yeast species.

  16. Co-ordinate regulation of lactate metabolism genes in yeast: the role of the lactate permease gene JEN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi, T; Fontanesi, F; Guiard, B

    2002-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the first step in lactate metabolism is its transport across the plasma membrane, a proton symport process mediated by the product of the gene JEN1. Under aerobic conditions, the expression of JEN1 is regulated by the carbon source: the gene is repressed by glucose and induced by non-fermentable substrates. JEN1 expression is also controlled by oxygen availability, but is unaffected by the absence of haem biosynthesis. JEN1 is negatively regulated by the repressors Mig1p and Mig2p, and requires Cat8p for full derepression. In this report we demonstrate that, in addition to these regulators, the Hap2/3/4/5 complex interacts specifically with a CAAT-box element in the JEN1 promoter, and acts to derepress JEN1 expression. We also provide evidence for transcriptional stimulation of JEN1 by the protein kinase Snf1p. Data are presented which provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms implicated in the co-regulation of genes involved in the metabolism of lactate.

  17. DNA repair and the genetic control of radiosensitivity in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: advantages of yeasts for easily manipulated model systems for studies on molecular biology of eukaryotes; induction of x-ray-resistant mutants by radiations and chemicals; genetics of uv-sensitive mutants; loci of genes affecting radiosensitivity; gene interactions in multiple mutants; liquid-holding recovery; mitotic and meiotic recombination; and repair of yeast mitochondrial DNA

  18. Analysis of Growth Inhibition and Metabolism of Hydroxycinnamic Acids by Brewing and Spoilage Strains of Brettanomyces Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lentz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Brettanomyces yeasts are well-known as spoilage organisms in both the wine and beer industries, but also contribute important desirable characters to certain beer styles. These properties are mediated in large part by Brettanomyces’ metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs present in beverage raw materials. Here we compare growth inhibition by, and metabolism of, HCAs among commercial brewing strains and spoilage strains of B. bruxellensis and B. anomalus. These properties vary widely among the different strains tested and between the HCAs analyzed. Brewing strains showed more efficient metabolism of ferulic acid over p-coumaric acid, a trait not shared among the spoilage strains.

  19. Analysis of Growth Inhibition and Metabolism of Hydroxycinnamic Acids by Brewing and Spoilage Strains of Brettanomyces Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Michael; Harris, Chad

    2015-10-15

    Brettanomyces yeasts are well-known as spoilage organisms in both the wine and beer industries, but also contribute important desirable characters to certain beer styles. These properties are mediated in large part by Brettanomyces ' metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) present in beverage raw materials. Here we compare growth inhibition by, and metabolism of, HCAs among commercial brewing strains and spoilage strains of B. bruxellensis and B. anomalus . These properties vary widely among the different strains tested and between the HCAs analyzed. Brewing strains showed more efficient metabolism of ferulic acid over p -coumaric acid, a trait not shared among the spoilage strains.

  20. Metabolic efficiency in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in relation to temperature dependent growth and biomass yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhartsev, Maksim; Yang, Xuelian; Reuss, Matthias; Pörtner, Hans Otto

    2015-08-01

    Canonized view on temperature effects on growth rate of microorganisms is based on assumption of protein denaturation, which is not confirmed experimentally so far. We develop an alternative concept, which is based on view that limits of thermal tolerance are based on imbalance of cellular energy allocation. Therefore, we investigated growth suppression of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the supraoptimal temperature range (30-40°C), i.e. above optimal temperature (Topt). The maximal specific growth rate (μmax) of biomass, its concentration and yield on glucose (Yx/glc) were measured across the whole thermal window (5-40°C) of the yeast in batch anaerobic growth on glucose. Specific rate of glucose consumption, specific rate of glucose consumption for maintenance (mglc), true biomass yield on glucose (Yx/glc(true)), fractional conservation of substrate carbon in product and ATP yield on glucose (Yatp/glc) were estimated from the experimental data. There was a negative linear relationship between ATP, ADP and AMP concentrations and specific growth rate at any growth conditions, whilst the energy charge was always high (~0.83). There were two temperature regions where mglc differed 12-fold, which points to the existence of a 'low' (within 5-31°C) and a 'high' (within 33-40°C) metabolic mode regarding maintenance requirements. The rise from the low to high mode occurred at 31-32°C in step-wise manner and it was accompanied with onset of suppression of μmax. High mglc at supraoptimal temperatures indicates a significant reduction of scope for growth, due to high maintenance cost. Analysis of temperature dependencies of product formation efficiency and Yatp/glc revealed that the efficiency of energy metabolism approaches its lower limit at 26-31°C. This limit is reflected in the predetermined combination of Yx/glc(true), elemental biomass composition and degree of reduction of the growth substrate. Approaching the limit implies a reduction of the safety margin

  1. Pleiotropic functions of the yeast Greatwall-family protein kinase Rim15p: a novel target for the control of alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Rim15p, a Greatwall-family protein kinase in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is required for cellular nutrient responses, such as the entry into quiescence and the induction of meiosis and sporulation. In higher eukaryotes, the orthologous gene products are commonly involved in the cell cycle G 2 /M transition. How are these pleiotropic functions generated from a single family of protein kinases? Recent advances in both research fields have identified the conserved Greatwall-mediated signaling pathway and a variety of downstream target molecules. In addition, our studies of S. cerevisiae sake yeast strains revealed that Rim15p also plays a significant role in the control of alcoholic fermentation. Despite an extensive history of research on glycolysis and alcoholic fermentation, there has been no critical clue to artificial modification of fermentation performance of yeast cells. Our finding of an in vivo metabolic regulatory mechanism is expected to provide a major breakthrough in yeast breeding technologies for fermentation applications.

  2. Trehalose-6-phosphate synthesis controls yeast gluconeogenesis downstream and independent of SNF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroover, Sofie; Ghillebert, Ruben; Broeckx, Tom; Winderickx, Joris; Rolland, Filip

    2016-06-01

    Trehalose-6-P (T6P), an intermediate of trehalose biosynthesis, was identified as an important regulator of yeast sugar metabolism and signaling. tps1Δ mutants, deficient in T6P synthesis (TPS), are unable to grow on rapidly fermentable medium with uncontrolled influx in glycolysis, depletion of ATP and accumulation of sugar phosphates. However, the exact molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. We show that SNF1 deletion restores the tps1Δ growth defect on glucose, suggesting that lack of TPS hampers inactivation of SNF1 or SNF1-regulated processes. In addition to alternative, non-fermentable carbon metabolism, SNF1 controls two major processes: respiration and gluconeogenesis. The tps1Δ defect appears to be specifically associated with deficient inhibition of gluconeogenesis, indicating more downstream effects. Consistently, Snf1 dephosphorylation and inactivation on glucose medium are not affected, as confirmed with an in vivo Snf1 activity reporter. Detailed analysis shows that gluconeogenic Pck1 and Fbp1 expression, protein levels and activity are not repressed upon glucose addition to tps1Δ cells, suggesting a link between the metabolic defect and persistent gluconeogenesis. While SNF1 is essential for induction of gluconeogenesis, T6P/TPS is required for inactivation of gluconeogenesis in the presence of glucose, downstream and independent of SNF1 activity and the Cat8 and Sip4 transcription factors. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Repression of mitochondrial translation, respiration and a metabolic cycle-regulated gene, SLF1, by the yeast Pumilio-family protein Puf3p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Chatenay-Lapointe

    Full Text Available Synthesis and assembly of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS system requires genes located both in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, but how gene expression is coordinated between these two compartments is not fully understood. One level of control is through regulated expression mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and other factors required for mitochondrial translation and OXPHOS assembly, which are all products of nuclear genes that are subsequently imported into mitochondria. Interestingly, this cadre of genes in budding yeast has in common a 3'-UTR element that is bound by the Pumilio family protein, Puf3p, and is coordinately regulated under many conditions, including during the yeast metabolic cycle. Multiple functions have been assigned to Puf3p, including promoting mRNA degradation, localizing nucleus-encoded mitochondrial transcripts to the outer mitochondrial membrane, and facilitating mitochondria-cytoskeletal interactions and motility. Here we show that Puf3p has a general repressive effect on mitochondrial OXPHOS abundance, translation, and respiration that does not involve changes in overall mitochondrial biogenesis and largely independent of TORC1-mitochondrial signaling. We also identified the cytoplasmic translation factor Slf1p as yeast metabolic cycle-regulated gene that is repressed by Puf3p at the post-transcriptional level and promotes respiration and extension of yeast chronological life span when over-expressed. Altogether, these results should facilitate future studies on which of the many functions of Puf3p is most relevant for regulating mitochondrial gene expression and the role of nuclear-mitochondrial communication in aging and longevity.

  4. Altered sterol metabolism in budding yeast affects mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Diane M; Chen, Opal S; Li, Liangtao; Kaplan, Jerry; Bhuiyan, Shah Alam; Natarajan, Selvamuthu K; Bard, Martin; Cox, James E

    2018-05-17

    Ergosterol synthesis is essential for cellular growth and viability of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and intracellular sterol distribution and homeostasis are therefore highly regulated in this species. Erg25 is an iron-containing C4-methyl sterol oxidase that contributes to the conversion of 4,4-dimethylzymosterol to zymosterol, a precursor of ergosterol. The ERG29 gene encodes an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein, and here we identified a role for Erg29 in the methyl sterol oxidase step of ergosterol synthesis. ERG29 deletion resulted in lethality in respiring cells, but respiration-incompetent (Rho- or Rho0) cells survived, suggesting that Erg29 loss leads to accumulation of oxidized sterol metabolites that affect cell viability. Down-regulation of ERG29 expression in Δerg29 cells indeed led to accumulation of methyl sterol metabolites, resulting in increased mitochondrial oxidants and a decreased ability of mitochondria to synthesize iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters due to reduced levels of Yfh1, the mammalian frataxin homolog, which is involved in mitochondrial Fe metabolism. Using a high-copy genomic library, we identified suppressor genes that permitted growth of Δerg29 cells on respiratory substrates, and these included genes encoding the mitochondrial proteins Yfh1, Mmt1, Mmt2, and Pet20, which reversed all phenotypes associated with loss of ERG29. Of note, loss of Erg25 also resulted in accumulation of methyl sterol metabolites and also increased mitochondrial oxidants and degradation of Yfh1. We propose that accumulation of toxic intermediates of the methyl sterol oxidase reaction increase mitochondrial oxidants, which affect Yfh1 protein stability. These results indicate an interaction between sterols generated by ER proteins and mitochondrial iron metabolism. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Expanding xylose metabolism in yeast for plant cell wall conversion to biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Yu, Vivian Yaci; Lin, Yuping; Chomvong, Kulika; Estrela, Raíssa; Park, Annsea; Liang, Julie M; Znameroski, Elizabeth A; Feehan, Joanna; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su; Glass, N Louise; Cate, Jamie HD

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable biofuel production from renewable biomass will require the efficient and complete use of all abundant sugars in the plant cell wall. Using the cellulolytic fungus Neurospora crassa as a model, we identified a xylodextrin transport and consumption pathway required for its growth on hemicellulose. Reconstitution of this xylodextrin utilization pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that fungal xylose reductases act as xylodextrin reductases, producing xylosyl-xylitol oligomers as metabolic intermediates. These xylosyl-xylitol intermediates are generated by diverse fungi and bacteria, indicating that xylodextrin reduction is widespread in nature. Xylodextrins and xylosyl-xylitol oligomers are then hydrolyzed by two hydrolases to generate intracellular xylose and xylitol. Xylodextrin consumption using a xylodextrin transporter, xylodextrin reductases and tandem intracellular hydrolases in cofermentations with sucrose and glucose greatly expands the capacity of yeast to use plant cell wall-derived sugars and has the potential to increase the efficiency of both first-generation and next-generation biofuel production. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05896.001 PMID:25647728

  6. Functional genomics of lipid metabolism in the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiselman, Gina M; Ito, Masakazu; Mondo, Stephen J; Reilly, Morgann C; Cheng, Ya-Fang; Bauer, Stefan; Grigoriev, Igor V; Gladden, John M; Simmons, Blake A; Brem, Rachel B

    2018-01-01

    The basidiomycete yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides (also known as Rhodotorula toruloides) accumulates high concentrations of lipids and carotenoids from diverse carbon sources. It has great potential as a model for the cellular biology of lipid droplets and for sustainable chemical production. We developed a method for high-throughput genetics (RB-TDNAseq), using sequence-barcoded Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA insertions. We identified 1,337 putative essential genes with low T-DNA insertion rates. We functionally profiled genes required for fatty acid catabolism and lipid accumulation, validating results with 35 targeted deletion strains. We identified a high-confidence set of 150 genes affecting lipid accumulation, including genes with predicted function in signaling cascades, gene expression, protein modification and vesicular trafficking, autophagy, amino acid synthesis and tRNA modification, and genes of unknown function. These results greatly advance our understanding of lipid metabolism in this oleaginous species and demonstrate a general approach for barcoded mutagenesis that should enable functional genomics in diverse fungi. PMID:29521624

  7. Very high gravity ethanol fermentation by flocculating yeast under redox potential-controlled conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chen-Guang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very high gravity (VHG fermentation using medium in excess of 250 g/L sugars for more than 15% (v ethanol can save energy consumption, not only for ethanol distillation, but also for distillage treatment; however, stuck fermentation with prolonged fermentation time and more sugars unfermented is the biggest challenge. Controlling redox potential (ORP during VHG fermentation benefits biomass accumulation and improvement of yeast cell viability that is affected by osmotic pressure and ethanol inhibition, enhancing ethanol productivity and yield, the most important techno-economic aspect of fuel ethanol production. Results Batch fermentation was performed under different ORP conditions using the flocculating yeast and media containing glucose of 201 ± 3.1, 252 ± 2.9 and 298 ± 3.8 g/L. Compared with ethanol fermentation by non-flocculating yeast, different ORP profiles were observed with the flocculating yeast due to the morphological change associated with the flocculation of yeast cells. When ORP was controlled at −100 mV, ethanol fermentation with the high gravity (HG media containing glucose of 201 ± 3.1 and 252 ± 2.9 g/L was completed at 32 and 56 h, respectively, producing 93.0 ± 1.3 and 120.0 ± 1.8 g/L ethanol, correspondingly. In contrast, there were 24.0 ± 0.4 and 17.0 ± 0.3 g/L glucose remained unfermented without ORP control. As high as 131.0 ± 1.8 g/L ethanol was produced at 72 h when ORP was controlled at −150 mV for the VHG fermentation with medium containing 298 ± 3.8 g/L glucose, since yeast cell viability was improved more significantly. Conclusions No lag phase was observed during ethanol fermentation with the flocculating yeast, and the implementation of ORP control improved ethanol productivity and yield. When ORP was controlled at −150 mV, more reducing power was available for yeast cells to survive, which in turn improved their viability and VHG

  8. Effect of yeast culture on milk production and metabolic and reproductive performance of early lactation dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalmus Piret

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main objective of this study was to estimate the effect of supplementation with Saccaromyces cerevisiae (SC (Yea-Sacc® 1026 on milk production, metabolic parameters and the resumption of ovarian activity in early lactation dairy cows. Methods The experiment was conducted during 2005/2006 in a commercial tied-house farm with an average of 200 milking Estonian Holstein Friesian cows. The late pregnant multiparous cows (n = 46 were randomly divided into two groups; one group received 10 g yeast culture from two weeks before to 14 weeks after calving. The groups were fed a total mixed ration with silages and concentrates. Milk recording data and blood samples for plasma metabolites were taken. Resumption of luteal activity was determined using milk progesterone (P4 measurements. Uterine bacteriology and ovarian ultrasonography (US were performed and body condition scores (BCS and clinical disease occurrences were recorded. For analysis, the statistical software Stata 9.2 and R were used to compute Cox proportional hazard and linear mixed models. Results The average milk production per cow did not differ between the groups (32.7 ± 6.4 vs 30.7 ± 5.3 kg/day in the SC and control groups respectively, but the production of milk fat (P P 4 results, all cows in both groups ovulated during the experimental period. The resumption of ovarian activity (first ovulations and time required for elimination of bacteria from the uterus did not differ between the groups. Conclusion Supplementation with SC had an effect on milk protein and fat production, but did not influence the milk yield. No effects on PP metabolic status, bacterial elimination from the uterus nor the resumption of ovarian activity were found.

  9. Genetic control of radiosensitivity modification of some yeast strons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petin, V.G.; Zhurakovskaya, I.P.

    1982-01-01

    The genetic determination of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of densely ionizing particles and cysteamine's radioprotective effect on irradiated cells, demonstrated earlier on yeast cells of different genotype, has been proved on diploid wild-type cells of Saccharomyces cerevisial yeasts, solitary mutants, homozygous with respect to rad 2 and rad 54, and double mutant containing both locuses in homozygous state. It is shown that RBE of α-particles and radioprotector's efficiency depend on repair system's activity. A possible mechanism of the participation of postirradiation recovery processes in the modification of cell radiosensitivity is discussed [ru

  10. Functional food red yeast rice (RYR) for metabolic syndrome amelioration: a review on pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Seema

    2016-05-01

    Red yeast rice (RYR), the fermentation product of mold Monascus purpureus has been an integral part of Oriental food and traditional Chinese medicine, long before the discovery of their medicinal roles. With the identification of bioactive components as polyketide pigments (statins), and unsaturated fatty acids, RYR has gained a nutraceutical status. Hypercholesterolemic effect of this fermented compound has been validated and monacolin K has been recognized as the pivotal component in cholesterol alleviation. Functional similarity with commercial drug lovastatin sans the side effects has catapulted its popularity in other parts of the world as well. Apart from the hypotensive role, ameliorative benefits of RYR as anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, anticancer and osteogenic agent have emerged, fueling intense research on it. Mechanistic studies have revealed their interaction with functional agents like coenzyme Q10, astaxanthin, vitamin D, folic acid, policosanol, and berberine. On the other hand, concurrence of mycotoxin citrinin and variable content of statin has marred its integration in mainstream medication. In this disputable scenario, evaluation of the scopes and lacunae to overcome seems to contribute to an eminent area of healthcare. Red yeast rice (RYR), the rice-based fermentation product of mold Monascus purpureus is a functional food. Its bioactive component monacolin K acts like synthetic drug lovastatin, without the severe side effects of the latter. RYR has been validated to lower cholesterol, control high blood pressure; confer anti-flammation, hypoglycaemic, anticancer and osteogenic properties. However, dose inconsistency and co-occurrence of toxin citrinin hampers its dietary supplementation prospect. Further research might facilitate development of RYR as a nutraceutical.

  11. Engineering yeast metabolism for production of terpenoids for use as perfume ingredients, pharmaceuticals and biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yueping; Nielsen, Jens; Liu, Zihe

    2017-01-01

    of terpenoids that find applications as perfume ingredients, pharmaceuticals and advanced biofuels. In this review, we describe the strategies to rewire the yeast pathway for terpenoid biosynthesis. Recent advances will be discussed together with challenges and perspectives of yeast as a cell factory to produce...

  12. Alterations in Phosphatidylcholine and Phosphatidylethanolamine Content During Fermentative Metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Brewer’s Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Čanadi Jurešić

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During beer production and serial recycling, brewer’s yeasts are exposed to various stress factors that, overpowering the cellular defence mechanisms, can impair yeast growth and fermentation performance. It is well known that yeast cells acclimatize to stress conditions in part by changing the lipid composition of their membranes. The main focus of this study is the effect of stressful fermentation conditions on two phospholipid species, phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho and phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae bottom-fermenting brewer’s yeast. For this purpose the content and fatty acid profile of these major classes of phospholipids have been compared, as well as their ratio in the whole cells of the starter culture, non-stressed yeast population, and the first three recycled yeast generations. The stressed yeast generations showed an increased mass fraction of PtdCho and a decreased mass fraction of PtdEtn, which led to an increased PtdCho/PtdEtn ratio in the recycled cells as compared to the non-stressed yeast culture. The most pronounced variation of PtdCho/PtdEtn ratio was found in the second yeast generation, yielding a 78 % increase with respect to the starter culture. Variations in the content of both, PtdCho and PtdEtn, were accompanied by a higher mass fraction of unsaturated fatty acids in both phospholipid species (palmitoleic acid in PtdCho, and palmitoleic and oleic in PtdEtn and by the increased ratio of C16/C18 acids in PtdCho. The results suggest that both phospholipid species, including their fatty acids, are highly involved in the adaptation of brewer’s yeast to stressful fermentation conditions.

  13. Engineering a Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast that exhibits reduced ethanol production during fermentation under controlled microoxygenation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heux, Stéphanie; Sablayrolles, Jean-Marie; Cachon, Rémy; Dequin, Sylvie

    2006-09-01

    We recently showed that expressing an H(2)O-NADH oxidase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae drastically reduces the intracellular NADH concentration and substantially alters the distribution of metabolic fluxes in the cell. Although the engineered strain produces a reduced amount of ethanol, a high level of acetaldehyde accumulates early in the process (1 g/liter), impairing growth and fermentation performance. To overcome these undesirable effects, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of the impact of oxygen on the metabolic network of the same NADH oxidase-expressing strain. While reducing the oxygen transfer rate led to a gradual recovery of the growth and fermentation performance, its impact on the ethanol yield was negligible. In contrast, supplying oxygen only during the stationary phase resulted in a 7% reduction in the ethanol yield, but without affecting growth and fermentation. This approach thus represents an effective strategy for producing wine with reduced levels of alcohol. Importantly, our data also point to a significant role for NAD(+) reoxidation in controlling the glycolytic flux, indicating that engineered yeast strains expressing an NADH oxidase can be used as a powerful tool for gaining insight into redox metabolism in yeast.

  14. TORCing up metabolic control in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietakangas, Ville; Cohen, Stephen M

    2008-05-01

    Transducer of regulated CREB activity 2 (TORC2) is a coactivator of CREB and an important regulator of energy balance in mammals through control of gluconeogenesis in the liver. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, Wang and coworkers (2008) report an intriguing role for Drosophila TORC in the neuronal regulation of metabolism.

  15. UPLC Q-TOF/MS-Based Metabolic Profiling of Urine Reveals the Novel Antipyretic Mechanisms of Qingkailing Injection in a Rat Model of Yeast-Induced Pyrexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Gao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fever is one of the most common clinical symptoms of many diseases. Qingkailing (QKL injection is widely used in China as a clinical emergency medicine due to its good antipyretic effects. It is a herbal formula which is composed by eight kinds of traditional Chinese medicines (TCM. As a kind of typical multiple constituents and multiple actions of TCM, it is very difficult to elaborate the antipyretic mechanism by conventional pharmacological method. Metabonomics technique provides beneficial tool for this challenge. In this study, an ultra performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC Q-TOF/MS metabonomics method was developed to explore the changing process of biochemical substances in rats of yeast-induced pyrexia. Partial least squares discriminate analysis (PLS-DA was used to distinguish the normal control group, the pyrexia model group, and the pyrexia model group treated by QKL injection. The potential biomarkers related to pyrexia were confirmed and identified. MetPA was used to find the possible metabolic pathways. The results indicated that the antipyretic effect of QKL injection on yeast-induced pyrexia rats was performed by repairing the perturbed metabolism of amino acids.

  16. Bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system as containment control in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, P.; Jensen, G. B.; Gerdes, K.

    2000-01-01

    The potential of a bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system for use in containment control in eukaryotes was explored. The Escherichia coli relE and relB genes were expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Expression of the relE gene was highly toxic to yeast cells. However, expression...... fermentation processes in which the escape of genetically modified cells would be considered highly risky....

  17. In Situ Analysis of Metabolic Characteristics Reveals the Key Yeast in the Spontaneous and Solid-State Fermentation Process of Chinese Light-Style Liquor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yu; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The in situ metabolic characteristics of the yeasts involved in spontaneous fermentation process of Chinese light-style liquor are poorly understood. The covariation between metabolic profiles and yeast communities in Chinese light-style liquor was modeled using the partial least square (PLS) regression method. The diversity of yeast species was evaluated by sequence analysis of the 26S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) D1/D2 domains of cultivable yeasts, and the volatile compounds in fermented grains were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS). Eight yeast species and 58 volatile compounds were identified, respectively. The modulation of 16 of these volatile compounds was associated with variations in the yeast population (goodness of prediction [Q2] > 20%). The results showed that Pichia anomala was responsible for the characteristic aroma of Chinese liquor, through the regulation of several important volatile compounds, such as ethyl lactate, octanoic acid, and ethyl tetradecanoate. Correspondingly, almost all of the compounds associated with P. anomala were detected in a pure culture of this yeast. In contrast to the PLS regression results, however, ethyl lactate and ethyl isobutyrate were not detected in the same pure culture, which indicated that some metabolites could be generated by P. anomala only when it existed in a community with other yeast species. Furthermore, different yeast communities provided different volatile patterns in the fermented grains, which resulted in distinct flavor profiles in the resulting liquors. This study could help identify the key yeast species involved in spontaneous fermentation and provide a deeper understanding of the role of individual yeast species in the community. PMID:24727269

  18. Genetical control of mitotic crossing over in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorova, I.V.; Marfin, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    Lethal effect of 8 methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and long-wave ultraviolet radiation (LUR) on diploid and haploid radiosensitive strains of yeast LSaccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied. It is shown that wild type diploids and homozygous with respect to locus rad 2 is considerably more stable than corresponding haploids, while diploid homozygous with respect to rad 54 locus is more sensitive than haploid. Use of the method of repeated irradiation permitted to study capability of radiosensitive diploids to remove 8 MOP-induced DNA photodamages-monoadducts. This process proceeds effectively in the wild type strain and rad 54 rad 54 diploid and was absent in rad 2 rad 2 diploid. Very strong recombinogenous effect of 8-MOP and LUR was discovered when studying mitotic segregation and crossing-over. It is also shown that rad 2 mutation increases slightly and rad 54 mutation decreases sharply frequency of recombination events in yeast cells. It is established by means of the repeated irradiation method that the main contribution to the 8 MOP and LUR recombinogenous effect is made with DNA sutures induced with these agents. Possible participation of different repair systems in the recombination processes induced with 8 MOP and LUR in yeast cells is discussed

  19. Sugar utilization patterns and respiro-fermentative metabolism in the baker’s yeast Torulaspora delbrueckii

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo, Cecília Alves; Pacheco, A.; Almeida, M. J.; Martins, I. Spencer; Leão, Cecília; Sousa, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    The highly osmo- and cryotolerant yeast species Torulaspora delbrueckii is an important case study among the non-Saccharomyces yeast species. The strain T delbrueckii PYCC 532 1, isolated from traditional corn and rye bread dough in northern Portugal, is considered particularly interesting for the baking industry. This paper reports the sugar utilization patterns of this strain, using media with glucose, maltose and sucrose, alone or in mixtures. Kinetics of growth, biomass and ethanol yields...

  20. Control of fluxes in metabolic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, Georg; Nikoloski, Zoran; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Barabási, Albert-László; Liu, Yang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the control of large-scale metabolic networks is central to biology and medicine. However, existing approaches either require specifying a cellular objective or can only be used for small networks. We introduce new coupling types describing the relations between reaction activities, and develop an efficient computational framework, which does not require any cellular objective for systematic studies of large-scale metabolism. We identify the driver reactions facilitating control of 23 metabolic networks from all kingdoms of life. We find that unicellular organisms require a smaller degree of control than multicellular organisms. Driver reactions are under complex cellular regulation in Escherichia coli, indicating their preeminent role in facilitating cellular control. In human cancer cells, driver reactions play pivotal roles in malignancy and represent potential therapeutic targets. The developed framework helps us gain insights into regulatory principles of diseases and facilitates design of engineering strategies at the interface of gene regulation, signaling, and metabolism. PMID:27197218

  1. Thermodynamics of the control of metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhoff, H. V.; Plomp, P. J.; Groen, A. K.; Wanders, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    A theory is presented, describing the control analysis of metabolic systems in terms of Gibbs free energies, extending earlier work of Kacser and Burns (25), and Heinrich and Rapoport (29). It is shown that relationships exist between flux control coefficients (the degree to which enzymes control

  2. Impact of xylose and mannose on central metabolism of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, J.P.

    2005-07-01

    In this study, understanding of the central metabolism was improved by quantification of metabolite concentrations, enzyme activities, protein abundances, and gene transcript concentrations. Intracellular fluxes were estimated by applying stoichiometric models of metabolism. The methods were applied in the study of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in two separate projects. A xylose project aimed at improved utilization of D- xylose as a substrate for, e.g., producing biomaterial- based fuel ethanol. A mannose project studied the production of GDP-mannose from D-mannose in a strain lacking the gene for phosphomannose isomerase (PMI40 deletion). Hexose, D-glucose is the only sugar more abundant than pentose D-xylose. D-xylose is common in hardwoods (e.g. birch) and crop residues (ca. 25% of dry weight). However, S. cerevisiae is unable to utilize D- xylose without a recombinant pathway where D-xylose is converted to Dxylulose. In this study D-xylose was converted in two steps via xylitol: by D-xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase encoded by XYL1 and XYL2 from Pichia stipitis, respectively. Additionally, endogenous xylulokinase (XKS1) was overexpressed in order to increase the consumption of D-xylose by enhancing the phosphorylation of D-xylulose. Despite of the functional recombinant pathway the utilization rates of D xylose still remained low. This study proposes a set of limitations that are responsible for the low utilization rates of D-xylose under microaerobic conditions. Cells compensated for the cofactor imbalance, caused by the conversion of D-xylose to D- xylulose, by increasing the flux through the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and by shuttling NADH redox potential to mitochondrion to be oxidized in oxidative phosphorylation. However, mitochondrial NADH inhibits citrate synthase in citric acid cycle, and consequently lower flux through citric acid cycle limits oxidative phosphorylation. Further, limitations in the uptake of D- xylose, in the

  3. Developing a set of strong intronic promoters for robust metabolic engineering in oleaginous Rhodotorula (Rhodosporidium) yeast species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanbin; Yap, Sihui Amy; Koh, Chong Mei John; Ji, Lianghui

    2016-11-25

    Red yeast species in the Rhodotorula/Rhodosporidium genus are outstanding producers of triacylglyceride and cell biomass. Metabolic engineering is expected to further enhance the productivity and versatility of these hosts for the production of biobased chemicals and fuels. Promoters with strong activity during oil-accumulation stage are critical tools for metabolic engineering of these oleaginous yeasts. The upstream DNA sequences of 6 genes involved in lipid biosynthesis or accumulation in Rhodotorula toruloides were studied by luciferase reporter assay. The promoter of perilipin/lipid droplet protein 1 gene (LDP1) displayed much stronger activity (4-11 folds) than that of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GPD1), one of the strongest promoters known in yeasts. Depending on the stage of cultivation, promoter of acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene (ACC1) and fatty acid synthase β subunit gene (FAS1) exhibited intermediate strength, displaying 50-160 and 20-90% levels of GPD1 promoter, respectively. Interestingly, introns significantly modulated promoter strength at high frequency. The incorporation of intron 1 and 2 of LDP1 (LDP1in promoter) enhanced its promoter activity by 1.6-3.0 folds. Similarly, the strength of ACC1 promoter was enhanced by 1.5-3.2 folds if containing intron 1. The intron 1 sequences of ACL1 and FAS1 also played significant regulatory roles. When driven by the intronic promoters of ACC1 and LDP1 (ACC1in and LDP1in promoter, respectively), the reporter gene expression were up-regulated by nitrogen starvation, independent of de novo oil biosynthesis and accumulation. As a proof of principle, overexpression of the endogenous acyl-CoA-dependent diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 gene (DGA1) by LDP1in promoter was significantly more efficient than GPD1 promoter in enhancing lipid accumulation. Intronic sequences play an important role in regulating gene expression in R. toruloides. Three intronic promoters, LDP1in, ACC1in and FAS1in, are

  4. Ddb1 controls genome stability and meiosis in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Christian Henrik; Fleck, Oliver; Hansen, H. A.

    2005-01-01

    The human UV-damaged DNA-binding protein Ddb1 associates with cullin 4 ubiquitin ligases implicated in nucleotide excision repair (NER). These complexes also contain the signalosome (CSN), but NER-relevant ubiquitination targets have not yet been identified. We report that fission yeast Ddb1......, Cullin 4 (Pcu4), and CSN subunits Csn1 and Csn2 are required for degradation of the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor protein Spd1. Ddb1-deficient cells have >20-fold increased spontaneous mutation rate. This is partly dependent on the error-prone translesion DNA polymerases. Spd1 deletion...... substantially reduced the mutation rate, suggesting that insufficient RNR activity accounts for ~50% of observed mutations. Epistasis analysis indicated that Ddb1 contributed to mutation avoidance and tolerance to DNA damage in a pathway distinct from NER. Finally, we show that Ddb1/Csn1/Cullin 4-mediated Spd1...

  5. Supplementary Material for: Polyglutamine toxicity in yeast induces metabolic alterations and mitochondrial defects

    KAUST Repository

    Papsdorf, Katharina; Kaiser, Christoph; Drazic, Adrian; Grö tzinger, Stefan W.; Haeß ner, Carmen; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    -S cluster formation. Indeed, we find that in vivo iron concentrations are misbalanced and observe a reduction in the activity of the prominent Fe-S cluster containing protein aconitase. Like in other yeast strains with impaired mitochondria, non-fermentative

  6. Integrated multilaboratory systems biology reveals differences in protein metabolism between two reference yeast strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canelas, Andre B.; Harrison, Nicola; Fazio, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    The field of systems biology is often held back by difficulties in obtaining comprehensive, high-quality, quantitative data sets. In this paper, we undertook an interlaboratory effort to generate such a data set for a very large number of cellular components in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae,...

  7. Control of baker’s yeast fermentation : PID and fuzzy algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Carlos; Gomes, Pedro; Soares, Rui; Pereira, Silvia; Soares, Filomena

    2001-01-01

    A MATLAB/SIMULINK-based simulator was employed for studies concerning the control of baker’s yeast fed-batch fermentation. Four control algorithms were implemented and compared: the classical PID control, two discrete versions- modified velocity and position algorithms, and a fuzzy law. The simulation package was seen to be an efficient tool for the simulation and tests of control strategies of the non-linear process.

  8. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen co-metabolism in yeast by ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry applying 13C- and 15N-labeled substrates simultaneously

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blank, Lars M.; Desphande, Rahul R.; Schmid, Andreas; Hayen, Heiko

    2012-01-01

    Alternative metabolic pathways inside a cell can be deduced using stable isotopically labeled substrates. One prerequisite is accurate measurement of the labeling pattern of targeted metabolites. Experiments are generally limited to the use of single-element isotopes, mainly 13 C. Here, we demonstrate the application of direct infusion nanospray, ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) for metabolic studies using differently labeled elemental isotopes simultaneously - i.e., 13 C and 15 N - in amino acids of a total protein hydrolysate. The optimized strategy for the analysis of metabolism by a hybrid linear ion trap-FTICR-MS comprises the collection of multiple adjacent selected ion monitoring scans. By limiting both the width of the mass range and the number of ions entering the ICR cell with automated gain control, sensitive measurements of isotopologue distribution were possible without compromising mass accuracy and isotope intensity mapping. The required mass-resolving power of more than 60,000 is only achievable on a routine basis by FTICR and Orbitrap mass spectrometers. Evaluation of the method was carried out by comparison of the experimental data to the natural isotope abundances of selected amino acids and by comparison to GC/MS results obtained from a labeling experiment with 13 C-labeled glucose. The developed method was used to shed light on the complexity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae carbon-nitrogen co-metabolism by administering both 13 C-labeled glucose and 15 N-labeled alanine. The results indicate that not only glutamate but also alanine acts as an amino donor during alanine and valine synthesis. Metabolic studies using FTICR-MS can exploit new possibilities by the use of multiple-labeled elemental isotopes. (orig.)

  9. Structures of two exonucleases involved in controlled RNA turnover in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Midtgaard, Søren Fuglsang; Van, Lan Bich

    divalent cations. The Pop2p structure reveals that the ability of this enzyme to degrade poly(A)/(U)/(C), but not poly(G) may be determined by structural hindrance of interaction with this specific nucleotide. In Rrp6p, mutations known to confer specific RNA degradation phenotypes in yeast nuclei can now...... rid of aberrant RNAs. Here we describe the structures of two 3'-5' exonucleases involved in controlled RNA decay in yeast, Pop2p and Rrp6p. Rrp6p is associated with the nuclear exosome where it participates in the degradation of improperly processed precursor mRNAs and trimming of stable RNAs [1]. Pop...

  10. A Hexose Transporter Homologue Controls Glucose Repression in the Methylotrophic Yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stasyk, Oleh V.; Stasyk, Olena G.; Komduur, Janet; Veenhuis, Marten; Cregg, James M.; Sibirny, Andrei A.

    2004-01-01

    Peroxisome biogenesis and synthesis of peroxisomal enzymes in the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha are under the strict control of glucose repression. We identified an H. polymorpha glucose catabolite repression gene (HpGCR1) that encodes a hexose transporter homologue. Deficiency in GCR1

  11. Metabolic gene polymorphism frequencies in control populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garte, Seymour; Gaspari, Laura; Alexandrie, Anna-Karin

    2001-01-01

    Using the International Project on Genetic Susceptibility to Environmental Carcinogens (GSEC) database containing information on over 15,000 control (noncancer) subjects, the allele and genotype frequencies for many of the more commonly studied metabolic genes (CYP1A1, CYP2E1, CYP2D6, GSTM1, GSTT1...

  12. Integrated control of Penicillium digitatum by the predacious yeast Saccharomycopsis crataegensis and sodium bicarbonate on oranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Pimenta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Our investigation of integrated biological control (IBC started with an assay testing activity of the predacious yeast Saccharomycopsis crataegensis UFMG-DC19.2 against Penicillium digitatum LCP 4354, a very aggressive fungus that causes postharvest decay in oranges. Under unfavourable environmental conditions, the yeast showed a high potential for control (39.9% disease severity reduction of this fungus. This result was decisive for the next step, in which S. crataegensis was tested in association with sodium bicarbonate salt, a generally regarded as safe (GRAS substance. The yeast was able to survive at different concentrations of the salt (1%, 2% and 5%, and continued to grow for a week at the wound site, remaining viable at high population for 14 days on the fruit surface. The yeast alone reduced the severity of decay by 41.7% and sodium bicarbonate alone reduced severity of decay by 19.8%, whereas the application of both led to a delay in the development of symptoms from 2 to 10 days. Ingredients of the formulations were not aggressive to fruits since no lesions were produced in control experiments.

  13. Nitrogen and carbon source balance determines longevity, independently of fermentative or respiratory metabolism in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Júlia; Leitão-Correia, Fernanda; Sousa, Maria João; Leão, Cecília

    2016-04-26

    Dietary regimens have proven to delay aging and age-associated diseases in several eukaryotic model organisms but the input of nutritional balance to longevity regulation is still poorly understood. Here, we present data on the role of single carbon and nitrogen sources and their interplay in yeast longevity. Data demonstrate that ammonium, a rich nitrogen source, decreases chronological life span (CLS) of the prototrophic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain PYCC 4072 in a concentration-dependent manner and, accordingly, that CLS can be extended through ammonium restriction, even in conditions of initial glucose abundance. We further show that CLS extension depends on initial ammonium and glucose concentrations in the growth medium, as long as other nutrients are not limiting. Glutamine, another rich nitrogen source, induced CLS shortening similarly to ammonium, but this effect was not observed with the poor nitrogen source urea. Ammonium decreased yeast CLS independently of the metabolic process activated during aging, either respiration or fermentation, and induced replication stress inhibiting a proper cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. The present results shade new light on the nutritional equilibrium as a key factor on cell longevity and may contribute for the definition of interventions to promote life span and healthy aging.

  14. A potential mechanism of energy-metabolism oscillation in an aerobic chemostat culture of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaojun; Tsurugi, Kunio

    2006-04-01

    The energy-metabolism oscillation in aerobic chemostat cultures of yeast is a periodic change of the respiro-fermentative and respiratory phase. In the respiro-fermentative phase, the NADH level was kept high and respiration was suppressed, and glucose was anabolized into trehalose and glycogen at a rate comparable to that of catabolism. On the transition to the respiratory phase, cAMP levels increased triggering the breakdown of storage carbohydrates and the increased influx of glucose into the glycolytic pathway activated production of glycerol and ethanol consuming NADH. The resulting increase in the NAD(+)/NADH ratio stimulated respiration in combination with a decrease in the level of ATP, which was consumed mainly in the formation of biomass accompanying budding, and the accumulated ethanol and glycerol were gradually degraded by respiration via NAD(+)-dependent oxidation to acetate and the respiratory phase ceased after the recovery of NADH and ATP levels. However, the mRNA levels of both synthetic and degradative enzymes of storage carbohydrates were increased around the early respiro-fermentative phase, when storage carbohydrates are being synthesized, suggesting that the synthetic enzymes were expressed directly as active forms while the degradative enzymes were activated late by cAMP. In summary, the energy-metabolism oscillation is basically regulated by a feedback loop of oxido-reductive reactions of energy metabolism mediated by metabolites like NADH and ATP, and is modulated by metabolism of storage carbohydrates in combination of post-translational and transcriptional regulation of the related enzymes. A potential mechanism of energy-metabolism oscillation is proposed.

  15. Influence of different yeast cell wall preparations and their components on performance and immune and metabolic pathways in Clostridium perfringens-challenged broiler chicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the influence of purification of yeast cell wall (YCW) preparations on broiler performance, and immunogenic and metabolic pathways under microbial challenge. A total of 240 day-of-hatch chicks were distributed among two battery brooder units (48 pens; 5 birds/pen; ...

  16. A consensus yeast metabolic network reconstruction obtained from a community approach to systems biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrgård, Markus J.; Swainston, Neil; Dobson, Paul; Dunn, Warwick B.; Arga, K. Yalçin; Arvas, Mikko; Blüthgen, Nils; Borger, Simon; Costenoble, Roeland; Heinemann, Matthias; Hucka, Michael; Novère, Nicolas Le; Li, Peter; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Mo, Monica L.; Oliveira, Ana Paula; Petranovic, Dina; Pettifer, Stephen; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Smallbone, Kieran; Spasić, Irena; Weichart, Dieter; Brent, Roger; Broomhead, David S.; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Kırdar, Betül; Penttilä, Merja; Klipp, Edda; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.; Sauer, Uwe; Oliver, Stephen G.; Mendes, Pedro; Nielsen, Jens; Kell, Douglas B.

    2008-01-01

    Genomic data allow the large-scale manual or semi-automated assembly of metabolic network reconstructions, which provide highly curated organism-specific knowledge bases. Although several genome-scale network reconstructions describe Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, they differ in scope and

  17. Flux-Enabled Exploration of the Role of Sip1 in galactose yeast metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shymansky, Christopher M.; Wang, George; Baidoo, Edward E. K.

    2017-01-01

    13C metabolic flux analysis (13C MFA) is an important systems biology technique that has been used to investigate microbial metabolism for decades. The heterotrimer Snf1 kinase complex plays a key role in the preference Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits for glucose over galactose, a phenomenon kn...

  18. Model based Control of a Continuous Yeast Fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maria Yolanda; Brabrand, Henrik; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1991-01-01

    Control of a continuous fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae is performed by manipulation of the feed flow rate using an ethanol measurement in the exit gas The process is controlled at the critical dilution rate with a low ethanol concentration of 40-50 mg/l. A standard PI controller is able...

  19. Metabolic peculiarities of the citric acid overproduction from glucose in yeasts Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Morgunov, Igor G

    2017-11-01

    Comparative study of 43 natural yeast strains belonging to 20 species for their capability for overproduction of citric acid (CA) from glucose under nitrogen limitation of cell growth was carried out. As a result, natural strain Yarrowia lipolytica VKM Y-2373 was selected. The effect of growth limitation by biogenic macroelements (nitrogen, phosphorus, or sulfur) on the CA production by the selected strain was studied. It was shown that yeasts Y. lipolytica grown under deficiency of nitrogen, phosphorus, or sulfur were able to excrete CA in industrially sufficient amounts (80-85g/L with the product yield (Y CA ) of 0.70-0.75g/g and the process selectivity of 92.5-95.3%). Based on the obtained data on activities of enzymes involved in the initial stages of glucose oxidation, the cycle of tricarboxylic acids, and the glyoxylate cycle, the conception of the mechanism responsible for the CA overproduction from glucose in Y. lipolytica was formulated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In vivo NMR study of yeast fermentative metabolism in the presence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-03-14

    Mar 14, 2011 ... Changes in the ion levels of nutrient media alter the intracellular ... influence the metabolic behaviour of microorganisms. We clearly have already ... during the sugar fermentation by cultures of S. cerevisiae. (Martini et al. 2004 ...

  1. Role of Gts1p in regulation of energy-metabolism oscillation in continuous cultures of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaojun; Tsurugi, Kunio

    2007-03-01

    Energy-metabolism oscillation (EMO) in an aerobic chemostat culture of yeast is basically regulated by a feedback loop of redox reactions in energy metabolism and modulated by metabolism of storage carbohydrates. In this study, we investigated the role of Gts1p in the stabilization of EMO, using the GTS1-deleted transformant gts1Delta. We found that fluctuations in the redox state of the NAD co-factor and levels of redox-regulated metabolites in glycolysis, especially of ethanol, are markedly reduced in amplitude during EMO of gts1Delta, while respiration indicated by the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) and energy charge is not so affected throughout EMO in gts1Delta. Further, the transitions of the levels of OUR, NAD(+) : NADH ratio and intracellular pH between the two phases were apparently retarded compared with those in the wild-type, suggesting attenuation of EMO in gts1Delta. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of genes encoding enzymes for the synthesis of trehalose and glycogen are fairly reduced in gts1Delta, consistent with the decreased synthesis of storage carbohydrates. In addition, the level of inorganic phosphate, which is required for the reduction of NAD(+) and mainly supplied from trehalose synthesis, was decreased in the early respiro-fermentative phase in gts1Delta. Thus, we suggested that the deletion of GTS1 as a transcriptional co-activator for these genes inhibited the metabolism of storage carbohydrates, which causes attenuation of the feedback loop of dehydrogenase reactions in glycolysis with the restricted fluctuation of ethanol as a main synchronizing agent for EMO in a cell population.

  2. Bio-prospecting of distillery yeasts as bio-control and bio-remediation agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, Juan F; Maldonado, María; Briones, Ana I; Francisco, J Fernández; González, Francisco J

    2014-05-01

    This work constitutes a preliminary study in which the capacity of non-Saccharomyces yeasts isolated from ancient distilleries as bio-control agents against moulds and in the treatment of waste waters contaminated by heavy metals-i.e. bio-remediation-is shown. In the first control assays, antagonist effect between non-Saccharomyces yeasts, their extracts and supernatants against some moulds, analysing the plausible (not exhaustive) involved factors were qualitatively verified. In addition, two enzymatic degrading properties of cell wall plant polymers, quitinolitic and pectinolitic, were screened. Finally, their use as agents of bio-remediation of three heavy metals (cadmium, chromium and lead) was analysed semi-quantitatively. The results showed that all isolates belonging to Pichia species effectively inhibited all moulds assayed. Moreover, P. kudriavzevii is a good candidate for both bio-control and bio-remediation because it inhibited moulds and accumulated the major proportion of the three tested metals.

  3. Metabolic Control of Redox and Redox Control of Metabolism in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reduction-oxidation (Redox) status operates as a major integrator of subcellular and extracellular metabolism and is simultaneously itself regulated by metabolic processes. Redox status not only dominates cellular metabolism due to the prominence of NAD(H) and NADP(H) couples in myriad metabolic reactions but also acts as an effective signal that informs the cell of the prevailing environmental conditions. After relay of this information, the cell is able to appropriately respond via a range of mechanisms, including directly affecting cellular functioning and reprogramming nuclear gene expression. Recent Advances: The facile accession of Arabidopsis knockout mutants alongside the adoption of broad-scale post-genomic approaches, which are able to provide transcriptomic-, proteomic-, and metabolomic-level information alongside traditional biochemical and emerging cell biological techniques, has dramatically advanced our understanding of redox status control. This review summarizes redox status control of metabolism and the metabolic control of redox status at both cellular and subcellular levels. Critical Issues: It is becoming apparent that plastid, mitochondria, and peroxisome functions influence a wide range of processes outside of the organelles themselves. While knowledge of the network of metabolic pathways and their intraorganellar redox status regulation has increased in the last years, little is known about the interorganellar redox signals coordinating these networks. A current challenge is, therefore, synthesizing our knowledge and planning experiments that tackle redox status regulation at both inter- and intracellular levels. Future Directions: Emerging tools are enabling ever-increasing spatiotemporal resolution of metabolism and imaging of redox status components. Broader application of these tools will likely greatly enhance our understanding of the interplay of redox status and metabolism as well as elucidating and

  4. Role of metabolic control on diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macedo Célia Sperandéo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this investigation was studying the influence of glucose metabolic control on diabetic nephropathy. The authors observed the effect of acarbose, insulin, and both drugs on the metabolic control and development of mesangial enlargement of kidney glomeruli in alloxan-diabetic rats. METHODS: Five groups of Wistar rats were used: normal rats (N, non-treated alloxan-diabetic rats (D, alloxan-diabetic rats treated with acarbose (AD, alloxan-diabetic rats treated with insulin (ID, and alloxan-diabetic rats treated with insulin plus acarbose (IAD. The following parameters were evaluated: body weight; water and food intake; diuresis; blood and urine glucose levels; and the kidney lesions: mesangial enlargement and tubule cell vacuolization. Renal lesions were analysed using a semi-quantitative score 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after diabetes induction. RESULTS: Diabetic rats showed a marked increase of glycemia, urinary glucose levels, diuresis, water and food intake, and weight loss, while the treated diabetic rats showed significant decreased levels of these parameters. The most satisfactory metabolic control was that of diabetic rats treated with acarbose + insulin. There was a significant mesangial enlargement in diabetic rats compared to normal rats from the third up to the 12th month after diabetes induction, with a significant difference between the animals treated with acarbose + insulin and non-treated diabetic rats. A difference between the animals treated with acarbose or insulin alone and non-treated diabetics rats was not seen. CONCLUSIONS: The authors discuss the results stressing the role of diabetic metabolic control in the prevention of diabetic nephropathy.

  5. Yeast and mammalian metabolism continuous monitoring by using pressure recording as an assessment technique for xenobiotic agent effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Marziale; Ballerini, Monica; Ferraro, Lorenzo; Marelli, E.; Mazza, Francesca; Zabeo, Matteo

    2002-06-01

    Our work is devoted to the study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human lymphocytes cellular metabolism in order to develop a reference model to assess biological systems responses to chemical or physical agents exposure. CO2 variations inside test-tubes are measured by differential pressure sensors; pressure values are subsequently converted in voltage. The system allows to test up to 16 samples at the same time. Sampling manages up to 100 acquisitions per second. Values are recorded by a data acquisition card connected to a computer. This procedure leads to a standard curve (pressure variation versus time), typical of the cellular line, that describe cellular metabolism. The longest time lapse used is of 170 h. Different phases appear in this curve: an initial growth up to a maximum, followed by a decrement that leads to a typical depression (pressure value inside the test-tubes is lower than the initial one) after about 35 h from the beginning of yeast cells. The curve is reproducible within an experimental error of 4%. The analysis of many samples and the low cost of the devices allow a good statistical significance of the data. In particular as a test we will compare two sterilizing agents effects: UV radiation and amuchina.

  6. Genome-wide analytical approaches for reverse metabolic engineering of industrially relevant phenotypes in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Bart; Maris, Antonius J A; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T

    2012-01-01

    Successful reverse engineering of mutants that have been obtained by nontargeted strain improvement has long presented a major challenge in yeast biotechnology. This paper reviews the use of genome-wide approaches for analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains originating from evolutionary engineering or random mutagenesis. On the basis of an evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of different methods, we conclude that for the initial identification of relevant genetic changes, whole genome sequencing is superior to other analytical techniques, such as transcriptome, metabolome, proteome, or array-based genome analysis. Key advantages of this technique over gene expression analysis include the independency of genome sequences on experimental context and the possibility to directly and precisely reproduce the identified changes in naive strains. The predictive value of genome-wide analysis of strains with industrially relevant characteristics can be further improved by classical genetics or simultaneous analysis of strains derived from parallel, independent strain improvement lineages. PMID:22152095

  7. Adaptive mutations in sugar metabolism restore growth on glucose in a pyruvate decarboxylase negative yeast strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yiming; Liu, Guodong; Engqvist, Martin K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain carrying deletions in all three pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) genes (also called Pdc negative yeast) represents a non-ethanol producing platform strain for the production of pyruvate derived biochemicals. However, it cannot grow on glucose as the sole...... DNA sequencing. Among these genetic changes, 4 genes were found to carry point mutations in at least two of the evolved strains: MTH1 encoding a negative regulator of the glucose-sensing signal transduction pathway, HXT2 encoding a hexose transporter, CIT1 encoding a mitochondrial citrate synthase...... further increased the maximum specific growth rate to 0.069 h-1. Conclusions: In this study, possible evolving mechanisms of Pdc negative strains on glucose were investigated by genome sequencing and reverse engineering. The non-synonymous mutations in MTH1 alleviated the glucose repression by repressing...

  8. A comparative study on glycerol metabolism to erythritol and citric acid in Yarrowia lipolytica yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska, Ludwika; Rakicka, Magdalena; Rymowicz, Waldemar; Rywińska, Anita

    2014-09-01

    Citric acid and erythritol biosynthesis from pure and crude glycerol by three acetate-negative mutants of Yarrowia lipolytica yeast was investigated in batch cultures in a wide pH range (3.0-6.5). Citric acid biosynthesis was the most effective at pH 5.0-5.5 in the case of Wratislavia 1.31 and Wratislavia AWG7. With a decreasing pH value, the direction of biosynthesis changed into erythritol synthesis accompanied by low production of citric acid. Pathways of glycerol conversion into erythritol and citric acid were investigated in Wratislavia K1 cells. Enzymatic activity was compared in cultures run at pH 3.0 and 4.5, that is, under conditions promoting the production of erythritol and citric acid, respectively. The effect of pH value (3.0 and 4.5) and NaCl presence on the extracellular production and intracellular accumulation of citric acid and erythritol was compared as well. Low pH and NaCl resulted in diminished activity of glycerol kinase, whereas such conditions stimulated the activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The presence of NaCl strongly influenced enzymes activity - the effective erythritol production was correlated with a high activity of transketolase and erythrose reductase. Therefore, presented results confirmed that transketolase and erythrose reductase are involved in the overproduction of erythritol in the cells of Y. lipolytica yeast. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The fate of acetic acid during glucose co-metabolism by the spoilage yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Zygosaccharomyces bailii is one of the most widely represented spoilage yeast species, being able to metabolise acetic acid in the presence of glucose. To clarify whether simultaneous utilisation of the two substrates affects growth efficiency, we examined growth in single- and mixed-substrate cultures with glucose and acetic acid. Our findings indicate that the biomass yield in the first phase of growth is the result of the weighted sum of the respective biomass yields on single-substrate medium, supporting the conclusion that biomass yield on each substrate is not affected by the presence of the other at pH 3.0 and 5.0, at least for the substrate concentrations examined. In vivo(13C-NMR spectroscopy studies showed that the gluconeogenic pathway is not operational and that [2-(13C]acetate is metabolised via the Krebs cycle leading to the production of glutamate labelled on C(2, C(3 and C(4. The incorporation of [U-(14C]acetate in the cellular constituents resulted mainly in the labelling of the protein and lipid pools 51.5% and 31.5%, respectively. Overall, our data establish that glucose is metabolised primarily through the glycolytic pathway, and acetic acid is used as an additional source of acetyl-CoA both for lipid synthesis and the Krebs cycle. This study provides useful clues for the design of new strategies aimed at overcoming yeast spoilage in acidic, sugar-containing food environments. Moreover, the elucidation of the molecular basis underlying the resistance phenotype of Z. bailii to acetic acid will have a potential impact on the improvement of the performance of S. cerevisiae industrial strains often exposed to acetic acid stress conditions, such as in wine and bioethanol production.

  10. Divergent Evolution of the Transcriptional Network Controlled by Snf1-Interacting Protein Sip4 in Budding Yeasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Mehlgarten

    Full Text Available Cellular responses to starvation are of ancient origin since nutrient limitation has always been a common challenge to the stability of living systems. Hence, signaling molecules involved in sensing or transducing information about limiting metabolites are highly conserved, whereas transcription factors and the genes they regulate have diverged. In eukaryotes the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK functions as a central regulator of cellular energy homeostasis. The yeast AMPK ortholog SNF1 controls the transcriptional network that counteracts carbon starvation conditions by regulating a set of transcription factors. Among those Cat8 and Sip4 have overlapping DNA-binding specificity for so-called carbon source responsive elements and induce target genes upon SNF1 activation. To analyze the evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 controlled transcriptional network we have compared the response to carbon limitation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to that of Kluyveromyces lactis. In high glucose, S. cerevisiae displays tumor cell-like aerobic fermentation and repression of respiration (Crabtree-positive while K. lactis has a respiratory-fermentative life-style, respiration being regulated by oxygen availability (Crabtree-negative, which is typical for many yeasts and for differentiated higher cells. We demonstrate divergent evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 network and present evidence that a role of Sip4 in controlling anabolic metabolism has been lost in the Saccharomyces lineage. We find that in K. lactis, but not in S. cerevisiae, the Sip4 protein plays an essential role in C2 carbon assimilation including induction of the glyoxylate cycle and the carnitine shuttle genes. Induction of KlSIP4 gene expression by KlCat8 is essential under these growth conditions and a primary function of KlCat8. Both KlCat8 and KlSip4 are involved in the regulation of lactose metabolism in K. lactis. In chromatin-immunoprecipitation experiments we demonstrate binding of both, KlSip4 and

  11. In vivo 31P NMR studies on the role of the vacuole in phosphate metabolism in yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolaij, K.; Scheffers, W.A.; Bruinenberg, P.M.; Kaptein, R.

    1983-01-01

    31P NMR was used to study the dynamics of phosphate pools during substrate utilization by aerobic and anaerobic suspensions of the yeast Candida utilis and by aerobic suspensions of the yeast Brettanomyces intermedius. In both yeast, the cytoplasmic pH was monitored; in C. utilis also the vacuolar

  12. Four inducible promoters for controlled gene expression in the oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula toruloides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Michael Bedford Johns

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rhodotorula (Rhodosporidium toruloides is an oleaginous yeast with great biotechnological potential, capable of accumulating lipid up to 70 % of its dry biomass, and of carotenoid biosynthesis. However, few molecular genetic tools are available for manipulation of this basidiomycete yeast and its high genomic GC content can make routine cloning difficult. We have developed plasmid vectors for transformation of R. toruloides which include elements for Saccharomyces cerevisiae in-yeast assembly; this method is robust to the assembly of GC-rich DNA and of large plasmids. Using such vectors we screened for controllable promoters, and identified inducible promoters from the genes NAR1, ICL1, CTR3 and MET16. These four promoters have independent induction/repression conditions and exhibit different levels and rates of induction in R. toruloides, making them appropriate for controllable transgene expression in different experimental situations. Nested deletions were used to identify regulatory regions in the four promoters, and to delimit the minimal inducible promoters, which are as small as 200 bp for the NAR1 promoter. The NAR1 promoter shows very tight regulation under repressed conditions as determined both by an EGFP reporter gene and by conditional rescue of a leu2 mutant. These new tools facilitate molecular genetic manipulation and controllable gene expression in R. toruloides.

  13. Flux-Enabled Exploration of the Role of Sip1 in Galactose Yeast Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Shymansky

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C MFA is an important systems biology technique that has been used to investigate microbial metabolism for decades. The heterotrimer Snf1 kinase complex plays a key role in the preference Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits for glucose over galactose, a phenomenon known as glucose repression or carbon catabolite repression. The SIP1 gene, encoding a part of this complex, has received little attention, presumably, because its knockout lacks a growth phenotype. We present a fluxomic investigation of the relative effects of the presence of galactose in classically glucose-repressing media and/or knockout of SIP1 using a multi-scale variant of 13C MFA known as 2-Scale 13C metabolic flux analysis (2S-13C MFA. In this study, all strains have the galactose metabolism deactivated (gal1Δ background so as to be able to separate the metabolic effects purely related to glucose repression from those arising from galactose metabolism. The resulting flux profiles reveal that the presence of galactose in classically glucose-repressing conditions, for a CEN.PK113-7D gal1Δ background, results in a substantial decrease in pentose phosphate pathway (PPP flux and increased flow from cytosolic pyruvate and malate through the mitochondria toward cytosolic branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. These fluxomic redistributions are accompanied by a higher maximum specific growth rate, both seemingly in violation of glucose repression. Deletion of SIP1 in the CEN.PK113-7D gal1Δ cells grown in mixed glucose/galactose medium results in a further increase. Knockout of this gene in cells grown in glucose-only medium results in no change in growth rate and a corresponding decrease in glucose and ethanol exchange fluxes and flux through pathways involved in aspartate/threonine biosynthesis. Glucose repression appears to be violated at a 1/10 ratio of galactose-to-glucose. Based on the scientific literature, we may have conducted our experiments

  14. Genome-wide analytical approaches for reverse metabolic engineering of industrially relevant phenotypes in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Bart; van Maris, Antonius J A; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T

    2012-03-01

    Successful reverse engineering of mutants that have been obtained by nontargeted strain improvement has long presented a major challenge in yeast biotechnology. This paper reviews the use of genome-wide approaches for analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains originating from evolutionary engineering or random mutagenesis. On the basis of an evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of different methods, we conclude that for the initial identification of relevant genetic changes, whole genome sequencing is superior to other analytical techniques, such as transcriptome, metabolome, proteome, or array-based genome analysis. Key advantages of this technique over gene expression analysis include the independency of genome sequences on experimental context and the possibility to directly and precisely reproduce the identified changes in naive strains. The predictive value of genome-wide analysis of strains with industrially relevant characteristics can be further improved by classical genetics or simultaneous analysis of strains derived from parallel, independent strain improvement lineages. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic analysis of yeast RPA1 reveals its multiple functions in DNA metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezu, K.; Sugawara, N.; Chen, C.; Haber, J.E.; Kolodner, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA-binding protein identified as an essential factor for SV40 DNA replication in vitro. To understand the in vivo functions of RPA, we mutagenized the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RFA1 gene and identified 19 ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation- and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-sensitive mutants and 5 temperature-sensitive mutants. The UV- and MMS-sensitive mutants showed up to 10 4 to 10 5 times increased sensitivity to these agents. Some of the UV- and MMSsensitive mutants were killed by an HO-induced double-strand break atMAT. Physical analysis of recombination in one UV- and MMS-sensitive rfa1 mutant demonstrated that it was defective for mating type switching and single-strand annealing recombination. Two temperature-sensitive mutants were characterized in detail, and at the restrictive temperature were found to have an arrest phenotype and DNA content indicative of incomplete DNA replication. DNA sequence analysis indicated that most of the mutations altered amino acids that were conserved between yeast, human, and Xenopus RPA1. Taken together, we conclude that RPA1 has multiple roles in vivo and functions in DNA replication, repair, and recombination, like the single-stranded DNA-binding proteins of bacteria and phages. (author)

  16. Involvement of Sac1 phosphoinositide phosphatase in the metabolism of phosphatidylserine in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2014-04-01

    Sac1 is a phosphoinositide phosphatase that preferentially dephosphorylates phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate. Mutation of SAC1 causes not only the accumulation of phosphoinositides but also reduction of the phosphatidylserine (PS) level in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we characterized the mechanism underlying the PS reduction in SAC1-deleted cells. Incorporation of (32) P into PS was significantly delayed in sac1∆ cells. Such a delay was also observed in SAC1- and PS decarboxylase gene-deleted cells, suggesting that the reduction in the PS level is caused by a reduction in the rate of biosynthesis of PS. A reduction in the PS level was also observed with repression of STT4 encoding phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase or deletion of VPS34 encoding phophatidylinositol 3-kinase. However, the combination of mutations of SAC1 and STT4 or VPS34 did not restore the reduced PS level, suggesting that both the synthesis and degradation of phosphoinositides are important for maintenance of the PS level. Finally, we observed an abnormal PS distribution in sac1∆ cells when a specific probe for PS was expressed. Collectively, these results suggested that Sac1 is involved in the maintenance of a normal rate of biosynthesis and distribution of PS. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Metabolic Engineering of Yeast and Plants for the Production of the Biologically Active Hydroxystilbene, Resveratrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeandet, Philippe; Delaunois, Bertrand; Aziz, Aziz; Donnez, David; Vasserot, Yann; Cordelier, Sylvain; Courot, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol, a stilbenic compound deriving from the phenyalanine/polymalonate route, being stilbene synthase the last and key enzyme of this pathway, recently has become the focus of a number of studies in medicine and plant physiology. Increased demand for this molecule for nutraceutical, cosmetic and possibly pharmaceutic uses, makes its production a necessity. In this context, the use of biotechnology through recombinant microorganisms and plants is particularly promising. Interesting results can indeed arise from the potential of genetically modified microorganisms as an alternative mechanism for producing resveratrol. Strategies used to tailoring yeast as they do not possess the genes that encode for the resveratrol pathway, will be described. On the other hand, most interest has centered in recent years, on STS gene transfer experiments from various origins to the genome of numerous plants. This work also presents a comprehensive review on plant molecular engineering with the STS gene, resulting in disease resistance against microorganisms and the enhancement of the antioxidant activities of several fruits in transgenic lines. PMID:22654481

  18. Population diversification in a yeast metabolic program promotes anticipation of environmental shifts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ophelia S Venturelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Delineating the strategies by which cells contend with combinatorial changing environments is crucial for understanding cellular regulatory organization. When presented with two carbon sources, microorganisms first consume the carbon substrate that supports the highest growth rate (e.g., glucose and then switch to the secondary carbon source (e.g., galactose, a paradigm known as the Monod model. Sequential sugar utilization has been attributed to transcriptional repression of the secondary metabolic pathway, followed by activation of this pathway upon depletion of the preferred carbon source. In this work, we demonstrate that although Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells consume glucose before galactose, the galactose regulatory pathway is activated in a fraction of the cell population hours before glucose is fully consumed. This early activation reduces the time required for the population to transition between the two metabolic programs and provides a fitness advantage that might be crucial in competitive environments.

  19. Metabolic control of feed intake: implications for metabolic disease of fresh cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael S; Piantoni, Paola

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this article is to discuss metabolic control of feed intake in the peripartum period and its implications for metabolic disease of fresh cows. Understanding how feed intake is controlled during the transition from gestation to lactation is critical to both reduce risk and successfully treat many metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. SREBP controls oxygen-dependent mobilization of retrotransposons in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfica Sehgal

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Retrotransposons are mobile genetic elements that proliferate through an RNA intermediate. Transposons do not encode transcription factors and thus rely on host factors for mRNA expression and survival. Despite information regarding conditions under which elements are upregulated, much remains to be learned about the regulatory mechanisms or factors controlling retrotransposon expression. Here, we report that low oxygen activates the fission yeast Tf2 family of retrotransposons. Sre1, the yeast ortholog of the mammalian membrane-bound transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP, directly induces the expression and mobilization of Tf2 retrotransposons under low oxygen. Sre1 binds to DNA sequences in the Tf2 long terminal repeat that functions as an oxygen-dependent promoter. We find that Tf2 solo long terminal repeats throughout the genome direct oxygen-dependent expression of adjacent coding and noncoding sequences, providing a potential mechanism for the generation of oxygen-dependent gene expression.

  1. Metabolic profiling of yeast culture using gas chromatography coupled with orthogonal acceleration accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry: application to biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Elsuida; Marriott, Philip J; Parker, Rhiannon M; Kouremenos, Konstantinos A; Morrison, Paul; Adams, Mike

    2014-01-07

    Yeast and yeast cultures are frequently used as additives in diets of dairy cows. Beneficial effects from the inclusion of yeast culture in diets for dairy mammals have been reported, and the aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive analytical method for the accurate mass identification of the 'global' metabolites in order to differentiate a variety of yeasts at varying growth stages (Diamond V XP, Yea-Sacc and Levucell). Microwave-assisted derivatization for metabolic profiling is demonstrated through the analysis of differing yeast samples developed for cattle feed, which include a wide range of metabolites of interest covering a large range of compound classes. Accurate identification of the components was undertaken using GC-oa-ToFMS (gas chromatography-orthogonal acceleration-time-of-flight mass spectrometry), followed by principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) for data reduction and biomarker discovery. Semi-quantification (fold changes in relative peak areas) was reported for metabolites identified as possible discriminative biomarkers (p-value 2), including D-ribose (four fold decrease), myo-inositol (five fold increase), L-phenylalanine (three fold increase), glucopyranoside (two fold increase), fructose (three fold increase) and threitol (three fold increase) respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular, metabolic, and genetic control: An introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, John J.; Mackey, Michael C.

    2001-03-01

    The living cell is a miniature, self-reproducing, biochemical machine. Like all machines, it has a power supply, a set of working components that carry out its necessary tasks, and control systems that ensure the proper coordination of these tasks. In this Special Issue, we focus on the molecular regulatory systems that control cell metabolism, gene expression, environmental responses, development, and reproduction. As for the control systems in human-engineered machines, these regulatory networks can be described by nonlinear dynamical equations, for example, ordinary differential equations, reaction-diffusion equations, stochastic differential equations, or cellular automata. The articles collected here illustrate (i) a range of theoretical problems presented by modern concepts of cellular regulation, (ii) some strategies for converting molecular mechanisms into dynamical systems, (iii) some useful mathematical tools for analyzing and simulating these systems, and (iv) the sort of results that derive from serious interplay between theory and experiment.

  3. A synthetic hybrid promoter for xylose-regulated control of gene expression in Saccharomyces yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolism of non-glucose carbon sources is often highly regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. This level of regulation is lacking in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains engineered to metabolize xylose. To better control transcription in S. cerevisiae, the xylose-dependent, DN...

  4. Games microbes play: The game theory behind cooperative sucrose metabolism in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Jeff

    2010-03-01

    The origin of cooperation is a central challenge to our understanding of evolution. Microbial interactions can be manipulated in ways that animal interactions cannot, thus leading to growing interest in microbial models of cooperation and competition. In order for the budding yeast S. cerevisiae to grow on sucrose, the disaccharide must first be hydrolyzed by the enzyme invertase. This hydrolysis reaction is performed outside of the cytoplasm in the periplasmic space between the plasma membrane and the cell wall. Here we demonstrate that the vast majority (˜99%) of the monosaccharides created by sucrose hydrolysis diffuse away before they can be imported into the cell, thus making invertase production and secretion a cooperative behavior [1]. A mutant cheater strain that does not produce invertase is able to take advantage of and invade a population of wildtype cooperator cells. However, over a wide range of conditions, the wildtype cooperator can also invade a population of cheater cells. Therefore, we observe coexistence between the two strains in well-mixed culture at steady state resulting from the fact that rare strategies outperform common strategies---the defining features of what game theorists call the snowdrift game. A simple model of the cooperative interaction incorporating nonlinear benefits explains the origin of this coexistence. Glucose repression of invertase expression in wildtype cells produces a strategy which is optimal for the snowdrift game---wildtype cells cooperate only when competing against cheater cells. In disagreement with recent theory [2], we find that spatial structure always aids the evolution of cooperation in our experimental snowdrift game. [4pt] [1] Gore, J., Youk, H. & van Oudenaarden, A., Nature 459, 253 -- 256 (2009) [0pt] [2] Hauert, C. & Doebeli, M., Nature 428, 643 -- 646 (2004)

  5. Incorporation of negative rules and evolution of a fuzzy controller for yeast fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birle, Stephan; Hussein, Mohamed Ahmed; Becker, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The control of bioprocesses can be very challenging due to the fact that these kinds of processes are highly affected by various sources of uncertainty like the intrinsic behavior of the used microorganisms. Due to the reason that these kinds of process uncertainties are not directly measureable in most cases, the overall control is either done manually because of the experience of the operator or intelligent expert systems are applied, e.g., on the basis of fuzzy logic theory. In the latter case, however, the control concept is mainly represented by using merely positive rules, e.g., "If A then do B". As this is not straightforward with respect to the semantics of the human decision-making process that also includes negative experience in form of constraints or prohibitions, the incorporation of negative rules for process control based on fuzzy logic is emphasized. In this work, an approach of fuzzy logic control of the yeast propagation process based on a combination of positive and negative rules is presented. The process is guided along a reference trajectory for yeast cell concentration by alternating the process temperature. The incorporation of negative rules leads to a much more stable and accurate control of the process as the root mean squared error of reference trajectory and system response could be reduced by an average of 62.8 % compared to the controller using only positive rules.

  6. Studies on cell-free metabolism: ethanol production by a yeast glycolytic system reconstituted from purified enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, P; Scopes, R K

    1985-07-01

    A reconstituted glycolytic system has been established from individually purified enzymes to simulate the conversion of glucose to ethanol plus CO/sub 2/ by yeast. Sustained and extensive conversion occurred provided that input of glucose matched the rate of ATP degradation appropriately. ATPase activity could be replaced by arsenate, which uncoupled ATP synthesis from glycolysis. The mode of uncoupling was investigated, and it was concluded that the artificial intermediate, 1-arseno-3-phosphoglycerate, has a half-life of no more than a few milliseconds. Arsenate at 4 mM concentration could simulate the equivalent of 10 ..mu..mol/ml min. of ATPase activity. The reconstituted enzyme system was capable of totally degrading one M (18% w/v) glucose in 8 hours giving 9% (w/v) ethanol. The levels of metabolites during metabolism were measured to detect rate-limiting steps. The successful operation of the reconstituted enzyme system demonstrates that it is possible to carry out complex chemical transformations with multiple enzyme systems in vitro. 36 references.

  7. Genetic analysis of D-xylose metabolism by endophytic yeast strains of Rhodotorula graminis and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Xu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Two novel endophytic yeast strains, WP1 and PTD3, isolated from within the stems of poplar (Populus trees, were genetically characterized with respect to their xylose metabolism genes. These two strains, belonging to the species Rhodotorula graminis and R. mucilaginosa, respectively, utilize both hexose and pentose sugars, including the common plant pentose sugar, D-xylose. The xylose reductase (XYL1 and xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2 genes were cloned and characterized. The derived amino acid sequences of xylose reductase (XR and xylose dehydrogenase (XDH were 32%~41% homologous to those of Pichia stipitis and Candida. spp., two species known to utilize xylose. The derived XR and XDH sequences of WP1 and PTD3 had higher homology (73% and 69% identity with each other. WP1 and PTD3 were grown in single sugar and mixed sugar media to analyze the XYL1 and XYL2 gene regulation mechanisms. Our results revealed that for both strains, the gene expression is induced by D-xylose, and that in PTD3 the expression was not repressed by glucose in the presence of xylose.

  8. Macrophage Interaction with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Yeast Cells Modulates Fungal Metabolism and Generates a Response to Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Alves Parente-Rocha

    Full Text Available Macrophages are key players during Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection. However, the relative contribution of the fungal response to counteracting macrophage activity remains poorly understood. In this work, we evaluated the P. brasiliensis proteomic response to macrophage internalization. A total of 308 differentially expressed proteins were detected in P. brasiliensis during infection. The positively regulated proteins included those involved in alternative carbon metabolism, such as enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis, beta-oxidation of fatty acids and amino acids catabolism. The down-regulated proteins during P. brasiliensis internalization in macrophages included those related to glycolysis and protein synthesis. Proteins involved in the oxidative stress response in P. brasiliensis yeast cells were also up-regulated during macrophage infection, including superoxide dismutases (SOD, thioredoxins (THX and cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP. Antisense knockdown mutants evaluated the importance of CCP during macrophage infection. The results suggested that CCP is involved in a complex system of protection against oxidative stress and that gene silencing of this component of the antioxidant system diminished the survival of P. brasiliensis in macrophages and in a murine model of infection.

  9. Chromatin-remodeling SWI/SNF complex regulates coenzyme Q6 synthesis and a metabolic shift to respiration in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Agape M; Venkataramanan, Srivats; Nag, Anish; Galivanche, Anoop Raj; Bradley, Michelle C; Neves, Lauren T; Douglass, Stephen; Clarke, Catherine F; Johnson, Tracy L

    2017-09-08

    Despite its relatively streamlined genome, there are many important examples of regulated RNA splicing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Here, we report a role for the chromatin remodeler SWI/SNF in respiration, partially via the regulation of splicing. We find that a nutrient-dependent decrease in Snf2 leads to an increase in splicing of the PTC7 transcript. The spliced PTC7 transcript encodes a mitochondrial phosphatase regulator of biosynthesis of coenzyme Q 6 (ubiquinone or CoQ 6 ) and a mitochondrial redox-active lipid essential for electron and proton transport in respiration. Increased splicing of PTC7 increases CoQ 6 levels. The increase in PTC7 splicing occurs at least in part due to down-regulation of ribosomal protein gene expression, leading to the redistribution of spliceosomes from this abundant class of intron-containing RNAs to otherwise poorly spliced transcripts. In contrast, a protein encoded by the nonspliced isoform of PTC7 represses CoQ 6 biosynthesis. Taken together, these findings uncover a link between Snf2 expression and the splicing of PTC7 and establish a previously unknown role for the SWI/SNF complex in the transition of yeast cells from fermentative to respiratory modes of metabolism. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Hematopoietic stem cell fate through metabolic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kyoko; Ito, Keisuke

    2018-05-25

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain a quiescent state in the bone marrow to preserve their self-renewal capacity, but also undergo cell divisions as required. Organelles such as the mitochondria sustain cumulative damage during these cell divisions, and this damage may eventually compromise the cells' self-renewal capacity. HSC divisions result in either self-renewal or differentiation, with the balance between the two directly impacting hematopoietic homeostasis; but the heterogeneity of available HSC-enriched fractions, together with the technical challenges of observing HSC behavior, has long hindered the analysis of individual HSCs, and prevented the elucidation of this process. However, recent advances in genetic models, metabolomics analyses and single-cell approaches have revealed the contributions made to HSC self-renewal by metabolic cues, mitochondrial biogenesis, and autophagy/mitophagy, which have highlighted mitochondrial quality as a key control factor in the equilibrium of HSCs. A deeper understanding of precisely how specific modes of metabolism control HSC fate at the single cell level is therefore not only of great biological interest, but will have clear clinical implications for the development of therapies for hematological disease. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Controlling Lipid Fluxes at Glycerol-3-phosphate Acyltransferase Step in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Nancy; Foglia, Julena; Terebiznik, Mauricio; Athenstaedt, Karin; Zaremberg, Vanina

    2012-01-01

    The ability to channel excess fatty acids into neutral lipids like triacylglycerol (TAG) is a critical strategy used by cells to maintain lipid homeostasis. Upon activation to acyl-CoA, fatty acids become readily available as substrates for acyltransferases involved in neutral lipid synthesis. Neutral lipids are then packed into organelles derived from the endoplasmic reticulum called lipid particles (LPs). The first acylation step in the de novo pathway for TAG synthesis is catalyzed by glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferases (GPATs). Two isoforms, Gat1p/Gpt2p and Gat2p/Sct1p, are present in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Previous evidence indicated that these enzymes contribute differentially to the synthesis of TAG in actively growing cells. In this work we studied the role of the yeast GPATs in the formation of LPs induced by a surplus of oleic acid. Yeast lacking Gat1p (but not Gat2p) were sensitive to oleate and failed to accumulate LPs induced by this unsaturated fatty acid. It is shown that oleate induces dephosphorylation of Gat1p as well as an increment in its levels. Most importantly, we identified novel Gat1p crescent structures that are formed in the presence of oleate. These structures are connected with the endoplasmic reticulum and are intimately associated with LPs. No such structures were observed for Gat2p. A crucial point of control of lipid fluxes at the GPAT step is proposed. PMID:22267742

  12. Bilateral Diabetic Papillopathy and Metabolic Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostri, Christoffer; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Sander, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The pathogenesis of diabetic papillopathy largely is unknown, but case reports suggest that it may follow rapidly improved metabolic control. The present study was designed to investigate this hypothesis. DESIGN: Retrospective case-control study. PARTICIPANTS: Two thousand sixty......-six patients with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Review of clinical, photographic, and clinical chemistry records from a large diabetology and ophthalmology unit between 2001 and 2008. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Simultaneous, bilateral diabetic papillopathy. RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 4.9 years. During 10 020...... patient-years of observation, bilateral diabetic papillopathy developed in 5 patients. During the year preceding this incident, all 5 patients had experienced a decrease in glycosylated hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1C)) at a maximum rate of -2.5 (mean) percentage points per quarter year, which was significantly...

  13. Activation of the oxidative stress regulator PpYap1 through conserved cysteine residues during methanol metabolism in the yeast Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Taisuke; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2009-06-01

    The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris can grow on methanol as sole source of carbon and energy. The first reaction in yeast methanol metabolism, catalyzed by an abundant peroxisomal enzyme, alcohol oxidase, generates high levels of H(2)O(2), but the oxidative stress response during methanol metabolism has not been elucidated. In this study, we isolated the Yap1 homolog of P. pastoris (PpYap1) and analyzed the properties of a PpYAP1-disruption strain. The PpYap1 transcription factor is activated after exposure to various reactive agents, and therefore functions as a regulator of the redox system in P. pastoris. We have also identified PpGPX1, the unique glutathione peroxidase-encoding gene in P. pastoris whose expression is induced by PpYap1. PpGpx1, but not the ScTsa1 or SpTpx1 homolog PpTsa1, functions as a H(2)O(2) sensor and activates PpYap1. This study is the first demonstration of a yeast Yap1 family protein activated during conventional metabolism.

  14. Dental caries and salivary status in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus, related to the metabolic control of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siudikiene, Jolanta; Machiulskiene, Vita; Nyvad, Bente; Tenovuo, Jorma; Nedzelskiene, Irena

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship among type 1 diabetes mellitus, dental caries, and salivary status in children. The study comprised 68, 10-15-yr-old diabetics, and 68, age- and gender-matched non-diabetic controls. Diabetics were categorized into well-to-moderately controlled (HbA1c or= 9.0%) groups. Caries was recorded by assessing lesion activity at non-cavitated and cavity levels. Teeth were examined visually for the presence of dental plaque. Saliva was analyzed for unstimulated and stimulated flow rates, buffer effect, mutans streptococci, lactobacilli, and yeasts. Diabetics had fewer caries and plaque, lower salivary flow rates and buffer effect, and more frequent growth of yeasts than their non-diabetic controls. Well-to-moderately controlled diabetics had fewer decayed surfaces and lower counts of mutans streptococci and yeasts than poorly controlled diabetics, but the level of metabolic control of diabetes had no influence on salivary flow rates and buffer effect. High caries levels in diabetics were significantly associated with age, plaque score, and decreased unstimulated salivary flow rate, but were not associated with the level of metabolic control of diabetes. High caries experience in this study population could be related to plaque accumulation and/or to changes in saliva induced by diabetes mellitus.

  15. Anaerobic organic acid metabolism of Candida zemplinina in comparison with Saccharomyces wine yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Ildikó; Nyitrai-Sárdy, Diána; Leskó, Annamária; Pomázi, Andrea; Kállay, Miklós

    2014-05-16

    Organic acid production under oxygen-limited conditions has been thoroughly studied in the Saccharomyces species, but practically never investigated in Candida zemplinina, which seems to be an acidogenic species under oxidative laboratory conditions. In this study, several strains of C. zemplinina were tested for organic acid metabolism, in comparison with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces uvarum and Candida stellata, under fermentative conditions. Only C. stellata produced significantly higher acidity in simple minimal media (SM) with low sugar content and two different nitrogen sources (ammonia or glutamic acid) at low level. However, the acid profile differed largely between the Saccharomyces and Candida species and showed inverse types of N-dependence in some cases. Succinic acid production was strongly enhanced on glutamic acid in Saccharomyces species, but not in Candida species. 2-oxoglutarate production was strongly supported on ammonium nitrogen in Candida species, but remained low in Saccharomyces. Candida species, C. stellata in particular, produced more pyruvic acid regardless of N-sources. From the results, we concluded that the anaerobic organic acid metabolisms of C. zemplinina and C. stellata are different from each other and also from that of the Saccharomyces species. In the formation of succinic acid, the oxidative pathway from glutamic acid seems to play little or no role in C. zemplinina. The reductive branch of the TCA cycle, however, produces acidic intermediates (malic, fumaric, and succinic acid) in a level comparable with the production of the Saccharomyces species. An unidentified organic acid, which was produced on glutamic acid only by the Candida species, needs further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Yeast Derived LysA2 Can Control Bacterial Contamination in Ethanol Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Seob Kim

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of fuel-ethanol fermentations continues to be a significant problem for the corn and sugarcane-based ethanol industries. In particular, members of the Lactobacillaceae family are the primary bacteria of concern. Currently, antibiotics and acid washing are two major means of controlling contaminants. However, antibiotic use could lead to increased antibiotic resistance, and the acid wash step stresses the fermenting yeast and has limited effectiveness. Bacteriophage endolysins such as LysA2 are lytic enzymes with the potential to contribute as antimicrobials to the fuel ethanol industries. Our goal was to evaluate the potential of yeast-derived LysA2 as a means of controlling Lactobacillaceae contamination. LysA2 intracellularly produced by Pichia pastoris showed activity comparable to Escherichia coli produced LysA2. Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB with the A4α peptidoglycan chemotype (L-Lys-D-Asp crosslinkage were the most sensitive to LysA2, though a few from that chemotype were insensitive. Pichia-expressed LysA2, both secreted and intracellularly produced, successfully improved ethanol productivity and yields in glucose (YPD60 and sucrose-based (sugarcane juice ethanol fermentations in the presence of a LysA2 susceptible LAB contaminant. LysA2 secreting Sacharomyces cerevisiae did not notably improve production in sugarcane juice, but it did control bacterial contamination during fermentation in YPD60. Secretion of LysA2 by the fermenting yeast, or adding it in purified form, are promising alternative tools to control LAB contamination during ethanol fermentation. Endolysins with much broader lytic spectrums than LysA2 could supplement or replace the currently used antibiotics or the acidic wash.

  17. Glycerol positive promoters for tailored metabolic engineering of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ping-Wei; Klein, Mathias; Futschik, Matthias; Nevoigt, Elke

    2018-05-01

    Glycerol offers several advantages as a substrate for biotechnological applications. An important step toward using the popular production host Saccharomyces cerevisiae for glycerol-based bioprocesses has been the fact that in recent studies commonly used S. cerevisiae strains were engineered to grow in synthetic medium containing glycerol as the sole carbon source. For metabolic engineering projects of S. cerevisiae growing on glycerol, characterized promoters are missing. In the current study, we used transcriptome analysis and a yECitrine-based fluorescence reporter assay to select and characterize 25 useful promoters. The promoters of the genes ALD4 and ADH2 showed 4.2-fold and 3-fold higher activities compared to the well-known strong TEF1 promoter. Moreover, the collection contains promoters with graded activities in synthetic glycerol medium and different degrees of glucose repression. To demonstrate the general applicability of the promoter collection, we successfully used a subset of the characterized promoters with graded activities in order to optimize growth on glycerol in an engineered derivative of CEN.PK, in which glycerol catabolism exclusively occurs via a non-native DHA pathway.

  18. Initiation of proteolysis of yeast fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase by pH-control of adenylate cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, H.; Purwin, C.; Pohlig, G.; Scheffers, W.A.; Nicolay, K.

    1986-01-01

    Addition of fermentable sugars or uncouplers such as CCCP to resting yeast cells grown on glucose initiates phosphorylation of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase). There is good evidence that phosphorylation marks FBPase for proteolytic degradation. 31 P-NMR measurements of the cytosolic pH of yeast cells demonstrated a decrease of the cytosolic pH from 7.0 to 6.5 after addition of glucose or CCCP to starved yeast. Activity of adenylate cyclase in permeabilized yeast cells increases 2-3-fold when the pH is lowered from 7.0 to 6.5. It is concluded that pH controlled activation of adenylate cyclase causes the previously described increase in cyclic AMP which leads to phosphorylation of FBPase and finally to proteolysis of FBPase

  19. It must be my metabolism: Metabolic control of mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana M Small

    2014-07-01

    relationship between the reinforcing potency of sugared solutions and the metabolic effects that follow their consumption (16, also see the abstract of I. de Araujo. We therefore hypothesized that metabolic response provides the critical signal necessary to condition preference. To test this prediction in humans we designed a flavor nutrient conditioning study in which participants first rated their liking for novel flavored beverages and then, over a three week-long conditioning protocol, alternately ingested one of the flavored beverages with 112.5 kcal from maltodextrin, a tasteless and odorless polysaccharide that breaks down into glucose, and another flavored beverage with no calories added. Plasma glucose was measured before and after each of the drinks’ consumption as a proxy measure of metabolic response, assuming that glucose oxidation depends upon the level of circulating glucose. For each participant flavor-calorie pairings were held constant but the identity of the conditioned flavors were counterbalanced across participants. Following the exposure phase, participants’ liking of, and brain responses to, non-caloric versions of the flavors were assessed. We predicted that change in plasma glucose produced by beverage consumption during the exposure sessions would be associated with neural responses in dopamine source and target regions to the calorie predictive flavor. As predicted, response in the ventral striatum and hypothalamus to the calorie-predictive flavor (CS+ vs. non the noncaloric-predictive flavor (CS- was strongly associated with the changes in plasma glucose levels produced by ingestion of these same beverages when consumed previously either with (CS+ or without (CS- calories (17. Specifically, the greater the increase in circulating glucose occurring post ingestion of the beverage containing 112.5 kcal from maltodextrin versus the noncaloric drink, the stronger was the brain response to the CS+ compared to the CS- flavor. Importantly, because each

  20. Genome-scale metabolic model of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the reconciliation of in silico/in vivo mutant growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the last decade, the genome-scale metabolic models have been playing increasingly important roles in elucidating metabolic characteristics of biological systems for a wide range of applications including, but not limited to, system-wide identification of drug targets and production of high value biochemical compounds. However, these genome-scale metabolic models must be able to first predict known in vivo phenotypes before it is applied towards these applications with high confidence. One benchmark for measuring the in silico capability in predicting in vivo phenotypes is the use of single-gene mutant libraries to measure the accuracy of knockout simulations in predicting mutant growth phenotypes. Results Here we employed a systematic and iterative process, designated as Reconciling In silico/in vivo mutaNt Growth (RING), to settle discrepancies between in silico prediction and in vivo observations to a newly reconstructed genome-scale metabolic model of the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, SpoMBEL1693. The predictive capabilities of the genome-scale metabolic model in predicting single-gene mutant growth phenotypes were measured against the single-gene mutant library of S. pombe. The use of RING resulted in improving the overall predictive capability of SpoMBEL1693 by 21.5%, from 61.2% to 82.7% (92.5% of the negative predictions matched the observed growth phenotype and 79.7% the positive predictions matched the observed growth phenotype). Conclusion This study presents validation and refinement of a newly reconstructed metabolic model of the yeast S. pombe, through improving the metabolic model’s predictive capabilities by reconciling the in silico predicted growth phenotypes of single-gene knockout mutants, with experimental in vivo growth data. PMID:22631437

  1. Respiratory metabolism and calorie restriction relieve persistent endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by calcium shortage in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Busti, Stefano; Mapelli, Valeria; Tripodi, Farida; Sanvito, Rossella; Magni, Fulvio; Coccetti, Paola; Rocchetti, Marcella; Nielsen, Jens; Alberghina, Lilia; Vanoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis is crucial to eukaryotic cell survival. By acting as an enzyme cofactor and a second messenger in several signal transduction pathways, the calcium ion controls many essential biological processes. Inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium concentration is carefully regulated to safeguard the correct folding and processing of secretory proteins. By using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that calcium shortage leads to a slowdown of cell growth and met...

  2. Conditionally controlling nuclear trafficking in yeast by chemical-induced protein dimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Johnson, Cole A; Gestwicki, Jason E; Kumar, Anuj

    2010-11-01

    We present here a protocol to conditionally control the nuclear trafficking of target proteins in yeast. In this system, rapamycin is used to heterodimerize two chimeric proteins. One chimera consists of a FK506-binding protein (FKBP12) fused to a cellular 'address' (nuclear localization signal or nuclear export sequence). The second chimera consists of a target protein fused to a fluorescent protein and the FKBP12-rapamycin-binding (FRB) domain from FKBP-12-rapamycin associated protein 1 (FRAP1, also known as mTor). Rapamycin induces dimerization of the FKBP12- and FRB-containing chimeras; these interactions selectively place the target protein under control of the cell address, thereby directing the protein into or out of the nucleus. By chemical-induced dimerization, protein mislocalization is reversible and enables the identification of conditional loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenotypes, in contrast to other systems that require permanent modification of the targeted protein. Yeast strains for this analysis can be constructed in 1 week, and the technique allows protein mislocalization within 15 min after drug treatment.

  3. Control of Native Spoilage Yeast on Dealcoholized Red Wine by Preservatives Alone and in Binary Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Rubio, Marta; Guerrouj, Kamal; Taboada-Rodríguez, Amaury; López-Gómez, Antonio; Marín-Iniesta, Fulgencio

    2017-09-01

    In order to preserve a commercial dealcoholized red wine (DRW), a study with 4 preservatives and binary mixtures of them were performed against 2 native spoilage yeasts: Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) for potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate, sodium metabisulfite and dimethyl dicarbonate (DMDC) were evaluated in DRW stored at 25 °C. MICs of potassium sorbate and sodium metabisulfite were 250 and 60 mg/kg, respectively for both target strains. However for sodium benzoate, differences between yeasts were found; R. mucilaginosa was inhibited at 125 mg/kg, while S. cerevisiae at 250 mg/kg. Regarding MFC, differences between strains were only found for sodium metabisulfite obtaining a MFC of 500 mg/kg for R. mucilaginosa and a MFC of 250 mg/kg for S. cerevisiae. Potassium sorbate and sodium benzoate showed the MFC at 1000 mg/kg and DMDC at 200 mg/kg. Regarding the effect of binary mixtures the Fractional Fungicidal Concentration Index (FFC i ) methodology showed that binary mixtures of 100 mg/kg DMDC/200 mg/kg potassium sorbate (FFC i = 0.7) and 50 mg/kg DMDC / 400 mg/kg sodium benzoate (FFC i = 0.65) have both synergistic effect against the 2 target strains. These binary mixtures can control the growth of spoilage yeasts in DRW without metabisulfite addition. The results of this work may be important in preserving the health of DRW consumers by eliminating the use of metabisulfite and reducing the risk of growth of R. mucilagosa, recently recognized as an emerging pathogen. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  4. Daughter-specific transcription factors regulate cell size control in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Talia, Stefano; Wang, Hongyin; Skotheim, Jan M; Rosebrock, Adam P; Futcher, Bruce; Cross, Frederick R

    2009-10-01

    In budding yeast, asymmetric cell division yields a larger mother and a smaller daughter cell, which transcribe different genes due to the daughter-specific transcription factors Ace2 and Ash1. Cell size control at the Start checkpoint has long been considered to be a main regulator of the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, resulting in longer G1 in the smaller daughter cells. Our recent data confirmed this concept using quantitative time-lapse microscopy. However, it has been proposed that daughter-specific, Ace2-dependent repression of expression of the G1 cyclin CLN3 had a dominant role in delaying daughters in G1. We wanted to reconcile these two divergent perspectives on the origin of long daughter G1 times. We quantified size control using single-cell time-lapse imaging of fluorescently labeled budding yeast, in the presence or absence of the daughter-specific transcriptional regulators Ace2 and Ash1. Ace2 and Ash1 are not required for efficient size control, but they shift the domain of efficient size control to larger cell size, thus increasing cell size requirement for Start in daughters. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Ace2 and Ash1 are direct transcriptional regulators of the G1 cyclin gene CLN3. Quantification of cell size control in cells expressing titrated levels of Cln3 from ectopic promoters, and from cells with mutated Ace2 and Ash1 sites in the CLN3 promoter, showed that regulation of CLN3 expression by Ace2 and Ash1 can account for the differential regulation of Start in response to cell size in mothers and daughters. We show how daughter-specific transcriptional programs can interact with intrinsic cell size control to differentially regulate Start in mother and daughter cells. This work demonstrates mechanistically how asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants results in cell-type-specific regulation of the cell cycle.

  5. Daughter-Specific Transcription Factors Regulate Cell Size Control in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Talia, Stefano; Wang, Hongyin; Skotheim, Jan M.; Rosebrock, Adam P.; Futcher, Bruce; Cross, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    In budding yeast, asymmetric cell division yields a larger mother and a smaller daughter cell, which transcribe different genes due to the daughter-specific transcription factors Ace2 and Ash1. Cell size control at the Start checkpoint has long been considered to be a main regulator of the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, resulting in longer G1 in the smaller daughter cells. Our recent data confirmed this concept using quantitative time-lapse microscopy. However, it has been proposed that daughter-specific, Ace2-dependent repression of expression of the G1 cyclin CLN3 had a dominant role in delaying daughters in G1. We wanted to reconcile these two divergent perspectives on the origin of long daughter G1 times. We quantified size control using single-cell time-lapse imaging of fluorescently labeled budding yeast, in the presence or absence of the daughter-specific transcriptional regulators Ace2 and Ash1. Ace2 and Ash1 are not required for efficient size control, but they shift the domain of efficient size control to larger cell size, thus increasing cell size requirement for Start in daughters. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Ace2 and Ash1 are direct transcriptional regulators of the G1 cyclin gene CLN3. Quantification of cell size control in cells expressing titrated levels of Cln3 from ectopic promoters, and from cells with mutated Ace2 and Ash1 sites in the CLN3 promoter, showed that regulation of CLN3 expression by Ace2 and Ash1 can account for the differential regulation of Start in response to cell size in mothers and daughters. We show how daughter-specific transcriptional programs can interact with intrinsic cell size control to differentially regulate Start in mother and daughter cells. This work demonstrates mechanistically how asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants results in cell-type-specific regulation of the cell cycle. PMID:19841732

  6. Daughter-specific transcription factors regulate cell size control in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Di Talia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In budding yeast, asymmetric cell division yields a larger mother and a smaller daughter cell, which transcribe different genes due to the daughter-specific transcription factors Ace2 and Ash1. Cell size control at the Start checkpoint has long been considered to be a main regulator of the length of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, resulting in longer G1 in the smaller daughter cells. Our recent data confirmed this concept using quantitative time-lapse microscopy. However, it has been proposed that daughter-specific, Ace2-dependent repression of expression of the G1 cyclin CLN3 had a dominant role in delaying daughters in G1. We wanted to reconcile these two divergent perspectives on the origin of long daughter G1 times. We quantified size control using single-cell time-lapse imaging of fluorescently labeled budding yeast, in the presence or absence of the daughter-specific transcriptional regulators Ace2 and Ash1. Ace2 and Ash1 are not required for efficient size control, but they shift the domain of efficient size control to larger cell size, thus increasing cell size requirement for Start in daughters. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Ace2 and Ash1 are direct transcriptional regulators of the G1 cyclin gene CLN3. Quantification of cell size control in cells expressing titrated levels of Cln3 from ectopic promoters, and from cells with mutated Ace2 and Ash1 sites in the CLN3 promoter, showed that regulation of CLN3 expression by Ace2 and Ash1 can account for the differential regulation of Start in response to cell size in mothers and daughters. We show how daughter-specific transcriptional programs can interact with intrinsic cell size control to differentially regulate Start in mother and daughter cells. This work demonstrates mechanistically how asymmetric localization of cell fate determinants results in cell-type-specific regulation of the cell cycle.

  7. Precision metabolic engineering: The design of responsive, selective, and controllable metabolic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNerney, Monica P; Watstein, Daniel M; Styczynski, Mark P

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic engineering is generally focused on static optimization of cells to maximize production of a desired product, though recently dynamic metabolic engineering has explored how metabolic programs can be varied over time to improve titer. However, these are not the only types of applications where metabolic engineering could make a significant impact. Here, we discuss a new conceptual framework, termed "precision metabolic engineering," involving the design and engineering of systems that make different products in response to different signals. Rather than focusing on maximizing titer, these types of applications typically have three hallmarks: sensing signals that determine the desired metabolic target, completely directing metabolic flux in response to those signals, and producing sharp responses at specific signal thresholds. In this review, we will first discuss and provide examples of precision metabolic engineering. We will then discuss each of these hallmarks and identify which existing metabolic engineering methods can be applied to accomplish those tasks, as well as some of their shortcomings. Ultimately, precise control of metabolic systems has the potential to enable a host of new metabolic engineering and synthetic biology applications for any problem where flexibility of response to an external signal could be useful. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Central nervous system control of triglyceride metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerling, Johanna Janetta (Janine)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes the role of the brain in the regulation of peripheral triglyceride metabolism, in the context of the metabolic syndrome. Based on various pharmacological studies we described the role of two hormones, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1, in the production and clearance of

  9. Altered Fermentation Performances, Growth, and Metabolic Footprints Reveal Competition for Nutrients between Yeast Species Inoculated in Synthetic Grape Juice-Like Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Rollero

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The sequential inoculation of non-Saccharomyces yeasts and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in grape juice is becoming an increasingly popular practice to diversify wine styles and/or to obtain more complex wines with a peculiar microbial footprint. One of the main interactions is competition for nutrients, especially nitrogen sources, that directly impacts not only fermentation performance but also the production of aroma compounds. In order to better understand the interactions taking place between non-Saccharomyces yeasts and S. cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation, sequential inoculations of three yeast species (Pichia burtonii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Zygoascus meyerae with S. cerevisiae were performed individually in a synthetic medium. Different species-dependent interactions were evidenced. Indeed, the three sequential inoculations resulted in three different behaviors in terms of growth. P. burtonii and Z. meyerae declined after the inoculation of S. cerevisiae which promptly outcompeted the other two species. However, while the presence of P. burtonii did not impact the fermentation kinetics of S. cerevisiae, that of Z. meyerae rendered the overall kinetics very slow and with no clear exponential phase. K. marxianus and S. cerevisiae both declined and became undetectable before fermentation completion. The results also demonstrated that yeasts differed in their preference for nitrogen sources. Unlike Z. meyerae and P. burtonii, K. marxianus appeared to be a competitor for S. cerevisiae (as evidenced by the uptake of ammonium and amino acids, thereby explaining the resulting stuck fermentation. Nevertheless, the results suggested that competition for other nutrients (probably vitamins occurred during the sequential inoculation of Z. meyerae with S. cerevisiae. The metabolic footprint of the non-Saccharomyces yeasts determined after 48 h of fermentation remained until the end of fermentation and combined with that of S. cerevisiae. For

  10. Altered Fermentation Performances, Growth, and Metabolic Footprints Reveal Competition for Nutrients between Yeast Species Inoculated in Synthetic Grape Juice-Like Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollero, Stephanie; Bloem, Audrey; Ortiz-Julien, Anne; Camarasa, Carole; Divol, Benoit

    2018-01-01

    The sequential inoculation of non-Saccharomyces yeasts and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in grape juice is becoming an increasingly popular practice to diversify wine styles and/or to obtain more complex wines with a peculiar microbial footprint. One of the main interactions is competition for nutrients, especially nitrogen sources, that directly impacts not only fermentation performance but also the production of aroma compounds. In order to better understand the interactions taking place between non-Saccharomyces yeasts and S. cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation, sequential inoculations of three yeast species (Pichia burtonii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Zygoascus meyerae) with S. cerevisiae were performed individually in a synthetic medium. Different species-dependent interactions were evidenced. Indeed, the three sequential inoculations resulted in three different behaviors in terms of growth. P. burtonii and Z. meyerae declined after the inoculation of S. cerevisiae which promptly outcompeted the other two species. However, while the presence of P. burtonii did not impact the fermentation kinetics of S. cerevisiae, that of Z. meyerae rendered the overall kinetics very slow and with no clear exponential phase. K. marxianus and S. cerevisiae both declined and became undetectable before fermentation completion. The results also demonstrated that yeasts differed in their preference for nitrogen sources. Unlike Z. meyerae and P. burtonii, K. marxianus appeared to be a competitor for S. cerevisiae (as evidenced by the uptake of ammonium and amino acids), thereby explaining the resulting stuck fermentation. Nevertheless, the results suggested that competition for other nutrients (probably vitamins) occurred during the sequential inoculation of Z. meyerae with S. cerevisiae. The metabolic footprint of the non-Saccharomyces yeasts determined after 48 h of fermentation remained until the end of fermentation and combined with that of S. cerevisiae. For instance

  11. Volatile phenols in wine: Control measures of Brettanomyces/Dekkera yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Šućur

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the considerable amount of research regarding volatile phenols production by Brettanomyces and on microbiological and technological parameters that influence development of these compounds during all stages of grape processing and winemaking. Also, volatile phenols impact on wine aroma and quality and prevention methods were discussed. The yeast genus Brettanomyces is the major microorganism that has the ability to convert hydroxycinnamic acids into significant concentration of phenolic compounds, especially of 4-ethylphenol and 4-ethylguaiacol, in red wine. When volatile phenols reach concentrations above the sensory threshold in wine, it is then characterized as wine with fault. In order to control the growth of Brettanomyces and preclude volatile phenols production, it is helpful to keep good quality of grape, winery sanitation, control of oxygen and sulphite level, as well as orderly check physiochemical composition of wine.

  12. Adherence to two methods of education and metabolic control in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Education in diabetes optimizes metabolic control, prevents acute and chronic complications, and improves quality of life. Our main objective was to evaluate if a better metabolic control is achieved in diabetic patients undergoing a program of intensive interactive care than in those with traditional care and ...

  13. Identification of microRNAs controlling hepatic mRNA levels for metabolic genes during the metabolic transition from embryonic to posthatch development in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Julie A; Porter, Tom E; Liu, Hsiao-Ching

    2017-09-05

    The transition from embryonic to posthatch development in the chicken represents a massive metabolic switch from primarily lipolytic to primarily lipogenic metabolism. This metabolic switch is essential for the chick to successfully transition from the metabolism of stored egg yolk to the utilization of carbohydrate-based feed. However, regulation of this metabolic switch is not well understood. We hypothesized that microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in the metabolic switch that is essential to efficient growth of chickens. We used high-throughput RNA sequencing to characterize expression profiles of mRNA and miRNA in liver during late embryonic and early posthatch development of the chicken. This extensive data set was used to define the contributions of microRNAs to the metabolic switch during development that is critical to growth and nutrient utilization in chickens. We found that expression of over 800 mRNAs and 30 miRNAs was altered in the embryonic liver between embryonic day 18 and posthatch day 3, and many of these differentially expressed mRNAs and miRNAs are associated with metabolic processes. We confirmed the regulation of some of these mRNAs by miRNAs expressed in a reciprocal pattern using luciferase reporter assays. Finally, through the use of yeast one-hybrid screens, we identified several proteins that likely regulate expression of one of these important miRNAs. Integration of the upstream regulatory mechanisms governing miRNA expression along with monitoring the downstream effects of this expression will ultimately allow for the construction of complete miRNA regulatory networks associated with the hepatic metabolic switch in chickens. Our findings support a key role for miRNAs in controlling the metabolic switch that occurs between embryonic and posthatch development in the chicken.

  14. A newly identified essential complex, Dre2-Tah18, controls mitochondria integrity and cell death after oxidative stress in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Vernis

    Full Text Available A mutated allele of the essential gene TAH18 was previously identified in our laboratory in a genetic screen for new proteins interacting with the DNA polymerase delta in yeast [1]. The present work shows that Tah18 plays a role in response to oxidative stress. After exposure to lethal doses of H(2O(2, GFP-Tah18 relocalizes to the mitochondria and controls mitochondria integrity and cell death. Dre2, an essential Fe/S cluster protein and homologue of human anti-apoptotic Ciapin1, was identified as a molecular partner of Tah18 in the absence of stress. Moreover, Ciapin1 is able to replace yeast Dre2 in vivo and physically interacts with Tah18. Our results are in favour of an oxidative stress-induced cell death in yeast that involves mitochondria and is controlled by the newly identified Dre2-Tah18 complex.

  15. Effects of oxygen limitation on sugar metabolism in yeasts: a continuous-culture study of the Kluyver effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weusthuis, R A; Visser, W; Pronk, J T; Scheffers, W A; van Dijken, J P

    1994-04-01

    Growth and metabolite formation were studied in oxygen-limited chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CBS 8066 and Candida utilis CBS 621 growing on glucose or maltose at a dilution rate of 0.1 h-1. With either glucose or maltose S. cerevisiae could be grown under dual limitation of oxygen and sugar. Respiration and alcoholic fermentation occurred simultaneously and the catabolite fluxes through these processes were dependent on the magnitude of the oxygen feed. C. utilis could also be grown under dual limitation of glucose and oxygen. However, at very low oxygen feed rates (i.e. below 4 mmol l-1 h-1) growth was limited by oxygen only, as indicated by the high residual glucose concentration in the culture. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, C. utilis could not be grown anaerobically at a dilution rate of 0.1 h-1. With C. utilis absence of oxygen resulted in wash-out, despite the presence of ergosterol and Tween-80 in the growth medium. The behaviour of C. utilis with respect to maltose utilization in oxygen-limited cultures was remarkable: alcoholic fermentation did not occur and the amount of maltose metabolized was dependent on the oxygen supply. Oxygen-limited cultures of C. utilis growing on maltose always contained high residual sugar concentrations. These observations throw new light on the so-called Kluyver effect. Apparently, maltose is a non-fermentable sugar for C. utilis CBS 621, despite the fact that it can serve as a substrate for growth of this facultatively fermentative yeast. This is not due to the absence of key enzymes of alcoholic fermentation. Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase were present at high levels in maltose-utilizing cells of C. utilis grown under oxygen limitation. It is concluded that the Kluyver effect, in C. utilis growing on maltose, results from a regulatory mechanism that prevents the sugar from being fermented. Oxygen is not a key factor in this phenomenon since under oxygen limitation alcoholic fermentation of

  16. Nutrient control of eukaryote cell growth: a systems biology study in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilley Kathryn S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To elucidate the biological processes affected by changes in growth rate and nutrient availability, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome responses of chemostat cultures of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, growing at a range of growth rates and in four different nutrient-limiting conditions. Results We find significant changes in expression for many genes in each of the four nutrient-limited conditions tested. We also observe several processes that respond differently to changes in growth rate and are specific to each nutrient-limiting condition. These include carbohydrate storage, mitochondrial function, ribosome synthesis, and phosphate transport. Integrating transcriptome data with proteome measurements allows us to identify previously unrecognized examples of post-transcriptional regulation in response to both nutrient and growth-rate signals. Conclusions Our results emphasize the unique properties of carbon metabolism and the carbon substrate, the limitation of which induces significant changes in gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level, as well as altering how many genes respond to growth rate. By comparison, the responses to growth limitation by other nutrients involve a smaller set of genes that participate in specific pathways. See associated commentary http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/62

  17. Some Metabolites Act as Second Messengers in Yeast Chronological Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamat Mohammad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations of some key metabolic intermediates play essential roles in regulating the longevity of the chronologically aging yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These key metabolites are detected by certain ligand-specific protein sensors that respond to concentration changes of the key metabolites by altering the efficiencies of longevity-defining cellular processes. The concentrations of the key metabolites that affect yeast chronological aging are controlled spatially and temporally. Here, we analyze mechanisms through which the spatiotemporal dynamics of changes in the concentrations of the key metabolites influence yeast chronological lifespan. Our analysis indicates that a distinct set of metabolites can act as second messengers that define the pace of yeast chronological aging. Molecules that can operate both as intermediates of yeast metabolism and as second messengers of yeast chronological aging include reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH, glycerol, trehalose, hydrogen peroxide, amino acids, sphingolipids, spermidine, hydrogen sulfide, acetic acid, ethanol, free fatty acids, and diacylglycerol. We discuss several properties that these second messengers of yeast chronological aging have in common with second messengers of signal transduction. We outline how these second messengers of yeast chronological aging elicit changes in cell functionality and viability in response to changes in the nutrient, energy, stress, and proliferation status of the cell.

  18. Screening the yeast genome for energetic metabolism pathways involved in a phenotypic response to the anti-cancer agent 3-bromopyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Paweł; Jurkiewicz, Paweł; Cal-Bąkowska, Magdalena; Ko, Young H; Pedersen, Peter L; Goffeau, Andre; Ułaszewski, Stanisław

    2016-03-01

    In this study the detailed characteristic of the anti-cancer agent 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model is described, with the emphasis on its influence on energetic metabolism of the cell. It shows that 3-BP toxicity in yeast is strain-dependent and influenced by the glucose-repression system. Its toxic effect is mainly due to the rapid depletion of intracellular ATP. Moreover, lack of the Whi2p phosphatase results in strongly increased sensitivity of yeast cells to 3-BP, possibly due to the non-functional system of mitophagy of damaged mitochondria through the Ras-cAMP-PKA pathway. Single deletions of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes, the TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondrial carriers result in multiple effects after 3-BP treatment. However, it can be concluded that activity of the pentose phosphate pathway is necessary to prevent the toxicity of 3-BP, probably due to the fact that large amounts of NADPH are produced by this pathway, ensuring the reducing force needed for glutathione reduction, crucial to cope with the oxidative stress. Moreover, single deletions of genes encoding the TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondrial carriers generally cause sensitivity to 3-BP, while totally inactive mitochondrial respiration in the rho0 mutant resulted in increased resistance to 3-BP.

  19. Interactions within the yeast t-SNARE Sso1p that control SNARE complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, M; Chen, X; Cocina, A E; Schultz, S M; Hughson, F M

    2000-10-01

    In the eukaryotic secretory and endocytic pathways, transport vesicles shuttle cargo among intracellular organelles and to and from the plasma membrane. Cargo delivery entails fusion of the transport vesicle with its target, a process thought to be mediated by membrane bridging SNARE protein complexes. Temporal and spatial control of intracellular trafficking depends in part on regulating the assembly of these complexes. In vitro, SNARE assembly is inhibited by the closed conformation adopted by the syntaxin family of SNAREs. To visualize this closed conformation directly, the X-ray crystal structure of a yeast syntaxin, Sso1p, has been determined and refined to 2.1 A resolution. Mutants designed to destabilize the closed conformation exhibit accelerated rates of SNARE assembly. Our results provide insight into the mechanism of SNARE assembly and its intramolecular and intermolecular regulation.

  20. Substrate-Limited Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Strains Allow Control of Fermentation during Bread Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyf, Nore; Laurent, Jitka; Verspreet, Joran; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Courtin, Christophe M

    2017-04-26

    Identification and use of yeast strains that are unable to consume one or more otherwise fermentable substrate types could allow a more controlled fermentation process with more flexibility regarding fermentation times. In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different capacities to consume substrates present in wheat were selected to investigate the impact of substrate limitation on dough fermentation and final bread volume. Results show that fermentation of dough with maltose-negative strains relies on the presence of fructan and sucrose as fermentable substrates and can be used for regular bread making. Levels of fructan and sucrose, endogenously present or added, hence determine the extent of fermentation and timing at the proofing stage. Whole meal is inherently more suitable for substrate-limited fermentation than white flour due to the presence of higher native levels of these substrates. Bread making protocols with long fermentation times are accommodated by addition of substrates such as sucrose.

  1. The pat1 protein kinase controls transcription of the mating-type genes in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O; Egel, R; Nielsen, Olaf

    1990-01-01

    . This differentiation process is characterized by a transcriptional induction of the mating-type genes. Conjugation can also be induced in pat1-ts mutants by a shift to a semi-permissive temperature. The pat1 gene encodes a protein kinase, which also functions further downstream in the developmental pathway controlling...... of the mating-type genes in the zygote leads to complete loss of pat1 protein kinase activity causing entry into meiosis. Thus, pat1 can promote its own inactivation. We suggest a model according to which a stepwise inactivation of pat1 leads to sequential derepression of the processes of conjugation......The developmental programme of fission yeast brings about a transition from mitotic cell division to the dormant state of ascospores. In response to nitrogen starvation, two cells of opposite mating type conjugate to form a diploid zygote, which then undergoes meiosis and sporulation...

  2. Temperature control strategy to enhance the activity of yeast inoculated into compost raw material for accelerated composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasaki, Kiyohiko; Hirai, Hidehira

    2017-07-01

    The effects of inoculating the mesophilic yeast Pichia kudriavzevii RB1, which is able to degrade organic acids, on organic matter degradation in composting were elucidated. When model food waste with high carbohydrate content (C/N=22.3) was used, fluctuation in the inoculated yeast cell density was observed, as well as fluctuation in the composting temperature until day 5 when the temperature rose to 60°C, which is lethal for the yeast. After the decrease in yeast, acetic acid accumulated to levels as high as 20mg/g-ds in the composting material and vigorous organic matter degradation was inhibited. However, by maintaining the temperature at 40°C for 2days during the heating phase in the early stage of composting, both the organic acids originally contained in the raw material and acetic acid produced during the heating phase were degraded by the yeast. The concentration of acetic acid was kept at a relatively low level (10.1mg/g-ds at the highest), thereby promoting the degradation of organic matter by other microorganisms and accelerating the composting process. These results indicate that temperature control enhances the effects of microbial inoculation into composts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chemical signaling and insect attraction is a conserved trait in yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Paul G; Hagman, Arne; Verschut, Vasiliki; Chakraborty, Amrita; Rozpędowska, Elżbieta; Lebreton, Sébastien; Bengtsson, Marie; Flick, Gerhard; Witzgall, Peter; Piškur, Jure

    2018-03-01

    Yeast volatiles attract insects, which apparently is of mutual benefit, for both yeasts and insects. However, it is unknown whether biosynthesis of metabolites that attract insects is a basic and general trait, or if it is specific for yeasts that live in close association with insects. Our goal was to study chemical insect attractants produced by yeasts that span more than 250 million years of evolutionary history and vastly differ in their metabolism and lifestyle. We bioassayed attraction of the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster to odors of phylogenetically and ecologically distinct yeasts grown under controlled conditions. Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae , the insect-associated species Candida californica , Pichia kluyveri and Metschnikowia andauensis , wine yeast Dekkera bruxellensis , milk yeast Kluyveromyces lactis , the vertebrate pathogens Candida albicans and Candida glabrata , and oleophilic Yarrowia lipolytica were screened for fly attraction in a wind tunnel. Yeast headspace was chemically analyzed, and co-occurrence of insect attractants in yeasts and flowering plants was investigated through a database search. In yeasts with known genomes, we investigated the occurrence of genes involved in the synthesis of key aroma compounds. Flies were attracted to all nine yeasts studied. The behavioral response to baker's yeast was independent of its growth stage. In addition to Drosophila , we tested the basal hexapod Folsomia candida (Collembola) in a Y-tube assay to the most ancient yeast, Y. lipolytica, which proved that early yeast signals also function on clades older than neopteran insects. Behavioral and chemical data and a search for selected genes of volatile metabolites underline that biosynthesis of chemical signals is found throughout the yeast clade and has been conserved during the evolution of yeast lifestyles. Literature and database reviews corroborate that yeast signals mediate mutualistic interactions between insects and yeasts

  4. A mitochondrially targeted compound delays aging in yeast through a mechanism linking mitochondrial membrane lipid metabolism to mitochondrial redox biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle T. Burstein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent study revealed a mechanism of delaying aging in yeast by a natural compound which specifically impacts mitochondrial redox processes. In this mechanism, exogenously added lithocholic bile acid enters yeast cells, accumulates mainly in the inner mitochondrial membrane, and elicits an age-related remodeling of phospholipid synthesis and movement within both mitochondrial membranes. Such remodeling of mitochondrial phospholipid dynamics progresses with the chronological age of a yeast cell and ultimately causes significant changes in mitochondrial membrane lipidome. These changes in the composition of membrane phospholipids alter mitochondrial abundance and morphology, thereby triggering changes in the age-related chronology of such longevity-defining redox processes as mitochondrial respiration, the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, the preservation of cellular homeostasis of mitochondrially produced reactive oxygen species, and the coupling of electron transport to ATP synthesis.

  5. Sleep Control, GPCRs, and Glucose Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    Modern lifestyles prolong daily activities into the nighttime, disrupting circadian rhythms, which may cause sleep disturbances. Sleep disturbances have been implicated in the dysregulation of blood glucose levels and reported to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and diabetic complications. Sleep disorders are treated using anti-insomnia drugs that target ionotropic and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists, melatonin agonists, and orexin receptor antagonists. A deeper understanding of the effects of these medications on glucose metabolism and their underlying mechanisms of action is crucial for the treatment of diabetic patients with sleep disorders. In this review we focus on the beneficial impact of sleep on glucose metabolism and suggest a possible strategy for therapeutic intervention against sleep-related metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Integrated RNA- and protein profiling of fermentation and respiration in diploid budding yeast provides insight into nutrient control of cell growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Emmanuelle; Liu, Yuchen; Lardenois, Aurélie; Walther, Thomas; Horecka, Joe; Stuparevic, Igor; Law, Michael J; Lavigne, Régis; Evrard, Bertrand; Demougin, Philippe; Riffle, Michael; Strich, Randy; Davis, Ronald W; Pineau, Charles; Primig, Michael

    2015-04-24

    Diploid budding yeast undergoes rapid mitosis when it ferments glucose, and in the presence of a non-fermentable carbon source and the absence of a nitrogen source it triggers sporulation. Rich medium with acetate is a commonly used pre-sporulation medium, but our understanding of the molecular events underlying the acetate-driven transition from mitosis to meiosis is still incomplete. We identified 263 proteins for which mRNA and protein synthesis are linked or uncoupled in fermenting and respiring cells. Using motif predictions, interaction data and RNA profiling we find among them 28 likely targets for Ume6, a subunit of the conserved Rpd3/Sin3 histone deacetylase-complex regulating genes involved in metabolism, stress response and meiosis. Finally, we identify 14 genes for which both RNA and proteins are detected exclusively in respiring cells but not in fermenting cells in our sample set, including CSM4, SPR1, SPS4 and RIM4, which were thought to be meiosis-specific. Our work reveals intertwined transcriptional and post-transcriptional control mechanisms acting when a MATa/α strain responds to nutritional signals, and provides molecular clues how the carbon source primes yeast cells for entering meiosis. Our integrated genomics study provides insight into the interplay between the transcriptome and the proteome in diploid yeast cells undergoing vegetative growth in the presence of glucose (fermentation) or acetate (respiration). Furthermore, it reveals novel target genes involved in these processes for Ume6, the DNA binding subunit of the conserved histone deacetylase Rpd3 and the co-repressor Sin3. We have combined data from an RNA profiling experiment using tiling arrays that cover the entire yeast genome, and a large-scale protein detection analysis based on mass spectrometry in diploid MATa/α cells. This distinguishes our study from most others in the field-which investigate haploid yeast strains-because only diploid cells can undergo meiotic development

  7. Hypothalamic control of energy and glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisley, Stephanie; Sandoval, Darleen

    2011-09-01

    The central nervous system (CNS), generally accepted to regulate energy homeostasis, has been implicated in the metabolic perturbations that either cause or are associated with obesity. Normally, the CNS receives hormonal, metabolic, and neuronal input to assure adequate energy levels and maintain stable energy homeostasis. Recent evidence also supports that the CNS uses these same inputs to regulate glucose homeostasis and this aspect of CNS regulation also becomes impaired in the face of dietary-induced obesity. This review focuses on the literature surrounding hypothalamic regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis and discusses how dysregulation of this system may contribute to obesity and T2DM.

  8. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2013-02-12

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  9. Yeast strains and methods of use thereof

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard, Matthew Robert; Gardner, Richard Clague; Anfang, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to yeast strains and, in particular, to yeast stains for use in fermentation processes. The invention also relates to methods of fermentation using the yeast strains of the invention either alone or in combination with other yeast strains. The invention thither relates to methods for the selection of yeast strains suitable for fermentation cultures by screening for various metabolic products and the use of specific nutrient sources.

  10. Metabolic network analysis on Phaffia rhodozyma yeast using C-13-labeled glucose and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannizzaro, C.; Christensen, B.; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    Carotenoid production by micro organisms, as opposed to chemical synthesis, could fulfill an ever-increasing demand for 'all natural' products. The yeast Phaffia rhodozyma has received considerable attention because it produces the red pigment astaxanthin, commonly used as an animal feed suppleme...

  11. Increased availability of NADH in metabolically engineered baker's yeast improves transaminase-oxidoreductase coupled asymmetric whole-cell bioconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Hägglöf, Cecilia; Weber, Nora

    2016-01-01

    yeast for transamination-reduction coupled asymmetric one-pot conversion was investigated. RESULTS: A series of active whole-cell biocatalysts were constructed by over-expressing the (S)-selective ω-transaminase (VAMT) from Capsicum chinense together with the NADH-dependent (S)-selective alcohol...

  12. Novel insights into iron metabolism by integrating deletome and transcriptome analysis in an iron deficiency model of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkin Adam P

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron-deficiency anemia is the most prevalent form of anemia world-wide. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used as a model of cellular iron deficiency, in part because many of its cellular pathways are conserved. To better understand how cells respond to changes in iron availability, we profiled the yeast genome with a parallel analysis of homozygous deletion mutants to identify essential components and cellular processes required for optimal growth under iron-limited conditions. To complement this analysis, we compared those genes identified as important for fitness to those that were differentially-expressed in the same conditions. The resulting analysis provides a global perspective on the cellular processes involved in iron metabolism. Results Using functional profiling, we identified several genes known to be involved in high affinity iron uptake, in addition to novel genes that may play a role in iron metabolism. Our results provide support for the primary involvement in iron homeostasis of vacuolar and endosomal compartments, as well as vesicular transport to and from these compartments. We also observed an unexpected importance of the peroxisome for growth in iron-limited media. Although these components were essential for growth in low-iron conditions, most of them were not differentially-expressed. Genes with altered expression in iron deficiency were mainly associated with iron uptake and transport mechanisms, with little overlap with those that were functionally required. To better understand this relationship, we used expression-profiling of selected mutants that exhibited slow growth in iron-deficient conditions, and as a result, obtained additional insight into the roles of CTI6, DAP1, MRS4 and YHR045W in iron metabolism. Conclusion Comparison between functional and gene expression data in iron deficiency highlighted the complementary utility of these two approaches to identify important functional

  13. Mitochondrial quality control pathways as determinants of metabolic health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Held, Ntsiki M.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is key for maintaining cellular health, while mitochondrial failure is associated with various pathologies, including inherited metabolic disorders and age-related diseases. In order to maintain mitochondrial quality, several pathways of mitochondrial quality control have

  14. Yeasts are essential for cocoa bean fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2014-03-17

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao) are the major raw material for chocolate production and fermentation of the beans is essential for the development of chocolate flavor precursors. In this study, a novel approach was used to determine the role of yeasts in cocoa fermentation and their contribution to chocolate quality. Cocoa bean fermentations were conducted with the addition of 200ppm Natamycin to inhibit the growth of yeasts, and the resultant microbial ecology and metabolism, bean chemistry and chocolate quality were compared with those of normal (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii and Kluyveromyces marxianus, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in the control fermentation. In fermentations with the presence of Natamycin, the same bacterial species grew but yeast growth was inhibited. Physical and chemical analyses showed that beans fermented without yeasts had increased shell content, lower production of ethanol, higher alcohols and esters throughout fermentation and lesser presence of pyrazines in the roasted product. Quality tests revealed that beans fermented without yeasts were purplish-violet in color and not fully brown, and chocolate prepared from these beans tasted more acid and lacked characteristic chocolate flavor. Beans fermented with yeast growth were fully brown in color and gave chocolate with typical characters which were clearly preferred by sensory panels. Our findings demonstrate that yeast growth and activity were essential for cocoa bean fermentation and the development of chocolate characteristics. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Phenylethanol promotes adhesion and biofilm formation of the antagonistic yeast Kloeckera apiculata for the control of blue mold on citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Liu; Jingfan, Fang; Kai, Chen; Chao-an, Long; Yunjiang, Cheng

    2014-06-01

    The yeast Kloeckera apiculata strain 34-9 is an antagonist with biological control activity against postharvest diseases of citrus fruit. In a previous study it was demonstrated that K. apiculata produced the aromatic alcohol phenylethanol. In the present study, we found that K. apiculata was able to form biofilm on citrus fruit and embed in an extracellular matrix, which created a mechanical barrier interposed between the wound surface and pathogen. As a quorum-sensing molecule, phenylethanol can promote the formation of filaments by K. apiculata in potato dextrose agar medium, whereas on the citrus fruit, the antagonist remains as yeast after being treated with the same concentration of phenylethanol. It only induced K. apiculata to adhere and form biofilm. Following genome-wide computational and experimental identification of the possible genes associated with K. apiculata adhesion, we identified nine genes possibly involved in triggering yeast adhesion. Six of these genes were significantly induced after phenylethanol stress treatment. This study provides a new model system of the biology of the antagonist-pathogen interactions that occur in the antagonistic yeast K. apiculata for the control of blue mold on citrus caused by Penicillium italicum. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Four linked genes participate in controlling sporulation efficiency in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giora Ben-Ari

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative traits are conditioned by several genetic determinants. Since such genes influence many important complex traits in various organisms, the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs is of major interest, but still encounters serious difficulties. We detected four linked genes within one QTL, which participate in controlling sporulation efficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following the identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms by comparing the sequences of 145 genes between the parental strains SK1 and S288c, we analyzed the segregating progeny of the cross between them. Through reciprocal hemizygosity analysis, four genes, RAS2, PMS1, SWS2, and FKH2, located in a region of 60 kilobases on Chromosome 14, were found to be associated with sporulation efficiency. Three of the four "high" sporulation alleles are derived from the "low" sporulating strain. Two of these sporulation-related genes were verified through allele replacements. For RAS2, the causative variation was suggested to be a single nucleotide difference in the upstream region of the gene. This quantitative trait nucleotide accounts for sporulation variability among a set of ten closely related winery yeast strains. Our results provide a detailed view of genetic complexity in one "QTL region" that controls a quantitative trait and reports a single nucleotide polymorphism-trait association in wild strains. Moreover, these findings have implications on QTL identification in higher eukaryotes.

  17. Metabolic control of the insecticides safety use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.I. Solomenko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of the conducted research affirm that the phosphororganic insecticides utilization can lead to the break in the nitrogen metabolism, breaking the protein formation, reducing the protein molecules renewal, causing the amino acid and amides accumulation in the active state. It has been revealed that the translocation and transformation of the insecticides under consideration are more closely connected with the changes of insoluble protein fraction. The stagnation point of the Phosphamide and Kaunter impact on the plant has been determined. And only the use of the preparation in optimal norms can influence stimulatingly the course of the process under consideration.

  18. Metabolic control by S6 kinases depends on dietary lipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara R Castañeda

    Full Text Available Targeted deletion of S6 kinase (S6K 1 in mice leads to higher energy expenditure and improved glucose metabolism. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling these effects remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we analyze the potential role of dietary lipids in regulating the mTORC1/S6K system. Analysis of S6K phosphorylation in vivo and in vitro showed that dietary lipids activate S6K, and this effect is not dependent upon amino acids. Comparison of male mice lacking S6K1 and 2 (S6K-dko with wt controls showed that S6K-dko mice are protected against obesity and glucose intolerance induced by a high-fat diet. S6K-dko mice fed a high-fat diet had increased energy expenditure, improved glucose tolerance, lower fat mass gain, and changes in markers of lipid metabolism. Importantly, however, these metabolic phenotypes were dependent upon dietary lipids, with no such effects observed in S6K-dko mice fed a fat-free diet. These changes appear to be mediated via modulation of cellular metabolism in skeletal muscle, as shown by the expression of genes involved in energy metabolism. Taken together, our results suggest that the metabolic functions of S6K in vivo play a key role as a molecular interface connecting dietary lipids to the endogenous control of energy metabolism.

  19. Effects of 60 Cobalt ionizing radiation in morphology and metabolism of yeasts and Chlamydospore of Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillo, Michel R.F.; Demicheli, Marina C.; Andrade Junior, Heitor F.; Galiesteo Junior, Andres A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a fungus responsible for 80-90% of fungal infections, as the symptoms are similar to those of systemic bacterial infections there is a difficulty for immediate diagnosis. These difficulties can lead to delays of antifungal therapy, which contributes to the high mortality rates associated with this infection. Resistance structures referred to as chlamydospores are very common in the pathogen, representing different cell types that form in response to certain genetic or environmental conditions. Recently, various antifungal agents and new therapeutic strategies have come into use, allowing the fungus to acquire a resistance to the drugs. The use of ionizing radiation has been widely employed for the production of immunogens against various parasites. In this work, we evaluate the effects of gamma radiation ( 60 Co) in yeast and chlamydospore of C. albicans with doses ranging from 320 to 10.240 Gy with Cobalt 60. Subsequently the samples were plated and after seven days, the colony forming units (CFU) told. The viability of irradiated cells were evaluated using the Janus green dye. A dose of 6000 Gy was considered ideal for the mitigation of chlamydospore and yeast. The dimorphic change mechanisms of both fungal structures were not harmed. The viability of chlamydospores remained above 70% while the yeast viability remained above 85%. By transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy may be noted cytoplasmic changes, defects in the cell wall, mitochondria, and the presence of partially preserved vesicles of both morphological forms of C. albicans. Irradiation both chlamydospore as C. albicans yeast allows the suppression of their reproduction, opening the possibility of their use in future candidate immunogens. (author)

  20. Effects of 60 Cobalt ionizing radiation in morphology and metabolism of yeasts and Chlamydospore of Candida albicans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillo, Michel R.F.; Demicheli, Marina C.; Andrade Junior, Heitor F.; Galiesteo Junior, Andres A.J., E-mail: galisteo@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IMTSP/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Medicina Tropical. Lab. de Protozoologia; Takakura, Cleusa F.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Patologia de Molestias Transmissiveis. Lab. de Patologia; Negro, Gilda M.B. del [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFM/USP/IMTSP/LIM-53), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Lab. de Micologia; Nascimento, Nanci do [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Candida albicans is a fungus responsible for 80-90% of fungal infections, as the symptoms are similar to those of systemic bacterial infections there is a difficulty for immediate diagnosis. These difficulties can lead to delays of antifungal therapy, which contributes to the high mortality rates associated with this infection. Resistance structures referred to as chlamydospores are very common in the pathogen, representing different cell types that form in response to certain genetic or environmental conditions. Recently, various antifungal agents and new therapeutic strategies have come into use, allowing the fungus to acquire a resistance to the drugs. The use of ionizing radiation has been widely employed for the production of immunogens against various parasites. In this work, we evaluate the effects of gamma radiation ({sup 60}Co) in yeast and chlamydospore of C. albicans with doses ranging from 320 to 10.240 Gy with Cobalt 60. Subsequently the samples were plated and after seven days, the colony forming units (CFU) told. The viability of irradiated cells were evaluated using the Janus green dye. A dose of 6000 Gy was considered ideal for the mitigation of chlamydospore and yeast. The dimorphic change mechanisms of both fungal structures were not harmed. The viability of chlamydospores remained above 70% while the yeast viability remained above 85%. By transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy may be noted cytoplasmic changes, defects in the cell wall, mitochondria, and the presence of partially preserved vesicles of both morphological forms of C. albicans. Irradiation both chlamydospore as C. albicans yeast allows the suppression of their reproduction, opening the possibility of their use in future candidate immunogens. (author)

  1. Physical Forces Modulate Oxidative Status and Stress Defense Meditated Metabolic Adaptation of Yeast Colonies: Spaceflight and Microgravity Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Timothy G.; Allen, Patricia L.; Gunter, Margaret A.; Chiang, Jennifer; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Birdsall, Holly H.

    2018-05-01

    Baker's yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) has broad genetic homology to human cells. Although typically grown as 1-2mm diameter colonies under certain conditions yeast can form very large (10 + mm in diameter) or `giant' colonies on agar. Giant yeast colonies have been used to study diverse biomedical processes such as cell survival, aging, and the response to cancer pharmacogenomics. Such colonies evolve dynamically into complex stratified structures that respond differentially to environmental cues. Ammonia production, gravity driven ammonia convection, and shear defense responses are key differentiation signals for cell death and reactive oxygen system pathways in these colonies. The response to these signals can be modulated by experimental interventions such as agar composition, gene deletion and application of pharmaceuticals. In this study we used physical factors including colony rotation and microgravity to modify ammonia convection and shear stress as environmental cues and observed differences in the responses of both ammonia dependent and stress response dependent pathways We found that the effects of random positioning are distinct from rotation. Furthermore, both true and simulated microgravity exacerbated both cellular redox responses and apoptosis. These changes were largely shear-response dependent but each model had a unique response signature as measured by shear stress genes and the promoter set which regulates them These physical techniques permitted a graded manipulation of both convection and ammonia signaling and are primed to substantially contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of drug action, cell aging, and colony differentiation.

  2. Physical Forces Modulate Oxidative Status and Stress Defense Meditated Metabolic Adaptation of Yeast Colonies: Spaceflight and Microgravity Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Timothy G.; Allen, Patricia L.; Gunter, Margaret A.; Chiang, Jennifer; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Birdsall, Holly H.

    2017-12-01

    Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) has broad genetic homology to human cells. Although typically grown as 1-2mm diameter colonies under certain conditions yeast can form very large (10 + mm in diameter) or `giant' colonies on agar. Giant yeast colonies have been used to study diverse biomedical processes such as cell survival, aging, and the response to cancer pharmacogenomics. Such colonies evolve dynamically into complex stratified structures that respond differentially to environmental cues. Ammonia production, gravity driven ammonia convection, and shear defense responses are key differentiation signals for cell death and reactive oxygen system pathways in these colonies. The response to these signals can be modulated by experimental interventions such as agar composition, gene deletion and application of pharmaceuticals. In this study we used physical factors including colony rotation and microgravity to modify ammonia convection and shear stress as environmental cues and observed differences in the responses of both ammonia dependent and stress response dependent pathways We found that the effects of random positioning are distinct from rotation. Furthermore, both true and simulated microgravity exacerbated both cellular redox responses and apoptosis. These changes were largely shear-response dependent but each model had a unique response signature as measured by shear stress genes and the promoter set which regulates them These physical techniques permitted a graded manipulation of both convection and ammonia signaling and are primed to substantially contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of drug action, cell aging, and colony differentiation.

  3. Components of a Fanconi-like pathway control Pso2-independent DNA interstrand crosslink repair in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Ward

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA is a devastating genetic disease, associated with genomic instability and defects in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL repair. The FA repair pathway is not thought to be conserved in budding yeast, and although the yeast Mph1 helicase is a putative homolog of human FANCM, yeast cells disrupted for MPH1 are not sensitive to ICLs. Here, we reveal a key role for Mph1 in ICL repair when the Pso2 exonuclease is inactivated. We find that the yeast FANCM ortholog Mph1 physically and functionally interacts with Mgm101, a protein previously implicated in mitochondrial DNA repair, and the MutSα mismatch repair factor (Msh2-Msh6. Co-disruption of MPH1, MGM101, MSH6, or MSH2 with PSO2 produces a lesion-specific increase in ICL sensitivity, the elevation of ICL-induced chromosomal rearrangements, and persistence of ICL-associated DNA double-strand breaks. We find that Mph1-Mgm101-MutSα directs the ICL-induced recruitment of Exo1 to chromatin, and we propose that Exo1 is an alternative 5'-3' exonuclease utilised for ICL repair in the absence of Pso2. Moreover, ICL-induced Rad51 chromatin loading is delayed when both Pso2 and components of the Mph1-Mgm101-MutSα and Exo1 pathway are inactivated, demonstrating that the homologous recombination stages of ICL repair are inhibited. Finally, the FANCJ- and FANCP-related factors Chl1 and Slx4, respectively, are also components of the genetic pathway controlled by Mph1-Mgm101-MutSα. Together this suggests that a prototypical FA-related ICL repair pathway operates in budding yeast, which acts redundantly with the pathway controlled by Pso2, and is required for the targeting of Exo1 to chromatin to execute ICL repair.

  4. The flexible feedstock concept in Industrial Biotechnology: Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, Pseudomonas, Bacillus and yeast strains for access to alternative carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendisch, Volker F; Brito, Luciana Fernandes; Gil Lopez, Marina; Hennig, Guido; Pfeifenschneider, Johannes; Sgobba, Elvira; Veldmann, Kareen H

    2016-09-20

    Most biotechnological processes are based on glucose that is either present in molasses or generated from starch by enzymatic hydrolysis. At the very high, million-ton scale production volumes, for instance for fermentative production of the biofuel ethanol or of commodity chemicals such as organic acids and amino acids, competing uses of carbon sources e.g. in human and animal nutrition have to be taken into account. Thus, the biotechnological production hosts E. coli, C. glutamicum, pseudomonads, bacilli and Baker's yeast used in these large scale processes have been engineered for efficient utilization of alternative carbon sources. This flexible feedstock concept is central to the use of non-glucose second and third generation feedstocks in the emerging bioeconomy. The metabolic engineering efforts to broaden the substrate scope of E. coli, C. glutamicum, pseudomonads, B. subtilis and yeasts to include non-native carbon sources will be reviewed. Strategies to enable simultaneous consumption of mixtures of native and non-native carbon sources present in biomass hydrolysates will be summarized and a perspective on how to further increase feedstock flexibility for the realization of biorefinery processes will be given. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Metabolic and transcriptomic response of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain EC1118 after an oxygen impulse under carbon-sufficient, nitrogen-limited fermentative conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Marcelo; Aceituno, Felipe F; Slater, Alex W; Almonacid, Leonardo I; Melo, Francisco; Agosin, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    During alcoholic fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exposed to continuously changing environmental conditions, such as decreasing sugar and increasing ethanol concentrations. Oxygen, a critical nutrient to avoid stuck and sluggish fermentations, is only discretely available throughout the process after pump-over operation. In this work, we studied the physiological response of the wine yeast S. cerevisiae strain EC1118 to a sudden increase in dissolved oxygen, simulating pump-over operation. With this aim, an impulse of dissolved oxygen was added to carbon-sufficient, nitrogen-limited anaerobic continuous cultures. Results showed that genes related to mitochondrial respiration, ergosterol biosynthesis, and oxidative stress, among other metabolic pathways, were induced after the oxygen impulse. On the other hand, mannoprotein coding genes were repressed. The changes in the expression of these genes are coordinated responses that share common elements at the level of transcriptional regulation. Beneficial and detrimental effects of these physiological processes on wine quality highlight the dual role of oxygen in 'making or breaking wines'. These findings will facilitate the development of oxygen addition strategies to optimize yeast performance in industrial fermentations. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. MiYA, an efficient machine-learning workflow in conjunction with the YeastFab assembly strategy for combinatorial optimization of heterologous metabolic pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yikang; Li, Gang; Dong, Junkai; Xing, Xin-Hui; Dai, Junbiao; Zhang, Chong

    2018-05-01

    Facing boosting ability to construct combinatorial metabolic pathways, how to search the metabolic sweet spot has become the rate-limiting step. We here reported an efficient Machine-learning workflow in conjunction with YeastFab Assembly strategy (MiYA) for combinatorial optimizing the large biosynthetic genotypic space of heterologous metabolic pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using β-carotene biosynthetic pathway as example, we first demonstrated that MiYA has the power to search only a small fraction (2-5%) of combinatorial space to precisely tune the expression level of each gene with a machine-learning algorithm of an artificial neural network (ANN) ensemble to avoid over-fitting problem when dealing with a small number of training samples. We then applied MiYA to improve the biosynthesis of violacein. Feed with initial data from a colorimetric plate-based, pre-screened pool of 24 strains producing violacein, MiYA successfully predicted, and verified experimentally, the existence of a strain that showed a 2.42-fold titer improvement in violacein production among 3125 possible designs. Furthermore, MiYA was able to largely avoid the branch pathway of violacein biosynthesis that makes deoxyviolacein, and produces very pure violacein. Together, MiYA combines the advantages of standardized building blocks and machine learning to accelerate the Design-Build-Test-Learn (DBTL) cycle for combinatorial optimization of metabolic pathways, which could significantly accelerate the development of microbial cell factories. Copyright © 2018 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Slave nodes and the controllability of metabolic networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Motter, Adilson E

    2009-01-01

    Recent work on synthetic rescues has shown that the targeted deletion of specific metabolic genes can often be used to rescue otherwise non-viable mutants. This raises a fundamental biophysical question: to what extent can the whole-cell behavior of a large metabolic network be controlled by constraining the flux of one or more reactions in the network? This touches upon the issue of the number of degrees of freedom contained by one such network. Using the metabolic network of Escherichia coli as a model system, here we address this question theoretically by exploring not only reaction deletions, but also a continuum of all possible reaction expression levels. We show that the behavior of the metabolic network can be largely manipulated by the pinned expression of a single reaction. In particular, a relevant fraction of the metabolic reactions exhibits canalizing interactions, in that the specification of one reaction flux determines cellular growth as well as the fluxes of most other reactions in optimal steady states. The activity of individual reactions can thus be used as surrogates to monitor and possibly control cellular growth and other whole-cell behaviors. In addition to its implications for the study of control processes, our methodology provides a new approach to study how the integrated dynamics of the entire metabolic network emerges from the coordinated behavior of its component parts.

  8. Hypothalamic control of energy metabolism via the autonomic nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, A.; Bruinstroop, E.; Yi, C. X.; Klieverik, L. P.; La Fleur, S. E.; Fliers, E.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothalamic control of hepatic glucose production is an evident aspect of energy homeostasis. In addition to the control of glucose metabolism by the circadian timing system, the hypothalamus also serves as a key relay center for (humoral) feedback information from the periphery, with the

  9. Modeling human Coenzyme A synthase mutation in yeast reveals altered mitochondrial function, lipid content and iron metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Ceccatelli Berti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in nuclear genes associated with defective coenzyme A biosynthesis have been identified as responsible for some forms of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA, namely PKAN and CoPAN. PKAN are defined by mutations in PANK2, encoding the pantothenate kinase 2 enzyme, that account for about 50% of cases of NBIA, whereas mutations in CoA synthase COASY have been recently reported as the second inborn error of CoA synthesis leading to CoPAN. As reported previously, yeast cells expressing the pathogenic mutation exhibited a temperature-sensitive growth defect in the absence of pantothenate and a reduced CoA content. Additional characterization revealed decreased oxygen consumption, reduced activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes, higher iron content, increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and reduced amount of lipid droplets, thus partially recapitulating the phenotypes found in patients and establishing yeast as a potential model to clarify the pathogenesis underlying PKAN and CoPAN diseases.

  10. Metabolic control of female puberty: potential therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Juan M; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    The onset of puberty in females is highly sensitive to the nutritional status and the amount of energy reserves of the organism. This metabolic information is sensed and transmitted to hypothalamic GnRH neurons, considered to be ultimately responsible for triggering puberty through the coordinated action of different peripheral hormones, central neurotransmitters, and molecular mediators. This article will review and discuss (i) the relevant actions of the adipose hormone leptin, as a stimulatory/permissive signal, and the gut hormone ghrelin, as an inhibitory factor, in the metabolic control of female puberty; (ii) the crucial role of the hypothalamic kisspeptin neurons, recently emerged as essential gatekeepers of puberty, in transmitting this metabolic information to GnRH neurons; and (iii) the potential involvement of key cellular energy sensors, such as mTOR, as molecular mediators in this setting. The thorough characterization of the physiological roles of the above elements in the metabolic control of female puberty, along with the discovery of novel factors, pathways, and mechanisms involved, will promote our understanding of the complex networks connecting metabolism and puberty and, ultimately, will aid in the design of target-specific treatments for female pubertal disorders linked to conditions of metabolic stress.

  11. Study of the Effects of Monacolin K and Other Constituents of Red Yeast Rice on Obesity, Insulin-Resistance, Hyperlipidemia, and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Using a Mouse Model of Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Fujimoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a progressive and intractable disease associated with metabolic syndrome. Red yeast rice (RYR contains monacolin K, a potent inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, and its consumption decreases cholesterol and triglyceride levels. We examined the efficacy of RYR constituents using a novel metabolic syndrome-NAFLD mouse model (MSG mice. Methods. Two types of RYR grown under different culture conditions were used. 1P-DU contained only 0.002 g/100 g of monacolin K, whereas 3P-D1 contained 0.131 g/100 g. MSG mice were divided into three groups: control (C group fed standard food, RYR-C group fed standard food with 1% 1P-DU, and RYR-M group fed standard food with 1% 3P-D1. Mice were examined from 12 to 24 weeks of age. Results. Serum insulin, leptin, and liver damage as well as macrophage aggregation in visceral fat in RYR-C and RYR-M groups were lower than those in C group. The serum adiponectin levels in RYR-C group were significantly higher than those in RYR-M and C groups. Conclusions. RYR was effective against obesity-related inflammation, insulin resistance, and NAFLD in MSG mice irrespective of monacolin K levels. GABA and various peptides produced during fermentation were determined as the active constituents of RYR.

  12. Cytosolic chaperones mediate quality control of higher-order septin assembly in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Courtney R; Weems, Andrew D; Brewer, Jennifer M; Thorner, Jeremy; McMurray, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    Septin hetero-oligomers polymerize into cytoskeletal filaments with essential functions in many eukaryotic cell types. Mutations within the oligomerization interface that encompasses the GTP-binding pocket of a septin (its "G interface") cause thermoinstability of yeast septin hetero-oligomer assembly, and human disease. When coexpressed with its wild-type counterpart, a G interface mutant is excluded from septin filaments, even at moderate temperatures. We show that this quality control mechanism is specific to G interface mutants, operates during de novo septin hetero-oligomer assembly, and requires specific cytosolic chaperones. Chaperone overexpression lowers the temperature permissive for proliferation of cells expressing a G interface mutant as the sole source of a given septin. Mutations that perturb the septin G interface retard release from these chaperones, imposing a kinetic delay on the availability of nascent septin molecules for higher-order assembly. Un-expectedly, the disaggregase Hsp104 contributes to this delay in a manner that does not require its "unfoldase" activity, indicating a latent "holdase" activity toward mutant septins. These findings provide new roles for chaperone-mediated kinetic partitioning of non-native proteins and may help explain the etiology of septin-linked human diseases. © 2015 Johnson et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Cell cycle-dependent transcription factors control the expression of yeast telomerase RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Isabelle; Larose, Stéphanie; Dandjinou, Alain T; Abou Elela, Sherif; Wellinger, Raymund J

    2013-07-01

    Telomerase is a specialized ribonucleoprotein that adds repeated DNA sequences to the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes to preserve genome integrity. Some secondary structure features of the telomerase RNA are very well conserved, and it serves as a central scaffold for the binding of associated proteins. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomerase RNA, TLC1, is found in very low copy number in the cell and is the limiting component of the known telomerase holoenzyme constituents. The reasons for this low abundance are unclear, but given that the RNA is very stable, transcriptional control mechanisms must be extremely important. Here we define the sequences forming the TLC1 promoter and identify the elements required for its low expression level, including enhancer and repressor elements. Within an enhancer element, we found consensus sites for Mbp1/Swi4 association, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the binding of Mbp1 and Swi4 to these sites of the TLC1 promoter. Furthermore, the enhancer element conferred cell cycle-dependent regulation to a reporter gene, and mutations in the Mbp1/Swi4 binding sites affected the levels of telomerase RNA and telomere length. Finally, ChIP experiments using a TLC1 RNA-binding protein as target showed cell cycle-dependent transcription of the TLC1 gene. These results indicate that the budding yeast TLC1 RNA is transcribed in a cell cycle-dependent fashion late in G1 and may be part of the S phase-regulated group of genes involved in DNA replication.

  14. Genetic control of yeast cell radiosensitivity modification by oxygen and hypoxic sensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuranovskaya, G.P.; Petin, V.G.

    1984-01-01

    Diploid yeast cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae ''of the wild type'', individual mutants, homozygous in rad 2 and rad 54 and double mutants, containing both these loci in homozygous state are considered to prove genetic determination of radiosensitivity modification of hypoxic cells by oxygen and electron acceptor compounds previously demonstrated on yeast cells of other genotypes. It is shown that both ''oxygen effect'' and the effect of hypoxic sensitizers depend on the activity of repair systems. The possible mechanism of participation of post-radiation restoration processes in the modification of cell radiosensitivity, is discussed

  15. Soft x-ray-controlled dose deposition in yeast cells: techniques, model, and biological assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Marziale; Batani, Dimitri; Conti, Aldo; Masini, Alessandra; Costato, Michele; Pozzi, Achille; Turcu, I. C. Edmond

    1996-12-01

    A procedure is presented to release soft x-rays onto yeast cell membrane allegedly damaging the resident enzymatic processes connected with fermentation. The damage is expected to be restricted to regulating fermentation processes without interference with respiration. By this technique fermentation is followed leading to CO2 production, and respiration resulting in global pressure measurements. A solid state pressure sensor system has been developed linked to a data acquisition system. Yeast cells cultures have been investigated at different concentrations and with different nutrients. A non-monotone response in CO2 production as a function of the delivered x-ray dose is observed.

  16. Yeast two-hybrid screens imply involvement of Fanconi anemia proteins in transcription regulation, cell signaling, oxidative metabolism, and cellular transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Tanja Y; Medhurst, Annette L; Waisfisz, Quinten; Zhi, Yu; Herterich, Sabine; Hoehn, Holger; Gross, Hans J; Joenje, Hans; Hoatlin, Maureen E; Mathew, Christopher G; Huber, Pia A J

    2003-10-01

    Mutations in one of at least eight different genes cause bone marrow failure, chromosome instability, and predisposition to cancer associated with the rare genetic syndrome Fanconi anemia (FA). The cloning of seven genes has provided the tools to study the molecular pathway disrupted in Fanconi anemia patients. The structure of the genes and their gene products provided few clues to their functional role. We report here the use of 3 FA proteins, FANCA, FANCC, and FANCG, as "baits" in the hunt for interactors to obtain clues for FA protein functions. Using five different human cDNA libraries we screened 36.5x10(6) clones with the technique of the yeast two-hybrid system. We identified 69 proteins which have not previously been linked to the FA pathway as direct interactors of FANCA, FANCC, or FANCG. Most of these proteins are associated with four functional classes including transcription regulation (21 proteins), signaling (13 proteins), oxidative metabolism (10 proteins), and intracellular transport (11 proteins). Interaction with 6 proteins, DAXX, Ran, IkappaBgamma, USP14, and the previously reported SNX5 and FAZF, was additionally confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and/or colocalization studies. Taken together, our data strongly support the hypothesis that FA proteins are functionally involved in several complex cellular pathways including transcription regulation, cell signaling, oxidative metabolism, and cellular transport.

  17. Metabolic engineering of the chloroplast genome reveals that the yeast ArDH gene confers enhanced tolerance to salinity and drought in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sarwar Khan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Osmoprotectants stabilize proteins and membranes against the denaturing effect of high concentrations of salts and other harmful solutes. In yeast, arabitol dehydrogenase (ArDH reduces D-ribulose to D-arabitol where D-ribulose is derived by dephosphorylating D-ribulose-5-PO4 in the oxidized pentose pathway. Osmotolerance in plants could be developed through metabolic engineering of chloroplast genome by introducing genes encoding polyols. Here, we report that ArDH expression in chloroplasts confers tolerance to NaCl (up to 400 mM. Transgenic plants compared to wild type survived for four to five weeks on 400 mM NaCl. Nevertheless, plants remained green and grew normal on concentrations up to 350 mM NaCl. Further, a-week-old seedlings were also challenged with poly ethylene glycol (PEG, up to 6% in the liquid medium, considering that membranes and proteins are protected under stress conditions due to accumulation of arabitol in chloroplasts. Seedlings were tolerant to 6% PEG, suggesting that ARDH enzyme maintains integrity of membranes in chloroplasts under drought conditions via metabolic engineering. Hence, the gene could be expressed in agronomic plants to withstand abiotic stresses.

  18. Metabolic sensing neurons and the control of energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Barry E

    2006-11-30

    The brain and periphery carry on a constant conversation; the periphery informs the brain about its metabolic needs and the brain provides for these needs through its control of somatomotor, autonomic and neurohumoral pathways involved in energy intake, expenditure and storage. Metabolic sensing neurons are the integrators of a variety of metabolic, humoral and neural inputs from the periphery. Such neurons, originally called "glucosensing", also respond to fatty acids, hormones and metabolites from the periphery. They are integrated within neural pathways involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Unlike most neurons, they utilize glucose and other metabolites as signaling molecules to regulate their membrane potential and firing rate. For glucosensing neurons, glucokinase acts as the rate-limiting step in glucosensing while the pathways that mediate responses to metabolites like lactate, ketone bodies and fatty acids are less well characterized. Many metabolic sensing neurons also respond to insulin and leptin and other peripheral hormones and receive neural inputs from peripheral organs. Each set of afferent signals arrives with different temporal profiles and by different routes and these inputs are summated at the level of the membrane potential to produce a given neural firing pattern. In some obese individuals, the relative sensitivity of metabolic sensing neurons to various peripheral inputs is genetically reduced. This may provide one mechanism underlying their propensity to become obese when exposed to diets high in fat and caloric density. Thus, metabolic sensing neurons may provide a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity.

  19. Intracellular pH is a tightly controlled signal in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orij, R.; Brul, S.; Smits, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nearly all processes in living cells are pH dependent, which is why intracellular pH (pHi) is a tightly regulated physiological parameter in all cellular systems. However, in microbes such as yeast, pHi responds to extracellular conditions such as the availability of nutrients. This

  20. Role of killer factors in the inhibitory activity of bio-control yeasts against Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus ochraceus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro da Silva Portes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the antagonism of killer positive yeast strains (isolated from 11 samples of different frozen fruit pulps against the strains of Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus ochraceus. Of the total 41 killer yeasts tested in YM agar, 19 showed antibiosis against P. expansum and A. ochraceus, with inhibition zone ranging from 10 to 18 mm and 10 to 19 mm, respectively. In the following step, the extracellular activity of Kluyveromyces sp. FP4(13 was tested performing the assay in YM broth. The antifungal activity of Kluyveromyces sp. FP4(13 cell-free culture supernatant (25ºC/96 h was more effective against the conidia germination, showing inhibition rates of 93.33 and 86.44% for P. expansum and A. ochraceus, respectively. The micelial growth inhibition was 28.45 and 21.0%, respectively. The antagonism showed by the selected yeasts could be used as a promising alternative tool to reduce and control the postharvest fungal spoilage of the fruits. However, further studies should be carried out in order to better elucidate the role of innocuous characters in antagonistic microorganisms, as well as the purification and characterization of new killer toxins.

  1. Metabolic control analysis of xylose catabolism in Aspergillus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prathumpai, W.; Gabelgaard, J.B.; Wanchanthuek, P.; Vondervoort, van de P.J.I.; Groot, de M.J.L.; McIntyre, M.; Nielsen, J.

    2003-01-01

    A kinetic model for xylose catabolism in Aspergillus is proposed. From a thermodynamic analysis it was found that the intermediate xylitol will accumulate during xylose catabolism. Use of the kinetic model allowed metabolic control analysis (MCA) of the xylose catabolic pathway to be carried out,

  2. Dynamic optimal metabolic control theory: a cybernetic approach for modelling of the central nitrogen metabolism of S. cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riel, van N.A.W.; Giuseppin, M.L.F.; Verrips, C.T.

    2000-01-01

    The theory of dynamic optimal metabolic control (DOMC), as developed by Giuseppin and Van Riel (Metab. Eng., 2000), is applied to model the central nitrogen metabolism (CNM) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The CNM represents a typical system encountered in advanced metabolic engineering. The CNM is the

  3. Telling metabolic stories to explore metabolomics data -- A case study on the Yeast response to cadmium exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.V. Milreu (Paulo); C.C. Klein (Cecilia); L. Cottret; V. Acuña (Vicente); E. Birmele; M. Borassi; C. Junot; A. Marchetti Spaccamela (Alberto); A. Morino; L. Stougie (Leen); F. Jourdan; P. Crescenzi; V. Lacroix; M.-F. Sagot (Marie-France)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractMotivation: The increasing availability of metabolomics data enables to better understand the metabolic processes involved in the immediate response of an organism to environmental changes and stress. The data usually come in the form of a list of metabolites whose concentrations

  4. Transcriptional switches in the control of macronutrient metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Alan

    2008-06-01

    This review shows how some transcription factors respond to alterations in macronutrients. Carbohydrates induce enzymes for their metabolism and fatty acid synthesis. Fatty acids reduce carbohydrate processing, induce enzymes for their metabolism, and increase both gluconeogenesis and storage of fat. Fat stores help control carbohydrate uptake by other cells. The following main transcription factors are discussed: carbohydrate response element-binding protein; sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, cyclic AMP response element-binding protein, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma.

  5. Sleep and metabolic control: waking to a problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenell, Michael I; Marshall, Nathaniel S; Rogers, Naomi L

    2007-01-01

    1. The aim of the present review is to outline: (i) the association between sleep and metabolism; (ii) how sleep duration influences the development of disease; and (iii) how sex differences, ageing and obesity may potentially influence the relationship between sleep, metabolic control and subsequent disease. 2. Sleep is associated with a number of endocrine changes, including a change in insulin action in healthy young individuals. Sleep duration shows a prospective U-shaped relationship with all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes. 3. Chronic sleep restriction is becoming more common. Experimental sleep restriction impedes daytime glucose control and increases appetite. 4. The sex hormones oestrogen and testosterone influence sleep duration and quality and may account for sex differences in the prevalence of sleep-related disorders. 5. Ageing is associated with a decreased sleep duration, decreased muscle mass and impaired insulin action. 6. Obesity impairs insulin action and is associated with the incidence and severity of obstructive sleep apnoea. 7. Sleep plays an integral role in metabolic control. Consequently, insufficient sleep may represent a modifiable risk factor for the development of Type 2 diabetes. The challenge ahead is to identify how sex differences, ageing and obesity could potentially influence the relationship between sleep and metabolism.

  6. On the Evolution of Specificity in Members of the Yeast Amino Acid Transporter Family as Parts of Specific Metabolic Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Gournas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, molecular modeling and substrate docking, coupled with biochemical and genetic analyses have identified the substrate-binding residues of several amino acid transporters of the yeast amino acid transporter (YAT family. These consist of (a residues conserved across YATs that interact with the invariable part of amino acid substrates and (b variable residues that interact with the side chain of the amino acid substrate and thus define specificity. Secondary structure sequence alignments showed that the positions of these residues are conserved across YATs and could thus be used to predict the specificity of YATs. Here, we discuss the potential of combining molecular modeling and structural alignments with intra-species phylogenetic comparisons of transporters, in order to predict the function of uncharacterized members of the family. We additionally define some orphan branches which include transporters with potentially novel, and to be characterized specificities. In addition, we discuss the particular case of the highly specific l-proline transporter, PrnB, of Aspergillus nidulans, whose gene is part of a cluster of genes required for the utilization of proline as a carbon and/or nitrogen source. This clustering correlates with transcriptional regulation of these genes, potentially leading to the efficient coordination of the uptake of externally provided l-Pro via PrnB and its enzymatic degradation in the cell.

  7. Rewiring yeast acetate metabolism through MPC1 loss of function leads to mitochondrial damage and decreases chronological lifespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Orlandi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available During growth on fermentable substrates, such as glucose, pyruvate, which is the end-product of glycolysis, can be used to generate acetyl-CoA in the cytosol via acetaldehyde and acetate, or in mitochondria by direct oxidative decarboxylation. In the latter case, the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC is responsible for pyruvate transport into mitochondrial matrix space. During chronological aging, yeast cells which lack the major structural subunit Mpc1 display a reduced lifespan accompanied by an age-dependent loss of autophagy. Here, we show that the impairment of pyruvate import into mitochondria linked to Mpc1 loss is compensated by a flux redirection of TCA cycle intermediates through the malic enzyme-dependent alternative route. In such a way, the TCA cycle operates in a “branched” fashion to generate pyruvate and is depleted of intermediates. Mutant cells cope with this depletion by increasing the activity of glyoxylate cycle and of the pathway which provides the nucleocytosolic acetyl-CoA. Moreover, cellular respiration decreases and ROS accumulate in the mitochondria which, in turn, undergo severe damage. These acquired traits in concert with the reduced autophagy restrict cell survival of the mpc1∆ mutant during chronological aging. Conversely, the activation of the carnitine shuttle by supplying acetyl-CoA to the mitochondria is sufficient to abrogate the short-lived phenotype of the mutant.

  8. Field Assessment of Yeast- and Oxalic Acid-generated Carbon Dioxide for Mosquito Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    SentinelTM, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light trap, sugar- fermenting yeast, electrolyzed oxalic acid INTRODUCTION Successful vector-borne...and Eisen 2008). Population data from trap surveil- lance provide key information for the develop- ment of disease risk assessment models (Diuk- Wasser...generated by a fermentation chamber, in which yeast metabolized sucrose. This source had been shown to attract various mosquito species in field and

  9. Controlling cell-free metabolism through physiochemical perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Ashty S; Heggestad, Jacob T; Crowe, Samantha A; Jewett, Michael C

    2018-01-01

    Building biosynthetic pathways and engineering metabolic reactions in cells can be time-consuming due to complexities in cellular metabolism. These complexities often convolute the combinatorial testing of biosynthetic pathway designs needed to define an optimal biosynthetic system. To simplify the optimization of biosynthetic systems, we recently reported a new cell-free framework for pathway construction and testing. In this framework, multiple crude-cell extracts are selectively enriched with individual pathway enzymes, which are then mixed to construct full biosynthetic pathways on the time scale of a day. This rapid approach to building pathways aids in the study of metabolic pathway performance by providing a unique freedom of design to modify and control biological systems for both fundamental and applied biotechnology. The goal of this work was to demonstrate the ability to probe biosynthetic pathway performance in our cell-free framework by perturbing physiochemical conditions, using n-butanol synthesis as a model. We carried out three unique case studies. First, we demonstrated the power of our cell-free approach to maximize biosynthesis yields by mapping physiochemical landscapes using a robotic liquid-handler. This allowed us to determine that NAD and CoA are the most important factors that govern cell-free n-butanol metabolism. Second, we compared metabolic profile differences between two different approaches for building pathways from enriched lysates, heterologous expression and cell-free protein synthesis. We discover that phosphate from PEP utilization, along with other physiochemical reagents, during cell-free protein synthesis-coupled, crude-lysate metabolic system operation inhibits optimal cell-free n-butanol metabolism. Third, we show that non-phosphorylated secondary energy substrates can be used to fuel cell-free protein synthesis and n-butanol biosynthesis. Taken together, our work highlights the ease of using cell-free systems to explore

  10. [Metabolic control in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Cárdenas, Claudia; Wong, Carolina; Vargas Catalán, Nelson A

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is an important disease in children and adolescent being a major risk factor for early morbidity and mortality. To know the degree of metabolic control and prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in T1D patients. Retrospective study including patients under 19 years of age with T1D controlled at a Chilean hospital in 2011. 94 patients were evaluated (average age at diagnosis: 7.3 years; current age: 11,9 years; evolution time: 4.5 years). Seventy-nine percent (79.8%) of patients presented glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) over the recommended level with an average of 8.9%. The group between 13 and 19 years of age exhibited the worst metabolic control (86% with HbA1c abnormal levels). Overweight or obesity occurred in 26.6% of patients, 20.3% had LDL >100mg/dl and 4.2% had hypertension. Only about twenty percent of patients had adequate metabolic control as measured by HbA1c, although cardiovascular risk profile was acceptable. Therapeutic and educational efforts must be reinforced mainly in adolescents, emphasizing the importance of adequate nutritional management as a primary method to treat this entity. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Neuroendocrine control by kisspeptins: role in metabolic regulation of fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Victor M; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2011-09-13

    The neurohormonal control of reproduction involves a hierarchical network of central and peripheral signals in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Development and function of this neuroendocrine system is the result of a lifelong delicate balance between endogenous regulators and environmental cues, including nutritional and metabolic factors. Kisspeptins are the peptide products of KISS1, which operate via the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR54 (also known as Kiss1R). These peptides have emerged as essential upstream regulators of neurons secreting gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), the major hypothalamic node for the stimulatory control of the HPG axis. They are potent elicitors of gonadotropin secretion in various species and physiological settings. Moreover, Kiss1 neurons in the hypothalamus participate in crucial features of reproductive maturation and function, such as brain-level sex differentiation, puberty onset and the neuroendocrine regulation of gonadotropin secretion and ovulation. Cotransmitters of Kiss1 neurons, such as neurokinin B, with roles in controlling the HPG axis have been identified by genetic, neuroanatomical and physiological studies. In addition, a putative role has been proposed for Kiss1 neurons in transmitting metabolic information to GnRH neurons, although the precise mechanisms are as yet unclear. In this Review, we present the major reproductive features of kisspeptins, especially their interplay with neurokinin B and potential roles in the metabolic control of puberty and fertility, and suggest new avenues for research.

  12. Pentose utilization in yeasts: Physiology and biochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeppson, H.

    1996-04-01

    The fermentive performance of bacteria, yeasts, and filamentous fungi was investigated in a pentose (xylose)-rich lignocellulosic hydrolyzate. The filamentous fungus Fusarium oxysporum and the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis were found to be very sensitive to the inhibiting hydrolyzate. Recombinant xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed very poor ethanol formation from xylose; xylitol being the major product formed. The highest ethanol yields were obtained with recombinant Escherichia coli KO11, however, for maximal ethanol yield detoxification of the hydrolyzate was required. The influence of oxygen on the regulation of carbohydrate metabolism in the xylose-fermenting yeast P. stipitis CBS 6054 was investigated. A low and well-controlled level of oxygenation has been found to be required for efficient ethanol formation from xylose by the xylose-fermenting yeasts. The requirement of oxygen is frequently ascribed to the apparent redox imbalance which develops under anaerobic conditions due to the difference in co-factor utilization of the two first enzymes in the xylose metabolism, further reflected in xylitol excretion. However, a low and well controlled level of oxygenation for maximal ethanol production from glucose was also demonstrated, suggesting that the oxygen requirement is not only due to the dual co-factor utilization, but also serves other purposes. Cyanide-insensitive and salicyl hydroxamic acid-sensitive respiration (CIR) was found in P. stipitis. CIR is suggested to act as a redox sink preventing xylitol formation in P. stipitis under oxygen-limited xylose fermentations. Xylitol metabolism by P. stipitis CBS 6054 was strictly respiratory and ethanol was not formed under any conditions. The absence of ethanol formation was not due to a lack of fermentative enzymes, since the addition of glucose to xylitol-pregrown cells resulted in ethanol formation. 277 refs, 5 figs, 7 tabs

  13. Leptin and the central nervous system control of glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Gregory J; Schwartz, Michael W

    2011-04-01

    The regulation of body fat stores and blood glucose levels is critical for survival. This review highlights growing evidence that leptin action in the central nervous system plays a key role in both processes. Investigation into underlying mechanisms has begun to clarify the physiological role of leptin in the control of glucose metabolism and raises interesting new possibilities for the treatment of diabetes and related disorders.

  14. The yeast spectrum of the 'tea fungus Kombucha'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayser, P; Fromme, S; Leitzmann, C; Gründer, K

    1995-01-01

    The tea fungus 'Kombucha' is a symbiosis of Acetobacter, including Acetobacter xylinum as a characteristic species, and various yeasts. A characteristic yeast species or genus has not yet been identified. Kombucha is mainly cultivated in sugared black tea to produce a slightly acidulous effervescent beverage that is said to have several curative effects. In addition to sugar, the beverage contains small amounts of alcohol and various acids, including acetic acid, gluconic acid and lactic acid, as well as some antibiotic substances. To characterize the yeast spectrum with special consideration given to facultatively pathogenic yeasts, two commercially available specimens of tea fungus and 32 from private households in Germany were analysed by micromorphological and biochemical methods. Yeasts of the genera Brettanomyces, Zygosaccharomyces and Saccharomyces were identified in 56%, 29% and 26% respectively. The species Saccharomycodes ludwigii and Candida kefyr were only demonstrated in isolated cases. Furthermore, the tests revealed pellicle-forming yeasts such as Candida krusei or Issatchenkia orientalis/occidentalis as well as species of the apiculatus yeasts (Kloeckera, Hanseniaspora). Thus, the genus Brettanomyces may be a typical group of yeasts that are especially adapted to the environment of the tea fungus. However, to investigate further the beneficial effects of tea fungus, a spectrum of the other typical genera must be defined. Only three specimens showed definite contaminations. In one case, no yeasts could be isolated because of massive contamination with Penicillium spp. In the remaining two samples (from one household), Candida albicans was demonstrated. The low rate of contamination might be explained by protective mechanisms, such as formation of organic acids and antibiotic substances. Thus, subjects with a healthy metabolism do not need to be advised against cultivating Kombucha. However, those suffering from immunosuppression should preferably

  15. How a Small Family of Yeast IDPs Control Complicated Processes Related to DNA Replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marabini, Riccardo

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) are two essential proteins involved in DNA replication. RNR catalyzes the last and rate limiting step of the deoxyribonucleotide biosynthetic pathway. The dysregulation of RNR has been related to higher mutation rate...... characterized in budding and fission yeast. Within this protein family Dif1 (from S. cerevisiae) and Spd1 (from S. pombe) were analyzed in this study. These proteins were previously found to interact with and regulate the activity of RNR and Spd1 was also linked to PCNA dependent signaling for degradation...

  16. Metabolic control of puberty: roles of leptin and kisspeptins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Garrido, Miguel A; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Puberty and Adolescence". Reproduction is an energy-demanding function. Accordingly, puberty is metabolically gated, as a means to prevent fertility in conditions of energy insufficiency. In addition, obesity has been shown to impact the timing of puberty and may be among the causes for the earlier trends of pubertal age reported in various countries. The metabolic control of puberty in such a spectrum of situations, ranging from energy deficit to extreme overweight, is the result of the concerted action of different peripheral hormones and central transmitters that sense the metabolic state of the organism and transmit this information to the various elements of the reproductive axis, mainly the GnRH neurons. Among the peripheral signals involved, the adipose hormone, leptin, is known to play an essential role in the regulation of puberty, especially in females. Yet, although it is clear that the effects of leptin on puberty onset are predominantly permissive and mainly conducted at central (hypothalamic) levels, the primary sites and mechanisms of action of leptin within the reproductive brain remain unsolved. In this context, neurons expressing kisspeptins, the products of the Kiss1 gene that have emerged recently as essential upstream regulators of GnRH neurons, operate as key sensors of the metabolic state and funnel of the reproductive effects of leptin. Yet, much debate has arisen recently on whether the putative actions of leptin on the Kiss1 system are actually indirect and/or may primarily target Kiss1-independent pathways, such as those originating from the ventral premmamilary nucleus. Moreover, evidence has been presented for extra-hypothalamic or peripheral actions of leptin, including direct gonadal effects, which may contribute to the metabolic control of reproduction in extreme body weight conditions. In this work, we will critically review the experimental evidence supporting a role of leptin, kisspeptin

  17. Production of Food Grade Yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyro Bekatorou

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts have been known to humans for thousands of years as they have been used in traditional fermentation processes like wine, beer and bread making. Today, yeasts are also used as alternative sources of high nutritional value proteins, enzymes and vitamins, and have numerous applications in the health food industry as food additives, conditioners and flavouring agents, for the production of microbiology media and extracts, as well as livestock feeds. Modern scientific advances allow the isolation, construction and industrial production of new yeast strains to satisfy the specific demands of the food industry. Types of commercial food grade yeasts, industrial production processes and raw materials are highlighted. Aspects of yeast metabolism, with respect to carbohydrate utilization, nutritional aspects and recent research advances are also discussed.

  18. Sense and nonsense in metabolic control of reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jill E; Klingerman, Candice M; Abdulhay, Amir

    2012-01-01

    An exciting synergistic interaction occurs among researchers working at the interface of reproductive biology and energy homeostasis. Reproductive biologists benefit from the theories, experimental designs, and methodologies used by experts on energy homeostasis while they bring context and meaning to the study of energy homeostasis. There is a growing recognition that identification of candidate genes for obesity is little more than meaningless reductionism unless those genes and their expression are placed in a developmental, environmental, and evolutionary context. Reproductive biology provides this context because metabolic energy is the most important factor that controls reproductive success and gonadal hormones affect energy intake, storage, and expenditure. Reproductive hormone secretion changes during development, and reproductive success is key to evolutionary adaptation, the process that most likely molded the mechanisms that control energy balance. It is likely that by viewing energy intake, storage, and expenditure in the context of reproductive success, we will gain insight into human obesity, eating disorders, diabetes, and other pathologies related to fuel homeostasis. This review emphasizes the metabolic hypothesis: a sensory system monitors the availability of oxidizable metabolic fuels and orchestrates behavioral motivation to optimize reproductive success in environments where energy availability fluctuates or is unpredictable.

  19. Role of Autophagy in the Control of Body Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenying Quan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy plays a crucial role in the maintenance of cellular nutrient balance and the function of organelles such as mitochondria or the endoplasmic reticulum, which are important in intracellular metabolism, insulin release, and insulin sensitivity. In the insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells, autophagy is important in the maintenance of β-cell mass, structure, and function. Mice with deficiencies in β-cell-specific autophagy show reduced β-cell mass and defects in insulin secretion that lead to hypoinsulinemia and hyperglycemia but not diabetes. However, these mice developed diabetes when bred with ob/ob mice, suggesting that autophagy-deficient β-cells have defects in dealing with the increased metabolic stress imposed by obesity. These results also imply that autophagy deficiency in β-cells could be a factor in the progression from obesity to diabetes. Another important function of autophagy is in hypothalamic neurons for the central control of energy expenditure, appetite, and body weight. In addition, mice with autophagy deficiencies in the target tissues of insulin have yielded diverse phenotypes. Taken together, these results suggest that autophagy is important in the control of whole body energy and nutrient homeostasis, and its dysregulation could play a role in the development of metabolic disorders and diabetes.

  20. Metabolic control of vesicular glutamate transport and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juge, Narinobu; Gray, John A; Omote, Hiroshi; Miyaji, Takaaki; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Hara, Chiaki; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Edwards, Robert H; Nicoll, Roger A; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2010-10-06

    Fasting has been used to control epilepsy since antiquity, but the mechanism of coupling between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission remains unknown. Previous work has shown that the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) required for exocytotic release of glutamate undergo an unusual form of regulation by Cl(-). Using functional reconstitution of the purified VGLUTs into proteoliposomes, we now show that Cl(-) acts as an allosteric activator, and the ketone bodies that increase with fasting inhibit glutamate release by competing with Cl(-) at the site of allosteric regulation. Consistent with these observations, acetoacetate reduced quantal size at hippocampal synapses and suppresses glutamate release and seizures evoked with 4-aminopyridine in the brain. The results indicate an unsuspected link between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission through anion-dependent regulation of VGLUT activity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Shaping meiotic chromosomes with SUMO: a feedback loop controls the assembly of the synaptonemal complex in budding yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Tsubouchi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The synaptonemal complex (SC is a meiosis-specific chromosomal structure in which homologous chromosomes are intimately linked through arrays of specialized proteins called transverse filaments (TF. Widely conserved in eukaryote meiosis, the SC forms during prophase I and is essential for accurate segregation of homologous chromosomes at meiosis I. However, the basic mechanism overlooking formation and regulation of the SC has been poorly understood. By using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we recently showed that SC formation is controlled through the attachment of multiple molecules of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO to a regulator of TF assembly. Intriguingly, this SUMOylation is activated by TF, implicating the involvement of a positive feedback loop in the control of SC assembly. We discuss the implication of this finding and possible involvement of a similar mechanism in regulating other processes.

  2. Enhanced α-ketoglutaric acid production and recovery in Yarrowia lipolytica yeast by effective pH controlling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgunov, Igor G; Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Samoilenko, Vladimir A

    2013-10-01

    The replacement of chemical synthesis by environmentally friendly energy-efficient technologies for production of valuable metabolites is a principal strategy of developing biotechnological industry all over the world. In the present study, we develop a method for α-ketoglutaric acid (KGA) production from rapeseed oil with the use of Yarrowia lipolytica yeast. Sixty strains of Y. lipolytica yeasts were tested for their ability to produce KGA, and the strain Y. lipolytica 212 (Y. lipolytica VKM Y-2412) was selected as a promising KGA producer. Using a three-stage pH controlling, in which pH was 4.5 in the growth phase, then since 72 to 144 h, pH was maintained at 3.5 and in the later phase of acid production, the titration by KOH was switch off, selected strain produced 106.5 g l(-1) of KGA with mass yield of 0.95 g g(-1). KGA in the form of monopotassium salt was isolated from the culture broth and purified. The isolation procedure involved separation of biomass, extraction of residual triglycerides, filtrate bleaching, and acidification with mineral acid (to pH 2.8-3.4), concentration, precipitation of mineral salts, and crystallization of the product. The purity of KGA isolated from the culture filtrate reached 99.1 %.

  3. Application of metabolic controls for the maximization of lipid production in semicontinuous fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingyang; Liu, Nian; Qiao, Kangjian; Vogg, Sebastian; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2017-07-03

    Acetic acid can be generated through syngas fermentation, lignocellulosic biomass degradation, and organic waste anaerobic digestion. Microbial conversion of acetate into triacylglycerols for biofuel production has many advantages, including low-cost or even negative-cost feedstock and environmental benefits. The main issue stems from the dilute nature of acetate produced in such systems, which is costly to be processed on an industrial scale. To tackle this problem, we established an efficient bioprocess for converting dilute acetate into lipids, using the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica in a semicontinuous system. The implemented design used low-strength acetic acid in both salt and acid forms as carbon substrate and a cross-filtration module for cell recycling. Feed controls for acetic acid and nitrogen based on metabolic models and online measurement of the respiratory quotient were used. The optimized process was able to sustain high-density cell culture using acetic acid of only 3% and achieved a lipid titer, yield, and productivity of 115 g/L, 0.16 g/g, and 0.8 g⋅L -1 ⋅h -1 , respectively. No carbon substrate was detected in the effluent stream, indicating complete utilization of acetate. These results represent a more than twofold increase in lipid production metrics compared with the current best-performing results using concentrated acetic acid as carbon feed.

  4. The Adder Phenomenon Emerges from Independent Control of Pre- and Post-Start Phases of the Budding Yeast Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler-Brown, Devon; Schmoller, Kurt M; Winetraub, Yonatan; Skotheim, Jan M

    2017-09-25

    Although it has long been clear that cells actively regulate their size, the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation have remained poorly understood. In budding yeast, cell size primarily modulates the duration of the cell-division cycle by controlling the G1/S transition known as Start. We have recently shown that the rate of progression through Start increases with cell size, because cell growth dilutes the cell-cycle inhibitor Whi5 in G1. Recent phenomenological studies in yeast and bacteria have shown that these cells add an approximately constant volume during each complete cell cycle, independent of their size at birth. These results seem to be in conflict, as the phenomenological studies suggest that cells measure the amount they grow, rather than their size, and that size control acts over the whole cell cycle, rather than specifically in G1. Here, we propose an integrated model that unifies the adder phenomenology with the molecular mechanism of G1/S cell-size control. We use single-cell microscopy to parameterize a full cell-cycle model based on independent control of pre- and post-Start cell-cycle periods. We find that our model predicts the size-independent amount of cell growth during the full cell cycle. This suggests that the adder phenomenon is an emergent property of the independent regulation of pre- and post-Start cell-cycle periods rather than the consequence of an underlying molecular mechanism measuring a fixed amount of growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Type 1 diabetes in children is not a predisposing factor for oral yeast colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana L; Silva, Branca M A; Soares, Rui; Mota, Diana; Alves, Vera; Mirante, Alice; Ramos, João C; Maló de Abreu, João; Santos-Rosa, Manuel; Caramelo, Francisco; Gonçalves, Teresa

    2017-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is considered a risk factor associated with oral yeast infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the yeast oral carriage (in saliva and mucosal surface) of children with T1D and potential relation with host factors, particularly the subset of CD4+ T cells. Yeasts were quantified and identified in stimulated saliva and in cheek mucosal swabs of 133 diabetic T1D and 72 healthy control subjects. Salivary lymphocytes were quantified using flow cytometry. The presence of yeasts in the oral cavity (60% of total patients) was not affected by diabetes, metabolic control, duration of the disease, salivary flow rate or saliva buffer capacity, by age, sex, place of residence, number of daily meals, consumption of sweets or frequency of tooth brushing. Candida albicans was the most prevalent yeast species, but a higher number of yeast species was isolated in nondiabetics. T1D children with HbA1c ≤ 7.5 (metabolically controlled) presented higher number of CD4+ T salivary subsets when compared with the other groups of children (non-diabetic and nonmetabolically controlled) and also presented the highest number of individuals without oral yeast colonization. In conclusion, T1D does not predisposes for increased oral yeast colonization and a higher number of salivary CD4+T cells seems to result in the absence of oral colonization by yeasts. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Sexual differentiation in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egel, R; Nielsen, O; Weilguny, D

    1990-01-01

    The regulation of sexual reproduction in yeast constitutes the highest level of differentiation observed in these unicellular organisms. The various ramifications of this system involve DNA rearrangement, transcriptional control, post-translational modification (such as protein phosphorylation) a......) and receptor/signal processing. A few basic similarities are common to both fission and budding yeasts. The wiring of the regulatory circuitry, however, varies considerably between these divergent yeast groups....

  7. RNA quality control in yeast - what is good and what is bad?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Røjkjær; Brodersen, Ditlev Egeskov

    positions in the tRNA molecules [2]. We believe that in such cases, the tRNAs are recognized by a common structural alteration that causes part of the molecule to unfold and thereby mark the tRNA as defect. We therefore want to isolate and crystallize the RNA binding proteins Air1p or Air2p in complex...... with aberrant tRNA analogous to gain knowledge of how the cell determines which RNAs are good and bad and use this as a model system for how the cell in general recognizes aberrant RNAs. So far, Air1p and Air2p have been cloned from different yeast organisms and the first expression tests of the proteins have...

  8. Genetic control of mitotic crossing over in yeast. 2. Influence of UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, I.A.; Marfin, S.V.; Koval'tsova, S.V.; Kasinova, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    UV-induced crossing-over and general mitotic segregation of the following strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts were studied: a wild-type diploid, diploids homozygous with respect to the radiosensitivity of rad 2, rad 15, rad 54, xrs 4, rad 2 rad 54, rad 15 rad 54. Wild-type diploids rad 2 and rad 15 have a high frequency of the induced mitotic crossing-over. Diploids rad 15, rad 54 can not cause UV-induced mitotic crossing-over. Reddish-pink and reddish-pink-white colonies ratio (the first appear if the crossing-over occurs during the first after the irradiation division, the second - during the second division) is 4.8:1 for the wild type, 1.6:1 for rad 2, and 1.1:1 for rad 15. Nonreciprocal mitotic segregation of high frequency was observed for the wild type rad 2, rad 15, xrs 4, and diploids rad 54, rad 2 rad 54, rad 15 rad 54 had a lower frequency. We suppose that after UV-irradiation there exist at least three types of repair in yeast diploid cells: excision repair, prereplication recombinating repair after the excision of dimers, and post-replication recombinating repair. Rad 2 and rad 15 mutations blow the first and second types, rad 54 mutation partially block the second and third parths. It seems that xrs 4 mutation does not block the recombinating capability but somehow changes the process of recombination in such a way that much nonreciprocal products recorded as seqregants are produced [ru

  9. Brain Ceramide Metabolism in the Control of Energy Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Cruciani-Guglielmacci

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of energy balance by the central nervous system (CNS is a key actor of energy homeostasis in mammals, and deregulations of the fine mechanisms of nutrient sensing in the brain could lead to several metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D. Indeed, while neuronal activity primarily relies on glucose (lactate, pyruvate, the brain expresses at high level enzymes responsible for the transport, utilization and storage of lipids. It has been demonstrated that discrete neuronal networks in the hypothalamus have the ability to detect variation of circulating long chain fatty acids (FA to regulate food intake and peripheral glucose metabolism. During a chronic lipid excess situation, this physiological lipid sensing is impaired contributing to type 2 diabetes in predisposed subjects. Recently, different studies suggested that ceramides levels could be involved in the regulation of energy balance in both hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic areas. Moreover, under lipotoxic conditions, these ceramides could play a role in the dysregulation of glucose homeostasis. In this review we aimed at describing the potential role of ceramides metabolism in the brain in the physiological and pathophysiological control of energy balance.

  10. NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD Metabolism in Vascular Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Li, Wen-Lin; Liu, Jian-Min; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Vascular repair plays important roles in postischemic remodeling and rehabilitation in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a well-known coenzyme involved in electron transport chain for generation of adenosine triphosphate, has emerged as an important controller regulating various biological signaling pathways. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the rate-limiting enzyme for NAD biosynthesis in mammals. NAMPT may also act in a nonenzymatic manner, presumably mediated by unknown receptor(s). Rapidly accumulating data in the past decade show that NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD metabolism regulate fundamental biological functions in endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and endothelial progenitor cells. The NAD-consuming proteins, including sirtuins, poly-ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs), and CD38, may contribute to the regulatory effects of NAMPT-NAD axis in these cells and vascular repair. This review discusses the current data regarding NAMPT and NAMPT-controlled NAD metabolism in vascular repair and the clinical potential translational application of NAMPT-related products in treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease.

  11. Metabolic control of muscle blood flow during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2003-01-01

    that combined blockade of NOS and PGI2, and NOS and cytochrome P450, both attenuate exercise-induced hyperemia in humans. Combined vasodilator blockade studies offer the potential to uncover important interactions and compensatory vasodilator responses. The signaling pathways that link metabolic events evoked...... to exert control of muscle vasodilation. Adenosine, nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin (PGI2), and endothelial-derived hyperpolarization factor (EDHF) are possible mediators of muscle vasodilation during exercise. In humans, adenosine has been shown to contribute to functional hyperemia as blood flow...... by muscle contraction to vasodilatory signals in the local vascular bed remains an important area of study....

  12. [Prevention and control of nosocomial and health-care facilities associated infections caused by species of Candida and other yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemán, Javier; Zaragoza, Rafael; Salavert, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of the epidemiology of invasive fungal diseases caused by yeasts (Candida spp., especially) in health care settings allows the establishment of the levels necessary for its prevention. A first step is to identify groups of patients at high risk of nosocomial invasive fungal infections, establish accurate risk factors, observing the periods of greatest risk, and analyze the epidemiological profile in genera and species as well as the patterns of antifungal resistance. Secondly, mechanisms to avoid persistent exposure to potential fungal pathogens must be programed, protecting areas and recommending measures such as the control of the quality of the air and water, inside and outside the hospital, and other products or substances able to cause outbreaks. Finally, apart from the correct implementation of these measures, in selected patients at very high risk, the use of antifungal prophylaxis should be considered following the guidelines published.

  13. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Activity: Endocrine System Growth Disorders Diabetes Center Thyroid Disorders Your Endocrine System Movie: Endocrine ...

  14. Exercise, Obesity and CNS Control of Metabolic Homeostasis: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, John K.

    2018-01-01

    This review details the manner in which the central nervous system regulates metabolic homeostasis in normal weight and obese rodents and humans. It includes a review of the homeostatic contributions of neurons located in the hypothalamus, the midbrain and limbic structures, the pons and the medullary area postrema, nucleus tractus solitarius, and vagus nucleus, and details how these brain regions respond to circulating levels of orexigenic hormones, such as ghrelin, and anorexigenic hormones, such as glucagon-like peptide 1 and leptin. It provides an insight as to how high intensity exercise may improve homeostatic control in overweight and obese subjects. Finally, it provides suggestions as to how further progress can be made in controlling the current pandemic of obesity and diabetes.

  15. Space Station CMIF extended duration metabolic control test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, Richard G.; Bagdigian, Robert M.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Ogle, Kathryn Y.; Wieland, Paul O.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Extended Duration Metabolic Control Test (EMCT) was conducted at the MSFC Core Module Integration Facility. The primary objective of the EMCT was to gather performance data from a partially-closed regenerative Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system functioning under steady-state conditions. Included is a description of the EMCT configuration, a summary of events, a discussion of anomalies that occurred during the test, and detailed results and analysis from individual measurements of water and gas samples taken during the test. A comparison of the physical, chemical, and microbiological methods used in the post test laboratory analyses of the water samples is included. The preprototype ECLS hardware used in the test, providing an overall process description and theory of operation for each hardware item. Analytical results pertaining to a system level mass balance and selected system power estimates are also included.

  16. Multiple determinants controlling activation of yeast replication origins late in S phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, K L; Diller, J D; Ferguson, B M; Nyland, S V; Brewer, B J; Fangman, W L

    1996-07-01

    Analysis of a 131-kb segment of the left arm of yeast chromosome XIV beginning 157 kb from the telomere reveals four highly active origins of replication that initiate replication late in S phase. Previous work has shown that telomeres act as determinants for late origin activation. However, at least two of the chromosome XIV origins maintain their late activation time when located on large circular plasmids, indicating that late replication is independent of telomeres. Analysis of the replication time of plasmid derivatives containing varying amounts of chromosome XIV DNA show that a minimum of three chromosomal elements, distinct from each tested origin, contribute to late activation time. These late determinants are functionally equivalent, because duplication of one set of contributing sequences can compensate for the removal of another set. Furthermore, insertion of an origin that is normally early activated into this domain results in a shift to late activation, suggesting that the chromosome XIV origins are not unique in their ability to respond to the late determinants.

  17. A conserved tryptophan within the WRDPLVDID domain of yeast Pah1 phosphatidate phosphatase is required for its in vivo function in lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonhee; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M

    2017-12-01

    PAH1 -encoded phosphatidate phosphatase, which catalyzes the dephosphorylation of phosphatidate to produce diacylglycerol at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, plays a major role in controlling the utilization of phosphatidate for the synthesis of triacylglycerol or membrane phospholipids. The conserved N-LIP and haloacid dehalogenase-like domains of Pah1 are required for phosphatidate phosphatase activity and the in vivo function of the enzyme. Its non-conserved regions, which are located between the conserved domains and at the C terminus, contain sites for phosphorylation by multiple protein kinases. Truncation analyses of the non-conserved regions showed that they are not essential for the catalytic activity of Pah1 and its physiological functions ( e.g. triacylglycerol synthesis). This analysis also revealed that the C-terminal region contains a previously unrecognized WRDPLVDID domain (residues 637-645) that is conserved in yeast, mice, and humans. The deletion of this domain had no effect on the catalytic activity of Pah1 but caused the loss of its in vivo function. Site-specific mutational analyses of the conserved residues within WRDPLVDID indicated that Trp-637 plays a crucial role in Pah1 function. This work also demonstrated that the catalytic activity of Pah1 is required but is not sufficient for its in vivo functions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. FGF-dependent metabolic control of vascular development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pengchun; Alves, Tiago C.; Fang, Jennifer S.; Xie, Yi; Zhu, Jie; Chen, Zehua; De Smet, Frederik; Zhang, Jiasheng; Jin, Suk-Won; Sun, Lele; Sun, Hongye; Kibbey, Richard G.; Hirschi, Karen K.; Hay, Nissim; Carmeliet, Peter; Chittenden, Thomas W.; Eichmann, Anne; Potente, Michael; Simons, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Blood and lymphatic vasculatures are intimately involved in tissue oxygenation and fluid homeostasis maintenance. Assembly of these vascular networks involves sprouting, migration and proliferation of endothelial cells. Recent studies have suggested that changes in cellular metabolism are of importance to these processes1. While much is known about vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-dependent regulation of vascular development and metabolism2,3, little is understood about the role of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) in this context4. Here we identify FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling as a critical regulator of vascular development. This is achieved by FGF-dependent control of c-MYC (MYC) expression that, in turn, regulates expression of the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase 2 (HK2). A decrease in HK2 levels in the absence of FGF signaling inputs results in decreased glycolysis leading to impaired endothelial cell proliferation and migration. Pan-endothelial- and lymphatic-specific Hk2 knockouts phenocopy blood and/or lymphatic vascular defects seen in Fgfr1/r3 double mutant mice while HK2 overexpression partially rescues the defects caused by suppression of FGF signaling. Thus, FGF-dependent regulation of endothelial glycolysis is a pivotal process in developmental and adult vascular growth and development. PMID:28467822

  19. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  20. Yeast glycolipid biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezierska, Sylwia; Claus, Silke; Van Bogaert, Inge

    2017-10-25

    Various yeasts, both conventional and exotic ones, are known to produce compounds useful to mankind. Ethanol is the most known of these compounds, but more complex molecules such as amphiphilic biosurfactants can also be derived from eukaryotic microorganisms at an industrially and commercially relevant scale. Among them, glycolipids are the most promising, due to their attractive properties and high product titers. Many of these compounds can be considered as secondary metabolites with a specific function for the host. Hence, a dedicated biosynthetic process enables regulation and combines pathways delivering the lipidic moiety and the hydrophilic carbohydrate part of the glycolipid. In this Review, we will discuss the biosynthetic and regulatory aspects of the yeast-derived sophorolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids, and cellobiose lipids, with special emphasis on the relation between glycolipid synthesis and the general lipid metabolism. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  1. The repertoire and dynamics of evolutionary adaptations to controlled nutrient-limited environments in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gresham

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The experimental evolution of laboratory populations of microbes provides an opportunity to observe the evolutionary dynamics of adaptation in real time. Until very recently, however, such studies have been limited by our inability to systematically find mutations in evolved organisms. We overcome this limitation by using a variety of DNA microarray-based techniques to characterize genetic changes -- including point mutations, structural changes, and insertion variation -- that resulted from the experimental adaptation of 24 haploid and diploid cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to growth in either glucose, sulfate, or phosphate-limited chemostats for approximately 200 generations. We identified frequent genomic amplifications and rearrangements as well as novel retrotransposition events associated with adaptation. Global nucleotide variation detection in ten clonal isolates identified 32 point mutations. On the basis of mutation frequencies, we infer that these mutations and the subsequent dynamics of adaptation are determined by the batch phase of growth prior to initiation of the continuous phase in the chemostat. We relate these genotypic changes to phenotypic outcomes, namely global patterns of gene expression, and to increases in fitness by 5-50%. We found that the spectrum of available mutations in glucose- or phosphate-limited environments combined with the batch phase population dynamics early in our experiments allowed several distinct genotypic and phenotypic evolutionary pathways in response to these nutrient limitations. By contrast, sulfate-limited populations were much more constrained in both genotypic and phenotypic outcomes. Thus, the reproducibility of evolution varies with specific selective pressures, reflecting the constraints inherent in the system-level organization of metabolic processes in the cell. We were able to relate some of the observed adaptive mutations (e.g., transporter gene amplifications to known features

  2. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lin), which signals cells to increase their anabolic activities. Metabolism is a complicated chemical process, so it's not ... how those enzymes or hormones work. When the metabolism of body chemicals is ... Hyperthyroidism (pronounced: hi-per-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hyperthyroidism ...

  3. Gleaning evolutionary insights from the genome sequence of a probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Indu; Akhtar, Akil; Kaur, Kamaldeep; Tomar, Rajul; Prasad, Gandham Satyanarayana; Ramya, Thirumalai Nallan Chakravarthy; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2013-10-22

    The yeast Saccharomyces boulardii is used worldwide as a probiotic to alleviate the effects of several gastrointestinal diseases and control antibiotics-associated diarrhea. While many studies report the probiotic effects of S. boulardii, no genome information for this yeast is currently available in the public domain. We report the 11.4 Mbp draft genome of this probiotic yeast. The draft genome was obtained by assembling Roche 454 FLX + shotgun data into 194 contigs with an N50 of 251 Kbp. We compare our draft genome with all other Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes. Our analysis confirms the close similarity of S. boulardii to S. cerevisiae strains and provides a framework to understand the probiotic effects of this yeast, which exhibits unique physiological and metabolic properties.

  4. Perspectives in metabolic engineering: understanding cellular regulation towards the control of metabolic routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadran, Sohila; Levine, Raphael D

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic engineering seeks to redirect metabolic pathways through the modification of specific biochemical reactions or the introduction of new ones with the use of recombinant technology. Many of the chemicals synthesized via introduction of product-specific enzymes or the reconstruction of entire metabolic pathways into engineered hosts that can sustain production and can synthesize high yields of the desired product as yields of natural product-derived compounds are frequently low, and chemical processes can be both energy and material expensive; current endeavors have focused on using biologically derived processes as alternatives to chemical synthesis. Such economically favorable manufacturing processes pursue goals related to sustainable development and "green chemistry". Metabolic engineering is a multidisciplinary approach, involving chemical engineering, molecular biology, biochemistry, and analytical chemistry. Recent advances in molecular biology, genome-scale models, theoretical understanding, and kinetic modeling has increased interest in using metabolic engineering to redirect metabolic fluxes for industrial and therapeutic purposes. The use of metabolic engineering has increased the productivity of industrially pertinent small molecules, alcohol-based biofuels, and biodiesel. Here, we highlight developments in the practical and theoretical strategies and technologies available for the metabolic engineering of simple systems and address current limitations.

  5. Improved Metabolic Control in Diabetes, HSP60, and Proinflammatory Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Blasi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diabetes-atherosclerosis relationship remains to be fully defined. Repeated prolonged hyperglycemia, increased ROS production and endothelial dysfunction are important factors. One theory is that increased blood levels of heat shock protein (HSP60 are proinflammatory, through activation of innate immunity, and contribute to the progression of vascular disease. It was hypothesized that improvement of diabetes control in patients presenting with metabolic syndrome would lower HSP60, and anti-HSP60 antibody levels and decrease inflammatory markers. Paired sera of 17 Italian patients, before and after intensive treatment, were assayed for cytokines, HSP60 and anti-HSP60 antibodies. As expected, intensive treatment was associated with a decrease in HgbA1C (P<0.001 and BMI (P<0.001. After treatment, there was a significant decrease in IL-6 (P<0.05. HSP60 levels were before treatment −6.9+1.9, after treatment −7.1+2.0 ng/mL (P=ns. Overall HSP60 concentrations were lower than published reports. Anti-HSP60 antibody titers were high and did not decrease with treatment. In conclusion, improvement of diabetic control did not alter HSP60 concentrations or antiHSP60 antibody titers, but led to a reduction of IL-6 levels.

  6. Functional analysis of the global repressor Tup1 for maltose metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: different roles of the functional domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xue; Yu, Ai-Qun; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Pi, Li; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2017-11-09

    Tup1 is a general transcriptional repressor of diverse gene families coordinately controlled by glucose repression, mating type, and other mechanisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several functional domains of Tup1 have been identified, each of which has differing effects on transcriptional repression. In this study, we aim to investigate the role of Tup1 and its domains in maltose metabolism of industrial baker's yeast. To this end, a battery of in-frame truncations in the TUP1 gene coding region were performed in the industrial baker's yeasts with different genetic background, and the maltose metabolism, leavening ability, MAL gene expression levels, and growth characteristics were investigated. The results suggest that the TUP1 gene is essential to maltose metabolism in industrial baker's yeast. Importantly, different domains of Tup1 play different roles in glucose repression and maltose metabolism of industrial baker's yeast cells. The Ssn6 interaction, N-terminal repression and C-terminal repression domains might play roles in the regulation of MAL transcription by Tup1 for maltose metabolism of baker's yeast. The WD region lacking the first repeat could influence the regulation of maltose metabolism directly, rather than indirectly through glucose repression. These findings lay a foundation for the optimization of industrial baker's yeast strains for accelerated maltose metabolism and facilitate future research on glucose repression in other sugar metabolism.

  7. Direct and indirect control of the initiation of meiotic recombination by DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Argunhan

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination plays an essential role in the proper segregation of chromosomes at meiosis I in many sexually reproducing organisms. Meiotic recombination is initiated by the scheduled formation of genome-wide DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. The timing of DSB formation is strictly controlled because unscheduled DSB formation is detrimental to genome integrity. Here, we investigated the role of DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms in the control of meiotic DSB formation using budding yeast. By using recombination defective mutants in which meiotic DSBs are not repaired, the effect of DNA damage checkpoint mutations on DSB formation was evaluated. The Tel1 (ATM pathway mainly responds to unresected DSB ends, thus the sae2 mutant background in which DSB ends remain intact was employed. On the other hand, the Mec1 (ATR pathway is primarily used when DSB ends are resected, thus the rad51 dmc1 double mutant background was employed in which highly resected DSBs accumulate. In order to separate the effect caused by unscheduled cell cycle progression, which is often associated with DNA damage checkpoint defects, we also employed the ndt80 mutation which permanently arrests the meiotic cell cycle at prophase I. In the absence of Tel1, DSB formation was reduced in larger chromosomes (IV, VII, II and XI whereas no significant reduction was found in smaller chromosomes (III and VI. On the other hand, the absence of Rad17 (a critical component of the ATR pathway lead to an increase in DSB formation (chromosomes VII and II were tested. We propose that, within prophase I, the Tel1 pathway facilitates DSB formation, especially in bigger chromosomes, while the Mec1 pathway negatively regulates DSB formation. We also identified prophase I exit, which is under the control of the DNA damage checkpoint machinery, to be a critical event associated with down-regulating meiotic DSB formation.

  8. Mga2 transcription factor regulates an oxygen-responsive lipid homeostasis pathway in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burr, Risa; Stewart, Emerson V; Shao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    -binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors regulate lipid homeostasis. In mammals, SREBP-2 controls cholesterol biosynthesis, whereas SREBP-1 controls triacylglycerol and glycerophospholipid biosynthesis. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the SREBP-2 homolog Sre1 regulates sterol homeostasis....... In the absence of mga2, fission yeast exhibited growth defects under both normoxia and low oxygen conditions. Mga2 transcriptional targets were enriched for lipid metabolism genes, and mga2Δ cells showed disrupted triacylglycerol and glycerophospholipid homeostasis, most notably with an increase in fatty acid...

  9. Self-Efficacy, Self-Care, and Metabolic Control in Persons with Type 2, Diet and Exercised Controlled Diabetes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Randall, Lisa

    1998-01-01

    ... (Diabetes control and Complications Trial, 1993). Nurses' understanding of diabetes management coupled with a holistic view of person makes them the optimal professionals to facilitate patient movement toward tight metabolic control...

  10. Nutrient Control of Yeast Gametogenesis Is Mediated by TORC1, PKA and Energy Availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilla Weidberg

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell fate choices are tightly controlled by the interplay between intrinsic and extrinsic signals, and gene regulatory networks. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the decision to enter into gametogenesis or sporulation is dictated by mating type and nutrient availability. These signals regulate the expression of the master regulator of gametogenesis, IME1. Here we describe how nutrients control IME1 expression. We find that protein kinase A (PKA and target of rapamycin complex I (TORC1 signalling mediate nutrient regulation of IME1 expression. Inhibiting both pathways is sufficient to induce IME1 expression and complete sporulation in nutrient-rich conditions. Our ability to induce sporulation under nutrient rich conditions allowed us to show that respiration and fermentation are interchangeable energy sources for IME1 transcription. Furthermore, we find that TORC1 can both promote and inhibit gametogenesis. Down-regulation of TORC1 is required to activate IME1. However, complete inactivation of TORC1 inhibits IME1 induction, indicating that an intermediate level of TORC1 signalling is required for entry into sporulation. Finally, we show that the transcriptional repressor Tup1 binds and represses the IME1 promoter when nutrients are ample, but is released from the IME1 promoter when both PKA and TORC1 are inhibited. Collectively our data demonstrate that nutrient control of entry into sporulation is mediated by a combination of energy availability, TORC1 and PKA activities that converge on the IME1 promoter.

  11. Control of enzymatic degradation of biodegradable polymers by treatment with biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, derived from Pseudozyma spp. yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Tokuma; Shinozaki, Yukiko; Tsuchiya, Wataru; Suzuki, Ken; Watanabe, Takashi; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitamoto, Hiroko

    2016-02-01

    Cutinase-like esterase from the yeasts Pseudozyma antarctica (PaE) shows strong degradation activity in an agricultural biodegradable plastic (BP) model of mulch films composed of poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA). P. antarctica is known to abundantly produce a glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylerythritol lipid (MEL). Here, the effects of MEL on PaE-catalyzed degradation of BPs were investigated. Based on PBSA dispersion solution, the degradation of PBSA particles by PaE was inhibited in the presence of MEL. MEL behavior on BP substrates was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using a sensor chip coated with polymer films. The positive SPR signal shift indicated that MEL readily adsorbed and spread onto the surface of a BP film. The amount of BP degradation by PaE was monitored based on the negative SPR signal shift and was decreased 1.7-fold by MEL pretreatment. Furthermore, the shape of PBSA mulch films in PaE-containing solution was maintained with MEL pretreatment, whereas untreated films were almost completely degraded and dissolved. These results suggest that MEL covering the surface of BP film inhibits adsorption of PaE and PaE-catalyzed degradation of BPs. We applied the above results to control the microbial degradation of BP mulch films. MEL pretreatment significantly inhibited BP mulch film degradation by both PaE solution and BP-degradable microorganism. Moreover, the degradation of these films was recovered after removal of the coated MEL by ethanol treatment. These results demonstrate that the biodegradation of BP films can be readily and reversibly controlled by a physical approach using MEL.

  12. Effect of genes controlling radiation sensitivity on chemical mutagenesis in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, L.

    1975-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation, x radiation, nitrogen mustard, methyl methanesulfonate, and dimethyl sulfate were found to revert all the tester strains with the same efficiency or without any dependence on simple types of base-pair changes, and it was concluded that these mutagens were nonspecific in the types of base-pair changes produced. The cycl-131 tester was used in studies designed to determine the genetic control of mutation induction using a variety of mutagens. The rad 6 and rad g genes greatly reduce the frequency of chemically induced reversion of cycl-131

  13. The use of commercial yeast as a protein source in the adult diet of the Mediterranean Fruit Fly, Ceratitis Capitata (Wied.) for its control using the sterile insect technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoman, A.A. and others

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the using eight different artificial adult diets of the mediterranean fruit fly, ceratitis capitata (Wied.) on egg and larval production was studied. Adults fed on complete homogenate diet consisting of 75% raw sugar 25% yeast hydrolysate, showed a slightly insignificant decrease in the number of eggs and larvae produced/ female/ day. In absence of yeast hydrolysate, adults offered either only pure or raw sugar, showed a drastically significant decrease in both the number of eggs laid and larvae produced by one female/day. On the other hand, when the protein source was offered as a mixture of yeast hydrolysate and commercial yeast in the ratio 1:1 and offered pure or raw sugar as a carbohydrate source, the egg and larval production were almost not affected. Moreover, when the protein source was offered as totally commercial yeast and using pure or raw sugar as a carbohydrate source at the ratio 1:3, egg and larval production were highly significantly reduced. The results showed that, the 3 diets producing the highest number of eggs and larval/female/day were that consisting of raw sugar and yeast hydrolysate at the ratio 3:1 as well as those consisting of raw sugar and yeast hydrolysate and commercial yeast at the ratio 6:1:1. these 3 diets showed almost no effect on neither pupal or adult production nor sex ratio compared to control diet

  14. Integration of Environmental and Developmental (or Metabolic) Control of Seed Mass by Sugar and Ethylene Metabolisms in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lai-Sheng; Xu, Meng-Ke; Wan, Wen; Wang, Jing-Yi

    2018-04-04

    In higher plants, seed mass is an important to evolutionary fitness. In this context, seedling establishment positively correlates with seed mass under conditions of environmental stress. Thus, seed mass constitutes an important agricultural trait. Here, we show loss-of-function of YODA (YDA), a MAPKK Kinase, and decreased seed mass, which leads to susceptibility to drought. Furthermore, we demonstrate that yda disrupts sugar metabolisms but not the gaseous plant hormone, ethylene. Our data suggest that the transcription factor EIN3 (ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE3), integral to both sugar and ethylene metabolisms, physically interacts with YDA. Further, ein3-1 mutants exhibited increased seed mass. Genetic analysis indicated that YDA and EIN3 were integral to a sugar-mediated metabolism cascade which regulates seed mass by maternally controlling embryo size. It is well established that ethylene metabolism leads to the suppression of drought tolerance by the EIN3 mediated inhibition of CBF1, a transcription factor required for the expression genes of abiotic stress. Our findings help guide the synthesis of a model predicting how sugar/ethylene metabolisms and environmental stress are integrated at EIN3 to control both the establishment of drought tolerance and the production of seed mass. Collectively, these insights into the molecular mechanism underpinning the regulation of plant seed size may aid prospective breeding or design strategies to increase crop yield.

  15. [Distiller Yeasts Producing Antibacterial Peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyachko, E V; Morozkina, E V; Zaitchik, B Ts; Benevolensky, S V

    2015-01-01

    A new method of controlling lactic acid bacteria contamination was developed with the use of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains producing antibacterial peptides. Genes encoding the antibacterial peptides pediocin and plantaricin with codons preferable for S. cerevisiae were synthesized, and a system was constructed for their secretory expression. Recombinant S. cerevisiae strains producing antibacterial peptides effectively inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus sakei, Pediacoccus pentasaceus, Pediacoccus acidilactici, etc. The application of distiller yeasts producing antibacterial peptides enhances the ethanol yield in cases of bacterial contamination. Recombinant yeasts producing the antibacterial peptides pediocin and plantaricin can successfully substitute the available industrial yeast strains upon ethanol production.

  16. On-Line Optimizing Control of a Simulated Continuous Yeast Fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maria Y.; Asferg, L.; Brabrand, H.

    1989-01-01

    On-line optimizing control of a simulated fermentation is investigated using a non-segregated dynamic model of aerobic glucose limited growth of saccharomyces cerevisiae. The optimization procedure is carried out with an underlying adaptive regulator to stabilize the culture. This stabilization...... is especially important during the setpoint changes specified by the optimizing routine. A linear ARMAX model structure is used for the fermentation process with dilution rate as input and biomass as output variable. The parameters of the linear model structure are estimated using a pseudo linear regression...... method with bandpass filtering of in- and output variables in order to ensure low frequency validity of the estimated model. An LQ-regulator is used with iterative solution of the Riccati equation. Simulation results illustrate the tuning of the underlying regulator, and the effect of perturbing...

  17. Genetic analysis of gamma-ray mutagenesis in yeast. II. Allele-specific control of mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, R.H.; Lawrence, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    We find that partially different sets of gene functions are required for the production of different kinds of mutations induced by 60 Co γ rays in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This observation is very similar to others made previously with respect to uv mutagenesis and confirms the conclusion that such distinctive patterns of genetic control reflect properties of the test alleles and their genetic locations, rather than the kinds of lesions required to revert them. The data also support the model of mutagenic repair outlined in the first paper of this series in which partially different sets of gene functions are required for the production of different kinds of mutations, the formation of mutations at different genetic sites and the induction of mutations by different mutagens

  18. Synergizing metabolic flux analysis and nucleotide sugar metabolism to understand the control of glycosylation of recombinant protein in CHO cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burleigh, Susan C

    2011-10-18

    Abstract Background The glycosylation of recombinant proteins can be altered by a range of parameters including cellular metabolism, metabolic flux and the efficiency of the glycosylation process. We present an experimental set-up that allows determination of these key processes associated with the control of N-linked glycosylation of recombinant proteins. Results Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) were cultivated in shake flasks at 0 mM glutamine and displayed a reduced growth rate, glucose metabolism and a slower decrease in pH, when compared to other glutamine-supplemented cultures. The N-linked glycosylation of recombinant human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) was also altered under these conditions; the sialylation, fucosylation and antennarity decreased, while the proportion of neutral structures increased. A continuous culture set-up was subsequently used to understand the control of HCG glycosylation in the presence of varied glutamine concentrations; when glycolytic flux was reduced in the absence of glutamine, the glycosylation changes that were observed in shake flask culture were similarly detected. The intracellular content of UDP-GlcNAc was also reduced, which correlated with a decrease in sialylation and antennarity of the N-linked glycans attached to HCG. Conclusions The use of metabolic flux analysis illustrated a case of steady state multiplicity, where use of the same operating conditions at each steady state resulted in altered flux through glycolysis and the TCA cycle. This study clearly demonstrated that the control of glycoprotein microheterogeneity may be examined by use of a continuous culture system, metabolic flux analysis and assay of intracellular nucleotides. This system advances our knowledge of the relationship between metabolic flux and the glycosylation of biotherapeutics in CHO cells and will be of benefit to the bioprocessing industry.

  19. [The role of remodeling complexes CHD1 and ISWI in spontaneous and UV-induced mutagenesis control in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstiukhina, T A; Alekseeva, E A; Fedorov, D V; Peshekhonov, V T; Korolev, V G

    2017-02-01

    Chromatin remodulators are special multiprotein machines capable of transforming the structure, constitution, and positioning of nucleosomes on DNA. Biochemical activities of remodeling complexes CHD1 and ISWI from the SWI2/SNF2 family are well established. They ensure correct positioning of nucleosomes along the genome, which is probably critical for genome stability, in particular, after action of polymerases, repair enzymes, and transcription. In this paper, we show that single mutations in genes ISW1, ISW2, and CHD1 weakly affect repair and mutagenic processes in yeast cells. At the same time, there are differences in the effect of these mutations on spontaneous mutation levels, which indicates certain specificity of action of protein complexes ISW1, ISW2, and CHD1 on expression of different genes that control repair and mutation processes in yeast.

  20. Genetic control of diploid recovery after γ-irradiation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, T.; Machida, I.; Nakai, S.

    1980-01-01

    Genetic mechanism(s) of γ-ray resistance of the diploid and budding haploid cells of S. cerevisiae were investigated, with special reference to mitotic recombination, by examining 11 rad mutant strains. The radiosentivity of the diploid was markedly enhanced in certain γ-ray-sensitive rad mutants, whereas the sensitivity of the haploid was not so enhanced in these rad mutants. These enhanced sensitivities of diploids were irrespective of their own haploid sensitivities. From these results, the existence of a mechanism of diploid-specific recovery was postulated. The magnitude of diploid radioresistance in rad mutants was positively correlated with the ability for the induction of mitotic recombinational events which were controlled by RAD genes belonging to the RAD-51 genetic pathway. The genetic mechanism(s) of the diploid recovery after γ-irradiation are probably related to recombinational processes between the homologous chromosomes leading to reciprocal recombination or non-reciprocal gene conversion. Furthermore, the higher radioresistance of budding cells in comparison with the non-budding cells was also correlated to the diploid radioresistance with a few exceptions. Consequently, the mechanism(s) of budding radioresistance similar to the diploid recovery seems to be related to mitotic recombinational processes. (orig.)

  1. Investigation of the cofactor controlled substrate specificity of yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Barry, R.J.; Brush, T.; Ting, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The PPase reaction requires the participation of three metal ion cofactors. One metal ion binds to PP activating it for reaction and the other two bind to the enzyme activating it for catalysis. Of the metal ions tested only Mg 2+ , Zn 2+ , Co 2+ , Mn 2+ can perform all these roles. Most trivalent metal ions can function to activate the PP for reaction but cannot activate the enzyme for catalysis. The Mg 2+ activated enzyme is specific for M-PP and M-PPS complexes while the Zn 2+ activated enzyme also acts on metal complexes of PPP, PPPOR, PPOR and PPF. 18 O-Incorporation studies show that the substituted phosphoryl group of the unsymmetrical PP complexes always serves as the leaving group. To gain insight into the mechanism of the cofactor control over the substrate specificity the order of substrate/cofactor binding to the enzyme was examined. Dead end inhibition studies in which Cr(III)PP served as substrate and Mg 2+ as cofactor indicate that the mechanism is rapid equilibrium ordered (CrPP binds first) while dead end inhibitor induced activator inhibition studies with Mg 2+ and MgPP indicate that the kinetic mechanism is steady state preferred order. Cofactor-enzyme binding was studied as a function of substrate structure and the results obtained rule out interference of Mg 2+ binding by substrate analogs as an explanation for the different substrate specificities of the Zn 2+ and Mg 2+ activated enzymes

  2. A two-step protein quality control pathway for a misfolded DJ-1 variant in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, Søs Grønbæk; Larsen, Ida B.; Poulsen, Esben Guldahl

    2015-01-01

    A mutation, L166P, in the cytosolic protein, PARK7/DJ-1, causes protein misfolding and is linked to Parkinson disease. Here, we identify the fission yeast protein Sdj1 as the orthologue of DJ-1 and calculate by in silico saturation mutagenesis the effects of point mutants on its structural...... stability. We also map the degradation pathways for Sdj1-L169P, the fission yeast orthologue of the disease-causing DJ-1 L166P protein. Sdj1-L169P forms inclusions, which are enriched for the Hsp104 disaggregase. Hsp104 and Hsp70-type chaperones are required for efficient degradation of Sdj1-L169P...

  3. Significance of family and peer support for metabolic control of type 1 diabetes in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Dušanka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to explore the significance of family and peer support for metabolic control of Type 1 diabetes in adolescents. Metabolic control refers to maintenance of acceptable blood glucose level thus diminishing risk for chronic complications. It involves regular insulin shots, measuring blood glucose and keeping diary, as the daily based self-control. Regular visits to endocrinologist and screening for chronic complications are compulsory. The sample comprised 79 adolescents age 10-17 years with diagnose of Type 1 diabetes and properly treated at the institute. The sample was divided in two groups - with good (N=40 and poor (N=39 metabolic control. A criterium for good metabolic control was glycosilated hemoglobin less than 7,6%. Social support was measured by Social Support Scale consisting of two parts - the first for estimation of registered family support (based upon modified Perceived Social Support Family Scale and the second for estimation of registered friends' support (modified Perceived Social Support Friend Scale. Adolescents with good metabolic control referred statistically more significant social support in the family, unlike the group with poor metabolic control. Considering peer social support, there was no statistically significant difference. Positive family history for diabetes also appeared to be directly linked to good metabolic control.

  4. Functional study of the Hap4-like genes suggests that the key regulators of carbon metabolism HAP4 and oxidative stress response YAP1 in yeast diverged from a common ancestor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Petryk

    Full Text Available The transcriptional regulator HAP4, induced by respiratory substrates, is involved in the balance between fermentation and respiration in S. cerevisiae. We identified putative orthologues of the Hap4 protein in all ascomycetes, based only on a conserved sixteen amino acid-long motif. In addition to this motif, some of these proteins contain a DNA-binding motif of the bZIP type, while being nonetheless globally highly divergent. The genome of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha contains two HAP4-like genes encoding the protein HpHap4-A which, like ScHap4, is devoid of a bZIP motif, and HpHap4-B which contains it. This species has been chosen for a detailed examination of their respective properties. Based mostly on global gene expression studies performed in the S. cerevisiae HAP4 disruption mutant (ScΔhap4, we show here that HpHap4-A is functionally equivalent to ScHap4, whereas HpHap4-B is not. Moreover HpHAP4-B is able to complement the H2O2 hypersensitivity of the ScYap1 deletant, YAP1 being, in S. cerevisiae, the main regulator of oxidative stress. Finally, a transcriptomic analysis performed in the ScΔyap1 strain overexpressing HpHAP4-B shows that HpHap4-B acts both on oxidative stress response and carbohydrate metabolism in a manner different from both ScYap1 and ScHap4. Deletion of these two genes in their natural host, H. polymorpha, confirms that HpHAP4-A participates in the control of the fermentation/respiration balance, while HpHAP4-B is involved in oxidative stress since its deletion leads to hypersensitivity to H2O2. These data, placed in an evolutionary context, raise new questions concerning the evolution of the HAP4 transcriptional regulation function and suggest that Yap1 and Hap4 have diverged from a unique regulatory protein in the fungal ancestor.

  5. A study on the fundamental mechanism and the evolutionary driving forces behind aerobic fermentation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagman, Arne; Piškur, Jure

    2015-01-01

    Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae rapidly converts sugars to ethanol and carbon dioxide at both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The later phenomenon is called Crabtree effect and has been described in two forms, long-term and short-term effect. We have previously studied under fully controlled aerobic conditions forty yeast species for their central carbon metabolism and the presence of long-term Crabtree effect. We have also studied ten steady-state yeast cultures, pulsed them with glucose, and followed the central carbon metabolism and the appearance of ethanol at dynamic conditions. In this paper we analyzed those wet laboratory data to elucidate possible mechanisms that determine the fate of glucose in different yeast species that cover approximately 250 million years of evolutionary history. We determine overflow metabolism to be the fundamental mechanism behind both long- and short-term Crabtree effect, which originated approximately 125-150 million years ago in the Saccharomyces lineage. The "invention" of overflow metabolism was the first step in the evolution of aerobic fermentation in yeast. It provides a general strategy to increase energy production rates, which we show is positively correlated to growth. The "invention" of overflow has also simultaneously enabled rapid glucose consumption in yeast, which is a trait that could have been selected for, to "starve" competitors in nature. We also show that glucose repression of respiration is confined mainly among S. cerevisiae and closely related species that diverged after the whole genome duplication event, less than 100 million years ago. Thus, glucose repression of respiration was apparently "invented" as a second step to further increase overflow and ethanol production, to inhibit growth of other microbes. The driving force behind the initial evolutionary steps was most likely competition with other microbes to faster consume and convert sugar into biomass, in niches that were semi-anaerobic.

  6. A study on the fundamental mechanism and the evolutionary driving forces behind aerobic fermentation in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Hagman

    Full Text Available Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae rapidly converts sugars to ethanol and carbon dioxide at both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The later phenomenon is called Crabtree effect and has been described in two forms, long-term and short-term effect. We have previously studied under fully controlled aerobic conditions forty yeast species for their central carbon metabolism and the presence of long-term Crabtree effect. We have also studied ten steady-state yeast cultures, pulsed them with glucose, and followed the central carbon metabolism and the appearance of ethanol at dynamic conditions. In this paper we analyzed those wet laboratory data to elucidate possible mechanisms that determine the fate of glucose in different yeast species that cover approximately 250 million years of evolutionary history. We determine overflow metabolism to be the fundamental mechanism behind both long- and short-term Crabtree effect, which originated approximately 125-150 million years ago in the Saccharomyces lineage. The "invention" of overflow metabolism was the first step in the evolution of aerobic fermentation in yeast. It provides a general strategy to increase energy production rates, which we show is positively correlated to growth. The "invention" of overflow has also simultaneously enabled rapid glucose consumption in yeast, which is a trait that could have been selected for, to "starve" competitors in nature. We also show that glucose repression of respiration is confined mainly among S. cerevisiae and closely related species that diverged after the whole genome duplication event, less than 100 million years ago. Thus, glucose repression of respiration was apparently "invented" as a second step to further increase overflow and ethanol production, to inhibit growth of other microbes. The driving force behind the initial evolutionary steps was most likely competition with other microbes to faster consume and convert sugar into biomass, in niches that

  7. Analysis of metabolic activity of lactic acid bacteria and yeast in model kefirs made from goat’s milk and mixtures of goat’s milk with mare’s milk based on changes in electrical conductivity and impedance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Cais-Sokolińska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse the metabolic activity of lactic acid bacteria and yeast based of changes in electrical conductivity and electrical impedance during fermentation of goat milk and mixtures of goat’s milk and mare’s milk (1:1, 1:2. As a result of fermentation, conductivity increased 1.4-fold. The conductivity of kefir prepared from goat and mare milk mixed at a ratio of 1:2 (6.210 Ω-3∙cm-1 was lower than that of the 1:1 mixture or of goat milk alone (7.242 Ω-3∙cm-1. A significant dependence of electrical conductivity and pH (0.970 ≤ r ≤ 0.993 was recorded during fermentation. The addition of mare milk to goat milk significantly slowed down the growth of LAB (Δλ = 0.8 h and yeasts during kefir production.

  8. Attenuation of yeast form of Paracoccidioides Brasiliensis by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demicheli, Marina Cortez

    2006-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, the most prevalent mycosis in Latin America, and currently there is no effective vaccine. The aim of this work was to attenuate the yeast form of P. brasiliensis by gamma irradiation for further studies on vaccine research. P. brasiliensis (strain Pb-18) cultures were irradiated at doses between 0.5 and 8.0 kGy. After each dose the fungal cells were plated and after 10 days the colony forming units (CFU) counted. The viability of the irradiated cells was measured using the dyes Janus green and methylene blue, and protein synthesis by incorporation of L 35 S methionine. The comparison between the antigenic profile of irradiated and control yeast was made by Western blot and the virulence evaluated by the inoculation in C 57 Bl/J6 and Balb/c mice. Morphological changes in irradiated yeast were evaluated by electronic microscopy and DNA integrity by electrophoresis in agarose gel. At 6.5 kGy the yeast lost the reproductive capacity. The viability and the incorporation of L- 35 S methionine were the same in control and up to 6.5 kGy irradiated cells, but 6.5 kGy irradiated yeast secreted 40% less proteins. The Western blot profile was clearly similar in control and 6.5 kGy irradiated yeast. No CFU could be recovered from the tissues of the mice infected with the radio attenuated yeast. At the dose of 6.5 kGy the DNA was degraded and this damage was not repaired. The transmission electronic microscopy showed significant alterations in the nucleus of the irradiated cells. The scanning electronic microscopy showed that two hours after the irradiation the cells were collapsed or presented deep folds in the surface, however these injury were reversible. We concluded that for P. brasiliensis yeast cells it was possible to find a dose in which the pathogen loses its reproductive ability and virulence, while retaining its viability, metabolic activity and the antigenic profile. (author)

  9. Nucleotide Metabolism and its Control in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Hammer, Karin; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2005-01-01

    Most metabolic reactions are connected through either their utilization of nucleotides or their utilization of nucleotides or their regulation by these metabolites. In this review the biosynthetic pathways for pyrimidine and purine metabolism in lactic acid bacteria are described including...... the interconversion pathways, the formation of deoxyribonucleotides and the salvage pathways for use of exogenous precursors. The data for the enzymatic and the genetic regulation of these pathways are reviewed, as well as the gene organizations in different lactic acid bacteria. Mutant phenotypes and methods...... for manipulation of nucleotide pools are also discussed. Our aim is to provide an overview of the physiology and genetics of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation that will facilitate the interpretation of data arising from genetics, metabolomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in lactic acid bacteria....

  10. Engineering 1-Alkene Biosynthesis and Secretion by Dynamic Regulation in Yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Yongjin J.; Hu, Yating; Zhu, Zhiwei

    2018-01-01

    strategy to control the expression of membrane enzyme and 1-alkene production and cell growth by relieving the possible toxicity of overexpressed membrane proteins. With these efforts, the engineered yeast cell factory produced 35.3 mg/L 1-alkenes with more than 80% being secreted. This represents a 10...... product secretion. Here, we engineered the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce and secrete 1-alkenes by manipulation of the fatty acid metabolism, enzyme selection, engineering the electron transfer system and expressing a transporter. Furthermore, we implemented a dynamic regulation...

  11. Metabolic Engineering of Chemical Defence Pathways in Plant Disease Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rook, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    on each topic. The chapter reviews the some of the scientific and technical challenges in metabolic engineering and the new possibilities emerging from recent technological developments. It concludes by discussing the outlook for bioengineered chemical defences as part of crop protection strategies, also...... with antimicrobial properties for use in crop protection. It presents an overview of the metabolic engineering efforts made in the area of plant chemical defence. For in-depth information on the characteristics of a specific class of chemical defence compounds, the reader is referred to the specialized reviews...

  12. Genomic Evolution of the Ascomycete Yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert; Haridas, Sajeet; Salamov, Asaf; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Goker, Markus; Hittinger, Chris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lopes, Mariana; Meir-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Rokas, Antonis; Rosa, Carlos; Scheuner, Carmen; Soares, Marco; Stielow, Benjamin; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Wolfe, Ken; Blackwell, Meredith; Kurtzman, Cletus; Grigoriev, Igor; Jeffries, Thomas

    2015-03-16

    Yeasts are important for industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable metabolic and phylogenetic diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 16 ascomycete yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. Phylogenetic analysis of these and previously published yeast genomes helped resolve the placement of species including Saitoella complicata, Babjeviella inositovora, Hyphopichia burtonii, and Metschnikowia bicuspidata. Moreover, we find that alternative nuclear codon usage, where CUG encodes serine instead of leucine, are monophyletic within the Saccharomycotina. Most of the yeasts have compact genomes with a large fraction of single exon genes, and a tendency towards more introns in early-diverging species. Analysis of enzyme phylogeny gives insights into the evolution of metabolic capabilities such as methanol utilization and assimilation of alternative carbon sources.

  13. Control of alanine metabolism in rat liver by transport processes or cellular metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Fafournoux, P; Rémésy, C; Demigné, C

    1983-01-01

    1. Factors governing hepatic utilization of alanine were studied in vivo and in vitro in rats adapted to increasing dietary protein. 2. Hepatic alanine utilization was enhanced 5-fold with a 90%-casein diet, compared with a 13%-casein diet. The increased uptake resulted from enhanced fractional extraction in the presence of high concentrations of alanine in the portal vein. 3. The increase in alanine metabolism on high-protein diets was associated with an increase in alanine aminotransferase ...

  14. Self-Efficacy, Self-Care, and Metabolic Control in Persons with Type 2, Diet and Exercised Controlled Diabetes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Randall, Lisa

    1998-01-01

    .... psychological determinants of self-care and metabolic control must be explored. Self-efficacy (Bandura, 1977) has demonstrated its importance in behavioral modification but has been minimally investigated in diabetes...

  15. Chinese red yeast rice (Monascus purpureus for primary hyperlipidemia: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimsgaard Sameline

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Extracts of Chinese red yeast rice (RYR, a traditional dietary seasoning of Monascus purpureus contains several active ingredients including lovastatin, and several trials of its possible lipid-lowering effects have been conducted. This meta-analysis assesses the effectiveness and safety of RYR preparations on lipid modification in primary hyperlipidemia. We included randomized controlled trials testing RYR preparation, compared with placebo, no treatment, statins, or other active lipid-lowering agents in people with hyperlipidemia through searching PubMed, CBMdisk, TCMLARS, the Cochrane Library, and AMED up to December 2004. Ninety-three randomized trials (9625 participants were included and three RYR preparations (Cholestin, Xuezhikang and Zhibituo were tested. The methodological quality of trial reports was generally low in terms of generation of the allocation sequence, allocation concealment, blinding, and intention-to-treat. The combined results showed significant reduction of serum total cholesterol levels (weighted mean difference -0.91 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval -1.12 to -0.71, triglycerides levels (-0.41 mmol/L, -0.6 to -0.22, and LDL-cholesterol levels (-0.73 mmol/L, -1.02 to -0.043, and increase of HDL-cholesterol levels (0.15 mmol/L, 0.09 to 0.22 by RYR treatment compared with placebo. The lipid modification effects appeared to be similar to pravastatin, simvastatin, lovastatin, atorvastatin, or fluvastatin. Compared with non-statin lipid lowering agents, RYR preparations appeared superior to nicotinate and fish oils, but equal to or less effective than fenofibrate and gemfibrozil. No significant difference in lipid profile was found between Xuezhikang and Zhibituo. RYR preparations were associated with non-serious adverse effects such as dizziness and gastrointestinal discomfort. Current evidence shows short-term beneficial effects of RYR preparations on lipid modification. More rigorous trials are needed, and long

  16. Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hittinger, Chris Todd; Rokas, Antonis; Bai, Feng-Yan; Boekhout, Teun; Gonçalves, Paula; Jeffries, Thomas W; Kominek, Jacek; Lachance, Marc-André; Libkind, Diego; Rosa, Carlos A; Sampaio, José Paulo; Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2015-12-01

    Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces cerevisiae; the common human commensal and opportunistic pathogen, Candida albicans; and over 1000 other known species (with more continuing to be discovered). Yeasts are found in every biome and continent and are more genetically diverse than angiosperms or chordates. Ease of culture, simple life cycles, and small genomes (∼10-20Mbp) have made yeasts exceptional models for molecular genetics, biotechnology, and evolutionary genomics. Here we discuss recent developments in understanding the genomic underpinnings of the making of yeast biodiversity, comparing and contrasting natural and human-associated evolutionary processes. Only a tiny fraction of yeast biodiversity and metabolic capabilities has been tapped by industry and science. Expanding the taxonomic breadth of deep genomic investigations will further illuminate how genome function evolves to encode their diverse metabolisms and ecologies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of rehydration nutrients on H2S metabolism and formation of volatile sulfur compounds by the wine yeast VL3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Gal; Henschke, Paul A; Higgins, Vincent J; Ugliano, Maurizio; Curtin, Chris D

    2011-11-02

    In winemaking, nutrient supplementation is a common practice for optimising fermentation and producing quality wine. Nutritionally suboptimal grape juices are often enriched with nutrients in order to manipulate the production of yeast aroma compounds. Nutrients are also added to active dry yeast (ADY) rehydration media to enhance subsequent fermentation performance. In this study we demonstrate that nutrient supplementation at rehydration also has a significant effect on the formation of volatile sulfur compounds during wine fermentations. The concentration of the 'fruity' aroma compounds, the polyfunctional thiols 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol (3MH) and 3-mercaptohexyl acetate (3MHA), was increased while the concentration of the 'rotten egg' aroma compound, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), was decreased. Nutrient supplementation of the rehydration media also changed the kinetics of H2S production during fermentation by advancing onset of H2S production. Microarray analysis revealed that this was not due to expression changes within the sulfate assimilation pathway, which is known to be a major contributor to H2S production. To gain insight into possible mechanisms responsible for this effect, a component of the rehydration nutrient mix, the tri-peptide glutathione (GSH) was added at rehydration and studied for its subsequent effects on H2S formation. GSH was found to be taken up during rehydration and to act as a source for H2S during the following fermentation. These findings represent a potential approach for managing sulfur aroma production through the use of rehydration nutrients.

  18. Mitofusin 2 as a driver that controls energy metabolism and insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzano, Antonio; Hernández-Alvarez, María Isabel; Sebastián, David; Muñoz, Juan Pablo

    2015-04-20

    Mitochondrial dynamics is a complex process that impacts on mitochondrial biology. Recent evidence indicates that proteins participating in mitochondrial dynamics have additional cellular roles. Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) is a potent modulator of mitochondrial metabolism with an impact on energy metabolism in muscle, liver, and hypothalamic neurons. In addition, Mfn2 is subjected to tight regulation. Hence, factors such as proinflammatory cytokines, lipid availability, or glucocorticoids block its expression, whereas exercise and increased energy expenditure promote its upregulation. Importantly, Mfn2 controls cell metabolism and insulin signaling by limiting reactive oxygen species production and by modulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress. In this connection, it is critical to understand precisely the molecular mechanisms involved in the global actions of Mfn2. Future directions should concentrate into the analysis of those mechanisms, and to fully demonstrate that Mfn2 represents a cellular hub that senses the metabolic and hormonal milieu and drives the control of metabolic homeostasis.

  19. Exercise, Obesity and CNS Control of Metabolic Homeostasis: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    John K. Smith

    2018-01-01

    This review details the manner in which the central nervous system regulates metabolic homeostasis in normal weight and obese rodents and humans. It includes a review of the homeostatic contributions of neurons located in the hypothalamus, the midbrain and limbic structures, the pons and the medullary area postrema, nucleus tractus solitarius, and vagus nucleus, and details how these brain regions respond to circulating levels of orexigenic hormones, such as ghrelin, and anorexigenic hormones...

  20. Metabolic syndrome and atypical antipsychotics: Possibility of prediction and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franch Pato, Clara M; Molina Rodríguez, Vicente; Franch Valverde, Juan I

    Schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders are associated with high morbidity and mortality, due to inherent health factors, genetic factors, and factors related to psychopharmacological treatment. Antipsychotics, like other drugs, have side-effects that can substantially affect the physical health of patients, with substantive differences in the side-effect profile and in the patients in which these side-effects occur. To understand and identify these risk groups could help to prevent the occurrence of the undesired effects. A prospective study, with 24 months follow-up, was conducted in order to analyse the physical health of severe mental patients under maintenance treatment with atypical antipsychotics, as well as to determine any predictive parameters at anthropometric and/or analytical level for good/bad outcome of metabolic syndrome in these patients. There were no significant changes in the physical and biochemical parameters individually analysed throughout the different visits. The baseline abdominal circumference (lambda Wilks P=.013) and baseline HDL-cholesterol levels (lambda Wilks P=.000) were the parameters that seem to be more relevant above the rest of the metabolic syndrome constituents diagnosis criteria as predictors in the long-term. In the search for predictive factors of metabolic syndrome, HDL-cholesterol and abdominal circumference at the time of inclusion were selected, as such that the worst the baseline results were, the higher probability of long-term improvement. Copyright © 2016 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. CASCADE, a platform for controlled gene amplification for high, tunable and selection-free gene expression in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strucko, Tomas; Buron, Line Due; Jarczynska, Zofia Dorota

    2017-01-01

    Over-expression of a gene by increasing its copy number is often desirable in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may facilitate elucidation of enzyme functions, and in cell factory design it is used to increase production of proteins and metabolites. Current methods are typically exploi...... production of two fluorescent proteins, the enzyme β-galactosidase the fungal polyketide 6-methyl salicylic acid and the plant metabolite vanillin glucoside....

  2. Metabolic Control and Academic Achievement over Time among Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnick, Joel B.; Berg, Cynthia A.; Wiebe, Deborah J.; Schaefer, Barbara A.; Lei, Pui-Wa; Butner, Jonathan E.

    2017-01-01

    The relation between metabolic control (HbA1c) and achievement (grade point average [GPA]) was examined over a period of 2.5 years (every 6 months) employing a dynamical systems approach that allowed for the examination of whether HbA1c was associated with change in subsequent GPA and vice versa. Metabolic control tends to deteriorate (i.e., with…

  3. Synthetic yeast based cell factories for vanillin-glucoside production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strucko, Tomas

    and controlled expression/overexpression of genes of interest. De novo biosynthetic pathway for vanillin-β-glucoside production was employed as a model system for several case studies in this project. In order to construct yeast cell factories fulfilling current demands of industrial biotechnology, methods......The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well a characterized microorganism and widely used as eukaryotic model organism as well as a key cell factory for bioproduction of various products. The latter comprise a large variety of scientifically and industrially relevant products such as low-value bulk...... chemicals and biofuels, food additives, high-value chemicals and recombinant proteins. Despite the recent achievements in the fields of systems biology and metabolic engineering together with availability of broad genetic engineering toolbox, the full potential of S. cerevisiae as a cell factory is not yet...

  4. The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Dashko, Sofia; Ishchuk, Olena P; Piškur, Jure

    2014-09-01

    Recently, the non-conventional yeast Dekkera bruxellensis has been gaining more and more attention in the food industry and academic research. This yeast species is a distant relative of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is especially known for two important characteristics: on the one hand, it is considered to be one of the main spoilage organisms in the wine and bioethanol industry; on the other hand, it is 'indispensable' as a contributor to the flavour profile of Belgium lambic and gueuze beers. Additionally, it adds to the characteristic aromatic properties of some red wines. Recently this yeast has also become a model for the study of yeast evolution. In this review we focus on the recently developed molecular and genetic tools, such as complete genome sequencing and transformation, to study and manipulate this yeast. We also focus on the areas that are particularly well explored in this yeast, such as the synthesis of off-flavours, yeast detection methods, carbon metabolism and evolutionary history. © 2014 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Combination of antagonistic yeasts with two food additives for control of brown rot caused by Monilinia fructicola on sweet cherry fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, G Z; Tian, S P; Xu, Y; Chan, Z L; Li, B Q

    2006-03-01

    To evaluate beneficial effect of two food additives, ammonium molybdate (NH4-Mo) and sodium bicarbonate (NaBi), on antagonistic yeasts for control of brown rot caused by Monilinia fructicola in sweet cherry fruit under various storage conditions. The mechanisms of action by which food additives enhance the efficacy of antagonistic yeasts were also evaluated. Biocontrol activity of Pichia membranefaciens and Cryptococcus laurentii against brown rot in sweet cherry fruit was improved by addition of 5 mmol l(-1) NH4-Mo or 2% NaBi when stored in air at 20 and 0 degrees C, and in controlled atmosphere (CA) storage with 10% O2 + 10% CO2 at 0 degrees C. Population dynamics of P. membranefaciens in the wounds of fruit were inhibited by NH4-Mo at 20 degrees C after 1 day of incubation and growth of C. laurentii was inhibited by NH4-Mo at 0 degrees C in CA storage after 60 days. In contrast, NaBi did not significantly influence growth of the two yeasts in fruit wounds under various storage conditions except that the growth of P. membranefaciens was stimulated after storage for 45 days at 0 degrees C in CA storage. When used alone, the two additives showed effective control of brown rot in sweet cherry fruit and the efficacy was closely correlated with the concentrations used. The result of in vitro indicated that growth of M. fructicola was significantly inhibited by NH4-Mo and NaBi. Application of additives improved biocontrol of brown rot on sweet cherry fruit under various storage conditions. It is postulated that the enhancement of disease control is directly because of the inhibitory effects of additives on pathogen growth, and indirectly because of the relatively little influence of additives on the growth of antagonistic yeasts. The results obtained in this study suggest that an integration of NH4-Mo or NaBi with biocontrol agents has great potential in commercial management of postharvest diseases of fruit.

  6. Non-conventional yeast species for lowering ethanol content of wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio eCiani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rising sugar content in grape must, and the concomitant increase in alcohol levels in wine, are some of the main challenges affecting the winemaking industry nowadays. Among the several alternative solutions currently under study, the use of non-conventional yeasts during fermentation holds good promise for contributing to relieve this problem. Non-Saccharomyces wine yeast species comprise a high number or species, so encompassing a wider physiological diversity than Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Indeed, the current oenological interest of these microorganisms was initially triggered by their potential positive contribution to the sensorial complexity of quality wines, through the production of aroma and other sensory-active compounds. This diversity also involves ethanol yield on sugar, one of the most invariant metabolic traits of S. cerevisiae. This review gathers recent research on non-Saccharomyces yeasts, aiming to produce wines with lower alcohol content than those from pure Saccharomyces starters. Critical aspects discussed include the selection of suitable yeast strains (considering there is a noticeable intra-species diversity for ethanol yield, as shown for other fermentation traits, identification of key environmental parameters influencing ethanol yields (including the use of controlled oxygenation conditions, and managing mixed fermentations, by either the sequential or simultaneous inoculation of S. cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces starter cultures. The feasibility, at the industrial level, of using non-Saccharomyces yeasts for reducing alcohol levels in wine will require an improved understanding of the metabolism of these alternative yeast species, as well as of the interactions between different yeast starters during the fermentation of grape must.

  7. Non-conventional Yeast Species for Lowering Ethanol Content of Wines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Maurizio; Morales, Pilar; Comitini, Francesca; Tronchoni, Jordi; Canonico, Laura; Curiel, José A.; Oro, Lucia; Rodrigues, Alda J.; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Rising sugar content in grape must, and the concomitant increase in alcohol levels in wine, are some of the main challenges affecting the winemaking industry nowadays. Among the several alternative solutions currently under study, the use of non-conventional yeasts during fermentation holds good promise for contributing to relieve this problem. Non-Saccharomyces wine yeast species comprise a high number or species, so encompassing a wider physiological diversity than Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Indeed, the current oenological interest of these microorganisms was initially triggered by their potential positive contribution to the sensorial complexity of quality wines, through the production of aroma and other sensory-active compounds. This diversity also involves ethanol yield on sugar, one of the most invariant metabolic traits of S. cerevisiae. This review gathers recent research on non-Saccharomyces yeasts, aiming to produce wines with lower alcohol content than those from pure Saccharomyces starters. Critical aspects discussed include the selection of suitable yeast strains (considering there is a noticeable intra-species diversity for ethanol yield, as shown for other fermentation traits), identification of key environmental parameters influencing ethanol yields (including the use of controlled oxygenation conditions), and managing mixed fermentations, by either the sequential or simultaneous inoculation of S. cerevisiae and non-Saccharomyces starter cultures. The feasibility, at the industrial level, of using non-Saccharomyces yeasts for reducing alcohol levels in wine will require an improved understanding of the metabolism of these alternative yeast species, as well as of the interactions between different yeast starters during the fermentation of grape must. PMID:27199967

  8. Modeling diauxic glycolytic oscillations in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Sørensen, Preben Graae

    2010-01-01

    for investigations of central metabolism dynamics of yeast cells. We have previously proposed a model for the open system comprised of the primary fermentative reactions in yeast that quantitatively describes the oscillatory dynamics. However, this model fails to describe the transient behavior of metabolic......Glycolytic oscillations in a stirred suspension of starved yeast cells is an excellent model system for studying the dynamics of metabolic switching in living systems. In an open-flow system the oscillations can be maintained indefinitely at a constant operating point where they can....... Experimental and computational results strongly suggest that regulation of acetaldehyde explains the observed behavior. We have extended the original model with regulation of pyruvate decarboxylase, a reversible alcohol dehydrogenase, and drainage of pyruvate. Using the method of time rescaling in the extended...

  9. Prions in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Bezdíčka, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The thesis describes yeast prions and their biological effects on yeast in general. It defines the basic characteristics of yeast prions, that distinguish prions from other proteins. The thesis introduces various possibilities of prion formation, and propagation as well as specific types of yeast prions, including various functions of most studied types of prions. The thesis also focuses on chaperones that affect the state of yeast prions in cells. Lastly, the thesis indicates similarities be...

  10. Iron metabolism mutant hbd mice have a deletion in Sec15l1, which has homology to a yeast gene for vesicle docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Robert A; Boydston, Leigh A; Brookshier, Terri R; McNulty, Steven G; Nsumu, Ndona N; Brewer, Brandon P; Blackmore, Krista

    2005-12-01

    Defects in iron absorption and utilization lead to iron deficiency and anemia. While iron transport by transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis is well understood, it is not completely clear how iron is transported from the endosome to the mitochondria where heme is synthesized. We undertook a positional cloning project to identify the causative mutation for the hemoglobin-deficit (hbd) mouse mutant, which suffers from a microcytic, hypochromic anemia apparently due to defective iron transport in the endocytosis cycle. As shown by previous studies, reticulocyte iron accumulation in homozygous hbd/hbd mice is deficient despite normal binding of transferrin to its receptor and normal transferrin uptake in the cell. We have identified a strong candidate gene for hbd, Sec15l1, a homologue to yeast SEC15, which encodes a key protein in vesicle docking. The hbd mice have an exon deletion in Sec15l1, which is the first known mutation of a SEC gene homologue in mammals.

  11. Application of a controllable degron strategy for metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knuf, Christoph; Maury, Jerome; Jacobsen, Simo Abdessamad

    2014-01-01

    In numerous cases of metabolic engineering, metabolite pools have to be increased in order to obtain flux into heterologous pathways. A simple tool for this would be the deletion of genes that would practically lead to a block of the natural pathway, so that the carbon can flow into the heterolog...... of intermediates of the mevalonate pathway around 2,3-oxidosqualene, which is the precursor for triterpenoids. Many triterpenoids are pharmaceutically relevant compounds which nowadays need to be extracted from plant material through an intricate and resource consuming process....

  12. Detection of driver metabolites in the human liver metabolic network using structural controllability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal states in human liver metabolism are major causes of human liver diseases ranging from hepatitis to hepatic tumor. The accumulation in relevant data makes it feasible to derive a large-scale human liver metabolic network (HLMN) and to discover important biological principles or drug-targets based on network analysis. Some studies have shown that interesting biological phenomenon and drug-targets could be discovered by applying structural controllability analysis (which is a newly prevailed concept in networks) to biological networks. The exploration on the connections between structural controllability theory and the HLMN could be used to uncover valuable information on the human liver metabolism from a fresh perspective. Results We applied structural controllability analysis to the HLMN and detected driver metabolites. The driver metabolites tend to have strong ability to influence the states of other metabolites and weak susceptibility to be influenced by the states of others. In addition, the metabolites were classified into three classes: critical, high-frequency and low-frequency driver metabolites. Among the identified 36 critical driver metabolites, 27 metabolites were found to be essential; the high-frequency driver metabolites tend to participate in different metabolic pathways, which are important in regulating the whole metabolic systems. Moreover, we explored some other possible connections between the structural controllability theory and the HLMN, and find that transport reactions and the environment play important roles in the human liver metabolism. Conclusion There are interesting connections between the structural controllability theory and the human liver metabolism: driver metabolites have essential biological functions; the crucial role of extracellular metabolites and transport reactions in controlling the HLMN highlights the importance of the environment in the health of human liver metabolism. PMID:24885538

  13. Fatty acids from oleaginous yeasts and yeast-like fungi and their potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Si-Jia; Chi, Zhe; Zhang, Yu; Li, Yan-Feng; Liu, Guang-Lei; Jiang, Hong; Hu, Zhong; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2018-02-01

    Oleaginous yeasts, fatty acids biosynthesis and regulation in the oleaginous yeasts and the fatty acids from the oleaginous yeasts and their applications are reviewed in this article. Oleaginous yeasts such as Rhodosporidium toruloides, Yarrowia lipolytica, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, and Aureobasidium melanogenum, which can accumulate over 50% lipid of their cell dry weight, have many advantages over other oleaginous microorganisms. The fatty acids from the oleaginous yeasts have many potential applications. Many oleaginous yeasts have now been genetically modified to over-produce fatty acids and their derivatives. The most important features of the oleaginous yeasts are that they have special enzymatic systems for enhanced biosynthesis and regulation of fatty acids in their lipid particles. Recently, some oleaginous yeasts such as R. toruloides have been found to have a unique fatty acids synthetase and other oleaginous yeasts such as A. melanogenum have a unique highly reducing polyketide synthase (HR-PKS) involved in the biosynthesis of hydroxyl fatty acids. It is necessary to further enhance lipid biosynthesis using metabolic engineering and explore new applications of fatty acids in biotechnology.

  14. Control of mitochondrial metabolism and systemic energy homeostasis by microRNAs 378 and 378*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrer, Michele; Liu, Ning; Grueter, Chad E; Williams, Andrew H; Frisard, Madlyn I; Hulver, Matthew W; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2012-09-18

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and deranged regulation of metabolic genes. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1β (PGC-1β) is a transcriptional coactivator that regulates metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis through stimulation of nuclear hormone receptors and other transcription factors. We report that the PGC-1β gene encodes two microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-378 and miR-378*, which counterbalance the metabolic actions of PGC-1β. Mice genetically lacking miR-378 and miR-378* are resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity and exhibit enhanced mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism and elevated oxidative capacity of insulin-target tissues. Among the many targets of these miRNAs, carnitine O-acetyltransferase, a mitochondrial enzyme involved in fatty acid metabolism, and MED13, a component of the Mediator complex that controls nuclear hormone receptor activity, are repressed by miR-378 and miR-378*, respectively, and are elevated in the livers of miR-378/378* KO mice. Consistent with these targets as contributors to the metabolic actions of miR-378 and miR-378*, previous studies have implicated carnitine O-acetyltransferase and MED13 in metabolic syndrome and obesity. Our findings identify miR-378 and miR-378* as integral components of a regulatory circuit that functions under conditions of metabolic stress to control systemic energy homeostasis and the overall oxidative capacity of insulin target tissues. Thus, these miRNAs provide potential targets for pharmacologic intervention in obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  15. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemontt, J F

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data, and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described particularly in relation to their involvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus, are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis.

  16. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemontt, J F

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described, particularly in relation to their imvolvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis.

  17. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemontt, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data, and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described particularly in relation to their involvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus, are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis

  18. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemontt, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described, particularly in relation to their imvolvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis

  19. Iron metabolism in critically ill patients developing anemia of inflammation: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshuizen, Margit; Binnekade, Jan M; Nota, Benjamin; van de Groep, Kirsten; Cremer, Olaf L; Tuinman, Pieter R; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J; van Bruggen, Robin; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2018-05-02

    Anemia occurring as a result of inflammatory processes (anemia of inflammation, AI) has a high prevalence in critically ill patients. Knowledge on changes in iron metabolism during the course of AI is limited, hampering the development of strategies to counteract AI. This case control study aimed to investigate iron metabolism during the development of AI in critically ill patients. Iron metabolism in 30 patients who developed AI during ICU stay was compared with 30 septic patients with a high Hb and 30 non-septic patients with a high Hb. Patients were matched on age and sex. Longitudinally collected plasma samples were analyzed for levels of parameters of iron metabolism. A linear mixed model was used to assess the predictive values of the parameters. In patients with AI, levels of iron, transferrin and transferrin saturation showed an early decrease compared to controls with a high Hb, already prior to the development of anemia. Ferritin, hepcidin and IL-6 levels were increased in AI compared to controls. During AI development, erythroferrone decreased. Differences in iron metabolism between groups were not influenced by APACHE IV score. The results show that in critically ill patients with AI, iron metabolism is already altered prior to the development of anemia. Levels of iron regulators in AI differ from septic controls with a high Hb, irrespective of disease severity. AI is characterized by high levels of hepcidin, ferritin and IL-6 and low levels of iron, transferrin and erythroferrone.

  20. Mammalian iron metabolism and its control by iron regulatory proteins☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cole P.; Shen, Lacy; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular iron homeostasis is maintained by iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1 and IRP2). IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) located in the untranslated regions of mRNAs encoding protein involved in iron uptake, storage, utilization and export. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding how IRPs are regulated by iron-dependent and iron-independent mechanisms and the pathological consequences of IRP2 deficiency in mice. The identification of novel IREs involved in diverse cellular pathways has revealed that the IRP–IRE network extends to processes other than iron homeostasis. A mechanistic understanding of IRP regulation will likely yield important insights into the basis of disorders of iron metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. PMID:22610083

  1. Heart over mind: metabolic control of white adipose tissue and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Michinari; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2014-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the heart controls the metabolism of peripheral organs. Olson and colleagues previously demonstrated that miR‐208a controls systemic energy homeostasis through the regulation of MED13 in cardiomyocytes (Grueter et al, 2012). In their follow‐up study in this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, white adipose tissue (WAT) and liver are identified as the physiological targets of cardiac MED13 signaling, most likely through cardiac‐derived circulating factors, which boost energy consumption by upregulating metabolic gene expression and increasing mitochondrial numbers (Baskin et al, 2014). In turn, increased energy expenditure in WAT and the liver confers leanness. These findings strengthen the evidence of metabolic crosstalk between the heart and peripheral tissues through cardiokines and also set the stage for the development of novel treatments for metabolic syndrome.

  2. How to determine control of growth rate in a chemostat. Using metabolic control analysis to resolve the paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoep, Jacky L.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Groeneveld, Philip

    1994-01-01

    how, paradoxically, one can determine control of growth rate, of growth yield and of other fluxes in a chemostat. We develop metabolic control analysis for the chemostat. this analysis does not depend on the particular way in which specific growth rate varies with the concentration of the growth...

  3. Association between metabolic control and oral health in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saes Busato, Ivana Maria; Bittencourt, Mônica Sommer; Machado, Maria Angela Naval; Grégio, Ana Maria Trindade; Azevedo-Alanis, Luciana Reis

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between metabolic control and oral health of adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1). A case-control epidemiologic study was performed on adolescents allocated between 2 groups: DM1 group composed of 51 with DM1, and control group composed of 51 without diabetes. In the DM1 group, metabolic control data were observed (glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb) and capillary glucose), whereby GHb 8.0% poor metabolic control (DM1-B). Oral mucosal abnormalites, Community Periodontal Index (CPI), and decayed, missing, and filled (DMF) index were documented. Salivary flow was evaluated by means of stimulated saliva collection (SSFR). Glycosylated hemoglobin values of 8.0% (DM1-B) in 34 (76%) of the subjects. The average DMF indexes were 1.5 (control) and 3.3 (DM1-group) (P < or = .05). The average CPIs were 0.2 (control), 1.4 (DM1-A), and 2.0 (DM1-B) (P < or = .05). Average SSFRs were 0.997 (DM1-A), 0.903 (DM1-B), and 1.224 (control) mL/min. Oral health of adolescents with DM1 was impaired regardless of metabolic control. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Yeast "make-accumulate-consume" life strategy evolved as a multi-step process that predates the whole genome duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagman, Arne; Säll, Torbjörn; Compagno, Concetta; Piskur, Jure

    2013-01-01

    When fruits ripen, microbial communities start a fierce competition for the freely available fruit sugars. Three yeast lineages, including baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have independently developed the metabolic activity to convert simple sugars into ethanol even under fully aerobic conditions. This fermentation capacity, named Crabtree effect, reduces the cell-biomass production but provides in nature a tool to out-compete other microorganisms. Here, we analyzed over forty Saccharomycetaceae yeasts, covering over 200 million years of the evolutionary history, for their carbon metabolism. The experiments were done under strictly controlled and uniform conditions, which has not been done before. We show that the origin of Crabtree effect in Saccharomycetaceae predates the whole genome duplication and became a settled metabolic trait after the split of the S. cerevisiae and Kluyveromyces lineages, and coincided with the origin of modern fruit bearing plants. Our results suggest that ethanol fermentation evolved progressively, involving several successive molecular events that have gradually remodeled the yeast carbon metabolism. While some of the final evolutionary events, like gene duplications of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes, have been deduced, the earliest molecular events initiating Crabtree effect are still to be determined.

  5. [Control levels of Sin3 histone deacetylase for spontaneous and UV-induced mutagenesis in yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebovka, I Iu; Kozhina, T N; Fedorova, I V; Peshekhonov, V T; Evstiukhina, T A; Chernenkov, A Iu; Korolev, V G

    2014-01-01

    SIN3 gene product operates as a repressor for a huge amount of genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sin3 protein with a mass of about 175 kDa is a member of the RPD3 protein complex with an assessed mass of greater than 2 million Da. It was previously shownthat RPD3 gene mutations influence recombination and repair processes in S. cerevisiae yeasts. We studied the impacts of the sin3 mutation on UV-light sensitivity and UV-induced mutagenesis in budding yeast cells. The deletion ofthe SIN3 gene causes weak UV-sensitivity of mutant budding cells as compared to the wild-type strain. These results show that the sin3 mutation decreases both spontaneous and UV-induced levels of levels. This fact is hypothetically related to themalfunction of ribonucleotide reductase activity regulation, which leads to a decrease in the dNTP pool and the inaccurate error-prone damage bypass postreplication repair pathway, which in turn provokes a reduction in the incidence of mutations.

  6. Metabolic control analysis of xylose catabolism in Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prathumpai, Wai; Gabelgaard, J.B.; Wanchanthuek, P.

    2003-01-01

    , and flux control was shown to be dependent on the metabolite levels. Due to thermodynamic constraints, flux control may reside at the first step in the pathway, i.e., at the xylose reductase, even when the intracellular xylitol concentration is high. On the basis of the kinetic analysis, the general dogma...

  7. The yeast metabolome addressed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: Initiation of a mass spectral library and its applications for metabolic footprinting by direct infusion mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højer-Pedersen, Jesper Juul; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a major driver for metabolomics, and gas chromatography (GC)-MS has been one of the primary techniques used for microbial metabolomics. The use of liquid chromatography (LC)-MS has however been limited, but electrospray ionization (ESI) is very well suited...... for ionization of microbial metabolites without any previous derivatization needed. To address the capabilities of ESI-MS in detecting the metabolome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the in silico metabolome of this organism was used as a template to present a theoretical metabolome. This showed that in combination......, which could be assigned using the in silico metabolome. By this approach metabolic footprinting can advance from a classification method that is used to derive biological information based on guilt-by-association, to a tool for extraction of metabolic differences, which can guide new targeted biological...

  8. Yeast-based biosensors: design and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniran, Adebola; Sherer, Michael; Tyo, Keith E J

    2015-02-01

    Yeast-based biosensing (YBB) is an exciting research area, as many studies have demonstrated the use of yeasts to accurately detect specific molecules. Biosensors incorporating various yeasts have been reported to detect an incredibly large range of molecules including but not limited to odorants, metals, intracellular metabolites, carcinogens, lactate, alcohols, and sugars. We review the detection strategies available for different types of analytes, as well as the wide range of output methods that have been incorporated with yeast biosensors. We group biosensors into two categories: those that are dependent upon transcription of a gene to report the detection of a desired molecule and those that are independent of this reporting mechanism. Transcription-dependent biosensors frequently depend on heterologous expression of sensing elements from non-yeast organisms, a strategy that has greatly expanded the range of molecules available for detection by YBBs. Transcription-independent biosensors circumvent the problem of sensing difficult-to-detect analytes by instead relying on yeast metabolism to generate easily detected molecules when the analyte is present. The use of yeast as the sensing element in biosensors has proven to be successful and continues to hold great promise for a variety of applications. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  9. Performance of non-conventional yeasts in co-culture with brewers’ yeast for steering ethanol and aroma production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijswijck, van Irma M.H.; Wolkers - Rooijackers, Judith C.M.; Abee, Tjakko; Smid, Eddy J.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing interest in new beer types has stimulated the search for approaches to extend the metabolic variation of brewers’ yeast. Therefore, we tested two approaches using non-conventional yeast to create a beer with lower ethanol content and a complex aroma bouquet. First, the mono-culture

  10. Dietary iron controls circadian hepatic glucose metabolism through heme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcox, Judith A; Mitchell, Thomas Creighton; Gao, Yan; Just, Steven F; Cooksey, Robert; Cox, James; Ajioka, Richard; Jones, Deborah; Lee, Soh-Hyun; King, Daniel; Huang, Jingyu; McClain, Donald A

    2015-04-01

    The circadian rhythm of the liver maintains glucose homeostasis, and disruption of this rhythm is associated with type 2 diabetes. Feeding is one factor that sets the circadian clock in peripheral tissues, but relatively little is known about the role of specific dietary components in that regard. We assessed the effects of dietary iron on circadian gluconeogenesis. Dietary iron affects circadian glucose metabolism through heme-mediated regulation of the interaction of nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group d member 1 (Rev-Erbα) with its cosuppressor nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR). Loss of regulated heme synthesis was achieved by aminolevulinic acid (ALA) treatment of mice or cultured cells to bypass the rate-limiting enzyme in hepatic heme synthesis, ALA synthase 1 (ALAS1). ALA treatment abolishes differences in hepatic glucose production and in the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes seen with variation of dietary iron. The differences among diets are also lost with inhibition of heme synthesis with isonicotinylhydrazine. Dietary iron modulates levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a transcriptional activator of ALAS1, to affect hepatic heme. Treatment of mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine diminishes PGC-1α variation observed among the iron diets, suggesting that iron is acting through reactive oxygen species signaling. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  11. Tools for genetic engineering of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saraya, Ruchi; Gidijala, Loknath; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J; Mapelli, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Hansenula polymorpha is a methylotrophic yeast species that has favorable properties for heterologous protein production and metabolic engineering. It provides an attractive expression platform with the capability to secrete high levels of commercially important proteins. Over the past few years

  12. Vaginal yeast infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts ...

  13. Diabetes in children and adolescents from ethnic minorities: barriers to education, treatment and good metabolic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Lene; Olsen, Birthe; Ladelund, Steen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: This paper reports an investigation to establish whether metabolic control is different in children and adolescents from ethnic minorities with type 1 diabetes compared with young Danish patients, and to learn about factors affecting their opportunities to achieve good metabolic control....... BACKGROUND: The prevalence of diabetes in children and adolescents from ethnic minorities in Denmark is increasing. Having a different ethnic background has frequently been described as a risk factor for poor metabolic control, but whether the risk is represented by the ethnicity and immigration itself...... the centres provided limited specialized knowledge and support. The questionnaires completed by the parents revealed limited schooling, lack of professional education and a major need for interpreters; these characteristics were especially prevalent among the mothers. CONCLUSIONS: Young patients from ethnic...

  14. Requirement of Sequences outside the Conserved Kinase Domain of Fission Yeast Rad3p for Checkpoint Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Carolyn Riley; Evans, Sarah Tyler; Carr, Antony M.; Enoch, Tamar

    1999-01-01

    The fission yeast Rad3p checkpoint protein is a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related family of protein kinases, which includes human ATMp. Mutation of the ATM gene is responsible for the disease ataxia-telangiectasia. The kinase domain of Rad3p has previously been shown to be essential for function. Here, we show that although this domain is necessary, it is not sufficient, because the isolated kinase domain does not have kinase activity in vitro and cannot complement a rad3 deletion strain. Using dominant negative alleles of rad3, we have identified two sites N-terminal to the conserved kinase domain that are essential for Rad3p function. One of these sites is the putative leucine zipper, which is conserved in other phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related family members. The other is a novel motif, which may also mediate Rad3p protein–protein interactions. PMID:10512862

  15. A metabolic switch controls intestinal differentiation downstream of Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Imelda T; Delacruz, Richard Glenn C; Miller, Braden N; Hill, Shauna; Olson, Kristofor A; Gabriel, Ana E; Boyd, Kevin; Satterfield, Christeena; Remmen, Holly Van; Rutter, Jared; Jones, David A

    2017-04-11

    Elucidating signaling pathways that regulate cellular metabolism is essential for a better understanding of normal development and tumorigenesis. Recent studies have shown that mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (MPC1) , a crucial player in pyruvate metabolism, is downregulated in colon adenocarcinomas. Utilizing zebrafish to examine the genetic relationship between MPC1 and Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), a key tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer, we found that apc controls the levels of mpc1 and that knock down of mpc1 recapitulates phenotypes of impaired apc function including failed intestinal differentiation. Exogenous human MPC1 RNA rescued failed intestinal differentiation in zebrafish models of apc deficiency. Our data demonstrate a novel role for apc in pyruvate metabolism and that pyruvate metabolism dictates intestinal cell fate and differentiation decisions downstream of apc .

  16. Differences between flocculating yeast and regular industrial yeast in transcription and metabolite profiling during ethanol fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To improve ethanolic fermentation performance of self-flocculating yeast, difference between a flocculating yeast strain and a regular industrial yeast strain was analyzed by transcriptional and metabolic approaches. Results: The number of down-regulated (industrial yeast YIC10 vs. flocculating yeast GIM2.71 and up-regulated genes were 4503 and 228, respectively. It is the economic regulation for YIC10 that non-essential genes were down-regulated, and cells put more “energy” into growth and ethanol production. Hexose transport and phosphorylation were not the limiting-steps in ethanol fermentation for GIM2.71 compared to YIC10, whereas the reaction of 1,3-disphosphoglycerate to 3-phosphoglycerate, the decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and its subsequent reduction to ethanol were the most limiting steps. GIM2.71 had stronger stress response than non-flocculating yeast and much more carbohydrate was distributed to other bypass, such as glycerol, acetate and trehalose synthesis. Conclusions: Differences between flocculating yeast and regular industrial yeast in transcription and metabolite profiling will provide clues for improving the fermentation performance of GIM2.71.

  17. Control activity of yeast geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase from dimer interface through H-bonds and hydrophobic interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Kang; Teng, Kuo-Hsun; Lin, Sheng-Wei; Chang, Tao-Hsin; Liang, Po-Huang

    2013-04-23

    Previously we showed that yeast geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS) becomes an inactive monomer when the first N-terminal helix involved in dimerization is deleted. This raises questions regarding why dimerization is required for GGPPS activity and which amino acids in the dimer interface are essential for dimerization-mediated activity. According to the GGPPS crystal structure, three amino acids (N101, N104, and Y105) located in the helix F of one subunit are near the active site of the other subunit. As presented here, when these residues were replaced individually with Ala caused insignificant activity changes, N101A/Y105A and N101A/N104A but not N104A/Y105A showed remarkably decreased k(cat) values (200-250-fold). The triple mutant N101A/N104A/Y105A displayed no detectable activity, although dimer was retained in these mutants. Because N101 and Y105 form H-bonds with H139 and R140 in the other subunit, respectively, we generated H139A/R140A double mutant and found it was inactive and became monomeric. Therefore, the multiple mutations apparently influence the integrity of the catalytic site due to the missing H-bonding network. Moreover, Met111, also on the highly conserved helix F, was necessary for dimer formation and enzyme activity. When Met111 was replaced with Glu, the negative-charged repulsion converted half of the dimer into a monomer. In conclusion, the H-bonds mainly through N101 for maintaining substrate binding stability and the hydrophobic interaction of M111 in dimer interface are essential for activity of yeast GGPPS.

  18. Emerging roles of the intestine in control of cholesterol metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, Janine-K.; Groen, Albert K.; van Berkel, Theo J.; Kuipers, Folkert

    2006-01-01

    The liver is considered the major "control center" for maintenance of whole body cholesterol homeostasis. This organ is the main site for de novo cholesterol synthesis, clears cholesterol-containing chylomicron remnants and low density lipoprotein particles from plasma and is the major contributor

  19. Roles for Orexin/Hypocretin in the Control of Energy Balance and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, Paulette B; Myers, Martin G

    The neuropeptide hypocretin is also commonly referred to as orexin, since its orexigenic action was recognized early. Orexin/hypocretin (OX) neurons project widely throughout the brain and the physiologic and behavioral functions of OX are much more complex than initially conceived based upon the stimulation of feeding. OX most notably controls functions relevant to attention, alertness, and motivation. OX also plays multiple crucial roles in the control of food intake, metabolism, and overall energy balance in mammals. OX signaling not only promotes food-seeking behavior upon short-term fasting to increase food intake and defend body weight, but, conversely, OX signaling also supports energy expenditure to protect against obesity. Furthermore, OX modulates the autonomic nervous system to control glucose metabolism, including during the response to hypoglycemia. Consistently, a variety of nutritional cues (including the hormones leptin and ghrelin) and metabolites (e.g., glucose, amino acids) control OX neurons. In this chapter, we review the control of OX neurons by nutritional/metabolic cues, along with our current understanding of the mechanisms by which OX and OX neurons contribute to the control of energy balance and metabolism.

  20. Metabolic Control and Illness Perceptions in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line Wisting

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Disturbed eating behavior and psychosocial variables have been found to influence metabolic control, but little is known about how these variables interact or how they influence metabolic control, separately and combined. Objective. To explore associations between metabolic control (measured by HbA1c and eating disorder psychopathology, coping strategies, illness perceptions, and insulin beliefs in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Methods. A total of 105 patients (41.9% males with type 1 diabetes (12–20 years were interviewed with the Child Eating Disorder Examination. In addition, self-report psychosocial questionnaires were completed. Clinical data, including HbA1c, was obtained from the Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry. Results. Significant gender differences were demonstrated. Among females, HbA1c correlated significantly with eating restriction (.29, p < .05, the illness perception dimensions consequences, personal control, coherence, and concern (ranging from .33 to .48, and the coping strategy ventilating negative feelings (−.26, p < .05. Illness perception personal control contributed significantly to HbA1c in a regression model, explaining 23% of the variance among females (β .48, p < .001. None of the variables were significantly associated with HbA1c among males. Conclusions. Illness perceptions appear to be important contributors to metabolic control in females, but not males, with type 1 diabetes.

  1. Role of Parenting Style in Achieving Metabolic Control in Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Shorer, Maayan; David, Ravit; Schoenberg-Taz, Michal; Levavi-Lavi, Ifat; Phillip, Moshe; Meyerovitch, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the role of parenting style in achieving metabolic control and treatment adherence in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Parents of 100 adolescents with type 1 diabetes completed assessments of their parenting style and sense of helplessness. Parents and patients rated patient adherence to the treatment regimen. Glycemic control was evaluated by HbA1c values. RESULTS An authoritative paternal parenting style predicted better glycemic control and...

  2. Control of Hepatic Glucose Metabolism by the Oral Hypoglycemic Sulfonylureas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-11

    diphosphate, 0.2 mM; 2,3 diphosphoglycerate , 0.1 mM; NADH, 0.2 mM; and 0.60 ml of deprotelnized sample. Pyruvate was measured by following the oxidation...J,; Rodgrlgues, L,M,; Whitton, P,A, and Hems, D,A, (1980) Control mechanisms in the acceleration of hepatic glycogen degradation during anoxia

  3. Modified metabolic syndrome and second cancers in women: A case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Mendoza, Carlos-Manuel; Pérez-Chávez, Ernesto; Fuente-Vera, Tania-Angélica De-la

    2016-01-01

    According to some studies, the metabolic syndrome causes diverse primary cancers; however, there is no evidence about metabolic syndrome impact on second cancers development in women. To find out the implication of the modified metabolic syndrome in women with second cancers. This was a case-control study, at a general hospital in Mexico City, in women with second cancers (cases) and age-matched women with only one neoplasm (controls). The analysis comprised: Tumor (s), anthropometric features, and body mass index (BMI); moreover, presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and fasting serum levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose. The sample was of nine cases and 27 controls. In cases, the metabolic syndrome (diabetes mellitus or glucose > 99 mg/dL + hypertension or blood pressure ≥ 135/85 mm Hg + triglycerides > 149 mg/dL or BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 ) was more frequent (odds ratio 20.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.9-227.1). Our results suggest that in women, the modified metabolic syndrome may be a risk factor for second cancers.

  4. Modified metabolic syndrome and second cancers in women: A case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos-Manuel Ortiz-Mendoza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to some studies, the metabolic syndrome causes diverse primary cancers; however, there is no evidence about metabolic syndrome impact on second cancers development in women. Aim: To find out the implication of the modified metabolic syndrome in women with second cancers. Materials and Methods: This was a case-control study, at a general hospital in Mexico City, in women with second cancers (cases and age-matched women with only one neoplasm (controls. The analysis comprised: Tumor (s, anthropometric features, and body mass index (BMI; moreover, presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and fasting serum levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose. Results: The sample was of nine cases and 27 controls. In cases, the metabolic syndrome (diabetes mellitus or glucose > 99 mg/dL + hypertension or blood pressure ≥ 135/85 mm Hg + triglycerides > 149 mg/dL or BMI ≥ 30 kg/m 2 was more frequent (odds ratio 20.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.9-227.1. Conclusion: Our results suggest that in women, the modified metabolic syndrome may be a risk factor for second cancers.

  5. Effect of live yeast culture Saccharomyces cerevisiae on milk production and some blood parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Peter Szucs

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of live yeast culture (Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sc 47 on milk yield, milk composition and some blood parameters of dairy cows during their early lactation on farm conditions. The live yeast culture was given in the diet of heifers and cows (5 g day-1 solid Actisaf for 14 days before calving and exclusively for the treated cows 12 g day-1 dissolved in 500 ml of water, during 14 days after calving. The experiment took until 100th day of lactation on farm conditions. Yeast culture supplementation was the most effective for the performance of primiparous cows: It was advantageous for blod plasma parameters: decreased the beta-hydroxy butyrate (BHB content and free fatty acids (FFA which indicated the protection of the animals against ketosis or other metabolic disorders. Increased the daily milk production and the lactose /glucose content of the milk. The live yeast culture increased the lactose content of the milk and decreased the somatic cell count of multiparous cows. The listed parameters were not significant (P<0.05 compare to the results of positive control groups. The applied live yeast culture supplementation did not significant affect for other performance of the cows.

  6. Control of Hepatic Glucose Metabolism by Islet and Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Jennifer M.; Schwartz, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of hepatic glucose uptake (HGU) and inability of insulin to suppress hepatic glucose production (HGP), both contribute to hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Growing evidence suggests that insulin can inhibit HGP not only through a direct effect on the liver, but also via a mechanism involving the brain. Yet the notion that insulin action in the brain plays a physiological role in the control of HGP continues to be controversial. Although studies in dogs suggest that the direct hepatic effect of insulin is sufficient to explain day-to-day control of HGP, a surprising outcome has been revealed by recent studies in mice investigating whether the direct hepatic action of insulin is necessary for normal HGP: when hepatic insulin signaling pathway was genetically disrupted, HGP was maintained normally even in the absence of direct input from insulin. Here we present evidence that points to a potentially important role of the brain in the physiological control of both HGU and HGP in response to input from insulin as well as other hormones and nutrients. PMID:25200294

  7. Role of glycolytic intermediate in regulation: Improving lycopene production in Escherichia coli by engineering metabolic control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, W.R.; Liao, J.C.

    2001-06-01

    Metabolic engineering in the postgenomic era is expected to benefit from a full understanding of the biosynthetic capability of microorganisms as a result of the progress being made in bioinformatics and functional genomics. The immediate advantage of such information is to allow the rational design of novel pathways and the elimination of native reactions that are detrimental or unnecessary for the desired purpose. However, with the ability to manipulate metabolic pathways becoming more effective, metabolic engineering will need to face a new challenge: the reengineering of the regulatory hierarchy that controls gene expression in those pathways. In addition to constructing the genetic composition of a metabolic pathway, they propose that it will become just as important to consider the dynamics of pathways gene expression. It has been widely observed that high-level induction of a recombinant protein or pathway leads to growth retardation and reduced metabolic activity. These phenotypic characteristics result from the fact that the constant demands of production placed upon the cell interfere with its changing requirements for growth. They believe that this common situation in metabolic engineering can be alleviated by designing a dynamic controller that is able to sense the metabolic state of the cell and regulate the expression of the recombinant pathway accordingly. This approach, which is termed metabolic control engineering, involves redesigning the native regulatory circuits and applying them to the recombinant pathway. The general goal of such an effort will be to control the flux to the recombinant pathway adaptively according to the cell's metabolic state. The dynamically controlled recombinant pathway can potentially lead to enhanced production, minimized growth retardation, and reduced toxic by-product formation. The regulation of gene expression in response to the physiological state is also essential to the success of gene therapy. Here they

  8. Alpha-ketoglutarate enhances freeze-thaw tolerance and prevents carbohydrate-induced cell death of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliak, Maria M; Hrynkiv, Olha V; Knyhynytska, Roksolana V; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2018-01-01

    Stress resistance and fermentative capability are important quality characteristics of baker's yeast. In the present study, we examined protective effects of exogenous alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG), an intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and amino acid metabolism, against freeze-thaw and carbohydrate-induced stresses in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growth on AKG-supplemented medium prevented a loss of viability and improved fermentative capacity of yeast cells after freeze-thaw treatment. The cells grown in the presence of AKG had higher levels of amino acids (e.g., proline), higher metabolic activity and total antioxidant capacity, and higher activities of catalase, NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthase compared to control ones. Both synthesis of amino acids and enhancement of antioxidant system capacity could be involved in AKG-improved freeze-thaw tolerance in S. cerevisiae. Cell viability dramatically decreased under incubation of stationary-phase yeast cells in 2% glucose or fructose solutions (in the absence of the other nutrients) as compared with incubation in distilled water or in 10 mM AKG solution. The decrease in cell viability was accompanied by acidification of the medium, and decrease in cellular respiration, aconitase activity, and levels of total protein and free amino acids. The supplementation with 10 mM AKG effectively prevented carbohydrate-induced yeast death. Protective mechanisms of AKG could be associated with the intensification of respiration and prevention of decreasing protein level as well as with direct antioxidant AKG action.

  9. Effect of Protectants on the Fermentation Performance of Wine Yeasts Subjected to Osmotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Caridi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During alcoholic fermentation of must from dried grapes, yeasts are subjected to very high sugar concentrations, besides other environmental stresses, and they modify their metabolic behaviour giving low ethanol yield and abnormally high acetic acid production. To investigate the protective effect of catechin, inositol, and SO2 on wine yeasts, three thermotolerant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, selected for wine making of must from dried grapes, and three strains of Saccharomyces selected for the production of wine, were inoculated in a sample of must at very high osmotic strength. A significant (p<0.01 or p<0.05 relationship between the addition of 100 mg/L of catechin, inositol or SO2 to the grape must and the change in the metabolic behaviour of the yeasts was observed. Compared to the control and depending on strain and protectant, the fermentation rate after 3 days increased up to 55 %, the ethanol content of the wines increased up to 16 %, the unitary succinic acid production increased up to 55 %, the unitary acetic acid production decreased up to 53 %, and the unitary glycerol production decreased up to 69 %. So by adding catechin, inositol or SO2 to the grape must it is possible to minimise the abnormal fermentation performance that wine yeasts exhibit in wine making of must from dried grapes.

  10. Herbicide glufosinate inhibits yeast growth and extends longevity during wine fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Beatriz; Picazo, Cecilia; Orozco, Helena; Matallana, Emilia; Aranda, Agustín

    2017-09-29

    Glufosinate ammonium (GA) is a widely used herbicide that inhibits glutamine synthetase. This inhibition leads to internal amino acid starvation which, in turn, causes the activation of different nutrient sensing pathways. GA also inhibits the enzyme of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in such a way that, although it is not used as a fungicide, it may alter yeast performance in industrial processes like winemaking. We describe herein how GA indeed inhibits the yeast growth of a wine strain during the fermentation of grape juice. In turn, GA extends longevity in a variety of growth media. The biochemical analysis indicates that GA partially inhibits the nutrient sensing TORC1 pathway, which may explain these phenotypes. The GCN2 kinase mutant is hypersensitive to GA. Hence the control of translation and amino acid biosynthesis is required to also deal with the damaging effects of this pesticide. A global metabolomics analysis under winemaking conditions indicated that an increase in amino acid and in polyamines occurred. In conclusion, GA affects many different biochemical processes during winemaking, which provides us with some insights into both the effect of this herbicide on yeast physiology and into the relevance of the metabolic step for connecting nitrogen and carbon metabolism.

  11. The relative contribution of insulin secretory capacity, insulin action, and incretins to metabolic control after islet transplantation in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burg, MPM; van Suylichem, PTR; Guicherit, OR; Frolich, M; Lemkes, HHPJ; Gooszen, HG

    Adequate metabolic control is central to the concept of islet transplantation, but has received limited attention. We studied metabolic control in 8 dogs at 6-9 months after intrasplenic autografting of similar to 25% of the normal mass islets - as compared to 30 controls. A similar posttransplant

  12. Comprehensive assessment of variables affecting metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qteishat, Rola Reyad; Ghananim, Abdel Rahman Al

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify variables affecting metabolic control among diabetic patients treated at diabetes and endocrine clinic in Jordan. A total of 200 patients were studied by using a cross sectional study design. Data were collected from patients' medical records, glycemic control tests and prestructured questionnaires about variables that were potentially important based on previous researches and clinical judgment: Adherence evaluation, Patients' knowledge about drug therapy and non-pharmacological therapy, Anxiety and depression, Beliefs about diabetes treatment (benefits and barriers of treatment), Knowledge about treatment goals, Knowledge about diabetes, Self efficacy, and Social support. The mean (±SD) age was 53.5 (±10.38) years and mean HbA1c was 8.4 (±1.95). In the multivariate analysis, education level, and self efficacy found to have significantly independent association with metabolic control (Pknowledge and high self efficacy was significant in patients with good metabolic control. Emphasizing the importance of continuous educational programs and improving the self efficacy as well, could warrant achieving good metabolic control. Copyright © 2015 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Yeast biotechnology: teaching the old dog new tricks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are regarded as the first microorganisms used by humans to process food and alcoholic beverages. The technology developed out of these ancient processes has been the basis for modern industrial biotechnology. Yeast biotechnology has gained great interest again in the last decades. Joining the potentials of genomics, metabolic engineering, systems and synthetic biology enables the production of numerous valuable products of primary and secondary metabolism, technical enzymes and biopharmaceutical proteins. An overview of emerging and established substrates and products of yeast biotechnology is provided and discussed in the light of the recent literature. PMID:24602262

  14. Yeast biotechnology: teaching the old dog new tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattanovich, Diethard; Sauer, Michael; Gasser, Brigitte

    2014-03-06

    Yeasts are regarded as the first microorganisms used by humans to process food and alcoholic beverages. The technology developed out of these ancient processes has been the basis for modern industrial biotechnology. Yeast biotechnology has gained great interest again in the last decades. Joining the potentials of genomics, metabolic engineering, systems and synthetic biology enables the production of numerous valuable products of primary and secondary metabolism, technical enzymes and biopharmaceutical proteins. An overview of emerging and established substrates and products of yeast biotechnology is provided and discussed in the light of the recent literature.

  15. A dual control mechanism synchronizes riboflavin and sulphur metabolism in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrolli, Danielle Biscaro; Kühm, Christian; Sévin, Daniel C.; Vockenhuber, Michael P.; Sauer, Uwe; Suess, Beatrix; Mack, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) riboswitches are genetic elements, which in many bacteria control genes responsible for biosynthesis and/or transport of riboflavin (rib genes). Cytoplasmic riboflavin is rapidly and almost completely converted to FMN by flavokinases. When cytoplasmic levels of FMN are sufficient (“high levels”), FMN binding to FMN riboswitches leads to a reduction of rib gene expression. We report here that the protein RibR counteracts the FMN-induced “turn-off” activities of both FMN riboswitches in Bacillus subtilis, allowing rib gene expression even in the presence of high levels of FMN. The reason for this secondary metabolic control by RibR is to couple sulfur metabolism with riboflavin metabolism. PMID:26494285

  16. [Metabolic control in the critically ill patient an update: hyperglycemia, glucose variability hypoglycemia and relative hypoglycemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Calatayud, Ángel Augusto; Guillén-Vidaña, Ariadna; Fraire-Félix, Irving Santiago; Anica-Malagón, Eduardo Daniel; Briones Garduño, Jesús Carlos; Carrillo-Esper, Raúl

    Metabolic changes of glucose in critically ill patients increase morbidity and mortality. The appropriate level of blood glucose has not been established so far and should be adjusted for different populations. However concepts such as glucose variability and relative hypoglycemia of critically ill patients are concepts that are changing management methods and achieving closer monitoring. The purpose of this review is to present new data about the management and metabolic control of patients in critical areas. Currently glucose can no longer be regarded as an innocent element in critical patients; both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia increase morbidity and mortality of patients. Protocols and better instruments for continuous measurement are necessary to achieve the metabolic control of our patients. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. The FOX transcription factor Hcm1 regulates oxidative metabolism in response to early nutrient limitation in yeast. Role of Snf1 and Tor1/Sch9 kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Colman, María José; Sorolla, M Alba; Vall-Llaura, Núria; Tamarit, Jordi; Ros, Joaquim; Cabiscol, Elisa

    2013-08-01

    Within Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Hcm1is a member of the forkhead transcription factor family with a role in chromosome organization. Our group recently described its involvement in mitochondrial biogenesis and stress resistance, and reports here that Hcm1 played a role in adaptation to respiratory metabolism when glucose or nitrogen was decreased. Regulation of Hcm1 activity occurs in at least three ways: i) protein quantity, ii) subcellular localization, and iii) transcriptional activity. Transcriptional activity was measured using a reporter gene fused to a promoter that contains a binding site for Hcm1. We also analyzed the levels of several genes whose expression is known to be regulated by Hcm1 levels and the role of the main kinases known to respond to nutrients. Lack of sucrose-nonfermenting (Snf1) kinase increases cytoplasmic localization of Hcm1, whereas Δtor1 cells showed a mild increase in nuclear Hcm1. In vitro experiments showed that Snf1 clearly phosphorylates Hcm1 while Sch9 exerts a milder phosphorylation. Although in vitroTor1 does not directly phosphorylate Hcm1, in vivo rapamycin treatment increases nuclear Hcm1. We conclude that Hcm1 participates in the adaptation of cells from fermentation to respiratory metabolism during nutrient scarcity. According to our hypothesis, when nutrient levels decrease, Snf1 phosphorylates Hcm1. This results in a shift from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and increased transcriptional activity of genes involved in respiration, use of alternative energy sources, NAD synthesis and oxidative stress resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Urea and Ammonia Metabolism and the Control of Renal Nitrogen Excretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitch, William E.; Sands, Jeff M.

    2015-01-01

    Renal nitrogen metabolism primarily involves urea and ammonia metabolism, and is essential to normal health. Urea is the largest circulating pool of nitrogen, excluding nitrogen in circulating proteins, and its production changes in parallel to the degradation of dietary and endogenous proteins. In addition to serving as a way to excrete nitrogen, urea transport, mediated through specific urea transport proteins, mediates a central role in the urine concentrating mechanism. Renal ammonia excretion, although often considered only in the context of acid-base homeostasis, accounts for approximately 10% of total renal nitrogen excretion under basal conditions, but can increase substantially in a variety of clinical conditions. Because renal ammonia metabolism requires intrarenal ammoniagenesis from glutamine, changes in factors regulating renal ammonia metabolism can have important effects on glutamine in addition to nitrogen balance. This review covers aspects of protein metabolism and the control of the two major molecules involved in renal nitrogen excretion: urea and ammonia. Both urea and ammonia transport can be altered by glucocorticoids and hypokalemia, two conditions that also affect protein metabolism. Clinical conditions associated with altered urine concentrating ability or water homeostasis can result in changes in urea excretion and urea transporters. Clinical conditions associated with altered ammonia excretion can have important effects on nitrogen balance. PMID:25078422

  19. Yeast for virus research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Richard Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) are two popular model organisms for virus research. They are natural hosts for viruses as they carry their own indigenous viruses. Both yeasts have been used for studies of plant, animal and human viruses. Many positive sense (+) RNA viruses and some DNA viruses replicate with various levels in yeasts, thus allowing study of those viral activities during viral life cycle. Yeasts are single cell eukaryotic organisms. Hence, many of the fundamental cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation or programed cell death are highly conserved from yeasts to higher eukaryotes. Therefore, they are particularly suited to study the impact of those viral activities on related cellular activities during virus-host interactions. Yeasts present many unique advantages in virus research over high eukaryotes. Yeast cells are easy to maintain in the laboratory with relative short doubling time. They are non-biohazardous, genetically amendable with small genomes that permit genome-wide analysis of virologic and cellular functions. In this review, similarities and differences of these two yeasts are described. Studies of virologic activities such as viral translation, viral replication and genome-wide study of virus-cell interactions in yeasts are highlighted. Impacts of viral proteins on basic cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation and programed cell death are discussed. Potential applications of using yeasts as hosts to carry out functional analysis of small viral genome and to develop high throughput drug screening platform for the discovery of antiviral drugs are presented. PMID:29082230

  20. Muscle insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism are controlled by the intrinsic muscle clock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyar, Kenneth A.; Ciciliot, Stefano; Wright, Lauren E.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms control metabolism and energy homeostasis, but the role of the skeletal muscle clock has never been explored. We generated conditional and inducible mouse lines with muscle-specific ablation of the core clock gene Bmal1. Skeletal muscles from these mice showed impaired insulin-s...

  1. The effect of metabolic control on hemodynamics in short-term insulin-dependent diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, E R; Hilsted, J; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1985-01-01

    Hemodynamics variables (heart rate, arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, hepato-splanchnic blood flow, forearm blood flow, and plasma catecholamines) were measured during good (median blood glucose 4.7 mmol/L) and poor (median blood glucose 16.3 mmol/L) metabolic control in eight young, short...

  2. The role of the autonomic nervous liver innervation in the control of energy metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, Chun-Xia; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2010-01-01

    Despite a longstanding research interest ever since the early work by Claude Bernard, the functional significance of autonomic liver innervation, either sympathetic or parasympathetic, is still ill defined. This scarcity of information not only holds for the brain control of hepatic metabolism, but

  3. Identification of a Sgo2-Dependent but Mad2-Independent Pathway Controlling Anaphase Onset in Fission Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Meadows

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The onset of anaphase is triggered by activation of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C following silencing of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC. APC/C triggers ubiquitination of Securin and Cyclin B, which leads to loss of sister chromatid cohesion and inactivation of Cyclin B/Cdk1, respectively. This promotes relocalization of Aurora B kinase and other components of the chromosome passenger complex (CPC from centromeres to the spindle midzone. In fission yeast, this is mediated by Clp1 phosphatase-dependent interaction of CPC with Klp9/MKLP2 (kinesin-6. When this interaction is disrupted, kinetochores bi-orient normally, but APC/C activation is delayed via a mechanism that requires Sgo2 and some (Bub1, Mph1/Mps1, and Mad3, but not all (Mad1 and Mad2, components of the SAC and the first, but not second, lysine, glutamic acid, glutamine (KEN box in Mad3. These data indicate that interaction of CPC with Klp9 terminates a Sgo2-dependent, but Mad2-independent, APC/C-inhibitory pathway that is distinct from the canonical SAC.

  4. Aeration Controls the Reduction and Methylation of Tellurium by the Aerobic, Tellurite-Resistant Marine Yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier, Patrick R. L.; Bahrou, Andrew S.; Church, Thomas M.; Hanson, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    We previously described a marine, tellurite-resistant strain of the yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa that both precipitates intracellular Te(0) and volatilizes methylated Te compounds when grown in the presence of the oxyanion tellurite. The uses of microbes as a “green” route for the production of Te(0)-containing nanostructures and for the remediation of Te-oxyanion wastes have great potential, and so a more thorough understanding of this process is required. Here, Te precipitation and volatilization catalyzed by R. mucilaginosa were examined in continuously aerated and sealed (low oxygen concentration) batch cultures. Continuous aeration was found to strongly promote Te volatilization while inhibiting Te(0) precipitation. This differs from the results in sealed batch cultures, for which tellurite reduction to Te(0) was found to be very efficient. We show also that volatile Te species may be degraded rapidly in medium and converted to the particulate form by biological activity. Further experiments revealed that Te(0) precipitates produced by R. mucilaginosa can be further transformed to volatile and dissolved Te species. However, it was not clearly determined whether Te(0) is a required intermediate for Te volatilization. Based on these results, we conclude that low oxygen concentrations will be the most efficient for production of Te(0) nanoparticles while limiting the production of toxic volatile Te species, although the production of these compounds may never be completely eliminated. PMID:21602387

  5. Rewiring AMPK and Mitochondrial Retrograde Signaling for Metabolic Control of Aging and Histone Acetylation in Respiratory-Defective Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Magnus N. Friis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal respiratory metabolism plays a role in numerous human disorders. We find that regulation of overall histone acetylation is perturbed in respiratory-incompetent (ρ0 yeast. Because histone acetylation is highly sensitive to acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA availability, we sought interventions that suppress this ρ0 phenotype through reprogramming metabolism. Nutritional intervention studies led to the discovery that genetic coactivation of the mitochondrion-to-nucleus retrograde (RTG response and the AMPK (Snf1 pathway prevents abnormal histone deacetylation in ρ0 cells. Metabolic profiling of signaling mutants uncovered links between chromatin-dependent phenotypes of ρ0 cells and metabolism of ATP, acetyl-CoA, glutathione, branched-chain amino acids, and the storage carbohydrate trehalose. Importantly, RTG/AMPK activation reprograms energy metabolism to increase the supply of acetyl-CoA to lysine acetyltransferases and extend the chronological lifespan of ρ0 cells. Our results strengthen the framework for rational design of nutrient supplementation schemes and drug-discovery initiatives aimed at mimicking the therapeutic benefits of dietary interventions.

  6. Reconstruction of the yeast Snf1 kinase regulatory network reveals its role as a global energy regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usaite, Renata; Jewett, Michael C; Oliveira, Ana Paula; Yates, John R; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Highly conserved among eukaryotic cells, the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is a central regulator of carbon metabolism. To map the complete network of interactions around AMPK in yeast (Snf1) and to evaluate the role of its regulatory subunit Snf4, we measured global mRNA, protein and metabolite levels in wild type, Δsnf1, Δsnf4, and Δsnf1Δsnf4 knockout strains. Using four newly developed computational tools, including novel DOGMA sub-network analysis, we showed the benefits of three-level ome-data integration to uncover the global Snf1 kinase role in yeast. We for the first time identified Snf1's global regulation on gene and protein expression levels, and showed that yeast Snf1 has a far more extensive function in controlling energy metabolism than reported earlier. Additionally, we identified complementary roles of Snf1 and Snf4. Similar to the function of AMPK in humans, our findings showed that Snf1 is a low-energy checkpoint and that yeast can be used more extensively as a model system for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying the global regulation of AMPK in mammals, failure of which leads to metabolic diseases. PMID:19888214

  7. Competition assays and physiological experiments of soil and phyllosphere yeasts identify Candida subhashii as a novel antagonist of filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilber-Bodmer, Maja; Schmid, Michael; Ahrens, Christian H; Freimoser, Florian M

    2017-01-05

    While recent advances in next generation sequencing technologies have enabled researchers to readily identify countless microbial species in soil, rhizosphere, and phyllosphere microbiomes, the biological functions of the majority of these species are unknown. Functional studies are therefore urgently needed in order to characterize the plethora of microorganisms that are being identified and to point out species that may be used for biotechnology or plant protection. Here, we used a dual culture assay and growth analyses to characterise yeasts (40 different isolates) and their antagonistic effect on 16 filamentous fungi; comprising plant pathogens, antagonists, and saprophytes. Overall, this competition screen of 640 pairwise combinations revealed a broad range of outcomes, ranging from small stimulatory effects of some yeasts up to a growth inhibition of more than 80% by individual species. On average, yeasts isolated from soil suppressed filamentous fungi more strongly than phyllosphere yeasts and the antagonistic activity was a species-/isolate-specific property and not dependent on the filamentous fungus a yeast was interacting with. The isolates with the strongest antagonistic activity were Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora sp., Cyberlindnera sargentensis, Aureobasidium pullulans, Candida subhashii, and Pichia kluyveri. Among these, the soil yeasts (C. sargentensis, A. pullulans, C. subhashii) assimilated and/or oxidized more di-, tri- and tetrasaccharides and organic acids than yeasts from the phyllosphere. Only the two yeasts C. subhashii and M. pulcherrima were able to grow with N-acetyl-glucosamine as carbon source. The competition assays and physiological experiments described here identified known antagonists that have been implicated in the biological control of plant pathogenic fungi in the past, but also little characterised species such as C. subhashii. Overall, soil yeasts were more antagonistic and metabolically versatile than yeasts from

  8. Making Sense of the Yeast Sphingolipid Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megyeri, Márton; Riezman, Howard; Schuldiner, Maya; Futerman, Anthony H

    2016-12-04

    Sphingolipids (SL) and their metabolites play key roles both as structural components of membranes and as signaling molecules. Many of the key enzymes and regulators of SL metabolism were discovered using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and based on the high degree of conservation, a number of mammalian homologs were identified. Although yeast continues to be an important tool for SL research, the complexity of SL structure and nomenclature often hampers the ability of new researchers to grasp the subtleties of yeast SL biology and discover new modulators of this intricate pathway. Moreover, the emergence of lipidomics by mass spectrometry has enabled the rapid identification of SL species in yeast and rendered the analysis of SL composition under various physiological and pathophysiological conditions readily amenable. However, the complex nomenclature of the identified species renders much of the data inaccessible to non-specialists. In this review, we focus on parsing both the classical SL nomenclature and the nomenclature normally used during mass spectrometry analysis, which should facilitate the understanding of yeast SL data and might shed light on biological processes in which SLs are involved. Finally, we discuss a number of putative roles of various yeast SL species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Flor Yeast: New Perspectives Beyond Wine Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Moreno-Garcia, Jaime; Zara, Severino; Zara, Giacomo; Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Mauricio, Juan C.; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Coi, Anna L.; Bou Zeidan, Marc; Dequin, Sylvie; Moreno, Juan; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-01-01

    The most important dogma in white-wine production is the preservation of the wine aroma and the limitation of the oxidative action of oxygen. In contrast, the aging of Sherry and Sherry-like wines is an aerobic process that depends on the oxidative activity of flor strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Under depletion of nitrogen and fermentable carbon sources, these yeast produce aggregates of floating cells and form an air–liquid biofilm on the wine surface, which is also known as velum or flor. This behavior is due to genetic and metabolic peculiarities that differentiate flor yeast from other wine yeast. This review will focus first on the most updated data obtained through the analysis of flor yeast with -omic tools. Comparative genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics of flor and wine yeast strains are shedding new light on several features of these special yeast, and in particular, they have revealed the extent of proteome remodeling imposed by the biofilm life-style. Finally, new insights in terms of promotion and inhibition of biofilm formation through small molecules, amino acids, and di/tri-peptides, and novel possibilities for the exploitation of biofilm immobilization within a fungal hyphae framework, will be discussed. PMID:27148192

  10. Yeast cell differentiation: Lessons from pathogenic and non-pathogenic yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palková, Zdena; Váchová, Libuše

    2016-09-01

    Yeasts, historically considered to be single-cell organisms, are able to activate different differentiation processes. Individual yeast cells can change their life-styles by processes of phenotypic switching such as the switch from yeast-shaped cells to filamentous cells (pseudohyphae or true hyphae) and the transition among opaque, white and gray cell-types. Yeasts can also create organized multicellular structures such as colonies and biofilms, and the latter are often observed as contaminants on surfaces in industry and medical care and are formed during infections of the human body. Multicellular structures are formed mostly of stationary-phase or slow-growing cells that diversify into specific cell subpopulations that have unique metabolic properties and can fulfill specific tasks. In addition to the development of multiple protective mechanisms, processes of metabolic reprogramming that reflect a changed environment help differentiated individual cells and/or community cell constituents to survive harmful environmental attacks and/or to escape the host immune system. This review aims to provide an overview of differentiation processes so far identified in individual yeast cells as well as in multicellular communities of yeast pathogens of the Candida and Cryptococcus spp. and the Candida albicans close relative, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Molecular mechanisms and extracellular signals potentially involved in differentiation processes are also briefly mentioned. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. SIRT4 Is a Lysine Deacylase that Controls Leucine Metabolism and Insulin Secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Kristin A; Huynh, Frank K; Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey

    2017-01-01

    in leucine oxidation, and we show a primary role for SIRT4 in controlling this pathway in mice. Furthermore, we find that dysregulated leucine metabolism in SIRT4KO mice leads to elevated basal and stimulated insulin secretion, which progressively develops into glucose intolerance and insulin resistance....... These findings identify a robust enzymatic activity for SIRT4, uncover a mechanism controlling branched-chain amino acid flux, and position SIRT4 as a crucial player maintaining insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis during aging....

  12. Yeast: A new oil producer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beopoulos Athanasios

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand of plant oils or animal fat for biodiesel and specific lipid derivatives for the oleochemical field (such as lubricants, adhesives or plastics have created price imbalance in both the alimentary and energy field. Moreover, the lack of non-edible oil feedstock has given rise to concerns on land-use practices and on oil production strategies. Recently, much attention has been paid to the exploitation of microbial oils. Most of them present lipid profiles similar in type and composition to plants and could therefore have many advantages as are no competitive with food, have short process cycles and their cultivation is independent of climate factors. Among microorganisms, yeasts seem to be very promising as they can be easily genetically enhanced, are suitable for large-scale fermentation and are devoid of endotoxins. This review will focus on the recent understanding of yeasts lipid metabolism, the succeeding genetic engineering of the lipid pathways and the recent developments on fermentation techniques that pointed out yeasts as promising alternative producers for oil or plastic.

  13. Genome-wide screening for genes whose deletions confer sensitivity to mutagenic purine base analogs in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozmin Stanislav G

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background N-hydroxylated base analogs, such as 6-hydroxylaminopurine (HAP and 2-amino-6-hydroxylaminopurine (AHA, are strong mutagens in various organisms due to their ambiguous base-pairing properties. The systems protecting cells from HAP and related noncanonical purines in Escherichia coli include specialized deoxyribonucleoside triphosphatase RdgB, DNA repair endonuclease V, and a molybdenum cofactor-dependent system. Fewer HAP-detoxification systems have been identified in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other eukaryotes. Cellular systems protecting from AHA are unknown. In the present study, we performed a genome-wide search for genes whose deletions confer sensitivity to HAP and AHA in yeast. Results We screened the library of yeast deletion mutants for sensitivity to the toxic and mutagenic action of HAP and AHA. We identified novel genes involved in the genetic control of base analogs sensitivity, including genes controlling purine metabolism, cytoskeleton organization, and amino acid metabolism. Conclusion We developed a method for screening the yeast deletion library for sensitivity to the mutagenic and toxic action of base analogs and identified 16 novel genes controlling pathways of protection from HAP. Three of them also protect from AHA.

  14. Vulnerability to stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms and metabolic control in Type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gois Carlos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vulnerability to stress has been associated to distress, emotional distress symptoms and metabolic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients as well. Furthermore some conflicting results were noticed. We aimed to evaluate the effect over metabolic control in what concerns vulnerability to stress beyond depressive and anxiety symptoms. Findings This cross-sectional study assessed 273 T2DM patients with depressive and anxiety symptoms using the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS and the 23 Questions to assess Vulnerability to Stress (23QVS, along with demographic and clinical diabetes-related variables. Hierarchical logistic regression models were used to investigate predictors of poor glycemic control. The results showed an association of depressive symptoms (odds ratio = 1.12, 95%CI = 1.01-1.24, P = 0.030 with increased risk of poor glycemic control. Anxiety symptoms and vulnerability to stress on their own were not predictive of metabolic control, respectively (odds ratio = 0.92, 95%CI = 0.84-1.00, P = 0.187 and odds ratio = 0.98, 95%CI = 0.95-1.01, P = 0.282. Conclusions Our data suggested that vulnerability to stress was not predictive of poor glycemic control in T2DM, but depressive symptoms were.

  15. Alcohol decreases baseline brain glucose metabolism more in heavy drinkers than controls but has no effect on stimulation-induced metabolic increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack; Shokri Kojori, Ehsan; Fowler, Joanna S; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-02-18

    During alcohol intoxication, the human brain increases metabolism of acetate and decreases metabolism of glucose as energy substrate. Here we hypothesized that chronic heavy drinking facilitates this energy substrate shift both for baseline and stimulation conditions. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of alcohol intoxication (0.75 g/kg alcohol vs placebo) on brain glucose metabolism during video stimulation (VS) versus when given with no stimulation (NS), in 25 heavy drinkers (HDs) and 23 healthy controls, each of whom underwent four PET-(18)FDG scans. We showed that resting whole-brain glucose metabolism (placebo-NS) was lower in HD than controls (13%, p = 0.04); that alcohol (compared with placebo) decreased metabolism more in HD (20 ± 13%) than controls (9 ± 11%, p = 0.005) and in proportion to daily alcohol consumption (r = 0.36, p = 0.01) but found that alcohol did not reduce the metabolic increases in visual cortex from VS in either group. Instead, VS reduced alcohol-induced decreases in whole-brain glucose metabolism (10 ± 12%) compared with NS in both groups (15 ± 13%, p = 0.04), consistent with stimulation-related glucose metabolism enhancement. These findings corroborate our hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption facilitates use of alternative energy substrates (i.e., acetate) for resting activity during intoxication, which might persist through early sobriety, but indicate that glucose is still favored as energy substrate during brain stimulation. Our findings are consistent with reduced reliance on glucose as the main energy substrate for resting brain metabolism during intoxication (presumably shifting to acetate or other ketones) and a priming of this shift in HDs, which might make them vulnerable to energy deficits during withdrawal. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/353248-08$15.00/0.

  16. Alcohol decreases baseline brain glucose metabolism more in heavy drinkers than controls but has no effect on stimulation-induced metabolic increases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Kojori, Eshan Shokri; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-01-01

    During alcohol intoxication the human brain increases metabolism of acetate and decreases metabolism of glucose as energy substrate. Here we hypothesized that chronic heavy drinking facilitates this energy substrate shift both for baseline and stimulation conditions. To test this hypothesis we compared the effects of alcohol intoxication (0.75g/kg alcohol versus placebo) on brain glucose metabolism during video-stimulation (VS) versus when given with no-stimulation (NS), in 25 heavy drinkers (HD) and 23 healthy controls each of whom underwent four PET- 18 FDG scans. We showed that resting whole-brain glucose metabolism (placebo-NS) was lower in HD than controls (13%, p=0.04); that alcohol (compared to placebo) decreased metabolism more in HD (20±13%) than controls (9±11%, p=0.005) and in proportion to daily alcohol consumption (r=0.36, p=0.01) but found that alcohol did not reduce the metabolic increases in visual cortex from VS in either group. Instead, VS reduced alcohol-induced decreases in whole-brain glucose metabolism (10±12%) compared to NS in both groups (15±13%, p=0.04), consistent with stimulation-related glucose metabolism enhancement. These findings corroborate our hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption facilitates use of alternative energy substrates (i.e. acetate) for resting activity during intoxication, which might persist through early sobriety, but indicate that glucose is still favored as energy substrate during brain stimulation. Our findings are consistent with reduced reliance on glucose as the main energy substrate for resting brain metabolism during intoxication (presumably shifting to acetate or other ketones) and a priming of this shift in heavy drinkers, which might make them vulnerable to energy deficits during withdrawal

  17. Combined Effects of Ezetimibe and Phytosterols on Cholesterol Metabolism: A Randomized, Controlled Feeding Study in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaobo; Racette, Susan B.; Lefevre, Michael; Ma, Lina; Spearie, Catherine Anderson; Steger-May, Karen; Ostlund, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Both ezetimibe and phytosterols inhibit cholesterol absorption. We tested the hypothesis that ezetimibe combined with phytosterols is more effective than ezetimibe alone in altering cholesterol metabolism. Methods and Results Twenty-one mildly hypercholesterolemic subjects completed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, triple crossover study. Each subject received a phytosterol-controlled diet plus (1) ezetimibe placebo + phytosterol placebo, (2) 10 mg ezetimibe/day + phytosterol placebo, and (3) 10 mg ezetimibe/day + 2.5 g phytosterols/day, for 3 weeks each. All meals were prepared in a metabolic kitchen. Primary outcomes were intestinal cholesterol absorption, fecal cholesterol excretion, and LDL cholesterol levels. The combined treatment resulted in significantly lower intestinal cholesterol absorption (598 mg/day, 95% CI 368 to 828) relative to control (2161 mg/day, 1112 to 3209) and ezetimibe alone (1054 mg/day, 546 to 1561, both P phytosterols averaged 129 (95% CI: 116 to 142), 108 (97 to 119), and 101 (90 to 112) mg/dL (P phytosterols to ezetimibe significantly enhanced the effects of ezetimibe on whole-body cholesterol metabolism and plasma LDL cholesterol. The large cumulative action of combined dietary and pharmacologic treatment on cholesterol metabolism emphasizes the potential importance of dietary phytosterols as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:21768544

  18. VDAC electronics: 4. Novel electrical mechanism and thermodynamic estimations of glucose repression of yeast respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2017-11-01

    Inhibition of cell respiration by high concentrations of glucose (glucose repression), known as "Crabtree effect", has been demonstrated for various cancerous strains, highly proliferating cells and yeast lines. Although significant progress in understanding metabolic events associated with the glucose repression of cell respiration has been achieved, it is not yet clear whether the Crabtree effect is the result of a limited activity of the respiratory chain, or of some glucose-mediated regulation of mitochondrial metabolic state. In this work we propose an electrical mechanism of glucose repression of the yeast S. cerevisiae, resulting from generation of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential (OMP) coupled to the direct oxidation of cytosolic NADH in mitochondria. This yeast-type mechanism of OMP generation is different from the earlier proposed VDAC-hexokinase-mediated voltage generation of cancer-type, associated with the mitochondrial outer membrane. The model was developed assuming that VDAC is more permeable to NADH than to NAD + . Thermodynamic estimations of OMP, generated as a result of NADH(2-)/NAD + (1-) turnover through the outer membrane, demonstrated that the values of calculated negative OMP match the known range of VDAC voltage sensitivity, thus suggesting a possibility of OMP-dependent VDAC-mediated regulation of cell energy metabolism. According to the proposed mechanism, we suggest that the yeast-type Crabtree effect is the result of a fast VDAC-mediated electrical repression of mitochondria due to a decrease in the outer membrane permeability to charged metabolites and owing their redistribution between the mitochondrial intermembrane space and the cytosol, both controlled by metabolically-derived OMP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Thyroid peroxidase antibodies in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes: impact on thyroid function, metabolic control and pregnancy outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestgaard, Marianne; Nielsen, Lene Ringholm; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

    2008-01-01

    In pregnant women with type 1 diabetes, we evaluated whether the presence of thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (anti-TPO) was associated with changes in thyroid function, metabolic control and pregnancy outcome.......In pregnant women with type 1 diabetes, we evaluated whether the presence of thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (anti-TPO) was associated with changes in thyroid function, metabolic control and pregnancy outcome....

  20. Impact of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species in the control of energy metabolism and food intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eDrougard

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamus is a key area involved in the control of metabolism and food intake via the integrations of numerous signals (hormones, neurotransmitters, metabolites from various origins. These factors modify hypothalamic neurons activity and generate adequate molecular and behavioral responses to control energy balance. In this complex integrative system, a new concept has been developed in recent years, that includes reactive oxygen species (ROS as a critical player in energy balance. ROS are known to act in many signaling pathways in different peripheral organs, but also in hypothalamus where they regulate food intake and metabolism by acting on different types of neurons, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC and agouti-related protein (AgRP/neuropeptide Y (NPY neurons. Hypothalamic ROS release is under the influence of different factors such as pancreatic and gut hormones, adipokines (leptin, apelin,..., neurotransmitters and nutrients (glucose, lipids,.... The sources of ROS production are multiple including NADPH oxidase, but also the mitochondria which is considered as the main ROS producer in the brain. ROS are considered as signaling molecules, but conversely impairment of this neuronal signaling ROS pathway contributes to alterations of autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine function, leading to metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.In this review we focus our attention on factors that are able to modulate hypothalamic ROS release in order to control food intake and energy metabolism, and whose deregulations could participate to the development of pathological conditions. This novel insight reveals an original mechanism in the hypothalamus that controls energy balance and identify hypothalamic ROS signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat metabolic disorders.

  1. Metabolic Control of Dendritic Cell Activation and Function: Recent Advances and Clinical Implications

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    Bart eEverts

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are key regulators of both immunity and tolerance by controlling activation and polarization of effector T helper cell and regulatory T cell responses. Therefore, there is a major focus on developing approaches to manipulate DC function for immunotherapy. It is well known that changes in cellular activation are coupled to profound changes in cellular metabolism. Over the past decade there is a growing appreciation that these metabolic changes also underlie the capacity of immune cells to perform particular functions. This has led to the concept that the manipulation of cellular metabolism can be used to shape innate and adaptive immune responses. While most of our understanding in this area has been gained from studies with T cells and macrophages, evidence is emerging that the activation and function of DCs are also dictated by the type of metabolism these cells commit to. We here discuss these new insights and explore whether targeting of metabolic pathways in DCs could hold promise as a novel approach to manipulate the functional properties of DCs for clinical purposes.

  2. Metabolism and the Control of Cell Fate Decisions and Stem Cell Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kyoko; Ito, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Although the stem cells of various tissues remain in the quiescent state to maintain their undifferentiated state, they also undergo cell divisions as required, and if necessary, even a single stem cell is able to provide for lifelong tissue homeostasis. Stem cell populations are precisely controlled by the balance between their symmetric and asymmetric divisions, with their division patterns determined by whether the daughter cells involved retain their self-renewal capacities. Recent studies have reported that metabolic pathways and the distribution of mitochondria are regulators of the division balance of stem cells and that metabolic defects can shift division balance toward symmetric commitment, which leads to stem cell exhaustion. It has also been observed that in asymmetric division, old mitochondria, which are central metabolic organelles, are segregated to the daughter cell fated to cell differentiation, whereas in symmetric division, young and old mitochondria are equally distributed between both daughter cells. Thus, metabolism and mitochondrial biology play important roles in stem cell fate decisions. As these decisions directly affect tissue homeostasis, understanding their regulatory mechanisms in the context of cellular metabolism is critical. PMID:27482603

  3. Biotechnology of non-Saccharomyces yeasts-the basidiomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric A

    2013-09-01

    Yeasts are the major producer of biotechnology products worldwide, exceeding production in capacity and economic revenues of other groups of industrial microorganisms. Yeasts have wide-ranging fundamental and industrial importance in scientific, food, medical, and agricultural disciplines (Fig. 1). Saccharomyces is the most important genus of yeast from fundamental and applied perspectives and has been expansively studied. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts (non-conventional yeasts) including members of the Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes also have substantial current utility and potential applicability in biotechnology. In an earlier mini-review, "Biotechnology of non-Saccharomyces yeasts-the ascomycetes" (Johnson Appl Microb Biotechnol 97: 503-517, 2013), the extensive biotechnological utility and potential of ascomycetous yeasts are described. Ascomycetous yeasts are particularly important in food and ethanol formation, production of single-cell protein, feeds and fodder, heterologous production of proteins and enzymes, and as model and fundamental organisms for the delineation of genes and their function in mammalian and human metabolism and disease processes. In contrast, the roles of basidiomycetous yeasts in biotechnology have mainly been evaluated only in the past few decades and compared to the ascomycetous yeasts and currently have limited industrial utility. From a biotechnology perspective, the basidiomycetous yeasts are known mainly for the production of enzymes used in pharmaceutical and chemical synthesis, for production of certain classes of primary and secondary metabolites such as terpenoids and carotenoids, for aerobic catabolism of complex carbon sources, and for bioremediation of environmental pollutants and xenotoxicants. Notwithstanding, the basidiomycetous yeasts appear to have considerable potential in biotechnology owing to their catabolic utilities, formation of enzymes acting on recalcitrant substrates, and through the production of unique primary

  4. Monitoring and robust adaptive control of fed-batch cultures of microorganisms exhibiting overflow metabolism [abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vande Wouwer, A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Overflow metabolism characterizes cells strains that are likely to produce inhibiting by-products resulting from an excess of substrate feeding and a saturated respiratory capacity. The critical substrate level separating the two different metabolic pathways is generally not well defined. Monitoring of this kind of cultures, going from model identification to state estimation, is first discussed. Then, a review of control techniques which all aim at maximizing the cell productivity of fed-batch fermentations is presented. Two main adaptive control strategies, one using an estimation of the critical substrate level as set-point and another regulating the by-product concentration, are proposed. Finally, experimental investigations of an adaptive RST control scheme using the observer polynomial for the regulation of the ethanol concentration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae fed-batch cultures ranging from laboratory to industrial scales, are also presented.

  5. The Role of Monoaminergic Neurotransmission for Metabolic Control in the Fruit Fly Drosophila Melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hormones control various metabolic traits comprising fat deposition or starvation resistance. Here we show that two invertebrate neurohormones, octopamine (OA and tyramine (TA as well as their associated receptors, had a major impact on these metabolic traits. Animals devoid of the monoamine OA develop a severe obesity phenotype. Using flies defective in the expression of receptors for OA and TA, we aimed to decipher the contributions of single receptors for these metabolic phenotypes. Whereas those animals impaired in octß1r, octß2r and tar1 share the obesity phenotype of OA-deficient (tβh-deficient animals, the octß1r, octß2r deficient flies showed reduced insulin release, which is opposed to the situation found in tβh-deficient animals. On the other hand, OAMB deficient flies were leaner than controls, implying that the regulation of this phenotype is more complex than anticipated. Other phenotypes seen in tβh-deficient animals, such as the reduced ability to perform complex movements tasks can mainly be attributed to the octß2r. Tissue-specific RNAi experiments revealed a very complex interorgan communication leading to the different metabolic phenotypes observed in OA or OA and TA-deficient flies.

  6. Genomic and Phenotypic Characterization of Yeast Biosensor for Deep-space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, Diana B.; Santa Maria, Sergio; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    The BioSentinel mission was selected to launch as a secondary payload onboard NASA Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) in 2018. In BioSentinel, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae will be used as a biosensor to measure the long-term impact of deep-space radiation to living organisms. In the 4U-payload, desiccated yeast cells from different strains will be stored inside microfluidic cards equipped with 3-color LED optical detection system to monitor cell growth and metabolic activity. At different times throughout the 12-month mission, these cards will be filled with liquid yeast growth media to rehydrate and grow the desiccated cells. The growth and metabolic rates of wild-type and radiation-sensitive strains in deep-space radiation environment will be compared to the rates measured in the ground- and microgravity-control units. These rates will also be correlated with measurements obtained from onboard physical dosimeters. In our preliminary long-term desiccation study, we found that air-drying yeast cells in 10% trehalose is the best method of cell preservation in order to survive the entire 18-month mission duration (6-month pre-launch plus 12-month full-mission periods). However, our study also revealed that desiccated yeast cells have decreasing viability over time when stored in payload-like environment. This suggests that the yeast biosensor will have different population of cells at different time points during the long-term mission. In this study, we are characterizing genomic and phenotypic changes in our yeast biosensor due to long-term storage and desiccation. For each yeast strain that will be part of the biosensor, several clones were reisolated after long-term storage by desiccation. These clones were compared to their respective original isolate in terms of genomic composition, desiccation tolerance and radiation sensitivity. Interestingly, clones from a radiation-sensitive mutant have better desiccation tolerance compared to their original isolate

  7. Risk of metabolic syndrome among children living in metropolitan Kuala Lumpur: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Bee S; Poh, Bee K; Bulgiba, Awang; Ismail, Mohd N; Ruzita, Abdul T; Hills, Andrew P

    2011-05-18

    With the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, the metabolic syndrome has been studied among children in many countries but not in Malaysia. Hence, this study aimed to compare metabolic risk factors between overweight/obese and normal weight children and to determine the influence of gender and ethnicity on the metabolic syndrome among school children aged 9-12 years in Kuala Lumpur and its metropolitan suburbs. A case control study was conducted among 402 children, comprising 193 normal-weight and 209 overweight/obese. Weight, height, waist circumference (WC) and body composition were measured, and WHO (2007) growth reference was used to categorise children into the two weight groups. Blood pressure (BP) was taken, and blood was drawn after an overnight fast to determine fasting blood glucose (FBG) and full lipid profile, including triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and total cholesterol (TC). International Diabetes Federation (2007) criteria for children were used to identify metabolic syndrome. Participants comprised 60.9% (n = 245) Malay, 30.9% (n = 124) Chinese and 8.2% (n = 33) Indian. Overweight/obese children showed significantly poorer biochemical profile, higher body fat percentage and anthropometric characteristics compared to the normal-weight group. Among the metabolic risk factors, WC ≥90th percentile was found to have the highest odds (OR = 189.0; 95%CI 70.8, 504.8), followed by HDL-C≤1.03 mmol/L (OR = 5.0; 95%CI 2.4, 11.1) and high BP (OR = 4.2; 95%CI 1.3, 18.7). Metabolic syndrome was found in 5.3% of the overweight/obese children but none of the normal-weight children (p < 0.01). Overweight/obese children had higher odds (OR = 16.3; 95%CI 2.2, 461.1) of developing the metabolic syndrome compared to normal-weight children. Binary logistic regression showed no significant association between age, gender and family history of communicable diseases with the metabolic

  8. Lansoprazole Is Associated with Worsening Asthma Control in Children with the CYP2C19 Poor Metabolizer Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jason E; Holbrook, Janet T; Mougey, Edward B; Wei, Christine Y; Wise, Robert A; Teague, W Gerald; Lima, John J

    2015-06-01

    Gastric acid blockade in children with asymptomatic acid reflux has not improved asthma control in published studies. There is substantial population variability regarding metabolism of and response to proton pump inhibitors based on metabolizer phenotype. How metabolizer phenotype affects asthma responses to acid blockage is not known. To determine how metabolizer phenotype based on genetic analysis of CYP2C19 affects asthma control among children treated with a proton pump inhibitor. Asthma control as measured by the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) and other questionnaires from a 6-month clinical trial of lansoprazole in children with asthma was analyzed for associations with surrogates of lansoprazole exposure (based on treatment assignment and metabolizer phenotype). Groups included placebo-treated children; lansoprazole-treated extensive metabolizers (EMs); and lansoprazole-treated poor metabolizers (PMs). Metabolizer phenotypes were based on CYP2C19 haplotypes. Carriers of the CYP2C19*2, *3, *8, *9, or *10 allele were PMs; carriers of two wild-type alleles were extensive metabolizers (EMs). Asthma control through most of the treatment period was unaffected by lansoprazole exposure or metabolizer phenotype. At 6 months, PMs displayed significantly worsened asthma control compared with EMs (+0.16 vs. -0.13; P = 0.02) and placebo-treated children (+0.16 vs. -0.23; P lansoprazole-treated PMs. Children with the PM phenotype developed worse asthma control after 6 months of lansoprazole treatment for poorly controlled asthma. Increased exposure to proton pump inhibitor may worsen asthma control by altering responses to respiratory infections. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00604851).

  9. Novel endophytic yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain PTD3 II: production of xylitol and ethanol in the presence of inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajzovic, Azra; Bura, Renata; Kohlmeier, Kevin; Doty, Sharon L

    2012-10-01

    A systematic study was conducted characterizing the effect of furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF), and acetic acid concentration on the production of xylitol and ethanol by a novel endophytic yeast, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain PTD3. The influence of different inhibitor concentrations on the growth and fermentation abilities of PTD3 cultivated in synthetic nutrient media containing 30 g/l xylose or glucose were measured during liquid batch cultures. Concentrations of up to 5 g/l of furfural stimulated production of xylitol to 77 % of theoretical yield (10 % higher compared to the control) by PTD3. Xylitol yields produced by this yeast were not affected in the presence of 5-HMF at concentrations of up to 3 g/l. At higher concentrations of furfural and 5-HMF, xylitol and ethanol yields were negatively affected. The higher the concentration of acetic acid present in a media, the higher the ethanol yield approaching 99 % of theoretical yield (15 % higher compared to the control) was produced by the yeast. At all concentrations of acetic acid tested, xylitol yield was lowered. PTD3 was capable of metabolizing concentrations of 5, 15, and 5 g/l of furfural, 5-HMF, and acetic acid, respectively. This yeast would be a potent candidate for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic sugars to biochemicals given that in the presence of low concentrations of inhibitors, its xylitol and ethanol yields are stimulated, and it is capable of metabolizing pretreatment degradation products.

  10. Baker's yeast: production of D- and L-3-hydroxy esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Allan Carsten; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1998-01-01

    harvested while growing. In contrast, the stereoselectivity was shifted towards L-hydroxy esters when the oxo esters were added slowly to ordinary baker's yeast supplied with gluconolactone as co-substrate. The reduction rate with gluconolactone was increased by active aeration. Ethyl L-(S)-3......Baker's yeast grown under oxygen limited conditions and used in the reduction of 3-oxo esters results in a shift of the stereoselectivity of the yeast towards D-hydroxy esters as compared with ordinary baker's yeast. The highest degree of stereoselectivity was obtained with growing yeast or yeast......-hydroxybutanoate was afforded in >99% ee. Both enantiomers of ethyl 3-hydroxypentanoate, D-(R) in 96% ee and L-(S) in 93% ee, and of ethyl 4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate, D-(S) in 98% ee and L-(R) in 94% ee, were obtained. The results demonstrate that the stereoselectivity of baker's yeast can be controlled...

  11. Defining a novel leptin–melanocortin–kisspeptin pathway involved in the metabolic control of puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Manfredi-Lozano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Puberty is a key developmental phenomenon highly sensitive to metabolic modulation. Worrying trends of changes in the timing of puberty have been reported in humans. These might be linked to the escalating prevalence of childhood obesity and could have deleterious impacts on later (cardio-metabolic health, but their underlying mechanisms remain unsolved. The neuropeptide α-MSH, made by POMC neurons, plays a key role in energy homeostasis by mediating the actions of leptin and likely participates in the control of reproduction. However, its role in the metabolic regulation of puberty and interplay with kisspeptin, an essential puberty-regulating neuropeptide encoded by Kiss1, remain largely unknown. We aim here to unveil the potential contribution of central α-MSH signaling in the metabolic control of puberty by addressing its role in mediating the pubertal effects of leptin and its potential interaction with kisspeptin. Methods: Using wild type and genetically modified rodent models, we implemented pharmacological studies, expression analyses, electrophysiological recordings, and virogenetic approaches involving DREADD technology to selectively inhibit Kiss1 neurons, in order to interrogate the physiological role of a putative leptin→α-MSH→kisspeptin pathway in the metabolic control of puberty. Results: Stimulation of central α-MSH signaling robustly activated the reproductive axis in pubertal rats, whereas chronic inhibition of melanocortin receptors MC3/4R, delayed puberty, and prevented the permissive effect of leptin on puberty onset. Central blockade of MC3/4R or genetic elimination of kisspeptin receptors from POMC neurons did not affect kisspeptin effects. Conversely, congenital ablation of kisspeptin receptors or inducible, DREADD-mediated inhibition of arcuate nucleus (ARC Kiss1 neurons resulted in markedly attenuated gonadotropic responses to MC3/4R activation. Furthermore, close appositions were observed between

  12. The fission yeast RNA binding protein Mmi1 regulates meiotic genes by controlling intron specific splicing and polyadenylation coupled RNA turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available The polyA tails of mRNAs are monitored by the exosome as a quality control mechanism. We find that fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, adopts this RNA quality control mechanism to regulate a group of 30 or more meiotic genes at the level of both splicing and RNA turnover. In vegetative cells the RNA binding protein Mmi1 binds to the primary transcripts of these genes. We find the novel motif U(U/C/GAAAC highly over-represented in targets of Mmi1. Mmi1 can specifically regulate the splicing of particular introns in a transcript: it inhibits the splicing of introns that are in the vicinity of putative Mmi1 binding sites, while allowing the splicing of other introns that are far from such sites. In addition, binding of Mmi1, particularly near the 3' end, alters 3' processing to promote extremely long polyA tails of up to a kilobase. The hyperadenylated transcripts are then targeted for degradation by the nuclear exonuclease Rrp6. The nuclear polyA binding protein Pab2 assists this hyperadenylation-mediated RNA decay. Rrp6 also targets other hyperadenylated transcripts, which become hyperadenylated in an unknown, but Mmi1-independent way. Thus, hyperadenylation may be a general signal for RNA degradation. In addition, binding of Mmi1 can affect the efficiency of 3' cleavage. Inactivation of Mmi1 in meiosis allows meiotic expression, through splicing and RNA stabilization, of at least 29 target genes, which are apparently constitutively transcribed.

  13. Glucose de-repression by yeast AMP-activated protein kinase SNF1 is controlled via at least two independent steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Salcedo, Raúl; Lubitz, Timo; Beltran, Gemma; Elbing, Karin; Tian, Ye; Frey, Simone; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Krantz, Marcus; Klipp, Edda; Hohmann, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase, AMPK, controls energy homeostasis in eukaryotic cells but little is known about the mechanisms governing the dynamics of its activation/deactivation. The yeast AMPK, SNF1, is activated in response to glucose depletion and mediates glucose de-repression by inactivating the transcriptional repressor Mig1. Here we show that overexpression of the Snf1-activating kinase Sak1 results, in the presence of glucose, in constitutive Snf1 activation without alleviating glucose repression. Co-overexpression of the regulatory subunit Reg1 of the Glc-Reg1 phosphatase complex partly restores glucose regulation of Snf1. We generated a set of 24 kinetic mathematical models based on dynamic data of Snf1 pathway activation and deactivation. The models that reproduced our experimental observations best featured (a) glucose regulation of both Snf1 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, (b) determination of the Mig1 phosphorylation status in the absence of glucose by Snf1 activity only and (c) a regulatory step directing active Snf1 to Mig1 under glucose limitation. Hence it appears that glucose de-repression via Snf1-Mig1 is regulated by glucose via at least two independent steps: the control of activation of the Snf1 kinase and directing active Snf1 to inactivating its target Mig1. © 2014 FEBS.

  14. Photoperiodism and enzyme activity: towards a model for the control of circadian metabolic rhythms in the crassulacean Acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, O; Morel, C

    1974-04-01

    Metabolic readjustments after a change from long days to short days appear, in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, to be achieved through the operation of two main mechanisms: variation in enzyme capacity, and circadian rhythmicity. After a lag time, capacity in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and capacity in aspartate aminotransferase increase exponentially and appear to be allometrically linked during 50 to 60 short days; then a sudden fall takes place in the activity of the former. Malic enzyme and alanine aminotransferase behave differently. Thus, the operation of the two sections of the pathway (before and after the malate step) give rise to a continuously changing functional compartmentation in the pathway. Circadian rhythmicity, on the other hand, produces time compartmentation through phase shifts and variation in amplitude, independently for each enzyme. These characteristics suggest that the operation of a so-called biological clock would be involved. We propose the hypothesis that feedback regulation would be more accurate and efficient when applied to an already oscillating, clock-controlled enzyme system.

  15. Biofuels. Altered sterol composition renders yeast thermotolerant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspeta, Luis; Chen, Yun; Ghiaci, Payam

    2014-01-01

    adaptive laboratory evolution to select yeast strains with improved growth and ethanol production at ≥40°C. Sequencing of the whole genome, genome-wide gene expression, and metabolic-flux analyses revealed a change in sterol composition, from ergosterol to fecosterol, caused by mutations in the C-5 sterol......Ethanol production for use as a biofuel is mainly achieved through simultaneous saccharification and fermentation by yeast. Operating at ≥40°C would be beneficial in terms of increasing efficiency of the process and reducing costs, but yeast does not grow efficiently at those temperatures. We used...... desaturase gene, and increased expression of genes involved in sterol biosynthesis. Additionally, large chromosome III rearrangements and mutations in genes associated with DNA damage and respiration were found, but contributed less to the thermotolerant phenotype....

  16. Changes in the isozymic pattern of phosphoenolpyruvate : An early step in photoperiodic control of crassulacean acid metabolism level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulfert, J; Arrabaça, M C; Guerrier, D; Queiroz, O

    1979-01-01

    Two major isofunctional forms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31) have been separated from the leaves of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Poelln. Tom Thumb by acrylamide gel electrophoresis and diethylaminoethyl cellulose techniques: one of the forms prevails under long-day treatment (low crassulacean acid metabolism level), the other develops under short-day treatment (high Crassulacean acid metabolism level). Molecular weights are significantly different: 175·10(3) and 186·10(3), respectively. These results indicate that two populations of phosphoenolyruvate carboxylase are present in the plant, one of which is responsible for Crassulacean acid metabolism activity under the control of photoperiod.The Crassulacean acid metabolism appears to depend on the same endogenous clock that governs other photoperiodically controlled events (e.g. flowering). The metabolic and energetic significance of this feature is discussed. It is suggested that modification in isozymic composition could be an early step in the response to photoperiodism at the metabolic level.

  17. Brain glucose sensing, glucokinase and neural control of metabolism and islet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunnowo-Bada, E O; Heeley, N; Brochard, L; Evans, M L

    2014-09-01

    It is increasingly apparent that the brain plays a central role in metabolic homeostasis, including the maintenance of blood glucose. This is achieved by various efferent pathways from the brain to periphery, which help control hepatic glucose flux and perhaps insulin-stimulated insulin secretion. Also, critically important for the brain given its dependence on a constant supply of glucose as a fuel--emergency counter-regulatory responses are triggered by the brain if blood glucose starts to fall. To exert these control functions, the brain needs to detect rapidly and accurately changes in blood glucose. In this review, we summarize some of the mechanisms postulated to play a role in this and examine the potential role of the low-affinity hexokinase, glucokinase, in the brain as a key part of some of this sensing. We also discuss how these processes may become altered in diabetes and related metabolic diseases. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Hypoglycemia in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes - Predictors and role of metabolic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, L.R.; Johansen, M.; Pedersen-Bjergaard, U.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE- In pregnancy with type 1 diabetes, we evaluated occurrence of mild and severe hypoglycemia and analyzed the influence of strict metabolic control, nausea, Vomiting, and other potential predictors of occurrence of severe hypoglycemia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- A prospective...... awareness or unawareness (3.2 [1.2-8.2]) as independent predictors for severe hypoglycemia. CONCLUSIONS - In pregnancy with type 1 diabetes, the incidence of mild and severe hypoglycemia was highest in early pregnancy, although metabolic control was tighter in the last part of pregnancy. Predictors...... observational study of 108 consecutive pregnant women with type 1 diabetes was conducted. At 8, 14, 21, 27, and 33 weeks of gestation, patients performed self-monitored plasma glucose (SMPG) (eight/day) for 3 days and completed a questionnaire on nausea, vomiting, hypoglycemia awareness, and history of mild...

  19. [Mitochondria inheritance in yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizikova, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    The review is devoted to the main mechanisms of mitochondria inheritance in yeast Saccharonmyces cerevisiae. The genetic mechanisms of functionally active mitochondria inheritance in eukaryotic cells is one of the most relevant in modem researches. A great number of genetic diseases are associated with mitochondria dysfunction. Plasticity of eukaryotic cell metabolism according to the environmental changes is ensured by adequate mitochondria functioning by means of ATP synthesis coordination, reactive oxygen species accumulation, apoptosis regulation and is an important factor of cell adaptation to stress. Mitochondria participation in important for cell vitality processes masters the presence of accurate mechanisms of mitochondria functions regulation according to environment fluctuations. The mechanisms of mitochondria division and distribution are highly conserved. Baker yeast S. cerevisiae is an ideal model object for mitochondria researches due to energetic metabolism lability, ability to switch over respiration to fermentation, and petite-positive phenotype. Correction of metabolism according to the environmental changes is necessary for cell vitality. The influence of respiratory, carbon, amino acid and phosphate metabolism on mitochondria functions was shown. As far as the mechanisms that stabilize functions of mitochondria and mtDNA are highly conserve, we can project yeast regularities on higher eukaryotes systems. This makes it possible to approximate understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of a great number of human diseases.

  20. Towards the design of an optimal strategy for the production of ergosterol from Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Náhlík, Jan; Hrnčiřík, Pavel; Mareš, Jan; Rychtera, Mojmír; Kent, Christopher A

    2017-05-01

    The total yield of ergosterol produced by the fermentation of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on the final amount of yeast biomass and the ergosterol content in the cells. At the same time ergosterol purity-defined as percentage of ergosterol in the total sterols in the yeast-is equally important for efficient downstream processing. This study investigated the development of both the ergosterol content and ergosterol purity in different physiological (metabolic) states of the microorganism S. cerevisiae with the aim of reaching maximal ergosterol productivity. To expose the yeast culture to different physiological states during fermentation an on-line inference of the current physiological state of the culture was used. The results achieved made it possible to design a new production strategy, which consists of two preferable metabolic states, oxidative-fermentative growth on glucose followed by oxidative growth on glucose and ethanol simultaneously. Experimental application of this strategy achieved a value of the total efficiency of ergosterol production (defined as product of ergosterol yield coefficient and volumetric productivity), 103.84 × 10 -6 g L -1 h -1 , more than three times higher than with standard baker's yeast fed-batch cultivations, which attained in average 32.14 × 10 -6 g L -1 h -1 . At the same time the final content of ergosterol in dry biomass was 2.43%, with a purity 86%. These results make the product obtained by the proposed control strategy suitable for effective down-stream processing. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:838-848, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  1. Role of parenting style in achieving metabolic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorer, Maayan; David, Ravit; Schoenberg-Taz, Michal; Levavi-Lavi, Ifat; Phillip, Moshe; Meyerovitch, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    To examine the role of parenting style in achieving metabolic control and treatment adherence in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Parents of 100 adolescents with type 1 diabetes completed assessments of their parenting style and sense of helplessness. Parents and patients rated patient adherence to the treatment regimen. Glycemic control was evaluated by HbA(1c) values. An authoritative paternal parenting style predicted better glycemic control and adherence in the child; a permissive maternal parenting style predicted poor adherence. A higher sense of helplessness in both parents predicted worse glycemic control and lesser adherence to treatment. Parental sense of helplessness was a significant predictor of diabetes control after correcting for other confounders (patient age, sex, and treatment method). An authoritative nonhelpless parenting style is associated with better diabetes control in adolescents. Paternal involvement is important in adolescent diabetes management. These results have implications for psychological interventions.

  2. Cardiovascular and metabolic syndrome risk among men with and without erectile dysfunction: case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Zambon, João Paulo; Mendonça, Rafaela Rosalba de; Wroclawski, Marcelo Langer; Karam Junior, Amir; Santos, Raul D.; Carvalho, José Antonio Maluf de; Wroclawski, Eric Roger

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Erectile dysfunction has been associated with cardiovascular diseases. The aim here was to evaluate cardiovascular risk through the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) criteria, C-reactive protein (CRP) assays and presence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in men with and without erectile dysfunction diagnosed within a healthcare program. DESIGN AND SETTING: A retrospective case-control study was conducted. The patients were selected from a healthcare program at the Hospital Israelita...

  3. Iron Sulfur and Molybdenum Cofactor Enzymes Regulate the Drosophila Life Cycle by Controlling Cell Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelja, Zvonimir; Leimkühler, Silke; Missirlis, Fanis

    2018-01-01

    Iron sulfur (Fe-S) clusters and the molybdenum cofactor (Moco) are present at enzyme sites, where the active metal facilitates electron transfer. Such enzyme systems are soluble in the mitochondrial matrix, cytosol and nucleus, or embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane, but virtually absent from the cell secretory pathway. They are of ancient evolutionary origin supporting respiration, DNA replication, transcription, translation, the biosynthesis of steroids, heme, catabolism of purines, hydroxylation of xenobiotics, and cellular sulfur metabolism. Here, Fe-S cluster and Moco biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster is reviewed and the multiple biochemical and physiological functions of known Fe-S and Moco enzymes are described. We show that RNA interference of Mocs3 disrupts Moco biosynthesis and the circadian clock. Fe-S-dependent mitochondrial respiration is discussed in the context of germ line and somatic development, stem cell differentiation and aging. The subcellular compartmentalization of the Fe-S and Moco assembly machinery components and their connections to iron sensing mechanisms and intermediary metabolism are emphasized. A biochemically active Fe-S core complex of heterologously expressed fly Nfs1, Isd11, IscU, and human frataxin is presented. Based on the recent demonstration that copper displaces the Fe-S cluster of yeast and human ferredoxin, an explanation for why high dietary copper leads to cytoplasmic iron deficiency in flies is proposed. Another proposal that exosomes contribute to the transport of xanthine dehydrogenase from peripheral tissues to the eye pigment cells is put forward, where the Vps16a subunit of the HOPS complex may have a specialized role in concentrating this enzyme within pigment granules. Finally, we formulate a hypothesis that (i) mitochondrial superoxide mobilizes iron from the Fe-S clusters in aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase; (ii) increased iron transiently displaces manganese on superoxide dismutase, which

  4. Iron Sulfur and Molybdenum Cofactor Enzymes Regulate the Drosophila Life Cycle by Controlling Cell Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonimir Marelja

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron sulfur (Fe-S clusters and the molybdenum cofactor (Moco are present at enzyme sites, where the active metal facilitates electron transfer. Such enzyme systems are soluble in the mitochondrial matrix, cytosol and nucleus, or embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane, but virtually absent from the cell secretory pathway. They are of ancient evolutionary origin supporting respiration, DNA replication, transcription, translation, the biosynthesis of steroids, heme, catabolism of purines, hydroxylation of xenobiotics, and cellular sulfur metabolism. Here, Fe-S cluster and Moco biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster is reviewed and the multiple biochemical and physiological functions of known Fe-S and Moco enzymes are described. We show that RNA interference of Mocs3 disrupts Moco biosynthesis and the circadian clock. Fe-S-dependent mitochondrial respiration is discussed in the context of germ line and somatic development, stem cell differentiation and aging. The subcellular compartmentalization of the Fe-S and Moco assembly machinery components and their connections to iron sensing mechanisms and intermediary metabolism are emphasized. A biochemically active Fe-S core complex of heterologously expressed fly Nfs1, Isd11, IscU, and human frataxin is presented. Based on the recent demonstration that copper displaces the Fe-S cluster of yeast and human ferredoxin, an explanation for why high dietary copper leads to cytoplasmic iron deficiency in flies is proposed. Another proposal that exosomes contribute to the transport of xanthine dehydrogenase from peripheral tissues to the eye pigment cells is put forward, where the Vps16a subunit of the HOPS complex may have a specialized role in concentrating this enzyme within pigment granules. Finally, we formulate a hypothesis that (i mitochondrial superoxide mobilizes iron from the Fe-S clusters in aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase; (ii increased iron transiently displaces manganese on superoxide

  5. Yeast biomass production: a new approach in glucose-limited feeding strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika Durão Vieira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to implement experimentally a simple glucose-limited feeding strategy for yeast biomass production in a bubble column reactor based on a spreadsheet simulator suitable for industrial application. In biomass production process using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, one of the constraints is the strong tendency of these species to metabolize sugars anaerobically due to catabolite repression, leading to low values of biomass yield on substrate. The usual strategy to control this metabolic tendency is the use of a fed-batch process in which where the sugar source is fed incrementally and total sugar concentration in broth is maintained below a determined value. The simulator presented in this work was developed to control molasses feeding on the basis of a simple theoretical model in which has taken into account the nutritional growth needs of yeast cell and two input data: the theoretical specific growth rate and initial cell biomass. In experimental assay, a commercial baker's yeast strain and molasses as sugar source were used. Experimental results showed an overall biomass yield on substrate of 0.33, a biomass increase of 6.4 fold and a specific growth rate of 0.165 h-1 in contrast to the predicted value of 0.180 h-1 in the second stage simulation.

  6. Synthetic biology and regulatory networks: where metabolic systems biology meets control engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Murabito, Ettore; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic pathways can be engineered to maximize the synthesis of various products of interest. With the advent of computational systems biology, this endeavour is usually carried out through in silico theoretical studies with the aim to guide and complement further in vitro and in vivo experimental efforts. Clearly, what counts is the result in vivo, not only in terms of maximal productivity but also robustness against environmental perturbations. Engineering an organism towards an increased production flux, however, often compromises that robustness. In this contribution, we review and investigate how various analytical approaches used in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology are related to concepts developed by systems and control engineering. While trade-offs between production optimality and cellular robustness have already been studied diagnostically and statically, the dynamics also matter. Integration of the dynamic design aspects of control engineering with the more diagnostic aspects of metabolic, hierarchical control and regulation analysis is leading to the new, conceptual and operational framework required for the design of robust and productive dynamic pathways. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Interaction of Pubertal Development and Metabolic Control in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Plamper

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In T1DM, delayed pubertal development and reduced final height are associated with inadequate metabolic control. Objective. To assess whether T1DM affects pubertal growth spurt and whether metabolic control during puberty is gender-related. Methods. Using a large multicentre database, longitudinal data from 1294 patients were analysed. Inclusion criteria: complete records of height and HbA1c from the age of seven to 16 years. Exclusion criteria: other significant chronic diseases and medications, T1DM duration less than three months, and initial BMI 97th percentile. Results. Growth velocity (GV was impaired with a significant reduction of peak GV by 1.2 cm in boys. HbA1c increase during male puberty was lower except for a period of 1.5 years. The highest HbA1c increase in boys coincided with maximum growth spurt. In girls, the highest HbA1c increase was observed during late puberty. Even though there is impaired GV, both sexes reach a height at 16 years of age which corresponds to the background population height. Conclusion. Worsening of metabolic control is sex-discordant and associated with gender-specific alterations of GV. However, the vast majority of boys and girls with T1DM seems to reach normal height at the age of 16 years.

  8. Hepatic mTORC1 controls locomotor activity, body temperature, and lipid metabolism through FGF21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornu, Marion; Oppliger, Wolfgang; Albert, Verena; Robitaille, Aaron M.; Trapani, Francesca; Quagliata, Luca; Fuhrer, Tobias; Sauer, Uwe; Terracciano, Luigi; Hall, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a key metabolic organ that controls whole-body physiology in response to nutrient availability. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a nutrient-activated kinase and central controller of growth and metabolism that is negatively regulated by the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1). To investigate the role of hepatic mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in whole-body physiology, we generated liver-specific Tsc1 (L-Tsc1 KO) knockout mice. L-Tsc1 KO mice displayed reduced locomotor activity, body temperature, and hepatic triglyceride content in a rapamycin-sensitive manner. Ectopic activation of mTORC1 also caused depletion of hepatic and plasma glutamine, leading to peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α)–dependent fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) expression in the liver. Injection of glutamine or knockdown of PGC-1α or FGF21 in the liver suppressed the behavioral and metabolic defects due to mTORC1 activation. Thus, mTORC1 in the liver controls whole-body physiology through PGC-1α and FGF21. Finally, mTORC1 signaling correlated with FGF21 expression in human liver tumors, suggesting that treatment of glutamine-addicted cancers with mTOR inhibitors might have beneficial effects at both the tumor and whole-body level. PMID:25082895

  9. Dose effects of dietary phytosterols on cholesterol metabolism: a controlled feeding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Susan B; Lin, Xiaobo; Lefevre, Michael; Spearie, Catherine Anderson; Most, Marlene M; Ma, Lina; Ostlund, Richard E

    2010-01-01

    Phytosterol supplementation of 2 g/d is recommended by the National Cholesterol Education Program to reduce LDL cholesterol. However, the effects of different intakes of phytosterol on cholesterol metabolism are uncertain. We evaluated the effects of 3 phytosterol intakes on whole-body cholesterol metabolism. In this placebo-controlled, crossover feeding trial, 18 adults received a phytosterol-deficient diet (50 mg phytosterols/2000 kcal) plus beverages supplemented with 0, 400, or 2000 mg phytosterols/d for 4 wk each, in random order. All meals were prepared in a metabolic kitchen; breakfast and dinner on weekdays were eaten on site. Primary outcomes were fecal cholesterol excretion and intestinal cholesterol absorption measured with stable-isotope tracers and serum lipoprotein concentrations. Phytosterol intakes (diet plus supplements) averaged 59, 459, and 2059 mg/d during the 3 diet periods. Relative to the 59-mg diet, the 459- and 2059-mg phytosterol intakes significantly (P phytosterol dose (-8.9 +/- 2.3%); a trend was observed with the 459-mg/d dose (-5.0 +/- 2.1%; P = 0.077). Dietary phytosterols in moderate and high doses favorably alter whole-body cholesterol metabolism in a dose-dependent manner. A moderate phytosterol intake (459 mg/d) can be obtained in a healthy diet without supplementation. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00860054.

  10. Dose effects of dietary phytosterols on cholesterol metabolism: a controlled feeding study123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaobo; Lefevre, Michael; Spearie, Catherine Anderson; Most, Marlene M; Ma, Lina; Ostlund, Richard E

    2010-01-01

    Background: Phytosterol supplementation of 2 g/d is recommended by the National Cholesterol Education Program to reduce LDL cholesterol. However, the effects of different intakes of phytosterol on cholesterol metabolism are uncertain. Objective: We evaluated the effects of 3 phytosterol intakes on whole-body cholesterol metabolism. Design: In this placebo-controlled, crossover feeding trial, 18 adults received a phytosterol-deficient diet (50 mg phytosterols/2000 kcal) plus beverages supplemented with 0, 400, or 2000 mg phytosterols/d for 4 wk each, in random order. All meals were prepared in a metabolic kitchen; breakfast and dinner on weekdays were eaten on site. Primary outcomes were fecal cholesterol excretion and intestinal cholesterol absorption measured with stable-isotope tracers and serum lipoprotein concentrations. Results: Phytosterol intakes (diet plus supplements) averaged 59, 459, and 2059 mg/d during the 3 diet periods. Relative to the 59-mg diet, the 459- and 2059-mg phytosterol intakes significantly (P phytosterol dose (−8.9 ± 2.3%); a trend was observed with the 459-mg/d dose (−5.0 ± 2.1%; P = 0.077). Conclusions: Dietary phytosterols in moderate and high doses favorably alter whole-body cholesterol metabolism in a dose-dependent manner. A moderate phytosterol intake (459 mg/d) can be obtained in a healthy diet without supplementation. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00860054. PMID:19889819

  11. Geniposide regulates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion possibly through controlling glucose metabolism in INS-1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Liu

    Full Text Available Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS is essential to the control of metabolic fuel homeostasis. The impairment of GSIS is a key element of β-cell failure and one of causes of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Although the KATP channel-dependent mechanism of GSIS has been broadly accepted for several decades, it does not fully describe the effects of glucose on insulin secretion. Emerging evidence has suggested that other mechanisms are involved. The present study demonstrated that geniposide enhanced GSIS in response to the stimulation of low or moderately high concentrations of glucose, and promoted glucose uptake and intracellular ATP levels in INS-1 cells. However, in the presence of a high concentration of glucose, geniposide exerted a contrary role on both GSIS and glucose uptake and metabolism. Furthermore, geniposide improved the impairment of GSIS in INS-1 cells challenged with a high concentration of glucose. Further experiments showed that geniposide modulated pyruvate carboxylase expression and the production of intermediates of glucose metabolism. The data collectively suggest that geniposide has potential to prevent or improve the impairment of insulin secretion in β-cells challenged with high concentrations of glucose, likely through pyruvate carboxylase mediated glucose metabolism in β-cells.

  12. Cholesterol Metabolism and Weight Reduction in Subjects with Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnoea: A Randomised, Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarit Hallikainen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate whether parameters of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA associate with cholesterol metabolism before and after weight reduction, 42 middle-aged overweight subjects with mild OSA were randomised to intensive lifestyle intervention (N=23 or to control group (N=18 with routine lifestyle counselling only. Cholesterol metabolism was evaluated with serum noncholesterol sterol ratios to cholesterol, surrogate markers of cholesterol absorption (cholestanol and plant sterols and synthesis (cholestenol, desmosterol, and lathosterol at baseline and after 1-year intervention. At baseline, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2 was associated with serum campesterol (P<0.05 and inversely with desmosterol ratios (P<0.001 independently of gender, BMI, and homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. Apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI was not associated with cholesterol metabolism. Weight reduction significantly increased SaO2and serum cholestanol and decreased AHI and serum cholestenol ratios. In the groups combined, the changes in AHI were inversely associated with changes of cholestanol and positively with cholestenol ratios independent of gender and the changes of BMI and HOMA-IR (P<0.05. In conclusion, mild OSA seemed to be associated with cholesterol metabolism independent of BMI and HOMA-IR. Weight reduction increased the markers of cholesterol absorption and decreased those of cholesterol synthesis in the overweight subjects with mild OSA.

  13. Adopt-A-MACT Project: A Manual of Model Documents and Guidance to Aid Compliance and Enforcement of the Nutritional Yeast MACT (Maximum Achievable Control Technology)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This manual provides a compliance checklist, and overview of emissions limitations, how to do performance tests, and an overview of applicability of general provisions for the Nutritional Yeast NESHAP.

  14. Yeast diversity and native vigor for flavor phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrau, Francisco; Gaggero, Carina; Aguilar, Pablo S

    2015-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the yeast used widely for beer, bread, cider, and wine production, is the most resourceful eukaryotic model used for genetic engineering. A typical concern about using engineered yeasts for food production might be negative consumer perception of genetically modified organisms. However, we believe the true pitfall of using genetically modified yeasts is their limited capacity to either refine or improve the sensory properties of fermented foods under real production conditions. Alternatively, yeast diversity screening to improve the aroma and flavors could offer groundbreaking opportunities in food biotechnology. We propose a 'Yeast Flavor Diversity Screening' strategy which integrates knowledge from sensory analysis and natural whole-genome evolution with information about flavor metabolic networks and their regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic and phenotypic characteristics of baker's yeast: relevance to baking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randez-Gil, Francisca; Córcoles-Sáez, Isaac; Prieto, José A

    2013-01-01

    Yeasts rarely encounter ideal physiological conditions during their industrial life span; therefore, their ability to adapt to changing conditions determines their usefulness and applicability. This is especially true for baking strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The success of this yeast in the ancient art of bread making is based on its capacity to rapidly transform carbohydrates into CO2 rather than its unusual resistance to environmental stresses. Moreover, baker's yeast must exhibit efficient respiratory metabolism during yeast manufacturing, which determines biomass yield. However, optimal growth conditions often have negative consequences in other commercially important aspects, such as fermentative power or stress tolerance. This article reviews the genetic and physiological characteristics of baking yeast strains, emphasizing the activation of regulatory mechanisms in response to carbon source and stress signaling and their importance in defining targets for strain selection and improvement.

  16. Correlating yeast cell stress physiology to changes in the cell surface morphology: atomic force microscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Walker, Graeme M; Adya, Ashok K

    2006-07-06

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful biophysical tool in biotechnology and medicine to investigate the morphological, physical, and mechanical properties of yeasts and other biological systems. However, properties such as, yeasts' response to environmental stresses, metabolic activities of pathogenic yeasts, cell-cell/cell-substrate adhesion, and cell-flocculation have rarely been investigated so far by using biophysical tools. Our recent results obtained by AFM on one strain each of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe show a clear correlation between the physiology of environmentally stressed yeasts and the changes in their surface morphology. The future directions of the AFM related techniques in relation to yeasts are also discussed.

  17. The yeast protein kinase Sch9 adjusts V-ATPase assembly/disassembly to control pH homeostasis and longevity in response to glucose availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Wilms

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The conserved protein kinase Sch9 is a central player in the nutrient-induced signaling network in yeast, although only few of its direct substrates are known. We now provide evidence that Sch9 controls the vacuolar proton pump (V-ATPase to maintain cellular pH homeostasis and ageing. A synthetic sick phenotype arises when deletion of SCH9 is combined with a dysfunctional V-ATPase, and the lack of Sch9 has a significant impact on cytosolic pH (pHc homeostasis. Sch9 physically interacts with, and influences glucose-dependent assembly/disassembly of the V-ATPase, thereby integrating input from TORC1. Moreover, we show that the role of Sch9 in regulating ageing is tightly connected with V-ATPase activity and vacuolar acidity. As both Sch9 and the V-ATPase are highly conserved in higher eukaryotes, it will be interesting to further clarify their cooperative action on the cellular processes that influence growth and ageing.

  18. [Dot1 and Set2 Histone Methylases Control the Spontaneous and UV-Induced Mutagenesis Levels in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhina, T N; Evstiukhina, T A; Peshekhonov, V T; Chernenkov, A Yu; Korolev, V G

    2016-03-01

    In the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts, the DOT1 gene product provides methylation of lysine 79 (K79) of hi- stone H3 and the SET2 gene product provides the methylation of lysine 36 (K36) of the same histone. We determined that the dot1 and set2 mutants suppress the UV-induced mutagenesis to an equally high degree. The dot1 mutation demonstrated statistically higher sensitivity to the low doses of MMC than the wild type strain. The analysis of the interaction between the dot1 and rad52 mutations revealed a considerable level of spontaneous cell death in the double dot1 rad52 mutant. We observed strong suppression of the gamma-in- duced mutagenesis in the set2 mutant. We determined that the dot1 and set2 mutations decrease the sponta- neous mutagenesis rate in both single and d ouble mutants. The epistatic interaction between the dot1 and set2 mutations and almost similar sensitivity of the corresponding mutants to the different types of DNA damage allow one to conclude that both genes are involved in the control of the same DNA repair pathways, the ho- mologous-recombination-based and the postreplicative DNA repair.

  19. A soft sensor for bioprocess control based on sequential filtering of metabolic heat signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, Dan; Gustavsson, Robert; Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik

    2014-09-26

    Soft sensors are the combination of robust on-line sensor signals with mathematical models for deriving additional process information. Here, we apply this principle to a microbial recombinant protein production process in a bioreactor by exploiting bio-calorimetric methodology. Temperature sensor signals from the cooling system of the bioreactor were used for estimating the metabolic heat of the microbial culture and from that the specific growth rate and active biomass concentration were derived. By applying sequential digital signal filtering, the soft sensor was made more robust for industrial practice with cultures generating low metabolic heat in environments with high noise level. The estimated specific growth rate signal obtained from the three stage sequential filter allowed controlled feeding of substrate during the fed-batch phase of the production process. The biomass and growth rate estimates from the soft sensor were also compared with an alternative sensor probe and a capacitance on-line sensor, for the same variables. The comparison showed similar or better sensitivity and lower variability for the metabolic heat soft sensor suggesting that using permanent temperature sensors of a bioreactor is a realistic and inexpensive alternative for monitoring and control. However, both alternatives are easy to implement in a soft sensor, alone or in parallel.

  20. A Soft Sensor for Bioprocess Control Based on Sequential Filtering of Metabolic Heat Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Paulsson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Soft sensors are the combination of robust on-line sensor signals with mathematical models for deriving additional process information. Here, we apply this principle to a microbial recombinant protein production process in a bioreactor by exploiting bio-calorimetric methodology. Temperature sensor signals from the cooling system of the bioreactor were used for estimating the metabolic heat of the microbial culture and from that the specific growth rate and active biomass concentration were derived. By applying sequential digital signal filtering, the soft sensor was made more robust for industrial practice with cultures generating low metabolic heat in environments with high noise level. The estimated specific growth rate signal obtained from the three stage sequential filter allowed controlled feeding of substrate during the fed-batch phase of the production process. The biomass and growth rate estimates from the soft sensor were also compared with an alternative sensor probe and a capacitance on-line sensor, for the same variables. The comparison showed similar or better sensitivity and lower variability for the metabolic heat soft sensor suggesting that using permanent temperature sensors of a bioreactor is a realistic and inexpensive alternative for monitoring and control. However, both alternatives are easy to implement in a soft sensor, alone or in parallel.

  1. Metabolic control over the oxygen consumption flux in intact skeletal muscle: in silico studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguzinski, Piotr; Korzeniewski, Bernard

    2006-12-01

    It has been postulated previously that a direct activation of all oxidative phosphorylation complexes in parallel with the activation of ATP usage and substrate dehydrogenation (the so-called each-step activation) is the main mechanism responsible for adjusting the rate of ATP production by mitochondria to the current energy demand during rest-to-work transition in intact skeletal muscle in vivo. The present in silico study, using a computer model of oxidative phosphorylation developed previously, analyzes the impact of the each-step-activation mechanism on the distribution of control (defined within Metabolic Control Analysis) over the oxygen consumption flux among the components of the bioenergetic system in intact oxidative skeletal muscle at different energy demands. It is demonstrated that in the absence of each-step activation, the oxidative phosphorylation complexes take over from ATP usage most of the control over the respiration rate and oxidative ATP production at higher (but still physiological) energy demands. This leads to a saturation of oxidative phosphorylation, impossibility of a further acceleration of oxidative ATP synthesis, and dramatic drop in the phosphorylation potential. On the other hand, the each-step-activation mechanism allows maintenance of a high degree of the control exerted by ATP usage over the ATP turnover and oxygen consumption flux even at high energy demands and thus enables a potentially very large increase in ATP turnover. It is also shown that low oxygen concentration shifts the metabolic control from ATP usage to cytochrome oxidase and thus limits the oxidative ATP production.

  2. Risk of metabolic syndrome among children living in metropolitan Kuala Lumpur: A case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Mohd N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, the metabolic syndrome has been studied among children in many countries but not in Malaysia. Hence, this study aimed to compare metabolic risk factors between overweight/obese and normal weight children and to determine the influence of gender and ethnicity on the metabolic syndrome among school children aged 9-12 years in Kuala Lumpur and its metropolitan suburbs. Methods A case control study was conducted among 402 children, comprising 193 normal-weight and 209 overweight/obese. Weight, height, waist circumference (WC and body composition were measured, and WHO (2007 growth reference was used to categorise children into the two weight groups. Blood pressure (BP was taken, and blood was drawn after an overnight fast to determine fasting blood glucose (FBG and full lipid profile, including triglycerides (TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and total cholesterol (TC. International Diabetes Federation (2007 criteria for children were used to identify metabolic syndrome. Results Participants comprised 60.9% (n = 245 Malay, 30.9% (n = 124 Chinese and 8.2% (n = 33 Indian. Overweight/obese children showed significantly poorer biochemical profile, higher body fat percentage and anthropometric characteristics compared to the normal-weight group. Among the metabolic risk factors, WC ≥90th percentile was found to have the highest odds (OR = 189.0; 95%CI 70.8, 504.8, followed by HDL-C≤1.03 mmol/L (OR = 5.0; 95%CI 2.4, 11.1 and high BP (OR = 4.2; 95%CI 1.3, 18.7. Metabolic syndrome was found in 5.3% of the overweight/obese children but none of the normal-weight children (p Conclusions We conclude that being overweight or obese poses a greater risk of developing the metabolic syndrome among children. Indian ethnicity is at higher risk compared to their counterparts of the same age. Hence, primary intervention strategies are

  3. Effect of oral cinnamon intervention on metabolic profile and body composition of Asian Indians with metabolic syndrome: a randomized double -blind control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta Jain, Sonal; Puri, Seema; Misra, Anoop; Gulati, Seema; Mani, Kalaivani

    2017-06-12

    Nutritional modulation remains central to the management of metabolic syndrome. Intervention with cinnamon in individuals with metabolic syndrome remains sparsely researched. We investigated the effect of oral cinnamon consumption on body composition and metabolic parameters of Asian Indians with metabolic syndrome. In this 16-week double blind randomized control trial, 116 individuals with metabolic syndrome were randomized to two dietary intervention groups, cinnamon [6 capsules (3 g) daily] or wheat flour [6 capsules (2.5 g) daily]. Body composition, blood pressure and metabolic parameters were assessed. Significantly greater decrease [difference between means, (95% CI)] in fasting blood glucose (mmol/L) [0.3 (0.2, 0.5) p = 0.001], glycosylated haemoglobin (mmol/mol) [2.6 (0.4, 4.9) p = 0.023], waist circumference (cm) [4.8 (1.9, 7.7) p = 0.002] and body mass index (kg/m2 ) [1.3 (0.9, 1.5) p = 0.001] was observed in the cinnamon group compared to placebo group. Other parameters which showed significantly greater improvement were: waist-hip ratio, blood pressure, serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, serum triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Prevalence of defined metabolic syndrome was significantly reduced in the intervention group (34.5%) vs. the placebo group (5.2%). A single supplement intervention with 3 g cinnamon for 16 weeks resulted in significant improvements in all components of metabolic syndrome in a sample of Asian Indians in north India. The clinical trial was retrospectively registered (after the recruitment of the participants) in ClinicalTrial.gov under the identification number: NCT02455778 on 25th May 2015.

  4. L-histidine inhibits biofilm formation and FLO11-associated phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou Zeidan, Marc; Zara, Giacomo; Viti, Carlo; Decorosi, Francesca; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Budroni, Marilena; Giovannetti, Luciana; Zara, Severino

    2014-01-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an innate diversity of Flo11p which codes for a highly hydrophobic and anionic cell-wall glycoprotein with a fundamental role in biofilm formation. In this study, 380 nitrogen compounds were administered to three S. cerevisiae flor strains handling Flo11p alleles with different expression levels. S. cerevisiae strain S288c was used as the reference strain as it cannot produce Flo11p. The flor strains generally metabolized amino acids and dipeptides as the sole nitrogen source, although with some exceptions regarding L-histidine and histidine containing dipeptides. L-histidine completely inhibited growth and its effect on viability was inversely related to Flo11p expression. Accordingly, L-histidine did not affect the viability of the Δflo11 and S288c strains. Also, L-histidine dramatically decreased air-liquid biofilm formation and adhesion to polystyrene of the flor yeasts with no effect on the transcription level of the Flo11p gene. Moreover, L-histidine modified the chitin and glycans content on the cell-wall of flor yeasts. These findings reveal a novel biological activity of L-histidine in controlling the multicellular behavior of yeasts [corrected].

  5. Effect of metabolic control on parathyroid hormone secretion in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula F.J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic derangement caused by diabetes mellitus may potentially affect bone mineral metabolism. In the present study we evaluated the effect of diabetes metabolic control on parathyroid hormone (PTH secretion during stimulation with EDTA infusion. The study was conducted on 24 individuals, 8 of them normal subjects (group N: glycated hemoglobin - HbA1C = 4.2 ± 0.2%; range = 3.5-5.0%, 8 patients with good and regular metabolic control (group G-R: HbA1C = 7.3 ± 0.4%; range = 6.0-8.5%, and 8 patients with poor metabolic control (group P: HbA1C = 12.5 ± 1.0%; range: 10.0-18.8%. Blood samples were collected at 10-min intervals throughout the study (a basal period of 30 min and a 2-h period of EDTA infusion, 30 mg/kg body weight and used for the determination of ionized calcium, magnesium, glucose and intact PTH. Basal ionized calcium levels were slightly lower in group P (1.19 ± 0.01 mmol/l than in group N (1.21 ± 0.01 mmol/l and group G-R (1.22 ± 0.01 mmol/l. After EDTA infusion, the three groups presented a significant fall in calcium, but with no significant difference among them at any time. Basal magnesium levels and levels determined during EDTA infusion were significantly lower (P<0.01 in group P than in group N. The induction of hypocalcemia caused an elevation in PTH which was similar in groups N and G-R but significantly higher than in group P throughout the infusion period (+110 min, N = 11.9 ± 2.1 vs G-R = 13.7 ± 1.6 vs P = 7.5 ± 0.7 pmol/l; P<0.05 for P vs N and G-R. The present results show that PTH secretion is impaired in patients with poorly controlled diabetes.

  6. Yeasts: providing questions and answers for modern biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, J R

    2000-01-01

    Yeasts are to be found in virtually every conceivable niche on this planet and are amazingly varied in their shapes ('morphologies'), life cycles, metabolic capabilities, potentials for use in industrial processes, abilities to spoil food and drink or to act as dangerous human pathogens. This review describes four very different species of yeast to illustrate some of the diversity which exists and, in the case of one of them, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (the familiar baker's or brewer's yeast), the extent of both our knowledge and ignorance.

  7. New Protocol Based on UHPLC-MS/MS for Quantitation of Metabolites in Xylose-Fermenting Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Christiane Gonçalves; Veras, Henrique César Teixeira; de Aquino Ribeiro, José Antônio; Costa, Patrícia Pinto Kalil Gonçalves; Araújo, Katiúscia Pereira; Rodrigues, Clenilson Martins; de Almeida, João Ricardo Moreira; Abdelnur, Patrícia Verardi

    2017-12-01

    Xylose fermentation is a bottleneck in second-generation ethanol production. As such, a comprehensive understanding of xylose metabolism in naturally xylose-fermenting yeasts is essential for prospection and construction of recombinant yeast strains. The objective of the current study was to establish a reliable metabolomics protocol for quantification of key metabolites of xylose catabolism pathways in yeast, and to apply this protocol to Spathaspora arborariae. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) was used to quantify metabolites, and afterwards, sample preparation was optimized to examine yeast intracellular metabolites. S. arborariae was cultivated using xylose as a carbon source under aerobic and oxygen-limited conditions. Ion pair chromatography (IPC) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) were shown to efficiently quantify 14 and 5 metabolites, respectively, in a more rapid chromatographic protocol than previously described. Thirteen and eleven metabolites were quantified in S. arborariae under aerobic and oxygen-limited conditions, respectively. This targeted metabolomics protocol is shown here to quantify a total of 19 metabolites, including sugars, phosphates, coenzymes, monosaccharides, and alcohols, from xylose catabolism pathways (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, and tricarboxylic acid cycle) in yeast. Furthermore, to our knowledge, this is the first time that intracellular metabolites have been quantified in S. arborariae after xylose consumption. The results indicated that fine control of oxygen levels during fermentation is necessary to optimize ethanol production by S. arborariae. The protocol presented here may be applied to other yeast species and could support yeast genetic engineering to improve second generation ethanol production. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Development of Industrial Yeast Platform Strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergdahl, Basti; Dato, Laura; Förster, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Most of the current metabolic engineering projects are carried out using laboratory strains as the starting host. Although such strains are easily manipulated genetically, their robustness does not always meet the requirements set by industrial fermentation conditions. In such conditions, the cells...... screening of the 36 industrial and laboratory yeast strains. In addition, progress in the development of molecular biology methods for generating the new strains will be presented....

  9. Cyanohydrin reactions enhance glycolytic oscillations in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Nielsen, Astrid Gram; Tortzen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous metabolic oscillations can be induced in yeast by addition of glucose and removal of extracellular acetaldehyde (ACAx). Compared to other means of ACAx removal, cyanide robustly induces oscillations, indicating additional cyanide reactions besides ACA to lactonitrile conversion. Here......: a) by reducing [ACAx] relative to oscillation amplitude, b) by targeting multiple intracellular carbonyl compounds during fermentation, and c) by acting as a phase resetting stimulus....

  10. Genetic manipulation of longevity-related genes as a tool to regulate yeast life span and metabolite production during winemaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Helena; Matallana, Emilia; Aranda, Agustín

    2013-01-02

    Yeast viability and vitality are essential for different industrial processes where the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a biotechnological tool. Therefore, the decline of yeast biological functions during aging may compromise their successful biotechnological use. Life span is controlled by a variety of molecular mechanisms, many of which are connected to stress tolerance and genomic stability, although the metabolic status of a cell has proven a main factor affecting its longevity. Acetic acid and ethanol accumulation shorten chronological life span (CLS), while glycerol extends it. Different age-related gene classes have been modified by deletion or overexpression to test their role in longevity and metabolism. Overexpression of histone deacetylase SIR2 extends CLS and reduces acetate production, while overexpression of SIR2 homolog HST3 shortens CLS, increases the ethanol level, and reduces acetic acid production. HST3 overexpression also enhances ethanol tolerance. Increasing tolerance to oxidative stress by superoxide dismutase SOD2 overexpression has only a moderate positive effect on CLS. CLS during grape juice fermentation has also been studied for mutants on several mRNA binding proteins that are regulators of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level; we found that NGR1 and UTH4 deletions decrease CLS, while PUF3 and PUB1 deletions increase it. Besides, the pub1Δ mutation increases glycerol production and blocks stress granule formation during grape juice fermentation. Surprisingly, factors relating to apoptosis, such as caspase Yca1 or apoptosis-inducing factor Aif1, play a positive role in yeast longevity during winemaking as their deletions shorten CLS. Manipulation of regulators of gene expression at both transcriptional (i.e., sirtuins) and posttranscriptional (i.e., mRNA binding protein Pub1) levels allows to modulate yeast life span during its biotechnological use. Due to links between aging and metabolism, it also influences the

  11. Genetic manipulation of longevity-related genes as a tool to regulate yeast life span and metabolite production during winemaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orozco Helena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeast viability and vitality are essential for different industrial processes where the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a biotechnological tool. Therefore, the decline of yeast biological functions during aging may compromise their successful biotechnological use. Life span is controlled by a variety of molecular mechanisms, many of which are connected to stress tolerance and genomic stability, although the metabolic status of a cell has proven a main factor affecting its longevity. Acetic acid and ethanol accumulation shorten chronological life span (CLS, while glycerol extends it. Results Different age-related gene classes have been modified by deletion or overexpression to test their role in longevity and metabolism. Overexpression of histone deacetylase SIR2 extends CLS and reduces acetate production, while overexpression of SIR2 homolog HST3 shortens CLS, increases the ethanol level, and reduces acetic acid production. HST3 overexpression also enhances ethanol tolerance. Increasing tolerance to oxidative stress by superoxide dismutase SOD2 overexpression has only a moderate positive effect on CLS. CLS during grape juice fermentation has also been studied for mutants on several mRNA binding proteins that are regulators of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level; we found that NGR1 and UTH4 deletions decrease CLS, while PUF3 and PUB1 deletions increase it. Besides, the pub1Δ mutation increases glycerol production and blocks stress granule formation during grape juice fermentation. Surprisingly, factors relating to apoptosis, such as caspase Yca1 or apoptosis-inducing factor Aif1, play a positive role in yeast longevity during winemaking as their deletions shorten CLS. Conclusions Manipulation of regulators of gene expression at both transcriptional (i.e., sirtuins and posttranscriptional (i.e., mRNA binding protein Pub1 levels allows to modulate yeast life span during its biotechnological use. Due to

  12. Longitudinal Trajectories of Metabolic Control across Adolescence: Associations with Parental Involvement, Adolescents’ Psychosocial Maturity, and Health Care Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Pamela S.; Berg, Cynthia A.; Butner, Jonathan; Drew, Linda M.; Foster, Carol; Donaldson, David; Murray, Mary; Swinyard, Michael; Wiebe, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To predict trajectories of metabolic control across adolescence from parental involvement and adolescent psychosocial maturity, and to link metabolic control trajectories to health care utilization. Methods 252 adolescents (M age at study initiation = 12.5, SD=1.5, range 10–14 years) with type 1 diabetes (54.4% female, 92.8% Caucasian, length of diagnosis M=4.7 years, SD=3.0, range 1–12) participated in a 2-year longitudinal study. Metabolic control was gathered from medical records every three months. Adolescents completed measures of self-reliance (functional autonomy and extreme peer orientation), self-control (self-control and externalizing behavior), and parental involvement in diabetes care (acceptance, monitoring, and frequency of help). At the end of the study, mothers reported health care utilization (diabetes-related emergency room visits and hospitalizations) over the past six months. Results Latent class growth analyses indicated two distinct trajectories of metabolic control across adolescence: moderate control with slight deterioration (92% of the sample; average HbA1c = 8.18%) and poor control with rapid deterioration (8% of the sample; average HbA1c of 12.09%). Adolescents with poor and rapidly deteriorating metabolic control reported lower paternal monitoring and frequency of help with diabetes management, lower functional autonomy, and lower self-control than others. Those with poor and rapidly deteriorating metabolic control were 6.4 times more likely to report diabetes-related emergency room visits, and 9.3 times more likely to report diabetes-related hospitalizations near the end of the study. Conclusions Parental involvement and adolescents’ psychosocial maturity predict patterns of deteriorating metabolic control across adolescence and could be targeted for intervention. PMID:22525113

  13. Analysis of clock-regulated genes in Neurospora reveals widespread posttranscriptional control of metabolic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Jennifer M.; Dasgupta, Arko; Emerson, Jillian M.; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Knabe, Nicole; Lipzen, Anna M.; Lindquist, Erika A.; Daum, Christopher G.; Barry, Kerrie W.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Smith, Kristina M.; Galagan, James E.; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah; Freitag, Michael; Cheng, Chao; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2014-01-01

    Neurospora crassa has been for decades a principal model for filamentous fungal genetics and physiology as well as for understanding the mechanism of circadian clocks. Eukaryotic fungal and animal clocks comprise transcription-translation–based feedback loops that control rhythmic transcription of a substantial fraction of these transcriptomes, yielding the changes in protein abundance that mediate circadian regulation of physiology and metabolism: Understanding circadian control of gene expression is key to understanding eukaryotic, including fungal, physiology. Indeed, the isolation of clock-controlled genes (ccgs) was pioneered in Neurospora where circadian output begins with binding of the core circadian transcription factor WCC to a subset of ccg promoters, including those of many transcription factors. High temporal resolution (2-h) sampling over 48 h using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) identified circadianly expressed genes in Neurospora, revealing that from ∼10% to as much 40% of the transcriptome can be expressed under circadian control. Functional classifications of these genes revealed strong enrichment in pathways involving metabolism, protein synthesis, and stress responses; in broad terms, daytime metabolic potential favors catabolism, energy production, and precursor assembly, whereas night activities favor biosynthesis of cellular components and growth. Discriminative regular expression motif elicitation (DREME) identified key promoter motifs highly correlated with the temporal regulation of ccgs. Correlations between ccg abundance from RNA-Seq, the degree of ccg-promoter activation as reported by ccg-promoter–luciferase fusions, and binding of WCC as measured by ChIP-Seq, are not strong. Therefore, although circadian activation is critical to ccg rhythmicity, posttranscriptional regulation plays a major role in determining rhythmicity at the mRNA level. PMID:25362047

  14. LA sprouts randomized controlled nutrition and gardening program reduces obesity and metabolic risk in Latino youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Nicole M; Martinez, Lauren C; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Davis, Jaimie N

    2015-06-01

    To assess the effects of a 12-week gardening, nutrition, and cooking intervention ("LA Sprouts") on dietary intake, obesity parameters, and metabolic disease risk among low-income, primarily Hispanic/Latino youth in Los Angeles. The randomized controlled trial involved four elementary schools [two schools randomized to intervention (172 third-through fifth-grade students); two schools randomized to control (147 third-through fifth-grade students)]. Classes were taught in 90-minute sessions once a week to each grade level for 12 weeks. Data collected at pre- and postintervention included dietary intake via food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), anthropometric measures [BMI, waist circumference (WC)], body fat, and fasting blood samples. LA Sprouts participants had significantly greater reductions in BMI z-scores (0.1-vs. 0.04-point decrease, respectively; P = 0.01) and WC (-1.2 cm vs. no change; P < 0.001). Fewer LA Sprouts participants had the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) after the intervention than before, while the number of controls with MetSyn increased. LA Sprouts participants had improvements in dietary fiber intake (+3.5% vs. -15.5%; P = 0.04) and less decreases in vegetable intake (-3.6% vs. -26.4%; P = 0.04). Change in fruit intake before and after the intervention did not significantly differ between LA Sprouts and control subjects. LA Sprouts was effective in reducing obesity and metabolic risk. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  15. A structured approach to the study of metabolic control principles in intact and impaired mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Heinrich J; Connolly, Niamh M C; Dussmann, Heiko; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2012-03-01

    We devised an approach to extract control principles of cellular bioenergetics for intact and impaired mitochondria from ODE-based models and applied it to a recently established bioenergetic model of cancer cells. The approach used two methods for varying ODE model parameters to determine those model components that, either alone or in combination with other components, most decisively regulated bioenergetic state variables. We found that, while polarisation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)) and, therefore, the protomotive force were critically determined by respiratory complex I activity in healthy mitochondria, complex III activity was dominant for ΔΨ(m) during conditions of cytochrome-c deficiency. As a further important result, cellular bioenergetics in healthy, ATP-producing mitochondria was regulated by three parameter clusters that describe (1) mitochondrial respiration, (2) ATP production and consumption and (3) coupling of ATP-production and respiration. These parameter clusters resembled metabolic blocks and their intermediaries from top-down control analyses. However, parameter clusters changed significantly when cells changed from low to high ATP levels or when mitochondria were considered to be impaired by loss of cytochrome-c. This change suggests that the assumption of static metabolic blocks by conventional top-down control analyses is not valid under these conditions. Our approach is complementary to both ODE and top-down control analysis approaches and allows a better insight into cellular bioenergetics and its pathological alterations.

  16. Thyroid peroxidase antibodies in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes: impact on thyroid function, metabolic control and pregnancy outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestgaard, Marianne; Nielsen, Lene Ringholm; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

    2008-01-01

    In pregnant women with type 1 diabetes, we evaluated whether the presence of thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (anti-TPO) was associated with changes in thyroid function, metabolic control and pregnancy outcome....

  17. Comparing metabolic control and complications in type 2 diabetes in two Pacific Islands at baseline and following diabetes care intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Thu Win Tin

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: This study indicates improved metabolic control but little change in diabetes complications 15 months after intervention. Efforts to improve and evaluate the ongoing quality and accessibility of diabetes care in Pacific Island settings need to be further strengthened.

  18. Nutrient sensing and signaling in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Michaela; Schothorst, Joep; Kankipati, Harish Nag; Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a favorite organism for pioneering studies on nutrient-sensing and signaling mechanisms. Many specific nutrient responses have been elucidated in great detail. This has led to important new concepts and insight into nutrient-controlled cellular regulation. Major highlights include the central role of the Snf1 protein kinase in the glucose repression pathway, galactose induction, the discovery of a G-protein-coupled receptor system, and role of Ras in glucose-induced cAMP signaling, the role of the protein synthesis initiation machinery in general control of nitrogen metabolism, the cyclin-controlled protein kinase Pho85 in phosphate regulation, nitrogen catabolite repression and the nitrogen-sensing target of rapamycin pathway, and the discovery of transporter-like proteins acting as nutrient sensors. In addition, a number of cellular targets, like carbohydrate stores, stress tolerance, and ribosomal gene expression, are controlled by the presence of multiple nutrients. The protein kinase A signaling pathway plays a major role in this general nutrient response. It has led to the discovery of nutrient transceptors (transporter receptors) as nutrient sensors. Major shortcomings in our knowledge are the relationship between rapid and steady-state nutrient signaling, the role of metabolic intermediates in intracellular nutrient sensing, and the identity of the nutrient sensors controlling cellular growth. PMID:24483210

  19. Proteomic evolution of a wine yeast during the first hours of fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadó, Zoel; Chiva, Rosana; Rodríguez-Vargas, Sonia; Rández-Gil, Francisca; Mas, Albert; Guillamón, José Manuel

    2008-11-01

    The inoculation of active dry wine yeast (ADWY) is one of the most common practices in winemaking. This inoculation exposes the yeast cells to strong osmotic, acidic and thermal stresses, and adaptation to the new medium is crucial for successful fermentation. We have analysed the changes that occur in the ADWY protein profile in the first hours after inoculation under enological-like conditions at a low temperature. Protein changes mainly included enzymes of the nitrogen and carbon metabolism and proteins related to the cellular stress response. Most of the enzymes of the lower part of the glycolysis showed an increase in their concentration 4 and 24 h after inoculation, indicating an increase in glycolytic flux and in ATP production. However, the shift from respiration to fermentation was not immediate in the inoculation because some mitochondrial proteins involved in oxidative metabolism were induced in the first hours after inoculation. Inoculation in this fresh medium also reduced the cellular concentration of stress proteins produced during industrial production of the ADWY. The only exception was Cys3p, which might be involved in glutathione synthesis as a response to oxidative stress. A better understanding of the yeast stress response to rehydration and inoculation will lead to improvements in the handling efficiency of ADWY in winemaking and presumably to better control of fermentation startup.

  20. Chromosomal Aneuploidy Improves the Brewing Characteristics of Sake Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Masafumi; Fujimaru, Yuki; Taguchi, Seiga; Ferdouse, Jannatul; Sawada, Kazutaka; Kimura, Yuta; Terasawa, Yohei; Agrimi, Gennaro; Anai, Toyoaki; Noguchi, Hideki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Akao, Takeshi; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2017-12-15

    The effect of chromosomal aneuploidy on the brewing characteristics of brewery yeasts has not been studied. Here we report that chromosomal aneuploidy in sake brewery yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae ) leads to the development of favorable brewing characteristics. We found that pyruvate-underproducing sake yeast, which produces less off-flavor diacetyl, is aneuploid and trisomic for chromosomes XI and XIV. To confirm that this phenotype is due to aneuploidy, we obtained 45 haploids with various chromosomal additions and investigated their brewing profiles. A greater number of chromosomes correlated with a decrease in pyruvate production. Especially, sake yeast haploids with extra chromosomes in addition to chromosome XI produced less pyruvate than euploids. Mitochondrion-related metabolites and intracellular oxygen species in chromosome XI aneuploids were higher than those in euploids, and this effect was canceled in their "petite" strains, suggesting that an increase in chromosomes upregulated mitochondrial activity and decreased pyruvate levels. These findings suggested that an increase in chromosome number, including chromosome XI, in sake yeast haploids leads to pyruvate underproduction through the augmentation of mitochondrial activity. This is the first report proposing that aneuploidy in brewery yeasts improves their brewing profile. IMPORTANCE Chromosomal aneuploidy has not been evaluated in development of sake brewing yeast strains. This study shows the relationship between chromosomal aneuploidy and brewing characteristics of brewery yeast strains. High concentrations of pyruvate during sake storage give rise to α-acetolactate and, in turn, to high concentrations of diacetyl, which is considered an off-flavor. It was demonstrated that pyruvate-underproducing sake yeast is trisomic for chromosome XI and XIV. Furthermore, sake yeast haploids with extra chromosomes produced reduced levels of pyruvate and showed metabolic processes characteristic of

  1. Effect of dietary regime on metabolic control in phenylketonuria: Is exact calculation of phenylalanine intake really necessary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Rohde

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Exact calculation of Phe content of all food is not necessary to achieve good metabolic control in children and adolescents with PKU. Excluding special low protein food, as well as fruit and vegetables from calculation of Phe-intake has no impact on metabolic control. However including protein rich food into the diet and simply estimating all Phe-intake appears insufficient. The simplification of dietary regime may be helpful in enhancing acceptability and feasibility.

  2. Effects of dietary yeastβ-glucan on nutrient digestibility and serum proifles in pre-ruminant Holstein calves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Tao; TU Yan; ZHANG Nai-feng; GUO Jiang-peng; DENG Kai-dong; ZHOU Yi; YUN Qiang; DIAO Qi-yu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of dietary supplementation of yeastβ-glucan on the nutrient digestibility and serum proifles in pre-ruminant Holstein calves. Forty-two neonatal Holstein calves ((39.6±4.2) kg) were randomly al otted to six groups, and each was offered one of the fol owing diets:a basal diet (control) or the basal diet supplemented with 25, 50, 75, 100 or 200 mg of yeastβ-glucan kg–1 feed (dry matter basis). The basal diet consisted of a milk replacer and a starter feed. The trial lasted for 56 d. Two digestibility trials were conducted from d 14 to 20 and from d 42 to 48. Blood samples were col ected on d 0, 14, 28 and 42 for serum proifle analyses. On d 56, three calves from each group were slaughtered, and intestinal samples were col ected to assess the vil ous height, crypt depth and mucosal thickness. Although feed intake was not affected by dietary treatment (P>0.05), the average daily gain (ADG) and gain-to-feed ratios were higher (P0.05). Compared with the control group, supplementation of yeastβ-glucan decreased (P0.05). The supplementation of yeastβ-glucan stimu-lated the enzymatic activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (P<0.05) compared with the control group. The lysozyme (LYZ) concentration increased quadratical y (P<0.05) with increasing yeastβ-glucan levels. The results suggested that dietary supplementation of yeastβ-glucan at 75 mg kg–1 feed improved nutrient digestibility, enhanced immunity by increasing the immunoglobulin concentration and stimulating ALP, and exerted no adverse effects on metabolism in pre-ruminant calves.

  3. Linking metabolic QTLs with network and cis-eQTLs controlling biosynthetic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Wentzell

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic variation between individuals of a species is often under quantitative genetic control. Genomic analysis of gene expression polymorphisms between individuals is rapidly gaining popularity as a way to query the underlying mechanistic causes of variation between individuals. However, there is little direct evidence of a linkage between global gene expression polymorphisms and phenotypic consequences. In this report, we have mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs-controlling glucosinolate content in a population of 403 Arabidopsis Bay x Sha recombinant inbred lines, 211 of which were previously used to identify expression QTLs controlling the transcript levels of biosynthetic genes. In a comparative study, we have directly tested two plant biosynthetic pathways for association between polymorphisms controlling biosynthetic gene transcripts and the resulting metabolites within the Arabidopsis Bay x Sha recombinant inbred line population. In this analysis, all loci controlling expression variation also affected the accumulation of the resulting metabolites. In addition, epistasis was detected more frequently for metabolic traits compared to transcript traits, even when both traits showed similar distributions. An analysis of candidate genes for QTL-controlling networks of transcripts and metabolites suggested that the controlling factors are a mix of enzymes and regulatory factors. This analysis showed that regulatory connections can feedback from metabolism to transcripts. Surprisingly, the most likely major regulator of both transcript level for nearly the entire pathway and aliphatic glucosinolate accumulation is variation in the last enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway, AOP2. This suggests that natural variation in transcripts may significantly impact phenotypic variation, but that natural variation in metabolites or their enzymatic loci can feed back to affect the transcripts.

  4. Effects of pistachio nuts on body composition, metabolic, inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters in Asian Indians with metabolic syndrome: a 24-wk, randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Seema; Misra, Anoop; Pandey, Ravindra Mohan; Bhatt, Surya Prakash; Saluja, Shelza

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of pistachio nuts as an adjunct to diet and exercise on body composition, metabolic, inflammatory, and oxidative stress parameters in Asian Indians with metabolic syndrome. In this 24-wk randomized control trial, 60 individuals with the metabolic syndrome were randomized to either pistachio (intervention group) or control group (diet as per weight and physical activity profile, modulated according to dietary guidelines for Asian Indians) after 3 wk of a diet and exercise run in. In the first group, unsalted pistachios (20% energy) were given daily. A standard diet and exercise protocol was followed for both groups. Body weight, waist circumference (WC), magnetic resonance imaging estimation of intraabdominal adipose tissue and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue, fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting serum insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin, lipid profile, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), adiponectin, free fatty acids (FFAs), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, leptin, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were assessed before and after the intervention. Statistically significant improvement in mean values for various parameters in the intervention group compared with control group were as follows: WC (P pistachios leads to beneficial effects on the cardiometabolic profile of Asian Indians with metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Locomotor Adaptation Improves Balance Control, Multitasking Ability and Reduces the Metabolic Cost of Postural Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R. A.; Batson, C. D.; Miller, C. A.; Ploutz-Snyder, R. J.; Guined, J. R.; Buxton, R. E.; Cohen, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    During exploration-class missions, sensorimotor disturbances may lead to disruption in the ability to ambulate and perform functional tasks during the initial introduction to a novel gravitational environment following a landing on a planetary surface. The overall goal of our current project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability training program to facilitate rapid adaptation to these environments. We have developed a unique training system comprised of a treadmill placed on a motion-base facing a virtual visual scene. It provides an unstable walking surface combined with incongruent visual flow designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. Greater metabolic cost incurred during balance instability means more physical work is required during adaptation to new environments possibly affecting crewmembers? ability to perform mission critical tasks during early surface operations on planetary expeditions. The goal of this study was to characterize adaptation to a discordant sensory challenge across a number of performance modalities including locomotor stability, multi-tasking ability and metabolic cost. METHODS: Subjects (n=15) walked (4.0 km/h) on a treadmill for an 8 -minute baseline walking period followed by 20-minutes of walking (4.0 km/h) with support surface motion (0.3 Hz, sinusoidal lateral motion, peak amplitude 25.4 cm) provided by the treadmill/motion-base system. Stride frequency and auditory reaction time were collected as measures of locomotor stability and multi-tasking ability, respectively. Metabolic data (VO2) were collected via a portable metabolic gas analysis system. RESULTS: At the onset of lateral support surface motion, subj ects walking on our treadmill showed an increase in stride frequency and auditory reaction time indicating initial balance and multi-tasking disturbances. During the 20-minute adaptation period, balance control and multi-tasking performance improved. Similarly, throughout the 20-minute adaptation period, VO2 gradually

  6. Effect of fungicides on epiphytic yeasts associated with strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debode, Jane; Van Hemelrijck, Wendy; Creemers, Piet; Maes, Martine

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effect of two commonly used fungicides on the epiphytic yeast community of strawberry. Greenhouse and field experiments were conducted applying Switch (cyprodinil plus fludioxonil) or Signum (boscalid plus pyraclostrobin) to strawberry plants. Yeasts on leaves and fruits were assessed on treated and untreated plants at several time points via plating and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. The yeast counts on plates of the treated plants were similar to the control plants. Unripe fruits had 10 times larger yeast concentrations than ripe fruits or leaves. Some dominant yeast types were isolated and in vitro tests showed that they were at least 10 times less sensitive to Switch and Signum as compared with two important fungal strawberry pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum acutatum, which are the targets for the fungicide control. DGGE analysis showed that the applied fungicides had no effect on the composition of the yeast communities, while the growing system, strawberry tissue, and sampling time did affect the yeast communities. The yeast species most commonly identified were Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, and Sporobolomyces. These results point toward the potential applicability of natural occurring yeast antagonists into an integrated disease control strategy for strawberry diseases.

  7. Brain PET substrate of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: A metabolic connectivity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Antoine; Klesse, Elsa; Chawki, Mohammad B; Witjas, Tatiana; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Eusebio, Alexandre; Guedj, Eric

    2018-04-10

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs) have received increased attention in Parkinson's disease (PD) because of potentially dramatic consequences. Their physiopathology, however, remains incompletely understood. An overstimulation of the mesocorticolimbic system has been reported, while a larger network has recently been suggested. The aim of this study is to specifically describe the metabolic PET substrate and related connectivity changes in PD patients with ICDs. Eighteen PD patients with ICDs and 18 PD patients without ICDs were evaluated using cerebral 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. SPM-T maps comparisons were performed between groups and metabolic connectivity was evaluated by interregional correlation analysis (IRCA; p  130) and by graph theory (p < .05). PD patients with ICDs had relative increased metabolism in the right middle and inferior temporal gyri compared to those without ICDs. The connectivity of this area was increased mostly with the mesocorticolimbic system, positively with the orbitofrontal region, and negatively with both the right parahippocampus and the left caudate (IRCA). Moreover, the betweenness centrality of this area with the mesocorticolimbic system was lost in patients with ICDs (graph analysis). ICDs are associated in PD with the dysfunction of a network exceeding the mesocorticolimbic system, and especially the caudate, the parahippocampus, and the orbitofrontal cortex, remotely including the right middle and inferior temporal gyri. This latest area loses its central place with the mesocorticolimbic system through a connectivity dysregulation. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Muscle insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism are controlled by the intrinsic muscle clock★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyar, Kenneth A.; Ciciliot, Stefano; Wright, Lauren E.; Biensø, Rasmus S.; Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio M.; Patel, Vishal R.; Forcato, Mattia; Paz, Marcia I.P.; Gudiksen, Anders; Solagna, Francesca; Albiero, Mattia; Moretti, Irene; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin L.; Baldi, Pierre; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Rizzuto, Rosario; Bicciato, Silvio; Pilegaard, Henriette; Blaauw, Bert; Schiaffino, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms control metabolism and energy homeostasis, but the role of the skeletal muscle clock has never been explored. We generated conditional and inducible mouse lines with muscle-specific ablation of the core clock gene Bmal1. Skeletal muscles from these mice showed impaired insulin-stimulated glucose uptake with reduced protein levels of GLUT4, the insulin-dependent glucose transporter, and TBC1D1, a Rab-GTPase involved in GLUT4 translocation. Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity was also reduced due to altered expression of circadian genes Pdk4 and Pdp1, coding for PDH kinase and phosphatase, respectively. PDH inhibition leads to reduced glucose oxidation and diversion of glycolytic intermediates to alternative metabolic pathways, as revealed by metabolome analysis. The impaired glucose metabolism induced by muscle-specific Bmal1 knockout suggests that a major physiological role of the muscle clock is to prepare for the transition from the rest/fasting phase to the active/feeding phase, when glucose becomes the predominant fuel for skeletal muscle. PMID:24567902

  9. A Transcript-Specific eIF3 Complex Mediates Global Translational Control of Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Meera; Su, Dan; Scheliga, Judith S; Pluskal, Tomáš; Boronat, Susanna; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Campos, Alexandre Rosa; Qi, Feng; Hidalgo, Elena; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Wolf, Dieter A

    2016-08-16

    The multi-subunit eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF3 is thought to assist in the recruitment of ribosomes to mRNA. The expression of eIF3 subunits is frequently disrupted in human cancers, but the specific roles of individual subunits in mRNA translation and cancer remain elusive. Using global transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic profiling, we found a striking failure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells lacking eIF3e and eIF3d to synthesize components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, leading to a defect in respiration, endogenous oxidative stress, and premature aging. Energy balance was maintained, however, by a switch to glycolysis with increased glucose uptake, upregulation of glycolytic enzymes, and strict dependence on a fermentable carbon source. This metabolic regulatory function appears to be conserved in human cells where eIF3e binds metabolic mRNAs and promotes their translation. Thus, via its eIF3d-eIF3e module, eIF3 orchestrates an mRNA-specific translational mechanism controlling energy metabolism that may be disrupted in cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. α/β-Hydrolase Domain 6 in the Ventromedial Hypothalamus Controls Energy Metabolism Flexibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fisette

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available α/β-Hydrolase domain 6 (ABHD6 is a monoacylglycerol hydrolase that degrades the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG. Although complete or peripheral ABHD6 loss of function is protective against diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, the role of ABHD6 in the central control of energy balance is unknown. Using a viral-mediated knockout approach, targeted endocannabinoid measures, and pharmacology, we discovered that mice lacking ABHD6 from neurons of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHKO have higher VMH 2-AG levels in conditions of endocannabinoid recruitment and fail to physiologically adapt to key metabolic challenges. VMHKO mice exhibited blunted fasting-induced feeding and reduced food intake, energy expenditure, and adaptive thermogenesis in response to cold exposure, high-fat feeding, and dieting (transition to a low-fat diet. Our findings identify ABHD6 as a regulator of the counter-regulatory responses to major metabolic shifts, including fasting, nutrient excess, cold, and dieting, thereby highlighting the importance of ABHD6 in the VMH in mediating energy metabolism flexibility.

  11. A Transcript-Specific eIF3 Complex Mediates Global Translational Control of Energy Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Shah

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The multi-subunit eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF3 is thought to assist in the recruitment of ribosomes to mRNA. The expression of eIF3 subunits is frequently disrupted in human cancers, but the specific roles of individual subunits in mRNA translation and cancer remain elusive. Using global transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic profiling, we found a striking failure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells lacking eIF3e and eIF3d to synthesize components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, leading to a defect in respiration, endogenous oxidative stress, and premature aging. Energy balance was maintained, however, by a switch to glycolysis with increased glucose uptake, upregulation of glycolytic enzymes, and strict dependence on a fermentable carbon source. This metabolic regulatory function appears to be conserved in human cells where eIF3e binds metabolic mRNAs and promotes their translation. Thus, via its eIF3d-eIF3e module, eIF3 orchestrates an mRNA-specific translational mechanism controlling energy metabolism that may be disrupted in cancer.

  12. The growth of solar radiated yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, T.

    1995-09-01

    This researcher plans to determine if solar radiation affects the growth of